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Sample records for activated treg cells

  1. TCR sequences and tissue distribution discriminate the subsets of naïve and activated/memory Treg cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Chaara, Wahiba; Ruggiero, Eliana; Mariotti-Ferrandiz, Encarnita; Dulauroy, Sophie; Schmidt, Manfred; von Kalle, Christof; Six, Adrien; Klatzmann, David

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of the regulatory T (Treg) cell TCR repertoire should help elucidate the nature and diversity of their cognate antigens and thus how Treg cells protect us from autoimmune diseases. We earlier identified CD44(hi) CD62L(low) activated/memory (am) Treg cells as a Treg-cell subset with a high turnover and possible self-specificity. We now report that amTreg cells are predominantly distributed in lymph nodes (LNs) draining deep tissues. Multivariate analyses of CDR3 spectratyping first revealed that amTreg TCR repertoire is different from that of naïve Treg cells (nTreg cells) and effector T (Teff) cells. Furthermore, in deep- versus superficial LNs, TCR-β deep sequencing further revealed diversified nTreg-cell and amTreg-cell repertoires, although twofold less diverse than that of Teff cells, and with repertoire richness significantly lower in deep-LN versus superficial-LN Treg cells. Importantly, expanded clonotypes were mostly detected in deep-LN amTreg cells, some accounting for 20% of the repertoire. Strikingly, these clonotypes were absent from nTreg cells, but found at low frequency in Teff cells. Our results, obtained in nonmanipulated mice, indicate different antigenic targets for naïve and amTreg cells and that amTreg cells are self-specific. The data we present are consistent with an instructive component in Treg-cell differentiation. PMID:25726757

  2. Scutellaria flavonoids inhibit tumor-mediated induction of Treg cells via inhibition of TGF-ß1 activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has become evident that tumor-induced Treg cell activity is mostly responsible for the sub-optimal response to therapeutic vaccines. Development of neo-adjuvant strategies targeting TGF-ß and Treg cell activity is therefore imperative. Scutellaria extracts or constituent flavonoids have shown e...

  3. Tumor-Derived Microvesicles Induce, Expand and Up-Regulate Biological Activities of Human Regulatory T Cells (Treg)

    PubMed Central

    Szajnik, Marta; Czystowska, Malgorzata; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; Mandapathil, Magis; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumor-derived microvesicles (TMV) or exosomes are present in body fluids of patients with cancer and might be involved in tumor progression. The frequency and suppressor functions of peripheral blood CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ Treg are higher in patients with cancer than normal controls. The hypothesis is tested that TMV contribute to induction/expansion/and activation of human Treg. Methodology/Principal Findings TMV isolated from supernatants of tumor cells but not normal cells induced the generation and enhanced expansion of human Treg. TMV also mediated conversion of CD4+CD25neg T cells into CD4+CD25highFOXP3+ Treg. Upon co-incubation with TMV, Treg showed an increased FasL, IL-10, TGF-β1, CTLA-4, granzyme B and perforin expression (p<0.05) and mediated stronger suppression of responder cell (RC) proliferation (p<0.01). Purified Treg were resistant to TMV-mediated apoptosis relative to other T cells. TMV also increased phospho-SMAD2/3 and phospho-STAT3 expression in Treg. Neutralizing Abs specific for TGF-β1 and/or IL-10 significantly inhibited TMV ability to expand Treg. Conclusions/Significance This study suggests that TMV have immunoregulatory properties. They induce Treg, promote Treg expansion, up-regulate Treg suppressor function and enhance Treg resistance to apoptosis. Interactions of TMV with Treg represent a newly-defined mechanism that might be involved in regulating peripheral tolerance by tumors and in supporting immune evasion of human cancers. PMID:20661468

  4. The Percentage of FoxP3+Helios+ Treg Cells Correlates Positively With Disease Activity in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Golding, Amit; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Illei, Gabor; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the use of Helios in combination with FoxP3 as a superior method for identifying non–cytokine-producing human Treg cells in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and to determine if FoxP3+Helios+ Treg cells are maintained at normal levels in patients with clinically active disease. Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were purified from the blood of healthy volunteer donors and from 52 consecutive patients with SLE of varying clinical activity (Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores of 0, 2–4, and ≥5). PBMCs (either fresh or after 4 hours of stimulation for cytokine production) were then analyzed by flow cytometry for the expression of cell surface markers (CD4, CD25, CD127, and CD45RA) and transcription factors (FoxP3 and Helios), as well as for the production of cytokines (interleukin-2 and interferon- γ). Results FoxP3+Helios+ Treg cells were found to be non–cytokine producing in both SLE patients and healthy controls. Patients with clinically active SLE had higher percentages of FoxP3+Helios+ Treg cells than did patients with inactive SLE or healthy controls. When corrected for the total CD4 cell count, the absolute numbers of FoxP3+Helios+ Treg cells in patients with moderately-to-highly active SLE were normal. Conclusion Previous reports of a deficiency in Treg cell number or function in SLE are limited by their use of CD25, either alone or in combination with other markers, to identify human Treg cells. Helios in combination with FoxP3 is a superior method for detecting all non–cytokine-producing Treg cells, irrespective of CD25 or CD45RA expression. Using this method, we showed that FoxP3+Helios+ Treg cell numbers are not reduced in patients with clinically active SLE. PMID:23925905

  5. CD46-induced human Tregs enhance B cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Anja; Atkinson, John P.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Kemper, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Summary Regulatory CD4+ T cells (Tregs) are important modulators of the immune response. Different types of Tregs have been identified based on whether they are thymically derived (natural Tregs) or induced in the periphery (adaptive Tregs). We recently reported on an adaptive Treg phenotype that can be induced by the concomitant stimulation of human CD4+ T cells through CD3 and the membrane complement regulator CD46. These complement-induced Treg cells (cTreg) potently inhibit bystander T cell proliferation through high-level secretion of IL-10. In addition, cTreg express granzyme B and exhibit cytotoxic effects towards activated effector T cells. Here we analyzed the effect of cTreg on B cell functions in a co-culture system. We found that cTreg enhance B cell antibody production. This B cell support is dependent on cell/cell contact as well as cTreg-derived IL-10. In addition, we show that T cells from a CD46-deficient patient are not capable of promoting B cell responses, whereas CD46-deficient B cells have no intrinsic defect in Ig production. This finding may relate to a subset of CD46-deficient patients who present with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). Thus, the lack of cTreg function in optimizing B cell responses could explain why some CD46-deficient patients develop CVID. PMID:19784949

  6. A CB2-Selective Cannabinoid Suppresses T-cell Activities and Increases Tregs and IL-10

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Rebecca H.; Meissler, Joseph J.; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Yu, Daohai; Adler, Martin W.; Eisenstein, Toby K.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously shown that agonists selective for the cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2), including O-1966, inhibit the Mixed Lymphocyte Reaction (MLR), an in vitro correlate of organ graft rejection, predominantly through effects on T-cells. Current studies explored the mechanism of this immunosuppression by O-1966 using mouse spleen cells. Treatment with O-1966 dose-relatedly decreased levels of the active nuclear forms of the transcription factors NF-κB and NFAT in wild-type T-cells, but not T-cells from CB2 knockout (CB2R k/o) mice. Additionally, a gene expression profile of purified T-cells from MLR cultures generated using a PCR T-cell activation array showed that O-1966 decreased mRNA expression of CD40 ligand and CyclinD3, and increased mRNA expression of Src-like-adaptor 2 (SLA2), Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling 5 (SOCS5), and IL-10. The increase in IL-10 was confirmed by measuring IL-10 protein levels in MLR culture supernatants. Further, an increase in the percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) was observed in MLR cultures. Pretreatment with anti-IL-10 resulted in a partial reversal of the inhibition of proliferation and blocked the increase of Tregs. Additionally, O-1966 treatment caused a dose-related decrease in the expression of CD4 in MLR cultures from wild-type, but not CB2R k/o, mice. These data support the potential of CB2-selective agonists as useful therapeutic agents to prolong graft survival in transplant patients, and strengthens their potential as a new class of immunosuppressive agents with broader applicability. PMID:25980325

  7. Disruption of CD8+ Treg activity results in expansion of T follicular helper cells and enhanced antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Arias, Diana A; Kim, Hye-Jung; Zhou, Penghui; Holderried, Tobias A W; Wang, Xuan; Dranoff, Glenn; Cantor, Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Tumor growth is associated with the inhibition of host antitumor immune responses that can impose serious obstacles to cancer immunotherapy. To define the potential contribution of Qa-1-restricted CD8 regulatory T cells (Treg) to the development of tumor immunity, we studied B6.Qa-1 D227K mice that harbor a point mutation in the MHC class Ib molecule Qa-1 that impairs CD8 Treg suppressive activity. Here, we report that the growth of B16 melanoma is substantially delayed in these Qa-1-mutant mice after therapeutic immunization with B16 melanoma cells engineered to express granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor compared with Qa-1 B6-WT controls. Reduced tumor growth is associated with enhanced expansion of follicular T helper cells, germinal center B cells, and high titers of antitumor autoantibodies, which provoke robust antitumor immune responses in concert with tumor-specific cytolytic T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating T cells revealed that the Qa-1 DK mutation was associated with an increase in the ratio of CD8(+) T effectors compared with CD8 Tregs. These data suggest that the CD8(+) T effector-Treg ratio may provide a useful prognostic index for cancer development and raise the possibility that depletion or inactivation of CD8 Tregs represents a potentially effective strategy to enhance antitumor immunity. PMID:24778317

  8. Glucocorticoids decrease Treg cell numbers in lungs of allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Olsen, P C; Kitoko, J Z; Ferreira, T P; de-Azevedo, C T; Arantes, A C; Martins, Μ A

    2015-01-15

    Glucocorticoids have been the hallmark anti-inflammatory drug used to treat asthma. It has been shown that glucocorticoids ameliorate asthma by increasing numbers and activity of Tregs, in contrast recent data show that glucocorticoid might have an opposite effect on Treg cells from normal mice. Since Tregs are target cells that act on the resolution of asthma, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on lung Tregs in mouse models of asthma. Allergen challenged mice were treated with either oral dexamethasone or nebulized budesonide. Broncoalveolar lavage and airway hyperresponsiveness were evaluated after allergenic challenge. Lung, thymic and lymph node cells were phenotyped on Treg through flow cytometry. Lung cytokine secretion was detected by ELISA. Although dexamethasone inhibited airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, improving resolution, we have found that both dexamethasone and budesonide induce a reduction of Treg numbers on lungs and lymphoid organs of allergen challenged mice. The reduction of lung Treg levels was independent of mice strain or type of allergen challenge. Our study also indicates that both glucocorticoids do not increase Treg activity through production of IL-10. Glucocorticoid systemic or localized treatment induced thymic atrophy. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids decrease Treg numbers and activity in different asthma mouse models, probably by reducing thymic production of T cells. Therefore, it is possible that glucocorticoids do not have beneficial effects on lung populations of Treg cells from asthmatic patients. PMID:25499819

  9. Molecular Mechanisms of Treg-Mediated T Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Angelika; Oberle, Nina; Krammer, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) can suppress other immune cells and, thus, are critical mediators of peripheral self-tolerance. On the one hand, Tregs avert autoimmune disease and allergies. On the other hand, Tregs can prevent immune reactions against tumors and pathogens. Despite the importance of Tregs, the molecular mechanisms of suppression remain incompletely understood and controversial. Proliferation and cytokine production of CD4+CD25− conventional T cells (Tcons) can be inhibited directly by Tregs. In addition, Tregs can indirectly suppress Tcon activation via inhibition of the stimulatory capacity of antigen presenting cells. Direct suppression of Tcons by Tregs can involve immunosuppressive soluble factors or cell contact. Different mechanisms of suppression have been described, so far with no consensus on one universal mechanism. Controversies might be explained by the fact that different mechanisms may operate depending on the site of the immune reaction, on the type and activation state of the suppressed target cell as well as on the Treg activation status. Further, inhibition of T cell effector function can occur independently of suppression of proliferation. In this review, we summarize the described molecular mechanisms of suppression with a particular focus on suppression of Tcons and rapid suppression of T cell receptor-induced calcium (Ca2+), NFAT, and NF-κB signaling in Tcons by Tregs. PMID:22566933

  10. Treg cells in rheumatoid arthritis: an update.

    PubMed

    Cooles, Faye A H; Isaacs, John D; Anderson, Amy E

    2013-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease arising from a breakdown in immunological self-tolerance, which leads to aberrant immune responses to autoantigens. Regulatory CD4(+) T-cells (Tregs) underpin one of the key mechanisms of self-tolerance and are a major focus of study in RA and other autoimmune diseases. In order to design new and improved therapies to reinstate self-tolerance, and perhaps cure disease, we need to understand the complex mechanism of action of Tregs. This review addresses recent findings in the field of Tregs in RA, with particular focus on identification of potential defects in Treg-mediated self-tolerance mechanisms present in RA patients, as well as how Tregs interact with other cells in the inflamed joints. As antigen-specific Tregs are a potential route for the reinstatement of immune tolerance, we also discuss new strategies currently being investigated which expand or induce de novo generation of Tregs. PMID:23888361

  11. Nanotechnology as a New Therapeutic Approach to Prevent the HIV-Infection of Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Ruiz, Didiana; De La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 has proved to infect regulatory T cells (Treg) modifying their phenotype and impairing their suppressive capacity. As Treg cells are a crucial component in the preservation of the immune homeostasis, we researched that the antiviral capacity of carboxilan dendrimers prevents the HIV-1 infection of Treg and their effects. The phenotype and suppressive capacity of Treg treated or non-treated with carbosilane dendrimers were studied by flow cytometry. Treated and non-treated Treg from healthy donors were infected with HIV-1NL4.3. The infection of Treg cells by HIV-1, and protective effect of two dendrimers were determined by measuring antigen p24gag in the supernatant of the culture and intracellular. Results The Treg cells were treated with cationic and anionic carbosilane dendrimers. The results showed that both dendrimers did not modify the phenotype and functionality of Treg cells compared with non- treated Treg cells. Anionic dendrimers showed high biocompatibility with normal activity of the Treg cells and in antiviral assays. These dendrimers were highly active against HIV-1 preventing the infection of Treg, and were able to protect the Treg from the Foxp3 downregulation induced by the HIV-1 infection. Conclusions This is the first work showing that the in vitro use of anionic dendrimers prevent the HIV-1 replication and the infection of expanded Treg cells in culture, which raises the possibility to use Treg cells therapeutically in HIV-1-infected subjects. PMID:26785250

  12. Tregs Modulate Lymphocyte Proliferation, Activation, and Resident-Memory T-Cell Accumulation within the Brain during MCMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sujata; Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S.; Singh, Amar; Lokensgard, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and retention of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been reported within post viral-encephalitic brains, however, the full extent to which these cells modulate neuroinflammation is yet to be elucidated. Here, we used Foxp3-DTR (diphtheria toxin receptor) knock-in transgenic mice, which upon administration of low dose diphtheria toxin (DTx) results in specific deletion of Tregs. We investigated the proliferation status of various immune cell subtypes within inflamed central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Depletion of Tregs resulted in increased proliferation of both CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell subsets within the brain at 14 d post infection (dpi) when compared to Treg-sufficient animals. At 30 dpi, while proliferation of CD8+ T-cells was controlled within brains of both Treg-depleted and undepleted mice, proliferation of CD4+ T-cells remained significantly enhanced with DTx-treatment. Previous studies have demonstrated that Treg numbers within the brain rebound following DTx treatment to even higher numbers than in untreated animals. Despite this rebound, CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells proliferated at a higher rate when compared to that of Treg-sufficient mice, thus maintaining sustained neuroinflammation. Furthermore, at 30 dpi we found the majority of CD8+ T-cells were CD127hi KLRG1- indicating that the cells were long lived memory precursor cells. These cells showed marked elevation of CD103 expression, a marker of tissue resident-memory T-cells (TRM) in the CNS, in untreated animals when compared to DTx-treated animals suggesting that generation of TRM is impaired upon Treg depletion. Moreover, the effector function of TRM as indicated by granzyme B production in response to peptide re-stimulation was found to be more potent in Treg-sufficient animals. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Tregs limit neuroinflammatory responses to viral infection by controlling cell proliferation and may direct a larger proportion of lymphocytes within the brain to be maintained

  13. Erythropoietin regulates Treg cells in asthma through TGFβ receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guoshi; Wei, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, the development of which is suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). Erythropoietin (EPO) is originally defined as a hematopoietic growth factor. Recently, the anti-inflammatory effects of EPO in asthma have been acknowledged. However, the underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Here, we showed that EPO treatment significantly reduced the severity of an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mice, seemingly through promoting Foxp3-mediated activation of Treg cells in OVA-treated mouse lung. The activation of Treg cells resulted from increases in transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), which were mainly produced by M2 macrophages (M2M). In vitro, Co-culture with M2M increased Foxp3 levels in Treg cells and the Treg cell number, in a TGFβ receptor signaling dependent manner. Moreover, elimination of macrophages abolished the therapeutic effects of EPO in vivo. Together, our data suggest that EPO may increase M2M, which activate Treg cells through TGFβ receptor signaling to mitigate the severity of asthma. PMID:26807178

  14. Erythropoietin regulates Treg cells in asthma through TGFβ receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Wan, Guoshi; Wei, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways, the development of which is suppressed by regulatory T cells (Treg). Erythropoietin (EPO) is originally defined as a hematopoietic growth factor. Recently, the anti-inflammatory effects of EPO in asthma have been acknowledged. However, the underlying mechanisms remain ill-defined. Here, we showed that EPO treatment significantly reduced the severity of an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced asthma in mice, seemingly through promoting Foxp3-mediated activation of Treg cells in OVA-treated mouse lung. The activation of Treg cells resulted from increases in transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), which were mainly produced by M2 macrophages (M2M). In vitro, Co-culture with M2M increased Foxp3 levels in Treg cells and the Treg cell number, in a TGFβ receptor signaling dependent manner. Moreover, elimination of macrophages abolished the therapeutic effects of EPO in vivo. Together, our data suggest that EPO may increase M2M, which activate Treg cells through TGFβ receptor signaling to mitigate the severity of asthma. PMID:26807178

  15. Homeostasis and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo: lessons from TCR-transgenic Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Attridge, Kesley; Walker, Lucy S K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of CD25 and subsequently Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) as markers for regulatory T cells (Tregs) has revolutionized our ability to explore this population experimentally. In a similar vein, our understanding of antigen-specific Treg responses in vivo owes much to the fortuitous generation of T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic Tregs. This has permitted tracking of Tregs with a defined specificity in vivo, facilitating analysis of how encounter with cognate antigen shapes Treg homeostasis and function. Here, we review the key lessons learned from a decade of analysis of TCR-transgenic Tregs and set this in the broader context of general progress in the field. Use of TCR-transgenic Tregs has led to an appreciation that Tregs are a highly dynamic proliferative population in vivo, rather than an anergic population as they were initially portrayed. It is now clear that Treg homeostasis is positively regulated by encounter with self-antigen expressed on peripheral tissues, which is likely to be relevant to the phenomenon of peripheral repertoire reshaping that has been described for Tregs and the observation that the Treg TCR specificities vary by anatomical location. Substantial evidence has also accumulated to support the role of CD28 costimulation and interleukin-2 in Treg homeostasis. The availability of TCR-transgenic Tregs has enabled analysis of Treg populations that are sufficient or deficient in particular genes, without the comparison being confounded by repertoire alterations. This approach has yielded insights into genes required for Treg function in vivo, with particular progress being made on the role of ctla-4 in this context. As the prospect of manipulating Treg populations in the clinic becomes reality, a full appreciation of the rules governing their homeostasis will prove increasingly important. PMID:24712457

  16. Tregs utilize beta-galactoside-binding protein to transiently inhibit PI3K/p21ras activity of human CD8+ T cells to block their TCR-mediated ERK activity and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baatar, Dolgor; Olkhanud, Purevdorj B; Wells, Valerie; Indig, Fred E; Mallucci, Livio; Biragyn, Arya

    2009-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and beta-galactoside-binding protein (betaGBP), a regulatory protein often found expressed at sites of immunological privilege, have similar functions. Their presence affects the outcome of harmful autoimmunity and cancers, including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and malignant gliomas. Here we report a novel pathway by which Tregs express and utilize betaGBP to control CD8(+) T cell responses partially activating TCR signaling but blocking PI3K activity. As a result, this leads to a loss of p21(ras), ERK and Akt activities despite activation of TCR proximal signals, such as phosphorylation of CD3zeta, Zap70, Lat and PKCtheta. Although non-processive TCR signaling often leads to cell anergy, Tregs/betaGBP did not affect cell viability. Instead, betaGBP/Tregs transiently prevented activation of CD8(+) T cells with self-antigens, while keeping their responses to xenogeneic antigens unaffected. PMID:19520156

  17. Leprosy Reactions Show Increased Th17 Cell Activity and Reduced FOXP3+ Tregs with Concomitant Decrease in TGF-β and Increase in IL-6

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Chaman; Siddiqui, Anisuddin; Ramesh, Venkatesh; Nath, Indira

    2016-01-01

    Background 50% of leprosy patients suffer from episodes of Type 1/ reversal reactions (RR) and Type 2/ Erythema Nodosum Leprosum (ENL) reactions which lead to morbidity and nerve damage. CD4+ subsets of Th17 cells and CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to play a major role in disease associated immunopathology and in stable leprosy as reported by us and others. The aim of our study was to analyze their role in leprosy reactions. Methodology and Principle Findings Quantitative reverse transcribed PCR (qPCR), flowcytometry and ELISA were used to respectively investigate gene expression, cell phenotypes and supernatant levels of cytokines in antigen stimulated PBMC cultures in patients with stable disease and those undergoing leprosy reactions. Both types of reactions are associated with significant increase of Th17 cells and associated cytokines IL-17A, IL-17F, IL-21, IL-23 and chemokines CCL20, CCL22 as compared to matching stable forms of leprosy. Concurrently patients in reactions show reduction in FOXP3+ Treg cells as well as reduction in TGF-β and increase in IL-6. Moreover, expression of many T cell markers, cytokines, chemokines and signaling factors were observed to be increased in RR as compared to ENL reaction patients. Conclusions Patients with leprosy reactions show an imbalance in Th17 and Treg populations. The reduction in Treg suppressor activity is associated withhigherTh17cell activity. The combined effect of reduced TGF-β and enhanced IL-6, IL-21 cytokines influence the balance between Th17 or Treg cells in leprosy reactions as reported in the murine models and autoimmune diseases. The increase in Th17 cell associated cytokines may contribute to lesional inflammation. PMID:27035913

  18. Anti-CD40 Ab- or 8-oxo-dG-enhanced Treg cells reduce development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis via down-regulating migration and activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Hong, Gwan Ui; Kim, Nam Goo; Jeoung, Dooil; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-07-15

    This study investigated whether anti-CD40 Ab and 8-oxo-dG attenuate mast cell migration and EAE development. Anti-CD40 Ab and 8-oxo-dG reduced EAE scores, mast cell numbers, expression of adhesion molecules, OX40L and Act1, levels of TNF-α, LTs, expression of cytokines, and co-localization of Treg cells and mast cells, all of which are increased in EAE-brain tissues. Each treatment enhanced Treg cells, expression of OX40, and cytokines related to suppressive function of Treg cells in EAE brain tissues. Act-BMMCs with Treg cells reduced expression of OX40L and CCL2/CCR2, VCAM-1, PECAM-1, [Ca²⁺]i levels, release of mediators, various signaling molecules, Act1 related to IL-17a signals versus those in act-BMMCs without Treg cells. The data suggest that IL-10- and IL-35-producing Foxp3⁺-Treg cells, enhanced by anti-CD40 Ab or 8-oxo-dG, suppress migration of mast cells through down-regulating the expression of adhesion molecules, and suppress mast cell activation through cell-to-cell cross-talk via OX40/OX40L in EAE development. PMID:23622820

  19. Natural killer cells regulate Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance in chlamydial lung infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Dong, Xiaojing; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Xiao; Wang, Yan; Yang, Xi; Wang, Hong; Zhao, Weiming

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell is an important component in innate immunity, playing a critical role in bridging innate and adaptive immunity by modulating the function of other immune cells including T cells. In this study, we focused on the role of NK cells in regulating Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance during chlamydial lung infection. We found that NK cell-depleted mice showed decreased Th1 and Th17 cells, which was correlated with reduced interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-12, IL-17 and IL-22 production as well as T-bet and receptor-related orphan receptor gamma t expression compared with mice treated with the isotype control antibody. In contrast, NK cell depletion significantly increased Treg in cell number and related transcription factor (Foxp3) expression. The opposite trends of changes of Th1/Th17 and Treg led to significant reduction in the Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg ratios. The data implicate that NK cells play an important role in host defence against chlamydial lung infection, mainly through maintaining Th1/Treg and Th17/Treg balance. PMID:27028780

  20. Novel Foxo1–dependent transcriptional programs control Treg cell function

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Weiming; Liao, Will; Luo, Chong T.; Yin, Na; Huse, Morgan; Kim, Myoungjoo V.; Peng, Min; Chan, Pamela; Ma, Qian; Mo, Yifan; Meijer, Dies; Zhao, Keji; Rudensky, Alexander Y.; Atwal, Gurinder; Zhang, Michael Q.; Li, Ming O.

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, characterized by expression of the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), maintain immune homeostasis by suppressing self-destructive immune responses1–4. Foxp3 operates as a late-acting differentiation factor controlling Treg cell homeostasis and function5, whereas the early Treg-cell-lineage commitment is regulated by the Akt kinase and the forkhead box O (Foxo) family of transcription factors6–10. However, whether Foxo proteins act beyond the Treg-cell-commitment stage to control Treg cell homeostasis and function remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Foxo1 is a pivotal regulatorof Treg cell function. Treg cells express high amounts of Foxo1 and display reduced T-cell-receptor-induced Akt activation, Foxo1 phosphorylation and Foxo1 nuclear exclusion. Mice with Treg-cell-specific deletion of Foxo1 develop a fatal inflammatory disorder similar in severity to that seen in Foxp3-deficient mice, but without the loss of Treg cells. Genome-wide analysis of Foxo1 binding sites reveals ~300 Foxo1-bound target genes, including the pro-inflammatory cytokine Ifng, that do not seem to be directly regulated by Foxp3. These findings show that the evolutionarily ancient Akt–Foxo1 signalling module controls a novel genetic program indispensable for Treg cell function. PMID:23135404

  1. Treg activation defect in type 1 diabetes: correction with TNFR2 agonism

    PubMed Central

    Okubo, Yoshiaki; Torrey, Heather; Butterworth, John; Zheng, Hui; Faustman, Denise L

    2016-01-01

    Activated T-regulatory cells (aTregs) prevent or halt various forms of autoimmunity. We show that type 1 diabetics (T1D) have a Treg activation defect through an increase in resting Tregs (rTregs, CD4+CD25+Foxp3+CD45RA) and decrease in aTregs (CD4+CD25+Foxp3+CD45RO) (n= 55 T1D, n=45 controls, P=0.01). The activation defect persists life long in T1D subjects (T1D=45, controls=45, P=0.01, P=0.04). Lower numbers of aTregs had clinical significance because they were associated with a trend for less residual C-peptide secretion from the pancreas (P=0.08), and poorer HbA1C control (P=0.03). In humans, the tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) is obligatory for Treg induction, maintenance and expansion of aTregs. TNFR2 agonism is a method for stimulating Treg conversion from resting to activated. Using two separate in vitro expansion protocols, TNFR2 agonism corrected the T1D activation defect by triggering conversion of rTregs into aTregs (n=54 T1D, P<0.001). TNFR2 agonism was superior to standard protocols and TNF in proliferating Tregs. In T1D, TNFR2 agonist-expanded Tregs were homogeneous and functionally potent by virtue of suppressing autologous cytotoxic T cells in a dose-dependent manner comparable to controls. Targeting the TNFR2 receptor for Treg expansion in vitro demonstrates a means to correct the activation defect in T1D. PMID:26900470

  2. Tolerogenic splenic IDO (+) dendritic cells from the mice treated with induced-Treg cells suppress collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Yiming; Fan, Huahua; Zou, Hejian

    2014-01-01

    TGF-β-induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) retain Foxp3 expression and immune-suppressive activity in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). However, the mechanisms whereby transferred iTregs suppress immune responses, particularly the interplay between iTregs and dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, remain incompletely understood. In this study, we found that after treatment with iTregs, splenic CD11c(+)DCs, termed "DCiTreg," expressed tolerogenic phenotypes, secreted high levels of IL-10, TGF-β, and IDO, and showed potent immunosuppressive activity in vitro. After reinfusion with DCiTreg, marked antiarthritic activity improved clinical scores and histological end-points were observed. The serological levels of inflammatory cytokines and anti-CII antibodies were low and TGF-β production was high in the DCiTreg-treated group. DCiTreg also induced new iTregs in vivo. Moreover, the inhibitory activity of DCiTreg on CIA was lost following pretreatment with the inhibitor of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Collectively, these findings suggest that transferred iTregs could induce tolerogenic characteristics in splenic DCs and these cells could effectively dampen CIA in an IDO-dependent manner. Thus, the potential therapeutic effects of iTregs in CIA are likely maintained through the generation of tolerogenic DCs in vivo. PMID:25405209

  3. Preferential expansion of pro-inflammatory Tregs in human non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Joseph D.; Blatner, Nichole R.; Haghi, Leila; DeCamp, Malcolm M.; Meyerson, Shari L.; Heiferman, Michael J.; Heiferman, Jeffrey R.; Gounari, Fotini; Bentrem, David J.; Khazaie, Khashayarsha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the USA. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) normally function to temper immune responses and decrease inflammation. Previous research has demonstrated different subsets of Tregs with contrasting anti- or pro-inflammatory properties. This study aimed to determine Treg subset distributions and characteristics present in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods Peripheral blood was collected from healthy controls (HC) and NSCLC patients preceding surgical resection, and mononuclear cells were isolated, stained, and analyzed by flow cytometry. Tregs were defined by expression of CD4 and CD25 and classified into CD45RA+Foxp3int (naïve, Fr. I) or CD45RA−Foxp3hi (activated Fr. II). Activated conventional T cells were CD4+CD45RA−Foxp3int (Fr. III). Results Samples from 23 HC and 26 NSCLC patients were collected. Tregs isolated from patients with NSCLC were found to have enhanced suppressive function on naive T cells. Cancer patients had significantly increased frequencies of activated Tregs (fraction II: FrII), 17.5 versus 3.2 % (P < 0.001). FrII Tregs demonstrated increased RORγt and IL17 expression and decreased IL10 expression compared to Tregs from HC, indicating pro-inflammatory characteristics. Conclusions This study demonstrates that a novel subset of Tregs with pro-inflammatory characteristics preferentially expand in NSCLC patients. This Treg subset appears identical to previously reported pro-inflammatory Tregs in human colon cancer patients and in mouse models of polyposis. We expect the pro-inflammatory Tregs in lung cancer to contribute to the immune pathogenesis of disease and propose that targeting this Treg subset may have protective benefits in NSCLC. PMID:26047578

  4. Tumor Progression Locus 2 (Tpl2) Activates the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathway, Inhibits Forkhead Box P3 (FoxP3) Expression, and Limits Regulatory T Cell (Treg) Immunosuppressive Functions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Acuff, Nicole V; Peeks, Angela R; Kirkland, Rebecca; Wyatt, Kara D; Nagy, Tamas; Watford, Wendy T

    2016-08-01

    The serine/threonine kinase tumor progression locus 2 (Tpl2, also known as Map3k8/Cot) is a potent inflammatory mediator that drives the production of TNFα, IL-1β, and IFNγ. We previously demonstrated that Tpl2 regulates T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and modulates T helper cell differentiation. However, very little is known about how Tpl2 modulates the development of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Tregs are a specialized subset of T cells that express FoxP3 and possess immunosuppressive properties to limit excess inflammation. Because of the documented role of Tpl2 in promoting inflammation, we hypothesized that Tpl2 antagonizes Treg development and immunosuppressive function. Here we demonstrate that Tpl2 constrains the development of inducible Tregs. Tpl2(-/-) naïve CD4(+) T cells preferentially develop into FoxP3(+) inducible Tregs in vitro as well as in vivo in a murine model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced systemic tolerance. Treg biasing of Tpl2(-/-) T cells depended on TCR signal strength and corresponded with reduced activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Importantly, Tpl2(-/-) Tregs have basally increased expression of FoxP3 and immunosuppressive molecules, IL-10 and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4). Furthermore, they were more immunosuppressive in vivo in a T cell transfer model of colitis, as evidenced by reduced effector T cell accumulation, systemic production of inflammatory cytokines, and colonic inflammation. These results demonstrate that Tpl2 promotes inflammation in part by constraining FoxP3 expression and Treg immunosuppressive functions. Overall, these findings suggest that Tpl2 inhibition could be used to preferentially drive Treg induction and thereby limit inflammation in a variety of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27261457

  5. TREG-cell therapies for autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Makoto; Ito, Yoshinaga; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2014-09-01

    Naturally occurring Foxp3(+)CD25(+)CD4(+) regulatory T (TREG) cells maintain immunological self-tolerance and prevent a variety of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. In animal models of rheumatic disease, autoimmune responses can be controlled by re-establishing the T-cell balance in favour of TREG cells. Here we discuss three potential strategies for the clinical use of TREG cells to treat autoimmune rheumatic disease: expansion of self-antigen-specific natural TREG cells in vivo; propagation of antigen-specific natural TREG cells ex vivo, by in vitro antigenic stimulation, and subsequent transfer back into the host; or conversion of antigen-specific conventional T cells into TREG cells in vivo or ex vivo. These strategies require depletion of the effector T cells that mediate autoimmunity before initiating TREG-cell-based therapies. Immunotherapies that target TREG cells, and the balance of TREG cells and autoreactive T cells, are therefore an important modality for the treatment of autoimmune rheumatic disease. PMID:24980140

  6. Affinity for self antigen selects Treg cells with distinct functional properties.

    PubMed

    Wyss, Lena; Stadinski, Brian D; King, Carolyn G; Schallenberg, Sonja; McCarthy, Nicholas I; Lee, Jun Young; Kretschmer, Karsten; Terracciano, Luigi M; Anderson, Graham; Surh, Charles D; Huseby, Eric S; Palmer, Ed

    2016-09-01

    The manner in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) control lymphocyte homeostasis is not fully understood. We identified two Treg cell populations with differing degrees of self-reactivity and distinct regulatory functions. We found that GITR(hi)PD-1(hi)CD25(hi) (Triple(hi)) Treg cells were highly self-reactive and controlled lympho-proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes. GITR(lo)PD-1(lo)CD25(lo) (Triple(lo)) Treg cells were less self-reactive and limited the development of colitis by promoting the conversion of CD4(+) Tconv cells into induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). Although Foxp3-deficient (Scurfy) mice lacked Treg cells, they contained Triple(hi)-like and Triple(lo)-like CD4(+) T cells zsuper> T cells infiltrated the skin, whereas Scurfy Triple(lo)CD4(+) T cells induced colitis and wasting disease. These findings indicate that the affinity of the T cell antigen receptor for self antigen drives the differentiation of Treg cells into distinct subsets with non-overlapping regulatory activities. PMID:27478940

  7. Foxp3 regulates ratio of Treg and NKT cells in a mouse model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanming; Guo, Yinshi; Xu, Linyun; Li, Yaqin; Cao, Lanfang

    2015-05-01

    Chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways causes asthma. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and Natural killer T cells (NKT cells) both play critical roles in the pathogenesis of asthma. Activation of Treg cells requires Foxp3, whereas whether Foxp3 may regulate the ratio of Treg and NKT cells to affect asthma is uncertain. In an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse model of asthma, we either increased Treg cells by lentivirus-mediated forced expression of exogenous Foxp3, or increased NKT cells by stimulation with its activator α-GalCer. We found that the CD4+CD25+ Treg cells increased by forced Foxp3 expression, and decreased by α-GalCer, while the CD3+CD161+ NKT cells decreased by forced Foxp3 expression, and increased by α-GalCer. Moreover, forced Foxp3 expression, but not α-GalCer, significantly alleviated the hallmarks of asthma. Furthermore, forced Foxp3 increased levels of IL_10 and TGFβ1, and α-GalCer increased levels of IL_4 and INFγ in the OVA-treated lung. Taken together, our study suggests that Foxp3 may activate Treg cells and suppress NKT cells in asthma. Treg and NKT cells may antagonize the effects of each other in asthma. PMID:25636804

  8. Tissue Tregs.

    PubMed

    Panduro, Marisella; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2016-05-20

    The immune system is responsible for defending an organism against the myriad of microbial invaders it constantly confronts. It has become increasingly clear that the immune system has a second major function: the maintenance of organismal homeostasis. Foxp3(+)CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important contributors to both of these critical activities, defense being the primary purview of Tregs circulating through lymphoid organs, and homeostasis ensured mainly by their counterparts residing in parenchymal tissues. This review focuses on so-called tissue Tregs. We first survey existing information on the phenotype, function, sustaining factors, and human equivalents of the three best-characterized tissue-Treg populations-those operating in visceral adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the colonic lamina propria. We then attempt to distill general principles from this body of work-as concerns the provenance, local adaptation, molecular sustenance, and targets of action of tissue Tregs, in particular. PMID:27168246

  9. Driving allotolerance: CAR-expressing Tregs for tolerance induction in organ and stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Edinger, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) modulate the function of a variety of immune cells and are critical for maintaining self-tolerance and preventing the development of autoimmune disease. Due to their ability to suppress effector T cells, Tregs have been increasingly explored for clinical use to suppress alloresponses. While this approach has been promising in preclinical models and early clinical trials, widespread clinical use of Tregs has been limited by the low number of these cells in the periphery and the unknown frequency of allo-responsive Tregs. In this issue of the JCI, MacDonald and colleagues transduced human Tregs with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) that targets the HLA class I molecule A2. These CAR-expressing T cells were readily activated via CAR stimulation and exerted potent immunosuppressive effects when stimulated in vitro. In a murine model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, CAR-modified Tregs were more effective in preventing the development of graft-versus-host disease compared with polyclonal Tregs. The results of this study lay the groundwork for the further evaluation of CAR-expressing Tregs in the prevention or treatment of transplant complications. PMID:26999608

  10. Human treg cells are characterized by low/negative CD6 expression.

    PubMed

    Garcia Santana, Carlos A; Tung, James W; Gulnik, Sergei

    2014-10-01

    Natural regulatory T cells (nTreg) can suppress different immune-cell responses and maintain the balance between tolerance and immunity in the individual. These cells are defined by CD4+ , CD25hi, and FOXP3+ expression, although a variety of other nTreg-associated markers have been reported to be expressed at different levels (e.g., HLA-DR, CTLA-4, GARP, Helios, CD39, etc.), presumably reflecting different functional stages of the heterogeneous nTreg population. Several markers show low/negative expression (i.e., CD127, CD49d, and CD26), but none of these markers are specific to nTreg. CD25hi expression has been a useful surface marker to identify/isolate nTreg; however, CD25 is also expressed on "adaptive" or "induced" Treg, as well as in activated conventional T cells. In addition, the fact that FOXP3 is also found in CD25 low/negative CD4+ T cells, and in a subset of CD8+ T cells, further complicates the definition of a specific nTreg marker. Although CD4+, CD25hi, and CD127low/negative markers characterize the majority of nTreg, it is still imperative to find additional surface-marker combinations that improve the identification/isolation of nTreg and their subsets. Herein, we present evidence that CD4+ CD25hi CD6(lo/-) nTreg have high expression of FOXP3and exhibit in vitro suppressive activity on CD8+ T-cell proliferation. Dot-plot analyses of CD4+ cells, with CD6, CD127, CD49d, or CD26 reveal that a higher enrichment yield of CD25hi FOXP3+ cells can be achieved in the combined CD6(lo/-) CD127(lo/-) population. We conclude that FOXP3+ nTreg cells are characterized by CD6(lo/-) expression, providing a new tool for the identification of nTreg cells without recourse to intracellular staining, and for the purification of these cells by negative selection. PMID:25088497

  11. Functional and genomic analyses of FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells as regulatory T (Treg)-like cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Joon-Young Kim, Han-Jong; Hurt, Elaine M.; Chen, Xin; Howard, O.M. Zack; Farrar, William L.

    2007-10-12

    FOXP3, a forkhead transcription factor is essential for the development and function of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs). In contrast to conversion of murine naive T cells to Tregs by transduction of Foxp3, it is controversial whether ectopic expression of FOXP3 in human CD4{sup +} T cells is sufficient for acquisition of suppressive activity. Here, we show that retroviral transduction of FOXP3 induces a Treg phenotype in human leukemic CD4{sup +} Jurkat-T cells, evidenced by increased expression of Treg-associated cell surface markers as well as inhibition of cytokine production. Furthermore, FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells suppress the proliferation of human CD4{sup +}CD25{sup -} T cells. Additionally, DNA microarray analysis identifies Treg-related genes regulated by FOXP3. Our study demonstrates that enforced expression of FOXP3 confers Treg-like properties on Jurkat-T cells, which can be a convenient and efficient Treg-like cell model for further study to identify Treg cell surface markers and target genes regulated by FOXP3.

  12. A cluster of coregulated genes determines TGF-beta-induced regulatory T-cell (Treg) dysfunction in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    D'Alise, Anna Morena; Ergun, Ayla; Hill, Jonathan A; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2011-05-24

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) originate in the thymus, but the Treg phenotype can also be induced in peripheral lymphoid organs or in vitro by stimulation of conventional CD4(+) T cells with IL-2 and TGF-β. There have been divergent reports on the suppressive capacity of these TGF-Treg cells. We find that TGF-Tregs derived from diabetes-prone NOD mice, although expressing normal Foxp3 levels, are uniquely defective in suppressive activity, whereas TGF-Tregs from control strains (B6g7) or ex vivo Tregs from NOD mice all function normally. Most Treg-typical transcripts were shared by NOD or B6g7 TGF-Tregs, except for a small group of differentially expressed genes, including genes relevant for suppressive activity (Lrrc32, Ctla4, and Cd73). Many of these transcripts form a coregulated cluster in a broader analysis of T-cell differentiation. The defect does not map to idd3 or idd5 regions. Whereas Treg cells from NOD mice are normal in spleen and lymph nodes, the NOD defect is observed in locations that have been tied to pathogenesis of diabetes (small intestine lamina propria and pancreatic lymph node). Thus, a genetic defect uniquely affects a specific Treg subpopulation in NOD mice, in a manner consistent with a role in determining diabetes susceptibility. PMID:21543717

  13. Cysticerci Drive Dendritic Cells to Promote In Vitro and In Vivo Tregs Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Adalid-Peralta, Laura; Arce-Sillas, Asiel; Fragoso, Gladis; Cárdenas, Graciela; Rosetti, Marcos; Casanova-Hernández, Didier; Rangel-Escareño, Claudia; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Fleury, Agnes; Sciutto, Edda

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a crucial role in immune homeostasis. Treg induction is a strategy that parasites have evolved to modulate the host's inflammatory environment, facilitating their establishment and permanence. In human Taenia solium neurocysticercosis (NC), the concurrence of increased peripheral and central Treg levels and their capacity to inhibit T cell activation and proliferation support their role in controlling neuroinflammation. This study is aimed at identifing possible mechanisms of Treg induction in human NC. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) from healthy human donors, cocultivated with autologous CD4+ naïve cells either in the presence or absence of cysticerci, promoted CD25highFoxp3+ Treg differentiation. An increased Treg induction was observed when cysticerci were present. Moreover, an augmentation of suppressive-related molecules (SLAMF1, B7-H1, and CD205) was found in parasite-induced DC differentiation. Increased Tregs and a higher in vivo DC expression of the regulatory molecules SLAMF1 and CD205 in NC patients were also found. SLAMF1 gene was downregulated in NC patients with extraparenchymal cysticerci, exhibiting higher inflammation levels than patients with parenchymal parasites. Our findings suggest that cysticerci may modulate DC to favor a suppressive environment, which may help parasite establishment, minimizing the excessive inflammation, which may lead to tissue damage. PMID:23762101

  14. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin

    PubMed Central

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4+CD25hiCD127−/low cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:26844452

  15. Function of Treg Cells Decreased in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Due To the Effect of Prolactin.

    PubMed

    Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Chávez-Rueda, Karina; Chávez-Sánchez, Luis; Cervera-Castillo, Hernando; Zenteno-Galindo, Edgar; Barile-Fabris, Leonor; Burgos-Vargas, Rubén; Álvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Blanco-Favela, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    Prolactin has different functions, including cytokine secretion and inhibition of the suppressor effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells in healthy individuals. Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by defects in the functions of B, T, and Treg cells. Prolactin plays an important role in the physiopathology of SLE. Our objective was to establish the participation of prolactin in the regulation of the immune response mediated by Treg cells from patients with SLE. CD4CD25CD127 cells were purified using magnetic beads and the relative expression of prolactin receptor was measured. The functional activity was evaluated by proliferation assay and cytokine secretion in activated cells, in the presence and absence of prolactin. We found that both percentage and function of Treg cells decrease in SLE patients compared to healthy individuals with statistical significance. The prolactin receptor is constitutively expressed on Treg and effector T (Teff) cells in SLE patients, and this expression is higher than in healthy individuals. The expression of this receptor differs in inactive and active patients: in the former, the expression is higher in Treg cells than in Teff cells, similar to healthy individuals, whereas there is no difference in the expression between Treg and Teff cells from active patients. In Treg:Teff cell cocultures, addition of prolactin decreases the suppressor effect exerted by Treg cells and increases IFNγ secretion. Our results suggest that prolactin plays an important role in the activation of the disease in inactive patients by decreasing the suppressor function exerted by Treg cells over Teff cells, thereby favoring an inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:26844452

  16. Adenoviral transduction of naive CD4 T cells to study Treg differentiation.

    PubMed

    Warth, Sebastian C; Heissmeyer, Vigo

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to provide immune tolerance to self as well as to certain foreign antigens. Tregs can be generated from naive CD4 T cells in vitro with TCR- and co-stimulation in the presence of TGFβ and IL-2. This bears enormous potential for future therapies, however, the molecules and signaling pathways that control differentiation are largely unknown. Primary T cells can be manipulated through ectopic gene expression, but common methods fail to target the most important naive state of the T cell prior to primary antigen recognition. Here, we provide a protocol to express ectopic genes in naive CD4 T cells in vitro before inducing Treg differentiation. It applies transduction with the replication-deficient adenovirus and explains its generation and production. The adenovirus can take up large inserts (up to 7 kb) and can be equipped with promoters to achieve high and transient overexpression in T cells. It effectively transduces naive mouse T cells if they express a transgenic Coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR). Importantly, after infection the T cells remain naive (CD44(low), CD62L(high)) and resting (CD25(-), CD69(-)) and can be activated and differentiated into Tregs similar to non-infected cells. Thus, this method enables manipulation of CD4 T cell differentiation from its very beginning. It ensures that ectopic gene expression is already in place when early signaling events of the initial TCR stimulation induces cellular changes that eventually lead into Treg differentiation. PMID:23979424

  17. New Insights about Treg and Th17 Cells in HIV Infection and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Valverde-Villegas, Jacqueline María; Matte, Maria Cristina Cotta; de Medeiros, Rúbia Marília; Chies, José Artur Bogo

    2015-01-01

    Treg and Th17 cell subsets are characterized by the expression of specific transcriptional factors and chemokine receptor as well as by secretion of specific cytokine and chemokines. These subsets are important to the differentiation, expansion, homing capacity, and recruitment of several different immune cell populations to the site of infection. Whereas Treg cells maintain self-tolerance and control the activation and expansion of autoreactive CD4+ T effector cells through an anti-inflammatory response, Th17 cells, in an exacerbated unregulated proinflammatory response, can promote autoimmunity. Despite such apparently opposite functions, Th17 and Treg cells share common characteristics, and their differentiation pathways are interconnected. Recent studies have revealed quite intricate relations between Treg and Th17 cells in HIV infection and progression to AIDS. Considering Treg cells, different subsets were already investigated in the context of HIV infection, indicating a fluctuation in the total number and frequency throughout the disease course. This review focuses on the recent findings regarding the role of regulatory T and Th17 cells in the context of HIV infection, highlighting the importance of the balance between these two subsets on disease progression. PMID:26568963

  18. miR-155 Inhibition Sensitizes CD4+ Th Cells for TREG Mediated Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Werner; Labhart, Paul; Alexiadis, Vassili; Becker, Christian; Hafner, Mathias; Weith, Andreas; Lenter, Martin C.; Jonuleit, Helmut; Schmitt, Edgar; Mennerich, Detlev

    2009-01-01

    Background In humans and mice naturally occurring CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (nTregs) are a thymus-derived subset of T cells, crucial for the maintenance of peripheral tolerance by controlling not only potentially autoreactive T cells but virtually all cells of the adaptive and innate immune system. Recent work using Dicer-deficient mice irrevocably demonstrated the importance of miRNAs for nTreg cell-mediated tolerance. Principal Findings DNA-Microarray analyses of human as well as murine conventional CD4+ Th cells and nTregs revealed a strong up-regulation of mature miR-155 (microRNA-155) upon activation in both populations. Studying miR-155 expression in FoxP3-deficient scurfy mice and performing FoxP3 ChIP-Seq experiments using activated human T lymphocytes, we show that the expression and maturation of miR-155 seem to be not necessarily regulated by FoxP3. In order to address the functional relevance of elevated miR-155 levels, we transfected miR-155 inhibitors or mature miR-155 RNAs into freshly-isolated human and mouse primary CD4+ Th cells and nTregs and investigated the resulting phenotype in nTreg suppression assays. Whereas miR-155 inhibition in conventional CD4+ Th cells strengthened nTreg cell-mediated suppression, overexpression of mature miR-155 rendered these cells unresponsive to nTreg cell-mediated suppression. Conclusion Investigation of FoxP3 downstream targets, certainly of bound and regulated miRNAs revealed the associated function between the master regulator FoxP3 and miRNAs as regulators itself. miR-155 is shown to be crucially involved in nTreg cell mediated tolerance by regulating the susceptibility of conventional human as well as murine CD4+ Th cells to nTreg cell-mediated suppression. PMID:19777054

  19. Apoptotic epithelial cells control the abundance of Treg cells at barrier surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Nakazawa, Yuta; Totsuka, Naoya; Miki, Haruka; Iino, Shuichi; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Shibuya, Kazuko; Shibuya, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial tissues continually undergo apoptosis. Commensal organisms that inhabit the epithelium influence tissue homeostasis, in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have a central role. However, the physiological importance of epithelial cell apoptosis and how the number of Treg cells is regulated are both incompletely understood. Here we found that apoptotic epithelial cells negatively regulated the commensal-stimulated proliferation of Treg cells. Gut commensals stimulated CX3CR1(+)CD103(-)CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DCs) to produce interferon-β (IFN-β), which augmented the proliferation of Treg cells in the intestine. Conversely, phosphatidylserine exposed on apoptotic epithelial cells suppressed IFN-β production by the DCs via inhibitory signaling mediated by the cell-surface glycoprotein CD300a and thus suppressed Treg cell proliferation. Our findings reveal a regulatory role for apoptotic epithelial cells in maintaining the number of Treg cell and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26855029

  20. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  1. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  2. Methionine Enkephalin (MENK) Inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25701137

  3. A TNFR2-Agonist Facilitates High Purity Expansion of Human Low Purity Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Sija; Bauland, Stijn C. G.; van den Dolder, Juliette

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are important for immune homeostasis and are considered of great interest for immunotherapy. The paucity of Treg numbers requires the need for ex vivo expansion. Although therapeutic Treg flow-sorting is feasible, most centers aiming at Treg-based therapy focus on magnetic bead isolation of CD4+CD25+ Treg using a good manufacturing practice compliant closed system that achieves lower levels of cell purity. Polyclonal Treg expansion protocols commonly use anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 monoclonal antibody (mAb) stimulation in the presence of rhIL-2, with or without rapamycin. However, the resultant Treg population is often heterogeneous and pro-inflammatory cytokines like IFNγ and IL-17A can be produced. Hence, it is crucial to search for expansion protocols that not only maximize ex vivo Treg proliferative rates, but also maintain Treg stability and preserve their suppressive function. Here, we show that ex vivo expansion of low purity magnetic bead isolated Treg in the presence of a TNFR2 agonist mAb (TNFR2-agonist) together with rapamycin, results in a homogenous stable suppressive Treg population that expresses FOXP3 and Helios, shows low expression of CD127 and hypo-methylation of the FOXP3 gene. These cells reveal a low IL-17A and IFNγ producing potential and hardly express the chemokine receptors CCR6, CCR7 and CXCR3. Restimulation of cells in a pro-inflammatory environment did not break the stability of this Treg population. In a preclinical humanized mouse model, the TNFR2-agonist plus rapamycin expanded Treg suppressed inflammation in vivo. Importantly, this Treg expansion protocol enables the use of less pure, but more easily obtainable cell fractions, as similar outcomes were observed using either FACS-sorted or MACS-isolated Treg. Therefore, this protocol is of great interest for the ex vivo expansion of Treg for clinical immunotherapy. PMID:27224512

  4. Induced Treg Cells Augment the Th17-Mediated Intestinal Inflammatory Response in a CTLA4-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kaminuma, Osamu; Kitamura, Noriko; Hiroi, Takachika

    2016-01-01

    Th17 cells and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are thought to promote and suppress inflammatory responses, respectively. However, whether they counteract each other or synergize in regulating immune reactions remains controversial. To determine their interactions, we describe the results of experiments employing mouse models of intestinal inflammation by transferring antigen-specific Th cells (Th1, Th2, and Th17) differentiated in vitro followed by the administration of the cognate antigen via enema. We show that cotransfer of induced Tregs (iTregs) suppressed Th1- and Th2-mediated colon inflammation. In contrast, colon inflammation induced by transfer of Th17 cells, was augmented by the cotransfer of iTregs. Furthermore, oral delivery of antigen potentiated Th17-mediated colon inflammation. Administration of a blocking antibody against cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA4) abrogated the effects of cotransfer of iTregs, while the injection of a soluble recombinant immunoglobulin (Ig) fusion protein, CTLA4-Ig substituted for the cotransfer of iTregs. These results suggest that antigen-specific activation of iTregs in a local environment stimulates the Th17-mediated inflammatory response in a CTLA4-dependent manner. PMID:26950218

  5. The fate of human Treg cells.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Manuela; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia

    2009-06-19

    In this issue of Immunity, Miyara et al. (2009) demonstrate that FoxP3(+) cells in human peripheral blood are heterogeneous in function, and CD45RA expression defines their different stages of differentiation. PMID:19538927

  6. Treg Cells, Life History, and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells expressing the FoxP3 transcription factor have a profound and nonredundant role in several aspects of immunological tolerance. We will review here the specification of this lineage, its population dynamics, and the diversity of subphenotypes that correlate with their diverse roles in controlling inflammation in a variety of settings. PMID:22952391

  7. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma. PMID:22792275

  8. Impact of dietary components on NK and Treg cell function for cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young S; Sayers, Thomas J; Colburn, Nancy H; Milner, John A; Young, Howard A

    2015-09-01

    An important characteristic of cancer is that the disease can overcome the surveillance of the immune system. A possible explanation for this resistance arises from the ability of tumor cells to block the tumoricidal activity of host immune cells such as natural killer (NK) cells by inducing the localized accumulation of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Evidence exists that components in commonly consumed foods including vitamins A, D, and E, water-soluble constituents of mushrooms, polyphenolics in fruits and vegetables, and n-3 fatty acids in fish oil can modulate NK cell activities, Treg cell properties, and the interactions between those two cell types. Thus, it is extremely important for cancer prevention to understand the involvement of dietary components with the early stage dynamics of interactions among these immune cells. This review addresses the potential significance of diet in supporting the function of NK cells, Treg cells, and the balance between those two cell types, which ultimately results in decreased cancer risk. PMID:25845339

  9. Function of miR-146a in controlling Treg cell-mediated regulation of Th1 responses

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Li-Fan; Boldin, Mark P.; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Lin, Ling-Li; Taganov, Konstantin D.; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Baltimore, David; Rudensky, Alexander Y.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells maintain immune homeostasis by limiting different types of inflammatory responses. Here, we report that miR-146a, one of the miRNAs prevalently expressed in Treg cells, is critical for their suppressor function. The deficiency of miR-146a in Treg cells resulted in a breakdown of immunological tolerance manifested in a fatal IFNγ-dependent immune-mediated lesions in a variety of organs. This was likely due to augmented expression and activation of signal transducer and activator transcription 1 (Stat1), a direct target of miR146a. Likewise, heightened Stat1 activation in Treg cells subjected to a selective ablation of SOCS1, a key negative regulator of Stat1 phosphorylation downstream of IFNγ receptor, was associated with analogous Th1-mediated pathology. Our results suggest that specific aspects of Treg suppressor function are controlled by a single miRNA and that an optimal range of Stat1 activation is important for Treg-mediated control of Th1 responses and associated autoimmunity. PMID:20850013

  10. Stabilization of the transcription factor Foxp3 by the deubiquitinase USP7 increases Treg-cell-suppressive capacity.

    PubMed

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Fleskens, Veerle; Fu, Juan; Brenkman, Arjan B; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Pals, Cornelieke E G M; Meerding, Jenny; Berkers, Celia R; Barbi, Joseph; Gröne, Andrea; Sijts, Alice J A M; Maurice, Madelon M; Kalkhoven, Eric; Prakken, Berent J; Ovaa, Huib; Pan, Fan; Zaiss, Dietmar M W; Coffer, Paul J

    2013-08-22

    Stable Foxp3 expression is required for the development of functional regulatory T (Treg) cells. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 can be regulated through the polyubiquitination of multiple lysine residues, resulting in proteasome-mediated degradation. Expression of the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP7 was found to be upregulated and active in Treg cells, being associated with Foxp3 in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of USP7 decreased Foxp3 polyubiquitination and increased Foxp3 expression. Conversely, either treatment with DUB inhibitor or USP7 knockdown decreased endogenous Foxp3 protein expression and decreased Treg-cell-mediated suppression in vitro. Furthermore, in a murine adoptive-transfer-induced colitis model, either inhibition of DUB activity or USP7 knockdown in Treg cells abrogated their ability to resolve inflammation in vivo. Our data reveal a molecular mechanism in which rapid temporal control of Foxp3 expression in Treg cells can be regulated by USP7, thereby modulating Treg cell numbers and function. PMID:23973222

  11. Stabilization of the Transcription Factor Foxp3 by the Deubiquitinase USP7 Increases Treg-Cell-Suppressive Capacity

    PubMed Central

    van Loosdregt, Jorg; Fleskens, Veerle; Fu, Juan; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Bekker, Cornelis P.J.; Pals, Cornelieke E.G.M.; Meerding, Jenny; Berkers, Celia R.; Barbi, Joseph; Gröne, Andrea; Sijts, Alice J.A.M.; Maurice, Madelon M.; Kalkhoven, Eric; Prakken, Berent J.; Ovaa, Huib; Pan, Fan; Zaiss, Dietmar M.W.; Coffer, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Stable Foxp3 expression is required for the development of functional regulatory T (Treg) cells. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of the transcription factor Foxp3 can be regulated through the polyubiquitination of multiple lysine residues, resulting in proteasome-mediated degradation. Expression of the deubiquitinase (DUB) USP7 was found to be upregulated and active in Treg cells, being associated with Foxp3 in the nucleus. Ectopic expression of USP7 decreased Foxp3 polyubiquitination and increased Foxp3 expression. Conversely, either treatment with DUB inhibitor or USP7 knockdown decreased endogenous Foxp3 protein expression and decreased Treg-cell-mediated suppression in vitro. Furthermore, in a murine adoptive-transfer-induced colitis model, either inhibition of DUB activity or USP7 knockdown in Treg cells abrogated their ability to resolve inflammation in vivo. Our data reveal a molecular mechanism in which rapid temporal control of Foxp3 expression in Treg cells can be regulated by USP7, thereby modulating Treg cell numbers and function. PMID:23973222

  12. Natural Treg cells spontaneously differentiate into pathogenic helper cells in lymphopenic conditions.

    PubMed

    Duarte, João H; Zelenay, Santiago; Bergman, Marie-Louise; Martins, Ana C; Demengeot, Jocelyne

    2009-04-01

    Induction of Forkhead-box p3 (Foxp3) expression in developing T cells upon peptide-MHC encountering has been proposed to define a lineage of committed Treg cells. However, sustained expression of Foxp3 is required for Treg function and what maintains Foxp3 expression in peripheral Treg remains obscure. To address this issue, we monitored natural Treg phenotype and function upon adoptive transfer into lymphocyte-deficient mice. We first show that about 50% of Foxp3-GFP(+) Treg isolated from Foxp3(gfp) KI animals loose Foxp3 expression in severe lymphopenic conditions. We next evidence that the cytokine IL-2, either produced by co-transferred conventional T cells or administrated i.v. prevents Foxp3 downregulation. Moreover, we document that Treg that lost Foxp3 expression upon adoptive transfer produce IL-2 are not suppressive and promote tissue infiltration and damage upon secondary transfer into alymphoid mice. Our findings that Treg convert into pathogenic Th cells in absence of IL-2 provide new clues to the success of Treg-based immune therapies. PMID:19291701

  13. Lack of estrogen down-regulates CXCR4 expression on Treg cells and reduces Treg cell population in bone marrow in OVX mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, X-L; Duan, X-B; Chen, Z-H; Li, M; Xu, J-S; Ding, G-M

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) is the most common metabolic bone disease in women after menopausal. Recent works focused on cross—talk between immune regulation and bone metabolism pathways and suggested Treg cells suppressed bone resorption and osteoclasts (OC) differentiation in bone marrow via cell—cell contact interaction and/or secreting of IL—10 and TGF—beta. In this study, we investigated the impact of estrogen on regulatory T cells (Treg cells) trafficking and staying in bone marrow and we found that a significant reduction of Treg cell population in bone marrow in estrogen deficiency ovariectomied (OVX) mice. We then studied the expressions of chemokines CXCL12/CXCR4 axes, which were critical to Treg cells migration and our data show the expression of CXCR4 on Treg cells was relative with oestrogen in vivo, however, the expression of CXCL12 was not. Furthermore, the loss of trafficking ability of Treg cells in OVX mice was recoverable in our system. These findings may mechanistically explain why Treg cells lose their suppressive functions on the regulation of OC cells and demonstrate a previously unappreciated role for estrogen, which may be critical to the novel therapy in clinical practice of PMO patients. PMID:26025396

  14. Treg17 cells are programmed by Stat3 to suppress Th17 responses in systemic lupus.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Malte A; Melderis, Simon; Nosko, Anna; Goerke, Boeren; Luig, Michael; Meyer, Matthias C; Turner, Jan-Eric; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Wegscheid, Claudia; Tiegs, Gisa; Stahl, Rolf A K; Panzer, Ulf; Steinmetz, Oliver M

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex and potentially fatal autoimmune disorder. Although Th17 cells are thought to be central mediators of SLE, mechanisms underlying their counter regulation remain largely unknown. To help define this, we studied the function of the newly defined Stat3-dependent Th17-specific regulatory T cells (Treg17). Treg-specific deletion of Stat3 was achieved by generating Foxp3(Cre) × Stat3(fl/fl) mice and SLE was induced by intraperitoneal injection of pristane. Lack of Treg17 cells in these mice caused selectively enhanced peritoneal Th17 inflammation. Importantly, Treg17 deficiency also resulted in aggravated pulmonary vasculitis with increased percentages of Th17 cells and significantly higher mortality. Similarly, 4 and 9 months after pristane injection, analysis of renal and systemic immunity showed overshooting Th17 responses in the absence of Treg17 cells, associated with the aggravation of lupus nephritis. Expression of the Th17 characteristic trafficking receptor CCR6 was strikingly reduced on Tregs of Foxp3(Cre) × Stat3(fl/fl) mice, resulting in impaired renal Treg infiltration. Thus, Stat3-induced Treg17 cells are novel antiinflammatory mediators of SLE. One mechanism enabling Treg17 cells to target pathogenic Th17 responses is shared expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6. PMID:26466322

  15. Dendritic Cells Induce a Subpopulation of IL-12Rβ2-Expressing Treg that Specifically Consumes IL-12 to Control Th1 Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Uri; Park, Chae Gyu; Park, Andrew; Olds, Peter; Wang, Shu; Fischetti, Vincent A.

    2016-01-01

    Cytokines secreted from dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the regulation of T helper (Th) cell differentiation and activation into effector cells. Therefore, controlling cytokine secretion from DCs may potentially regulate Th differentiation/activation. DCs also induce de-novo generation of regulatory T cells (Treg) that modulate the immune response. In the current study we used the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR) to investigate the effect of allospecific Treg on IL-12, TNFα and IL-6 secretion by DCs. Treg cells were found to markedly down-regulate IL-12 secretion from DCs following stimulation with TLR7/8 agonist. This down-regulation of IL-12 was neither due to a direct suppression of its production by the DCs nor a result of marked DC death. We found that IL-12 was rather actively consumed by Treg cells. IL-12 consumption was mediated by a subpopulation of IL-12Rβ2-expressing Treg cells and was dependent on MHC class-II expressed on dendritic cells. Furthermore, IL-12 consumption by Tregs increased their suppressive effect on T cell proliferation and Th1 activation. These results provide a new pathway of Th1 response regulation where IL-12 secreted by DCs is consumed by a sub-population of IL-12Rβ2-expressing Treg cells. Consumption of IL-12 by Tregs not only reduces the availability of IL-12 to Th effector cells but also enhances the Treg immunosuppressive effect. This DC-induced IL-12Rβ2-expressing Treg subpopulation may have a therapeutic advantage in suppressing Th1 mediated autoimmunity. PMID:26745371

  16. Organ-Specific and Memory Treg Cells: Specificity, Development, Function, and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Campbell, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are essential for establishing and maintaining self-tolerance, and also inhibit immune responses to innocuous environmental antigens. Imbalances and dysfunction in Treg cells lead to a variety of immune-mediated diseases, as deficits in Treg cell function contribute to the development autoimmune disease and pathological tissue damage, whereas overabundance of Treg cells can promote chronic infection and tumorigenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the fact that Treg cells themselves are a diverse collection of phenotypically and functionally specialized populations, with distinct developmental origins, antigen-specificities, tissue-tropisms, and homeostatic requirements. The signals directing the differentiation of these populations, their specificities and the mechanisms by which they combine to promote organ-specific and systemic tolerance, and how they embody the emerging property of regulatory memory are the focus of this review. PMID:25076948

  17. The GARP/Latent TGF-β1 complex on Treg cells modulates the induction of peripherally derived Treg cells during oral tolerance.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Justin P; Hand, Timothy W; Morais da Fonseca, Denise; Glass, Deborah D; Belkaid, Yasmine; Shevach, Ethan M

    2016-06-01

    Treg cells can secrete latent TGF-β1 (LTGF-β1), but can also utilize an alternative pathway for transport and expression of LTGF-β1 on the cell surface in which LTGF-β1 is coupled to a distinct LTGF-β binding protein termed glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP)/LRRC32. The function of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex has remained elusive. Here, we examine in vivo the roles of GARP and TGF-β1 in the induction of oral tolerance. When Foxp3(-) OT-II T cells were transferred to wild-type recipient mice followed by OVA feeding, the conversion of Foxp3(-) to Foxp3(+) OT-II cells was dependent on recipient Treg cells. Neutralization of IL-2 in the recipient mice also abrogated this conversion. The GARP/LTGF-β1 complex on recipient Treg cells, but not dendritic cell-derived TGF-β1, was required for efficient induction of Foxp3(+) T cells and for the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity. Expression of the integrin αvβ8 by Treg cells (or T cells) in the recipients was dispensable for induction of Foxp3 expression. Transient depletion of the bacterial flora enhanced the development of oral tolerance by expanding Treg cells with enhanced expression of the GARP/LTGF-β1 complex. PMID:27062243

  18. Disentangling Tfr cells from Treg cells and Tfh cells: How to untie the Gordian knot.

    PubMed

    Amiezer, Mayan; Phan, Tri Giang

    2016-05-01

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells are a subpopulation of Treg cells that have adopted the T follicular helper cell program to localize to the B-cell follicle. Because of the difficulties in generating mouse models in which Tfr cells are selectively affected, determining where and how Tfr cells regulate the germinal center response remains to be resolved. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Dent and colleagues [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 1152-1161] describe a simple, elegant mouse model to conditionally delete Tfr cells without impacting on the Treg- and Tfh-cell populations. Their initial studies suggest that Tfr cells have a more complex role than previously thought, particularly with respect to the regulation of immunoglobulin isotype switching to IgA. PMID:27109022

  19. IL-1 signaling modulates STAT activation to antagonize retinoic acid signaling and control Th17–iTreg balance

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Rajatava; Whitley, Sarah K.; Bhaumik, Suniti; Zindl, Carlene L.; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Benveniste, Etty N.; Pear, Warren S.; Hatton, Robin D.; Weaver, Casey T.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin 17 (IL-17)-producing helper (TH17) and inducible regulatory CD4+ T (iTreg) cells emerge from an overlapping developmental program. In the intestines, the vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid (RA) is produced at steady state and acts as an important cofactor to induce iTreg cell development while potently inhibiting TH17 development. Here, we found that IL-1 was required to fully override RA-mediated Foxp3 expression and induce protective TH17 responses. Through induction of an NF-κB-dependent repression of SOCS3 expression, IL-1 increased the amplitude and duration of STAT3 phosphorylation induced by TH17-polarizing cytokines, leading to an altered balance of STAT3–STAT5 binding to shared consensus sequences in developing T cells. Thus, IL-1 signaling differentially modulated STAT activation downstream of cytokine receptors to control TH17–iTreg developmental fate. PMID:25642823

  20. Analysis of subsets of B cells, Breg, CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells in adult patients with primary selective IgM deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2016-01-01

    Primary selective IgM deficiency (SIGMD) is a rare and recently IUIS-recognized primary immunodeficiency disease with increased susceptibility to infections, allergy, and autoimmune diseases. The pathogenesis of selective IgM remains unclear. The objective of the study was to understand the pathogenesis of selective IgM deficiency via a comprehensive analysis of subsets of B cells, naïve and memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and Breg, CD4Treg, and CD8Treg cells. Twenty adult patients with SIGMD (serum IgM 4 mg/dl-32 mg/dl) and age-and gender-matched healthy controls were studied. Naïve B cells, transitional B cells, marginal zone B cells, germinal center B cells, IgM memory B cells, switched memory B cells, plasmablasts, CD21low B cells, B1 cells, CXCR3+ naive and memory B cells; naïve, central memory, and effector memory subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and CD4Treg, CD8Treg and Breg were phenotypically analyzed using multicolor flow cytometry. A significant increase in CD21low, IgM memory B cells, Breg and CD8Treg, and a significant decreased in germinal center B cells, and CXCR3+ naïve and memory B cells were observed in SIGMD. These alterations in subsets of B cells, and Breg and CD8Treg cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of SIGMD. PMID:27168952

  1. The role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in the Tregs-amplifying effect of Sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Song, Jiyong; Xiao, Li; Du, Guosheng; Gao, Yu; Chen, Wen; Yang, Shaozhen; Fan, Wenmei; Shi, Bingyi

    2016-09-01

    Sirolimus can significantly amplify regulatory T cells (Tregs) in vivo and in vitro, but the specific mechanism of this has not been well documented. The role of regulatory B cells (Bregs) in the Tregs-amplifying effect of Sirolimus was investigated in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro in this study. The results showed that the percentages of both CD19+CD24+CD38+TGF-β1+ Bregs and CD19+CD24+CD38+IL-10+ Bregs to B cells were elevated by Sirolimus in PBMCs including B cells. Sirolimus significantly enhances the cytokine production of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in PBMCs with B cells, and the enhancement significantly decreased in PBMCs without B cells. The percentage of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs to T cells was also elevated by Sirolimus in PBMCs including B cells. The elevation of Tregs percentage decreased in PBMCs without B cells and recovered when additional TGF-β1 and IL-10 were added. The amplification of Tregs by Sirolimus was partially inhibited when either TGF-β1 or IL-10 was neutralized, and it even disappeared when these two cytokines were both neutralized. These results indicate that Sirolimus can amplify Bregs and Tregs in PBMCs in vitro, and Bregs may be the why Sirolimus amplifies Tregs. PMID:27258186

  2. Is there a feudal hierarchy amongst regulatory immune cells? More than just Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Claudia; Carter, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    Nature has provided the developing immune system with several checkpoints important for the maintenance of tolerance and the prevention of autoimmunity. The regulatory mechanisms operating in the periphery of the system are mediated by subsets of regulatory cells, now considered principal contributors to peripheral tolerance. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have received titanic interest in the past decade, placing them at the centre of immuno-suppressive reactions. However, it has become clearer that other immune suppressive cells inhibit auto-reactivity as effectively as Tregs. The function of Tregs and other regulatory cells in rheumatoid arthritis will be discussed in this review. PMID:19664198

  3. T cell receptor signal strength in Treg and iNKT cell development demonstrated by a novel fluorescent reporter mouse

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Amy E.; Holzapfel, Keli L.; Xing, Yan; Cunningham, Nicole R.; Maltzman, Jonathan S.; Punt, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The ability of antigen receptors to engage self-ligands with varying affinity is crucial for lymphocyte development. To further explore this concept, we generated transgenic mice expressing GFP from the immediate early gene Nr4a1 (Nur77) locus. GFP was up-regulated in lymphocytes by antigen receptor stimulation but not by inflammatory stimuli. In T cells, GFP was induced during positive selection, required major histocompatibility complex for maintenance, and directly correlated with the strength of T cell receptor (TCR) stimulus. Thus, our results define a novel tool for studying antigen receptor activation in vivo. Using this model, we show that regulatory T cells (Treg cells) and invariant NKT cells (iNKT cells) perceived stronger TCR signals than conventional T cells during development. However, although Treg cells continued to perceive strong TCR signals in the periphery, iNKT cells did not. Finally, we show that Treg cell progenitors compete for recognition of rare stimulatory TCR self-ligands. PMID:21606508

  4. Disturbed Th17/Treg Balance in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Duan, Min-Chao; Han, Wei; Jin, Pei-Wen; Wei, Yu-Ping; Wei, Qiu; Zhang, Liang-Ming; Li, Jun-Chen

    2015-12-01

    The fine balance of T help-17 (Th17)/regulatory T(Treg) cells is crucial for maintenance of immune homeostasis. However, there is little information concerning the role played in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by Th17/Treg cells. The objective of this study was to investigate the variation of Th17 and Treg cells in the peripheral blood of patients with NSCLC. Blood samples were collected from 19 patients with NSCLC and 19 healthy donors. Samples were processed to detect CD4(+)IL-17(+) Th17 cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells by flow cytometry, and related gene expressions were assessed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17, IL-23, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) were also measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis (ELISA). The frequency of circulating Th17 cells and Treg cells was increased in samples derived from patients with NSCLC, accompanied by the upregulation of Foxp3 and RORγt. However, a negative correlation between Treg cells and Th17 cells was found in patients with NSCLC. Additionally, the Th17/Treg ratio and the related cytokines were also significantly higher in patients with NSCLC than in healthy controls. Furthermore, the frequency of Th17 cells was positively correlated with IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-23 in patients with NSCLC, and the frequency of Treg cells was positively correlated with TGF-β1 and IL-10. More importantly, the Th17/Treg ratio was positively correlated with the CEA concentrations in patients with NSCLC. Our data indicated that Th17 and Treg subset are involved in the immunopathology of NSCLC. Distinct cytokine environment might play a key role in the differentiation of the Th17 and Treg cells in NSCLC. Reconstituting an adequate balance between Th17 and Treg may be beneficial in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:26077695

  5. Infiltration of IL-17-Producing T Cells and Treg Cells in a Mouse Model of Smoke-Induced Emphysema.

    PubMed

    Duan, Min-Chao; Zhang, Jian-Quan; Liang, Yue; Liu, Guang-Nan; Xiao, Jin; Tang, Hai-Juan; Liang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a progressive and irreversible chronic inflammatory disease associated with the accumulation of activated T cells. To date, there is little information concerning the intrinsic association among Th17, Tc17, and regulatory T (Treg) cells in COPD. The objective of this study was to investigate the variation of lungs CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells and IL-17-producing CD4 and CD8 (Th17 and Tc17) lymphocytes in mice with cigarette-induced emphysema. Groups of mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or room air. At weeks 12 and 24, mice were sacrificed to observe histological changes by HE stain. The frequencies of Th17 (CD4(+)IL-17(+)T), Tc17 (CD8(+)IL-17(+)T), and Treg (CD4(+)Foxp3(+)T) cells in lungs from these mice were analyzed by flow cytometry. The mRNA levels of orphan nuclear receptor ROR γt and Foxp3 were performed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of interleukin-17 (IL-17), IL-6, IL-10, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cigarette smoke caused substantial enlargement of the air spaces accompanied by the destruction of the normal alveolar architecture and led to emphysema. The frequencies of Th17 and Tc17 cells, as well as the expressions of IL-6, IL-17, TGF-β1, and ROR γt were greater in the lungs of cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed mice, particularly in the 24-week CS-exposed mice. The frequencies of Treg cells and the expressions of IL-10 and Foxp3 were lower in CS-exposed mice compared to control group. More important, the frequencies of Tregs were negatively correlated with Th17 cells and with Tc17 cells. Interestingly, a significant portion of the cells that infiltrate the lungs was skewed towards a Tc17 phenotype. Our findings suggest the contribution of Th17, Tc17, and Treg cells in the pathogenesis of COPD. Rebalance of these cells will be helpful for developing and refining the new immunological therapies for COPD

  6. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells contribute to systemic lupus erythaematosus by regulating differentiation of Th17 cells and Tregs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jianjian; Xu, Jingjing; Zhao, Shuli; Liu, Fei; Qi, Jingjing; Song, Yuxian; Ren, Jing; Wang, Tingting; Dou, Huan; Hou, Yayi

    2016-08-01

    Although major advancements have made in investigating the aetiology of SLE (systemic lupus erythaematosus), the role of MDSCs (myeloid-derived suppressor cells) in SLE progression remains confused. Recently, some studies have revealed that MDSCs play an important role in lupus mice. However, the proportion and function of MDSCs in lupus mice and SLE patients are still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the proportion and function of MDSCs using different stages of MRL/lpr lupus mice and specimens from SLE patients with different activity. Results showed that splenic granulocytic (G-)MDSCs were significantly expanded by increasing the expression of CCR1 (CC chemokine receptor 1) in diseased MRL/lpr lupus mice and in high-disease-activity SLE patients. However, the proportion of monocytic (M-)MDSCs remains similar in MRL/lpr lupus mice and SLE patients. G-MDSCs produce high levels of ROS (reactive oxygen species) through increasing gp91(phox) expression, and activated TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2) and AIM2 (absent in melanoma 2) inflammasome in M-MDSCs lead to IL-1β (interleukin 1β) expression in diseased MRL/lpr mice and high-disease-activity SLE patients. Previous study has revealed that MDSCs could alter the plasticity of Th17 (T helper 17) cells and Tregs (regulatory T-cells) via ROS and IL-1β. Co-culture experiments showed that G-MDSCs impaired Treg differentiation via ROS and M-MDSCs promoted Th17 cell polarization by IL-1β in vitro Furthermore, adoptive transfer or antibody depletion of MDSCs in MRL/lpr mice confirmed that MDSCs influenced the imbalance of Tregs and Th17 cells in vivo Our results indicate that MDSCs with the capacity to regulate Th17 cell/Treg balance may be a critical pathogenic factor in SLE. PMID:27231253

  7. Th17 and Th17/Treg ratio at early HIV infection associate with protective HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses and disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Falivene, Juliana; Ghiglione, Yanina; Laufer, Natalia; Eugenia Socías, María; Pía Holgado, María; Julia Ruiz, María; Maeto, Cynthia; Inés Figueroa, María; Giavedoni, Luis D.; Cahn, Pedro; Salomón, Horacio; Sued, Omar; Turk, Gabriela; Magdalena Gherardi, María

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze Th17 and Treg subsets and their correlation with anti-HIV T-cell responses and clinical parameters during (acute/early) primary HIV infection (PHI) and up to one year post-infection (p.i). Samples from 14 healthy donors (HDs), 40 PHI patients, 17 Chronics, and 13 Elite controllers (ECs) were studied. The percentages of Th17 and Treg subsets were severely altered in Chronics, whereas all HIV-infected individuals (including ECs) showed Th17/Treg imbalance compared to HDs, in concordance with higher frequencies of activated CD8+ T-cells (HLA-DR+/CD38+). Better clinical status (higher CD4 counts, lower viral loads and activation) was associated with higher Th17 and lower Treg levels. We found positive correlations between Th17 at baseline and anti-HIV CD8+ T-cell functionality: viral inhibitory activity (VIA) and key polyfunctions (IFN-γ+/CD107A/B+) at both early and later times p.i, highlighting the prognostic value of Th17 cells to preserve an effective HIV T-cell immunity. Th17/Treg ratio and the IL-17 relative mean fluorescence intensity (rMFI of IL-17) were also positively correlated with VIA. Taken together, our results suggested a potential link between Th17 and Th17/Treg ratio with key HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses against the infection. PMID:26099972

  8. The roles of serum CXCL16 in circulating Tregs and gastrointestinal stromal tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jun-Yan; Xu, Hui-Mian

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are the most common sarcomas of the digestive system. Abnormal expression of CXCL16 and its sole receptor, CXCR6, has been demonstrated in many cancers. However, no studies have shown the relationship between CXCL16 or CXCR6 expression and GIST. In this study, we detected CXCL16 and CXCR6 expression in GIST patient samples by using immunohistochemistry analysis and Western blot analysis. Serum CXCL16 level was determined by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Circulating Tregs were isolated by using flow cytometry. MTT assay, cell cycle assay, and transwell assay were used to test the effects of recombinant CXCL16 on Tregs and GIST cells in vitro. The levels of CXCL16 and CXCR6 protein were higher in cancer tissues than in normal tissues. Serum CXCL16 level and circulating Tregs were higher in GIST patients than that in the healthy volunteers. CXCL16, CXCR6, serum CXCL16, and circulating Tregs were significantly associated with a decreased survival time of patients. Relative to control cells, high concentration recombinant CXCL16 treated Tregs and GIST cells exhibited lower proliferation and mobility rates as assessed by MTT assay and transwell assay, respectively. Taken together, CXCL16 was observed to mediate the inhibitory effects in Tregs and GIST cells, and these involved suppression of the MEK/ERK signaling pathway. PMID:27418838

  9. Once a Treg, always a Treg?

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Deepali V.; Vignali, Dario A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevail as a specialized cell lineage that has a central role in the dominant control of immunological tolerance and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Thymus-derived Tregs (tTregs) and their peripherally-induced counterparts (pTregs) are imprinted with a unique Foxp3-dependent and independent transcriptional and epigenetic characteristics that bestows on them the ability to suppress disparate immunological and non-immunological challenges. Thus, unidirectional commitment and the predominant stability of this regulatory lineage is essential for their unwavering and robust suppressor function and has clinical implications for the use of Tregs as cellular therapy for various immune pathologies. However, recent studies have revealed considerable heterogeneity or plasticity in the Treg lineage, acquisition of alternative effector or hybrid fates, and promotion rather than suppression of inflammation in extreme contexts. In addition, the absolute stability of Tregs under all circumstances has been questioned. Since these observations challenge the safety and efficacy of human Treg therapy, the issue of Treg stability versus plasticity continues to be enthusiastically debated. In this review, we assess our current understanding of the defining features of Foxp3+ Tregs, the intrinsic and extrinsic cues that guide development and commitment to the Treg lineage, and the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity that shapes the plasticity and stability of this critical regulatory population in inflammatory contexts. PMID:24712466

  10. Heme Oxygenase-1 Ameliorates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-induced Acute Murine Colitis by Regulating Th17/Treg Cell Balance*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liya; Zhang, Yanjie; Zhong, Wenwei; Di, Caixia; Lin, Xiaoliang; Xia, Zhenwei

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, is a group of autoimmune diseases characterized by nonspecific inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent investigations suggest that activation of Th17 cells and/or deficiency of regulatory T cells (Treg) is involved in the pathogenesis of IBD. Heme oxygenase (HO)-1 is a protein with a wide range of anti-inflammatory and immune regulatory function, which exerts significantly protective roles in various T cell-mediated diseases. In this study, we aim to explore the immunological regulation of HO-1 in the dextran sulfate sodium-induced model of experimental murine colitis. BALB/c mice were administered 4% dextran sulfate sodium orally; some mice were intraperitoneally pretreated with HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor stannum protoporphyrin IX. The results show that hemin enhances the colonic expression of HO-1 and significantly ameliorates the symptoms of colitis with improved histological changes, accompanied by a decreased proportion of Th17 cells and increased number of Tregs in mesenteric lymph node and spleen. Moreover, induction of HO-1 down-regulates retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt expression and IL-17A levels, while promoting Treg-related forkhead box p3 (Foxp3) expression and IL-10 levels in colon. Further study in vitro revealed that up-regulated HO-1 switched the naive T cells to Tregs when cultured under a Th17-inducing environment, which involved in IL-6R blockade. Therefore, HO-1 may exhibit anti-inflammatory activity in the murine model of acute experimental colitis via regulating the balance between Th17 and Treg cells, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in IBD. PMID:25112868

  11. Acupuncture Attenuated Inflammation and Inhibited Th17 and Treg Activity in Experimental Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Dong, Ming; Zhang, Hongying; Lv, Yubao; Liu, Jiaqi; Wei, Kai; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Xu, Fei; Dong, Jingcheng

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is an effective therapeutic method in asthma treatment in traditional Chinese medicine. Here, we evaluated the effect of acupuncture on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and the associated inflammatory changes as well as Th17 and Treg activity in ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced experimental asthma. Our results revealed that acupuncture treatment significantly inhibited AHR, lung inflammation, and mucus secretion of experimental asthma mice. Furthermore, a decrease in lymphocytes and eosinophils as well as neutrophils was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice treated with acupuncture. Acupuncture reduced the OVA specific IgE level as well as the Th17 cytokine levels including IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 in the serum of the experimental asthma mice. Acupuncture treatment group also had reduced CD4+IL-17A+ cell numbers and increased CD4+Foxp3+ cell numbers in BALF. In addition, acupuncture could inhibit IL-17R, RORγt, p65, and the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase-α (IKKα) protein expression. Our results indicated that acupuncture was effective in inhibiting AHR and inflammation in OVA-induced experimental asthma, which may be associated with the regulation of Th17 and Treg activity and NF-κB pathway. PMID:26612993

  12. Acupuncture Attenuated Inflammation and Inhibited Th17 and Treg Activity in Experimental Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Dong, Ming; Zhang, Hongying; Lv, Yubao; Liu, Jiaqi; Wei, Kai; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Xu, Fei; Dong, Jingcheng

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is an effective therapeutic method in asthma treatment in traditional Chinese medicine. Here, we evaluated the effect of acupuncture on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and the associated inflammatory changes as well as Th17 and Treg activity in ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced experimental asthma. Our results revealed that acupuncture treatment significantly inhibited AHR, lung inflammation, and mucus secretion of experimental asthma mice. Furthermore, a decrease in lymphocytes and eosinophils as well as neutrophils was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice treated with acupuncture. Acupuncture reduced the OVA specific IgE level as well as the Th17 cytokine levels including IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 in the serum of the experimental asthma mice. Acupuncture treatment group also had reduced CD4+IL-17A+ cell numbers and increased CD4+Foxp3+ cell numbers in BALF. In addition, acupuncture could inhibit IL-17R, RORγt, p65, and the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase-α (IKKα) protein expression. Our results indicated that acupuncture was effective in inhibiting AHR and inflammation in OVA-induced experimental asthma, which may be associated with the regulation of Th17 and Treg activity and NF-κB pathway. PMID:26612993

  13. Alterations in the adenosine metabolism and CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery cause loss of Treg cell function and autoimmunity in ADA-deficient SCID

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha V.; Brigida, Immacolata; Carriglio, Nicola; Jofra Hernandez, Raisa; Scaramuzza, Samantha; Clavenna, Daniela; Sanvito, Francesca; Poliani, Pietro L.; Gagliani, Nicola; Carlucci, Filippo; Tabucchi, Antonella; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Traggiai, Elisabetta; Villa, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine acts as anti-inflammatory mediator on the immune system and has been described in regulatory T cell (Treg)–mediated suppression. In the absence of adenosine deaminase (ADA), adenosine and other purine metabolites accumulate, leading to severe immunodeficiency with recurrent infections (ADA-SCID). Particularly ADA-deficient patients with late-onset forms and after enzyme replacement therapy (PEG-ADA) are known to manifest immune dysregulation. Herein we provide evidence that alterations in the purine metabolism interfere with Treg function, thereby contributing to autoimmune manifestations in ADA deficiency. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA–treated patients are reduced in number and show decreased suppressive activity, whereas they are corrected after gene therapy. Untreated murine ADA−/− Tregs show alterations in the plasma membrane CD39/CD73 ectonucleotidase machinery and limited suppressive activity via extracellular adenosine. PEG-ADA–treated mice developed multiple autoantibodies and hypothyroidism in contrast to mice treated with bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Tregs isolated from PEG-ADA–treated mice lacked suppressive activity, suggesting that this treatment interferes with Treg functionality. The alterations in the CD39/CD73 adenosinergic machinery and loss of function in ADA-deficient Tregs provide new insights into a predisposition to autoimmunity and the underlying mechanisms causing defective peripheral tolerance in ADA-SCID. Trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00598481/NCT00599781. PMID:22184407

  14. Rapamycin ameliorates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice through reciprocal regulation of the Th17/Treg cell balance.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lei; Deng, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Qing

    2016-08-01

    Previous investigations have suggested that the activation of Th17 cells and/or deficiency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of rapamycin on immune responses in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced murine liver fibrosis model. Liver fibrosis was induced by intraperitoneal administration with CCl4. Following injection of CCl4, the mice were treated intraperitoneally with rapamycin (1.25 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining were used for histological examination. The protein levels of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor P3, retinoic-acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)‑γt in liver tissue were determined by western blotting, the frequency of Th17 and Treg cells in the liver was evaluated by flow cytometry, and a suppression assay was measured by incorporating [3H]‑thymidine. In addition, to explore the effect of Tregs expanded with rapamycin on hepatic stellate cells (HSC), HSCs were co‑cultured with Tregs from rapamycin or phosphate‑buffered saline‑treated mice. It was found that rapamycin treatment led to a significant reduction in the number of Th17 cells and in the expression levels of ROR‑γt in the liver tissues. Simultaneously, the results of the present study showed a significant increase in the frequency of Tregs and a marked enhancement in the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor P3 in the rapamycin‑treated mice. Furthermore, the Tregs in rapamycin‑treated mice had significantly higher suppressive effects, compared with the cells from mice treated with phospphate‑buffered saline. Consequently, rapamycin treatment prevented the development of CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis, which was shown by its histological appearances. These results suggested that the immunosuppressive effect of rapamycin on liver fibrosis was associated with the suppression of hepatic

  15. Rapamycin ameliorates CCl4-induced liver fibrosis in mice through reciprocal regulation of the Th17/Treg cell balance

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Deng, Wen-Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Fei; Zhou, Hong; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Previous investigations have suggested that the activation of Th17 cells and/or deficiency of regulatory T cells (Tregs) are involved in the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of rapamycin on immune responses in a carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced murine liver fibrosis model. Liver fibrosis was induced by intraperitoneal administration with CCl4. Following injection of CCl4, the mice were treated intraperitoneally with rapamycin (1.25 mg/kg/day) for 8 weeks. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining were used for histological examination. The protein levels of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor P3, retinoic-acid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γt in liver tissue were determined by western blotting, the frequency of Th17 and Treg cells in the liver was evaluated by flow cytometry, and a suppression assay was measured by incorporating [3H]-thymidine. In addition, to explore the effect of Tregs expanded with rapamycin on hepatic stellate cells (HSC), HSCs were co-cultured with Tregs from rapamycin or phosphate-buffered saline-treated mice. It was found that rapamycin treatment led to a significant reduction in the number of Th17 cells and in the expression levels of ROR-γt in the liver tissues. Simultaneously, the results of the present study showed a significant increase in the frequency of Tregs and a marked enhancement in the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor P3 in the rapamycin-treated mice. Furthermore, the Tregs in rapamycin-treated mice had significantly higher suppressive effects, compared with the cells from mice treated with phospphate-buffered saline. Consequently, rapamycin treatment prevented the development of CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis, which was shown by its histological appearances. These results suggested that the immunosuppressive effect of rapamycin on liver fibrosis was associated with the suppression of hepatic fibrogenesis and

  16. RA8, A human anti-CD25 antibody against human treg cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Robyn; Flanagan, Meg; Miller, Keith D.; Nien, Yu-Chih; Hu, Peisheng; Gray, Dixon; Khawli, Leslie A.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2007-06-01

    Although anti-CD25 antibodies exist for clinical use in patients, there is a need for the development of a human Treg antibody that will abrogate the immunosuppressive function of this small but critical T cell subtype. Based upon mounting evidence that the level of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with clinical prognosis and stage in man, it appears that Treg cells play an important role in the tumor's ability to overcome host immune responses. In mice, the rat anti-mouse CD25 antibody PC61 causes depletion of CD25-bearing Treg cells both peripherally in lymphatic tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, without inducing symptoms of autoimmunity. A similar antibody, though with the ability to delete Treg cells specifically, would be an important new tool for reversing tumor escape associated with Treg immunosuppression in man. To begin to generate such a reagent, we now describe the development of a human anti-CD25 antibody using a novel yeast display library. The target antigen CD25-Fc was constructed and used for five rounds of selection using a non-immune yeast display library that contained as many as 109 single chain variable fragments (scFv). Two unique clones with low KD values (RA4 and RA8) were then selected to construct fully human anti-CD25 antibodies (IgG1/kappa) for stable expression. One antibody, RA8, showed excellent binding to human CD25+ cell lines and to human Treg cells and appears to be an excellent candidate for the generation of a human reagent that may be used in man for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  17. Protection of Tregs, Suppression of Th1 and Th17 Cells, and Amelioration of Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis by a Physically-Modified Saline

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Susanta; Martinson, Jeffrey A.; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard; Pahan, Kalipada

    2012-01-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases, the autoreactive T cells overcome the resistance provided by the regulatory T cells (Tregs) due to a decrease in the number of Foxp3-expressing Tregs. Therefore, upregulation and/or maintenance of Tregs during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Here we have undertaken an innovative approach to upregulate Tregs and achieve immunomodulation. RNS60 is a 0.9% saline solution generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille (TCP) flow under elevated oxygen pressure. RNS60, but not NS (normal saline), RNS10.3 (TCP-modified saline without excess oxygen) and PNS60 (saline containing excess oxygen without TCP modification), was found to upregulate Foxp3 and enrich Tregs in MBP-primed T cells. Moreover, RNS60, but not NS, RNS10.3 and PNS60, inhibited the production of nitric oxide (NO) and the expression of iNOS in MBP-primed splenocytes. Incubation of the cells with an NO donor abrogated the RNS60-mediated upregulation of Foxp3. These results suggest that RNS60 boosts Tregs via suppression of NO production. Consistent to the suppressive activity of Tregs towards autoreactive T cells, RNS60, but not NS, RNS10.3, or PNS60, suppressed the differentiation of Th17 and Th1 cells and shifted the balance towards a Th2 response. Finally, RNS60 treatment exhibited immunomodulation and ameliorated adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS, via Tregs. These results describe a novel immunomodulatory property of RNS60 and suggest its exploration for therapeutic intervention in MS and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:23284794

  18. FOXP3(+)Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in lung tissues of mice with asthma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hua; Wu, Xianbo; Zhu, Haiyan; Xie, Yiqiang; Tang, Songqi; Jiang, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Immunocyte imbalances, particularly of Th1 and Th2 type helper T (Th) cells, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases like asthma. Recent studies have suggested an important role for the balance between Th17 cells and FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). However, whether this balance is important in asthma remains unknown. This study sought to detect the populations of T cell subtypes (Th1, Th2, FOXP3(+) Treg, Th17) in lung tissue of a mouse model of asthma to understand the significance of immunocyte balances in the disease. An asthma model was generated by sensitizing ten pathogen-free BALB/c mice using a standard ovalbumin challenge; ten other mice were challenged with PBS to serve as a control group. Total white cells and differential cell counts were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and percentages of T cell subtypes were determined using flow cytometry. The severity of inflammation in lung tissue was evaluated in tissue sections, and airway hyperresponsiveness was assessed by unrestrained plethysmography. In mice with asthma, compared to those in the control group, total white cell, eosinophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte cell counts were higher, and lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were more severe (P<0.05), indicating that the model of asthma was successfully generated. Further, mice with asthma had higher percentages of Th2 and Th17 cells and lower percentages of Th1 and Foxp3(+) Treg cells in lung tissue (P<0.05). Consequently, the ratios of Th1/Th2 cells and FOXP3(+)Treg/Th17 cells were higher in the asthma group (P<0.05). Thus, in addition to the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells, an imbalance of FOXP3(+)Treg/Th17 cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26064325

  19. FOXP3+Treg/Th17 cell imbalance in lung tissues of mice with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hua; Wu, Xianbo; Zhu, Haiyan; Xie, Yiqiang; Tang, Songqi; Jiang, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Immunocyte imbalances, particularly of Th1 and Th2 type helper T (Th) cells, have been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases like asthma. Recent studies have suggested an important role for the balance between Th17 cells and FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). However, whether this balance is important in asthma remains unknown. This study sought to detect the populations of T cell subtypes (Th1, Th2, FOXP3+ Treg, Th17) in lung tissue of a mouse model of asthma to understand the significance of immunocyte balances in the disease. An asthma model was generated by sensitizing ten pathogen-free BALB/c mice using a standard ovalbumin challenge; ten other mice were challenged with PBS to serve as a control group. Total white cells and differential cell counts were determined in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and percentages of T cell subtypes were determined using flow cytometry. The severity of inflammation in lung tissue was evaluated in tissue sections, and airway hyperresponsiveness was assessed by unrestrained plethysmography. In mice with asthma, compared to those in the control group, total white cell, eosinophil, monocyte, and lymphocyte cell counts were higher, and lung inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness were more severe (P<0.05), indicating that the model of asthma was successfully generated. Further, mice with asthma had higher percentages of Th2 and Th17 cells and lower percentages of Th1 and Foxp3+ Treg cells in lung tissue (P<0.05). Consequently, the ratios of Th1/Th2 cells and FOXP3+Treg/Th17 cells were higher in the asthma group (P<0.05). Thus, in addition to the imbalance of Th1/Th2 cells, an imbalance of FOXP3+Treg/Th17 cells may play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. PMID:26064325

  20. Comprehensive analysis of miRNA expression in T-cell subsets of rheumatoid arthritis patients reveals defined signatures of naive and memory Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Smigielska-Czepiel, K; van den Berg, A; Jellema, P; van der Lei, R J; Bijzet, J; Kluiver, J; Boots, A M H; Brouwer, E; Kroesen, B-J

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) in regulatory T cells (Tregs) leads to development of autoimmunity in experimental mouse models. However, the miRNA expression signature characterizing Tregs of autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has not been determined yet. In this study, we have used a microarray approach to comprehensively analyze miRNA expression signatures of both naive Tregs (CD4+CD45RO-CD25++) and memory Tregs (CD4+CD45RO+CD25+++), as well as conventional naive (CD4+CD45RO−CD25−) and memory (CD4+CD45RO+CD25−) T cells (Tconvs) derived from peripheral blood of RA patients and matched healthy controls. Differential expression of selected miRNAs was validated by TaqMan-based quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We found a positive correlation between increased expression of miR-451 in T cells of RA patients and disease activity score (DAS28), erythrocyte sedimentation rate levels and serum levels of interleukin-6. Moreover, we found characteristic, disease- and treatment-independent, global miRNA expression signatures defining naive Tregs, memory Tregs, naive Tconvs and memory Tconvs. The analysis allowed us to define miRNAs characteristic for a general naive phenotype (for example, miR-92a) and a general memory phenotype (for example, miR-21, miR-155). Importantly, the analysis allowed us to define miRNAs that are specifically expressed in both naive and memory Tregs, defining as such miRNA signature characterizing the Treg phenotype (that is, miR-146a, miR-3162, miR-1202, miR-1246 and miR-4281). PMID:24401767

  1. Estrogen deficiency inducing shifted cytokines profile in bone marrow stromal cells inhibits Treg cells function in OVX mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Q-M; Liu, D-C; Zhang, X-C; Wu, J-P; Ding, L; Meng, D-H; Zhang, J

    2015-01-01

    The study aims to reveal the effect of estrogen deficiency on Treg cells population in bone marrow in the development of osteoclastogenis with comparing the differences about Treg cells phenotypes and cytokines related with the homeostasis and functions maintenance of Treg cells in bone marrow in OVX mice and health control group. Wide—type C57BL/6 mice were operated OVX to mimic estrogen deficiency in PMO women. Treg cells population and their surface markers expressions were detected by flow cytometry. Cytokines profiles in bone marrow with examined by real—time PCR and ELISA analysis. Signal pathways and key modulators responsible to inflammatory cytokines expressions in bone marrow stromal cells were also detected with using western blotting. Estrogen deficiency in OVX mice decreased Treg cells and their functions, and cytokines profile in bone marrow were found shifted in bone marrow when compared with control group. Consistent to these observations, signal pathways in bone marrow stromal cells were reported altered by estrogen deficiency in our model. Estrogen deficiency effects Treg cells population and their functions in OVX mice with altering cytokines profile in bone marrow stromal cells. PMID:26025405

  2. Graft-infiltrating cells expressing a CD200 transgene prolong allogeneic skin graft survival in association with local increases in Foxp3(+)Treg and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Chen, Zhiqi; Khatri, Ismat; Yu, Kai

    2011-12-01

    Expression of the molecule CD200 has been reported to increase allograft survival by suppression of inflammation and acquired immunity. In previous studies we have shown that increased skin and cardiac allograft survival in transgenic mice over-expressing CD200 (CD200(tg)) occurs in association with increased intra-graft expression of mRNAs for genes associated with altered T cell subset differentiation. We investigated changes in graft-infiltrating cells, Treg and mast cells in skin grafts post transplantation into control or CD200(tg) mice, using focused gene array and real-time PCR to assess altered gene expression, and FACS, immunohistology and MLC to determine numbers/function of those cells. Graft-infiltrating cells isolated from CD200(tg) recipients suppressed induction of CTL from control lymph node cells in vitro, and contained increased numbers of infiltrating, non-degranulating, mast cells and Foxp3(+)Treg. Mast cells were also evident in graft tissue of control animals, but there these cells showed evidence for degranulation, and fewer Foxp3(+)Treg were present than was the case of CD200(tg) mice. The infusion of a competitive inhibitor of CD200:CD200R interactions, CD200(tr), at high concentrations (50μg/mouse iv) caused rapid rejection of grafts in CD200(tg) mice, mast cell degranulation within graft tissue, and a decrease in Treg infiltrates. These effects were attenuated by simultaneous infusion of the mast cell stabilizer, sodium cromoglycate. We conclude that CD200 expression contributes to graft prolongation through local suppression of mast cell degranulation, attraction/expansion of Treg, and attenuation of T cell effector activation. PMID:21801836

  3. Depletion of fat-resident Treg cells prevents age-associated insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Sagar P; Myoung Suh, Jae; Fang, Sungsoon; Liu, Sihao; Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Albert; Zhou, Carmen; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R; Yu, Ruth T; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M; Zheng, Ye

    2015-12-01

    Age-associated insulin resistance (IR) and obesity-associated IR are two physiologically distinct forms of adult-onset diabetes. While macrophage-driven inflammation is a core driver of obesity-associated IR, the underlying mechanisms of the obesity-independent yet highly prevalent age-associated IR are largely unexplored. Here we show, using comparative adipo-immune profiling in mice, that fat-resident regulatory T cells, termed fTreg cells, accumulate in adipose tissue as a function of age, but not obesity. Supporting the existence of two distinct mechanisms underlying IR, mice deficient in fTreg cells are protected against age-associated IR, yet remain susceptible to obesity-associated IR and metabolic disease. By contrast, selective depletion of fTreg cells via anti-ST2 antibody treatment increases adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. These findings establish that distinct immune cell populations within adipose tissue underlie ageing- and obesity-associated IR, and implicate fTreg cells as adipo-immune drivers and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of age-associated IR. PMID:26580014

  4. CD4(+)CD25 (+)CD127 (low/-) T cells: a more specific Treg population in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ning; Li, Xiaomei; Song, Weiya; Li, Dongmei; Yu, Daliang; Zeng, Xiaofeng; Li, Mengtao; Leng, Xiaomei; Li, Xiangpei

    2012-12-01

    The quantitative identification and enrichment of viable regulatory T cells (Treg) requires reliable surface markers that are selectively expressed on Treg. Foxp3 is the accepted marker of nTreg, but it cannot be used to isolate cells for functional studies. In this study, we compared four staining profiles of Treg, including CD4(+)CD25(high) T cells, CD4(+)CD39(+) T cells, CD4(+)CD73(+) T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) T cells. We found that CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) T cells expressed the highest level of Foxp3 and had the strongest correlation with CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T cells, the accepted identifying characteristics for "real" nTreg cells. Moreover, functional data showed that CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) T cells could effectively suppress the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, suggesting that compared with the other three populations, CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) T cells best fit the definition of naturally occurring regulatory T cells in human peripheral blood. Finally, we showed that CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) can be used to quantitate Treg cells in individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus supporting the use of CD4(+)CD25(+)CD127(low/-) to identify human Treg cells. PMID:22752562

  5. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide is an intrinsic regulator of Treg abundance and protects against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yossan-Var; Abad, Catalina; Lopez, Robert; Dong, Hongmei; Liu, Shen; Lee, Alice; Gomariz, Rosa P; Leceta, Javier; Waschek, James A

    2009-02-10

    Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a widely expressed neuropeptide originally discovered in the hypothalamus. It closely resembles vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a neuropeptide well known to inhibit macrophage activity, promote Th2-type responses, and enhance regulatory T cell (Treg) production. Recent studies have shown that administration of PACAP, like VIP, can attenuate dramatically the clinical and pathological features of murine models of autoimmune diseases such as experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and collagen-induced arthritis. However, specific roles (if any) of endogenous VIP and PACAP in the protection against autoimmune diseases have not been explored. Here, we subjected PACAP-deficient mice to myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(35-55))-induced EAE. MOG immunization of PACAP-deficient mice triggered heightened clinical and pathological manifestations of EAE compared to wild-type mice. The increased sensitivity was accompanied by enhanced mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-6, IFN-gamma, IL-12p35, IL-23p19, and IL-17), chemokines (MCP-1/CCL2, MIP-1alpha/CCL3, and RANTES/CCL5), and chemotactic factor receptors (CCR1, CCR2, and CCR5), but downregulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4, IL-10, and TGF-beta) in the spinal cord. Moreover, the abundance of CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in lymph nodes and levels of FoxP3 mRNA in the spinal cord were also diminished. The reduction in Tregs was associated with increased proliferation and decreased TGF-beta secretion in lymph node cultures stimulated with MOG. These results demonstrate that endogenous PACAP provides protection in EAE and identify PACAP as an intrinsic regulator of Treg abundance after inflammation. PMID:19190179

  6. Tetrandrine ameliorates collagen-induced arthritis in mice by restoring the balance between Th17 and Treg cells via the aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xusheng; Tong, Bei; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Wei, Zhifeng; Dai, Yue

    2016-02-01

    Tetrandrine is an alkaloid constituent of the root of Stephania tetrandra S. Moore. The long-term clinical uses of tetrandrine for treatments of rheumatalgia and arthralgia as well as the inhibition of rat adjuvant-induced arthritis imply that tetrandrine may have therapeutic potential in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we explored its anti-RA mechanism in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in relation to the balance between T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells. DBA/1 mice were immunized with chicken type II collagen and were orally administered tetrandrine for 14 consecutive days. Then, the mice were sacrificed, their joints were removed for histological analysis, and spleens and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were removed to examine the Th17 and Treg cells. Tetrandrine markedly alleviated the severity of arthritis, reduced the serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and restored the Th17/Treg balance, as demonstrated by the serum levels of their related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-10) and the proportion of each cell type. Tetrandrine inhibited Th17 cell differentiation and induced Treg cell differentiation in vitro . Notably, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) was proven to play a crucial role in tetrandrine-mediated T cell differentiation. The correlation between AhR activation, regulation of Th17/Treg and amelioration of arthritis by tetrandrine was verified in the CIA mice. Moreover, tetrandrine might be a ligand of AhR because it facilitated the expression of the AhR target gene cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and the activation of its downstream signaling pathways. Taken together, tetrandrine exerts its anti-arthritis efficacy by restoring Th17/Treg balance via AhR. PMID:26640276

  7. In silico investigation into dendritic cell regulation of CD8Treg mediated killing of Th1 cells in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis has been used extensively as an animal model of T cell mediated autoimmunity. A down-regulatory pathway through which encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells are killed by CD8 regulatory T cells (Treg) has recently been proposed. With the CD8Treg cells being primed by dendritic cells, regulation of recovery may be occuring around these antigen presenting cells. CD4Treg cells provide critical help within this process, by licensing dendritic cells to prime CD8Treg cells, however the spatial and temporal aspects of this help in the CTL response is currently unclear. Results We have previously developed a simulator of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (ARTIMMUS). We use ARTIMMUS to perform novel in silico experimentation regarding the priming of CD8Treg cells by dendritic cells, and the resulting CD8Treg mediated killing of encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells. Simulations using dendritic cells that present antigenic peptides in a mutually exclusive manner (either MBP or TCR-derived, but not both) suggest that there is no significant reliance on dendritic cells that can prime both encephalitogenic CD4Th1 and Treg cells. Further, in silico experimentation suggests that dynamics of CD8Treg priming are significantly influenced through their spatial competition with CD4Treg cells and through the timing of Qa-1 expression by dendritic cells. Conclusion There is no requirement for the encephalitogenic CD4Th1 cells and cytotoxic CD8Treg cells to be primed by the same dendritic cells. We conjecture that no significant portion of CD4Th1 regulation by Qa-1 restricted CD8Treg cells occurs around individual dendritic cells, and as such, that CD8Treg mediated killing of CD4Th1 cells occurring around dendritic cells is not critical for recovery from the murine autoimmune disease. Furthermore, the timing of the CD4Treg licensing of dendritic cells and the spatial competition between CD4Treg and CD8Treg cells around the dendritic cell is

  8. Pathological conditions re-shape physiological Tregs into pathological Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, William Y.; Shao, Ying; Lopez-Pastrana, Jahaira; Mai, Jietang; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2015-01-01

    CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4 T cells that play an essential role in maintaining peripheral immune tolerance, controlling acute and chronic inflammation, allergy, autoimmune diseases, and anti-cancer immune responses. Over the past 20 years, significant progress has been made since Tregs were first characterized in 1995. Many concepts and principles regarding Tregs generation, phenotypic features, subsets (tTregs, pTregs, iTregs, and iTreg35), tissue specificity (central Tregs, effector Tregs, and tissue resident Tregs), homeostasis (highly dynamic and apoptotic), regulation of Tregs by receptors for PAMPs and DAMPs, Treg plasticity (re-differentiation to other CD4 T helper cell subsets, Th1, Th2, Tfh and Th17), and epigenetic regulation of Tregs phenotypes and functions have been innovated. In this concise review, we want to briefly analyze these eight new progresses in the study of Tregs. We have also proposed for the first time a novel concept that “physiological Tregs” have been re-shaped into “pathological Tregs” in various pathological environments. Continuing of the improvement in our understanding on this important cellular component about the immune tolerance and immune suppression, would lead to the future development of novel therapeutics approaches for acute and chronic inflammatory diseases, allergy, allogeneic transplantation-related immunity, sepsis, autoimmune diseases, and cancers. PMID:26623425

  9. Foxp3(+)-Treg cells enhanced by repeated low-dose gamma-irradiation attenuate ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Bum Soo; Hong, Gwan Ui; Ro, Jai Youl

    2013-05-01

    Gamma radiation is used for several therapeutic indications such as cancers and autoimmune diseases. Low-dose whole-body γ irradiation has been shown to activate immune responses in several ways, however, the effect and mechanism of irradiation on allergic asthma remains poorly understood. This study investigated whether or not irradiation exacerbates allergic asthma responses and its potential mechanism. C57BL/6 mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA) to induce asthma. The mice received whole-body irradiation once daily for 3 consecutive days with a dose of 0.667 Gy using (137)Cs γ rays 24 h before every OVA challenge. Repeated low-dose irradiation reduced OVA-specific IgE levels, the number of inflammatory cells including mast cells, goblet cell hyperplasia, collagen deposition, airway hyperresponsiveness, expression of inflammatory cytokines, CCL2/CCR2, as well as nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and activator protein-1 activities. All of these factors were increased in BAL cells and lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. Irradiation increased the number of Treg cells, expression of interleukin (IL)-10, IL-2 and IL-35 in BAL cells and lung tissue. Irradiation also increased Treg cell-expressed Foxp3 and IL-10 by NF-κB and RUNX1 in OVA-challenged mice. Furthermore, while Treg cell-expressing OX40 and IL-10 were enhanced in lung tissue or act-bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) with Treg cells, but BMMCs-expressing OX40L and TGF-β were decreased. The data suggest that irradiation enhances Foxp3(+)- and IL-10-producing Treg cells, which reduce OVA-induced allergic airway inflammation and tissue remodeling through the down-regulation of migration by the CCL2/CCR2 axis and activation of mast cells via OX40/OX40L in lung tissue of OVA-challenged mice. PMID:23560633

  10. Regulatory T cells vs Th17: differentiation of Th17 versus Treg, are the mutually exclusive?

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    Naive CD4+ cells differentiate into T helper (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells to execute their immunologic function. Whereas TGF-β suppresses Th1 and Th2 cell differentiation, this cytokine promotes Th9, Th17 and Foxp3+ regulatory T cells depending upon the presence of other cytokines. IL-6 promotes Th17, but suppresses regulatory T cell differentiation. Moreover, natural but not TGF-β-induced regulatory T cells convert into Th17 cells in the inflammatory milieu. Here an update of T cell differentiation and conversion, as well as underlying mechanisms are given. PMID:23885327

  11. Mast cells control insulitis and increase Treg cells to confer protection against STZ-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    PubMed

    Carlos, Daniela; Yaochite, Juliana N U; Rocha, Fernanda A; Toso, Vanina D; Malmegrim, Kelen C R; Ramos, Simone G; Jamur, Maria C; Oliver, Constance; Camara, Niels O; Andrade, Marcus V M; Cunha, Fernando Q; Silva, João S

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative alterations in mast cell numbers in pancreatic lymph nodes (PLNs) have been reported to be associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D) progression, but their potential role during T1D remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the role of mast cells in T1D induced by multiple low-dose streptozotocin (MLD-STZ) treatments, using two strains of mast cell-deficient mice (W/W(v) or Wsh/Wsh) and the adoptive transfer of mast cells. Mast cell deficient mice developed severe insulitis and accelerated hyperglycemia, with 100% of mice becoming diabetic compared to their littermates. In parallel, these diabetic mice had decreased numbers of T regulatory (Treg) cells in the PLNs. Additionally, mast cell deficiency caused a significant reduction in IL-10, TGF-β, and IL-6 expression in the pancreatic tissue. Interestingly, IL-6-deficient mice are more susceptible to T1D associated with reduced Treg-cell numbers in the PLNs, but mast cell transfer from wild-type mice induced protection to T1D in these mice. Finally, mast cell adoptive transfer prior to MLD-STZ administration conferred resistance to T1D, promoted increased Treg cells, and decreased IL-17-producing T cells in the PLNs. Taken together, our results indicate that mast cells are implicated in resistance to STZ-induced T1D via an immunological tolerance mechanism mediated by Treg cells. PMID:26234742

  12. LAP TGF-Beta Subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg Cells is Increased and Overexpresses LAP TGF-Beta in Lung Adenocarcinoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Islas-Vazquez, Lorenzo; Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Galicia-Velasco, Miriam; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Camacho-Mendoza, Catalina; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Adenocarcinoma, the most commonly diagnosed histologic type of lung cancer, is associated with smoking. Cigarette smoke promotes inflammation on the airways, which might be mediated by Th17 cells. This inflammatory environment may contribute to tumor development. In contrast, some reports indicate that tumors may induce immunosuppressive Treg cells to dampen immune reactivity, supporting tumor growth and progression. Thus, we aimed to analyze whether chronic inflammation or immunosuppression predominates at the systemic level in lung adenocarcinoma patients, and several cytokines and Th17 and Treg cells were studied. Higher proportions of IL-17-producing CD4+ T-cells were found in smoking control subjects and in lung adenocarcinoma patients compared to nonsmoking control subjects. In addition, lung adenocarcinoma patients increased both plasma concentrations of IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10, and proportions of Latency Associated Peptide (LAP) TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells, which overexpressed LAP TGF-β. This knowledge may lead to the development of immunotherapies that could inhibit the suppressor activity mediated by the LAP TGF-β subset of CD4+CD25+CD127− Treg cells to promote reactivity of immune cells against lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:26582240

  13. Th1-Like ICOS+ Foxp3+ Treg Cells Preferentially Express CXCR3 and Home to β-Islets during Pre-Diabetes in BDC2.5 NOD Mice.

    PubMed

    Kornete, Mara; Mason, Edward S; Girouard, Julien; Lafferty, Erin I; Qureshi, Salman; Piccirillo, Ciriaco A

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) occurs through a breakdown of self-tolerance resulting in the autoimmune destruction of the insulin producing β-islets of the pancreas. A numerical and functional waning of CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells, prompted by a pancreatic IL-2 deficiency, accompanies Th1 autoimmunity and T1D progression in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recently, we identified a dominant subset of intra-islet Treg cells that expresses the ICOS costimulatory receptor and promotes self-tolerance delaying the onset of T1D. ICOS co-stimulation potently enhances IL-2 induced survival and proliferation, and suppressive activity of Treg cells in situ. Here, we propose an ICOS-dependent mechanism of Treg cell homing to the β-islets during pre-diabetes in the NOD model via upregulation of the CXCR3 chemokine receptor. The islet-specific ICOS+ Treg cell subset preferentially expresses CXCR3 in the pancreatic lymph nodes (pLN) in response to Teff cell-mediated pancreatic inflammation, an expression correlating with the onset and magnitude of IFN-γ production by Teff cells in pancreatic sites. We also reveal that intra-pancreatic APC populations and insulin-producing β, but not α nor δ, islet cells secrete the CXCR3 chemokines, CXCL9, 10 and 11, and selectively promote ICOS+ CXCR3+ Treg cell chemotaxis in vitro. Strikingly, islet-derived Treg cells also produce these chemokines suggesting an auto-regulation of homing by this subset. Unlike ICOS- cells, ICOS+ Treg cells adopt a Th1-like Treg phenotype while maintaining their suppressive capacity, characterized by expression of T-bet and CXCR3 and production of IFN-γ in the draining pLNs. Finally, in vivo neutralization of IFN-γ blocked Treg cell CXCR3 upregulation evincing its role in regulating expression of this chemokine receptor by Treg cells. Thus, CXCR3-mediated trafficking of Treg cells could represent a mechanism of homeostatic immunoregulation during diabetogeneesis. PMID:25946021

  14. Kaempferol enhances the suppressive function of Treg cells by inhibiting FOXP3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fang; Luo, Xuerui; Tsun, Andy; Li, Zhiyuan; Li, Dan; Li, Bin

    2015-10-01

    Kaempferol is a natural flavonoid found in many vegetables and fruits. Epidemiologic studies have described that Kaempferol intake could reduce risk of cancer, especially lung, gastric, pancreatic and ovarian cancers. Recent studies have shown that Kaempferol could also be beneficial to the body to defend against inflammation, and infection by bacteria and viruses; however, the molecular mechanism of its immunoregulatory function remains largely unknown. Through screening a small molecule library of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), we identified that Kaempferol could enhance the suppressive function of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Kaempferol was found to increase FOXP3 expression level in Treg cells and prevent pathological symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis in a rat animal model. Kaempferol could also reduce PIM1-mediated FOXP3 phosphorylation at S422. Our study reveals a molecular mechanism that underlies the anti-inflammatory action of Kaempferol for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25870037

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4(+) T-cell response is increased, and Treg cells decreased, in anthelmintic-treated patients with latent TB.

    PubMed

    Toulza, Frederic; Tsang, Lillian; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; Brown, Michael; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2016-03-01

    In many settings, adults with active or latent tuberculosis will also be coinfected with helminths. Our study aimed to investigate how anthelmintic treatment modulates antimycobacterial immunity, in a setting where helminth reinfection should not occur. We investigated the potential impact of helminth infection on immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in patients with latent Mtb infection with or without helminth infection (Strongyloides or Schistosoma), and tested T-cell responses before and after anthelmintic treatment. The study was performed in migrants resident in the United Kingdom, where reexposure and reinfection following anthelmintic treatment would not occur. The frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells was measured following stimulation with Mtb Purified Protein Derivative or ESAT-6/CFP-10 antigen, and concentrations of IFN-γ in culture supernatants measured by ELISA and multiplex bead array. Helminth infection was associated with a lower frequency of CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, which increased following treatment. Patients with helminth infection showed a significant increase in CD4(+) FoxP3(+) T cells (Treg) compared to those without helminth infection. There was a decrease in the frequency of Treg cells, and an associated increase in CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells after the anthelmintic treatment. Here, we show a potential role of Treg cells in reducing the frequency and function of antimycobacterial CD4(+) IFN-γ(+) T cells, and that these effects are reversed after anthelmintic treatment. PMID:26638865

  16. Dynamic Changes of Treg and Th17 Cells and Related Cytokines Closely Correlate With the Virological and Biochemical Response in Chronic Hepatitis B Patients Undergoing Nucleos(t)ide Analogues Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xue-Ping; Guo, Ru-Yi; Su, Mi-Long; Ming, De-Song; Lin, Cheng-Zu; Deng, Yong; Lin, Zhen-Zhong; Su, Zhi-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background: The restoration of HBV-specific T-cell response during antiviral therapy is associated with CD4+T-cell activity. Treg cells and Th17 cells are subtypes of CD4+T cell. However, it has remained unknown how the Treg and Th17 cells and their associated cytokines affect nucleos(t)ide analogues (NA) antiviral efficacy. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to provide a new insight to evaluate the NA antiviral therapy for patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Patients and Methods: Forty-four CHB patients hospitalized between July 2010 and August 2011 were enrolled in this study. They were received NA (entecavir, lamivudine and adefovir) treatment for 14.42 ± 13.08 weeks, and the peripheral blood was collected. The frequencies of Treg and Th17 cells were detected by flow cytometric analysis, and the levels of IL-10, TGF-β1, IL-17 and IL-23 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: In complete and partial-responders, Treg cells frequencies and IL-10, TGF-β1, IL-23 levels were all decreased significantly after NA therapy, while Th17 cells and the IL-17 levels were increased slightly. Treg/Th17 ratio was only dramatically declined in complete-responders. But there was no significant difference in non-responders. Either HBV DNA decreased by at least 2 log copies /mL or ALT turned to normal level, Treg cells frequencies and IL-10, TGF-β1, IL-23 levels were significantly reduced. Meanwhile, Treg cells were positively correlated with HBV DNA and ALT. Conclusions: The changes of Treg and Th17 cells and their associated cytokines were related to virological and biochemical responses. PMID:24403916

  17. IL-2 therapy promotes suppressive ICOS+ Treg expansion in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Geok Choo; Martin-Orozco, Natalia; Jin, Lei; Yang, Yan; Wu, Sheng; Washington, Edwina; Sanders, Deborah; Lacey, Carol; Wang, Yijun; Vence, Luis; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2013-01-01

    High-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy in patients with cancer increases the general population of Tregs, which are positive for CD4, CD25, and the Treg-specific marker Foxp3. It is unknown whether specific subsets of Tregs are activated and expanded during HD IL-2 therapy or whether activation of any particular Treg subset correlates with clinical outcome. Here, we evaluated Treg population subsets that were induced in patients with melanoma following HD IL-2 therapy. We identified a Treg population that was positive for CD4, CD25, Foxp3, and the inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS). This Treg population increased more than any other lymphocyte subset during HD IL-2 therapy and had an activated Treg phenotype, as indicated by high levels of CD39, CD73, and TGF-β. ICOS+ Tregs were the most proliferative lymphocyte population in the blood after IL-2 therapy. Patients with melanoma with enhanced expansion of ICOS+ Tregs in blood following the first cycle of HD IL-2 therapy had worse clinical outcomes than patients with fewer ICOS+ Tregs. However, there was no difference in total Treg expansion between HD IL-2 responders and nonresponders. These data suggest that increased expansion of the ICOS+ Treg population following the first cycle of HD IL-2 therapy may be predictive of clinical outcome. PMID:24292706

  18. The Circulating Treg/Th17 Cell Ratio Is Correlated with Relapse and Treatment Response in Pulmonary Sarcoidosis Patients after Corticosteroid Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongzhe; Qiu, Lan; Wang, Yanxun; Aimurola, Halimulati; Zhao, Yuyue; Li, Shan; Xu, Zuojun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary sarcoidosis is an immune-mediated disease, and some patients can be effectively treated with corticosteroids. However, nearly half of all sarcoidosis patients relapse after corticosteroid withdrawal. Different subsets of CD4+ helper T cells participate in the immunopathogenesis of sarcoidosis. Thus, the aims of our study were to investigate whether the circulating subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were associated with sarcoidosis relapse and with its remission after retreatment. Additionally, we identified a useful biomarker for predicting the relapse and remission of sarcoidosis patients. Methods Forty-two patients were enrolled in the present study who had previously been diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis and treated with corticosteroids. The patients were allocated into either a stable group if they exhibited sustained remission (n = 22) or a relapse group if they experienced clinical or radiological recurrence after treatment withdrawal (n = 20). Peripheral blood cells were collected from these patients and analyzed to determine the frequencies of subsets of circulating CD4+ helper T cells by flow cytometry. The patients in the relapse group were retreated with corticosteroids and immunosuppressive agents and were then reevaluated to determine the frequencies of dynamic subsets of circulating CD4+ helper T cells after remission. Results The frequencies of circulating Tregs were significantly increased concomitant with a decrease in the circulating Th17 cell frequency in the relapsed patients compared with the stable patients. The Treg/Th17 ratio was negatively correlated with sarcoidosis activity and was sensitive to retreatment. In addition, the percentage of isolated CD45RO+Ki67+ Tregs was higher in the patients who were stable and in those who recovered after retreatment than in those who relapsed. Conclusions An imbalance between Tregs and Th17 cells is associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis relapse after corticosteroid withdrawal. The

  19. Anti-CD25 Treatment Depletes Treg Cells and Decreases Disease Severity in Susceptible and Resistant Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Felonato, Maíra; Pina, Adriana; de Araujo, Eliseu Frank; Loures, Flávio V.; Bazan, Silvia B.; Feriotti, Cláudia; Calich, Vera L. G.

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are fundamental in the control of immunity and excessive tissue pathology. In paracoccidioidomycosis, an endemic mycosis of Latin America, the immunoregulatory mechanisms that control the progressive and regressive forms of this infection are poorly known. Due to its modulatory activity on Treg cells, we investigated the effects of anti-CD25 treatment over the course of pulmonary infection in resistant (A/J) and susceptible (B10.A) mice infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. We verified that the resistant A/J mice developed higher numbers and more potent Treg cells than susceptible B10.A mice. Compared to B10.A cells, the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells of A/J mice expressed higher levels of CD25, CTLA4, GITR, Foxp3, LAP and intracellular IL-10 and TGF-β. In both resistant and susceptible mice, anti-CD25 treatment decreased the CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cell number, impaired indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression and resulted in decreased fungal loads in the lungs, liver and spleen. In A/J mice, anti-CD25 treatment led to an early increase in T cell immunity, demonstrated by the augmented influx of activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells to the lungs. At a later phase, the mild infection was associated with decreased inflammatory reactions and increased Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokine production. In B10.A mice, anti-CD25 treatment did not alter the inflammatory reactions but increased the fungicidal mechanisms and late secretion of Th1/Th2/Th17 cytokines. Importantly, in both mouse strains, the early depletion of CD25+ cells resulted in less severe tissue pathology and abolished the enhanced mortality observed in susceptible mice. In conclusion, this study is the first to demonstrate that anti-CD25 treatment is beneficial to the progressive and regressive forms of paracoccidioidomycosis, potentially due to the anti-CD25-mediated reduction of Treg cells, as these cells have suppressive effects on the early T cell response in

  20. Treg functional stability and its responsiveness to the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent autoimmunity and tissue damage resulting from excessive or unnecessary immune activation through their suppressive function. While their importance for proper immune control is undeniable, the stability of the Treg lineage has recently become a controversial topic. Many reports have shown dramatic loss of the signature Treg transcription factor Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) and Treg function under various inflammatory conditions. Other recent studies demonstrate that most Tregs are extremely resilient in their expression of Foxp3 and the retention of suppressive function. While this debate is unlikely to be settled in the immediate future, improved understanding of the considerable heterogeneity within the Foxp3+ Treg population and how Treg subsets respond to ranging environmental cues may be keys to reconciliation. In this review, we discuss the diverse mechanisms responsible for the observed stability or instability of Foxp3+ Treg identity and function. These include transcriptional and epigenetic programs, transcript targeting and posttranslational modifications that appear responsive to numerous elements of the microenvironment. These mechanisms for Treg functional modulation add to the discussion of Treg stability. PMID:24712463

  1. Treg functional stability and its responsiveness to the microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew; Pan, Fan

    2014-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent autoimmunity and tissue damage resulting from excessive or unnecessary immune activation through their suppressive function. While their importance for proper immune control is undeniable, the stability of the Treg lineage has recently become a controversial topic. Many reports have shown dramatic loss of the signature Treg transcription factor Forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) and Treg function under various inflammatory conditions. Other recent studies demonstrate that most Tregs are extremely resilient in their expression of Foxp3 and the retention of suppressive function. While this debate is unlikely to be settled in the immediate future, improved understanding of the considerable heterogeneity within the Foxp3(+) Treg population and how Treg subsets respond to ranging environmental cues may be keys to reconciliation. In this review, we discuss the diverse mechanisms responsible for the observed stability or instability of Foxp3(+) Treg identity and function. These include transcriptional and epigenetic programs, transcript targeting, and posttranslational modifications that appear responsive to numerous elements of the microenvironment. These mechanisms for Treg functional modulation add to the discussion of Treg stability. PMID:24712463

  2. Phenotypic and Functional Analysis of Activated Regulatory T Cells Isolated from Chronic Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus-infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo Jin; Oh, Ji Hoon; Ha, Sang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which express Foxp3 as a transcription factor, are subsets of CD4(+) T cells. Treg cells play crucial roles in immune tolerance and homeostasis maintenance by regulating the immune response. The primary role of Treg cells is to suppress the proliferation of effector T (Teff) cells and the production of cytokines such as IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2. It has been demonstrated that Treg cells' ability to inhibit the function of Teff cells is enhanced during persistent pathogen infection and cancer development. To clarify the function of Treg cells under resting or inflamed conditions, a variety of in vitro suppression assays using mouse or human Treg cells have been devised. The main aim of this study is to develop a method to compare the differences in phenotype and suppressive function between resting and activated Treg cells. To isolate activated Treg cells, mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) clone 13 (CL13), a chronic strain of LCMV. Treg cells isolated from the spleen of LCMV CL13-infected mice exhibited both the activated phenotype and enhanced suppressive activity compared with resting Treg cells isolated from naïve mice. Here, we describe the basic protocol for ex vivo phenotype analysis to distinguish activated Treg cells from resting Treg cells. Furthermore, we describe a protocol for the measurement of the suppressive activity of fully activated Treg cells. PMID:27404802

  3. Cyclosporine restores hematopoietic function by compensating for decreased Tregs in patients with pure red cell aplasia and acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Dao, An T T; Yamazaki, Hirohito; Takamatsu, Hiroyuki; Sugimori, Chiharu; Katagiri, Takamasa; Maruyama, Hiroyuki; Zaimoku, Yoshitaka; Maruyama, Kana; Ly, Trung Q; Espinoza, Luis; Nakao, Shinji

    2016-04-01

    Most patients with acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and some with acquired aplastic anemia (AA) respond well to cyclosporine (CsA), but thereafter often show CsA dependency. The mechanism underlying this dependency remains unknown. We established a reliable method for measuring the regulatory T cell (Treg) count using FoxP3 and Helios expression as markers and determined the balance between Tregs and other helper T cell subsets in 16 PRCA and 29 AA patients. The ratios of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) (Th1) T cells to Tregs in untreated patients and CsA-dependent patients were significantly higher (PRCA 5.77 ± 1.47 and 7.38 ± 2.58; AA 6.18 ± 2.35 and 8.94 ± 4.06) than in healthy volunteers (HVs; 3.33 ± 0.90) due to the profound decrease in the percentage of Tregs. In contrast, the ratios were comparable to HVs in convalescent CsA-treated AA patients (4.74 ± 2.10) and AA patients in remission after the cessation of CsA treatment (4.24 ± 1.67). Low-dose CsA (100 ng/ml) inhibited the proliferation of conventional T cells (Tconv) to a similar degree to the inhibition by Tregs in a co-culture with a 1:1 Treg/Tconv ratio. The data suggest that CsA may reverse the hematopoietic suppression in PRCA and AA patients by compensating for the inadequate immune regulatory function that occurs due to a profound decrease in the Treg count. PMID:26968551

  4. Strength of TCR signal from self-peptide modulates autoreactive thymocyte deletion and Foxp3(+) Treg-cell formation.

    PubMed

    Caton, Andrew J; Kropf, Elizabeth; Simons, Donald M; Aitken, Malinda; Weissler, Katherine A; Jordan, Martha S

    2014-03-01

    Autoreactive CD4(+) CD8(-) (CD4SP) thymocytes can be subjected to deletion when they encounter self-peptide during their development, but they can also undergo selection to become CD4SPFoxp3(+) Treg cells. We have analyzed the relationship between these distinct developmental fates using mice in which signals transmitted by the TCR have been attenuated by mutation of a critical tyrosine residue of the adapter protein SLP-76. In mice containing polyclonal TCR repertoires, the mutation caused increased frequencies of CD4SPFoxp3(+) thymocytes. CD4SP thymocytes expressing TCR Vβ-chains that are subjected to deletion by endogenous retroviral superantigens were also present at increased frequencies, particularly among Foxp3(+) thymocytes. In transgenic mice in which CD4SP thymocytes expressing an autoreactive TCR undergo both deletion and Treg-cell formation in response to a defined self-peptide, SLP-76 mutation abrogated deletion of autoreactive CD4SP thymocytes. Notably, Foxp3(+) Treg-cell formation still occurred, albeit with a reduced efficiency, and the mutation was also associated with decreased Nur77 expression by the autoreactive CD4SP thymocytes. These studies provide evidence that the strength of the TCR signal can play a direct role in directing the extent of both thymocyte deletion and Treg-cell differentiation, and suggest that distinct TCR signaling thresholds and/or pathways can promote CD4SP thymocyte deletion versus Treg-cell formation. PMID:24307208

  5. Citrate Attenuates Adenine-Induced Chronic Renal Failure in Rats by Modulating the Th17/Treg Cell Balance.

    PubMed

    Ou, Yan; Li, Shuiqin; Zhu, Xiaojing; Gui, Baosong; Yao, Ganglian; Ma, Liqun; Zhu, Dan; Fu, Rongguo; Ge, Heng; Wang, Li; Jia, Lining; Tian, Lifang; Duan, Zhaoyang

    2016-02-01

    Citrate is commonly used as an anticoagulant in hemodialysis for chronic renal failure (CRF) and for the regulation of the immune dysfunction in CRF patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of citrate on the balance of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells in CRF. The levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (Scr) were significantly increased in the CRF model group compared to the control group, and were decreased in the citrate-treated groups. Citrate treatment inhibited the viability of Th17 cells while elevating the viability of Treg cells in CRF rats. Moreover, Th17-related cytokines significantly decreased while the Treg-related cytokines significantly increased with citrate treatment. Moreover, citrate had a negative influence on the deviation of Th17/Treg cells in CRF rats. Therefore, our study suggests that citrate had an anti-inflammatory effect on CRF through the modulation of the Th17/Treg balance. PMID:26253296

  6. NAD+ regulates Treg cell fate and promotes allograft survival via a systemic IL-10 production that is CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ T cells independent

    PubMed Central

    Elkhal, Abdallah; Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Hector; Heinbokel, Timm; Uehara, Hirofumi; Quante, Markus; Seyda, Midas; Schuitenmaker, Jeroen M.; Krenzien, Felix; Camacho, Virginia; de la Fuente, Miguel A.; Ghiran, Ionita; Tullius, Stefan G.

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs have been shown to play a central role in immune homeostasis while preventing from fatal inflammatory responses, while Th17 cells have traditionally been recognized as pro-inflammatory mediators implicated in a myriad of diseases. Studies have shown the potential of Tregs to convert into Th17 cells, and Th17 cells into Tregs. Increasing evidence have pointed out CD25 as a key molecule during this transdifferentiation process, however molecules that allow such development remain unknown. Here, we investigated the impact of NAD+ on the fate of CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ Tregs in-depth, dissected their transcriptional signature profile and explored mechanisms underlying their conversion into IL-17A producing cells. Our results demonstrate that NAD+ promotes Treg conversion into Th17 cells in vitro and in vivo via CD25 cell surface marker. Despite the reduced number of Tregs, known to promote homeostasis, and an increased number of pro-inflammatory Th17 cells, NAD+ was able to promote an impressive allograft survival through a robust systemic IL-10 production that was CD4+ CD25+ Foxp3+ independent. Collectively, our study unravels a novel immunoregulatory mechanism of NAD+ that regulates Tregs fate while promoting allograft survival that may have clinical applications in alloimmunity and in a wide spectrum of inflammatory conditions. PMID:26928119

  7. Oncoprotein mdig contributes to silica-induced pulmonary fibrosis by altering balance between Th17 and Treg T cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiaying; Zhang, Yadong; Lu, Yongju; Battelli, Lori; Porter, Dale W.; Chen, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Mineral dust-induced gene (mdig, also named Mina53) was first identified from alveolar macrophages of the coal miners with chronic lung inflammation or fibrosis, but how this gene is involved in lung diseases is poorly understood. Here we show that heterozygotic knockout of mdig (mdig+/−) ameliorates silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 cells and Treg cells. Relative to the wild type (WT) mice, infiltration of the macrophages and Th17 cells was reduced in lungs from silica-exposed mdig+/− mice. In contrast, an increased infiltration of the T regulatory (Treg) cells to the lung intestitium was observed in the mdig+/− mice treated with silica. Both the number of Th17 cells in the lung lymph nodes and the level of IL-17 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluids were decreased in the mdig+/− mice in response to silica. Thus, these results suggest that mdig may contribute to silica-induced lung fibrosis by altering the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. Genetic deficiency of mdig impairs Th17 cell infiltration and function, but favors infiltration of the Treg cells, the immune suppressive T cells that are able to limit the inflammatory responses by repressing the Th17 cells and macrophages. PMID:25669985

  8. Decreased expression of microRNA-21 correlates with the imbalance of Th17 and Treg cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Liyang; Wang, Xuefeng; Tan, Jun; Li, Hao; Qian, Wei; Chen, Jianguo; Chen, Qiaoyun; Wang, Jun; Xu, Wenlin; Tao, Caihua; Wang, Shengjun

    2014-01-01

    The imbalance of Th17/Treg cell populations has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis; however, the mechanism behind this phenomenon remains unclear. Recent studies have shown how microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of immune responses and are involved in the development of a variety of inflammatory diseases, including RA. In this study, we demonstrated that the frequencies of CD3+CD4+IL-17+Th17 cells were significantly higher, and CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells significantly lower in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from RA patients. Detection of cytokines from RA patients revealed an elevated panel of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including IL-17, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-22, which carry the inflammatory signature of RA and are crucial in the differentiation and maintenance of pathogenic Th17 cells and dysfunction of Treg cells. However, the level of miR-21 was significantly lower in RA patients, accompanied by the increase in STAT3 expression and activation, and decrease in STAT5/pSTAT5 protein and Foxp3 mRNA levels. Furthermore, lipopolysaccharide stimulation up-regulated miR-21 expression from healthy controls, but down-regulated miR-21 expression from RA patients. Therefore, we speculate that miR-21 may be part of a negative feedback loop in the normal setting. However, miR-21 levels decrease significantly in RA patients, suggesting that this feedback loop is dysregulated and may contribute to the imbalance of Th17 and Treg cells. MiR-21 may thus serve as a novel regulator in T-cell differentiation and homoeostasis, and provides a new therapeutic target for the treatment of RA. PMID:25164131

  9. Rejection of metastatic 4T1 breast cancer by attenuation of Treg cells in combination with immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Huang, Tian-Gui; Meseck, Marcia; Mandeli, John; Fallon, John; Woo, Savio L C

    2007-12-01

    4T1 breast carcinoma is a highly malignant and poorly immunogenic murine tumor model that resembles advanced breast cancer in humans, and is refractory to most immune stimulation-based treatments. We hypothesize that the ineffectiveness of immune stimulatory treatment is mediated by the suppressive effects of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells, which can be attenuated by engaging the glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family-related protein with its natural ligand (GITRL); further, combination treatment with existing immune stimulation regimens will augment anti-tumor immunity and eradicate metastatic 4T1 tumors in mice.A soluble homodimeric form of mouse GITRL (mIg-mGITRLs) was molecularly constructed and used to treat orthotopic 4T1 tumors established in immune-competent, syngeneic Balb/c mice. When applied in combination with adenovirus-mediated intratumoral murine granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-12 (IL-12) gene delivery plus systemic 4-1BB activation, mIg-mGITRLs attenuated the immune-suppressive function of splenic Treg cells, which led to elevated interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) production, tumor-specific cytolytic T-cell activities, tumor rejection and long-term survival in 65% of the animals without apparent toxicities. The results demonstrate that addition of mIg-mGITRLs to an immune-stimulatory treatment regimen significantly improved long-term survival without apparent toxicity, and could potentially be clinically translated into an effective and safe treatment modality for metastatic breast cancer in patients. PMID:17968355

  10. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3(+) CD4(+) Treg cells that inhibit CD8(+) T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination.

    PubMed

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3(+) CD25(+) CD4(+) Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced K(b)/A12-21-monospecific CD8(+) T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical K(b)/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3(+) CD25(+) Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1(-/-) hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76-90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8(+) T cells in this diabetes model. PMID:27406624

  11. Exploring the induction of preproinsulin-specific Foxp3+ CD4+ Treg cells that inhibit CD8+ T cell-mediated autoimmune diabetes by DNA vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Stifter, Katja; Schuster, Cornelia; Schlosser, Michael; Boehm, Bernhard Otto; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2016-01-01

    DNA vaccination is a promising strategy to induce effector T cells but also regulatory Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ Treg cells and inhibit autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Little is known about the antigen requirements that facilitate priming of Treg cells but not autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells. We have shown that the injection of preproinsulin (ppins)-expressing pCI/ppins vector into PD-1- or PD-L1-deficient mice induced Kb/A12-21-monospecific CD8+ T cells and autoimmune diabetes. A pCI/ppinsΔA12-21 vector (lacking the critical Kb/A12-21 epitope) did not induce autoimmune diabetes but elicited a systemic Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell immunity that suppressed diabetes induction by a subsequent injection of the diabetogenic pCI/ppins. TGF-β expression was significantly enhanced in the Foxp3+ CD25+ Treg cell population of vaccinated/ppins-primed mice. Ablation of Treg cells in vaccinated/ppins-primed mice by anti-CD25 antibody treatment abolished the protective effect of the vaccine and enabled diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. Adoptive transfer of Treg cells from vaccinated/ppins-primed mice into PD-L1−/− hosts efficiently suppressed diabetes induction by pCI/ppins. We narrowed down the Treg-stimulating domain to a 15-residue ppins76–90 peptide. Vaccine-induced Treg cells thus play a crucial role in the control of de novo primed autoreactive effector CD8+ T cells in this diabetes model. PMID:27406624

  12. Phenotypic, Functional, and Gene Expression Profiling of Peripheral CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg Cells in Patients With Chronic Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Gina J.; Fleskens, Veerle; Frederiksen, Klaus S.; Rajasekhar, Megha; Menon, Bina; Gerwien, Jens G.; Evans, Hayley G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflicting evidence exists regarding the suppressive capacity of Treg cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to determine whether Treg cells are intrinsically defective in RA. Methods Using a range of assays on PB samples from patients with chronic RA and healthy controls, CD3+CD4+CD25+CD127low Treg cells from the CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ T cell compartments were analyzed for phenotype, cytokine expression (ex vivo and after in vitro stimulation), suppression of Teff cell proliferation and cytokine production, suppression of monocyte‐derived cytokine/chemokine production, and gene expression profiles. Results No differences between RA patients and healthy controls were observed with regard to the frequency of Treg cells, ex vivo phenotype (CD4, CD25, CD127, CD39, or CD161), or proinflammatory cytokine profile (interleukin‐17 [IL‐17], interferon‐γ [IFNγ], or tumor necrosis factor [TNF]). FoxP3 expression was slightly increased in Treg cells from RA patients. The ability of Treg cells to suppress the proliferation of T cells or the production of cytokines (IFNγ or TNF) upon coculture with autologous CD45RO+ Teff cells and monocytes was not significantly different between RA patients and healthy controls. In PB samples from some RA patients, CD45RO+ Treg cells showed an impaired ability to suppress the production of certain cytokines/chemokines (IL‐1β, IL‐1 receptor antagonist, IL‐7, CCL3, or CCL4) by autologous lipopolysaccharide‐activated monocytes. However, this was not observed in all patients, and other cytokines/chemokines (TNF, IL‐6, IL‐8, IL‐12, IL‐15, or CCL5) were generally suppressed. Finally, gene expression profiling of CD45RA+ or CD45RO+ Treg cells from the PB revealed no statistically significant differences between RA patients and healthy controls. Conclusion Our findings indicate that there is no global defect in either CD45RO+ or CD45RA+ Treg cells in

  13. Immunotherapy with methyl gallate, an inhibitor of Treg cell migration, enhances the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunseong; Lee, Gihyun; Sohn, Sung-Hwa; Lee, Chanju; Kwak, Jung Won

    2016-01-01

    Foxp3+ CD25+CD4+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are crucial for the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and are abundant in tumors. Most of these cells are chemo-attracted to tumor tissues and suppress anti-tumor responses inside the tumor. Currently, several cancer immunotherapies targeting Treg cells are being clinically tested. Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs widely used for cancer treatment. While cisplatin is a powerful drug for the treatment of multiple cancers, there are obstacles that limit its use, such as renal dysfunction and the development of cisplatin-resistant cancer cells after its use. To minimize these barriers, combinatorial therapies of cisplatin with other drugs have been developed and have proven to be more effective to treat cancer. In the present study, we evaluated the eff ect of the combination therapy using methyl gallate with cisplatin in EL4 murine lymphoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. The combinatorial therapy of methyl gallate and cisplatin showed stronger anti-cancer eff ects than methyl gallate or cisplatin as single treatments. In Treg cell-depleted mice, however, the eff ect of methyl gallate vanished. It was found that methyl gallate treatment inhibited Treg cell migration into the tumor regardless of cisplatin treatment. Additionally, in both the normal and cisplatin-treated tumor-bearing mice, there was no renal toxicity attributed to methyl gallate treatment. These findings suggest that methyl gallate treatment could be useful as an adjuvant method accompanied with cisplatin therapy. PMID:27162480

  14. Translating Treg Therapy in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Susanne A.; Bellinghausen, Iris; Trinschek, Bettina; Becker, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) control immune cell function as well as non-immunological processes. Their far-reaching regulatory activities suggest their functional manipulation as a means to sustainably and causally intervene with the course of diseases. Preclinical tools and strategies are however needed to further test and develop interventional strategies outside the human body. “Humanized” mouse models consisting of mice engrafted with human immune cells and tissues provide new tools to analyze human Treg ontogeny, immunobiology, and therapy. Here, we summarize the current state of humanized mouse models as a means to study human Treg function at the molecular level and to design strategies to harness these cells for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26697017

  15. Moxibustion and Acupuncture Ameliorate Crohn's Disease by Regulating the Balance between Th17 and Treg Cells in the Intestinal Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Bao, Chunhui; Li, Jing; Zhu, Yifang; Wang, Siyao; Yang, Ling; Shi, Yin; Liu, Huirong; Dou, Chuanzi; Ding, Guanghong; Wang, Xiaomei; Wu, Huangan

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that acupuncture is beneficial to patients with Crohn's disease (CD), but the mechanism underlying its therapeutic effects remains unclear. To identify the mechanism by which acupuncture treats CD, the balance between Th17 and Treg cells was assessed in CD patients. In this study, Ninety-two CD patients were randomly and equally assigned to a treatment group that were treated with herb-partitioned moxibustion and acupuncture or a control group with wheat bran-partitioned moxibustion and superficial acupuncture. The effect of these treatments on Th17 and Treg cells and their related molecular markers in the intestinal mucosa were detected before (week 0) and after (week 12) treatment. The results suggested that the ratio of Th17 and Treg cells was significantly decreased after treatment and that the levels of IL-17 and RORγt in the intestinal mucosa were obviously reduced, while the expression of FOXP3 was increased after treatment in both groups. In the treatment group, the expression of these molecules was more markedly regulated than the control group. In conclusion, moxibustion and acupuncture have been shown to regulate the ratio of Th17 and Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of CD patients and restore the balance between these immune cell subsets. PMID:26347488

  16. High avidity autoreactive CD4+ T cells induce host CTL, overcome Tregs and mediate tumor destruction

    PubMed Central

    Brandmaier, Andrew G.; Leitner, Wolfgang W.; Ha, Sung P.; Sidney, John; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Touloukian, Christopher E.

    2009-01-01

    Despite progress made over the past 25 years, existing immunotherapies have limited clinical effectiveness in patients with cancer. Immune tolerance consistently blunts the generated immune response, and the largely solitary focus on CD8+ T cell immunity has proven ineffective in the absence of CD4+ T cell help. To address these twin-tier deficiencies, we developed a translational model of melanoma immunotherapy focused on the exploitation of high avidity CD4+ T cells that become generated in germline antigen deficient mice. We had previously identified a TRP-1 specific HLA-DRB1*0401-restricted epitope. Using this epitope in conjunction with a newly described TRP-1 germline-knockout, we demonstrate that endogenous TRP-1 expression alters the functionality of the auto-reactive T cell repertoire. More importantly, we show, by using MHC-mismatched combinations, that CD4+ T cells derived from the self-antigen deficient host indirectly triggers the eradication of established B16 lung metastases. We demonstrate that the treatment effect is mediated entirely by endogenous CD8+ T cells and is not affected by the depletion of host Tregs. These findings suggest that high avidity CD4+ T cells can overcome endogenous conditions and mediate their anti-tumor effects exclusively through the elicitation of CD8+ T cell immunity. PMID:19561540

  17. Ubiquitin-dependent regulation of Foxp3 and Treg function

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells are crucial enforcers of immune homeostasis. Their characteristic suppressive function largely arises from an equally unique pattern of gene expression. A complex network of factors and processes contribute to this ‘signature’ Treg gene expression landscape. Many of these alter the level and activity of the Treg-defining transcription factor Foxp3. Since stable expression of Foxp3 is important for the ability of Treg cells to successfully prevent excessive or inappropriate immune activation, uncovering the mechanisms regulating Foxp3 level is required for the understanding and therapeutic exploitation of Tregs. While transcriptional regulation of the Foxp3 gene has been studied in depth, additional regulatory layers exist controlling the expression and activity of this key transcription factor. These include less-defined mechanisms active at the posttranslational level. These pathways are just beginning to be elucidated. Here we summarize emerging evidence for distinct, posttranslationally active, ubiquitin-dependent pathways capable of controlling the activation and expression of Foxp3 and the function of Tregs. These pathways offer untapped opportunities for therapeutic fine-tuning of Tregs and their all-important restraint of the immune system. PMID:26085205

  18. Ubiquitin-dependent regulation of Foxp3 and Treg function.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew M; Pan, Fan

    2015-07-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are crucial enforcers of immune homeostasis. Their characteristic suppressive function largely arises from an equally unique pattern of gene expression. A complex network of factors and processes contribute to this 'signature' Treg gene expression landscape. Many of these alter the level and activity of the Treg-defining transcription factor Foxp3. As stable expression of Foxp3 is important for the ability of Treg cells to successfully prevent excessive or inappropriate immune activation, uncovering the mechanisms regulating Foxp3 level is required for the understanding and therapeutic exploitation of Tregs. While transcriptional regulation of the Foxp3 gene has been studied in depth, additional regulatory layers exist controlling the expression and activity of this key transcription factor. These include less-defined mechanisms active at the post-translational level. These pathways are just beginning to be elucidated. Here, we summarize emerging evidence for distinct, post-translationally active, ubiquitin-dependent pathways capable of controlling the activation and expression of Foxp3 and the function of Tregs. These pathways offer untapped opportunities for therapeutic fine-tuning of Tregs and their all-important restraint of the immune system. PMID:26085205

  19. The autophagy gene Atg16l1 differentially regulates Treg and TH2 cells to control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Harrison, Oliver J; Riffelmacher, Thomas; Moghaddam, Amin E; Pearson, Claire F; Laing, Adam; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Forman, Simon P; Grencis, Richard K; Sattentau, Quentin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphism in the autophagy gene Atg16l1 is associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it remains unclear how autophagy contributes to intestinal immune homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy is essential for maintenance of balanced CD4(+) T cell responses in the intestine. Selective deletion of Atg16l1 in T cells in mice resulted in spontaneous intestinal inflammation that was characterized by aberrant type 2 responses to dietary and microbiota antigens, and by a loss of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. Specific ablation of Atg16l1 in Foxp3(+) Treg cells in mice demonstrated that autophagy directly promotes their survival and metabolic adaptation in the intestine. Moreover, we also identify an unexpected role for autophagy in directly limiting mucosal TH2 cell expansion. These findings provide new insights into the reciprocal control of distinct intestinal TH cell responses by autophagy, with important implications for understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:26910010

  20. Mast cells mobilize myeloid-derived suppressor cells and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment via IL-17 pathway in murine hepatocarcinoma model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhuoshun; Zhang, Biao; Li, Dapeng; Lv, Meng; Huang, Chunmei; Shen, Guan-Xin; Huang, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Tumor immunosuppression is commonly braided with chronic inflammation during tumor development. However, the relationship between immunosuppression and inflammation in tumor microenvironment is still unclear. We have demonstrated that mast cells are accumulated and exacerbate the inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment via SCF/c-kit signaling pathway. Here, we further elucidate the underlying mechanism, which involves both myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T (Treg) cells. Our data showed that mast cells mobilized the infiltration of MDSCs to tumor and induced the production of IL-17 by MDSCs; MDSCs-derived IL-17 indirectly attracted Treg cells, enhanced their suppressor function, and induced the IL-9 production by Treg cells; in turn, IL-9 strengthened the survival and protumor effect of mast cells in tumor microenvironment. Our findings disclose a closed loop among mast cells, MDSCs and Treg cells in tumor microenvironment, which provides a new insight into the paralleled developments of inflammation and immunosuppression in tumor microenvironment. Based on these findings, we propose that targeting tumor inflammation might be a potential strategy to reverse the immunosuppression of tumor microenvironment, thus facilitating cancer immunotherapy. PMID:20111717

  1. Deletion of Fanca or Fancd2 dysregulates Treg in mice

    PubMed Central

    Du, Wei; Erden, Ozlem; Wilson, Andrew; Sipple, Jared M.; Schick, Jonathan; Mehta, Parinda; Myers, Kasiani C.; Steinbrecher, Kris A.; Davies, Stella M.

    2014-01-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disorder associated with bone marrow (BM) failure and leukemia. Recent studies demonstrate variable immune defects in FA. However, the cause for FA immunodeficiency is unknown. Here we report that deletion of Fanca or Fancd2 dysregulates the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells (Tregs), shown functionally as exacerbation of graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) in mice. Recipient mice of Fanca−/− or Fancd2−/− BM chimeras exhibited severe acute GVHD after allogeneic BM transplantation (BMT). T cells from Fanca−/− or Fancd2−/− mice induced higher GVHD lethality than those from wild-type (WT) littermates. FA Tregs possessed lower proliferative suppression potential compared with WT Tregs, as demonstrated by in vitro proliferation assay and BMT. Analysis of CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs indicated that loss of Fanca or Fancd2 dysregulated Foxp3 target gene expression. Additionally, CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs of Fanca−/− or Fancd2−/− mice were less efficient in suppressing the production of GVHD-associated inflammatory cytokines. Consistently, aberrant NF-κB activity was observed in infiltrated T cells from FA GVHD mice. Conditional deletion of p65 in FA Tregs decreased GVHD mortality. Our study uncovers an essential role for FA proteins in maintaining Treg homeostasis, possibly explaining, at least in part, the immune deficiency reported in some FA patients. PMID:24501220

  2. Hypomethylation of the Treg-Specific Demethylated Region in FOXP3 Is a Hallmark of the Regulatory T-cell Subtype in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Shimazu, Yayoi; Shimazu, Yutaka; Hishizawa, Masakatsu; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Nagai, Yuya; Sugino, Noriko; Fujii, Sumie; Kawahara, Masahiro; Kadowaki, Norimitsu; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Takaori-Kondo, Akifumi

    2016-02-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) is an aggressive T-cell malignancy caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1. Because of its immunosuppressive property and resistance to treatment, patients with ATL have poor prognoses. ATL cells possess the regulatory T cell (Treg) phenotype, such as CD4 and CD25, and usually express forkhead box P3 (FOXP3). However, the mechanisms of FOXP3 expression and its association with Treg-like characteristics in ATL remain unclear. Selective demethylation of the Treg-specific demethylated region (TSDR) in the FOXP3 gene leads to stable FOXP3 expression and defines natural Tregs. Here, we focus on the functional and clinical relationship between the epigenetic pattern of the TSDR and ATL. Analysis of DNA methylation in specimens from 26 patients with ATL showed that 15 patients (58%) hypomethylated the TSDR. The FOXP3(+) cells were mainly observed in the TSDR-hypomethylated cases. The TSDR-hypomethylated ATL cells exerted more suppressive function than the TSDR-methylated ATL cells. Thus, the epigenetic analysis of the FOXP3 gene identified a distinct subtype with Treg properties in heterogeneous ATL. Furthermore, we observed that the hypomethylation of TSDR was associated with poor outcomes in ATL. These results suggest that the DNA methylation status of the TSDR is an important hallmark to define this heterogeneous disease and to predict ATL patient prognosis. PMID:26681759

  3. Early kinetic window of target T cell susceptibility to CD25+ regulatory T cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Hughson, Angela; Sukiennicki, Teresa L; Fowell, Deborah J

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral tolerance is maintained in part by thymically derived CD25+CD4+ T cells (regulatory T cells (Tregs)). Their mechanism of action has not been well characterized. Therefore, to get a better understanding of Treg action, we investigated the kinetics of murine Treg activity in vitro. Tregs were suppressive within a surprisingly narrow kinetic window: necessary and sufficient only in the first 6-10 h of culture. Visualization of this time frame, using a sensitive single-cell assay for IL-2, revealed the early elaboration of target cell IL-2 producers in the first 6 h despite the presence of CD25+CD4+ Tregs. However, after 6 h, a rapid rise in the number of IL-2 producers in the absence of Tregs was dramatically abrogated by the presence of Tregs. Importantly, the timing of suppression was dictated by the kinetics of target T cell activation suggesting that early target T cell signals may alter susceptibility to suppression. Modulating target T cell activation signals with provision of CD28, IL-2, or high Ag dose all abrogated suppression of proliferation late in culture. However, only CD28 signals enabled target T cells to resist the early Treg-induced down-regulation of IL-2. Therefore the quality of early target T cell activation signals, in particular engagement of CD28, represents an important control point in the balance between vulnerability and resistance to Treg suppression. PMID:16301632

  4. Therapeutic approaches to allergy and autoimmunity based on FoxP3+ regulatory T-cell activation and expansion.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Makoto; Wing, Kajsa; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2009-04-01

    Forkhead box protein 3-positive regulatory T (Treg) cells are indispensable for the maintenance of self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. They can also be exploited for the treatment of immunologic diseases, including autoimmune diseases and allergy, by way of activating and expanding antigen-specific Treg cells in vivo. Cell therapy with in vitro activated and expanded Treg cells can be another therapeutic modality. The feasibility of such Treg cell-based therapeutic strategies is discussed based on recent advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of Treg cell development and function. PMID:19348913

  5. TLRs, Treg, and B Cells, an Interplay of Regulation during Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig-Portugall, Isis; Layland, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Commonly described as masters of regulation parasitic helminth infections provide a fascinating insight into the complexity of our immune system. As with many other pathogens helminths have developed complex evasion strategies and the immune response of the host has to find a balance between eliciting severe damage to eliminate the parasite or limiting damage and thereby accepting the infection. Nevertheless, one should not forget that these infections still pose a serious public health problem and can elicit severe disfigurement or death in the individual. An interesting spin-off of helminth manipulation on host responses is the apparent prevention of autoimmune diseases or allergy although the actual mechanisms remain unclear. It is well known that Toll-like-receptors (TLR) and non-TLR PRRs play a critical role in initiating innate immune responses which in turn create appropriate adaptive immune reactions. Helminths comprise of a multitude of (glyco)-proteins and (glyco)-lipids and some have been shown to trigger TLR, or alter TLR-mediated responses. Such reactions of course alter adaptive immunity as well. This review will address the consequences of TLR-triggering by helminth antigens and the downstream effect on B cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) actions. PMID:22566894

  6. Helicobacter pylori neutrophil-activating protein: a potential Treg modulator suppressing allergic asthma?

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Anjna; Sinha, Siddharth; Saxena, Abhishek

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate aim of the immune system is to eliminate pathogens without being harmful to the host. But what if eliminating the pathogen in itself is discomforting for the host? One such emerging case is of Helicobacter pylori. Modern medicine, infantile vaccination, and ultra-hygienic conditions have led to progressive disappearance of H. pylori in different parts of the world. However, the adversities caused by H. pylori's absence are much larger than those caused by its presence. Asthma is rising as an epidemic in last few decades and several reports suggest an inverse-relationship between H. pylori's persistence and early-life onset asthma. Regulatory T cells play an important role in both the cases. This is further supported by experiments on mouse-models. Hence, need of the hour is to discern the relationship between H. pylori and its host and eliminating its negative impacts without disturbing our indigenous microbiota. To resolve whether H. pylori is a pathogen or an amphibiont is another important side. This review explores the biological basis of H. pylori-induced priming of immune system offering resistance to childhood-onset asthma. HP-NAP-Tregs interaction has been predicted using molecular docking and dynamic simulation. PMID:26082756

  7. FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Hepatic Fibrosis and Splenomegaly Caused by Schistosoma japonicum: The Spleen May Be a Major Source of Tregs in Subjects with Splenomegaly

    PubMed Central

    Sertorio, Mathieu; Dessein, Hélia; Cabantous, Sandrine; Oliveira, Pablo; Li, Jun; Oyegue, Sandrine; Arnaud, Violaine; Luo, Xinsong; Chavanieu, Martine; Mariani, Odette; Sastre, Xavier; Dombey, Anne-Marie; He, Hongbin; Li, Yuesheng; Dessein, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma eggs cause chronic liver inflammation and a complex disease characterized by hepatic fibrosis (HF) and splenomegaly (SplM). FOXP3+ Tregs could regulate inflammation, but it is unclear where these cells are produced and what roles they play in human schistosomiasis. We investigated blood and spleen FOXP3+ Tregs in Chinese fishermen with lifelong exposure to Schistosoma japonicum and various degrees of liver and spleen disease. FOXP3+ Tregs accounted for 4.3% of CD4+ T cells and 41.2% of FOXP3+CD4+ T cells; they could be divided into CD45RA-FOXP3hi effector (eTregs) and CD45RA+FOXP3low naive Tregs. Blood Treg levels were high in severe HF (+1.3; p = 0.004) and in SplM (+1.03, p = 0.03). Multivariate regression showed that severe HF (+0.85, p = 0.01) and SplM (+0.97; p = 0.05) were independently associated with the higher proportion of Tregs in the blood. This effect was mostly due to an increase in the proportion of eTregs in the blood of HF+++ (+0.9%; p = 0.04) and SplM (+0.9%; p = 0.04) patients. The proportion of eTregs expressing CXCR3 in the blood was lower in the HF+++ patients (37.4 +/- 5.9%) than in those with milder fibrosis (51.7 ± 2%; p = 0.009), whereas proportion were similar for cells expressing CD25hi, CCR7, and CTLA-4. Splenectomy improves symptoms and was associated with decreases in blood FOXP3+ Treg (-2.5; p<0.001) and eTreg (-1.3; p = 0.03) levels. SplM spleens contained a high proportion of eTregs with CXCR3, CCR5 and CTLA4 upregulation and CCR7 downregulation. This, and the strong expression of ligands of CXCR3 and CCR5 in the liver (n = 8) but not in the spleen suggested that spleen eTregs migrated to Th1-infiltrated liver tissues. Such migration may be attenuated in hepatosplenic patients due to lower levels of CXCR3 expression on Tregs (p = 0.009). Thus, higher blood Treg levels are associated with severe liver disease and splenomegaly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that the spleen is a major source of Tregs in

  8. The numbers of Foxp3 + Treg cells are positively correlated with higher grade of infiltration at the salivary glands in primary Sjogren's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarigul, M; Yazisiz, V; Bassorgun, C I; Ulker, M; Avci, A B; Erbasan, F; Gelen, T; Gorczynski, R M; Terzioglu, E

    2010-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether Foxp3( +) regulatory T (Treg) cells play a role in the histopathologic changes of primary Sjögren's Syndrome (pSS) and to evaluate other factors possibly associated with Foxp3(+) Treg cells in pSS patients. The number of FoxP3-expressing T cells in peripheral blood (PB) of 39 patients with pSS, 40 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 28 healthy controls was measured by flow-cytometer analysis. FoxP3-expressing CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells were analyzed in minor salivary gland (SG) tissues of 39 pSS patients. Histopathologic changes were examined by light microscopy according to Chisholm's classification. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were performed to assess the Foxp3(+) Treg in SG biopsy specim-ens. The numbers of CD4(+) T cells and FoxP3-expressing CD4(+) T cells in PB were similar in all groups. Expression of CD25 on CD4(+) T cells in PB of patients with pSS and RA was significantly higher than in healthy controls, especially for RA patients. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence showed that FoxP3(+) Treg were enriched in the SGs of pSS patients, with a positive correlation between the increase in FoxP3(+) Treg in SG and the Chisholm score in pSS (p < 0.001, r = +0.605). The increase of FoxP3( +) Treg cells in the SGs of pSS patients, which is correlated with gland infiltration, suggests that natural regulatory T cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of pSS. Further studies are required to explore the mechanisms that mediate the relationship between Treg and the pathogenesis of pSS. PMID:19952070

  9. Characterization of the Treg Response in the Hepatitis B Virus Hydrodynamic Injection Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Dietze, Kirsten K.; Schimmer, Simone; Kretzmer, Freya; Wang, Junzhong; Lin, Yong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Weimin; Wang, Baoju; Lu, Mengji

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in counter-regulating effector T cell responses in many infectious diseases. However, they can also contribute to the development of T cell dysfunction and pathogen persistence in chronic infections. Tregs have been reported to suppress virus-specific T cell responses in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection of human patients as well as in HBV animal models. However, the phenotype and expansion of Tregs has so far only been investigated in other infections, but not in HBV. We therefore performed hydrodynamic injections of HBV plasmids into mice and analyzed the Treg response in the spleen and liver. Absolute Treg numbers significantly increased in the liver but not the spleen after HBV injection. The cells were natural Tregs that surprisingly did not show any activation or proliferation in response to the infection. However, they were able to suppress effector T cell responses, as selective depletion of Tregs significantly increased HBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses and accelerated viral antigen clearance. The data implies that natural Tregs infiltrate the liver in HBV infection without further activation or expansion but are still able to interfere with T cell mediated viral clearance. PMID:26986976

  10. Characterization of the Treg Response in the Hepatitis B Virus Hydrodynamic Injection Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Kirsten K; Schimmer, Simone; Kretzmer, Freya; Wang, Junzhong; Lin, Yong; Huang, Xuan; Wu, Weimin; Wang, Baoju; Lu, Mengji; Dittmer, Ulf; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in counter-regulating effector T cell responses in many infectious diseases. However, they can also contribute to the development of T cell dysfunction and pathogen persistence in chronic infections. Tregs have been reported to suppress virus-specific T cell responses in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection of human patients as well as in HBV animal models. However, the phenotype and expansion of Tregs has so far only been investigated in other infections, but not in HBV. We therefore performed hydrodynamic injections of HBV plasmids into mice and analyzed the Treg response in the spleen and liver. Absolute Treg numbers significantly increased in the liver but not the spleen after HBV injection. The cells were natural Tregs that surprisingly did not show any activation or proliferation in response to the infection. However, they were able to suppress effector T cell responses, as selective depletion of Tregs significantly increased HBV-specific CD8+ T cell responses and accelerated viral antigen clearance. The data implies that natural Tregs infiltrate the liver in HBV infection without further activation or expansion but are still able to interfere with T cell mediated viral clearance. PMID:26986976

  11. American tegumentary leishmaniasis: mRNA expression for Th1 and Treg mediators are predominant in patients with recent active disease.

    PubMed

    Souza, Marina A; Almeida, Thays M; Castro, Maria Carolina A B; Oliveira-Mendes, Andresa P; Almeida, Amanda F; Oliveira, Beatriz C; Rocha, Lucas F; Medeiros, Angela C R; Brito, Maria E F; Dessein, Alain J J; Pereira, Valéria R A

    2016-02-01

    Besides the Th1×Th2 paradigm, Treg and Th17 cytokines may play a role in the response to American tegumentary leishmaniasis. Considering the sensitivity and accuracy of qPCR and the lack of studies using this approach, we evaluated mRNA expression for IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, IL-10, IL-6, IL-17A, IL-22, TGF-β, Foxp3 and RORC in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with active disease, after stimulation with L. (V.) braziliensis soluble or insoluble fractions. Our results show that the antigens promoted specific mRNA expression related to the immune response in patients with ATL, and the insoluble fraction seems to stimulate the immune response in a higher intensity. The pro-inflammatory response was also fueled by IFN-γ and TNF-α, probably due to the active disease. IL-4, in certain way, seems to regulate this response along with IL-10 that may be produced by Treg cells, which are supposedly present in the patients' samples due the evidenced expression of Foxp3, in the presence of AgIns. In contrast, down-regulated RORC suggests that the significant levels of IL-6 expressed in response to AgSol were not able to induce an expressive Th17 profile along with TGF-β, which might have predominantly contributed to the development of a regulatory profile in the active disease. PMID:26572279

  12. Combining FoxP3 and Helios with GARP/LAP markers can identify expanded Treg subsets in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, Yazan S.; Ammori, Basil J.; Elkord, Eyad

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) comprise numerous heterogeneous subsets with distinct phenotypic and functional features. Identifying Treg markers is critical to investigate the role and clinical impact of various Treg subsets in pathological settings, and also for developing more effective immunotherapies. We have recently shown that non-activated FoxP3−Helios+ and activated FoxP3+/–Helios+ CD4+ T cells express GARP/LAP immunosuppressive markers in healthy donors. In this study we report similar observations in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) and liver metastases from colorectal cancer (LICRC). Comparing levels of different Treg subpopulations in cancer patients and controls, we report that in PC patients, and unlike LICRC patients, there was no increase in Treg levels as defined by FoxP3 and Helios. However, defining Tregs based on GARP/LAP expression showed that FoxP3−LAP+ Tregs in non-activated and activated settings, and FoxP3+Helios+GARP+LAP+ activated Tregs were significantly increased in both groups of patients, compared with controls. This work implies that a combination of Treg-specific markers could be used to more accurately determine expanded Treg subsets and to understand their contribution in cancer settings. Additionally, GARP−/+LAP+ CD4+ T cells made IL-10, and not IFN-γ, and levels of IL-10-secreting CD4+ T cells were elevated in LICRC patients, especially with higher tumor staging. Taken together, our results indicate that investigations of Treg levels in different cancers should consider diverse Treg-related markers such as GARP, LAP, Helios, and others and not only FoxP3 as a sole Treg-specific marker. PMID:26885615

  13. Stable inhibitory activity of regulatory T cells requires the transcription factor Helios.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jung; Barnitz, R Anthony; Kreslavsky, Taras; Brown, Flavian D; Moffett, Howell; Lemieux, Madeleine E; Kaygusuz, Yasemin; Meissner, Torsten; Holderried, Tobias A W; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe; Haining, W Nicholas; Cantor, Harvey

    2015-10-16

    The maintenance of immune homeostasis requires regulatory T cells (T(regs)). Given their intrinsic self-reactivity, T(regs) must stably maintain a suppressive phenotype to avoid autoimmunity. We report that impaired expression of the transcription factor (TF) Helios by FoxP3(+) CD4 and Qa-1-restricted CD8 T(regs) results in defective regulatory activity and autoimmunity in mice. Helios-deficient T(regs) develop an unstable phenotype during inflammatory responses characterized by reduced FoxP3 expression and increased effector cytokine expression secondary to diminished activation of the STAT5 pathway. CD8 T(regs) also require Helios-dependent STAT5 activation for survival and to prevent terminal T cell differentiation. The definition of Helios as a key transcription factor that stabilizes T(regs) in the face of inflammatory responses provides a genetic explanation for a core property of T(regs). PMID:26472910

  14. The Th17/Treg Immune Imbalance in Ulcerative Colitis Disease in a Chinese Han Population

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yang; Lin, Yifan; Zhao, Ning; He, Xiaojuan; Lu, Aiping; Wei, Wei; Jiang, Miao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the Th17/Treg immune balance in the ulcerative colitis (UC) patients in a Chinese Han population. Methods. Ninety UC patients and 30 healthy subjects were enrolled. The serum IL-17 and TGF-β1 levels of these participants were measured with ELISA; the percentage of Th17 and Treg cells in peripheral blood was determined with flow cytometry. Results. In UC patients, the levels of IL-17 and Th17 were significantly higher compared with healthy subjects; the percentage of Th17 and IL-17 level in moderate and severe subgroup was significantly higher than in mild subgroup; a positive correlation existed between these two indexes and clinical activity index and endoscopic evaluation. TGF-β1 level and Treg cells in UC patients were lower than healthy subjects. TGF-β1 level in moderate and severe subgroup was lower than in mild subgroup. There was a negative linear correlation between Treg cells and clinical activity index, endoscopic evaluation. A positive correlation was detected between Treg cells and TGF-β1 level. Conclusions. Th17/Treg immune imbalance might play a crucial role in the development of UC. To induce the production of Treg cells and TGF-β1, inhibit the level of Th17 and IL-17, and thus recover the Th17/Treg immune balance might imply new therapeutic targets in UC management. PMID:26977120

  15. Continuous Activation of Autoreactive CD4+ CD25+ Regulatory T Cells in the Steady State

    PubMed Central

    Fisson, Sylvain; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Litvinova, Elena; Septier, Franck; Klatzmann, David; Liblau, Roland; Salomon, Benoît L.

    2003-01-01

    Despite a growing interest in CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) that play a major role in self-tolerance and immunoregulation, fundamental parameters of the biology and homeostasis of these cells are poorly known. Here, we show that this population is composed of two Treg subsets that have distinct phenotypes and homeostasis in normal unmanipulated mice. In the steady state, some Treg remain quiescent and have a long lifespan, in the order of months, whereas the other Treg are dividing extensively and express multiple activation markers. After adoptive transfer, tissue-specific Treg rapidly divide and expand preferentially in lymph nodes draining their target self-antigens. These results reveal the existence of a cycling Treg subset composed of autoreactive Treg that are continuously activated by tissue self-antigens. PMID:12939344

  16. The autophagy gene Atg16l1 differentially regulates Treg and TH2 cells to control intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kabat, Agnieszka M; Moghaddam, Amin E; Pearson, Claire F; Laing, Adam; Abeler-Dörner, Lucie; Forman, Simon P; Grencis, Richard K; Sattentau, Quentin; Simon, Anna Katharina; Pott, Johanna; Maloy, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    A polymorphism in the autophagy gene Atg16l1 is associated with susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD); however, it remains unclear how autophagy contributes to intestinal immune homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that autophagy is essential for maintenance of balanced CD4+ T cell responses in the intestine. Selective deletion of Atg16l1 in T cells in mice resulted in spontaneous intestinal inflammation that was characterized by aberrant type 2 responses to dietary and microbiota antigens, and by a loss of Foxp3+ Treg cells. Specific ablation of Atg16l1 in Foxp3+ Treg cells in mice demonstrated that autophagy directly promotes their survival and metabolic adaptation in the intestine. Moreover, we also identify an unexpected role for autophagy in directly limiting mucosal TH2 cell expansion. These findings provide new insights into the reciprocal control of distinct intestinal TH cell responses by autophagy, with important implications for understanding and treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12444.001 PMID:26910010

  17. Does CD4+CD25+foxp3+ cell (Treg) and IL-10 profile determine susceptibility to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in HIV disease?

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Velu, Vijayakumar; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Sekar, Ramalingam; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Lloyd, Charmaine AC; Saravanan, Shanmugam; Solomon, Suniti; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran

    2008-01-01

    HIV-specific T-lymphocyte responses that underlie IRIS are incomplete and largely remain hypothetical. Of the several mechanisms presented by the host to control host immunological damage, Treg cells are believed to play a critical role. Using the available experimental evidence, it is proposed that enormous synthesis of conventional FoxP3- Th cells (responsive) often renders subjects inherently vulnerable to IRIS, whereas that of natural FoxP3+ Treg cell synthesis predominate among subjects that may not progress to IRIS. We also propose that IRIS non-developers generate precursor T-cells with a high avidity to generate CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs whereas IRIS developers generate T-cells of intermediate avidity yielding Th0 cells and effector T-cells to mediate the generation of proinflammatory cytokines in response to cell-signaling factors (IL-2, IL-6 etc.). Researchers have shown that IL-10 Tregs (along with TGF-β, a known anti-inflammatory cytokine) limit immune responses against microbial antigens in addition to effectively controlling HIV replication, the prime objective of HAART. Although certain technical limitations are described herein, we advocate measures to test the role of Tregs in IRIS. PMID:18282273

  18. Decreased intratumoral Foxp3 Tregs and increased dendritic cell density by neoadjuvant chemotherapy associated with favorable prognosis in advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Min; Li, Kai; Maskey, Ninu; Xu, Zhigao; Peng, Chunwei; Wang, Bicheng; Li, Yan; Yang, Guifang

    2014-01-01

    Although neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) has been increasingly used to improve the outcome of advanced gastric cancer (GC) for decades, its precise efficacy has been difficult to evaluate yet. Abundant studies have investigated the predictive factors that represent the effect of NACT on advanced GC. In the present study, the intratumoral infiltration of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and dendritic cells (DCs) response to NACT in advanced GC and their correlation with prognosis were evaluated. Infiltration of Tregs (marked by Foxp3) and DCs (marked by S-100) in 102 advanced GC specimens with or without NACT was measured using immunohistochemical method. Intratumoral infiltration of Foxp3 Tregs was significantly lower and DC density was significantly higher in NACT group than that in nNACT group (P=0.007, P=0.002, respectively). Infiltration of Foxp3 Tregs was significantly associated with tumor invasion depth (P<0.001). The DC density was significantly correlated with histopathologic type (P=0.035), invasion depth (P=0.002), TNM stage (P=0.018), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.001). There was no significant difference of patient’s OS between NACT and nNACT groups (P=0.452); however, patients treated with NACT had longer OS with lower infiltration of Foxp3 Tregs (P<0.001) and higher infiltration of DCs (P=0.010). Univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that infiltration of Foxp3 Tregs and DCs were independent prognostic factors (P=0.002, P=0.003, respectively). The results demonstrated that NACT could decrease intratumoral Foxp3 Tregs infiltration and increase DCs density, and that infiltration of Foxp3 Tregs and DCs may serve as novel prognostic biomarkers of human GC. PMID:25197340

  19. FOXP3+Helios+ Regulatory T Cells, Immune Activation, and Advancing Disease in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Khaitan, Alka; Kravietz, Adam; Mwamzuka, Mussa; Marshed, Fatma; Ilmet, Tiina; Said, Swalehe; Ahmed, Aabid; Borkowsky, William; Unutmaz, Derya

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are functionally suppressive CD4 T cells, critical for establishing peripheral tolerance and controlling inflammatory responses. Previous reports of Tregs during chronic HIV disease have conflicting results with higher or lower levels compared with controls. Identifying true Tregs with suppressive activity proves challenging during HIV infection, as traditional Treg markers, CD25 and FOXP3, may transiently upregulate expression as a result of immune activation (IA). Helios is an Ikaros family transcription factor that marks natural Tregs with suppressive activity and does not upregulate expression after activation. Coexpression of FOXP3 and Helios has been suggested as a highly specific marker of "bona fide" Tregs. We evaluated Treg subsets by FOXP3 coexpressed with either CD25 or Helios and their association with HIV disease progression in perinatally infected HIV-positive children. Identifying Tregs by FOXP3 coexpression with Helios rather than CD25 revealed markedly higher Treg frequencies, particularly in HIV+ children. Regardless of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected children had a selective expansion of memory FOXP3+Helios+ Tregs. The rise in memory Tregs correlated with declining HIV clinical status, indicated by falling CD4 percentages and CD4:CD8 ratios and increasing HIV plasma viremia and IA. In addition, untreated HIV+ children exhibited an imbalance between the levels of Tregs and activated T cells. Finally, memory Tregs expressed IA markers CD38 and Ki67 and exhaustion marker, PD-1, that tightly correlated with a similar phenotype in memory CD4 T cells. Overall, HIV-infected children had significant disruptions of memory Tregs that associated with advancing HIV disease. PMID:27003495

  20. Ocotillol, a Majonoside R2 Metabolite, Ameliorates 2,4,6-Trinitrobenzenesulfonic Acid-Induced Colitis in Mice by Restoring the Balance of Th17/Treg Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Jeong, Jin-Ju; Le, Thi Hong Van; Eun, Su-Hyeon; Nguyen, Minh Duc; Park, Jeong Hill; Kim, Dong-Hyun

    2015-08-12

    In a preliminary experiment, majonoside R2 (MR2), isolated from Vietnamese ginseng (Panax vietnamensis Ha et Grushv.), inhibited differentiation to Th17 cells and was metabolized to ocotillol via pseudoginsenoside RT4 (PRT4) by gut microbiota. Therefore, we examined the inhibitory effects of MR2 and its metabolites PRT4 and ocotillol against Th17 cell differentiation. These ginsenosides significantly suppressed interleukin (IL)-6/tumor growth factor beta-induced differentiation of splenic CD4(+) T cells into Th17 cells and expression of IL-17 in vitro. Among these ginsenosides, ocotillol showed the highest inhibitory effect. We also examined the anti-inflammatory effect of ocotillol in mice with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis. Oral administration of ocotillol significantly suppressed TNBS-induced colon shortening, macroscopic score, myeloperoxidase activity, and production of nitric oxide and prostaglandin E2. Ocotillol treatment increased TNBS-suppressed expression of tight junction proteins ZO-1, occludin, and claudin-1 in the colon. Treatment with ocotillol inhibited TNBS-induced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-1β, as well as activation of NF-κB and MAPKs. Moreover, treatment with ocotillol inhibited TNBS- induced differentiation to Th17 cells in the lamina propria of colon, as well as expression of T-bet, RORγt, IL-17, and IL-23. Ocotillol treatment also increased Treg cell differentiation and Foxp3 and IL-10 expression. These findings suggest that orally administered MR2 may be metabolized to ocotillol in the intestine by gut microbiota and the transformed ocotillol may ameliorate inflammatory diseases such as colitis by restoring the balance of Th17/Treg cells. PMID:26194345

  1. AKT isoforms modulate Th1-like Treg generation and function in human autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Kitz, Alexandra; de Marcken, Marine; Gautron, Anne-Sophie; Mitrovic, Mitja; Hafler, David A; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita

    2016-08-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) exhibit plasticity, which dictates their function. Secretion of the inflammatory cytokine IFNγ, together with the acquisition of a T helper 1 (Th1)-like effector phenotype as observed in cancer, infection, and autoimmune diseases, is associated with loss of Treg suppressor function through an unknown mechanism. Here, we describe the signaling events driving the generation of human Th1-Tregs. Using a genome-wide gene expression approach and pathway analysis, we identify the PI3K/AKT/Foxo1/3 signaling cascade as the major pathway involved in IFNγ secretion by human Tregs. Furthermore, we describe the opposing roles of AKT isoforms in Th1-Treg generation ex vivo Finally, we employ multiple sclerosis as an in vivo model with increased but functionally defective Th1-Tregs. We show that the PI3K/AKT/Foxo1/3 pathway is activated in ex vivo-isolated Tregs from untreated relapsing-remitting MS patients and that blockade of the pathway inhibits IFNγ secretion and restores the immune suppressive function of Tregs. These data define a fundamental pathway regulating the function of human Tregs and suggest a novel treatment paradigm for autoimmune diseases. PMID:27312110

  2. Enlarged colitogenic T cell population paradoxically supports colitis prevention through the B-lymphocyte-dependent peripheral generation of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells

    PubMed Central

    do Canto, Fábio Barrozo; Campos, Sylvia Maria Nicolau; Granato, Alessandra; da Silva, Rafael F.; de Paiva, Luciana Souza; Nóbrega, Alberto; Bellio, Maria; Fucs, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation can be induced by the reconstitution of T/B cell-deficient mice with low numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes depleted of CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg). Using RAG-knockout mice as recipients of either splenocytes exclusively depleted of CD25+ cells or FACS-purified CD4+CD25−Foxp3− T cells, we found that the augmentation of potentially colitogenic naïve T cell numbers in the inoculum was unexpectedly beneficial for the suppression of colon disease and maintenance of immune homeostasis. Protection against T cell-mediated colitis correlated with a significant increment in the frequency of peripherally-induced CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (pTreg) cells, especially in the mesenteric lymph nodes, an effect that required the presence of B cells and CD4+CD25−Foxp3+ cells in physiological proportions. Our findings support a model whereby the interplay between B lymphocytes and a diversified naïve T cell repertoire is critical for the generation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ pTreg cells and colitis suppression. PMID:27353032

  3. The Chromatin-Modifying Enzyme Ezh2 Is Critical for the Maintenance of Regulatory T Cell Identity after Activation

    PubMed Central

    DuPage, Michel; Chopra, Gaurav; Quiros, Jason; Rosenthal, Wendy L.; Morar, Malika M.; Holohan, Dan; Zhang, Ruan; Turka, Laurence; Marson, Alexander; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are required for immune homeostasis. Chromatin remodeling is essential for establishing diverse cellular identities, but how the epigenetic program in Treg cells is maintained throughout the dynamic activation process remains unclear. Here we have shown that CD28 co-stimulation, an extracellular cue intrinsically required for Treg cell maintenance, induced the chromatin-modifying enzyme, Ezh2. Treg-specific ablation of Ezh2 resulted in spontaneous autoimmunity with reduced Foxp3+ cells in non-lymphoid tissues and impaired resolution of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Utilizing a model designed to selectively deplete wild-type Treg cells in adult mice co-populated with Ezh2-deficient Treg cells, Ezh2-deficient cells were destabilized and failed to prevent autoimmunity. After activation, the transcriptome of Ezh2-deficient Treg cells was disrupted, with altered expression of Treg cell lineage genes in a pattern similar to Foxp3-deficient Treg cells. These studies reveal a critical role for Ezh2 in the maintenance of Treg cell identity during cellular activation. PMID:25680271

  4. Metformin attenuates graft-versus-host disease via restricting mammalian target of rapamycin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and promoting adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase-autophagy for the balance between T helper 17 and Tregs.

    PubMed

    Park, Min-Jung; Lee, Seon-Yeong; Moon, Su-Jin; Son, Hye-Jin; Lee, Sung-Hee; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Byun, Jae-Kyeong; Shin, Dong Yun; Park, Sung-Hwan; Yang, Chul-Woo; Cho, Mi-La

    2016-07-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD), caused by donor T cell-mediated injury to host tissues, is a problem in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The transition from naïve to effector T cells is accompanied by shift in metabolism main pathway; from glucose oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that is a metabolic sensor that helps maintain cellular energy homeostasis. Although AMPK activation can exert anti-inflammatory properties by negatively regulating pro-inflammatory mediators, its role as a therapeutic potential of graft-versus-host disease development remains unclear. In this study, we found that the intraperitoneal administration of metformin, which activates AMPK signaling significantly, ameliorated the clinical severity of aGHVD and lethality. This was associated with reductions in type I T helper (Th1) and Th17 and rises in Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) cell. The enhanced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation noted during the development of aGVHD was reduced by metformin treatment. Furthermore, metformin-treated Th17 cells became converted into Treg cells via enhanced autophagy. The reduction in mortality associated with metformin treatment was associated with inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. These results suggest that metformin might be of significant use in the treatment of patients with aGVHD. PMID:27126953

  5. Epithelial-derived IL-18 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and Foxp3⁺ Treg cell function in the intestine.

    PubMed

    Harrison, O J; Srinivasan, N; Pott, J; Schiering, C; Krausgruber, T; Ilott, N E; Maloy, K J

    2015-11-01

    Elevated levels of interleukin-18 (IL-18) are found in many chronic inflammatory disorders, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and polymorphisms in the IL18R1-IL18RAP locus are associated with IBD susceptibility. IL-18 is an IL-1 family cytokine that has been proposed to promote barrier function in the intestine, but the effects of IL-18 on intestinal CD4(+) T cells are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that IL-18R1 expression is enhanced on both effector and regulatory CD4(+) T cells in the intestinal lamina propria, with T helper type 17 (Th17) cells exhibiting particularly high levels. We further show that, during steady state, intestinal epithelial cells constitutively secrete IL-18 that acts directly on IL-18R1-expressing CD4(+) T cells to limit colonic Th17 cell differentiation, in part by antagonizing IL-1R1 signaling. In addition, although IL-18R1 is not required for colonic Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cell differentiation, we found that IL-18R1 signaling was critical for Foxp3(+) Treg cell-mediated control of intestinal inflammation, where it promoted the expression of key Treg effector molecules. Thus IL-18 is a key epithelial-derived cytokine that differentially regulates distinct subsets of intestinal CD4(+) T cells during both homeostatic and inflammatory conditions, a finding with potential implications for treatment of chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:25736457

  6. Regulatory T cells with multiple suppressive and potentially pro-tumor activities accumulate in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Timperi, Eleonora; Pacella, Ilenia; Schinzari, Valeria; Focaccetti, Chiara; Sacco, Luca; Farelli, Francesco; Caronna, Roberto; Del Bene, Gabriella; Longo, Flavia; Ciardi, Antonio; Morelli, Sergio; Vestri, Anna Rita; Chirletti, Piero; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Piconese, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Tregs can contribute to tumor progression by suppressing antitumor immunity. Exceptionally, in human colorectal cancer (CRC), Tregs are thought to exert beneficial roles in controlling pro-tumor chronic inflammation. The goal of our study was to characterize CRC-infiltrating Tregs at multiple levels, by phenotypical, molecular and functional evaluation of Tregs from the tumor site, compared to non-tumoral mucosa and peripheral blood of CRC patients. The frequency of Tregs was higher in mucosa than in blood, and further significantly increased in tumor. Ex vivo, those Tregs suppressed the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. A differential compartmentalization was detected between Helios(high) and Helios(low) Treg subsets (thymus-derived versus peripherally induced): while Helios(low) Tregs were enriched in both sites, only Helios(high) Tregs accumulated significantly and specifically in tumors, displayed a highly demethylated TSDR region and contained high proportions of cells expressing CD39 and OX40, markers of activation and suppression. Besides the suppression of T cells, Tregs may contribute to CRC progression also through releasing IL-17, or differentiating into Tfr cells that potentially antagonize a protective Tfh response, events that were both detected in tumor-associated Tregs. Overall, our data indicate that Treg accumulation may contribute through multiple mechanisms to CRC establishment and progression. PMID:27622025

  7. Amniotic membrane mesenchymal cells-derived factors skew T cell polarization toward Treg and downregulate Th1 and Th17 cells subsets.

    PubMed

    Pianta, Stefano; Bonassi Signoroni, Patrizia; Muradore, Ivan; Rodrigues, Melissa Francis; Rossi, Daniele; Silini, Antonietta; Parolini, Ornella

    2015-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that cells derived from the mesenchymal layer of the human amniotic membrane (hAMSC) and their conditioned medium (CM-hAMSC) modulate lymphocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in immune regulation exerted by hAMSC, we analyzed the effects of CM-hAMSC on T-cell polarization towards Th1, Th2, Th17, and T-regulatory (Treg) subsets. We show that CM-hAMSC equally suppresses the proliferation of both CD4(+) T-helper (Th) and CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocytes. Moreover, we prove that the CM-hAMSC inhibitory ability affects both central (CD45RO(+)CD62L(+)) and effector memory (CD45RO(+)CD62L(-)) subsets. We evaluated the phenotype of CD4(+) cells in the MLR setting and showed that CM-hAMSC significantly reduced the expression of markers associated to the Th1 (T-bet(+)CD119(+)) and Th17 (RORγt(+)CD161(+)) populations, while having no effect on the Th2 population (GATA3(+)CD193(+)/GATA3(+)CD294(+)cells). T-cell subset modulation was substantiated through the analysis of cytokine release for 6 days during co-culture with alloreactive T-cells, whereby we observed a decrease in specific subset-related cytokines, such as a decrease in pro-inflammatory, Th1-related (TNFα, IFNγ, IL-1β), Th2 (IL-5, IL-6), Th9 (IL-9), and Th17 (IL-17A, IL-22). Furthermore, CM-hAMSC significantly induced the Treg compartment, as shown by an induction of proliferating CD4(+)FoxP3(+) cells, and an increase of CD25(+)FoxP3(+) and CD39(+)FoxP3(+) Treg in the CD4(+) population. Induction of Treg cells was corroborated by the increased secretion of TGF-β. Taken together, these data strengthen the findings regarding the immunomodulatory properties of CM-hAMSC derived from human amniotic membrane MSC, and in particular provide insights into their effect on regulation of T cell polarization. PMID:25348066

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of the Action of Vitamin A in Th17/Treg Axis in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Abdolahi, Mina; Yavari, Parvaneh; Honarvar, Niyaz Mohammadzadeh; Bitarafan, Sama; Mahmoudi, Maryam; Saboor-Yaraghi, Ali Akbar

    2015-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoinflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS). The immunopathogenesis of this disease involves an impaired balance of T helper (Th) 17 cells and regulatory T (Tregs) cells. MS is an autoinflammatory disease characterized by the degeneration of the CNS. For many years, MS has been considered to be an autoreactive Th1 and Th17 cell-dominated disease. The activity and number of Th17 cells are increased in MS; however, the function and number of Treg cells are reduced. Therefore, in MS, the balance between Th17 cells and Treg cells is impaired. Th17 cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, which play a role in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and MS. However, Treg cell-mediated production of cytokines maintains immune homeostasis and can ameliorate the progression of MS. These observations, therefore, confirm the pathogenic and protective role of Th17 and Treg cells, respectively, and highlight the importance of maintaining the balance of both of these cell types. Evidence suggests that vitamin A and its active metabolites (all-trans-retinoic acid and 9-cis-retinoic acid) modulate the imbalance of Th17 and Treg cells through multiple molecular pathways and can be considered as a promising target in the prevention and treatment of MS. PMID:26319266

  9. GITR subverts Foxp3(+) Tregs to boost Th9 immunity through regulation of histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xiang; Shi, Xiaomin; Fan, Yihui; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wu, Minhao; Lan, Peixiang; Minze, Laurie; Fu, Yang-Xin; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Liu, Wentao; Li, Xian Chang

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) is a costimulatory molecule with diverse effects on effector T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the underlying mechanism remains poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that GITR ligation subverts the induction of Foxp3(+) Tregs and directs the activated CD4(+) T cells to Th9 cells. Such GITR-mediated iTreg to Th9 induction enhances anti-tumour immunity in vivo. Mechanistically, GITR upregulates the NF-κB family member p50, which recruits histone deacetylases to the Foxp3 locus to produce a 'closed' chromatin structure. Furthermore, GITR ligation also activates STAT6, and STAT6 renders Il9 locus accessible via recruitment of histone acetyltransferase p300, and together with inhibition of Foxp3, GITR induces strong Th9 responses. Thus, Th9 cells and iTregs are developmentally linked and GITR can subvert tolerogenic conditions to boost Th9 immunity. PMID:26365427

  10. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant promotes intestinal barrier function, balances Treg and TH17 cells and ameliorates hepatic injury in a mouse model of chronic-binge alcohol feeding.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui-Cong; Xu, Lan-Man; Du, Shan-Jie; Huang, Si-Si; Wu, He; Dong, Jia-Jia; Huang, Jian-Rong; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Feng, Wen-Ke; Chen, Yong-Ping

    2016-01-22

    Impaired intestinal barrier function plays a critical role in alcohol-induced hepatic injury, and the subsequent excessive absorbed endotoxin and bacterial translocation activate the immune response that aggravates the liver injury. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG supernatant (LGG-s) has been suggested to improve intestinal barrier function and alleviate the liver injury induced by chronic and binge alcohol consumption, but the underlying mechanisms are still not clear. In this study, chronic-binge alcohol fed model was used to determine the effects of LGG-s on the prevention of alcoholic liver disease in C57BL/6 mice and investigate underlying mechanisms. Mice were fed Lieber-DeCarli diet containing 5% alcohol for 10 days, and one dose of alcohol was gavaged on Day 11. In one group, LGG-s was supplemented along with alcohol. Control mice were fed isocaloric diet. Nine hours later the mice were sacrificed for analysis. Chronic-binge alcohol exposure induced an elevation in liver enzymes, steatosis and morphology changes, while LGG-s supplementation attenuated these changes. Treatment with LGG-s significantly improved intestinal barrier function reflected by increased mRNA expression of tight junction (TJ) proteins and villus-crypt histology in ileum, and decreased Escherichia coli (E. coli) protein level in liver. Importantly, flow cytometry analysis showed that alcohol reduced Treg cell population while increased TH17 cell population as well as IL-17 secretion, which was reversed by LGG-s administration. In conclusion, our findings indicate that LGG-s is effective in preventing chronic-binge alcohol exposure-induced liver injury and shed a light on the importance of the balance of Treg and TH17 cells in the role of LGG-s application. PMID:26617183

  11. Developmental Progression and Interrelationship of Central and Effector Regulatory T Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Toomer, Kevin H; Yuan, Xiaomei; Yang, Jing; Dee, Michael J; Yu, Aixin; Malek, Thomas R

    2016-05-01

    Resting central Tregs (cTregs) and activated effector Tregs (eTregs) are required for self-tolerance, but the heterogeneity and relationships within and between phenotypically distinct subsets of cTregs and eTregs are poorly understood. By extensive immune profiling and deep sequencing of TCR-β V regions, two subsets of cTregs, based on expression of Ly-6C, and three subsets of eTregs, based on distinctive expression of CD62L, CD69, and CD103, were identified. Ly-6C(+) cTregs exhibited lower basal activation, expressed on average lower affinity TCRs, and less efficiently developed into eTregs when compared with Ly-6C(-) cTregs. The dominant TCR Vβs of Ly-6C(+) cTregs were shared by eTregs at a low frequency. A single TCR clonotype was also identified that was largely restricted to Ly-6C(+) cTregs, even under conditions that promoted the development of eTregs. Collectively, these findings indicate that some Ly-6C(+) cTregs may persist as a lymphoid-specific subset, with minimal potential to develop into highly activated eTregs, whereas other cTregs readily develop into eTregs. In contrast, subsets of CD62L(lo) eTregs showed higher clonal expansion and were more highly interrelated than cTreg subsets based on their TCR-β repertoires, but exhibited varied immune profiles. The CD62L(lo) CD69(-) CD103(-) eTreg subset displayed properties of a transitional intermediate between cTregs and more activated eTreg subsets. Thus, eTreg subsets appear to exhibit substantial flexibility, most likely in response to environmental cues, to adopt defined immune profiles that are expected to optimize suppression of autoreactive T cells. PMID:27009492

  12. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A.; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for Treg-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in Treg cells than Tconv cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in Treg cells under inflammatory conditions with concomitant decrease of suppressor activity in dextran sulfate-induced colitis model. YY1 inhibits Smad3/4 binding to and chromatin remodelling of the Foxp3 locus. In addition, YY1 interrupts Foxp3-dependent target gene expression by physically interacting with Foxp3 and by directly binding to the Foxp3 target genes. Thus, YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of Treg cells by blocking Foxp3. PMID:26892542

  13. Preventative role of interleukin-17 producing regulatory T helper type 17 (Treg 17) cells in type 1 diabetes in non-obese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Bellemore, S M; Nikoopour, E; Schwartz, J A; Krougly, O; Lee-Chan, E; Singh, B

    2015-12-01

    T helper type 17 (Th17) cells have been shown to be pathogenic in autoimmune diseases; however, their role in type 1 diabetes (T1D) remains inconclusive. We have found that Th17 differentiation of CD4(+) T cells from BDC2·5 T cell receptor transgenic non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice can be driven by interleukin (IL)-23+IL-6 to produce large amounts of IL-22, and these cells induce T1D in young NOD mice upon adoptive transfer. Conversely, polarizing these cells with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β+IL-6 led to non-diabetogenic regulatory Th17 (Treg 17) cells that express high levels of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and IL-10 but produced much reduced levels of IL-22. The diabetogenic potential of these Th17 subsets was assessed by adoptive transfer studies in young NOD mice and not NOD.severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice to prevent possible transdifferentiation of these cells in vivo. Based upon our results, we suggest that both pathogenic Th17 cells and non-pathogenic regulatory Treg 17 cells can be generated from CD4(+) T cells under appropriate polarization conditions. This may explain the contradictory role of Th17 cells in T1D. The IL-17 producing Treg 17 cells offer a novel regulatory T cell population for the modulation of autoimmunity. PMID:26250153

  14. IL-33 Receptor-Expressing Regulatory T Cells Are Highly Activated, Th2 Biased and Suppress CD4 T Cell Proliferation through IL-10 and TGFβ Release

    PubMed Central

    Datsi, Angeliki; Hegazy, Ahmed N.; Varga, Domonkos V.; Holecska, Vivien; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Löhning, Max

    2016-01-01

    Immunomodulatory Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) form a heterogeneous population consisting of subsets with different activation states, migratory properties and suppressive functions. Recently, expression of the IL-33 receptor ST2 was shown on Tregs in inflammatory settings. Here we report that ST2 expression identifies highly activated Tregs in mice even under homeostatic conditions. ST2+ Tregs preferentially accumulate at non-lymphoid sites, likely mediated by their high expression of several chemokine receptors facilitating tissue homing. ST2+ Tregs exhibit a Th2-biased character, expressing GATA-3 and producing the Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13 –especially in response to IL-33. Yet, IL-33 is dispensable for the generation and maintenance of these cells in vivo. Furthermore, ST2+ Tregs are superior to ST2− Tregs in suppressing CD4+ T cell proliferation in vitro independent of IL-33. This higher suppressive capacity is partially mediated by enhanced production and activation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGFβ. Thus, ST2 expression identifies a highly activated, strongly suppressive Treg subset preferentially located in non-lymphoid tissues. Here ST2+ Tregs may be well positioned to immediately react to IL-33 alarm signals. Their specific properties may render ST2+ Tregs useful targets for immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:27548066

  15. The Effects of TLR Activation on T-Cell Development and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Bo; Sun, Tao; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Yang, Ying-Xiang; Yeo, Anthony E. T.

    2012-01-01

    Invading pathogens have unique molecular signatures that are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) resulting in either activation of antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and/or costimulation of T cells inducing both innate and adaptive immunity. TLRs are also involved in T-cell development and can reprogram Treg cells to become helper cells. T cells consist of various subsets, that is, Th1, Th2, Th17, T follicular helper (Tfh), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), regulatory T cells (Treg) and these originate from thymic progenitor thymocytes. T-cell receptor (TCR) activation in distinct T-cell subsets with different TLRs results in differing outcomes, for example, activation of TLR4 expressed in T cells promotes suppressive function of regulatory T cells (Treg), while activation of TLR6 expressed in T cells abrogates Treg function. The current state of knowledge of regarding TLR-mediated T-cell development and differentiation is reviewed. PMID:22737174

  16. The Treg/Th17 Axis: A Dynamic Balance Regulated by the Gut Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Omenetti, Sara; Pizarro, Theresa T.

    2015-01-01

    T-helper 17 (Th17) and T-regulatory (Treg) cells are frequently found at barrier surfaces, particularly within the intestinal mucosa, where they function to protect the host from pathogenic microorganisms and to restrain excessive effector T-cell responses, respectively. Despite their differing functional properties, Th17 cells and Tregs share similar developmental requirements. In fact, the fate of antigen-naïve T-cells to either Th17 or Treg lineages is finely regulated by key mediators, including TGFβ, IL-6, and all-trans retinoic acid. Importantly, the intestinal microbiome also provides immunostimulatory signals, which can activate innate and downstream adaptive immune responses. Specific components of the gut microbiome have been implicated in the production of proinflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells, such as IL-6, IL-23, IL-1β, and the subsequent generation and expansion of Th17 cells. Similarly, commensal bacteria and their metabolites can also promote the generation of intestinal Tregs that can actively induce mucosal tolerance. As such, dysbiosis of the gut microbiome may not solely represent a consequence of gut inflammation, but rather shape the Treg/Th17 commitment and influence susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease. In this review, we discuss Treg and Th17 cell plasticity, its dynamic regulation by the microbiome, and highlight its impact on intestinal homeostasis and disease. PMID:26734006

  17. Natural T Regulatory Cells (n Treg) in the Peripheral Blood of Healthy Subjects and Subjects with Chronic Periodontitis – A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Sabarish, Ram; Lavu, Vamsi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The T cells play a central role in the aetiopathogenesis of periodontal disease. Natural T regulatory cells (nTreg) are the key stone immunoregulatory elements having an anergic phenotype and play an important role in the suppression of exaggerated immune responses thereby maintaining homeostasis. There are increasing evidences for the role of nTreg in the periodontal disease pathogenesis. Aim To identify the proportion of natural T regulatory cells in the peripheral blood of periodontally healthy subjects and subjects with chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods A total of 15 subjects (7 with healthy gingiva and 8 with chronic periodontitis) were recruited for this pilot study. Baseline periodontal parameters were recorded and 5 ml of peripheral blood was collected. The samples from both the groups were analysed for the relative proportion of nTreg (identified by the expression CD45RB+CD4+CD25+FOXP3+) using flow cytometry. Results The mean percentages of the CD45RB+CD4+CD25+ cells expressing FOXP3 in control and chronic periodontitis group were found to be 14.75±5.04 and 43.13±11.17 respectively. The mean proportion of nTreg were compared between the control and chronic periodontitis sample using Mann-Whitney Test and was found to be statistically significant with (p<0.001). Conclusion A higher proportion of nTreg in the peripheral blood sample of chronic periodontitis subjects were observed as compared to that of healthy individuals. PMID:27134998

  18. Melanoma cells express ICOS ligand to promote the activation and expansion of T-regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Orozco, Natalia; Li, Yufeng; Wang, Yijun; Liu, Shijuan; Hwu, Patrick; Liu, Yong-Jun; Dong, Chen; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2010-01-01

    CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs) accumulate in tumors, however little is known about how the tumor environment influences this process. Here we show that human melanomas express ICOS-ligand (ICOS-L/B7H) that can provide costimulation through ICOS for the expansion of activated Tregs maintaining high Foxp3 and CD25 expression as well as suppressive function. Thus, ICOS-L expression by melanoma tumor cells may directly drive Treg activation and expansion in the tumor microenvironment as another mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:21098714

  19. Ginsenoside Rp1 Exerts Anti-inflammatory Effects via Activation of Dendritic Cells and Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jingyu; Koo, Jihye; Kim, Soochan; Park, Tae-Yoon; Kim, Mi-Yeon

    2012-10-01

    Ginsenoside Rp1 (G-Rp1) is a saponin derivate that provides anti-metastatic activities through inhibition of the NF-κB pathway. In this study, we examined the effects of G-Rp1 on regulatory T cell (Treg) activation. After treatment of splenocytes with G-Rp1, Tregs exhibited upregulation of IL-10 expression, and along with dendritic cells (DCs), these Tregs showed increased cell number compared to other cell populations. The effect of G-Rp1 on Treg number was augmented in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which mimics pathological changes that occur during inflammation. However, depletion of DCs prevented the increase in Treg number in the presence of G-Rp1 and/or LPS. In addition, G-Rp1 promoted the differentiation of the memory types of CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD62L(low) Tregs rather than the generation of new Tregs. In vivo experiments also demonstrated that Tregs and DCs from mice that were fed G-Rp1 for 7 d and then injected with LPS exhibited increased activation compared with those from mice that were injected with LPS alone. Expression of TGF-β and CTLA4 in Tregs was increased, and upregulation of IL-2 and CD80/ CD86 expression by DCs affected the suppressive function of Tregs through IL-2 receptors and CTLA4. These data demonstrate that G-Rp1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects by activating Tregs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23717139

  20. Increased Presence of FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells in Inflamed Muscle of Patients with Active Juvenile Dermatomyositis Compared to Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Vercoulen, Yvonne; Bellutti Enders, Felicitas; Meerding, Jenny; Plantinga, Maud; Elst, Elisabeth F.; Varsani, Hemlata; van Schieveen, Christa; Bakker, Mette H.; Klein, Mark; Scholman, Rianne C.; Spliet, Wim; Ricotti, Valeria; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.; de Weger, Roel A.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is an immune-mediated inflammatory disease affecting the microvasculature of skin and muscle. CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key regulators of immune homeostasis. A role for Tregs in JDM pathogenesis has not yet been established. Here, we explored Treg presence and function in peripheral blood and muscle of JDM patients. We analyzed number, phenotype and function of Tregs in blood from JDM patients by flow cytometry and in vitro suppression assays, in comparison to healthy controls and disease controls (Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy). Presence of Tregs in muscle was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Overall, Treg percentages in peripheral blood of JDM patients were similar compared to both control groups. Muscle biopsies of new onset JDM patients showed increased infiltration of numbers of T cells compared to Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy. Both in JDM and Duchenne’s muscular dystrophy the proportion of FOXP3+ T cells in muscles were increased compared to JDM peripheral blood. Interestingly, JDM is not a self-remitting disease, suggesting that the high proportion of Tregs in inflamed muscle do not suppress inflammation. In line with this, peripheral blood Tregs of active JDM patients were less capable of suppressing effector T cell activation in vitro, compared to Tregs of JDM in clinical remission. These data show a functional impairment of Tregs in a proportion of patients with active disease, and suggest a regulatory role for Tregs in JDM inflammation. PMID:25157414

  1. Subsets of regulatory T cells and their roles in allergy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyun; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Guo, Lianyi; Sun, Xiaoyun; He, Shaoheng

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it is recognized that acquired immunity is controlled by regulatory T cell (Treg). Since fundamental pathophysiological changes of allergy are mainly caused by hyperresponsiveness of immune system to allergens that acquires after birth, Tregs likely play key roles in the pathogenesis of allergy, particularly during the sensitization phase. However, accumulated information indicate that there are several distinctive subtypes of Tregs in man, and each of them seems to play different role in controlling immune system, which complicates the involvement of Tregs in allergy. The aim of the present study is to attempt to classify subtypes of Tregs and summarize their roles in allergy. Tregs should include natural Tregs (nTreg) including inducible costimulator (ICOS)(+) Tregs, inducible/adaptive Tregs (iTreg), interleukin (IL)-10-producing type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells), CD8(+) Tregs and IL-17-producing Tregs. These cells share some common features including expression of Foxp3 (except for Tr1 cells), and secretion of inhibitory cytokine IL-10 and/or TGF-β. Furthermore, it is noticeable that Tregs likely contribute to allergic disorders such as dermatitis and airway inflammation, and play a crucial role in the treatment of allergy through their actions on suppression of effector T cells and inhibition of activation of mast cells and basophils. Modulation of functions of Tregs may provide a novel strategy to prevent and treat allergic diseases. PMID:24886492

  2. Subsets of regulatory T cells and their roles in allergy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, it is recognized that acquired immunity is controlled by regulatory T cell (Treg). Since fundamental pathophysiological changes of allergy are mainly caused by hyperresponsiveness of immune system to allergens that acquires after birth, Tregs likely play key roles in the pathogenesis of allergy, particularly during the sensitization phase. However, accumulated information indicate that there are several distinctive subtypes of Tregs in man, and each of them seems to play different role in controlling immune system, which complicates the involvement of Tregs in allergy. The aim of the present study is to attempt to classify subtypes of Tregs and summarize their roles in allergy. Tregs should include natural Tregs (nTreg) including inducible costimulator (ICOS)(+) Tregs, inducible/adaptive Tregs (iTreg), interleukin (IL)-10-producing type 1 Tregs (Tr1 cells), CD8(+) Tregs and IL-17-producing Tregs. These cells share some common features including expression of Foxp3 (except for Tr1 cells), and secretion of inhibitory cytokine IL-10 and/or TGF-β. Furthermore, it is noticeable that Tregs likely contribute to allergic disorders such as dermatitis and airway inflammation, and play a crucial role in the treatment of allergy through their actions on suppression of effector T cells and inhibition of activation of mast cells and basophils. Modulation of functions of Tregs may provide a novel strategy to prevent and treat allergic diseases. PMID:24886492

  3. Characterization and functional studies of forkhead box protein 3(-) lymphocyte activation gene 3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells induced by mucosal B cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, K-H; Chiang, B-L

    2015-05-01

    The induction of mucosal tolerance has been demonstrated to be an effective therapeutic approach for the treatment of allergic diseases. Our previous study demonstrated that Peyer's patch B cells could convert naive T cells into regulatory T cells (so-called Treg -of-B(P) cells); however, it is important to characterize this particular subset of Treg -of-B cells for future applications. This study aimed to investigate the role of lymphocyte activating gene 3 (LAG3) in mediating the regulatory function of Treg -of-B(P) cells induced by mucosal follicular B (FOB) cells. Microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were used to assess the gene expression pattern of Treg -of-B(P) cells. To evaluate the role of LAG3, the in-vitro suppressive function and the alleviation of airway inflammation in a murine model of asthma was assessed. Our data indicated that FOB cells isolated from Peyer's patches had the ability to generate more suppressive Treg -of-B cells with LAG3 expression, compared with CD23(lo) CD21(lo) B cells. LAG3 is not only a marker for Treg -of-B(P) cells, but also participate in the suppressive ability. Moreover, CCR4 and CCR6 could be detected on the LAG3(+) , not LAG3(-) , Treg -of-B(P) cells and would help cells homing to allergic lung. In the murine model of asthma, the adoptive transfer of LAG3(+) Treg -of-B(P) cells was able to sufficiently suppress T helper type 2 (Th2) cytokine production, eosinophil infiltration and alleviate asthmatic symptoms. LAG3 was expressed in Treg -of-B(P) cells and was also involved in the function of Treg -of-B(P) cells. In the future, this particular subset of Treg -of-B cells might be used to alleviate allergic symptoms. PMID:25581421

  4. Effects of transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation on the imbalance of Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells following thoracotomy of patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    WU, HUAXING; WANG, KUN; LI, GUIXIAN; MENG, DEXIN; HAN, JIACHENG; WANG, GUONIAN; LI, YU

    2016-01-01

    An imbalance in the various T lymphocytes, including T-helper (Th)1, Th2 and Th17 cells, and regulatory T (Treg) cells, has been associated with immune dysfunction, and may occur following thoracotomy of patients with lung cancer. The use of transcutaneous acupoint electrical stimulation (TAES) has previously been demonstrated to exert immunoregulatory effects; therefore, the present study aimed to evaluate whether TAES was able to attenuate postoperative immune suppression in patients with lung cancer. Thoracic surgical patients with lung cancer (n=27) underwent TAES (frequency, 2/100 Hz; intensity, 4–12 mA) at the bilateral large intestine 4, pericardium 6, small intestine 3 and San Jiao 6 acupuncture points for 30 min, prior to incision, and at 20, 44, 68, 92 and 116 h following thoracotomy. The number of Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells, and the protein and mRNA expression levels of related cytokines were measured by flow cytometry, ELISA and polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The balance of Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells in the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer was disrupted following thoracotomy. TAES administration increased the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells, the protein expression levels of interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon-γ, the mRNA expression levels of T-bet and RAR-related orphan receptor-γt, and decreased the percentage of Th2 cells, IL-10 protein expression levels, and GATA binding protein 3 mRNA expression levels. The results of the present study demonstrated that TAES was able to partially attenuate the postoperative immune depression of patients with lung cancer, by regulating the balance of Th1, Th2, Th17 and Treg cells, and the expression levels of related cytokines and transcription factors; therefore, TAES may be considered to be a promising strategy for treating postoperative immune dysfunction in patients with lung cancer. PMID:26893636

  5. Nuclear transfer nTreg model reveals fate-determining TCR-β and novel peripheral nTreg precursors.

    PubMed

    Ku, Manching; Chang, Shih-En; Hernandez, Julio; Abadejos, Justin R; Sabouri-Ghomi, Mohsen; Muenchmeier, Niklas J; Schwarz, Anna; Valencia, Anna M; Kirak, Oktay

    2016-04-19

    To study the development and function of "natural-arising" T regulatory (nTreg) cells, we developed a novel nTreg model on pure nonobese diabetic background using epigenetic reprogramming via somatic cell nuclear transfer. On RAG1-deficient background, we found that monoclonal FoxP3(+)CD4(+)Treg cells developed in the thymus in the absence of other T cells. Adoptive transfer experiments revealed that the thymic niche is not a limiting factor in nTreg development. In addition, we showed that the T-cell receptor (TCR) β-chain of our nTreg model was not only sufficient to bias T-cell development toward the CD4 lineage, but we also demonstrated that this TCR β-chain was able to provide stronger TCR signals. This TCR-β-driven mechanism would thus unify former per se contradicting hypotheses of TCR-dependent and -independent nTreg development. Strikingly, peripheral FoxP3(-)CD4(+)T cells expressing the same TCR as this somatic cell nuclear transfer nTreg model had a reduced capability to differentiate into Th1 cells but were poised to differentiate better into induced nTreg cells, both in vitro and in vivo, representing a novel peripheral precursor subset of nTreg cells to which we refer to as pre-nTreg cells. PMID:27044095

  6. Selective depletion of Foxp3+ Treg during sensitization phase aggravates experimental allergic airway inflammation.

    PubMed

    Baru, Abdul Mannan; Hartl, Andrea; Lahl, Katharina; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Fehrenbach, Heinz; Yildirim, Ali O; Garn, Holger; Renz, Harald; Behrens, Georg M N; Sparwasser, Tim

    2010-08-01

    Recent studies highlight the role of Treg in preventing unnecessary responses to allergens and maintaining functional immune tolerance in the lung. We investigated the role of Treg during the sensitization phase in a murine model of experimental allergic airway inflammation by selectively depleting the Treg population in vivo. DEpletion of REGulatory T cells (DEREG) mice were depleted of Treg by diphtheria toxin injection. Allergic airway inflammation was induced using OVA as a model allergen. Pathology was assessed by scoring for differential cellular infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage, IgE and IgG1 levels in serum, cytokine secretion analysis of lymphocytes from lung draining lymph nodes and lung histology. Use of DEREG mice allowed us for the first time to track and specifically deplete both CD25(+) and CD25(-) Foxp3(+) Treg, and to analyze their significance in limiting pathology in allergic airway inflammation. We observed that depletion of Treg during the priming phase of an active immune response led to a dramatic exacerbation of allergic airway inflammation in mice, suggesting an essential role played by Treg in regulating immune responses against allergens as early as the sensitization phase via maintenance of functional tolerance. PMID:20544727

  7. Altered Expression of Specific Transcription Factors of Th17 (RORγt, RORα) and Treg Lymphocytes (FOXP3) by Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Etesam, Zahra; Nemati, Maryam; Ebrahimizadeh, Mohammad-Amin; Ebrahimi, Hossain-Ali; Hajghani, Hossain; Khalili, Tahereh; Frootan, Razieyeh; Zinoddini, Nahid; Jafarzadeh, Abdollah

    2016-09-01

    The imbalance in Th17/Treg cell-related responses plays an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). The development of Th17- and Treg cells is regulated by specific transcription factors-RORγt and RORα-and FOXP3, respectively. The aim was to determine the expression of RORγt, RORα, and FOXP3 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from MS patients following in vitro stimulation. The PBMCs from 22 MS patients and 20 healthy subjects were cultured in the presence of 10 μg/ml MOG, 10 μg/ml PHA, or without stimulation. The PBMCs were incubated at 37 °C for 24 h, and then the messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of RORγt, RORα, and FOXP3 was determined by real-time PCR. The expression of RORγt and RORα was increased in non-stimulated, MOG-stimulated, and PHA-stimulated PBMCs from MS patients in comparison with same cultures from the healthy group (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, and P < 0.02 for RORγt; P < 0.001, P < 0.001, and P < 0.05, for RORα, respectively). The FOXP3 expression in non-stimulated PBMCs from MS patients was significantly lower than that in equal culture from healthy subjects (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences between healthy subjects and MS patients regarding the expression of FOXP3 mRNA by MOG-stimulated and PHA-stimulated PBMCs. These results showed an imbalance in Th17/Treg cells at transcription factor levels with a deviation toward Th17 cell in MS. The correction of Th17/Treg balance at transcription levels should be considered to design novel therapeutic strategies for MS treatment. PMID:27370539

  8. Balance of Treg versus T-effector cells during systemic treatment with adalimumab and topical treatment with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate ointment.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Romy R M C; Joosten, Irma; Hendriks, Anke G M; Koenen, Hans J P M; van Erp, Piet E J; van de Kerkhof, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    Diminished suppressive capacity of regulatory T cells (Treg) has been demonstrated in blood and in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. Treatment with anti-TNFα restored the number and function of circulating Treg in psoriasis. We aimed to study Treg in the skin of psoriatic patients undergoing topical treatment with calcipotriol-betamethasone dipropionate (CBD) ointment (n = 12) or systemic treatment with anti-TNFα agent adalimumab (n = 10). Skin biopsies were collected from patients with chronic plaque psoriasis who responded to the above-mentioned treatments with a SUM-score improvement of at least 50% (at the end of treatment). Biopsies were processed for immunohistochemistry. As Treg function is associated with a numerical balance between Treg and effector T cells, Foxp3/CD4 ratios were calculated. It appeared that both treatments cause a significant decrease in the presence of Foxp3+ cells. However, in patients that were treated with CBD ointment, we observed lower Foxp3/CD4 ratios after 8 weeks of treatment compared to baseline (t = 0: 0.41 ± 0.08; t = 8: 0.22 ± 0.04, P = 0.033), whereas in patients who were treated with adalimumab we observed an increase of the Foxp3/CD4 ratios after 1.5 and 16 weeks of treatment compared to baseline (t = 0: 0.25 ± 0.04; t = 1.5: 0.32 ± 0.06; t = 16: 0.49 ± 0.10, P = 0.15). Based on Foxp3/CD4 ratios, we can conclude that adalimumab treated skin differs from CBD treated skin with regard to the anti-inflammatory/inflammatory balance. We suggest that, in contrast to CBD ointment, adalimumab favours local Treg function in the skin. PMID:25355140

  9. APL1, an altered peptide ligand derived from human heat-shock protein 60, increases the frequency of Tregs and its suppressive capacity against antigen responding effector CD4 + T cells from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Barberá, Ariana; Lorenzo, Noraylis; van Kooten, Peter; van Roon, Joel; de Jager, Wilco; Prada, Dinorah; Gómez, Jorge; Padrón, Gabriel; van Eden, Willem; Broere, Femke; Del Carmen Domínguez, María

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic relapsing-remitting joint inflammation. Perturbations in the balance between CD4 + T cells producing IL-17 and CD4 + CD25(high)FoxP3 + Tregs correlate with irreversible bone and cartilage destruction in RA. APL1 is an altered peptide ligand derived from a CD4+ T-cell epitope of human HSP60, an autoantigen expressed in the inflamed synovium, which increases the frequency of CD4 + CD25(high)FoxP3+ Tregs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from RA patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the suppressive capacity of Tregs induced by APL1 on proliferation of effector CD4+ T cells using co-culture experiments. Enhanced Treg-mediated suppression was observed in APL1-treated cultures compared with cells cultured only with media. Subsequent analyses using autologous cross-over experiments showed that the enhanced Treg suppression in APL1-treated cultures could reflect increased suppressive function of Tregs against APL1-responsive T cells. On the other hand, APL1-treatment had a significant effect reducing IL-17 levels produced by effector CD4+ T cells. Hence, this peptide has the ability to increase the frequency of Tregs and their suppressive properties whereas effector T cells produce less IL-17. Thus, we propose that APL1 therapy could help to ameliorate the pathogenic Th17/Treg balance in RA patients. PMID:27241313

  10. Functional Mechanisms of Treg in the Context of HIV Infection and the Janus Face of Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    López-Abente, Jacobo; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in infections, by modulating host immune responses and avoiding the overreactive immunity that in the case of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection leads to a marked erosion and deregulation of the entire immune system. Therefore, the suppressive function of Treg in HIV-infected patients is critical because of their implication on preventing the immune hyperactivation, even though it could also have a detrimental effect by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses. In recent years, several studies have shown that HIV-1 can directly infect Treg, disturbing their phenotype and suppressive capacity via different mechanisms. These effects include Foxp3 and CD25 downregulation, and the impairment of suppressive capacity. This review describes the functional mechanisms of Treg to modulate immune activation during HIV infection, and how such control is no longer fine-tune orchestrated once Treg itself get infected. We will review the current knowledge about the HIV effects on the Treg cytokine expression, on pathways implying the participation of different ectoenzymes (i.e., CD39/CD73 axis), transcription factors (ICER), and lastly on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), one of the keystones in Treg-suppressive function. To define which are the HIV effects upon these regulatory mechanisms is crucial not only for the comprehension of immune deregulation in HIV-infected patients but also for the correct understanding of the role of Tregs in HIV infection. PMID:27242797

  11. Targeting Tregs in Malignant Brain Cancer: Overcoming IDO

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmark features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common adult primary brain tumor with a very dismal prognosis, is the accumulation of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Regulatory T cells (Tregs) segregate into two primary categories: thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) that develop from the interaction between immature T cells and thymic epithelial stromal cells, and inducible Tregs (iTregs) that arise from the conversion of CD4+FoxP3− T cells into FoxP3 expressing cells. Normally, these Treg subsets complement one another’s actions by maintaining tolerance of self-antigens, thereby suppressing autoimmunity, while also enabling effective immune responses toward non-self-antigens, thus promoting infectious protection. However, Tregs have also been shown to be associated with the promotion of pathological outcomes, including cancer. In the setting of GBM, nTregs appear to be primary players that contribute to immunotherapeutic failure, ultimately leading to tumor progression. Several attempts have been made to therapeutically target these cells with variable levels of success. The blood brain barrier-crossing chemotherapeutics, temozolomide, and cyclophosphamide (CTX), vaccination against the Treg transcriptional regulator, FoxP3, as well as mAbs against Treg-associated cell surface molecules CD25, CTLA-4, and GITR are all different therapeutic approaches under investigation. Contributing to the poor success of past approaches is the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme overexpressed in GBM, and critically involved in regulating tumor-infiltrating Treg levels. Herein, we review the current literature on Tregs in brain cancer, providing a detailed phenotype, causative mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis, and strategies that have been used to target this population, therapeutically. PMID:23720663

  12. Targeting Tregs in Malignant Brain Cancer: Overcoming IDO.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2013-01-01

    One of the hallmark features of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common adult primary brain tumor with a very dismal prognosis, is the accumulation of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). Regulatory T cells (Tregs) segregate into two primary categories: thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) that develop from the interaction between immature T cells and thymic epithelial stromal cells, and inducible Tregs (iTregs) that arise from the conversion of CD4(+)FoxP3(-) T cells into FoxP3 expressing cells. Normally, these Treg subsets complement one another's actions by maintaining tolerance of self-antigens, thereby suppressing autoimmunity, while also enabling effective immune responses toward non-self-antigens, thus promoting infectious protection. However, Tregs have also been shown to be associated with the promotion of pathological outcomes, including cancer. In the setting of GBM, nTregs appear to be primary players that contribute to immunotherapeutic failure, ultimately leading to tumor progression. Several attempts have been made to therapeutically target these cells with variable levels of success. The blood brain barrier-crossing chemotherapeutics, temozolomide, and cyclophosphamide (CTX), vaccination against the Treg transcriptional regulator, FoxP3, as well as mAbs against Treg-associated cell surface molecules CD25, CTLA-4, and GITR are all different therapeutic approaches under investigation. Contributing to the poor success of past approaches is the expression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO), a tryptophan catabolizing enzyme overexpressed in GBM, and critically involved in regulating tumor-infiltrating Treg levels. Herein, we review the current literature on Tregs in brain cancer, providing a detailed phenotype, causative mechanisms involved in their pathogenesis, and strategies that have been used to target this population, therapeutically. PMID:23720663

  13. Mature dendritic cells cause Th17/Treg imbalance by secreting TGF-β1 and IL-6 in the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Pingxia; Cao, Yingping; Wang, Meihua; Zheng, Peizheng; Hou, Juan; Zhu, Chanhong

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is generally acknowledged to be an autoimmune disease, but its etiology remains unknown. The most intensively studied animal model of MS is experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), have gained increasing attention because they connect innate and adaptive immunity. The aim of this study was to determine the role of mature DCs in the pathogenesis of EAE. It was found that the number of mature DCs in the EAE spleen increased compared to the control group (p < 0.05). And there was an imbalance between Th17 (effector) and Treg (regulatory) in EAE. The data showed that mature DCs can regulate the differentiation of Th17 and Treg in EAE. In addition, there was a significant difference in secretion of TGF-β1 and IL-6 between mature DCs from mice with EAE and controls. The present data suggest that mature DCs cause an imbalance between Th17 and Treg by secreting TGF-β1 and IL-6 in the pathogenesis of EAE disease. Thus, targeting DC may be an effective strategy for treating MS. PMID:27536199

  14. Glucocorticoid-Induced Tumour Necrosis Factor Receptor-Related Protein: A Key Marker of Functional Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Simona; Ricci, Erika; Petrillo, Maria Grazia; Cari, Luigi; Migliorati, Graziella; Nocentini, Giuseppe; Riccardi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR, TNFRSF18, and CD357) is expressed at high levels in activated T cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs). In this review, we present data from mouse and human studies suggesting that GITR is a crucial player in the differentiation of thymic Tregs (tTregs), and expansion of both tTregs and peripheral Tregs (pTregs). The role of GITR in Treg expansion is confirmed by the association of GITR expression with markers of memory T cells. In this context, it is not surprising that GITR appears to be a marker of active Tregs, as suggested by the association of GITR expression with other markers of Treg activation or cytokines with suppressive activity (e.g., IL-10 and TGF-β), the presence of GITR+ cells in tissues where Tregs are active (e.g., solid tumours), or functional studies on Tregs. Furthermore, some Treg subsets including Tr1 cells express either low or no classical Treg markers (e.g., FoxP3 and CD25) and do express GITR. Therefore, when evaluating changes in the number of Tregs in human diseases, GITR expression must be evaluated. Moreover, GITR should be considered as a marker for isolating Tregs. PMID:25961057

  15. CD8+CD122+CD49dlow regulatory T cells maintain T-cell homeostasis by killing activated T cells via Fas/FasL-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Akane, Kazuyuki; Kojima, Seiji; Mak, Tak W; Shiku, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Haruhiko

    2016-03-01

    The Fas/FasL (CD95/CD178) system is required for immune regulation; however, it is unclear in which cells, when, and where Fas/FasL molecules act in the immune system. We found that CD8(+)CD122(+) cells, which are mostly composed of memory T cells in comparison with naïve cells in the CD8(+)CD122(-) population, were previously shown to include cells with regulatory activity and could be separated into CD49d(low) cells and CD49d(high) cells. We established in vitro and in vivo experimental systems to evaluate the regulatory activity of CD122(+) cells. Regulatory activity was observed in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(low) but not in CD8(+)CD122(+)CD49d(high) cells, indicating that the regulatory cells in the CD8(+)CD122(+) population could be narrowed down to CD49d(low) cells. CD8(+)CD122(-) cells taken from lymphoproliferation (lpr) mice were resistant to regulation by normal CD122(+) Tregs. CD122(+) Tregs taken from generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) mice did not regulate wild-type CD8(+)CD122(-) cells, indicating that the regulation by CD122(+) Tregs is Fas/FasL-dependent. CD122(+) Tregs taken from IL-10-deficient mice could regulate CD8(+)CD122(-) cells as equally as wild-type CD122(+) Tregs both in vitro and in vivo. MHC class I-missing T cells were not regulated by CD122(+) Tregs in vitro. CD122(+) Tregs also regulated CD4(+) cells in a Fas/FasL-dependent manner in vitro. These results suggest an essential role of Fas/FasL as a terminal effector of the CD122(+) Tregs that kill activated T cells to maintain immune homeostasis. PMID:26869716

  16. YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of regulatory T cells by blocking Foxp3 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Soo Seok; Jang, Sung Woong; Kim, Min Kyung; Kim, Lark Kyun; Kim, Bong-Sung; Kim, Hyeong Su; Kim, Kiwan; Lee, Wonyong; Flavell, Richard A; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T (T(reg)) cells are essential for maintenance of immune homeostasis. Foxp3 is the key transcription factor for T(reg)-cell differentiation and function; however, molecular mechanisms for its negative regulation are poorly understood. Here we show that YY1 expression is lower in T(reg) cells than T(conv) cells, and its overexpression causes a marked reduction of Foxp3 expression and abrogation of suppressive function of Treg cells. YY1 is increased in T(reg) cells under inflammatory conditions with concomitant decrease of suppressor activity in dextran sulfate-induced colitis model. YY1 inhibits Smad3/4 binding to and chromatin remodelling of the Foxp3 locus. In addition, YY1 interrupts Foxp3-dependent target gene expression by physically interacting with Foxp3 and by directly binding to the Foxp3 target genes. Thus, YY1 inhibits differentiation and function of T(reg) cells by blocking Foxp3. PMID:26892542

  17. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-10 on Treg cells, IL-10 and TGF-β in transplantation of rabbit skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai Shan; Fan, Xiao Qin; Zhang, Lei; Wen, Qiong Na; Feng, Ji Hong; Chen, Fu Chao; Luo, Jun Min; Sun, Wan Bang

    2014-02-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the rejection and survival time of grafted skin, and the changes of Treg cells, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in peripheral blood following skin transplantation with recombinant human interleukin-10 (rhIL-10) or cyclosporin A (CsA), as well as the role of IL-10 in immunological rejection mechanisms. A total of 36 rabbits were divided into two groups. The skin of a donor rabbit was transplanted onto the back of one receptor rabbit. Receptors were randomly divided into six groups, including rhIL-10 low-dose (5 µg/kg/d), rhIL-10 high-dose (10 µg/kg/d), CsA low-dose (5 mg/kg/d), CsA high-dose (10 mg/kg/d), rhIL-10 (5 µg/kg/d) and CsA (5 mg/kg/d) and negative control normal saline (NS; 1 ml/d). All groups received intramuscular drug injection for ten days, beginning one day prior to skin transplantation surgery. Following transplantation, each rabbit's peripheral blood was collected at different times. The changes of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, IL-10 and TGF-β were determined by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. When compared with the control group, the rejection and survival times of the experimental groups were longer following skin graft. Compared with the two CsA groups and the control group, the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells of rhIL-10 groups was significantly upregulated on the 4th and 7th days following surgery. However, TGF-β levels were not significantly different. Data suggested that the concentration of IL-10 was positively correlated with the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. In addition, IL-10 may delay the rejection time of rabbit skin transplantation and prolong the survival time. Thus, the role of IL-10 in inhibited allograft rejection may be associated with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and IL-10, and may be independent of TGF-β. PMID:24270972

  18. Treg engage lymphotoxin beta receptor for afferent lymphatic transendothelial migration

    PubMed Central

    Brinkman, C. Colin; Iwami, Daiki; Hritzo, Molly K.; Xiong, Yanbao; Ahmad, Sarwat; Simon, Thomas; Hippen, Keli L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Bromberg, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential to suppress unwanted immunity or inflammation. After islet allo-transplant Tregs must migrate from blood to allograft, then via afferent lymphatics to draining LN to protect allografts. Here we show that Tregs but not non-Treg T cells use lymphotoxin (LT) during migration from allograft to draining LN, and that LT deficiency or blockade prevents normal migration and allograft protection. Treg LTαβ rapidly modulates cytoskeletal and membrane structure of lymphatic endothelial cells; dependent on VCAM-1 and non-canonical NFκB signalling via LTβR. These results demonstrate a form of T-cell migration used only by Treg in tissues that serves an important role in their suppressive function and is a unique therapeutic focus for modulating suppression. PMID:27323847

  19. TGF-β-Induced Regulatory T Cells Directly Suppress B Cell Responses through a Noncytotoxic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Anping; Liu, Ya; Chen, Weiqian; Wang, Julie; Xue, Youqiu; Huang, Feng; Rong, Liming; Lin, Jin; Liu, Dahai; Yan, Mei; Li, Quan-Zhen; Li, Bin; Song, Jianxun; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) playing a crucial role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of autoimmune diseases consist of thymus-derived naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells (nTreg) and those that can be induced ex vivo with TGF-β (iTreg). Although both Treg subsets share similar phenotypes and functional characteristics, they also have potential biologic differences on their biology. The role of iTreg in regulating B cells remains unclear so far. The suppression assays of Treg subsets on activation, proliferation, and Abs production of B cells were measured using a Treg and B cell coculture system in vitro. Transwell and Ab blockade experiments were performed to assess the roles of cell contact and soluble cytokines. Treg were adoptively transferred to lupus mice to assess in vivo effects on B cells. Like nTreg, iTreg subset also directly suppressed activation and proliferation of B cells. nTreg subset suppressed B cell responses through cytotoxic manner related to expression of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin, whereas the role of iTreg subset on B cells did not involve in cytotoxic action but depending on TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, iTreg subset can significantly suppress Ab produced by lupus B cells in vitro. Comparison experiments using autoantibodies microarrays demonstrated that adoptive transfer of iTreg had a superior effect than nTreg subset on suppressing lupus B cell responses in vivo. Our data implicate a role and advantage of iTreg subset in treating B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, boosting the translational potential of these findings. PMID:27001954

  20. Special regulatory T-cell review: A rose by any other name: from suppressor T cells to Tregs, approbation to unbridled enthusiasm.

    PubMed

    Germain, Ronald N

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1970s a spate of papers by research groups around the world provided evidence for a negative regulatory role of thymus-derived lymphocytes (T cells). In 1971, Gershon and Kondo published a seminal paper in Immunology entitled 'Infectious Immunological Tolerance' indicating that such negative regulation could be a dominant effect that prevented otherwise 'helpful' T cells from mediating their function. Over the next decade, suppressor T cells, as these negative regulatory cells became known, were intensively investigated and a complex set of interacting cells and soluble factors were described as mediators in this process of immune regulation. In the early 1980s, however, biochemical and molecular experiments raised questions about the interpretation of the earlier studies, and within a few years, the term 'suppressor T cell' had all but disappeared from prominence and research on this phenomenon was held in poor esteem. While this was happening, new studies appeared suggesting that a subset of T cells played a critical role in preventing autoimmunity. These T cells, eventually dubbed 'regulatory T cells', have become a major focus of modern cellular immunological investigation, with a predominance that perhaps eclipses even that seen in the earlier period of suppressor T cell ascendancy. This brief review summarizes the rise and fall of 'suppressorology' and the possibility that Tregs are a modern rediscovery of suppressor T cells made convincing by more robust models for their study and better reagents for their identification and analysis. PMID:18154615

  1. Regulatory iNKT cells lack expression of the transcription factor PLZF and control the homeostasis of T(reg) cells and macrophages in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Lydia; Michelet, Xavier; Zhang, Sai; Brennan, Patrick J; Moseman, Ashley; Lester, Chantel; Besra, Gurdyal; Vomhof-Dekrey, Emilie E; Tighe, Mike; Koay, Hui-Fern; Godfrey, Dale I; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Sant'Angelo, Derek B; von Andrian, Ulrich; Brenner, Michael B

    2015-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are lipid-sensing innate T cells that are restricted by the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d and express the transcription factor PLZF. iNKT cells accumulate in adipose tissue, where they are anti-inflammatory, but the factors that contribute to their anti-inflammatory nature, as well as their targets in adipose tissue, are unknown. Here we found that iNKT cells in adipose tissue had a unique transcriptional program and produced interleukin 2 (IL-2) and IL-10. Unlike other iNKT cells, they lacked PLZF but expressed the transcription factor E4BP4, which controlled their IL-10 production. The adipose iNKT cells were a tissue-resident population that induced an anti-inflammatory phenotype in macrophages and, through the production of IL-2, controlled the number, proliferation and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Treg cells) in adipose tissue. Thus, iNKT cells in adipose tissue are unique regulators of immunological homeostasis in this tissue. PMID:25436972

  2. Autophagy enforces functional integrity of regulatory T cells by coupling environmental cues and metabolic homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Jun; Long, Lingyun; Yang, Kai; Guy, Cliff; Shrestha, Sharad; Chen, Zuojia; Wu, Chuan; Vogel, Peter; Neale, Geoffrey; Green, Douglas R; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells respond to immune and inflammatory signals to mediate immunosuppression, but how functional integrity of Treg cells is maintained under activating environments remains elusive. Here we found that autophagy was active in Treg cells and supported their lineage stability and survival fitness. Treg cell-specific deletion of the essential autophagy gene Atg7 or Atg5 led to loss of Treg cells, increased tumor resistance, and development of inflammatory disorders. Atg7-deficient Treg cells had increased apoptosis and readily lost Foxp3 expression, especially after activation. Mechanistically, autophagy deficiency upregulated mTORC1 and c-Myc function and glycolytic metabolism that contributed to defective Treg function. Therefore, autophagy couples environmental signals and metabolic homeostasis to protect lineage and survival integrity of Treg cells in activating contexts. PMID:26808230

  3. The PTEN pathway in Tregs is a critical driver of the suppressive tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Madhav D.; Shinde, Rahul; McGaha, Tracy L.; Huang, Lei; Holmgaard, Rikke B.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Mautino, Mario R.; Celis, Esteban; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Francisco, Loise M.; Powell, Jonathan D.; Yagita, Hideo; Mellor, Andrew L.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Munn, David H.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is profoundly immunosuppressive. We show that multiple tumor types create intratumoral immune suppression driven by a specialized form of regulatory T cell (Treg) activation dependent on the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) lipid phosphatase. PTEN acted to stabilize Tregs in tumors, preventing them from reprogramming into inflammatory effector cells. In mice with a Treg-specific deletion of PTEN, tumors grew slowly, were inflamed, and could not create an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. In normal mice, exposure to apoptotic tumor cells rapidly elicited PTEN-expressing Tregs, and PTEN-deficient mice were unable to maintain tolerance to apoptotic cells. In wild-type mice with large established tumors, pharmacologic inhibition of PTEN after chemotherapy or immunotherapy profoundly reconfigured the tumor microenvironment, changing it from a suppressive to an inflammatory milieu, and tumors underwent rapid regression. Thus, the immunosuppressive milieu in tumors must be actively maintained, and tumors become susceptible to immune attack if the PTEN pathway in Tregs is disrupted. PMID:26601142

  4. Regulatory T cells and chronic immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Freguja, R; Gianesin, K; Mosconi, I; Zanchetta, M; Carmona, F; Rampon, O; Giaquinto, C; De Rossi, A

    2011-01-01

    The function of CD4+ T cells with regulatory activity (Tregs) is the down-regulation of immune responses. This suppressive activity may limit the magnitude of effector responses, resulting in failure to control human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, but may also suppress chronic immune activation, a characteristic feature of HIV-1 disease. We evaluated the correlation between viral load, immune activation and Tregs in HIV-1-infected children. Eighty-nine HIV-1-infected children (aged 6–14 years) were included in the study and analysed for HIV-1 plasmaviraemia, HIV-1 DNA load, CD4 and CD8 cell subsets. Treg cells [CD4+ CD25highCD127lowforkhead box P3 (FoxP3high)] and CD8-activated T cells (CD8+CD38+) were determined by flow cytometry. Results showed that the number of activated CD8+CD38+ T cells increased in relation to HIV-1 RNA plasmaviraemia (r = 0·403, P < 0·0001). The proportion of Tregs also correlated positively with HIV-1 plasmaviraemia (r = 0·323, P = 0·002), but correlated inversely with CD4+ cells (r = −0·312, P = 0·004), thus suggesting a selective expansion along with increased viraemia and CD4+ depletion. Interestingly, a positive correlation was found between the levels of Tregs and CD8+CD38+ T cells (r = 0·305, P = 0·005), and the percentage of Tregs tended to correlate with HIV-1 DNA load (r = 0·224, P = 0·062). Overall, these findings suggest that immune activation contributes to the expansion of Treg cells. In turn, the suppressive activity of Tregs may impair effector responses against HIV-1, but appears to be ineffective in limiting immune activation. PMID:21438872

  5. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD

    PubMed Central

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M.; Lamborn, Ian T.; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2012-01-01

    FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8+FoxP3+ T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8+FoxP3+ T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4+ counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3+ Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD. PMID:22496155

  6. Cell-autonomous role of TGFβ and IL-2 receptors in CD4+ and CD8+ inducible regulatory T-cell generation during GVHD.

    PubMed

    Sawamukai, Norifumi; Satake, Atsushi; Schmidt, Amanda M; Lamborn, Ian T; Ojha, Priti; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Kambayashi, Taku

    2012-06-01

    FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress GVHD while preserving graft-versus-tumor effects, making them an attractive target for GVHD therapy. The donor-derived Treg pool can potentially be derived from the expansion of preexisting natural Tregs (nTregs) or from de novo generation of inducible Tregs (iTregs) from donor Tconvs in the transplantation recipient. Using an MHC-mismatched model of acute GVHD, in the present study we found that the Treg pool was comprised equally of donor-derived nTregs and iTregs. Experiments using various combinations of T cells from wild-type and FoxP3-deficient mice suggested that both preexisting donor nTregs and the generation of iTregs in the recipient mice contribute to protection against GVHD. Surprisingly, CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells represented approximately 70% of the iTreg pool. These CD8(+)FoxP3(+) T cells shared phenotypic markers with their CD4(+) counterparts and displayed suppressive activity, suggesting that they were bona fide iTregs. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) Tregs appeared to be protective against GVHD-induced lethality and required IL-2 and TGFβ receptor expression for their generation. These data illustrate the complex makeup of the donor-derived FoxP3(+) Treg pool in allogeneic recipients and their potential role in protection against GVHD. PMID:22496155

  7. FOXP3+ regulatory T cell development and function require histone/protein deacetylase 3

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liqing; Liu, Yujie; Han, Rongxiang; Beier, Ulf H.; Bhatti, Tricia R.; Akimova, Tatiana; Greene, Mark I.; Hiebert, Scott W.; Hancock, Wayne W.

    2015-01-01

    Treg dysfunction is associated with a variety of inflammatory diseases. Treg populations are defined by expression of the oligomeric transcription factor FOXP3 and inability to produce IL-2, a cytokine required for T cell maintenance and survival. FOXP3 activity is regulated post-translationally by histone/protein acetyltransferases and histone/protein deacetylases (HDACs). Here, we determined that HDAC3 mediates both the development and function of the two main Treg subsets, thymus-derived Tregs and induced Tregs (iTregs). We determined that HDAC3 and FOXP3 physically interact and that HDAC3 expression markedly reduces Il2 promoter activity. In murine models, conditional deletion of Hdac3 during thymic Treg development restored Treg production of IL-2 and blocked the suppressive function of Tregs. HDAC3-deficient mice died from autoimmunity by 4–6 weeks of age; however, injection of WT FOXP3+ Tregs prolonged survival. Adoptive transfer of Hdac3-deficient Tregs, unlike WT Tregs, did not control T cell proliferation in naive mice and did not prevent allograft rejection or colitis. HDAC3 also regulated the development of iTregs, as HDAC3-deficient conventional T cells were not converted into iTregs under polarizing conditions and produced large amounts of IL-2, IL-6, and IL-17. We conclude that HDAC3 is essential for the normal development and suppressive functions of thymic and peripheral FOXP3+ Tregs. PMID:25642770

  8. Exchange Protein Directly Activated by cAMP Modulates Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Almahariq, Muayad; Mei, Fang C.; Wang, Hui; Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Soong, Lynn; Sun, Jiaren; Cong, Yingzi; Chen, Ju; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway plays an essential role in immune functions. In this study we examined the role of the cAMP/EPAC1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) axis in regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated immune suppression using genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Genetic deletion of EPAC1 in Treg and effector T-cells (Teff) synergistically attenuated Treg-mediated suppression of Teff. Mechanistically, EPAC1 inhibition enhanced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and up-regulated SMAD7 expression while down-regulating expression of SMAD4. Consequently, CD4+T-cells were desensitized to TGF-β1, a cytokine employed by Treg cells to exert a broad inhibitory function within the immune system. Furthermore, deletion of EPAC1 led to production of significant levels of OVA-IgG antibodies in a low dose oral tolerance mouse mode. These in vivo observations are consistent with the finding that EPAC1 plays an important role in Treg-mediated suppression. More importantly, pharmacological inhibition of EPAC1 using an EPAC specific inhibitor recapitulates the EPAC1 deletion phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. Our results show that EPAC1 boosts Treg-mediated suppression, and identify EPAC1 as a target with broad therapeutic potential since Treg cells are involved in numerous pathologies including autoimmunity, infections, and a wide range of cancers. PMID:25339598

  9. Effect of iodine excess on Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg cell subpopulations in the thyroid of NOD.H-2h4 mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Gao, Tianshu; Shi, Rui; Zhou, Xiyu; Qu, Jinqiao; Xu, Jia; Shan, Zhongyan; Teng, Weiping

    2014-06-01

    Iodine is an indispensable micronutrient for thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism. Iodine excess may trigger and exacerbate autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT). The pathogenetic mechanism of iodine excess-induced AIT is partly regarded as T helper type 1 (Th1) cell and/or T helper type 17 (Th17) cell dominant autoimmune disease. It is still unknown whether other cluster of differentiation 4+ T (CD4+T) cell subpopulations are involved. Therefore, we studied the profile of all the CD4+T cell subpopulations of the thyroid in iodine excess-induced nonobese diabetic-H2h4 (NOD.H-2h4) mice to explore the potential immunologic mechanism of iodine excess-induced AIT. A total of 40 healthy 8-week-old NOD.H-2h4 mice were randomly allocated into the normal group (NG, n=20) and the test group (TG, n=20), which were fed with double-distilled water and 0.05% sodium iodine (NaI) for 8 weeks, respectively. Compared to the NG, in the TG, the incidence of AIT was significantly higher, the expressions of interleukin-17 (IL-17), interleukin-23 (IL-23), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) remarkably increased by immunohistochemistry, which were further verified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), while the protein and mRNA expressions of interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interferon-γ (INF-γ) decreased markedly. In the AIT mice, the expressions of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt), retinoic acid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORα), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) were much higher, the expression of forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3) significantly lower by western blot, and the proportion of Th17 cells by flow cytometry method (FCM) much larger compared to those of the NG group. In conclusion, Th17 cells may promote an inflammatory reaction in the development of iodine-excess-induced AIT, which is negatively regulated by Th1, T helper type 2 (Th2), and regulatory T (Treg

  10. Targeted IL-4 therapy synergizes with dexamethasone to induce a state of tolerance by promoting Treg cells and macrophages in mice with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kawalkowska, Joanna Z; Hemmerle, Teresa; Pretto, Francesca; Matasci, Mattia; Neri, Dario; Williams, Richard O

    2016-05-01

    F8-IL-4 is a recently developed immunocytokine that delivers IL-4 to sites of inflammation by targeting the neovasculature. We previously reported that F8-IL-4, in combination with dexamethasone (DXM), provides a durable therapy in mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Therefore, the objective of this study was to identify the mechanism by which IL-4 and DXM combination therapy provides long-lasting disease remission. F8-IL-4 alone attenuated inflammation in CIA and this was associated with increased TH 2 and decreased TH 17 cell numbers in the joints. Similarly, DXM alone had an antiinflammatory effect associated with lower TH 17 cell numbers. In both cases, these therapeutic benefits were reversed once treatment was stopped. On the other hand, combination therapy with F8-IL-4 plus DXM led to a synergistic increase in the percentage of regulatory T (Treg) cells and antiinflammatory macrophages in the arthritic joint and spleen as well as IL-10 levels in serum and spleen. The net result of this was a more pronounced attenuation of inflammation and, more importantly, protection from arthritis relapse post therapy retraction. In conclusion, F8-IL-4 plus DXM is a durable treatment for arthritis that acts by promoting Treg cells in a synergistic manner, and by producing a sustained increase in antiinflammatory macrophages. PMID:26919786

  11. p(⁷⁰S⁶K¹) in the TORC1 pathway is essential for the differentiation of Th17 Cells, but not Th1, Th2, or Treg cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Carl Y; Chen, Gang; Munk, Rachel; Eitan, Erez; Martindale, Jennifer; Longo, Dan L; Ghosh, Paritosh

    2016-01-01

    The TORC1 pathway is necessary for ribosomal biogenesis and initiation of protein translation. Furthermore, the differentiation of Th1 and Th17 cells requires TORC1 activity. To investigate the role of the TORC1 pathway in the differentiation of Th1 and/or Th17 cells in more detail, we compared the differentiation capacity of naïve T cells from wild type and p70(S6K1) knockout mice. Expression of many of the genes associated with Th17-cell differentiation, such as IL17a, IL17f, and IL-23R, were reduced in p70(S6K1) knockout mice. In contrast, the development of Th1, Th2, and Treg cells was unaffected in the absence of p70(S6K1) . Furthermore, expression of the major transcription factor in Th17-cell differentiation, retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor gamma T, remained unchanged. However, the acetylation of histone 3 at the promoters of IL17a and IL17f was reduced in the absence of p70(S6K1) . In accordance with the in vitro data, the kinetics, but not the development, of EAE was affected with the loss of p70(S6K1) expression. Collectively, our findings suggested that both in vitro and in vivo differentiation of Th17 cells were positively regulated by p70(S6K1) . PMID:26514620

  12. FoxP3 Tregs Response to Sublingual Allergen Specific Immunotherapy in Children Depends on the Manifestation of Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna; Głodkowska-Mrówka, Eliza; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades allergic diseases has become a major health problem worldwide. The only specific treatment to date is allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Although it was shown that ASIT generates allergen-tolerant T cells, detailed mechanism underlying its activity is still unclear and there is no reliable method to monitor its effectiveness. The aim of our study was to evaluate ASIT influence on the frequency of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) Tregs in allergic children with various clinical manifestations. The relative number of FoxP3 Tregs in 32 blood samples from allergic children at baseline and/or after 1 year of ASIT was assessed by flow cytometry. In the entire studied group, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs did not increase 1 year after ASIT. Nevertheless, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs after ASIT significantly increased in children with respiratory allergy (conjunctivitis, asthma, and rhinitis) coexisting with nonrespiratory manifestations (food allergy and/or atopic dermatitis), whereas, in patients with respiratory allergy only, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs decreased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing various differential FoxP3 Tregs response to ASIT in allergic children. FoxP3 Tregs number could be useful in treatment monitoring. Further studies are warranted to confirm these observations. PMID:26457309

  13. FoxP3 Tregs Response to Sublingual Allergen Specific Immunotherapy in Children Depends on the Manifestation of Allergy.

    PubMed

    Stelmaszczyk-Emmel, Anna; Zawadzka-Krajewska, Anna; Głodkowska-Mrówka, Eliza; Demkow, Urszula

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades allergic diseases has become a major health problem worldwide. The only specific treatment to date is allergen specific immunotherapy (ASIT). Although it was shown that ASIT generates allergen-tolerant T cells, detailed mechanism underlying its activity is still unclear and there is no reliable method to monitor its effectiveness. The aim of our study was to evaluate ASIT influence on the frequency of forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) Tregs in allergic children with various clinical manifestations. The relative number of FoxP3 Tregs in 32 blood samples from allergic children at baseline and/or after 1 year of ASIT was assessed by flow cytometry. In the entire studied group, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs did not increase 1 year after ASIT. Nevertheless, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs after ASIT significantly increased in children with respiratory allergy (conjunctivitis, asthma, and rhinitis) coexisting with nonrespiratory manifestations (food allergy and/or atopic dermatitis), whereas, in patients with respiratory allergy only, the percentage of FoxP3 Tregs decreased. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing various differential FoxP3 Tregs response to ASIT in allergic children. FoxP3 Tregs number could be useful in treatment monitoring. Further studies are warranted to confirm these observations. PMID:26457309

  14. Diversification and senescence of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tauro, Sharyn; Nguyen, Phuong; Li, Bofeng; Geiger, Terrence L

    2013-05-01

    The fate of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells responding during autoimmunity is not well defined. We observed a marked elevation in KLRG1(+) (where KLRG1 stands for killer cell lectin-like receptor G1) CNS-infiltrating Treg cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and assessed their origin and properties. KLRG1(+) Treg cells showed increased activation marker expression, Foxp3 and CD25 levels, and more rapid cell cycling than KLRG1(-) cells. KLRG1(-) Treg cells converted into KLRG1(+) cells and this was increased in autoimmune inflammation. Conversion was unidirectional; KLRG1(+) Treg cells did not revert to a KLRG1(-) state. KLRG1(+) but notKLRG1(-) Treg cells survived poorly, indicative of terminal differentiation. This was associated with diminished BCL2 and increased apoptosis of isolated cells. KLRG1 was also upregulated on iTreg cells after transfer and EAE induction or on iTreg cells developing spontaneously during EAE. KLRG1(+) Treg cells produced more IL-10 and had altered effector cytokine production compared with their KLRG1(-) counterparts. Despite their differences, KLRG1(+) and KLRG1(-) Treg cells proved similarly potent in suppressing EAE. KLRG1(+) and KLRG1(-) populations were phenotypically heterogeneous, with the extent and pattern of activation marker expression dependent both on cellular location and inflammation. Our results support an extensive diversification of Treg cells during EAE, and associate KLRG1 with altered Treg-cell function and senescence. PMID:23436224

  15. T regulatory cells (TREG)(TCD4+CD25+FOXP3+) distribution in the different clinical forms of leprosy and reactional states*

    PubMed Central

    Parente, José Napoleão Tavares; Talhari, Carolina; Schettini, Antônio Pedro Mendes; Massone, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Leprosy is characterized histologically by a spectrum of different granulomatous skin lesions, reflecting patients' immune responses to Mycobacterium leprae. Although CD4+CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells are pivotal in the immuneregulation, presence, frequency, and distribution of Tregs in leprosy, its reactional states have been investigated in few studies. OBJECTIVES This study aimed to verify the frequency and distribution of regulatory T cells in different clinical forms and reactional states of leprosy. METHODS We performed an immunohistochemical study on 96 leprosy cases [Indeterminate (I): 9 patients; tuberculoid tuberculoid: 13 patients; borderline tuberculoid: 26 patients; borderline borderline: 3 patients; borderline lepromatous: 8 patients; lepromatous lepromatous: 27 patients; reversal reaction: 8 patients; and erythema nodosum leprosum: 2 patients]. RESULTS FoxP3-positive cells were present in 100% of the cases with an average density of 2.82% of the infiltrate. Their distribution was not related to granulomatous structures or special locations. There was a statistically significant increment of FoxP3 expression in patients with leprosy reversal reactions when compared with patients presenting with type I leprosy (P= 0.0228); borderline tuberculoid leprosy (P = 0.0351) and lepromatous leprosy (P = 0.0344). CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that Tregs play a relevant role in the etiopathogenesis of leprosy, mainly in type I leprosy reaction. PMID:25672298

  16. mTOR Inhibition Attenuates Dextran Sulfate Sodium-Induced Colitis by Suppressing T Cell Proliferation and Balancing TH1/TH17/Treg Profile

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yilin; Wang, Zhengting; Pei, Yaofei; Fan, Rong; Liu, Xiqiang; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jie; Zheng, Sichang; Zhang, Tianyu; Lin, Yun; Zhang, Maochen; Tao, Ran; Zhong, Jie

    2016-01-01

    It has been established that mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors have anti-inflammatory effects in models of experimental colitis. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. In this research, we investigate the anti-inflammatory effects of AZD8055, a potent mTOR inhibitor, on T cell response in dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis in mice, a commonly used animal model of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Severity of colitis is evaluated by changing of body weight, bloody stool, fecal consistency, histology evaluation and cytokine expression. We find that AZD8055 treatment attenuates DSS-induced body weight loss, colon length shortening and pathological damage of the colon. And AZD8055 treatment decreases colonic expression of genes encoding the pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ, interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-1β,IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor(TNF)-a and increases colonic expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10. We show that AZD8055 treatment decreases the percentages of CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells in spleen, lymph nodes and peripheral blood of mice. We also find that AZD8055 treatment significantly reduces the number of T helper 1(TH1) cells and TH17 cells and increases regulatory T (Treg) cells in the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes. Furthermore, we demonstrates that AZD8055 suppresses the proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and the differentiation of TH1/TH17 cells and expands Treg cells in vitro. The results suggest that, in experimental colitis, AZD8055 exerts anti-inflammatory effect by regulating T helper cell polarization and proliferation. PMID:27128484

  17. Notch1 regulated autophagy controls survival and suppressor activity of activated murine T-regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Nimi; Sarin, Apurva

    2016-01-01

    Cell survival is one of several processes regulated by the Notch pathway in mammalian cells. Here we report functional outcomes of non-nuclear Notch signaling to activate autophagy, a conserved cellular response to nutrient stress, regulating survival in murine natural T-regulatory cells (Tregs), an immune subset controlling tolerance and inflammation. Induction of autophagy required ligand-dependent, Notch intracellular domain (NIC) activity, which controlled mitochondrial organization and survival of activated Tregs. Consistently, NIC immune-precipitated Beclin and Atg14, constituents of the autophagy initiation complex. Further, ectopic expression of an effector of autophagy (Atg3) or recombinant NIC tagged to a nuclear export signal (NIC-NES), restored autophagy and suppressor function in Notch1-/- Tregs. Furthermore, Notch1 deficiency in the Treg lineage resulted in immune hyperactivity, implicating Notch activity in Treg homeostasis. Notch1 integration with autophagy, revealed in these experiments, holds implications for Notch regulated cell-fate decisions governing differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14023.001 PMID:27267497

  18. miR-146b antagomir-treated human Tregs acquire increased GVHD inhibitory potency.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yunjie; Hippen, Keli L; Lemire, Amanda L; Gu, Jian; Wang, Weizhi; Ni, Xuhao; Ranganathan, Parvathi; Levine, Bruce L; Riley, James L; June, Carl H; Turka, Laurence A; Munn, David H; Garzon, Ramiro; Lu, Ling; Blazar, Bruce R

    2016-09-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) thymic-derived regulatory T cells (tTregs) are indispensable for maintaining immune system equilibrium. Adoptive transfer of tTregs is an effective means of suppressing graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in murine models and in early human clinical trials. Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme that mediates nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation, plays an essential role in modulating regulatory T cell survival and function. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs, which mediate RNA silencing and posttranscriptional gene repression. By performing comprehensive TaqMan Low Density Array miRNA assays, we identified 10 miRNAs differentially regulated in human tTreg compared with control T cells. One candidate, miR-146b, is preferentially and highly expressed in human naive tTregs compared with naive CD4 T cells. miRNA prediction software revealed that TRAF6 was the one of the top 10 scored mRNAs involved tTreg function with the highest probability as a potential miR-146b target. Antagomir-mediated knockdown of miRNA-146b, but not another miRNA-146 family member (miRNA-146a), enhanced TRAF6 expression. TRAF6, in turn, increases NF-κB activation, which is essential for tTreg function as well as Foxp3 protein and antiapoptotic gene expression, and downregulates proapoptotic gene expression. miR-146b knockdown increased the nuclear localization and expression of genes regulated by NF-κB, which was associated with enhanced tTreg survival, proliferation, and suppressive function measured in vitro and in vivo. TRAF6 inhibition had the opposite effects. We conclude that an miR-146b-TRAF6-NF-κB-FoxP3 signaling pathway restrains regulatory T cell survival, proliferation, and suppressor function. In vitro exposure of human tTregs to miR-146b antagomirs can be exploited to improve the clinical efficacy of human adoptive tTreg transfer in a GVHD setting. PMID:27485827

  19. Analysis of Suppressor and Non-Suppressor FOXP3+ T Cells in HIV-1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Arruvito, Lourdes; Baz, Plácida; Billordo, Luis A.; Lasala, Maria B.; Salomón, Horacio; Geffner, Jorge; Fainboim, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    Recently, it was shown that peripheral blood FOXP3+CD4+ T cells are composed of three phenotypic and functionally distinct subpopulations. Two of them having in vitro suppressive effects were characterized as resting Treg cells (rTregs) and activated Treg cells (aTregs). A third subset, identified as FOXP3+ non-Tregs, does not display any suppressor activity and produce high levels of Th1 and Th17 cytokines upon stimulation. In the present study we focus on the characteristics of these three subsets of FOXP3+CD4+ T cells in untreated HIV-1-infected patients. We found that the absolute counts of rTregs, aTregs and FOXP3+ non-Tregs were reduced in HIV-1 patients compared with healthy donors. The relative frequency of rTregs and aTregs was similar in HIV-1 patients and healthy donors, while the frequency of FOXP3+ non-Tregs was significantly higher in HIV-1 patients, reaching a maximum in those patients with the lower values of CD4 counts. Contrasting with the observations made in FOXP3- CD4+ T cells, we did not find a negative correlation between the number of rTregs, aTregs or FOXP3+ non-Tregs and virus load. Studies performed with either whole PBMCs or sorted aTregs and FOXP3+ non-Tregs cells showed that these two populations of FOXP3+ T cells were highly permissive to HIV-1 infection. Upon infection, FOXP3+ non-Tregs markedly down-regulates its capacity to produce Th1 and Th17 cytokines, however, they retain the ability to produce substantial amounts of Th2 cytokines. This suggests that FOXP3+ non-Tregs might contribute to the polarization of CD4+ T cells into a Th2 profile, predictive of a poor outcome of HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:23285102

  20. Advances in distinguishing natural from induced Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaohong; Chen, Maogen; Liu, Ya; Guo, Zhiyong; He, Xiaoshun; Brand, David; Zheng, Song Guo

    2013-01-01

    For more than a decade now, the regulatory T (Treg) cell has widely been considered as a critical subpopulation of T cells which can suppress effector T cell responses as well as suppressing the activity of other immune cells, such as mast cell, dendritic cells, and B cells. Treg cells have been broadly characterized as comprising of two main populations: thymus-derived natural Treg (nTreg) cells, and peripherally generated induced Treg (iTreg) cells. Both subsets have similar phenotypic characteristics and comparable suppressive function against T cell-mediated immune response and diseases. However, both Foxp3 positive Treg subsets exhibit some specific differences such as different mRNA transcripts and protein expression, epigenetic modification, and stability. These subtle differences reinforce the notion that they represent unique and distinct subsets. Accurately distinguishing iTregs from nTregs will help to clarify the biological features and contributions of each Treg subsets in peripheral tolerance, autoimmunity and tumor immunity. One difficult problem is that it has not been possible to distinguish iTregs from nTregs using surface markers until two recent articles were published to address this possibility. This review will focus on very recent advances in using molecular markers to differentiate these Treg subsets. PMID:23329997

  1. A shift in the balance of T17 and Treg cells in menstrual blood of women with unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Samira; Shokri, Fazel; Ansari Pour, Soheila; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Nikoo, Shohreh; Yousefi, Mehdi; Zarnani, Amir-Hassan

    2016-08-01

    To determine usefulness of menstrual blood for assessment of differential frequency of T cell subsets, peripheral blood (PB) and menstrual blood (MB) from healthy fertile (n=15), unexplained recurrent spontaneous abortion (URSA) women (n=15) and unexplained infertile women (n=8) were collected in the second day of menstrual bleeding. Frequency of T cell subsets was measured by flow cytometry. URSA and unexplained infertile patients had higher frequency of TCRαβ(+)CD3(+)CD56(-) and CD45RO(+) T cells as well as CD45RO(+)/CD45RO(-) ratio in PB as compared to MB. Frequency of CD3(+)TCRγδ(+) cells in PB of unexplained infertile and MB of URSA patients were significantly lower than that in fertile group. In all groups MB contained higher percentage of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory and lower percentages of CD16(+) T cells compared to PB. T17 cells (CD3(+)CD56(-)IL-17(+)) was found to be significantly higher in MB of only fertile and unexplained infertile subjects and not URSA patients in comparison with PB. Compared to PB, only fertile women had higher T17:Treg ratio in their MB. URSA women had significantly lower MB T17 cells and T17:Treg ratio compared to those in fertile and unexplained infertile women. Based on the findings presented here, we speculate that MB has its own unique immune milieu which is not solely continuation of the immune environment of secretory endometrium. Indeed, immunophenotyping of MB immune cells could potentially be a useful tool for investigation of immunological disturbances in pregnancy-related disorders. PMID:27128988

  2. Non-suppressive regulatory T cell subset expansion in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sada, Yoshiharu; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Uga, Sayuri; Higashi, Akifumi; Kinoshita, Hiroki; Kihara, Yasuki

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been reported to play a pivotal role in the vascular remodeling of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Recent studies have revealed that Tregs are heterogeneous and can be characterized by three phenotypically and functionally different subsets. In this study, we investigated the roles of Treg subsets in the pathogenesis of PAH in eight patients with PAH and 14 healthy controls. Tregs and their subsets in peripheral blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry. Treg subsets were defined as CD4(+)CD45RA(+)FoxP3(low) resting Tregs (rTregs), CD4(+)CD45RA(-)FoxP3(high) activated Tregs (aTregs), and CD4(+)CD45RA(-)FoxP3(low) non-suppressive Tregs (non-Tregs). The proportion of Tregs among CD4(+) T cells was significantly higher in PAH patients than in controls (6.54 ± 1.10 vs. 3.81 ± 0.28 %, p < 0.05). Of the three subsets, the proportion of non-Tregs was significantly elevated in PAH patients compared with controls (4.06 ± 0.40 vs. 2.79 ± 0.14 %, p < 0.01), whereas those of rTregs and aTregs were not different between the two groups. Moreover, the expression levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4, a functional cell surface molecule, in aTregs (p < 0.05) and non-Tregs (p < 0.05) were significantly higher in PAH patients compared with controls. These results suggested the non-Treg subset was expanded and functionally activated in peripheral lymphocytes obtained from IPAH patients. We hypothesize that immunoreactions involving the specific activation of the non-Treg subset might play a role in the vascular remodeling of PAH. PMID:26319442

  3. Synergy between rapamycin and FLT3 ligand enhances plasmacytoid dendritic cell–dependent induction of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Treg

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Moanaro; Sarkar, Debalina; Kumar, Sandeep R. P.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Markusic, David M.; Liao, Gongxian; Terhorst, Cox

    2015-01-01

    CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical elements for maintaining immune tolerance, for instance to exogenous antigens that are introduced during therapeutic interventions such as cell/organ transplant or gene/protein replacement therapy. Coadministration of antigen with rapamycin simultaneously promotes deletion of conventional CD4+ T cells and induction of Treg. Here, we report that the cytokine FMS-like receptor tyrosine kinase ligand (Flt3L) enhances the in vivo effect of rapamycin. This occurs via selective expansion of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), which further augments the number of Treg. Whereas in conventional DCs, rapamycin effectively blocks mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) 1 signaling induced by Flt3L, increased mTOR1 activity renders pDCs more resistant to inhibition by rapamycin. Consequently, Flt3L and rapamycin synergistically promote induction of antigen-specific Treg via selective expansion of pDCs. This concept is supported by the finding that Treg induction is abrogated upon pDC depletion. The combination with pDCs and rapamycin is requisite for Flt3L/antigen-induced Treg induction because Flt3L/antigen by itself fails to induce Treg. As coadministering Flt3L, rapamycin, and antigen blocked CD8+ T-cell and antibody responses in models of gene and protein therapy, we conclude that the differential effect of rapamycin on DC subsets can be exploited for improved tolerance induction. PMID:25833958

  4. Reduction of IL-17A might suppress the Th1 response and promote the Th2 response by boosting the function of Treg cells during silica-induced inflammatory response in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wen; Liu, Fangwei; Chen, Ying; Song, Laiyu; Dai, Wujing; Li, Chao; Weng, Dong; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Silica inhalation can induce chronic lung inflammation and fibrosis. Upon silica stimulation, activated macrophages trigger the T-lymphocyte which can differentiate into many different types of Th cells, including the recently discovered Th17 cells. IL-17A, the typical Th17 cytokine, is reported in some inflammatory diseases. However, the role of IL-17A in silica-induced inflammatory response is still not clear. The regulatory mechanism of silica-induced Th17 response also needs to be investigated. So we established a mice primary cell coculture system (macrophage and lymphocyte) to investigate the role of IL-17A in silica-induced inflammatory response in vitro, by using anti-IL-17A mAb and IL-1Ra. Both anti-IL-17A mAb and IL-1Ra decreased the level of IL-17A and increased the function of Treg cells. The Th1 response was suppressed and the Th2 response was promoted by the addition of anti-IL-17A mAb or IL-1Ra. IL-1Ra treatment decreased the level of IL-6, whereas the levels of IL-23 and ROR- γ t were increased. Our study demonstrated that IL-17A reduction altered the pattern of silica-induced Th responses by boosting the function of Treg cells in vitro. Blocking the function of IL-1 signal pathway could suppress the level of IL-17A, which played the major role in modulating silica-induced Th responses in vitro. PMID:24692850

  5. Interaction with activated monocytes enhances cytokine expression and suppressive activity of human CD4+CD45RO+CD25+CD127low regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Gina J.; Evans, Hayley G.; Menon, Bina; Gullick, Nicola J.; Kirkham, Bruce W.; Cope, Andrew P.; Geissmann, Frédéric; Taams, Leonie S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the high frequency of CD4+ T cells with a regulatory phenotype (CD25+CD127lowFoxP3+) in the joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammation persists. One possible explanation is that human Tregs are converted into pro-inflammatory IL-17-producing cells by inflammatory mediators and thereby lose their suppressive function. We investigated whether activated monocytes, which are potent producers of inflammatory cytokines and abundantly present in the rheumatic joint, induce pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in human Tregs and impair their regulatory function. Methods The presence and phenotype of CD4+CD45RO+CD25+CD127low T cells (memory Tregs) and CD14+ monocytes in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with RA was investigated by flow cytometry. FACS-sorted memory Tregs from healthy controls were co-cultured with autologous activated monocytes and stimulated with anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody. Intracellular cytokine expression, phenotype and function of cells were determined by flow cytometry, ELISA and proliferation assays. Results Patients with RA showed higher frequencies of CD4+CD45RO+CD25+CD127low Tregs and activated CD14+ monocytes in SF relative to PB. In vitro-activated monocytes induced an increase in the percentage of IL-17+, IFNγ+ and TNF-α+, but also IL-10+ Tregs. The observed increase in IL-17+ and IFNγ+ Tregs was driven by monocyte-derived IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α and was mediated by both CD14+CD16− and CD14+CD16+ monocyte subsets. Despite enhanced cytokine expression, cells maintained their CD25+FoxP3+CD39+ Treg phenotype and showed enhanced capacity to suppress proliferation and IL-17 production by effector T cells. Conclusion Tregs exposed to a pro-inflammatory environment show increased cytokine expression as well as enhanced suppressive activity. PMID:23280063

  6. Regulatory T Cell Responses to High-Dose Methylprednisolone in Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Chader, Driss; Cohen-Aubart, Fleur; Haroche, Julien; Fadlallah, Jehane; Claër, Laetitia; Musset, Lucile; Gorochov, Guy; Amoura, Zahir; Miyara, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background/Purpose A slight increase in the proportion of circulating regulatory T (Treg) cells has been reported in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients taking oral prednisone. The effects of intravenous (IV) high dose methylprednisolone (MP) on Tregs have not yet been described, especially in active SLE. Methods We prospectively analyzed the proportion of circulating CD4+ Treg cell subsets defined as follows: (1) naïve Treg (nTreg) FoxP3lowCD45RA+ cells; (2) effector Treg (eTreg) FoxP3highCD45RA− cells; and (3) non-suppressive FoxP3lowCD45RA− cells (non-regulatory Foxp3low T cells). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with active SLE were analyzed before the first infusion of IV high dose MP (day 0) and the following days (day 1, day 2, ±day 3 and ±day 8). The activity of SLE was assessed by the SLEDAI score. Results Seventeen patients were included. Following MP infusions, the median (range) percentage of eTregs significantly increased from 1.62% (0.53–8.43) at day 0 to 2.80% (0.83–14.60) at day 1 (p = 0.003 versus day 0), 4.64% (0.50–12.40) at day 2 (p = 0.06 versus day 1) and 7.50% (1.02–20.70) at day 3 (p = 0.008 versus day 2), and declined to baseline values at day 8. Expanding eTreg cells were actively proliferating, as they expressed Ki-67. The frequency of non-regulatory FoxP3low T cells decreased from 6.39% (3.20–17.70) at day 0 to 4.74% (1.03–9.72) at day 2 (p = 0.005); nTreg frequency did not change. All patients clinically improved immediately after MP pulses. The absence of flare after one year of follow up was associated with a higher frequency of eTregs at day 2. Conclusion IV high dose MP induces a rapid, dramatic and transient increase in circulating regulatory T cells. This increase may participate in the preventive effect of MP on subsequent flares in SLE. PMID:26629828

  7. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Pötschke, Christian; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M; Vogelgesang, Antje; Dressel, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3(+) Tregs and CD39(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4(+) T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39(+) Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4(+) Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3(+)CD39(+) Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  8. Reduced Numbers and Impaired Function of Regulatory T Cells in Peripheral Blood of Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ruhnau, Johanna; Schulze, Juliane; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Heinrich, Marie; Langner, Sönke; Wilden, Anika; Kessler, Christof; Bröker, Barbara M.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been suggested to modulate stroke-induced immune responses. However, analyses of Tregs in patients and in experimental stroke have yielded contradictory findings. We performed the current study to assess the regulation and function of Tregs in peripheral blood of stroke patients. Age dependent expression of CD39 on Tregs was quantified in mice and men. Methods. Total FoxP3+ Tregs and CD39+FoxP3+ Tregs were quantified by flow cytometry in controls and stroke patients on admission and on days 1, 3, 5, and 7 thereafter. Treg function was assessed by quantifying the inhibition of activation-induced expression of CD69 and CD154 on T effector cells (Teffs). Results. Total Tregs accounted for 5.0% of CD4+ T cells in controls and <2.8% in stroke patients on admission. They remained below control values until day 7. CD39+ Tregs were most strongly reduced in stroke patients. On day 3 the Treg-mediated inhibition of CD154 upregulation on CD4+ Teff was impaired in stroke patients. CD39 expression on Treg increased with age in peripheral blood of mice and men. Conclusion. We demonstrate a loss of active FoxP3+CD39+ Tregs from stroke patient's peripheral blood. The suppressive Treg function of remaining Tregs is impaired after stroke. PMID:27073295

  9. Adenosine deaminase regulates Treg expression in autologous T cell-dendritic cell cocultures from patients infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Naval-Macabuhay, Isaac; Casanova, Víctor; Navarro, Gemma; García, Felipe; León, Agathe; Miralles, Laia; Rovira, Cristina; Martinez-Navio, José M; Gallart, Teresa; Mallol, Josefa; Gatell, José M; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J; Climent, Núria

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells have an important role in immune suppression during HIV-1 infection. As regulatory T cells produce the immunomodulatory molecule adenosine, our aim here was to assess the potential of adenosine removal to revert the suppression of anti-HIV responses exerted by regulatory T cells. The experimental setup consisted of ex vivo cocultures of T and dendritic cells, to which adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, was added. In cells from healthy individuals, adenosine hydrolysis decreased CD4(+)CD25(hi) regulatory T cells. Addition of 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, significantly decreased CD4(+)CD25(lo) cells, confirming a modulatory role of adenosine acting via adenosine receptors. In autologous cocultures of T cells with HIV-1-pulsed dendritic cells, addition of adenosine deaminase led to a significant decrease of HIV-1-induced CD4(+)CD25(hi) forkhead box p3(+) cells and to a significant enhancement of the HIV-1-specific CD4(+) responder T cells. An increase in the effector response was confirmed by the enhanced production of CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD25(-)CD45RO(+) memory cell generation and secretion of Th1 cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-15 and chemokines MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, and RANTES/CCL5. These ex vivo results show, in a physiologically relevant model, that adenosine deaminase is able to enhance HIV-1 effector responses markedly. The possibility to revert regulatory T cell-mediated inhibition of immune responses by use of adenosine deaminase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes adenosine, merits attention for restoring T lymphocyte function in HIV-1 infection. PMID:26310829

  10. The impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the small bowel mucosa of children with celiac disease and atopic dermatitis in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Vorobjova, Tamara; Ress, Krista; Luts, Katrin; Uibo, Oivi; Uibo, Raivo

    2016-08-01

    In the present study we aimed to evaluate the impact of langerin (CD207)+ dendritic cells (DCs) and FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestinal mucosa of children with celiac disease (CD) and atopic dermatitis (AD) in comparison to children with functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGD). Seventy-five children (37 male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.8 years), who randomly underwent small bowel biopsy, were studied. The CD was diagnosed in 14 children, including five persons with concomitant AD (all positive for anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA antibodies and with small bowel atrophy). Normal small bowel mucosa was found in eight patients with AD and in 53 patients with FGD. The sera of all patients were tested for total and specific IgE antibodies to food allergen panels. Staining for CD11c+, langerin (CD207+) DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was performed on paraffin-embedded sections of bioptates using immunohistochemistry. The density of CD11c+ DCs, CD4+, and FOXP3+ Treg cells was higher in the CD patients compared to the AD and FGD patients (p = 0.02; p = 0.001). In AD, significantly higher density of CD11c+ DCs was detected in patients positive for specific IgE to food allergen panels (p = 0.02). The FGD patients with elevated total IgE had increased density of langerin (CD207)+ DCs compared to the patients with normal total IgE levels (p = 0.01). The increased density of FOXP3+ Treg cells, CD4+, cells and CD11c+ DCs was associated with CD but not with AD. The elevated level of total IgE or specific IgE to food allergens was associated with more pronounced expression of DCs, indicating a possible link between the presence of these cells in small bowel mucosa with elevated level of serum IgE. PMID:27200487

  11. Regulatory T cells require TCR signaling for their suppressive function

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Amanda M.; Lu, Wen; Sindhava, Vishal J.; Huang, Yanping; Burkhardt, Janis K.; Yang, Enjun; Riese, Matthew J.; Maltzman, Jonathan S.; Jordan, Martha S.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4+ T cells that maintain immune tolerance in part by their ability to inhibit the proliferation of conventional CD4+ T cells (Tconvs). The role of the T cell receptor (TCR) and the downstream signaling pathways required for this suppressive function of Tregs are not fully understood. To yield insight into how TCR-mediated signals influence Treg suppressive function, we assessed the ability of Tregs with altered TCR-mediated signaling capacity to inhibit Tconv proliferation. Mature Tregs deficient in SLP-76, an adaptor protein that nucleates the proximal signaling complex downstream of the TCR, were unable to inhibit Tconv proliferation, suggesting that TCR signaling is required for Treg suppressive function. Moreover, Tregs with defective PLCγ activation due to a Y145F mutation of SLP-76 were also defective in their suppressive function. Conversely, enhancement of diacylglycerol-mediated signaling downstream of PLCγ by genetic ablation of a negative regulator of diacylglycerol kinase ζ increased the suppressive ability of Tregs. Since SLP-76 is also important for integrin activation and signaling, we tested the role of integrin activation in Treg-mediated suppression. Tregs lacking the adaptor proteins ADAP or Crk/CrkL, which are required for TCR-mediated integrin activation, inhibited Tconv proliferation to a similar extent as wildtype Tregs. Together, these data suggest that TCR-mediated PLCγ activation but not integrin activation is required for Tregs to inhibit Tconv proliferation. PMID:25821220

  12. Targeting regulatory T cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T (Treg ) cells play a crucial role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. However, they also represent a major barrier to effective antitumor immunity and immunotherapy. Consequently, there has been considerable interest in developing approaches that can selectively or preferentially target Treg cells in tumors, while not impacting their capacity to maintain peripheral immune homeostasis. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the recruitment, expansion, and suppressive activity of tumor-associated Treg cells, and discuss the approaches used and the challenges encountered in the immunotherapeutic targeting of Treg cells. In addition, we summarize the primary clinical targets and some emerging data on exciting new potential Treg cell-restricted targets. We propose that discovering and understanding mechanisms that are preferentially used by Treg cells within the tumor microenvironment will lead to strategies that selectively target Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor immunity while maintaining peripheral immune tolerance. PMID:26787424

  13. Decidual vascular endothelial cells promote maternal-fetal immune tolerance by inducing regulatory T cells through canonical Notch1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yanyi; Song, Jieping; Wang, Weipeng; Liu, Nian

    2016-05-01

    Adaptation of the maternal immune response to accommodate the semiallogeneic fetus is necessary for pregnancy success. However, the mechanisms by which the fetus avoids rejection despite expression of paternal alloantigens remain incompletely understood. Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are pivotal for maintaining immune homeostasis, preventing autoimmune disease and fetus rejection. In this study, we found that maternal decidual vascular endothelial cells (DVECs) sustained Foxp3 expression in resting Treg cells in vitro. Moreover, under in vitro Treg cell induction condition with agonistic antibodies and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, DVECs promoted Treg cell differentiation from non-Treg conventional T cells. Consistent with the promotion of Treg cell maintenance and differentiation, Treg cell-associated gene expression such as TGF-β, Epstein-Barr-induced gene-3, CD39 and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor was also increased in the presence of DVECs. Further study revealed that DVECs expressed Notch ligands such as Jagged-1, Delta-like protein 1 (DLL-1) and DLL-4, while Treg cells expressed Notch1 on their surface. The effects of DVECs on Treg cells was inhibited by siRNA-induced knockdown of expression of Jagged-1 and DLL-1 in DVECs. Downregulation of Notch1 in Treg cells using lentiviral shRNA transduction decreased Foxp3 expression in Treg cells. Adoptive transfer of Notch1-deficient Treg cells increased abortion rate in a murine semiallogeneic pregnancy model. Taken together, our study suggests that maternal DVECs are able to maintain decidual Treg cell identity and promote Treg cell differentiation through activation of Notch1 signal pathway in Treg cells and subsequently inhibit the immune response against semiallogeneic fetuses and preventing spontaneous abortion. PMID:26714886

  14. Effect of chorioamnionitis on regulatory T cells in moderate/late preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Cesar M; Wells, Casey B; Gisslen, Tate; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Chougnet, Claire A

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Treg) have a protective role for the control of immune activation and tissue damage. The effects of chorioamnionitis (chorio) on Treg in moderate/late preterm newborns are not known. We hypothesized that infants exposed to chorio would have decreased Treg frequency and/or function. We isolated mononuclear cells from adult peripheral blood and cord blood from term and moderate/late preterm infants who were classified for severity of chorio exposure. Mononuclear cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for Treg frequency and phenotype. Treg suppression of activation of conventional T-cells (Tcon) was also quantified. Treg frequencies were similar in all groups of neonates, but lower than that found in adults. Newborn Treg had a naïve phenotype, with decreased levels of CD45RO, HLA-DR, CD39 and TIGIT compared to adult Treg and chorio did not affect the phenotype. Treg from preterm newborns exposed to severe chorio had higher expression of Ki67 compared to the other groups. Treg from preterm newborns were less suppressive than Treg from adults or term, and the level of suppression was reduced with severe chorio. Relative to term, Treg frequency and phenotype were not affected by prematurity and chorio but their functionality was decreased. Lower Treg activity may contribute to inflammation in newborns that is often associated with chorioamnionitis. PMID:25451985

  15. Inducing and Administering Tregs to Treat Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Perdigoto, Ana Luisa; Chatenoud, Lucienne; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Herold, Kevan C.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) control unwanted immune responses, including those that mediate tolerance to self as well as to foreign antigens. Their mechanisms of action include direct and indirect effects on effector T cells and important functions in tissue repair and homeostasis. Tregs express a number of cell surface markers and transcriptional factors that have been instrumental in defining their origins and potentially their function. A number of immune therapies, such as rapamycin, IL-2, and anti-T cell antibodies, are able to induce Tregs and are being tested for their efficacy in diverse clinical settings with exciting preliminary results. However, a balance exists with the use of some, such as IL-2, that may have effects on unwanted populations as well as promoting expansion and survival of Tregs requiring careful selection of dose for clinical use. The use of cell surface markers has enabled investigators to isolate and expand ex vivo Tregs more than 500-fold routinely. Clinical trials have begun, administering these expanded Tregs to patients as a means of suppressing autoimmune and alloimmune responses and potentially inducing immune tolerance. Studies in the future are likely to build on these initial technical achievements and use combinations of agents to improve the survival and functional capacity of Tregs. PMID:26834735

  16. Selective Treg reconstitution during lymphopenia normalizes DC costimulation and prevents graft-versus-host disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Holly A.; Zhu, Erhua; Terry, Alexandra M.; Guy, Thomas V.; Koh, Woon-Puay; Tan, Sioh-Yang; Power, Carl A.; Bertolino, Patrick; Lahl, Katharina; Sparwasser, Tim; Shklovskaya, Elena; de St. Groth, Barbara Fazekas

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to enhance immune reconstitution and prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; however, it is unclear how Tregs mediate these effects. Here, we developed a model to examine the mechanism of Treg-dependent regulation of immune reconstitution. Lymphopenic mice were selectively reconstituted with Tregs prior to transfer of conventional CD4+ T cells. Full Treg reconstitution prevented the rapid oligoclonal proliferation that gives rise to pathogenic CD4 effector T cells, while preserving the slow homeostatic form of lymphopenia-induced peripheral expansion that repopulates a diverse peripheral T cell pool. Treg-mediated CTLA-4–dependent downregulation of CD80/CD86 on DCs was critical for inhibition of rapid proliferation and was a function of the Treg/DC ratio achieved by reconstitution. In an allogeneic BM transplant model, selective Treg reconstitution before T cell transfer also normalized DC costimulation and provided complete protection against GVHD. In contrast, cotransfer of Tregs was not protective. Our results indicate that achieving optimal recovery from lymphopenia should aim to improve early Treg reconstitution in order to increase the relative number of Tregs to DCs and thereby inhibit spontaneous oligoclonal T cell proliferation. PMID:26301814

  17. T regulatory cells and the immune aging process

    PubMed Central

    Jagger, Ann Titi; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Goronzy, Jorg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    Constant exposure to new and persisting antigens and the need to replace cellular attrition with newly build cells lead to profound remodeling of the immune system during the second half of life. The impact of the immunosenescence process varies amongst the different functional subsets represented within the immune system, and emerging data suggest that progressive aging significantly affects frequencies, subset distribution and functional competence of regulatory T cells (Treg). Given the central role of Treg cells in immune homeostasis, age-related loss of Treg function would be predicted to render the host susceptible to excessive immunity, encountered in elderly humans as a syndrome of chronic-smoldering inflammation. Conversely, age-dependent gain of Treg activity would expose the host to greater risk of immune failure, such as the rising risk of malignancies and infections in the aging population. Emerging data suggest that some Treg populations, specifically naturally occurring Tregs (nTreg), seem to accumulate with advancing age, whereas inducible Tregs (iTreg) appear to be less available in the older host. More studies are necessary to elucidate functional competence of old Tregs, with emphasis on comparing efficacy of young on old Tregs for defined functional domains. Mechanisms of declining Treg inducibility are not understood, but may provide an opportunity for targeted immunomodulation in the elderly. On the horizon is the potential to develop novel therapeutic interventions that target Tregs to make the elderly more efficient in fighting cancers and infections and dampen the risk for senescence-associated inflammation. PMID:24296590

  18. Effector Regulatory T Cells Reflect the Equilibrium between Antitumor Immunity and Autoimmunity in Adult T-cell Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ureshino, Hiroshi; Shindo, Takero; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Watanabe, Nobukazu; Watanabe, Eri; Satoh, Natsuko; Kitaura, Kazutaka; Kitamura, Hiroaki; Doi, Kazuko; Nagase, Kotaro; Kimura, Hiromi; Samukawa, Makoto; Kusunoki, Susumu; Miyahara, Masaharu; Shin-I, Tadasu; Suzuki, Ryuji; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Kimura, Shinya

    2016-08-01

    The regulatory T cells (Treg) with the most potent immunosuppressive activity are the effector Tregs (eTreg) with a CD45RA(-)Foxp3(++)CCR4(+) phenotype. Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells often share the Treg phenotype and also express CCR4. Although mogamulizumab, a monoclonal antibody to CCR4, shows marked antitumor effects against ATL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, concerns have been raised that it may induce severe autoimmune immunopathology by depleting eTregs. Here, we present case reports for two patients with ATL who responded to mogamulizumab but developed a severe skin rash and autoimmune brainstem encephalitis. Deep sequencing of the T-cell receptor revealed that ATL cells and naturally occurring Tregs within the cell population with a Treg phenotype can be clearly distinguished according to CADM1 expression. The onset of skin rash and brainstem encephalitis was coincident with eTreg depletion from the peripheral blood, whereas ATL relapses were coincident with eTreg recovery. These results imply that eTreg numbers in the peripheral blood sensitively reflect the equilibrium between antitumor immunity and autoimmunity, and that mogamulizumab might suppress ATL until the eTreg population recovers. Close monitoring of eTreg numbers is crucial if we are to provide immunomodulatory treatments that target malignancy without severe adverse events. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 644-9. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27215229

  19. H7N9 T-cell epitopes that mimic human sequences are less immunogenic and may induce Treg-mediated tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Moise, Leonard; Tassone, Ryan; Gutierrez, Andres H; Terry, Frances E; Sangare, Kotou; Ardito, Matthew T; Martin, William D; De Groot, Anne S

    2015-01-01

    Avian-origin H7N9 influenza is a novel influenza A virus (IAV) that emerged in humans in China in 2013. Using immunoinformatics tools, we identified several H7N9 T cell epitopes with T cell receptor (TCR)-facing residues identical to those of multiple epitopes from human proteins. We hypothesized that host tolerance to these peptides may impair T helper response and contribute to the low titer, weak hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody responses and diminished seroconversion rates that have been observed in human H7N9 infections and vaccine trials. We found that the magnitude of human T effector responses to individual H7N9 peptides was inversely correlated with the peptide's resemblance to self. Furthermore, a promiscuous T cell epitope from the hemagglutinin (HA) protein suppressed responses to other H7N9 peptides when co-administered in vitro. Along with other highly ‘human-like’ peptides from H7N9, this peptide was also shown to expand FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Thus, H7N9 may be camouflaged from effective human immune response by T cell epitope sequences that avert or regulate effector T cell responses through host tolerance. PMID:26090577

  20. Selective expression of latency-associated peptide (LAP) and IL-1 receptor type I/II (CD121a/CD121b) on activated human FOXP3+ regulatory T cells allows for their purification from expansion cultures

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, John; Hardwick, Donna; Bebris, Lolita; Illei, Gabor G.

    2009-01-01

    Although adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells (Foxp3+ Tregs) has proven to be efficacious in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases and graft-versus-host disease in rodents, a major obstacle for the use of Treg immunotherapy in humans is the difficulty of obtaining a highly purified preparation after ex vivo expansion. We have identified latency-associated peptide (LAP) and IL-1 receptor type I and II (CD121a/CD121b) as unique cell-surface markers that distinguish activated Tregs from activated FOXP3− and FOXP3+ non-Tregs. We show that it is feasible to sort expanded FOXP3+ Tregs from non-Tregs with the use of techniques for magnetic bead cell separation based on expression of these 3 markers. After separation, the final product contains greater than 90% fully functional FOXP3+ Tregs. This novel protocol should facilitate the purification of Tregs for both cell-based therapies as well as detailed studies of human Treg function in health and disease. PMID:19299332

  1. Selective Sparing of Human Tregs by Pharmacologic Inhibitors of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase and MEK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zwang, N. A.; Zhang, R.; Germana, S.; Fan, M. Y.; Hastings, W. D.; Cao, A.; Turka, L. A.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated (MEK) signaling are central to the survival and proliferation of many cell types. Multiple lines of investigation in murine models have shown that control of the PI3K pathway is particularly important for regulatory T cell (Treg) stability and function. PI3K and MEK inhibitors are being introduced into the clinic, and we hypothesized that pharmacologic inhibition of PI3K, and possibly MEK, in mixed cultures of human mononuclear cells would preferentially affect CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes compared with Tregs. We tested this hypothesis using four readouts: proliferation, activation, functional suppression, and signaling. Results showed that Tregs were less susceptible to inhibition by both δ and α isoform–specific PI3K inhibitors and by an MEK inhibitor compared with their conventional CD4+ and CD8+ counterparts. These studies suggest less functional reliance on PI3K and MEK signaling in Tregs compared with conventional CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes. Therefore, the PI3K and MEK pathways are attractive pharmacologic targets for transplantation and treatment of autoimmunity. PMID:27017850

  2. Decreased Circulating T Regulatory Cells in Egyptian Patients with Nonsegmental Vitiligo: Correlation with Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hegab, Doaa Salah; Attia, Mohamed Attia Saad

    2015-01-01

    Background. Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary skin disorder resulting from autoimmune destruction of melanocytes. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), specifically CD4+CD25+ and Forkhead box P3+ (FoxP3+) Tregs, acquired notable attention because of their role in a variety of autoimmune pathologies. Dysregulation of Tregs may be one of the factors that can break tolerance to melanocyte self-antigens and contribute to vitiligo pathogenesis. Methods. In order to sustain the role of Tregs in pathogenesis and disease activity of vitiligo, surface markers for CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ peripheral Tregs were evaluated by flow cytometry in 80 Egyptian patients with nonsegmental vitiligo in addition to 60 healthy control subjects and correlated with clinical findings. Results. Vitiligo patients had significantly decreased numbers of both peripheral CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ T cells compared to control subjects (11.49%  ± 8.58% of CD4+ T cells versus 21.20%  ± 3.08%, and 1.09%  ± 0.96% versus 1.44%  ± 0.24%, resp., P < 0.05 for both). Peripheral numbers of CD4+CD25+ and FoxP3+ Tregs correlated negatively with VIDA score. Conclusion. Treg depletion with impaired immune downregulatory function might play a key role in the autoimmune conditions beyond nonsegmental vitiligo particularly in active cases. Effective Treg cell-based immunotherapies might be a future hope for patients with progressive vitiligo. PMID:26788051

  3. Regulatory T cells require the phosphatase PTEN to restrain type 1 and follicular helper T-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Sharad; Yang, Kai; Guy, Cliff; Vogel, Peter; Neale, Geoffrey; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between effector and regulatory T (Treg) cells is crucial for adaptive immunity, but how Treg control diverse effector responses is elusive. We found that the phosphatase PTEN links Treg stability to repression of TH1 and TFH (follicular helper) responses. Depletion of PTEN in Treg resulted in excessive TFH and germinal center responses and spontaneous inflammatory disease. These defects are considerably blocked by deletion of Interferon-γ, indicating coordinated control of TH1 and TFH responses. Mechanistically, PTEN maintains Treg stability and metabolic balance between glycolysis and mitochondrial fitness. Moreover, PTEN deficiency upregulates mTORC2-Akt activity, and loss of this activity restores PTEN-deficient Treg function. Our studies establish a PTEN-mTORC2 axis that maintains Treg stability and coordinates Treg-mediated control of effector responses. PMID:25559258

  4. GITR ligand-costimulation activates effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, Hanna; Cao, Yujia; Iwai, Hideyuki; Piao, Jinhua; Kamimura, Yosuke; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Amagasa, Teruo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2008-05-16

    Engagement of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR-related protein (GITR) enables the costimulation of both CD25{sup -}CD4{sup +} effector (Teff) and CD25{sup +}CD4{sup +} regulatory (Treg) cells; however, the effects of GITR-costimulation on Treg function remain controversial. In this study, we examined the effects of GITR ligand (GITRL) binding on the respective functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. GITRL-P815 transfectants efficiently augmented anti-CD3-induced proliferation and cytokine production by Teff cells. Proliferation and IL-10 production in Treg were also enhanced by GITRL transfectants when exogenous IL-2 and stronger CD3 stimulation was provided. Concomitant GITRL-costimulation of Teff and Treg converted the anergic state of Treg into a proliferating state, maintaining and augmenting their function. Thus, GITRL-costimulation augments both effector and regulatory functions of CD4{sup +} T cells. Our results suggest that highly activated and increased ratios of Treg reverse the immune-enhancing effects of GITRL-costimulation in Teff, which may be problematic for therapeutic applications using strong GITR agonists.

  5. Metabolic control of the Treg/Th17 axis

    PubMed Central

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew; Pan, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Summary The interplay of the immune system with other aspects of physiology is continually being revealed and in some cases studied in considerable mechanistic detail. A prime example is the influence of metabolic cues on immune responses. It is well appreciated that upon activation, T cells take on a metabolic profile profoundly distinct from that of their quiescent and anergic counterparts; however, a number of recent breakthroughs have greatly expanded our knowledge of how aspects of cellular metabolism can shape a T-cell response. Particularly important are findings that certain environmental cues can tilt the delicate balance between inflammation and immune tolerance by skewing T-cell fate decisions toward either the T-helper 17 (Th17) or T-regulatory (Treg) cell lineage. Recognizing the unappreciated immune modifying potential of metabolic factors and particularly those involved in the generation of these functionally opposing T-cell subsets will likely add new and potent therapies to our repertoire for treating immune mediated pathologies. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings linking certain metabolic pathways, enzymes, and byproducts to shifts in the balance between Th17 and Treg cell populations. These advances highlight numerous opportunities for immune modulation. PMID:23405895

  6. Metabolic control of the Treg/Th17 axis.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Joseph; Pardoll, Drew; Pan, Fan

    2013-03-01

    The interplay of the immune system with other aspects of physiology is continually being revealed and in some cases studied in considerable mechanistic detail. A prime example is the influence of metabolic cues on immune responses. It is well appreciated that upon activation, T cells take on a metabolic profile profoundly distinct from that of their quiescent and anergic counterparts; however, a number of recent breakthroughs have greatly expanded our knowledge of how aspects of cellular metabolism can shape a T-cell response. Particularly important are findings that certain environmental cues can tilt the delicate balance between inflammation and immune tolerance by skewing T-cell fate decisions toward either the T-helper 17 (Th17) or T-regulatory (Treg) cell lineage. Recognizing the unappreciated immune-modifying potential of metabolic factors and particularly those involved in the generation of these functionally opposing T-cell subsets will likely add new and potent therapies to our repertoire for treating immune mediated pathologies. In this review, we summarize and discuss recent findings linking certain metabolic pathways, enzymes, and by-products to shifts in the balance between Th17 and Treg cell populations. These advances highlight numerous opportunities for immune modulation. PMID:23405895

  7. Low-level regulatory T-cell activity is essential for functional type-2 effector immunity to expel gastrointestinal helminths.

    PubMed

    Smith, K A; Filbey, K J; Reynolds, L A; Hewitson, J P; Harcus, Y; Boon, L; Sparwasser, T; Hämmerling, G; Maizels, R M

    2016-03-01

    Helminth infection is frequently associated with the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppression of immune responses to bystander antigens. We show that infection of mice with the chronic gastrointestinal helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus drives rapid polyclonal expansion of Foxp3(+)Helios(+)CD4(+) thymic (t)Tregs in the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes while Foxp3(+)Helios(-)CD4(+) peripheral (p)Treg expand more slowly. Notably, in partially resistant BALB/c mice parasite survival positively correlates with Foxp3(+)Helios(+)CD4(+) tTreg numbers. Boosting of Foxp3(+)Helios(+)CD4(+) tTreg populations by administration of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2):anti-IL-2 (IL-2C) complex increased worm persistence by diminishing type-2 responsiveness in vivo, including suppression of alternatively activated macrophage and granulomatous responses at the sites of infection. IL-2C also increased innate lymphoid cell (ILC) numbers, indicating that Treg functions dominate over ILC effects in this setting. Surprisingly, complete removal of Tregs in transgenic Foxp3-DTR mice also resulted in increased worm burdens, with "immunological chaos" evident in high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and interferon-γ. In contrast, worm clearance could be induced by anti-CD25 antibody-mediated partial depletion of early Treg, alongside increased T helper type 2 responses and without incurring pathology. These findings highlight the overarching importance of the early Treg response to infection and the non-linear association between inflammation and the prevailing Treg frequency. PMID:26286232

  8. Low-level regulatory T-cell activity is essential for functional type-2 effector immunity to expel gastrointestinal helminths

    PubMed Central

    Smith, K A; Filbey, K J; Reynolds, L A; Hewitson, J P; Harcus, Y; Boon, L; Sparwasser, T; Hämmerling, G; Maizels, R M

    2016-01-01

    Helminth infection is frequently associated with the expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppression of immune responses to bystander antigens. We show that infection of mice with the chronic gastrointestinal helminth Heligmosomoides polygyrus drives rapid polyclonal expansion of Foxp3+Helios+CD4+ thymic (t)Tregs in the lamina propria and mesenteric lymph nodes while Foxp3+Helios−CD4+ peripheral (p)Treg expand more slowly. Notably, in partially resistant BALB/c mice parasite survival positively correlates with Foxp3+Helios+CD4+ tTreg numbers. Boosting of Foxp3+Helios+CD4+ tTreg populations by administration of recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2):anti-IL-2 (IL-2C) complex increased worm persistence by diminishing type-2 responsiveness in vivo, including suppression of alternatively activated macrophage and granulomatous responses at the sites of infection. IL-2C also increased innate lymphoid cell (ILC) numbers, indicating that Treg functions dominate over ILC effects in this setting. Surprisingly, complete removal of Tregs in transgenic Foxp3-DTR mice also resulted in increased worm burdens, with “immunological chaos” evident in high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and interferon-γ. In contrast, worm clearance could be induced by anti-CD25 antibody–mediated partial depletion of early Treg, alongside increased T helper type 2 responses and without incurring pathology. These findings highlight the overarching importance of the early Treg response to infection and the non-linear association between inflammation and the prevailing Treg frequency. PMID:26286232

  9. Reduced Frequencies and Activation of Regulatory T Cells After the Treatment of HIV-1-Infected Individuals with the CCR5 Antagonist Maraviroc Are Associated with a Reduction in Viral Loads Rather Than a Direct Effect of the Drug on Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Joedicke, Jara J; Dirks, Miriam; Esser, Stefan; Verheyen, Jens; Dittmer, Ulf

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and they frequently express the chemokine receptor CCR5. We therefore investigated whether antiretroviral treatment with the CCR5 antagonist Maraviroc affected Tregs in chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. HIV-1-infected patients with high viral loads had elevated frequencies of activated Tregs in the peripheral blood compared with healthy controls. In patients successfully treated with antiretroviral drugs (undetectable viral loads), the frequency and the activation status of Tregs were comparable with healthy controls without any specific effect related to the treatment with Maraviroc. These results indicate that the control of viral replication in general rather than a direct binding of Maraviroc to CCR5-positive Tregs influences Treg responses in successfully treated chronically HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:27035639

  10. Brown Adipose Tissue Harbors a Distinct Sub-Population of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Medrikova, Dasa; Sijmonsma, Tjeerd P.; Sowodniok, Katharina; Richards, David M.; Delacher, Michael; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Schafmeier, Tobias; Feuerer, Markus; Herzig, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are critical determinants of both immune responses and metabolic control. Here we show that systemic ablation of Treg cells compromised the adaptation of whole-body energy expenditure to cold exposure, correlating with impairment in thermogenic marker gene expression and massive invasion of pro-inflammatory macrophages in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Indeed, BAT harbored a unique sub-set of Treg cells characterized by a unique gene signature. As these Treg cells respond to BAT activation upon cold exposure, this study defines a BAT-specific Treg sub-set with direct implications for the regulation of energy homeostasis in response to environmental stress. PMID:25714366

  11. Effect of resveratrol on Treg/Th17 signaling and ulcerative colitis treatment in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jun; Wei, Cheng; Wang, Jian-Yao; Zhang, Ru; Li, Ying-Xue; Wang, Li-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol on ulcerative colitis (UC) and its underlying mechanisms. METHODS: The mouse UC model was developed using 5% dextran sulfate sodium. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, UC model group, resveratrol low-dose group (RLD; 50 mg/kg per day), and resveratrol high-dose group (RHD; 100 mg/kg per day). RESULTS: The results showed that RLD regulates Treg/Th17 balance mainly through reducing the number of Th17 cells, whereas RHD regulates Treg/Th17 balance through both downregulating the number of Th17 cells and upregulating the number of Treg cells. Resveratrol can also regulate the level of plasma and intestinal mucosal cytokines including interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor-β1, IL-6, and IL-17. The expressions of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 were significantly decreased in the intestinal tissues of mice treated with resveratrol. CONCLUSION: The therapeutic efficacy of resveratrol in UC is dose dependent and closely associated with the regulation of Treg/Th17 balance and the HIF-1α/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:26074695

  12. Rapid Rebound of the Treg Compartment in DEREG Mice Limits the Impact of Treg Depletion on Mycobacterial Burden, but Prevents Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Filipa; Behrends, Jochen; Swallow, Maxine; Kruse, Friederike; Krull, Freyja; Ghorbani, Peyman; Mayer, Christian T.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis (Tb) represents one of the major medical challenges of this century. Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only vaccine available at present, is mostly effective at preventing disseminated Tb in children, but shows variable protection against pulmonary Tb, the most common form in adults. The reasons for this poor efficacy are not completely understood, but there is evidence that T regulatory cells (Tregs) might be involved. Similarly, Tregs have been associated with the immunosuppression observed in patients infected with Tb and are therefore believed to play a role in pathogen persistence. Thus, Treg depletion has been postulated as a novel strategy to potentiate M. bovis BCG vaccination on one side, while on the other, employed as a therapeutic approach during chronic Tb infection. Yet since Tregs are critically involved in controlling autoimmune inflammation, elimination of Tregs may therefore also incur the danger of an excessive inflammatory immune response. Thus, understanding the dynamics and function of Tregs during mycobacterial infection is crucial to evaluate the potential of Treg depletion as a medical option. To address this, we depleted Tregs after infection with M. bovis BCG or Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) using DEREG mice, which express the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the FoxP3 locus, thereby allowing the selective depletion of FoxP3+ Tregs. Our results show that after depletion, the Treg niche is rapidly refilled by a population of DT-insensitive Tregs (diTregs) and bacterial load remains unchanged. On the contrary, impaired rebound of Tregs in DEREG × FoxP3GFP mice improves pathogen burden, but is accompanied by detrimental autoimmune inflammation. Therefore, our study provides the proof-of-principle that, although a high degree of Treg depletion may contribute to the control of mycobacterial infection, it carries the risk of autoimmunity

  13. Rapid rebound of the Treg compartment in DEREG mice limits the impact of Treg depletion on mycobacterial burden, but prevents autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Berod, Luciana; Stüve, Philipp; Varela, Filipa; Behrends, Jochen; Swallow, Maxine; Kruse, Friederike; Krull, Freyja; Ghorbani, Peyman; Mayer, Christian T; Hölscher, Christoph; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The development of an effective vaccine against tuberculosis (Tb) represents one of the major medical challenges of this century. Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), the only vaccine available at present, is mostly effective at preventing disseminated Tb in children, but shows variable protection against pulmonary Tb, the most common form in adults. The reasons for this poor efficacy are not completely understood, but there is evidence that T regulatory cells (Tregs) might be involved. Similarly, Tregs have been associated with the immunosuppression observed in patients infected with Tb and are therefore believed to play a role in pathogen persistence. Thus, Treg depletion has been postulated as a novel strategy to potentiate M. bovis BCG vaccination on one side, while on the other, employed as a therapeutic approach during chronic Tb infection. Yet since Tregs are critically involved in controlling autoimmune inflammation, elimination of Tregs may therefore also incur the danger of an excessive inflammatory immune response. Thus, understanding the dynamics and function of Tregs during mycobacterial infection is crucial to evaluate the potential of Treg depletion as a medical option. To address this, we depleted Tregs after infection with M. bovis BCG or Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) using DEREG mice, which express the diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the FoxP3 locus, thereby allowing the selective depletion of FoxP3+ Tregs. Our results show that after depletion, the Treg niche is rapidly refilled by a population of DT-insensitive Tregs (diTregs) and bacterial load remains unchanged. On the contrary, impaired rebound of Tregs in DEREG × FoxP3GFP mice improves pathogen burden, but is accompanied by detrimental autoimmune inflammation. Therefore, our study provides the proof-of-principle that, although a high degree of Treg depletion may contribute to the control of mycobacterial infection, it carries the risk of autoimmunity

  14. Baicalin attenuates TNBS-induced colitis in rats by modulating the Th17/Treg paradigm.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ying; Dai, Shi-Xue; Chi, Hong-Gang; Li, Tao; He, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Jian; Ye, Cai-Guo; Huang, Guo-Liang; Zhao, Bing; Li, Wen-Yang; Wan, Zheng; Feng, Jin-Shan; Zheng, Xue-Bao

    2015-10-01

    Baicalin, a flavonoid, has a wide range of pharmacological properties, including immunomodulation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of baicalin on the balance of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells in a colitis model. The rat colitis model was induced by 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baicalin (10 ml/kg, each) or mesalazine (positive control) was then administered orally for 7 days. Inflammatory and immunological responses were evaluated by pathology, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, real-time polymerase chain reaction, western blot analysis, and flow cytometry. Our study showed that baicalin not only significantly attenuated TNBS-induced colitis by reducing the disease activity index as well as macroscopic and microscopic scores, but it also improved the weight loss and shortening of the colon. Baicalin treatment also induced a significant decrease in the levels of inflammatory mediators, including the myeloperoxidase activity, the levels of tumor necrosis factor α, IL-1β, and Th1-related cytokines IL-12 and IFN-γ. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of baicalin seem to be associated with regulation of the Th17 and Treg paradigm. We found that administration of baicalin significantly downregulated the number of Th17 cells and the levels of Th17-related cytokines (IL-17 and IL-6) and retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor γt. In contrast, there was an increase in Treg cells numbers, Treg-related cytokines transforming growth factor-β and IL-10, and forkhead box P3. Our results suggest that the anti-inflammatory effect of baicalin may be linked to modulation of the balance between Th17 and Treg cells in TNBS-induced ulcerative colitis. PMID:25269538

  15. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-04-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  16. Activation and Recruitment of Regulatory T Cells via Chemokine Receptor Activation in Trichinella spiralis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jeong-Bin; Kang, Shin Ae; Kim, Dong-Hee; Yu, Hak Sun

    2016-01-01

    As most infections by the helminth parasite elicit the recruitment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T (Treg) cells, many scientists have suggested that these cells could be used for the treatment of immune-mediated inflammation and associated diseases. In order to investigate the distribution and alteration of activated Treg cells, we compared the expression levels of Treg cell activation markers in the ileum and gastrocnemius tissues 1, 2, and 4 weeks after infection. The number of Treg cells was monitored using GFP-coded Foxp3 transgenic mice. In mice at 1 week after Trichinella spiralis infection, the number of activated Treg cells was higher than in the control group. In mice at 2 weeks after infection, there was a significant increase in the number of cells expressing Foxp3 and CTLA-4 when compared to the control group and mice at 1 week after infection. At 4 weeks after infection, T. spiralis was easily identifiable in nurse cells in mouse muscles. In the intestine, the expression of Gzmb and Klrg1 decreased over time and that of Capg remained unchanged for the first and second week, then decreased in the 4th week. However, in the muscles, the expression of most chemokine genes was increased due to T. spiralis infection, in particular the expression levels of Gzmb, OX40, and CTLA-4 increased until week 4. In addition, increased gene expression of all chemokine receptors in muscle, CXCR3, CCR4, CCR5, CCR9, and CCR10, was observed up until the 4th week. In conclusion, various chemokine receptors showed increased expressions combined with recruitment of Treg cells in the muscle tissue. PMID:27180574

  17. Microbiota-Specific CD4CD8αα Tregs: Role in Intestinal Immune Homeostasis and Implications for IBD

    PubMed Central

    Sarrabayrouse, Guillaume; Alameddine, Joudy; Altare, Frédéric; Jotereau, Francine

    2015-01-01

    In studies in murine models, active suppression by IL-10-secreting Foxp3 regulatory T cells (Tregs) has emerged as an essential mechanism in colon homeostasis. However, the role of the equivalent subset in humans remains unclear, leading to suggestions that other subsets and/or mechanisms may substitute for Foxp3 Tregs in the maintenance of colon homeostasis. We recently described a new subset of CD4CD8αα T cells reactive to the gut bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and endowed with regulatory/suppressive functions. This subset is abundant in the healthy colonic mucosa, but less common in that of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We discuss here the physiological significance and potential role of these Tregs in preventing inflammation of the gut mucosa and the potential applications of these discoveries for IBD management. PMID:26500657

  18. Unifying roles for regulatory T cells and inflammation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Erdman, Susan E.; Rao, Varada P.; Olipitz, Werner; Taylor, Christie L.; Jackson, Erin A.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Lee, Chung-Wei; Horwitz, Bruce H.; Fox, James G.; Ge, Zhongming; Poutahidis, Theofilos

    2014-01-01

    Activities of CD4+ regulatory (TREG) cells restore immune homeostasis during chronic inflammatory disorders. Roles for TREG cells in inflammation-associated cancers, however, are paradoxical. It is widely believed that TREG function in cancer mainly to suppress protective anticancer responses. However, we demonstrate here that TREG cells also function to reduce cancer risk throughout the body by efficiently downregulating inflammation arising from the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Building on a “hygiene hypothesis” model in which GI infections lead to changes in TREG that reduce immune-mediated diseases, here we show that gut bacteria-triggered TREG may function to inhibit cancer even in extraintestinal sites. Ability of bacteria-stimulated TREG to suppress cancer depends on interleukin (IL)-10, which serves to maintain immune homeostasis within bowel and support a protective antiinflammatory TREG phenotype. However, under proinflammatory conditions, TREG may fail to provide antiinflammatory protection and instead contribute to a T helper (Th)-17-driven procarcinogenic process; a cancer state that is reversible by downregulation of inflammation. Consequently, hygienic individuals with a weakened IL-10 and TREG-mediated inhibitory loop are highly susceptible to the carcinogenic consequences of elevated IL-6 and IL-17 and show more frequent inflammation-associated cancers. Taken together, these data unify seemingly divergent disease processes such as autoimmunity and cancer and help explain the paradox of TREG and inflammation in cancer. Enhancing protective TREG functions may promote healthful longevity and significantly reduce risk of cancer. PMID:19795459

  19. Protein SUMOylation Is Required for Regulatory T Cell Expansion and Function.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao; Wang, Aibo; Ma, Xiaopeng; Demarque, Maud; Jin, Wei; Xin, Huawei; Dejean, Anne; Dong, Chen

    2016-07-26

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for immune tolerance; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying Treg cell expansion and function are still not well understood. SUMOylation is a protein post-translational modification characterized by covalent attachment of SUMO moieties to lysines. UBC9 is the only E2 conjugating enzyme involved in this process, and loss of UBC9 completely abolishes the SUMOylation pathway. Here, we report that selective deletion of Ubc9 within the Treg lineage results in fatal early-onset autoimmunity similar to Foxp3 mutant mice. Ubc9-deficient Treg cells exhibit severe defects in TCR-driven homeostatic proliferation, accompanied by impaired activation and compromised suppressor function. Importantly, TCR ligation enhanced SUMOylation of IRF4, a critical regulator of Treg cell function downstream of TCR signals, which regulates its stability in Treg cells. Our data thus have demonstrated an essential role of SUMOylation in the expansion and function of Treg cells. PMID:27425617

  20. Anti-CCR4 monoclonal antibody enhances antitumor immunity by modulating tumor-infiltrating Tregs in an ovarian cancer xenograft humanized mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Chang, De-Kuan; Peterson, Eric; Sun, Jiusong; Goudie, Calum; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Liu, Joyce F.; Matulonis, Ursula; Zhu, Quan; Marasco, Wayne A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent studies have demonstrated that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are recruited to tumor sites where they can suppress antitumor immunity. The chemokine receptor CCR4 is expressed at high levels on functional CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs and production of the CCR4 ligand CCL22 by tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages is associated with Treg recruitment to the tumor site. Here, we tested IgG1 and IgG4 isotypes of human anti-CCR4 mAb2-3 for their in vitro activity and in vivo capacity in a NSG mouse model bearing CCL22-secreting ovarian cancer (OvCA) xenograft to modulate Tregs and restore antitumor activity. Both mAb2-3 isotypes blocked in vitro chemoattraction of Tregs to CCL22-secreting OvCA cells. However, they differed in their in vivo mode of action with IgG1 causing Treg depletion and IgG4 blocking migration to the tumors. Primary T cells that were primed with OvCA-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) demonstrated INFγ secretion that could be enhanced through Treg depletion by mAb2-3. Humanized mice reconstructed with allogeneic tumor-primed T cells (TP-T) were used to evaluate the restoration of OvCA immunity by depletion or blockade of Tregs with mAb2-3. We observed that IgG1 was more potent than IgG4 in inhibiting tumor growth. Mechanism studies demonstrated that mAb2-3 treatment lead to inhibition of IL-2 binding to its receptor. Further studies showed that mAb2-3 induced CD25 shedding (sCD25) from Tregs which lead to a decrease in IL-2-dependent survival. Together, the results demonstrate that mAb2-3 is an agonist antibody that can restore anti-OvCA immunity through modulation of Treg activity. PMID:27141347

  1. Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet Modulates Th17/Treg Balance in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Roberta; Viscomi, Carmela; Andreozzi, Paola; D'Ettorre, Gabriella; Viscogliosi, Giovanni; Barbaro, Barbara; Gori, Manuele; Vullo, Vincenzo; Balsano, Clara

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with hepatic and extrahepatic manifestations, including immunological disorders. Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC) is often characterized by cholesterol and lipid metabolism alterations, leading to hepatic steatosis. Cholesterol metabolism, in fact, is crucial for the viral life cycle. Recent works described that a higher dietary cholesterol intake is associated with the progression of HCV-related liver disease. CHC patients have increased levels of T helper 17 (Th17)-cells, a lymphocytic population involved in the pathogenesis of liver inflammation and autoimmune hepatitis. The balance between Th17 and regulatory T (Treg) cells is crucial for chronic inflammation and autoimmunity. Th17-cell differentiation is deeply influenced by the activation LXRs, nuclear receptors modulating cholesterol homeostasis. Moreover, HCV may affect these nuclear receptors, and cholesterol metabolism, through both direct and indirect mechanisms. On these bases, we hypothesized that modulation of cholesterol levels through Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet (NLCD) may represent an innovative strategy to reduce the progression of HCV infection, through the modulation of peripheral Th17/Treg balance. To this end, we performed a pilot study to investigate whether a Normocaloric Low Cholesterol Diet may be able to modulate Th17/Treg balance in patients affected by chronic HCV infection. After 30 days of NLCD CHC patients showed a significant reduction in Th17 cells frequency, which correlated with strong reduction of IL-17 and IL-22 serum levels. At the same time, we appreciated an increase in the percentage of Treg cells, thus improving Treg/Th17balance. Moreover, we observed an increased expression of LXRs and their target genes: SREBP-1c and ABCA-1. In conclusion, NLCD finely regulates Th17/Treg balance, improving immune system response in CHC patients. This study could pave the way for new treatments of CHC patients, suggesting that change in

  2. Unexpected T cell regulatory activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody: Its mode of action in regulatory T cell-dependent and -independent manners

    SciTech Connect

    Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Katayama, Akiko; Nakano, Toshiaki; Yamanaka, Yasushi; Takahashi, Miki; Shimada, Yayoi; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Ohmori, Naoya; Aki, Tsunehiro; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Goto, Shigeru; Chen, Chao-Long; Ono, Kazuhisa

    2013-02-08

    Highlights: ► Anti-histone H1 autoantibody (anti-H1) acts on T cells to inhibit their activation. ► Anti-H1 suppresses T cell activation in Treg cell-dependent and -independent manners. ► Suboptimal dose of anti-H1 enhances suppressor function of Treg cells. ► High dose of anti-H1 directly inhibits T cell receptor signaling. -- Abstract: Induction of anti-nuclear antibodies against DNA or histones is a hallmark of autoimmune disorders, but their actual contribution to disease predisposition remains to be clarified. We have previously reported that autoantibodies against histone H1 work as a critical graft survival factor in a rat model of tolerogeneic liver transplantation. Here we show that an immunosuppressive anti-histone H1 monoclonal antibody (anti-H1 mAb) acts directly on T cells to inhibit their activation in response to T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Intriguingly, the T cell activation inhibitory activity of anti-H1 mAb under suboptimal dosages required regulatory T (Treg) cells, while high dose stimulation with anti-H1 mAb triggered a Treg cell-independent, direct negative regulation of T cell activation upon TCR cross-linking. In the Treg cell-dependent mode of immunosuppressive action, anti-H1 mAb did not induce the expansion of CD4{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells, but rather potentiated their regulatory capacity. These results reveal a previously unappreciated T cell regulatory role of anti-H1 autoantibody, whose overproduction is generally thought to be pathogenic in the autoimmune settings.

  3. First Insight into the Kinome of Human Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Sebastian; Probst-Kepper, Michael; Reinl, Tobias; Jeron, Andreas; Huehn, Jochen; Schraven, Burkhart; Jänsch, Lothar

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for controlling peripheral tolerance by the active suppression of various immune cells including conventional T effector cells (Teffs). Downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR), more than 500 protein kinases encoded by the human genome have to be considered in signaling cascades regulating the activation of Tregs and Teffs, respectively. Following TCR engagement, Tregs posses a number of unique attributes, such as constitutive expression of Foxp3, hyporesponsiveness and poor cytokine production. Furthermore, recent studies showed that altered regulation of protein kinases is important for Treg function. These data indicate that signaling pathways in Tregs are distinctly organized and alterations at the level of protein kinases contribute to the unique Treg phenotype. However, kinase-based signaling networks in Tregs are poorly understood and necessitate further systematic characterization. In this study, we analyzed the differential expression of kinases in Tregs and Teffs by using a kinase-selective proteome strategy. In total, we revealed quantitative information on 185 kinases expressed in the human CD4+ T cell subsets. The majority of kinases was equally abundant in both T cell subsets, but 11 kinases were differentially expressed in Tregs. Most strikingly, Tregs showed an altered expression of cell cycle kinases including CDK6. Quantitative proteomics generates first comparative insight into the kinase complements of the CD4+ Teff and Treg subset. Treg-specific expression pattern of 11 protein kinases substantiate the current opinion that TCR-mediated signaling cascades are altered in Tregs and further suggests that Tregs exhibit significant specificities in cell-cycle control and progression. PMID:22815858

  4. Stem cell-derived tissue-associated regulatory T cells ameliorate the development of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Lei, Fengyang; Zheng, Songguo; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to produce almost all of the cells in the body, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the exact conditions required for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) are not well delineated. Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be tissue/organ-associated and migrate to local inflamed tissues/organs to suppress the autoimmune response after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. In this study, we developed a new approach to generate functional Ag-specific Tregs from induced PSCs (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-Tregs, which had the ability to generate an Ag-specific immunosuppressive response in a murine model of arthritis. We retrovirally transduced murine iPSCs with a construct containing genes of Ag-specific T cell receptor (TCR) and the transcriptional factor FoxP3. We differentiated the iPSCs into Ag-specific iPSC-Tregs using in vitro or in vivo Notch signaling, and demonstrated that adoptive transfer of such Tregs dramatically suppressed autoimmunity in a well-established Ag-induced arthritis model, including the inflammation, joint destruction, cartilage prostaglandin depletion, osteoclast activity, and Th17 production. Our results indicate that PSCs can be used to develop Ag-specific Tregs, which have a therapeutic potential for Treg-based therapies of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26846186

  5. Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells delay expulsion of intestinal nematodes by suppression of IL-9-driven mast cell activation in BALB/c but not in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Blankenhaus, Birte; Reitz, Martina; Brenz, Yannick; Eschbach, Marie-Luise; Hartmann, Wiebke; Haben, Irma; Sparwasser, Tim; Huehn, Jochen; Kühl, Anja; Feyerabend, Thorsten B; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Breloer, Minka

    2014-02-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that IL-9-mediated immunity plays a fundamental role in control of intestinal nematode infection. Here we report a different impact of Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells (Treg) in nematode-induced evasion of IL-9-mediated immunity in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Infection with Strongyloides ratti induced Treg expansion with similar kinetics and phenotype in both strains. Strikingly, Treg depletion reduced parasite burden selectively in BALB/c but not in C57BL/6 mice. Treg function was apparent in both strains as Treg depletion increased nematode-specific humoral and cellular Th2 response in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice to the same extent. Improved resistance in Treg-depleted BALB/c mice was accompanied by increased production of IL-9 and accelerated degranulation of mast cells. In contrast, IL-9 production was not significantly elevated and kinetics of mast cell degranulation were unaffected by Treg depletion in C57BL/6 mice. By in vivo neutralization, we demonstrate that increased IL-9 production during the first days of infection caused accelerated mast cell degranulation and rapid expulsion of S. ratti adults from the small intestine of Treg-depleted BALB/c mice. In genetically mast cell-deficient (Cpa3-Cre) BALB/c mice, Treg depletion still resulted in increased IL-9 production but resistance to S. ratti infection was lost, suggesting that IL-9-driven mast cell activation mediated accelerated expulsion of S. ratti in Treg-depleted BALB/c mice. This IL-9-driven mast cell degranulation is a central mechanism of S. ratti expulsion in both, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, because IL-9 injection reduced and IL-9 neutralization increased parasite burden in the presence of Treg in both strains. Therefore our results suggest that Foxp3⁺ Treg suppress sufficient IL-9 production for subsequent mast cell degranulation during S. ratti infection in a non-redundant manner in BALB/c mice, whereas additional regulatory pathways are functional in Treg-depleted C57BL/6

  6. Comparative Analysis of Protocols to Induce Human CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by Combinations of IL-2, TGF-beta, Retinoic Acid, Rapamycin and Butyrate

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Angelika; Eriksson, Matilda; Shang, Ming-Mei; Weyd, Heiko; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress other immune cells and are critical mediators of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutic manipulation of Tregs is subject to numerous clinical investigations including trials for adoptive Treg transfer. Since the number of naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) is minute, it is highly desirable to develop a complementary approach of inducing Tregs (iTregs) from naïve T cells. Mouse studies exemplify the importance of peripherally induced Tregs as well as the applicability of iTreg transfer in different disease models. Yet, procedures to generate iTregs are currently controversial, particularly for human cells. Here we therefore comprehensively compare different established and define novel protocols of human iTreg generation using TGF-β in combination with other compounds. We found that human iTregs expressed several Treg signature molecules, such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 and EOS, while exhibiting low expression of the cytokines Interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-17. Importantly, we identified a novel combination of TGF-β, retinoic acid and rapamycin as a robust protocol to induce human iTregs with superior suppressive activity in vitro compared to currently established induction protocols. However, iTregs generated by these protocols did not stably retain Foxp3 expression and did not suppress in vivo in a humanized graft-versus-host-disease mouse model, highlighting the need for further research to attain stable, suppressive iTregs. These results advance our understanding of the conditions enabling human iTreg generation and may have important implications for the development of adoptive transfer strategies targeting autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26886923

  7. Comparative Analysis of Protocols to Induce Human CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells by Combinations of IL-2, TGF-beta, Retinoic Acid, Rapamycin and Butyrate.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Angelika; Eriksson, Matilda; Shang, Ming-Mei; Weyd, Heiko; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress other immune cells and are critical mediators of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutic manipulation of Tregs is subject to numerous clinical investigations including trials for adoptive Treg transfer. Since the number of naturally occurring Tregs (nTregs) is minute, it is highly desirable to develop a complementary approach of inducing Tregs (iTregs) from naïve T cells. Mouse studies exemplify the importance of peripherally induced Tregs as well as the applicability of iTreg transfer in different disease models. Yet, procedures to generate iTregs are currently controversial, particularly for human cells. Here we therefore comprehensively compare different established and define novel protocols of human iTreg generation using TGF-β in combination with other compounds. We found that human iTregs expressed several Treg signature molecules, such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 and EOS, while exhibiting low expression of the cytokines Interferon-γ, IL-10 and IL-17. Importantly, we identified a novel combination of TGF-β, retinoic acid and rapamycin as a robust protocol to induce human iTregs with superior suppressive activity in vitro compared to currently established induction protocols. However, iTregs generated by these protocols did not stably retain Foxp3 expression and did not suppress in vivo in a humanized graft-versus-host-disease mouse model, highlighting the need for further research to attain stable, suppressive iTregs. These results advance our understanding of the conditions enabling human iTreg generation and may have important implications for the development of adoptive transfer strategies targeting autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:26886923

  8. Patients treated with high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin show selective activation of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tjon, A S W; Tha-In, T; Metselaar, H J; van Gent, R; van der Laan, L J W; Groothuismink, Z M A; te Boekhorst, P A W; van Hagen, P M; Kwekkeboom, J

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) is used to treat autoimmune and systemic inflammatory diseases caused by derailment of humoral and cellular immunity. In this study we investigated whether IVIg treatment can modulate regulatory T cells (Tregs) in humans in vivo. Blood was collected from IVIg-treated patients with immunodeficiency or autoimmune disease who were treated with low-dose (n = 12) or high-dose (n = 15) IVIg before, immediately after and at 7 days after treatment. Percentages and activation status of circulating CD4+CD25+forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3+) Tregs and of conventional CD4+FoxP3− T-helper cells (Tconv) were measured. The suppressive capacity of Tregs purified from blood collected at the time-points indicated was determined in an ex-vivo assay. High-dose, but not low-dose, IVIg treatment enhanced the activation status of circulating Tregs, as shown by increased FoxP3 and human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR) expression, while numbers of circulating Tregs remained unchanged. The enhanced activation was sustained for at least 7 days after infusion, and the suppressive capacity of purified Tregs was increased from 41 to 70% at day 7 after IVIg treatment. The activation status of Tconv was not affected by IVIg. We conclude that high-dose IVIg treatment activates Tregs selectively and enhances their suppressive function in humans in vivo. This effect may be one of the mechanisms by which IVIg restores imbalanced immune homeostasis in patients with autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorders. PMID:23607448

  9. Human CD4+CD25+ Regulatory T Cells Are Sensitive to Low Dose Cyclophosphamide: Implications for the Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Huong; van Gool, Stefaan; Bacher, Nicole; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Kaina, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a pivotal role in the immune system since they inhibit the T cell response. It is well known that cyclophosphamide applied at low dose is able to stimulate the immune response while high dose cyclophosphamide exerts inhibitory activity. Data obtained in mice indicate that cyclophosphamide provokes a reduction in the number of Treg and impairs their suppressive activity, resulting in immune stimulation. Here, we addressed the question of the sensitivity of human Treg to cyclophosphamide, comparing Treg with cytotoxic T cells (CTL) and T helper cells (Th). We show that Treg are more sensitive than CTL and Th to mafosfamide, which is an active derivative of cyclophosphamide, which does not need metabolic activation. The high sensitivity of Treg was due to the induction of apoptosis. Treg compared to CTL and Th were not more sensitive to the alkylating drugs temozolomide and nimustine and also not to mitomycin C, indicating a specific Treg response to mafosfamide. The high sensitivity of Treg to mafosfamide resulted not only in enhanced cell death, but also in impaired Treg function as demonstrated by a decline in the suppressor activity of Treg in a co-culture model with Th and Helios positive Treg. Treatment of Treg with mafosfamide gave rise to a high level of DNA crosslinks, which were not repaired to the same extent as observed in Th and CTL. Also, Treg showed a low level of γH2AX foci up to 6 h and a high level 24 h after treatment, indicating alterations in the DNA damage response. Overall, this is the first demonstration that human Treg are, in comparison with Th and CTL, hypersensitive to cyclophosphamide, which is presumably due to a DNA repair defect. PMID:24376696

  10. Helios Controls a Limited Subset of Regulatory T Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Mathew; Lopez-Ocasio, Maria; Metidji, Amina; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Shevach, Ethan M; Thornton, Angela M

    2016-01-01

    A subpopulation (60-70%) of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in both mouse and man expresses the transcription factor Helios, but its role in Treg function is still unknown. We generated Treg-specific Helios-deficient mice to examine the function of Helios in Tregs. We show that the selective deletion of Helios in Tregs leads to slow, progressive systemic immune activation, hypergammaglobulinemia, and enhanced germinal center formation in the absence of organ-specific autoimmunity. Helios-deficient Treg suppressor function was normal in vitro, as well as in an in vivo inflammatory bowel disease model. However, Helios-deficient Tregs failed to control the expansion of pathogenic T cells derived from scurfy mice, failed to mediate T follicular regulatory cell function, and failed to control both T follicular helper cell and Th1 effector cell responses. In competitive settings, Helios-deficient Tregs, particularly effector Tregs, were at a disadvantage, indicating that Helios regulates effector Treg fitness. Thus, we demonstrate that Helios controls certain aspects of Treg-suppressive function, differentiation, and survival. PMID:26582951

  11. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  12. Effects of active bufadienolide compounds on human cancer cells and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in mitogen-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Bo; He, Jing; Kisoh, Keishi; Hayashi, Hideki; Tanaka, Sachiko; Si, Nan; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Hirano, Toshihiko; Bian, Baolin; Takagi, Norio

    2016-09-01

    The growth inhibitory effects of bufadienolide compounds were investigated in two intractable cancer cells, a human glioblastoma cell line U-87 and a pancreatic cancer cell line SW1990. Among four bufadienolide compounds, a dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed in these cancer cells after treatment with gamabufotalin and arenobufagin. The IC50 values of the two compounds were 3-5 times higher in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) than these values for both cancer cell lines. However, similar phenomena were not observed for two other bufadienolide compounds, telocinobufagin and bufalin. These results thus suggest that gamabufotalin and arenobufagin possess selective cytotoxic activity against tumor cells rather than normal cells. Moreover, a clear dose-dependent lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, a well-known hallmark of necrosis, was observed in both cancer cells treated with gamabufotalin, suggesting that gamabufotalin-mediated cell death is predominantly associated with a necrosis-like phenotype. Of most importance, treatment with as little as 8 ng/ml of gamabufotalin, even an almost non-toxic concentration to PBMCs, efficiently downregulated the percentages of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulator T (Treg) cells in mitogen-activated PBMCs. Given that Treg cells play a critical role in tumor immunotolerance by suppressing antitumor immunity, these results suggest that gamabufotalin may serve as a promising candidate, as an adjuvant therapeutic agent by manipulating Treg cells to enhance the efficacy of conventional anticancer drugs and lessen their side-effects. These findings provide insights into the clinical application of gamabufotalin for cancer patients with glioblastoma/pancreatic cancer based on its cytocidal effect against tumor cells as well as its depletion of Treg cells. PMID:27431260

  13. Functional delineation and differentiation dynamics of human CD4+ T cells expressing the FoxP3 transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Makoto; Yoshioka, Yumiko; Kitoh, Akihiko; Shima, Tomoko; Wing, Kajsa; Niwa, Akira; Parizot, Christophe; Taflin, Cécile; Heike, Toshio; Valeyre, Dominique; Mathian, Alexis; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Nomura, Takashi; Ono, Masahiro; Amoura, Zahir; Gorochov, Guy; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2009-06-19

    FoxP3 is a key transcription factor for the development and function of natural CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Here we show that human FoxP3(+)CD4(+) T cells were composed of three phenotypically and functionally distinct subpopulations: CD45RA(+)FoxP3(lo) resting Treg cells (rTreg cells) and CD45RA(-)FoxP3(hi) activated Treg cells (aTreg cells), both of which were suppressive in vitro, and cytokine-secreting CD45RA(-)FoxP3(lo) nonsuppressive T cells. The proportion of the three subpopulations differed between cord blood, aged individuals, and patients with immunological diseases. Terminally differentiated aTreg cells rapidly died whereas rTreg cells proliferated and converted into aTreg cells in vitro and in vivo. This was shown by the transfer of rTreg cells into NOD-scid-common gamma-chain-deficient mice and by TCR sequence-based T cell clonotype tracing in peripheral blood in a normal individual. Taken together, the dissection of FoxP3(+) cells into subsets enables one to analyze Treg cell differentiation dynamics and interactions in normal and disease states, and to control immune responses through manipulating particular FoxP3(+) subpopulations. PMID:19464196

  14. Concomitant analysis of Helios and Neuropilin-1 as a marker to detect thymic derived regulatory T cells in naïve mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kailash; Hjort, Marcus; Thorvaldson, Lina; Sandler, Stellan

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are characterized by the expression of CD4, CD25 and the intracellular Foxp3. However, these markers do not indicate whether Treg cells are thymic derived Treg (tTreg) cells or peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. Recently, Helios and Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) has been reported as potential markers for tTreg cells. Herein, we used flow cytometry to examine the proportion of CD4+CD8−CD25+ Treg cells expressing Helios, Nrp1 and Foxp3 in thymus, pancreatic draining lymph nodes (PDLNs) and spleen of CD-1 mice, and thymus of NOD and C57BL/6 mice. The frequency of Helios+ cells was higher than that of Nrp1+ cells in CD4+CD8−CD25+ and CD4+CD8−CD25+Foxp3+ Treg cells in thymus. Interestingly, the proportion of IL-10+, Ebi3+and CTLA-4+ cells was higher in Helios+ than Nrp1+ tTreg cells. The anti-apoptotic activity of Helios+ tTreg cells was higher in thymus compared to Nrp1+ tTreg cells. Nrp1 seems to be expressed at a later developmental stage compared to Helios and Foxp3. Furthermore, the expression of Nrp1 in CD4+CD25+ T cells of younger mice did not increase after stimulating them in vitro with anti-CD3 and –CD28. Thus, under these conditions, Helios could be considered a more reliable marker for distinguishing tTreg cells from pTreg cells than Nrp1. PMID:25586548

  15. Metabolic control of regulatory T cell development and function.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Hu; Chi, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) maintain immune tolerance and play an important role in immunological diseases and cancers. Recent studies have revealed an intricate relationship between Treg biology and host and microbial metabolism. Various metabolites or nutrients produced by host and commensal microbes, such as vitamins and short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), regulate Treg generation, trafficking, and function. Furthermore, cell intrinsic metabolic programs, orchestrated by mTOR and other metabolic sensors, modulate Foxp3 induction and Treg suppressive activity. Conversely, Tregs are crucial in regulating obesity-associated inflammation and host metabolic balance, and in shaping homeostasis of gut microbiota. We review here the interplay between Tregs and metabolism, with a particular focus on how host, commensal, and cellular metabolism impinge upon Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25248463

  16. Natural and induced T regulatory cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Adeegbe, Dennis O; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    CD4+Foxp3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells control many facets of immune responses ranging from autoimmune diseases, to inflammatory conditions, and cancer in an attempt to maintain immune homeostasis. Natural Treg (nTreg) cells develop in the thymus and constitute a critical arm of active mechanisms of peripheral tolerance particularly to self antigens. A growing body of knowledge now supports the existence of induced Treg (iTreg) cells which may derive from a population of conventional CD4+ T cells. The fork-head transcription factor (Foxp3) typically is expressed by natural CD4+ Treg cells, and thus serves as a marker to definitively identify these cells. On the contrary, there is less consensus on what constitutes iTreg cells as their precise definition has been somewhat elusive. This is in part due to their distinct phenotypes which are shaped by exposure to certain inflammatory or "assault" signals stemming from the underlying immune disorder. The "policing" activity of Treg cells tends to be uni-directional in several pathological conditions. On one end of the spectrum, Treg cell suppressive activity is beneficial by curtailing T cell response against self-antigens and allergens thus preventing autoimmune diseases and allergies. On the other end however, their inhibitory roles in limiting immune response against pseudo-self antigens as in tumors often culminates into negative outcomes. In this review, we focus on this latter aspect of Treg cell immunobiology by highlighting the involvement of nTreg cells in various animal models and human tumors. We further discuss iTreg cells, relationship with their natural counterpart, and potential co-operation between the two in modulating immune response against tumors. Lastly, we discuss studies focusing on these cells as targets for improving anti-tumor immunity. PMID:23874336

  17. The NF-κB transcription factor RelA is required for the tolerogenic function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Messina, Nicole; Fulford, Thomas; O'Reilly, Lorraine; Loh, Wen Xian; Motyer, Jessica M; Ellis, Darcy; McLean, Catriona; Naeem, Haroon; Lin, Ann; Gugasyan, Raffi; Slattery, Robyn M; Grumont, Raelene J; Gerondakis, Steve

    2016-06-01

    The properties of CD4(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets are dictated by distinct patterns of gene expression determined by FOXP3 and different combinations of various transcription factors. Here we show the NF-κB transcription factor RelA is constitutively active in naïve and effector Tregs. The conditional inactivation of Rela in murine FOXP3(+) cells induces a rapid onset, multi-focal autoimmune disease that depends on RelA being expressed in conventional T cells. In addition to promoting Treg lineage stability, RelA determines the size of the effector Treg population, a function influenced by the presence or absence of RelA in conventional T cells. These findings showing that RelA controls Treg stability and promotes the competitive fitness of effector Tregs highlight the importance of RelA activity in peripheral Treg induced tolerance. PMID:27068879

  18. Immune Response to Bifidobacterium bifidum Strains Support Treg/Th17 Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    López, Patricia; González-Rodríguez, Irene; Gueimonde, Miguel; Margolles, Abelardo; Suárez, Ana

    2011-01-01

    In this work we analyzed the immune activation properties of different Bifidobacterium strains in order to establish their ability as inductors of specific effector (Th) or regulatory (Treg) responses. First, we determined the cytokine pattern induced by 21 Bifidobacterium strains in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results showed that four Bifidobacterium bifidum strains showed the highest production of IL-17 as well as a poor secretion of IFNγ and TNFα, suggesting a Th17 profile whereas other Bifidobacterium strains exhibited a Th1-suggestive profile. Given the key role of Th17 subsets in mucosal defence, strains suggestive of Th17 responses and the putative Th1 Bifidobacterium breve BM12/11 were selected to stimulate dendritic cells (DC) to further determine their capability to induce the differentiation of naïve CD4+ lymphocytes toward different Th or Treg cells. All selected strains were able to induce phenotypic DC maturation, but showed differences in cytokine stimulation, DC treated with the putative Th17 strains displaying high IL-1β/IL-12 and low IL-12/IL-10 index, whereas BM12/11-DC exhibited the highest IL-12/IL-10 ratio. Differentiation of naïve lymphocytes confirmed Th1 polarization by BM12/11. Unexpectedly, any B. bifidum strain showed significant capability for Th17 generation, and they were able to generate functional Treg, thus suggesting differences between in vivo and vitro responses. In fact, activation of memory lymphocytes present in PBMCS with these bacteria, point out the presence in vivo of specific Th17 cells, supporting the plasticity of Treg/Th17 populations and the key role of commensal bacteria in mucosal tolerance and T cell reprogramming when needed. PMID:21966367

  19. Human regulatory T cells suppress proliferation of B lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Grygorowicz, Monika Anna; Biernacka, Marzena; Bujko, Mateusz; Nowak, Eliza; Rymkiewicz, Grzegorz; Paszkiewicz-Kozik, Ewa; Borycka, Ilona Sara; Bystydzienski, Zbigniew; Walewski, Jan; Markowicz, Sergiusz

    2016-08-01

    Activated regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress proliferation and differentiation of normal B cells. In our study, allogeneic polyclonal CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs and CD4 (+) CD25 (+) CD127(lo)Tregs expanded in vitro in the presence of rapamycin and low dose IL-2 suppressed proliferation of 11 out of 12 established lymphoma B-cell lines. The effect of expanded CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs on survival of freshly isolated lymphoma B cells maintained in culture with soluble multimeric CD40L and IL-4 was variable across lymphoma entities. The survival of freshly isolated follicular lymphoma cells usually decreased in cocultures with CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs. Treg effect on chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma cells ranged from suppression to help in individual patients. CD4 (+) CD25 (+) Tregs or CD4 (+) CD25 (+) CD127(lo)Tregs expanded ex vivo with rapamycin could be used to suppress regrowth of residual lymphoma after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), and to counteract both graft-versus-host disease and lymphoma re-growth after allogeneic HCT in select patients with lymphoma susceptible to the regulation by Tregs. PMID:26758248

  20. Control of TH17/Treg Balance by Hypoxia-inducible Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Eric V.; Barbi, Joseph; Yang, Huang-Yu; Jinasena, Dilini; Yu, Hong; Zheng, Ying; Bordman, Zachary; Fu, Juan; Kim, Young; Yen, Hung-Rong; Luo, Weibo; Zeller, Karen; Shimoda, Larissa; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Semenza, Gregg L.; Dang, Chi V.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell differentiation into distinct functional effector and inhibitory subsets is regulated in part by the cytokine environment present at the time of antigen recognition. Here, we show that hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1), a key metabolic sensor, regulates the balance between T regulatory (Treg) and TH17 differentiation. HIF-1α enhances TH17 development through direct transcriptional activation of RORvt, and via tertiary complex formation with RORvt and p300 recruitment to the IL17 promoter, thereby regulating TH17 signature genes. Concurrently, HIF-1α attenuates Treg development by binding Foxp3 and targeting it for proteasomal degradation. Importantly this regulation occurs under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Mice with HIF-1α deficient T cells are resistant to induction of TH17-dependent experimental autoimmune encephalitis associated with diminished TH17 and increased Treg cells. These findings highlight the importance of metabolic cues in T cell fate determination and suggest that metabolic modulation could ameliorate certain T cell-based immune pathologies. PMID:21871655

  1. The relative values of CD8+CD25+Foxp3brigh Treg cells correlate with selected lung function parameters in asthma.

    PubMed

    Eusebio, M; Kuna, P; Kraszula, L; Kupczyk, M; Pietruczuk, M

    2015-06-01

    The study aimed to detect CD8(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(brigh) Tregs and investigate their possible association with selected lung function values. CD8(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(brigh) Tregs were detected by flow cytometry in the peripheral blood of 25 patients with severe asthma (SA), 25 patients with mild-to-moderate asthma (MA), and 25 age-matched healthy donors (NC). The percentages of CD8(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(brigh) Tregs of the patients with severe (3.4 ± 4.55), and mild-to-moderate asthma (7.5 ± 8.15), were markedly lower than those of controls (12.1 ± 13.2). The mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) % predicted value in severe asthma subpopulation was significantly lower (67.05 ± 15.98%) when compared with that of mild-to-moderate asthma subgroup (87.71 ± 16.12%). Interestingly, the percentages of CD8(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(brigh) Tregs correlate with mean peak expiratory flow (PEF)% predicted values in severe (r = 0.7, P <0.01) and mild-to-moderate (r = 0.73, P <0.01) asthma. In contrast, this parameter was positively correlated with FEV1% predicted values in the severe asthmatics only (r = 0.71, P <0.01). In summary, this study establishes a link between the percentage of CD8(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(brigh) Tregs and selected lung function parameters, suggesting that this parameter has potential as a marker for inflammation and airflow obstruction. PMID:25921629

  2. CD161 expression characterizes a subpopulation of human regulatory T cells that produces IL-17 in a STAT3-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Afzali, Behdad; Mitchell, Peter J; Edozie, Francis C; Povoleri, Giovanni AM; Dowson, Sophie E; Demandt, Laura; Walter, Gina; Canavan, James B; Scotta, Cristiano; Menon, Bina; Chana, Prabhjoat S; Khamri, Wafa; Kordasti, Shahram Y; Heck, Susanne; Grimbacher, Bodo; Tree, Timothy; Cope, Andrew P; Taams, Leonie S; Lechler, Robert I; John, Susan; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Treg cells are critical for the prevention of autoimmune diseases and are thus prime candidates for cell-based clinical therapy. However, human Treg cells are “plastic”, and are able to produce IL-17 under inflammatory conditions. Here, we identify and characterize the human Treg subpopulation that can be induced to produce IL-17 and identify its mechanisms. We confirm that a subpopulation of human Treg cells produces IL-17 in vitro when activated in the presence of IL-1β, but not IL-6. “IL-17 potential” is restricted to population III (CD4+CD25hiCD127loCD45RA−) Treg cells expressing the natural killer cell marker CD161. We show that these cells are functionally as suppressive and have similar phenotypic/molecular characteristics to other subpopulations of Treg cells and retain their suppressive function following IL-17 induction. Importantly, we find that IL-17 production is STAT3 dependent, with Treg cells from patients with STAT3 mutations unable to make IL-17. Finally, we show that CD161+ population III Treg cells accumulate in inflamed joints of patients with inflammatory arthritis and are the predominant IL-17-producing Treg-cell population at these sites. As IL-17 production from this Treg-cell subpopulation is not accompanied by a loss of regulatory function, in the context of cell therapy, exclusion of these cells from the cell product may not be necessary. PMID:23677517

  3. Regulatory T cell reprogramming towards a Th2 cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Magali Noval; Burton, Oliver T.; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C.; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal

    2015-01-01

    Summary Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible mice (Il4raF709) with enhanced IL-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of T helper 2 (Th2) cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral blood allergen-specific Treg cells of food allergic children. Selective augmentation of IL-4R signaling in Treg cells induced their reprogramming into Th2-like cells and disease susceptibility, whereas Treg cell lineage-specific deletion of Il4 and Il13 was protective. IL-4R signaling impaired the capacity of Treg cells to suppress mast cell activation and expansion, which in turn drove Treg cell Th2 cell reprogramming. Interruption of Treg cell Th2 cell reprogramming may thus provide novel therapeutic strategies in food allergy. PMID:25769611

  4. Regulatory T cell reprogramming toward a Th2-cell-like lineage impairs oral tolerance and promotes food allergy.

    PubMed

    Noval Rivas, Magali; Burton, Oliver T; Wise, Petra; Charbonnier, Louis-Marie; Georgiev, Peter; Oettgen, Hans C; Rachid, Rima; Chatila, Talal A

    2015-03-17

    Oral immunotherapy has had limited success in establishing tolerance in food allergy, reflecting failure to elicit an effective regulatory T (Treg) cell response. We show that disease-susceptible (Il4ra(F709)) mice with enhanced interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) signaling exhibited STAT6-dependent impaired generation and function of mucosal allergen-specific Treg cells. This failure was associated with the acquisition by Treg cells of a T helper 2 (Th2)-cell-like phenotype, also found in peripheral-blood allergen-specific Treg cells of food-allergic children. Selective augmentation of IL-4R signaling in Treg cells induced their reprogramming into Th2-like cells and disease susceptibility, whereas Treg-cell-lineage-specific deletion of Il4 and Il13 was protective. IL-4R signaling impaired the capacity of Treg cells to suppress mast cell activation and expansion, which in turn drove Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells. Interruption of Th2 cell reprogramming of Treg cells might thus provide candidate therapeutic strategies in food allergy. PMID:25769611

  5. Regulatory T cells prevent CD8 T cell maturation by inhibiting CD4 Th cells at tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Cordier, Corinne; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Klatzmann, David; Azogui, Orly

    2007-10-15

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in high frequencies among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in draining lymph nodes, supposedly facilitating tumor development. To investigate their role in controlling local immune responses, we analyzed intratumoral T cell accumulation and function in the presence or absence of Tregs. Tumors that grew in normal BALB/c mice injected with the 4T1 tumor cell line were highly infiltrated by Tregs, CD4 and CD8 cells, all having unique characteristics. Most infiltrating Tregs expressed low levels of CD25Rs and Foxp3. They did not proliferate even in the presence of IL-2 but maintained a strong suppressor activity. CD4 T cells were profoundly anergic and CD8 T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were severely impaired. Depletion of Tregs modified the characteristics of tumor infiltrates. Tumors were initially invaded by activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, which produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. This was followed by the recruitment of highly cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells at tumor sites leading to tumor rejection. The beneficial effect of Treg depletion in tumor regression was abrogated when CD4 helper cells were also depleted. These findings indicate that the massive infiltration of tumors by Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper response. The Tregs in our model prevent Th cell activation and subsequent development of efficient CD8 T cell activity required for the control of tumor growth. PMID:17911581

  6. Role of Dendritic Cell Maturity/Costimulation for Generation, Homeostasis, and Suppressive Activity of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pletinckx, Katrien; Döhler, Anja; Pavlovic, Vladimir; Lutz, Manfred B.

    2011-01-01

    Tolerogenicity of dendritic cells (DCs) has initially been attributed exclusively to immature/resting stages, while mature/activated DCs were considered strictly immunogenic. Later, all different subsets among the myeloid/conventional DCs and plasmacytoid DCs have been shown to bear tolerogenic potential, so that tolerogenicity could not be attributed to a specific subset. Immunosuppressive treatments of immature DC subsets could prevent re-programming into mature DCs or upregulated inhibitory surface markers or cytokines. Furthermore, the different T cell tolerance mechanisms anergy, deletion, immune deviation, and suppression require different quantities and qualities of costimulation by DCs. Since expansion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) has been shown to be promoted best by fully mature DCs the role of CD80/B7-1 and CD86/B7-2 as major costimulatory molecules for Treg biology is under debate. In this review, we discuss the role of these and other costimulatory molecules on myeloid DCs and their ligands CD28 and CD152/CTLA-4 on Tregs for peripheral conversion from naive CD4+ T cells into the major subsets of Foxp3+ Tregs and Foxp3− IL-10+ regulatory type-1 T cells (Tr1) or Tr1-like cells and their role for peripheral maintenance in the steady state and after activation. PMID:22566829

  7. Increased Th17/Treg Ratio in Poststroke Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjing; Kenkare, Komal; Li, Shanshan; Desai, Varsha; Wong, John; Luo, Xun; Wood, Lisa J.; Xu, Yuming; Wang, Qing Mei

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is a major debilitating symptom after stroke. The biological mechanisms underlying poststroke fatigue (PFS) are unknown. We hypothesized that PSF is associated with an alteration in the balance between Th17 and Treg cells. To test this hypothesis we assessed fatigue in 30 stroke survivors using the Fatigue Scale for Motor and Cognitive Functions (FSMC). Peripheral blood was collected for assessment of Th17 and Treg cell populations and measurement of interleukin-10 (IL-10). Participants were dichotomized into severe fatigue (n = 14) and low-moderate fatigue (n = 16) groups by K-mean cluster analysis of FSMC scores. There were no group differences in age, gender, stroke type, stroke severity, or time since stroke. Stroke survivors in the severe fatigue group reported greater anxiety (p = 0.004) and depression (p = 0.001) than in the low-moderate fatigue group. The ratio of Th17 to Treg cells was significantly increased in the severe fatigue group relative to the mild-moderate fatigue group (p = 0.035). Serum levels of IL-10 negatively correlated withTh17/Treg ratio (r = −0.408,  p = 0.025). Our preliminary findings suggest that an imbalance in the Th17/Treg ratio is associated with the severity of PSF. PMID:26166952

  8. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology. PMID:26371251

  9. Type 1 diabetes vaccine candidates promote human Foxp3(+)Treg induction in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Serr, Isabelle; Fürst, Rainer W; Achenbach, Peter; Scherm, Martin G; Gökmen, Füsun; Haupt, Florian; Sedlmeier, Eva-Maria; Knopff, Annette; Shultz, Leonard; Willis, Richard A; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance is executed partly by Foxp3(+)regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoreactive T cells. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) impaired tolerance promotes destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. The development of autoantigen-specific vaccination strategies for Foxp3(+)Treg-induction and prevention of islet autoimmunity in patients is still in its infancy. Here, using human haematopoietic stem cell-engrafted NSG-HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice, we provide direct evidence for human autoantigen-specific Foxp3(+)Treg-induction in vivo. We identify HLA-DQ8-restricted insulin-specific CD4(+)T cells and demonstrate efficient human insulin-specific Foxp3(+)Treg-induction upon subimmunogenic vaccination with strong agonistic insulin mimetopes in vivo. Induced human Tregs are stable, show increased expression of Treg signature genes such as Foxp3, CTLA4, IL-2Rα and TIGIT and can efficiently suppress effector T cells. Such Foxp3(+)Treg-induction does not trigger any effector T cells. These T1D vaccine candidates could therefore represent an expedient improvement in the challenge to induce human Foxp3(+)Tregs and to develop novel precision medicines for prevention of islet autoimmunity in children at risk of T1D. PMID:26975663

  10. Type 1 diabetes vaccine candidates promote human Foxp3+Treg induction in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Serr, Isabelle; Fürst, Rainer W.; Achenbach, Peter; Scherm, Martin G.; Gökmen, Füsun; Haupt, Florian; Sedlmeier, Eva-Maria; Knopff, Annette; Shultz, Leonard; Willis, Richard A.; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance is executed partly by Foxp3+regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoreactive T cells. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) impaired tolerance promotes destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. The development of autoantigen-specific vaccination strategies for Foxp3+Treg-induction and prevention of islet autoimmunity in patients is still in its infancy. Here, using human haematopoietic stem cell-engrafted NSG-HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice, we provide direct evidence for human autoantigen-specific Foxp3+Treg-induction in vivo. We identify HLA-DQ8-restricted insulin-specific CD4+T cells and demonstrate efficient human insulin-specific Foxp3+Treg-induction upon subimmunogenic vaccination with strong agonistic insulin mimetopes in vivo. Induced human Tregs are stable, show increased expression of Treg signature genes such as Foxp3, CTLA4, IL-2Rα and TIGIT and can efficiently suppress effector T cells. Such Foxp3+Treg-induction does not trigger any effector T cells. These T1D vaccine candidates could therefore represent an expedient improvement in the challenge to induce human Foxp3+Tregs and to develop novel precision medicines for prevention of islet autoimmunity in children at risk of T1D. PMID:26975663

  11. Regulatory T cell homeostasis: steady-state maintenance and modulation during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Smigiel, Kate S.; Srivastava, Shivani; Stolley, J. Michael; Campbell, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a vital role in the prevention of autoimmunity and the maintenance of self-tolerance but also have an active role in inhibiting immune responses during viral, bacterial and parasitic infections. Whereas excessive Treg activity can lead to immunodeficiency, chronic infection and cancer, too little Treg activity results in autoimmunity and immunopathology, and impairs the quality of pathogen-specific responses. Recent studies have helped define the homeostatic mechanisms that support the diverse pool of peripheral Treg cells under steady-state conditions, and delineate how the abundance and function of Treg cells changes during inflammation. These findings are highly relevant for developing effective strategies to manipulate Treg cell activity to promote allograft tolerance and treat autoimmunity, chronic infection and cancer. PMID:24712458

  12. Self-specific memory regulatory T cells protect embryos at implantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ting; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Courau, Tristan; Churlaud, Guillaume; Valdivia, Karina; Strominger, Jack L.; Ruocco, Maria Grazia; Chaouat, Gérard; Klatzmann, David

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play crucial roles in both fetal and tumor development. We recently showed that immunosurveillance by pre-existing CD44hiCD62Llow activated/memory Tregs (amTregs) specific for self-antigens protects emergent tumor cells in mice. This Treg response of a memory type is more rapid than and dominates the anti-tumor response of tumor-specific effector T cells. Here, we report striking similarities between the early Treg responses to embryo and tumor implantation. Tregs are (i) rapidly recruited to uterus-draining lymph nodes and activated in the first days after embryo implantation in both syngeneic and allogeneic matings; (ii) they express the markers of the amTreg subset; and (iii) are at least in part self-antigen-specific, as seen in tumor emergence. Unlike in the tumor emergence setting, however, for which pre-immunization against tumor antigens is sufficient for complete tumor eradication even in the presence of Tregs, Treg depletion is additionally required for high frequencies of fetus loss after pre-immunization against paternal tissue antigens. Thus, amTregs play a major role in protecting embryos in both naïve and pre-immune settings. This role and the ensuing therapeutic potential are further highlighted by showing that Treg stimulation, directly by low-dose interleukin-2 or indirectly by Fms-related tyrosine-kinase-3 ligand, lead to normal pregnancy rates in a spontaneous abortion-prone model. PMID:23913969

  13. Thymus medulla fosters generation of natural Treg cells, invariant γδ T cells, and invariant NKT cells: What we learn from intrathymic migration

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Jennifer E; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The organization of the thymus into distinct cortical and medullary regions enables it to control the step-wise migration and development of immature T-cell precursors. Such a process provides access to specialized cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells at defined stages of maturation, ensuring the generation of self-tolerant and MHC-restricted conventional CD4+ and CD8+ αβ T cells. The migratory cues and stromal cell requirements that regulate the development of conventional αβ T cells have been well studied. However, the thymus also fosters the generation of several immunoregulatory T-cell populations that form key components of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These include Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells, invariant γδ T cells, and CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). While less is known about the intrathymic requirements of these nonconventional T cells, recent studies have highlighted the importance of the thymus medulla in their development. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms controlling the intrathymic migration of distinct T-cell subsets, and relate this to knowledge of the microenvironmental requirements of these cells. PMID:25615828

  14. Functional Improvement of Regulatory T Cells from Rheumatoid Arthritis Subjects Induced by Capsular Polysaccharide Glucuronoxylomannogalactan

    PubMed Central

    Alunno, Alessia; Bartoloni Bocci, Elena; Perito, Stefano; Chow, Siu-Kei; Cenci, Elio; Casadevall, Arturo; Gerli, Roberto; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective Regulatory T cells (Treg) play a critical role in the prevention of autoimmunity, and the suppressive activity of these cells is impaired in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to investigate function and properties of Treg of RA patients in response to purified polysaccharide glucuronoxylomannogalactan (GXMGal). Methods Flow cytometry and western blot analysis were used to investigate the frequency, function and properties of Treg cells. Results GXMGal was able to: i) induce strong increase of FOXP3 on CD4+ T cells without affecting the number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg cells with parallel increase in the percentage of non-conventional CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells; ii) increase intracellular levels of TGF-β1 in CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells and of IL-10 in both CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ and CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells; iii) enhance the suppressive activity of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ and CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells in terms of inhibition of effector T cell activity and increased secretion of IL-10; iv) decrease Th1 response as demonstrated by inhibition of T-bet activation and down-regulation of IFN-γ and IL-12p70 production; v) decrease Th17 differentiation by down-regulating pSTAT3 activation and IL-17A, IL-23, IL-21, IL-22 and IL-6 production. Conclusion These data show that GXMGal improves Treg functions and increases the number and function of CD4+CD25−FOXP3+ Treg cells of RA patients. It is suggested that GXMGal may be potentially useful for restoring impaired Treg functions in autoimmune disorders and for developing Treg cell-based strategies for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:25338013

  15. Regulatory T cells actively infiltrate metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Adam Quasar; Rolle, Cleo E; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, Treg) have been shown to play a major role in suppression of the immune response to malignant gliomas. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of Treg infiltration in metastatic brain tumor models, including melanoma, breast and colon cancers. Our data indicate that both CD4+ and Treg infiltration are significantly increased throughout the time of metastatic tumor progression. These findings were recapitulated in human CNS tumor samples of metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Collectively, these data support investigating immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Treg in metastatic CNS tumors. PMID:19424570

  16. CTLA-4 control over Foxp3+ regulatory T cell function.

    PubMed

    Wing, Kajsa; Onishi, Yasushi; Prieto-Martin, Paz; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Miyara, Makoto; Fehervari, Zoltan; Nomura, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2008-10-10

    Naturally occurring Foxp3+CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for maintaining immunological self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Here, we show that a specific deficiency of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) in Tregs results in spontaneous development of systemic lymphoproliferation, fatal T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, and hyperproduction of immunoglobulin E in mice, and it also produces potent tumor immunity. Treg-specific CTLA-4 deficiency impairs in vivo and in vitro suppressive function of Tregs-in particular, Treg-mediated down-regulation of CD80 and CD86 expression on dendritic cells. Thus, natural Tregs may critically require CTLA-4 to suppress immune responses by affecting the potency of antigen-presenting cells to activate other T cells. PMID:18845758

  17. Manipulation of regulatory T cells and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G

    2015-01-01

    The most potent killing machinery in our immune system is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Since the possibility for self-destruction by these cells is high, many regulatory activities exist to prevent autoimmune destruction by these cells. A tumour (cancer) grows from the cells of the body and is tolerated by the body's immune system. Yet, it has been possible to generate tumour-associated antigen (TAA) -specific CTL that are also self-antigen specific in vivo, to achieve a degree of therapeutic efficacy. Tumour-associated antigen-specific T-cell tolerance through pathways of self-tolerance generation represents a significant challenge to successful immunotherapy. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells, referred to as T regulatory (Treg) cells, are selected in the thymus as controllers of the anti-self repertoire. These cells are referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. According to the new consensus (Nature Immunology 2013; 14:307–308) these cells are to be termed as (tTreg). There is another class of CD4+ Treg cells also involved in regulatory function in the periphery, also phenotypically CD4+ CD25±, classified as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. These cells are to be termed as peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. In vitro-induced Treg cells with suppressor function should be termed as iTreg. These different Treg cells differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. The current challenges are to determine the degree of specificity of these Treg cells in recognizing the same TAA as the CTL population and to circumvent their regulatory constraints so as to achieve robust CTL responses against cancer. PMID:25243729

  18. CD4+FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cells from Gαi2−/− Mice Are Functionally Active In Vitro, but Do Not Prevent Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Götlind, Yu-Yuan C.; Raghavan, Sukanya; Bland, Paul W.; Hörnquist, Elisabeth Hultgren

    2011-01-01

    Background Mice deficient in the inhibitory G protein subunit Gαi2 spontaneously develop a T helper 1 dominated colitis. We examined whether a defect in CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) underpins the pathogenesis of colitis in the Gαi2−/− (Gαi2-deficient) colitis model. Methodology/Principal Findings Using flow cytometry, we found that thymus and colonic lamina propria, but not spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes, of colitic Gαi2−/− mice contained increased frequencies of Treg, whereas FoxP3 expression intensity was similar in Gαi2−/− compared to Gαi2+/− or Gαi2+/+ wild type (WT) mice. The frequency of CD4+FoxP3+ T cells expressing CD103 was significantly increased in Gαi2−/− compared to WT mice. Treg in colons from WT mice clustered in the T cell areas of colonic lymphoid patches (CLP), with relatively few Treg in the lamina propria, as demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. In Gαi2−/− mice, CLP were not observed but lamina propria Treg were increased in number and frequency within the CD4+ infiltrate, compared to WT mice. Using an in vitro co-culture system and flow cytometric analysis of cell division we could demonstrate that the in vitro suppressive function of WT and Gαi2−/− CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (WT-Treg and KO-Treg) was indistinguishable, but that T effector cells (CD4+25− T cells) from Gαi2−/− mice were less readily suppressed than WT effectors (WT-Teff) by Treg from either source. However, neither WT nor Gαi2−/− Treg was able to suppress colitis induced by adoptive transfer of Gαi2−/− effector T cells (KO-Teff) to RAG2−/− recipients. The enhanced inflammatory activity of Gαi2−/− effectors was accompanied by increased expression of an effector/memory T cell phenotype and increased cytokine secretion, especially IL-4, IL-6 and IFN-γ. Conclusions There is an increased frequency of Gαi2−/− Treg in the colon, and they demonstrate no endogenous functional defect. However, Gαi2

  19. Tremelimumab (anti-CTLA4) mediates immune responses mainly by direct activation of T effector cells rather than by affecting T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sameena; Burt, Deborah J; Ralph, Christy; Thistlethwaite, Fiona C; Hawkins, Robert E; Elkord, Eyad

    2011-01-01

    Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4) blockade has shown antitumor activity against common cancers. However, the exact mechanism of immune mediation by anti-CTLA4 remains to be elucidated. Further understanding of how CTLA4 blockade with tremelimumab mediates immune responses may allow a more effective selection of responsive patients. Our results show that tremelimumab enhanced the proliferative response of T effector cells (Teff) upon TCR stimulation, and abrogated Treg suppressive ability. In the presence of tremelimumab, frequencies of IL-2-secreting CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were increased in response to polyclonal activation and tumor antigens. Importantly, Treg frequency was not reduced in the presence of tremelimumab, and expanded Tregs in cancer patients treated with tremelimumab expressed FoxP3 with no IL-2 release, confirming them as bona fide Tregs. Taken together, this data indicates that tremelimumab induces immune responses mainly by direct activation of Teff rather than by affecting Tregs. PMID:21056008

  20. Nonviral-Mediated Hepatic Expression of IGF-I Increases Treg Levels and Suppresses Autoimmune Diabetes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Anguela, Xavier M.; Tafuro, Sabrina; Roca, Carles; Callejas, David; Agudo, Judith; Obach, Mercè; Ribera, Albert; Ruzo, Albert; Mann, Christopher J.; Casellas, Alba; Bosch, Fatima

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes, loss of tolerance to β-cell antigens results in T-cell–dependent autoimmune destruction of β cells. The abrogation of autoreactive T-cell responses is a prerequisite to achieve long-lasting correction of the disease. The liver has unique immunomodulatory properties and hepatic gene transfer results in tolerance induction and suppression of autoimmune diseases, in part by regulatory T-cell (Treg) activation. Hence, the liver could be manipulated to treat or prevent diabetes onset through expression of key genes. IGF-I may be an immunomodulatory candidate because it prevents autoimmune diabetes when expressed in β cells or subcutaneously injected. Here, we demonstrate that transient, plasmid-derived IGF-I expression in mouse liver suppressed autoimmune diabetes progression. Suppression was associated with decreased islet inflammation and β-cell apoptosis, increased β-cell replication, and normalized β-cell mass. Permanent protection depended on exogenous IGF-I expression in liver nonparenchymal cells and was associated with increased percentage of intrapancreatic Tregs. Importantly, Treg depletion completely abolished IGF-I-mediated protection confirming the therapeutic potential of these cells in autoimmune diabetes. This study demonstrates that a nonviral gene therapy combining the immunological properties of the liver and IGF-I could be beneficial in the treatment of the disease. PMID:23099863

  1. Hepatitis C virus core protein triggers expansion and activation of CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells in chronic hepatitis C patients.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Naicui; Chi, Xiumei; Li, Tianyang; Song, Hongxiao; Li, Haijun; Jin, Xia; Crispe, Ian Nicholas; Su, Lishan; Niu, Junqi; Tu, Zhengkun

    2015-11-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are increased in patients with chronic hepatitis C, which may contribute to the sustained suppression of hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific T-cell responses and viral persistence in HCV-infected individuals. We postulated that HCV core protein (HCVc) directly contributes to the expansion of Tregs in HCV-infected patients, and we provide evidence to support this hypothesis in the report. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and sera were collected from 87 treatment-naïve chronic HCV-infected patients, CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs were measured by flow cytometry, and HCV RNA and HCVc levels were detected using qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), respectively. CD4(+), CD8(+), CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells were purified from healthy donors and cultured with recombinant HCVc and Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell proliferation, and ELISA was performed to measure cytokine production. In the 87 chronic HCV-infected patients, HCVc showed a significant correlation with HCV RNA and CD4(+)CD25(+) Tregs. Mechanistic studies showed that HCVc, together with anti-CD3 antibody, augmented CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg proliferation, but inhibited CD4(+)CD25(-) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ production, in a dose-dependent and Treg-dependent manner. Moreover, unlike the TLR3 ligand (poly I:C) and the TLR4 ligand (lipopolysaccharide, LPS), the TLR2 ligand (lipoteichoic acid, LTA) and HCVc both inhibited TCR-induced CD4(+) T-cell proliferation and IFN-γ secretion in a Treg-dependent manner. These data indicate that HCVc, like other TLR2 ligands, triggers CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg activation and expansion to inhibit host immune responses, which may play a critical role in viral persistence in HCV-infected patients. PMID:25531392

  2. Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Suppression of Conventional T-Cells and Dendritic Cells by Different cAMP Intracellular Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Rueda, Cesar M.; Jackson, Courtney M.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediate their suppressive action by acting directly on conventional T-cells (Tcons) or dendritic cells (DCs). One mechanism of Treg suppression is the increase of cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP) levels in target cells. Tregs utilize cAMP to control Tcon responses, such as proliferation and cytokine production. Tregs also exert their suppression on DCs, diminishing DC immunogenicity by downmodulating the expression of costimulatory molecules and actin polymerization at the immunological synapse. The Treg-mediated usage of cAMP occurs through two major mechanisms. The first involves the Treg-mediated influx of cAMP in target cells through gap junctions. The second is the conversion of adenosine triphosphate into adenosine by the ectonucleases CD39 and CD73 present on the surface of Tregs. Adenosine then binds to receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to increased intracellular cAMP levels in these targets. Downstream, cAMP can activate the canonical protein kinase A (PKA) pathway and the exchange protein activated by cyclic AMP (EPAC) non-canonical pathway. In this review, we discuss the most recent findings related to cAMP activation of PKA and EPAC, which are implicated in Treg homeostasis as well as the functional alterations induced by cAMP in cellular targets of Treg suppression. PMID:27313580

  3. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  4. The interplay of effector and regulatory T cells in cancer.

    PubMed

    Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Eil, Robert L; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2015-04-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress effector T (Teff) cells and prevent immune-mediated rejection of cancer. Much less appreciated are mechanisms by which Teff cells antagonize Treg cells. Herein, we consider how complex reciprocal interactions between Teff and Treg cells shape their population dynamics within tumors. Under states of tolerance, including during tumor escape, suppressed Teff cells support Treg cell populations through antigen-dependent provision of interleukin (IL)-2. During immune activation, Teff cells can lose this supportive capacity and directly antagonize Treg cell populations to neutralize their immunosuppressive function. While this latter state is rarely achieved spontaneously within tumors, we propose that therapeutic induction of immune activation has the potential to stably disrupt immunosuppressive population states resulting in durable cancer regression. PMID:25728990

  5. Induction of Human Regulatory T Cells with Bacterial Superantigens.

    PubMed

    Caserta, Stefano; Taylor, Amanda L; Terrazzini, Nadia; Llewelyn, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress the activation of immune effector cells limit immunopathology and are fast emerging as therapeutic targets for autoimmune and cancer disease. Tools enabling Treg in vitro-induction, expansion, and characterization and manipulation will help future clinical developments. In this chapter, we describe in detail how to use bacterial superantigens to induce human Tregs efficiently from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. How to assess human Treg phenotype and suppressive capacity are also described. Technical details, variations, and alternative experimental conditions are provided. PMID:26676048

  6. Eos is redundant for T regulatory cell function, but plays an important role in IL-2 and Th17 production by CD4+ T conventional cells

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Metidji, Amina; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Thornton, Angela M.; Ikeda, Tohru; Morgan, Bruce A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Eos is a transcription factor that belongs to the Ikaros family of transcription factors. Eos has been reported to be a T regulatory cell (Treg) signature gene, to play a critical role in Treg suppressor functions, and to maintain Treg stability. We have utilized mice with a global deficiency of Eos to re-examine the role of Eos expression in both Treg and T conventional (Tconv) cells. Treg from Eos deficient (Eos−/−) mice developed normally, displayed a normal Treg phenotype, and exhibited normal suppressor function in vitro. Eos−/− Treg were as effective as Treg from wild type (WT) mice in suppression of inflammation in a model of inflammatory bowel disease. Bone marrow (BM) from Eos−/− mice was as effective as BM from WT mice in controlling T cell activation when used to reconstitute immunodeficient mice in the presence of Scurfy fetal liver cells. Surprisingly, Eos was expressed in activated Tconv cells and was required for IL-2 production, CD25 expression and proliferation in vitro by CD4+ Tconv cells. Eos−/− mice developed more severe Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis than WT mice, displayed increased numbers of effector T cells in the periphery and CNS, and amplified IL-17 production. In conclusion, our studies are not consistent with a role for Eos in Treg development and function, but demonstrate that Eos plays an important role in the activation and differentiation of Tconv cells. PMID:26062998

  7. Regulatory T cells are baby's best friends.

    PubMed

    Teles, Ana; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Schumacher, Anne

    2013-04-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are one of the most and best studied immune cell population during human and murine pregnancy, and there is a general consent about their expansion during pregnancy. However, the identification of new and more reliable Treg markers during the last years resulted in some controversies about the kinetics of various Treg subsets at different pregnancy stages. No doubt exists regarding the importance of Treg for a normal pregnancy as pregnancy complications like spontaneous abortion and preeclampsia could be associated with a reduced Treg number and activity. In future, more attention should be paid to bring established data from the bench to the bedside to force the development of adequate therapies for treatment of pregnancy complications. In this article, we summarize previous and recent data on several aspects of Treg biology during human and murine pregnancy. PMID:23289369

  8. Regulatory T cells: stability revisited

    PubMed Central

    Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha L.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2011-01-01

    Breakdown in self-tolerance is due, in part, to a loss of regulatory T (Treg) cells. Recently, a controversy has surfaced about whether Treg cells are overwhelmingly stable, or if they can be reprogrammed in inflammatory and autoimmune environments. Those in the instability “camp” have shown that a fraction of Treg cells lose Foxp3 and acquire effector arm activities. Instability is coupled with IL-2 insufficiency and the inflammatory milieu that promote reprogramming. Here, we highlight the basic tenets of each viewpoint and discuss technical, biological and environmental differences in the models that may help yield a unifying hypothesis. Also considered is how Treg cell instability could link to development of autoimmune disease and the implications for Treg cell-based cellular therapy trials. PMID:21620768

  9. Stat3 Programs Th17-Specific Regulatory T Cells to Control GN

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Malte A.; Luig, Michael; Wegscheid, Claudia; Goerke, Boeren; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Brix, Silke R.; Yan, Isabell; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Hagl, Beate; Renner, Ellen D.; Tiegs, Gisa; Wiech, Thorsten; Stahl, Rolf A.K.; Panzer, Ulf

    2014-01-01

    A pathogenic role for Th17 cells in inflammatory renal disease is well established. The mechanisms underlying their counter-regulation are, however, largely unknown. Recently, Th17 lineage-specific regulatory T cells (Treg17) that depend on activation of the transcription factor Stat3 were identified. We studied the function of Treg17 in the nephrotoxic nephritis (NTN) model of crescentic GN. The absence of Treg17 cells in Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice resulted in the aggravation of NTN and skewing of renal and systemic immune responses toward Th17. Detailed analysis of Stat3-deficient Tregs revealed that the survival, activation, proliferation, and suppressive function of these cells remained intact. However, Tregs from Foxp3Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacked surface expression of the chemokine receptor CCR6, which resulted in impaired renal trafficking. Furthermore, aggravation of NTN was reversible in the absence of Th17 responses, as shown in CD4Cre×Stat3fl/fl mice lacking both Treg17 and Th17 cells, suggesting that Th17 cells are indeed the major target of Treg17 cells. Notably, immunohistochemistry revealed CCR6-bearing Treg17 cells in kidney biopsy specimens of patients with GN. CCR6 expression on human Treg17 cells also appears dependent on STAT3, as shown by analysis of Tregs from patients with dominant-negative STAT3 mutations. Our data indicate the presence and involvement of Stat3/STAT3-dependent Treg17 cells that specifically target Th17 cells in murine and human crescentic GN, and suggest the kidney-specific action of these Treg17 cells is regulated by CCR6-directed migration into areas of Th17 inflammation. PMID:24511136

  10. T regulatory cells: Achilles' heel of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection?

    PubMed

    Parkash, Om; Agrawal, Sonali; Madhan Kumar, M

    2015-07-01

    T regulatory cells (Treg) constitute a specialized subset of T cells that play a pivotal role in preventing the occurrence of autoimmune diseases by suppressing deleterious activities of immune cells. Contrarily, they can have adverse effect on immune response against infectious diseases where Treg weaken the host immunity leading to enhanced microbial load and thereby increase in severity of the disease. Here, we have attempted to review plethora of information documenting prevalence of Treg in tuberculosis (TB) and their involvement in progression and immunopathogenesis of the disease. Further, we have laid emphasis on the possible use of Treg as a biomarker for determining the TB treatment efficacy. Also, we have discussed the probable contribution of Treg in dampening the efficacy of BCG, the anti-TB vaccine. Finally, we have speculated some of the possible strategies which might be explored by exploiting Treg for enhancing the efficacy of TB management. PMID:25948475

  11. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network

    PubMed Central

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne A.; Mazur, Johanna; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Scholma, Jetse; Marg, Iris; Ulges, Alexander; Satoh, Kazuki; Bopp, Tobias; Joore, Jos; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff) in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26881744

  12. Kinome Profiling of Regulatory T Cells: A Closer Look into a Complex Intracellular Network.

    PubMed

    Tuettenberg, Andrea; Hahn, Susanne A; Mazur, Johanna; Gerhold-Ay, Aslihan; Scholma, Jetse; Marg, Iris; Ulges, Alexander; Satoh, Kazuki; Bopp, Tobias; Joore, Jos; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are essential for T cell homeostasis and maintenance of peripheral tolerance. They prevent activation of auto-reactive T effector cells (Teff) in the context of autoimmunity and allergy. Otherwise, Treg also inhibit effective immune responses against tumors. Besides a number of Treg-associated molecules such as Foxp3, CTLA-4 or GARP, known to play critical roles in Treg differentiation, activation and function, the involvement of additional regulatory elements is suggested. Herein, kinase activities seem to play an important role in Treg fine tuning. Nevertheless, our knowledge regarding the complex intracellular signaling pathways controlling phenotype and function of Treg is still limited and based on single kinase cascades so far. To gain a more comprehensive insight into the pathways determining Treg function we performed kinome profiling using a phosphorylation-based kinome array in human Treg at different activation stages compared to Teff. Here we have determined intriguing quantitative differences in both populations. Resting and activated Treg showed an altered pattern of CD28-dependent kinases as well as of those involved in cell cycle progression. Additionally, significant up-regulation of distinct kinases such as EGFR or CK2 in activated Treg but not in Teff not only resemble data we obtained in previous studies in the murine system but also suggest that those specific molecular activation patterns can be used for definition of the activation and functional state of human Treg. Taken together, detailed investigation of kinome profiles opens the possibility to identify novel molecular mechanisms for a better understanding of Treg biology but also for development of effective immunotherapies against unwanted T cell responses in allergy, autoimmunity and cancer. PMID:26881744

  13. Th17/Treg-related cytokine imbalance in sulfur mustard exposed and stable chronic obstructive pulmonary (COPD) patients: correlation with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Imani, Saber; Salimian, Jafar; Fu, Junjiang; Ghanei, Mostafa; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-08-01

    In this study, we investigated expression changes of Th17/Treg-related cytokine in transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLBs) of sulfur mustard (SM) exposure, stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and also compared it with a healthy control (HC) group. Here, ROR-γt, FoxP3, and Treg/Th17-related cytokines (IL-10, IL-17A, IL-6, and TGF-β1) were assessed using a combination of RT-QPCR and ELISA in 11 SM-exposed cases, 9 patients with GOLD stage II COPD diagnosed, and 8 HC. Our results showed that the levels of Foxp3 expression were lower and ROR-γt expression was higher in SM and COPD patients when compared with HC (all p values were less than 0.001). The relative Foxp3 expressions and Foxp3/ROR-γt ratio were positively correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.682 and R = 0.602, respectively; p ≤ 0.001). However, the relative ROR-γt expressions were inversely correlated with FEV1 (%) pred (R= -0.75, p = 0.003) and relative Foxp3 expression (R= -0.704, p = 0.003). The mRNA and protein expression of IL-10 were significantly decreased in SM and COPD patients compared with HC (p < 0.001). An increase of IL-17A (∼7.2 fold) and TGF-β1 (∼5.6 fold) are involved in the lung exacerbation of SM and COPD patients. The expression of IL-6 was variable between three groups (p ≥ 0.05). In addition, an inverse correlation were observed between FEV1 (%) pred and expressions of IL-17A (R= -0.741), IL-6 (R= -0.673) and TGF-β1 (R= -0.632) (p ≤ 0.001). Instead, positive correlation was found between IL-10 ratios and FEV1 (%) pred (R = 0.777, p = 0.001). These findings suggest that Treg/Th17-mediated distributions are involved in the progression of chronic lung injury of SM and COPD patients. PMID:27241137

  14. Regulatory T cell effects in antitumor laser immunotherapy: a mathematical model and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawkins, Bryan A.; Laverty, Sean M.

    2016-03-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have tremendous influence on treatment outcomes in patients receiving immunotherapy for cancerous tumors. We present a mathematical model incorporating the primary cellular and molecular components of antitumor laser immunotherapy. We explicitly model developmental classes of dendritic cells (DCs), cytotoxic T cells (CTLs), primary and metastatic tumor cells, and tumor antigen. Regulatory T cells have been shown to kill antigen presenting cells, to influence dendritic cell maturation and migration, to kill activated killer CTLs in the tumor microenvironment, and to influence CTL proliferation. Since Tregs affect explicitly modeled cells, but we do not explicitly model dynamics of Treg themselves, we use model parameters to analyze effects of Treg immunosuppressive activity. We will outline a systematic method for assigning clinical outcomes to model simulations and use this condition to associate simulated patient treatment outcome with Treg activity.

  15. Cyclophosphamide and IL-12-transduced DCs enhance the antitumor activity of tumor antigen-stimulated DCs and reduce Tregs and MDSCs number.

    PubMed

    Rossowska, Joanna; Pajtasz-Piasecka, Elżbieta; Anger, Natalia; Wojas-Turek, Justyna; Kicielińska, Jagoda; Piasecki, Egbert; Duś, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    A hostile tumor microenvironment, characterized by an abundance of T regulatory cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), considerably limits the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccines. The intention of this study was to enhance the antitumor activity of vaccines consisting of bone marrow-derived DCs stimulated with TAg (BMDC/TAg) via single administration of cyclophosphamide and multiple injections of interleukin (IL)-12-transduced DCs (BMDC/IL-12). The combined chemoimmunotherapy was applied in the treatment of mice with subcutaneously (SC) growing, advanced MC38 colon carcinoma. The highest level of tumor growth inhibition, accompanied by high cytotoxic activity of effector cells, and their increased influx into tumor tissue, was observed after application of cyclophosphamide in combination with BMDC/TAg and BMDC/IL-12. The effect was probably associated with the elimination of T regulatory cells from spleens and tumors, but most of all with changes in the number and differentiation stage of MDSCs. After the therapy, the percentage of granulocytic and monocytic MDSCs in spleens was significantly lower than in the control group. Moreover, MDSCs derived from spleens and tumors showed increased expression of MHC class II, which may indicate the higher maturation stage of the myeloid cells as well as their enhanced capacity toward antigen presentation. The obtained data indicate that the optimal composition of antitumor vaccines able to limit the suppressor activity of MDSCs is essential to enhance the elimination of tumor cells and to achieve an optimal therapeutic effect. PMID:25304726

  16. Human and Mouse CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ Regulatory T Cells at Steady State and during Interleukin-2 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Churlaud, Guillaume; Pitoiset, Fabien; Jebbawi, Fadi; Lorenzon, Roberta; Bellier, Bertrand; Rosenzwajg, Michelle; Klatzmann, David

    2015-01-01

    In addition to CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), CD8+ suppressor T cells are emerging as an important subset of regulatory T cells. Diverse populations of CD8+ T cells with suppressive activities have been described. Among them, a small population of CD8+CD25+FOXP3+ T cells is found both in mice and humans. In contrast to thymic-derived CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Tregs, their origin and their role in the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases (AIDs) are less understood. We report here the number, phenotype, and function of CD8+ Tregs cells in mice and humans, at the steady state and in response to low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). CD8+ Tregs represent approximately 0.4 and 0.1% of peripheral blood T cells in healthy humans and mice, respectively. In mice, their frequencies are quite similar in lymph nodes (LNs) and the spleen, but two to threefold higher in Peyer patches and mesenteric LNs. CD8+ Tregs express low levels of CD127. CD8+ Tregs express more activation or proliferation markers such as CTLA-4, ICOS, and Ki-67 than other CD8+ T cells. In vitro, they suppress effector T cell proliferation as well as or even better than CD4+ Tregs. Owing to constitutive expression of CD25, CD8+ Tregs are 20- to 40-fold more sensitive to in vitro IL-2 stimulation than CD8+ effector T cells, but 2–4 times less than CD4+ Tregs. Nevertheless, low-dose IL-2 dramatically expands and activates CD8+ Tregs even more than CD4+ Tregs, in mice and humans. Further studies are warranted to fully appreciate the clinical relevance of CD8+ Tregs in AIDs and the efficacy of IL-2 treatment. PMID:25926835

  17. Progesterone suppresses the mTOR pathway and promotes generation of induced regulatory T cells with increased stability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee H.; Lydon, John P.; Kim, Chang H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary While induced FoxP3+ T cells (iTregs) are promising cellular therapeutics to treat inflammatory diseases, a limitation in utilizing iTregs prepared in vitro is their low stability in inflammatory conditions. Progesterone (P4) is an immune regulatory nuclear hormone with a potent Treg induction activity. We reasoned that this function of progesterone would be utilized to generate iTregs with highly suppressive activity and improved stability in vivo. We generated iTregs with progesterone in vitro and found that progesterone generates iTregs that are highly stable in inflammatory conditions. Moreover, P4-induced iTregs highly express latency-associated peptide TGFβ1 and are efficient in regulating inflammation in multiple tissues, whereas control iTregs induced with TGFβ1 alone are less stable and ineffective in suppressing inflammation. The function of progesterone in inducing iTregs with improved regulatory activity is associated with the function of P4 in suppressing the mTOR pathway. Moreover, the function of progesterone in inducing FoxP3+ T cells is decreased but not completely abolished on nuclear progesterone receptor-deficient T cells, suggesting that both nuclear and non-nuclear progesterone receptors are involved in mediating the function. We conclude that P4 can be utilized to generate iTregs with a high therapeutic potential in treatment of tissue inflammation. PMID:22740122

  18. Control of regulatory T cell lineage commitment and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Josefowicz, Steven Z.; Rudensky, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress pathology mediated by immune responses against self and foreign antigens, and commensal microorganisms. Sustained expression of the transcription factor Foxp3, a key distinguishing feature of Treg cells, is required for their differentiation and suppressor function. In addition, Foxp3 expression prevents deviation of Treg cells into effector T cell lineages and confers dependence of Treg cell survival and expansion on growth factors, foremost interleukin-2, provided by activated effector T cells. In this review we discuss Treg cell differentiation and maintenance with a particular emphasis on molecular regulation of Foxp3 expression, arguably a key to mechanistic understanding of biology of regulatory T cells. PMID:19464984

  19. Effect of antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C on the frequency of regulatory T cells, T-cell activation, and serum levels of TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Pavel; Davidová, Alžběta; Beran, Ondřej; Arientová, Simona; Boštík, Pavel; Kapla, Jaroslav; Kondělková, Kateřina; Plíšek, Stanislav; Holub, Michal

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to analyze T-regulatory cells (Tregs), activated CD8(+) T cells, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF)-β in hepatitis C patients. We enrolled 31 patients with chronic genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 30 seropositive persons with spontaneous HCV elimination, and 23 healthy volunteers. The patients were examined at the beginning of the interferon-alpha (IFN-α)-based therapy (baseline) and at weeks 4 (W4) and 12 (W12) of the therapy. The percentage of Tregs and the expression of activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR on CD8(+) T cells were analyzed in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry. Serum levels of TGF-β were measured in a multiplex assay using flow cytometry. The percentage of Tregs in patients was higher than in controls and seropositive persons. Similarly, the percentage of CD8(+) T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR was higher in patients compared with controls and seropositive persons. Chronic HCV infection is associated with elevated circulating Tregs and activated CD8(+) T cells. During IFN-α-based therapy these cells gradually increase, whereas TGF-β serum levels decrease. PMID:27307383

  20. T regulatory cells in allergy.

    PubMed

    Braga, M; Quecchia, C; Cavallucci, E; Di Giampaolo, L; Schiavone, C; Petrarca, C; Di Gioacchino, M

    2011-01-01

    The progressive understanding of the nature and mechanisms of T regulatory (Treg) cells in the last decade has changed the concept of immune tolerance, that is no longer considered as a mere lack of immune reactivity but as a finely regulated process that requires specific activity of cells, adhesion and secreted molecules. Tregs play a key role in maintenance of self-tolerance and induction of tolerance against ubiquitous innocuous non-self antigens, so preventing the onset of autoimmune diseases and allergies. This review will focus on the Treg response in allergy that is characterized by a down-regulation of allergen specific T cell proliferation and inhibition of both Th1 and Th2 cytokines production. Hence, Treg cells suppress allergen-specific Th1 and Th2 cell responses playing an important role in the physiological immune response to allergens. Further, Treg cells are able to suppress IgE production by B lymphocytes and directly or indirectly inhibit the activity of allergic inflammation effector cells, namely eosinophils, basophils and mastcells. Finally, increasing evidence suggests that Treg cells are also implicated in chronicity development of inflammatory diseases. This appears to happen through a fine interaction they entertain with resident tissue cells and has been particularly highlighted in the study of airways remodeling in asthma. The understanding of the mechanisms underlying allergen tolerance has brought new interest in the development of new allergy treatment, able to target Treg cells, both in allergy prevention and in the therapy of established allergy. PMID:21329567

  1. Depletion of Fat Tregs Prevents Age-Associated Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Bapat, Sagar P.; Suh, Jae Myoung; Fang, Sungsoon; Liu, Sihao; Zhang, Yang; Cheng, Albert; Zhou, Carmen; Liang, Yuqiong; LeBlanc, Mathias; Liddle, Christopher; Atkins, Annette R.; Yu, Ruth T.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.; Zheng, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Age-associated insulin resistance (IR) and obesity-associated IR are two physiologically distinct forms of adult onset diabetes. While macrophage-driven inflammation is a core driver of obesity-associated IR1–6, the underlying mechanisms of the obesity-independent yet highly prevalent age-associated IR7 are largely unexplored. Comparative adipo-immune profiling (AIP) reveals that fat-resident regulatory T cells, termed fTregs, accumulate in adipose tissue as a function of age, but not obesity. Supporting the existence of two distinct mechanisms underlying IR, mice deficient in fTregs are protected against age-associated IR, yet remain susceptible to obesity-associated IR and metabolic disease. In contrast, selective depletion of fTregs via anti-ST2 antibody treatment increases adipose tissue insulin sensitivity. These findings establish that distinct immune cell populations within adipose tissue underlie aging- and obesity-associated IR and implicate fTregs as adipo-immune drivers and potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of age-associated IR. PMID:26580014

  2. The Dynamics of Treg/Th17 and the Imbalance of Treg/Th17 in Clonorchis sinensis-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Hui; Li, Bo; Zhang, Bo; Yu, Qian; Li, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Ying; Pan, Wei; Liu, Xiang-Ye; Tang, Ren-Xian; Zheng, Kui-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by the liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis, is a chronic parasitic infection regulated by T cell subsets. An imbalance of CD4+CD25+ Foxp3+regulatory T (Treg) and interleukin (IL)-17-secreting T cells (Th17) may control inflammation and play an important role in the pathogenesis of immune evasion. In the present study, we assessed the dynamics of Treg/Th17 and determined whether the Treg/Th17 ratio is altered in C. sinensis-infected mice. The results showed that the percentages of splenic Treg cells in CD4+ T cells were suppressed on day 14 post-infection (PI) but increased on day 56 PI, while Th17 cells were increased on day 56 PI compared with normal control (NC) mice. The Treg/Th17 ratio steadily increased from day 28 to day 56 PI. The hepatic levels of their specific transcription factors (Foxp3 for Treg and RORγt for Th17) were increased in C. sinensis-infected mice from day 14 to 56 PI, and significantly higher than those in NC mice. Meanwhile, serum levels of IL-2 and IL-17 were profoundly increased in C. sinensis-infected mice throughout the experiment; while the concentrations of IL-6 and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) peaked on day 14 PI, but then decreased on day 28 and 56 PI. Our results provide the first evidence of an increased Treg/Th17 ratio in C. sinensis-infected mice, suggesting that a Treg/Th17 imbalance may play a role in disease outcomes of clonorchiasis. PMID:26599407

  3. Impaired function of regulatory T-cells in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

    PubMed

    Tan, Dino B A; Fernandez, Sonia; Price, Patricia; French, Martyn A; Thompson, Philip J; Moodley, Yuben P

    2014-12-01

    Anti-inflammatory pathways affecting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are poorly understood. Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are important negative regulators of T-cell activity and hence were investigated in COPD patients in this study. We hypothesised that functional defects in Tregs may promote increased inflammation contributing to the pathogenesis of COPD. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from patients with stable COPD and age-matched non-smoking controls. Treg-mediated suppression of memory non-Treg (Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+)) CD4(+) T-cell activation was analysed by comparing PBMC responses to staphylococcal enterotoxin-B (SEB) pre- and post-depletion of Tregs (CD25(+)CD127(low)CD4(+) T-cells) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Activation of T-cells was assessed by HLA-DR expression. Levels of secreted cytokines were measured by ELISA. Depletion of Tregs increased SEB-induced activation of Foxp3(-)CD45RO(+) CD4(+) T-cells in samples from 15/15 healthy controls (demonstrating Treg-mediated suppression) and 9/14 COPD patients (Fisher's test, p=0.017). A screen of clinical data associated a failure of Treg-mediated suppression in the remaining five COPD patients with a higher body mass index (BMI) (33-38 kg/m(2)) compared to patients with unimpaired Treg function (20-32 kg/m(2)). In conclusion, we demonstrate impaired Treg-mediated suppression of CD4(+) T-cell activation in a subset of COPD patients, all of whom had high BMI. Obesity and/or perturbed homeostasis of Treg subsets may explain this defect and therefore contribute to increased inflammation observed in COPD. PMID:25097153

  4. Microbial infection-induced expansion of effector T cells overcomes the suppressive effects of regulatory T cells via an IL-2 deprivation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Benson, Alicia; Murray, Sean; Divakar, Prashanthi; Burnaevskiy, Nikolay; Pifer, Reed; Forman, James; Yarovinsky, Felix

    2012-01-15

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are a critical cell population that suppresses T cell activation in response to microbial and viral pathogens. We identify a cell-intrinsic mechanism by which effector CD4(+) T cells overcome the suppressive effects of Treg cells in the context of three distinct infections: Toxoplasma gondii, Listeria monocytogenes, and vaccinia virus. The acute responses to the parasitic, bacterial, and viral pathogens resulted in a transient reduction in frequency and absolute number of Treg cells. The infection-induced partial loss of Treg cells was essential for the initiation of potent Th1 responses and host protection against the pathogens. The observed disappearance of Treg cells was a result of insufficiency in IL-2 caused by the expansion of pathogen-specific CD4(+) T cells with a limited capacity of IL-2 production. Exogenous IL-2 treatment during the parasitic, bacterial, and viral infections completely prevented the loss of Treg cells, but restoration of Treg cells resulted in a greatly enhanced susceptibility to the pathogens. These results demonstrate that the transient reduction in Treg cells induced by pathogens via IL-2 deprivation is essential for optimal T cell responses and host resistance to microbial and viral pathogens. PMID:22147768

  5. In vivo inhibition of human CD19 targeted effector T cells by natural T regulatory cells in a xenotransplant murine model of B cell malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, James; Hayman, Erik; Pegram, Hollie; Santos, Elmer; Heller, Glen; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier J.

    2011-01-01

    Human T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) specific to the B cell tumor antigen CD19 can successfully eradicate systemic human CD19+ tumors in immunocompromised SCID-Beige mice. However, in the clinical setting, CD4+ CD25hi T regulatory cells (Tregs) present within the tumor microenvironment are potent suppressors of tumor-targeted effector T cells. In order to assess the impact of Tregs on CAR-modified T cells in the SCID-Beige xenotransplant model, we isolated, genetically targeted and expanded natural T regulatory cells (nTregs). In vitro, nTregs, modified to express CD19 targeted CARs efficiently inhibited the proliferation of activated human T cells, as well as the capacity of CD19-targeted 19-28z+ effector T cells to lyse CD19+ Raji tumor cells. Intravenous infusion of CD19-targeted nTregs into SCID-Beige mice with systemic Raji tumors traffic to sites of tumor and recapitulate a clinically relevant hostile tumor microenvironment. Anti-tumor efficacy of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells was fully abrogated as assessed by long-term survival of treated mice. Optimal suppression by genetically targeted nTregs was dependent on nTreg to effector T cell ratios and in vivo nTreg activation. Prior infusion of cyclophosphamide in the setting of this nTreg-mediated hostile microenvironment was able to restore the anti-tumor activity of subsequently infused 19-28z+ effector T cells through the eradication of tumor targeted nTregs. These findings have significant implications on the design of future clinical trials utilizing CAR-based adoptive T cell therapies of cancer. PMID:21487038

  6. Anti-CTLA-4 antibodies of IgG2a isotype enhance antitumor activity through reduction of intratumoral regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Selby, Mark J; Engelhardt, John J; Quigley, Michael; Henning, Karla A; Chen, Timothy; Srinivasan, Mohan; Korman, Alan J

    2013-07-01

    Antitumor activity of CTLA-4 antibody blockade is thought to be mediated by interfering with the negative regulation of T-effector cell (Teff) function resulting from CTLA-4 engagement by B7-ligands. In addition, a role for CTLA-4 on regulatory T cells (Treg), wherein CTLA-4 loss or inhibition results in reduced Treg function, may also contribute to antitumor responses by anti-CTLA-4 treatment. We have examined the role of the immunoglobulin constant region on the antitumor activity of anti-CTLA-4 to analyze in greater detail the mechanism of action of anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Anti-CTLA-4 antibody containing the murine immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a constant region exhibits enhanced antitumor activity in subcutaneous established MC38 and CT26 colon adenocarcinoma tumor models compared with anti-CTLA-4 containing the IgG2b constant region. Interestingly, anti-CTLA-4 antibodies containing mouse IgG1 or a mutated mouse IgG1-D265A, which eliminates binding to all Fcγ receptors (FcγR), do not show antitumor activity in these models. Assessment of Teff and Treg populations at the tumor and in the periphery showed that anti-CTLA-4-IgG2a mediated a rapid and dramatic reduction of Tregs at the tumor site, whereas treatment with each of the isotypes expanded Tregs in the periphery. Expansion of CD8(+) Teffs is observed with both the IgG2a and IgG2b anti-CTLA-4 isotypes, resulting in a superior Teff to Treg ratio for the IgG2a isotype. These data suggest that anti-CTLA-4 promotes antitumor activity by a selective reduction of intratumoral Tregs along with concomitant activation of Teffs. PMID:24777248

  7. Impaired NK cells' activity and increased numbers of CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells in multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fan, Renhua; Xiang, Yangen; Yang, Li; Liu, Yanke; Chen, Pingsheng; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wenjun; Yin, Ke; Fu, Manjiao; Xu, Yixin; Wu, Jialin

    2016-05-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) often causes persistent infection and chemotherapy failure, which brings heavy burden of society and family. Many immune cell subsets and regulatory mechanisms may operate throughout the various stages of infection. The presence of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is thought to be an important mechanism that TB successfully evades the immune system. Tregs play a central role in the prevention of autoimmunity and in the control of immune responses. The role of Tregs in MDR-TB infection and persistence is inadequately documented. The current study was designed to determine whether CD4 + CD25+ regulatory T cells may modulate innate immunity (such as NK cells) against human tuberculosis. Our results indicated that the numbers of CD4 + CD25+ Treg cells increased in MDR-TB patients' blood, and the cytokine production of IL-10 increased from MDR-patients compared with healthy subjects, along with the lower activity and low CD69 expression of NK cells in patients. These results suggested that immunity to MDR-TB patients induced circulating CD4 + CD25+ T regulatory cells expansion, which may be related to the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, and to the balance between effectors immune responses and suppression immune responses. PMID:27156613

  8. Activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor by TCDD prevents diabetes in NOD mice and increases Foxp3+ T cells in pancreatic lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Kerkvliet, Nancy I; Steppan, Linda B; Vorachek, William; Oda, Shannon; Farrer, David; Wong, Carmen P; Pham, Duy

    2009-01-01

    The ligand-activated transcription factor, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), is a novel inducer of adaptive Tregs. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), the most potent AHR ligand, induces adaptive CD4+CD25+ Tregs during an acute graft-versus-host (GvH) response and prevents the generation of allospecific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. TCDD also suppresses the induction of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in association with an expanded population of Foxp3+ Tregs. In this study, we show that chronic treatment of NOD mice with TCDD potently suppresses the development of autoimmune Type 1 diabetes in parallel with greatly reduced pancreatic islet insulitis and an expanded population of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ cells in the pancreatic lymph nodes. When treatment with TCDD was terminated after 15 weeks (23 weeks of age), mice developed diabetes over the next 8 weeks in association with lower numbers of Tregs and decreased activation of AHR. Analysis of the expression levels of several genes associated with inflammation, T-cell activation and/or Treg function in pancreatic lymph node cells failed to reveal any differences associated with TCDD treatment. Taken together, the data suggest that AHR activation by TCDD-like ligands may represent a novel avenue for treatment of immune-mediated diseases. PMID:20174617

  9. Establishment of a heterotypic 3D culture system to evaluate the interaction of TREG lymphocytes and NK cells with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; Dix-Peek, Thérèse; Duarte, Raquel; Candy, Geoffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture approaches to investigate breast tumour progression are yielding information more reminiscent of the in vivo microenvironment. We have established a 3D Matrigel system to determine the interactions of luminal phenotype MCF-7 cells and basal phenotype MDA-MB-231 cells with regulatory T lymphocytes and Natural Killer cells. Immune cells were isolated from peripheral blood using magnetic cell sorting and their phenotype validated using flow cytometry both before and after activation with IL-2 and phytohaemagglutinin. Following the establishment of the heterotypic culture system, tumour cells displayed morphologies and cell-cell associations distinct to that observed in 2D monolayer cultures, and associated with tissue remodelling and invasion processes. We found that the level of CCL4 secretion was influenced by breast cancer phenotype and immune stimulation. We further established that for RNA extraction, the use of proteinase K in conjunction with the Qiagen RNeasy Mini Kit and only off-column DNA digestion gave the best RNA yield, purity and integrity. We also investigated the efficacy of the culture system for immunolocalisation of the biomarkers oestrogen receptor-α and the glycoprotein mucin 1 in luminal phenotype breast cancer cells; and epidermal growth factor receptor in basal phenotype breast cancer cells, in formalin-fixed, paraffin-wax embedded cultures. The expression of these markers was shown to vary under immune mediation. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of using this co-culture system for downstream applications including cytokine analysis, immunolocalisation of tumour biomarkers on serial sections and RNA extraction in accordance with MIQE guidelines. PMID:26215372

  10. Instability of Helios-deficient Tregs is associated with conversion to a T-effector phenotype and enhanced antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hidetoshi; Sido, Jessica M; Reyes, Edwin E; Kiers, Valerie; Cantor, Harvey; Kim, Hye-Jung

    2016-05-31

    Expression of the transcription factor Helios by Tregs ensures stable expression of a suppressive and anergic phenotype in the face of intense inflammatory responses, whereas Helios-deficient Tregs display diminished lineage stability, reduced FoxP3 expression, and production of proinflammatory cytokines. Here we report that selective Helios deficiency within CD4 Tregs leads to enhanced antitumor immunity through induction of an unstable phenotype and conversion of intratumoral Tregs into T effector cells within the tumor microenvironment. Induction of an unstable Treg phenotype is associated with enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines by tumor-infiltrating but not systemic Tregs and significantly delayed tumor growth. Ab-dependent engagement of Treg surface receptors that result in Helios down-regulation also promotes conversion of intratumoral but not systemic Tregs into T effector cells and leads to enhanced antitumor immunity. These findings suggest that selective instability and conversion of intratumoral CD4 Tregs through genetic or Ab-based targeting of Helios may represent an effective approach to immunotherapy. PMID:27185917

  11. IL-2 Expression in Activated Human Memory FOXP3+ Cells Critically Depends on the Cellular Levels of FOXP3 as Well as of Four Transcription Factors of  T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bendfeldt, Hanna; Benary, Manuela; Scheel, Tobias; Steinbrink, Kerstin; Radbruch, Andreas; Herzel, Hanspeter; Baumgrass, Ria

    2012-01-01

    The human CD4+FOXP3+ T cell population is heterogeneous and consists of various subpopulations which remain poorly defined. Anergy and suppression are two main functional characteristics of FOXP3+Treg cells. We used the anergic behavior of FOXP3+Treg cells for a better discrimination and characterization of such subpopulations. We compared IL-2-expressing with IL-2-non-expressing cells within the memory FOXP3+ T cell population. In contrast to IL-2-non-expressing FOXP3+ cells, IL-2-expressing FOXP3+ cells exhibit intermediate characteristics of Treg and Th cells concerning the Treg cell markers CD25, GITR, and Helios. Besides lower levels of FOXP3, they also have higher levels of the transcription factors NFATc2, c-Fos, NF-κBp65, and c-Jun. An approach combining flow cytometric measurements with statistical interpretation for quantitative transcription factor analysis suggests that the physiological expression levels not only of FOXP3 but also of NFATc2, c-Jun, c-Fos, and NF-κBp65 are limiting for the decision whether IL-2 is expressed or not in activated peripheral human memory FOXP3+ cells. These findings demonstrate that concomitant high levels of NFATc2, c-Jun, c-Fos, and NF-κBp65 lead in addition to potential IL-2 expression in those FOXP3+ cells with low levels of FOXP3. We hypothesize that not only the level of FOXP3 expression but also the amounts of the four transcription factors studied represent determining factors for the anergic phenotype of FOXP3+ Treg cells. PMID:22969764

  12. IL-9 production by regulatory T cells recruits mast cells that are essential for regulatory T cell-induced immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Eller, Kathrin; Wolf, Dominik; Huber, Julia M; Metz, Martin; Mayer, Gert; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Maurer, Marcus; Rosenkranz, Alexander R; Wolf, Anna M

    2011-01-01

    Both mast cells (MCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) have gained attention as immunosuppressive cell populations. To investigate a possible interaction, we used the Th1- and Th17-dependent model of nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), in which both MCs and Tregs have been shown to play a protective role. Transfer of wild-type (wt) Tregs into wt recipients almost completely prevents development of NTS and leads to a profound increase of MCs in the renal draining lymph nodes (LNs). By contrast, transfer of wt Tregs into animals deficient in MCs, which are characterized by an exaggerated susceptibility to NTS, no longer exhibited protective effects. Blocking the pleiotropic cytokine IL-9, known to be involved in MC recruitment and proliferation, by means of a mAb in mice receiving Tregs abrogated protection from NTS. Moreover, transfer of IL-9-deficient Tregs also failed to protect from NTS. In the absence of Treg-derived IL-9, MCs fail to accumulate in the LNs, despite the fact that IL-9 deficiency does not alter the general suppressive activity of Tregs. In summary, to our knowledge, we provide the first direct in vivo evidence that the nephroprotective, anti-inflammatory effects of Tregs critically depend on IL-9-mediated attraction of MCs into kidney-draining LNs. PMID:21115728

  13. Follicular B Lymphomas Generate Regulatory T Cells via the ICOS/ICOSL Pathway and Are Susceptible to Treatment by Anti-ICOS/ICOSL Therapy.

    PubMed

    Le, Kieu-Suong; Thibult, Marie-Laure; Just-Landi, Sylvain; Pastor, Sonia; Gondois-Rey, Françoise; Granjeaud, Samuel; Broussais, Florence; Bouabdallah, Reda; Colisson, Renaud; Caux, Christophe; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; Leroux, Dominique; Xerri, Luc; Olive, Daniel

    2016-08-15

    The prognosis of follicular lymphoma (FL) patients is suspected to be influenced by tumor-infiltrating regulatory T cells (Treg). The mechanism of Treg enrichment in FL and their impact on malignant FL B cells remains to be elucidated. We analyzed 46 fresh lymph node biopsy samples, including FL (n = 20), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 10), classical Hodgkin lymphoma (n = 9), and reactive lymphadenitis (n = 7). Using multicolor flow cytometry and cell sorting, we observed an accumulation of CD25(high)CD127(low/neg) Tregs in FL tissues. These Tregs comprised activated ICOS(+) Tregs that were able to suppress not only conventional T cells, but also FL B cells. These FL B cells were able to express ICOSL in vitro and to generate CD25(high)FoxP3(high) Tregs expressing ICOS. Treg generation was associated with ICOS/ICOSL engagement and was abrogated by antagonist anti-ICOS and anti-ICOSL antibodies. Interactions between Tregs and FL B cells resulted in ICOSL downregulation on FL B cells. Our results highlight a key role for Tregs in FL pathogenesis and suggest that targeting the ICOS/ICOSL pathway may be a promising immunotherapy for FL treatment. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4648-60. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27246829

  14. Lunasin alleviates allergic airway inflammation while increases antigen-specific Tregs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jingjing; Tung, Chun-Yu; Gardiner, Gail; Wang, Qun; Chang, Hua-Chen; Zhou, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Lunasin is a naturally occurring peptide isolated from soybeans and has been explored in cancer treatment. Lunasin inhibits NF-κB activation and thus pro-inflammatory cytokine and mediator production in macrophages. In this study we demonstrate that lunasin can effectively suppress allergic airway inflammation in two murine models of asthma. In an OVA+Alum sensitization model, intranasal lunasin treatment at the time of OVA challenges significantly reduced total cells counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and eosinophilia, peribronchiolar inflammatory infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia and airway IL-4 production. In an OVA+LPS intranasal sensitization model, lunasin treatment either at the time of sensitization or challenge has similar effects in suppress allergic airway inflammation including significantly reduced total cell and eosinophil counts in BAL fluid, inflammatory gene Fizz1 expression in the lung, and IL-4 production by OVA re-stimulated cells from mediastinal lymph nodes. We further show that intranasal instillation of OVA+lunasin significantly increases OVA-specific regulatory T cell (Treg) accumulation in the lung comparing to OVA only treatment. Taken together, our results suggest lunasin as an anti-inflammatory agent can be potentially used in asthma therapy or as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of antigen-specific Tregs and thus boost the efficacy of allergy immunotherapy. PMID:25646897

  15. Lunasin Alleviates Allergic Airway Inflammation while Increases Antigen-Specific Tregs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jingjing; Tung, Chun-Yu; Gardiner, Gail; Wang, Qun; Chang, Hua-Chen; Zhou, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    Lunasin is a naturally occurring peptide isolated from soybeans and has been explored in cancer treatment. Lunasin inhibits NF-κB activation and thus pro-inflammatory cytokine and mediator production in macrophages. In this study we demonstrate that lunasin can effectively suppress allergic airway inflammation in two murine models of asthma. In an OVA+Alum sensitization model, intranasal lunasin treatment at the time of OVA challenges significantly reduced total cells counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and eosinophilia, peribronchiolar inflammatory infiltration, goblet cell metaplasia and airway IL-4 production. In an OVA+LPS intranasal sensitization model, lunasin treatment either at the time of sensitization or challenge has similar effects in suppress allergic airway inflammation including significantly reduced total cell and eosinophil counts in BAL fluid, inflammatory gene Fizz1 expression in the lung, and IL-4 production by OVA re-stimulated cells from mediastinal lymph nodes. We further show that intranasal instillation of OVA+lunasin significantly increases OVA-specific regulatory T cell (Treg) accumulation in the lung comparing to OVA only treatment. Taken together, our results suggest lunasin as an anti-inflammatory agent can be potentially used in asthma therapy or as an adjuvant to enhance the induction of antigen-specific Tregs and thus boost the efficacy of allergy immunotherapy. PMID:25646897

  16. Regulatory T Cell DNA Methyltransferase Inhibition Accelerates Resolution of Lung Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Benjamin D.; Mock, Jason R.; Aggarwal, Neil R.; Garibaldi, Brian T.; Sidhaye, Venkataramana K.; Florez, Marcus A.; Chau, Eric; Gibbs, Kevin W.; Mandke, Pooja; Tripathi, Ashutosh; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; King, Landon S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common and often fatal inflammatory lung condition without effective targeted therapies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) resolve lung inflammation, but mechanisms that enhance Tregs to promote resolution of established damage remain unknown. DNA demethylation at the forkhead box protein 3 (Foxp3) locus and other key Treg loci typify the Treg lineage. To test how dynamic DNA demethylation affects lung injury resolution, we administered the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (DAC) to wild-type (WT) mice beginning 24 hours after intratracheal LPS-induced lung injury. Mice that received DAC exhibited accelerated resolution of their injury. Lung CD4+CD25hiFoxp3+ Tregs from DAC-treated WT mice increased in number and displayed enhanced Foxp3 expression, activation state, suppressive phenotype, and proliferative capacity. Lymphocyte-deficient recombinase activating gene-1–null mice and Treg-depleted (diphtheria toxin-treated Foxp3DTR) mice did not resolve their injury in response to DAC. Adoptive transfer of 2 × 105 DAC-treated, but not vehicle-treated, exogenous Tregs rescued Treg-deficient mice from ongoing lung inflammation. In addition, in WT mice with influenza-induced lung inflammation, DAC rescue treatment facilitated recovery of their injury and promoted an increase in lung Treg number. Thus, DNA methyltransferase inhibition, at least in part, augments Treg number and function to accelerate repair of experimental lung injury. Epigenetic pathways represent novel manipulable targets for the treatment of ARDS. PMID:25295995

  17. Regulatory T cells suppress systemic and mucosal immune activation to control intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Izcue, Ana; Coombes, Janine L; Powrie, Fiona

    2006-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is the main interface where the body encounters exogenous antigens. It is crucial that the local response here is tightly regulated to avoid an immune reaction against dietary antigens and commensal flora while still mounting an efficient defense against pathogens. Faults in establishing intestinal tolerance can lead to disease, inducing local and often also systemic inflammation. Studies in human as well as in animal models suggest a role for regulatory T cells (Tregs) in maintaining intestinal homeostasis. Transfer of Tregs can not only prevent the development of colitis in animal models but also cure established disease, acting both systemically and at the site of inflammation. In this review, we discuss the major regulatory pathways, including transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), and their role in Treg-mediated control of systemic and mucosal responses. In addition, we give an overview of the known mechanisms of lymphocyte migration to the intestine and discuss how CD103 expression can influence the balance between regulatory and effector T cells. Further understanding of the factors that control the activity of Tregs in different immune compartments may facilitate the design of strategies to target regulation in a tissue-specific way. PMID:16903919

  18. Imbalanced signal transduction in regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dapeng; Farache, Julia; Mingueneau, Michael; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2015-12-01

    FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells have a fundamental role in immunological tolerance, with transcriptional and functional phenotypes that demarcate them from conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv). Differences between these two lineages in the signaling downstream of T-cell receptor-triggered activation have been reported, and there are different requirements for some signaling factors. Seeking a comprehensive view, we found that Treg cells have a broadly dampened activation of several pathways and signaling nodes upon TCR-mediated activation, with low phosphorylation of CD3ζ, SLP76, Erk1/2, AKT, or S6 and lower calcium flux. In contrast, STAT phosphorylation triggered by interferons, IL2 or IL6, showed variations between Treg and Tconv in magnitude or choice of preferential STAT activation but no general Treg signaling defect. Much, but not all, of the Treg/Tconv difference in TCR-triggered responses could be attributed to lower responsiveness of antigen-experienced cells with CD44(hi) or CD62L(lo) phenotypes, which form a greater proportion of the Treg pool. Candidate regulators were tested, but the Treg/Tconv differential could not be explained by overexpression in Treg cells of the signaling modulator CD5, the coinhibitors PD-1 and CTLA4, or the regulatory phosphatase DUSP4. However, transcriptome profiling in Dusp4-deficient mice showed that DUSP4 enhances the expression of a segment of the canonical Treg transcriptional signature, which partially overlaps with the TCR-dependent Treg gene set. Thus, Treg cells, likely because of their intrinsically higher reactivity to self, tune down TCR signals but seem comparatively more attuned to cytokines or other intercellular signals. PMID:26627244

  19. Human dendritic cells acquire a semimature phenotype and lymph node homing potential through interaction with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Triebel, Frédéric; Kaveri, Srini V; Tough, David F

    2007-04-01

    Interactions between dendritic cells (DC) and T cells are known to involve the delivery of signals in both directions. We sought to characterize the effects on human DC of contact with different subsets of activated CD4+ T cells. The results showed that interaction with CD25(high)CD4+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) caused DC to take on very different properties than contact with naive or memory phenotype T cells. Whereas non-Tregs stimulated DC maturation, culture with Tregs produced DC with a mixed phenotype. By many criteria, Tregs inhibited DC maturation, inducing down-regulation of costimulatory molecules and T cell stimulatory activity. However, DC exposed to Tregs also showed some changes typically associated with DC maturation, namely, increased expression of CCR7 and MHC class II molecules, and gained the ability to migrate in response to the CCR7 ligand CCL19. Both soluble factors and cell-associated molecules were shown to be involved in Treg modulation of DC, with lymphocyte activation gene 3 (LAG-3) playing a predominant role in driving maturation-associated changes. The data show that Tregs induce the generation of semimature DC with the potential to migrate into lymphoid organs, suggesting a possible mechanism by which Tregs down-modulate immune responses. PMID:17371975

  20. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag(-/-) γc(-/-) mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  1. Regulatory T cells inhibit CD34+ cell differentiation into NK cells by blocking their proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Pedroza-Pacheco, Isabela; Shah, Divya; Domogala, Anna; Luevano, Martha; Blundell, Michael; Jackson, Nicola; Thrasher, Adrian; Madrigal, Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    Graft versus Host Disease (GvHD) remains one of the main complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Due to their ability to suppress effector cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been proposed as a cellular therapy to prevent GvHD, however they also inhibit the functions of natural killer (NK) cells, key effectors of the Graft versus Leukemia effect. In this study, we have explored whether a Tregs therapy will also impact on NK cell differentiation. Using an in vitro model of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation into NK cells, we found that activated Tregs led to a 90% reduction in NK cell numbers when added at the time of commitment to the NK cell lineage. This effect was contact dependent and was reversible upon Tregs depletion. The few NK cells that developed in these cultures were mature and exhibited normal functions. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of activated Tregs in rag-/- γc-/- mice abrogated HSC differentiation into NK cells thus confirming our in vitro findings. Collectively, these results demonstrate for the first time that activated Tregs can inhibit NK cell differentiation from HSC under specific conditions. PMID:26915707

  2. Blockade of TNF-α signaling benefits cancer therapy by suppressing effector regulatory T cell expansion

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Su, Shih-Huan; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Effector but not naive regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can accumulate in the peripheral blood as well as the tumor microenvironment, expand during tumor progression and be one of the main suppressors for antitumor immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms for effector Treg cell expansion in tumor are still unknown. We demonstrate that effector Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor CD8+ T cells is tumor-nonspecific. Furthermore, TNFR2 expression is increased in these Treg cells by Affymetrix chip analysis which was confirmed by monoclonal antibody staining in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and murine models. Correspondingly, increased levels of TNF-α in both tissue and serum were also demonstrated. Interestingly, TNF-α could not only expand effector Treg cells through TNFR2 signaling, but also enhanced their suppressive activity against antitumor immunity of CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, targeting TNFR2 signaling with a TNF-α inhibitor could selectively reduce rapid resurgence of effector Treg cells after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion and markedly inhibit the growth of established tumors. Herein, we propose a novel mechanism in which TNF-α could promote tumor-associated effector Treg cell expansion and suggest a new cancer immunotherapy strategy using TNF-α inhibitors to reduce effector Treg cells expansion after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion. PMID:26451304

  3. In vitro generated Th17 cells support the expansion and phenotypic stability of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qiong; Hu, Ya; Howard, O M Zack; Oppenheim, Joost J; Chen, Xin

    2014-01-01

    CD4(+) T cells stimulate immune responses through distinct patterns of cytokine produced by Th1, Th2 or Th17 cells, or inhibit immune responses through Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs). Paradoxically, effector T cells were recently shown to activate Tregs, however, it remains unclear which Th subset is responsible for this effect. In this study, we found that Th17 cells expressed the highest levels of TNF among in vitro generated Th subsets, and most potently promoted expansion and stabilized Foxp3 expression by Tregs when co-transferred into Rag1(-/-) mice. Both TNF and IL-2 produced by Th17 cells contributed to this effect. The stimulatory effect of Th17 cells on Tregs was largely abolished when co-transferred with TNFR2-deficient Tregs. Furthermore, Tregs deficient in TNFR2 also supported a much lower production of IL-17A and TNF expression by co-transferred Th17 cells. Thus, our data indicate that the TNF-TNFR2 pathway plays a crucial role in the reciprocal stimulatory effect of Th17 cells and Tregs. This bidirectional interaction should be taken into account when designing therapy targeting Th17 cells, Tregs, TNF and TNFR2. PMID:24080164

  4. Human Treg responses allow sustained recombinant adeno-associated virus–mediated transgene expression

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Christian; Chulay, Jeffrey D.; Trapnell, Bruce C.; Humphries, Margaret; Carey, Brenna; Sandhaus, Robert A.; McElvaney, Noel G.; Messina, Louis; Tang, Qiushi; Rouhani, Farshid N.; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Fu, Ann Dongtao; Yachnis, Anthony; Knop, David R.; Ye, Guo-jie; Brantly, Mark; Calcedo, Roberto; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Richman, Lee P.; Vonderheide, Robert H.; Hulme, Maigan A.; Brusko, Todd M.; Wilson, James M.; Flotte, Terence R.

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors have shown promise for the treatment of several diseases; however, immune-mediated elimination of transduced cells has been suggested to limit and account for a loss of efficacy. To determine whether rAAV vector expression can persist long term, we administered rAAV vectors expressing normal, M-type α-1 antitrypsin (M-AAT) to AAT-deficient subjects at various doses by multiple i.m. injections. M-specific AAT expression was observed in all subjects in a dose-dependent manner and was sustained for more than 1 year in the absence of immune suppression. Muscle biopsies at 1 year had sustained AAT expression and a reduction of inflammatory cells compared with 3 month biopsies. Deep sequencing of the TCR Vβ region from muscle biopsies demonstrated a limited number of T cell clones that emerged at 3 months after vector administration and persisted for 1 year. In situ immunophenotyping revealed a substantial Treg population in muscle biopsy samples containing AAT-expressing myofibers. Approximately 10% of all T cells in muscle were natural Tregs, which were activated in response to AAV capsid. These results suggest that i.m. delivery of rAAV type 1–AAT (rAAV1-AAT) induces a T regulatory response that allows ongoing transgene expression and indicates that immunomodulatory treatments may not be necessary for rAAV-mediated gene therapy. PMID:24231351

  5. Leptin directly promotes T-cell glycolytic metabolism to drive effector T-cell differentiation in a mouse model of autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gerriets, Valerie A; Danzaki, Keiko; Kishton, Rigel J; Eisner, William; Nichols, Amanda G; Saucillo, Donte C; Shinohara, Mari L; MacIver, Nancie J

    2016-08-01

    Upon activation, T cells require energy for growth, proliferation, and function. Effector T (Teff) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, utilize high levels of glycolytic metabolism to fuel proliferation and function. In contrast, Treg cells require oxidative metabolism to fuel suppressive function. It remains unknown how Teff/Treg-cell metabolism is altered when nutrients are limited and leptin levels are low. We therefore examined the role of malnutrition and associated hypoleptinemia on Teff versus Treg cells. We found that both malnutrition-associated hypoleptinemia and T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout suppressed Teff-cell number, function, and glucose metabolism, but did not alter Treg-cell metabolism or suppressive function. Using the autoimmune mouse model EAE, we confirmed that fasting-induced hypoleptinemia altered Teff-cell, but not Treg-cell, glucose metabolism, and function in vivo, leading to decreased disease severity. To explore potential mechanisms, we examined HIF-1α, a key regulator of Th17 differentiation and Teff-cell glucose metabolism, and found HIF-1α expression was decreased in T cell-specific leptin receptor knockout Th17 cells, and in Teff cells from fasted EAE mice, but was unchanged in Treg cells. Altogether, these data demonstrate a selective, cell-intrinsic requirement for leptin to upregulate glucose metabolism and maintain function in Teff, but not Treg cells. PMID:27222115

  6. Relationships between IL-17(+) subsets, Tregs and pDCs that distinguish among SIV infected elite controllers, low, medium and high viral load rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Khowawisetsut, Ladawan; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Mayne, Ann E; Little, Dawn M; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive studies of the frequencies and absolute numbers of the various cell lineages that synthesize IL-17 in the blood and corresponding gastrointestinal (GI) tissues, their correlation with CD4(+) Tregs, CD8(+) Tregs, total and IFN-α synthesizing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) relative to plasma viral load in SIV infection has been lacking. The unique availability of SIV infected rhesus macaques (RM) classified as Elite Controllers (EC), and those with Low, Intermediate and High Viral Loads (HVL) provided a unique opportunity to address this issue. Results of these studies showed that EC demonstrated a remarkable ability to reverse changes that are induced acutely by SIV in the various cell lineages. Highlights of the differences between EC and HVL RM within Gastro-intestinal tissues (GIT) was the maintenance and/or increases in the levels of IL-17 synthesizing CD4, CD8, and NK cells and pDCs associated with slight decreases in the levels of CD4(+) Tregs and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in EC as compared with decreases in the levels of IL-17 synthesizing CD4, CD8 and NK cells associated with increases in pDCs and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in HVL monkeys. A previously underappreciated role for CD8(+) Tregs was also noted with a moderate increase in ECs but further increases of CD8(+) Tregs with increasing VL in viremic monkeys. Positive correlations between plasma VL and decreases in the levels of Th17, Tc17, NK-17, CD4(+) Tregs and increases in the levels of CD8(+) Tregs, total and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs were also noted. This study also identified 2 additional IL-17(+) subsets in GIT as CD3(-/)CD8(+)/NKG2a(-) and CD3(+)/CD8(+)/NKG2a(+) subsets. Studies also suggest a limited role for IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in chronic immune activation despite persistent up-regulation of ISGs. Finally, elevated persistent innate immune responses appear associated with poor prognosis. These findings provide an initial foundation for markers important to follow for vaccine

  7. Hurdles in therapy with regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Trzonkowski, Piotr; Bacchetta, Rosa; Battaglia, Manuela; Berglund, David; Bohnenkamp, Hermann Richard; ten Brinke, Anja; Bushell, Andrew; Cools, Nathalie; Geissler, Edward K; Gregori, Silvia; Marieke van Ham, S; Hilkens, Catharien; Hutchinson, James A; Lombardi, Giovanna; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Marek-Trzonkowska, Natalia; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Sanchez-Ramon, Silvia; Saudemont, Aurore; Sawitzki, Birgit

    2015-09-01

    Improper activation of the immune system contributes to a variety of clinical conditions, including autoimmune and allergic diseases as well as solid organ and bone marrow transplantation. One approach to counteract this activation is through adoptive therapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs). Efforts to manufacture these cells have led to good maunfacturing practice-compliant protocols, and Treg products are entering early clinical trials. Here, we report the stance of the European Union Cooperation in Science and Technology Action BM1305, "Action to Focus and Accelerate Cell-based Tolerance-inducing Therapies-A FACTT," which identifies hurdles hindering Treg clinical applications in Europe and provides possible solutions. PMID:26355029

  8. Novel Foxp3(-) IL-10(-) Regulatory T-cells Induced by B-Cells Alleviate Intestinal Inflammation in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tzu-Yu; Hsu, Ling-Hui; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed various Foxp3(-) regulatory T (Treg) cell subsets effectively protect mice from colitis. In the present study, we demonstrated that B cells induced a particular subset of regulatory T (Treg-of-B) cells, expressing programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), inducible costimulator (ICOS), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3), glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR), and OX-40, did not express Foxp3. Treg-of-B cells produced abundant levels of IL-10 and low levels of IL-4 and TGF-β. Adoptive transfer of Treg-of-B cells protected mice from CD4(+)CD45RB(hi) T-cell-induced colitis, including infiltration of leukocytes, depletion of goblet cells, epithelial hyperplasia, and inhibition of Th1 and Th17 cytokines. These features were similar to IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells; however, IL-10-deficient Treg-of-B cells maintained their suppressive function in vitro as well as in vivo, while the regulation of Tr1 cells depended on IL-10. In conclusion, Treg-of-B cells protected against experimental colitis through an IL-10-independent mechanism. We reported a novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells was different from conventional Foxp3(+) Treg and IL-10-producing Tr1 cells. PMID:27581189

  9. Complement-induced regulatory T cells suppress T-cell responses but allow for dendritic-cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Barchet, Winfried; Price, Jeffrey D.; Cella, Marina; Colonna, Marco; MacMillan, Sandra K.; Cobb, J. Perren; Thompson, Paul A.; Murphy, Kenneth M.; Atkinson, John P.; Kemper, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent activation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) and complement regulator CD46 on human CD4+ T lymphocytes induces Tr1-like regulatory T cells that suppress through IL-10 secretion bystander T-cell proliferation. Here we show that, despite their IL-10 production, CD46-induced T-regulatory T cells (Tregs) do not suppress the activation/maturation of dendritic cells (DCs). DC maturation by complement/CD46-induced Tregs is mediated through simultaneous secretion of GM-CSF and soluble CD40L, factors favoring DC differentiation and reversing inhibitory effects of IL-10. Thus, CD46-induced Tregs produce a distinct cytokine profile that inhibits T-cell responses but leaves DC activation unimpaired. Such “DC-sparing” Tregs could be desirable at host/environment interfaces such as the gastrointestinal tract where their specific cytokine profile provides a mechanism that ensures unresponsiveness to commensal bacteria while maintaining reactivity to invading pathogens. PMID:16239430

  10. Deletion of Fibrinogen-like Protein 2 (FGL-2), a Novel CD4+ CD25+ Treg Effector Molecule, Leads to Improved Control of Echinococcus multilocularis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junhua; Vuitton, Dominique A.; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew; Spiliotis, Markus; Blagosklonov, Oleg; Grandgirard, Denis; Leib, Stephen L.; Shalev, Itay; Levy, Gary; Lu, Xiaomei; Lin, Renyong; Wen, Hao; Gottstein, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background The growth potential of the tumor-like Echinococcus multilocularis metacestode (causing alveolar echinococcosis, AE) is directly linked to the nature/function of the periparasitic host immune-mediated processes. We previously showed that Fibrinogen-like-protein 2 (FGL2), a novel CD4+CD25+ Treg effector molecule, was over-expressed in the liver of mice experimentally infected with E. multilocularis. However, little is known about its contribution to the control of this chronic helminth infection. Methods/Findings Key parameters for infection outcome in E. multilocularis-infected fgl2-/- (AE-fgl2-/-) and wild type (AE-WT) mice at 1 and 4 month(s) post-infection were (i) parasite load (i. e. wet weight of parasitic metacestode tissue), and (ii) parasite cell proliferation as assessed by determining E. multilocularis 14-3-3 gene expression levels. Serum FGL2 levels were measured by ELISA. Spleen cells cultured with ConA for 48h or with E. multilocularis Vesicle Fluid (VF) for 96h were analyzed ex-vivo and in-vitro. In addition, spleen cells from non-infected WT mice were cultured with rFGL2/anti-FGL2 or rIL-17A/anti-IL-17A for further functional studies. For Treg-immune-suppression-assays, purified CD4+CD25+ Treg suspensions were incubated with CD4+ effector T cells in the presence of ConA and irradiated spleen cells as APCs. Flow cytometry and qRT-PCR were used to assess Treg, Th17-, Th1-, Th2-type immune responses and maturation of dendritic cells. We showed that AE-fgl2-/- mice exhibited (as compared to AE-WT-animals) (a) a significantly lower parasite load with reduced proliferation activity, (b) an increased T cell proliferative response to ConA, (c) reduced Treg numbers and function, and (d) a persistent capacity of Th1 polarization and DC maturation. Conclusions FGL2 appears as one of the key players in immune regulatory processes favoring metacestode survival by promoting Treg cell activity and IL-17A production that contributes to FGL2-regulation

  11. IFNγ Signaling Endows DCs with the Capacity to Control Type I Inflammation during Parasitic Infection through Promoting T-bet+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyang-Mi; Fleige, Anne; Forman, Ruth; Cho, Sunglim; Khan, Aly Azeem; Lin, Ling-Li; Nguyen, Duc T.; O'Hara-Hall, Aisling; Yin, Zhinan; Hunter, Christopher A.; Muller, Werner; Lu, Li-Fan

    2015-01-01

    IFNγ signaling drives dendritic cells (DCs) to promote type I T cell (Th1) immunity. Here, we show that activation of DCs by IFNγ is equally crucial for the differentiation of a population of T-bet+ regulatory T (Treg) cells specialized to inhibit Th1 immune responses. Conditional deletion of IFNγ receptor in DCs but not in Treg cells resulted in a severe defect in this specific Treg cell subset, leading to exacerbated immune pathology during parasitic infections. Mechanistically, IFNγ-unresponsive DCs failed to produce sufficient amount of IL-27, a cytokine required for optimal T-bet induction in Treg cells. Thus, IFNγ signalling endows DCs with the ability to efficiently control a specific type of T cell immunity through promoting a corresponding Treg cell population. PMID:25658840

  12. Eosinophils from Murine Lamina Propria Induce Differentiation of Naïve T Cells into Regulatory T Cells via TGF-β1 and Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ojcius, David M.; Hu, Wei-Lin; Ge, Yu-Mei; Lin, Xu’ai; Li, Lan-Juan; Pan, Jian-Ping; Yan, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Treg cells play a crucial role in immune tolerance, but mechanisms that induce Treg cells are poorly understood. We here have described eosinophils in lamina propria (LP) that displayed high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, a rate-limiting step during all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) synthesis, and expressed TGF-β1 mRNA and high levels of ATRA. Co-incubation assay confirmed that LP eosinophils induced the differentiation of naïve T cells into Treg cells. Differentiation promoted by LP eosinophils were inhibited by blocked either TGF-β1 or ATRA. Peripheral blood (PB) eosinophils did not produce ATRA and could not induce Treg differentiation. These data identifies LP eosinophils as effective inducers of Treg cell differentiation through a mechanism dependent on TGF-β1 and ATRA. PMID:26587591

  13. Mucosal Regulatory T Cells and T Helper 17 Cells in HIV-Associated Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Pandiyan, Pushpa; Younes, Souheil-Antoine; Ribeiro, Susan Pereira; Talla, Aarthi; McDonald, David; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Levine, Alan D.; Weinberg, Aaron; Sekaly, Rafick P.

    2016-01-01

    Residual mucosal inflammation along with chronic systemic immune activation is an important feature in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and has been linked to a wide range of co-morbidities, including malignancy, opportunistic infections, immunopathology, and cardiovascular complications. Although combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can reduce plasma viral loads to undetectable levels, reservoirs of virus persist, and increased mortality is associated with immune dysbiosis in mucosal lymphoid tissues. Immune-based therapies are pursued with the goal of improving CD4+ T-cell restoration, as well as reducing chronic immune activation in cART-treated patients. However, the majority of research on immune activation has been derived from analysis of circulating T cells. How immune cell alterations in mucosal tissues contribute to HIV immune dysregulation and the associated risk of non-infectious chronic complications is less studied. Given the significant differences between mucosal T cells and circulating T cells, and the immediate interactions of mucosal T cells with the microbiome, more attention should be devoted to mucosal immune cells and their contribution to systemic immune activation in HIV-infected individuals. Here, we will focus on mucosal immune cells with a specific emphasis on CD4+ T lymphocytes, such as T helper 17 cells and CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), which play crucial roles in maintaining mucosal barrier integrity and preventing inflammation, respectively. We hypothesize that pro-inflammatory milieu in cART-treated patients with immune activation significantly contributes to enhanced loss of Th17 cells and increased frequency of dysregulated Tregs in the mucosa, which in turn may exacerbate immune dysfunction in HIV-infected patients. We also present initial evidence to support this hypothesis. A better comprehension of how pro-inflammatory milieu impacts these two types of cells in the mucosa will shed light

  14. T-cell activation or tolerization: the Yin and Yang of bacterial superantigens.

    PubMed

    Sähr, Aline; Förmer, Sandra; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Heeg, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial superantigens (SAg) are exotoxins from pathogens which interact with innate and adaptive immune cells. The paradox that SAgs cause activation and inactivation/anergy of T-cells was soon recognized. The structural and molecular events following SAg binding to antigen presenting cells (APCs) followed by crosslinking of T-cell receptors were characterized in detail. Activation, cytokine burst and T-cell anergy have been described in vitro and in vivo. Later it became clear that SAg-induced T-cell anergy is in part caused by SAg-dependent activation of T-regulatory cells (Tregs). Although the main focus of analyses was laid on T-cells, it was also shown that SAg binding to MHC class II molecules on APCs induces a signal, which leads to activation and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Accordingly APCs are mandatory for T-cell activation. So far it is not known, whether APCs play a role during SAg-triggered activation of Tregs. We therefore tested whether in SAg (Streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin A) -treated APCs an anti-inflammatory program is triggered in addition. We show here that not only the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and the co-inhibitory surface molecule PD-L1 (CD274) but also inhibitory effector systems like indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) or intracellular negative feedback loops (suppressor of cytokine signaling molecules, SOCS) are induced by SAgs. Moreover, cyclosporine A completely prevented induction of this program. We therefore propose that APCs triggered by SAgs play a key role in T-cell activation as well as inactivation and induction of Treg cells. PMID:26539181

  15. Comparison of induced versus natural regulatory T cells of the same TCR specificity for induction of tolerance to an environmental antigen.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui; Ma, Yanna; Dawicki, Wojciech; Zhang, Xiaobei; Gordon, John R

    2013-08-01

    Recent evidence shows that natural CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (nTreg) and induced CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) both contribute to tolerance in mouse models of colitis and asthma, but there is little evidence regarding their relative contributions to this tolerance. We compared the abilities of nTreg and iTreg, both from OVA-TCR-transgenic OTII mice, to mediate tolerance in OVA-asthmatic C57BL/6 mice. The iTreg were differentiated from Th2 effector T cells by exposure to IL-10-differentiated dendritic cells (DC10) in vitro or in vivo, whereas we purified nTreg from allergen-naive mice and exposed them to DC10 before use. Each Treg population was subsequently repurified and tested for its therapeutic efficacy in vitro and in vivo. DC10 engaged the nTreg in a cognate fashion in Forster (or fluorescence) resonance energy transfer assays, and these nTreg reduced in vitro OVA-asthmatic Th2 effector T cell responses by 41-56%, whereas the comparator iTreg reduced these responses by 72-86%. Neutralization of IL-10, but not TGF-β, eliminated the suppressive activities of iTreg but not nTreg. Delivery of 5 × 10(5) purified nTreg reduced allergen challenge-induced airway IL-4 (p ≤ 0.03) and IL-5 (p ≤ 0.001) responses of asthmatic recipients by ≤ 23% but did not affect airway hyperresponsiveness or IgE levels, whereas equal numbers of iTreg of identical TCR specificity reduced all airway responses to allergen challenge by 82-96% (p ≤ 0.001) and fully normalized airway hyperresponsiveness. These data confirm that allergen-specific iTreg and nTreg have active roles in asthma tolerance and that iTreg are substantially more tolerogenic in this setting. PMID:23817420

  16. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  17. Novel Foxp3− IL-10− Regulatory T-cells Induced by B-Cells Alleviate Intestinal Inflammation in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Tzu-Yu; Hsu, Ling-Hui; Chien, Chien-Hui; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed various Foxp3− regulatory T (Treg) cell subsets effectively protect mice from colitis. In the present study, we demonstrated that B cells induced a particular subset of regulatory T (Treg-of-B) cells, expressing programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), inducible costimulator (ICOS), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3), glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor (GITR), and OX-40, did not express Foxp3. Treg-of-B cells produced abundant levels of IL-10 and low levels of IL-4 and TGF-β. Adoptive transfer of Treg-of-B cells protected mice from CD4+CD45RBhi T-cell-induced colitis, including infiltration of leukocytes, depletion of goblet cells, epithelial hyperplasia, and inhibition of Th1 and Th17 cytokines. These features were similar to IL-10-producing type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells; however, IL-10-deficient Treg-of-B cells maintained their suppressive function in vitro as well as in vivo, while the regulation of Tr1 cells depended on IL-10. In conclusion, Treg-of-B cells protected against experimental colitis through an IL-10-independent mechanism. We reported a novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells was different from conventional Foxp3+ Treg and IL-10-producing Tr1 cells. PMID:27581189

  18. Foxp3(+) T cells expressing RORγt represent a stable regulatory T-cell effector lineage with enhanced suppressive capacity during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, B-H; Hagemann, S; Mamareli, P; Lauer, U; Hoffmann, U; Beckstette, M; Föhse, L; Prinz, I; Pezoldt, J; Suerbaum, S; Sparwasser, T; Hamann, A; Floess, S; Huehn, J; Lochner, M

    2016-03-01

    Foxp3 (forkhead box P3 transcription factor)-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for immunological tolerance, best illustrated by uncontrolled effector T-cell responses and autoimmunity upon loss of Foxp3 expression. Tregs can adopt specific effector phenotypes upon activation, reflecting the diversity of functional demands in the different tissues of the body. Here, we report that Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells coexpressing retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt), the master transcription factor for T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, represent a stable effector Treg lineage. Transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling revealed that Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells display signatures of both Tregs and Th17 cells, although the degree of similarity was higher to Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs than to Foxp3(-)RORγt(+) T cells. Importantly, Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells were significantly demethylated at Treg-specific epigenetic signature genes such as Foxp3, Ctla-4, Gitr, Eos, and Helios, suggesting that these cells have a stable regulatory rather than inflammatory function. Indeed, adoptive transfer of Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells in the T-cell transfer colitis model confirmed their Treg function and lineage stability in vivo, and revealed an enhanced suppressive capacity as compared with Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs. Thus, our data suggest that RORγt expression in Tregs contributes to an optimal suppressive capacity during gut-specific immune responses, rendering Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells as an important effector Treg subset in the intestinal system. PMID:26307665

  19. Regulatory T cells in human and angiotensin II-induced mouse abdominal aortic aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi; Wu, Wenxue; Lindholt, Jes S.; Sukhova, Galina K.; Libby, Peter; Yu, Xueqing; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Aims Regulatory T cells (Tregs) protect mice from angiotensin II (Ang-II)-induced abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA). This study tested whether AAA patients are Treg-insufficient and the Treg molecular mechanisms that control AAA pathogenesis. Methods and results ELISA determined the Foxp3 concentration in blood cell lysates from 485 AAA patients and 204 age- and sex-matched controls. AAA patients exhibited lower blood cell Foxp3 expression than controls (P < 0.0001). Pearson's correlation test demonstrated a significant but negative correlation between Foxp3 and AAA annual expansion rate before (r = –0.147, P = 0.007) and after (r = –0.153, P = 0.006) adjustment for AAA risk factors. AAA in apolipoprotein E-deficient (Apoe–/–) mice that received different doses of Ang-II exhibited a negative correlation of lesion Foxp3+ Treg numbers with AAA size (r = –0.883, P < 0.0001). Adoptive transfer of Tregs from wild-type (WT) and IL10-deficient (Il10–/–) mice increased AAA lesion Treg content, but only WT mice Tregs reduced AAA size, AAA incidence, blood pressure, lesion macrophage and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell accumulation, and angiogenesis with concurrent increase of lesion collagen content. Both AAA lesion immunostaining and plasma ELISA demonstrated that adoptive transfer of WT Tregs, but not Il10–/– Tregs, reduced the expression of MCP-1. In vitro cell culture and aortic ring assay demonstrated that only Tregs from WT mice, but not those from Il10–/– mice, reduced macrophage MCP-1 secretion, macrophage and vascular cell protease expression and activity, and aortic ring microvessel formation. Conclusion This study supports a protective role of Tregs in human and experimental AAA by releasing IL10 to suppress inflammatory cell chemotaxis, arterial wall remodelling, and angiogenesis. PMID:25824145

  20. Technical advance: soluble OX40 molecule mimics regulatory T cell modulatory activity on FcεRI-dependent mast cell degranulation.

    PubMed

    Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Frossi, Barbara; Tripodo, Claudio; Suzuki, Ryo; Rivera, Juan; MacDonald, Andrew S; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-10-01

    Tregs play a central role in modulating FcεRI-dependent MC effector functions in the course of the allergic response. Cellular interaction depends on the constitutive expression of OX40 on Tregs and the OX40L counterpart on MCs. Study of OX40L signaling on MCs is hampered by the need of a highly purified molecule, which triggers OX40L specifically. We now report that sOX40 mimics the physiological activity of Treg interaction by binding to activated MCs. When treated with sOX40, activated MCs showed decreased degranulation and Ca(++) influx, whereas PLC-γ2 phosphorylation remained unaffected. Once injected into experimental animals, sOX40 not only located within the endothelium but also in parenchyma, where it could be found in close proximity and apparently bound to MCs. This soluble molecule triggers MC-OX40L without the requirement of Tregs, thus allowing study of OX40L signaling pathways in MCs and in other OX40L-expressing cell populations. Importantly, as sOX40 inhibits MC degranulation, it may provide an in vivo therapeutic tool in allergic disease. PMID:21653238

  1. SHARPIN controls the development of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Redecke, Vanessa; Chaturvedi, Vandana; Kuriakose, Jeeba; Häcker, Hans

    2016-06-01

    SHARPIN is an essential component of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) complex that controls signalling pathways of various receptors, including the tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR), Toll-like receptor (TLR) and antigen receptor, in part by synthesis of linear, non-degrading ubiquitin chains. Consistent with SHARPIN's function in different receptor pathways, the phenotype of SHARPIN-deficient mice is complex, including the development of inflammatory systemic and skin diseases, the latter of which depend on TNFR signal transduction. Given the established function of SHARPIN in primary and malignant B cells, we hypothesized that SHARPIN might also regulate T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling and thereby control T-cell biology. Here, we focus primarily on the role of SHARPIN in T cells, specifically regulatory T (Treg) cells. We found that SHARPIN-deficient (Sharpin(cpdm/cpdm) ) mice have significantly reduced numbers of FOXP3(+) Treg cells in lymphoid organs and the peripheral blood. Competitive reconstitution of irradiated mice with mixed bone marrow from wild-type and SHARPIN-deficient mice revealed an overall reduced thymus population with SHARPIN-deficient cells with almost complete loss of thymic Treg development. Consistent with this cell-intrinsic function of SHARPIN in Treg development, TCR stimulation of SHARPIN-deficient thymocytes revealed reduced activation of nuclear factor-κB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase, establishing a function of SHARPIN in TCR signalling, which may explain the defective Treg development. In turn, in vitro generation and suppressive activity of mature SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells were comparable to wild-type cells, suggesting that maturation, but not function, of SHARPIN-deficient Treg cells is impaired. Taken together, these findings show that SHARPIN controls TCR signalling and is required for efficient generation of Treg cells in vivo, whereas the inhibitory function of mature Treg cells appears to be

  2. Activation of Salmonella Typhi-Specific Regulatory T Cells in Typhoid Disease in a Wild-Type S. Typhi Challenge Model

    PubMed Central

    McArthur, Monica A.; Fresnay, Stephanie; Magder, Laurence S.; Darton, Thomas C.; Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S.; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Dougan, Gordon; Angus, Brian; Levine, Myron M.; Pollard, Andrew J.; Sztein, Marcelo B.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, causes significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Currently available vaccines are moderately efficacious, and identification of immunological responses associated with protection or disease will facilitate the development of improved vaccines. We investigated S. Typhi-specific modulation of activation and homing potential of circulating regulatory T cells (Treg) by flow and mass cytometry using specimens obtained from a human challenge study. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were obtained from volunteers pre- and at multiple time-points post-challenge with wild-type S. Typhi. We identified differing patterns of S. Typhi-specific modulation of the homing potential of circulating Treg between volunteers diagnosed with typhoid (TD) and those who were not (No TD). TD volunteers demonstrated up-regulation of the gut homing molecule integrin α4ß7 pre-challenge, followed by a significant down-regulation post-challenge consistent with Treg homing to the gut. Additionally, S. Typhi-specific Treg from TD volunteers exhibited up-regulation of activation molecules post-challenge (e.g., HLA-DR, LFA-1). We further demonstrate that depletion of Treg results in increased S. Typhi-specific cytokine production by CD8+ TEM in vitro. These results suggest that the tissue distribution of activated Treg, their characteristics and activation status may play a pivotal role in typhoid fever, possibly through suppression of S. Typhi-specific effector T cell responses. These studies provide important novel insights into the regulation of immune responses that are likely to be critical in protection against typhoid and other enteric infectious diseases. PMID:26001081

  3. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4(+) CD25(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  4. Imbalance of Th17/Tregs in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Mian-yang; Lan, Ya-ting; Wang, Cheng-bin

    2016-01-01

    T helper (Th) 17 cells and CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are supposed to be critically involved in regulating autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the Th17/Treg pattern in rats with gunpowder smog-induced acute lung injury. Wistar rats were equally randomized to three groups: normal control group, ALI 6 h group (smoke inhalation for 6 h) and ALI 24 h group (smoke inhalation for 24 h). We observed changes in cell counting in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), alveolar-capillary membrane permeability and lung tissue pathology. Moreover, rats in ALI 6 h and ALI 24 h group showed increased expression of Th17 cell and related cytokines (IL-17 A, IL-6, TGF-β and IL-23). Meanwhile, Treg prevalence and related cytokines (IL-10, IL-2 and IL-35) were decreased. Consequently, the ratio of Th17/Treg was higher after smoke inhalation. Additionally, Th1 cell decreased while Th2 cell increased at 6 h and 24 h after smoke inhalation. In conclusion, Th17/Treg imbalance exists in rats with smoke inhalation-induced acute lung injury, suggesting its potential role in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26884314

  5. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Regulatory Tregs inhibit fibrocyte recruitment and fibrosis via suppression of FGF-9 production in the TGF-β1 exposed murine lung

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xueyan; Moore, Meagan W.; Peng, Hong; Sun, Huanxing; Gan, Ye; Homer, Robert J.; Herzog, Erica L.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a difficult to treat, often fatal disease whose pathogenesis involves dysregulated TGF-β1 signaling. CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (“Tregs”) exert important effects on host tolerance and arise from naïve CD4+ lymphocytes in response to TGF-β1. However, the precise contribution of Tregs to experimentally induced murine lung fibrosis remains unclear. We sought to better understand the role of Tregs in this context. Using a model of fibrosis caused by lung specific, doxycycline inducible overexpression of the bioactive form of the human TGF-β1 gene we find that Tregs accumulate in the lung parenchyma within 5 days of transgene activation and that this enhancement persists to at least 14 days. Anti-CD25 Antibody mediated depletion of Tregs causes increased accumulation of soluble collagen and of intrapulmonary CD45+Col Iα1 fibrocytes. These effects are accompanied by enhanced local concentrations of the classical inflammatory mediators CD40L, TNF-α, and IL-1α, along with the neuroimmune molecule fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF-9, also known as “glial activating factor”). FGF-9 expression localizes to parenchymal cells and alveolar macrophages in this model and antibody mediated neutralization of FGF-9 results in attenuated detection of intrapulmonary collagen and fibrocytes without affecting Treg quantities. These data indicate that CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ Tregs attenuate TGF-β1 induced lung fibrosis and fibrocyte accumulation in part via suppression of FGF-9. PMID:24904415

  6. Monitoring regulatory T cells in clinical samples: consensus on an essential marker set and gating strategy for regulatory T cell analysis by flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Dijkgraaf, Eveline M; Battaglia, Alessandra; Beckhove, Philipp; Britten, Cedrik M; Gallimore, Awen; Godkin, Andrew; Gouttefangeas, Cecile; de Gruijl, Tanja D; Koenen, Hans J P M; Scheffold, Alexander; Shevach, Ethan M; Staats, Janet; Taskén, Kjetil; Whiteside, Theresa L; Kroep, Judith R; Welters, Marij J P; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg)-mediated immunosuppression is considered a major obstacle for successful cancer immunotherapy. The association between clinical outcome and Tregs is being studied extensively in clinical trials, but unfortunately, no consensus has been reached about (a) the markers and (b) the gating strategy required to define human Tregs in this context, making it difficult to draw final conclusions. Therefore, we have organized an international workshop on the detection and functional testing of Tregs with leading experts in the field, and 40 participants discussing different analyses and the importance of different markers and context in which Tregs were analyzed. This resulted in a rationally composed ranking list of "Treg markers". Subsequently, the proposed Treg markers were tested to get insight into the overlap/differences between the most frequently used Treg definitions and their utility for Treg detection in various human tissues. Here, we conclude that the CD3, CD4, CD25, CD127, and FoxP3 markers are the minimally required markers to define human Treg cells. Staining for Ki67 and CD45RA showed to provide additional information on the activation status of Tregs. The use of markers was validated in a series of PBMC from healthy donors and cancer patients, as well as in tumor-draining lymph nodes and freshly isolated tumors. In conclusion, we propose an essential marker set comprising antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD25, CD127, Foxp3, Ki67, and CD45RA and a corresponding robust gating strategy for the context-dependent analysis of Tregs by flow cytometry. PMID:26122357

  7. IL-34 is a Treg-specific cytokine and mediates transplant tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Bézie, Séverine; Picarda, Elodie; Ossart, Jason; Tesson, Laurent; Usal, Claire; Renaudin, Karine; Anegon, Ignacio; Guillonneau, Carole

    2015-01-01

    Cytokines and metabolic pathway–controlling enzymes regulate immune responses and have potential as powerful tools to mediate immune tolerance. Blockade of the interaction between CD40 and CD40L induces long-term cardiac allograft survival in rats through a CD8+CD45RClo Treg potentiation. Here, we have shown that the cytokine IL-34, the immunoregulatory properties of which have not been previously studied in transplantation or T cell biology, is expressed by rodent CD8+CD45RClo Tregs and human FOXP3+CD45RCloCD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. IL-34 was involved in the suppressive function of both CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs and markedly inhibited alloreactive immune responses. Additionally, in a rat cardiac allograft model, IL-34 potently induced transplant tolerance that was associated with a total inhibition of alloantibody production. Treatment of rats with IL-34 promoted allograft tolerance that was mediated by induction of CD8+ and CD4+ Tregs. Moreover, these Tregs were capable of serial tolerance induction through modulation of macrophages that migrate early to the graft. Finally, we demonstrated that human macrophages cultured in the presence of IL-34 greatly expanded CD8+ and CD4+ FOXP3+ Tregs, with a superior suppressive potential of antidonor immune responses compared with non–IL-34–expanded Tregs. In conclusion, we reveal that IL-34 serves as a suppressive Treg–specific cytokine and as a tolerogenic cytokine that efficiently inhibits alloreactive immune responses and mediates transplant tolerance. PMID:26389674

  8. Hepatitis C virus-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells regulate T-cell differentiation and function via the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun P; Zhao, Juan; Dai, Jun; Griffin, Jeddidiah W D; Wang, Ling; Wu, Xiao Y; Morrison, Zheng D; Li, Guang Y; El Gazzar, Mohamed; Ning, Shun B; Moorman, Jonathan P; Yao, Zhi Q

    2016-08-01

    T cells play a pivotal role in controlling viral infection; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for regulating T-cell differentiation and function during infections are incompletely understood. In this study, we demonstrated an expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), in particular the monocytic MDSCs (M-MDSCs; CD14(+) CD33(+) CD11b(+) HLA-DR(-/low) ), in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Notably, HCV-induced M-MDSCs express high levels of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (pSTAT3) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with healthy subjects. Blocking STAT3 signalling reduced HCV-mediated M-MDSC expansion and decreased IL-10 expression. Importantly, we observed a significant increase in the numbers of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells following incubation of healthy peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with MDSCs derived from HCV-infected patients or treated with HCV core protein. In addition, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs led to a significant reduction of Foxp3(+) Treg cells developed during chronic HCV infection. Moreover, depletion of MDSCs from PBMCs significantly increased interferon-γ production by CD4(+) T effector (Teff) cells derived from HCV patients. These results suggest that HCV-induced MDSCs promote Treg cell development and inhibit Teff cell function, suggesting a novel mechanism for T-cell regulation and a new strategy for immunotherapy against human viral diseases. PMID:27149428

  9. Systemic inflammatory response elicited by superantigen destabilizes T regulatory cells, rendering them ineffective during toxic shock syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; Chowdhary, Vaidehi R; David, Chella S; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-09-15

    Life-threatening infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus, particularly the community-acquired methicillin-resistant strains of S. aureus, continue to pose serious problems. Greater virulence and increased pathogenicity of certain S. aureus strains are attributed to higher prevalence of exotoxins. Of these exotoxins, the superantigens (SAg) are likely most pathogenic because of their ability to rapidly and robustly activate the T cells even in extremely small quantities. Therefore, countering SAg-mediated T cell activation using T regulatory cells (Tregs) might be beneficial in diseases such as toxic shock syndrome (TSS). As the normal numbers of endogenous Tregs in a typical host are insufficient, we hypothesized that increasing the Treg numbers by administration of IL-2/anti-IL-2 Ab immune complexes (IL2C) or by adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded Tregs might be more effective in countering SAg-mediated immune activation. HLA-DR3 transgenic mice that closely recapitulate human TSS were treated with IL2C to increase endogenous Tregs or received ex vivo expanded Tregs. Subsequently, they were challenged with SAg to induce TSS. Analyses of various parameters reflective of TSS (serum cytokine/chemokine levels, multiple organ pathology, and SAg-induced peripheral T cell expansion) indicated that increasing the Tregs failed to mitigate TSS. On the contrary, serum IFN-γ levels were increased in IL2C-treated mice. Exploration into the reasons behind the lack of protective effect of Tregs revealed IL-17 and IFN-γ-dependent loss of Tregs during TSS. In addition, significant upregulation of glucocorticoid-induced TNFR family-related receptor on conventional T cells during TSS could render them resistant to Treg-mediated suppression, contributing to failure of Treg-mediated immune regulation. PMID:25092888

  10. Differential contribution of three immune checkpoint (VISTA, CTLA-4, PD-1) pathways to antitumor responses against squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Yuta; Ohno, Tatsukuni; Nishii, Naoto; Harada, Kiyoshi; Yagita, Hideo; Azuma, Miyuki

    2016-06-01

    V domain-containing Ig suppressor of T-cell activation (VISTA)/PD-1H is a novel immune checkpoint molecule for regulating T-cell activation. We examined the effects of anti-VISTA mAb monotherapy and combination therapy with CTLA-4 or PD-1 blockade in a squamous cell carcinoma (SCCVII) model. VISTA monotherapy did not show clear tumor growth regression, but efficiently induced CD8(+) T cell activation by converting resting and exhausted cells into functional effector cells. VISTA monotherapy did not inhibit recruitment of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor microenvironment (TME). As an additional treatment to VISTA, CTLA-4 blockade, but not PD-1 blockade, elicited further tumor regression. The CTLA-4 and VISTA combination efficiently inhibited Treg recruitment and increased the ratios of both CD8 T/Treg and CD4 conventional T (Tcon)/Treg in the TME, whereas the PD-1 and VISTA combination dramatically increased tumor-recruiting CD8(+) T cells, but markedly reduced the Tcon/Treg ratio. Our results demonstrate that VISTA blockade efficiently converts CD8(+) T cells into functional effector T cells, but is not sufficient to regress tumor growth due to weak Treg suppression in the TME. Our results suggest that combined CTLA-4 and VISTA blockade is more efficacious than combined PD-1 and VISTA blockade for tumors like head and neck squamous cell carcinoma in which Treg-mediated immune regulation is dominant. PMID:27208845

  11. Platelet microparticles inhibit IL-17 production by regulatory T cells through P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Dinkla, Sip; van Cranenbroek, Bram; van der Heijden, Wouter A; He, Xuehui; Wallbrecher, Rike; Dumitriu, Ingrid E; van der Ven, André J; Bosman, Giel J C G M; Koenen, Hans J P M; Joosten, Irma

    2016-04-21

    Self-tolerance and immune homeostasis are orchestrated by FOXP3(+)regulatory T cells (Tregs). Recent data have revealed that upon stimulation, Tregs may exhibit plasticity toward a proinflammatory phenotype, producing interleukin 17 (IL-17) and/or interferon γ (IFN-γ). Such deregulation of Tregs may contribute to the perpetuation of inflammatory processes, including graft-versus-host disease. Thus, it is important to identify immunomodulatory factors influencing Treg stability. Platelet-derived microparticles (PMPs) are involved in hemostasis and vascular health and have recently been shown to be intimately involved in (pathogenic) immune responses. Therefore, we investigated whether PMPs have the ability to affect Treg plasticity. PMPs were cocultured with healthy donor peripheral blood-derived Tregs that were stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 monoclonal antibodies in the presence of IL-2, IL-15, and IL-1β. PMPs prevented the differentiation of peripheral blood-derived Tregs into IL-17- and IFN-γ-producing cells, even in the presence of the IL-17-driving proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β. The mechanism of action by which PMPs prevent Treg plasticity consisted of rapid and selective P-selectin-dependent binding of PMPs to a CCR6(+)HLA-DR(+)memory-like Treg subset and their ability to inhibit Treg proliferation, in part through CXCR3 engagement. The findings that ∼8% of Tregs in the circulation of healthy individuals are CD41(+)P-selectin(+)and that distinct binding of patient plasma PMPs to Tregs was observed support in vivo relevance. These findings open the exciting possibility that PMPs actively regulate the immune response at sites of (vascular) inflammation, where they are known to accumulate and interact with leukocytes, consolidating the (vascular) healing process. PMID:26903549

  12. Nod2 Activates NF-kB in CD4+ T Cells but Its Expression Is Dispensable for T Cell-Induced Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Zanello, Galliano; Goethel, Ashleigh; Forster, Katharina; Geddes, Kaoru; Philpott, Dana J.; Croitoru, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Although the etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) remains elusive this disease is characterized by T cell activation that leads to chronic inflammation and mucosal damage. A potential role for maladaptation between the intestinal microbiota and the mucosal immune response is suggested by the fact that mutations in the pattern recognition receptor Nod2 are associated with higher risks for developing CD. Although Nod2 deletion in CD4+ T cells has been shown to impair the induction of colitis in the murine T cell transfer model, the analysis of T cell intrinsic Nod2 function in T cell differentiation and T cell-mediated immunity is inconsistent between several studies. In addition, the role of T cell intrinsic Nod2 in regulatory T cell (Treg) development and function during colitis remain to be analyzed. In this study, we show that Nod2 expression is higher in activated/memory CD4+ T cells and its expression was inducible after T cell receptor (TCR) ligation. Nod2 stimulation with muramyl dipeptide (MDP) led to a nuclear accumulation of c-Rel NF-kB subunit. Although functionally active in CD4+ T cells, the deletion of Nod2 did not impair the induction and the prevention of colitis in the T cell transfer model. Moreover, Nod2 deletion did not affect the development of Foxp3+ Treg cells in the spleen of recipient mice and Nod2 deficient CD4 T cells expressing the OVA specific transgenic TCR were able to differentiate in Foxp3+ Treg cells after OVA feeding. In vitro, CD25+ Nod2 deficient T cells suppressed T cell proliferation as well as wild type counter parts and T cell stimulation with MDP did not affect the proliferation and the cytokine secretion of T cells. In conclusion, our data indicate that Nod2 is functional in murine CD4+ T cells but its expression is dispensable for the T cell regulation of colitis. PMID:24324812

  13. The role of nuclear receptors in regulation of Th17/Treg biology and its implications for diseases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear receptors play an essential role in cellular environmental sensing, differentiation, development, homeostasis, and metabolism and are thus highly conserved across multiple species. The anti-inflammatory role of nuclear receptors in immune cells has recently gained recognition. Nuclear receptors play critical roles in both myeloid and lymphoid cells, particularly in helper CD4+ T-cell type 17 (Th17) and regulatory T cells (Treg). Th17 and Treg have a major impact on cellular fate through their interactions with cytokine signaling pathways. Recent studies have emphasized the interactions between nuclear receptors and the known cytokine signals and how these interactions affect the expression and function of master transcription factors in Th17 and Treg subsets. This review will focus on the most recent discoveries concerning the roles of nuclear receptors in regulating the Th17/Treg cell-fate determination. PMID:25958843

  14. Altered expression and editing of miRNA-100 regulates iTreg differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Vinny; Paul, Deepanjan; Das, Sudipta; Bajpai, Prashant; Singh, Suchita; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram

    2015-01-01

    RNA editing of miRNAs, especially in the seed region, adds another layer to miRNA mediated gene regulation which can modify its targets, altering cellular signaling involved in important processes such as differentiation. In this study, we have explored the role of miRNA editing in CD4+ T cell differentiation. CD4+ T cells are an integral component of the adaptive immune system. Naïve CD4+ T cells, on encountering an antigen, get differentiated either into inflammatory subtypes like Th1, Th2 or Th17, or into immunosuppressive subtype Treg, depending on the cytokine milieu. We found C-to-U editing at fifth position of mature miR-100, specifically in Treg. The C-to-U editing of miR-100 is functionally associated with at least one biologically relevant target change, from MTOR to SMAD2. Treg cell polarization by TGFβ1 was reduced by both edited and unedited miR-100 mimics, but percentage of Treg in PBMCs was only reduced by edited miR-100 mimics, suggesting a model in which de-repression of MTOR due to loss of unedited mir-100, promotes tolerogenic signaling, while gain of edited miR-100 represses SMAD2, thereby limiting the Treg. Such delicately counterbalanced systems are a hallmark of immune plasticity and we propose that miR-100 editing is a novel mechanism toward this end. PMID:26209130

  15. Altered expression and editing of miRNA-100 regulates iTreg differentiation.

    PubMed

    Negi, Vinny; Paul, Deepanjan; Das, Sudipta; Bajpai, Prashant; Singh, Suchita; Mukhopadhyay, Arijit; Agrawal, Anurag; Ghosh, Balaram

    2015-09-18

    RNA editing of miRNAs, especially in the seed region, adds another layer to miRNA mediated gene regulation which can modify its targets, altering cellular signaling involved in important processes such as differentiation. In this study, we have explored the role of miRNA editing in CD4(+) T cell differentiation. CD4(+) T cells are an integral component of the adaptive immune system. Naïve CD4(+) T cells, on encountering an antigen, get differentiated either into inflammatory subtypes like Th1, Th2 or Th17, or into immunosuppressive subtype Treg, depending on the cytokine milieu. We found C-to-U editing at fifth position of mature miR-100, specifically in Treg. The C-to-U editing of miR-100 is functionally associated with at least one biologically relevant target change, from MTOR to SMAD2. Treg cell polarization by TGFβ1 was reduced by both edited and unedited miR-100 mimics, but percentage of Treg in PBMCs was only reduced by edited miR-100 mimics, suggesting a model in which de-repression of MTOR due to loss of unedited mir-100, promotes tolerogenic signaling, while gain of edited miR-100 represses SMAD2, thereby limiting the Treg. Such delicately counterbalanced systems are a hallmark of immune plasticity and we propose that miR-100 editing is a novel mechanism toward this end. PMID:26209130

  16. Regulatory T Cells in HIV Infection: Can Immunotherapy Regulate the Regulator?

    PubMed Central

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Ancuta, Petronela; Gilmore, Norbert; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a dominant role in self-tolerance and control of autoimmune diseases. These cells also play a pivotal role in chronic viral infections and cancer by limiting immune activation and specific immune response. The role of Tregs in HIV pathogenesis remains poorly understood as their function, changes according to the phases of infection. Tregs can suppress anti-HIV specific responses and conversely can have a beneficial role by reducing the deleterious impact of immune activation. We review the frequency, function and homing potential of Tregs in the blood and lymphoid tissues as well as their interaction with dendritic cells in the context of HIV infection. We also examine the new insights generated by recombinant IL-2 and IL-7 clinical trials in HIV-infected adults, including the immunomodulatory effects of Tregs. Based on their detrimental role in limiting anti-HIV responses, we propose Tregs as potential targets for immunotherapeutic strategies aimed at decreasing Tregs frequency and/or immunosuppressive function. However, such approaches require a better understanding of the time upon infection when interfering with Treg function may not cause a deleterious state of hyperimmune activation. PMID:23251223

  17. Suppression of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis by autologous T regulatory cells.

    PubMed

    Aricha, Revital; Reuveni, Debby; Fuchs, Sara; Souroujon, Miriam C

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of regulatory T (Treg) cells have been employed effectively for suppression of several animal models for autoimmune diseases. In order to employ Treg cell therapy in patients, it is necessary to generate Treg cells from the patient's own cells (autologous) that would be able to suppress effectively the disease in vivo, upon their reintroduction to the patient. Towards this objective, we report in the present study on a protocol for a successful immune-regulation of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) by ex vivo--generated autologous Treg cells. For this protocol bone marrow (BM) cells, are first cultured in the presence of GM-CSF, giving rise to a population of CD11c(+)MHCII(+)CD45RA(+)CD8(-) DCs (BMDCs). Splenic CD4(+) T cells are then co-cultured with the differentiated BM cells and expand to 90% of Foxp3(+) Treg cells. In vitro assay exhibits a similar dose dependent manner in the suppression of T effector cells proliferation between Treg cells obtained from either healthy or sick donors. In addition, both Treg cells inhibit similarly the secretion of IFN-γ from activated splenocytes. Administration of 1 × 10(6) ex-vivo generated Treg cells, I.V, to EAMG rats, modulates the disease following a single treatment, given 3 days or 3 weeks after disease induction. Similar disease inhibition was achieved when CD4 cells were taken from either healthy or sick donors. The disease suppression was accompanied by reduced levels of total AChR specific antibodies in the serum. Moreover, due to the polyclonality of the described Treg cell, we have examined whether this treatment approach could be also employed for the treatment of other autoimmune diseases involving Treg cells. Indeed, we demonstrated that the ex-vivo generated autologous Treg cells suppress Adjuvant Arthritis (AA) in rats. This study opens the way for the application of induced autologous Treg cell therapy for myasthenia gravis, as well as for other human autoimmune diseases

  18. The ubiquitin ligase Stub1 negatively modulates regulatory T cell suppressive activity by promoting degradation of the transcription factor Foxp3.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zuojia; Barbi, Joseph; Bu, Shurui; Yang, Huang-Yu; Li, Zhiyuan; Gao, Yayi; Jinasena, Dilini; Fu, Juan; Lin, Fang; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Ning; Li, Xiangpei; Shan, Zhao; Nie, Jia; Gao, Zhimei; Tian, Hong; Li, Yangyang; Yao, Zhengju; Zheng, Ying; Park, Benjamin V; Pan, Ziyi; Zhang, Jing; Dang, Eric; Li, Zhiguang; Wang, Honglin; Luo, Weibo; Li, Liwu; Semenza, Gregg L; Zheng, Song-Guo; Loser, Karin; Tsun, Andy; Greene, Mark I; Pardoll, Drew M; Pan, Fan; Li, Bin

    2013-08-22

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress inflammatory immune responses and autoimmunity caused by self-reactive T cells. The key Treg cell transcription factor Foxp3 is downregulated during inflammation to allow for the acquisition of effector T cell-like functions. Here, we demonstrate that stress signals elicited by proinflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharides lead to the degradation of Foxp3 through the action of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Stub1. Stub1 interacted with Foxp3 to promote its K48-linked polyubiquitination in an Hsp70-dependent manner. Knockdown of endogenous Stub1 or Hsp70 prevented Foxp3 degradation. Furthermore, the overexpression of Stub1 in Treg cells abrogated their ability to suppress inflammatory immune responses in vitro and in vivo and conferred a T-helper-1-cell-like phenotype. Our results demonstrate the critical role of the stress-activated Stub1-Hsp70 complex in promoting Treg cell inactivation, thus providing a potential therapeutic target for the intervention against autoimmune disease, infection, and cancer. PMID:23973223

  19. The Ubiquitin Ligase Stub1 Negatively Modulates Regulatory T cell Suppressive Activity by Promoting Degradation of the Transcription Factor Foxp3

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Huang-Yu; Li, Zhiyuan; Gao, Yayi; Jinasena, Dilini; Fu, Juan; Lin, Fang; Chen, Chen; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Ning; Li, Xiangpei; Shan, Zhao; Nie, Jia; Gao, Zhimei; Tian, Hong; Li, Yangyang; Yao, Zhengju; Zheng, Ying; Park, Benjamin V.; Pan, Ziyi; Zhang, Jing; Dang, Eric; Li, Zhiguang; Wang, Honglin; Luo, Weibo; Li, Liwu; Semenza, Gregg L.; Zheng, Song-Guo; Loser, Karin; Tsun, Andy; Greene, Mark I.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Pan, Fan; Li, Bin

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress inflammatory immune responses and autoimmunity caused by self-reactive T cells. The key Treg cell transcription factor Foxp3 is downregulated during inflammation to allow for the acquisition of effector T cell-like functions. Here, we demonstrate that stress signals elicited by proinflammatory cytokines and lipopolysaccharide lead to the degradation of Foxp3 through the action of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Stub1. Stub1 interacted with Foxp3 to promote its K48-linked polyubiquitination in an Hsp70-dependent manner. Knockdown of endogenous Stub1 or Hsp70 prevented Foxp3 degradation. Furthermore, the overexpression of Stub1 in Treg cells abrogated their ability to suppress inflammatory immune responses in vitro and in vivo, and conferred a T helper 1 (Th1) cell-like phenotype. Our results demonstrate the critical role of the stress-activated Stub1-Hsp70 complex in promoting Treg cell inactivation, thus providing a potential therapeutic target for the intervention against autoimmune disease, infection and cancer. PMID:23973223

  20. Controversies concerning thymus-derived regulatory T cells: fundamental issues and a new perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masahiro; Tanaka, Reiko J

    2016-01-01

    Thymus-derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) are considered to be a distinct T-cell lineage that is genetically programmed and specialised for immunosuppression. This perspective is based on the key evidence that CD25+ Tregs emigrate to neonatal spleen a few days later than other T cells and that thymectomy of 3-day-old mice depletes Tregs only, causing autoimmune diseases. Although widely believed, the evidence has never been reproduced as originally reported, and some studies indicate that Tregs exist in neonates. Thus we examine the consequences of the controversial evidence, revisit the fundamental issues of Tregs and thereby reveal the overlooked relationship of T-cell activation and Foxp3-mediated control of the T-cell system. Here we provide a new model of Tregs and Foxp3, a feedback control perspective, which views Tregs as a component of the system that controls T-cell activation, rather than as a distinct genetically programmed lineage. This perspective provides new insights into the roles of self-reactivity, T cell–antigen-presenting cell interaction and T-cell activation in Foxp3-mediated immune regulation. PMID:26215792

  1. Expression of IL-37 contributes to the immunosuppressive property of human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Xu; Wei-min, Li; Tong, Ya-lin; Dong, Ning; Sheng, Zhi-yong; Yao, Yong-ming

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-37 (IL-37) possesses the function of down-regulate systemic and local inflammation. It is unknown whether IL-37 is expressed in human regulatory T cells (Tregs) and its role in modulating the immune response of Tregs. In the present study, cell surface molecules and secretory cytokines were analyzed in order to determine the function of IL-37 in regulating inhibitory effect of human CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs. Meanwhile, the effects of IL-37 on T cell differentiation and proliferation as co-culture of CD4(+)CD25(+)Treg/CD4(+)CD25(-)T cell were also investigated. It was showed that IL-37 was expressed in cytoplasm of CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs, and the levels of IL-37 were gradually elevated with the enhanced activity of CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs. Secretory cytokines such as transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and interleukin (IL)-10, and expressions of cell surface molecules, including forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (FOXP3) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte associated antigen (CTLA)-4, were significantly decreased when IL-37 gene was silenced by siRNA. Furthermore, down-regulation of IL-37 expression in human CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs obviously promoted proliferation of co-cultured T cell and differentiation, together with observably enhancement of IL-2 formation. These results demonstrated that IL-37 might manifest as a critical protein involving in immunosuppression of human CD4(+)CD25(+)Tregs. PMID:26411375

  2. Single-cell dynamics of mast cell-CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Frossi, Barbara; D'Incà, Federica; Crivellato, Enrico; Sibilano, Riccardo; Gri, Giorgia; Mongillo, Marco; Danelli, Luca; Maggi, Laura; Pucillo, Carlo E

    2011-07-01

    The biological behavior of immune cells is determined by their intrinsic properties and interactions with other cell populations within their microenvironment. Several studies have confirmed the existence of tight spatial interactions between mast cells (MCs) and Tregs in different settings. For instance, we have recently identified the functional cross-talk between MCs and Tregs, through the OX40L-OX40 axis, as a new mechanism of reciprocal influence. However, there is scant information regarding the single-cell dynamics of this process. In this study, time-lapse video microscopy revealed direct interactions between Tregs and MCs in both murine and human cell co-cultures, resulting in the inhibition of the MC degranulation response. MCs incubated with WT, but not OX40-deficient, Tregs mediated numerous and long-lasting interactions and displayed different morphological features lacking the classical signs of exocytosis. MC degranulation and Ca2+ mobilization upon activation were inhibited by Tregs on a single-cell basis, without affecting overall cytokine secretion. Transmission electron microscopy showed ultrastructural evidence of vesicle-mediated secretion reconcilable with the morphological pattern of piecemeal degranulation. Our results suggest that MC morphological and functional changes following MC-Treg interactions can be ascribed to cell-cell contact and represent a transversal, non-species-specific mechanism of immune response regulation. Further research, looking at the molecular composition of this interaction will broaden our understanding of its contribution to immunity. PMID:21509780

  3. Th17/Treg Imbalance Induced by Dietary Salt Variation Indicates Inflammation of Target Organs in Humans.

    PubMed

    Luo, Tao; Ji, Wen-Jie; Yuan, Fei; Guo, Zhao-Zeng; Li, Yun-Xiao; Dong, Yan; Ma, Yong-Qiang; Zhou, Xin; Li, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The functions of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells are tightly orchestrated through independent differentiation pathways that are involved in the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines induced by high-salt dietary. However, the role of imbalanced Th17/Treg ratio implicated in inflammation and target organ damage remains elusive. Here, by flow cytometry analysis, we demonstrated that switching to a high-salt diet resulted in decreased Th17 cells and reciprocally increased Treg cells, leading to a decreased Th17/Treg ratio. Meanwhile, Th17-related pathway was down-regulated after one day of high salt loading, with the increase in high salt loading as shown by microarray and RT-PCR. Subsequently, blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) observed hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2(*) signal) during high-salt loading, which was regressed to its baseline level in a step-down fashion during low-salt feeding. The flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the branchial artery was significantly higher on the first day of high salt loading. Collectively, these observations indicate that a short-term increase in dietary salt intake could induce reciprocal switches in Th17/Treg ratio and related cytokines, which might be the underlying cellular mechanism of high-salt dietary induced end organ inflammation and potential atherosclerotic risk. PMID:27353721

  4. Th17/Treg Imbalance Induced by Dietary Salt Variation Indicates Inflammation of Target Organs in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Tao; Ji, Wen-jie; Yuan, Fei; Guo, Zhao-zeng; Li, Yun-xiao; Dong, Yan; Ma, Yong-qiang; Zhou, Xin; Li, Yu-ming

    2016-01-01

    The functions of T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T (Treg) cells are tightly orchestrated through independent differentiation pathways that are involved in the secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines induced by high-salt dietary. However, the role of imbalanced Th17/Treg ratio implicated in inflammation and target organ damage remains elusive. Here, by flow cytometry analysis, we demonstrated that switching to a high-salt diet resulted in decreased Th17 cells and reciprocally increased Treg cells, leading to a decreased Th17/Treg ratio. Meanwhile, Th17-related pathway was down-regulated after one day of high salt loading, with the increase in high salt loading as shown by microarray and RT-PCR. Subsequently, blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-MRI) observed hypoxia in the renal medulla (increased R2* signal) during high-salt loading, which was regressed to its baseline level in a step-down fashion during low-salt feeding. The flow-mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the branchial artery was significantly higher on the first day of high salt loading. Collectively, these observations indicate that a short-term increase in dietary salt intake could induce reciprocal switches in Th17/Treg ratio and related cytokines, which might be the underlying cellular mechanism of high-salt dietary induced end organ inflammation and potential atherosclerotic risk. PMID:27353721

  5. Activated Conventional T-Cells Are Present in Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Lesions Despite the Presence of Immune Suppressive Cytokines.

    PubMed

    Quispel, Willemijn T; Stegehuis-Kamp, Janine A; Santos, Susy J; Egeler, R Maarten; van Halteren, Astrid G S

    2015-10-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) lesions are characterized by neoplastic CD1a(+)/Langerin(+) histiocytes (LCH-cells) and display many features of chronic inflammation. Cancer cells can escape immune-surveillance through intra-tumoral secretion of immune-suppressive cytokines. We therefore studied by immunohistochemistry the local cytokine milieu and phenotypic characteristics of T-cells and LCH-cells present in LCH lesions collected from 25 therapy naïve patients. LCH biopsies predominantly expressed interleukin-10 (IL-10) (10/25), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) (9/25), or both cytokines (6/25). The absolute number of CD3(+)T-cells and the CD3(+)FOXP3(-) conventional cell (T-CONV) versus the CD3(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T-cell (T-REG) was comparable for each suppressive cytokine profile (5:1). IL-10-expressing lesions contained, however, a higher proportion of T-CONV expressing the activation markers CD25 98% (38%-100%) and inducible costimulatory molecule (ICOS) 86% (47%-100%) than lesions wherein solely TGF-β was detected (CD25(+) 20% (6%-54%); ICOS(+) 29% (7%-51%)). Virtually all T-REG expressed CD25 and ICOS in IL-10 lesions, whereas TGF-β(+) lesions contained a lower proportion of ICOS(+) T-REG (P=0.05). IL-10(+) lesions contained more LCH-cells expressing high intensity of ICOS ligand (ICOSL) compared with TGF-β(+) lesions (P=0.03). ICOS expression by lesion-infiltrating T-CONV and T-REG positively correlated to the extent of ICOSL expression by LCH-cells (P=0.004). Our study points out that the combined detection of interlesional IL-10 and ICOSL expression by LCH-cells is associated with the highest prevalence of activated T-CONV. Immune profiling of LCH-affected tissues obtained at the time of diagnosis may set the stage for the development of new types of therapies, which aim at local boosting of immune cells that recognize and eliminate neoplastic LCH-cells. PMID:26381039

  6. Follicular Lymphoma Tregs Have a Distinct Transcription Profile Impacting Their Migration and Retention in the Malignant Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Hyrien, Ollivier; Burack, W. Richard; Quataert, Sally A.; Baker, Christina M.; Azadniv, Mitra; Welle, Stephen L.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Kim, Minsoo; Bernstein, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that regulatory T cells (Tregs) infiltrating follicular lymphoma lymph nodes are quantitatively and qualitatively different than those infiltrating normal and reactive nodes. To gain insight into how such Treg populations differ, we performed RNA sequence (RNAseq) analyses on flow sorted Tregs from all three sources. We identify several molecules that could contribute to the observed increased suppressive capacity of follicular lymphoma nodal tregs, including upregulation of CTLA-4, IL-10, and GITR, all confirmed by protein expression. In addition, we identify, and confirm functionally, a novel mechanism by which Tregs target to and accumulate within a human tumor microenvironment, through the down regulation of S1PR1, SELL (L-selectin) and CCR7, potentially resulting in greater lymph node retention. In addition we identify and confirm functionally the upregulation of the chemokine receptor CXCR5 as well as the secretion of the chemokines CXCL13 and IL-16 demonstrating the unique ability of the follicular derived Tregs to localize and accumulate within not only the malignant lymph node, but also localize and accumulate within the malignant B cell follicle itself. Such findings offer significant new insights into how follicular lymphoma nodal Tregs may contribute to the biology of follicular lymphoma and identify several novel therapeutic targets. PMID:27228053

  7. Cerebral ischemia increases bone marrow CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells in mice via signals from sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianping; Yu, Lie; Jiang, Chao; Fu, Xiaojie; Liu, Xi; Wang, Menghan; Ou, Chunying; Cui, Xiaobing; Zhou, Chengguang; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has shown that an increase in CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells may contribute to stroke-induced immunosuppression. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie this increase in Treg cells remain unclear. Here, we used a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion model in mice and specific pathway inhibitors to demonstrate that stroke activates the sympathetic nervous system, which was abolished by 6-OHDA. The consequent activation of β2-adrenergic receptor (AR) signaling increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in bone marrow. β2-AR antagonist prevented the upregulation of PGE2. PGE2, which acts on prostaglandin E receptor subtype 4 (EP4), upregulated the expression of receptor activator for NF-κB ligand (RANKL) in CD4(+) T cells and mediated the increase in Treg cells in bone marrow. Treatment of MCAO mice with RANKL antagonist OPG inhibited the increase in percent of bone marrow Treg cells. PGE2 also elevated the expression of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase in CD11C(+) dendritic cells and promoted the development of functional Treg cells. The effect was neutralized by treatment with indomethacin. Concurrently, stroke reduced production of stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) via β3-AR signals in bone marrow but increased the expression of C-X-C chemokine receptor (CXCR) 4 in Treg and other bone marrow cells. Treatment of MCAO mice with β3-AR antagonist SR-59230A reduced the percent of Treg cells in peripheral blood after stroke. The disruption of the CXCR4-SDF-1 axis may facilitate mobilization of Treg cells and other CXCR4(+) cells into peripheral blood. This mechanism could account for the increase in Treg cells, hematopoietic stem cells, and progenitor cells in peripheral blood after stroke. We conclude that cerebral ischemia can increase bone marrow CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells via signals from the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:25110149

  8. HY-Specific Induced Regulatory T Cells Display High Specificity and Efficacy in the Prevention of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Heinrichs, Jessica; Haarberg, Kelley; Semple, Kenrick; Veerapathran, Anandharaman; Liu, Chen; Anasetti, Claudio; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2015-07-15

    Naturally derived regulatory T cells (Tregs) may prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) while preserving graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. However, clinical application of naturally derived regulatory T cells has been severely hampered by their scarce availability and nonselectivity. To overcome these limitations, we took alternative approaches to generate Ag-specific induced Tregs (iTregs) and tested their efficacy and selectivity in the prevention of GVHD in preclinical models of bone marrow transplantation. We selected HY as a target Ag because it is a naturally processed, ubiquitously expressed minor histocompatibility Ag (miHAg) with a proven role in GVHD and GVL effect. We generated HY-specific iTregs (HY-iTregs) from resting CD4 T cells derived from TCR transgenic mice, in which CD4 cells specifically recognize HY peptide. We found that HY-iTregs were highly effective in preventing GVHD in male (HY(+)) but not female (HY(-)) recipients using MHC II-mismatched, parent→F1, and miHAg-mismatched murine bone marrow transplantation models. Interestingly, the expression of target Ag (HY) on the hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic compartment alone was sufficient for iTregs to prevent GVHD. Furthermore, treatment with HY-iTregs still preserved the GVL effect even against pre-established leukemia. We found that HY-iTregs were more stable in male than in female recipients. Furthermore, HY-iTregs expanded extensively in male but not female recipients, which in turn significantly reduced donor effector T cell expansion, activation, and migration into GVHD target organs, resulting in effective prevention of GVHD. This study demonstrates that iTregs specific for HY miHAgs are highly effective in controlling GVHD in an Ag-dependent manner while sparing the GVL effect. PMID:26048147

  9. Oscillatory mTOR inhibition and Treg increase in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, M; Ruggiero, G; Palatucci, A T; Rubino, V; Federico, S; Giovazzino, A; Apicella, L; Santopaolo, M; Matarese, G; Galgani, M; Terrazzano, G

    2015-11-01

    Intracellular metabolic pathways dependent upon the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) play a key role in immune-tolerance control. In this study, we focused on long-term mTOR-dependent immune-modulating effects in kidney transplant recipients undergoing conversion from calcineurin inhibitors (CNI) to mTOR inhibitors (everolimus) in a 1-year follow-up. The conversion to everolimus is associated with a decrease of neutrophils and of CD8(+) T cells. In addition, we observed a reduced production of interferon (IFN)-γ by CD8(+) T cells and of interleukin (IL)-17 by CD4(+) T lymphocytes. An increase in CD4(+) CD25(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(+) [regulatory T cell [(Treg)] numbers was also seen. Treg increase correlated with a higher proliferation rate of this regulatory subpopulation when compared with the CD4(+) FoxP3(-) effector counterpart. Basal phosphorylation level of S6 kinase, a major mTOR-dependent molecular target, was substantially maintained in patients treated with everolimus. Moreover, oscillations in serum concentration of everolimus were associated with changes in basal and activation-dependent S6 kinase phosphorylation of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Indeed, T cell receptor (TCR) triggering was observed to induce significantly higher S6 kinase phosphorylation in the presence of lower everolimus serum concentrations. These results unveil the complex mTOR-dependent immune-metabolic network leading to long-term immune-modulation and might have relevance for novel therapeutic settings in kidney transplants. PMID:26077103

  10. Role of Treg in immune regulation of allergic diseases.

    PubMed

    Palomares, Oscar; Yaman, Görkem; Azkur, Ahmet K; Akkoc, Tunc; Akdis, Mübeccel; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2010-05-01

    Allergy is a Th2-mediated disease that involves the formation of specific IgE antibodies against innocuous environmental substances. The prevalence of allergic diseases has dramatically increased over the past decades, affecting up to 30% of the population in industrialized countries. The understanding of mechanisms underlying allergic diseases as well as those operating in non-allergic healthy responses and allergen-specific immunotherapy has experienced exciting advances over the past 15 years. Studies in healthy non-atopic individuals and several clinical trials of allergen-specific immunotherapy have demonstrated that the induction of a tolerant state in peripheral T cells represent a key step in healthy immune responses to allergens. Both naturally occurring thymus-derived CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ Treg and inducible type 1 Treg inhibit the development of allergy via several mechanisms, including suppression of other effector Th1, Th2, Th17 cells; suppression of eosinophils, mast cells and basophils; Ab isotype change from IgE to IgG4; suppression of inflammatory DC; and suppression of inflammatory cell migration to tissues. The identification of the molecules involved in these processes will contribute to the development of more efficient and safer treatment modalities. PMID:20148422

  11. MicroRNA-17 Modulates Regulatory T Cell Function by Targeting Co-regulators of the Foxp3 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huang-Yu; Barbi, Joseph; Wu, Chao-Yi; Zheng, Ying; Vignali, Paolo D A; Wu, Xingmei; Tao, Jin-Hui; Park, Benjamin V; Bandara, Shashika; Novack, Lewis; Ni, Xuhao; Yang, Xiaoping; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Wu, Ren-Chin; Zhang, Junran; Yang, Chih-Wei; Pardoll, Drew M; Li, Huabin; Pan, Fan

    2016-07-19

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are important in maintaining self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. The Treg cell transcription factor Foxp3 works in concert with other co-regulatory molecules, including Eos, to determine the transcriptional signature and characteristic suppressive phenotype of Treg cells. Here, we report that the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) actively repressed Eos expression through microRNA-17 (miR-17). miR-17 expression increased in Treg cells in the presence of IL-6, and its expression negatively correlated with that of Eos. Treg cell suppressive activity was diminished upon overexpression of miR-17 in vitro and in vivo, which was mitigated upon co-expression of an Eos mutant lacking miR-17 target sites. Also, RNAi of miR-17 resulted in enhanced suppressive activity. Ectopic expression of miR-17 imparted effector-T-cell-like characteristics to Treg cells via the de-repression of genes encoding effector cytokines. Thus, miR-17 provides a potent layer of Treg cell control through targeting Eos and additional Foxp3 co-regulators. PMID:27438767

  12. Memory regulatory T cells require IL-7 and not IL-2 for their maintenance in peripheral tissues1

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Truong, Hong-An; Yang, Sara Hsin-Yi; Maurano, Megan M.; Lee, Karim; Abbas, Abul K.; Rosenblum, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    Thymic Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells are activated by peripheral self antigen to increase their suppressive function, and a fraction of these cells survive as memory Tregs (mTregs). Memory Tregs persist in non-lymphoid tissue after cessation of antigen expression and have enhanced capacity to suppress tissue-specific autoimmunity. Here, we show that murine mTregs express specific effector memory T cell markers and localize preferentially to hair follicles in skin. Memory Tregs express high levels of both IL-2Rα and IL-7Rα. Using a genetic deletion approach, we show that IL-2 is required to generate mTregs from naive CD4+ T cell precursors in vivo. However, IL-2 is not required to maintain these cells in the skin and skin-draining lymph nodes. Conversely, IL-7 is essential for maintaining mTregs in skin in the steady state. These results elucidate the fundamental biology of mTregs and show that IL-7 plays an important role in their survival in skin. PMID:23543753

  13. 5-Azacytidine Promotes an Inhibitory T-Cell Phenotype and Impairs Immune Mediated Antileukemic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stübig, Thomas; Luetkens, Tim; Hildebrandt, York; Atanackovic, Djordje; Binder, Thomas M. C.; Fehse, Boris; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ+ T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza. PMID:24757283

  14. 5-azacytidine promotes an inhibitory T-cell phenotype and impairs immune mediated antileukemic activity.

    PubMed

    Stübig, Thomas; Badbaran, Anita; Luetkens, Tim; Hildebrandt, York; Atanackovic, Djordje; Binder, Thomas M C; Fehse, Boris; Kröger, Nicolaus

    2014-01-01

    Demethylating agent, 5-Azacytidine (5-Aza), has been shown to be active in treatment of myeloid malignancies. 5-Aza enhances anticancer immunity, by increasing expression of tumor-associated antigens. However, the impact of 5-Aza immune responses remains poorly understood. Here, T-cell mediated tumor immunity effects of 5-Aza, are investigated in vitro and in vivo. T-cells from healthy donors were treated with 5-Aza and analyzed by qRT-PCR and flow cytometry for changes in gene expression and phenotype. Functionality was assessed by a tumor lysis assay. Peripheral blood from patients treated with 5-Aza after alloSCT was monitored for changes in T-cell subpopulations. 5-Aza treatment resulted in a decrease in CD8+ T-cells, whereas CD4+ T-cells increased. Furthermore, numbers of IFN-γ + T-helper 1 cells (Th1) were reduced, while Treg-cells showed substantial increase. Additionally, CD8+ T-cells exhibited limited killing capacity against leukemic target cells. In vivo data confirm the increase of Treg compartment, while CD8+ T-effector cell numbers were reduced. 5-Aza treatment results in a shift from cytotoxic to regulatory T-cells with a functional phenotype and a major reduction in proinflammatory Th1-cells, indicating a strong inhibition of tumor-specific T-cell immunity by 5-Aza. PMID:24757283

  15. Strongyloides ratti infection induces expansion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells that interfere with immune response and parasite clearance in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Blankenhaus, Birte; Klemm, Ulrike; Eschbach, Marie-Luise; Sparwasser, Tim; Huehn, Jochen; Kühl, Anja A; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Jacobs, Thomas; Breloer, Minka

    2011-04-01

    To escape expulsion by their host's immune system, pathogenic nematodes exploit regulatory pathways that are intrinsic parts of the mammalian immune system, such as regulatory T cells (Tregs). Using depletion of Treg mice, we showed that Foxp3(+) Treg numbers increased rapidly during infection with the nematode Strongyloides ratti. Transient depletion of Tregs during the first days of infection led to dramatically reduced worm burden and larval output, without aggravation of immune pathology. The transient absence of Tregs during primary infection did not interfere with the generation of protective memory. Depletion of Tregs at later time points of infection (i.e., day 4) did not improve resistance, suggesting that Tregs exert their counterregulatory function during the priming of S. ratti-specific immune responses. Improved resistance upon early Treg depletion was accompanied by accelerated and prolonged mast cell activation and increased production of types 1 and 2 cytokines. In contrast, the blockade of the regulatory receptor CTLA-4 specifically increased nematode-specific type 2 cytokine production. Despite this improved immune response, resistance to the infection was only marginally improved. Taken together, we provide evidence that Treg expansion during S. ratti infection suppresses the protective immune response to this pathogenic nematode and, thus, represents a mechanism of immune evasion. PMID:21335490

  16. Regulatory Cell Populations in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (RRMS) Patients: Effect of Disease Activity and Treatment Regimens.

    PubMed

    Rodi, Maria; Dimisianos, Nikolaos; de Lastic, Anne-Lise; Sakellaraki, Panagiota; Deraos, George; Matsoukas, John; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Mouzaki, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) of autoimmune etiology that results from an imbalance between CNS-specific T effector cells and peripheral suppressive mechanisms mediated by regulatory cells (RC). In this research, we collected blood samples from 83 relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) patients and 45 healthy persons (HC), to assess the sizes of their RC populations, including CD4⁺CD25(high)Foxp3⁺ (nTregs), CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺, CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-), CD3⁺CD56⁺, and CD56(bright) cells, and how RC are affected by disease activity (acute phase or remission) and types of treatment (methylprednisolone, interferon, or natalizumab). In addition, we isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cultured them with peptides mapping to myelin antigens, to determine RC responsiveness to autoantigens. The results showed decreased levels of nTregs in patients in the acute phase ± methylprednisolone and in remission + natalizumab, but HC levels in patients in remission or receiving interferon. Patients + interferon had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD4⁺HLA(-)G⁺ and CD3⁺CD8⁺CD28(-) RC, and patients in the acute phase + methylprednisolone the lowest. Patients in remission had the highest levels of CD3⁺CD56⁺, and patients in remission + natalizumab the highest levels of CD56(bright) cells. Only nTregs responded to autoantigens in culture, regardless of disease activity or treatment. The highest suppressive activity was exhibited by nTregs from patients in remission. In conclusion, in RRMS disease activity and type of treatment affect different RC populations. nTregs respond to myelin antigens, indicating that it is possible to restore immunological tolerance through nTreg induction. PMID:27571060

  17. Inhibition of th17 cells and promotion of tregs in fc gamma chain-deficient mice contributes to the attenuated atherosclerotic lesions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of anti-oxLDL IgG is well documented in clinical and animal studies. However, the role for Fc Rs to the progression of atherosclerosis has not been studied in detail. In the present study, we investigated the role for activating Fc R in the progression of atherosclerosis using apoE-Fc -...

  18. Engineering an "infectious" T(reg) biomimetic through chemoselective tethering of TGF-β1 to PEG brush surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, E Y; Kronenfeld, J P; Gattás-Asfura, K M; Bayer, A L; Stabler, C L

    2015-10-01

    Modulation of immunological responses to allografts following transplantation is of pivotal importance to improving graft outcome and duration. Of the many approaches, harnessing the dominant tolerance induced by regulatory T cells (Treg) holds tremendous promise. Recent studies have highlighted the unique potency of cell surface-bound TGF-β1 on Treg for promoting infectious tolerance, i.e. to confer suppressive capacity from one cell to another. To mimic this characteristic, TGF-β1 was chemoselectively tethered to inert and viable polymer grafting platforms using Staudinger ligation. We report the synthesis and functional characterization of these engineered TGF-β1 surfaces. Inert beads tethered with TGF-β1 were capable of efficiently converting naïve CD4(+) CD62L(hi) T cells to functional Treg. Concordantly, translation of conjugation scheme from inert surfaces to viable cells also led to efficient generation of functional Treg. Further, the capacity of these platforms to generate antigen-specific Treg was demonstrated. These findings illustrate the unique faculty of tethered TGF-β1 biomaterial platforms to function as an "infectious" Treg and provide a compelling approach for generating tolerogenic microenvironments for allograft transplantation. PMID:26197412

  19. FoxP3+ regulatory T cells suppress early stages of granuloma formation but have little impact on sarcoidosis lesions.

    PubMed

    Taflin, Cécile; Miyara, Makoto; Nochy, Dominique; Valeyre, Dominique; Naccache, Jean-Marc; Altare, Frédéric; Salek-Peyron, Pascale; Badoual, Cécile; Bruneval, Patrick; Haroche, Julien; Mathian, Alexis; Amoura, Zahir; Hill, Gary; Gorochov, Guy

    2009-02-01

    Sarcoidosis is characterized by a disproportionate Th1 granulomatous immune response in involved organs. It is also associated with both peripheral and intratissular regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion. These cells exhibit powerful antiproliferative activity, yet do not completely inhibit the production of either tumor necrosis factor-alpha or interferon-gamma. The origin of the observed Treg amplification and, more importantly, its impact on the evolution of sarcoidosis remain unresolved issues. Here, we show that CD4(+)CD45RA(-)FoxP3(bright) Tregs proliferate and accumulate within granulomas. However, circulating and tissue Treg numbers are neither correlated with the dissemination of the disease nor correlated locally with the extent of granulomatous inflammation. Rather, we found a positive correlation between the presence of Tregs in renal granulomas and the degree of interstitial fibrosis (r = 0.46, P = 0.03, n = 20). Furthermore, Treg depletion accelerates in vitro granuloma growth in mononuclear cell cultures of healthy controls, but not in those from patients with active sarcoidosis. The results of this study show that although healthy Tregs suppress the initial steps of granuloma formation, they have no positive influence on sarcoidosis lesions. Our findings argue for a more preventive than curative effect of Tregs on inflammatory processes. PMID:19147826

  20. Regulatory T cells: regulators of life.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Anne; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-08-01

    Pregnancy still represents one of the most fascinating paradoxical phenomena in science. Immediately after conception, the maternal immune system is challenged by the presence of foreign paternal antigens in the semen. This triggers mechanisms of recognition and tolerance that all together allow the embryo to implant and later the fetus to develop. Tolerance mechanisms to maintain pregnancy are of special interest as they defy the classical immunology rules. Several cell types, soluble factors, and immune regulatory molecules have been proposed to contribute to fetal tolerance. Within these, regulatory T cells (Treg) are one of the most studied immune cell populations lately. They are reportedly involved in fetal acceptance. Here, we summarize several aspects of Treg biology in normal and pathologic pregnancies focusing on Treg frequencies, subtypes, antigen specificity, and activity as well as on factors influencing Treg generation, recruitment, and function. This review also highlights the contribution of fetal Treg in tolerance induction and addresses the role of Treg in autoimmune diseases and infections during gestation. Finally, the potential of Treg as a predictive marker for the success of assisted reproductive techniques and for therapeutic interventions is discussed. PMID:24661545

  1. IFNα/βR Signaling Promotes Regulatory T Cell Development and Function Under Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Metidji, Amina; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Glass, Deborah Dacek; Cremer, Isabelle; Punkosdy, George A.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Type I IFNs are a family of cytokines with antiviral and immunomodulatory properties. While the antiviral effects of IFNs are well characterized, their immunomodulatory properties are less clear. To specifically address the effects of type I IFNs on Treg, we studied mixed bone morrow (BM) chimeras between wild-type (WT) and IFNα/βR (IFNAR) knockout (KO) mice, and heterozygous female mice expressing a Treg-specific deletion of the IFNAR. In these two models, IFNAR signaling promotes the development of the Treg lineage in the thymus and their survival in the periphery. IFNAR KO Treg had a higher expression of the pro-apoptotic gene Bim and higher frequency of active caspase positive cells. IFNAR KO Treg from chimeric mice displayed a more naïve phenotype, accompanied by lower levels of CD25 and phosphorylated STAT5. Therefore, in Treg IFNAR signaling may directly or indirectly affect phosphorylation of STAT5. In mixed chimeras with Scurfy fetal liver, Treg derived from IFNAR KO BM were unable to control T effector cell activation and tissue inflammation. Under stress conditions or in a competitive environment, IFNAR signaling may be required to maintain Treg homeostasis and function. PMID:25795758

  2. Solar cell activation system

    SciTech Connect

    Apelian, L.

    1983-07-05

    A system for activating solar cells involves the use of phosphorescent paint, the light from which is amplified by a thin magnifying lens and used to activate solar cells. In a typical system, a member painted with phosphorescent paint is mounted adjacent a thin magnifying lens which focuses the light on a predetermined array of sensitive cells such as selenium, cadmium or silicon, mounted on a plastic board. A one-sided mirror is mounted adjacent the cells to reflect the light back onto said cells for purposes of further intensification. The cells may be coupled to rechargeable batteries or used to directly power a small radio or watch.

  3. IL-15 renders conventional lymphocytes resistant to suppressive functions of regulatory T cells through activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Ben Ahmed, Mélika; Belhadj Hmida, Nadia; Moes, Nicolette; Buyse, Sophie; Abdeladhim, Maha; Louzir, Hechmi; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine

    2009-06-01

    IL-15 drives chronic inflammation in several human diseases. We have recently shown that IL-15 inhibits the immunosuppressive effects of TGF-beta through blockage of the Smad3-signaling pathway. Data pointing to reciprocal interactions between TGF-beta and CD4(+) regulatory T cells led us to investigate the impact of IL-15 on the de novo generation and function of regulatory T cells in humans. Our data indicate that IL-15 does not counteract, but rather promotes the effect of TGF-beta on the de novo generation of regulatory T cells (Treg). Thus, in the presence of TGF-beta, IL-15 enhanced the acquisition of regulatory functions by CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells stimulated by anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 Abs. In contrast, IL-15 impaired the functions of Tregs by acting on effector CD4 and CD8 T cells. Accordingly, in the presence of IL-15, proliferation and IFN-gamma production by peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells could not be efficiently inhibited by Tregs. IL-15-induced resistance of effector T cells to Tregs resulted from activation of the PI3K signaling pathway but did not involve the rescue of effector T cells from apoptosis. Altogether, these data point to the ambiguous role of IL-15 in the control of Treg functions. This dual role may be instrumental to mount rapid but transient proinflammatory immune responses against pathogens but may become deleterious in situations associated with protracted IL-15 over-expression. PMID:19454671

  4. A study on FoxP3 and Tregs in paired samples of peripheral blood and synovium in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shalini P., Usha; Debnath, Tanya; JVS, Vidyasagar; Kamaraju, Suguna R.; Kancherla, Ravindranath; Chelluri, Lakshmi K.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing evidence suggesting the role of fork head boxP3 (FoxP3) in the development and the regulation of CD4+CD25+ Treg cells. T-cell regulatory mechanisms in rheumatoid arthritis patients were evaluated by the contributing factors such as pro-inflammatory cytokines, circulating immune complexes, HLA DR expression, ligand binding biomarkers, FoxP3 expression in paired samples of peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF). These cellular responses were further correlated with the humoral immune responses such as anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides IgG (CCP), circulating immune complex-c1q IgG (CIC), immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) of the rheumatoid arthritis factor (RAF). The results suggest a definitive role of Tregs in the homeostatic control because there is an increase in FoxP3 (37%) and HLA-DR (45%) expression in the synovial fluid as compared to PB. Furthermore, humoral responses as a downstream effector mechanism are positively correlated with the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A positive relationship exists between quantitative anti-CCP production and the expression of HLA-DR. The study relates an increased and pivotal role of B cell activation in the synovial fluid thereby permitting the need to ablate the targeted B cell immune responses. PMID:26862306

  5. Antitumor activity of total flavonoids from Tetrastigma hemsleyanum Diels et Gilg is associated with the inhibition of regulatory T cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Zhengquan; Hao, Wanrong; Lin, Xiaoyang; Fan, Daping; Zhou, Juhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the antitumor activity of Radix tetrastigmae flavonoids and their inhibitory effect on regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice. Materials and methods Total flavonoids were isolated from Radix tetrastigmae, the root of Tetrastigma hemsleyanum Diels et Gilg, and administered to C57BL/6 mice by oral gavage after inoculation with Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. The effects of total flavonoids on tumor growth in vivo were examined. Flow cytometry was used to study the effects on Tregs, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to analyze the changes in the serum levels of transforming growth factor β, prostaglandin E2, and cyclooxygenase 2 after tumor inoculation and flavonoid administration. Results Total flavonoids from T. hemsleyanum Diels et Gilg significantly inhibited tumor growth in C57BL/6 mice inoculated with LLCs. These flavonoids dramatically suppressed regulatory T-cell development in tumor-bearing mice. Further studies revealed that total flavonoids significantly decreased the serum levels of transforming growth factor β, prostaglandin E2, and cyclooxygenase 2 in tumor-bearing mice, which may be responsible for the inhibition of Tregs. Conclusion The antitumor activity of total flavonoids from T. hemsleyanum Diels et Gilg is associated with the inhibition of Tregs in a mouse tumor model. Total flavonoids from T. hemsleyanum Diels et Gilg may be used as antitumor agents in cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:24959081

  6. Modulation of Treg function improves adenovirus vector-mediated gene expression in the airway.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Y; Limberis, M P; Zhang, H

    2014-02-01

    Virus vector-mediated gene transfer has been developed as a treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF) airway disease, a lethal inherited disorder caused by somatic mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene. The pathological proinflammatory environment of CF as well as the naïve and adaptive immunity induced by the virus vector itself limits the effectiveness of gene therapy for CF airway. Here, we report the use of an HDAC inhibitor, valproic acid (VPA), to enhance the activity of the regulatory T cells (T(reg)) and to improve the expression of virus vector-mediated gene transfer to the respiratory epithelium. Our study demonstrates the potential utility of VPA, a drug used for over 50 years in humans as an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizer, in controlling inflammation and improving the efficacy of gene transfer in CF airway. PMID:24385144

  7. Freeze and Thaw of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells Results in Loss of CD62L Expression and a Reduced Capacity to Protect against Graft-versus-Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Florek, Mareike; Schneidawind, Dominik; Pierini, Antonio; Baker, Jeanette; Armstrong, Randall; Pan, Yuqiong; Leveson-Gower, Dennis; Negrin, Robert; Meyer, Everett

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in murine models of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been shown to protect recipient mice from lethal acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and this approach is being actively investigated in human clinical trials. Here, we examined the effects of cryopreservation on Tregs. We found that freeze and thaw of murine and human Tregs is associated with reduced expression of L-selectin (CD62L), which was previously established to be an important factor that contributes to the in vivo protective effects of Tregs. Frozen and thawed murine Tregs showed a reduced capacity to bind to the CD62L binding partner MADCAM1 in vitro as well as an impaired homing to secondary lymphoid organs in vivo. Upon adoptive transfer frozen and thawed Tregs failed to protect against lethal GVHD compared with fresh Tregs in a murine model of allogeneic HCT across major histocompatibility barriers. In summary, the direct administration of adoptively transferred frozen and thawed Tregs adversely affects their immunosuppressive potential which is an important factor to consider in the clinical implementation of Treg immunotherapies. PMID:26693907

  8. Epirubicin, Identified Using a Novel Luciferase Reporter Assay for Foxp3 Inhibitors, Inhibits Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kashima, Hajime; Momose, Fumiyasu; Umehara, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Nao; Ogo, Naohisa; Muraoka, Daisuke; Shiku, Hiroshi; Harada, Naozumi; Asai, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box protein p3 (Foxp3) is crucial to the development and suppressor function of regulatory T cells (Tregs) that have a significant role in tumor-associated immune suppression. Development of small molecule inhibitors of Foxp3 function is therefore considered a promising strategy to enhance anti-tumor immunity. In this study, we developed a novel cell-based assay system in which the NF-κB luciferase reporter signal is suppressed by the co-expressed Foxp3 protein. Using this system, we screened our chemical library consisting of approximately 2,100 compounds and discovered that a cancer chemotherapeutic drug epirubicin restored the Foxp3-inhibited NF-κB activity in a concentration-dependent manner without influencing cell viability. Using immunoprecipitation assay in a Treg-like cell line Karpas-299, we found that epirubicin inhibited the interaction between Foxp3 and p65. In addition, epirubicin inhibited the suppressor function of murine Tregs and thereby improved effector T cell stimulation in vitro. Administration of low dose epirubicin into tumor-bearing mice modulated the function of immune cells at the tumor site and promoted their IFN-γ production without direct cytotoxicity. In summary, we identified the novel action of epirubicin as a Foxp3 inhibitor using a newly established luciferase-based cellular screen. Our work also demonstrated our screen system is useful in accelerating discovery of Foxp3 inhibitors. PMID:27284967

  9. Few Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells are sufficient to protect adult mice from lethal autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian T; Ghorbani, Peyman; Kühl, Anja A; Stüve, Philipp; Hegemann, Maike; Berod, Luciana; Gershwin, M Eric; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Foxp3 specifies the Treg cell lineage and is indispensable for immune tolerance. Accordingly, rare Foxp3 mutations cause lethal autoimmunity. The mechanisms precipitating more prevalent human autoimmune diseases are poorly understood, but involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Many autoimmune diseases associate with a partial Treg-cell dysfunction, yet mouse models reflecting such complex pathophysiological processes are rare. Around 95% of Foxp3(+) Treg cells can be specifically depleted in bacterial artifical chromosome (BAC)-transgenic Depletion of REGulatory T cells (DEREG) mice through diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment. However, Treg-cell depletion fails to cause autoimmunity in adult DEREG mice for unclear reasons. By crossing Foxp3(GFP) knock-in mice to DEREG mice, we introduced additional genetic susceptibility that does not affect untreated mice. Strikingly, DT treatment of DEREG × Foxp3(GFP) mice rapidly causes autoimmunity characterized by blepharitis, tissue damage, and autoantibody production. This inflammatory disease is associated with augmented T-cell activation, increased Th2 cytokine production and myeloproliferation, and is caused by defective Treg-cell homeostasis, preventing few DT-insensitive Treg cells from repopulating the niche after Treg-cell depletion. Our study provides important insights into self-tolerance. We further highlight DEREG × Foxp3(GFP) mice as a model to investigate the role of environmental factors in precipitating autoimmunity. This may help to better understand and treat human autoimmunity. PMID:25042334

  10. Selective NFAT targeting in T cells ameliorates GvHD while maintaining antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Vaeth, Martin; Bäuerlein, Carina A; Pusch, Tobias; Findeis, Janina; Chopra, Martin; Mottok, Anja; Rosenwald, Andreas; Beilhack, Andreas; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike

    2015-01-27

    Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a life-threatening immunological complication after allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT). The intrinsic graft-versus-leukemia (GvL) effect, however, is the desirable curative benefit. Patients with acute GvHD are treated with cyclosporine A (CsA) or tacrolimus (FK506), which not only often causes severe adverse effects, but also interferes with the anticipated GvL. Both drugs inhibit calcineurin, thus at first suppressing activation of the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT). Therefore, we explored the specific contribution of individual NFAT factors in donor T cells in animal models of GvHD and GvL. Ablation of NFAT1, NFAT2, or a combination of both resulted in ameliorated GvHD, due to reduced proliferation, target tissue homing, and impaired effector function of allogenic donor T cells. In contrast, the frequency of Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells was increased and NFAT-deficient Tregs were fully protective in GvHD. CD8(+) T-cell recall response and, importantly, the beneficial antitumor activity were largely preserved in NFAT-deficient effector T cells. Thus, specific inhibition of NFAT opens an avenue for an advanced therapy of GvHD maintaining protective GvL. PMID:25583478

  11. A Novel mTORC1-Dependent, Akt-Independent Pathway Differentiates the Gut Tropism of Regulatory and Conventional CD4 T Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Leo C; Nicholson, Yawah T; Rosborough, Brian R; Thomson, Angus W; Raimondi, Giorgio

    2016-08-15

    The vitamin A metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces a gut-homing phenotype in activated CD4(+) conventional T cells (Tconv) by upregulating the integrin α4β7 and the chemokine receptor CCR9. We report that, in contrast to mouse Tconv, only ∼50% of regulatory T cells (Treg) upregulate CCR9 when stimulated by physiological levels of ATRA, even though Tconv and Treg express similar levels of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR). The resulting bimodal CCR9 expression is not associated with differences in the extent of their proliferation, level of Foxp3 expression, or affiliation with naturally occurring Treg or induced Treg in the circulating Treg pool. Furthermore, we find that exposure of Treg to the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin suppresses upregulation of both CCR9 and α4β7, an effect that is not evident with Tconv. This suggests that in Treg, ATRA-induced upregulation of CCR9 and α4β7 is dependent on activation of a mTOR signaling pathway. The involvement of mTOR is independent of Akt activity, because specific inhibition of Akt, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase-1, or its downstream target glycogen synthase kinase-3 did not prevent CCR9 expression. Additionally, Rictor (mTOR complex [mTORC]2)-deficient Treg showed unaltered ability to express CCR9, whereas Raptor (mTORC1)-deficient Treg were unable to upregulate CCR9, suggesting the selective participation of mTORC1. These findings reveal a novel difference between ATRA signaling and chemokine receptor induction in Treg versus Tconv and provide a framework via which the migratory behavior of Treg versus Tconv might be regulated differentially for therapeutic purposes. PMID:27402696

  12. A new paradigm in ulcerative colitis: regulatory T cells are key factor which induces/exacerbates UC through an immune imbalance.

    PubMed

    Hanai, Hiroyuki; Iida, Takayuki; Ikeya, Kentaro; Abe, Jinrou; Maruyama, Yasuhiko; Shimura, Teruyuki; Sugimoto, Ken; Watanabe, Fumitoshi

    2013-06-01

    Leukocytapheresis (LCAP) appears to remove or inactivate inflammatory cells and to reset immunological responses, resulting to cure responders of ulcerative colitis (UC). The changes of T cell subsets were investigated in UC patients treated with LCAP. Levels of T cell subsets in peripheral blood before and after LCAP were analysed by flow cytometric analysis. Of 20 UC patients, 13 (65%) achieved remission and 2 (10%) showed the improvement of UC symptoms. Ratios of some T cell subtypes such as regulatory T (Treg) cells and memory T cells to CD4(+) T cells changed significantly only in responders. Especially, ratio of resting Treg/CD4(+) T cells was significantly increased after the first LCAP session, and then one of activated Treg/CD4(+) T cells was increased after 2 week. This may lead to the development of a new UC paradigm in which an imbalance in Treg cell subsets triggers the onset and/or exacerbation of UC. PMID:23280396

  13. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    SciTech Connect

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Economou, James S.; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Doerthe

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4{sup +}CD25{sup hi}Foxp3{sup +} Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  14. Mast cells counteract regulatory T-cell suppression through interleukin-6 and OX40/OX40L axis toward Th17-cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Piconese, Silvia; Gri, Giorgia; Tripodo, Claudio; Musio, Silvia; Gorzanelli, Andrea; Frossi, Barbara; Pedotti, Rosetta; Pucillo, Carlo E; Colombo, Mario P

    2009-09-24

    The development of inflammatory diseases implies inactivation of regulatory T (Treg) cells through mechanisms that still are largely unknown. Here we showed that mast cells (MCs), an early source of inflammatory mediators, are able to counteract Treg inhibition over effector T cells. To gain insight into the molecules involved in their interplay, we set up an in vitro system in which all 3 cellular components were put in contact. Reversal of Treg suppression required T cell-derived interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the OX40/OX40L axis. In the presence of activated MCs, concomitant abundance of IL-6 and paucity of Th1/Th2 cytokines skewed Tregs and effector T cells into IL-17-producing T cells (Th17). In vivo analysis of lymph nodes hosting T-cell priming in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis revealed activated MCs, Tregs, and Th17 cells displaying tight spatial interactions, further supporting the occurrence of an MC-mediated inhibition of Treg suppression in the establishment of Th17-mediated inflammatory responses. PMID:19643985

  15. FTY720 ameliorates Th1-mediated colitis in mice by directly affecting the functional activity of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Carolin; Sartory, Nico; Zahn, Nadine; Geisslinger, Gerd; Radeke, Heinfried H; Stein, Juergen M

    2007-02-15

    Following the present concepts, the synthetic sphingosine analog of myriocin FTY720 alters migration and homing of lymphocytes via sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors. However, several studies indicate that the immunosuppressive properties of FTY720 may alternatively be due to tolerogenic activities via modulation of dendritic cell differentiation or based on direct effects on CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Treg). As Treg play an important role for the cure of inflammatory colitis, we used the Th1-mediated 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) colitis model to address the therapeutic potential of FTY720 in vivo. A rectal enema of TNBS was given to BALB/c mice. FTY720 was administered i.p. from days 0 to 3 or 3 to 5. FTY720 substantially reduced all clinical, histopathologic, macroscopic, and microscopic parameters of colitis analyzed. The therapeutic effects of FTY720 were associated with a down-regulation of IL-12p70 and subsequent Th1 cytokines. Importantly, FTY720 treatment resulted in a prominent up-regulation of FoxP3, IL-10, TGFbeta, and CTLA4. Supporting the hypothesis that FTY720 directly affects functional activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg, we measured a significant increase of CD25 and FoxP3 expression in isolated lamina propria CD4(+) T cells of FTY720-treated mice. The impact of FTY720 on Treg induction was further confirmed by concomitant in vivo blockade of CTLA4 or IL-10R which significantly abrogated its therapeutic activity. In conclusion, our data provide clear evidence that in addition to its well-established effects on migration FTY720 leads to a specific down-regulation of proinflammatory signals while simultaneously inducing functional activity of CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg. Thus, FTY720 may offer a promising new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of IBD. PMID:17277153

  16. Epigenetic Enzymes Are the Therapeutic Targets for CD4+CD25+/highFoxp3+ Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pastrana, Jahaira Lopez; Shao, Ying; Chernaya, Valeria; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-feng

    2014-01-01

    CD4+CD25+/highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4+ T cells that play an essential role in maintaining peripheral immune tolerance. Several transcriptional co-factors have been recently identified, which form complexes with Tregs transcription factor Foxp3 and contribute in the suppressive function of Tregs. However, Foxp3 is still defined as a “master” (multiple pathway) regulator gene that controls the development and stability of Tregs. Due to its importance, the regulatory mechanisms underlying Foxp3 expression have been a focus of intensive investigation. Recent progress suggests that the epigenetics mechanisms responsible for regulating the Foxp3 gene expression are key components of Tregs suppressive activity. This review not only discusses the basic concepts of Tregs biology and epigenetic modifications. We also analyze the translational clinical aspect of Tregs epigenetic modifications, focusing on several ongoing clinical trials as well as FDA approved epigenetic based drugs. The new progress in identifying epigenetic enzymes functional in Treg cells is a new target for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, graft-versus-host disease and cancers. PMID:25193380

  17. The role of regulatory T cells during Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS infection in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Pang, W; Sun, X; Feng, H; Wang, J; Cui, L; Cao, Y

    2016-07-01

    An inappropriate immune response to parasite infection is one of the primary drivers of malaria pathogenesis. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), an important subset of CD4(+) T cells, can maintain self-tolerance and prevent autoimmune diseases. However, there is little consensus about their role in malaria pathogenesis. In this study, we transiently depleted Tregs (CD25(+) T cells) using an anti-CD25 mAb (7D4 clone) at different time points following Plasmodium chabaudi chabaudi AS infection in BALB/c mice and investigated the effect of depletion of Tregs in this model. In control mice, Tregs proliferated significantly and their suppressive function was enhanced after infection. IL-10 was increased drastically during infection. Depletion of Tregs at various time points can lead to divergent outcomes. When Tregs were depleted prior to or during the early phase of infection, most mice survived and had a robust Th1 immune response. In contrast, when Tregs were depleted close to peak parasitemia, all mice died as a result of inflammation. Taken together, these data suggest that in P. c. chabaudi AS-infected BALB/c mice, Tregs inhibit the Th1 response and macrophage activation, leading to increased parasite load; however, they also control inflammation-mediated pathology by secreting high levels of IL-10. PMID:27139002

  18. Human naïve regulatory T-cells feature high steady-state turnover and are maintained by IL-7

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Caetano, Ana; Foxall, Russell B.; Pires, Ana R.; Matoso, Paula; Fernandes, Susana M.; Ferreira, João; Cheynier, Rémi; Victorino, Rui M. M.; Caramalho, Iris; Barata, João T.; Sousa, Ana E.

    2016-01-01

    Naïve FoxP3-expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are essential to control immune responses via continuous replenishment of the activated-Treg pool with thymus-committed suppressor cells. The mechanisms underlying naïve-Treg maintenance throughout life in face of the age-associated thymic involution remain unclear. We found that in adults thymectomized early in infancy the naïve-Treg pool is remarkably well preserved, in contrast to conventional naïve CD4 T-cells. Naïve-Tregs featured high levels of cycling and pro-survival markers, even in healthy individuals, and contrasted with other circulating naïve/memory CD4 T-cell subsets in terms of their strong γc-cytokine-dependent signaling, particularly in response to IL-7. Accordingly, ex-vivo stimulation of naïve-Tregs with IL-7 induced robust cytokine-dependent signaling, Bcl-2 expression, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent proliferation, whilst preserving naïve phenotype and suppressive capacity. Altogether, our data strongly implicate IL-7 in the thymus-independent long-term survival of functional naïve-Tregs, and highlight the potential of targeting the IL-7 pathway to modulate Tregs in different clinical settings. PMID:26910841

  19. Human naïve regulatory T-cells feature high steady-state turnover and are maintained by IL-7.

    PubMed

    Silva, Susana L; Albuquerque, Adriana S; Serra-Caetano, Ana; Foxall, Russell B; Pires, Ana R; Matoso, Paula; Fernandes, Susana M; Ferreira, João; Cheynier, Rémi; Victorino, Rui M M; Caramalho, Iris; Barata, João T; Sousa, Ana E

    2016-03-15

    Naïve FoxP3-expressing regulatory T-cells (Tregs) are essential to control immune responses via continuous replenishment of the activated-Treg pool with thymus-committed suppressor cells. The mechanisms underlying naïve-Treg maintenance throughout life in face of the age-associated thymic involution remain unclear. We found that in adults thymectomized early in infancy the naïve-Treg pool is remarkably well preserved, in contrast to conventional naïve CD4 T-cells. Naïve-Tregs featured high levels of cycling and pro-survival markers, even in healthy individuals, and contrasted with other circulating naïve/memory CD4 T-cell subsets in terms of their strong γc-cytokine-dependent signaling, particularly in response to IL-7. Accordingly, ex-vivo stimulation of naïve-Tregs with IL-7 induced robust cytokine-dependent signaling, Bcl-2 expression, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent proliferation, whilst preserving naïve phenotype and suppressive capacity. Altogether, our data strongly implicate IL-7 in the thymus-independent long-term survival of functional naïve-Tregs, and highlight the potential of targeting the IL-7 pathway to modulate Tregs in different clinical settings. PMID:26910841

  20. Breaking Free of Control: How Conventional T Cells Overcome Regulatory T Cell Suppression.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Emily R; Lorenz, Ulrike M

    2016-01-01

    Conventional T (Tcon) cells are crucial in shaping the immune response, whether it is protection against a pathogen, a cytotoxic attack on tumor cells, or an unwanted response to self-antigens in the context of autoimmunity. In each of these immune settings, regulatory T cells (Tregs) can potentially exert control over the Tcon cell response, resulting in either suppression or activation of the Tcon cells. Under physiological conditions, Tcon cells are able to transiently overcome Treg-imposed restraints to mount a protective response against an infectious threat, achieving clonal expansion, differentiation, and effector function. However, evidence has accumulated in recent years to suggest that Tcon cell resistance to Treg-mediated suppression centrally contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Tipping the balance too far in the other direction, cancerous tumors utilize Tregs to establish an overly suppressive microenvironment, preventing antitumor Tcon cell responses. Given the wide-ranging clinical importance of the Tcon/Treg interaction, this review aims to provide a better understanding of what determines whether a Tcon cell is susceptible to Treg-mediated suppression and how perturbations to this finely tuned balance play a role in pathological conditions. Here, we focus in detail on the complex array of factors that confer Tcon cells with resistance to Treg suppression, which we have divided into two categories: (1) extracellular factor-mediated signaling and (2) intracellular signaling molecules. Further, we explore the therapeutic implications of manipulating the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway, which is proposed to be the convergence point of signaling pathways that mediate Tcon resistance to suppression. Finally, we address important unresolved questions on the timing and location of acquisition of resistance, and the stability of the "Treg-resistant" phenotype. PMID:27242798

  1. Breaking Free of Control: How Conventional T Cells Overcome Regulatory T Cell Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Mercadante, Emily R.; Lorenz, Ulrike M.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional T (Tcon) cells are crucial in shaping the immune response, whether it is protection against a pathogen, a cytotoxic attack on tumor cells, or an unwanted response to self-antigens in the context of autoimmunity. In each of these immune settings, regulatory T cells (Tregs) can potentially exert control over the Tcon cell response, resulting in either suppression or activation of the Tcon cells. Under physiological conditions, Tcon cells are able to transiently overcome Treg-imposed restraints to mount a protective response against an infectious threat, achieving clonal expansion, differentiation, and effector function. However, evidence has accumulated in recent years to suggest that Tcon cell resistance to Treg-mediated suppression centrally contributes to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. Tipping the balance too far in the other direction, cancerous tumors utilize Tregs to establish an overly suppressive microenvironment, preventing antitumor Tcon cell responses. Given the wide-ranging clinical importance of the Tcon/Treg interaction, this review aims to provide a better understanding of what determines whether a Tcon cell is susceptible to Treg-mediated suppression and how perturbations to this finely tuned balance play a role in pathological conditions. Here, we focus in detail on the complex array of factors that confer Tcon cells with resistance to Treg suppression, which we have divided into two categories: (1) extracellular factor-mediated signaling and (2) intracellular signaling molecules. Further, we explore the therapeutic implications of manipulating