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Sample records for activated treg cells

  1. Low-dose IL-2 selectively activates subsets of CD4+ Tregs and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Hirakawa, Masahiro; Matos, Tiago; Liu, Hongye; Koreth, John; Kim, Haesook T.; Paul, Nicole E.; Murase, Kazuyuki; Whangbo, Jennifer; Alho, Ana C.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Cutler, Corey; Ho, Vincent T.; Armand, Philippe; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Lacerda, Joao F.; Soiffer, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4Tregs) play a critical role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. IL-2 supports the proliferation and survival of CD4Tregs and previous studies have demonstrated that IL-2 induces selective expansion of CD4Tregs and improves clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD. However, mechanisms for selective activation of CD4Tregs and the effects of low-dose IL-2 on other immune cells are not well understood. Using mass cytometry, we demonstrate that low concentrations of IL-2 selectively induce STAT5 phosphorylation in Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells in vitro. Preferential activation and expansion of Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56brightCD16– NK cells was also demonstrated in patients with chronic GVHD receiving low-dose IL-2. With prolonged IL-2 treatment for 48 weeks, phenotypic changes were also observed in Helios– CD4Tregs. The effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on conventional CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells were limited to increased expression of PD-1 on effector memory T cells. These studies reveal the selective effects of low-dose IL-2 therapy on Helios+ CD4Tregs and CD56bright NK cells that constitutively express high-affinity IL-2 receptors as well as the indirect effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations of IL-2 in vivo. PMID:27812545

  2. Scutellaria flavonoids inhibit tumor-mediated induction of Treg cells via inhibition of TGF-ß1 activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has become evident that tumor-induced Treg cell activity is mostly responsible for the sub-optimal response to therapeutic vaccines. Development of neo-adjuvant strategies targeting TGF-ß and Treg cell activity is therefore imperative. Scutellaria extracts or constituent flavonoids have shown e...

  3. Sinomenine induces the generation of intestinal Treg cells and attenuates arthritis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Tong, Bei; Yuan, Xusheng; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wang, Yuhui; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-10-01

    Sinomenine (SIN), an anti-arthritis drug, has previously been proven to exert immunomodulatory activity in rats by inducing intestinal regulatory T-cells (Treg cells). Here, we assessed the effect of SIN on the generation and function of Treg cells in autoimmune arthritis, and the underlying mechanisms in view of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). The proportions of Treg cells and IL-17-producing T-cells (Th17 cells) differentiated from naive T-cells were analyzed by flow cytometric analysis. The AhR agonistic effect of SIN was tested by analyzing the activation of downstream signaling pathways and target genes. The dependence of intestinal Treg cell induction and arthritis alleviation by SIN on AhR activation was confirmed in a mouse collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model. SIN promoted the differentiation and function of intestinal Treg cells in vitro. It induced the expression and activity of AhR target gene, promoted AhR/Hsp90 dissociation and AhR nuclear translocation, induced XRE reporter activity, and facilitated AhR/XRE binding in vitro, displaying the potential to be an agonist of AhR. In CIA mice, SIN induced the generation of intestinal Treg cells, and facilitated the immunosuppressive function of these Treg cells as shown by an adoptive transfer test. In addition, the induction of intestinal Treg cells and the anti-arthritic effect of SIN in CIA mice could be largely diminished by the AhR antagonist resveratrol. SIN attenuates arthritis by promoting the generation and function of Treg cells in an AhR-dependent manner. PMID:27617398

  4. A CB2-Selective Cannabinoid Suppresses T-cell Activities and Increases Tregs and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Rebecca H.; Meissler, Joseph J.; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Daohai; Adler, Martin W.; Eisenstein, Toby K.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that agonists selective for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), including O-1966, inhibit the Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR), an in vitro correlate of organ graft rejection, predominantly through effects on T-cells. Current studies explored the mechanism of this immunosuppression by O-1966 using mouse spleen cells. Treatment with O-1966 dose-relatedly decreased levels of the active nuclear forms of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT in wild-type T-cells, but not T-cells from CB2 knockout (CB2R k/o) mice. Additionally, a gene expression profile of purified T-cells from MLR cultures generated using a PCR T-cell activation array showed that O-1966 decreased mRNA expression of CD40 ligand and CyclinD3, and increased mRNA expression of Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2), Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 5 (SOCS5), and IL-10. The increase in IL-10 was confirmed by measuring IL-10 protein levels in MLR culture supernatants. Further, an increase in the percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) was observed in MLR cultures. Pretreatment with anti-IL-10 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibition of proliferation and blocked the increase of Tregs. Additionally, O-1966 treatment caused a dose-related decrease in the expression of CD4 in MLR cultures from wild-type, but not CB2R k/o, mice. These data support the potential of CB2-selective agonists as useful therapeutic agents to prolong graft survival in transplant patients, and strengthens their potential as a new class of immunosuppressive agents with broader applicability. PMID:25980325

  5. Nanotechnology as a New Therapeutic Approach to Prevent the HIV-Infection of Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Ruiz, Didiana; De La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 has proved to infect regulatory T cells (Treg) modifying their phenotype and impairing their suppressive capacity. As Treg cells are a crucial component in the preservation of the immune homeostasis, we researched that the antiviral capacity of carboxilan dendrimers prevents the HIV-1 infection of Treg and their effects. The phenotype and suppressive capacity of Treg treated or non-treated with carbosilane dendrimers were studied by flow cytometry. Treated and non-treated Treg from healthy donors were infected with HIV-1NL4.3. The infection of Treg cells by HIV-1, and protective effect of two dendrimers were determined by measuring antigen p24gag in the supernatant of the culture and intracellular. Results The Treg cells were treated with cationic and anionic carbosilane dendrimers. The results showed that both dendrimers did not modify the phenotype and functionality of Treg cells compared with non- treated Treg cells. Anionic dendrimers showed high biocompatibility with normal activity of the Treg cells and in antiviral assays. These dendrimers were highly active against HIV-1 preventing the infection of Treg, and were able to protect the Treg from the Foxp3 downregulation induced by the HIV-1 infection. Conclusions This is the first work showing that the in vitro use of anionic dendrimers prevent the HIV-1 replication and the infection of expanded Treg cells in culture, which raises the possibility to use Treg cells therapeutically in HIV-1-infected subjects. PMID:26785250

  6. FOXP3+ Treg Cells and Gender Bias in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Jia; Li, Yang Yang; Zheng, Song Guo; Tsun, Andy; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, where the X-linked master transcription factor forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) determines Treg cell development and function. Genetic deficiency of foxp3 induces dysfunction of Treg cells and immuno-dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, and X-linked syndrome in humans. Functionally deficient Treg cells or the development of exTreg cells positively correlate with autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In general, females are more susceptible to SLE and MS but less susceptible to AS, where the expression of FOXP3 and its protein complex are perturbed by multiple factors, including hormonal fluctuations, inflammatory cytokines, and danger signals. Therefore, it is critical to explore the potential molecular mechanisms involved and these differences linked to gender. Here, we review recent findings on the regulation of FOXP3 activity in Treg cells and also discuss gender difference in the determination of Treg cell function in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26441996

  7. Erythropoietin regulates Treg cells in asthma through TGFβ receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Guoshi; Wei, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, the development of which is suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). Erythropoietin (EPO) is originally defined as a hematopoietic growth factor. Recently, the anti-inflammatory effects of EPO in asthma have been acknowledged. However, the underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Here, we showed that EPO treatment significantly reduced the severity of an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mice, seemingly through promoting Foxp3-mediated activation of Treg cells in OVA-treated mouse lung. The activation of Treg cells resulted from increases in transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), which were mainly produced by M2 macrophages (M2M). In vitro, Co-culture with M2M increased Foxp3 levels in Treg cells and the Treg cell number, in a TGFβ receptor signaling dependent manner. Moreover, elimination of macrophages abolished the therapeutic effects of EPO in vivo. Together, our data suggest that EPO may increase M2M, which activate Treg cells through TGFβ receptor signaling to mitigate the severity of asthma.

  8. Erythropoietin regulates Treg cells in asthma through TGFβ receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoshi; Wei, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, the development of which is suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). Erythropoietin (EPO) is originally defined as a hematopoietic growth factor. Recently, the anti-inflammatory effects of EPO in asthma have been acknowledged. However, the underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Here, we showed that EPO treatment significantly reduced the severity of an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mice, seemingly through promoting Foxp3-mediated activation of Treg cells in OVA-treated mouse lung. The activation of Treg cells resulted from increases in transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), which were mainly produced by M2 macrophages (M2M). In vitro, Co-culture with M2M increased Foxp3 levels in Treg cells and the Treg cell number, in a TGFβ receptor signaling dependent manner. Moreover, elimination of macrophages abolished the therapeutic effects of EPO in vivo. Together, our data suggest that EPO may increase M2M, which activate Treg cells through TGFβ receptor signaling to mitigate the severity of asthma. PMID:26807178

  9. Dendritic cells decreased the concomitant expanded Tregs and Tregs related IL-35 in cytokine-induced killer cells and increased their cytotoxicity against leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ying; Tao, Qianshan; Wang, Huiping; Xiong, Shudao; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Tianping; Tao, Lili; Zhai, Zhimin

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are potent immunosuppressive cells and essential for inducing immune tolerance. Recent studies have reported that Tregs and Tregs related cytokines can inhibit the antitumor activity of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, but dendritic cells co-cultured CIK (DC-CIK) cells can be used for induction of a specific immune response by blocking of Tregs and TGF-β, IL-10. As a novel identified cytokine, IL-35 is specially produced by Tregs and plays an essential role in immune regulation. However, it remains unknown whether IL-35 roles in tumor immunotherapy mediated by CIK and DC-CIK cells. In this study, we cultured CIK and DC-CIK cells from the same healthy adult samples, and investigated their phenotype, proliferation, cytotoxic activity against leukemia cell lines K562 and NB4 by FCM and CCK-8, measured IL-35, TGF-β and IL-10 protein by ELISA, detected Foxp3, IL-35 and IL-35 receptor mRNA by Real-time PCR, respectively. We found Tregs and IL-35 concomitantly expanded by a time-dependent way during the generation of CIK cells, but DC significantly down-regulated the expression of them and simultaneously up-regulated the proliferation ability as well as cytotoxic activity of CIK cells against leukemia cell lines. Therefore, our data suggested that DC decreased concomitant expanded Tregs and Tregs related IL-35 in CIK cells and might contribute to improve their cytotoxicity against leukemia cells in vitro.

  10. Blockade of LFA-1 augments in vitro differentiation of antigen-induced Foxp3+ Treg cells

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Johan; Wraith, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific, in vitro-induced Foxp3+ Treg (iTreg) cells protects against autoimmune disease. To generate antigen-specific iTreg cells at high purity, however, remains a challenge. Whereas polyclonal T cell stimulation with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibody yields Foxp3+ iTreg cells at a purity of 90–95%, antigen-induced iTreg cells typically do not exceed a purity of 65–75%, even in a TCR-transgenic model. In a similar vein to thymic Treg cell selection, iTreg cell differentiation is influenced not only by antigen recognition and the availability of TGF-β but also by co-factors including costimulation and adhesion molecules. In this study, we demonstrate that blockade of the T cell integrin Leukocyte Function-associated Antigen-1 (LFA-1) during antigen-mediated iTreg cell differentiation augments Foxp3 induction, leading to approximately 90% purity of Foxp3+ iTreg cells. This increased efficacy not only boosts the yield of Foxp3+ iTreg cells, it also reduces contamination with activated effector T cells, thus improving the safety of adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:25108241

  11. Novel Foxo1–dependent transcriptional programs control Treg cell function

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Luo, Chong T.; Yin, Na; Huse, Morgan; Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Peng, Min; Chan, Pamela; Ma, Qian; Mo, Yifan; Meijer, Dies; Zhao, Keji; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Atwal, Gurinder; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, characterized by expression of the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), maintain immune homeostasis by suppressing self-destructive immune responses1–4. Foxp3 operates as a late-acting differentiation factor controlling Treg cell homeostasis and function5, whereas the early Treg-cell-lineage commitment is regulated by the Akt kinase and the forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors6–10. However, whether Foxo proteins act beyond the Treg-cell-commitment stage to control Treg cell homeostasis and function remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Foxo1 is a pivotal regulatorof Treg cell function. Treg cells express high amounts of Foxo1 and display reduced T-cell-receptor-induced Akt activation, Foxo1 phosphorylation and Foxo1 nuclear exclusion. Mice with Treg-cell-specific deletion of Foxo1 develop a fatal inflammatory disorder similar in severity to that seen in Foxp3-deficient mice, but without the loss of Treg cells. Genome-wide analysis of Foxo1 binding sites reveals ~300 Foxo1-bound target genes, including the pro-inflammatory cytokine Ifng, that do not seem to be directly regulated by Foxp3. These findings show that the evolutionarily ancient Akt–Foxo1 signalling module controls a novel genetic program indispensable for Treg cell function. PMID:23135404

  12. NKT cells, Treg, and their interactions in bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Pillai, Asha B.; Lowsky, Robert; Strober, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with leukemia and lymphoma. Tumor eradication is promoted by the anti-tumor activity of donor T cells contained in the transplant; however, donor T cells also mediate the serious side effect of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Separation of GVHD from graft anti-tumor activity is an important goal of research in improving transplant outcome. One approach is to take advantage of the immunomodulatory activity of regulatory NKT cells and CD4+ CD25+ Treg of host and/or donor origin. Both host and donor NKT cells and donor Treg are able to prevent GVHD in murine models. In this review, we summarize the mechanisms of NKT cell- and Treg-mediated protection against GVHD in mice while maintaining graft anti-tumor activity. In addition, we also examine the interactions between NKT cells and Treg in the context of BMT, and integrate the data from murine experimental models with the observations made in humans. PMID:20583031

  13. The presence and preferential activation of Tregs diminishes adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes by polyclonal NOD T cell effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid mice1

    PubMed Central

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E.; Leiter, Edward H.; Brehm, Michael A.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Serreze, David V.

    2015-01-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rgnull (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T-cells in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2 receptor gamma chain (Il-2rγ) dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T-cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il2rγnull -NSG versus Il2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic ß-cell autoreactive T-cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived ß-cell autoreactive T-cell clones and lines, but when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false negative results. PMID:26283479

  14. Characterization of regulatory T cell (Treg) function in patients infected with Leishmania braziliensis.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diego L; Guimarães, Luiz H; Cardoso, Thiago M; Queiroz, Adriano; Lago, Ednaldo; Roselino, Ana M; Bacellar, Olívia; Carvalho, Edgar M; Silva, João S

    2013-12-01

    Th1 immune responses are crucial for eliminating Leishmania parasites. However, despite strong Th1 responses, cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) patients infected with Leishmania braziliensis develop the disease, while milder Th1 responses are found in sub-clinical (SC) infections. Therefore, CL patients may experience impaired regulatory T cell (Treg) function, causing excessive Th1 responses and tissue damage. To address this hypothesis, we characterized the function of circulating Tregs in L. braziliensis infected CL patients and compared them to Tregs from uninfected controls (UC) and SC subjects. The frequency of circulating Tregs was similar in CL patients, UC and SC subjects. Moreover, CL patients Tregs suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and PBMC pro-inflammatory cytokine production more efficiently than UC Tregs, and also produced higher levels of IL-10 than UC and SC Tregs. Furthermore, PBMC and mononuclear cells from lesions of CL patients responded normally to Treg-induced suppression. Therefore, the lesion development in CL patients infected with L. braziliensis is not associated with impairment in Treg function or failure of cells to respond to immunomodulation. Rather, the increased Treg activation in CL patients may impair parasite elimination, resulting in establishment of chronic infection. Thus, immunological strategies that interfere with this response may improve leishmaniasis treatment.

  15. Affinity for self antigen selects Treg cells with distinct functional properties.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Lena; Stadinski, Brian D; King, Carolyn G; Schallenberg, Sonja; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Lee, Jun Young; Kretschmer, Karsten; Terracciano, Luigi M; Anderson, Graham; Surh, Charles D; Huseby, Eric S; Palmer, Ed

    2016-09-01

    The manner in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control lymphocyte homeostasis is not fully understood. We identified two Treg cell populations with differing degrees of self-reactivity and distinct regulatory functions. We found that GITR(hi)PD-1(hi)CD25(hi) (Triple(hi)) Treg cells were highly self-reactive and controlled lympho-proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes. GITR(lo)PD-1(lo)CD25(lo) (Triple(lo)) Treg cells were less self-reactive and limited the development of colitis by promoting the conversion of CD4(+) Tconv cells into induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). Although Foxp3-deficient (Scurfy) mice lacked Treg cells, they contained Triple(hi)-like and Triple(lo)-like CD4(+) T cells zsuper> T cells infiltrated the skin, whereas Scurfy Triple(lo)CD4(+) T cells induced colitis and wasting disease. These findings indicate that the affinity of the T cell antigen receptor for self antigen drives the differentiation of Treg cells into distinct subsets with non-overlapping regulatory activities. PMID:27478940

  16. mTORC1 couples immune signals and metabolic programming to establish Treg cell function

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hu; Yang, Kai; Cloer, Caryn; Neale, Geoffrey; Vogel, Peter; Chi, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway integrates diverse environmental inputs, including immune signals and metabolic cues, to direct T cell fate decisions1. Activation of mTOR, comprised of mTORC1 and mTORC2 complexes, delivers an obligatory signal for proper activation and differentiation of effector CD4+ T cells2,3, whereas in the regulatory T cell (Treg) compartment, the Akt-mTOR axis is widely acknowledged as a crucial negative regulator of Treg de novo differentiation4–8 and population expansion9. However, whether mTOR signaling affects the homeostasis and function of Tregs remains largely unexplored. Here we show that mTORC1 signaling is a pivotal positive determinant of Treg function. Tregs have elevated steady-state mTORC1 activity compared to naïve T cells. Signals via T cell receptor (TCR) and IL-2 provide major inputs for mTORC1 activation, which in turn programs suppressive function of Tregs. Disruption of mTORC1 through Treg-specific deletion of the essential component Raptor leads to a profound loss of Treg suppressive activity in vivo and development of a fatal early-onset inflammatory disorder. Mechanistically, Raptor/mTORC1 signaling in Tregs promotes cholesterol/lipid metabolism, with the mevalonate pathway particularly important for coordinating Treg proliferation and upregulation of suppressive molecules CTLA-4 and ICOS to establish Treg functional competency. In contrast, mTORC1 does not directly impact the expression of Foxp3 or anti- and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Tregs, suggesting a non-conventional mechanism for Treg functional regulation. Lastly, we provide evidence that mTORC1 maintains Treg function partly through inhibiting the mTORC2 pathway. Our results demonstrate that mTORC1 acts as a fundamental ‘rheostat’ in Tregs to link immunological signals from TCR and IL-2 to lipogenic pathways and functional fitness, and highlight a central role of metabolic programming of Treg suppressive activity in immune

  17. BRG1-mediated immune tolerance: facilitation of Treg activation and partial independence of chromatin remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Chaiyachati, Barbara H; Jani, Anant; Wan, Yisong; Huang, Haichang; Flavell, Richard; Chi, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Treg activation in response to environmental cues is necessary for regulatory T cells (Tregs) to suppress inflammation, but little is known about the transcription mechanisms controlling Treg activation. We report that despite the known proinflammatory role of the chromatin-remodelling factor BRG1 in CD4 cells, deleting Brg1 in all αβ T cell lineages led to fatal inflammation, which reflected essential roles of BRG1 in Tregs. Brg1 deletion impaired Treg activation, concomitant with the onset of the inflammation. Remarkably, as the inflammation progressed, Tregs became increasingly activated, but the activation levels could not catch up with the severity of inflammation. In vitro assays indicate that BRG1 regulates a subset of TCR target genes including multiple chemokine receptor genes. Finally, using a method that can create littermates bearing either a tissue-specific point mutation or deletion, we found the BRG1 ATPase activity partially dispensable for BRG1 function. Collectively, these data suggest that BRG1 acts in part via remodelling-independent functions to sensitize Tregs to inflammatory cues, thus allowing Tregs to promptly and effectively suppress autoimmunity. PMID:23321680

  18. MHC-derived allopeptide activates TCR-biased CD8+ Tregs and suppresses organ rejection

    PubMed Central

    Picarda, Elodie; Bézie, Séverine; Venturi, Vanessa; Echasserieau, Klara; Mérieau, Emmanuel; Delhumeau, Aurélie; Renaudin, Karine; Brouard, Sophie; Bernardeau, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2014-01-01

    In a rat heart allograft model, preventing T cell costimulation with CD40Ig leads to indefinite allograft survival, which is mediated by the induction of CD8+CD45RClo regulatory T cells (CD8+CD40Ig Tregs) interacting with plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). The role of TCR-MHC-peptide interaction in regulating Treg activity remains a topic of debate. Here, we identified a donor MHC class II–derived peptide (Du51) that is recognized by TCR-biased CD8+CD40Ig Tregs and activating CD8+CD40Ig Tregs in both its phenotype and suppression of antidonor alloreactive T cell responses. We generated a labeled tetramer (MHC-I RT1.Aa/Du51) to localize and quantify Du51-specific T cells within rat cardiac allografts and spleen. RT1.Aa/Du51-specific CD8+CD40Ig Tregs were the most suppressive subset of the total Treg population, were essential for in vivo tolerance induction, and expressed a biased, restricted Vβ11-TCR repertoire in the spleen and the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that treatment of transplant recipients with the Du51 peptide resulted in indefinite prolongation of allograft survival. These results show that CD8+CD40Ig Tregs recognize a dominant donor antigen, resulting in TCR repertoire alterations in the graft and periphery. Furthermore, this allopeptide has strong therapeutic activity and highlights the importance of TCR-peptide-MHC interaction for Treg generation and function. PMID:24789907

  19. Tissue Tregs.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations-those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work-as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular.

  20. Caerulomycin A Enhances Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β)-Smad3 Protein Signaling by Suppressing Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 1 (STAT1) Protein Signaling to Expand Regulatory T Cells (Tregs)*

    PubMed Central

    Gurram, Rama Krishna; Kujur, Weshely; Maurya, Sudeep K.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines play a very important role in the regulation of immune homeostasis. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) responsible for the generation of peripheral tolerance are under the tight regulation of the cytokine milieu. In this study, we report a novel role of a bipyridyl compound, Caerulomycin A (CaeA), in inducing the generation of Tregs. It was observed that CaeA substantially up-regulated the pool of Tregs, as evidenced by an increased frequency of CD4+ Foxp3+ cells. In addition, CaeA significantly suppressed the number of Th1 and Th17 cells, as supported by a decreased percentage of CD4+/IFN-γ+ and CD4+/IL-17+ cells, respectively. Furthermore, we established the mechanism and observed that CaeA interfered with IFN-γ-induced STAT1 signaling by augmenting SOCS1 expression. An increase in the TGF-β-mediated Smad3 activity was also noted. Furthermore, CaeA rescued Tregs from IFN-γ-induced inhibition. These results were corroborated by blocking Smad3 activity, which abolished the CaeA-facilitated generation of Tregs. In essence, our results indicate a novel role of CaeA in inducing the generation of Tregs. This finding suggests that CaeA has enough potential to be considered as a potent future drug for the treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:24811173

  1. Altered connexin 43 expression underlies age dependent decrease of Treg cell suppressor function in NOD mice

    PubMed Central

    Kuczma, Michal; Wang, Cong-Yi; Ignatowicz, Leszek; Gourdie, Robert; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Type I diabetes (T1D) is one of the most extensively studied autoimmune diseases but the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to T cell-mediated destruction of insulin-producing β-cells are still not well understood. Here we show that Treg cells in NOD mice undergo age-dependent loss of suppressor functions exacerbated by the decreased ability of activated effector T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate Treg cells in the peripheral organs. This age-dependent loss is associated with reduced intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions, which is caused by impaired upregulation and decreased expression of connexin 43. Regulatory functions can be corrected, even in T cells isolated from aged, diabetic mice, by a synergistic activity of retinoic acid, TGF-β, and IL-2, which enhance connexin 43 and Foxp3 expression in Treg cells and restore the ability of conventional CD4+ T cells to upregulate Foxp3 and generate peripherally derived Treg cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that suppression mediated by Treg cells from diabetic mice is enhanced by a novel reagent, which facilitates gap junction aggregation. In summary, our report identifies gap junction-mediated intercellular communication as an important component of the Treg cell suppression mechanism compromised in NOD mice and suggests how Treg mediated immune regulation can be improved. PMID:25911751

  2. Driving allotolerance: CAR-expressing Tregs for tolerance induction in organ and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Edinger, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate the function of a variety of immune cells and are critical for maintaining self-tolerance and preventing the development of autoimmune disease. Due to their ability to suppress effector T cells, Tregs have been increasingly explored for clinical use to suppress alloresponses. While this approach has been promising in preclinical models and early clinical trials, widespread clinical use of Tregs has been limited by the low number of these cells in the periphery and the unknown frequency of allo-responsive Tregs. In this issue of the JCI, MacDonald and colleagues transduced human Tregs with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that targets the HLA class I molecule A2. These CAR-expressing T cells were readily activated via CAR stimulation and exerted potent immunosuppressive effects when stimulated in vitro. In a murine model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CAR-modified Tregs were more effective in preventing the development of graft-versus-host disease compared with polyclonal Tregs. The results of this study lay the groundwork for the further evaluation of CAR-expressing Tregs in the prevention or treatment of transplant complications. PMID:26999608

  3. Cysticerci Drive Dendritic Cells to Promote In Vitro and In Vivo Tregs Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Arce-Sillas, Asiel; Fragoso, Gladis; Cárdenas, Graciela; Rosetti, Marcos; Casanova-Hernández, Didier; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Fleury, Agnes; Sciutto, Edda

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in immune homeostasis. Treg induction is a strategy that parasites have evolved to modulate the host's inflammatory environment, facilitating their establishment and permanence. In human Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NC), the concurrence of increased peripheral and central Treg levels and their capacity to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation support their role in controlling neuroinflammation. This study is aimed at identifing possible mechanisms of Treg induction in human NC. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) from healthy human donors, cocultivated with autologous CD4+ naïve cells either in the presence or absence of cysticerci, promoted CD25highFoxp3+ Treg differentiation. An increased Treg induction was observed when cysticerci were present. Moreover, an augmentation of suppressive-related molecules (SLAMF1, B7-H1, and CD205) was found in parasite-induced DC differentiation. Increased Tregs and a higher in vivo DC expression of the regulatory molecules SLAMF1 and CD205 in NC patients were also found. SLAMF1 gene was downregulated in NC patients with extraparenchymal cysticerci, exhibiting higher inflammation levels than patients with parenchymal parasites. Our findings suggest that cysticerci may modulate DC to favor a suppressive environment, which may help parasite establishment, minimizing the excessive inflammation, which may lead to tissue damage. PMID:23762101

  4. Differential Responses of Human Regulatory T Cells (Treg) and Effector T Cells to Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Laura; Czystowska, Malgorzata; Szajnik, Marta; Mandapathil, Magis; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin (RAPA) promotes the expansion of CD4+ CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells via mechanisms that remain unknown. Here, we studied expansion, IL-2R-γ chain signaling, survival pathways and resistance to apoptosis in human Treg responding to RAPA. Methodology/Principal Findings CD4+CD25+ and CD4+CD25neg T cells were isolated from PBMC of normal controls (n = 21) using AutoMACS. These T cell subsets were cultured in the presence of anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies and 1000 IU/mL IL-2 for 3 to 6 weeks. RAPA (1–100 nM) was added to half of the cultures. After harvest, the cell phenotype, signaling via the PI3K/mTOR and STAT pathways, expression of survival proteins and Annexin V binding were determined and compared to values obtained with freshly-separated CD4+CD25high and CD4+CD25neg T cells. Suppressor function was tested in co-cultures with autologous CFSE-labeled CD4+CD25neg or CD8+CD25neg T-cell responders. The frequency and suppressor activity of Treg were increased after culture of CD4+CD25+ T cells in the presence of 1–100 nM RAPA (p<0.001). RAPA-expanded Treg were largely CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ cells and were resistant to apoptosis, while CD4+CD25neg T cells were sensitive. Only Treg upregulated anti-apoptotic and down-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins. Treg expressed higher levels of the PTEN protein than CD4+CD25neg cells. Activated Treg±RAPA preferentially phosphorylated STAT5 and STAT3 and did not utilize the PI3K/mTOR pathway. Conclusions/Significance RAPA favors Treg expansion and survival by differentially regulating signaling, proliferation and sensitivity to apoptosis of human effector T cells and Treg after TCR/IL-2 activation. PMID:19543393

  5. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin

    PubMed Central

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4+CD25hiCD127−/low cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:26844452

  6. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin.

    PubMed

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4CD25CD127 cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment.

  7. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin.

    PubMed

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4CD25CD127 cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:26844452

  8. Adenoviral transduction of naive CD4 T cells to study Treg differentiation.

    PubMed

    Warth, Sebastian C; Heissmeyer, Vigo

    2013-08-13

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to provide immune tolerance to self as well as to certain foreign antigens. Tregs can be generated from naive CD4 T cells in vitro with TCR- and co-stimulation in the presence of TGFβ and IL-2. This bears enormous potential for future therapies, however, the molecules and signaling pathways that control differentiation are largely unknown. Primary T cells can be manipulated through ectopic gene expression, but common methods fail to target the most important naive state of the T cell prior to primary antigen recognition. Here, we provide a protocol to express ectopic genes in naive CD4 T cells in vitro before inducing Treg differentiation. It applies transduction with the replication-deficient adenovirus and explains its generation and production. The adenovirus can take up large inserts (up to 7 kb) and can be equipped with promoters to achieve high and transient overexpression in T cells. It effectively transduces naive mouse T cells if they express a transgenic Coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Importantly, after infection the T cells remain naive (CD44(low), CD62L(high)) and resting (CD25(-), CD69(-)) and can be activated and differentiated into Tregs similar to non-infected cells. Thus, this method enables manipulation of CD4 T cell differentiation from its very beginning. It ensures that ectopic gene expression is already in place when early signaling events of the initial TCR stimulation induces cellular changes that eventually lead into Treg differentiation.

  9. New Insights about Treg and Th17 Cells in HIV Infection and Disease Progression.

    PubMed

    Valverde-Villegas, Jacqueline María; Matte, Maria Cristina Cotta; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Chies, José Artur Bogo

    2015-01-01

    Treg and Th17 cell subsets are characterized by the expression of specific transcriptional factors and chemokine receptor as well as by secretion of specific cytokine and chemokines. These subsets are important to the differentiation, expansion, homing capacity, and recruitment of several different immune cell populations to the site of infection. Whereas Treg cells maintain self-tolerance and control the activation and expansion of autoreactive CD4(+) T effector cells through an anti-inflammatory response, Th17 cells, in an exacerbated unregulated proinflammatory response, can promote autoimmunity. Despite such apparently opposite functions, Th17 and Treg cells share common characteristics, and their differentiation pathways are interconnected. Recent studies have revealed quite intricate relations between Treg and Th17 cells in HIV infection and progression to AIDS. Considering Treg cells, different subsets were already investigated in the context of HIV infection, indicating a fluctuation in the total number and frequency throughout the disease course. This review focuses on the recent findings regarding the role of regulatory T and Th17 cells in the context of HIV infection, highlighting the importance of the balance between these two subsets on disease progression.

  10. Apoptotic epithelial cells control the abundance of Treg cells at barrier surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Nakazawa, Yuta; Totsuka, Naoya; Miki, Haruka; Iino, Shuichi; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Shibuya, Kazuko; Shibuya, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial tissues continually undergo apoptosis. Commensal organisms that inhabit the epithelium influence tissue homeostasis, in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have a central role. However, the physiological importance of epithelial cell apoptosis and how the number of Treg cells is regulated are both incompletely understood. Here we found that apoptotic epithelial cells negatively regulated the commensal-stimulated proliferation of Treg cells. Gut commensals stimulated CX3CR1(+)CD103(-)CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DCs) to produce interferon-β (IFN-β), which augmented the proliferation of Treg cells in the intestine. Conversely, phosphatidylserine exposed on apoptotic epithelial cells suppressed IFN-β production by the DCs via inhibitory signaling mediated by the cell-surface glycoprotein CD300a and thus suppressed Treg cell proliferation. Our findings reveal a regulatory role for apoptotic epithelial cells in maintaining the number of Treg cell and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26855029

  11. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  12. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  13. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  14. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  15. Methionine enkephalin (MENK) inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Methionine Enkephalin (MENK) Inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25701137

  17. A TNFR2-Agonist Facilitates High Purity Expansion of Human Low Purity Treg Cells.

    PubMed

    He, Xuehui; Landman, Sija; Bauland, Stijn C G; van den Dolder, Juliette; Koenen, Hans J P M; Joosten, Irma

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are important for immune homeostasis and are considered of great interest for immunotherapy. The paucity of Treg numbers requires the need for ex vivo expansion. Although therapeutic Treg flow-sorting is feasible, most centers aiming at Treg-based therapy focus on magnetic bead isolation of CD4+CD25+ Treg using a good manufacturing practice compliant closed system that achieves lower levels of cell purity. Polyclonal Treg expansion protocols commonly use anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody (mAb) stimulation in the presence of rhIL-2, with or without rapamycin. However, the resultant Treg population is often heterogeneous and pro-inflammatory cytokines like IFNγ and IL-17A can be produced. Hence, it is crucial to search for expansion protocols that not only maximize ex vivo Treg proliferative rates, but also maintain Treg stability and preserve their suppressive function. Here, we show that ex vivo expansion of low purity magnetic bead isolated Treg in the presence of a TNFR2 agonist mAb (TNFR2-agonist) together with rapamycin, results in a homogenous stable suppressive Treg population that expresses FOXP3 and Helios, shows low expression of CD127 and hypo-methylation of the FOXP3 gene. These cells reveal a low IL-17A and IFNγ producing potential and hardly express the chemokine receptors CCR6, CCR7 and CXCR3. Restimulation of cells in a pro-inflammatory environment did not break the stability of this Treg population. In a preclinical humanized mouse model, the TNFR2-agonist plus rapamycin expanded Treg suppressed inflammation in vivo. Importantly, this Treg expansion protocol enables the use of less pure, but more easily obtainable cell fractions, as similar outcomes were observed using either FACS-sorted or MACS-isolated Treg. Therefore, this protocol is of great interest for the ex vivo expansion of Treg for clinical immunotherapy. PMID:27224512

  18. A TNFR2-Agonist Facilitates High Purity Expansion of Human Low Purity Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Sija; Bauland, Stijn C. G.; van den Dolder, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are important for immune homeostasis and are considered of great interest for immunotherapy. The paucity of Treg numbers requires the need for ex vivo expansion. Although therapeutic Treg flow-sorting is feasible, most centers aiming at Treg-based therapy focus on magnetic bead isolation of CD4+CD25+ Treg using a good manufacturing practice compliant closed system that achieves lower levels of cell purity. Polyclonal Treg expansion protocols commonly use anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody (mAb) stimulation in the presence of rhIL-2, with or without rapamycin. However, the resultant Treg population is often heterogeneous and pro-inflammatory cytokines like IFNγ and IL-17A can be produced. Hence, it is crucial to search for expansion protocols that not only maximize ex vivo Treg proliferative rates, but also maintain Treg stability and preserve their suppressive function. Here, we show that ex vivo expansion of low purity magnetic bead isolated Treg in the presence of a TNFR2 agonist mAb (TNFR2-agonist) together with rapamycin, results in a homogenous stable suppressive Treg population that expresses FOXP3 and Helios, shows low expression of CD127 and hypo-methylation of the FOXP3 gene. These cells reveal a low IL-17A and IFNγ producing potential and hardly express the chemokine receptors CCR6, CCR7 and CXCR3. Restimulation of cells in a pro-inflammatory environment did not break the stability of this Treg population. In a preclinical humanized mouse model, the TNFR2-agonist plus rapamycin expanded Treg suppressed inflammation in vivo. Importantly, this Treg expansion protocol enables the use of less pure, but more easily obtainable cell fractions, as similar outcomes were observed using either FACS-sorted or MACS-isolated Treg. Therefore, this protocol is of great interest for the ex vivo expansion of Treg for clinical immunotherapy. PMID:27224512

  19. Induced Treg Cells Augment the Th17-Mediated Intestinal Inflammatory Response in a CTLA4-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kaminuma, Osamu; Kitamura, Noriko; Hiroi, Takachika

    2016-01-01

    Th17 cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are thought to promote and suppress inflammatory responses, respectively. However, whether they counteract each other or synergize in regulating immune reactions remains controversial. To determine their interactions, we describe the results of experiments employing mouse models of intestinal inflammation by transferring antigen-specific Th cells (Th1, Th2, and Th17) differentiated in vitro followed by the administration of the cognate antigen via enema. We show that cotransfer of induced Tregs (iTregs) suppressed Th1- and Th2-mediated colon inflammation. In contrast, colon inflammation induced by transfer of Th17 cells, was augmented by the cotransfer of iTregs. Furthermore, oral delivery of antigen potentiated Th17-mediated colon inflammation. Administration of a blocking antibody against cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) abrogated the effects of cotransfer of iTregs, while the injection of a soluble recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig) fusion protein, CTLA4-Ig substituted for the cotransfer of iTregs. These results suggest that antigen-specific activation of iTregs in a local environment stimulates the Th17-mediated inflammatory response in a CTLA4-dependent manner. PMID:26950218

  20. Function of miR-146a in controlling Treg cell-mediated regulation of Th1 responses

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li-Fan; Boldin, Mark P.; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Lin, Ling-Li; Taganov, Konstantin D.; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Baltimore, David; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain immune homeostasis by limiting different types of inflammatory responses. Here, we report that miR-146a, one of the miRNAs prevalently expressed in Treg cells, is critical for their suppressor function. The deficiency of miR-146a in Treg cells resulted in a breakdown of immunological tolerance manifested in a fatal IFNγ-dependent immune-mediated lesions in a variety of organs. This was likely due to augmented expression and activation of signal transducer and activator transcription 1 (Stat1), a direct target of miR146a. Likewise, heightened Stat1 activation in Treg cells subjected to a selective ablation of SOCS1, a key negative regulator of Stat1 phosphorylation downstream of IFNγ receptor, was associated with analogous Th1-mediated pathology. Our results suggest that specific aspects of Treg suppressor function are controlled by a single miRNA and that an optimal range of Stat1 activation is important for Treg-mediated control of Th1 responses and associated autoimmunity. PMID:20850013

  1. Impact of dietary components on NK and Treg cell function for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young S; Sayers, Thomas J; Colburn, Nancy H; Milner, John A; Young, Howard A

    2015-09-01

    An important characteristic of cancer is that the disease can overcome the surveillance of the immune system. A possible explanation for this resistance arises from the ability of tumor cells to block the tumoricidal activity of host immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells by inducing the localized accumulation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Evidence exists that components in commonly consumed foods including vitamins A, D, and E, water-soluble constituents of mushrooms, polyphenolics in fruits and vegetables, and n-3 fatty acids in fish oil can modulate NK cell activities, Treg cell properties, and the interactions between those two cell types. Thus, it is extremely important for cancer prevention to understand the involvement of dietary components with the early stage dynamics of interactions among these immune cells. This review addresses the potential significance of diet in supporting the function of NK cells, Treg cells, and the balance between those two cell types, which ultimately results in decreased cancer risk. PMID:25845339

  2. Impact of Dietary Components on NK and Treg Cell Function for Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Sayers, Thomas J.; Colburn, Nancy H.; Milner, John A.; Young, Howard A.

    2015-01-01

    An important characteristic of cancer is that the disease can overcome the surveillance of the immune system. A possible explanation for this resistance arises from the ability of tumor cells to block the tumoricidal activity of host immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells by inducing the localized accumulation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Evidence exists that components in commonly consumed foods including vitamins A, D, and E, water-soluble constituents of mushrooms, polyphenolics in fruits and vegetables, and n-3 fatty acids in fish oil can modulate NK cell activities, Treg cell properties, and the interactions between those two cell types. Thus, it is extremely important for cancer prevention to understand the involvement of dietary components with the early stage dynamics of interactions among these immune cells. This review addresses the potential significance of diet in supporting the function of NK cells, Treg cells, and the balance between those two cell types, which ultimately results in decreased cancer risk. PMID:25845339

  3. Tumor-Expressed IDO Recruits and Activates MDSCs in a Treg-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Holmgaard, Rikke B; Zamarin, Dmitriy; Li, Yanyun; Gasmi, Billel; Munn, David H; Allison, James P; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2015-10-13

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) has been described as a major mechanism of immunosuppression in tumors, though the mechanisms of this are poorly understood. Here, we find that expression of IDO by tumor cells results in aggressive tumor growth and resistance to T-cell-targeting immunotherapies. We demonstrate that IDO orchestrates local and systemic immunosuppressive effects through recruitment and activation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), through a mechanism dependent on regulatory T cells (Tregs). Supporting these findings, we find that IDO expression in human melanoma tumors is strongly associated with MDSC infiltration. Treatment with a selective IDO inhibitor in vivo reversed tumor-associated immunosuppression by decreasing numbers of tumor-infiltrating MDSCs and Tregs and abolishing their suppressive function. These findings establish an important link between IDO and multiple immunosuppressive mechanisms active in the tumor microenvironment, providing a strong rationale for therapeutic targeting of IDO as one of the central regulators of immune suppression.

  4. Disturbed Th17/Treg Balance in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Min-Chao; Han, Wei; Jin, Pei-Wen; Wei, Yu-Ping; Wei, Qiu; Zhang, Liang-Ming; Li, Jun-Chen

    2015-12-01

    The fine balance of T help-17 (Th17)/regulatory T(Treg) cells is crucial for maintenance of immune homeostasis. However, there is little information concerning the role played in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by Th17/Treg cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the variation of Th17 and Treg cells in the peripheral blood of patients with NSCLC. Blood samples were collected from 19 patients with NSCLC and 19 healthy donors. Samples were processed to detect CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells by flow cytometry, and related gene expressions were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IL-23, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis (ELISA). The frequency of circulating Th17 cells and Treg cells was increased in samples derived from patients with NSCLC, accompanied by the upregulation of Foxp3 and RORγt. However, a negative correlation between Treg cells and Th17 cells was found in patients with NSCLC. Additionally, the Th17/Treg ratio and the related cytokines were also significantly higher in patients with NSCLC than in healthy controls. Furthermore, the frequency of Th17 cells was positively correlated with IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 in patients with NSCLC, and the frequency of Treg cells was positively correlated with TGF-β1 and IL-10. More importantly, the Th17/Treg ratio was positively correlated with the CEA concentrations in patients with NSCLC. Our data indicated that Th17 and Treg subset are involved in the immunopathology of NSCLC. Distinct cytokine environment might play a key role in the differentiation of the Th17 and Treg cells in NSCLC. Reconstituting an adequate balance between Th17 and Treg may be beneficial in the treatment of NSCLC.

  5. Characterization of Th17 and FoxP3(+) Treg Cells in Paediatric Psoriasis Patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Li, Y; Yang, X; Wei, J; Zhou, S; Zhao, Z; Cheng, J; Duan, H; Jia, T; Lei, Q; Huang, J; Feng, C

    2016-03-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common inflammatory skin conditions affecting both children and adults. Growing evidence indicates that T-helper 17 (Th17) cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. However, the relationship between Th17 and Treg cells and their dynamic variations in paediatric psoriasis remain unclear. In this study, we found that both Th17 and FoxP3(+) Treg cells and the ratio of Th17 to Treg cell frequency in the peripheral circulation were increased in patients with paediatric psoriasis and were positively correlated with the disease severity. The function of Treg to suppress CD4(+) CD25(-) T cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion was impaired during the onset of psoriasis. After disease remission, both the Th17 and Treg cell frequencies were decreased, and the suppressive function of the Treg cells was obviously restored. However, neither Treg cells from the disease onset nor those after remission can regulate IL-17 secretion by CD4(+) T cells. These findings will further our understanding of the associations between Th17 and Treg cells in paediatric psoriasis and their influence on disease severity.

  6. Dendritic Cells Induce a Subpopulation of IL-12Rβ2-Expressing Treg that Specifically Consumes IL-12 to Control Th1 Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Uri; Park, Chae Gyu; Park, Andrew; Olds, Peter; Wang, Shu; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the regulation of T helper (Th) cell differentiation and activation into effector cells. Therefore, controlling cytokine secretion from DCs may potentially regulate Th differentiation/activation. DCs also induce de-novo generation of regulatory T cells (Treg) that modulate the immune response. In the current study we used the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) to investigate the effect of allospecific Treg on IL-12, TNFα and IL-6 secretion by DCs. Treg cells were found to markedly down-regulate IL-12 secretion from DCs following stimulation with TLR7/8 agonist. This down-regulation of IL-12 was neither due to a direct suppression of its production by the DCs nor a result of marked DC death. We found that IL-12 was rather actively consumed by Treg cells. IL-12 consumption was mediated by a subpopulation of IL-12Rβ2-expressing Treg cells and was dependent on MHC class-II expressed on dendritic cells. Furthermore, IL-12 consumption by Tregs increased their suppressive effect on T cell proliferation and Th1 activation. These results provide a new pathway of Th1 response regulation where IL-12 secreted by DCs is consumed by a sub-population of IL-12Rβ2-expressing Treg cells. Consumption of IL-12 by Tregs not only reduces the availability of IL-12 to Th effector cells but also enhances the Treg immunosuppressive effect. This DC-induced IL-12Rβ2-expressing Treg subpopulation may have a therapeutic advantage in suppressing Th1 mediated autoimmunity. PMID:26745371

  7. Extracellular purine metabolism and signaling of CD73-derived adenosine in murine Treg and Teff cells.

    PubMed

    Romio, Michael; Reinbeck, Benjamin; Bongardt, Sabine; Hüls, Sandra; Burghoff, Sandra; Schrader, Jürgen

    2011-08-01

    CD73-derived adenosine acts as potent inhibitor of inflammation, and regulatory T cells (Treg) have been shown to express CD73 as a novel marker. This study explored the role of endogenously formed adenosine in modulating NF-κB activity and cytokine/chemokine release from murine Treg and effector T cells (Teff) including key enzymes/purinergic receptors of extracellular ATP catabolism. Stimulating murine splenocytes and CD4(+) T cells with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 significantly upregulated activated NF-κB in CD73(-/-) T cells (wild type: 4.36 ± 0.21; CD73(-/-): 6.58 ± 0.75; n = 4; P = 0.029). This was associated with an augmented release of proinflammatory cytokines IL-2, TNF-α, and IFN-γ. Similar changes were observed with the CD73 inhibitor APCP (50 μM) on NF-κB and IFN-γ in wild-type CD4(+) T-cells. Treatment of stimulated CD4(+) T-cells with adenosine (25 μM) potently reduced IFN-γ release which is mediated by adenosine A2a receptors (A2aR). AMP (50 μM) also reduced cytokine release which was not inhibited by APCP. In Teff, A2aR activation (CGS21680) potently inhibited the release of IL-1, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-12, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), CCL3, and CCL4. However, in Treg, CGS21680 did not alter cytokine/chemokine release. In summary, CD73-derived adenosine tonically inhibits active NF-κB in CD4(+) T-cells, thereby modulating the release of a broad spectrum of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Downregulation of P2X7 and upregulation of CD73 in Treg after antigenic stimulation may be an important mechanism to maintain the ability of Treg to generate immunosuppressive adenosine.

  8. Disentangling Tfr cells from Treg cells and Tfh cells: How to untie the Gordian knot.

    PubMed

    Amiezer, Mayan; Phan, Tri Giang

    2016-05-01

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells are a subpopulation of Treg cells that have adopted the T follicular helper cell program to localize to the B-cell follicle. Because of the difficulties in generating mouse models in which Tfr cells are selectively affected, determining where and how Tfr cells regulate the germinal center response remains to be resolved. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Dent and colleagues [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 1152-1161] describe a simple, elegant mouse model to conditionally delete Tfr cells without impacting on the Treg- and Tfh-cell populations. Their initial studies suggest that Tfr cells have a more complex role than previously thought, particularly with respect to the regulation of immunoglobulin isotype switching to IgA. PMID:27109022

  9. Disentangling Tfr cells from Treg cells and Tfh cells: How to untie the Gordian knot.

    PubMed

    Amiezer, Mayan; Phan, Tri Giang

    2016-05-01

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells are a subpopulation of Treg cells that have adopted the T follicular helper cell program to localize to the B-cell follicle. Because of the difficulties in generating mouse models in which Tfr cells are selectively affected, determining where and how Tfr cells regulate the germinal center response remains to be resolved. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Dent and colleagues [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 1152-1161] describe a simple, elegant mouse model to conditionally delete Tfr cells without impacting on the Treg- and Tfh-cell populations. Their initial studies suggest that Tfr cells have a more complex role than previously thought, particularly with respect to the regulation of immunoglobulin isotype switching to IgA.

  10. Analysis of subsets of B cells, Breg, CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells in adult patients with primary selective IgM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Primary selective IgM deficiency (SIGMD) is a rare and recently IUIS-recognized primary immunodeficiency disease with increased susceptibility to infections, allergy, and autoimmune diseases. The pathogenesis of selective IgM remains unclear. The objective of the study was to understand the pathogenesis of selective IgM deficiency via a comprehensive analysis of subsets of B cells, naïve and memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and Breg, CD4Treg, and CD8Treg cells. Twenty adult patients with SIGMD (serum IgM 4 mg/dl-32 mg/dl) and age-and gender-matched healthy controls were studied. Naïve B cells, transitional B cells, marginal zone B cells, germinal center B cells, IgM memory B cells, switched memory B cells, plasmablasts, CD21low B cells, B1 cells, CXCR3+ naive and memory B cells; naïve, central memory, and effector memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and CD4Treg, CD8Treg and Breg were phenotypically analyzed using multicolor flow cytometry. A significant increase in CD21low, IgM memory B cells, Breg and CD8Treg, and a significant decreased in germinal center B cells, and CXCR3+ naïve and memory B cells were observed in SIGMD. These alterations in subsets of B cells, and Breg and CD8Treg cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of SIGMD. PMID:27168952

  11. IL-35, an anti-inflammatory cytokine which expands CD4+CD25+ Treg Cells.

    PubMed

    Castellani, Maria Luisa; Anogeianaki, A; Felaco, P; Toniato, E; De Lutiis, M A; Shaik, B; Fulcheri, M; Vecchiet, J; Tetè, S; Salini, V; Theoharides, T C; Caraffa, A; Antinolfi, P; Frydas, I; Conti, P; Cuccurullo, C; Ciampoli, C; Cerulli, G; Kempuraj, D

    2010-01-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL 12) p35/p40 is a heterodimeric cytokine which plays a critical role in inflammation, immunity and tissue proliferation, and also plays a relevant function in T helper (Th) cell polarization and Th1 T-cell differentiation. IL-12 family members, IL-12p70, IL-23, IL-27 and IL-35, play an important role in influencing helper T-cell differentiation. EBV-induced gene 3 can be associated with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, also called IL-35. It has been shown that IL-35 has biological activity and able to expand CD4+CD25+ Treg cells, suppress the proliferation of CD4+CD25- effector cells and inhibit Th17 cell polarization. IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by regulatory T (Treg) cells CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. IL-35 is a crucial mediator which provokes CD4+CD25+ T cell proliferation and IL-10 generation, another well-known anti-inflammatory cytokine, along with TGFbeta cytokine. These studies suggest that IL-35, together with other successfully discovered cytokine inhibitors, represents a new potential therapeutic cytokine for chronic inflammation, autoimmunity and other immunological disorders.

  12. Human fibrocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells express IDO and promote tolerance via Treg-cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Zoso, Alessia; Mazza, Emilia M C; Bicciato, Silvio; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo; Serafini, Paolo; Inverardi, Luca

    2014-11-01

    By restraining T-cell activation and promoting Treg-cell expansion, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and tolerogenic DCs can control self-reactive and antigraft effector T cells in autoimmunity and transplantation. Their therapeutic use and characterization, however, is limited by their scarce availability in the peripheral blood of tumor-free donors. In the present study, we describe and characterize a novel population of human myeloid suppressor cells, named fibrocytic MDSC, which are differentiated from umbilical cord blood precursors by 4-day culture with FDA-approved cytokines (recombinant human-GM-CSF and recombinant human-G-CSF). This MDSC subset, characterized by the expression of MDSC-, DC-, and fibrocyte-associated markers, promotes Treg-cell expansion and induces normoglycemia in a xenogeneic mouse model of Type 1 diabetes. In order to exert their protolerogenic function, fibrocytic MDSCs require direct contact with activated T cells, which leads to the production and secretion of IDO. This new myeloid subset may have an important role in the in vitro and in vivo production of Treg cells for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, and in either the prevention or control of allograft rejection.

  13. TCR usage, gene expression and function of two distinct FOXP3(+)Treg subsets within CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells identified by expression of CD39 and CD45RO.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingying; Goodall, Jane C; Zhang, Libin; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Lam, Brian; Jiang, Lei; Liu, Wei; Yin, Jian; Lin, Li; Li, Ting; Wu, Xin; Yeo, Giles; Shugay, Mikhail; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Gaston, Hill; Xu, Huji

    2016-03-01

    FOXP3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are indispensable for immune homeostasis, but their study in humans is complicated by heterogeneity within Treg, the difficulty in purifying Tregs using surface marker expression (e.g. CD25) and the transient expression of FOXP3 by activated effector cells. Here, we report that expression of CD39 and CD45RO distinguishes three sub-populations within human CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells. Initial phenotypic and functional analysis demonstrated that CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD39(+)CD45RO(+) cells had properties consistent with effector Treg, CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD39(-)CD45RO(-) cells were naïve Treg and CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD39(-)CD45RO(+) cells were predominantly non-Treg with effector T-cell function. Differences in these two newly identified Treg subsets were corroborated by studies of gene expression and TCR analysis. To apply this approach, we studied these two newly identified Treg subsets in ankylosing spondylitis, and showed impairment in both effector and naïve Treg. This work highlights the importance of discriminating Treg subsets to enable proper comparisons of immune regulatory capacity in healthy individuals and those with inflammatory disease.

  14. Renal allograft rejection: examination of delayed differentiation of Treg and Th17 effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Pekalski, Marcin; Jenkinson, Sarah E; Willet, Joseph D P; Poyner, Elizabeth F M; Alhamidi, Abdulaziz H; Robertson, Helen; Ali, Simi; Kirby, John A

    2013-03-01

    Antigen presentation after kidney transplantation occurs in lymphoid tissues remote from the allograft, with activated T cells then migrating towards the graft. This study examined the possibility that these activated T cells can differentiate to acquire Th17 or Treg phenotypes after a time consistent with their arrival within renal allograft tissues. An immunocytochemical study was performed to demonstrate the response to intragraft TGF-β and the phenotype of lymphoid cells within rejecting human renal allograft tissue. A series of in vitro experiments was then performed to determine the potential to induce these phenotypes by addition of appropriate cytokines 3days after initial T cell activation. During renal allograft rejection there was a strong response to TGF-β, and both FOXP3 and IL-17A were expressed by separate lymphoid cells in the graft infiltrate. FOXP3 could be induced to high levels by the addition of TGF-β1 3days after the initiation of allogeneic mixed leukocyte culture. This Treg marker was enriched in the sub-population of T cells expressing the cell-surface αE(CD103)β7 integrin. The RORγt transcription factor and IL-17A were induced 3days after T cell activation by the addition of TGF-β1, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23; many of these Th17 cells also co-expressed CD103. T cells can develop an effector phenotype following cytokine stimulation 3days after initial activation. This suggests that the intragraft T cell phenotype may be indicative of the prevailing cytokine microenvironment.

  15. Th17 and Th17/Treg ratio at early HIV infection associate with protective HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Falivene, Juliana; Ghiglione, Yanina; Laufer, Natalia; Eugenia Socías, María; Pía Holgado, María; Julia Ruiz, María; Maeto, Cynthia; Inés Figueroa, María; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Cahn, Pedro; Salomón, Horacio; Sued, Omar; Turk, Gabriela; Magdalena Gherardi, María

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze Th17 and Treg subsets and their correlation with anti-HIV T-cell responses and clinical parameters during (acute/early) primary HIV infection (PHI) and up to one year post-infection (p.i). Samples from 14 healthy donors (HDs), 40 PHI patients, 17 Chronics, and 13 Elite controllers (ECs) were studied. The percentages of Th17 and Treg subsets were severely altered in Chronics, whereas all HIV-infected individuals (including ECs) showed Th17/Treg imbalance compared to HDs, in concordance with higher frequencies of activated CD8+ T-cells (HLA-DR+/CD38+). Better clinical status (higher CD4 counts, lower viral loads and activation) was associated with higher Th17 and lower Treg levels. We found positive correlations between Th17 at baseline and anti-HIV CD8+ T-cell functionality: viral inhibitory activity (VIA) and key polyfunctions (IFN-γ+/CD107A/B+) at both early and later times p.i, highlighting the prognostic value of Th17 cells to preserve an effective HIV T-cell immunity. Th17/Treg ratio and the IL-17 relative mean fluorescence intensity (rMFI of IL-17) were also positively correlated with VIA. Taken together, our results suggested a potential link between Th17 and Th17/Treg ratio with key HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses against the infection. PMID:26099972

  16. The roles of serum CXCL16 in circulating Tregs and gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common sarcomas of the digestive system. Abnormal expression of CXCL16 and its sole receptor, CXCR6, has been demonstrated in many cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between CXCL16 or CXCR6 expression and GIST. In this study, we detected CXCL16 and CXCR6 expression in GIST patient samples by using immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blot analysis. Serum CXCL16 level was determined by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Circulating Tregs were isolated by using flow cytometry. MTT assay, cell cycle assay, and transwell assay were used to test the effects of recombinant CXCL16 on Tregs and GIST cells in vitro. The levels of CXCL16 and CXCR6 protein were higher in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. Serum CXCL16 level and circulating Tregs were higher in GIST patients than that in the healthy volunteers. CXCL16, CXCR6, serum CXCL16, and circulating Tregs were significantly associated with a decreased survival time of patients. Relative to control cells, high concentration recombinant CXCL16 treated Tregs and GIST cells exhibited lower proliferation and mobility rates as assessed by MTT assay and transwell assay, respectively. Taken together, CXCL16 was observed to mediate the inhibitory effects in Tregs and GIST cells, and these involved suppression of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27418838

  17. Rapamycin ameliorates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice through reciprocal regulation of the Th17/Treg cell balance

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Deng, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations have suggested that the activation of Th17 cells and/or deficiency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of rapamycin on immune responses in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced murine liver fibrosis model. Liver fibrosis was induced by intraperitoneal administration with CCl4. Following injection of CCl4, the mice were treated intraperitoneally with rapamycin (1.25 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining were used for histological examination. The protein levels of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor P3, retinoic-acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt in liver tissue were determined by western blotting, the frequency of Th17 and Treg cells in the liver was evaluated by flow cytometry, and a suppression assay was measured by incorporating [3H]-thymidine. In addition, to explore the effect of Tregs expanded with rapamycin on hepatic stellate cells (HSC), HSCs were co-cultured with Tregs from rapamycin or phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice. It was found that rapamycin treatment led to a significant reduction in the number of Th17 cells and in the expression levels of ROR-γt in the liver tissues. Simultaneously, the results of the present study showed a significant increase in the frequency of Tregs and a marked enhancement in the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor P3 in the rapamycin-treated mice. Furthermore, the Tregs in rapamycin-treated mice had significantly higher suppressive effects, compared with the cells from mice treated with phospphate-buffered saline. Consequently, rapamycin treatment prevented the development of CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis, which was shown by its histological appearances. These results suggested that the immunosuppressive effect of rapamycin on liver fibrosis was associated with the suppression of hepatic fibrogenesis and

  18. RA8, A human anti-CD25 antibody against human treg cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Robyn; Flanagan, Meg; Miller, Keith D.; Nien, Yu-Chih; Hu, Peisheng; Gray, Dixon; Khawli, Leslie A.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2007-06-01

    Although anti-CD25 antibodies exist for clinical use in patients, there is a need for the development of a human Treg antibody that will abrogate the immunosuppressive function of this small but critical T cell subtype. Based upon mounting evidence that the level of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with clinical prognosis and stage in man, it appears that Treg cells play an important role in the tumor's ability to overcome host immune responses. In mice, the rat anti-mouse CD25 antibody PC61 causes depletion of CD25-bearing Treg cells both peripherally in lymphatic tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, without inducing symptoms of autoimmunity. A similar antibody, though with the ability to delete Treg cells specifically, would be an important new tool for reversing tumor escape associated with Treg immunosuppression in man. To begin to generate such a reagent, we now describe the development of a human anti-CD25 antibody using a novel yeast display library. The target antigen CD25-Fc was constructed and used for five rounds of selection using a non-immune yeast display library that contained as many as 109 single chain variable fragments (scFv). Two unique clones with low KD values (RA4 and RA8) were then selected to construct fully human anti-CD25 antibodies (IgG1/kappa) for stable expression. One antibody, RA8, showed excellent binding to human CD25+ cell lines and to human Treg cells and appears to be an excellent candidate for the generation of a human reagent that may be used in man for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  19. Protection of Tregs, Suppression of Th1 and Th17 Cells, and Amelioration of Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis by a Physically-Modified Saline

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Susanta; Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases, the autoreactive T cells overcome the resistance provided by the regulatory T cells (Tregs) due to a decrease in the number of Foxp3-expressing Tregs. Therefore, upregulation and/or maintenance of Tregs during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate Tregs and achieve immunomodulation. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen) and PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification), was found to upregulate Foxp3 and enrich Tregs in MBP-primed T cells. Moreover, RNS60, but not NS, RNS10.3 and PNS60, inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of iNOS in MBP-primed splenocytes. Incubation of the cells with an NO donor abrogated the RNS60-mediated upregulation of Foxp3. These results suggest that RNS60 boosts Tregs via suppression of NO production. Consistent to the suppressive activity of Tregs towards autoreactive T cells, RNS60, but not NS, RNS10.3, or PNS60, suppressed the differentiation of Th17 and Th1 cells and shifted the balance towards a Th2 response. Finally, RNS60 treatment exhibited immunomodulation and ameliorated adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS, via Tregs. These results describe a novel immunomodulatory property of RNS60 and suggest its exploration for therapeutic intervention in MS and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:23284794

  20. Protection of Tregs, suppression of Th1 and Th17 cells, and amelioration of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis by a physically-modified saline.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Susanta; Martinson, Jeffrey A; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases, the autoreactive T cells overcome the resistance provided by the regulatory T cells (Tregs) due to a decrease in the number of Foxp3-expressing Tregs. Therefore, upregulation and/or maintenance of Tregs during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate Tregs and achieve immunomodulation. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen) and PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification), was found to upregulate Foxp3 and enrich Tregs in MBP-primed T cells. Moreover, RNS60, but not NS, RNS10.3 and PNS60, inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of iNOS in MBP-primed splenocytes. Incubation of the cells with an NO donor abrogated the RNS60-mediated upregulation of Foxp3. These results suggest that RNS60 boosts Tregs via suppression of NO production. Consistent to the suppressive activity of Tregs towards autoreactive T cells, RNS60, but not NS, RNS10.3, or PNS60, suppressed the differentiation of Th17 and Th1 cells and shifted the balance towards a Th2 response. Finally, RNS60 treatment exhibited immunomodulation and ameliorated adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS, via Tregs. These results describe a novel immunomodulatory property of RNS60 and suggest its exploration for therapeutic intervention in MS and other autoimmune disorders.

  1. Low expression of CD39(+) /CD45RA(+) on regulatory T cells (Treg ) cells in type 1 diabetic children in contrast to high expression of CD101(+) /CD129(+) on Treg cells in children with coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Åkesson, K; Tompa, A; Rydén, A; Faresjö, M

    2015-04-01

    show signs of CD101(+) /CD129(+) Treg cells that may indicate suppressor activity.

  2. Polyclonal Recipient nTregs Are Superior to Donor or Third-Party Tregs in the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pilat, Nina; Klaus, Christoph; Hock, Karin; Baranyi, Ulrike; Unger, Lukas; Mahr, Benedikt; Farkas, Andreas M; Wrba, Fritz; Wekerle, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Induction of donor-specific tolerance is still considered as the "Holy Grail" in transplantation medicine. The mixed chimerism approach is virtually the only tolerance approach that was successfully translated into the clinical setting. We have previously reported successful induction of chimerism and tolerance using cell therapy with recipient T regulatory cells (Tregs) to avoid cytotoxic recipient treatment. Treg therapy is limited by the availability of cells as large-scale expansion is time-consuming and associated with the risk of contamination with effector cells. Using a costimulation-blockade based bone marrow (BM) transplantation (BMT) model with Treg therapy instead of cytoreductive recipient treatment we aimed to determine the most potent Treg population for clinical translation. Here we show that CD4(+)CD25(+) in vitro activated nTregs are superior to TGFβ induced iTregs in promoting the induction of chimerism and tolerance. Therapy with nTregs (but not iTregs) led to multilineage chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in mice receiving as few as 0.5 × 10(6) cells. Moreover, we show that only recipient Tregs, but not donor or third-party Tregs, had a beneficial effect on BM engraftment at the tested doses. Thus, recipient-type nTregs significantly improve chimerism and tolerance and might be the most potent Treg population for translation into the clinical setting.

  3. Polyclonal Recipient nTregs Are Superior to Donor or Third-Party Tregs in the Induction of Transplantation Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Pilat, Nina; Klaus, Christoph; Hock, Karin; Baranyi, Ulrike; Unger, Lukas; Mahr, Benedikt; Farkas, Andreas M.; Wrba, Fritz; Wekerle, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Induction of donor-specific tolerance is still considered as the “Holy Grail” in transplantation medicine. The mixed chimerism approach is virtually the only tolerance approach that was successfully translated into the clinical setting. We have previously reported successful induction of chimerism and tolerance using cell therapy with recipient T regulatory cells (Tregs) to avoid cytotoxic recipient treatment. Treg therapy is limited by the availability of cells as large-scale expansion is time-consuming and associated with the risk of contamination with effector cells. Using a costimulation-blockade based bone marrow (BM) transplantation (BMT) model with Treg therapy instead of cytoreductive recipient treatment we aimed to determine the most potent Treg population for clinical translation. Here we show that CD4+CD25+ in vitro activated nTregs are superior to TGFβ induced iTregs in promoting the induction of chimerism and tolerance. Therapy with nTregs (but not iTregs) led to multilineage chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in mice receiving as few as 0.5 × 106 cells. Moreover, we show that only recipient Tregs, but not donor or third-party Tregs, had a beneficial effect on BM engraftment at the tested doses. Thus, recipient-type nTregs significantly improve chimerism and tolerance and might be the most potent Treg population for translation into the clinical setting. PMID:26273682

  4. PTEN ameliorates autoimmune arthritis through down-regulating STAT3 activation with reciprocal balance of Th17 and Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Park, Jin-Sil; Byun, Jae-Kyung; Jhun, JooYeon; Jung, KyungAh; Seo, Hyeon-Beom; Moon, Young-Mee; Kim, Ho-Youn; Park, Sung-Hwan; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-01-01

    PTEN is a tyrosine phosphatase with significant function in inhibiting STAT3 activation. Recently, inactivation of STAT3 has been demonstrated as a therapeutic candidate for autoimmune arthritis. The expression of PTEN controlled by p53 regulates autoimmune arthritis through modulating the balance between Th17 and Treg. We hypothesized that PTEN regulated by p53 might reduce CIA severity and inflammatory response via inhibiting STAT3 activation. Our results revealed that PTEN could ameliorate experimental autoimmune arthritis by reducing STAT3 activity and Th17 differentiation. Systemic infusion of PTEN overexpression downregulated CIA severity. In addition, PTEN overexpression decreased the activation of T cells and modulated reciprocal differentiation of Th17 and Treg cells. We observed that PTEN expression downregulated by p53 deficiency induced the activation of STAT3. Loss of p53 exacerbated autoimmune arthritis and dysregulated the population of Th17 and Treg. These data suggest that induction of STAT3-modulatory activity of PTEN may be a therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis therapy. PMID:27708408

  5. The relation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and regulatory T-cells (Tregs) with HPV persistence in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected women.

    PubMed

    Strickler, Howard D; Martinson, Jeffrey; Desai, Seema; Xie, Xianhong; Burk, Robert D; Anastos, Kathryn; Massad, L Stewart; Minkoff, Howard; Xue, Xiaonan; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Levine, Alexandra M; Colie, Christine; Watts, D Heather; Palefsky, Joel M; Landay, Alan

    2014-02-01

    Other than CD4+ count, the immunologic factors that underlie the relationship of HIV/AIDS with persistent oncogenic HPV (oncHPV) and cervical cancer are not well understood. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are of particular interest. pDCs have both effector and antigen presenting activity and, in HIV-positive patients, low pDC levels are associated with opportunistic infections. Tregs downregulate immune responses, and are present at high levels in HIV-positives. The current pilot study shows for the first time that low pDC and high Treg levels may be significantly associated with oncHPV persistence in both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. Larger studies are now warranted.

  6. In vivo imaging of Tregs providing immune privilege to the hematopoietic stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Fujisaki, Joji; Wu, Juwell; Carlson, Alicia L.; Silberstein, Lev; Putheti, Prabhakar; Larocca, Rafael; Gao, Wenda; Saito, Toshiki I.; Celso, Cristina Lo; Tsuyuzaki, Hitoshi; Sato, Tatsuyuki; Côté, Daniel; Sykes, Megan; Strom, Terry B.; Scadden, David T.; Lin, Charles P.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells reside in a specialized regulatory microenvironment or niche1,2, where they receive appropriate support for maintaining self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation capacity1-3. The niche may also protect stem cells from environmental insults3 including cytotoxic chemotherapy and perhaps pathogenic immunity4. The testis, hair follicle, and placenta are all sites of residence for stem cells and are immune suppressive environments, called immune privileged (IP) sites, where multiple mechanisms conspire to prevent immune attack, even enabling prolonged survival of foreign allografts without immunosuppression (IS)4. We sought to determine if somatic stem cell niches more broadly are IP sites by examining the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) niche1,2,5-7 in the bone marrow (BM), a site where immune reactivity exists8,9. We observed persistence of allo-HSPCs in non-irradiated recipients for 30 days without IS with the same survival frequency compared to syngeneic HSPCs. These HSPCs were lost after the depletion of FoxP3 regulatory T cells (Tregs). High resolution in vivo imaging over time demonstrated marked co-localization of HSPCs with Tregs that accumulated on the endosteal surface in the calvarial and trabecular BM. Tregs appear to participate in creating a localized zone where HSPCs reside and where Tregs are necessary for allo-HSPC persistence. In addition to processes supporting stem cell function, the niche will provide a relative sanctuary from immune attack. PMID:21654805

  7. Depletion of fat-resident Treg cells prevents age-associated insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Sagar P; Myoung Suh, Jae; Fang, Sungsoon; Liu, Sihao; Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Albert; Zhou, Carmen; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Zheng, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Age-associated insulin resistance (IR) and obesity-associated IR are two physiologically distinct forms of adult-onset diabetes. While macrophage-driven inflammation is a core driver of obesity-associated IR, the underlying mechanisms of the obesity-independent yet highly prevalent age-associated IR are largely unexplored. Here we show, using comparative adipo-immune profiling in mice, that fat-resident regulatory T cells, termed fTreg cells, accumulate in adipose tissue as a function of age, but not obesity. Supporting the existence of two distinct mechanisms underlying IR, mice deficient in fTreg cells are protected against age-associated IR, yet remain susceptible to obesity-associated IR and metabolic disease. By contrast, selective depletion of fTreg cells via anti-ST2 antibody treatment increases adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. These findings establish that distinct immune cell populations within adipose tissue underlie ageing- and obesity-associated IR, and implicate fTreg cells as adipo-immune drivers and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of age-associated IR.

  8. Ex vivo expansion of human Tregs specific for alloantigens presented directly or indirectly

    PubMed Central

    Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Pidala, Joseph; Beato, Francisca; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevents GVHD in experimental animals. Because antigen activation drives Treg function, we measured the frequency, growth requirements, and function of alloantigen-specific (allospecific) Tregs from human blood. When alloantigen was presented directly, the precursor frequency of allo-specific Tregs in normal individuals was 1.02% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.65-1.59) and non-Tregs 1.56% (95% CI: 0.94-2.55). When alloantigen was presented indirectly, the frequency of specific Tregs was approximately 100-fold less. Purified Tregs were expanded with APCs, rapamycin, IL-2, and IL-15. In 12 days, allo-specific Tregs expanded 793-fold (95% CI: 480-1107), with duplication approximately every 24 hours. Purified allo-specific Tregs suppressed responses to specific alloantigen selectively and were approximately 100-fold more potent than polyspecific Tregs and nonexpanded Tregs. Allo-specific Tregs maintained high expression of Foxp3, Bcl-2, lymphoid homing receptor CD62L, and chemokine receptor CCR7, predicting sustained function and migration to lymphoid tissues in vivo. Allo-specific Tregs produced TGF-β and IL-10 and expressed more cytoplasmic CTLA-4 compared with non-Tregs. These data provide a platform for the selective expansion of Tregs against major and possibly minor histocompatibility antigens and predict the feasibility of adoptive immunotherapy trials using Tregs with indirect allo-recognition for preventing GVHD while sparing GVL effects. PMID:21948174

  9. Alteration of Th17 and Treg cells in patients with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion before and after lymphocyte immunization therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Several types of T cells have been associated with the pathogenesis of unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA), including Th1/Th2/Th17/Tregs cell. It has been appreciated that immunotherapy with paternal or third party lymphocytes is an effective method of treatment for URSA patients. The balance of Th1/Th2 cells could be maintained and an increase of Treg cells would be beneficial after immunotherapy; however, the mechanism by which the Th17/Treg balance affects URSA has not yet been fully elucidated. Methods Here, we used flow cytometry, liquid chip technology and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) methods to characterize Th17/Treg cell populations after immunotherapy. We found that after immunotherapy in URSA patients, the percentage of Th17 cells decreased and the percentage of Treg cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) increased, as detected by flow cytometry. Results Immunotherapy may induce a decrease in the Th17/Treg ratio and the Treg bias, which may be beneficial for the maintenance of pregnancy. The expression level of ROR gamma t, a transcription factor found in Th17 cells, decreased and the expression of the Treg-specific transcription factor Foxp3 increased in peripheral blood as detected by qPCR. Immunotherapy may induce a decrease in the ratio of ROR gamma t to Foxp3 and a Treg cell bias, which would be beneficial for pregnancy maintenance. The secretion of the Treg-associated cytokine TGF-beta, as well as Th2 cytokines, was increased in serum, while the secretion of Th17-associated cytokine IL-17A and Th1 cytokine production was decreased. The Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio significantly decreased. Similarly, the Th17/Treg ratio significantly decreased in the total patient after immunotherapy. Conclusions These results indicate that in patients with URSA, immunotherapy with mononuclear cells derived from the baby’s father could affect both Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg balance, and we found that the Th2 and Treg bias would be

  10. Treg cell-IgA axis in maintenance of host immune homeostasis with microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ting; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2010-01-01

    The intestine is the home to a vast diversity of microbiota and a complex of mucosal immune system. Multiple regulatory mechanisms control host immune responses to microbiota and maintain intestinal immune homeostasis. This mini review will provide evidence indicating a Treg cell-IgA axis and such axis playing a major role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis. PMID:21111079

  11. Citrate Attenuates Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure in Rats by Modulating the Th17/Treg Cell Balance.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yan; Li, Shuiqin; Zhu, Xiaojing; Gui, Baosong; Yao, Ganglian; Ma, Liqun; Zhu, Dan; Fu, Rongguo; Ge, Heng; Wang, Li; Jia, Lining; Tian, Lifang; Duan, Zhaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Citrate is commonly used as an anticoagulant in hemodialysis for chronic renal failure (CRF) and for the regulation of the immune dysfunction in CRF patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of citrate on the balance of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells in CRF. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr) were significantly increased in the CRF model group compared to the control group, and were decreased in the citrate-treated groups. Citrate treatment inhibited the viability of Th17 cells while elevating the viability of Treg cells in CRF rats. Moreover, Th17-related cytokines significantly decreased while the Treg-related cytokines significantly increased with citrate treatment. Moreover, citrate had a negative influence on the deviation of Th17/Treg cells in CRF rats. Therefore, our study suggests that citrate had an anti-inflammatory effect on CRF through the modulation of the Th17/Treg balance.

  12. mTORC1-Activated Monocytes Increase Tregs and Inhibit the Immune Response to Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Huaijun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shixuan; Xue, Ting; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yazhi; Wan, Qian; Shi, Zhexin; Zhan, Xulong

    2016-01-01

    The TSC1/2 heterodimer, a key upstream regulator of the mTOR, can inhibit the activation of mTOR, which plays a critical role in immune responses after bacterial infections. Monocytes are an innate immune cell type that have been shown to be involved in bacteremia. However, how the mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of monocytes is largely unknown. In our study, TSC1 KO mice and WT mice were infected with E. coli. When compared to WT mice, we found higher mortality, greater numbers of bacteria, decreased expression of coactivators in monocytes, increased numbers of Tregs, and decreased numbers of effector T cells in TSC1 KO mice. Monocytes obtained from TSC1 KO mice produced more ROS, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β and less IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibited immune functioning in TSC1 KO mice is influenced by mTORC1 activation in monocytes. The reduced expression of coactivators resulted in inhibited effector T cell proliferation. mTORC1-activated monocytes are harmful during bacterial infections. Therefore, inhibiting mTORC1 signaling through rapamycin administration could rescue the harmful aspects of an overactive immune response, and this knowledge provides a new direction for clinical therapy. PMID:27746591

  13. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  14. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR.

  15. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells from tumor-bearing mice impair TGF-β-induced differentiation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs from CD4+CD25-FoxP3- T cells.

    PubMed

    Centuori, Sara M; Trad, Malika; LaCasse, Collin J; Alizadeh, Darya; Larmonier, Claire B; Hanke, Neale T; Kartchner, Jessica; Janikashvili, Nona; Bonnotte, Bernard; Larmonier, Nicolas; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2012-11-01

    MDSCs and Tregs play an essential role in the immunosuppressive networks that contribute to tumor-immune evasion. The mechanisms by which tumors promote the expansion and/or function of these suppressive cells and the cross-talk between MDSC and Treg remain incompletely defined. Previous reports have suggested that MDSC may contribute to Treg induction in cancer. Herein, we provide evidence that tumor-induced gr-MDSCs, endowed with the potential of suppressing conventional T Lc, surprisingly impair TGF-β1-mediated generation of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) iTregs. Furthermore, gr-MDSCs impede the proliferation of nTregs without, however, affecting FoxP3 expression. Suppression of iTreg differentiation from naïve CD4(+) cells by gr-MDSC occurs early in the polarization process, requires inhibition of early T cell activation, and depends on ROS and IDO but does not require arginase 1, iNOS, NO, cystine/cysteine depletion, PD-1 and PD-L1 signaling, or COX-2. These findings thus indicate that gr-MDSCs from TB hosts have the unanticipated ability to restrict immunosuppressive Tregs.

  16. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells from tumor-bearing mice impair TGF-β-induced differentiation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs from CD4+CD25−FoxP3− T cells

    PubMed Central

    Centuori, Sara M.; Trad, Malika; LaCasse, Collin J.; Alizadeh, Darya; Larmonier, Claire B.; Hanke, Neale T.; Kartchner, Jessica; Janikashvili, Nona; Bonnotte, Bernard; Larmonier, Nicolas; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    MDSCs and Tregs play an essential role in the immunosuppressive networks that contribute to tumor-immune evasion. The mechanisms by which tumors promote the expansion and/or function of these suppressive cells and the cross-talk between MDSC and Treg remain incompletely defined. Previous reports have suggested that MDSC may contribute to Treg induction in cancer. Herein, we provide evidence that tumor-induced gr-MDSCs, endowed with the potential of suppressing conventional T Lc, surprisingly impair TGF-β1-mediated generation of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ iTregs. Furthermore, gr-MDSCs impede the proliferation of nTregs without, however, affecting FoxP3 expression. Suppression of iTreg differentiation from naïve CD4+ cells by gr-MDSC occurs early in the polarization process, requires inhibition of early T cell activation, and depends on ROS and IDO but does not require arginase 1, iNOS, NO, cystine/cysteine depletion, PD-1 and PD-L1 signaling, or COX-2. These findings thus indicate that gr-MDSCs from TB hosts have the unanticipated ability to restrict immunosuppressive Tregs. PMID:22891289

  17. Th1-Like ICOS+ Foxp3+ Treg Cells Preferentially Express CXCR3 and Home to β-Islets during Pre-Diabetes in BDC2.5 NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Kornete, Mara; Mason, Edward S; Girouard, Julien; Lafferty, Erin I; Qureshi, Salman; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs through a breakdown of self-tolerance resulting in the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing β-islets of the pancreas. A numerical and functional waning of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, prompted by a pancreatic IL-2 deficiency, accompanies Th1 autoimmunity and T1D progression in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recently, we identified a dominant subset of intra-islet Treg cells that expresses the ICOS costimulatory receptor and promotes self-tolerance delaying the onset of T1D. ICOS co-stimulation potently enhances IL-2 induced survival and proliferation, and suppressive activity of Treg cells in situ. Here, we propose an ICOS-dependent mechanism of Treg cell homing to the β-islets during pre-diabetes in the NOD model via upregulation of the CXCR3 chemokine receptor. The islet-specific ICOS+ Treg cell subset preferentially expresses CXCR3 in the pancreatic lymph nodes (pLN) in response to Teff cell-mediated pancreatic inflammation, an expression correlating with the onset and magnitude of IFN-γ production by Teff cells in pancreatic sites. We also reveal that intra-pancreatic APC populations and insulin-producing β, but not α nor δ, islet cells secrete the CXCR3 chemokines, CXCL9, 10 and 11, and selectively promote ICOS+ CXCR3+ Treg cell chemotaxis in vitro. Strikingly, islet-derived Treg cells also produce these chemokines suggesting an auto-regulation of homing by this subset. Unlike ICOS- cells, ICOS+ Treg cells adopt a Th1-like Treg phenotype while maintaining their suppressive capacity, characterized by expression of T-bet and CXCR3 and production of IFN-γ in the draining pLNs. Finally, in vivo neutralization of IFN-γ blocked Treg cell CXCR3 upregulation evincing its role in regulating expression of this chemokine receptor by Treg cells. Thus, CXCR3-mediated trafficking of Treg cells could represent a mechanism of homeostatic immunoregulation during diabetogeneesis. PMID:25946021

  18. The cytokines interleukin 27 and interferon-γ promote distinct Treg cell populations required to limit infection-induced pathology.

    PubMed

    Hall, Aisling O'Hara; Beiting, Daniel P; Tato, Cristina; John, Beena; Oldenhove, Guillaume; Lombana, Claudia Gonzalez; Pritchard, Gretchen Harms; Silver, Jonathan S; Bouladoux, Nicolas; Stumhofer, Jason S; Harris, Tajie H; Grainger, John; Wojno, Elia D Tait; Wagage, Sagie; Roos, David S; Scott, Philip; Turka, Laurence A; Cherry, Sara; Reiner, Steven L; Cua, Daniel; Belkaid, Yasmine; Elloso, M Merle; Hunter, Christopher A

    2012-09-21

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) promotes a population of T-bet(+) CXCR3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells that limit T helper 1 (Th1) cell-mediated pathology. Our studies demonstrate that interleukin-27 (IL-27) also promoted expression of T-bet and CXCR3 in Treg cells. During infection with Toxoplasma gondii, a similar population emerged that limited T cell responses and was dependent on IFN-γ in the periphery but on IL-27 at mucosal sites. Transfer of Treg cells ameliorated the infection-induced pathology observed in Il27(-/-) mice, and this was dependent on their ability to produce IL-10. Microarray analysis revealed that Treg cells exposed to either IFN-γ or IL-27 have distinct transcriptional profiles. Thus, IFN-γ and IL-27 have different roles in Treg cell biology and IL-27 is a key cytokine that promotes the development of Treg cells specialized to control Th1 cell-mediated immunity at local sites of inflammation.

  19. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T-cell response is increased, and Treg cells decreased, in anthelmintic-treated patients with latent TB.

    PubMed

    Toulza, Frederic; Tsang, Lillian; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Brown, Michael; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    In many settings, adults with active or latent tuberculosis will also be coinfected with helminths. Our study aimed to investigate how anthelmintic treatment modulates antimycobacterial immunity, in a setting where helminth reinfection should not occur. We investigated the potential impact of helminth infection on immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients with latent Mtb infection with or without helminth infection (Strongyloides or Schistosoma), and tested T-cell responses before and after anthelmintic treatment. The study was performed in migrants resident in the United Kingdom, where reexposure and reinfection following anthelmintic treatment would not occur. The frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells was measured following stimulation with Mtb Purified Protein Derivative or ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigen, and concentrations of IFN-γ in culture supernatants measured by ELISA and multiplex bead array. Helminth infection was associated with a lower frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, which increased following treatment. Patients with helminth infection showed a significant increase in CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T cells (Treg) compared to those without helminth infection. There was a decrease in the frequency of Treg cells, and an associated increase in CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells after the anthelmintic treatment. Here, we show a potential role of Treg cells in reducing the frequency and function of antimycobacterial CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, and that these effects are reversed after anthelmintic treatment. PMID:26638865

  1. CLL-cells induce IDOhi CD14+HLA-DRlo myeloid-derived suppressor cells that inhibit T-cell responses and promote TRegs.

    PubMed

    Jitschin, Regina; Braun, Martina; Büttner, Maike; Dettmer-Wilde, Katja; Bricks, Juliane; Berger, Jana; Eckart, Michael J; Krause, Stefan W; Oefner, Peter J; Le Blanc, Katarina; Mackensen, Andreas; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios

    2014-07-31

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent a heterogeneous population that shares certain characteristics including an aberrant myeloid phenotype and the ability to suppress T cells. MDSCs have been predominantly studied in malignant diseases and findings suggest involvement in tumor-associated immune suppression. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the leukemia with the highest incidence among adults. Immune defects occur already at early disease stages and impact the clinical course. We assessed presence, frequency, association to other immune parameters, and functional properties of circulating CD14(+) cells lacking HLA-DR expression (HLA-DR(lo)) in patients with untreated CLL. These monocytic cells represent one of the best-defined human MDSC subsets. Frequency of CD14(+)HLA-DR(lo) cells was significantly increased in CLL patients. Furthermore, MDSCs suppressed in vitro T-cell activation and induced suppressive regulatory T cells (TRegs). The MDSC-mediated modulation of T cells could be attributed to their increased indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) activity. CLL cells induced IDO(hi) MDSCs from healthy donor monocytes suggesting bidirectional crosstalk between CLL-cells, MDSCs, and TRegs. Overall, we identified a MDSC population that expands in CLL. The exact mechanisms responsible for such accumulation remain to be elucidated and it will be of interest to test whether antagonizing suppressive functions of CLL MDSCs could represent a mean for enhancing immune responses.

  2. CD39 expression on Treg and Th17 cells is associated with metabolic factors in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; Cortés-Garcia, Juan Diego; Martínez-Leija, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Rivera, Jose Guillermo; Barajas-López, Carlos; González-Amaro, Roberto; Portales-Pérez, Diana Patricia

    2015-09-01

    Th17 cells are involved in the pathogenesis of multiple inflammatory diseases such as type two diabetes (T2D). CD39(+) Treg cells have been implicated as responsible for suppressing Th17 cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the number and function of CD4(+)CD25(high)CD39(+) Treg and Th17 cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from T2D patients and healthy control subjects. The Th17 cells were detected in PBMC under culture with human anti-CD3/CD28 and PMA/ionomycin and the levels of IL-17 were assessed by ELISA and qPCR. The T2D patients with obesity showed significantly lower percentages of CD39(+) Treg cells. A negative correlation between CD39(+) Treg cells and weight, and body mass index was detected. In contrast, the low levels of CD4(+)IL-17(+) cells in overweight and obese T2D patients showed a positive correlation with glucose and HbA1c. Additionally, we found a subpopulation of Th17 cells that express CD39 and were correlated with glucose and HbA1c. Our findings suggest that the expression of CD39 on Treg cells and also in CD4(+)IL-17(+) cells from T2D patients is related to hyperglycemia as well as to overweight and obesity and therefore may participate as a modulator of the effector capacity of Th17 cells.

  3. The Circulating Treg/Th17 Cell Ratio Is Correlated with Relapse and Treatment Response in Pulmonary Sarcoidosis Patients after Corticosteroid Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongzhe; Qiu, Lan; Wang, Yanxun; Aimurola, Halimulati; Zhao, Yuyue; Li, Shan; Xu, Zuojun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary sarcoidosis is an immune-mediated disease, and some patients can be effectively treated with corticosteroids. However, nearly half of all sarcoidosis patients relapse after corticosteroid withdrawal. Different subsets of CD4+ helper T cells participate in the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. Thus, the aims of our study were to investigate whether the circulating subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were associated with sarcoidosis relapse and with its remission after retreatment. Additionally, we identified a useful biomarker for predicting the relapse and remission of sarcoidosis patients. Methods Forty-two patients were enrolled in the present study who had previously been diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis and treated with corticosteroids. The patients were allocated into either a stable group if they exhibited sustained remission (n = 22) or a relapse group if they experienced clinical or radiological recurrence after treatment withdrawal (n = 20). Peripheral blood cells were collected from these patients and analyzed to determine the frequencies of subsets of circulating CD4+ helper T cells by flow cytometry. The patients in the relapse group were retreated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents and were then reevaluated to determine the frequencies of dynamic subsets of circulating CD4+ helper T cells after remission. Results The frequencies of circulating Tregs were significantly increased concomitant with a decrease in the circulating Th17 cell frequency in the relapsed patients compared with the stable patients. The Treg/Th17 ratio was negatively correlated with sarcoidosis activity and was sensitive to retreatment. In addition, the percentage of isolated CD45RO+Ki67+ Tregs was higher in the patients who were stable and in those who recovered after retreatment than in those who relapsed. Conclusions An imbalance between Tregs and Th17 cells is associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis relapse after corticosteroid withdrawal. The

  4. Treg functional stability and its responsiveness to the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent autoimmunity and tissue damage resulting from excessive or unnecessary immune activation through their suppressive function. While their importance for proper immune control is undeniable, the stability of the Treg lineage has recently become a controversial topic. Many reports have shown dramatic loss of the signature Treg transcription factor Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) and Treg function under various inflammatory conditions. Other recent studies demonstrate that most Tregs are extremely resilient in their expression of Foxp3 and the retention of suppressive function. While this debate is unlikely to be settled in the immediate future, improved understanding of the considerable heterogeneity within the Foxp3+ Treg population and how Treg subsets respond to ranging environmental cues may be keys to reconciliation. In this review, we discuss the diverse mechanisms responsible for the observed stability or instability of Foxp3+ Treg identity and function. These include transcriptional and epigenetic programs, transcript targeting and posttranslational modifications that appear responsive to numerous elements of the microenvironment. These mechanisms for Treg functional modulation add to the discussion of Treg stability. PMID:24712463

  5. Protein kinase CK2 governs the molecular decision between encephalitogenic TH17 cell and Treg cell development.

    PubMed

    Ulges, Alexander; Witsch, Esther J; Pramanik, Gautam; Klein, Matthias; Birkner, Katharina; Bühler, Ulrike; Wasser, Beatrice; Luessi, Felix; Stergiou, Natascha; Dietzen, Sarah; Brühl, Till-Julius; Bohn, Toszka; Bündgen, Georg; Kunz, Horst; Waisman, Ari; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Zipp, Frauke; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    T helper 17 (TH17) cells represent a discrete TH cell subset instrumental in the immune response to extracellular bacteria and fungi. However, TH17 cells are considered to be detrimentally involved in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast to TH17 cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to be pivotal in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Thus, the balance between Treg cells and TH17 cells determines the severity of a TH17 cell-driven disease and therefore is a promising target for treating autoimmune diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this balance are still unclear. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibition as well as genetic ablation of the protein kinase CK2 (CK2) ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity and relapse incidence. Furthermore, CK2 inhibition or genetic ablation prevents TH17 cell development and promotes the generation of Treg cells. Molecularly, inhibition of CK2 leads to reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and strongly attenuated expression of the IL-23 receptor, IL-17, and GM-CSF. Thus, these results identify CK2 as a nodal point in TH17 cell development and suggest this kinase as a potential therapeutic target to treat TH17 cell-driven autoimmune responses. PMID:27555590

  6. Protein kinase CK2 governs the molecular decision between encephalitogenic TH17 cell and Treg cell development.

    PubMed

    Ulges, Alexander; Witsch, Esther J; Pramanik, Gautam; Klein, Matthias; Birkner, Katharina; Bühler, Ulrike; Wasser, Beatrice; Luessi, Felix; Stergiou, Natascha; Dietzen, Sarah; Brühl, Till-Julius; Bohn, Toszka; Bündgen, Georg; Kunz, Horst; Waisman, Ari; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Zipp, Frauke; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    T helper 17 (TH17) cells represent a discrete TH cell subset instrumental in the immune response to extracellular bacteria and fungi. However, TH17 cells are considered to be detrimentally involved in autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis (MS). In contrast to TH17 cells, regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to be pivotal in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Thus, the balance between Treg cells and TH17 cells determines the severity of a TH17 cell-driven disease and therefore is a promising target for treating autoimmune diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling this balance are still unclear. Here, we report that pharmacological inhibition as well as genetic ablation of the protein kinase CK2 (CK2) ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) severity and relapse incidence. Furthermore, CK2 inhibition or genetic ablation prevents TH17 cell development and promotes the generation of Treg cells. Molecularly, inhibition of CK2 leads to reduced STAT3 phosphorylation and strongly attenuated expression of the IL-23 receptor, IL-17, and GM-CSF. Thus, these results identify CK2 as a nodal point in TH17 cell development and suggest this kinase as a potential therapeutic target to treat TH17 cell-driven autoimmune responses.

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of Activated Regulatory T Cells Isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus-infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Jin; Oh, Ji Hoon; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which express Foxp3 as a transcription factor, are subsets of CD4(+) T cells. Treg cells play crucial roles in immune tolerance and homeostasis maintenance by regulating the immune response. The primary role of Treg cells is to suppress the proliferation of effector T (Teff) cells and the production of cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. It has been demonstrated that Treg cells' ability to inhibit the function of Teff cells is enhanced during persistent pathogen infection and cancer development. To clarify the function of Treg cells under resting or inflamed conditions, a variety of in vitro suppression assays using mouse or human Treg cells have been devised. The main aim of this study is to develop a method to compare the differences in phenotype and suppressive function between resting and activated Treg cells. To isolate activated Treg cells, mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13 (CL13), a chronic strain of LCMV. Treg cells isolated from the spleen of LCMV CL13-infected mice exhibited both the activated phenotype and enhanced suppressive activity compared with resting Treg cells isolated from naïve mice. Here, we describe the basic protocol for ex vivo phenotype analysis to distinguish activated Treg cells from resting Treg cells. Furthermore, we describe a protocol for the measurement of the suppressive activity of fully activated Treg cells. PMID:27404802

  8. Epigenetic control of Foxp3 by SMYD3 H3K4 histone methyltransferase controls iTreg development and regulates pathogenic T-cell responses during pulmonary viral infection.

    PubMed

    Nagata, D E de Almeida; Ting, H-A; Cavassani, K A; Schaller, M A; Mukherjee, S; Ptaschinski, C; Kunkel, S L; Lukacs, N W

    2015-09-01

    The generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells is driven by Foxp3 and is responsible for dampening inflammation and reducing autoimmunity. In this study, the epigenetic regulation of inducible Treg (iTreg) cells was examined and an H3K4 histone methyltransferase, SMYD3 (SET and MYND Domain 3), which regulates the expression of Foxp3 by a TGFβ1/Smad3 (transforming growth factor-β1/Smad3)-dependent mechanism, was identified. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, SMYD3 depletion led to a reduction in H3K4me3 in the promoter region and CNS1 (conserved noncoding DNA sequence) of the foxp3 locus. SMYD3 abrogation affected iTreg cell formation while allowing dysregulated interleukin-17 production. In a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection, a model in which iTreg cells have a critical role in regulating lung pathogenesis, SMYD3(-/-) mice demonstrated exacerbation of RSV-induced disease related to enhanced proinflammatory responses and worsened pathogenesis within the lung. Our data highlight a novel activation role for the TGFβ-inducible SMYD3 in regulating iTreg cell formation leading to increased severity of virus-related disease. PMID:25669152

  9. Epithelial-derived IL-18 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and Foxp3+ Treg cell function in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, OJ; Srinivasan, N; Pott, J; Schiering, C; Krausgruber, T; Ilott, NE; Maloy, KJ

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-18 (IL-18) are found in many chronic inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and polymorphisms in the IL18R1-IL18RAP locus are associated with IBD susceptibility. IL-18 is an IL-1 family cytokine that has been proposed to promote barrier function in the intestine, but the effects of IL-18 on intestinal CD4+ T cells are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that IL-18R1 expression is enhanced on both effector and regulatory CD4+ T cells in the intestinal lamina propria, with Th17 cells exhibiting particularly high levels. We further show that, during steady state, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) constitutively secrete IL-18 that acts directly on IL-18R1-expressing CD4+ T cells to limit colonic Th17 cell differentiation, in part by antagonizing IL-1R1-signalling. In addition, although IL-18R1 is not required for colonic Foxp3+ Treg cell differentiation, we found that IL-18R1 signaling was critical for Foxp3+ Treg cell mediated control of intestinal inflammation, where it promoted expression of key Treg effector molecules. Thus, IL-18 is a key epithelial-derived cytokine that differentially regulates distinct subsets of intestinal CD4+ T cells during both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions, a finding with potential implications for treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:25736457

  10. Naive Treg-like CCR7(+) mononuclear cells indicate unfavorable prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jie-Yi; Duan, Meng; Sun, Qi-Man; Yang, Liuxiao; Wang, Zhi-Chao; Mynbaev, Ospan A; He, Yi-Feng; Wang, Ling-Yan; Zhou, Jian; Tang, Qi-Qun; Cao, Ya; Fan, Jia; Wang, Xiao-Ying; Gao, Qiang

    2016-07-01

    Chemokine receptor-like 1 (CCRL1) has the potential in creating a low level of CCL19 and CCL21 to hinder CCR7(+) cell tracking to tumor tissue. Previously, we found a tumor suppressive role of CCRL1 by impairing CCR7-related chemotaxis of tumor cells in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we reported a contribution of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells in the tumor microenvironment to the progression of disease. Immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the distribution and clinical significance of CCR7(+) cells in a cohort of 240 HCC patients. Furthermore, the phenotype, composition, and functional status of CCR7(+) cells were determined by flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and in vitro co-culture assays. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells were dispersed around tumor tissue and negatively related to tumoral expression of CCRL1 (P < 0.001, r = 0.391). High density of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells positively correlated with the absence of tumor capsule, vascular invasion, and poor differentiation (P < 0.05). Survival analyses revealed that increased number of CCR7(+) mononuclear cells was significantly associated with worse survival and increased recurrence. We found that CCR7(+) mononuclear cells featured a naive Treg-like phenotype (CD45RA(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)) and possessed tumor-promoting potential by producing TGF-β1. Moreover, CCR7(+) cells were also composed of several immunocytes, a third of which were CD8(+) T cells. CCR7(+) Treg-like cells facilitate tumor growth and indicate unfavorable prognosis in HCC patients, but fortunately, their tracking to tumor tissue is under the control of CCRL1. PMID:26813566

  11. TH17, TH22 and TReg Cells Are Enriched in the Healthy Human Cecum

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Martin J.; Leung, Jacqueline M.; Davenport, Michael; Poles, Michael A.; Cho, Ilseung; Loke, P'ng

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that dysregulation of CD4+ T cell populations leads to intestinal inflammation, but the regional distribution of these populations throughout the intestinal tract in healthy individuals remains unclear. Here, we show that TH17, TH22 and TReg cells are enriched in the healthy human cecum compared to the terminal ileum and sigmoid colon, whereas TH1 and TH2 cells do not significantly vary by location. Transcriptional profiling analysis of paired pinch biopsies from different regions of the intestine identified significant differences in the metabolic state of the terminal ileum, cecum, and sigmoid colon. An increased proportion of TH17 cells was positively associated with expression of resistin (RETN) and negatively associated with expression of trefoil factor 1 (TFF1). These results suggest that CD4+ T helper cells that are important in maintaining mucosal barrier function may be enriched in the cecum as a result of metabolic differences of the surrounding microenvironment. PMID:22829946

  12. NAD+ regulates Treg cell fate and promotes allograft survival via a systemic IL-10 production that is CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T cells independent

    PubMed Central

    Elkhal, Abdallah; Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Hector; Heinbokel, Timm; Uehara, Hirofumi; Quante, Markus; Seyda, Midas; Schuitenmaker, Jeroen M.; Krenzien, Felix; Camacho, Virginia; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Ghiran, Ionita; Tullius, Stefan G.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs have been shown to play a central role in immune homeostasis while preventing from fatal inflammatory responses, while Th17 cells have traditionally been recognized as pro-inflammatory mediators implicated in a myriad of diseases. Studies have shown the potential of Tregs to convert into Th17 cells, and Th17 cells into Tregs. Increasing evidence have pointed out CD25 as a key molecule during this transdifferentiation process, however molecules that allow such development remain unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of NAD+ on the fate of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs in-depth, dissected their transcriptional signature profile and explored mechanisms underlying their conversion into IL-17A producing cells. Our results demonstrate that NAD+ promotes Treg conversion into Th17 cells in vitro and in vivo via CD25 cell surface marker. Despite the reduced number of Tregs, known to promote homeostasis, and an increased number of pro-inflammatory Th17 cells, NAD+ was able to promote an impressive allograft survival through a robust systemic IL-10 production that was CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ independent. Collectively, our study unravels a novel immunoregulatory mechanism of NAD+ that regulates Tregs fate while promoting allograft survival that may have clinical applications in alloimmunity and in a wide spectrum of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26928119

  13. Oncoprotein mdig contributes to silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis by altering balance between Th17 and Treg T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaying; Zhang, Yadong; Lu, Yongju; Battelli, Lori; Porter, Dale W.; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dust-induced gene (mdig, also named Mina53) was first identified from alveolar macrophages of the coal miners with chronic lung inflammation or fibrosis, but how this gene is involved in lung diseases is poorly understood. Here we show that heterozygotic knockout of mdig (mdig+/−) ameliorates silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 cells and Treg cells. Relative to the wild type (WT) mice, infiltration of the macrophages and Th17 cells was reduced in lungs from silica-exposed mdig+/− mice. In contrast, an increased infiltration of the T regulatory (Treg) cells to the lung intestitium was observed in the mdig+/− mice treated with silica. Both the number of Th17 cells in the lung lymph nodes and the level of IL-17 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were decreased in the mdig+/− mice in response to silica. Thus, these results suggest that mdig may contribute to silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Genetic deficiency of mdig impairs Th17 cell infiltration and function, but favors infiltration of the Treg cells, the immune suppressive T cells that are able to limit the inflammatory responses by repressing the Th17 cells and macrophages. PMID:25669985

  14. Rejection of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer by attenuation of Treg cells in combination with immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huang, Tian-Gui; Meseck, Marcia; Mandeli, John; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2007-12-01

    4T1 breast carcinoma is a highly malignant and poorly immunogenic murine tumor model that resembles advanced breast cancer in humans, and is refractory to most immune stimulation-based treatments. We hypothesize that the ineffectiveness of immune stimulatory treatment is mediated by the suppressive effects of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which can be attenuated by engaging the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related protein with its natural ligand (GITRL); further, combination treatment with existing immune stimulation regimens will augment anti-tumor immunity and eradicate metastatic 4T1 tumors in mice.A soluble homodimeric form of mouse GITRL (mIg-mGITRLs) was molecularly constructed and used to treat orthotopic 4T1 tumors established in immune-competent, syngeneic Balb/c mice. When applied in combination with adenovirus-mediated intratumoral murine granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery plus systemic 4-1BB activation, mIg-mGITRLs attenuated the immune-suppressive function of splenic Treg cells, which led to elevated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, tumor-specific cytolytic T-cell activities, tumor rejection and long-term survival in 65% of the animals without apparent toxicities. The results demonstrate that addition of mIg-mGITRLs to an immune-stimulatory treatment regimen significantly improved long-term survival without apparent toxicity, and could potentially be clinically translated into an effective and safe treatment modality for metastatic breast cancer in patients. PMID:17968355

  15. B7-H4Ig inhibits mouse and human T-cell function and treats EAE via IL-10/Treg-dependent mechanisms☆

    PubMed Central

    Podojil, Joseph R.; Liu, Linda N.; Marshall, Shannon A.; Chiang, Ming-Yi; Goings, Gwen E.; Chen, Lieping; Langermann, Solomon; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the therapeutic efficacy and mechanisms of action of both mouse and human B7-H4 Immunoglobulin fusion proteins (mB7-H4Ig; hB7-H4Ig) in treating EAE. The present data show that mB7-H4Ig both directly and indirectly (via increasing Treg function) inhibited CD4+ T-cell proliferation and differentiation in both Th1- and Th17-cell promoting conditions while inducing production of IL-10. B7-H4Ig treatment effectively ameliorated progression of both relapsing (R-EAE) and chronic EAE correlating with decreased numbers of activated CD4+ T-cells within the CNS and spleen, and a concurrent increase in number and function of Tregs. The functional requirement for Treg activation in treating EAE was demonstrated by a loss of therapeutic efficacy of hB7-H4Ig in R-EAE following inactivation of Treg function either by anti-CD25 treatment or blockade of IL-10. Significant to the eventual translation of this treatment into clinical practice, hB7-H4Ig similarly inhibited the in vitro differentiation of naïve human CD4+ T-cells in both Th1- and Th17-promoting conditions, while promoting the production of IL-10. B7-H4Ig thus regulates pro-inflammatory T-cell responses by a unique dual mechanism of action and demonstrates significant promise as a therapeutic for autoimmune diseases, including MS. PMID:23683881

  16. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3+ CD4+ Treg cells that inhibit CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced Kb/A12-21-monospecific CD8+ T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical Kb/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1−/− hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76–90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells in this diabetes model. PMID:27406624

  17. Phenotypic, Functional, and Gene Expression Profiling of Peripheral CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg Cells in Patients With Chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Gina J.; Fleskens, Veerle; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Rajasekhar, Megha; Menon, Bina; Gerwien, Jens G.; Evans, Hayley G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting evidence exists regarding the suppressive capacity of Treg cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to determine whether Treg cells are intrinsically defective in RA. Methods Using a range of assays on PB samples from patients with chronic RA and healthy controls, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells from the CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ T cell compartments were analyzed for phenotype, cytokine expression (ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation), suppression of Teff cell proliferation and cytokine production, suppression of monocyte‐derived cytokine/chemokine production, and gene expression profiles. Results No differences between RA patients and healthy controls were observed with regard to the frequency of Treg cells, ex vivo phenotype (CD4, CD25, CD127, CD39, or CD161), or proinflammatory cytokine profile (interleukin‐17 [IL‐17], interferon‐γ [IFNγ], or tumor necrosis factor [TNF]). FoxP3 expression was slightly increased in Treg cells from RA patients. The ability of Treg cells to suppress the proliferation of T cells or the production of cytokines (IFNγ or TNF) upon coculture with autologous CD45RO+ Teff cells and monocytes was not significantly different between RA patients and healthy controls. In PB samples from some RA patients, CD45RO+ Treg cells showed an impaired ability to suppress the production of certain cytokines/chemokines (IL‐1β, IL‐1 receptor antagonist, IL‐7, CCL3, or CCL4) by autologous lipopolysaccharide‐activated monocytes. However, this was not observed in all patients, and other cytokines/chemokines (TNF, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐15, or CCL5) were generally suppressed. Finally, gene expression profiling of CD45RA+ or CD45RO+ Treg cells from the PB revealed no statistically significant differences between RA patients and healthy controls. Conclusion Our findings indicate that there is no global defect in either CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ Treg cells in

  18. Equilibrium of Treg/Th17 cells of peripheral blood in syphilitic patients with sero-resistance

    PubMed Central

    ZHAO, JIANBIN; MA, JIE; ZHANG, XIAOYAN; LI, QING; YANG, XUEPING

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine changes of cellular homeostasis in regulatory T (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) cells by detecting the proportion of Treg and Th17 cells of peripheral blood, as well as the expression of specific transcription factors in these two types of cells, in syphilitic patients with sero-resistance. A total of 49 subjects were enrolled in the study and divided into two groups, comprising 26 cases of sero-resistant syphilitic patients in the experimental group, and 23 cases of healthy donors in the normal control group. Flow cytometry was applied to examine the proportion of Treg and Th17 cells, as well as the quantitative expression of relevant specific transcription factors [forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) and retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (ROR-γt)] in the two groups. A correlation analysis was subsequently performed. The results showed that in syphilitic patients with sero-resistance, the proportion of peripheral blood Treg cells was obviously higher than that of the normal control group (p<0.01) and the proportion of Th17 cells was significantly lower than that of the normal control group (p<0.01). In addition, the expression of transcription factor Foxp3 in CD4+ T cells was higher than that of the normal control group, while the expression of ROR-γt was lower than that of the normal control (p<0.05). The expression of Foxp3 and ROR-γt in peripheral blood CD4+ T cells had a negative correlation (r=−0.481, p<0.01). In conclusion, the peripheral blood of syphilitic patients with sero-resistance may have abnormalities in Treg/Th17 cellular balance. PMID:27284313

  19. High avidity autoreactive CD4+ T cells induce host CTL, overcome Tregs and mediate tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andrew G.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Ha, Sung P.; Sidney, John; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Touloukian, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress made over the past 25 years, existing immunotherapies have limited clinical effectiveness in patients with cancer. Immune tolerance consistently blunts the generated immune response, and the largely solitary focus on CD8+ T cell immunity has proven ineffective in the absence of CD4+ T cell help. To address these twin-tier deficiencies, we developed a translational model of melanoma immunotherapy focused on the exploitation of high avidity CD4+ T cells that become generated in germline antigen deficient mice. We had previously identified a TRP-1 specific HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted epitope. Using this epitope in conjunction with a newly described TRP-1 germline-knockout, we demonstrate that endogenous TRP-1 expression alters the functionality of the auto-reactive T cell repertoire. More importantly, we show, by using MHC-mismatched combinations, that CD4+ T cells derived from the self-antigen deficient host indirectly triggers the eradication of established B16 lung metastases. We demonstrate that the treatment effect is mediated entirely by endogenous CD8+ T cells and is not affected by the depletion of host Tregs. These findings suggest that high avidity CD4+ T cells can overcome endogenous conditions and mediate their anti-tumor effects exclusively through the elicitation of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:19561540

  20. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibition promotes human iTreg differentiation and suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yongxiang; Zhuo, Han; Lu, Yunjie; Deng, Lei; Jiang, Runqiu; Zhang, Long; Zhu, Qin; Pu, Liyong; Wang, Xuehao; Lu, Ling

    2015-05-01

    Induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) are essential to maintain immunological tolerance, immune homeostasis and prevention of autoimmunity. Some studies suggest that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is involved in the mouse iTreg differentiation; however, whether GSK3β inhibits or enhances iTreg differentiation is still a matter of controversy. To address this issue, we have utilized human naïve CD4(+) T cells and investigated whether GSK3 activity changes during iTreg differentiation and whether altering GSK3 activity influences the development of iTregs and its suppressive function. As a constitutively activated kinase, during iTreg differentiation GSK3β became quickly deactivated (phosphorylated at serine 9), which is dependent on MAPK pathway rather than PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Our results indicated that inhibition of GSK3β by specific inhibitors, SB216763 or TDZD-8, promoted the differentiation of iTreg and increased their suppressive activity. In contrast, overexpression of GSK3β significantly inhibited iTreg differentiation. Furthermore, GSK3β inhibition enhanced iTreg differentiation through the TGF-β/Smad3 pathway. Taken together, this study demonstrates that inhibition of GSK3β enhances human iTreg differentiation and its suppressive activity, and provides a rationale to target GSK3β as a novel immunotherapeutic strategy.

  1. Epigenetic control of Foxp3 by SMYD3 H3K4 histone methyltransferase controls iTreg development and regulates pathogenic T cell responses during pulmonary viral infection

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida Nagata, Denise E.; Ting, Hung-An; Cavassani, Karen A.; Schaller, Matthew A.; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Ptaschinski, Catherine; Kunkel, Steven L.; Lukacs, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    The generation of regulatory T (Treg) cells is driven by Foxp3 and is responsible for dampening inflammation and reducing autoimmunity. In this study the epigenetic regulation of iTreg cells was examined and identified a H3K4 histone methyltransferase, SMYD3, which regulates expression of Foxp3 by a TGFβ1/Smad3 dependent mechanism. Using ChIP assays, SMYD3 depletion led to reduction in H3K4me3 in the promoter region and CNS-1 of the foxp3 locus. SMYD3 abrogation affected iTreg cell formation while allowing dysregulated IL-17 production. In a mouse model of respiratory syncytial virus infection (RSV), a model where iTreg cells play a critical role in regulating lung pathogenesis, SMYD3−/− mice demonstrated exacerbation of RSV-induced disease related to enhanced proinflammatory responses and worsened pathogenesis within the lung. Our data highlight a novel activation role for the TGFβ-inducible SMYD3 in regulating iTreg cell formation leading to increased severity of virus-related disease. PMID:25669152

  2. The autophagy gene Atg16l1 differentially regulates Treg and TH2 cells to control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Harrison, Oliver J; Riffelmacher, Thomas; Moghaddam, Amin E; Pearson, Claire F; Laing, Adam; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Forman, Simon P; Grencis, Richard K; Sattentau, Quentin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-02-24

    A polymorphism in the autophagy gene Atg16l1 is associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it remains unclear how autophagy contributes to intestinal immune homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy is essential for maintenance of balanced CD4(+) T cell responses in the intestine. Selective deletion of Atg16l1 in T cells in mice resulted in spontaneous intestinal inflammation that was characterized by aberrant type 2 responses to dietary and microbiota antigens, and by a loss of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Specific ablation of Atg16l1 in Foxp3(+) Treg cells in mice demonstrated that autophagy directly promotes their survival and metabolic adaptation in the intestine. Moreover, we also identify an unexpected role for autophagy in directly limiting mucosal TH2 cell expansion. These findings provide new insights into the reciprocal control of distinct intestinal TH cell responses by autophagy, with important implications for understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders.

  3. The autophagy gene Atg16l1 differentially regulates Treg and TH2 cells to control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Harrison, Oliver J; Riffelmacher, Thomas; Moghaddam, Amin E; Pearson, Claire F; Laing, Adam; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Forman, Simon P; Grencis, Richard K; Sattentau, Quentin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphism in the autophagy gene Atg16l1 is associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it remains unclear how autophagy contributes to intestinal immune homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy is essential for maintenance of balanced CD4(+) T cell responses in the intestine. Selective deletion of Atg16l1 in T cells in mice resulted in spontaneous intestinal inflammation that was characterized by aberrant type 2 responses to dietary and microbiota antigens, and by a loss of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Specific ablation of Atg16l1 in Foxp3(+) Treg cells in mice demonstrated that autophagy directly promotes their survival and metabolic adaptation in the intestine. Moreover, we also identify an unexpected role for autophagy in directly limiting mucosal TH2 cell expansion. These findings provide new insights into the reciprocal control of distinct intestinal TH cell responses by autophagy, with important implications for understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:26910010

  4. Dependence on nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) levels discriminates conventional T cells from Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Martin; Schliesser, Ulrike; Müller, Gerd; Reissig, Sonja; Satoh, Kazuki; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Jonuleit, Helmut; Waisman, Ari; Müller, Martin R; Serfling, Edgar; Sawitzki, Birgit S; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2012-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to control regulatory T cells: thymus-derived naturally occurring regulatory T cells (nTreg) depend on calcium signals, the Foxp3 gene harbors several NFAT binding sites, and the Foxp3 (Fork head box P3) protein interacts with NFAT. Therefore, we investigated the impact of NFAT on Foxp3 expression. Indeed, the generation of peripherally induced Treg (iTreg) by TGF-β was highly dependent on NFAT expression because the ability of CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into iTreg diminished markedly with the number of NFAT family members missing. It can be concluded that the expression of Foxp3 in TGF-β-induced iTreg depends on the threshold value of NFAT rather than on an individual member present. This is specific for iTreg development, because frequency of nTreg remained unaltered in mice lacking NFAT1, NFAT2, or NFAT4 alone or in combination. Different from expectation, however, the function of both nTreg and iTreg was independent on robust NFAT levels, reflected by less nuclear NFAT in nTreg and iTreg. Accordingly, absence of one or two NFAT members did not alter suppressor activity in vitro or during colitis and transplantation in vivo. This scenario emphasizes an inhibition of high NFAT activity as treatment for autoimmune diseases and in transplantation, selectively targeting the proinflammatory conventional T cells, while keeping Treg functional.

  5. TLR ligand suppression or enhancement of Treg cells? A double-edged sword in immunity to tumours.

    PubMed

    Conroy, H; Marshall, N A; Mills, K H G

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are potent activators of innate immune responses, activating dendritic cell (DC) maturation and inflammatory cytokine secretion by innate immune cells and as a consequence they promote adaptive immune response when coadministered with foreign antigens. There is also some evidence from mouse models that TLR ligands can help to break tolerance to self-antigens and promote immune responses to tumour antigens. Therefore, they have been exploited as adjuvants for tumour vaccines or as immunotherapeutics against cancer. Clinical evaluation of TLR agonists has resulted in a licensed immunotherapeutic for basal cell carcinoma, but there have also been disappointing results from clinical trials, with one pharmaceutical company recently halting its clinical programme. A major obstacle to the development of any active immunotherapeutic approach to cancer is the immunosuppressive environment of the growing tumour, including the induction of tolerogenic DCs and regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress the development of protective effector T-cell responses. This can be compounded by the use of TLR ligands as immunotherapeutics. A problem with TLR agonists that has not been fully appreciated is that they can generate suppressive as well as inflammatory responses in innate immune cells and can promote the induction of regulatory as well as effector T cells. This is part of a normal mechanism for limiting collateral damage during infection or sterile inflammation, but can constrain their ability to induce protective antitumour immunity, especially in the immune suppressed environment of the tumour. Alternatively, manipulating the TLR-activated innate immune responses to selectively blocking immunosuppressive arm, as well as that induced by the tumour, may hold the key to enhancing their efficacy as tumour immunotherapeutics and as adjuvants for cancer vaccines.

  6. Roles of Treg/Th17 Cell Imbalance and Neuronal Damage in the Visual Dysfunction Observed in Experimental Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Chronologically.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Zhuhong; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Optic neuritis associated with multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune optic neuritis (EAON), is characterized by inflammation, T cell activation, demyelination, and neuronal damage, which might induce permanent vision loss. Elucidating the chronological relationship among the features is critical for treatment of demyelinating optic neuritis. EAON was induced in C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein subcutaneously, and visual function was assessed by flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) at days 7, 11, 14, 19, 23, 28 post-immunization. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling. Demyelination and axonal damage were verified with myelin basic protein (MBP) and β-amyloid precursor protein staining, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantified IL-17, IL-1β, TGF-β, FoxP3, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA expression in the optic nerve, as well as FoxP3 and IL-17 staining. Systemic changes of Th17 and Treg cells were tested by flow cytometry in spleen. F-VEP latency was prolonged at 11 days and peaked at 23 days commensurate with demyelination. However, F-VEP amplitude was reduced at 11 days, preceding axon damage, and was exacerbated at 23 days when a peak in RGC apoptosis was detected. Th17 cells up-regulated as early as 7 days and peaked at 11 days, while Treg cells down-regulated inversely compared to Th17 cells change as verified by IL-17 and FoxP3 expression; spleen cell samples were slightly different, demonstrating marked changed at 14 days. Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in the optic nerve precedes and may initiate neuronal damage of axons and RGCs. These changes are commensurate with the appearances of visual dysfunction reflected in F-VEP and hence may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for vision preservation. PMID:26318182

  7. Roles of Treg/Th17 Cell Imbalance and Neuronal Damage in the Visual Dysfunction Observed in Experimental Autoimmune Optic Neuritis Chronologically.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyuan; You, Caiyun; Zhang, Zhuhong; Zhang, Jingkai; Yan, Hua

    2015-12-01

    Optic neuritis associated with multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune optic neuritis (EAON), is characterized by inflammation, T cell activation, demyelination, and neuronal damage, which might induce permanent vision loss. Elucidating the chronological relationship among the features is critical for treatment of demyelinating optic neuritis. EAON was induced in C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein subcutaneously, and visual function was assessed by flash-visual evoked potential (F-VEP) at days 7, 11, 14, 19, 23, 28 post-immunization. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis was measured by terminal-deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated nick-end labeling. Demyelination and axonal damage were verified with myelin basic protein (MBP) and β-amyloid precursor protein staining, respectively. Real-time polymerase chain reaction quantified IL-17, IL-1β, TGF-β, FoxP3, IL-6, and IL-10 mRNA expression in the optic nerve, as well as FoxP3 and IL-17 staining. Systemic changes of Th17 and Treg cells were tested by flow cytometry in spleen. F-VEP latency was prolonged at 11 days and peaked at 23 days commensurate with demyelination. However, F-VEP amplitude was reduced at 11 days, preceding axon damage, and was exacerbated at 23 days when a peak in RGC apoptosis was detected. Th17 cells up-regulated as early as 7 days and peaked at 11 days, while Treg cells down-regulated inversely compared to Th17 cells change as verified by IL-17 and FoxP3 expression; spleen cell samples were slightly different, demonstrating marked changed at 14 days. Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in the optic nerve precedes and may initiate neuronal damage of axons and RGCs. These changes are commensurate with the appearances of visual dysfunction reflected in F-VEP and hence may offer a novel therapeutic avenue for vision preservation.

  8. Constitutive nuclear localization of NFAT in Foxp3+ regulatory T cells independent of calcineurin activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuxia; Shakya, Arvind; Guo, Xiaohua; Zhang, Hongbo; Tantin, Dean; Jensen, Peter E; Chen, Xinjian

    2012-05-01

    Foxp3 plays an essential role in conferring suppressive functionality to CD4(+)/Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Although studies showed that Foxp3 has to form cooperative complexes with NFAT to bind to target genes, it remains unclear whether NFAT is available in the nucleus of primary Tregs for Foxp3 access. It is generally believed that NFAT in resting cells resides in the cytoplasm, and its nuclear translocation depends on calcineurin (CN) activation. We report that a fraction of NFAT protein constitutively localizes in the nucleus of primary Tregs, where it selectively binds to Foxp3 target genes. Treating Tregs with CN inhibitor does not induce export of NFAT from the nucleus, indicating that its nuclear translocation is independent of CN activity. Consistently, Tregs are resistant to CN inhibitors in the presence of IL-2 and continue to proliferate in response to anti-CD3 stimulation, whereas proliferation of non-Tregs is abrogated by CN inhibitors. In addition, PMA, which activates other transcription factors required for T cell activation but not NFAT, selectively induces Treg proliferation in the absence of ionomycin. TCR interaction with self-MHC class II is not required for PMA-induced Treg proliferation. Tregs expanded by PMA or in the presence of CN inhibitors maintain Treg phenotype and functionality. These findings shed light on Treg biology, paving the way for strategies to selectively activate Tregs.

  9. Epicutaneous immunization with DNP-BSA induces CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells that inhibit Tc1-mediated CS.

    PubMed

    Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Zemelka-Wiącek, Magdalena; Ptak, Włodzimierz; Wen, Li; Szczepanik, Marian

    2012-09-01

    As we have shown previously that protein antigen applied epicutaneously (EC) in mice inhibits TNP-specific Th1-mediated contact sensitivity (CS), we postulated that the maneuver of EC immunization might also suppress Tc1-dependent CS response. Here we showed that EC immunization of normal mice with 2,4-dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) applied on the skin in the form of a patch induces a state of subsequent unresponsiveness due to regulatory T cells (Treg) that inhibited sensitization and elicitation of effector T-cell responses. Suppression is transferable in vivo by TCRαβ(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) lymphocytes harvested from lymph nodes (LNs) of skin-patched animals. Flow cytometry revealed that EC immunization with DNP-BSA increased TCRαβ(+) CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) lymphocytes in subcutaneous LNs, suggesting that observed suppression was mediated by Treg cells. Further, in vitro experiments showed that EC immunization with DNP-BSA prior to 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzen sensitization suppressed LN cell proliferation and inhibited production of TNF-α, IL-12 and IFN-γ. Using a transwell system or anti-CTLA-4 mAb, we found that EC induced suppression required direct Treg-effector cell contact and is CTLA-4-dependent.

  10. Co-stimulation with TNF receptor superfamily 4/25 antibodies enhances in-vivo expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Tregs) in a mouse study for active DNA Aβ42 immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Rosenberg, Roger N

    2015-01-15

    The study was designed to test DNA Aβ42 immunization in mice as alternative approach for possible active immunotherapy in Alzheimer patients. As results, we found polarized Th2 immune responses, efficient Aβ42 antibody levels, and disappearance of antigen specific T cells. In-vivo TNFRSF4/25 antibody co-stimulation enhanced Aβ42 specific T cell responses with initial Th2 expansion and subsequent development of Aβ42 specific CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells. It showed that Th2 biased responses due to gene gun immunizations propagate the development of regulatory T cells. In conclusion, full-length DNA Aβ42 immunization into skin results in a regulatory response with minimal risk of inflammation and autoimmunity. PMID:25595257

  11. Combining Exosomes Derived from Immature DCs with Donor Antigen-Specific Treg Cells Induces Tolerance in a Rat Liver Allograft Model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ben; Yang, Jing-Yue; Song, Wen-Jie; Ding, Rui; Zhang, Zhuo-Chao; Ji, Hong-Chen; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-Lin; Yang, Xi-Sheng; Tao, Kai-Shan; Dou, Ke-Feng; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Allograft tolerance is the ultimate goal in the field of transplantation immunology. Immature dendritic cells (imDCs) play an important role in establishing tolerance but have limitations, including potential for maturation, short lifespan in vivo and short storage times in vitro. However, exosomes (generally 30-100 nm) from imDCs (imDex) retain many source cell properties and may overcome these limitations. In previous reports, imDex prolonged the survival time of heart or intestine allografts. However, tolerance or long-term survival was not achieved unless immune suppressants were used. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can protect allografts from immune rejection, and our previous study showed that the effects of imDex were significantly associated with Tregs. Therefore, we incorporated Tregs into the treatment protocol to further reduce or avoid suppressant use. We defined the optimal exosome dose as approximately 20 μg (per treatment before, during and after transplantation) in rat liver transplantation and the antigen-specific role of Tregs in protecting liver allografts. In the co-treatment group, recipients achieved long-term survival, and tolerance was induced. Moreover, imDex amplified Tregs, which required recipient DCs and were enhanced by IL-2. Fortunately, the expanded Tregs retained their regulatory ability and donor-specificity. Thus, imDex and donor-specific Tregs can collaboratively induce graft tolerance. PMID:27640806

  12. Combining Exosomes Derived from Immature DCs with Donor Antigen-Specific Treg Cells Induces Tolerance in a Rat Liver Allograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ben; Yang, Jing-Yue; Song, Wen-jie; Ding, Rui; Zhang, Zhuo-chao; Ji, Hong-chen; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Jian-lin; Yang, Xi-sheng; Tao, Kai-shan; Dou, Ke-feng; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Allograft tolerance is the ultimate goal in the field of transplantation immunology. Immature dendritic cells (imDCs) play an important role in establishing tolerance but have limitations, including potential for maturation, short lifespan in vivo and short storage times in vitro. However, exosomes (generally 30–100 nm) from imDCs (imDex) retain many source cell properties and may overcome these limitations. In previous reports, imDex prolonged the survival time of heart or intestine allografts. However, tolerance or long-term survival was not achieved unless immune suppressants were used. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can protect allografts from immune rejection, and our previous study showed that the effects of imDex were significantly associated with Tregs. Therefore, we incorporated Tregs into the treatment protocol to further reduce or avoid suppressant use. We defined the optimal exosome dose as approximately 20 μg (per treatment before, during and after transplantation) in rat liver transplantation and the antigen-specific role of Tregs in protecting liver allografts. In the co-treatment group, recipients achieved long-term survival, and tolerance was induced. Moreover, imDex amplified Tregs, which required recipient DCs and were enhanced by IL-2. Fortunately, the expanded Tregs retained their regulatory ability and donor-specificity. Thus, imDex and donor-specific Tregs can collaboratively induce graft tolerance. PMID:27640806

  13. NADPH oxidase deficiency underlies dysfunction of aged CD8+ Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Zhenke; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Li, Yinyin; Ju, Jihang; Yang, Zhen; Tian, Lu; Goronzy, Jörg J.

    2016-01-01

    Immune aging results in progressive loss of both protective immunity and T cell–mediated suppression, thereby conferring susceptibility to a combination of immunodeficiency and chronic inflammatory disease. Here, we determined that older individuals fail to generate immunosuppressive CD8+CCR7+ Tregs, a defect that is even more pronounced in the age-related vasculitic syndrome giant cell arteritis. In young, healthy individuals, CD8+CCR7+ Tregs are localized in T cell zones of secondary lymphoid organs, suppress activation and expansion of CD4 T cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of membrane-proximal signaling molecules, and effectively inhibit proliferative expansion of CD4 T cells in vitro and in vivo. We identified deficiency of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) as the molecular underpinning of CD8 Treg failure in the older individuals and in patients with giant cell arteritis. CD8 Tregs suppress by releasing exosomes that carry preassembled NOX2 membrane clusters and are taken up by CD4 T cells. Overexpression of NOX2 in aged CD8 Tregs promptly restored suppressive function. Together, our data support NOX2 as a critical component of the suppressive machinery of CD8 Tregs and suggest that repairing NOX2 deficiency in these cells may protect older individuals from tissue-destructive inflammatory disease, such as large-vessel vasculitis. PMID:27088800

  14. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  15. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-09-24

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  16. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs. PMID:27683634

  17. Tregs and kidney: From diabetic nephropathy to renal transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dousdampanis, Periklis; Trigka, Kostantina; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is recognised as the most effective treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Kidney transplantation continues to face several challenges including long-term graft and patient survival, and the side effects of immunosuppressive therapy. The tendency in kidney transplantation is to avoid the side effects of immunosuppresants and induce immune tolerance. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) contribute to self-tolerance, tolerance to alloantigen and transplant tolerance, mainly by suppressing the activation and function of reactive effector T-cells. Additionally, Tregs are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetes, which is the leading cause of ESRD, suggesting that these cells play a role both in the pathogenesis of chronic kidney disease and the induction of transplant tolerance. Several strategies to achieve immunological tolerance to grafts have been tested experimentally, and include combinations of co-stimulatory blockade pathways, T-cell depletion, in vivo Treg-induction and/or infusion of ex-vivo expanded Tregs. However, a successful regimen that induces transplant tolerance is not yet available for clinical application. This review brings together certain key studies on the role of Tregs in ESRD, diabetes and kidney transplantation, only to emphasize that many more studies are needed to elucidate the clinical significance and the therapeutic applications of Tregs.

  18. Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 Attenuates Cyclophosphamide-Induced Immunosuppression and Regulates Th17/Treg Cell Immune Responses in Mice.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junhua; Nie, Shaoping; Yu, Qiang; Yin, Junyi; Xiong, Tao; Gong, Deming; Xie, Mingyong

    2016-02-17

    The balance of T helper cells 17 (Th17)/regulatory T cells (Treg) plays a key role in maintaining a normal immune response. It is well-known that cyclophosphamide (CTX) applied at high dose often damages the immune system by inhibiting immune cell proliferation. In this study, the immunomodulating effects of Lactobacillus plantarum NCU116 in CTX-induced immunosuppression mice were investigated. Results showed that the levels of cytokines interleukin (IL)-17 and IL-21 were significantly increased after 10 days of treatment with a high dose of NCU116 (46.92 ± 4.28 and 119.92 ± 10.89, respectively) compared with the model group (36.20 ± 2.63, 61.00 ± 6.92, respectively), and the levels of cytokines IL-23 and TGF-β3 of the three NCU116 treatment groups were significantly higher than that of the model group (90.48 ± 6.33 and 140.45 ± 14.30, respectively) (p < 0.05) and close to 62 and 69% of the normal group's level (140.98 ± 14.74 and 266.95 ± 23.11, respectively) at 10 days. The bacterium was also found to increase the expression levels of Th17 immune response and Treg immune response specific transcription factors RORγt and Foxp3. In addition, the bacterium significantly increased the number of CD4(+)T cells and dendrtic cells (DCs) and up-regulated mRNA expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs). These findings demonstrated that NCU116 has the potential ability to enhance intestinal mucosa immunity and regulate the Th17/Treg balance, which may be attributed to the TLR pathway in DCs.

  19. Continuous Activation of Autoreactive CD4+ CD25+ Regulatory T Cells in the Steady State

    PubMed Central

    Fisson, Sylvain; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Litvinova, Elena; Septier, Franck; Klatzmann, David; Liblau, Roland; Salomon, Benoît L.

    2003-01-01

    Despite a growing interest in CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) that play a major role in self-tolerance and immunoregulation, fundamental parameters of the biology and homeostasis of these cells are poorly known. Here, we show that this population is composed of two Treg subsets that have distinct phenotypes and homeostasis in normal unmanipulated mice. In the steady state, some Treg remain quiescent and have a long lifespan, in the order of months, whereas the other Treg are dividing extensively and express multiple activation markers. After adoptive transfer, tissue-specific Treg rapidly divide and expand preferentially in lymph nodes draining their target self-antigens. These results reveal the existence of a cycling Treg subset composed of autoreactive Treg that are continuously activated by tissue self-antigens. PMID:12939344

  20. The autophagy gene Atg16l1 differentially regulates Treg and TH2 cells to control intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Moghaddam, Amin E; Pearson, Claire F; Laing, Adam; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Forman, Simon P; Grencis, Richard K; Sattentau, Quentin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphism in the autophagy gene Atg16l1 is associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it remains unclear how autophagy contributes to intestinal immune homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy is essential for maintenance of balanced CD4+ T cell responses in the intestine. Selective deletion of Atg16l1 in T cells in mice resulted in spontaneous intestinal inflammation that was characterized by aberrant type 2 responses to dietary and microbiota antigens, and by a loss of Foxp3+ Treg cells. Specific ablation of Atg16l1 in Foxp3+ Treg cells in mice demonstrated that autophagy directly promotes their survival and metabolic adaptation in the intestine. Moreover, we also identify an unexpected role for autophagy in directly limiting mucosal TH2 cell expansion. These findings provide new insights into the reciprocal control of distinct intestinal TH cell responses by autophagy, with important implications for understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12444.001 PMID:26910010

  1. Somatic mutations and affinity maturation are impaired by excessive numbers of T follicular helper cells and restored by Treg cells or memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Preite, Silvia; Baumjohann, Dirk; Foglierini, Mathilde; Basso, Camilla; Ronchi, Francesca; Rodriguez, Blanca M. Fernandez; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that Cd3e‐deficient mice adoptively transferred with CD4+ T cells generate high numbers of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, which go on to induce a strong B‐cell and germinal center (GC) reaction. Here, we show that in this system, GC B cells display an altered distribution between the dark and light zones, and express low levels of activation‐induced cytidine deaminase. Furthermore, GC B cells from Cd3e –/– mice accumulate fewer somatic mutations as compared with GC B cells from wild‐type mice, and exhibit impaired affinity maturation and reduced differentiation into long‐lived plasma cells. Reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with regulatory T (Treg) cells restored Tfh‐cell numbers, GC B‐cell numbers and B‐cell distribution within dark and light zones, and the rate of antibody somatic mutations. Tfh‐cell numbers and GC B‐cell numbers and dynamics were also restored by pre‐reconstitution of Cd3e –/– mice with Cxcr5 –/– Treg cells or non‐regulatory, memory CD4+ T cells. Taken together, these findings underline the importance of a quantitatively regulated Tfh‐cell response for an efficient and long‐lasting serological response. PMID:26332258

  2. Activated CD8+ T cells induce expansion of Vβ5+ regulatory T cells via TNFR2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Joedicke, Jara J; Myers, Lara; Carmody, Aaron B; Messer, Ronald J; Wajant, Harald; Lang, Karl S; Lang, Philipp A; Mak, Tak W; Hasenkrug, Kim J; Dittmer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    Vβ5+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are specific for a mouse endogenous retroviral superantigen, become activated and proliferate in response to Friend retrovirus (FV) infection. We previously reported that FV-induced expansion of this Treg subset was dependent on CD8+ T cells and TNFα, but independent of IL-2. We now show that the inflammatory milieu associated with FV infection is not necessary for induction of Vβ5+ Treg expansion. Rather, it is the presence of activated CD8+ T cells that is critical for their expansion. The data indicate that the mechanism involves signaling between the membrane-bound form of TNFα (memTNFα) on activated CD8+ T cells and TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) on Tregs. CD8+ T cells expressing memTNFα but no soluble TNFα (solTNFα) remained competent to induce strong Vβ5+ Treg expansion in vivo. In addition, Vβ5+ Tregs expressing only TNFR2 but no TNFR1 were still responsive to expansion. Finally, treatment of naïve mice with solTNFα did not induce Vβ5+ Treg expansion, but treatment with a TNFR2-specific agonist did. These results reveal a new mechanism of intercellular communication between activated CD8+ T cell effectors and Tregs that results in the activation and expansion of a Treg subset that subsequently suppresses CD8+ T cell functions. PMID:25098294

  3. Tregs Are Regulated by Cytokines: Implications for Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    La Cava, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Several immune cell subsets contribute to the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by taking active participation in the networks that suppress autoreactive immune responses. There is ample evidence that CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) can have an important role in suppressing the production of autoimmune responses in animal models and in humans. This review describes the influences that specific cytokines have on the differentiation, maintenance and survival of Tregs, and how these effects can ultimately directly influence both number and functional activity of these cells in autoimmune disease. PMID:18771756

  4. High Level of Tregs Is a Positive Prognostic Marker in Patients with HPV-Positive Oral and Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Lukesova, E.; Boucek, J.; Rotnaglova, E.; Salakova, M.; Koslabova, E.; Grega, M.; Eckschlager, T.; Rihova, B.; Prochazka, B.; Klozar, J.; Tachezy, R.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been proved as one of the etiological factors of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). Patients with tumors of viral etiology have a lower recurrence rate and better prognosis. OPSCC is linked to an alteration in the immune system. Only a limited number of studies have correlated both the immunological parameters and HPV status with patient prognosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether HPV infection and the immunological status influence patient prognosis individually or in concurrence. Material and Methods. Sixty patients with oral and oropharyngeal carcinomas were enrolled. They were divided into HPV-positive and HPV-negative groups based on the expression of HPV 16 E6 mRNA. Basic lymphocyte subpopulations were determined in the peripheral blood by means of flow cytometry. Results. Significantly better disease-specific survival (DSS) was observed in patients with HPV-positive tumors. Nodal status, tumor grade, recurrence, and CD8+/Tregs ratio were identified as factors influencing DSS. A higher level of Tregs and a lower ratio of CD8/Tregs influenced overall survival (OS) independently of HPV status and age. Patients with HPV-positive tumors and high levels of Tregs survived significantly better than patients from the other groups. Conclusion. Better survival is associated with HPV positivity and elevated Tregs levels. Our data suggest that HPV infection and Tregs do not influence patient prognosis in concurrence. PMID:24864233

  5. Enlarged colitogenic T cell population paradoxically supports colitis prevention through the B-lymphocyte-dependent peripheral generation of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells

    PubMed Central

    do Canto, Fábio Barrozo; Campos, Sylvia Maria Nicolau; Granato, Alessandra; da Silva, Rafael F.; de Paiva, Luciana Souza; Nóbrega, Alberto; Bellio, Maria; Fucs, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation can be induced by the reconstitution of T/B cell-deficient mice with low numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes depleted of CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). Using RAG-knockout mice as recipients of either splenocytes exclusively depleted of CD25+ cells or FACS-purified CD4+CD25−Foxp3− T cells, we found that the augmentation of potentially colitogenic naïve T cell numbers in the inoculum was unexpectedly beneficial for the suppression of colon disease and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Protection against T cell-mediated colitis correlated with a significant increment in the frequency of peripherally-induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (pTreg) cells, especially in the mesenteric lymph nodes, an effect that required the presence of B cells and CD4+CD25−Foxp3+ cells in physiological proportions. Our findings support a model whereby the interplay between B lymphocytes and a diversified naïve T cell repertoire is critical for the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ pTreg cells and colitis suppression. PMID:27353032

  6. Enlarged colitogenic T cell population paradoxically supports colitis prevention through the B-lymphocyte-dependent peripheral generation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells.

    PubMed

    do Canto, Fábio Barrozo; Campos, Sylvia Maria Nicolau; Granato, Alessandra; da Silva, Rafael F; de Paiva, Luciana Souza; Nóbrega, Alberto; Bellio, Maria; Fucs, Rita

    2016-06-29

    Intestinal inflammation can be induced by the reconstitution of T/B cell-deficient mice with low numbers of CD4(+) T lymphocytes depleted of CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). Using RAG-knockout mice as recipients of either splenocytes exclusively depleted of CD25(+) cells or FACS-purified CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(-) T cells, we found that the augmentation of potentially colitogenic naïve T cell numbers in the inoculum was unexpectedly beneficial for the suppression of colon disease and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Protection against T cell-mediated colitis correlated with a significant increment in the frequency of peripherally-induced CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (pTreg) cells, especially in the mesenteric lymph nodes, an effect that required the presence of B cells and CD4(+)CD25(-)Foxp3(+) cells in physiological proportions. Our findings support a model whereby the interplay between B lymphocytes and a diversified naïve T cell repertoire is critical for the generation of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) pTreg cells and colitis suppression.

  7. γc-signaling cytokines induce a regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype in malignant CD4+ T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kasprzycka, M; Zhang, Q; Witkiewicz, A; Marzec, M; Potoczek, M; Liu, X; Wang, HY; Milone, M; Basu, S; Mauger, J; Choi, JK; Abrams, T; Hou, S; Rook, AH; Vonderheid, E; Woetmann, A; Odum, N; Wasik, MA

    2008-01-01

    Here we demonstrate that malignant mature CD4+ T lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) variably display some aspects of the Tregulatory (Treg) phenotype. Whereas seven cell lines representing a spectrum of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoproliferative disorders expressed CD25 and TGF-β, the expression of FOXP3 and, to a lesser degree, IL-10 was restricted to two CTCL cell lines that are dependent on exogeneous IL-2. IL-2, IL-15 and IL-21, all of which signals through receptors containing the common γ (γc) chain, induced expression of IL-10 in the IL-2-dependent cell lines as well as primary leukemic CTCL cells. However, only IL-2 and IL-15, but not IL-21, induced expression of FOXP3. The IL-2-triggered induction of IL-10 and FOXP3 expression occurred by signaling through STAT3 and STAT5, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis of the CTCL tissues revealed that FOXP3-expressing cells were common among the CD7-negative enlarged atypical and small lymphocytes at the early, skin patch and plaque stages. Their frequency was profoundly diminished at the tumor stage and in the CTCL lymph node lesions with or without large cell transformation. These results indicate that the Treg cell features are induced in CTCL T cells by γc signaling cytokines such as IL-2 and do not represent a fully pre-determined, constitutive phenotype independent of the local environmental stimuli to which these malignant mature CD4+ T cells become exposed. PMID:18684941

  8. Regulatory T cells with multiple suppressive and potentially pro-tumor activities accumulate in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Timperi, Eleonora; Pacella, Ilenia; Schinzari, Valeria; Focaccetti, Chiara; Sacco, Luca; Farelli, Francesco; Caronna, Roberto; Del Bene, Gabriella; Longo, Flavia; Ciardi, Antonio; Morelli, Sergio; Vestri, Anna Rita; Chirletti, Piero; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Piconese, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Tregs can contribute to tumor progression by suppressing antitumor immunity. Exceptionally, in human colorectal cancer (CRC), Tregs are thought to exert beneficial roles in controlling pro-tumor chronic inflammation. The goal of our study was to characterize CRC-infiltrating Tregs at multiple levels, by phenotypical, molecular and functional evaluation of Tregs from the tumor site, compared to non-tumoral mucosa and peripheral blood of CRC patients. The frequency of Tregs was higher in mucosa than in blood, and further significantly increased in tumor. Ex vivo, those Tregs suppressed the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. A differential compartmentalization was detected between Helios(high) and Helios(low) Treg subsets (thymus-derived versus peripherally induced): while Helios(low) Tregs were enriched in both sites, only Helios(high) Tregs accumulated significantly and specifically in tumors, displayed a highly demethylated TSDR region and contained high proportions of cells expressing CD39 and OX40, markers of activation and suppression. Besides the suppression of T cells, Tregs may contribute to CRC progression also through releasing IL-17, or differentiating into Tfr cells that potentially antagonize a protective Tfh response, events that were both detected in tumor-associated Tregs. Overall, our data indicate that Treg accumulation may contribute through multiple mechanisms to CRC establishment and progression. PMID:27622025

  9. Epithelial-derived IL-18 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and Foxp3⁺ Treg cell function in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, O J; Srinivasan, N; Pott, J; Schiering, C; Krausgruber, T; Ilott, N E; Maloy, K J

    2015-11-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-18 (IL-18) are found in many chronic inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and polymorphisms in the IL18R1-IL18RAP locus are associated with IBD susceptibility. IL-18 is an IL-1 family cytokine that has been proposed to promote barrier function in the intestine, but the effects of IL-18 on intestinal CD4(+) T cells are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that IL-18R1 expression is enhanced on both effector and regulatory CD4(+) T cells in the intestinal lamina propria, with T helper type 17 (Th17) cells exhibiting particularly high levels. We further show that, during steady state, intestinal epithelial cells constitutively secrete IL-18 that acts directly on IL-18R1-expressing CD4(+) T cells to limit colonic Th17 cell differentiation, in part by antagonizing IL-1R1 signaling. In addition, although IL-18R1 is not required for colonic Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we found that IL-18R1 signaling was critical for Foxp3(+) Treg cell-mediated control of intestinal inflammation, where it promoted the expression of key Treg effector molecules. Thus IL-18 is a key epithelial-derived cytokine that differentially regulates distinct subsets of intestinal CD4(+) T cells during both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions, a finding with potential implications for treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders.

  10. Constitutive expression of genes encoding notch receptors and ligands in developing lymphocytes, nTreg cells and dendritic cells in the human thymus.

    PubMed

    Bento-de-Souza, Luciana; Victor, Jefferson R; Bento-de-Souza, Luiz C; Arrais-Santos, Magaly; Rangel-Santos, Andréia C; Pereira-Costa, Érica; Raniero-Fernandes, Elaine; Seixas-Duarte, Maria I; Oliveira-Filho, João B; Silva Duarte, Alberto J

    2016-01-01

    The thymus is the site of T cell maturation. Notch receptors (Notch1-4) and ligands (DLL1-3 and Jagged1-2) constitute one of several pathways involved in this process. Our data revealed differential constitutive expression of Notch genes and ligands in T lymphocytes and thymic dendritic cells (tDCs), suggesting their participation in human thymocyte maturation. nTreg analyses indicated that the Notch components function in parallel to promote maturation in the thymus. PMID:27504259

  11. GITR subverts Foxp3+ Tregs to boost Th9 immunity through regulation of histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Shi, Xiaomin; Fan, Yihui; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wu, Minhao; Lan, Peixiang; Minze, Laurie; Fu, Yang-Xin; Ghobrial, Rafik M.; Liu, Wentao; Li, Xian Chang

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) is a costimulatory molecule with diverse effects on effector T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the underlying mechanism remains poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that GITR ligation subverts the induction of Foxp3+ Tregs and directs the activated CD4+ T cells to Th9 cells. Such GITR-mediated iTreg to Th9 induction enhances anti-tumour immunity in vivo. Mechanistically, GITR upregulates the NF-κB family member p50, which recruits histone deacetylases to the Foxp3 locus to produce a ‘closed' chromatin structure. Furthermore, GITR ligation also activates STAT6, and STAT6 renders Il9 locus accessible via recruitment of histone acetyltransferase p300, and together with inhibition of Foxp3, GITR induces strong Th9 responses. Thus, Th9 cells and iTregs are developmentally linked and GITR can subvert tolerogenic conditions to boost Th9 immunity. PMID:26365427

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application.

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application. PMID:26617183

  14. Highly heterogeneous, activated and short-lived regulatory T cells during chronic filarial infection

    PubMed Central

    Metenou, Simon; Coulibaly, Yaya I.; Sturdevant, Daniel; Dolo, Housseini; Diallo, Abdallah A.; Soumaoro, Lamine; Coulibaly, Michel E.; Kanakabandi, Kishore; Porcella, Stephen F.; Klion, Amy D.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the increase in the numbers of regulatory T (Treg) cells in chronic infection settings remain unclear. Here we have delineated the phenotype and transcriptional profiles of Treg cells from 18 filarial-infected (Fil+) and 19 filarial-uninfected (Fil-) subjects. We found that the frequencies of Foxp3+ Treg cells expressing CTLA-4, GITR, LAG-3 and IL-10 were significantly higher in Fil+ subjects compared with that in Fil- subjects. Foxp3-expressing Treg-cell populations in Fil+ subjects were also more heterogeneous and had higher expression of IL-10, CCL-4, IL-29, CTLA-4 and TGF-β than Fil- subjects, each of these cytokines having been implicated in immune suppression. Moreover, Foxp3-expressing Treg cells from Fil+ subjects had markedly upregulated expression of activation-induced apoptotic genes with concomitant downregulation of those involved in cell survival. To determine whether the expression of apoptotic genes was due to Treg-cell activation, we found that the expression of CTLA-4, CDk8, RAD50, TNFRSF1A, FOXO3 and RHOA were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells compared with unstimulated cells. Taken together, our results suggest that in patent filarial infection, the expanded Treg-cell populations are heterogeneous, short-lived, activated and express higher levels of molecules known to modulate immune responsiveness, suggesting that filarial infection is associated with high Treg-cell turnover. PMID:24737144

  15. Downregulation of IL-10 secretion by Treg cells in osteoarthritis is associated with a reduction in Tim-3 expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Shufeng; Wan, Jinliang; Anderson, William; Sun, Huaqiang; Zhang, Hu; Peng, Xianbo; Yu, Zhaolong; Wang, Teng; Yan, Xinfeng; Smith, Wendy

    2016-04-01

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common cause of musculoskeletal pain and disability in the knee. Though traditionally thought a mechanical wear-and-tear disease, in recent years, knee OA as a low-grade, chronic inflammatory disease has been increasingly recognized. In this study, we examined the Treg responses in non-obese knee OA patients at different stages. Significantly elevated frequencies of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Tregs were found in OA patients, while on the other hand, lower IL-10 secretion from Tregs in OA patients was observed. Importantly, this decrease in IL-10 was associated with reduced Tim-3 expression on Tregs. Although both Tim-3(-) and Tim3(+) Tregs could secrete IL-10, the majority of IL-10 was observed in Tim-3(+) Tregs. Reduction of Tim-3(+) Tregs in OA patients resulted in less IL-10-producing Tregs. Interestingly, the OA patients in more advanced stages showed further reductions in IL-10 and Tim-3 expression. In conclusion, our results revealed an immunoregulatory disorder in OA independent of obesity, and demonstrated a potential mechanism in establishing the proinflammatory status of OA patients.

  16. IL-33 Receptor-Expressing Regulatory T Cells Are Highly Activated, Th2 Biased and Suppress CD4 T Cell Proliferation through IL-10 and TGFβ Release

    PubMed Central

    Datsi, Angeliki; Hegazy, Ahmed N.; Varga, Domonkos V.; Holecska, Vivien; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Löhning, Max

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) form a heterogeneous population consisting of subsets with different activation states, migratory properties and suppressive functions. Recently, expression of the IL-33 receptor ST2 was shown on Tregs in inflammatory settings. Here we report that ST2 expression identifies highly activated Tregs in mice even under homeostatic conditions. ST2+ Tregs preferentially accumulate at non-lymphoid sites, likely mediated by their high expression of several chemokine receptors facilitating tissue homing. ST2+ Tregs exhibit a Th2-biased character, expressing GATA-3 and producing the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 –especially in response to IL-33. Yet, IL-33 is dispensable for the generation and maintenance of these cells in vivo. Furthermore, ST2+ Tregs are superior to ST2− Tregs in suppressing CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro independent of IL-33. This higher suppressive capacity is partially mediated by enhanced production and activation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGFβ. Thus, ST2 expression identifies a highly activated, strongly suppressive Treg subset preferentially located in non-lymphoid tissues. Here ST2+ Tregs may be well positioned to immediately react to IL-33 alarm signals. Their specific properties may render ST2+ Tregs useful targets for immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27548066

  17. IL-33 Receptor-Expressing Regulatory T Cells Are Highly Activated, Th2 Biased and Suppress CD4 T Cell Proliferation through IL-10 and TGFβ Release.

    PubMed

    Siede, Julia; Fröhlich, Anja; Datsi, Angeliki; Hegazy, Ahmed N; Varga, Domonkos V; Holecska, Vivien; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Löhning, Max

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) form a heterogeneous population consisting of subsets with different activation states, migratory properties and suppressive functions. Recently, expression of the IL-33 receptor ST2 was shown on Tregs in inflammatory settings. Here we report that ST2 expression identifies highly activated Tregs in mice even under homeostatic conditions. ST2+ Tregs preferentially accumulate at non-lymphoid sites, likely mediated by their high expression of several chemokine receptors facilitating tissue homing. ST2+ Tregs exhibit a Th2-biased character, expressing GATA-3 and producing the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 -especially in response to IL-33. Yet, IL-33 is dispensable for the generation and maintenance of these cells in vivo. Furthermore, ST2+ Tregs are superior to ST2- Tregs in suppressing CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro independent of IL-33. This higher suppressive capacity is partially mediated by enhanced production and activation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGFβ. Thus, ST2 expression identifies a highly activated, strongly suppressive Treg subset preferentially located in non-lymphoid tissues. Here ST2+ Tregs may be well positioned to immediately react to IL-33 alarm signals. Their specific properties may render ST2+ Tregs useful targets for immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27548066

  18. WASP regulates suppressor activity of human and murine CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ natural regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Francesco; Trifari, Sara; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Panaroni, Cristina; Martino, Silvana; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Baz, Zeina; Metin, Ayse; Cattaneo, Federica; Villa, Anna; Aiuti, Alessandro; Battaglia, Manuela; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Dupré, Loïc

    2007-01-01

    A large proportion of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS) patients develop autoimmunity and allergy. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ natural regulatory T (nTreg) cells play a key role in peripheral tolerance to prevent immune responses to self-antigens and allergens. Therefore, we investigated the effect of WAS protein (WASP) deficiency on the distribution and suppressor function of nTreg cells. In WAS−/− mice, the steady-state distribution and phenotype of nTreg cells in the thymus and spleen were normal. However, WAS−/− nTreg cells engrafted poorly in immunized mice, indicating perturbed homeostasis. Moreover, WAS−/− nTreg cells failed to proliferate and to produce transforming growth factor β upon T cell receptor (TCR)/CD28 triggering. WASP-dependent F-actin polarization to the site of TCR triggering might not be involved in WAS−/− nTreg cell defects because this process was also inefficient in wild-type (WT) nTreg cells. Compared with WT nTreg cells, WAS−/− nTreg cells showed reduced in vitro suppressor activity on both WT and WAS−/− effector T cells. Similarly, peripheral nTreg cells were present at normal levels in WAS patients but failed to suppress proliferation of autologous and allogeneic CD4+ effector T cells in vitro. Thus, WASP appears to play an important role in the activation and suppressor function of nTreg cells, and a dysfunction or incorrect localization of nTreg cells may contribute to the development of autoimmunity in WAS patients. PMID:17296785

  19. Natural T Regulatory Cells (n Treg) in the Peripheral Blood of Healthy Subjects and Subjects with Chronic Periodontitis – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sabarish, Ram; Lavu, Vamsi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The T cells play a central role in the aetiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. Natural T regulatory cells (nTreg) are the key stone immunoregulatory elements having an anergic phenotype and play an important role in the suppression of exaggerated immune responses thereby maintaining homeostasis. There are increasing evidences for the role of nTreg in the periodontal disease pathogenesis. Aim To identify the proportion of natural T regulatory cells in the peripheral blood of periodontally healthy subjects and subjects with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods A total of 15 subjects (7 with healthy gingiva and 8 with chronic periodontitis) were recruited for this pilot study. Baseline periodontal parameters were recorded and 5 ml of peripheral blood was collected. The samples from both the groups were analysed for the relative proportion of nTreg (identified by the expression CD45RB+CD4+CD25+FOXP3+) using flow cytometry. Results The mean percentages of the CD45RB+CD4+CD25+ cells expressing FOXP3 in control and chronic periodontitis group were found to be 14.75±5.04 and 43.13±11.17 respectively. The mean proportion of nTreg were compared between the control and chronic periodontitis sample using Mann-Whitney Test and was found to be statistically significant with (p<0.001). Conclusion A higher proportion of nTreg in the peripheral blood sample of chronic periodontitis subjects were observed as compared to that of healthy individuals. PMID:27134998

  20. Clinical grade manufacturing of human alloantigen-reactive regulatory T cells for use in transplantation.

    PubMed

    Putnam, A L; Safinia, N; Medvec, A; Laszkowska, M; Wray, M; Mintz, M A; Trotta, E; Szot, G L; Liu, W; Lares, A; Lee, K; Laing, A; Lechler, R I; Riley, J L; Bluestone, J A; Lombardi, G; Tang, Q

    2013-11-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy has the potential to induce transplantation tolerance so that immunosuppression and associated morbidity can be minimized. Alloantigen-reactive Tregs (arTregs) are more effective at preventing graft rejection than polyclonally expanded Tregs (PolyTregs) in murine models. We have developed a manufacturing process to expand human arTregs in short-term cultures using good manufacturing practice-compliant reagents. This process uses CD40L-activated allogeneic B cells to selectively expand arTregs followed by polyclonal restimulation to increase yield. Tregs expanded 100- to 1600-fold were highly alloantigen reactive and expressed the phenotype of stable Tregs. The alloantigen-expanded Tregs had a diverse TCR repertoire. They were more potent than PolyTregs in vitro and more effective at controlling allograft injuries in vivo in a humanized mouse model.

  1. Nuclear transfer nTreg model reveals fate-determining TCR-β and novel peripheral nTreg precursors

    PubMed Central

    Ku, Manching; Chang, Shih-En; Hernandez, Julio; Abadejos, Justin R.; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Muenchmeier, Niklas J.; Schwarz, Anna; Valencia, Anna M.; Kirak, Oktay

    2016-01-01

    To study the development and function of “natural-arising” T regulatory (nTreg) cells, we developed a novel nTreg model on pure nonobese diabetic background using epigenetic reprogramming via somatic cell nuclear transfer. On RAG1-deficient background, we found that monoclonal FoxP3+ CD4+ Treg cells developed in the thymus in the absence of other T cells. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that the thymic niche is not a limiting factor in nTreg development. In addition, we showed that the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain of our nTreg model was not only sufficient to bias T-cell development toward the CD4 lineage, but we also demonstrated that this TCR β-chain was able to provide stronger TCR signals. This TCR-β–driven mechanism would thus unify former per se contradicting hypotheses of TCR-dependent and -independent nTreg development. Strikingly, peripheral FoxP3− CD4+ T cells expressing the same TCR as this somatic cell nuclear transfer nTreg model had a reduced capability to differentiate into Th1 cells but were poised to differentiate better into induced nTreg cells, both in vitro and in vivo, representing a novel peripheral precursor subset of nTreg cells to which we refer to as pre-nTreg cells. PMID:27044095

  2. Histone acetyltransferase mediated regulation of FOXP3 acetylation and Treg function

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yan; Li, Bin; Zhou, Zhaocai; Hancock, Wayne W.; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I.

    2010-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are required for the maintenance of immune homeostasis as first clearly described by Herman Waldmann’s laboratory. Dysfunction of Treg cells also leads to fatal autoimmunity in humans and mice. Conversely, the activation of different classes of Tregs operative systemically and within the cancer microenvironment can suppress host anti-tumor immune responses and promote tumor progression. Therefore, the development of new therapeutic approaches to regulate the activity of Treg cells may have considerable clinical potential. FOXP3 is the key transcriptional regulator of Treg development and function. The activity of FOXP3 is regulated by acetylation, a process catalyzed by distinct types of histone/protein acetyltransferases (HATs) that regulate the functions of many transcription factors, independently of FOXP3, as well as non-histone proteins, in addition to their effects on chromatin accessibility. Interactions between FOXP3 and these enzymes determine the suppressive function of FOXP3. Clearly, small molecules targeting these enzymes are candidates for the regulation of Treg function in vaccines and tumor therapies. PMID:20869864

  3. Restoring host-microbe homeostasis via selective chemoattraction of Tregs.

    PubMed

    Garlet, G P; Sfeir, C S; Little, S R

    2014-09-01

    The disruption of host-microbe homeostasis at the site of periodontal disease is considered a key factor for disease initiation and progress. While the downstream mechanisms responsible for the tissue damage per se are relatively well-known (involving various patterns of immune response operating toward periodontal tissue destruction), we are only beginning to understand the complexity of host-microbe interactions in the periodontal environment. Unfortunately, most of the research has been focused on the disruption of host-microbe homeostasis instead of focusing on the factors responsible for maintaining homeostasis. In this context, regulatory T-cells (Tregs) comprise a CD4+FOXp3 +T-cell subset with a unique ability to regulate other leukocyte functions to avoid excessive immune activation and its pathological consequences. Tregs act as critical determinants of host-microbe homeostasis, as well as determinants of a balanced host response after the disruption of host-microbe homeostasis by pathogens. In periodontitis, Tregs play a protective role, with their natural recruitment being responsible for conversion of active into inactive lesions. With controlled-release technology, it is now possible to achieve a selective chemoattraction of Tregs to periodontal tissues, attenuating experimental periodontitis evolution due to the local control of inflammatory immune response and the generation of a pro-reparative environment.

  4. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  5. Functional Mechanisms of Treg in the Context of HIV Infection and the Janus Face of Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    López-Abente, Jacobo; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in infections, by modulating host immune responses and avoiding the overreactive immunity that in the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to a marked erosion and deregulation of the entire immune system. Therefore, the suppressive function of Treg in HIV-infected patients is critical because of their implication on preventing the immune hyperactivation, even though it could also have a detrimental effect by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses. In recent years, several studies have shown that HIV-1 can directly infect Treg, disturbing their phenotype and suppressive capacity via different mechanisms. These effects include Foxp3 and CD25 downregulation, and the impairment of suppressive capacity. This review describes the functional mechanisms of Treg to modulate immune activation during HIV infection, and how such control is no longer fine-tune orchestrated once Treg itself get infected. We will review the current knowledge about the HIV effects on the Treg cytokine expression, on pathways implying the participation of different ectoenzymes (i.e., CD39/CD73 axis), transcription factors (ICER), and lastly on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), one of the keystones in Treg-suppressive function. To define which are the HIV effects upon these regulatory mechanisms is crucial not only for the comprehension of immune deregulation in HIV-infected patients but also for the correct understanding of the role of Tregs in HIV infection. PMID:27242797

  6. Mature dendritic cells cause Th17/Treg imbalance by secreting TGF-β1 and IL-6 in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pingxia; Cao, Yingping; Wang, Meihua; Zheng, Peizheng; Hou, Juan; Zhu, Chanhong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is generally acknowledged to be an autoimmune disease, but its etiology remains unknown. The most intensively studied animal model of MS is experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), have gained increasing attention because they connect innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to determine the role of mature DCs in the pathogenesis of EAE. It was found that the number of mature DCs in the EAE spleen increased compared to the control group (p < 0.05). And there was an imbalance between Th17 (effector) and Treg (regulatory) in EAE. The data showed that mature DCs can regulate the differentiation of Th17 and Treg in EAE. In addition, there was a significant difference in secretion of TGF-β1 and IL-6 between mature DCs from mice with EAE and controls. The present data suggest that mature DCs cause an imbalance between Th17 and Treg by secreting TGF-β1 and IL-6 in the pathogenesis of EAE disease. Thus, targeting DC may be an effective strategy for treating MS. PMID:27536199

  7. T(reg) stability: to be or not to be.

    PubMed

    Overacre, Abigail E; Vignali, Dario Aa

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cell (T(reg)) stability has been primarily determined by the maintained expression of the transcription factor Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3). However, T(regs) can exhibit instability while maintaining Foxp3 expression, requiring a re-examination of what defines T(reg) stability. Recent work suggests that the establishment and stability of T(regs) is mediated by a number of mechanisms besides Foxp3 expression, such as epigenetic modifications, Foxo1/3a localization, expression of Eos and signaling via Neuropilin-1. Additional studies may help to define approaches that can undermine T(reg) stability in cancer or enhance T(reg) stability in transplantation, autoimmune or inflammatory diseases and therefore have substantial therapeutic utility. In this review, we will discuss how T(reg) stability is defined and the mechanisms utilized to maintain stability.

  8. Bcl6 Controls the Th2 Inflammatory Activity of Regulatory T Cells by Repressing Gata3 Function

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Deepali V.; Sehra, Sarita; Nguyen, Evelyn T.; Jadhav, Rohit; Englert, Kate; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Hangoc, Giao; Broxmeyer, Hal E.; Nakayama, Toshinori; Perumal, Narayanan B.; Kaplan, Mark H.; Dent, Alexander L.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Bcl6 is a critical arbiter of T helper cell fate, promoting the follicular helper (Tfh) lineage while repressing other T helper cell lineages. Bcl6-deficient (Bcl6-/-) mice develop a spontaneous and severe Th2-type inflammatory disease, thus warranting assessment of Bcl6 in Treg cell function. Bcl6-/- Tregs were competent at suppressing T cell proliferation in vitro and Th1-type colitogenic T cell responses in vivo. In contrast, Bcl6-/- Treg cells strongly exacerbated lung inflammation in a model of allergic airway disease, and promoted higher Th2 responses, including systemic up-regulation of microRNA-21. Further, Bcl6-/- Tregs were selectively impaired at controlling Th2 responses but not Th1 and Th17 responses, in mixed chimeras of Bcl6-/- bone marrow with Foxp3-/- bone marrow. Bcl6-/- Tregs displayed increased levels of the Th2 transcription factor Gata3 and other Th2 and Treg genes. Bcl6 potently repressed Gata3 transcriptional transactivation, providing a mechanism for the increased expression of Th2 genes by Bcl6-/- Tregs. Gata3 has a critical role in regulating Foxp3 expression and functional fitness of Tregs, however, the signal that regulates Gata3 and restricts its transactivation of Th2 cytokines in Tregs has remained unexplored. Our results identify Bcl6 as an essential transcription factor regulating Gata3 activity in Tregs. Thus, Bcl6 represents a crucial regulatory layer in the Treg functional program, required for specific suppression of Gata3 and Th2 effector responses by Tregs. PMID:23053511

  9. Interplay between the TH17 and TReg cell lineages: a (co-)evolutionary perspective.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Casey T; Hatton, Robin D

    2009-12-01

    The origins of the adaptive immune system and the basis for its unique association with vertebrate species have been a source of considerable speculation. In light of recent advances in our understanding of the developmental and functional links between the induced regulatory T cell and T helper 17 cell lineages, and their specialized relationship to the gut, we speculate that the co-evolution of these adaptive immune pathways might have given primitive vertebrates a means to benefit from the diversification of their commensal microbiota.

  10. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for T(reg)-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in T(reg) cells than T(conv) cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in T(reg) cells under inflammatory conditions with concomitant decrease of suppressor activity in dextran sulfate-induced colitis model. YY1 inhibits Smad3/4 binding to and chromatin remodelling of the Foxp3 locus. In addition, YY1 interrupts Foxp3-dependent target gene expression by physically interacting with Foxp3 and by directly binding to the Foxp3 target genes. Thus, YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of T(reg) cells by blocking Foxp3. PMID:26892542

  11. CD8+CD122+CD49dlow regulatory T cells maintain T-cell homeostasis by killing activated T cells via Fas/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Akane, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Mak, Tak W; Shiku, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    The Fas/FasL (CD95/CD178) system is required for immune regulation; however, it is unclear in which cells, when, and where Fas/FasL molecules act in the immune system. We found that CD8(+)CD122(+) cells, which are mostly composed of memory T cells in comparison with naïve cells in the CD8(+)CD122(-) population, were previously shown to include cells with regulatory activity and could be separated into CD49d(low) cells and CD49d(high) cells. We established in vitro and in vivo experimental systems to evaluate the regulatory activity of CD122(+) cells. Regulatory activity was observed in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(low) but not in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(high) cells, indicating that the regulatory cells in the CD8(+)CD122(+) population could be narrowed down to CD49d(low) cells. CD8(+)CD122(-) cells taken from lymphoproliferation (lpr) mice were resistant to regulation by normal CD122(+) Tregs. CD122(+) Tregs taken from generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) mice did not regulate wild-type CD8(+)CD122(-) cells, indicating that the regulation by CD122(+) Tregs is Fas/FasL-dependent. CD122(+) Tregs taken from IL-10-deficient mice could regulate CD8(+)CD122(-) cells as equally as wild-type CD122(+) Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. MHC class I-missing T cells were not regulated by CD122(+) Tregs in vitro. CD122(+) Tregs also regulated CD4(+) cells in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest an essential role of Fas/FasL as a terminal effector of the CD122(+) Tregs that kill activated T cells to maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26869716

  12. TGF-β-Induced Regulatory T Cells Directly Suppress B Cell Responses through a Noncytotoxic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Anping; Liu, Ya; Chen, Weiqian; Wang, Julie; Xue, Youqiu; Huang, Feng; Rong, Liming; Lin, Jin; Liu, Dahai; Yan, Mei; Li, Quan-Zhen; Li, Bin; Song, Jianxun; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) playing a crucial role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of autoimmune diseases consist of thymus-derived naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells (nTreg) and those that can be induced ex vivo with TGF-β (iTreg). Although both Treg subsets share similar phenotypes and functional characteristics, they also have potential biologic differences on their biology. The role of iTreg in regulating B cells remains unclear so far. The suppression assays of Treg subsets on activation, proliferation, and Abs production of B cells were measured using a Treg and B cell coculture system in vitro. Transwell and Ab blockade experiments were performed to assess the roles of cell contact and soluble cytokines. Treg were adoptively transferred to lupus mice to assess in vivo effects on B cells. Like nTreg, iTreg subset also directly suppressed activation and proliferation of B cells. nTreg subset suppressed B cell responses through cytotoxic manner related to expression of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin, whereas the role of iTreg subset on B cells did not involve in cytotoxic action but depending on TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, iTreg subset can significantly suppress Ab produced by lupus B cells in vitro. Comparison experiments using autoantibodies microarrays demonstrated that adoptive transfer of iTreg had a superior effect than nTreg subset on suppressing lupus B cell responses in vivo. Our data implicate a role and advantage of iTreg subset in treating B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, boosting the translational potential of these findings. PMID:27001954

  13. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  14. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-10 on Treg cells, IL-10 and TGF-β in transplantation of rabbit skin

    PubMed Central

    LIU, KAI SHAN; FAN, XIAO QIN; ZHANG, LEI; WEN, QIONG NA; FENG, JI HONG; CHEN, FU CHAO; LUO, JUN MIN; SUN, WAN BANG

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the rejection and survival time of grafted skin, and the changes of Treg cells, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in peripheral blood following skin transplantation with recombinant human interleukin-10 (rhIL-10) or cyclosporin A (CsA), as well as the role of IL-10 in immunological rejection mechanisms. A total of 36 rabbits were divided into two groups. The skin of a donor rabbit was transplanted onto the back of one receptor rabbit. Receptors were randomly divided into six groups, including rhIL-10 low-dose (5 μg/kg/d), rhIL-10 high-dose (10 μg/kg/d), CsA low-dose (5 mg/kg/d), CsA high-dose (10 mg/kg/d), rhIL-10 (5 μg/kg/d) and CsA (5 mg/kg/d) and negative control normal saline (NS; 1 ml/d). All groups received intramuscular drug injection for ten days, beginning one day prior to skin transplantation surgery. Following transplantation, each rabbit’s peripheral blood was collected at different times. The changes of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, IL-10 and TGF-β were determined by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. When compared with the control group, the rejection and survival times of the experimental groups were longer following skin graft. Compared with the two CsA groups and the control group, the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells of rhIL-10 groups was significantly upregulated on the 4th and 7th days following surgery. However, TGF-β levels were not significantly different. Data suggested that the concentration of IL-10 was positively correlated with the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. In addition, IL-10 may delay the rejection time of rabbit skin transplantation and prolong the survival time. Thus, the role of IL-10 in inhibited allograft rejection may be associated with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and IL-10, and may be independent of TGF-β. PMID:24270972

  15. Special regulatory T-cell review: A rose by any other name: from suppressor T cells to Tregs, approbation to unbridled enthusiasm.

    PubMed

    Germain, Ronald N

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1970s a spate of papers by research groups around the world provided evidence for a negative regulatory role of thymus-derived lymphocytes (T cells). In 1971, Gershon and Kondo published a seminal paper in Immunology entitled 'Infectious Immunological Tolerance' indicating that such negative regulation could be a dominant effect that prevented otherwise 'helpful' T cells from mediating their function. Over the next decade, suppressor T cells, as these negative regulatory cells became known, were intensively investigated and a complex set of interacting cells and soluble factors were described as mediators in this process of immune regulation. In the early 1980s, however, biochemical and molecular experiments raised questions about the interpretation of the earlier studies, and within a few years, the term 'suppressor T cell' had all but disappeared from prominence and research on this phenomenon was held in poor esteem. While this was happening, new studies appeared suggesting that a subset of T cells played a critical role in preventing autoimmunity. These T cells, eventually dubbed 'regulatory T cells', have become a major focus of modern cellular immunological investigation, with a predominance that perhaps eclipses even that seen in the earlier period of suppressor T cell ascendancy. This brief review summarizes the rise and fall of 'suppressorology' and the possibility that Tregs are a modern rediscovery of suppressor T cells made convincing by more robust models for their study and better reagents for their identification and analysis. PMID:18154615

  16. Autophagy enforces functional integrity of regulatory T cells by coupling environmental cues and metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Long, Lingyun; Yang, Kai; Guy, Cliff; Shrestha, Sharad; Chen, Zuojia; Wu, Chuan; Vogel, Peter; Neale, Geoffrey; Green, Douglas R; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells respond to immune and inflammatory signals to mediate immunosuppression, but how functional integrity of Treg cells is maintained under activating environments remains elusive. Here we found that autophagy was active in Treg cells and supported their lineage stability and survival fitness. Treg cell-specific deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg7 or Atg5 led to loss of Treg cells, increased tumor resistance, and development of inflammatory disorders. Atg7-deficient Treg cells had increased apoptosis and readily lost Foxp3 expression, especially after activation. Mechanistically, autophagy deficiency upregulated mTORC1 and c-Myc function and glycolytic metabolism that contributed to defective Treg function. Therefore, autophagy couples environmental signals and metabolic homeostasis to protect lineage and survival integrity of Treg cells in activating contexts. PMID:26808230

  17. Amphiregulin activates regulatory T lymphocytes and suppresses CD8+ T cell-mediated anti-tumor response in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chun-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Ming; Zhu, Cheng-Liang; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wu, Long; Chen, Hao; Feng, Mao-Hui; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2015-10-13

    CD8+ T cell-mediated immune response plays an important role in inhibiting progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). For strategic immunotherapy, it is critical to understand why some of the tumor cells escape from this immune attack. In this study, we investigated how HCC cells alter endogenous anti-tumor immunity and their related signaling pathways. We found that HCC cells, both in vitro and in vivo, substantially secret and express amphiregulin (AR). AR in turn activates immunosuppressive function of intratumoral CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), a major inhibitor of CD8+ T cells. Using either lentiviral siRNA, or AR neutralizing antibody, we blocked the expression and function of AR to test the specificity of AR mediated activation of Tregs, Biochemical and cell biology studies were followed and confirmed that blocking of AR inhibited Tregs activation. In addition, we found that AR can trigger the activation of rapamycin complex 1(mTORC1) signaling in Tregs. The mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin treatment led to compromise Treg function and resulted in enhancing anti-tumor function of CD8+ T cells. Blocking AR/EGFR signaling in Tregs with Gefitinib also enhanced anti-tumor immunity and decreased tumor size in a mouse xenograft tumor model. Taken together, our study suggested a novel mechanism of functional interaction between HCC and Tregs for regulating anti-tumor function of CD8+ T cells. PMID:26451607

  18. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD.

    PubMed

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M; Lamborn, Ian T; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Kambayashi, Taku

    2012-06-01

    FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4(+) counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3(+) Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD.

  19. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8+FoxP3+ T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8+FoxP3+ T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4+ counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3+ Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD. PMID:22496155

  20. Three novel acetylation sites in the Foxp3 transcription factor regulate the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hye-Sook; Lim, Hyung W.; Wu, Jessica; Schnoelzer, Martina; Verdin, Eric; Ott, Melanie

    2012-01-01

    The Foxp3 transcription factor is the master regulator of regulatory T cell (Treg) differentiation and function. Its activity is regulated by reversible acetylation. Using mass spectrometry of immunoprecipitated proteins, we identify three novel acetylation sites in murine Foxp3 (K31, K262, and K267) and the corresponding sites in human FoxP3 proteins. Newly raised modification-specific antibodies against acetylated K31 and K267 confirm acetylation of these residues in murine Tregs. Mutant Foxp3 proteins carrying arginine substitutions at the three acetylation sites (3KR) accumulate in T cells to higher levels than wildtype Foxp3 and exert better suppressive activity in co-culture experiments. Acetylation and stability of wildtype, but not mutant, Foxp3 is enhanced when cells are treated with Ex-527, an inhibitor of the NAD+-dependent deacetylase SIRT1. Treatment with Ex-527 promotes Foxp3 expression during induced Treg differentiation, enhances Foxp3 levels in natural Tregs, and prevents loss of Foxp3 expression in adoptively transferred Tregs in mice. Our data identify SIRT1 as a negative regulator of Treg function via deacetylation of three novel target sites in Foxp3. SIRT1 inhibitors strengthen the suppressive activity of Tregs and may be useful in enhancing Treg-based therapeutic approaches to autoimmune diseases or graft rejections. PMID:22312127

  1. mTOR Inhibition Attenuates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis by Suppressing T Cell Proliferation and Balancing TH1/TH17/Treg Profile

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilin; Wang, Zhengting; Pei, Yaofei; Fan, Rong; Liu, Xiqiang; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Sichang; Zhang, Tianyu; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Maochen; Tao, Ran; Zhong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have anti-inflammatory effects in models of experimental colitis. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this research, we investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of AZD8055, a potent mTOR inhibitor, on T cell response in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, a commonly used animal model of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Severity of colitis is evaluated by changing of body weight, bloody stool, fecal consistency, histology evaluation and cytokine expression. We find that AZD8055 treatment attenuates DSS-induced body weight loss, colon length shortening and pathological damage of the colon. And AZD8055 treatment decreases colonic expression of genes encoding the pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-1β,IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-a and increases colonic expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10. We show that AZD8055 treatment decreases the percentages of CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells in spleen, lymph nodes and peripheral blood of mice. We also find that AZD8055 treatment significantly reduces the number of T helper 1(TH1) cells and TH17 cells and increases regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, we demonstrates that AZD8055 suppresses the proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the differentiation of TH1/TH17 cells and expands Treg cells in vitro. The results suggest that, in experimental colitis, AZD8055 exerts anti-inflammatory effect by regulating T helper cell polarization and proliferation. PMID:27128484

  2. mTOR Inhibition Attenuates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis by Suppressing T Cell Proliferation and Balancing TH1/TH17/Treg Profile.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shurong; Chen, Mengmeng; Wang, Yilin; Wang, Zhengting; Pei, Yaofei; Fan, Rong; Liu, Xiqiang; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Sichang; Zhang, Tianyu; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Maochen; Tao, Ran; Zhong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have anti-inflammatory effects in models of experimental colitis. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this research, we investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of AZD8055, a potent mTOR inhibitor, on T cell response in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, a commonly used animal model of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Severity of colitis is evaluated by changing of body weight, bloody stool, fecal consistency, histology evaluation and cytokine expression. We find that AZD8055 treatment attenuates DSS-induced body weight loss, colon length shortening and pathological damage of the colon. And AZD8055 treatment decreases colonic expression of genes encoding the pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-1β,IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-a and increases colonic expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10. We show that AZD8055 treatment decreases the percentages of CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells in spleen, lymph nodes and peripheral blood of mice. We also find that AZD8055 treatment significantly reduces the number of T helper 1(TH1) cells and TH17 cells and increases regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, we demonstrates that AZD8055 suppresses the proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the differentiation of TH1/TH17 cells and expands Treg cells in vitro. The results suggest that, in experimental colitis, AZD8055 exerts anti-inflammatory effect by regulating T helper cell polarization and proliferation. PMID:27128484

  3. miR-146b antagomir-treated human Tregs acquire increased GVHD inhibitory potency.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjie; Hippen, Keli L; Lemire, Amanda L; Gu, Jian; Wang, Weizhi; Ni, Xuhao; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Levine, Bruce L; Riley, James L; June, Carl H; Turka, Laurence A; Munn, David H; Garzon, Ramiro; Lu, Ling; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-09-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) thymic-derived regulatory T cells (tTregs) are indispensable for maintaining immune system equilibrium. Adoptive transfer of tTregs is an effective means of suppressing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in murine models and in early human clinical trials. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that mediates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, plays an essential role in modulating regulatory T cell survival and function. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs, which mediate RNA silencing and posttranscriptional gene repression. By performing comprehensive TaqMan Low Density Array miRNA assays, we identified 10 miRNAs differentially regulated in human tTreg compared with control T cells. One candidate, miR-146b, is preferentially and highly expressed in human naive tTregs compared with naive CD4 T cells. miRNA prediction software revealed that TRAF6 was the one of the top 10 scored mRNAs involved tTreg function with the highest probability as a potential miR-146b target. Antagomir-mediated knockdown of miRNA-146b, but not another miRNA-146 family member (miRNA-146a), enhanced TRAF6 expression. TRAF6, in turn, increases NF-κB activation, which is essential for tTreg function as well as Foxp3 protein and antiapoptotic gene expression, and downregulates proapoptotic gene expression. miR-146b knockdown increased the nuclear localization and expression of genes regulated by NF-κB, which was associated with enhanced tTreg survival, proliferation, and suppressive function measured in vitro and in vivo. TRAF6 inhibition had the opposite effects. We conclude that an miR-146b-TRAF6-NF-κB-FoxP3 signaling pathway restrains regulatory T cell survival, proliferation, and suppressor function. In vitro exposure of human tTregs to miR-146b antagomirs can be exploited to improve the clinical efficacy of human adoptive tTreg transfer in a GVHD setting. PMID:27485827

  4. Cerebral regulatory T cells restrain microglia/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses via IL-10.

    PubMed

    Xie, Luokun; Choudhury, Gourav Roy; Winters, Ali; Yang, Shao-Hua; Jin, Kunlin

    2015-01-01

    Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain the immune tolerance and prevent inflammatory responses in the periphery. However, the presence of Treg cells in the CNS under steady state has not been studied. Here, for the first time, we show a substantial TCRαβ (+) CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T-cell population (cerebral Treg cells) in the rat cerebrum, constituting more than 15% of the cerebral CD4(+) T-cell compartment. Cerebral Treg cells showed an activated/memory phenotype and expressed many Treg-cell signature genes at higher levels than peripheral Treg cells. Consistent with their activated/memory phenotype, cerebral Treg cells robustly restrained the LPS-induced inflammatory responses of brain microglia/macrophages, suggesting a role in maintaining the cerebral homeostasis by inhibiting the neuroinflammation. In addition, brain astrocytes were the helper cells that sustained Foxp3 expression in Treg cells through IL-2/STAT5 signaling, showing that the interaction between astrocytes and Treg cells contributes to the maintenance of Treg-cell identity in the brain. Taken together, our work represents the first study to characterize the phenotypic and functional features of Treg cells in the rat cerebrum. Our data have provided a novel insight for the contribution of Treg cells to the immunosurveillance and immunomodulation in the cerebrum under steady state.

  5. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  6. NY-ESO-1-specific circulating CD4+ T cells in ovarian cancer patients are prevalently T(H)1 type cells undetectable in the CD25+ FOXP3+ Treg compartment.

    PubMed

    Redjimi, Nassima; Duperrier-Amouriaux, Karine; Raimbaud, Isabelle; Luescher, Immanuel; Dojcinovic, Danijel; Classe, Jean-Marc; Berton-Rigaud, Dominique; Frenel, Jean-Sébastien; Bourbouloux, Emmanuelle; Valmori, Danila; Ayyoub, Maha

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous CD4(+) T-cell responses to the tumor-specific antigen NY-ESO-1 (ESO) are frequently found in patients with epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). If these responses are of effector or/and Treg type, however, has remained unclear. Here, we have used functional approaches together with recently developed MHC class II/ESO tetramers to assess the frequency, phenotype and function of ESO-specific cells in circulating lymphocytes from EOC patients. We found that circulating ESO-specific CD4(+) T cells in EOC patients with spontaneous immune responses to the antigen are prevalently T(H)1 type cells secreting IFN-γ but no IL-17 or IL-10 and are not suppressive. We detected tetramer(+) cells ex vivo, at an average frequency of 1:25,000 memory cells, that is, significantly lower than in patients immunized with an ESO vaccine. ESO tetramer(+) cells were mostly effector memory cells at advanced stages of differentiation and were not detected in circulating CD25(+)FOXP3(+)Treg. Thus, spontaneous CD4(+) T-cell responses to ESO in cancer patients are prevalently of T(H)1 type and not Treg. Their relatively low frequency and advanced differentiation stage, however, may limit their efficacy, that may be boosted by immunogenic ESO vaccines.

  7. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  8. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA(+)VacA(+) strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA(+)VacA(+) H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8(+) T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis.

  9. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA+VacA+ strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA+VacA+ H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8+ T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis. PMID:27648132

  10. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA+VacA+ strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA+VacA+ H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8+ T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8+ T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis.

  11. Preferential Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, supported by tumor-associated macrophages, is associated with worse prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pinying; Yue, Rongxi; Tang, Jiahong; Si, Haige; Shen, Liqun; Guo, Changsheng; Zhang, Lixin; Han, Huaizhong; Song, Haihan K; Zhao, Pengfei; Wang, Ning; Song, Zongchang; Guo, Chunliang

    2016-01-01

    While infection with H. pylori is a strong risk factor for gastric cancer, most H. pylori-colonized individuals, even those with the high-risk CagA(+)VacA(+) strain, remain asymptomatic over their lifetime. We hypothesized that the discordant outcomes were due to differences in the host immune responses. Previously, Tim-3-mediated immune modulation was observed in H. pylori-challenged mice. In this study, we compared Tim-3-related responses in CagA(+)VacA(+) H. pylori-infected asymptomatic individuals and H. pylori-associated gastric adenocarcinoma patients. We showed that compared to H. pylori-uninfected individuals, both H. pylori-infected asymptomatic and gastric cancer patients upregulated Tim-3 overall. However, the Tim-3 upregulation was enriched on Th1 cells in asymptomatic patients and on Treg and CD8(+) T cells in gastric cancer patients, with respective differences in T cell subset functions. In gastric cancer patients, high Tim-3 expression on Treg and CD8(+) T cells, but not on Th1 cells, was associated with worse prognosis. H. pylori-antigen presentation by tumor-associated macrophages upregulated Tim-3 expression more effectively than by blood monocyte-derived macrophages in vitro. The upregulation of Tim-3 in vitro depended on the concentration of H. pylori antigen but not on whether the cells were from asymptomatic or cancer patients. These data suggest that the discrepancy in Tim-3 upregulation in asymptomatic and cancer subjects is induced by cancer but not the other way around. Once gastric cancer is developed, Tim-3 expression is associated with worse prognosis. PMID:27648132

  12. Regulatory T Cell Responses to High-Dose Methylprednisolone in Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Chader, Driss; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Haroche, Julien; Fadlallah, Jehane; Claër, Laetitia; Musset, Lucile; Gorochov, Guy; Amoura, Zahir; Miyara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background/Purpose A slight increase in the proportion of circulating regulatory T (Treg) cells has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients taking oral prednisone. The effects of intravenous (IV) high dose methylprednisolone (MP) on Tregs have not yet been described, especially in active SLE. Methods We prospectively analyzed the proportion of circulating CD4+ Treg cell subsets defined as follows: (1) naïve Treg (nTreg) FoxP3lowCD45RA+ cells; (2) effector Treg (eTreg) FoxP3highCD45RA− cells; and (3) non-suppressive FoxP3lowCD45RA− cells (non-regulatory Foxp3low T cells). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active SLE were analyzed before the first infusion of IV high dose MP (day 0) and the following days (day 1, day 2, ±day 3 and ±day 8). The activity of SLE was assessed by the SLEDAI score. Results Seventeen patients were included. Following MP infusions, the median (range) percentage of eTregs significantly increased from 1.62% (0.53–8.43) at day 0 to 2.80% (0.83–14.60) at day 1 (p = 0.003 versus day 0), 4.64% (0.50–12.40) at day 2 (p = 0.06 versus day 1) and 7.50% (1.02–20.70) at day 3 (p = 0.008 versus day 2), and declined to baseline values at day 8. Expanding eTreg cells were actively proliferating, as they expressed Ki-67. The frequency of non-regulatory FoxP3low T cells decreased from 6.39% (3.20–17.70) at day 0 to 4.74% (1.03–9.72) at day 2 (p = 0.005); nTreg frequency did not change. All patients clinically improved immediately after MP pulses. The absence of flare after one year of follow up was associated with a higher frequency of eTregs at day 2. Conclusion IV high dose MP induces a rapid, dramatic and transient increase in circulating regulatory T cells. This increase may participate in the preventive effect of MP on subsequent flares in SLE. PMID:26629828

  13. KLF2 is a rate-limiting transcription factor that can be targeted to enhance regulatory T-cell production

    PubMed Central

    Pabbisetty, Sudheer K.; Rabacal, Whitney; Maseda, Damian; Cendron, Delphine; Collins, Patrick L.; Hoek, Kristen L.; Parekh, Vrajesh V.; Aune, Thomas M.; Sebzda, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a specialized subset of CD4+ T cells that maintain self-tolerance by functionally suppressing autoreactive lymphocytes. The Treg compartment is composed of thymus-derived Tregs (tTregs) and peripheral Tregs (pTregs) that are generated in secondary lymphoid organs after exposure to antigen and specific cytokines, such as TGF-β. With regard to this latter lineage, pTregs [and their ex vivo generated counterparts, induced Tregs (iTregs)] offer particular therapeutic potential because these cells can be raised against specific antigens to limit autoimmunity. We now report that transcription factor Krüppel-like factor 2 (KLF2) is necessary for the generation of iTregs but not tTregs. Moreover, drugs that limit KLF2 proteolysis during T-cell activation enhance iTreg development. To the authors’ knowledge, this study identifies the first transcription factor to distinguish between i/pTreg and tTreg ontogeny and demonstrates that KLF2 is a therapeutic target for the production of regulatory T cells. PMID:24979767

  14. CD8+ Tregs in Lupus, Autoimmunity, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Dinesh, Ravi K; Skaggs, Brian J; Cava, Antonio La; Hahn, Bevra H.; Singh, Ram Pyare

    2010-01-01

    While CD4+CD25high regulatory T cells (Tregs) have garnered much attention for their role in the maintenance of immune homeostasis, recent findings have shown that subsets of CD8+ T cells (CD8+ Tregs) display immunoregulatory functions as well. Both CD4+ Tregs and CD8+ Tregs appear impaired in number and/or function in several autoimmune diseases and in experimental animal models of autoimmunity, suggesting the possibility of immunotherapeutic targeting of these cells for improved management of autoimmune conditions. Our group has developed a strategy to induce CD8+ Tregs in autoimmune mice through the use of a tolerogenic self-peptide, and new information has been gained on the phenotype, function and role of induced CD8+ Tregs in autoimmunity. Here we present an overview of the role and mechanisms of action of CD8+ Tregs in autoimmunity, with a special focus on lupus. We also discuss the potential role of CD8+ Tregs in other diseases, including chronic infection and cancer. PMID:20385256

  15. Schistosoma mansoni Larvae Do Not Expand or Activate Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells during Their Migratory Phase

    PubMed Central

    Redpath, Stephen A.; van der Werf, Nienke; MacDonald, Andrew S.; Maizels, Rick M.

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play a key role in suppression of immune responses during parasitic helminth infection, both by controlling damaging immunopathology and by inhibiting protective immunity. During the patent phase of Schistosoma mansoni infection, Foxp3+ Treg cells are activated and suppress egg-elicited Th2 responses, but little is known of their induction and role during the early prepatent larval stage of infection. We quantified Foxp3+ Treg cell responses during the first 3 weeks of murine S. mansoni infection in C57BL/6 mice, a time when larval parasites migrate from the skin and transit the lungs en route to the hepatic and mesenteric vasculature. In contrast to other helminth infections, S. mansoni did not elicit a Foxp3+ Treg cell response during this early phase of infection. We found that the numbers and proportions of Foxp3+ Treg cells remained unchanged in the lungs, draining lymph nodes, and spleens of infected mice. There was no increase in the activation status of Foxp3+ Treg cells upon infection as assessed by their expression of CD25, Foxp3, and Helios. Furthermore, infection failed to induce Foxp3+ Treg cells to produce the suppressive cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10). Instead, only CD4+ Foxp3− IL-4+ Th2 cells showed increased IL-10 production upon infection. These data indicate that Foxp3+ Treg cells do not play a prominent role in regulating immunity to S. mansoni larvae and that the character of the initial immune response invoked by S. mansoni parasites contrasts with the responses to other parasitic helminth infections that promote rapid Foxp3+ Treg cell responses. PMID:26195548

  16. The impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the small bowel mucosa of children with celiac disease and atopic dermatitis in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Ress, Krista; Luts, Katrin; Uibo, Oivi; Uibo, Raivo

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we aimed to evaluate the impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of children with celiac disease (CD) and atopic dermatitis (AD) in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGD). Seventy-five children (37 male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.8 years), who randomly underwent small bowel biopsy, were studied. The CD was diagnosed in 14 children, including five persons with concomitant AD (all positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies and with small bowel atrophy). Normal small bowel mucosa was found in eight patients with AD and in 53 patients with FGD. The sera of all patients were tested for total and specific IgE antibodies to food allergen panels. Staining for CD11c+, langerin (CD207+) DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of bioptates using immunohistochemistry. The density of CD11c+ DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was higher in the CD patients compared to the AD and FGD patients (p = 0.02; p = 0.001). In AD, significantly higher density of CD11c+ DCs was detected in patients positive for specific IgE to food allergen panels (p = 0.02). The FGD patients with elevated total IgE had increased density of langerin (CD207)+ DCs compared to the patients with normal total IgE levels (p = 0.01). The increased density of FOXP3+ Treg cells, CD4+, cells and CD11c+ DCs was associated with CD but not with AD. The elevated level of total IgE or specific IgE to food allergens was associated with more pronounced expression of DCs, indicating a possible link between the presence of these cells in small bowel mucosa with elevated level of serum IgE. PMID:27200487

  17. Decidual vascular endothelial cells promote maternal-fetal immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells through canonical Notch1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yanyi; Song, Jieping; Wang, Weipeng; Liu, Nian

    2016-05-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semiallogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success. However, the mechanisms by which the fetus avoids rejection despite expression of paternal alloantigens remain incompletely understood. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are pivotal for maintaining immune homeostasis, preventing autoimmune disease and fetus rejection. In this study, we found that maternal decidual vascular endothelial cells (DVECs) sustained Foxp3 expression in resting Treg cells in vitro. Moreover, under in vitro Treg cell induction condition with agonistic antibodies and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, DVECs promoted Treg cell differentiation from non-Treg conventional T cells. Consistent with the promotion of Treg cell maintenance and differentiation, Treg cell-associated gene expression such as TGF-β, Epstein-Barr-induced gene-3, CD39 and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor was also increased in the presence of DVECs. Further study revealed that DVECs expressed Notch ligands such as Jagged-1, Delta-like protein 1 (DLL-1) and DLL-4, while Treg cells expressed Notch1 on their surface. The effects of DVECs on Treg cells was inhibited by siRNA-induced knockdown of expression of Jagged-1 and DLL-1 in DVECs. Downregulation of Notch1 in Treg cells using lentiviral shRNA transduction decreased Foxp3 expression in Treg cells. Adoptive transfer of Notch1-deficient Treg cells increased abortion rate in a murine semiallogeneic pregnancy model. Taken together, our study suggests that maternal DVECs are able to maintain decidual Treg cell identity and promote Treg cell differentiation through activation of Notch1 signal pathway in Treg cells and subsequently inhibit the immune response against semiallogeneic fetuses and preventing spontaneous abortion. PMID:26714886

  18. Classical dendritic cells are required for dietary antigen-mediated induction of peripheral T(reg) cells and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Esterházy, Daria; Loschko, Jakob; London, Mariya; Jove, Veronica; Oliveira, Thiago Y; Mucida, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Oral tolerance prevents pathological inflammatory responses to innocuous foreign antigens by peripheral regulatory T cells (pT(reg) cells). However, whether a particular subset of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is required during dietary antigen exposure for the 'instruction' of naive CD4(+) T cells to differentiate into pT(reg) cells has not been defined. Using myeloid lineage-specific APC depletion in mice, we found that monocyte-derived APCs were dispensable, while classical dendritic cells (cDCs) were critical, for pT(reg) cell induction and oral tolerance. CD11b(-) cDCs from the gut-draining lymph nodes efficiently induced pT(reg) cells and, conversely, loss of transcription factor IRF8-dependent CD11b(-) cDCs impaired their polarization, although oral tolerance remained intact. These data reveal the hierarchy of cDC subsets in the induction of pT(reg) cells and their redundancy during the development of oral tolerance.

  19. Inducing and Administering Tregs to Treat Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perdigoto, Ana Luisa; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Herold, Kevan C.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control unwanted immune responses, including those that mediate tolerance to self as well as to foreign antigens. Their mechanisms of action include direct and indirect effects on effector T cells and important functions in tissue repair and homeostasis. Tregs express a number of cell surface markers and transcriptional factors that have been instrumental in defining their origins and potentially their function. A number of immune therapies, such as rapamycin, IL-2, and anti-T cell antibodies, are able to induce Tregs and are being tested for their efficacy in diverse clinical settings with exciting preliminary results. However, a balance exists with the use of some, such as IL-2, that may have effects on unwanted populations as well as promoting expansion and survival of Tregs requiring careful selection of dose for clinical use. The use of cell surface markers has enabled investigators to isolate and expand ex vivo Tregs more than 500-fold routinely. Clinical trials have begun, administering these expanded Tregs to patients as a means of suppressing autoimmune and alloimmune responses and potentially inducing immune tolerance. Studies in the future are likely to build on these initial technical achievements and use combinations of agents to improve the survival and functional capacity of Tregs. PMID:26834735

  20. Protein phosphatase 2A is requisite for the function of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Apostolidis, Sokratis A.; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Noé; Suárez-Fueyo, Abel; Dioufa, Nikolina; Ozcan, Esra; Crispín, José C.; Tsokos, Maria G.; Tsokos, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Immune homeostasis depends on the proper function of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Compromised Treg cell suppressive activity leads to autoimmune disease, graft rejection and promotes anti-tumor immunity. Here we report the previously unrecognized requirement of the serine/threonine phosphatase Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) for the function of Treg cells. Treg cells exhibited high PP2A activity and Treg cell-specific ablation of the PP2A complex resulted in a severe, multi-organ, lymphoproliferative autoimmune disorder. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed that PP2A associates with components of the mTOR pathway and suppresses mTORC1 activity. In the absence of PP2A, Treg cells altered their metabolic and cytokine profile and were unable to suppress effector immune responses. Therefore, PP2A is requisite for the function of Treg cells and the prevention of autoimmunity. PMID:26974206

  1. Loss of Dab2 Expression in Breast Cancer Cells Impairs Their Ability to Deplete TGF-β and Induce Tregs Development via TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shuguang; Zhu, Jingzhi; Wu, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    Dab2 is a multifunctional adapter protein which is frequently under-expressed in a variety of cancers. It is implicated in many critical functions, including several signaling pathways, cell arrangement, differentiation of stem cells, and receptor endocytosis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a secreted multifunctional protein that controls several developmental processes and pathogenesis of many diseases. It has been documented that Dab2 played an important role in TGF-β receptors endocytosis. Here, we present evidence that re-expression of Dab2 in SK-BR-3 cell partially restored its ability to deplete TGF-β in surrounding medium by normalizing the trafficking of TGF-β receptors. We also demonstrate that the difference in TGF-β depletions produced by Dab2 expression was sufficient to impact on the conversion of naive CD4+ T cells to regulatory T cells (Tregs), and thus inhibited the proliferation of T cells. This work revealed a critical result that breast cancer cell was deficient in Dab2 expression and related receptor endocytosis-mediated TGF-β depletion, which may contribute to the accumulation of TGF-β in tumor microenvironment and the induction of immune tolerance. PMID:24638085

  2. H7N9 T-cell epitopes that mimic human sequences are less immunogenic and may induce Treg-mediated tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Moise, Leonard; Tassone, Ryan; Gutierrez, Andres H; Terry, Frances E; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Avian-origin H7N9 influenza is a novel influenza A virus (IAV) that emerged in humans in China in 2013. Using immunoinformatics tools, we identified several H7N9 T cell epitopes with T cell receptor (TCR)-facing residues identical to those of multiple epitopes from human proteins. We hypothesized that host tolerance to these peptides may impair T helper response and contribute to the low titer, weak hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody responses and diminished seroconversion rates that have been observed in human H7N9 infections and vaccine trials. We found that the magnitude of human T effector responses to individual H7N9 peptides was inversely correlated with the peptide's resemblance to self. Furthermore, a promiscuous T cell epitope from the hemagglutinin (HA) protein suppressed responses to other H7N9 peptides when co-administered in vitro. Along with other highly ‘human-like’ peptides from H7N9, this peptide was also shown to expand FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Thus, H7N9 may be camouflaged from effective human immune response by T cell epitope sequences that avert or regulate effector T cell responses through host tolerance. PMID:26090577

  3. Selective expression of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and IL-1 receptor type I/II (CD121a/CD121b) on activated human FOXP3+ regulatory T cells allows for their purification from expansion cultures

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, John; Hardwick, Donna; Bebris, Lolita; Illei, Gabor G.

    2009-01-01

    Although adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells (Foxp3+ Tregs) has proven to be efficacious in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases and graft-versus-host disease in rodents, a major obstacle for the use of Treg immunotherapy in humans is the difficulty of obtaining a highly purified preparation after ex vivo expansion. We have identified latency-associated peptide (LAP) and IL-1 receptor type I and II (CD121a/CD121b) as unique cell-surface markers that distinguish activated Tregs from activated FOXP3− and FOXP3+ non-Tregs. We show that it is feasible to sort expanded FOXP3+ Tregs from non-Tregs with the use of techniques for magnetic bead cell separation based on expression of these 3 markers. After separation, the final product contains greater than 90% fully functional FOXP3+ Tregs. This novel protocol should facilitate the purification of Tregs for both cell-based therapies as well as detailed studies of human Treg function in health and disease. PMID:19299332

  4. Selective Sparing of Human Tregs by Pharmacologic Inhibitors of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and MEK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zwang, N. A.; Zhang, R.; Germana, S.; Fan, M. Y.; Hastings, W. D.; Cao, A.; Turka, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK) signaling are central to the survival and proliferation of many cell types. Multiple lines of investigation in murine models have shown that control of the PI3K pathway is particularly important for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. PI3K and MEK inhibitors are being introduced into the clinic, and we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K, and possibly MEK, in mixed cultures of human mononuclear cells would preferentially affect CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes compared with Tregs. We tested this hypothesis using four readouts: proliferation, activation, functional suppression, and signaling. Results showed that Tregs were less susceptible to inhibition by both δ and α isoform–specific PI3K inhibitors and by an MEK inhibitor compared with their conventional CD4+ and CD8+ counterparts. These studies suggest less functional reliance on PI3K and MEK signaling in Tregs compared with conventional CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Therefore, the PI3K and MEK pathways are attractive pharmacologic targets for transplantation and treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:27017850

  5. Selective Sparing of Human Tregs by Pharmacologic Inhibitors of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and MEK Pathways.

    PubMed

    Zwang, N A; Zhang, R; Germana, S; Fan, M Y; Hastings, W D; Cao, A; Turka, L A

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK) signaling are central to the survival and proliferation of many cell types. Multiple lines of investigation in murine models have shown that control of the PI3K pathway is particularly important for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. PI3K and MEK inhibitors are being introduced into the clinic, and we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K, and possibly MEK, in mixed cultures of human mononuclear cells would preferentially affect CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes compared with Tregs. We tested this hypothesis using four readouts: proliferation, activation, functional suppression, and signaling. Results showed that Tregs were less susceptible to inhibition by both δ and α isoform-specific PI3K inhibitors and by an MEK inhibitor compared with their conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) counterparts. These studies suggest less functional reliance on PI3K and MEK signaling in Tregs compared with conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes. Therefore, the PI3K and MEK pathways are attractive pharmacologic targets for transplantation and treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:27017850

  6. Decreased Circulating T Regulatory Cells in Egyptian Patients with Nonsegmental Vitiligo: Correlation with Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Attia, Mohamed Attia Saad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary skin disorder resulting from autoimmune destruction of melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), specifically CD4+CD25+ and Forkhead box P3+ (FoxP3+) Tregs, acquired notable attention because of their role in a variety of autoimmune pathologies. Dysregulation of Tregs may be one of the factors that can break tolerance to melanocyte self-antigens and contribute to vitiligo pathogenesis. Methods. In order to sustain the role of Tregs in pathogenesis and disease activity of vitiligo, surface markers for CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ peripheral Tregs were evaluated by flow cytometry in 80 Egyptian patients with nonsegmental vitiligo in addition to 60 healthy control subjects and correlated with clinical findings. Results. Vitiligo patients had significantly decreased numbers of both peripheral CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ T cells compared to control subjects (11.49%  ± 8.58% of CD4+ T cells versus 21.20%  ± 3.08%, and 1.09%  ± 0.96% versus 1.44%  ± 0.24%, resp., P < 0.05 for both). Peripheral numbers of CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ Tregs correlated negatively with VIDA score. Conclusion. Treg depletion with impaired immune downregulatory function might play a key role in the autoimmune conditions beyond nonsegmental vitiligo particularly in active cases. Effective Treg cell-based immunotherapies might be a future hope for patients with progressive vitiligo. PMID:26788051

  7. Decreased Circulating T Regulatory Cells in Egyptian Patients with Nonsegmental Vitiligo: Correlation with Disease Activity.

    PubMed

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Attia, Mohamed Attia Saad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary skin disorder resulting from autoimmune destruction of melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), specifically CD4(+)CD25(+) and Forkhead box P3(+) (FoxP3(+)) Tregs, acquired notable attention because of their role in a variety of autoimmune pathologies. Dysregulation of Tregs may be one of the factors that can break tolerance to melanocyte self-antigens and contribute to vitiligo pathogenesis. Methods. In order to sustain the role of Tregs in pathogenesis and disease activity of vitiligo, surface markers for CD4(+)CD25(+) and FoxP3(+) peripheral Tregs were evaluated by flow cytometry in 80 Egyptian patients with nonsegmental vitiligo in addition to 60 healthy control subjects and correlated with clinical findings. Results. Vitiligo patients had significantly decreased numbers of both peripheral CD4(+)CD25(+) and FoxP3(+) T cells compared to control subjects (11.49%  ± 8.58% of CD4(+) T cells versus 21.20%  ± 3.08%, and 1.09%  ± 0.96% versus 1.44%  ± 0.24%, resp., P < 0.05 for both). Peripheral numbers of CD4(+)CD25(+) and FoxP3(+) Tregs correlated negatively with VIDA score. Conclusion. Treg depletion with impaired immune downregulatory function might play a key role in the autoimmune conditions beyond nonsegmental vitiligo particularly in active cases. Effective Treg cell-based immunotherapies might be a future hope for patients with progressive vitiligo. PMID:26788051

  8. Subcutaneous vaccination with Porphyromonas gingivalis ameliorates periodontitis by modulating Th17/Treg imbalance in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linyuan; Guan, Ning; Jin, Ying; Lin, Xiaoping; Gao, Hong

    2015-03-01

    To date, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) vaccination has been studied only in animals, and no effective prophylactic human periodontal vaccine has been developed, with the reason for the failure of prophylactic human periodontal vaccines unknown. T helper 17 cell (Th17)/regulatory T (Treg) cell responses play an important role in the development of periodontitis, and a Th17/Treg imbalance causes the pathogenesis of periodontitis. However, whether vaccination with P. gingivalis can prevent periodontitis through modulation of the Th17/Treg imbalance remains unknown. In this study, mice were subcutaneously vaccinated with formalin-killed P. gingivalis and then orally challenged with P. gingivalis. The vaccination protected the mice from alveolar bone resorption and inflammation. These protective effects might be ascribed to downregulation of Th17 cells and interleukin (IL)-17A production, upregulation of Treg and receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL)(+)CD4(+)T cells, and IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β1 production, and inhibition of lymphocyte proliferation. Our findings may provide a direction for the development of a vaccine or therapy against periodontitis by alteration of the Th17/Treg imbalance.

  9. Novel CD8+ Treg suppress EAE by TGF-β- and IFN-γ-dependent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei-Ling; Yan, Bo-Shiun; Kozoriz, Deneen; Weiner, Howard L.

    2010-01-01

    Although CD8+ Treg-mediated suppression has been described, CD8+ Treg remain poorly characterized. Here we identify a novel subset of CD8+ Treg that express latency-associated peptide (LAP) on their cell surface (CD8+LAP+ cells) and exhibit regulatory activity in vitro and in vivo. Only a small fraction of CD8+LAP+ cells express Foxp3 or CD25, although the expression levels of Foxp3 for these cells are higher than their LAP− counterparts. In addition to TGF-β, CD8+LAP+ cells produce IFN-γ, and these cells suppress EAE that is dependent on both TGF-β and IFN-γ. In an adoptive co-transfer model, CD8+LAP+ cells suppress myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)-specific immune responses by inducing or expanding Foxp3+ cells and by inhibiting proliferation and IFN-γ production in vivo. Furthermore, in vivo neutralization of IFN-γ and studies with IFN-γ-deficient mice demonstrate an important role for IFN-γ production in the function of CD8+LAP+ cells. Our findings identify the underlying mechanisms that account for the immunoregulatory activity of CD8+ T cells and suggest that induction or amplification of CD8+LAP+ cells may be a therapeutic strategy to help control autoimmune processes. PMID:19768696

  10. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  11. Metabolic control of the Treg/Th17 axis

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew; Pan, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Summary The interplay of the immune system with other aspects of physiology is continually being revealed and in some cases studied in considerable mechanistic detail. A prime example is the influence of metabolic cues on immune responses. It is well appreciated that upon activation, T cells take on a metabolic profile profoundly distinct from that of their quiescent and anergic counterparts; however, a number of recent breakthroughs have greatly expanded our knowledge of how aspects of cellular metabolism can shape a T-cell response. Particularly important are findings that certain environmental cues can tilt the delicate balance between inflammation and immune tolerance by skewing T-cell fate decisions toward either the T-helper 17 (Th17) or T-regulatory (Treg) cell lineage. Recognizing the unappreciated immune modifying potential of metabolic factors and particularly those involved in the generation of these functionally opposing T-cell subsets will likely add new and potent therapies to our repertoire for treating immune mediated pathologies. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings linking certain metabolic pathways, enzymes, and byproducts to shifts in the balance between Th17 and Treg cell populations. These advances highlight numerous opportunities for immune modulation. PMID:23405895

  12. Reduced Frequencies and Activation of Regulatory T Cells After the Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Individuals with the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Are Associated with a Reduction in Viral Loads Rather Than a Direct Effect of the Drug on Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Joedicke, Jara J; Dirks, Miriam; Esser, Stefan; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and they frequently express the chemokine receptor CCR5. We therefore investigated whether antiretroviral treatment with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc affected Tregs in chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1-infected patients with high viral loads had elevated frequencies of activated Tregs in the peripheral blood compared with healthy controls. In patients successfully treated with antiretroviral drugs (undetectable viral loads), the frequency and the activation status of Tregs were comparable with healthy controls without any specific effect related to the treatment with Maraviroc. These results indicate that the control of viral replication in general rather than a direct binding of Maraviroc to CCR5-positive Tregs influences Treg responses in successfully treated chronically HIV-1-infected individuals.

  13. Rapid Rebound of the Treg Compartment in DEREG Mice Limits the Impact of Treg Depletion on Mycobacterial Burden, but Prevents Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Filipa; Behrends, Jochen; Swallow, Maxine; Kruse, Friederike; Krull, Freyja; Ghorbani, Peyman; Mayer, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis (Tb) represents one of the major medical challenges of this century. Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only vaccine available at present, is mostly effective at preventing disseminated Tb in children, but shows variable protection against pulmonary Tb, the most common form in adults. The reasons for this poor efficacy are not completely understood, but there is evidence that T regulatory cells (Tregs) might be involved. Similarly, Tregs have been associated with the immunosuppression observed in patients infected with Tb and are therefore believed to play a role in pathogen persistence. Thus, Treg depletion has been postulated as a novel strategy to potentiate M. bovis BCG vaccination on one side, while on the other, employed as a therapeutic approach during chronic Tb infection. Yet since Tregs are critically involved in controlling autoimmune inflammation, elimination of Tregs may therefore also incur the danger of an excessive inflammatory immune response. Thus, understanding the dynamics and function of Tregs during mycobacterial infection is crucial to evaluate the potential of Treg depletion as a medical option. To address this, we depleted Tregs after infection with M. bovis BCG or Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) using DEREG mice, which express the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the FoxP3 locus, thereby allowing the selective depletion of FoxP3+ Tregs. Our results show that after depletion, the Treg niche is rapidly refilled by a population of DT-insensitive Tregs (diTregs) and bacterial load remains unchanged. On the contrary, impaired rebound of Tregs in DEREG × FoxP3GFP mice improves pathogen burden, but is accompanied by detrimental autoimmune inflammation. Therefore, our study provides the proof-of-principle that, although a high degree of Treg depletion may contribute to the control of mycobacterial infection, it carries the risk of autoimmunity

  14. Serine protease inhibitor 6 plays a critical role in protecting murine granzyme B-producing regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Jamil; Skartsis, Nikolaos; Mounayar, Marwan; Magee, Ciara N; Batal, Ibrahim; Ting, Christopher; Moore, Robert; Riella, Leonardo V; Ohori, Shunsuke; Abdoli, Rozita; Smith, Brian; Fiorina, Paolo; Heathcote, Dean; Bakhos, Tannous; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G; Abdi, Reza

    2013-09-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and hold great promise as cell therapy for a variety of immune-mediated diseases. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate Treg maintenance and homeostasis have yet to be fully explored. Although Tregs express granzyme-B (GrB) to suppress effector T cells via direct killing, the mechanisms by which they protect themselves from GrB-mediated self-inflicted damage are unknown. To our knowledge, we show for the first time that both induced Tregs and natural Tregs (nTregs) increase their intracellular expression of GrB and its endogenous inhibitor, serine protease inhibitor 6 (Spi6) upon activation. Subcellular fractionation and measurement of GrB activity in the cytoplasm of Tregs show that activated Spi6(-/-) Tregs had significantly higher cytoplasmic GrB activity. We observed an increase in GrB-mediated apoptosis in Spi6(-/-) nTregs and impaired suppression of alloreactive T cells in vitro. Spi6(-/-) Tregs were rescued from apoptosis by the addition of a GrB inhibitor (Z-AAD-CMK) in vitro. Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments showed that Spi6(-/-) nTregs were less effective than wild type nTregs in suppressing graft-versus-host disease because of their impaired survival, as shown in our in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Finally, Spi6-deficient recipients rejected MHC class II-mismatch heart allografts at a much faster rate and showed a higher rate of apoptosis among Tregs, as compared with wild type recipients. To our knowledge, our data demonstrate, for the first time, a novel role for Spi6 in Treg homeostasis by protecting activated Tregs from GrB-mediated injury. These data could have significant clinical implications for Treg-based therapy in immune-mediated diseases.

  15. Role of Metabolism in the Immunobiology of Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Galgani, Mario; De Rosa, Veronica; La Cava, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-10-01

    Intracellular metabolism is central to cell activity and function. CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) that express the transcription factor FOXP3 play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune tolerance to self. Recent studies showed that the metabolism and function of Tregs are influenced significantly by local environmental conditions and the availability of certain metabolites. It also was reported that defined metabolic programs associate with Treg differentiation, expression of FOXP3, and phenotype stabilization. This article reviews how metabolism modulates FOXP3 expression and Treg function, what environmental factors are involved, and how metabolic manipulation could alter Treg frequency and function in physiopathologic conditions. PMID:27638939

  16. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  17. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-04-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  18. Microbiota-Specific CD4CD8αα Tregs: Role in Intestinal Immune Homeostasis and Implications for IBD.

    PubMed

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Alameddine, Joudy; Altare, Frédéric; Jotereau, Francine

    2015-01-01

    In studies in murine models, active suppression by IL-10-secreting Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Tregs) has emerged as an essential mechanism in colon homeostasis. However, the role of the equivalent subset in humans remains unclear, leading to suggestions that other subsets and/or mechanisms may substitute for Foxp3 Tregs in the maintenance of colon homeostasis. We recently described a new subset of CD4CD8αα T cells reactive to the gut bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and endowed with regulatory/suppressive functions. This subset is abundant in the healthy colonic mucosa, but less common in that of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We discuss here the physiological significance and potential role of these Tregs in preventing inflammation of the gut mucosa and the potential applications of these discoveries for IBD management.

  19. Unifying roles for regulatory T cells and inflammation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Rao, Varada P.; Olipitz, Werner; Taylor, Christie L.; Jackson, Erin A.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Lee, Chung-Wei; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Fox, James G.; Ge, Zhongming; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Activities of CD4+ regulatory (TREG) cells restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. Roles for TREG cells in inflammation-associated cancers, however, are paradoxical. It is widely believed that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer responses. However, we demonstrate here that TREG cells also function to reduce cancer risk throughout the body by efficiently downregulating inflammation arising from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Building on a “hygiene hypothesis” model in which GI infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce immune-mediated diseases, here we show that gut bacteria-triggered TREG may function to inhibit cancer even in extraintestinal sites. Ability of bacteria-stimulated TREG to suppress cancer depends on interleukin (IL)-10, which serves to maintain immune homeostasis within bowel and support a protective antiinflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under proinflammatory conditions, TREG may fail to provide antiinflammatory protection and instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process; a cancer state that is reversible by downregulation of inflammation. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10 and TREG-mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated IL-6 and IL-17 and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data unify seemingly divergent disease processes such as autoimmunity and cancer and help explain the paradox of TREG and inflammation in cancer. Enhancing protective TREG functions may promote healthful longevity and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:19795459

  20. Anti-TNF-α therapy improves Treg and suppresses Teff in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuochun; Yang, Bin; Shi, Yunying; Cai, Bei; Li, Yi; Feng, Weihua; Fu, Yang; Luo, Limei; Wang, Lanlan

    2012-09-01

    Anti-TNF-α therapies have been applied in RA treatment, but the regulatory effect of the drug on immune system is not clear. In this study, we included 33 active RA patients and divided them into two groups. One group received anti-TNF-α mAb+methotrexate for 24 weeks, the other group got placebo+methotrexate for the first 12 weeks and anti-TNF-α mAb+methotrexate for another 12 weeks. Circulatory regulatory T cell (Treg) and effector T cell (Teff) frequency was analyzed pre-therapy and week 12 and week 24 for both group patients by flowcytometry. Our results indicated significantly elevated Treg and decreased Teff at week 24 compared with pre-therapy and week 12 for both group patients, and a little higher Treg and lower Teff frequency in anti-TNF-α therapy group than in placebo therapy patients. Our results demonstrated anti-TNF-α therapy has regulatory effect on immune system of RA patients by promoting Treg proportion increase and suppressing Teff.

  1. PD-1 is not required for natural or peripherally induced regulatory T cells: Severe autoimmunity despite normal production of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Ellestad, Kristofor K; Thangavelu, Govindarajan; Ewen, Catherine L; Boon, Louis; Anderson, Colin C

    2014-12-01

    The expression of the coinhibitor PD-1 on T cells is important for the establishment of immune homeostasis. We previously found that PD-1 is particularly critical for the control of self-tolerance during lymphopenia-induced proliferation of recent thymic emigrants (RTEs). Previous studies suggested that PD-1 modulates the generation of Treg cells, particularly peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells, and controls Th17 cells. However, these conclusions were derived indirectly from studies on the ligand PD-L1, and not PD-1 itself. Herein we directly tested whether T-cell PD-1 expression was needed for Treg cell generation and examined if a paucity of Treg cells or enhanced Th17 cells could explain the severe lymphopenia-potentiated autoimmunity caused by PD-1 KO RTEs. Employing the murine FoxP3(EGFP) reporter system to simultaneously monitor conversion of WT and PD-1 KO T cells to pTreg cells in the same animal, we found that PD-1 deficiency did not inhibit pTreg cell generation or lead to Th17-cell-mediated autoimmunity. Surprisingly, pTreg cell numbers were increased in PD-1 KO versus WT cell populations. Furthermore, we noted an increased conversion to pTreg cells by RTEs. Our data suggest that the primary role for PD-1 is to restrain T-cell activation/proliferation to self-Ags rather than promote generation of Treg cells.

  2. The interplay between regulatory T cells and metabolism in immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Hu; Chi, Hongbo

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are crucial for peripheral tolerance and are intimately involved in immunological diseases and cancer. Recent studies have highlighted a key role for Tregs in metabolic disorders, for instance as they accumulate in the adipose tissue to protect against obesity-related inflammation and insulin resistance. Conversely, the generation and immunosuppressive functions of Tregs are influenced by both systemic and cellular metabolism. The nutritional status as well as metabolic cues such as those provided by leptin impinge upon the proliferation of Tregs. In addition, the mTOR-dependent lipid metabolism has a crucial role in programming the activity of Tregs under steady-state conditions as well as upon activation. This review discusses the intricate interaction between Tregs and metabolism, focusing on the roles of Tregs in systemic and local metabolic circuitries as well as on the regulation of Treg abundance and function by metabolic signals. PMID:24404429

  3. Murine regulatory T cells contain hyper-proliferative and death-prone subsets with differential ICOS expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Shen, Shudan; Gorentla, Balachandra; Gao, Jimin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are crucial for self-tolerance. It has been an enigma that Treg exhibit an anergic phenotype reflected by hypo-proliferation in vitro following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation but undergo vigorous proliferation in vivo. We report here that, different from conventional T cells (Tcon), murine Treg are prone to death but hyper-proliferative in vitro and in vivo. During in vitro culture, most Treg die with or without TCR stimulation, correlated with constitutive activation of the intrinsic death pathway. However, a small portion of the Treg population is more sensitive to TCR stimulation, particularly weak stimulation, proliferates more vigorously than CD4+ Tcon, and are resistant to activation induced cell death. Treg proliferation is enhanced by IL-2 but less dependent on CD28-mediated costimulation than Tcon. We demonstrate further that the surviving and proliferative Treg are ICOS positive while the death-prone Treg are ICOS negative. Moreover, ICOS+ Treg contain much stronger suppressive activity than ICOS− Treg. Our data indicates that massive death contributes to the anergic phenotype of Treg in vitro and suggest modulating Treg survival as a therapeutic strategy for treatment of autoimmune diseases and cancer. PMID:22231701

  4. Anti-CCR4 monoclonal antibody enhances antitumor immunity by modulating tumor-infiltrating Tregs in an ovarian cancer xenograft humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, De-Kuan; Peterson, Eric; Sun, Jiusong; Goudie, Calum; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Liu, Joyce F.; Matulonis, Ursula; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are recruited to tumor sites where they can suppress antitumor immunity. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed at high levels on functional CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs and production of the CCR4 ligand CCL22 by tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages is associated with Treg recruitment to the tumor site. Here, we tested IgG1 and IgG4 isotypes of human anti-CCR4 mAb2-3 for their in vitro activity and in vivo capacity in a NSG mouse model bearing CCL22-secreting ovarian cancer (OvCA) xenograft to modulate Tregs and restore antitumor activity. Both mAb2-3 isotypes blocked in vitro chemoattraction of Tregs to CCL22-secreting OvCA cells. However, they differed in their in vivo mode of action with IgG1 causing Treg depletion and IgG4 blocking migration to the tumors. Primary T cells that were primed with OvCA-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) demonstrated INFγ secretion that could be enhanced through Treg depletion by mAb2-3. Humanized mice reconstructed with allogeneic tumor-primed T cells (TP-T) were used to evaluate the restoration of OvCA immunity by depletion or blockade of Tregs with mAb2-3. We observed that IgG1 was more potent than IgG4 in inhibiting tumor growth. Mechanism studies demonstrated that mAb2-3 treatment lead to inhibition of IL-2 binding to its receptor. Further studies showed that mAb2-3 induced CD25 shedding (sCD25) from Tregs which lead to a decrease in IL-2-dependent survival. Together, the results demonstrate that mAb2-3 is an agonist antibody that can restore anti-OvCA immunity through modulation of Treg activity. PMID:27141347

  5. Human regulatory T cells are selectively activated by low-dose application of the CD28 superagonist TGN1412/TAB08.

    PubMed

    Tabares, Paula; Berr, Susanne; Römer, Paula S; Chuvpilo, Sergej; Matskevich, Alexey A; Tyrsin, Dmitry; Fedotov, Yury; Einsele, Hermann; Tony, Hans-Peter; Hünig, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    CD28 superagonists (CD28SAs) are potent T-cell-activating monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). In contrast to their benign behavior and marked therapeutic efficacy as activators of regulatory T (Treg) cells in preclinical rodent models, a phase I trial of the human CD28SA TGN1412 (now called TAB08) in 2006 resulted in a life-threatening cytokine release syndrome (CRS). We studied TAB08-mediated Treg-cell activation in a recently developed in vitro system of human PBMCs, which also reproduces the CRS experienced by the healthy volunteers. We show that just as in rodents, CD28SAs are potent activators and expanders of Treg cells from healthy donors and rheumatoid arthritis patients, even under effective blockade of pro-inflammatory cytokine release by a corticosteroid. Moreover, CD28SA titration identifies a dose range where pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion from conventional T cells is absent while appreciable Treg-cell activation is maintained. Finally, we report that low-dose application of TAB08 to healthy volunteers results in dose-dependent systemic release of the Treg-cell signature cytokine IL-10 in the absence of the pro-inflammatory factors associated with the CRS of the 2006 TGN1412 study. These results demonstrate the potential of appropriately dosed CD28SA and corticosteroid comedication to mobilize human Treg cells for the treatment of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions.

  6. Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet Modulates Th17/Treg Balance in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Roberta; Viscomi, Carmela; Andreozzi, Paola; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Barbaro, Barbara; Gori, Manuele; Vullo, Vincenzo; Balsano, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations, including immunological disorders. Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) is often characterized by cholesterol and lipid metabolism alterations, leading to hepatic steatosis. Cholesterol metabolism, in fact, is crucial for the viral life cycle. Recent works described that a higher dietary cholesterol intake is associated with the progression of HCV-related liver disease. CHC patients have increased levels of T helper 17 (Th17)-cells, a lymphocytic population involved in the pathogenesis of liver inflammation and autoimmune hepatitis. The balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells is crucial for chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17-cell differentiation is deeply influenced by the activation LXRs, nuclear receptors modulating cholesterol homeostasis. Moreover, HCV may affect these nuclear receptors, and cholesterol metabolism, through both direct and indirect mechanisms. On these bases, we hypothesized that modulation of cholesterol levels through Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet (NLCD) may represent an innovative strategy to reduce the progression of HCV infection, through the modulation of peripheral Th17/Treg balance. To this end, we performed a pilot study to investigate whether a Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet may be able to modulate Th17/Treg balance in patients affected by chronic HCV infection. After 30 days of NLCD CHC patients showed a significant reduction in Th17 cells frequency, which correlated with strong reduction of IL-17 and IL-22 serum levels. At the same time, we appreciated an increase in the percentage of Treg cells, thus improving Treg/Th17balance. Moreover, we observed an increased expression of LXRs and their target genes: SREBP-1c and ABCA-1. In conclusion, NLCD finely regulates Th17/Treg balance, improving immune system response in CHC patients. This study could pave the way for new treatments of CHC patients, suggesting that change in

  7. Stem cell-derived tissue-associated regulatory T cells ameliorate the development of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Lei, Fengyang; Zheng, Songguo; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to produce almost all of the cells in the body, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the exact conditions required for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) are not well delineated. Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be tissue/organ-associated and migrate to local inflamed tissues/organs to suppress the autoimmune response after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. In this study, we developed a new approach to generate functional Ag-specific Tregs from induced PSCs (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-Tregs, which had the ability to generate an Ag-specific immunosuppressive response in a murine model of arthritis. We retrovirally transduced murine iPSCs with a construct containing genes of Ag-specific T cell receptor (TCR) and the transcriptional factor FoxP3. We differentiated the iPSCs into Ag-specific iPSC-Tregs using in vitro or in vivo Notch signaling, and demonstrated that adoptive transfer of such Tregs dramatically suppressed autoimmunity in a well-established Ag-induced arthritis model, including the inflammation, joint destruction, cartilage prostaglandin depletion, osteoclast activity, and Th17 production. Our results indicate that PSCs can be used to develop Ag-specific Tregs, which have a therapeutic potential for Treg-based therapies of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26846186

  8. First Insight into the Kinome of Human Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Sebastian; Probst-Kepper, Michael; Reinl, Tobias; Jeron, Andreas; Huehn, Jochen; Schraven, Burkhart; Jänsch, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for controlling peripheral tolerance by the active suppression of various immune cells including conventional T effector cells (Teffs). Downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR), more than 500 protein kinases encoded by the human genome have to be considered in signaling cascades regulating the activation of Tregs and Teffs, respectively. Following TCR engagement, Tregs posses a number of unique attributes, such as constitutive expression of Foxp3, hyporesponsiveness and poor cytokine production. Furthermore, recent studies showed that altered regulation of protein kinases is important for Treg function. These data indicate that signaling pathways in Tregs are distinctly organized and alterations at the level of protein kinases contribute to the unique Treg phenotype. However, kinase-based signaling networks in Tregs are poorly understood and necessitate further systematic characterization. In this study, we analyzed the differential expression of kinases in Tregs and Teffs by using a kinase-selective proteome strategy. In total, we revealed quantitative information on 185 kinases expressed in the human CD4+ T cell subsets. The majority of kinases was equally abundant in both T cell subsets, but 11 kinases were differentially expressed in Tregs. Most strikingly, Tregs showed an altered expression of cell cycle kinases including CDK6. Quantitative proteomics generates first comparative insight into the kinase complements of the CD4+ Teff and Treg subset. Treg-specific expression pattern of 11 protein kinases substantiate the current opinion that TCR-mediated signaling cascades are altered in Tregs and further suggests that Tregs exhibit significant specificities in cell-cycle control and progression. PMID:22815858

  9. Comparative Analysis of Protocols to Induce Human CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by Combinations of IL-2, TGF-beta, Retinoic Acid, Rapamycin and Butyrate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Angelika; Eriksson, Matilda; Shang, Ming-Mei; Weyd, Heiko; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress other immune cells and are critical mediators of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutic manipulation of Tregs is subject to numerous clinical investigations including trials for adoptive Treg transfer. Since the number of naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) is minute, it is highly desirable to develop a complementary approach of inducing Tregs (iTregs) from naïve T cells. Mouse studies exemplify the importance of peripherally induced Tregs as well as the applicability of iTreg transfer in different disease models. Yet, procedures to generate iTregs are currently controversial, particularly for human cells. Here we therefore comprehensively compare different established and define novel protocols of human iTreg generation using TGF-β in combination with other compounds. We found that human iTregs expressed several Treg signature molecules, such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 and EOS, while exhibiting low expression of the cytokines Interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-17. Importantly, we identified a novel combination of TGF-β, retinoic acid and rapamycin as a robust protocol to induce human iTregs with superior suppressive activity in vitro compared to currently established induction protocols. However, iTregs generated by these protocols did not stably retain Foxp3 expression and did not suppress in vivo in a humanized graft-versus-host-disease mouse model, highlighting the need for further research to attain stable, suppressive iTregs. These results advance our understanding of the conditions enabling human iTreg generation and may have important implications for the development of adoptive transfer strategies targeting autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26886923

  10. Comparative Analysis of Protocols to Induce Human CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by Combinations of IL-2, TGF-beta, Retinoic Acid, Rapamycin and Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Angelika; Eriksson, Matilda; Shang, Ming-Mei; Weyd, Heiko; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress other immune cells and are critical mediators of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutic manipulation of Tregs is subject to numerous clinical investigations including trials for adoptive Treg transfer. Since the number of naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) is minute, it is highly desirable to develop a complementary approach of inducing Tregs (iTregs) from naïve T cells. Mouse studies exemplify the importance of peripherally induced Tregs as well as the applicability of iTreg transfer in different disease models. Yet, procedures to generate iTregs are currently controversial, particularly for human cells. Here we therefore comprehensively compare different established and define novel protocols of human iTreg generation using TGF-β in combination with other compounds. We found that human iTregs expressed several Treg signature molecules, such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 and EOS, while exhibiting low expression of the cytokines Interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-17. Importantly, we identified a novel combination of TGF-β, retinoic acid and rapamycin as a robust protocol to induce human iTregs with superior suppressive activity in vitro compared to currently established induction protocols. However, iTregs generated by these protocols did not stably retain Foxp3 expression and did not suppress in vivo in a humanized graft-versus-host-disease mouse model, highlighting the need for further research to attain stable, suppressive iTregs. These results advance our understanding of the conditions enabling human iTreg generation and may have important implications for the development of adoptive transfer strategies targeting autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26886923

  11. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Katayama, Akiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki; Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Ohmori, Naoya; Aki, Tsunehiro; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Goto, Shigeru; Chen, Chao-Long; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  12. Human Regulatory T Cells with Alloantigen Specificity Are More Potent Inhibitors of Alloimmune Skin Graft Damage than Polyclonal Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Pervinder; Ali, Niwa; Garg, Garima; Nestle, Frank O.; Lechler, Robert I.; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Graft rejection by the immune system is a major cause of transplant failure. Lifelong immunosuppression decreases the incidence of graft rejection; however, nonspecific immunosuppression results in increased susceptibly to infection and cancer. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which suppress the activation of the immune system and induce tolerance, are currently under evaluation for use in clinical transplantation. Ex vivo expanded polyclonal Tregs that are introduced into transplant recipients alter the balance of T effector cells to Tregs; however, experimental data suggest that alloantigen-specific Tregs would be more effective at preventing graft rejection. We have developed a method to enrich alloantigen-specific human Tregs based on the coexpression of activation markers, CD69 and CD71. These Tregs could be readily expanded in vitro and demonstrated potent antigen-specific suppression. In a humanized mouse model of alloimmune-mediated injury of human skin grafts, alloantigen-specific Tregs resulted in a significant reduction in clinically relevant indicators of dermal tissue injury when compared with polyclonal Tregs, restoring a histology comparable to healthy skin. This method of human allospecific Treg selection should be scalable to the clinic. The improved in vivo efficacy of alloantigen-specific Tregs over polyclonal Tregs shown here suggests that generating “customized” Tregs with defined anti-donor allospecificities may improve current practice in clinical immunotherapy. PMID:21593402

  13. Helios Controls a Limited Subset of Regulatory T Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Mathew; Lopez-Ocasio, Maria; Metidji, Amina; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Shevach, Ethan M; Thornton, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    A subpopulation (60-70%) of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in both mouse and man expresses the transcription factor Helios, but its role in Treg function is still unknown. We generated Treg-specific Helios-deficient mice to examine the function of Helios in Tregs. We show that the selective deletion of Helios in Tregs leads to slow, progressive systemic immune activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and enhanced germinal center formation in the absence of organ-specific autoimmunity. Helios-deficient Treg suppressor function was normal in vitro, as well as in an in vivo inflammatory bowel disease model. However, Helios-deficient Tregs failed to control the expansion of pathogenic T cells derived from scurfy mice, failed to mediate T follicular regulatory cell function, and failed to control both T follicular helper cell and Th1 effector cell responses. In competitive settings, Helios-deficient Tregs, particularly effector Tregs, were at a disadvantage, indicating that Helios regulates effector Treg fitness. Thus, we demonstrate that Helios controls certain aspects of Treg-suppressive function, differentiation, and survival. PMID:26582951

  14. Treg inducing adjuvants for therapeutic vaccination against chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Keijzer, Chantal; van der Zee, Ruurd; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke

    2013-01-01

    Many existing therapies in autoimmune diseases are based on systemic suppression of inflammation and the observed side effects of these therapies illustrate the pressing need for more specific interventions. Regulatory T-cells (Treg) are pivotal controllers of (auto-aggressive) immune responses and inflammation, and decreased Treg numbers and/or functioning have been associated with autoimmune disease. Therefore, Treg became frequently studied targets for more specific immunotherapy. Especially antigen-specific targeting of Treg would enable local and tailor made interventions, while obviating the negative side effect of general immuno-suppression. Self-antigens that participate in inflammation, irrespective of the etiology of the different autoimmune diseases, are held to be candidate antigens for antigen-specific interventions. Rather than tolerance induction to disease inciting self-antigens, which are frequently unknown, general self-antigens expressed at sites of inflammation would allow targeting of disease independent, but inflammatory-site specific, regulatory mechanisms. Preferably, such self-antigens should be abundantly expressed and up-regulated at the inflammatory-site. In this perspective heat shock proteins (Hsp) have several characteristics that make them highly attractive targets for antigen-specific Treg inducing therapy. The development of an antigen-specific Treg inducing vaccine is a major novel goal in the field of immunotherapy in autoimmune diseases. However, progress is hampered not only by the lack of effective antigens, but also by the fact that other factors such as dose, route, and the presence or absence of an adjuvant, turned out to be critical unknowns, with respect to the effective induction of Treg. In addition, the use of a Treg inducing adjuvant might be required to achieve an effective regulatory response, in the case of ongoing inflammation. Future goals in clinical trials will be the optimization of natural Treg expansion (or

  15. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  16. Serine protease inhibitor-6 plays a critical role in protecting murine Granzyme B-producing regulatory T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Jamil; Skartsis, Nikolaos; Mounayar, Marwan; Magee, Ciara N.; Batal, Ibrahim; Ting, Christopher; Moore, Robert; Riella, Leonardo V.; Ohori, Shunsuke; Abdoli, Rozita; Smith, Brian; Fiorina, Paolo; Heathcote, Dean; Bakhos, Tannous; Ashton-Rickardt, Philip G.; Abdi, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and hold great promise as cell therapy for a variety of immune-mediated diseases. However, the cellular mechanisms that regulate Treg maintenance and homeostasis have yet to be fully explored. While Tregs express Granzyme-B (GrB) to suppress effector T-cells via direct-killing, the mechanisms by which they protect themselves from GrB-mediated self-inflicted damage are unknown. We show, for the first time, that both iTregs and nTregs increase their intracellular expression of GrB and its endogenous inhibitor, Serine Protease Inhibitor-6 (Spi6) upon activation. Sub-cellular fractionation and measurement of GrB activity in the cytoplasm of Tregs show that activated Spi6−/− Tregs had significantly higher cytoplasmic GrB activity. We observed an increase in GrB-mediated apoptosis in Spi6−/− nTregs and impaired suppression of alloreactive T-cells in vitro. Spi6−/− Tregs were rescued from apoptosis by the addition of a GrB inhibitor (Z-AAD-CMK) in vitro. Furthermore, adoptive transfer experiments showed that Spi6−/− nTregs were less effective than WT nTregs in suppressing Graft-versus-host-disease (GVHD) due to their impaired survival, as shown in our in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Finally, Spi6-deficient recipients rejected MHC class II-mismatch heart allografts at a much faster rate and showed a higher rate of apoptosis among Tregs, as compared to WT recipients. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, a novel role for Spi6 in Treg homeostasis by protecting activated Tregs from GrB-mediated injury. These data could have significant clinical implications for Treg-based therapy in immune-mediated diseases. PMID:23913965

  17. Preserved dendritic cell HLA-DR expression and reduced regulatory T cell activation in asymptomatic Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax infection.

    PubMed

    Kho, Steven; Marfurt, Jutta; Noviyanti, Rintis; Kusuma, Andreas; Piera, Kim A; Burdam, Faustina H; Kenangalem, Enny; Lampah, Daniel A; Engwerda, Christian R; Poespoprodjo, Jeanne R; Price, Ric N; Anstey, Nicholas M; Minigo, Gabriela; Woodberry, Tonia

    2015-08-01

    Clinical illness with Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax compromises the function of dendritic cells (DC) and expands regulatory T (Treg) cells. Individuals with asymptomatic parasitemia have clinical immunity, restricting parasite expansion and preventing clinical disease. The role of DC and Treg cells during asymptomatic Plasmodium infection is unclear. During a cross-sectional household survey in Papua, Indonesia, we examined the number and activation of blood plasmacytoid DC (pDC), CD141(+), and CD1c(+) myeloid DC (mDC) subsets and Treg cells using flow cytometry in 168 afebrile children (of whom 15 had P. falciparum and 36 had P. vivax infections) and 162 afebrile adults (of whom 20 had P. falciparum and 20 had P. vivax infections), alongside samples from 16 patients hospitalized with uncomplicated malaria. Unlike DC from malaria patients, DC from children and adults with asymptomatic, microscopy-positive P. vivax or P. falciparum infection increased or retained HLA-DR expression. Treg cells in asymptomatic adults and children exhibited reduced activation, suggesting increased immune responsiveness. The pDC and mDC subsets varied according to clinical immunity (asymptomatic or symptomatic Plasmodium infection) and, in asymptomatic infection, according to host age and parasite species. In conclusion, active control of asymptomatic infection was associated with and likely contingent upon functional DC and reduced Treg cell activation.

  18. Bach2 Regulates Homeostasis of Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells and Protects against Fatal Lung Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui Ho; Gasper, David J.; Lee, Song Hee; Plisch, Erin Hemmila; Svaren, John; Suresh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Variants of the Bach2 gene are linked to vitiligo, celiac disease and type I diabetes, but the underlying immunological mechanisms are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that Bach2 plays crucial roles in maintaining T cell quiescence, and governing the differentiation, activation, and survival of foxp3+ Treg cells. Bach2-deficient T cells display spontaneous activation and produce elevated levels of TH1/TH2 type cytokines. Without Bach2, Treg cells exhibit diminished foxp3 expression, depleted numbers, hyper-activation, enhanced proliferation and profound loss of competitive fitness in vivo. Mechanistically, reduced survival of Bach2-deficient Treg cells was associated with reduced Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 levels and elevated Bim:Bcl-2 ratio. Additionally, Bach2 deficiency induced selective loss of Helios− foxp3+ Treg cells and a Treg cell transcriptome skewed towards the TH1/TH2 effector program at the expense of the Treg program. In vitro experiments confirmed that Bach2: (1) is indispensable for TCR/TGF-β-induced foxp3 expression and (2) mitigates aberrant differentiation of Treg cells by repression of the competing Gata3-driven TH2 effector program. Importantly, perturbations in the differentiation of induced Treg cells was linked to a fatal TH2 type chronic inflammatory lung disease in Bach2-deficient mice. Thus, Bach2 enforces T cell quiescence, promotes the development and survival of Treg lineage, restrains aberrant differentiation of Treg cells and protects against immune -mediated diseases. PMID:24367030

  19. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, D; Cruvinel, W M; Araujo, J A P; Salmazi, K C; Kallas, E G; Andrade, L E C

    2014-08-01

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/high CD127 Ø/low FoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3 Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25098715

  20. Imbalanced expression of functional surface molecules in regulatory and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita Júnior, D.; Cruvinel, W.M.; Araujo, J.A.P.; Salmazi, K.C.; Kallas, E.G.; Andrade, L.E.C.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T (TREG) cells play an important role in maintaining immune tolerance and avoiding autoimmunity. We analyzed the expression of membrane molecules in TREG and effector T cells in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). TREG and effector T cells were analyzed for the expression of CTLA-4, PD1, CD28, CD95, GITR, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO in 26 patients with active disease, 31 with inactive disease, and 26 healthy controls. TREG cells were defined as CD25+/highCD127Ø/lowFoxP3+, and effector T cells were defined as CD25+CD127+FoxP3Ø. The ratio of TREG to effector T cells expressing GITR, PD1, HLA-DR, OX40, CD40L, and CD45RO was determined in the three groups. The frequency of TREG cells was similar in patients with SLE and controls. However, SLE patients had a decreased frequency of CTLA-4+TREG and CD28+TREG cells and an increased frequency of CD40L+TREG cells. There was a decrease in the TREG/effector-T ratio for GITR+, HLA-DR+, OX40+, and CD45RO+ cells, and an increased ratio of TREG/effector-T CD40L+ cells in patients with SLE. In addition, CD40L+TREG cell frequency correlated with the SLE disease activity index (P=0.0163). In conclusion, our findings showed several abnormalities in the expression of functionally critical surface molecules in TREG and effector T cells in SLE that may be relevant to the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25098715

  1. Regulatory T cells and tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G; Mukherji, Bijay

    2005-12-01

    Central deletion of "self-reactive" T cells has been the textbook paradigm for inducing "self-tolerance" in the periphery and the concept of a role of T cell-mediated suppression in this process has long been controversial. A decisive shift in the opinion on suppressor T cells has lately occurred with the observations of Sakaguchi's group that linked a class of CD4+CD25+ T cells to the prevention of autoimmunity from neonatal thymectomy in mice. These CD4+CD25+ T cells have been named T regulatory (Treg) cells. They are believed to be selected in the thymus as an anti-self repertoire. Hence they were referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. Presently, in addition to their role in autoimmunity, they are believed to exert regulatory function in infection, in transplantation immunity as well as in tumor immunity. In contrast to these nTreg cells, another class of CD4+ Treg cells also exercises regulatory function in the periphery. These Treg cells are also CD4+ T cells and after activation they also become phenotypically CD4+CD25+. They are, however induced in the periphery as Treg cells. Hence, they are termed as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. There are major differences in the biology of these two types of Treg cells. They differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. Nonetheless, evidence indicates that both nTreg cells and iTreg cells are involved in the control of tumor immunity. The question of how to circumvent their regulatory constraints, therefore, has become a major challenge for tumor immunologists. PMID:15868167

  2. Regulatory T cells prevent CD8 T cell maturation by inhibiting CD4 Th cells at tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Cordier, Corinne; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Klatzmann, David; Azogui, Orly

    2007-10-15

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in high frequencies among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in draining lymph nodes, supposedly facilitating tumor development. To investigate their role in controlling local immune responses, we analyzed intratumoral T cell accumulation and function in the presence or absence of Tregs. Tumors that grew in normal BALB/c mice injected with the 4T1 tumor cell line were highly infiltrated by Tregs, CD4 and CD8 cells, all having unique characteristics. Most infiltrating Tregs expressed low levels of CD25Rs and Foxp3. They did not proliferate even in the presence of IL-2 but maintained a strong suppressor activity. CD4 T cells were profoundly anergic and CD8 T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were severely impaired. Depletion of Tregs modified the characteristics of tumor infiltrates. Tumors were initially invaded by activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, which produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. This was followed by the recruitment of highly cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells at tumor sites leading to tumor rejection. The beneficial effect of Treg depletion in tumor regression was abrogated when CD4 helper cells were also depleted. These findings indicate that the massive infiltration of tumors by Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper response. The Tregs in our model prevent Th cell activation and subsequent development of efficient CD8 T cell activity required for the control of tumor growth. PMID:17911581

  3. Treg/Th17 balance in stable CAD patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Potekhina, Alexandra V; Pylaeva, Ekaterina; Provatorov, Sergey; Ruleva, Natalya; Masenko, Valery; Noeva, Elena; Krasnikova, Tatiana; Arefieva, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Immune processes play a significant role in atherosclerosis plaque progression. Regulatory T cells and T helpers 17 were shown to possess anti- and pro-atherogenic activity, respectively. We aimed to investigate the balance of circulating Treg and Th17 in stable angina patients with different stages of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods. Treg, Th17 and Th1 cell frequencies were studied in 117 patients via direct immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry. Group 1 had intact coronary arteries. Group 2 and Group 3 had undergone previous coronary stenting; in Group 2 no coronary atherosclerosis progression was found, in Group 3 patients had disease progression in non-invaded coronary arteries. Group 4 had severe coronary atherosclerosis. Results. The frequencies of CD4+CD25highCD127low, CD4+foxp3+, and CD4+IL10 + T cells were decreased, and CD4+IL17 + T cells frequencies were increased in group 4 vs. 1. Treg/Th17 ratios were declined in groups 3 and 4 vs. groups 1 and 2. IL-10 level was lower while hsCRP and sCD25 levels were higher in group 4 vs. 1. Conclusion. We assume that the imbalance in pro- and anti-inflammatory/atherogenic lymphocyte subpopulations is associated with atherosclerosis progression.

  4. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology. PMID:26371251

  5. Type 1 diabetes vaccine candidates promote human Foxp3+Treg induction in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Serr, Isabelle; Fürst, Rainer W.; Achenbach, Peter; Scherm, Martin G.; Gökmen, Füsun; Haupt, Florian; Sedlmeier, Eva-Maria; Knopff, Annette; Shultz, Leonard; Willis, Richard A.; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance is executed partly by Foxp3+regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoreactive T cells. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) impaired tolerance promotes destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. The development of autoantigen-specific vaccination strategies for Foxp3+Treg-induction and prevention of islet autoimmunity in patients is still in its infancy. Here, using human haematopoietic stem cell-engrafted NSG-HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice, we provide direct evidence for human autoantigen-specific Foxp3+Treg-induction in vivo. We identify HLA-DQ8-restricted insulin-specific CD4+T cells and demonstrate efficient human insulin-specific Foxp3+Treg-induction upon subimmunogenic vaccination with strong agonistic insulin mimetopes in vivo. Induced human Tregs are stable, show increased expression of Treg signature genes such as Foxp3, CTLA4, IL-2Rα and TIGIT and can efficiently suppress effector T cells. Such Foxp3+Treg-induction does not trigger any effector T cells. These T1D vaccine candidates could therefore represent an expedient improvement in the challenge to induce human Foxp3+Tregs and to develop novel precision medicines for prevention of islet autoimmunity in children at risk of T1D. PMID:26975663

  6. Self-specific memory regulatory T cells protect embryos at implantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Courau, Tristan; Churlaud, Guillaume; Valdivia, Karina; Strominger, Jack L.; Ruocco, Maria Grazia; Chaouat, Gérard; Klatzmann, David

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play crucial roles in both fetal and tumor development. We recently showed that immunosurveillance by pre-existing CD44hiCD62Llow activated/memory Tregs (amTregs) specific for self-antigens protects emergent tumor cells in mice. This Treg response of a memory type is more rapid than and dominates the anti-tumor response of tumor-specific effector T cells. Here, we report striking similarities between the early Treg responses to embryo and tumor implantation. Tregs are (i) rapidly recruited to uterus-draining lymph nodes and activated in the first days after embryo implantation in both syngeneic and allogeneic matings; (ii) they express the markers of the amTreg subset; and (iii) are at least in part self-antigen-specific, as seen in tumor emergence. Unlike in the tumor emergence setting, however, for which pre-immunization against tumor antigens is sufficient for complete tumor eradication even in the presence of Tregs, Treg depletion is additionally required for high frequencies of fetus loss after pre-immunization against paternal tissue antigens. Thus, amTregs play a major role in protecting embryos in both naïve and pre-immune settings. This role and the ensuing therapeutic potential are further highlighted by showing that Treg stimulation, directly by low-dose interleukin-2 or indirectly by Fms-related tyrosine-kinase-3 ligand, lead to normal pregnancy rates in a spontaneous abortion-prone model. PMID:23913969

  7. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression. PMID:27679683

  8. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-09-26

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression. PMID:27679683

  9. Immunomodulation by mesenchymal stem cells: Interplay between mesenchymal stem cells and regulatory lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Oscar Ka-Fai; Chan, Koon Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possess immunomodulatory properties, which confer enormous potential for clinical application. Considerable evidence revealed their efficacy on various animal models of autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and uveitis. MSCs elicit their immunomodulatory effects by inhibiting lymphocyte activation and proliferation, forbidding the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, limiting the function of antigen presenting cells, and inducing regulatory T (Treg) and B (Breg) cells. The induction of Treg and Breg cells is of particular interest since Treg and Breg cells have significant roles in maintaining immune tolerance. Several mechanisms have been proposed regarding to the MSCs-mediated induction of Treg and Breg cells. Accordingly, MSCs induce regulatory lymphocytes through secretion of multiple pleiotropic cytokines, cell-to-cell contact with target cells and modulation of antigen-presenting cells. Here, we summarized how MSCs induce Treg and Breg cells to provoke immunosuppression.

  10. Functional Improvement of Regulatory T Cells from Rheumatoid Arthritis Subjects Induced by Capsular Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannogalactan

    PubMed Central

    Alunno, Alessia; Bartoloni Bocci, Elena; Perito, Stefano; Chow, Siu-Kei; Cenci, Elio; Casadevall, Arturo; Gerli, Roberto; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a critical role in the prevention of autoimmunity, and the suppressive activity of these cells is impaired in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to investigate function and properties of Treg of RA patients in response to purified polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal). Methods Flow cytometry and western blot analysis were used to investigate the frequency, function and properties of Treg cells. Results GXMGal was able to: i) induce strong increase of FOXP3 on CD4+ T cells without affecting the number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells with parallel increase in the percentage of non-conventional CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells; ii) increase intracellular levels of TGF-β1 in CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells and of IL-10 in both CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ and CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells; iii) enhance the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ and CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells in terms of inhibition of effector T cell activity and increased secretion of IL-10; iv) decrease Th1 response as demonstrated by inhibition of T-bet activation and down-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12p70 production; v) decrease Th17 differentiation by down-regulating pSTAT3 activation and IL-17A, IL-23, IL-21, IL-22 and IL-6 production. Conclusion These data show that GXMGal improves Treg functions and increases the number and function of CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells of RA patients. It is suggested that GXMGal may be potentially useful for restoring impaired Treg functions in autoimmune disorders and for developing Treg cell-based strategies for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:25338013

  11. Manipulation of regulatory T cells and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G

    2015-01-01

    The most potent killing machinery in our immune system is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Since the possibility for self-destruction by these cells is high, many regulatory activities exist to prevent autoimmune destruction by these cells. A tumour (cancer) grows from the cells of the body and is tolerated by the body's immune system. Yet, it has been possible to generate tumour-associated antigen (TAA) -specific CTL that are also self-antigen specific in vivo, to achieve a degree of therapeutic efficacy. Tumour-associated antigen-specific T-cell tolerance through pathways of self-tolerance generation represents a significant challenge to successful immunotherapy. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells, referred to as T regulatory (Treg) cells, are selected in the thymus as controllers of the anti-self repertoire. These cells are referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. According to the new consensus (Nature Immunology 2013; 14:307–308) these cells are to be termed as (tTreg). There is another class of CD4+ Treg cells also involved in regulatory function in the periphery, also phenotypically CD4+ CD25±, classified as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. These cells are to be termed as peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. In vitro-induced Treg cells with suppressor function should be termed as iTreg. These different Treg cells differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. The current challenges are to determine the degree of specificity of these Treg cells in recognizing the same TAA as the CTL population and to circumvent their regulatory constraints so as to achieve robust CTL responses against cancer. PMID:25243729

  12. Thymus medulla fosters generation of natural Treg cells, invariant γδ T cells, and invariant NKT cells: what we learn from intrathymic migration.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Jennifer E; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-03-01

    The organization of the thymus into distinct cortical and medullary regions enables it to control the step-wise migration and development of immature T-cell precursors. Such a process provides access to specialized cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells at defined stages of maturation, ensuring the generation of self-tolerant and MHC-restricted conventional CD4(+) and CD8(+) αβ T cells. The migratory cues and stromal cell requirements that regulate the development of conventional αβ T cells have been well studied. However, the thymus also fosters the generation of several immunoregulatory T-cell populations that form key components of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These include Foxp3(+) natural regulatory T cells, invariant γδ T cells, and CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). While less is known about the intrathymic requirements of these nonconventional T cells, recent studies have highlighted the importance of the thymus medulla in their development. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms controlling the intrathymic migration of distinct T-cell subsets, and relate this to knowledge of the microenvironmental requirements of these cells.

  13. Thymus medulla fosters generation of natural Treg cells, invariant γδ T cells, and invariant NKT cells: What we learn from intrathymic migration

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Jennifer E; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The organization of the thymus into distinct cortical and medullary regions enables it to control the step-wise migration and development of immature T-cell precursors. Such a process provides access to specialized cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells at defined stages of maturation, ensuring the generation of self-tolerant and MHC-restricted conventional CD4+ and CD8+ αβ T cells. The migratory cues and stromal cell requirements that regulate the development of conventional αβ T cells have been well studied. However, the thymus also fosters the generation of several immunoregulatory T-cell populations that form key components of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These include Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells, invariant γδ T cells, and CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). While less is known about the intrathymic requirements of these nonconventional T cells, recent studies have highlighted the importance of the thymus medulla in their development. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms controlling the intrathymic migration of distinct T-cell subsets, and relate this to knowledge of the microenvironmental requirements of these cells. PMID:25615828

  14. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Buckner, Jane H; Fitch, Mark; Gitelman, Stephen E; Gupta, Shipra; Hellerstein, Marc K; Herold, Kevan C; Lares, Angela; Lee, Michael R; Li, Kelvin; Liu, Weihong; Long, S Alice; Masiello, Lisa M; Nguyen, Vinh; Putnam, Amy L; Rieck, Mary; Sayre, Peter H; Tang, Qizhi

    2015-11-25

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust technique has been developed to isolate and expand Tregs from patients with T1D. The expanded Tregs retained their T cell receptor diversity and demonstrated enhanced functional activity. We report on a phase 1 trial to assess safety of Treg adoptive immunotherapy in T1D. Fourteen adult subjects with T1D, in four dosing cohorts, received ex vivo-expanded autologous CD4(+)CD127(lo/-)CD25(+) polyclonal Tregs (0.05 × 10(8) to 26 × 10(8) cells). A subset of the adoptively transferred Tregs was long-lived, with up to 25% of the peak level remaining in the circulation at 1 year after transfer. Immune studies showed transient increases in Tregs in recipients and retained a broad Treg FOXP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD127(lo) phenotype long-term. There were no infusion reactions or cell therapy-related high-grade adverse events. C-peptide levels persisted out to 2+ years after transfer in several individuals. These results support the development of a phase 2 trial to test efficacy of the Treg therapy. PMID:26606968

  15. Regulatory T cells in central nervous system injury: A double-edged sword

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James T.; Zheng, Jingjing; Smirnov, Igor; Lorenz, Ulrike; Tung, Kenneth; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Previous research investigating the roles of effector (Teff) and regulatory (Treg) T cells after injury to the central nervous system (CNS) has yielded contradictory conclusions, with both protective and destructive functions being ascribed to each of these T-cell subpopulations. Here we study this dichotomy by examining how regulation of the immune system affects the response to CNS trauma. We show that in response to CNS injury, Teff and Treg subsets in the CNS-draining deep cervical lymph nodes are activated, and surgical resection of these lymph nodes results in impaired neuronal survival. Depletion of Treg, not surprisingly, induces a robust Teff response in the draining lymph nodes and is associated with impaired neuronal survival. Interestingly, however, injection of exogenous Treg cells, which limits the spontaneous beneficial immune response after CNS injury, also impairs neuronal survival. We found that no Treg accumulate at the site of CNS injury, and that changes in Treg numbers do not alter the amount of infiltration by other immune cells into the site of injury. The phenotype of macrophages at the site, however, is affected: both addition and removal of Treg negatively impact the numbers of macrophages with alternatively activated (tissue-building) phenotype. Our data demonstrate that neuronal survival after CNS injury is impaired when Treg cells are either removed or added. With this exacerbation of neurodegeneration seen with both addition or depletion of Treg, we recommend exercising extreme caution when considering the therapeutic targeting Treg cells after CNS injury, and possibly in chronic neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25320276

  16. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  17. Expansion of effector memory regulatory T cells represents a novel prognostic factor in lower risk myelodysplastic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Adam W; Sugimori, Chiharu; Komrokji, Rami S; Yang, Lili; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Sekeres, Mikkael A; Paquette, Ronald; Loughran, Thomas P; List, Alan F; Epling-Burnette, Pearlie K

    2012-09-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes are premalignant diseases characterized by cytopenias, myeloid dysplasia, immune dysregulation with association to autoimmunity, and variable risk for acute myeloid leukemia transformation. Studies of FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) indicate that the number and/or activation state may influence cancer progression in these patients. Focusing on patients with a lower risk for leukemia transformation, 18 (34.6%) of 52 patients studied displayed an altered Treg compartment compared with age-matched controls. Delineation of unique Treg subsets revealed that an increase in the absolute number of CD4(+)FOXP3(+)CD25(+)CD127(low)CD45RA(-)CD27(-) Tregs (effector memory Tregs [Treg(EM)]) was significantly associated with anemia (p = 0.046), reduced hemoglobin (p = 0.038), and blast counts ≥5% (p = 0.006). In healthy donors, this Treg(EM) population constitutes only 2% of all Tregs (one to six Tregs per microliter) in peripheral blood but, when isolated, exhibit greater suppressive activity in vitro. With a median follow-up of 3.1 y (range 2.7-4.9 y) from sample acquisition, increased numbers of Treg(EM) cells proved to have independent prognostic importance in survival estimates, suggesting that enumeration of this Treg subset may be a more reliable indicator of immunological escape than FOXP3(+) T cells as a whole. Based on multivariate analyses, Treg(EM) impacted survival independently from myeloblast characteristics, cytopenias, karyotype, and comorbidities. Based on these findings, Treg(EM) cell expansion may be synonymous with human Treg activation and indicate microenvironmental changes conducive to transformation in myelodysplastic syndromes.

  18. Divergent phenotypes of human regulatory T cells expressing the receptors TIGIT and CD226

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrman, Christopher A.; Yeh, Wen-I; Seay, Howard R.; Lakshmi, Priya Saikumar; Chopra, Gaurav; Zhang, Lin; Perry, Daniel J.; McClymont, Stephanie A.; Yadav, Mahesh; Lopez, Maria-Cecilia; Baker, Henry V.; Zhang, Ying; Li, Yizheng; Whitley, Maryann; von Schack, David; Atkinson, Mark A.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Brusko, Todd M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a central role in counteracting inflammation and autoimmunity. A more complete understanding of cellular heterogeneity and the potential for lineage plasticity in human Treg subsets may identify markers of disease pathogenesis and facilitate the development of optimized cellular therapeutics. To better elucidate human Treg subsets, we conducted direct transcriptional profiling of CD4+FOXP3+Helios+ thymic-derived Treg (tTreg) and CD4+FOXP3+Helios− T cells, followed by comparison to CD4+FOXP3−Helios− T conventional (Tconv) cells. These analyses revealed that the coinhibitory receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT) was highly expressed on tTreg. TIGIT and the costimulatory factor CD226 bind the common ligand CD155. Thus, we analyzed the cellular distribution and suppressive activity of isolated subsets of CD4+CD25+CD127lo/− T cells expressing CD226 and/or TIGIT. We observed TIGIT is highly expressed and upregulated on Treg following activation and in vitro expansion and is associated with lineage stability and suppressive capacity. Conversely, the CD226+TIGIT− population was associated with reduced Treg purity and suppressive capacity following expansion, along with a marked increase in IL-10 and effector cytokine production. These studies provide additional markers to delineate functionally distinct Treg subsets that may help direct cellular therapies and provide important phenotypic markers for assessing the role of Treg in health and disease. PMID:25994968

  19. Induction of Human Regulatory T Cells with Bacterial Superantigens.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Stefano; Taylor, Amanda L; Terrazzini, Nadia; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress the activation of immune effector cells limit immunopathology and are fast emerging as therapeutic targets for autoimmune and cancer disease. Tools enabling Treg in vitro-induction, expansion, and characterization and manipulation will help future clinical developments. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to use bacterial superantigens to induce human Tregs efficiently from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. How to assess human Treg phenotype and suppressive capacity are also described. Technical details, variations, and alternative experimental conditions are provided.

  20. Expanded Non-human Primate Tregs Exhibit A Unique Gene Expression Signature and Potently Downregulate Allo-immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Alan; Martens, Christine; Hendrix, Rose; Stempora, Linda; Miller, Wes; Hamby, Kelly; Russell, Maria; Strobert, Elizabeth; Blazar, Bruce R.; Pearson, Thomas C.; Larsen, Christian P.; Kean, Leslie S.

    2009-01-01

    We have established two complementary strategies for purifying naturally occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs) from rhesus macaques in quantities which would be sufficient for use as an in vivo cellular therapeutic. The first identified Tregs based on their being CD4+/CD25bright. The second incorporated CD127, and purified Tregs based on their expression of CD4 and CD25 and their low expression of CD127. Using these purification strategies, we were able to purify as many as 1×106 Tregs from 120cc of peripheral blood. Culture of these cells with anti-CD3, anti-CD28 and IL-2 over 21 days yielded as much as 450-fold expansion, ultimately producing as many as 4.7×108 Tregs. Expanded Treg cultures potently inhibited alloimmune proliferation as measured by a CFSE-MLR assay even at a 1:100 ratio with responder T cells. Furthermore, both responder-specific and third-party Tregs downregulated alloproliferation similarly. Both freshly isolated and cultured Tregs had gene expression signatures distinguishable from concurrently isolated bulk CD4+ T cell populations, as measured by single-plex RT-PCR and gene array. Moreover, an overlapping yet distinct gene expression signature seen in freshly isolated compared to expanded Tregs identifies a subset of Treg genes likely to be functionally significant. PMID:18801023

  1. Eos is redundant for T regulatory cell function, but plays an important role in IL-2 and Th17 production by CD4+ T conventional cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Metidji, Amina; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Thornton, Angela M.; Ikeda, Tohru; Morgan, Bruce A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Eos is a transcription factor that belongs to the Ikaros family of transcription factors. Eos has been reported to be a T regulatory cell (Treg) signature gene, to play a critical role in Treg suppressor functions, and to maintain Treg stability. We have utilized mice with a global deficiency of Eos to re-examine the role of Eos expression in both Treg and T conventional (Tconv) cells. Treg from Eos deficient (Eos−/−) mice developed normally, displayed a normal Treg phenotype, and exhibited normal suppressor function in vitro. Eos−/− Treg were as effective as Treg from wild type (WT) mice in suppression of inflammation in a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Bone marrow (BM) from Eos−/− mice was as effective as BM from WT mice in controlling T cell activation when used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice in the presence of Scurfy fetal liver cells. Surprisingly, Eos was expressed in activated Tconv cells and was required for IL-2 production, CD25 expression and proliferation in vitro by CD4+ Tconv cells. Eos−/− mice developed more severe Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than WT mice, displayed increased numbers of effector T cells in the periphery and CNS, and amplified IL-17 production. In conclusion, our studies are not consistent with a role for Eos in Treg development and function, but demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of Tconv cells. PMID:26062998

  2. Stat3 Programs Th17-Specific Regulatory T Cells to Control GN

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Malte A.; Luig, Michael; Wegscheid, Claudia; Goerke, Boeren; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Brix, Silke R.; Yan, Isabell; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Hagl, Beate; Renner, Ellen D.; Tiegs, Gisa; Wiech, Thorsten; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Panzer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    A pathogenic role for Th17 cells in inflammatory renal disease is well established. The mechanisms underlying their counter-regulation are, however, largely unknown. Recently, Th17 lineage-specific regulatory T cells (Treg17) that depend on activation of the transcription factor Stat3 were identified. We studied the function of Treg17 in the nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) model of crescentic GN. The absence of Treg17 cells in Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice resulted in the aggravation of NTN and skewing of renal and systemic immune responses toward Th17. Detailed analysis of Stat3-deficient Tregs revealed that the survival, activation, proliferation, and suppressive function of these cells remained intact. However, Tregs from Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacked surface expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6, which resulted in impaired renal trafficking. Furthermore, aggravation of NTN was reversible in the absence of Th17 responses, as shown in CD4Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacking both Treg17 and Th17 cells, suggesting that Th17 cells are indeed the major target of Treg17 cells. Notably, immunohistochemistry revealed CCR6-bearing Treg17 cells in kidney biopsy specimens of patients with GN. CCR6 expression on human Treg17 cells also appears dependent on STAT3, as shown by analysis of Tregs from patients with dominant-negative STAT3 mutations. Our data indicate the presence and involvement of Stat3/STAT3-dependent Treg17 cells that specifically target Th17 cells in murine and human crescentic GN, and suggest the kidney-specific action of these Treg17 cells is regulated by CCR6-directed migration into areas of Th17 inflammation. PMID:24511136

  3. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network

    PubMed Central

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne A.; Mazur, Johanna; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Scholma, Jetse; Marg, Iris; Ulges, Alexander; Satoh, Kazuki; Bopp, Tobias; Joore, Jos; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff) in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26881744

  4. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network.

    PubMed

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne A; Mazur, Johanna; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Scholma, Jetse; Marg, Iris; Ulges, Alexander; Satoh, Kazuki; Bopp, Tobias; Joore, Jos; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff) in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26881744

  5. Linked T Cell Receptor and Cytokine Signaling Govern the Development of the Regulatory T cell Repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Burchill, Matthew A.; Yang, Jianying; Vang, Kieng B.; Moon, James J.; Chu, H. Hamlet; Lio, Chan-Wang J.; Vegoe, Amanda L.; Hsieh, Chyi-Song; Jenkins, Marc K.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Appropriate development of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is necessary to prevent autoimmunity. Neonatal mice, unlike adults, lack factors required for Treg development. It is unclear what these missing factors are. However, signals emanating from the TCR, CD28 and γc-dependent cytokine receptors are required for Treg development. Herein we demonstrate that expression of a constitutively-active STAT5b transgene (STAT5b-CA) allows for Treg development in neonatal mice and restores Treg numbers in CD28−/− mice. Sequence analysis of TCR genes in STAT5b-CA Tregs indicates that ectopic STAT5 activation results in a TCR repertoire that more closely resembles that of naïve T cells. Using MHCII tetramers to identify antigen-specific T cells, we demonstrate that STAT5 signals divert thymocytes normally destined to become naïve T cells into the Treg lineage. Our data support a two-step model of Treg differentiation in which TCR/CD28 signals induce cytokine responsiveness; STAT5-inducing cytokines then complete the program of Treg differentiation. PMID:18199418

  6. Generation of Human Alloantigen-Specific Regulatory T Cells Under Good Manufacturing Practice-Compliant Conditions for Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheraï, Mustapha; Hamel, Yamina; Baillou, Claude; Touil, Soumia; Guillot-Delost, Maude; Charlotte, Frédéric; Kossir, Laila; Simonin, Ghislaine; Maury, Sébastien; Cohen, José L; Lemoine, François M

    2015-01-01

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) may have a great therapeutic potential to induce tolerance in allogeneic cells and organ transplantations. In mice, we showed that alloantigen-specific Tregs (spe-Tregs) were more efficient than polyclonal Tregs (poly-Tregs) in controlling graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Here we describe a clinical-grade compliant method for generating human spe-Tregs. Tregs were enriched from leukapheresis products with anti-CD25 immunomagnetic beads, primed twice by allogeneic mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells (mDCs), and cultured during 3 weeks in medium containing interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-15, and rapamycin. After 3 weeks of culture, final cell products were expanded 8.3-fold from the initial CD25(+) purifications. Immunophenotypic analyses of final cells indicate that they were composed of 88 ± 2.6% of CD4(+) T cells, all expressing Treg-specific markers (FOXP3, Helios, GARP, LAP, and CD152). Spe-Tregs were highly suppressive in vitro and also in vivo using a xeno-GVHD model established in immunodeficient mice. The specificity of their suppressive activity was demonstrated on their ability to significantly suppress the proliferation of autologous effector T cells stimulated by the same mDCs compared to third-party mDCs. Our data provide evidence that functional alloantigen Tregs can be generated under clinical-grade compliant conditions. Taking into account that 130 × 10(6) CD25(+) cells can be obtained at large scale from standard leukapheresis, our cell process may give rise to a theoretical final number of 1 × 10(9) spe-Tregs. Thus, using our strategy, we can propose to prepare spe-Tregs for clinical trials designed to control HLA-mismatched GVHD or organ transplantation rejection.

  7. Involvement of the IL-23/IL-17 axis and the Th17/Treg balance in the pathogenesis and control of autoimmune arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Astry, Brian; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H.; Moudgil, Kamal D.

    2014-01-01

    The T helper (Th) cell subsets are characterized by the type of cytokines produced and the master transcription factor expressed. Th1 cells participate in cell-mediated immunity, whereas Th2 cells promote humoral immunity. Furthermore, the two subsets can control each other. Thereby, Th1-Th2 balance offered a key paradigm in understanding the induction and regulation of immune pathology in autoimmune and other diseases. However, over the past decade, Th17 cells producing interleukin-17 (IL-17) have emerged as the major pathogenic T cell subset in many pathological conditions that were previously attributed to Th1 cells. In addition, the role of CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells (Treg) in controlling the activity of Th17 and other T cell subsets has increasingly been realized. Thereby, examination of the Th17/Treg balance in the course of autoimmune diseases has significantly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of these disorders. The differentiation of Th17 and Treg cells from naïve T cells is inter-related and controlled in part by the cytokine milieu. For example, transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) is required for Treg induction, whereas the same cytokine in the presence of IL-6 (or IL-1) promotes the differentiation of Th17. Furthermore, IL-23 plays a role in the maintenance of Th17. Accordingly, novel therapeutic approaches are being developed to target IL-23/IL-17 as well as to modulate the Th17/Treg balance in favor of immune regulation to control autoimmunity. PMID:25595306

  8. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells, immune stimulation and host defence against infection

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Jared H; Ertelt, James M; Way, Sing Sing

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is intricately regulated allowing potent effectors to expand and become rapidly mobilized after infection, while simultaneously silencing potentially detrimental responses that averts immune-mediated damage to host tissues. This relies in large part on the delicate interplay between immune suppressive regulatory CD4+ T (Treg) cells and immune effectors that without active suppression by Treg cells cause systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity. Although these beneficial roles have been classically described as counterbalanced by impaired host defence against infection, newfound protective roles for Treg cells against specific viral pathogens (e.g. herpes simplex virus 2, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, West Nile virus) have been uncovered using transgenic mice that allow in vivo Treg-cell ablation based on Foxp3 expression. In turn, Foxp3+ Treg cells also provide protection against some parasitic (Plasmodium sp., Toxoplasma gondii) and fungal (Candida albicans) pathogens. By contrast, for bacterial and mycobacterial infections (e.g. Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enterica, Mycobacterium tuberculosis), experimental manipulation of Foxp3+ cells continues to indicate detrimental roles for Treg cells in host defence. This variance is probably related to functional plasticity in Treg cell suppression that shifts discordantly following infection with different types of pathogens. Furthermore, the efficiency whereby Treg cells silence immune activation coupled with the plasticity in Foxp3+ cell activity suggest that overriding Treg-mediated suppression represents a prerequisite ‘signal zero’ that together with other stimulation signals [T-cell receptor (signal 1), co-stimulation (signal 2), inflammatory cytokines (signal 3)] are essential for T-cell activation in vivo. Herein, the importance of Foxp3+ Treg cells in host defence against infection, and the significance of infection-induced shifts in Treg-cell suppression are summarized. PMID

  9. TLR4 regulates IFN-γ and IL-17 production by both thymic and induced Foxp3+ Tregs during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Anthony T; Yao, Suxia; Stefka, Andrew T; Liu, Zhanju; Qin, Hongwei; Liu, Houpu; Evans-Marin, Heather L; Elson, Charles O; Nagler, Cathryn R; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-11-01

    Tregs play a crucial role in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. However, significant numbers of Foxp3(+) Tregs accumulate in the inflamed lesions in experimental colitis and in IBD patients. Treg production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and/or IL-17 may arguably explain their ineffectiveness in suppressing intestinal inflammation. However, it remains unknown whether iTreg and tTreg produce proinflammatory cytokines and how TLR signaling regulates this process. Here, we found that Foxp3(+)Tregs were increased in the intestines of B6.TLR4(-/-) and B6.IL-10(-/-) mice when compared with WT B6 mice. TLR4(-/-) and IL-10(-/-) resulted in more Tregs within inflamed intestines. The majority of Foxp3(+) Tregs in the spleen was Helios(+)Nrp1(+), whereas most Foxp3(+) Tregs in the intestinal LP were Helios(-)Nrp1(-). More Helios(+)Nrp1(+) Tregs expressed IFN-γ and/or IL-17 than did Helios(-)Nrp1(-) Tregs in the spleen and intestine, which was increased with TLR4(-/-). TLR4 signaling in T cells and APCs inhibited Foxp3(+) induction via MyD88-dependent, TRIF-independent pathways, which was negatively regulated by SOCS3. Collectively, these data demonstrate Helios(+)Nrp1(+) tTregs and Helios(-)Nrp1(-) iTregs produce proinflammatory cytokines in the intestines during inflammation, which was regulated by TLR4 signaling.

  10. Dendritic Cells Coordinate the Development and Homeostasis of Organ-Specific Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Leventhal, Daniel S; Gilmore, Dana C; Berger, Julian M; Nishi, Saki; Lee, Victoria; Malchow, Sven; Kline, Douglas E; Kline, Justin; Vander Griend, Donald J; Huang, Haochu; Socci, Nicholas D; Savage, Peter A

    2016-04-19

    Although antigen recognition mediated by the T cell receptor (TCR) influences many facets of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell biology, including development and function, the cell types that present antigen to Treg cells in vivo remain largely undefined. By tracking a clonal population of Aire-dependent, prostate-specific Treg cells in mice, we demonstrated an essential role for dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating organ-specific Treg cell biology. We have shown that the thymic development of prostate-specific Treg cells required antigen presentation by DCs. Moreover, Batf3-dependent CD8α(+) DCs were dispensable for the development of this clonotype and had negligible impact on the polyclonal Treg cell repertoire. In the periphery, CCR7-dependent migratory DCs coordinated the activation of organ-specific Treg cells in the prostate-draining lymph nodes. Our results demonstrate that the development and peripheral regulation of organ-specific Treg cells are dependent on antigen presentation by DCs, implicating DCs as key mediators of organ-specific immune tolerance.

  11. Thymus-deriving natural regulatory T cell generation in vitro: role of the source of activation signals.

    PubMed

    Bieńkowska, Anna; Kiernozek, Ewelina; Kozlowska, Ewa; Zarzycki, Michał; Drela, Nadzieja

    2014-12-01

    In this research we have examined different sources of activation signals in order to optimize culture conditions for in vitro generation of thymus-deriving natural regulatory T cells (nTregs). We have established a novel model using JAWS II dendritic cell line of immature phenotype and compared it to commonly used methods for the generation of Tregs from peripheral lymphoid organs or blood T cells. In our model the first activation signal is provided by anti-CD3 monoclonal antibodies while the second is delivered by costimulatory molecules expressed on JAWS II cells. The presence of JAWS II cells co-cultured in vitro with unsorted thymocytes directly isolated from the thymus gland creates environment favoring SP CD4+ differentiation, provides the apoptotic cells clearance, maintains the survival of thymocytes and facilitate nTreg generation. Moreover the usage of immature dendritic cells stimuli enables to conduct research on agents affecting nTreg survival, proliferation and development in conditions of cell-to-cell contact of undifferentiated thymocytes with dendritic cells.

  12. Regulatory T cell effects in antitumor laser immunotherapy: a mathematical model and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have tremendous influence on treatment outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy for cancerous tumors. We present a mathematical model incorporating the primary cellular and molecular components of antitumor laser immunotherapy. We explicitly model developmental classes of dendritic cells (DCs), cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), primary and metastatic tumor cells, and tumor antigen. Regulatory T cells have been shown to kill antigen presenting cells, to influence dendritic cell maturation and migration, to kill activated killer CTLs in the tumor microenvironment, and to influence CTL proliferation. Since Tregs affect explicitly modeled cells, but we do not explicitly model dynamics of Treg themselves, we use model parameters to analyze effects of Treg immunosuppressive activity. We will outline a systematic method for assigning clinical outcomes to model simulations and use this condition to associate simulated patient treatment outcome with Treg activity.

  13. Mechanisms of regulatory T-cell suppression – a diverse arsenal for a moving target

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Huang, Yu-Hui; Fowell, Deborah J

    2008-01-01

    Naturally-occurring regulatory T cells (Tregs) are emerging as key regulators of immune responses to self-tissues and infectious agents. Insight has been gained into the cell types and the cellular events that are regulated by Tregs. Indeed, Tregs have been implicated in the control of initial activation events, proliferation, differentiation and effector function. However, the mechanisms by which Tregs disable their cellular targets are not well understood. Here we review recent advances in the identification of distinct mechanisms of Treg action and of signals that enable cellular targets to escape regulation. Roles for inhibitory cytokines, cytotoxic molecules, modulators of cAMP and cytokine competition have all been demonstrated. The growing number of inhibitory mechanisms ascribed to Tregs suggests that Tregs take a multi-pronged approach to immune regulation. It is likely that the relative importance of each inhibitory mechanism is context dependent and modulated by the inflammatory milieu and the magnitude of the immune response. In addition, the target cell may be differentially susceptible or resistant to distinct Treg mechanisms depending on their activation or functional status at the time of the Treg encounter. Understanding when and where each suppressive tool is most effective will help to fine tune therapeutic strategies to promote or constrain specific arms of Treg suppression. PMID:18346152

  14. Regulatory Cell Populations in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Patients: Effect of Disease Activity and Treatment Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Rodi, Maria; Dimisianos, Nikolaos; de Lastic, Anne-Lise; Sakellaraki, Panagiota; Deraos, George; Matsoukas, John; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of autoimmune etiology that results from an imbalance between CNS-specific T effector cells and peripheral suppressive mechanisms mediated by regulatory cells (RC). In this research, we collected blood samples from 83 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients and 45 healthy persons (HC), to assess the sizes of their RC populations, including CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ (nTregs), CD3+CD4+HLA−G+, CD3+CD8+CD28−, CD3+CD56+, and CD56bright cells, and how RC are affected by disease activity (acute phase or remission) and types of treatment (methylprednisolone, interferon, or natalizumab). In addition, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cultured them with peptides mapping to myelin antigens, to determine RC responsiveness to autoantigens. The results showed decreased levels of nTregs in patients in the acute phase ± methylprednisolone and in remission + natalizumab, but HC levels in patients in remission or receiving interferon. Patients + interferon had the highest levels of CD3+CD4+HLA−G+ and CD3+CD8+CD28− RC, and patients in the acute phase + methylprednisolone the lowest. Patients in remission had the highest levels of CD3+CD56+, and patients in remission + natalizumab the highest levels of CD56bright cells. Only nTregs responded to autoantigens in culture, regardless of disease activity or treatment. The highest suppressive activity was exhibited by nTregs from patients in remission. In conclusion, in RRMS disease activity and type of treatment affect different RC populations. nTregs respond to myelin antigens, indicating that it is possible to restore immunological tolerance through nTreg induction. PMID:27571060

  15. Human and Mouse CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells at Steady State and during Interleukin-2 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Churlaud, Guillaume; Pitoiset, Fabien; Jebbawi, Fadi; Lorenzon, Roberta; Bellier, Bertrand; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), CD8+ suppressor T cells are emerging as an important subset of regulatory T cells. Diverse populations of CD8+ T cells with suppressive activities have been described. Among them, a small population of CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells is found both in mice and humans. In contrast to thymic-derived CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs, their origin and their role in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are less understood. We report here the number, phenotype, and function of CD8+ Tregs cells in mice and humans, at the steady state and in response to low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). CD8+ Tregs represent approximately 0.4 and 0.1% of peripheral blood T cells in healthy humans and mice, respectively. In mice, their frequencies are quite similar in lymph nodes (LNs) and the spleen, but two to threefold higher in Peyer patches and mesenteric LNs. CD8+ Tregs express low levels of CD127. CD8+ Tregs express more activation or proliferation markers such as CTLA-4, ICOS, and Ki-67 than other CD8+ T cells. In vitro, they suppress effector T cell proliferation as well as or even better than CD4+ Tregs. Owing to constitutive expression of CD25, CD8+ Tregs are 20- to 40-fold more sensitive to in vitro IL-2 stimulation than CD8+ effector T cells, but 2–4 times less than CD4+ Tregs. Nevertheless, low-dose IL-2 dramatically expands and activates CD8+ Tregs even more than CD4+ Tregs, in mice and humans. Further studies are warranted to fully appreciate the clinical relevance of CD8+ Tregs in AIDs and the efficacy of IL-2 treatment. PMID:25926835

  16. Th17/Treg-related cytokine imbalance in sulfur mustard exposed and stable chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD) patients: correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated expression changes of Th17/Treg-related cytokine in transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLBs) of sulfur mustard (SM) exposure, stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and also compared it with a healthy control (HC) group. Here, ROR-γt, FoxP3, and Treg/Th17-related cytokines (IL-10, IL-17A, IL-6, and TGF-β1) were assessed using a combination of RT-QPCR and ELISA in 11 SM-exposed cases, 9 patients with GOLD stage II COPD diagnosed, and 8 HC. Our results showed that the levels of Foxp3 expression were lower and ROR-γt expression was higher in SM and COPD patients when compared with HC (all p values were less than 0.001). The relative Foxp3 expressions and Foxp3/ROR-γt ratio were positively correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.682 and R = 0.602, respectively; p ≤ 0.001). However, the relative ROR-γt expressions were inversely correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R= -0.75, p = 0.003) and relative Foxp3 expression (R= -0.704, p = 0.003). The mRNA and protein expression of IL-10 were significantly decreased in SM and COPD patients compared with HC (p < 0.001). An increase of IL-17A (∼7.2 fold) and TGF-β1 (∼5.6 fold) are involved in the lung exacerbation of SM and COPD patients. The expression of IL-6 was variable between three groups (p ≥ 0.05). In addition, an inverse correlation were observed between FEV1 (%) pred and expressions of IL-17A (R= -0.741), IL-6 (R= -0.673) and TGF-β1 (R= -0.632) (p ≤ 0.001). Instead, positive correlation was found between IL-10 ratios and FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.777, p = 0.001). These findings suggest that Treg/Th17-mediated distributions are involved in the progression of chronic lung injury of SM and COPD patients.

  17. Regulatory T cell suppression is potentiated by target T cells in a cell contact, IL-35- and IL-10-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Collison, Lauren W; Pillai, Meenu R; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Vignali, Dario A A

    2009-05-15

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are believed to suppress conventional T cell (T(conv)) proliferation in vitro in a contact-dependent, cytokine-independent manner, based in part on experiments in which T(reg) and T(conv) are separated by a permeable membrane. We show that the production of IL-35, a novel inhibitory cytokine expressed by natural T(reg), increases substantially following contact with T(conv). Surprisingly, T(reg) were able to mediate potent suppression of T(conv) across a permeable membrane when placed in direct contact with T(conv) in the upper chamber of a Transwell plate. Suppression was IL-35 and IL-10 dependent, and T(conv) activation was required for maximal potentiation of T(reg) suppression. These data suggest that it is the induction of suppression, rather than the function of T(reg) that is obligatorily contact dependent.

  18. Alteration of regulatory T cells in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tingting; Xiang, Yufei; Chang, Christopher; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2014-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterized by the destruction of pancreatic β cells. Numerous studies have demonstrated the key role of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the development of T1DM. However, the changes in Treg expression and function as well as the regulation of these activities are not clearly elucidated. Most studies on the role of Tregs in T1DM were performed on peripheral blood rather than pancreas or pancreatic lymph nodes. Tissue-based studies are more difficult to perform, and there is a lack of histological data to support the role of Tregs in T1DM. In spite of this, strategies to increase Treg cell number and/or function have been viewed as potential therapeutic approaches in treating T1DM, and several clinical trials using these strategies have already emerged. Notably, many trials fail to demonstrate clinical response even when Treg treatment successfully boosts Tregs. In view of this, whether a failure of Tregs does exist and contribute to the development of T1DM and whether more Tregs would be clinically beneficial to patients should be carefully taken into consideration before applying Tregs as treatments in T1DM.

  19. Rapid and Efficient Generation of Regulatory T Cells to Commensal Antigens in the Periphery.

    PubMed

    Nutsch, Katherine; Chai, Jiani N; Ai, Teresa L; Russler-Germain, Emilie; Feehley, Taylor; Nagler, Cathryn R; Hsieh, Chyi-Song

    2016-09-27

    Commensal bacteria shape the colonic regulatory T (Treg) cell population required for intestinal tolerance. However, little is known about this process. Here, we use the transfer of naive commensal-reactive transgenic T cells expressing colonic Tregcell receptors (TCRs) to study peripheral Treg (pTreg) cell development in normal hosts. We found that T cells were activated primarily in the distal mesenteric lymph node. Treg cell induction was rapid, generating >40% Foxp3(+) cells 1 week after transfer. Contrary to prior reports, Foxp3(+) cells underwent the most cell divisions, demonstrating that pTreg cell generation can be the dominant outcome from naive T cell activation. Moreover, Notch2-dependent, but not Batf3-dependent, dendritic cells were involved in Treg cell selection. Finally, neither deletion of the conserved nucleotide sequence 1 (CNS1) region in Foxp3 nor blockade of TGF-β (transforming growth factor-β)-receptor signaling completely abrogated Foxp3 induction. Thus, these data show that pTreg cell selection to commensal bacteria is rapid, is robust, and may be specified by TGF-β-independent signals. PMID:27681432

  20. Depletion of Fat Tregs Prevents Age-Associated Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bapat, Sagar P.; Suh, Jae Myoung; Fang, Sungsoon; Liu, Sihao; Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Albert; Zhou, Carmen; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R.; Yu, Ruth T.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.; Zheng, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Age-associated insulin resistance (IR) and obesity-associated IR are two physiologically distinct forms of adult onset diabetes. While macrophage-driven inflammation is a core driver of obesity-associated IR1–6, the underlying mechanisms of the obesity-independent yet highly prevalent age-associated IR7 are largely unexplored. Comparative adipo-immune profiling (AIP) reveals that fat-resident regulatory T cells, termed fTregs, accumulate in adipose tissue as a function of age, but not obesity. Supporting the existence of two distinct mechanisms underlying IR, mice deficient in fTregs are protected against age-associated IR, yet remain susceptible to obesity-associated IR and metabolic disease. In contrast, selective depletion of fTregs via anti-ST2 antibody treatment increases adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. These findings establish that distinct immune cell populations within adipose tissue underlie aging- and obesity-associated IR and implicate fTregs as adipo-immune drivers and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of age-associated IR. PMID:26580014

  1. The Dynamics of Treg/Th17 and the Imbalance of Treg/Th17 in Clonorchis sinensis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hui; Li, Bo; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Qian; Li, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Ying; Pan, Wei; Liu, Xiang-Ye; Tang, Ren-Xian; Zheng, Kui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis, is a chronic parasitic infection regulated by T cell subsets. An imbalance of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+regulatory T (Treg) and interleukin (IL)-17-secreting T cells (Th17) may control inflammation and play an important role in the pathogenesis of immune evasion. In the present study, we assessed the dynamics of Treg/Th17 and determined whether the Treg/Th17 ratio is altered in C. sinensis-infected mice. The results showed that the percentages of splenic Treg cells in CD4+ T cells were suppressed on day 14 post-infection (PI) but increased on day 56 PI, while Th17 cells were increased on day 56 PI compared with normal control (NC) mice. The Treg/Th17 ratio steadily increased from day 28 to day 56 PI. The hepatic levels of their specific transcription factors (Foxp3 for Treg and RORγt for Th17) were increased in C. sinensis-infected mice from day 14 to 56 PI, and significantly higher than those in NC mice. Meanwhile, serum levels of IL-2 and IL-17 were profoundly increased in C. sinensis-infected mice throughout the experiment; while the concentrations of IL-6 and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) peaked on day 14 PI, but then decreased on day 28 and 56 PI. Our results provide the first evidence of an increased Treg/Th17 ratio in C. sinensis-infected mice, suggesting that a Treg/Th17 imbalance may play a role in disease outcomes of clonorchiasis. PMID:26599407

  2. The Dynamics of Treg/Th17 and the Imbalance of Treg/Th17 in Clonorchis sinensis-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chao; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Hua, Hui; Li, Bo; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Qian; Li, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Ying; Pan, Wei; Liu, Xiang-Ye; Tang, Ren-Xian; Zheng, Kui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis, is a chronic parasitic infection regulated by T cell subsets. An imbalance of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+regulatory T (Treg) and interleukin (IL)-17-secreting T cells (Th17) may control inflammation and play an important role in the pathogenesis of immune evasion. In the present study, we assessed the dynamics of Treg/Th17 and determined whether the Treg/Th17 ratio is altered in C. sinensis-infected mice. The results showed that the percentages of splenic Treg cells in CD4+ T cells were suppressed on day 14 post-infection (PI) but increased on day 56 PI, while Th17 cells were increased on day 56 PI compared with normal control (NC) mice. The Treg/Th17 ratio steadily increased from day 28 to day 56 PI. The hepatic levels of their specific transcription factors (Foxp3 for Treg and RORγt for Th17) were increased in C. sinensis-infected mice from day 14 to 56 PI, and significantly higher than those in NC mice. Meanwhile, serum levels of IL-2 and IL-17 were profoundly increased in C. sinensis-infected mice throughout the experiment; while the concentrations of IL-6 and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) peaked on day 14 PI, but then decreased on day 28 and 56 PI. Our results provide the first evidence of an increased Treg/Th17 ratio in C. sinensis-infected mice, suggesting that a Treg/Th17 imbalance may play a role in disease outcomes of clonorchiasis. PMID:26599407

  3. Impaired function of regulatory T-cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Tan, Dino B A; Fernandez, Sonia; Price, Patricia; French, Martyn A; Thompson, Philip J; Moodley, Yuben P

    2014-12-01

    Anti-inflammatory pathways affecting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are poorly understood. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are important negative regulators of T-cell activity and hence were investigated in COPD patients in this study. We hypothesised that functional defects in Tregs may promote increased inflammation contributing to the pathogenesis of COPD. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from patients with stable COPD and age-matched non-smoking controls. Treg-mediated suppression of memory non-Treg (Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) T-cell activation was analysed by comparing PBMC responses to staphylococcal enterotoxin-B (SEB) pre- and post-depletion of Tregs (CD25(+)CD127(low)CD4(+) T-cells) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Activation of T-cells was assessed by HLA-DR expression. Levels of secreted cytokines were measured by ELISA. Depletion of Tregs increased SEB-induced activation of Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+) CD4(+) T-cells in samples from 15/15 healthy controls (demonstrating Treg-mediated suppression) and 9/14 COPD patients (Fisher's test, p=0.017). A screen of clinical data associated a failure of Treg-mediated suppression in the remaining five COPD patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) (33-38 kg/m(2)) compared to patients with unimpaired Treg function (20-32 kg/m(2)). In conclusion, we demonstrate impaired Treg-mediated suppression of CD4(+) T-cell activation in a subset of COPD patients, all of whom had high BMI. Obesity and/or perturbed homeostasis of Treg subsets may explain this defect and therefore contribute to increased inflammation observed in COPD.

  4. CD39/CD73 and the imbalance of Th17 cells and regulatory T cells in allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Tang, Hua-Ping; Shi, Guo-Chao; Wan, Huan-Ying; Tang, Wei; Hou, Xiao-Xia; Pan, Li-Na; Shi, Bao-Yu; Tao, Lian-Qin

    2013-11-01

    In the immune system, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain self‑tolerance and Th17 cells mediate inflammatory responses. CD39 is expressed on the surface of a subset of naturally occurring human Tregs that are important in constraining pathogenic Th17 cells. Additional studies have shown that Tregs differentiate into interleukin‑17 (IL‑17)+Foxp3+ T cells. Our previous study indicated an imbalance of Th17 and Tregs in allergic asthma; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using quantitative PCR (qPCR), CD39 and CD73 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells were investigated. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the proportion of IL‑17+Foxp3+ T cells, and CD39 and CD73 expressed by CD4+ T cells and Tregs in the peripheral blood of the subjects. The results of the present study demonstrated an increased frequency of CD4+Foxp3+IL‑17+ T cells in moderate to severe asthma. A deficiency in CD39 expressed on the surface of CD4+ T cells and Tregs was observed in asthma patients. The expression of CD39 and CD73 on the surface of CD4+ T cells and Tregs was negatively correlated with the number of Th17 cells. These results indicated that the plasticity of Tregs transforming to IL‑17+Foxp3+CD4+ T cells, the reduced frequency of CD39+ Tregs and less effective suppression of IL‑17 production by residual CD39+ Tregs leads to an imbalance of Th17 and Tregs in asthma. Therefore, enhanced CD39 activity is hypothesized to prevent the progression of asthma.

  5. Protein kinase CK2 enables regulatory T cells to suppress excessive TH2 responses in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ulges, Alexander; Klein, Matthias; Reuter, Sebastian; Gerlitzki, Bastian; Hoffmann, Markus; Grebe, Nadine; Staudt, Valérie; Stergiou, Natascha; Bohn, Toszka; Brühl, Till-Julius; Muth, Sabine; Yurugi, Hajime; Rajalingam, Krishnaraj; Bellinghausen, Iris; Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne; Reißig, Sonja; Haben, Irma; Zipp, Frauke; Waisman, Ari; Probst, Hans-Christian; Beilhack, Andreas; Buchou, Thierry; Filhol-Cochet, Odile; Boldyreff, Brigitte; Breloer, Minka; Jonuleit, Helmut; Schild, Hansjörg; Schmitt, Edgar; Bopp, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    The quality of the adaptive immune response depends on the differentiation of distinct CD4(+) helper T cell subsets, and the magnitude of an immune response is controlled by CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells). However, how a tissue- and cell type-specific suppressor program of Treg cells is mechanistically orchestrated has remained largely unexplored. Through the use of Treg cell-specific gene targeting, we found that the suppression of allergic immune responses in the lungs mediated by T helper type 2 (TH2) cells was dependent on the activity of the protein kinase CK2. Genetic ablation of the β-subunit of CK2 specifically in Treg cells resulted in the proliferation of a hitherto-unexplored ILT3(+) Treg cell subpopulation that was unable to control the maturation of IRF4(+)PD-L2(+) dendritic cells required for the development of TH2 responses in vivo.

  6. Regulatory T-cells are essential to promote proper CD4 T-cell priming upon mucosal infection

    PubMed Central

    Soerens, Andrew G.; Da Costa, Andreia; Lund, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) limit autoimmunity and immunopathology using a variety of suppressive mechanisms, but their roles during pathogen-directed immune responses remain unclear. Following Herpes Simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection, mice lacking Tregs fail to control viral replication, pointing to a role for Tregs in facilitating productive immune responses. Using adoptive transfer of TCR transgenic CD4 T-cells into Treg-sufficient or Treg-depleted mice prior to HSV-2 infection, we found that Tregs are required for timely accumulation of HSV-2-specific CD4 T-cells within the infected tissues. Further, Tregs are critical for appropriate trafficking of dendritic cells (DCs) from the vaginal mucosa to the dLN, which results in fully effective CD4 T-cell priming, activation, and ultimately migration to the infected tissues. Using CTLA-4 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that Tregs impact DC migration through a CTLA-4-mediated mechanism. Together, our data highlight the critical role of Tregs in proper potentiation of adaptive immune responses to microbial infection. PMID:27007674

  7. IL-21 is a major negative regulator of IRF4-dependent lipolysis affecting Tregs in adipose tissue and systemic insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fabrizi, Marta; Marchetti, Valentina; Mavilio, Maria; Marino, Arianna; Casagrande, Viviana; Cavalera, Michele; Moreno-Navarrete, Josè Maria; Mezza, Teresa; Sorice, Gian Pio; Fiorentino, Loredana; Menghini, Rossella; Lauro, Renato; Monteleone, Giovanni; Giaccari, Andrea; Fernandez Real, José Manuel; Federici, Massimo

    2014-06-01

    Obesity elicits immune cell infiltration of adipose tissue provoking chronic low-grade inflammation. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are specifically reduced in adipose tissue of obese animals. Since interleukin (IL)-21 plays an important role in inducing and maintaining immune-mediated chronic inflammatory processes and negatively regulates Treg differentiation/activity, we hypothesized that it could play a role in obesity-induced insulin resistance. We found IL-21 and IL-21R mRNA expression upregulated in adipose tissue of high-fat diet (HFD) wild-type (WT) mice and in stromal vascular fraction from human obese subjects in parallel to macrophage and inflammatory markers. Interestingly, a larger infiltration of Treg cells was seen in the adipose tissue of IL-21 knockout (KO) mice compared with WT animals fed both normal diet and HFD. In a context of diet-induced obesity, IL-21 KO mice, compared with WT animals, exhibited lower body weight, improved insulin sensitivity, and decreased adipose and hepatic inflammation. This metabolic phenotype is accompanied by a higher induction of interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4), a transcriptional regulator of fasting lipolysis in adipose tissue. Our data suggest that IL-21 exerts negative regulation on IRF4 and Treg activity, developing and maintaining adipose tissue inflammation in the obesity state.

  8. B7-deficient autoreactive T cells are highly susceptible to suppression by CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    May, Kenneth F; Chang, Xing; Zhang, Huiming; Lute, Kenneth D; Zhou, Penghui; Kocak, Ergun; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress immunity to infections and tumors as well as autoimmunity and graft-vs-host disease. Since Tregs constitutively express CTLA-4 and activated T cells express B7-1 and B7-2, it has been suggested that the interaction between CTLA-4 on Tregs and B7-1/2 on the effector T cells may be required for immune suppression. In this study, we report that autopathogenic T cells from B7-deficient mice cause multiorgan inflammation when adoptively transferred into syngeneic RAG-1-deficient hosts. More importantly, this inflammation is suppressed by adoptive transfer of purified wild-type (WT) CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. WT Tregs also inhibited lymphoproliferation and acquisition of activation markers by the B7-deficient T cells. An in vitro suppressor assay revealed that WT and B7-deficient T cells are equally susceptible to WT Treg regulation. These results demonstrate that B7-deficient T cells are highly susceptible to immune suppression by WT Tregs and refute the hypothesis that B7-CTLA-4 interaction between effector T cells and Tregs plays an essential role in Treg function.

  9. Lysosomal-associated Transmembrane Protein 4B (LAPTM4B) Decreases Transforming Growth Factor β1 (TGF-β1) Production in Human Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Huygens, Caroline; Liénart, Stéphanie; Dedobbeleer, Olivier; Stockis, Julie; Gauthy, Emilie; Coulie, Pierre G; Lucas, Sophie

    2015-08-14

    Production of active TGF-β1 is one mechanism by which human regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress immune responses. This production is regulated by glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), a transmembrane protein present on stimulated Tregs but not on other T lymphocytes (Th and CTLs). GARP forms disulfide bonds with proTGF-β1, favors its cleavage into latent inactive TGF-β1, induces the secretion and surface presentation of GARP·latent TGF-β1 complexes, and is required for activation of the cytokine in Tregs. We explored whether additional Treg-specific protein(s) associated with GARP·TGF-β1 complexes regulate TGF-β1 production in Tregs. We searched for such proteins by yeast two-hybrid assay, using GARP as a bait to screen a human Treg cDNA library. We identified lysosomal-associated transmembrane protein 4B (LAPTM4B), which interacts with GARP in mammalian cells and is expressed at higher levels in Tregs than in Th cells. LAPTM4B decreases cleavage of proTGF-β1, secretion of soluble latent TGF-β1, and surface presentation of GARP·TGF-β1 complexes by Tregs but does not contribute to TGF-β1 activation. Therefore, LAPTM4B binds to GARP and is a negative regulator of TGF-β1 production in human Tregs. It may play a role in the control of immune responses by decreasing Treg immunosuppression.

  10. Prevention of murine autoimmune diabetes by CCL22-mediated Treg recruitment to the pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Montane, Joel; Bischoff, Loraine; Soukhatcheva, Galina; Dai, Derek L; Hardenberg, Gijs; Levings, Megan K; Orban, Paul C; Kieffer, Timothy J; Tan, Rusung; Verchere, C Bruce

    2011-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by destruction of insulin-producing β cells in the pancreatic islets by effector T cells. Tregs, defined by the markers CD4 and FoxP3, regulate immune responses by suppressing effector T cells and are recruited to sites of action by the chemokine CCL22. Here, we demonstrate that production of CCL22 in islets after intrapancreatic duct injection of double-stranded adeno-associated virus encoding CCL22 recruits endogenous Tregs to the islets and confers long-term protection from autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. In addition, adenoviral expression of CCL22 in syngeneic islet transplants in diabetic NOD recipients prevented β cell destruction by autoreactive T cells and thereby delayed recurrence of diabetes. CCL22 expression increased the frequency of Tregs, produced higher levels of TGF-β in the CD4+ T cell population near islets, and decreased the frequency of circulating autoreactive CD8+ T cells and CD8+ IFN-γ–producing T cells. The protective effect of CCL22 was abrogated by depletion of Tregs with a CD25-specific antibody. Our results indicate that islet expression of CCL22 recruits Tregs and attenuates autoimmune destruction of β cells. CCL22-mediated recruitment of Tregs to islets may be a novel therapeutic strategy for type 1 diabetes. PMID:21737880

  11. Heat Shock Protein 60 in Eggs Specifically Induces Tregs and Reduces Liver Immunopathology in Mice with Schistosomiasis Japonica

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Sha; Jin, Xin; Chen, Xiaojun; Zhu, Jifeng; Xu, Zhipeng; Wang, Xuefeng; Liu, Feng; Hu, Wei; Zhou, Liang; Su, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Parasitic helminths need to suppress the host immune system to establish chronic infections. Paradoxically, immunosuppression induced by the worm also benefits the host by limiting excessive inflammation and tissue damage, which remains the major cause leading to serious morbidity and mortality. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key immune regulators of this mutualism. The successive rise in Tregs during schistosome infection plays a critical role in immunoregulation. We and others previously showed that Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) egg antigens (SEA) induce Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, we identified that SjHSP60 derived from SEA significantly induces Tregs in vivo and in vitro. However, the contribution of SjHSP60 in SEA to Treg induction and the related mechanisms of the Treg induction have not yet been identified. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we showed that S. japonicum stress protein HSP60 (SjHSP60) was constitutively and extensively expressed in eggs of S. japonicum. SjHSP60 specially induced Tregs in vivo and in vitro without inducing other CD4+ T sub-populations including Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells. Furthermore, we showed that the SjHSP60-depleted SEA almost lost the ability in vitro and displayed a significant impaired ability to induce Tregs in vivo. Finally, our study illustrated that the mechanisms of SjHSP60-mediated induction of Tregs are through both conversion of CD4+CD25- T cells into CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs and expansion of preexisting CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs in a TLR4-dependent manner. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our findings identify SjHSP60 as a major parasitic contributor of Treg induction in S. japonicum egg antigens, which not only contributes to the better understanding of the mechanism of immunoregulation during helminth infection, but also suggests its potential as a therapeutic target for control of immunopathology, allergic and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26418003

  12. Ocular allergy modulation to hi-dose antigen sensitization is a Treg-dependent process.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Soo; Schlereth, Simona; Khandelwal, Payal; Saban, Daniel R

    2013-01-01

    A reproducible method to inhibit allergic immune responses is accomplished with hi-dose Ag sensitization, via intraperitoneal (IP) injection. However, the role of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells (Treg) in this process is unknown, as is whether such modulation extends to ocular allergy. We therefore determined herein whether hi-dose sensitization modulates ocular allergy, and whether CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg are involved. C57BL/6 mice were IP sensitized via low-dose (100 µg) versus hi-dose (1000 µg) ovalbumin (OVA), in aluminum hydroxide (1 mg) and pertussis-toxin (300 ng). Other mice received anti-CD25 Ab (PC61) to ablate Treg during sensitization. In another experiment, Treg from hi-dose sensitized mice were adoptively transferred into low-dose sensitized mice. Once daily OVA challenges were administered. Clinical signs, IgE, T cell cytokines, and eosinophils were assessed. Data revealed that hi-dose, but not low-dose, sensitization led to allergy modulation, indicated by decreased clinical signs, serum IgE levels, Th2 recall responses, and eosinophil recruitment. T cells from hi-dose sensitized mice showed a robust increase in TGF-b production, and Treg from these mice were able to efficiently suppress effector T cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, in vivo Treg ablation in hi-dose sensitized mice revoked allergy modulation. Lastly, Treg from hi-dose sensitized mice were able to adoptively transfer allergy modulation to their low-dose sensitized counterparts. Collectively, these findings indicate that modulation to hi-dose sensitization, which is extended to ocular allergy, occurs in a Treg-dependent manner. In addition, our data suggest that hi-dose sensitization may henceforth facilitate the further examination of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ Treg in allergic disease.

  13. Macrophages overexpressing Aire induce CD4+Foxp3+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jitong; Fu, Haiying; Wu, Jing; Zhu, Wufei; Li, Yi; Yang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Aire plays an important role in central immune tolerance by regulating the transcription of thousands of genes. However, the role of Aire in the peripheral immune system is poorly understood. Regulatory T (Treg) cells are considered essential for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance, but the effect of Aire on Treg cells in the peripheral immune system is currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of macrophages overexpressing Aire on CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells by co-culturing Aire-overexpressing RAW264.7 cells or their supernatant with splenocytes. The results show that macrophages overexpressing Aire enhanced the expression of Foxp3 mRNA and induced different subsets of Treg cells in splenocytes through cell-cell contact or a co-culture supernatants. TGF-β is a key molecule in the increases of CD4+CD45RA+Foxp3hi T cell and activating Treg (aTreg) levels observed following cell‑supernatant co-culturing. Subsets of Treg cells were induced by Aire-overexpressing macrophages, and the manipulation of Treg cells by the targeting of Aire may provide a method for the treatment of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases.

  14. Impaired NK cells' activity and increased numbers of CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Renhua; Xiang, Yangen; Yang, Li; Liu, Yanke; Chen, Pingsheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wenjun; Yin, Ke; Fu, Manjiao; Xu, Yixin; Wu, Jialin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) often causes persistent infection and chemotherapy failure, which brings heavy burden of society and family. Many immune cell subsets and regulatory mechanisms may operate throughout the various stages of infection. The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is thought to be an important mechanism that TB successfully evades the immune system. Tregs play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses. The role of Tregs in MDR-TB infection and persistence is inadequately documented. The current study was designed to determine whether CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells may modulate innate immunity (such as NK cells) against human tuberculosis. Our results indicated that the numbers of CD4 + CD25+ Treg cells increased in MDR-TB patients' blood, and the cytokine production of IL-10 increased from MDR-patients compared with healthy subjects, along with the lower activity and low CD69 expression of NK cells in patients. These results suggested that immunity to MDR-TB patients induced circulating CD4 + CD25+ T regulatory cells expansion, which may be related to the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, and to the balance between effectors immune responses and suppression immune responses. PMID:27156613

  15. Viral antigen induces differentiation of Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells in influenza virus-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Felipe; Cheng, Guang-Shing; Leibow, Abigail; Zakhary, Nardine; Weissler, Kate; Garcia, Victoria; Aitken, Malinda; Kropf, Elizabeth; Garlick, David S.; Wherry, E. John; Erikson, Jan; Caton, ndrew J.

    2013-01-01

    We have examined the formation, participation and functional specialization of virus-reactive Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in a mouse model of influenza virus infection. “Natural” Tregs generated intra-thymically based on interactions with a self-peptide proliferated in response to a homologous viral antigen in the lungs, and to a lesser extent in the lung-draining mediastinal LN (medLN), of virus-infected mice. By contrast, conventional CD4+ T cells with identical TCR specificity underwent little or no conversion to become “adaptive” Tregs. The virus-reactive Tregs in the medLN and the lungs of infected mice upregulated a variety of molecules associated with Treg activation, and also acquired expression of molecules (T-bet, Blimp-1 and IL-10) that confer functional specialization to Tregs. Notably, however, the phenotypes of the T-bet+ Tregs obtained from these sites were distinct, since Tregs isolated from the lungs expressed significantly higher levels of T-bet, Blimp-1 and IL-10 than did Tregs from the medLN. Adoptive transfer of antigen-reactive Tregs led to decreased proliferation of anti-viral CD4+ and CD8+ effector T cells in the lungs of infected hosts, while depletion of Tregs had a reciprocal effect. These studies demonstrate that thymically-generated Tregs can become activated by a pathogen-derived peptide and acquire discrete T-bet+ Treg phenotypes while participating in and modulating an antiviral immune response. PMID:23667113

  16. Establishment of a heterotypic 3D culture system to evaluate the interaction of TREG lymphocytes and NK cells with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Duarte, Raquel; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to investigate breast tumour progression are yielding information more reminiscent of the in vivo microenvironment. We have established a 3D Matrigel system to determine the interactions of luminal phenotype MCF-7 cells and basal phenotype MDA-MB-231 cells with regulatory T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Immune cells were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic cell sorting and their phenotype validated using flow cytometry both before and after activation with IL-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Following the establishment of the heterotypic culture system, tumour cells displayed morphologies and cell-cell associations distinct to that observed in 2D monolayer cultures, and associated with tissue remodelling and invasion processes. We found that the level of CCL4 secretion was influenced by breast cancer phenotype and immune stimulation. We further established that for RNA extraction, the use of proteinase K in conjunction with the Qiagen RNeasy Mini Kit and only off-column DNA digestion gave the best RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also investigated the efficacy of the culture system for immunolocalisation of the biomarkers oestrogen receptor-α and the glycoprotein mucin 1 in luminal phenotype breast cancer cells; and epidermal growth factor receptor in basal phenotype breast cancer cells, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax embedded cultures. The expression of these markers was shown to vary under immune mediation. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this co-culture system for downstream applications including cytokine analysis, immunolocalisation of tumour biomarkers on serial sections and RNA extraction in accordance with MIQE guidelines. PMID:26215372

  17. Establishment of a heterotypic 3D culture system to evaluate the interaction of TREG lymphocytes and NK cells with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Duarte, Raquel; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to investigate breast tumour progression are yielding information more reminiscent of the in vivo microenvironment. We have established a 3D Matrigel system to determine the interactions of luminal phenotype MCF-7 cells and basal phenotype MDA-MB-231 cells with regulatory T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Immune cells were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic cell sorting and their phenotype validated using flow cytometry both before and after activation with IL-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Following the establishment of the heterotypic culture system, tumour cells displayed morphologies and cell-cell associations distinct to that observed in 2D monolayer cultures, and associated with tissue remodelling and invasion processes. We found that the level of CCL4 secretion was influenced by breast cancer phenotype and immune stimulation. We further established that for RNA extraction, the use of proteinase K in conjunction with the Qiagen RNeasy Mini Kit and only off-column DNA digestion gave the best RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also investigated the efficacy of the culture system for immunolocalisation of the biomarkers oestrogen receptor-α and the glycoprotein mucin 1 in luminal phenotype breast cancer cells; and epidermal growth factor receptor in basal phenotype breast cancer cells, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax embedded cultures. The expression of these markers was shown to vary under immune mediation. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this co-culture system for downstream applications including cytokine analysis, immunolocalisation of tumour biomarkers on serial sections and RNA extraction in accordance with MIQE guidelines.

  18. Regulatory T Cell DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition Accelerates Resolution of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Mock, Jason R.; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Florez, Marcus A.; Chau, Eric; Gibbs, Kevin W.; Mandke, Pooja; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; King, Landon S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and often fatal inflammatory lung condition without effective targeted therapies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) resolve lung inflammation, but mechanisms that enhance Tregs to promote resolution of established damage remain unknown. DNA demethylation at the forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) locus and other key Treg loci typify the Treg lineage. To test how dynamic DNA demethylation affects lung injury resolution, we administered the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) to wild-type (WT) mice beginning 24 hours after intratracheal LPS-induced lung injury. Mice that received DAC exhibited accelerated resolution of their injury. Lung CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs from DAC-treated WT mice increased in number and displayed enhanced Foxp3 expression, activation state, suppressive phenotype, and proliferative capacity. Lymphocyte-deficient recombinase activating gene-1–null mice and Treg-depleted (diphtheria toxin-treated Foxp3DTR) mice did not resolve their injury in response to DAC. Adoptive transfer of 2 × 105 DAC-treated, but not vehicle-treated, exogenous Tregs rescued Treg-deficient mice from ongoing lung inflammation. In addition, in WT mice with influenza-induced lung inflammation, DAC rescue treatment facilitated recovery of their injury and promoted an increase in lung Treg number. Thus, DNA methyltransferase inhibition, at least in part, augments Treg number and function to accelerate repair of experimental lung injury. Epigenetic pathways represent novel manipulable targets for the treatment of ARDS. PMID:25295995

  19. Imbalanced signal transduction in regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Dapeng; Farache, Julia; Mingueneau, Michael; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells have a fundamental role in immunological tolerance, with transcriptional and functional phenotypes that demarcate them from conventional CD4+ T cells (Tconv). Differences between these two lineages in the signaling downstream of T-cell receptor-triggered activation have been reported, and there are different requirements for some signaling factors. Seeking a comprehensive view, we found that Treg cells have a broadly dampened activation of several pathways and signaling nodes upon TCR-mediated activation, with low phosphorylation of CD3ζ, SLP76, Erk1/2, AKT, or S6 and lower calcium flux. In contrast, STAT phosphorylation triggered by interferons, IL2 or IL6, showed variations between Treg and Tconv in magnitude or choice of preferential STAT activation but no general Treg signaling defect. Much, but not all, of the Treg/Tconv difference in TCR-triggered responses could be attributed to lower responsiveness of antigen-experienced cells with CD44hi or CD62Llo phenotypes, which form a greater proportion of the Treg pool. Candidate regulators were tested, but the Treg/Tconv differential could not be explained by overexpression in Treg cells of the signaling modulator CD5, the coinhibitors PD-1 and CTLA4, or the regulatory phosphatase DUSP4. However, transcriptome profiling in Dusp4-deficient mice showed that DUSP4 enhances the expression of a segment of the canonical Treg transcriptional signature, which partially overlaps with the TCR-dependent Treg gene set. Thus, Treg cells, likely because of their intrinsically higher reactivity to self, tune down TCR signals but seem comparatively more attuned to cytokines or other intercellular signals. PMID:26627244

  20. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies hypomethylated genes regulated by FOXP3 in human regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuxia; Maksimovic, Jovana; Naselli, Gaetano; Qian, Junyan; Chopin, Michael; Blewitt, Marnie E; Oshlack, Alicia; Harrison, Leonard C

    2013-10-17

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) prevent the emergence of autoimmune disease. Prototypic natural Treg (nTreg) can be reliably identified by demethylation at the Forkhead-box P3 (FOXP3) locus. To explore the methylation landscape of nTreg, we analyzed genome-wide methylation in human naive nTreg (rTreg) and conventional naive CD4(+) T cells (Naive). We detected 2315 differentially methylated cytosine-guanosine dinucleotides (CpGs) between these 2 cell types, many of which clustered into 127 regions of differential methylation (RDMs). Activation changed the methylation status of 466 CpGs and 18 RDMs in Naive but did not alter DNA methylation in rTreg. Gene-set testing of the 127 RDMs showed that promoter methylation and gene expression were reciprocally related. RDMs were enriched for putative FOXP3-binding motifs. Moreover, CpGs within known FOXP3-binding regions in the genome were hypomethylated. In support of the view that methylation limits access of FOXP3 to its DNA targets, we showed that increased expression of the immune suppressive receptor T-cell immunoglobulin and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif domain (TIGIT), which delineated Treg from activated effector T cells, was associated with hypomethylation and FOXP3 binding at the TIGIT locus. Differential methylation analysis provides insight into previously undefined human Treg signature genes and their mode of regulation.

  1. Human dendritic cells acquire a semimature phenotype and lymph node homing potential through interaction with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Triebel, Frédéric; Kaveri, Srini V; Tough, David F

    2007-04-01

    Interactions between dendritic cells (DC) and T cells are known to involve the delivery of signals in both directions. We sought to characterize the effects on human DC of contact with different subsets of activated CD4+ T cells. The results showed that interaction with CD25(high)CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) caused DC to take on very different properties than contact with naive or memory phenotype T cells. Whereas non-Tregs stimulated DC maturation, culture with Tregs produced DC with a mixed phenotype. By many criteria, Tregs inhibited DC maturation, inducing down-regulation of costimulatory molecules and T cell stimulatory activity. However, DC exposed to Tregs also showed some changes typically associated with DC maturation, namely, increased expression of CCR7 and MHC class II molecules, and gained the ability to migrate in response to the CCR7 ligand CCL19. Both soluble factors and cell-associated molecules were shown to be involved in Treg modulation of DC, with lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) playing a predominant role in driving maturation-associated changes. The data show that Tregs induce the generation of semimature DC with the potential to migrate into lymphoid organs, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Tregs down-modulate immune responses. PMID:17371975

  2. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  3. An Imbalance between Frequency of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells and CCR4+ and CCR9+ Circulating Helper T Cells Is Associated with Active Perennial Allergic Conjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Galicia-Carreón, J.; Santacruz, C.; Ayala-Balboa, J.; Robles-Contreras, A.; Perez-Tapia, S. M.; Garfias, Y.; Hong, E.; Jiménez-Martínez, M. C.

    2013-01-01

    Allergic conjunctivitis (AC) is one of the most common eye disorders in ophthalmology. In mice models, it has been suggested that control of allergic conjunctivitis is a delicate balance between Tregs and inflammatory migrating effector cells. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency of Tregs and the frequency of homing receptors expressing cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with perennial allergic conjunctivitis (PAC). The analyses of phenotypic markers on CD4+ T cells and both soluble or intracellular cytokines were performed by flow cytometry. CD4+CD25+ cells were 15 times more frequent in PBMC from patients than HC; the vast majority of these CD4+CD25+ cells were FOXP3−, and most of CD4+ T cells were CCR4+ and CCR9+ cells. Upon allergen-stimulation, no significant changes were observed in frequency of Treg; however, an increased frequency of CD4+CCR4+CCR9+ cells, CD4+CD103+ cells and CD4+CD108+ cells with increased IL-5, IL-6, and IL-8 production was observed. These findings suggest an immune dysregulation in PAC, characterized by diminished frequency of Tregs and increased frequency of circulating activated CD4+ T cells; upon allergen-stimulation, these cells were expressing cell-surface molecules related to mucosa homing and were able to trigger an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:24368924

  4. CTLA4 blockade expands FoxP3+ regulatory and activated effector CD4+ T cells in a dose-dependent fashion

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, Brian; O'Brien, Shaun; Lee, David; Hou, Yafei; Weinberg, Vivian; Rini, Brian; Allison, James P.; Small, Eric J.

    2008-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) delivers inhibitory signals to activated T cells. CTLA4 is constitutively expressed on regulatory CD4+ T cells (Tregs), but its role in these cells remains unclear. CTLA4 blockade has been shown to induce antitumor immunity. In this study, we examined the effects of anti-CTLA4 antibody on the endogenous CD4+ T cells in cancer patients. We show that CTLA4 blockade induces an increase not only in the number of activated effector CD4+ T cells, but also in the number of CD4+ FoxP3+ Tregs. Although the effects were dose-dependent, CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells could be expanded at lower antibody doses. In contrast, expansion of effector T cells was seen only at the highest dose level studied. Moreover, these expanded CD4+ FoxP3+ regulatory T cells are induced to proliferate with treatment and possess suppressor function. Our results demonstrate that treatment with anti-CTLA4 antibody does not deplete human CD4+ FoxP3+ Tregs in vivo, but rather may mediate its effects through the activation of effector T cells. Our results also suggest that CTLA4 may inhibit Treg proliferation similar to its role on effector T cells. This study is registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00064129, registry number NCT00064129. PMID:18523152

  5. Impaired Th1 immunity in ovarian cancer patients is mediated by TNFR2+ Tregs within the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Govindaraj, Chindu; Scalzo-Inguanti, Karen; Madondo, Mutsa; Hallo, Julene; Flanagan, Katie; Quinn, Michael; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2013-10-01

    Ovarian cancer is a prevalent gynecological malignancy with potent immune-suppression capabilities; regulatory T cells (Tregs) are significant contributors to this immune-suppression. As ovarian cancer patients present with high levels of TNF and Tregs expressing TNFR2 are associated with maximal suppressive capacity, we investigated TNFR2+ Tregs within these patients. Indeed, TNFR2+ Tregs from tumor-associated ascites were the most potent suppressor T cell fraction. They were abundantly present within the ascites and more suppressive than peripheral blood TNFR2+ Tregs in patients. The increased suppressive capacity can be explained by a distinct cell surface expression profile, which includes high levels of CD39, CD73, TGF-β and GARP. Additionally, CD73 expression level on TNFR2+ Tregs was inversely correlated with IFN-γ production by effector T cells. This Treg fraction can be selectively recruited into the ascites from the peripheral blood of patients. Targeting TNFR2+ Tregs may offer new approaches to enhance the poor survival rates of ovarian cancer.

  6. Leptin directly promotes T-cell glycolytic metabolism to drive effector T-cell differentiation in a mouse model of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gerriets, Valerie A; Danzaki, Keiko; Kishton, Rigel J; Eisner, William; Nichols, Amanda G; Saucillo, Donte C; Shinohara, Mari L; MacIver, Nancie J

    2016-08-01

    Upon activation, T cells require energy for growth, proliferation, and function. Effector T (Teff) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, utilize high levels of glycolytic metabolism to fuel proliferation and function. In contrast, Treg cells require oxidative metabolism to fuel suppressive function. It remains unknown how Teff/Treg-cell metabolism is altered when nutrients are limited and leptin levels are low. We therefore examined the role of malnutrition and associated hypoleptinemia on Teff versus Treg cells. We found that both malnutrition-associated hypoleptinemia and T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout suppressed Teff-cell number, function, and glucose metabolism, but did not alter Treg-cell metabolism or suppressive function. Using the autoimmune mouse model EAE, we confirmed that fasting-induced hypoleptinemia altered Teff-cell, but not Treg-cell, glucose metabolism, and function in vivo, leading to decreased disease severity. To explore potential mechanisms, we examined HIF-1α, a key regulator of Th17 differentiation and Teff-cell glucose metabolism, and found HIF-1α expression was decreased in T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout Th17 cells, and in Teff cells from fasted EAE mice, but was unchanged in Treg cells. Altogether, these data demonstrate a selective, cell-intrinsic requirement for leptin to upregulate glucose metabolism and maintain function in Teff, but not Treg cells.

  7. Leptin directly promotes T-cell glycolytic metabolism to drive effector T-cell differentiation in a mouse model of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gerriets, Valerie A; Danzaki, Keiko; Kishton, Rigel J; Eisner, William; Nichols, Amanda G; Saucillo, Donte C; Shinohara, Mari L; MacIver, Nancie J

    2016-08-01

    Upon activation, T cells require energy for growth, proliferation, and function. Effector T (Teff) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, utilize high levels of glycolytic metabolism to fuel proliferation and function. In contrast, Treg cells require oxidative metabolism to fuel suppressive function. It remains unknown how Teff/Treg-cell metabolism is altered when nutrients are limited and leptin levels are low. We therefore examined the role of malnutrition and associated hypoleptinemia on Teff versus Treg cells. We found that both malnutrition-associated hypoleptinemia and T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout suppressed Teff-cell number, function, and glucose metabolism, but did not alter Treg-cell metabolism or suppressive function. Using the autoimmune mouse model EAE, we confirmed that fasting-induced hypoleptinemia altered Teff-cell, but not Treg-cell, glucose metabolism, and function in vivo, leading to decreased disease severity. To explore potential mechanisms, we examined HIF-1α, a key regulator of Th17 differentiation and Teff-cell glucose metabolism, and found HIF-1α expression was decreased in T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout Th17 cells, and in Teff cells from fasted EAE mice, but was unchanged in Treg cells. Altogether, these data demonstrate a selective, cell-intrinsic requirement for leptin to upregulate glucose metabolism and maintain function in Teff, but not Treg cells. PMID:27222115

  8. Stability of Regulatory T Cells Undermined or Endorsed by Different Type-1 Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Piconese, Silvia; Barnaba, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) encompass an array of immunosuppressive cells responsible for the protection against exacerbated immune responses and the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Various Treg subtypes, normally resident within distinct lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues, can be recruited and expanded during inflammation, possibly undergoing functional and molecular re-programming. Generally, two processes have been reported in different settings of type-1 response: i) Treg subpopulations acquiring the ability to specifically suppress Th1 cells (called Th1-suppressing Tregs), and ii) Treg subsets rather polarizing into IFN-γ-producing (called Th1-like) Tregs.Along the development of type-1 responses, Tregs are exposed to a variety of cytokines and other signals, exerting disparate activities. The combinatorial effects of typical Th1-driving cytokines, such as IL-12 (mostly produced by antigen-presenting cells during Th1 priming) and IFN-γ (mostly produced by pre-existing NK cells) lead to inhibition of Treg expansion and function, while promoting Th1-like Treg polarization. Conversely, cytokines produced at more advanced phases by Th1 effectors, such as IL-2, TNF-α and IFN-γ, promote Treg proliferation and/or Th1-suppressing Treg specialization. Some controversy exists around IL-27 and IFN-α, cytokines possibly released during bacterial or viral infections. Furthermore, cytokine signals can be finely tuned by the concomitant stimulation of costimulatory or coinhibitory receptors, such as OX40 and PD-1 respectively, within inflamed tissues.A model may be envisaged of an alternate Treg response to type-1 cytokines, being hampered or boosted by early or late phase cytokines, respectively. Such regulation would unleash the development of protective type-1 immunity while constraining exacerbated Th1 responses, possibly causing immunopathology. PMID:26324343

  9. The regulation and activation of lupus-associated B cells.

    PubMed

    Fields, Michele L; Hondowicz, Brian D; Wharton, Gina N; Adair, Brigette S; Metzgar, Michele H; Alexander, Shawn T; Caton, Andrew J; Erikson, Jan

    2005-04-01

    Anti-double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) B cells are regulated in non-autoimmune mice. While some are deleted or undergo receptor editing, a population of anti-dsDNA (VH3H9/V lambda 1) B cells that emigrate into the periphery has also been identified. These cells have an altered phenotype relative to normal B cells in that they have a reduced lifespan, appear developmentally arrested, and localize primarily to the T/B-cell interface in the spleen. This phenotype may be the consequence of immature B cells encountering antigen in the absence of T-cell help. When provided with T-cell help, the anti-dsDNA B cells differentiate into antibody-forming cells. In the context of the autoimmune-prone lpr/lpr or gld/gld mutations, the VH3H9/V lambda 1 anti-dsDNA B cells populate the B-cell follicle and by 12 weeks of age produce serum autoantibodies. The early event of anti-dsDNA B-cell follicular entry, in the absence of autoantibody production, is dependent upon CD4(+) T cells. We hypothesize that control of autoantibody production in young autoimmune-prone mice may be regulated by the counterbalancing effect of T-regulatory (T(reg)) cells. Consistent with this model, we have demonstrated that T(reg) cells are able to prevent autoantibody production induced by T-cell help. Additional studies are aimed at investigating the mechanisms of this suppression as well as probing the impact of distinct forms of T-cell-dependent and -independent activation on anti-dsDNA B cells.

  10. CD4+CD25+ FOXP3+ regulatory T cells from human thymus and cord blood suppress antigen-specific T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Kajsa; Larsson, Pia; Sandström, Kerstin; Lundin, Samuel B; Suri-Payer, Elisabeth; Rudin, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Activation of self-reactive T cells in healthy adults is prevented by the presence of autoantigen-specific CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (CD25+ Treg). To explore the functional development of autoantigen-reactive CD25+ Treg in humans we investigated if thymic CD25+ Treg from children aged 2 months to 11 years and cord blood CD25+ Treg are able to suppress proliferation and cytokine production induced by specific antigens. While CD4+CD25− thymocytes proliferated in response to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin, suppression of proliferation was not detected after the addition of thymic CD25+ Treg. However, CD25+ Treg inhibited interferon (IFN)-γ production induced by MOG, which indicates that MOG-reactive CD25+ Treg are present in the thymus. In contrast, cord blood CD25+ Treg suppressed both proliferation and cytokine production induced by MOG. Both cord blood and thymic CD25+ Treg expressed FOXP3 mRNA. However, FOXP3 expression was lower in cord blood than in thymic CD25+ T cells. Further characterization of cord blood CD25+ T cells revealed that FOXP3 was highly expressed by CD25+CD45RA+ cells while CD25+CD45RA− cells contained twofold less FOXP3, which may explain the lower expression level of FOXP3 in cord blood CD25+ T cells compared to thymic CD25+ T cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that low numbers of MOG-reactive functional CD25+ Treg are present in normal thymus, but that the suppressive ability of the cells is broader in cord blood. This suggests that the CD25+ Treg may be further matured in the periphery after being exported from the thymus. PMID:16011520

  11. Virus-induced tumor inflammation facilitates effective DC cancer immunotherapy in a Treg-dependent manner in mice

    PubMed Central

    Woller, Norman; Knocke, Sarah; Mundt, Bettina; Gürlevik, Engin; Strüver, Nina; Kloos, Arnold; Boozari, Bita; Schache, Peter; Manns, Michael P.; Malek, Nisar P.; Sparwasser, Tim; Zender, Lars; Wirth, Thomas C.; Kubicka, Stefan; Kühnel, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Vaccination using DCs pulsed with tumor lysates or specific tumor-associated peptides has so far yielded limited clinical success for cancer treatment, due mainly to the low immunogenicity of tumor-associated antigens. In this study, we have identified intratumoral virus-induced inflammation as a precondition for effective antitumor DC vaccination in mice. Administration of a tumor-targeted DC vaccine during ongoing virus-induced tumor inflammation, a regimen referred to as oncolysis-assisted DC vaccination (ODC), elicited potent antitumoral CD8+ T cell responses. This potent effect was not replicated by TLR activation outside the context of viral infection. ODC-elicited immune responses mediated marked tumor regression and successful eradication of preestablished lung colonies, an essential prerequisite for potentially treating metastatic cancers. Unexpectedly, depletion of Tregs during ODC did not enhance therapeutic efficacy; rather, it abrogated antitumor cytotoxicity. This phenomenon could be attributed to a compensatory induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in Treg-depleted and thus vigorously inflamed tumors, which prevented ODC-mediated immune responses. Consequently, Tregs are not only general suppressors of immune responses, but are essential for the therapeutic success of multimodal and temporally fine-adjusted vaccination strategies. Our results highlight tumor-targeting, replication-competent viruses as attractive tools for eliciting effective antitumor responses upon DC vaccination. PMID:21646722

  12. T regulatory cells and allergy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alison; Verhagen, Johan; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2005-06-01

    Anergy, tolerance and active suppression may not be independent events, but rather involve similar mechanisms and cell types in immune regulation. Induction of allergen-specific T(Reg) cells seems essential for maintaining a healthy immune response towards allergens. By utilizing multiple secreted cytokines and surface molecules, antigen-specific T(Reg) cells may re-direct an inappropriate immune response against allergens or auto-antigens.

  13. Suppression of intratumoral CCL22 by type i interferon inhibits migration of regulatory T cells and blocks cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Anz, David; Rapp, Moritz; Eiber, Stephan; Koelzer, Viktor H; Thaler, Raffael; Haubner, Sascha; Knott, Max; Nagel, Sarah; Golic, Michaela; Wiedemann, Gabriela M; Bauernfeind, Franz; Wurzenberger, Cornelia; Hornung, Veit; Scholz, Christoph; Mayr, Doris; Rothenfusser, Simon; Endres, Stefan; Bourquin, Carole

    2015-11-01

    The chemokine CCL22 is abundantly expressed in many types of cancer and is instrumental for intratumoral recruitment of regulatory T cells (Treg), an important subset of immunosuppressive and tumor-promoting lymphocytes. In this study, we offer evidence for a generalized strategy to blunt Treg activity that can limit immune escape and promote tumor rejection. Activation of innate immunity with Toll-like receptor (TLR) or RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) ligands prevented accumulation of Treg in tumors by blocking their immigration. Mechanistic investigations indicated that Treg blockade was a consequence of reduced intratumoral CCL22 levels caused by type I IFN. Notably, stable expression of CCL22 abrogated the antitumor effects of treatment with RLR or TLR ligands. Taken together, our findings argue that type I IFN blocks the Treg-attracting chemokine CCL22 and thus helps limit the recruitment of Treg to tumors, a finding with implications for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26432403

  14. Dietary Vitamin D Increases Percentages and Function of Regulatory T Cells in the Skin-Draining Lymph Nodes and Suppresses Dermal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Geldenhuys, Sian; Judge, Melinda; Weeden, Clare E.; Waithman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Skin inflammatory responses in individuals with allergic dermatitis may be suppressed by dietary vitamin D through induction and upregulation of the suppressive activity of regulatory T (TReg) cells. Vitamin D may also promote TReg cell tropism to dermal sites. In the current study, we examined the capacity of dietary vitamin D3 to modulate skin inflammation and the numbers and activity of TReg cells in skin and other sites including lungs, spleen, and blood. In female BALB/c mice, dietary vitamin D3 suppressed the effector phase of a biphasic ear swelling response induced by dinitrofluorobenzene in comparison vitamin D3-deficient female BALB/c mice. Vitamin D3 increased the percentage of TReg (CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) cells in the skin-draining lymph nodes (SDLN). The suppressive activity of TReg cells in the SDLN, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and blood was upregulated by vitamin D3. However, there was no difference in the expression of the naturally occurring TReg cell marker, neuropilin, nor the expression of CCR4 or CCR10 (skin-tropic chemokine receptors) on TReg cells in skin, SDLN, lungs, and airway-draining lymph nodes. These data suggest that dietary vitamin D3 increased the percentages and suppressive activity of TReg cells in the SDLN, which are poised to suppress dermal inflammation. PMID:27672666

  15. Dietary Vitamin D Increases Percentages and Function of Regulatory T Cells in the Skin-Draining Lymph Nodes and Suppresses Dermal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Geldenhuys, Sian; Judge, Melinda; Weeden, Clare E.; Waithman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Skin inflammatory responses in individuals with allergic dermatitis may be suppressed by dietary vitamin D through induction and upregulation of the suppressive activity of regulatory T (TReg) cells. Vitamin D may also promote TReg cell tropism to dermal sites. In the current study, we examined the capacity of dietary vitamin D3 to modulate skin inflammation and the numbers and activity of TReg cells in skin and other sites including lungs, spleen, and blood. In female BALB/c mice, dietary vitamin D3 suppressed the effector phase of a biphasic ear swelling response induced by dinitrofluorobenzene in comparison vitamin D3-deficient female BALB/c mice. Vitamin D3 increased the percentage of TReg (CD3+CD4+CD25+Foxp3+) cells in the skin-draining lymph nodes (SDLN). The suppressive activity of TReg cells in the SDLN, mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and blood was upregulated by vitamin D3. However, there was no difference in the expression of the naturally occurring TReg cell marker, neuropilin, nor the expression of CCR4 or CCR10 (skin-tropic chemokine receptors) on TReg cells in skin, SDLN, lungs, and airway-draining lymph nodes. These data suggest that dietary vitamin D3 increased the percentages and suppressive activity of TReg cells in the SDLN, which are poised to suppress dermal inflammation.

  16. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Deficiency in T Cells Accelerates Chronic Rejection by Influencing the Differentiation of CD4+ T Cells and Alternatively Activated Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Ping; Cheng, Chao; Wu, Jie; Wang, Sihua; Sun, Yuan; Liu, Zheng; Xie, Aini; Xia, Jiahong

    2014-01-01

    Background In a previous study, activation of the peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor γ (PPARγ) inhibited chronic cardiac rejection. However, because of the complexity of chronic rejection and the fact that PPARγ is widely expressed in immune cells, the mechanism of the PPARγ - induced protective effect was unclear. Materials and Methods A chronic rejection model was established using B6.C-H-2bm12KhEg (H-2bm12) mice as donors, and MHC II-mismatched T-cell-specific PPARγ knockout mice or wild type (WT) littermates as recipients. The allograft lesion was assessed by histology and immunohistochemistry. T cells infiltrates in the allograft were isolated, and cytokines and subpopulations were detected using cytokine arrays and flow cytometry. Transcription levels in the allograft were measured by RT-PCR. In vitro, the T cell subset differentiation was investigated after culture in various polarizing conditions. PPARγ-deficient regularory T cells (Treg) were cocultured with monocytes to test their ability to induce alternatively activated macrophages (AAM). Results T cell-specific PPARγ knockout recipients displayed reduced cardiac allograft survival and an increased degree of pathology compared with WT littermates. T cell-specific PPARγ knockout resulted in more CD4+ T cells infiltrating into the allograft and altered the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios. The polarization of AAM was also reduced by PPARγ deficiency in T cells through the action of Th2 and Treg. PPARγ-deficient T cells eliminated the pioglitazone-induced polarization of AAM and reduced allograft survival. Conclusions PPARγ-deficient T cells influenced the T cell subset and AAM polarization in chronic allograft rejection. The mechanism of PPARγ activation in transplantation tolerance could yield a novel treatment without side effects. PMID:25383620

  17. A rapid diagnostic test for human regulatory T-cell function to enable regulatory T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Canavan, James B.; Afzali, Behdad; Scottà, Cristiano; Fazekasova, Henrieta; Edozie, Francis C.; Macdonald, Thomas T.; Hernandez-Fuentes, Maria P.; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lord, Graham M.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25hiCD127lo-FOXP3+ T cells [Tregs]) are a population of lymphocytes involved in the maintenance of self-tolerance. Abnormalities in function or number of Tregs are a feature of autoimmune diseases in humans. The ability to expand functional Tregs ex vivo makes them ideal candidates for autologous cell therapy to treat human autoimmune diseases and to induce tolerance to transplants. Current tests of Treg function typically take up to 120 hours, a kinetic disadvantage as clinical trials of Tregs will be critically dependent on the availability of rapid diagnostic tests before infusion into humans. Here we evaluate a 7-hour flow cytometric assay for assessing Treg function, using suppression of the activation markers CD69 and CD154 on responder T cells (CD4+CD25− [Tresp]), compared with traditional assays involving inhibition of CFSE dilution and cytokine production. In both freshly isolated and ex vivo expanded Tregs, we describe excellent correlation with gold standard suppressor cell assays. We propose that the kinetic advantage of the new assay may place it as the preferred rapid diagnostic test for the evaluation of Treg function in forthcoming clinical trials of cell therapy, enabling the translation of the large body of preclinical data into potentially useful treatments for human diseases. PMID:22219224

  18. Deletion of Fibrinogen-like Protein 2 (FGL-2), a Novel CD4+ CD25+ Treg Effector Molecule, Leads to Improved Control of Echinococcus multilocularis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew; Spiliotis, Markus; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L.; Shalev, Itay; Levy, Gary; Lu, Xiaomei; Lin, Renyong; Wen, Hao; Gottstein, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background The growth potential of the tumor-like Echinococcus multilocularis metacestode (causing alveolar echinococcosis, AE) is directly linked to the nature/function of the periparasitic host immune-mediated processes. We previously showed that Fibrinogen-like-protein 2 (FGL2), a novel CD4+CD25+ Treg effector molecule, was over-expressed in the liver of mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis. However, little is known about its contribution to the control of this chronic helminth infection. Methods/Findings Key parameters for infection outcome in E. multilocularis-infected fgl2-/- (AE-fgl2-/-) and wild type (AE-WT) mice at 1 and 4 month(s) post-infection were (i) parasite load (i. e. wet weight of parasitic metacestode tissue), and (ii) parasite cell proliferation as assessed by determining E. multilocularis 14-3-3 gene expression levels. Serum FGL2 levels were measured by ELISA. Spleen cells cultured with ConA for 48h or with E. multilocularis Vesicle Fluid (VF) for 96h were analyzed ex-vivo and in-vitro. In addition, spleen cells from non-infected WT mice were cultured with rFGL2/anti-FGL2 or rIL-17A/anti-IL-17A for further functional studies. For Treg-immune-suppression-assays, purified CD4+CD25+ Treg suspensions were incubated with CD4+ effector T cells in the presence of ConA and irradiated spleen cells as APCs. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR were used to assess Treg, Th17-, Th1-, Th2-type immune responses and maturation of dendritic cells. We showed that AE-fgl2-/- mice exhibited (as compared to AE-WT-animals) (a) a significantly lower parasite load with reduced proliferation activity, (b) an increased T cell proliferative response to ConA, (c) reduced Treg numbers and function, and (d) a persistent capacity of Th1 polarization and DC maturation. Conclusions FGL2 appears as one of the key players in immune regulatory processes favoring metacestode survival by promoting Treg cell activity and IL-17A production that contributes to FGL2-regulation

  19. All-Trans Retinoic Acid Promotes TGF-β-Induced Tregs via Histone Modification but Not DNA Demethylation on Foxp3 Gene Locus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiyuan; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Liu, Ya; Xia, Zanxian; Wang, Julie; Han, Yuanping; Shi, Wei; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Brand, David; Li, Bin; Liu, Zhongmin; Zheng, Song Guo

    2011-01-01

    Background It has been documented all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) promotes the development of TGF-β-induced CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (iTreg) that play a vital role in the prevention of autoimmune responses, however, molecular mechanisms involved remain elusive. Our objective, therefore, was to determine how atRA promotes the differentiation of iTregs. Methodology/Principal Findings Addition of atRA to naïve CD4+CD25− cells stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies in the presence of TGF-β not only increased Foxp3+ iTreg differentiation, but maintained Foxp3 expression through apoptosis inhibition. atRA/TGF-β-treated CD4+ cells developed complete anergy and displayed increased suppressive activity. Infusion of atRA/TGF-β-treated CD4+ cells resulted in the greater effects on suppressing symptoms and protecting the survival of chronic GVHD mice with typical lupus-like syndromes than did CD4+ cells treated with TGF-β alone. atRA did not significantly affect the phosphorylation levels of Smad2/3 and still promoted iTreg differentiation in CD4+ cells isolated from Smad3 KO and Smad2 conditional KO mice. Conversely, atRA markedly increased ERK1/2 activation, and blockade of ERK1/2 signaling completely abolished the enhanced effects of atRA on Foxp3 expression. Moreover, atRA significantly increased histone methylation and acetylation within the promoter and conserved non-coding DNA sequence (CNS) elements at the Foxp3 gene locus and the recruitment of phosphor-RNA polymerase II, while DNA methylation in the CNS3 was not significantly altered. Conclusions/Significance We have identified the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which atRA promotes the development and maintenance of iTregs. These results will help to enhance the quantity and quality of development of iTregs and may provide novel insights into clinical cell therapy for patients with autoimmune diseases and those needing organ transplantation. PMID:21931768

  20. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  1. Lack of suppressive CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells in advanced stages of primary cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tiemessen, Machteld M; Mitchell, Tracey J; Hendry, Lisa; Whittaker, Sean J; Taams, Leonie S; John, Susan

    2006-10-01

    Mycosis fungoides and its leukemic variant, Sezary syndrome, are the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). In an ex vivo study, we investigated the percentage, phenotype, and suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood of CTCL patients. The percentage of Tregs did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Functional assays demonstrated a dichotomy in Treg function: in four out of 10 patients CD4+CD25+ T cells were incapable of suppressing autologous CD4+CD25- T-cell proliferation, whereas suppressive function was intact in the other six patients. Suppressive activity of Tregs inversely correlated with the peripheral blood tumor burden. T-plastin gene expression, used as a Sezary cell marker, confirmed that Sezary cells were heterogeneous for CD25 expression. Mixed lymphocyte reactions demonstrated that CD4+CD25- T cells from patients who lacked functional Tregs were susceptible to suppression by Tregs from healthy controls, and had not become suppressive themselves. Furthermore, we found reduced expression of Foxp3 in the CD4+CD25+ Tregs of these patients relative to the other six CTCL patients and controls. Our findings thus indicate a dysfunction of peripheral Tregs in certain CTCL patients, which correlates with tumor burden.

  2. Lack of Suppressive CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ T Cells in Advanced Stages of Primary Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tiemessen, Machteld M.; Mitchell, Tracey J.; Hendry, Lisa; Whittaker, Sean J.; Taams, Leonie S.; John, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides and its leukemic variant, Sezary syndrome, are the most common primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs). In an ex vivo study, we investigated the percentage, phenotype, and suppressive function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) from peripheral blood of CTCL patients. The percentage of Tregs did not differ significantly between patients and controls. Functional assays demonstrated a dichotomy in Treg function: in four out of 10 patients CD4+CD25+ T cells were incapable of suppressing autologous CD4+CD25- T-cell proliferation, whereas suppressive function was intact in the other six patients. Suppressive activity of Tregs inversely correlated with the peripheral blood tumor burden. T-plastin gene expression, used as a Sezary cell marker, confirmed that Sezary cells were heterogeneous for CD25 expression. Mixed lymphocyte reactions demonstrated that CD4+CD25- T cells from patients who lacked functional Tregs were susceptible to suppression by Tregs from healthy controls, and had not become suppressive themselves. Furthermore, we found reduced expression of Foxp3 in the CD4+CD25+ Tregs of these patients relative to the other six CTCL patients and controls. Our findings thus indicate a dysfunction of peripheral Tregs in certain CTCL patients, which correlates with tumor burden. PMID:16741512

  3. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D.; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P.

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4+ T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will shed light

  4. T-cell activation or tolerization: the Yin and Yang of bacterial superantigens

    PubMed Central

    Sähr, Aline; Förmer, Sandra; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Heeg, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens (SAg) are exotoxins from pathogens which interact with innate and adaptive immune cells. The paradox that SAgs cause activation and inactivation/anergy of T-cells was soon recognized. The structural and molecular events following SAg binding to antigen presenting cells (APCs) followed by crosslinking of T-cell receptors were characterized in detail. Activation, cytokine burst and T-cell anergy have been described in vitro and in vivo. Later it became clear that SAg-induced T-cell anergy is in part caused by SAg-dependent activation of T-regulatory cells (Tregs). Although the main focus of analyses was laid on T-cells, it was also shown that SAg binding to MHC class II molecules on APCs induces a signal, which leads to activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly APCs are mandatory for T-cell activation. So far it is not known, whether APCs play a role during SAg-triggered activation of Tregs. We therefore tested whether in SAg (Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A) -treated APCs an anti-inflammatory program is triggered in addition. We show here that not only the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the co-inhibitory surface molecule PD-L1 (CD274) but also inhibitory effector systems like indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) or intracellular negative feedback loops (suppressor of cytokine signaling molecules, SOCS) are induced by SAgs. Moreover, cyclosporine A completely prevented induction of this program. We therefore propose that APCs triggered by SAgs play a key role in T-cell activation as well as inactivation and induction of Treg cells. PMID:26539181

  5. Novel Foxp3− IL-10− Regulatory T-cells Induced by B-Cells Alleviate Intestinal Inflammation in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Tzu-Yu; Hsu, Ling-Hui; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed various Foxp3− regulatory T (Treg) cell subsets effectively protect mice from colitis. In the present study, we demonstrated that B cells induced a particular subset of regulatory T (Treg-of-B) cells, expressing programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), inducible costimulator (ICOS), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3), glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR), and OX-40, did not express Foxp3. Treg-of-B cells produced abundant levels of IL-10 and low levels of IL-4 and TGF-β. Adoptive transfer of Treg-of-B cells protected mice from CD4+CD45RBhi T-cell-induced colitis, including infiltration of leukocytes, depletion of goblet cells, epithelial hyperplasia, and inhibition of Th1 and Th17 cytokines. These features were similar to IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells; however, IL-10-deficient Treg-of-B cells maintained their suppressive function in vitro as well as in vivo, while the regulation of Tr1 cells depended on IL-10. In conclusion, Treg-of-B cells protected against experimental colitis through an IL-10-independent mechanism. We reported a novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells was different from conventional Foxp3+ Treg and IL-10-producing Tr1 cells. PMID:27581189

  6. Regulatory T cells in human and angiotensin II-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Wu, Wenxue; Lindholt, Jes S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Libby, Peter; Yu, Xueqing; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aims Regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect mice from angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). This study tested whether AAA patients are Treg-insufficient and the Treg molecular mechanisms that control AAA pathogenesis. Methods and results ELISA determined the Foxp3 concentration in blood cell lysates from 485 AAA patients and 204 age- and sex-matched controls. AAA patients exhibited lower blood cell Foxp3 expression than controls (P < 0.0001). Pearson's correlation test demonstrated a significant but negative correlation between Foxp3 and AAA annual expansion rate before (r = –0.147, P = 0.007) and after (r = –0.153, P = 0.006) adjustment for AAA risk factors. AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe–/–) mice that received different doses of Ang-II exhibited a negative correlation of lesion Foxp3+ Treg numbers with AAA size (r = –0.883, P < 0.0001). Adoptive transfer of Tregs from wild-type (WT) and IL10-deficient (Il10–/–) mice increased AAA lesion Treg content, but only WT mice Tregs reduced AAA size, AAA incidence, blood pressure, lesion macrophage and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell accumulation, and angiogenesis with concurrent increase of lesion collagen content. Both AAA lesion immunostaining and plasma ELISA demonstrated that adoptive transfer of WT Tregs, but not Il10–/– Tregs, reduced the expression of MCP-1. In vitro cell culture and aortic ring assay demonstrated that only Tregs from WT mice, but not those from Il10–/– mice, reduced macrophage MCP-1 secretion, macrophage and vascular cell protease expression and activity, and aortic ring microvessel formation. Conclusion This study supports a protective role of Tregs in human and experimental AAA by releasing IL10 to suppress inflammatory cell chemotaxis, arterial wall remodelling, and angiogenesis. PMID:25824145

  7. Foxp3(+) T cells expressing RORγt represent a stable regulatory T-cell effector lineage with enhanced suppressive capacity during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, B-H; Hagemann, S; Mamareli, P; Lauer, U; Hoffmann, U; Beckstette, M; Föhse, L; Prinz, I; Pezoldt, J; Suerbaum, S; Sparwasser, T; Hamann, A; Floess, S; Huehn, J; Lochner, M

    2016-03-01

    Foxp3 (forkhead box P3 transcription factor)-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for immunological tolerance, best illustrated by uncontrolled effector T-cell responses and autoimmunity upon loss of Foxp3 expression. Tregs can adopt specific effector phenotypes upon activation, reflecting the diversity of functional demands in the different tissues of the body. Here, we report that Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells coexpressing retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt), the master transcription factor for T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, represent a stable effector Treg lineage. Transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling revealed that Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells display signatures of both Tregs and Th17 cells, although the degree of similarity was higher to Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs than to Foxp3(-)RORγt(+) T cells. Importantly, Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells were significantly demethylated at Treg-specific epigenetic signature genes such as Foxp3, Ctla-4, Gitr, Eos, and Helios, suggesting that these cells have a stable regulatory rather than inflammatory function. Indeed, adoptive transfer of Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells in the T-cell transfer colitis model confirmed their Treg function and lineage stability in vivo, and revealed an enhanced suppressive capacity as compared with Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs. Thus, our data suggest that RORγt expression in Tregs contributes to an optimal suppressive capacity during gut-specific immune responses, rendering Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells as an important effector Treg subset in the intestinal system. PMID:26307665

  8. A robust, good manufacturing practice-compliant, clinical-scale procedure to generate regulatory T cells from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Alsuliman, Abdullah; Appel, Stanley H; Beers, David R; Basar, Rafet; Shaim, Hila; Kaur, Indresh; Zulovich, Jane; Yvon, Eric; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Kondo, Kayo; Liu, Enli; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a fundamental role in the maintenance of self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Defects in Treg function and/or frequencies have been reported in multiple disease models. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Compelling evidence supports a neuroprotective role for Tregs in this disease. Indeed, rapid progression in ALS patients is associated with decreased FoxP3 expression and Treg frequencies. Thus, we propose that strategies to restore Treg number and function may slow disease progression in ALS. In this study, we developed a robust, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant procedure to enrich and expand Tregs from ALS patients. Tregs isolated from these patients were phenotypically similar to those from healthy individuals but were impaired in their ability to suppress T-cell effector function. In vitro expansion of Tregs for 4 weeks in the presence of GMP-grade anti-CD3/CD28 beads, interleukin (IL)-2 and rapamcyin resulted in a 25- to 200-fold increase in their number and restored their immunoregulatory activity. Collectively, our data facilitate and support the implementation of clinical trials of adoptive therapy with ex vivo expanded and highly suppressive Tregs in patients with ALS.

  9. Increased frequency and suppressive activity of CD127(low/-) regulatory T cells in the peripheral circulation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are associated with advanced stage and nodal involvement.

    PubMed

    Drennan, Samantha; Stafford, Nicholas D; Greenman, John; Green, Victoria L

    2013-11-01

    The presence of regulatory T (Treg) cells is thought to be an important mechanism by which head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) successfully evades the immune system. Using multicolour flow cytometry, the frequency and functional capacity of two CD4(+)  CD127(low/-) Treg cell populations, separated on the basis of different levels of CD25 expression (CD25(inter) and CD25(high) ), from the peripheral circulation of newly presenting HNSCC patients were assessed with regard to clinicopathological features and healthy controls. The frequency of circulating Treg cells was similar between HNSCC patients and healthy controls, and for patients with HNSCC developing from different subsites (laryngeal compared with oropharyngeal). However, patients with advanced stage tumours and those with nodal involvement had significantly elevated levels of CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells compared with patients who had early stage tumours (P = 0·03) and those without nodal involvement (P = 0·03), respectively. CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells from the entire HNSCC patient cohort and from patients whose tumours had metastasized to the lymph nodes were also shown to suppress the proliferation of effector T cells significantly more, compared with those from healthy controls (P = 0·04) or patients with no nodal involvement (P = 0·04). Additionally, CD4(+)  CD25(inter)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells consistently induced greater suppressive activity than CD4(+)  CD25(high)  CD127(low/-) Treg cells on the proliferation of the effector T-cell populations (CD4(+)  CD25(-)  CD127(-/+) and CD4(+)  CD25(+)  CD127(+) ). Peripheral Treg cells, identified by the CD127(low/-) phenotype, have been shown to be influenced by a patient's tumour stage and/or nodal status in HNSCC; suggesting a role in tumour progression that could be manipulated by future immunotherapy.

  10. SHARPIN controls the development of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Redecke, Vanessa; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kuriakose, Jeeba; Häcker, Hans

    2016-06-01

    SHARPIN is an essential component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) complex that controls signalling pathways of various receptors, including the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and antigen receptor, in part by synthesis of linear, non-degrading ubiquitin chains. Consistent with SHARPIN's function in different receptor pathways, the phenotype of SHARPIN-deficient mice is complex, including the development of inflammatory systemic and skin diseases, the latter of which depend on TNFR signal transduction. Given the established function of SHARPIN in primary and malignant B cells, we hypothesized that SHARPIN might also regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thereby control T-cell biology. Here, we focus primarily on the role of SHARPIN in T cells, specifically regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that SHARPIN-deficient (Sharpin(cpdm/cpdm) ) mice have significantly reduced numbers of FOXP3(+) Treg cells in lymphoid organs and the peripheral blood. Competitive reconstitution of irradiated mice with mixed bone marrow from wild-type and SHARPIN-deficient mice revealed an overall reduced thymus population with SHARPIN-deficient cells with almost complete loss of thymic Treg development. Consistent with this cell-intrinsic function of SHARPIN in Treg development, TCR stimulation of SHARPIN-deficient thymocytes revealed reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, establishing a function of SHARPIN in TCR signalling, which may explain the defective Treg development. In turn, in vitro generation and suppressive activity of mature SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells were comparable to wild-type cells, suggesting that maturation, but not function, of SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells is impaired. Taken together, these findings show that SHARPIN controls TCR signalling and is required for efficient generation of Treg cells in vivo, whereas the inhibitory function of mature Treg cells appears to be

  11. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  12. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-02-17

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  13. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  14. Activation of Salmonella Typhi-specific regulatory T cells in typhoid disease in a wild-type S. Typhi challenge model.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Monica A; Fresnay, Stephanie; Magder, Laurence S; Darton, Thomas C; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S; Blohmke, Christoph J; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M; Pollard, Andrew J; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2015-05-01

    Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently available vaccines are moderately efficacious, and identification of immunological responses associated with protection or disease will facilitate the development of improved vaccines. We investigated S. Typhi-specific modulation of activation and homing potential of circulating regulatory T cells (Treg) by flow and mass cytometry using specimens obtained from a human challenge study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from volunteers pre- and at multiple time-points post-challenge with wild-type S. Typhi. We identified differing patterns of S. Typhi-specific modulation of the homing potential of circulating Treg between volunteers diagnosed with typhoid (TD) and those who were not (No TD). TD volunteers demonstrated up-regulation of the gut homing molecule integrin α4ß7 pre-challenge, followed by a significant down-regulation post-challenge consistent with Treg homing to the gut. Additionally, S. Typhi-specific Treg from TD volunteers exhibited up-regulation of activation molecules post-challenge (e.g., HLA-DR, LFA-1). We further demonstrate that depletion of Treg results in increased S. Typhi-specific cytokine production by CD8+ TEM in vitro. These results suggest that the tissue distribution of activated Treg, their characteristics and activation status may play a pivotal role in typhoid fever, possibly through suppression of S. Typhi-specific effector T cell responses. These studies provide important novel insights into the regulation of immune responses that are likely to be critical in protection against typhoid and other enteric infectious diseases.

  15. IL-34 is a Treg-specific cytokine and mediates transplant tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bézie, Séverine; Picarda, Elodie; Ossart, Jason; Tesson, Laurent; Usal, Claire; Renaudin, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines and metabolic pathway–controlling enzymes regulate immune responses and have potential as powerful tools to mediate immune tolerance. Blockade of the interaction between CD40 and CD40L induces long-term cardiac allograft survival in rats through a CD8+CD45RClo Treg potentiation. Here, we have shown that the cytokine IL-34, the immunoregulatory properties of which have not been previously studied in transplantation or T cell biology, is expressed by rodent CD8+CD45RClo Tregs and human FOXP3+CD45RCloCD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. IL-34 was involved in the suppressive function of both CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs and markedly inhibited alloreactive immune responses. Additionally, in a rat cardiac allograft model, IL-34 potently induced transplant tolerance that was associated with a total inhibition of alloantibody production. Treatment of rats with IL-34 promoted allograft tolerance that was mediated by induction of CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. Moreover, these Tregs were capable of serial tolerance induction through modulation of macrophages that migrate early to the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that human macrophages cultured in the presence of IL-34 greatly expanded CD8+ and CD4+ FOXP3+ Tregs, with a superior suppressive potential of antidonor immune responses compared with non–IL-34–expanded Tregs. In conclusion, we reveal that IL-34 serves as a suppressive Treg–specific cytokine and as a tolerogenic cytokine that efficiently inhibits alloreactive immune responses and mediates transplant tolerance. PMID:26389674

  16. Tregs control the development of symptomatic West Nile virus infection in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lanteri, Marion C; O'Brien, Katie M; Purtha, Whitney E; Cameron, Mark J; Lund, Jennifer M; Owen, Rachel E; Heitman, John W; Custer, Brian; Hirschkorn, Dale F; Tobler, Leslie H; Kiely, Nancy; Prince, Harry E; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Kamel, Hany T; Kelvin, David J; Busch, Michael P; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Diamond, Michael S; Norris, Philip J

    2009-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes asymptomatic infection in most humans, but for undefined reasons, approximately 20% of immunocompetent individuals develop West Nile fever, a potentially debilitating febrile illness, and approximately 1% develop neuroinvasive disease syndromes. Notably, since its emergence in 1999, WNV has become the leading cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in North America. We hypothesized that CD4+ Tregs might be differentially regulated in subjects with symptomatic compared with those with asymptomatic WNV infection. Here, we show that in 32 blood donors with acute WNV infection, Tregs expanded significantly in the 3 months after index (RNA+) donations in all subjects. Symptomatic donors exhibited lower Treg frequencies from 2 weeks through 1 year after index donation yet did not show differences in systemic T cell or generalized inflammatory responses. In parallel prospective experimental studies, symptomatic WNV-infected mice also developed lower Treg frequencies compared with asymptomatic mice at 2 weeks after infection. Moreover, Treg-deficient mice developed lethal WNV infection at a higher rate than controls. Together, these results suggest that higher levels of peripheral Tregs after infection protect against severe WNV disease in immunocompetent animals and humans.

  17. Sodium chloride inhibits the suppressive function of FOXP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Amanda L; Kitz, Alexandra; Wu, Chuan; Lowther, Daniel E; Rodriguez, Donald M; Vudattu, Nalini; Deng, Songyan; Herold, Kevan C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Kleinewietfeld, Markus; Hafler, David A

    2015-11-01

    FOXP3+ Tregs are central for the maintenance of self-tolerance and can be defective in autoimmunity. In multiple sclerosis and type-1 diabetes, dysfunctional self-tolerance is partially mediated by a population of IFNγ-secreting Tregs. It was previously reported that increased NaCl concentrations promote the induction of proinflammatory Th17 cells and that high-salt diets exacerbate experimental models of autoimmunity. Here, we have shown that increasing NaCl, either in vitro or in murine models via diet, markedly impairs Treg function. NaCl increased IFNγ secretion in Tregs, and reducing IFNγ - either by neutralization with anti-IFNγ antibodies or shRNA-mediated knockdown - restored suppressive activity in Tregs. The heightened IFNγ secretion and loss of Treg function were mediated by the serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK1). A high-salt diet also impaired human Treg function and was associated with the induction of IFNγ-secreting Tregs in a xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease model and in adoptive transfer models of experimental colitis. Our results demonstrate a putative role for an environmental factor that promotes autoimmunity by inducing proinflammatory responses in CD4 effector cells and Treg pathways.

  18. Construction of self-recognizing regulatory T cells from conventional T cells by controlling CTLA-4 and IL-2 expression.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Kishi, Ayumi; Osaki, Motonao; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Prieto-Martin, Paz; Wing, Kajsa; Saito, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2013-06-01

    Thymus-produced CD4(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box p3, are potently immunosuppressive and characteristically possess a self-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. To determine the molecular basis of Treg suppressive activity and their self-skewed TCR repertoire formation, we attempted to reconstruct these Treg-specific properties in conventional T (Tconv) cells by genetic manipulation. We show that Tconv cells rendered IL-2 deficient and constitutively expressing transgenic cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) were potently suppressive in vitro when they were preactivated by antigenic stimulation. They also suppressed in vivo inflammatory bowel disease and systemic autoimmunity/inflammation produced by Treg deficiency. In addition, in the thymus, transgenic CTLA-4 expression in developing Tconv cells skewed their TCR repertoire toward higher self-reactivity, whereas CTLA-4 deficiency specifically in developing thymic Treg cells cancelled their physiological TCR self-skewing. The extracellular portion of CTLA-4 was sufficient for the suppression and repertoire shifting. It interfered with CD28 signaling to responder Tconv cells via outcompeting CD28 for binding to CD80 and CD86,or modulating CD80/CD86 expression on antigen-presenting cells. Thus, a triad of IL-2 repression, CTLA-4 expression, and antigenic stimulation is a minimalistic requirement for conferring Treg-like suppressive activity on Tconv cells, in accordance with the function of forkhead box p3 to strongly repress IL-2 and maintain CTLA-4 expression in natural Treg cells. Moreover, CTLA-4 expression is a key element for the formation of a self-reactive TCR repertoire in natural Treg cells. These findings can be exploited to control immune responses by targeting IL-2 and CTLA-4 in Treg and Tconv cells.

  19. Platelet microparticles inhibit IL-17 production by regulatory T cells through P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Dinkla, Sip; van Cranenbroek, Bram; van der Heijden, Wouter A; He, Xuehui; Wallbrecher, Rike; Dumitriu, Ingrid E; van der Ven, André J; Bosman, Giel J C G M; Koenen, Hans J P M; Joosten, Irma

    2016-04-21

    Self-tolerance and immune homeostasis are orchestrated by FOXP3(+)regulatory T cells (Tregs). Recent data have revealed that upon stimulation, Tregs may exhibit plasticity toward a proinflammatory phenotype, producing interleukin 17 (IL-17) and/or interferon γ (IFN-γ). Such deregulation of Tregs may contribute to the perpetuation of inflammatory processes, including graft-versus-host disease. Thus, it is important to identify immunomodulatory factors influencing Treg stability. Platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) are involved in hemostasis and vascular health and have recently been shown to be intimately involved in (pathogenic) immune responses. Therefore, we investigated whether PMPs have the ability to affect Treg plasticity. PMPs were cocultured with healthy donor peripheral blood-derived Tregs that were stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 monoclonal antibodies in the presence of IL-2, IL-15, and IL-1β. PMPs prevented the differentiation of peripheral blood-derived Tregs into IL-17- and IFN-γ-producing cells, even in the presence of the IL-17-driving proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. The mechanism of action by which PMPs prevent Treg plasticity consisted of rapid and selective P-selectin-dependent binding of PMPs to a CCR6(+)HLA-DR(+)memory-like Treg subset and their ability to inhibit Treg proliferation, in part through CXCR3 engagement. The findings that ~8% of Tregs in the circulation of healthy individuals are CD41(+)P-selectin(+)and that distinct binding of patient plasma PMPs to Tregs was observed support in vivo relevance. These findings open the exciting possibility that PMPs actively regulate the immune response at sites of (vascular) inflammation, where they are known to accumulate and interact with leukocytes, consolidating the (vascular) healing process.

  20. IL-10 regulate decidual Tregs apoptosis contributing to the abnormal pregnancy with Toxoplasma gondii infection.

    PubMed

    Lao, Kaixue; Zhao, Mingdong; Li, Zhidan; Liu, Xianbing; Zhang, Haixia; Jiang, Yuzhu; Wang, Yanlin; Hu, Xuemei

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to investigate whether IL-10 regulate decidual Treg cells apoptosis to reverse the abnormal pregnancy outcomes with Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) infection. Recombinant mouse IL-10 (rIL-10) treatment and IL-10 deficiency (IL-10(-/-)) abnormal pregnancy animal models with T. gondii infection were established. Apoptosis related molecules cleaved Caspase-3 and Caspase-8 in decidual Treg cells were examined using flow cytometry. The levels of cleaved Caspase-3 and Caspase-8 in decidual Treg cells were up-regulated with T. gondii infection. Compared to infected group, the expressions of cleaved Caspase-3 and Caspase-8 in decidual Treg cells were down-regulated in rIL-10-treated group, while up-regulated in infected IL-10(-/-) group. In addition, pregnant outcomes were improved in rIL-10-treated group, while worse in IL-10(-/-) group compared to infected group. These findings revealed that IL-10 reduced the decidual Treg cells apoptosis contributing to improving adverse pregnant outcomes following T. gondii infection.

  1. Hepatitis C virus-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T-cell differentiation and function via the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun P; Zhao, Juan; Dai, Jun; Griffin, Jeddidiah W D; Wang, Ling; Wu, Xiao Y; Morrison, Zheng D; Li, Guang Y; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Ning, Shun B; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2016-08-01

    T cells play a pivotal role in controlling viral infection; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for regulating T-cell differentiation and function during infections are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated an expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), in particular the monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs; CD14(+) CD33(+) CD11b(+) HLA-DR(-/low) ), in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Notably, HCV-induced M-MDSCs express high levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with healthy subjects. Blocking STAT3 signalling reduced HCV-mediated M-MDSC expansion and decreased IL-10 expression. Importantly, we observed a significant increase in the numbers of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells following incubation of healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with MDSCs derived from HCV-infected patients or treated with HCV core protein. In addition, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs led to a significant reduction of Foxp3(+) Treg cells developed during chronic HCV infection. Moreover, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs significantly increased interferon-γ production by CD4(+) T effector (Teff) cells derived from HCV patients. These results suggest that HCV-induced MDSCs promote Treg cell development and inhibit Teff cell function, suggesting a novel mechanism for T-cell regulation and a new strategy for immunotherapy against human viral diseases. PMID:27149428

  2. Bacterial CD1d-restricted glycolipids induce IL-10 production by human regulatory T cells upon cross-talk with invariant NKT cells.

    PubMed

    Venken, Koen; Decruy, Tine; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Lambrecht, Bart N; Elewaut, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important immune regulatory T cells with Ag reactivity to glycolipids and peptides, respectively. However, the functional interplay between these cells in humans is poorly understood. We show that Tregs suppress iNKT cell proliferation induced by CD1d-restricted glycolipids, including bacterial-derived diacylglycerols, as well as by innate-like activation. Inhibition was related to the potency of iNKT agonists, making diacylglycerol iNKT responses very prone to suppression. Cytokine production by iNKT cells was differentially modulated by Tregs because IL-4 production was reduced more profoundly compared with IFN-γ. A compelling observation was the significant production of IL-10 by Tregs after cell contact with iNKT cells, in particular in the presence of bacterial diacylglycerols. These iNKT-primed Tregs showed increased FOXP3 expression and superior suppressive function. Suppression of iNKT cell responses, but not conventional T cell responses, was IL-10 dependent, suggesting that there is a clear difference in mechanism between the Treg-mediated inhibition of these cell types. Our data highlight a physiologically relevant interaction between human iNKT and Tregs upon pathogen-derived glycolipid recognition that has a significant impact on the design of iNKT cell-based therapeutics.

  3. Cutting edge: maresin-1 engages regulatory T cells to limit type 2 innate lymphoid cell activation and promote resolution of lung inflammation.

    PubMed

    Krishnamoorthy, Nandini; Burkett, Patrick R; Dalli, Jesmond; Abdulnour, Raja-Elie E; Colas, Romain; Ramon, Sesquile; Phipps, Richard P; Petasis, Nicos A; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Serhan, Charles N; Levy, Bruce D

    2015-02-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease that fails to resolve. Recently, a key role for type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) was linked to asthma pathogenesis; however, mechanisms for ILC2 regulation remain to be determined. In this study, metabololipidomics of murine lungs identified temporal changes in endogenous maresin 1 (MaR1) during self-limited allergic inflammation. Exogenous MaR1 reduced lung inflammation and ILC2 expression of IL-5 and IL-13 and increased amphiregulin. MaR1 augmented de novo generation of regulatory T cells (Tregs), which interacted with ILC2s to markedly suppress cytokine production in a TGF-β-dependent manner. Ab-mediated depletion of Tregs interrupted MaR1 control of ILC2 expression of IL-13 in vivo. Together, the findings uncover Tregs as potent regulators of ILC2 activation; MaR1 targets Tregs and ILC2s to restrain allergic lung inflammation, suggesting MaR1 as the basis for a new proresolving therapeutic approach to asthma and other chronic inflammatory diseases.

  4. Differential contribution of three immune checkpoint (VISTA, CTLA-4, PD-1) pathways to antitumor responses against squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuta; Ohno, Tatsukuni; Nishii, Naoto; Harada, Kiyoshi; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2016-06-01

    V domain-containing Ig suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA)/PD-1H is a novel immune checkpoint molecule for regulating T-cell activation. We examined the effects of anti-VISTA mAb monotherapy and combination therapy with CTLA-4 or PD-1 blockade in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) model. VISTA monotherapy did not show clear tumor growth regression, but efficiently induced CD8(+) T cell activation by converting resting and exhausted cells into functional effector cells. VISTA monotherapy did not inhibit recruitment of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor microenvironment (TME). As an additional treatment to VISTA, CTLA-4 blockade, but not PD-1 blockade, elicited further tumor regression. The CTLA-4 and VISTA combination efficiently inhibited Treg recruitment and increased the ratios of both CD8 T/Treg and CD4 conventional T (Tcon)/Treg in the TME, whereas the PD-1 and VISTA combination dramatically increased tumor-recruiting CD8(+) T cells, but markedly reduced the Tcon/Treg ratio. Our results demonstrate that VISTA blockade efficiently converts CD8(+) T cells into functional effector T cells, but is not sufficient to regress tumor growth due to weak Treg suppression in the TME. Our results suggest that combined CTLA-4 and VISTA blockade is more efficacious than combined PD-1 and VISTA blockade for tumors like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in which Treg-mediated immune regulation is dominant.

  5. Controversies concerning thymus-derived regulatory T cells: fundamental issues and a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Ono, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2016-01-01

    Thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered to be a distinct T-cell lineage that is genetically programmed and specialised for immunosuppression. This perspective is based on the key evidence that CD25(+) Tregs emigrate to neonatal spleen a few days later than other T cells and that thymectomy of 3-day-old mice depletes Tregs only, causing autoimmune diseases. Although widely believed, the evidence has never been reproduced as originally reported, and some studies indicate that Tregs exist in neonates. Thus we examine the consequences of the controversial evidence, revisit the fundamental issues of Tregs and thereby reveal the overlooked relationship of T-cell activation and Foxp3-mediated control of the T-cell system. Here we provide a new model of Tregs and Foxp3, a feedback control perspective, which views Tregs as a component of the system that controls T-cell activation, rather than as a distinct genetically programmed lineage. This perspective provides new insights into the roles of self-reactivity, T cell-antigen-presenting cell interaction and T-cell activation in Foxp3-mediated immune regulation.

  6. The role of nuclear receptors in regulation of Th17/Treg biology and its implications for diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors play an essential role in cellular environmental sensing, differentiation, development, homeostasis, and metabolism and are thus highly conserved across multiple species. The anti-inflammatory role of nuclear receptors in immune cells has recently gained recognition. Nuclear receptors play critical roles in both myeloid and lymphoid cells, particularly in helper CD4+ T-cell type 17 (Th17) and regulatory T cells (Treg). Th17 and Treg have a major impact on cellular fate through their interactions with cytokine signaling pathways. Recent studies have emphasized the interactions between nuclear receptors and the known cytokine signals and how these interactions affect the expression and function of master transcription factors in Th17 and Treg subsets. This review will focus on the most recent discoveries concerning the roles of nuclear receptors in regulating the Th17/Treg cell-fate determination. PMID:25958843

  7. TLR4 regulates IFN-γ and IL-17 production by both thymic and induced Foxp3+ Tregs during intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Stefka, Andrew T.; Liu, Zhanju; Qin, Hongwei; Liu, Houpu; Evans-Marin, Heather L.; Elson, Charles O.; Nagler, Cathryn R.; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-01-01

    Tregs play a crucial role in the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. However, significant numbers of Foxp3+ Tregs accumulate in the inflamed lesions in experimental colitis and in IBD patients. Treg production of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ and/or IL-17 may arguably explain their ineffectiveness in suppressing intestinal inflammation. However, it remains unknown whether iTreg and tTreg produce proinflammatory cytokines and how TLR signaling regulates this process. Here, we found that Foxp3+Tregs were increased in the intestines of B6.TLR4−/− and B6.IL-10−/− mice when compared with WT B6 mice. TLR4−/− and IL-10−/− resulted in more Tregs within inflamed intestines. The majority of Foxp3+ Tregs in the spleen was Helios+Nrp1+, whereas most Foxp3+ Tregs in the intestinal LP were Helios−Nrp1−. More Helios+Nrp1+ Tregs expressed IFN-γ and/or IL-17 than did Helios−Nrp1− Tregs in the spleen and intestine, which was increased with TLR4−/−. TLR4 signaling in T cells and APCs inhibited Foxp3+ induction via MyD88-dependent, TRIF-independent pathways, which was negatively regulated by SOCS3. Collectively, these data demonstrate Helios+Nrp1+ tTregs and Helios−Nrp1− iTregs produce proinflammatory cytokines in the intestines during inflammation, which was regulated by TLR4 signaling. PMID:25015957

  8. Altered expression and editing of miRNA-100 regulates iTreg differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Vinny; Paul, Deepanjan; Das, Sudipta; Bajpai, Prashant; Singh, Suchita; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing of miRNAs, especially in the seed region, adds another layer to miRNA mediated gene regulation which can modify its targets, altering cellular signaling involved in important processes such as differentiation. In this study, we have explored the role of miRNA editing in CD4+ T cell differentiation. CD4+ T cells are an integral component of the adaptive immune system. Naïve CD4+ T cells, on encountering an antigen, get differentiated either into inflammatory subtypes like Th1, Th2 or Th17, or into immunosuppressive subtype Treg, depending on the cytokine milieu. We found C-to-U editing at fifth position of mature miR-100, specifically in Treg. The C-to-U editing of miR-100 is functionally associated with at least one biologically relevant target change, from MTOR to SMAD2. Treg cell polarization by TGFβ1 was reduced by both edited and unedited miR-100 mimics, but percentage of Treg in PBMCs was only reduced by edited miR-100 mimics, suggesting a model in which de-repression of MTOR due to loss of unedited mir-100, promotes tolerogenic signaling, while gain of edited miR-100 represses SMAD2, thereby limiting the Treg. Such delicately counterbalanced systems are a hallmark of immune plasticity and we propose that miR-100 editing is a novel mechanism toward this end. PMID:26209130

  9. Controversies concerning thymus-derived regulatory T cells: fundamental issues and a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2016-01-01

    Thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered to be a distinct T-cell lineage that is genetically programmed and specialised for immunosuppression. This perspective is based on the key evidence that CD25+ Tregs emigrate to neonatal spleen a few days later than other T cells and that thymectomy of 3-day-old mice depletes Tregs only, causing autoimmune diseases. Although widely believed, the evidence has never been reproduced as originally reported, and some studies indicate that Tregs exist in neonates. Thus we examine the consequences of the controversial evidence, revisit the fundamental issues of Tregs and thereby reveal the overlooked relationship of T-cell activation and Foxp3-mediated control of the T-cell system. Here we provide a new model of Tregs and Foxp3, a feedback control perspective, which views Tregs as a component of the system that controls T-cell activation, rather than as a distinct genetically programmed lineage. This perspective provides new insights into the roles of self-reactivity, T cell–antigen-presenting cell interaction and T-cell activation in Foxp3-mediated immune regulation. PMID:26215792

  10. Antigen-specific expansion of human regulatory T cells as a major tolerance mechanism against mucosal fungi.

    PubMed

    Bacher, P; Kniemeyer, O; Schönbrunn, A; Sawitzki, B; Assenmacher, M; Rietschel, E; Steinbach, A; Cornely, O A; Brakhage, A A; Thiel, A; Scheffold, A

    2014-07-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) have a central role for keeping the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory immune responses against chronically encountered antigens at mucosal sites. However, their antigen specificity especially in humans is largely unknown. Here we used a sensitive enrichment technology for antigen-reactive T cells to directly compare the conventional vs. regulatory CD4(+) T-cell response directed against two ubiquitous mucosal fungi, Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. In healthy humans, fungus-specific CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(-)Foxp3(+) Treg are strongly expanded in peripheral blood and possess phenotypic, epigenetic and functional features of thymus-derived Treg. Intriguingly, for A. fumigatus, the strong Treg response contrasts with minimal conventional T-cell memory, indicating selective Treg expansion as an effective mechanism to prevent inappropriate immune activation in healthy individuals. By contrast, in subjects with A. fumigatus allergies, specific Th2 cells were strongly expanded despite the presence of specific Treg. Taken together, we demonstrate a largely expanded Treg population specific for mucosal fungi as part of the physiological human T-cell repertoire and identify a unique capacity of A. fumigatus to selectively generate Treg responses as a potentially important mechanism for the prevention of allergic reactions.

  11. Quantitative and qualitative deficiencies of regulatory T cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

    PubMed

    Bonelli, Michael; Savitskaya, Anastasia; von Dalwigk, Karolina; Steiner, Carl Walter; Aletaha, Daniel; Smolen, Josef S; Scheinecker, Clemens

    2008-07-01

    The objective of the study was that the regulatory T cells (Treg) that specialize in the suppression of immune responses might be critically involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. As for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), however, published data concerning Treg phenotype and function are partly conflicting. We therefore performed quantitative and qualitative analyses of naturally occurring CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg from SLE patients as compared with healthy controls (HC) in order to further elucidate the role of Treg in this systemic autoimmune disease. The phenotype of peripheral blood CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg was determined by flow cytometry (FACS) in SLE patients and HC. Treg were isolated from SLE patients and HC and their functional capacity was analyzed in suppression assays. Phenotypic and functional data were correlated with clinical data. Decreased proportions of CD4(+) Treg with high-level expression of CD25 (CD4(+)CD25(hi)) were observed in active and inactive SLE patients (0.96 +/- 0.08 and 1.17 +/- 0.08%, respectively) as compared with HC (2 +/- 0.1%). In contrast to HC, Treg from SLE patients displayed an activated phenotype as determined by the expression of CD69, CD71 and HLA-DR. The suppressive capacity of isolated Treg from SLE patients, however, was significantly reduced as compared with HC. Proportions of CD4(+)CD25(hi) T cells and the suppressive capacity of Treg were inversely correlated with the clinical disease activity in SLE patients. Our data describe quantitative and qualitative defects of Treg in SLE patients. These deficiencies might contribute to the breakdown of self-tolerance and the development of the autoimmune response in SLE patients.

  12. Regulatory T-cell Trafficking: From Thymic Development to Tumor-Induced Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Mailloux, Adam W.; Young, M. Rita I.

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have become a priority for many investigators in immunology due to their potent immunosuppressive and tolerogenic effects. While Treg activity is required for normal immune homeostasis, dysregulation of their numbers can induce autoimmunity or aid in the pathogenesis of disease. Therefore, great effort has been made to understand the mechanisms by which Tregs accumulate in different areas of the body. Like other lymphocytes, Tregs migrate in response to a network of chemotactic stimuli involving chemokines, chemokine receptors, integrins, and their corresponding ligands. However, many of these stimuli are exclusive to Tregs, inducing their migration while leaving conventional populations unaffected. It is these selective stimuli that result in increased ratios of Tregs among conventional effector populations, leading to changes in immune suppression and homeostasis. This review explores selective Treg trafficking during thymic Treg development, migration to secondary lymphoid tissues and emigration into the periphery during homeostatic conditions, inflammation, and the tumor microenvironment, placing emphasis on stimuli that selectively recruits Tregs to target locations. PMID:21083525

  13. Th17/Treg Imbalance Induced by Dietary Salt Variation Indicates Inflammation of Target Organs in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Ji, Wen-jie; Yuan, Fei; Guo, Zhao-zeng; Li, Yun-xiao; Dong, Yan; Ma, Yong-qiang; Zhou, Xin; Li, Yu-ming

    2016-01-01

    The functions of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells are tightly orchestrated through independent differentiation pathways that are involved in the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines induced by high-salt dietary. However, the role of imbalanced Th17/Treg ratio implicated in inflammation and target organ damage remains elusive. Here, by flow cytometry analysis, we demonstrated that switching to a high-salt diet resulted in decreased Th17 cells and reciprocally increased Treg cells, leading to a decreased Th17/Treg ratio. Meanwhile, Th17-related pathway was down-regulated after one day of high salt loading, with the increase in high salt loading as shown by microarray and RT-PCR. Subsequently, blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) observed hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2* signal) during high-salt loading, which was regressed to its baseline level in a step-down fashion during low-salt feeding. The flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the branchial artery was significantly higher on the first day of high salt loading. Collectively, these observations indicate that a short-term increase in dietary salt intake could induce reciprocal switches in Th17/Treg ratio and related cytokines, which might be the underlying cellular mechanism of high-salt dietary induced end organ inflammation and potential atherosclerotic risk. PMID:27353721

  14. Follicular Lymphoma Tregs Have a Distinct Transcription Profile Impacting Their Migration and Retention in the Malignant Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Hyrien, Ollivier; Burack, W. Richard; Quataert, Sally A.; Baker, Christina M.; Azadniv, Mitra; Welle, Stephen L.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Kim, Minsoo; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that regulatory T cells (Tregs) infiltrating follicular lymphoma lymph nodes are quantitatively and qualitatively different than those infiltrating normal and reactive nodes. To gain insight into how such Treg populations differ, we performed RNA sequence (RNAseq) analyses on flow sorted Tregs from all three sources. We identify several molecules that could contribute to the observed increased suppressive capacity of follicular lymphoma nodal tregs, including upregulation of CTLA-4, IL-10, and GITR, all confirmed by protein expression. In addition, we identify, and confirm functionally, a novel mechanism by which Tregs target to and accumulate within a human tumor microenvironment, through the down regulation of S1PR1, SELL (L-selectin) and CCR7, potentially resulting in greater lymph node retention. In addition we identify and confirm functionally the upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR5 as well as the secretion of the chemokines CXCL13 and IL-16 demonstrating the unique ability of the follicular derived Tregs to localize and accumulate within not only the malignant lymph node, but also localize and accumulate within the malignant B cell follicle itself. Such findings offer significant new insights into how follicular lymphoma nodal Tregs may contribute to the biology of follicular lymphoma and identify several novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27228053

  15. The Glucose Transporter Glut1 is Selectively Essential for CD4 T Cell Activation and Effector Function

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Amanda G.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Rudolph, Michael C.; Deoliveira, Divino; Anderson, Steven M.; Abel, E. Dale; Chen, Benny J.; Hale, Laura P.; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY CD4 T cell activation leads to rapid proliferation and differentiation into effector (Teff) or regulatory (Treg) cells that mediate or control immunity. While Teff and Treg prefer distinct glycolytic or oxidative metabolic programs in vitro, requirements and mechanisms that control T cell glucose uptake and metabolism in vivo are poorly understood. Despite expression of multiple glucose transporters, Glut1-deficiency selectively impaired metabolism and function of thymocytes and Teff. Resting T cells were normal until activated, when Glut1-deficiency prevented increased glucose uptake and glycolysis, growth, proliferation, and decreased cell survival and Teff differentiation. Importantly, Glut1-deficiency decreased Teff expansion and ability to induce inflammatory disease in vivo. Treg, in contrast, were enriched in vivo and appeared functionally unaffected by Glut1-deficiency and able to suppress Teff irrespective of Glut1 expression. These data show a selective in vivo requirement for Glut1 in metabolic reprogramming of CD4 T cell activation and Teff expansion and survival. PMID:24930970

  16. Loss of ABCG1 influences regulatory T cell differentiation and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hsin-Yuan; Gaddis, Dalia E; Wu, Runpei; McSkimming, Chantel; Haynes, LaTeira D; Taylor, Angela M; McNamara, Coleen A; Sorci-Thomas, Mary; Hedrick, Catherine C

    2016-09-01

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) promotes cholesterol accumulation and alters T cell homeostasis, which may contribute to progression of atherosclerosis. Here, we investigated how the selective loss of ABCG1 in T cells impacts atherosclerosis in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-deficient) mice, a model of the disease. In LDLR-deficient mice fed a high-cholesterol diet, T cell-specific ABCG1 deficiency protected against atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, T cell-specific ABCG1 deficiency led to a 30% increase in Treg percentages in aorta and aorta-draining lymph nodes (LNs) of these mice compared with animals with only LDLR deficiency. When Abcg1 was selectively deleted in Tregs of LDLR-deficient mice, we observed a 30% increase in Treg percentages in aorta and aorta-draining LNs and reduced atherosclerosis. In the absence of ABCG1, intracellular cholesterol accumulation led to downregulation of the mTOR pathway, which increased the differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into Tregs. The increase in Tregs resulted in reduced T cell activation and increased IL-10 production by T cells. Last, we found that higher ABCG1 expression in Tregs was associated with a higher frequency of these cells in human blood samples. Our study indicates that ABCG1 regulates T cell differentiation into Tregs, highlighting a pathway by which cholesterol accumulation can influence T cell homeostasis in atherosclerosis. PMID:27482882

  17. Production of IL-10 by CD4+ regulatory T cells during the resolution of infection promotes the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J; Cui, Weiguo; Amezquita, Robert A; Gray, Simon M; Guan, Tianxia; Lu, Yisi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Flavell, Richard A; Kleinstein, Steven H; Craft, Joe; Kaech, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells are critical for host defense upon reexposure to intracellular pathogens. We found that interleukin 10 (IL-10) derived from CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) was necessary for the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells following acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Treg cell–derived IL-10 was most important during the resolution phase, calming inflammation and the activation state of dendritic cells. Adoptive transfer of IL-10-sufficient Treg cells during the resolution phase ‘restored’ the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells in IL-10-deficient mice. Our data indicate that Treg cell–derived IL-10 is needed to insulate CD8+ T cells from inflammatory signals, and reveal that the resolution phase of infection is a critical period that influences the quality and function of developing memory CD8+ T cells. PMID:26147684

  18. IL-2-independent and TNFα-dependent Expansion of Vβ5+ Natural Regulatory T Cells During Retrovirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Lara; Joedicke, Jara J.; Carmody, Aaron B.; Messer, Ronald J.; Kassiotis, George; Dudley, Jaquelin P.; Dittmer, Ulf; Hasenkrug, Kim J.

    2013-01-01

    Friend virus (FV) infection of mice induces the expansion and activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that dampen acute immune responses and promote the establishment and maintenance of chronic infection. Adoptive transfer experiments and the expression of Neuropilin 1 indicate that these cells are predominantly natural Tregs rather than virus-specific conventional CD4+ T cells that converted into induced Tregs. Analysis of Treg TCR Vβ chain usage revealed a broadly distributed polyclonal response with a high proportionate expansion of the Vβ5+ Treg subset, which are known to be responsive to endogenous retrovirus-encoded superantigens. In contrast to the major population of Tregs, the Vβ5+ subset expressed markers of terminally differentiated effector cells, and their expansion was associated with the level of the antiviral CD8+ T cell response rather than the level of FV infection. Surprisingly, the expansion and accumulation of the Vβ5+ Tregs was IL-2 independent but dependent upon TNFα. These experiments reveal a subset-specific Treg induction by a new pathway. PMID:23645880

  19. Memory regulatory T cells require IL-7 and not IL-2 for their maintenance in peripheral tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Truong, Hong-An; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Maurano, Megan M.; Lee, Karim; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells are activated by peripheral self antigen to increase their suppressive function, and a fraction of these cells survive as memory Tregs (mTregs). Memory Tregs persist in non-lymphoid tissue after cessation of antigen expression and have enhanced capacity to suppress tissue-specific autoimmunity. Here, we show that murine mTregs express specific effector memory T cell markers and localize preferentially to hair follicles in skin. Memory Tregs express high levels of both IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα. Using a genetic deletion approach, we show that IL-2 is required to generate mTregs from naive CD4+ T cell precursors in vivo. However, IL-2 is not required to maintain these cells in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, IL-7 is essential for maintaining mTregs in skin in the steady state. These results elucidate the fundamental biology of mTregs and show that IL-7 plays an important role in their survival in skin. PMID:23543753

  20. Regulatory T cells in central nervous system injury: a double-edged sword.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James T; Zheng, Jingjing; Smirnov, Igor; Lorenz, Ulrike; Tung, Kenneth; Kipnis, Jonathan

    2014-11-15

    Previous research investigating the roles of T effector (T(eff)) and T regulatory (T(reg)) cells after injury to the CNS has yielded contradictory conclusions, with both protective and destructive functions being ascribed to each of these T cell subpopulations. In this work, we study this dichotomy by examining how regulation of the immune system affects the response to CNS trauma. We show that, in response to CNS injury, T(eff) and T(reg) subsets in the CNS-draining deep cervical lymph nodes are activated, and surgical resection of these lymph nodes results in impaired neuronal survival. Depletion of T(reg), not surprisingly, induces a robust T(eff) response in the draining lymph nodes and is associated with impaired neuronal survival. Interestingly, however, injection of exogenous T(reg) cells, which limits the spontaneous beneficial immune response after CNS injury, also impairs neuronal survival. We found that no T(reg) accumulate at the site of CNS injury, and that changes in T(reg) numbers do not alter the amount of infiltration by other immune cells into the site of injury. The phenotype of macrophages at the site, however, is affected: both addition and removal of T(reg) negatively impact the numbers of macrophages with alternatively activated (tissue-building) phenotype. Our data demonstrate that neuronal survival after CNS injury is impaired when T(reg) cells are either removed or added. With this exacerbation of neurodegeneration seen with both addition and depletion of T(reg), we recommend exercising extreme caution when considering the therapeutic targeting of T(reg) cells after CNS injury, and possibly in chronic neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:25320276

  1. β8 Integrin Expression and Activation of TGF-β by Intestinal Dendritic Cells Are Determined by Both Tissue Microenvironment and Cell Lineage.

    PubMed

    Boucard-Jourdin, Mathilde; Kugler, David; Endale Ahanda, Marie-Laure; This, Sébastien; De Calisto, Jaime; Zhang, Ailiang; Mora, J Rodrigo; Stuart, Lynda M; Savill, John; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Paidassi, Helena

    2016-09-01

    Activation of TGF-β by dendritic cells (DCs) expressing αvβ8 integrin is essential for the generation of intestinal regulatory T cells (Tregs) that in turn promote tolerance to intestinal Ags. We have recently shown that αvβ8 integrin is preferentially expressed by CD103(+) DCs and confers their ability to activate TGF-β and generate Tregs. However, how these DCs become specialized for this vital function is unknown. In this study, we show that β8 expression is controlled by a combination of factors that include DC lineage and signals derived from the tissue microenvironment and microbiota. Specifically, our data demonstrate that TGF-β itself, along with retinoic acid and TLR signaling, drives expression of αvβ8 in DCs. However, these signals only result in high levels of β8 expression in cells of the cDC1 lineage, CD8α(+), or CD103(+)CD11b(-) DCs, and this is associated with epigenetic changes in the Itgb8 locus. Together, these data provide a key illustrative example of how microenvironmental factors and cell lineage drive the generation of regulatory αvβ8-expressing DCs specialized for activation of TGF-β to facilitate Treg generation. PMID:27481847

  2. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  3. Prolactin down-regulates CD4+CD25hiCD127low/- regulatory T cell function in humans.

    PubMed

    Legorreta-Haquet, M V; Chávez-Rueda, K; Montoya-Díaz, E; Arriaga-Pizano, L; Silva-García, R; Chávez-Sánchez, L; Moreno-Lafont, M; Zenteno-Galindo, E; Blanco-Favela, F

    2012-02-01

    Among its many functions, prolactin (PRL) participates in immune responses and promotes the activation, differentiation and proliferation of T cells. However, the mechanisms by which PRL regulates regulatory T (T(reg)) cells are still unknown. Our goal was to determine whether PRL plays a role in T(reg) function. We measured the expression of PRL and its receptor in T(reg) and effector T (T(eff)) cells from 15 healthy individuals. We also evaluated the functional activity of T(reg) cells by examining proliferation and cytokine secretion in cells activated with anti-CD3/CD28 in the presence or absence of PRL. We report that T(reg) cells constitutively expressed PRL receptor, whereas T(eff) cells required stimulation with anti-CD3/CD28 to induce PRL receptor expression. Expression of PRL was constitutive in both populations. We found that the addition of PRL inhibited the suppressor effect (proliferation) mediated by T(reg) cells in vitro, reducing suppression from 37.4 to 13% when PRL was added to co-cultures of T(reg) and T(eff) cells (P<0.05). Cultures treated with PRL favoured a Th1 cytokine profile, with increased production of TNF and IFNγ. We report for the first time that PRL receptor expression was constitutive in T(reg) cells but not in T(eff) cells, which require stimulation to induce PRL receptor expression. PRL inhibited the suppressive function of T(reg) cells, apparently through the induced secretion of Th1 cytokines.

  4. Engineering an "infectious" T(reg) biomimetic through chemoselective tethering of TGF-β1 to PEG brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, E Y; Kronenfeld, J P; Gattás-Asfura, K M; Bayer, A L; Stabler, C L

    2015-10-01

    Modulation of immunological responses to allografts following transplantation is of pivotal importance to improving graft outcome and duration. Of the many approaches, harnessing the dominant tolerance induced by regulatory T cells (Treg) holds tremendous promise. Recent studies have highlighted the unique potency of cell surface-bound TGF-β1 on Treg for promoting infectious tolerance, i.e. to confer suppressive capacity from one cell to another. To mimic this characteristic, TGF-β1 was chemoselectively tethered to inert and viable polymer grafting platforms using Staudinger ligation. We report the synthesis and functional characterization of these engineered TGF-β1 surfaces. Inert beads tethered with TGF-β1 were capable of efficiently converting naïve CD4(+) CD62L(hi) T cells to functional Treg. Concordantly, translation of conjugation scheme from inert surfaces to viable cells also led to efficient generation of functional Treg. Further, the capacity of these platforms to generate antigen-specific Treg was demonstrated. These findings illustrate the unique faculty of tethered TGF-β1 biomaterial platforms to function as an "infectious" Treg and provide a compelling approach for generating tolerogenic microenvironments for allograft transplantation. PMID:26197412

  5. FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells Suppress Early Stages of Granuloma Formation but Have Little Impact on Sarcoidosis Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Taflin, Cécile; Miyara, Makoto; Nochy, Dominique; Valeyre, Dominique; Naccache, Jean-Marc; Altare, Frédéric; Salek-Peyron, Pascale; Badoual, Cécile; Bruneval, Patrick; Haroche, Julien; Mathian, Alexis; Amoura, Zahir; Hill, Gary; Gorochov, Guy

    2009-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is characterized by a disproportionate Th1 granulomatous immune response in involved organs. It is also associated with both peripheral and intratissular regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion. These cells exhibit powerful antiproliferative activity, yet do not completely inhibit the production of either tumor necrosis factor-α or interferon-γ. The origin of the observed Treg amplification and, more importantly, its impact on the evolution of sarcoidosis remain unresolved issues. Here, we show that CD4+CD45RA−FoxP3bright Tregs proliferate and accumulate within granulomas. However, circulating and tissue Treg numbers are neither correlated with the dissemination of the disease nor correlated locally with the extent of granulomatous inflammation. Rather, we found a positive correlation between the presence of Tregs in renal granulomas and the degree of interstitial fibrosis (r = 0.46, P = 0.03, n = 20). Furthermore, Treg depletion accelerates in vitro granuloma growth in mononuclear cell cultures of healthy controls, but not in those from patients with active sarcoidosis. The results of this study show that although healthy Tregs suppress the initial steps of granuloma formation, they have no positive influence on sarcoidosis lesions. Our findings argue for a more preventive than curative effect of Tregs on inflammatory processes. PMID:19147826

  6. Regulatory Cell Populations in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Patients: Effect of Disease Activity and Treatment Regimens.

    PubMed

    Rodi, Maria; Dimisianos, Nikolaos; de Lastic, Anne-Lise; Sakellaraki, Panagiota; Deraos, George; Matsoukas, John; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of autoimmune etiology that results from an imbalance between CNS-specific T effector cells and peripheral suppressive mechanisms mediated by regulatory cells (RC). In this research, we collected blood samples from 83 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients and 45 healthy persons (HC), to assess the sizes of their RC populations, including CD4⁺CD25(high)Foxp3⁺ (nTregs), CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺, CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-), CD3⁺CD56⁺, and CD56(bright) cells, and how RC are affected by disease activity (acute phase or remission) and types of treatment (methylprednisolone, interferon, or natalizumab). In addition, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cultured them with peptides mapping to myelin antigens, to determine RC responsiveness to autoantigens. The results showed decreased levels of nTregs in patients in the acute phase ± methylprednisolone and in remission + natalizumab, but HC levels in patients in remission or receiving interferon. Patients + interferon had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺ and CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-) RC, and patients in the acute phase + methylprednisolone the lowest. Patients in remission had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD56⁺, and patients in remission + natalizumab the highest levels of CD56(bright) cells. Only nTregs responded to autoantigens in culture, regardless of disease activity or treatment. The highest suppressive activity was exhibited by nTregs from patients in remission. In conclusion, in RRMS disease activity and type of treatment affect different RC populations. nTregs respond to myelin antigens, indicating that it is possible to restore immunological tolerance through nTreg induction. PMID:27571060

  7. Pim-2 Kinase Influences Regulatory T Cell Function and Stability by Mediating Foxp3 Protein N-terminal Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guoping; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Li, Zhiyuan; Dai, Shujia; Ohtani, Takuya; Banham, Alison; Li, Bin; Wu, Shiaw-Lin; Hancock, Wayne; Samanta, Arabinda; Zhang, Hongtao; Greene, Mark I

    2015-08-14

    Regulation of the extent of immune responses is a requirement to maintain self-tolerance and limit inflammatory processes. CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in regulation. The Foxp3 transcription factor is considered a dominant regulator for Treg cell development and function. Foxp3 function itself is directly regulated by multiple posttranslational modifications that occur in response to various external stimuli. The Foxp3 protein is a component of several dynamic macromolecular regulatory complexes. The complexes change constituents over time and through different signals to regulate the development and function of regulatory T cells. Here we identified a mechanism regulating Foxp3 level and activity that operates through discrete phosphorylation. The Pim-2 kinase can phosphorylate Foxp3, leading to decreased suppressive functions of Treg cells. The amino-terminal domain of Foxp3 is modified at several sites by Pim-2 kinase. This modification leads to altered expression of proteins related to Treg cell functions and increased Treg cell lineage stability. Treg cell suppressive function can be up-regulated by either pharmacologically inhibiting Pim-2 kinase activity or by genetically knocking out Pim-2 in rodent Treg cells. Deficiency of Pim-2 activity increases murine host resistance to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis in vivo, and a Pim-2 small molecule kinase inhibitor also modified Treg cell functions. Our studies define a pathway for limiting the regulation of Foxp3 function because the Pim-2 kinase represents a potential therapeutic target for modulating the Treg cell suppressive activities in controlling immune responses. PMID:25987564

  8. IFNα/βR Signaling Promotes Regulatory T Cell Development and Function Under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Metidji, Amina; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Cremer, Isabelle; Punkosdy, George A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Type I IFNs are a family of cytokines with antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. While the antiviral effects of IFNs are well characterized, their immunomodulatory properties are less clear. To specifically address the effects of type I IFNs on Treg, we studied mixed bone morrow (BM) chimeras between wild-type (WT) and IFNα/βR (IFNAR) knockout (KO) mice, and heterozygous female mice expressing a Treg-specific deletion of the IFNAR. In these two models, IFNAR signaling promotes the development of the Treg lineage in the thymus and their survival in the periphery. IFNAR KO Treg had a higher expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bim and higher frequency of active caspase positive cells. IFNAR KO Treg from chimeric mice displayed a more naïve phenotype, accompanied by lower levels of CD25 and phosphorylated STAT5. Therefore, in Treg IFNAR signaling may directly or indirectly affect phosphorylation of STAT5. In mixed chimeras with Scurfy fetal liver, Treg derived from IFNAR KO BM were unable to control T effector cell activation and tissue inflammation. Under stress conditions or in a competitive environment, IFNAR signaling may be required to maintain Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25795758

  9. Inhibition of th17 cells and promotion of tregs in fc gamma chain-deficient mice contributes to the attenuated atherosclerotic lesions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of anti-oxLDL IgG is well documented in clinical and animal studies. However, the role for Fc Rs to the progression of atherosclerosis has not been studied in detail. In the present study, we investigated the role for activating Fc R in the progression of atherosclerosis using apoE-Fc -...

  10. Autophagy-dependent regulatory T cells are critical for the control of graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Le Texier, Laëtitia; Lineburg, Katie E.; Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Nicholls, Jemma; Melino, Michelle; Nalkurthi, Blessy C.; Alexander, Kylie A.; Teal, Bianca; Blake, Stephen J.; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Engwerda, Christian R.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Lane, Steven W.; Teh, Charis; Gray, Daniel; Clouston, Andrew D.; Nilsson, Susan K.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Quantitative and/or qualitative defects in Tregs result in diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy, malignancy, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We recently reported increased expression of autophagy-related genes (Atg) in association with enhanced survival of Tregs after SCT. Autophagy is a self-degradative process for cytosolic components that promotes cell homeostasis and survival. Here, we demonstrate that the disruption of autophagy within FoxP3+ Tregs (B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+) resulted in a profound loss of Tregs, particularly within the bone marrow (BM). This resulted in dysregulated effector T cell activation and expansion, and the development of enterocolitis and scleroderma in aged mice. We show that the BM compartment is highly enriched in TIGIT+ Tregs and that this subset is differentially depleted in the absence of autophagy. Moreover, following allogeneic SCT, recipients of grafts from B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+ donors exhibited reduced Treg reconstitution, exacerbated GVHD, and reduced survival compared with recipients of B6.WT-FoxP3cre+ grafts. Collectively, these data indicate that autophagy-dependent Tregs are critical for the maintenance of tolerance after SCT and that the promotion of autophagy represents an attractive immune-restorative therapeutic strategy after allogeneic SCT.

  11. Autophagy-dependent regulatory T cells are critical for the control of graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Le Texier, Laëtitia; Lineburg, Katie E.; Leveque-El Mouttie, Lucie; Nicholls, Jemma; Melino, Michelle; Nalkurthi, Blessy C.; Alexander, Kylie A.; Teal, Bianca; Blake, Stephen J.; Souza-Fonseca-Guimaraes, Fernando; Engwerda, Christian R.; Kuns, Rachel D.; Lane, Steven W.; Teh, Charis; Gray, Daniel; Clouston, Andrew D.; Nilsson, Susan K.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; MacDonald, Kelli P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Quantitative and/or qualitative defects in Tregs result in diseases such as autoimmunity, allergy, malignancy, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), a serious complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). We recently reported increased expression of autophagy-related genes (Atg) in association with enhanced survival of Tregs after SCT. Autophagy is a self-degradative process for cytosolic components that promotes cell homeostasis and survival. Here, we demonstrate that the disruption of autophagy within FoxP3+ Tregs (B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+) resulted in a profound loss of Tregs, particularly within the bone marrow (BM). This resulted in dysregulated effector T cell activation and expansion, and the development of enterocolitis and scleroderma in aged mice. We show that the BM compartment is highly enriched in TIGIT+ Tregs and that this subset is differentially depleted in the absence of autophagy. Moreover, following allogeneic SCT, recipients of grafts from B6.Atg7fl/fl-FoxP3cre+ donors exhibited reduced Treg reconstitution, exacerbated GVHD, and reduced survival compared with recipients of B6.WT-FoxP3cre+ grafts. Collectively, these data indicate that autophagy-dependent Tregs are critical for the maintenance of tolerance after SCT and that the promotion of autophagy represents an attractive immune-restorative therapeutic strategy after allogeneic SCT. PMID:27699243

  12. T regulatory (Treg) and T helper 17 (Th17) lymphocytes in thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    González-Amaro, Roberto; Marazuela, Mónica

    2016-04-01

    Different immune cell subsets have a relevant role in the pathogenesis of and tissue damage seen in autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD), including T regulatory (Treg) lymphocytes and T helper (Th) 17 cells. There are several types of CD4+ Treg cells (Foxp3+, CD69+, Tr1), which are able to prevent the appearance of autoimmune diseases, down regulating the immune response and the inflammatory phenomenon. However, despite their presence in peripheral blood and thyroid tissue from patients with AITD, these cells are apparently unable to put down the autoimmune process. Moreover, many reports indicate the involvement of Th17 cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, including AITD. Nevertheless, it is now evident that these lymphocytes show a remarkable plasticity, giving rise to anti-inflammatory (including Treg lymphocytes) and pro-inflammatory cell subtypes. Nowadays, both Treg and Th17 cells must be considered as key elements in the pathogenesis of AITD as well as plausible potential targets for the next generation of therapeutic options of this condition.

  13. Evaluation of the expression and function of the P2X7 receptor and ART1 in human regulatory T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Garcia, Juan D; López-López, Cintya; Cortez-Espinosa, Nancy; García-Hernández, Mariana H; Guzmán-Flores, Juan M; Layseca-Espinosa, Esther; Portales-Cervantes, Liliana; Portales-Pérez, Diana P

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells that express CD39 (CD39+ Treg) exhibit specific immunomodulatory properties. Ectonucleotidase CD39 hydrolyses ATP and ADP. ATP is a ligand of the P2X7 receptor and induces the shedding of CD62L and apoptosis. However, the role of ATP in CD39+ Treg cells has not been defined. Furthermore, NAD can activate the P2X7 receptor via ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) enzymes and cause cell depletion in murine models. We evaluated the expression and function of P2X7 and ART1 in CD39+ Treg and CD39- Treg cells in the presence or absence of ATP and NAD. We isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy subjects and purified CD4+ T cells, CD4+ CD25+ T cells and CD4+ CD25+ CD39+ T cells. P2X7 and ART1 expression was assessed by flow cytometry and real-time PCR. Our results showed low P2X7 expression on CD39+ Treg cells and higher levels of ART1 expression in CD4+ CD39+ T cells than the other subtypes studied. Neither shedding of CD62L nor cell death of CD39+ Treg or CD39- Treg cells was observed by 1mM ATP or 60μM NAD. In contrast, P2Xs receptor-dependent proliferation with 300μM ATP, was inhibited by NAD in the different cell types analysed. The NAD proliferation-inhibition was increased with P2Xs and A2a agonist and was reversed with P2Xs and A2a antagonist, therefore NAD inhibits P2Xs-dependent proliferation and A2a activation. In conclusion, our results suggest that the altered function and expression of P2X7 and ART1 in the human CD39+ Treg or CD39- Treg cells could participate in the resistance against cell death induced by ATP or NAD.

  14. Freeze and Thaw of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Results in Loss of CD62L Expression and a Reduced Capacity to Protect against Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Florek, Mareike; Schneidawind, Dominik; Pierini, Antonio; Baker, Jeanette; Armstrong, Randall; Pan, Yuqiong; Leveson-Gower, Dennis; Negrin, Robert; Meyer, Everett

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in murine models of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been shown to protect recipient mice from lethal acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and this approach is being actively investigated in human clinical trials. Here, we examined the effects of cryopreservation on Tregs. We found that freeze and thaw of murine and human Tregs is associated with reduced expression of L-selectin (CD62L), which was previously established to be an important factor that contributes to the in vivo protective effects of Tregs. Frozen and thawed murine Tregs showed a reduced capacity to bind to the CD62L binding partner MADCAM1 in vitro as well as an impaired homing to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. Upon adoptive transfer frozen and thawed Tregs failed to protect against lethal GVHD compared with fresh Tregs in a murine model of allogeneic HCT across major histocompatibility barriers. In summary, the direct administration of adoptively transferred frozen and thawed Tregs adversely affects their immunosuppressive potential which is an important factor to consider in the clinical implementation of Treg immunotherapies. PMID:26693907

  15. Aberrant expression of Treg-associated cytokine IL-35 along with IL-10 and TGF-β in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Li, Peng; Shao, Na; Ma, Jingjing; Ji, Min; Sun, Xiulian; Ma, Daoxin; Ji, Chunyan

    2012-05-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common hematological malignancy in adults, characterized by distorted proliferation and the development of myeloid cells and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Interleukin 35 (IL-35), a novel inhibitory cytokine secreted by regulatory T (Treg) cells is a novel potential target used for the therapeutic manipulation of Treg activity in order to treat cancer and autoimmune diseases. To investigate the role and imbalance of Treg-related cytokines in the pathogenesis of AML, we measured the plasma concentration of three Treg-associated cytokines [IL-35, IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)] and evaluated their clinical relevance. The concentration of IL-35, IL-10 and TGF-β in plasma specimens from 55 patients with AML [27 newly diagnosed (ND) patients and 28 in complete remission (CR)] and 24 controls was analyzed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. Significantly higher levels of plasma IL-35 and IL-10 were observed in AML ND patients compared with healthy controls or AML CR patients. IL-10 concentrations were positively correlated with TGF-β, whereas no correlations were found between the other cytokines. IL-10 levels were positively correlated with white blood cell (WBC) and neutrophil (NEU) count but there were no correlations between IL-35 and TGF-β with WBC and NEU count. In conclusion, we demonstrated for the first time that AML ND patients have increased plasma concentrations of IL-35, suggesting that this cytokine is involved in the pathophysiological process of the disease, and that further research is required to address this issue.

  16. Superiority of rapamycin over tacrolimus in preserving nonhuman primate Treg half-life and phenotype after adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Singh, K; Stempora, L; Harvey, R D; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P; Blazar, B R; Kean, L S

    2014-12-01

    Many critical issues remain concerning how best to deploy adoptive regulatory T cell (Treg) immunotherapy to the clinic. These include a determination of their pharmacokinetic characteristics, their optimal dose, their phenotypic stability and the best therapies with which to pair Tregs. By performing a CFSE-labeled autologous Treg pulse experiment, we determined that the accessible peripheral blood Treg pool in rhesus macaques is quite large (75 ± 11 × 10(6) Tregs/kg). Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that Tregs have two phases of elimination: an α phase, with a T1/2 in the peripheral blood of 32.4 ± 11.3 h and a β phase with a T1/2 of 120.4 ± 19.7 h. In addition to their short initial half-life, Tregs underwent rapid phenotypic shifts after infusion, with significant loss of both CD25 and FoxP3 by day +6. While tacrolimus stabilized CD25 expression, it did not improve T1/2 , nor mitigate the loss of FoxP3. In contrast, rapamycin significantly stabilized both CD25 and FoxP3, and supported an increased half-life, with an α phase of 67.7 ± 6.9 h and a β phase of 252.1 ± 54.9 h. These results suggest that rapamycin may be a necessary addition to Treg immunotherapy, and that tacrolimus may be deleterious to Treg integrity posttransfer.

  17. Divergent effects of type-I interferons on regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Piconese, Silvia; Pacella, Ilenia; Timperi, Eleonora; Barnaba, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) exert a dominant role in the protection of unwanted immune responses and in the resolution of inflammation. To ensure the proper mounting of protective immune responses, Treg should be finely modulated by microenvironmental signals, mostly conveyed by cytokines. Type-I interferons are pleiotropic cytokines, best known for their anti-viral activities but also playing relevant immunostimulatory as well as immunomodulatory functions. The impact of type-I interferons on Treg homeostasis and functions is quite controversial, as some studies indicate that interferons sustain Treg stability and suppression, while other reports describe a null or even negative role for interferons in Treg activities. Interferons may also establish alternative routes of suppression, through the induction of other suppressive populations, such as Tr1 and the recently discovered FoxA1+ Treg. Discrepant results about Treg behavior in vivo emerge also from data collected in patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic hepatitis C or cancer undergoing interferon therapy. Concurrent events, such as Treg-extrinsic interferon activities, desensitization to chronic interferon exposure, and changes in microenvironmental signals during the evolution of diseases, may contribute to depict such a complex scenario, in which short-term and long-term effects of interferon exposure may give rise to apparently opposite conclusions.

  18. IL-12 Converts Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells to Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T Cells with Inhibitory Functions During Induction of Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ting; Cao, Anthony T.; Weaver, Casey T.; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2011-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are plastic, but the in vivo mechanisms by which they are converted into Foxp3+interferon (IFN)-γ+ T cells, and whether these converted cells retain the ability to inhibit colitis, are not clear. Methods Foxp3+ Treg cells were generated by culture of naïve CD4+ T cells from Foxp3GFP CBir1 T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic (CBir1-Tg) mice, which are specific for CBir1 flagellin (an immunodominant microbiota antigen), with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β. Foxp3GFP+ CBir1-Tg Treg cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and transferred into TCRβxδ−/− mice. Colitis was induced by transfer of naïve CBir1-Tg CD4+ T cells into immunodeficient mice. Results Microbiota antigen-specific Foxp3+ Treg cells were converted, in the intestine, to IFN-γ+ T-helper (Th)1 cells, interleukin (IL)-17+ Th17 cells, and Foxp3+ T cells that coexpress IFN-γ and/or IL-17. Conversion of Treg cells into IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells and Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T cells required innate cell production of IL-12 in the intestine; blocking IL-12 with an antibody inhibited their conversion to Th1 and Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T cells in the intestines of mice that were recipients of Treg cells. Addition of IL-12, but not IL-23, promoted conversion of Treg cells into Th1 and Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T cells, in vitro. Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T cells had regulatory activity, because they suppressed proliferation of naïve T cells, in vitro, and inhibited induction of colitis by microbiota antigen-specific T cells. IFN-γ+ Th1 cells were not converted into Treg cells; Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T cells differentiated into IFN-γ+ but not Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions IL-12 promotes conversion of Treg cells into IFN-γ-expressing cells; Foxp3+IFN-γ+ T cells retain their regulatory functions and develop during the transition of Foxp3+ Treg cells into IFN-γ+ Th1 cells. PMID:21419767

  19. Few Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells are sufficient to protect adult mice from lethal autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian T; Ghorbani, Peyman; Kühl, Anja A; Stüve, Philipp; Hegemann, Maike; Berod, Luciana; Gershwin, M Eric; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Foxp3 specifies the Treg cell lineage and is indispensable for immune tolerance. Accordingly, rare Foxp3 mutations cause lethal autoimmunity. The mechanisms precipitating more prevalent human autoimmune diseases are poorly understood, but involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Many autoimmune diseases associate with a partial Treg-cell dysfunction, yet mouse models reflecting such complex pathophysiological processes are rare. Around 95% of Foxp3(+) Treg cells can be specifically depleted in bacterial artifical chromosome (BAC)-transgenic Depletion of REGulatory T cells (DEREG) mice through diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment. However, Treg-cell depletion fails to cause autoimmunity in adult DEREG mice for unclear reasons. By crossing Foxp3(GFP) knock-in mice to DEREG mice, we introduced additional genetic susceptibility that does not affect untreated mice. Strikingly, DT treatment of DEREG × Foxp3(GFP) mice rapidly causes autoimmunity characterized by blepharitis, tissue damage, and autoantibody production. This inflammatory disease is associated with augmented T-cell activation, increased Th2 cytokine production and myeloproliferation, and is caused by defective Treg-cell homeostasis, preventing few DT-insensitive Treg cells from repopulating the niche after Treg-cell depletion. Our study provides important insights into self-tolerance. We further highlight DEREG × Foxp3(GFP) mice as a model to investigate the role of environmental factors in precipitating autoimmunity. This may help to better understand and treat human autoimmunity. PMID:25042334

  20. Oestradiol potentiates the suppressive function of human CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells by promoting their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, G Aleph; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the control of the immune system by suppressing the proliferation of effector cells, thereby preventing autoreactive, unnecessary or inconvenient responses. Recently, it has been shown that the number of Treg cells increases during pregnancy, a period with high serum levels of female sex hormones. Oestrogen replacement therapy has been reported to alleviate the symptoms of autoimmune diseases, yet the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved are not fully understood. Here, we show that physiological doses of oestradiol (E2) found during pregnancy, combined with activation through CD3/CD28 engagement, promoted the proliferation of Treg cells without altering their suppressive phenotype. Enhanced suppression was detected when Treg cells were pretreated with the hormone as well as when both cell subpopulations (Treg and T effector) were exposed to E2 throughout the experiment. Together, these data suggest that when combined with an activating stimulus, E2 can modulate the function of human Treg cells by regulating their numbers, and highlight a potential use of E2, or its analogs, to manipulate Treg function. PMID:16630023

  1. Epirubicin, Identified Using a Novel Luciferase Reporter Assay for Foxp3 Inhibitors, Inhibits Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hajime; Momose, Fumiyasu; Umehara, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Nao; Ogo, Naohisa; Muraoka, Daisuke; Shiku, Hiroshi; Harada, Naozumi; Asai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein p3 (Foxp3) is crucial to the development and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that have a significant role in tumor-associated immune suppression. Development of small molecule inhibitors of Foxp3 function is therefore considered a promising strategy to enhance anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay system in which the NF-κB luciferase reporter signal is suppressed by the co-expressed Foxp3 protein. Using this system, we screened our chemical library consisting of approximately 2,100 compounds and discovered that a cancer chemotherapeutic drug epirubicin restored the Foxp3-inhibited NF-κB activity in a concentration-dependent manner without influencing cell viability. Using immunoprecipitation assay in a Treg-like cell line Karpas-299, we found that epirubicin inhibited the interaction between Foxp3 and p65. In addition, epirubicin inhibited the suppressor function of murine Tregs and thereby improved effector T cell stimulation in vitro. Administration of low dose epirubicin into tumor-bearing mice modulated the function of immune cells at the tumor site and promoted their IFN-γ production without direct cytotoxicity. In summary, we identified the novel action of epirubicin as a Foxp3 inhibitor using a newly established luciferase-based cellular screen. Our work also demonstrated our screen system is useful in accelerating discovery of Foxp3 inhibitors. PMID:27284967

  2. Epigenetic Enzymes Are the Therapeutic Targets for CD4+CD25+/highFoxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Jahaira Lopez; Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2014-01-01

    CD4+CD25+/highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4+ T cells that play an essential role in maintaining peripheral immune tolerance. Several transcriptional co-factors have been recently identified, which form complexes with Tregs transcription factor Foxp3 and contribute in the suppressive function of Tregs. However, Foxp3 is still defined as a “master” (multiple pathway) regulator gene that controls the development and stability of Tregs. Due to its importance, the regulatory mechanisms underlying Foxp3 expression have been a focus of intensive investigation. Recent progress suggests that the epigenetics mechanisms responsible for regulating the Foxp3 gene expression are key components of Tregs suppressive activity. This review not only discusses the basic concepts of Tregs biology and epigenetic modifications. We also analyze the translational clinical aspect of Tregs epigenetic modifications, focusing on several ongoing clinical trials as well as FDA approved epigenetic based drugs. The new progress in identifying epigenetic enzymes functional in Treg cells is a new target for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, graft-versus-host disease and cancers. PMID:25193380

  3. Dysfunction of IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T cells and CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in a mimic model of human multiple sclerosis in Cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Ma, Anlun; Xiong, Zuquan; Hu, Yanxin; Qi, Shijie; Song, Lijun; Dun, Hao; Zhang, Liangyan; Lou, Deyan; Yang, Penghui; Zhao, Zhongpeng; Wang, Xiliang; Zhang, Dongqing; Daloze, Pierre; Chen, Huifang

    2009-05-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg and IL-10(+) Tr1 cells play a major role in controlling autoimmunity by suppressing self-reactive T cells. Dysfunction of Tregs appears to be a critical factor in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disorder of CNS, where CD4(+) T cells result in nervous tissue damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective role of Treg and Tr1 cells in a mimic model of human MS in Cynomolgus monkeys. This study indicated the suppressive capacity of Tregs from MS monkeys was impaired compared with naive controls. The population of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs was decreased in acute stage of MS. However, they showed a restored function and percentage in remitting monkeys. In stable phase, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs differentially expressed elevated level of CD62P cell adhesion molecule which contributes to the mechanism by which Treg cells inhibit CD4(+) T cell responses. On the other hand, the percentage of CD4(+)IL-10(+) Tr1 and suppressive function of Tr1 cells were found reduced in MS monkeys. IL-10 secretion was diminished almost 9-fold in active MS, and recovered in active MS. This deficit in IL-10 secretion was specific to CD3/CD46, but not to CD3/CD28 stimulation. The concentrations of IFN-gamma secreted by CD3/CD46-activated T cells were also not affected. These results demonstrate that Tregs are dysfunctional in Cynomolgus monkey with MS. Loss of regulatory function appears to be an important factor in the pathogenesis of MS. Hence, to develop new approaches for induction of Tregs in vivo may be beneficial for the clinical treatment in autoimmune diseases. PMID:19539557

  4. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Economou, James S.; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Doerthe

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  5. Regulatory T-Cell Therapy for Graft-versus-host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Heinrichs, Jessica; Bastian, David; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Anasetti, Claudio; Betts, Brain; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a significant cause of non-relapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Existing strategies to prevent and treat GVHD are incomplete, where a significant portion of allo-HCT recipients developed this complication. Despite this, one such therapy has emerged involving the use of regulatory T cells (Tregs) to control GVHD. The use of natural Tregs (nTregs) yielded positive pre-clinical results and are actively under investigation to reduce GVHD. However, broad application of this approach may require standardization of Treg expansion methods and dosing. Inducible Tregs (iTregs) can be seamlessly generated, but controversial pre-clinical findings and phenotype instability have hampered their translation into the clinic. Here, we review the current biological differences between nTregs and iTregs, as well as their effects on GVHD and graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) responses. We conclude by exploring the idea of combinational cellular therapies for the prevention of GVHD and preservation of GVL. PMID:27722210

  6. Human naïve regulatory T-cells feature high steady-state turnover and are maintained by IL-7

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Caetano, Ana; Foxall, Russell B.; Pires, Ana R.; Matoso, Paula; Fernandes, Susana M.; Ferreira, João; Cheynier, Rémi; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Caramalho, Iris; Barata, João T.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2016-01-01

    Naïve FoxP3-expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are essential to control immune responses via continuous replenishment of the activated-Treg pool with thymus-committed suppressor cells. The mechanisms underlying naïve-Treg maintenance throughout life in face of the age-associated thymic involution remain unclear. We found that in adults thymectomized early in infancy the naïve-Treg pool is remarkably well preserved, in contrast to conventional naïve CD4 T-cells. Naïve-Tregs featured high levels of cycling and pro-survival markers, even in healthy individuals, and contrasted with other circulating naïve/memory CD4 T-cell subsets in terms of their strong γc-cytokine-dependent signaling, particularly in response to IL-7. Accordingly, ex-vivo stimulation of naïve-Tregs with IL-7 induced robust cytokine-dependent signaling, Bcl-2 expression, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent proliferation, whilst preserving naïve phenotype and suppressive capacity. Altogether, our data strongly implicate IL-7 in the thymus-independent long-term survival of functional naïve-Tregs, and highlight the potential of targeting the IL-7 pathway to modulate Tregs in different clinical settings. PMID:26910841

  7. Promises and paradoxes of regulatory T cells in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Lord, James D

    2015-10-28

    Since their discovery two decades ago, CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) have become the subject of intense investigation by immunologists. Unlike other T cells, which promote an immune response, Tregs actively inhibit inflammation when activated by their cognate antigen, thus raising hope that these cells could be engineered into a highly targeted, antigen-specific, immunosuppressant therapy. Although Tregs represent less than 10% of circulating CD4(+)T cells, they have been shown to play an essential role in preventing or limiting inflammation in a variety of animal models and human diseases. In particular, spontaneous intestinal inflammation has been shown to occur in the absence of Tregs, suggesting that there may be a Treg defect central to the pathogenesis of human inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, over the past decade, multiple groups have reported no qualitative or quantitative deficits in Tregs from the intestines and blood of IBD patients to explain why these cells fail to regulate inflammation in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. In this review, we will discuss the history of Tregs, what is known about them in IBD, and what progress and obstacles have been seen with efforts to employ them for therapeutic benefit.

  8. Selective NFAT targeting in T cells ameliorates GvHD while maintaining antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Martin; Bäuerlein, Carina A; Pusch, Tobias; Findeis, Janina; Chopra, Martin; Mottok, Anja; Rosenwald, Andreas; Beilhack, Andreas; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2015-01-27

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a life-threatening immunological complication after allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). The intrinsic graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, however, is the desirable curative benefit. Patients with acute GvHD are treated with cyclosporine A (CsA) or tacrolimus (FK506), which not only often causes severe adverse effects, but also interferes with the anticipated GvL. Both drugs inhibit calcineurin, thus at first suppressing activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Therefore, we explored the specific contribution of individual NFAT factors in donor T cells in animal models of GvHD and GvL. Ablation of NFAT1, NFAT2, or a combination of both resulted in ameliorated GvHD, due to reduced proliferation, target tissue homing, and impaired effector function of allogenic donor T cells. In contrast, the frequency of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells was increased and NFAT-deficient Tregs were fully protective in GvHD. CD8(+) T-cell recall response and, importantly, the beneficial antitumor activity were largely preserved in NFAT-deficient effector T cells. Thus, specific inhibition of NFAT opens an avenue for an advanced therapy of GvHD maintaining protective GvL.

  9. Breaking Free of Control: How Conventional T Cells Overcome Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Mercadante, Emily R.; Lorenz, Ulrike M.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional T (Tcon) cells are crucial in shaping the immune response, whether it is protection against a pathogen, a cytotoxic attack on tumor cells, or an unwanted response to self-antigens in the context of autoimmunity. In each of these immune settings, regulatory T cells (Tregs) can potentially exert control over the Tcon cell response, resulting in either suppression or activation of the Tcon cells. Under physiological conditions, Tcon cells are able to transiently overcome Treg-imposed restraints to mount a protective response against an infectious threat, achieving clonal expansion, differentiation, and effector function. However, evidence has accumulated in recent years to suggest that Tcon cell resistance to Treg-mediated suppression centrally contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Tipping the balance too far in the other direction, cancerous tumors utilize Tregs to establish an overly suppressive microenvironment, preventing antitumor Tcon cell responses. Given the wide-ranging clinical importance of the Tcon/Treg interaction, this review aims to provide a better understanding of what determines whether a Tcon cell is susceptible to Treg-mediated suppression and how perturbations to this finely tuned balance play a role in pathological conditions. Here, we focus in detail on the complex array of factors that confer Tcon cells with resistance to Treg suppression, which we have divided into two categories: (1) extracellular factor-mediated signaling and (2) intracellular signaling molecules. Further, we explore the therapeutic implications of manipulating the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which is proposed to be the convergence point of signaling pathways that mediate Tcon resistance to suppression. Finally, we address important unresolved questions on the timing and location of acquisition of resistance, and the stability of the “Treg-resistant” phenotype. PMID:27242798

  10. Breaking Free of Control: How Conventional T Cells Overcome Regulatory T Cell Suppression.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Emily R; Lorenz, Ulrike M

    2016-01-01

    Conventional T (Tcon) cells are crucial in shaping the immune response, whether it is protection against a pathogen, a cytotoxic attack on tumor cells, or an unwanted response to self-antigens in the context of autoimmunity. In each of these immune settings, regulatory T cells (Tregs) can potentially exert control over the Tcon cell response, resulting in either suppression or activation of the Tcon cells. Under physiological conditions, Tcon cells are able to transiently overcome Treg-imposed restraints to mount a protective response against an infectious threat, achieving clonal expansion, differentiation, and effector function. However, evidence has accumulated in recent years to suggest that Tcon cell resistance to Treg-mediated suppression centrally contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Tipping the balance too far in the other direction, cancerous tumors utilize Tregs to establish an overly suppressive microenvironment, preventing antitumor Tcon cell responses. Given the wide-ranging clinical importance of the Tcon/Treg interaction, this review aims to provide a better understanding of what determines whether a Tcon cell is susceptible to Treg-mediated suppression and how perturbations to this finely tuned balance play a role in pathological conditions. Here, we focus in detail on the complex array of factors that confer Tcon cells with resistance to Treg suppression, which we have divided into two categories: (1) extracellular factor-mediated signaling and (2) intracellular signaling molecules. Further, we explore the therapeutic implications of manipulating the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which is proposed to be the convergence point of signaling pathways that mediate Tcon resistance to suppression. Finally, we address important unresolved questions on the timing and location of acquisition of resistance, and the stability of the "Treg-resistant" phenotype. PMID:27242798

  11. FTY720 ameliorates Th1-mediated colitis in mice by directly affecting the functional activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Carolin; Sartory, Nico; Zahn, Nadine; Geisslinger, Gerd; Radeke, Heinfried H; Stein, Juergen M

    2007-02-15

    Following the present concepts, the synthetic sphingosine analog of myriocin FTY720 alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. However, several studies indicate that the immunosuppressive properties of FTY720 may alternatively be due to tolerogenic activities via modulation of dendritic cell differentiation or based on direct effects on CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). As Treg play an important role for the cure of inflammatory colitis, we used the Th1-mediated 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis model to address the therapeutic potential of FTY720 in vivo. A rectal enema of TNBS was given to BALB/c mice. FTY720 was administered i.p. from days 0 to 3 or 3 to 5. FTY720 substantially reduced all clinical, histopathologic, macroscopic, and microscopic parameters of colitis analyzed. The therapeutic effects of FTY720 were associated with a down-regulation of IL-12p70 and subsequent Th1 cytokines. Importantly, FTY720 treatment resulted in a prominent up-regulation of FoxP3, IL-10, TGFbeta, and CTLA4. Supporting the hypothesis that FTY720 directly affects functional activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg, we measured a significant increase of CD25 and FoxP3 expression in isolated lamina propria CD4(+) T cells of FTY720-treated mice. The impact of FTY720 on Treg induction was further confirmed by concomitant in vivo blockade of CTLA4 or IL-10R which significantly abrogated its therapeutic activity. In conclusion, our data provide clear evidence that in addition to its well-established effects on migration FTY720 leads to a specific down-regulation of proinflammatory signals while simultaneously inducing functional activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg. Thus, FTY720 may offer a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of IBD.

  12. Regulatory T Cell Dysfunction Acquiesces to BTLA+ Regulatory B Cells Subsequent to Oral Intervention in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Huarte, Eduardo; Jun, SangMu; Rynda-Apple, Agnieszka; Golden, Sara; Jackiw, Larissa; Hoffman, Carol; Maddaloni, Massimo; Pascual, David W

    2016-06-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) induced during autoimmunity often become quiescent and unable to resolve disease, suggesting inadequate activation. Resolution of established experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) can be achieved with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) fused to reovirus protein σ1 (MOG-pσ1), which activates Tregs, restoring protection, but requiring other regulatory cells to revitalize them. B cells have a dichotomous role in both the pathogenesis and recovery from EAE. Although inflammatory B cells contribute to EAE's pathogenesis, treatment of EAE mice with MOG-pσ1, but not OVA-pσ1, resulted in an influx of IL-10-producing B220(+)CD5(+) B regulatory cells (Bregs) enabling Tregs to recover their inhibitory activity, and in turn, leading to the rapid amelioration of EAE. These findings implicate direct interactions between Bregs and Tregs to facilitate this recovery. Adoptive transfer of B220(+)CD5(-) B cells from MOG-pσ1-treated EAE or Bregs from PBS-treated EAE mice did not resolve disease, whereas the adoptive transfer of MOG-pσ1-induced B220(+)CD5(+) Bregs greatly ameliorated EAE. MOG-pσ1-, but not OVA-pσ1-induced IL-10-producing Bregs, expressed elevated levels of B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) relative to CD5(-) B cells, as opposed to Tregs or effector T (Teff) cells, whose BTLA expression was not affected. These induced Bregs restored EAE Treg function in a BTLA-dependent manner. BTLA(-/-) mice showed more pronounced EAE with fewer Tregs, but upon adoptive transfer of MOG-pσ1-induced BTLA(+) Bregs, BTLA(-/-) mice were protected against EAE. Hence, this evidence shows the importance of BTLA in activating Tregs to facilitate recovery from EAE. PMID:27194787

  13. Heat shock protein 60 enhances CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell function via innate TLR2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Cahalon, Liora; Tal, Guy; Margalit, Raanan; Lider, Ofer; Cohen, Irun R

    2006-07-01

    CD4+CD25+ Tregs regulate immunity, but little is known about their own regulation. We now report that the human 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) acts as a costimulator of human Tregs, both CD4+CD25int and CD4+CD25hi. Treatment of Tregs with HSP60, or its peptide p277, before anti-CD3 activation significantly enhanced the ability of relatively low concentrations of the Tregs to downregulate CD4+CD25- or CD8+ target T cells, detected as inhibition of target T cell proliferation and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha secretion. The enhancing effects of HSP60 costimulation on Tregs involved innate signaling via TLR2, led to activation of PKC, PI3K, and p38, and were further enhanced by inhibition of ERK. HSP60-treated Tregs suppressed target T cells both by cell-to-cell contact and by secretion of TGF-beta and IL-10. In addition, the expression of ERK, NF-kappaB, and T-bet by downregulated target T cells was inhibited. Thus, HSP60, a self-molecule, can downregulate adaptive immune responses by upregulating Tregs innately through TLR2 signaling. PMID:16767222

  14. A tax on luxury: HTLV-I infection of CD4+CD25+ Tregs.

    PubMed

    Fujinami, Robert S

    2005-05-01

    Almost a quarter of a century ago, Oldstone and colleagues proposed that infection of cells by noncytopathic viruses may lead to an alteration of the cells' ability to produce certain products or perform certain tasks, i.e., inhibition of "luxury function." In this issue of the JCI, this topic has been revisited by Yamano et al., who demonstrate that human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection of CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs in patients with HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) results in a decrease in FOXP3 mRNA and protein expression. This leads to the inability of HTLV-I-infected CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs to inhibit the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) Tregs, due to the effect of the HTLV-I tax gene. Defects in the Treg population could be responsible for the large numbers of virus-specific T cells and occurrence of lymphoproliferation and inflammatory autoimmune disease in HAM/TSP patients.

  15. Metformin ameliorates the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by regulating T helper 17 and regulatory T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yafei; Tian, Tian; Gao, Juan; Liu, Xiaoqian; Hou, Huiqing; Cao, Runjing; Li, Bin; Quan, Moyuan; Guo, Li

    2016-03-15

    Immoderate immunoreaction of antigen-specific Th17 and Treg cell dysfunction play critical roles in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. We examined Th17/Treg immune responses and the underlying mechanisms in response to metformin in C57BL/6 mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Metformin reduced Th17 and increased Treg cell percentages along with the levels of associated cytokines. Molecules involved in cellular metabolism were altered in mice with EAE. Suppressed activation of mTOR and its downstream target, HIF-1α, likely mediated the protective effects of metformin. Our findings demonstrate that regulation of T cell metabolism represents a new therapeutic target for CNS autoimmune disorders.

  16. Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Regulates Development and Activation of CD4(+) T Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuczma, Michal; Kraj, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are growth factors belonging to the TGF-β (transforming growth factor β) superfamily. BMPs were found to regulate multiple cell processes such as proliferation, survival, differentiation, and apoptosis. They were originally described to play a pivotal role in inducing bone, cartilage, ligament, and tendon formation at both heterotopic and orthotopic sites but were found to play a significant role in embryogenesis and development of multiple tissues and organs. Activities of BMPs are regulated by a number of secreted proteins, which modulate their availability to bind cellular receptors. The functions of individual BMPs are highly redundant due to binding the same receptors and inducing overlapping signal transduction pathways. Recently, BMPs were found to regulate cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. BMPs are involved in thymic development of T cells at the early, double negative, as well as later, double positive, stages of thymopoesis. They specifically modulate thymic development of regulatory T cells (T(reg)). In the periphery, BMPs affect T cell activation, promoting generation of T(reg) cells. We found that mice deficient for one of the receptors activated by BMPs demonstrated slower growth of transplantable melanoma tumors.

  17. Human HLA-G+ extravillous trophoblasts: Immune-activating cells that interact with decidual leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Tilburgs, Tamara; Crespo, Ângela C; van der Zwan, Anita; Rybalov, Basya; Raj, Towfique; Stranger, Barbara; Gardner, Lucy; Moffett, Ashley; Strominger, Jack L

    2015-06-01

    Invading human leukocyte antigen-G+ (HLA-G+) extravillous trophoblasts (EVT) are rare cells that are believed to play a key role in the prevention of a maternal immune attack on foreign fetal tissues. Here highly purified HLA-G+ EVT and HLA-G- villous trophoblasts (VT) were isolated. Culture on fibronectin that EVT encounter on invading the uterus increased HLA-G, EGF-Receptor-2, and LIF-Receptor expression on EVT, presumably representing a further differentiation state. Microarray and functional gene set enrichment analysis revealed a striking immune-activating potential for EVT that was absent in VT. Cocultures of HLA-G+ EVT with sample matched decidual natural killer cells (dNK), macrophages, and CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were established. Interaction of EVT with CD4+ T cells resulted in increased numbers of CD4+CD25(HI)FOXP3+CD45RA+ resting regulatory T cells (Treg) and increased the expression level of the Treg-specific transcription factor FOXP3 in these cells. However, EVT did not enhance cytokine secretion in dNK, whereas stimulation of dNK with mitogens or classical natural killer targets confirmed the distinct cytokine secretion profiles of dNK and peripheral blood NK cells (pNK). EVT are specialized cells involved in maternal-fetal tolerance, the properties of which are not imitated by HLA-G-expressing surrogate cell lines. PMID:26015573

  18. HIV-specific regulatory T cells are associated with higher CD4 cell counts in primary infection

    PubMed Central

    Kared, Hassen; Lelièvre, Jean-Daniel; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Aouba, Albertine; Melica, Giovanna; Balbo, Michèle; Weiss, Laurence; Lévy, Yves

    2008-01-01

    Objective Expansion of Regulatory T (Treg) cells has been described in chronically HIV-infected subjects. We investigated whether HIV-suppressive Treg could be detected during primary HIV infection (PHI). Methods Seventeen patients diagnosed early after PHI (median: 13 days; 1–55) were studied. Median CD4 cell count was 480 cells/μl (33–1306) and plasma HIV RNA levels ranged between 3.3 to 5.7 log10 cp/mL. Suppressive capacity of blood purified CD4+CD25+ was evaluated in a co-culture assay. Fox-p3, IL-2 and IL-10 were quantified by RT-PCR and intra-cellular staining of ex vivo and activated CD4+CD25high T cells. Results The frequency of CD4+CD127lowCD25high T cells among CD4 T cells was lower in PHI compared to chronic patients (n=19). They exhibited a phenotype of memory T cells and expressed constitutively FoxP3. Similarly to chronic patients, Treg from PHI patients inhibited the proliferation of PPD and HIV p24 activated CD4+CD25− T cells. CD4+CD25high T cells from PHI patients responded specifically to p24 stimulation by expressing IL-10. In untreated PHI patients, the frequency, as well as HIV-specific activity of Treg decreased during a 24-month follow up. A positive correlation between percentages of Treg and both CD4 cell counts and the magnitude of p24-specific suppressive activity at diagnosis of PHI was found. Conclusions Our data showed that HIV drives Treg since PHI and that these cells persist throughout the course of the infection. A correlation between the frequency of Treg and CD4 T cell counts suggest that these cells may impact on the immune activation set point at PHI diagnosis. PMID:19005268

  19. Role of Regulatory T-cells in Different Clinical Expressions of Helicobacter pylori Infection.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Nader; Azadegan-Dehkordi, Fatemeh; Rahimian, Ghorbanali; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2016-05-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) colonization induces vigorous innate and specific immune responses; however, the infection does not disappear and a chronic active gastritis continues if left untreated. It has been shown that the topographical pattern and immune response of gastritis are the main reasons for the bacteria persistence and the clinical outcome. Gastritis due to H. pylori is caused by a complicated interaction among a variety of T cell subsets. Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppressing the immune response of antigen-specific T-cells have recently been demonstrated to play a key role in chronic inflammation by immunologic tolerance. Treg cells have been identified as the major regulatory component of the adaptive immune response and being involved in H. pylori-related inflammation and bacterial persistence. There have been many controversies over the role of Treg cells in H. pylori infection. Many studies have shown that the local Treg response protects the gastric mucosa from intensified inflammation and tissue damage, and the risk of H. pylori-associated diseases has an inverse correlation with Treg accumulation, even if the decrease in the inflammatory response is recognized by Treg it causes increase in bacterial density. This paper reviews the role of Treg in different clinical expressions of H. pylori infection. PMID:27664483

  20. Skewed T-helper (Th)1/2- and Th17/T regulatory‑cell balances in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Long; Yang, Cheng; Zhao, Zitong; Xu, Bin; Zheng, Minghuan; Zhang, Chao; Min, Zhihui; Guo, Jianming; Rong, Ruiming

    2015-02-01

    The characterization of CD4+ T-cell subsets reflects the immune status and is important in the maintenance of tumorigenesis and homeostasis. To identify changes in the balance of T helper (Th)1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cells (Treg) in individuals with renal cell carcinoma (RCC), the present study investigated a total of 131 patients with RCC and 36 healthy volunteers. The number of CD4+ T‑bet+ cells, CD4+ GATA binding protein 3+ cells, CD4+ RAR-related orphan receptor γt+ cells, CD4+ CD25hi CD127lo CD45RA‑ cells and CD4+ CD25hi CD127lo CD45RA+ cells, defined as Th1, Th2, Th17, activated and naïve Treg cells, respectively, were detected in the peripheral blood using flow cytometric analysis. In addition, tumor‑infiltrating forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)+ cells were examined using immunohistochemistry. Compared with healthy volunteers, a significant decrease in the peripheral percentages of Th1, activated and naïve Treg cells was observed in patients with RCC, while those of the Th2 and Th17 cells were increased. In particular, as the tumor stage and grade progressed, the levels of Th1, activated and naïve Treg cells in the peripheral blood decreased; however, the levels of Th2 and Th17 cells increased. Furthermore, the number of tumor-infiltrating Foxp3+ cells increased with increasing tumor stage. These results demonstrated that the balance of Th1 and Th2 cells was skewed towards the Th2 profile and the balance of Th17 and Treg cells was skewed towards the Th17 profile in the peripheral blood of patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and Treg cells were recruited to the tumor sites. Therefore, dysfunctional host anti‑tumor immunity was observed in patients with RCC, with a skewed Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg balance.

  1. Specificity of regulatory CD4+CD25+ T cells for self-T cell receptor determinants.

    PubMed

    Buenafe, Abigail C; Tsaknaridis, Laura; Spencer, Leslie; Hicks, Kevin S; McMahan, Rachel H; Watson, Lisa; Culbertson, Nicole E; Latocha, Dorian; Wegmann, Keith; Finn, Tom; Bartholomew, Richard; Burrows, Gregory G; Whitham, Ruth; Bourdette, Dennis N; Jones, Richard E; Offner, Halina; Chou, Yuan K; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2004-04-01

    Although the phenotypic and regulatory properties of the CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell lineage (Treg cells) have been well described, the specificities remain largely unknown. We demonstrate here that the CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg population includes the recognition of a broad spectrum of human TCR CDR2 determinants found in the germline V gene repertoire as well as that of a clonotypic nongermline-encoded CDR3beta sequence present in a recombinant soluble T cell receptor (TCR) protein. Regulatory activity was demonstrated in T cell lines responsive to TCR but not in T cell lines responsive to control antigens. Inhibitory activity of TCR-reactive T cells required cell-cell contact and involved CTLA-4, GITR, IL-10, and IL-17. Thus, the T-T regulatory network includes Treg cells with specificity directed toward self-TCR determinants.

  2. Regulatory T-Cells at the Interface between Human Host and Pathogens in Infectious Diseases and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Boer, Mardi C.; Joosten, Simone A.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) act at the interface of host and pathogen interactions in human infectious diseases. Tregs are induced by a wide range of pathogens, but distinct effects of Tregs have been demonstrated for different pathogens and in different stages of infection. Moreover, Tregs that are induced by a specific pathogen may non-specifically suppress immunity against other microbes and parasites. Thus, Treg effects need to be assessed not only in homologous but also in heterologous infections and vaccinations. Though Tregs protect the human host against excessive inflammation, they probably also increase the risk of pathogen persistence and chronic disease, and the possibility of disease reactivation later in life. Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing leprosy and tuberculosis, respectively, are among the most ancient microbes known to mankind, and are master manipulators of the immune system toward tolerance and pathogen persistence. The majority of mycobacterial infections occur in settings co-endemic for viral, parasitic, and (other) bacterial coinfections. In this paper, we discuss recent insights in the activation and activity of Tregs in human infectious diseases, with emphasis on early, late, and non-specific effects in disease, coinfections, and vaccination. We highlight mycobacterial infections as important models of modulation of host responses and vaccine-induced immunity by Tregs. PMID:26029205

  3. Regulatory T-Cells at the Interface between Human Host and Pathogens in Infectious Diseases and Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Boer, Mardi C; Joosten, Simone A; Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) act at the interface of host and pathogen interactions in human infectious diseases. Tregs are induced by a wide range of pathogens, but distinct effects of Tregs have been demonstrated for different pathogens and in different stages of infection. Moreover, Tregs that are induced by a specific pathogen may non-specifically suppress immunity against other microbes and parasites. Thus, Treg effects need to be assessed not only in homologous but also in heterologous infections and vaccinations. Though Tregs protect the human host against excessive inflammation, they probably also increase the risk of pathogen persistence and chronic disease, and the possibility of disease reactivation later in life. Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, causing leprosy and tuberculosis, respectively, are among the most ancient microbes known to mankind, and are master manipulators of the immune system toward tolerance and pathogen persistence. The majority of mycobacterial infections occur in settings co-endemic for viral, parasitic, and (other) bacterial coinfections. In this paper, we discuss recent insights in the activation and activity of Tregs in human infectious diseases, with emphasis on early, late, and non-specific effects in disease, coinfections, and vaccination. We highlight mycobacterial infections as important models of modulation of host responses and vaccine-induced immunity by Tregs. PMID:26029205

  4. The Special Relationship in the Development and Function of T Helper 17 and Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Matthias; Wang, Zuobai; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-01-01

    T helper 17 (Th17) cells play an essential role in the clearance of extracellular pathogenic bacteria and fungi. However, this subset is critically involved in the pathology of many autoimmune diseases, e.g., psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, allergy, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel diseases in humans. Therefore, Th17 responses need to be tightly regulated in vivo to mediate effective host defenses against pathogens without causing excessive host tissue damage. Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in maintaining peripheral tolerance to self-antigens and in counteracting the inflammatory activity of effector T helper cell subsets. Although Th17 and Treg cells represent two CD4(+) T cell subsets with opposing principal functions, these cell types are functionally connected. In this review, we will first give an overview on the biology of Th17 cells and describe their development and in vivo function, followed by an account on the special developmental relationship between Th17 and Treg cells. We will describe the identification of Treg/Th17 intermediates and consider their lineage stability and function in vivo. Finally, we will discuss how Treg cells may regulate the Th17 cell response in the context of infection and inflammation, and elude on findings demonstrating that Treg cells can also have a prominent function in promoting the differentiation of Th17 cells. PMID:26615094

  5. Regulatory T cell frequencies are increased in preterm infants with clinical early-onset sepsis.

    PubMed

    Pagel, J; Hartz, A; Figge, J; Gille, C; Eschweiler, S; Petersen, K; Schreiter, L; Hammer, J; Karsten, C M; Friedrich, D; Herting, E; Göpel, W; Rupp, J; Härtel, C

    2016-08-01

    The predisposition of preterm neonates to invasive infection is, as yet, incompletely understood. Regulatory T cells (Tregs ) are potential candidates for the ontogenetic control of immune activation and tissue damage in preterm infants. It was the aim of our study to characterize lymphocyte subsets and in particular CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) Tregs in peripheral blood of well-phenotyped preterm infants (n = 117; 23 + 0 - 36 + 6 weeks of gestational age) in the first 3 days of life in comparison to term infants and adults. We demonstrated a negative correlation of Treg frequencies and gestational age. Tregs were increased in blood samples of preterm infants compared to term infants and adults. Notably, we found an increased Treg frequency in preterm infants with clinical early-onset sepsis while cause of preterm delivery, e.g. chorioamnionitis, did not affect Treg frequencies. Our data suggest that Tregs apparently play an important role in maintaining maternal-fetal tolerance, which turns into an increased sepsis risk after preterm delivery. Functional analyses are needed in order to elucidate whether Tregs have potential as future target for diagnostics and therapeutics.

  6. Loss- and Gain-of-Function Approaches Indicate a Dual Role Exerted by Regulatory T Cells in Pulmonary Paracoccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, Silvia B.; Costa, Tania A.; de Araújo, Eliseu Frank; Feriotti, Claudia; Loures, Flávio V.; Pretel, Fernando D.; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), is a pulmonary fungal disease whose severity depends on the adequate development of T cell immunity. Although regulatory T (Treg) cells were shown to control immunity against PCM, deleterious or protective effects were described in different experimental settings. To clarify the function of Treg cells in pulmonary PCM, loss-and gain-of-function approaches were performed with Foxp3GFP knock-in mice and immunodeficient Rag1-/- mice, respectively, which were intratracheally infected with 106 yeast cells. The activity of Foxp3-expressing Treg cells in pulmonary PCM was determined in Foxp3GFP transgenic mice. First, it was verified that natural Treg cells migrate to the lungs of infected mice, where they become activated. Depletion of Treg cells led to reduced fungal load, diminished pathogen dissemination and increased Th1/Th2/Th17 immunity. Further, adoptive transfer of diverse T cell subsets to Rag1-/- mice subsequently infected by the pulmonary route demonstrated that isolated CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells were able to confer some degree of immunoprotection and that CD4+Foxp3- T cells alone reduced fungal growth and enhanced T cell immunity, but induced vigorous inflammatory reactions in the lungs. Nevertheless, transfer of Treg cells combined with CD4+Foxp3- T cells generated more efficient and balanced immune Th1/Th2/Th17 responses able to limit pathogen growth and excessive tissue inflammation, leading to regressive disease and increased survival rates. Altogether, these loss- and gain-of-function approaches allow us to clearly demonstrate the dual role of Treg cells in pulmonary PCM, their deleterious effects by impairing T cell immunity and pathogen eradication, and their protective role by suppressing exacerbated tissue inflammation. PMID:26512987

  7. Vitamin A improve Th17 and Treg regulation in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Handono, Kusworini; Firdausi, Sevita Nuril; Pratama, Mirza Zaka; Endharti, Agustina Tri; Kalim, Handono

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the role of vitamin A in modulating T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T cell (Treg) balance in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. Sixty-two female SLE patients and sixty-two female controls were measured for vitamin A levels from serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and percentages of Th17 and Treg from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by flow cytometry. We also performed an in vitro study to evaluate the effects of retinoic acid treatment (0, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 μg/ml) in modulating Th17/Treg balance in CD4(+) T cell culture from hypovitaminosis A SLE patients. Th17 and Treg percentages from cell cultures were measured by flow cytometry. Vitamin A levels in the SLE patients were lower compared to those in the healthy control (46.9 ± 43.4 vs. 75.6 ± 73.1 ng/ml, p = 0.015). Vitamin A levels also had a negative correlation to Th17 percentages in the SLE patients (p = 0.000, R = -0.642). Th17 percentages in the hypovitaminosis A SLE patients were higher compared to those SLE patients with normal vitamin A levels (10.9 ± 5.3 vs. 2.9 ± 2.2 %, p = 0.000). Treatment of 0.3 μg/ml of retinoic acid could increase Treg differentiation (33.9 ± 1.6 vs. 21.8 ± 1.1 %, p = 0.000) and decrease Th17 differentiation (27.2 ± 2.5 vs. 37.4 ± 1.3 %, p = 0.000). In conclusion, vitamin A has important roles in modulating Th17/Treg balance in the SLE patients shown by the significant decrease of vitamin A levels in the SLE patients which negatively correlate with Th17 population, and treatment of retinoic acid could decrease Th17 and increase Treg percentages in CD4(+) T cells cultures.

  8. Abdominal {gamma}-Radiation Induces an Accumulation of Function-Impaired Regulatory T Cells in the Small Intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Billiard, Fabienne; Buard, Valerie; Benderitter, Marc; Linard, Christine

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the frequency and the functional characteristics of one major component of immune tolerance, the CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) in a mouse model of abdominal irradiation. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to a single abdominal dose of {gamma}-radiation (10 Gy). We evaluated small intestine Treg infiltration by Foxp3 immunostaining and the functional suppressive activity of Tregs isolated from mesenteric lymph nodes. Results: Foxp3 immunostaining showed that radiation induced a long-term infiltration of the intestine by Tregs (levels 5.5 times greater than in controls). Co-culture of Tregs from mesenteric lymph nodes with CD4{sup +} effector cells showed that the Tregs had lost their suppressive function. This loss was associated with a significant decrease in the levels of Foxp3, TGF-{beta}, and CTLA-4 mRNA, all required for optimal Treg function. At Day 90 after irradiation, Tregs regained their suppressive activity as forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-{beta}), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) expression returned to normal. Analysis of the secretory function of mesenteric lymph node Tregs, activated in vitro with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 Abs, showed that this dysfunction was independent of a defect in interleukin-10 secretion. Conclusion: Radiation caused a long-term accumulation of function-impaired Foxp3{sup +}CD4{sup +} Tregs in the intestine. Our study provides new insights into how radiation affects the immune tolerance in peripheral tissues.

  9. Immune homeostasis enforced by co-localized effector and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiduo; Gerner, Michael Y.; Van Panhuys, Nicholas; Levine, Andrew G.; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Germain, Ronald N.

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a critical role in preventing autoimmune disease by limiting the effector activity of conventional T cells that have escaped thymic negative selection or cell-autonomous peripheral inactivation1–3. However, despite the substantial information available about the molecular players mediating Treg functional interference with auto-aggressive effector responses4,5, the relevant cellular events in intact tissues remain largely unexplored and the issues of whether Tregs prevent activation of self-specific T cells or function primarily to limit damage from such cells have not been addressed6. Here we have employed multiplex, high-resolution, quantitative imaging to reveal that within most secondary lymphoid tissues, Tregs expressing phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) and high amounts of the suppressive molecules CD73 and CTLA-4 exist in discrete clusters with rare IL-2 producing effector T cells activated by self-antigens. This local IL-2 production induces the STAT5 phosphorylation in the Tregs and is part of a feedback circuit that augments the suppressive properties of the Tregs to limit further autoimmune responses. Inducible ablation of TCR expression by Tregs reduces their regulatory capacity and disrupts their localization in such clusters, resulting in uncontrolled effector T cell responses. Our data thus reveal that autoreactive T cells reach a state of activation and cytokine gene induction on a regular basis, with physically co-clustering, TCR-stimulated Tregs responding to this activation in a feedback manner to suppress incipient autoimmunity and maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26605524

  10. A Listeria Vaccine and Depletion of T-Regulatory Cells Activate Immunity Against Early Stage Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasms and Prolong Survival of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Bridget P.; Saenger, Yvonne; Kafrouni, Michel I.; Leubner, Ashley; Lauer, Peter; Maitra, Anirban; Rucki, Agnieszka A.; Gunderson, Andrew J.; Coussens, Lisa M.; Brockstedt, Dirk G.; Dubensky, Thomas W.; Hassan, Raffit; Armstrong, Todd D.; Jaffee, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Premalignant lesions and early stage tumors contain immunosuppressive microenvironments that create barriers for cancer vaccines. KrasG12D/+;Trp53R172H/+;Pdx-1-Cre (KPC) mice, which express an activated form of Kras in pancreatic tissues, develop pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanIN) that progress to pancreatic ductal adeno-carcinoma (PDA). We used these mice to study immune suppression in PDA. METHODS We immunized KPC and KrasG12D/+;Pdx-1-Cre mice with attenuated intracellular Listeria monocytogenes (which induces CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell immunity) engineered to express KrasG12D (LM-Kras). The vaccine was given alone or in sequence with an anti-CD25 antibody (PC61) and cyclophosphamide, to deplete T-regulatory (Treg) cells. Survival times were measured; pancreatic and spleen tissues were collected and analyzed by histologic, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical analyses. RESULTS Interferon γ-mediated, CD8+ T-cell responses were observed in KPC and KrasG12D/+;Pdx-1-Cre mice given LM-Kras, but not in unvaccinated mice. Administration of LM-Kras to KPC mice 4–6 weeks old (with early stage PanINs), depleted of Treg cells, significantly prolonged survival and reduced PanIN progression (median survival, 265 days), compared with unvaccinated mice (median survival, 150 days; P = .002), mice given only LM-Kras (median survival, 150 days; P = .050), and unvaccinated mice depleted of Treg cells (median (medium survival, 170 days; P = .048). In 8- to 12-week-old mice (with late-stage PanINs),¼LM-Kras, alone or in combination with Treg cell depletion, did not increase survival time or slow PanIN progression. The combination of LM-Kras and Treg cell depletion reduced numbers of Foxp3+CD4+ T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes, increased numbers of CD4+ T cells that secrete interleukin 17 and interferon g, and caused CD11b+Gr1+ cells in the pancreas to acquire an immunostimulatory phenotype. CONCLUSIONS Immunization of KPC mice with Listeria monocytogenes

  11. Defective circulating CD25 regulatory T cells in patients with chronic immune thrombocytopenic purpura

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jin; Heck, Susanne; Patel, Vivek; Levan, Jared; Yu, Yu; Bussel, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) is characterized by the presence of antiplatelet autoantibodies as a result of loss of tolerance. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Decreased levels of peripheral Tregs in patients with ITP have been reported. To test whether inefficient production or reduced immunosuppressive activity of Tregs contributes to loss of tolerance in patients with chronic ITP, we investigated the frequency and function of their circulating CD4+CD25hi Tregs. We found a com-parable frequency of circulating CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs in patients and controls (n = 16, P > .05). However, sorted CD4+CD25hi cells from patients with chronic ITP (n = 13) had a 2-fold reduction of in vitro immunosuppressive activity compared with controls (n = 10, P < .05). The impaired suppression was specific to Tregs as shown by cross-mixing experiments with T cells from controls. These data suggest that functional defects in Tregs contribute to breakdown of self-tolerance in patients with chronic ITP. PMID:18420827

  12. Hepatic stellate cells inhibit T cells through active TGFβ1 from a cell-surface-bound latent TGFβ1/GARP complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Qian, Shiguang; Letterio, John J.; Fung, John J.; Lu, Lina; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) inhibit T cells, a process that could help the liver to maintain its immunoprivileged status. HSCs secrete latent TGFβ1, but the detailed mechanisms by which latent TGFβ1 is activated and whether it plays any role in HSC-mediated T-cell suppression remain unclear. Glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP) is a surface marker of activated regulatory T cells (Tregs). GARP binds latent TGFβ1 for its activation, which is critical for Tregs to suppress effector T cells; however, it is still unclear whether GARP is present on HSCs and whether it has any impact on HSC function. In this study, we found that TGFβ1+/− HSCs, which produce reduced levels of TGFβ1, showed decreased potency in inhibiting T cells. We also found that pharmaceutical or genetic inhibition of the TGFβ1 signaling pathway reduced the T-cell-inhibiting activity of HSCs. In addition, using isolated primary HSCs, we demonstrated that GARP was constitutively expressed on HSCs. Blocking GARP function or knocking down GARP expression significantly impaired the potency of HSCs to suppress the proliferation of and IFNγ production from activated T cells, suggesting that GARP is important for HSCs to inhibit T cells. These results demonstrate the unexpected presence of GARP on HSCs and its significance in regard to the ability of HSCs to activate latent TGFβ1 and thereby inhibit T cells. Our study reveals a new mechanism for HSC-mediated immune regulation and potentially for other conditions, such as liver fibrosis, that involve HSC-secreted TGFβ1. PMID:26246140

  13. Epigenetic modification of the FoxP3 TSDR in HAM/TSP decreases the functional suppression of Tregs.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique R; Enose-Akahata, Yoshimi; Massoud, Raya; Ngouth, Nyater; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Oh, Unsong; Jacobson, Steven

    2014-09-01

    HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus that is associated with the neuroinflammatory disorder HTLV-1 associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). In these patients, HTLV-1 is primarily found in the CD4(+)CD25(+) T cell subset (Regulatory T cells:Tregs), which is responsible for peripheral immune tolerance and is known to be dysfunctional in HAM/TSP. Recent evidence suggests that FoxP3 expression and function is determined epigenetically through DNA demethylation in the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR). We analyzed the methylation of the TSDR in PBMCs, CD4(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from normal healthy donors (NDs) and HAM/TSP patients. We demonstrated that there is decreased demethylation in analyzed PBMCs and CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells from HAM/TSP patients as compared to NDs. Furthermore, decreased TSDR demethylation was associated with decreased functional suppression by Tregs. Additionally, increased HTLV-1 Tax expression in HAM/TSP PBMC culture correlated with a concomitant decline in FoxP3 TSDR demethylation. Overall, we suggest that HTLV-1 infection decreases Treg functional suppressive capacity in HAM/TSP through modification of FoxP3 TSDR demethylation and that dysregulated Treg function may contribute to HAM/TSP disease pathogenesis. PMID:24845974

  14. Diversity of TCRs on natural Foxp3+ T cells in mice lacking Aire expression.

    PubMed

    Daniely, Danielle; Kern, Joanna; Cebula, Anna; Ignatowicz, Leszek

    2010-06-15

    Medullary thymic epithelial cells expressing the Aire gene play a critical role in the induction of tolerance to tissue-specific Ags (TSAs). It was postulated that recognition of Aire-controlled TSAs by immature thymocytes results in the selection of natural CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and enriches this repertoire in self-reactive receptors, contributing to its vast diversity. In this study, we compared the TCRs on individual Tregs in Aire+ and Aire- mice expressing a miniature TCR repertoire (TCRmini) along with GFP driven by the Foxp3 promoter (Foxp3GFP). The Treg TCR repertoires in Aire+ and Aire- TCRminiFoxp3GFP mice were similar and more diverse than their repertoires on CD4+ Foxp3- thymocytes. Further, TCRs found on potentially self-reactive T cells, with an activated phenotype (CD4+Foxp3-CD62Llow) in Aire- TCRminiFoxp3GFP mice, appear distinct from TCRs found on Tregs in Aire+ TCRminiFoxp3GFP mice. Lastly, we found no evidence that TSAs presented by medullary thymic epithelial cells in Aire+TCRmini mice are often recognized as agonists by Treg-derived TCR hybridomas or CD4+CD25+ thymocytes, containing both natural Tregs and precursors. Thus, positive selection and self-reactivity of the global Treg repertoire are not controlled by Aire-dependent TSAs.

  15. Low-Dose IL-2 Induces Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Control of Experimental Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Benjamin; Vigneron, James; Levacher, Béatrice; Vazquez, Thomas; Pitoiset, Fabien; Brimaud, Faustine; Churlaud, Guillaume; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are pivotal for maintenance of immune self-tolerance and also regulate immune responses to exogenous Ags, including allergens. Both decreased Treg number and function have been reported in allergic patients, offering new therapeutic perspectives. We previously demonstrated that Tregs can be selectively expanded and activated by low doses of IL-2 (ld-IL-2) inducing immunoregulation without immunosuppression and established its protective effect in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ld-IL-2 to control allergy in an experimental model of food allergy. Ld-IL-2 induced Treg expansion and activation that elicited protection against clinical manifestations of food allergy in two mouse models with OVA and peanut. This clinical effect was lost in Treg-depleted mice, demonstrating the major contribution of Tregs in ld-IL-2 efficacy. Mechanistic studies further indicated that protection from allergy could be explained by a Treg-dependent local modification of the Th1/Th2 balance and an inhibition of mast cell recruitment and activation. Preventive and therapeutic effects of ld-IL-2 were observed over a 7-mo-period, highlighting its long-term efficacy. This study demonstrated that ld-IL-2 is efficient to prevent and to treat allergic immune responses, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy for managing allergic diseases. PMID:27259854

  16. Inhibition of FOXP3/NFAT Interaction Enhances T Cell Function after TCR Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Teresa; Villanueva, Lorea; Durántez, Maika; Gorraiz, Marta; Ruiz, Marta; Belsúe, Virginia; Riezu-Boj, José I; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Oyarzábal, Julen; Bandukwala, Hozefa; Lourenço, Ana R; Coffer, Paul J; Sarobe, Pablo; Prieto, Jesús; Casares, Noelia; Lasarte, Juan J

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg) activity is modulated by a cooperative complex between the transcription factor NFAT and FOXP3, a lineage specification factor for Tregs. FOXP3/NFAT interaction is required to repress expression of IL-2, upregulate expression of the Treg markers CTLA4 and CD25, and confer suppressor function to Tregs. However, FOXP3 is expressed transiently in conventional CD4(+) T cells upon TCR stimulation and may lead to T cell hyporesponsiveness. We found that a short synthetic peptide able to inhibit FOXP3/NFAT interaction impaired suppressor activity of conventional Tregs in vitro. Specific inhibition of FOXP3/NFAT interaction with this inhibitory peptide revealed that FOXP3 downregulates NFAT-driven promoter activity of CD40L and IL-17. Inhibition of FOXP3/NFAT interaction upregulated CD40L expression on effector T cells and enhanced T cell proliferation and IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-6, or IL-17 production in response to TCR stimulation. The inhibitory peptide impaired effector T cell conversion into induced Tregs in the presence of TGF-β. Moreover, in vivo peptide administration showed antitumor efficacy in mice bearing Hepa129 or TC1 tumor cells when combined with sorafenib or with an antitumor vaccine, respectively. Our results suggest that inhibition of NFAT/FOXP3 interaction might improve antitumor immunotherapies.

  17. Tregalizumab – A Monoclonal Antibody to Target Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Martin; Rharbaoui, Faiza; Aigner, Silke; Dälken, Benjamin; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a subpopulation of CD4+ T cells, which are essential for the maintenance of immunological tolerance. The absence or dysfunction of Tregs can lead to autoimmunity and allergies. The restoration of functional Tregs and/or Treg cell numbers represents a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, e.g., rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The CD4 cell surface receptor is a target for modulation of T cell function. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CD4 have previously been tested for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including RA. Furthermore, in model systems, anti-CD4 antibodies are able to induce tolerance and mediate immunomodulatory effects through a variety of mechanisms. Despite the availability of innovative and effective therapies for RA, many patients still have persistently active disease or experience adverse events that can limit use. A growing body of evidence suggests that Treg modulation could offer a new therapeutic strategy in RA and other autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe tregalizumab (BT-061), which is a novel, non-depleting IgG1 mAb that binds to a unique epitope of CD4. Tregalizumab represents the first humanized anti-CD4 mAb that selectively induces Treg activation. PMID:26834751

  18. CD8+CD45RA+CCR7+FOXP3+ T cells with immunosuppressive properties: a novel subset of inducible human regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masakatsu; Jagger, Ann L.; Konya, Christine; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Pryshchep, Sergey; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2012-01-01

    CD8 T cells stimulated with a suboptimal dose of anti-CD3 antibodies (100 pg/ml) in the presence of IL-15 retain a naïve phenotype with expression of CD45RA, CD28, CD27 and CCR7 but acquire new functions and differentiate into immunosuppressive T cells. CD8+CCR7+ Tregs express FOXP3 and prevent CD4 T cells from responding to T-cell receptor stimulation and entering the cell cycle. Naïve CD4 T cells are more susceptible to inhibition than memory cells. The suppressive activity of CD8+CCR7+ Tregs is not mediated by IL-10, TGF-β, CTLA-4, CCL4 or adenosine and relies on interference with very early steps of the TCR signaling cascade. Specifically, CD8+CCR7+ Tregs prevent TCR-induced phosphorylation of ZAP70 and dampen the rise of intracellular calcium in CD4 T cells. The inducibility of CD8+CCR7+ Tregs is correlated to the age of the individual with peripheral blood lymphocytes of donors older than 60 years yielding low numbers of FOXP3low CD8 Treg cells. Loss of CD8+CCR7+ Tregs in the elderly host may be of relevance in the aging immune system as immunosenescence is associated with a state of chronic smoldering inflammation. PMID:22821963

  19. An asthma-associated IL4R variant exacerbates airway inflammation by promoting conversion of regulatory T cells to TH17-like cells.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Amir Hossein; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Phipatanakul, Wanda; Chatila, Talal A

    2016-09-01

    Mechanisms by which regulatory T (Treg) cells fail to control inflammation in asthma remain poorly understood. We show that a severe asthma-associated polymorphism in the gene encoding the interleukin (IL)-4 receptor alpha chain (Il4ra(R576)) promotes conversion of induced Treg (iTreg) cells toward a T helper 17 (TH17) cell fate. This skewing is mediated by the recruitment by IL-4Rα(R576) of the growth-factor-receptor-bound protein 2 (GRB2) adaptor protein, which drives IL-17 expression by activating a pathway that involves extracellular-signal-regulated kinase, IL-6 and the transcription factor STAT3. Treg cell-specific deletion of genes that regulate TH17 cell differentiation, including Il6ra and RAR-related orphan receptor gamma (Rorc), but not of Il4 or Il13, prevented exacerbated airway inflammation in mice expressing Il4ra(R576) (hereafter referred to as Il4ra(R576) mice). Furthermore, treatment of Il4ra(R576) mice with a neutralizing IL-6-specific antibody prevented iTreg cell reprogramming into TH17-like cells and protected against severe airway inflammation. These findings identify a previously unknown mechanism for the development of mixed TH2-TH17 cell inflammation in genetically prone individuals and point to interventions that stabilize iTreg cells as potentially effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:27479084

  20. Human CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells do not constitutively express IL-35.

    PubMed

    Bardel, Emilie; Larousserie, Frédérique; Charlot-Rabiega, Pascaline; Coulomb-L'Herminé, Aurore; Devergne, Odile

    2008-11-15

    EBV-induced gene 3 (EBI3) can associate with p28 to form the heterodimeric cytokine IL-27, or with the p35 subunit of IL-12 to form the EBI3/p35 heterodimer, recently named IL-35. In mice, IL-35 has been shown to be constitutively expressed by CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and suggested to contribute to their suppressive activity. In this study, we investigated whether human Treg cells express IL-35. Double-staining analysis of human thymuses showed that neither Foxp3(+) nor CD25(+) cells coexpressed EBI3. Similarly, Foxp3(+) cells present in human lymph nodes, tonsils, spleens, and intestines did not express EBI3. Consistent with these in situ observations, Treg cells purified from blood or tonsils were negative for EBI3 by immunoblotting. Other human T cell subsets, including effector T cells, naive and memory CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells also did not constitutively express EBI3, which contrasts with IL-35 expression observed in murine CD8(+) and gammadelta T cells. Furthermore, although CD3/CD28 stimulation consistently induced low levels of EBI3 in various CD4(+) T cell subsets, no EBI3 could be detected in CD3/CD28-stimulated Treg cells. RT-PCR analysis showed that, whereas p35 transcripts were detected in both Teff and Treg cells, EBI3 transcripts were detected only in activated Teff cells, but not in resting or activated Treg cells. Thus, in contrast to their murine counterpart, human Treg cells do not express detectable amounts of IL-35.

  1. Coexpression of TIGIT and FCRL3 identifies Helios+ human memory regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bin Dhuban, Khalid; d'Hennezel, Eva; Nashi, Emil; Bar-Or, Amit; Rieder, Sadiye; Shevach, Ethan M; Nagata, Satoshi; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2015-04-15

    Two distinct subsets of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells have been described based on the differential expression of Helios, a transcription factor of the Ikaros family. Efforts to understand the origin and biological roles of these Treg populations in regulating immune responses have, however, been hindered by the lack of reliable surface markers to distinguish and isolate them for subsequent functional studies. Using a single-cell cloning strategy coupled with microarray analysis of different Treg functional subsets in humans, we identify the mRNA and protein expression of TIGIT and FCRL3 as a novel surface marker combination that distinguishes Helios(+)FOXP3(+) from Helios(-)FOXP3(+) memory cells. Unlike conventional markers that are modulated on conventional T cells upon activation, we show that the TIGIT/FCRL3 combination allows reliable identification of Helios(+) Treg cells even in highly activated conditions in vitro as well as in PBMCs of autoimmune patients. We also demonstrate that the Helios(-)FOXP3(+) Treg subpopulation harbors a larger proportion of nonsuppressive clones compared with the Helios(+)FOXP3(+) cell subset, which is highly enriched for suppressive clones. Moreover, we find that Helios(-) cells are exclusively responsible for the productions of the inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-17 in FOXP3(+) cells ex vivo, highlighting important functional differences between Helios(+) and Helios(-) Treg cells. Thus, we identify novel surface markers for the consistent identification and isolation of Helios(+) and Helios(-) memory Treg cells in health and disease, and we further reveal functional differences between these two populations. These new markers should facilitate further elucidation of the functional roles of Helios-based Treg heterogeneity.

  2. Coexpression of TIGIT and FCRL3 Identifies Helios+ Human Memory Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dhuban, Khalid Bin; d’Hennezel, Eva; Nashi, Emil; Bar-Or, Amit; Rieder, Sadiye; Shevach, Ethan M.; Nagata, Satoshi; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A.