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Sample records for activates adenylate cyclase

  1. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  2. Activation of fat cell adenylate cyclase by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Naghshineh, S.; Noguchi, M.; Huang, K.P.; Londos, C.

    1986-05-01

    Purified protein kinase C (C-kinase) from guinea pig pancreas and rat brain stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in purified rat adipocyte membranes. Cyclase stimulation occurred over 100 to 1000 mU/ml of C-kinase activity, required greater than 10 ..mu..M calcium, proceeded without a lag, was not readily reversible, and required no exogenous phospholipid. Moreover, C-kinase inhibitors, such as chlorpromazine and palmitoyl carnitine, inhibited selectively adenylate cyclase which was activated by C-kinase and calcium. Depending on assay conditions, 10 nM 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) either enhanced or was required for kinase action on cyclase. Also, TPA plus calcium promoted the quantitative association of C-kinase with membranes. Adenylate cyclase activation by C-kinase was seen both in the presence and absence of exogenous GTP, indicating that the kinase effect does not result from an action on the GTP-binding, inhibitory regulatory component (N/sub i/) of the cyclase system. Moreover, the kinase effect was seen in the presence of non-phosphorylating ATP analogs, such as AppNHp and AppCH/sub 2/p, suggesting that the effects of C-kinase described herein may result from association with, rather than phosphorylation of, adenylate cyclase.

  3. Restoration of adenylate cyclase responsiveness in murine myeloid leukemia permits inhibition of proliferation by hormone. Butyrate augments catalytic activity of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Inhorn, L; Fleming, J W; Klingberg, D; Gabig, T G; Boswell, H S

    1988-04-01

    Mechanisms of leukemic cell clonal dominance may include aberrations of transmembrane signaling. In particular, neoplastic transformation has been associated with reduced capacity for hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. In the present study, prostaglandin E, a hormonal activator of adenylate cyclase that has antiproliferative activity in myeloid cells, and cholera toxin, an adenylate cyclase agonist that functions at a postreceptor site by activating the adenylate cyclase stimulatory GTP-binding protein (Gs), were studied for antiproliferative activity in two murine myeloid cell lines. FDC-P1, an interleukin 3 (IL 3)-dependent myeloid cell line and a tumorigenic IL 3-independent subline, FI, were resistant to these antiproliferative agents. The in vitro ability of the "differentiation" agent, sodium butyrate, to reverse their resistance to adenylate cyclase agonists was studied. The antiproliferative action of butyrate involved augmentation of transmembrane adenylate cyclase activity. Increased adenylate cyclase catalyst activity was the primary alteration of this transmembrane signaling group leading to the functional inhibitory effects on leukemia cells, although alterations in regulatory G-proteins appear to play a secondary role.

  4. Forskolin activation of serotonin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    McNall, S J; Mansour, T E

    1985-05-15

    Properties of forskolin activation of adenylate cyclase in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica are described. Forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in cell-free fluke particles to levels more than 30-fold above the basal rate. This activation was not dependent on guanine nucleotides and, upon washing of the particles, was rapidly reversed. Forskolin potentiated the activation of adenylate cyclase by serotonin (5-HT) and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), resulting in both an increase in the maximal level of enzyme activity and a decrease in the apparent activation constant (KA). The 5-HT antagonist 2-bromo-LSD did not inhibit enzyme activation by forskolin. Furthermore, forskolin had no effect on specific [3H]LSD binding to fluke particles. Activation of adenylate cyclase by sodium fluoride or guanine nucleotides was modified in a complex manner by forskolin with both stimulatory and inhibitory effects present. The results suggest that forskolin does not interact directly with the 5-HT receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase. Instead, it appears that forskolin effects are, at least in part, due to its ability to alter the interaction between the regulatory and catalytic components of adenylate cyclase. Incubation of intact flukes with forskolin increased their cAMP levels 2- to 3-fold. The concentration dependence of this response was similar to that for forskolin activation of adenylate cyclase in fluke particles, with 300 microM forskolin giving the maximum response. Forskolin and other agents that increased fluke cAMP levels also stimulated fluke motility.

  5. Calmodulin independence of human duodenal adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Griffin, M; Mireylees, S E; Long, R G

    1991-01-01

    The calmodulin and calcium dependence of human adenylate cyclase from the second part of the duodenum was assessed in washed particulate preparations of biopsy specimens by investigating (a) the concentration dependent effects of free [Ca2+] on enzyme activity, (b) the effects of exogenous calmodulin on enzyme activity in ethylene glycol bis (b-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetra-acetic acid (EGTA) washed particulate preparations, and (c) the effects of calmodulin antagonists on enzyme activity. Both basal (IC50 = 193.75 (57.5) nmol/l (mean (SEM)) and NaF stimulated (IC50 = 188.0 (44.0) nmol/l) adenylate cyclase activity was strongly inhibited by free [Ca2+] greater than 90 nmol/l. Free [Ca2+] less than 90 nmol/l had no effect on adenylate cyclase activity. NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by 50% at 2.5 mmol/l EGTA. This inhibition could not be reversed by free Ca2+. The addition of exogenous calmodulin to EGTA (5 mmol/l) washed particulate preparations failed to stimulate adenylate cyclase activity. Trifluoperazine and N-(8-aminohexyl)-5-IODO-1-naphthalene-sulphonamide (IODO 8) did not significantly inhibit basal and NaF stimulated adenylate cyclase activity when measured at concentrations of up to 100 mumol/l. These results suggest that human duodenal adenylate cyclase activity is calmodulin independent but is affected by changes in free [Ca2+]. PMID:1752461

  6. [The aspects of adenylate cyclase activity regulation in myocardium cell membranes during hypokinesia].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, K Ia; Komar, E S; Lobanok, L M

    1999-01-01

    Nonstimulated and isoproterenol, GTF, GITF, NaF stimulated activities of the adenylate cyclase in sarcolemma in white rats' myocardium was studied after two weeks of hypokinesia. As was established, in restrained animals the sensitivity of adenylate cyclase to the specified agents was increased and transition to the bimodal GTF regulation took place. It is hypothesised that involvement of membrane-bound Gi-proteins in the adrenergic effects on cardiomyocytes is one of mechanisms of the cardiotropic effects of restraint and heart distresses.

  7. Regulation of brain adenylate cyclase by calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    This thesis examined the interaction between the Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein, calmodulin (CaM), and the cAMP synthesizing enzyme, adenylate cyclase. The regulation of guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylate cyclase by CaM was examined in a particulate fraction from bovine striatum. CaM stimulated basal adenylate cyclase activity and enhanced the stimulation of the enzyme by GTP and dopamine (DA). The potentiation of GTP- and DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities by CaM was more sensitive to the concentration of CaM than was the stimulation of basal activity. A photoreactive CaM derivative was developed in order to probe the interactions between CaM and the adenylate cyclase components of bovine brain. Iodo-({sup 125}I)-CaM-diazopyruvamide ({sup 125}I-CAM-DAP) behaved like native CaM with respect to Ca{sup 2+}-enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a Ca{sup 2+}-dependent, concentration-dependent, and CaM-specific manner. Photolysis of {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP and forskolin-agarose purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase produced an adduct with a molecular weight of 140,000.

  8. Mechanisms of nonhormonal activation of adenylate cyclase based on target analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Verkman, A.S.; Ausiello, D.A.; Jung, C.Y.; Skorecki, K.L.

    1986-08-12

    Radiation inactivation was used to examine the mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase in the cultured renal epithelial cell line LLC-PK1 with hormonal (vasopressin) and nonhormonal (GTP, forskolin, fluoride, and chloride) activating ligands. Intact cells were frozen, irradiated at -70 degrees C (0-14 Mrad), thawed, and assayed for adenylate cyclase activity in the presence of activating ligands. The ln (adenylate cyclase activity) vs. radiation dose relation was linear (target size 162 kDa) for vasopressin- (2 microM) stimulated activity and concave downward for unstimulated (10 mM Mn/sup 2 +/), NaF- (10 mM) stimulated, and NaCl- (100 mM) stimulated activities. Addition of 2 microM vasopressin did not alter the ln activity vs. dose relation for NaF- (10 mM) stimulated activity. The dose-response relations for adenylate cyclase activation and for transition in the ln activity vs. dose curve shape were measured for vasopressin and NaF. On the basis of our model for adenylate cyclase subunit interactions reported previously (Verkman, A. S., Skorecki, K. L., and Ausiello, D. A. (1986) Am. J. Physiol. 260, C103-C123) and of new mathematical analyses, activation mechanisms for each ligand are proposed. In the unstimulated state, equilibrium between alpha beta and alpha + beta favors alpha beta; dissociated alpha binds to GTP (rate-limiting step), which then combines with the catalytic (C) subunit to form active enzyme. Vasopressin binding to receptor provides a rapid pathway for GTP binding to alpha. GTP and its analogues accelerate the rate of alpha GTP formation. Forskolin inhibits the spontaneous deactivation of activated C. Activation by fluoride may occur without alpha beta dissociation or GTP addition through activation of C by an alpha beta-F complex.

  9. Modulation of receptors and adenylate cyclase activity during sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpace, P.J.; Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E. Univ. of California, Los Angeles )

    1987-12-01

    Thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) serves as a regulator of body temperature and weight maintenance. Thermogenesis can be stimulated by catecholamine activation of adenylate cyclase through the {beta}-adrenergic receptor. To investigate the effects of sucrose feeding, food deprivation, and cold exposure on the {beta}-adrenergic pathway, adenylate cyclase activity and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were assessed in rat BAT after 2 wk of sucrose feeding, 2 days of food deprivation, or 2 days of cold exposure. {beta}-Adrenergic receptors were identified in BAT using ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol. Binding sites had the characteristics of mixed {beta}{sub 1}- and {beta}{sub 2}-type adrenergic receptors at a ratio of 60/40. After sucrose feeding or cold exposure, there was the expected increase in BAT mitochondrial mass as measured by total cytochrome-c oxidase activity but a decrease in {beta}-adrenergic receptor density due to a loss of the {beta}{sub 1}-adrenergic subtype. This BAT {beta}-adrenergic receptor downregulation was tissue specific, since myocardial {beta}-adrenergic receptors were unchanged with either sucrose feeding or cold exposure. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity increased in BAT after sucrose feeding or cold exposure but not after food deprivation. These data suggest that in BAT, sucrose feeding or cold exposure result in downregulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors and that isoproterenol-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was limited by receptor availability.

  10. Functional consequences of single amino acid substitutions in calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, P; Munier, H; Gilles, A M; Krin, E; Porumb, T; Bârzu, O; Sarfati, R; Pellecuer, C; Danchin, A

    1991-01-01

    Calmodulin-activated adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis are two cognate bacterial toxins. Three short regions of 13-24 amino acid residues in these proteins exhibit between 66 and 80% identity. Site-directed mutagenesis of four residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase situated in the second (Asp188, Asp190) and third (His298, Glu301) segments of identity were accompanied by important decrease, or total loss, of enzyme activity. The calmodulin-binding properties of mutated proteins showed no important differences when compared to the wild-type enzyme. Apart from the loss of enzymatic activity, the most important change accompanying replacement of Asp188 by other amino acids was a dramatic decrease in binding of 3'-anthraniloyl-2'-deoxyadenosine 5'-triphosphate, a fluorescent analogue of ATP. From these results we concluded that the two neighbouring aspartic acid residues in B. pertussis adenylate cyclase, conserved in many other ATP-utilizing enzymes, are essential for binding the Mg(2+)-nucleotide complex, and for subsequent catalysis. Replacement of His298 and Glu301 by other amino acid residues affected the nucleotide-binding properties of adenylate cyclase to a lesser degree suggesting that they might be important in the mechanism of enzyme activation by calmodulin, rather than being involved directly in catalysis. PMID:2050107

  11. Iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in horse and dog thyroid.

    PubMed

    Cochaux, P; Van Sande, J; Swillens, S; Dumont, J E

    1987-12-30

    The characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation in dog thyroid slices have been previously described [Van Sande, J., Cochaux, P. and Dumont, J. E. (1985) Mol. Cell. Endocrinol. 40, 181-192]. In the present study we investigated the characteristics of the iodide-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity in dog and horse thyroid. The inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation by iodide in stimulated horse thyroid slices was similar to that observed in dog thyroid slices. The inhibition was observed in slices stimulated by thyroid-stimulating hormone, cholera toxin and forskolin. Increasing the concentration of the stimulators did not overcome the iodide-induced inhibition. Adenylate cyclase activity, assayed in crude homogenates or in plasma-membrane-containing particulates (100,000 x g pellets), was lower in homogenates or in particulates prepared from iodide-treated slices than from control slices. This inhibition was observed on the cyclase activity stimulated by forskolin, fluoride or guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imino]triphosphate, but also on the basal activity. It was relieved when the homogenate was prepared from slices incubated with iodide and methimazole. Similar results were obtained with dog thyroid. The inhibition persisted when the particulate fraction was washed three times during 1 h at 100,000 x g, in the presence of bovine serum albumin or increasing concentration of KCl. It was similar whatever the duration of the cyclase assay, in a large range of protein concentration. These results indicate that a stable modification of adenylate cyclase activity, closely related to the plasma membrane, was induced when slices were incubated with iodide. Iodide inhibition did not modify the affinity of adenylate cyclase for its substrate (MgATP), but induced a decrease of the maximal velocity of the enzyme. The percentage inhibition was slightly decreased when Mg2+ concentration increased, and markedly decreased when Mn2

  12. Picomolar-affinity binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by melatonin in Syrian hamster hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Niles, L.P.; Hashemi, F. )

    1990-12-01

    1. The effect of melatonin on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was measured in homogenates of Syrian hamster hypothalamus. In addition, the saturation binding characteristics of the melatonin receptor ligand, ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin, was examined using an incubation temperature (30{degree}C) similar to that used in enzyme assays. 2. At concentrations ranging from 10 pM to 1 nM, melatonin caused a significant decrease in stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a maximum inhibition of approximately 22%. 3. Binding experiments utilizing ({sup 125}I)iodomelatonin in a range of approximately 5-80 pM indicated a single class of high-affinity sites: Kd = 55 +/- 9 pM, Bmax = 1.1 +/- 0.3 fmol/mg protein. 4. The ability of picomolar concentrations of melatonin to inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity suggests that this affect is mediated by picomolar-affinity receptor binding sites for this hormone in the hypothalamus.

  13. Adenylate Cyclase Activity Not Found in Soybean Hypocotyl and Onion Meristem 1

    PubMed Central

    Yunghans, Wayne N.; Morré, D. James

    1977-01-01

    Tissue, homogenates, and purified cell fractions prepared from hypocotyls of a dicot, soybean (Glycine max), and meristematic tissue of a monocot, onion (Allium cepa), were examined critically for evidence of adenylate cyclase activity. Three assay methods were used: chemical analysis, isotope dilution analysis, and enzyme cytochemistry. In both crude extracts or whole tissue, as well as purified membranes, with or without auxin, no adenylate cyclase was detected by any of the three methods. For plasma membranes, the specific activity was less than 1/40 or 1/25,000 that of rat liver plasma membranes, depending on the assay procedure, i.e. below the limits of detection. Using comparable methods, we could detect neither cyclic adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate nor the phosphodiesterase responsible for its degradation in either purified membranes or homogenates. The results suggest that hormone responses in plants are not generally mediated by a mechanism involving the obligate production of cyclic adenosine 3′:5′-monophosphate by a plasma membrane associated adenylate cyclase. Images PMID:16660026

  14. A Simple Luminescent Adenylate-Cyclase Functional Assay for Evaluation of Bacillus anthracis Edema Factor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Israeli, Ma’ayan; Rotem, Shahar; Elia, Uri; Bar-Haim, Erez; Cohen, Ofer; Chitlaru, Theodor

    2016-01-01

    Edema Factor (EF), the toxic sub-unit of the Bacillus anthracis Edema Toxin (ET) is a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase whose detrimental activity in the infected host results in severe edema. EF is therefore a major virulence factor of B. anthracis. We describe a simple, rapid and reliable functional adenylate-cyclase assay based on inhibition of a luciferase-mediated luminescence reaction. The assay exploits the efficient adenylate cyclase-mediated depletion of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), and the strict dependence on ATP of the light-emitting luciferase-catalyzed luciferin-conversion to oxyluciferin, which can be easily visualized. The assay exhibits a robust EF-dose response decrease in luminescence, which may be specifically reverted by anti-EF antibodies. The application of the assay is exemplified in: (a) determining the presence of EF in B. anthracis cultures, or its absence in cultures of EF-defective strains; (b) evaluating the anti-EF humoral response in experimental animals infected/vaccinated with B. anthracis; and (c) rapid discrimination between EF producing and non-producing bacterial colonies. Furthermore, the assay may be amenable with high-throughput screening for EF inhibitory molecules. PMID:27548219

  15. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: entry of bacterial adenylate cyclase into mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Confer, D L; Slungaard, A S; Graf, E; Panter, S S; Eaton, J W

    1984-01-01

    We have identified an adenylate cyclase toxin in urea extracts and culture supernatant fluids of Bordetella pertussis (2). The ability of this toxin and the lack of a strong correlation between its activity and adenylate cyclase activity found in urea extracts suggest that it is an oligomer of readily dissociable subunits. The mechanism by which Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin interacts with target cells is unknown, but polyvalent cations are necessary. Neutrophils exposed to the toxin acquire a 39,000 Mr protein that can also be photoaffinity labeled with 32P-ATP. We anticipate that this protein will prove to be a catalytic component of Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin. Susceptible cells exposed to Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin are functionally aberrant. In phagocytes, decreased bactericidal capacity may be important in the pathogenesis of human whooping cough and other Bordetella infections occurring in domestic animals. The effects of the toxin on neoplastic cells may offer new insights into the factors controlling their growth and differentiation. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin is a unique bacterial product. Further purification and characterization of this toxin will add to our understanding of cell-protein interactions and pathogen-host relationships.

  16. Effect of mitomycin C on the activation of adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH130 cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Matsunaga, T; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R

    1986-09-01

    Isoproterenol (IPN)-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner by exposure of AH130 cells to mitomycin C (MMC). The enhancement was also observed in prostaglandin E1-, guanine nucleotide analog-, NaF-, cholera toxin- and forskolin-stimulated activities of the enzyme but not in manganese-stimulated activity. In addition, even when the cells pretreated with islet-activating protein were exposed to MMC, IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase was enhanced. Anaerobic exposure of AH130 cells to MMC somewhat inhibited IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase in contrast with aerobic exposure. Exposure of cells to adriamycin also caused enhancement of IPN-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase but exposure to nitrogen mustard inhibited the enzyme stimulation by IPN. The enhancing effect of MMC was lost by the combined treatment with alpha-tocopherol. From these results, it was shown that MMC modulated the activity of adenylate cyclase, probably through alterations in membrane structure.

  17. Mechanism of activation of light-activated phosphodiesterase and evidence for homology with hormone-activated adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yamazaki, A.; Wheeler, M.A.; George, J.S.; Rasenick, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) is one of the effector proteins in the rod outer segments in vertebrate retina. The hydrolysis of cGMP in rod occurs with a speed and light sensitivity which suggests a role for this hydrolysis in visual transduction. In fact, there is electrophysiological data which supports the possibility that cGMP could regulate rod membrane voltage. PDE shows very rapid activation in the presence of photons and GTP. We have called attention to the intriguing analogy between light activated rod phosphodiesterase and hormone activated adenylate cyclase. A number of studies have implicated the binding of GTP to a GTP binding protein as a factor in the hormone dependent activation of adenylate cyclase. Moreover, Cassel and Selinger have shown that hydrolysis of GTP is a component in the inactivation of the hormone dependent adenylate cyclase. We review here recent additional data which provide specific molecular details of the mechanism of light activation of rod PDE as well as demonstrate the exchange of components between light activated PDE and hormone activated cyclase.

  18. WR-2721 inhibits parathyroid adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, M.E.; Morrissey, J.; McConkey, C. Jr.; Goldfarb, S.; Slatopolsky, E.; Martin, K.J.

    1987-02-01

    WR-2721 (S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethylphosphorothioic acid) is a chemoprotective and radioprotective agent that has been shown to lower serum calcium in dogs and in humans. This is secondary both to impaired release of CaS from bone and diminished secretion of parathyroid hormone (PTH) from parathyroid glands. Because cAMP plays a role in the regulation of PTH secretion and WR-2721 has been shown to lower cAMP levels in radiated mouse spleen, the authors investigated the effects of WR-2721 on cAMP production in dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Additional, they studied the adenylate cyclase in plasma membranes from normal bovine parathyroid glands after exposure to WR-2721. With parathyroid cells incubated at 0.5 mM CaS , addition of Wr-2721 in concentrations ranging from 0.02 to 2.0 mM resulted in a progressive decrease in intracellular cAMP measured by radioimmunoassay. In plasma membranes of bovine parathyroid cells a dose-dependent decrease in adenylate cyclase activity was noted. Inhibition of the cyclase was seen over a wide range of MgS concentrations. WR-2721 inhibited both basal and NaF, Gpp(NH)(, forskolin, and pertussin toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. These data suggest that WR-2721 inhibits the activity of parathyroid adenylate cyclase.

  19. Multiple effects of phorbol esters on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1987-06-01

    In S49 lymphoma cells, 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances adenylate cyclase activity and doubles cAMP accumulation in response to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation at 37/sup 0/C, putatively via the action of protein kinase C. at 27/sup 0/C, TPA has the opposite effect, inhibiting cAMP production in response to isoproterenol by approx. 25%. TPA also inhibits the response to prostaglandin E/sub 1/ (PGE/sub 1/), another stimulant of hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in these cells, by 30% at 37/sup 0/C and almost 50% at 27/sup 0/C. In contrast, TPA enhances responses to forskolin and cholera toxin at both 27 and 37/sup 0/C. In membranes from cells treated with TPA, PGE/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity is inhibited by 50%, whereas the catalytic activity stimulated by NaF or forskolin is enhanced. TPA reduces the potency of both PGE/sub 1/ and isoproterenol for cAMP generation by 50%. TPA causes a similar decrease in ..beta..-adrenergic agonist affinity with no reduction in the density of either antagonist of agonist binding sites in wild type cells and in cells lacking the ..cap alpha..-subunit of the stimulatory transducer protein (G/sub s/) (cyc/sup -/) or lacking functional receptor G/sub s/ coupling (UNC). Therefore, TPA has at least three functionally distinct effects on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase in S49 cells. The authors conclude that multiple and opposing effects of TPA on hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase occur simultaneously within the same cell, affecting the responses to several agonists differently. In addition, the data offer a mechanism by which a cell can achieve heterogeneous efficacies to hormones that activate adenylate cyclase.

  20. GSK3β Mediates Renal Response to Vasopressin by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Satish; Hao, ChuanMing; Woodgett, James; Harris, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a serine/threonine protein kinase, is a key target of drug discovery in several diseases, including diabetes and Alzheimer disease. Because lithium, a potent inhibitor of GSK3β, causes nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, GSK3β may play a crucial role in regulating water homeostasis. We developed renal collecting duct-specific GSK3β knockout mice to determine whether deletion of GSK3β affects arginine vasopressin-dependent renal water reabsorption. Although only mildly polyuric under normal conditions, knockout mice exhibited an impaired urinary concentrating ability in response to water deprivation or treatment with a vasopressin analogue. The knockout mice had reduced levels of mRNA, protein, and membrane localization of the vasopressin-responsive water channel aquaporin 2 compared with wild-type mice. The knockout mice also expressed lower levels of pS256-AQP2, a phosphorylated form crucial for membrane trafficking. Levels of cAMP, a major regulator of aquaporin 2 expression and trafficking, were also lower in the knockout mice. Both GSK3β gene deletion and pharmacologic inhibition of GSK3β reduced adenylate cyclase activity. In summary, GSK3β inactivation or deletion reduces aquaporin 2 expression by modulating adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP generation, thereby impairing responses to vasopressin in the renal collecting duct. PMID:20056751

  1. Cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase: relative activity of constituents and metabolites of marihuana.

    PubMed

    Howlett, A C

    1987-05-01

    delta 9Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) has been shown to inhibit the activity of adenylate cyclase in the N18TG2 clone of murine neuroblastoma cells. The concentration of delta 9THC exhibiting half-maximal inhibition was 500 nM. delta 8Tetrahydrocannabinol was less active, and cannabinol was only partially active. Cannabidiol, cannabigerol, cannabichromene, olivetol and compounds having a reduced length of the C3 alkyl side chain were inactive. The metabolites of delta 8THC and delta 9THC hydroxylated at the C11 position were more potent than the parent drugs. However, hydroxylation at the C8 position of the terpenoid ring resulted in loss of activity. Compounds hydroxylated along the C3 alkyl side chain were equally efficacious but less potent than delta 9THC. These findings are compared to the pharmacology of cannabinoids reported for psychological effects in humans and behavioral effects in a variety of animal models.

  2. Fetal nicotine exposure produces postnatal up-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity in peripheral tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Slotkin, T.A.; Navarro, H.A.; McCook, E.C.; Seidler, F.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Gestational exposure to nicotine has been shown to affect development of noradrenergic activity in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the current study, pregnant rats received nicotine infusions of 6 mg/kg/day throughout gestation, administered by osmotic minipump implants. After birth, offspring of the nicotine-infused dams exhibited marked increases in basal adenylate cyclase activity in membranes prepared from kidney and heart, as well as supersensitivity to stimulation by either a {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or by forskolin. The altered responses were not accompanied by up-regulation of {beta}-adrenergic receptors: in fact, ({sup 125}I)pindolol binding was significantly decreased in the nicotine group. These results indicate that fetal nicotine exposure affects enzymes involved in membrane receptor signal transduction, leading to altered responsiveness independently of changes at the receptor level.

  3. Characterization of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase activity in rat brown fat

    SciTech Connect

    Baresi, L.A.; Morley, J.E.; Scarpace, P.J.

    1986-03-01

    Catecholamines stimulate thermogenesis in rat brown fat through a mechanism which involves binding to the beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR), stimulation of adenylate cyclase (AC) and culminating with uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration from ATP synthesis. The authors characterized BAR, AC and cytochrome (cyt) c oxidase in CDF (F-344) interscapular brown fat. Scatchard analysis of (/sup 125/)Iodopindolol binding yields a straight line consistent with a single class of antagonist binding sites with 41.8 +/- 12.0 fmol BAR/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 118 +/- 15 pM. Binding was both specific and stereospecific. Competition with 1-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 6.7 nM) was 15 times more potent than d-propranolol (K/sub d/ = 103 nM). Competition with isoproterenol (K/sub d/ = 79 nM) was 10 times more potent than epinephrine (K/sub d/ = 820 nM) which was 35 times more potent than norepinephrine (K/sub d/ = 2.9 x 10/sup -5/ M) suggesting predominate beta/sub 2/-type BAR. Cyt c oxidase activity was assessed in brown fat mitochrondrial preparations. The ratio of BAR to cyt c activity was 959 +/- 275 nmol BAR/mol cyc c/min. Isoproterenol (0.1 mM) stimulated AC activity was 24 times GTP (0.1 mM) stimulated AC (98.5 vs 40.7 pmol cAMP/min/mg). NaF-stimulated AC was nine times basal activity (90.5 vs 11.3 pmol cAMP/min/mg). These data demonstrate the presence of a beta-/sub 2/-type BAR coupled to adenylate cyclase in rat brown fat.

  4. Tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 after inhibition of NO synthesis: a loss of adenylate cyclase activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The vasodilator effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27) are subject to tachyphylaxis in rats treated with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). This study examined whether this tachyphylaxis is due to the loss of vasodilator potency of cAMP generated by activation of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptors. Five successive treatments with PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline-treated rats that were not subject to tachyphylaxis. The first injection of PACAP-27 (2 nmol/kg iv) in L-NAME (50 micromol/kg iv)-treated rats produced vasodilator responses of similar magnitude to those in saline-treated rats, whereas four subsequent injections produced progressively and markedly smaller responses. The hemodynamic effects of the membrane-permeable cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP; 5-15 micromol/kg iv) were similar in L-NAME-treated rats and in L-NAME-treated rats that had received the five injections of PACAP-27. In addition, five injections of 8-CPT-cAMP (10 micromol/kg iv) produced pronounced vasodilator responses in saline- and L-NAME-treated rats that were not subject to the development of tachyphylaxis. These results suggest that a loss of biological potency of cAMP is not responsible for tachyphylaxis to PACAP-27 in L-NAME-treated rats. This tachyphylaxis may be due to the inability of the G(s) protein-coupled PACAP receptor to activate adenylate cyclase.

  5. Cellular interactions uncouple beta-adrenergic receptors from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ciment, G; de Vellis, J

    1978-11-17

    C6 glioma cells and B104 neuroblastoma cells both possess adenylate cyclase activity, but only C6 cells have beta-adrenergic receptors. However, when cocultured with B104 cells, C6 cells show a marked decrease in their ability to accumulate adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate upon stimulation with beta receptor agonists. Since both beta receptors and cholera toxin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities are present in C6/B104 cocultures, we conclude that the beta receptor/adenylate cyclase transduction mechanism in cocultured C6 cells is uncoupled.

  6. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Reverses Ammonium Metavanadate-Induced Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tlili, Mounira; Rouatbi, Sonia; Sriha, Badreddine; Ben Rhouma, Khémais; Sakly, Mohsen; Vaudry, David; Wurtz, Olivier; Tebourbi, Olfa

    2015-01-01

    The rate of atmospheric vanadium is constantly increasing due to fossil fuel combustion. This environmental pollution favours vanadium exposure in particular to its vanadate form, causing occupational bronchial asthma and bronchitis. Based on the well admitted bronchodilator properties of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), we investigated the ability of this neuropeptide to reverse the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in rats. Exposure to ammonium metavanadate aerosols (5 mg/m3/h) for 15 minutes induced 4 hours later an array of pathophysiological events, including increase of bronchial resistance and histological alterations, activation of proinflammatory alveolar macrophages, and increased oxidative stress status. Powerfully, PACAP inhalation (0.1 mM) for 10 minutes alleviated many of these deleterious effects as demonstrated by a decrease of bronchial resistance and histological restoration. PACAP reduced the level of expression of mRNA encoding inflammatory chemokines (MIP-1α, MIP-2, and KC) and cytokines (IL-1α and TNF-α) in alveolar macrophages and improved the antioxidant status. PACAP reverses the vanadate-induced airway hyperresponsiveness not only through its bronchodilator activity but also by counteracting the proinflammatory and prooxidative effects of the metal. Then, the development of stable analogs of PACAP could represent a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of inflammatory respiratory disorders. PMID:26199679

  7. Adenyl cyclase activator forskolin protects against Huntington's disease-like neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Mehan, Sidharth; Parveen, Shaba; Kalra, Sanjeev

    2017-01-01

    Long term suppression of succinate dehydrogenase by selective inhibitor 3-nitropropionic acid has been used in rodents to model Huntington's disease where mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative damages are primary pathological hallmarks for neuronal damage. Improvements in learning and memory abilities, recovery of energy levels, and reduction of excitotoxicity damage can be achieved through activation of Adenyl cyclase enzyme by a specific phytochemical forskolin. In this study, intraperitoneal administration of 10 mg/kg 3-nitropropionic acid for 15 days in rats notably reduced body weight, worsened motor cocordination (grip strength, beam crossing task, locomotor activity), resulted in learning and memory deficits, greatly increased acetylcholinesterase, lactate dehydrogenase, nitrite, and malondialdehyde levels, obviously decreased adenosine triphosphate, succinate dehydrogenase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and reduced glutathione levels in the striatum, cortex and hippocampus. Intragastric administration of forskolin at 10, 20, 30 mg/kg dose-dependently reversed these behavioral, biochemical and pathological changes caused by 3-nitropropionic acid. These results suggest that forskolin exhibits neuroprotective effects on 3-nitropropionic acid-induced Huntington's disease-like neurodegeneration.

  8. Forskolin- and dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1987-05-01

    The purpose of the present investigation was to determine if dietary lipids can induce changes in the adenylate cyclase system in rat heart. Three groups of male young Sprague-Dawley rats were fed for 6 weeks diets containing 10% corn oil (I), 8% coconut oil + 2% corn oil (II) or 10% menhaden oil (III). Adenylate cyclase activity (basal, fluoride-, isoproterenol-, and forskolin-stimulated) was higher in heart homogenates of rats in group III than in the other two groups. Concentration of the (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites in the cardiac membranes were significantly higher in rats fed menhaden oil. The values (pmol/mg protein) were 4.8 +/- 0.2 (I), 4.5 +/- 0.7 (II) and 8.4 +/- 0.5 (III). There was no significant difference in the affinity of the forskolin binding sites among the 3 dietary groups. When measured at different concentrations of forskolin, the adenylate cyclase activity in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil was higher than in the other 2 groups. Concentrations of the (/sup 3/H)DHA binding sites were slightly higher but their affinity was lower in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The results suggest that diets containing fish oil increase the concentration of the forskolin binding sites and may also affect the characteristics of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptor in rat heart.

  9. Ultraviolet radiation augments epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response

    SciTech Connect

    Iizuka, H.; Kajita, S.; Ohkawara, A.

    1985-05-01

    Pig skin was irradiated in vivo with fluorescent sunlamp tubes (peak emission at 305 nm). A significant increase in epidermal beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was observed as early as 12 h following 1-2 minimum erythema doses (MEDs) UVB exposure, which lasted at least 48 h. The augmentation of adenylate cyclase response was relatively specific to the beta-adrenergic system and there was no significant difference in either adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response of epidermis. The increased beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response was less marked at higher doses of UVB exposure (5 MEDs); in the latter condition, a significant reduction in adenosine- or histamine-adenylate cyclase response was observed. There was no significant difference in either low- or high-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity between control and UVB-treated skin at 1-2 MEDs. These data indicate that the epidermal adenylate cyclase responses are affected in vivo by UVB irradiation, which might be a significant regulatory mechanism of epidermal cyclic AMP systems.

  10. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide induces a depressive-like phenotype in rats

    PubMed Central

    Seiglie, Mariel P.; Smith, Karen L.; Blasio, Angelo; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) is a chronic, life-threatening psychiatric condition characterized by depressed mood, psychomotor alterations, and a markedly diminished interest or pleasure in most activities, known as anhedonia. Available pharmacotherapies have limited success and the need for new strategies is clear. Recent studies attribute a major role to the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) system in mediating the response to stress. PACAP knockout mice display profound alterations in depressive-like behaviors and genetic association studies have demonstrated that genetic variants of the PACAP gene are associated with MDD. However, the effects of PACAP on depressive-like behaviors in rodents have not yet been systematically examined. The present study investigated the effects of central administration of PACAP in rats on depressive-like behaviors, using well-established animal models that represent some of the endophenotypes of depression. We used intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) to assess the brain reward function, saccharin preference test to assess anhedonia, social interaction to assess social withdrawal, and forced swim test (FST) to assess behavioral despair. PACAP raised the current threshold for ICSS, elevation blocked by the PACAP antagonist PACAP(6-38). PACAP reduced the preference for a sweet saccharin solution, and reduced the time the rats spent interacting with a novel animal. Interestingly, PACAP administration did not affect immobility in the FST. Our results demonstrate a role for the central PACAP/PAC1R system in the regulation of depressive-like behaviors, and suggest that hyperactivity of the PACAP/PAC1R system may contribute to the pathophysiology of depression, particularly the associated anhedonic symptomatology and social dysfunction. PMID:26264905

  11. Hemodynamic actions of systemically injected pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aims of this study were (1) to characterize the hemodynamic mechanisms underlying the hypotensive effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP-27 0.1-2.0 nmol/kg, i.v.) in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats, and (2) to determine the roles of the autonomic nervous system, adrenal catecholamines and endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) in the expression of PACAP-27-mediated effects on hemodynamic function. PACAP-27 produced dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial blood pressure and hindquarter and mesenteric vascular resistances in saline-treated rats. PACAP-27 also produced pronounced falls in mean arterial blood pressure in rats treated with the ganglion blocker, chlorisondamine (5 mg/kg, i.v.). The hypotensive and vasodilator actions of PACAP-27 were not attenuated by the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, propranolol (1 mg/kg, i.v.), or the NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME 50 micromol/kg, i.v.). PACAP-27 produced dose-dependent increases in heart rate whereas the hypotensive response produced by the nitrovasodilator, sodium nitroprusside (10 microg/kg, i.v.), was associated with a minimal tachycardia. The PACAP-27-induced tachycardia was unaffected by chlorisondamine, but was virtually abolished by propranolol. These results suggest that the vasodilator effects of PACAP-27 are due to actions in the microcirculation rather than to the release of adrenal catecholamines and that this vasodilation may not involve the release of endothelium-derived NO. These results also suggest that PACAP-27 produces tachycardia by directly releasing norepinephrine from cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals rather than by direct or baroreceptor reflex-mediated increases in sympathetic nerve activity.

  12. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Ameliorates Experimental Acute Ileitis and Extra-Intestinal Sequelae

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Silvia; Fischer, André; Grundmann, Ursula; Alutis, Marie; Kühl, Anja A.; Tamas, Andrea; Toth, Gabor; Dunay, Miklos P.; Göbel, Ulf B.; Reglodi, Dora; Bereswill, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background The neuropeptide Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) plays pivotal roles in immunity and inflammation. So far, potential immune-modulatory properties of PACAP have not been investigated in experimental ileitis. Methodology/Principal Findings Mice were perorally infected with Toxoplasma (T.) gondii to induce acute ileitis (day 0) and treated daily with synthetic PACAP38 from day 1 to 6 post infection (p.i.; prophylaxis) or from day 4 to 6 p.i. (therapy). Whereas placebo-treated control mice suffered from acute ileitis at day 7 p.i. and succumbed to infection, intestinal immunopathology was ameliorated following PACAP prophylaxis. PACAP-treated mice exhibited increased abundance of small intestinal FOXP3+ cells, but lower numbers of ileal T lymphocytes, neutrophils, monocytes and macrophages, which was accompanied by less ileal expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-23p19, IL-22, IFN-γ, and MCP-1. Furthermore, PACAP-treated mice displayed higher anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations in mesenteric lymph nodes and liver and higher systemic anti-inflammatory IL-10 levels in spleen and serum as compared to control animals at day 7 p.i. Remarkably, PACAP-mediated anti-inflammatory effects could also be observed in extra-intestinal compartments as indicated by reduced pro-inflammatory mediator levels in spleen (TNF-α, nitric oxide) and liver (TNF-α, IFN-γ, MCP-1, IL-6) and less severe histopathological sequelae in lungs and kidneys following prophylactic PACAP treatment. Strikingly, PACAP prolonged survival of T. gondii infected mice in a time-of-treatment dependent manner. Conclusion/Significance Synthetic PACAP ameliorates acute small intestinal inflammation and extra-intestinal sequelae by down-regulating Th1-type immunopathology, reducing oxidative stress and up-regulating anti-inflammatory cytokine responses. These findings provide novel potential treatment options of inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:25238233

  13. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is a sympathoadrenal neurotransmitter involved in catecholamine regulation and glucohomeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamelink, Carol; Tjurmina, Olga; Damadzic, Ruslan; Young, W Scott; Weihe, Eberhard; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Eiden, Lee E

    2002-01-08

    The adrenal gland is important for homeostatic responses to metabolic stress: hypoglycemia stimulates the splanchnic nerve, epinephrine is released from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells, and compensatory glucogenesis ensues. Acetylcholine is the primary neurotransmitter mediating catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Accumulating evidence suggests that a secretin-related neuropeptide also may function as a transmitter at the adrenomedullary synapse. Costaining with highly specific antibodies against the secretin-related neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) revealed that PACAP is found in nerve terminals at all mouse adrenomedullary cholinergic synapses. Mice with a targeted deletion of the PACAP gene had otherwise normal cholinergic innervation and morphology of the adrenal medulla, normal adrenal catecholamine and blood glucose levels, and an intact initial catecholamine secretory response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. However, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was more profound and longer-lasting in PACAP knock-outs, and was associated with a dose-related lethality absent in wild-type mice. Failure of PACAP-deficient mice to adequately counterregulate plasma glucose levels could be accounted for by impaired long-term secretion of epinephrine, secondary to a lack of induction of tyrosine hydroxylase, normally occurring after insulin hypoglycemia in wild-type mice, and a consequent depletion of adrenomedullary epinephrine stores. Thus, PACAP is needed to couple epinephrine biosynthesis to secretion during metabolic stress. PACAP appears to function as an "emergency response" cotransmitter in the sympathoadrenal axis, where the primary secretory response is controlled by a classical neurotransmitter but sustained under paraphysiological conditions by a neuropeptide.

  14. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide: an important vascular regulator in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Stephan; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Schmidt-Choudhury, Anjona; Rosignoli, Carine; Shpacovitch, Victoria; von Arnim, Ulrike; Metze, Dieter; Rukwied, Roman; Schmelz, Martin; Paus, Ralf; Voegel, Johannes J; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Steinhoff, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is an important neuropeptide and immunomodulator in various tissues. Although this peptide and its receptors (ie, VPAC1R, VPAC2R, and PAC1R) are expressed in human skin, their biological roles are unknown. Therefore, we tested whether PACAP regulates vascular responses in human skin in vivo. When injected intravenously, PACAP induced a significant, concentration-dependent vascular response (ie, flush, erythema, edema) and mediated a significant and concentration-dependent increase in intrarectal body temperature that peaked at 2.7°C. Topical application of PACAP induced marked concentration-dependent edema. Immunohistochemistry revealed a close association of PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibers with mast cells and dermal blood vessels. VPAC1R was expressed by dermal endothelial cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, mast cells, and keratinocytes, whereas VPAC2R was expressed only in keratinocytes. VPAC1R protein and mRNA were also detected in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. The PACAP-induced change in cAMP production in these cells demonstrated VPAC1R to be functional. PACAP treatment of organ-cultured human skin strongly increased the number of CD31+ vessel cross-sections. Taken together, these results suggest that PACAP directly induces vascular responses that may be associated with neurogenic inflammation, indicating for the first time that PACAP may be a crucial vascular regulator in human skin in vivo. Antagonists to PACAP function may be beneficial for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases with a neurogenic component.

  15. Pituitary Adenylate-Cyclase Activating Polypeptide Regulates Hunger- and Palatability-Induced Binge Eating

    PubMed Central

    Hurley, Matthew M.; Maunze, Brian; Block, Megan E.; Frenkel, Mogen M.; Reilly, Michael J.; Kim, Eugene; Chen, Yao; Li, Yan; Baker, David A.; Liu, Qing-Song; Choi, SuJean

    2016-01-01

    While pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the hypothalamic ventromedial nuclei (VMN) has been shown to regulate feeding, a challenge in unmasking a role for this peptide in obesity is that excess feeding can involve numerous mechanisms including homeostatic (hunger) and hedonic-related (palatability) drives. In these studies, we first isolated distinct feeding drives by developing a novel model of binge behavior in which homeostatic-driven feeding was temporally separated from feeding driven by food palatability. We found that stimulation of the VMN, achieved by local microinjections of AMPA, decreased standard chow consumption in food-restricted rats (e.g., homeostatic feeding); surprisingly, this manipulation failed to alter palatable food consumption in satiated rats (e.g., hedonic feeding). In contrast, inhibition of the nucleus accumbens (NAc), through local microinjections of GABA receptor agonists baclofen and muscimol, decreased hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. PACAP microinjections produced the site-specific changes in synaptic transmission needed to decrease feeding via VMN or NAc circuitry. PACAP into the NAc mimicked the actions of GABA agonists by reducing hedonic feeding without altering homeostatic feeding. In contrast, PACAP into the VMN mimicked the actions of AMPA by decreasing homeostatic feeding without affecting hedonic feeding. Slice electrophysiology recordings verified PACAP excitation of VMN neurons and inhibition of NAc neurons. These data suggest that the VMN and NAc regulate distinct circuits giving rise to unique feeding drives, but that both can be regulated by the neuropeptide PACAP to potentially curb excessive eating stemming from either drive. PMID:27597817

  16. Neurally released pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide enhances guinea pig intrinsic cardiac neurone excitability.

    PubMed

    Tompkins, John D; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Hoover, Donald B; Parsons, Rodney L

    2007-07-01

    Intracellular recordings were made in vitro from guinea-pig cardiac ganglia to determine whether endogenous neuropeptides such as pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) or substance P released during tetanic neural stimulation modulate cardiac neurone excitability and/or contribute to slow excitatory postsynaptic potentials (sEPSPs). When nicotinic and muscarinic receptors were blocked by hexamethonium and atropine, 20 Hz stimulation for 10 s initiated a sEPSP in all innervated neurones. In 40% of the cells, excitability was enhanced after termination of the sEPSP. This suggested that non-cholinergic receptor-mediated mechanisms contributed to the sEPSP and modulated neuronal excitability. Exogenous PACAP and substance P initiated a slow depolarization in the neurones whereas neuronal excitability was only increased by PACAP. When ganglia were treated with the PAC1 antagonist PACAP6-38 (500 nM), the sEPSP evoked by 20 Hz stimulation was reduced by approximately 50% and an enhanced excitability occurred in only 10% of the cells. These observations suggested that PACAP released from preganglionic nerve terminals during tetanic stimulation enhanced neuronal excitability and evoked sEPSPs. After addition of 1 nM PACAP to the bath, 7 of 9 neurones exhibited a tonic firing pattern whereas in untreated preparations, the neurons had a phasic firing pattern. PACAP6-38 (500 nM) diminished the increase in excitability caused by 1 nM PACAP so that only 4 of 13 neurones exhibited a tonic firing pattern and the other 9 cells retained a phasic firing pattern. These findings indicate that PACAP can be released by tetanic neural stimulation in vitro and increase the excitability of intrinsic cardiac neurones. We hypothesize that in vivo PACAP released during preganglionic firing may modulate neurotransmission within the intrinsic cardiac ganglia.

  17. Adrenalectomy mediated alterations in adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    El-Refai, M.; Chan, T.

    1986-05-01

    Adrenalectomy caused a large increase in the number of ..beta..-adrenergic binding sites on liver plasma membranes as measured by /sup 125/I-iodocyanopindolol (22 and 102 fmol/mg protein for control and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats). Concomitantly an increase in the number of binding sites for /sup 3/H-yohimbine was also observed (104 and 175 fmol/mg protein for control and adx membranes). Epinephrine-stimulated increase in cyclic AMP accumulation in isolated hepatocytes were greater in cells from ADX rats. This increase in ..beta..-adrenergic mediated action was much less than what may be expected as a result of the increase in the ..beta..-adrenergic binding in ADX membranes. In addition phenoxybenzamine (10 ..mu..M) further augmented this action of epinephrine in both control and ADX cells. To test the hypothesis that the increase in the number of the inhibitory ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in adrenalectomy is responsible for the muted ..beta..-adrenergic response, the authors injected rats with pertussis toxin (PT). This treatment may cause the in vivo ribosylation of the inhibitory binding protein (Ni). Adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in liver plasma membranes prepared from treated and untreated animals was measured. In contrast with control rats, treatment of ADX rats with PT resulted in a significant increase in the basal activity of AC (5.5 and 7.7 pmol/mg protein/min for untreated and treated rats respectively). Isoproterenol (10 ..mu..M), caused AC activity to increase to 6.5 and 8.4 pmol/mg protein/min for membranes obtained from ADX untreated and ADX treated rats respectively. The ..cap alpha..-adrenergic antagonists had no significant effect on the ..beta..-adrenergic-mediated activation of AC in liver plasma membranes from PT treated control and ADX rats. The authors conclude that the ..beta..-adrenergic activation of AC is attenuated by Ni protein both directly and as a result of activation of ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors.

  18. Dual actions of (-)-stepholidine on the dopamine receptor-mediated adenylate cyclase activity in rat corpus striatum.

    PubMed

    Dong, Z J; Guo, X; Chen, L J; Han, Y F; Jin, G Z

    1997-01-01

    (-)-Stepholidine (SPD) is an antagonist of normosensitive dopamine (DA) receptors, but it exhibits D1 agonistic action on rotational behaviour in rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesions of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC). In the present study, agonistic and antagonistic effects of SPD on the DA receptor-mediated synaptosomal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in rat striatum were investigated. After blockade of D2 receptors, SPD augmented AC activity dose-dependently. The EC50 value was 41.1 +/- 8.6 micromol/L. At the concentration of 10 micromol/L, SPD increased cAMP formation from a basal level (50.8 +/- 10.3 pmol/mg protein/min) to 133.7 +/- 31.8 pmol/mg protein/min. The SPD-induced stimulation of AC activity was almost completely reversed by 10 micromol/L Sch23390. These results indicate that SPD possesses an agonistic action on the D1 receptor. Forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase (FSAC) activity was used as a model to elucidate the effect of SPD on D2 receptors. The results indicate that DA inhibited FSAC activity dose-dependently, while SPD partially restored FSAC activity. Taken together, these results support the conclusion that SPD has dual actions on DA receptors that mediate AC activity, i.e., an agonistic action on D1 receptors and an antagonistic action on D2 receptors.

  19. Part II: Biochemical changes after pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 infusion in migraine patients.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Vollesen, Anne Luise Haulund; Hansen, Young Bae Lee; Frandsen, Erik; Andersen, Malene Rohr; Amin, Faisal Mohammad; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-02-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP38) provokes migraine attacks in 65-70% of migraine without aura (MO) patients. We investigated whether PACAP38 infusion causes changes in the endogenous production of PACAP38, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), S100 calcium binding protein B (S100B), neuron-specific enolase and pituitary hormones in migraine patients. Methods We allocated 32 previously genotyped MO patients to receive intravenous infusion PACAP38 (10 pmol/kg/minute) for 20 minutes and recorded migraine-like attacks. Sixteen of the patients were carriers of the risk allele rs2274316 ( MEF2D), which confers increased risk of MO and may regulate PACAP38 expression, and 16 were non-carriers. We collected blood samples at baseline and 20, 30, 40, 60 and 90 minutes after the start of the infusion. A control group of six healthy volunteers received intravenous saline. Results PACAP38 infusion caused significant changes in plasma concentrations of VIP ( p = 0.026), prolactin ( p = 0.011), S100B ( p < 0.001) and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; p = 0.015), but not CGRP ( p = 0.642) and TNFα ( p = 0.535). We found no difference in measured biochemical variables after PACAP38 infusion in patients who later developed migraine-like attacks compared to those who did not ( p > 0.05). There was no difference in the changes of biochemical variables between patients with and without the MEF2D-associated gene variant ( p > 0.05). Conclusion PACAP38 infusion elevated the plasma levels of VIP, prolactin, S100B and TSH, but not CGRP and TNFα. Development of delayed migraine-like attacks or the presence of the MEF2D gene variant was not associated with pre-ictal changes in plasma levels of neuropeptides, TNFα and pituitary hormones.

  20. Effects of Acetazolamide on the Unrinary Excretion of Cyclic AMP and on the Activity of Renal Adenyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Hector J.; Walls, John; Yates, Jesse; Klahr, Saulo

    1974-01-01

    Acetazolamide, an inhibitor of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase, increased the urinary excretion of cyclic AMP in normal and parathyroidectomized rats. The increase was greater in rats with intact parathyroid glands than in parathyroidectomized rats. This rise in the urinary excretion of cyclic AMP was not due to an increase in urine flow or a change in urine pH. Furosemide caused an increase in urine flow, but did not affect the excretion of cyclic AMP or phosphate. Alkalinization of the urine with bicarbonate did not increase the urinary excretion of phosphate or cyclic AMP. Acetazolamide increased the productionof cyclic AMP by rat renal cortical slices in vitro. This effect was dose-dependent. Acetazolamide also stimulated the activity of renal cortical adenyl cyclase in a dose-dependent manner but had no effect on the activity of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The pattern of urinary excretion of cyclic AMP and phosphate after administration of acetazolamide was similar to that observed in rats given parathyroid hormone. It is suggested that acetazolamide stimulates the renal production of cyclic AMP by activating adenyl cyclase and that this may be the mechanism by which this inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase produces phosphaturia. PMID:4357608

  1. [Structure, localization and physiologic role of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)].

    PubMed

    Vincze, E; Köves, K

    2001-03-11

    PACAP was isolated on the basis of its ability to stimulate adenylate cyclase in primary anterior pituitary cell culture from ovine hypothalami by Miyata et al. in 1989. This peptide is structurally related to the secretin family and shows a 67% sequence homology with vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP). The amino acid sequence of PACAP has been highly preserved during the evolution that may be connected with its important physiological role. Similar to other "brain-gut peptides" PACAP is localized not only in the central but in the peripheral nervous system and in non-neural tissues as well. In addition to its hypophysiotropic effects in the hypothalamo-hypophysial system PACAP exerts its effects on water-salt balance, cardiovascular functions, gastrointestinal motility and secretion and also on the regulation of reproductive functions. PACAP has a role in certain neuro-immuno-endocrine processes, in the differentiation of the nervous system, and it has neuroprotective effects in the case of ischaemia and various toxic agents. Locally PACAP takes its effects as an auto- and paracrine hormone, a neurotransmitter or a neuromodulator in different organs. Besides VIP, PACAP plays an important role in the function of the photo-neuro-endocrine system.

  2. Interaction of 7-bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin with adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Laurenza, A.; Morris, D.I.; Seamon, K.B.

    1986-05-01

    7-Bromoacetyl-7-desacetylforskolin (BrAcFk) and the 12-tritio derivative (/sup 3/H-BrAckFk) were synthesized as alkylating analogs of forskolin. BrAcFk stimulated adenylate cyclase in human platelet and bovine brain membranes with an EC50 of 50..mu..M and inhibited /sup 3/H-forskolin binding to these membranes with a K/sub i/ of 300 nM. /sup 3/H-forskolin binding was decreased in membranes pretreated for 20 min with 10 ..mu..M BrAcFk. The i,9-dideoxy derivative of BrAcFk did not activate adenylate cyclase or inhibit /sup 3/H-forskolin binding. Proteins labelled by BrAcFk in solubilized preparations from bovine brain and human platelets were identified by fluorography of SDS gels. The two predominant bands labelled in the low and high molecular weight regions had molecular weights of 50,000 and 135,000 daltons respectively. The 135,000 dalton band identified by fluorography coeluted with adenylate cyclase activity on a Dupont GF450 column and has a molecular weight identical to that of the catalytic subunit determined by silver staining of SDS gels. These results suggest that BrAcFk can react covalently with the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase.

  3. Glucose Inhibition of Adenylate Cyclase in Intact Cells of Escherichia coli B

    PubMed Central

    Peterkofsky, Alan; Gazdar, Celia

    1974-01-01

    Previous studies in E. coli B have demonstrated an inverse correlation between the presence of glucose in the medium and the accumulation of cyclic AMP in the medium. This observation could not be explained by the action of glucose as a repressor of adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) synthesis, as a stabilizer of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) activity, or as a direct inhibitor of adenylate cyclase activity in cell-free preparations. The recent development of an in vivo assay for adenylate cyclase has provided a basis for further exploring the inhibitory action of glucose in intact cells. With this assay it has been possible to show that, while glucose does not affect adenylate cyclase in vitro, it rapidly inhibits the enzyme activity in intact cells. Extensive metabolism of glucose is not required, since α-methylglucoside also inhibits adenylate cyclase in vivo. When cells are grown on glucose as carbon source, some sugars (mannose, glucosamine) substitute for glucose as adenylate cyclase inhibitors while others (e.g., fructose) do not. Dose-response studies indicate that low concentrations of glucose lead to essentially complete inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity while only moderately decreasing intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations. The evidence presented suggests that the decreased cellular cyclic AMP levels resulting from glucose addition can be accounted for by inhibition of adenylate cyclase without any significant effect on cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase or the transport of cyclic AMP from the cells to the medium. PMID:4366761

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide in stress-related disorders: data convergence from animal and human studies

    PubMed Central

    May, Victor

    2014-01-01

    The maladaptive expression and function of several stress-associated hormones have been implicated in pathological stress- and anxiety-related disorders. Among these, recent evidence has suggested that pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has critical roles in central neurocircuits mediating stress-related emotional behaviors. We describe the PACAPergic systems, the data implicating PACAP in stress biology and how altered PACAP expression and signaling may result in psychopathologies. We include our work implicating PACAP signaling within the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in mediating the consequences of stressor exposure and relatedly, describe more recent studies suggesting that PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) may impact the emotional aspects of chronic pain states. In aggregate, these results are consistent with data suggesting that PACAP dysregulation is associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in humans. PMID:25636177

  5. Irreversible stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity of fat cell membranes of phosphoramidate and phosphonate analogs of GTP.

    PubMed

    Cuatrecasas, P; Bennett, V; Jacobs, S

    1975-01-01

    The ability of 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) to stimulate irreversibly the adenylate cyclease activity of fat cell membranes has been studied by preincubating the membranes with this or related analogs followed by assaying after thoroughly washing the membranes. Activation can occur in a simple Tris-HCl buffer, in the absence of added divalent cations and in the presence of EDTA. Dithiothreitol enhances the apparent degree of activation, perhaps by stabilization. The importance of utilizing optimal conditions for stabilizing enzyme activity, and of measuring the simultaneous changes in the control enzyme, is illustrated. The organomercurial, p-aminophenylmercuric acetate, inhibits profoundly the activity of the native as well as the Gpp(NH)p-stimulated adenylate cyclase, but in both cases subsequent exposure to dithiothreitol restores fully the original enzyme activity. However, the mercurial-inactivated enzyme does not react with Gpp(NP)p, as evidenced by the subsequent restoration of only the control enzyme activity upon exposure to dithiothreitol. Thus, reaction with Gpp(NH)p requires intact sulfhydryl groups, but the activated state is not irreversibly destroyed by the inactivation caused by sulfhydryl blockade. GTP and, less effectively, GDP and ATP inhibit activation by Gpp(NH)p, but interpretations are complicated by the facts that this inhibition is overcome with time and that GTP and ATP can protect potently from spontaneous inactivation. These two nucleotides can be used in the Gpp(NH)p preincubation to stabilize the enzyme. The Gpp(NH)p-activated enzyme cannot be reversed spontaneously during prolonged incubation at 30 degrees C in the absence or presence of GTP, ATP, MgCl2, glycine, dithiothreitol, NaF or EDTA. The strong nucleophile, neutral hydroxylamine, decreases the Gpp(NH)p-activated enzyme activity and no subsequent activation is detected upon re-exposure to the nucleotide.

  6. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  7. Engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by near-infrared window light.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Kang, In-Hye; Nelson, Mathew D; Jensen, Tricia M; Lyuksyutova, Anna I; Siltberg-Liberles, Jessica; Raizen, David M; Gomelsky, Mark

    2014-07-15

    Bacteriophytochromes sense light in the near-infrared window, the spectral region where absorption by mammalian tissues is minimal, and their chromophore, biliverdin IXα, is naturally present in animal cells. These properties make bacteriophytochromes particularly attractive for optogenetic applications. However, the lack of understanding of how light-induced conformational changes control output activities has hindered engineering of bacteriophytochrome-based optogenetic tools. Many bacteriophytochromes function as homodimeric enzymes, in which light-induced conformational changes are transferred via α-helical linkers to the rigid output domains. We hypothesized that heterologous output domains requiring homodimerization can be fused to the photosensory modules of bacteriophytochromes to generate light-activated fusions. Here, we tested this hypothesis by engineering adenylate cyclases regulated by light in the near-infrared spectral window using the photosensory module of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteriophytochrome BphG1 and the adenylate cyclase domain from Nostoc sp. CyaB1. We engineered several light-activated fusion proteins that differed from each other by approximately one or two α-helical turns, suggesting that positioning of the output domains in the same phase of the helix is important for light-dependent activity. Extensive mutagenesis of one of these fusions resulted in an adenylate cyclase with a sixfold photodynamic range. Additional mutagenesis produced an enzyme with a more stable photoactivated state. When expressed in cholinergic neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, the engineered adenylate cyclase affected worm behavior in a light-dependent manner. The insights derived from this study can be applied to the engineering of other homodimeric bacteriophytochromes, which will further expand the optogenetic toolset.

  8. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  9. Antineoplastic effects of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Slungaard, A; Confer, D L; Jacob, H S; Eaton, J W

    1983-01-01

    Urea extracts of B. pertussis, but not B. bronchiseptica, cause large and sustained intracellular cAMP elevation in several neoplastic cell lines. These cAMP elevations are associated with growth inhibition (HL-60, Friend erythroleukemia) and a phenotypic change/differentiation (HL-60, L1210). B. pertussis extract injections prolong survival of L1210 tumor-bearing mice. Pretreatment of L1210 cells with B. pertussis extract both delays mortality and induces growth of solid tumors instead of ascites in subsequently inoculated mice. We conclude that B. pertussis adenylate cyclase is capable of invading a variety of neoplastic cells to catalyze the intracellular formation of large amounts of cAMP. These cAMP elevations are durable and promote growth arrest, differentiation, or phenotypic alterations reflected in altered biologic behavior. B. pertussis adenylate cyclase should prove to be a useful tool for manipulating cAMP levels in neoplastic cells to elucidate the role of cAMP in malignant transformation.

  10. (/sup 3/H)forskolin- and (/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol-binding sites and adenylate cyclase activity in heart of rats fed diets containing different oils

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, S.Q.; Ren, Y.F.; Alam, B.S.

    1988-03-01

    The characteristics of the cardiac adenylate cyclase system were studied in rats fed diets containing fish oil (menhaden oil) and other oils. Adenylate cyclase activity generally was higher in cardiac homogenates and membranes of rats fed diet containing 10% menhaden oil than in the other oils. The increase in enzyme activity, especially in forskolin-stimulated activity, was associated with an increase in the concentration of the (/sup 3/H) forskolin-binding sites in cardiac membranes of rats fed menhaden oil. The beta-adrenergic receptor concentration was not significantly altered although the affinity for (/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol-binding was lower in membranes of rats fed menhaden oil than those fed the other oils. omega-3 fatty acids from menhaden oil were incorporated into the cardiac membrane phospholipids. The results suggest that the observed increase in myocardial adenylate cyclase activity of rats fed menhaden oil may be due to an increase in the number of the catalytic subunits of the enzyme or due to a greater availability of the forskolin-binding sites.

  11. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding to peripheral tissue and activation of the adenylate cyclase-adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate system

    SciTech Connect

    Dave, J.R.; Eiden, L.E.; Eskay, R.L.

    1985-06-01

    Specific binding sites for rat corticotropin-releasing factor (rCRF) are present in rat adrenal medulla, ventral prostate, spleen, liver, kidney, and testis and bovine chromaffin cells in culture. Maximal binding of (/sup 125/I)rCRF occurred within 25 min at 4 C and was saturable. Scatchard analysis of rCRF binding to rat adrenal membranes and bovine chromaffin cells revealed the existence of two classes of binding sites. One class had a relatively higher apparent affinity and lower number of binding sites, whereas the other class had a relatively lower affinity and higher number of binding sites. CRF induced a dose-related increase in rat adrenal membrane adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells. Nanomolar concentrations of rCRF maximally stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in rat adrenal membranes and maximally increased cAMP levels in bovine chromaffin cells to 86% and 130% above control values, respectively. The demonstration of specific CRF-binding sites in a variety of peripheral tissues and the finding that activation of specific CRF-binding sites in adrenal tissue stimulates the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system suggest that CRF may have an important regulatory role in various peripheral tissues.

  12. Role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in modulating hypothalamus-pituitary neuroendocrine functions in mouse cell models.

    PubMed

    Kanasaki, H; Oride, A; Kyo, S

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) was originally identified as a hypothalamic activator of cyclic adenosine monophosphate production in pituitary cells. PACAP and its receptor are expressed not only in the central nervous system, but also in peripheral organs, and function to stimulate pituitary hormone synthesis and secretion as both a hypothalamic-pituitary-releasing factor and an autocrine-paracrine factor within the pituitary. PACAP stimulates the expression of the gonadotrophin α, luteinising hormone (LH) β and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) β subunits, as well as the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor and its own PACAP type I receptor (PAC1R) in gonadotrophin-secreting pituitary cells. In turn, GnRH, which is known to be a crucial component of gonadotrophin secretion, stimulates the expression of PACAP and PAC1R in gonadotrophs. In addition, PAC1R and PACAP modulate the functions of GnRH-producing neurones in the hypothalamus. This review summarises the current understanding of the possible roles of PACAP and PAC1R in modulating hypothalamus and pituitary neuroendocrine cells in the mouse models.

  13. Plant-activated bacterial receptor adenylate cyclases modulate epidermal infection in the Sinorhizobium meliloti-Medicago symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Chang Fu; Garnerone, Anne-Marie; Mathieu-Demazière, Céline; Masson-Boivin, Catherine; Batut, Jacques

    2012-04-24

    Legumes and soil bacteria called rhizobia have coevolved a facultative nitrogen-fixing symbiosis. Establishment of the symbiosis requires bacterial entry via root hair infection threads and, in parallel, organogenesis of nodules that subsequently are invaded by bacteria. Tight control of nodulation and infection is required to maintain the mutualistic character of the interaction. Available evidence supports a passive bacterial role in nodulation and infection after the microsymbiont has triggered the symbiotic plant developmental program. Here we identify in Sinorhizobium meliloti, the Medicago symbiont, a cAMP-signaling regulatory cascade consisting of three receptor-like adenylate cyclases, a Crp-like regulator, and a target gene of unknown function. The cascade is activated specifically by a plant signal during nodule organogenesis. Cascade inactivation results in a hyperinfection phenotype consisting of abortive epidermal infection events uncoupled from nodulation. These findings show that, in response to a plant signal, rhizobia play an active role in the control of infection. We suggest that rhizobia may modulate the plant's susceptibility to infection. This regulatory loop likely aims at optimizing legume infection.

  14. Studies of the cAMP mediated aggregation in Dictyostelium discoideum: receptor mediated activation of the adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Theibert, W.E.A.B.

    1985-01-01

    Dictyostelium discoideum, a eukaryotic amoeba of the cellular slime mold family, provides an interesting paradigm in developmental biology. During development, hundreds of thousands of cells aggregate to form a multicellular aggregate. Aggregation is mediated by chemotaxis and chemical signaling. Waves of adenosine 3'-5' cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) propagate through the monolayer and provide transient gradients for chemotaxis. The author has used a reversible inhibitor of the cAMP signaling response to demonstrate that adaptation to cAMP is independent of the activation of the adenylate cyclase and therefore is not caused by the rise in intracellular cAMP. Next, it is shown that adenosine inhibits the cAMP signaling response. Inhibition is rapid, reversible, and depends on the cAMP stimulus concentration. Then the specificity of the cAMP receptors which mediates signaling is determined and compared with the receptors which mediate chemotaxis, the cGMP response, and cAMP binding antagonism. The cAMP surface receptor has been identified by photoaffinity labeling intact cells with (/sup 32/P)-8-N/sub 3/-cAMP using an ammonium sulfate binding stabilization technique. The photoactivated ligand specifically labels a polypeptide, localized to the membrane fraction, which migrates as a closely spaced doublet on SDS Page.

  15. Purification and primary structure of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) from the brain of an elasmobranch, stingray, Dasyatis akajei.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, K; Yoshida, T; Nagano, Y; Kashimoto, K; Yatohgo, T; Shimomura, H; Shioda, S; Arimura, A; Uchiyama, M

    1998-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) was isolated from ovine hypothalami and found to exist as two amidated forms with 38 (PACAP 38) and 27 (PACAP 27) residues. The amino acid sequences of PACAPs isolated from the vertebrates, such as a bird, a frog and teleost fish, appear to be well conserved. In the present study, we attempted to isolate PACAP from the brain of an elasmobranch fish, Dasyatis akajei (stingray), which belongs to the Chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fish), by extraction of the acetone-dried powder with acetic acid, followed by successive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on a gel-filtration, a cation-exchange and two reverse-phase columns. Purification was monitored by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and Western blotting analysis using an anti-PACAP 27 serum. The PACAP thus obtained consisted of 44 residues. The amino acid sequence of the comparable portion of its N-terminal 38 residues showed 92%, 89%, 89%, and 82% identity with those of mammalian, chicken, frog and teleost PACAPs with 38 residues, respectively. The extra six C-terminal residues of the stingray resembled those of tetrapod and teleost PACAP precursors which were deduced from the respective cDNAs. These results indicate that PACAP, which has an amino acid sequence showing high similarity with those of tetrapod and teleost PACAPs, is present in the elasmobranch brain.

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 (PAC1) receptor is expressed during embryonic development of the earthworm.

    PubMed

    Boros, Akos; Somogyi, Ildikó; Engelmann, Péter; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dóra; Pollák, Edit; Molnár, László

    2010-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP)-like molecules have been shown to be present in cocoon albumin and in Eisenia fetida embryos at an early developmental stage (E1) by immunocytochemistry and radioimmunoassay. Here, we focus on detecting the stage at which PAC1 receptor (PAC1R)-like immunoreactivity first appears in germinal layers and structures, e.g., various parts of the central nervous system (CNS), in developing earthworm embryos. PAC1R-like immunoreactivity was revealed by Western blot and Far Western blot as early as the E2 developmental stage, occurring in the ectoderm and later in specific neurons of the developing CNS. Labeled CNS neurons were first seen in the supraesophageal ganglion (brain) and subsequently in the subesophageal and ventral nerve cord ganglia. Ultrastructurally, PAC1Rs were located mainly on plasma membranes and intracellular membranes, especially on cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, PACAP-like compounds probably influence the differentiation of germinal layers (at least the ectoderm) and of some neurons and might act as signaling molecules during earthworm embryonic development.

  17. Stress-related disorders, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP)ergic system, and sex differences.

    PubMed

    Ramikie, Teniel S; Ressler, Kerry J

    2016-12-01

    Trauma-related disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are remarkably common and debilitating, and are often characterized by dysregulated threat responses. Across numerous epidemiological studies, females have been found to have an approximately twofold increased risk for PTSD and other stress-related disorders. Understanding the biological mechanisms of this differential risk is of critical importance. Recent data suggest that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) pathway is a critical regulator of the stress response across species. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that this pathway is regulated by both stress and estrogen modulation and may provide an important window into understanding mechanisms of sex differences in the stress response. We have recently shown that PACAP and its receptor (PAC1R) are critical mediators of abnormal processes after psychological trauma. Notably, in heavily traumatized human subjects, there appears to be a robust sex-specific association of PACAP blood levels and PAC1R gene variants with fear physiology, PTSD diagnosis, and symptoms, specifically in females. The sex-specific association occurs within a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2267735) that resides in a putative estrogen response element involved in PAC1R gene regulation. Complementing these human data, the PAC1R messenger RNA is induced with fear conditioning or estrogen replacement in rodent models. These data suggest that perturbations in the PACAP-PAC1R pathway are regulated by estrogen and are involved in abnormal fear responses underlying PTSD.

  18. Dopaminergic modulation of adenylate cyclase stimulation by vasoactive intestinal peptide in anterior pituitary.

    PubMed Central

    Onali, P; Schwartz, J P; Costa, E

    1981-01-01

    The activation of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was used as a model to investigate the molecular mechanisms triggered by the occupancy of dopamine recognition sites in rat anterior pituitary. Dopamine failed to change the basal enzyme activity, but it inhibited the stimulation of adenylate cyclase elicited by VIP. Apomorphine, 2-amino-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene, and 2-bromo-alpha-ergocryptine mimicked the effect of dopamine, whereas (-)-sulpiride and and classical neuroleptics antagonized it. Dopamine failed to modulate the activation of pituitary adenylate cyclase by prostaglandin E1, which does not increase prolactin secretion. From these results we infer that stimulation of D-2 (dopamine) receptors may affect pituitary secretion by inhibiting the activation of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase by VIP or other secretagogues. PMID:6171819

  19. Enhancement of adenylate cyclase activity by phorbol ester: effects on the inhibitory pathway in S49 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.D.; Brunton, L.L.

    1986-05-01

    12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) enhances the apparent V/sub max/ of adenylate cyclase (AC) in S49 lymphoma cells. This effect does not result from an increased rate of activation of the catalytic subunit by the stimulatory GTP binding transducer protein (G/sub s/). In wild type (WT) membranes this enhancement seems to involve a GTP binding protein since TPA enhances forskolin-stimulated AC activity by 30% in the presence of GTP (10 ..mu..M) or Gpp(NH)p (1 ..mu..M) but not in the absence of guanine nucleotide. The authors obtain comparable results in the cyc- variant that lacks the GTP binding subunit of G/sub s/ responsible for stimulating AC, suggesting the importance of a different GTP binding protein. Blockade of the activity of the inhibitory GTP binding protein (G/sub i/) by high concentrations of Mg/sup + +/ (approx.100 mM) or Mn/sup + +/ (approx.1 mM) abolishes the effect of TPA to enhance AC activity in WT membranes. The time course of Gpp(NH)p-mediated inhibition of AC reveals a characteristic lag prior to steady state, indicative of the rate of G/sub i/ activation; TPA increases this lag 3-4 fold. The authors conclude that reduction in the rate of activation of G/sub i/ by guanine nucleotide is one mechanism by which phorbol esters enhance guanine nucleotide-dependent activity of AC, hypothetically via the phosphorylation of G/sub i/ by protein kinase C.

  20. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Signalling Exerts Chondrogenesis Promoting and Protecting Effects: Implication of Calcineurin as a Downstream Target

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Matta, Csaba; Katona, Éva; Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Gergely, Pál; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Tóth, Gábor; Reglődi, Dóra; Tamás, Andrea; Zákány, Róza

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an important neurotrophic factor influencing differentiation of neuronal elements and exerting protecting role during traumatic injuries or inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although increasing evidence is available on its presence and protecting function in various peripheral tissues, little is known about the role of PACAP in formation of skeletal components. To this end, we aimed to map elements of PACAP signalling in developing cartilage under physiological conditions and during oxidative stress. mRNAs of PACAP and its receptors (PAC1,VPAC1, VPAC2) were detectable during differentiation of chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Expression of PAC1 protein showed a peak on days of final commitment of chondrogenic cells. Administration of either the PAC1 receptor agonist PACAP 1-38, or PACAP 6-38 that is generally used as a PAC1 antagonist, augmented cartilage formation, stimulated cell proliferation and enhanced PAC1 and Sox9 protein expression. Both variants of PACAP elevated the protein expression and activity of the Ca-calmodulin dependent Ser/Thr protein phosphatase calcineurin. Application of PACAPs failed to rescue cartilage formation when the activity of calcineurin was pharmacologically inhibited with cyclosporine A. Moreover, exogenous PACAPs prevented diminishing of cartilage formation and decrease of calcineurin activity during oxidative stress. As an unexpected phenomenon, PACAP 6-38 elicited similar effects to those of PACAP 1-38, although to a different extent. On the basis of the above results, we propose calcineurin as a downstream target of PACAP signalling in differentiating chondrocytes either in normal or pathophysiological conditions. Our observations imply the therapeutical perspective that PACAP can be applied as a natural agent that may have protecting effect during joint inflammation and/or may promote cartilage regeneration

  1. Developmental changes of beta-adrenergic receptor-linked adenylate cyclase of rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, M.S.; Boland, S.R.; Schmidt, S.J.

    1985-06-01

    beta-Adrenergic agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity and binding of the beta-adrenergic antagonist(-)-(/sup 125/I)iodopindolol were studied in rat liver during development of male Fischer 344 rats ages 6-60 days. In liver homogenates maximum adenylate cyclase response to beta-adrenergic agonist (10(-5) M isoproterenol or epinephrine) decreased by 73% (P less than 0.01) between 6 and 60 days, with most of the decrease (56%; P less than 0.01) occurring by 20 days. beta-adrenergic receptor density (Bmax) showed a corresponding decrease of 66% (P less than 0.01) by 20 days without subsequent change. Binding characteristics of stereospecificity, pharmacological specificity, saturability with time, and reversibility were unchanged with age. GTP-, fluoride-, forskolin-, and Mn2+-stimulated adenylate cyclase activities also decreased during development, suggesting a decrease of activity of the catalytic component and/or guanine nucleotide regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that the developmental decrease of beta-adrenergic agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity may result from decreased numbers of beta-adrenergic receptors. Developmental alterations of nonreceptor components of the enzyme may also contribute to changes of catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase.

  2. Protective Effects of Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Against Oxidative Stress in Zebrafish Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Kasica, Natalia; Podlasz, Piotr; Sundvik, Maria; Tamas, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Kaleczyc, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a pleiotropic neuropeptide, with known antiapoptotic functions. Our previous in vitro study has demonstrated the ameliorative role of PACAP-38 in chicken hair cells under oxidative stress conditions, but its effects on living hair cells is now yet known. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate in vivo the protective role of PACAP-38 in hair cells found in zebrafish (Danio rerio) sense organs-neuromasts. To induce oxidative stress the 5-day postfertilization (dpf) zebrafish larvae were exposed to 1.5 mM H2O2 for 15 min or 1 h. This resulted in an increase in caspase-3 and p-38 MAPK level in the hair cells as well as in an impairment of the larvae basic behavior. To investigate the ameliorative role of PACAP-38, the larvae were incubated with a mixture of 1.5 mM H2O2 and 100 nM PACAP-38 following 1 h preincubation with 100 nM PACAP-38 only. PACAP-38 abilities to prevent hair cells from apoptosis were investigated. Whole-mount immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy analyses revealed that PACAP-38 treatment decreased the cleaved caspase-3 level in the hair cells, but had no influence on p-38 MAPK. The analyses of basic locomotor activity supported the protective role of PACAP-38 by demonstrating the improvement of the fish behavior after PACAP-38 treatment. In summary, our in vivo findings demonstrate that PACAP-38 protects zebrafish hair cells from oxidative stress by attenuating oxidative stress-induced apoptosis.

  3. Presence of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the plasma and milk of ruminant animals.

    PubMed

    Czegledi, Levente; Tamas, Andrea; Borzsei, Rita; Bagoly, Terez; Kiss, Peter; Horvath, Gabriella; Brubel, Reka; Nemeth, Jozsef; Szalontai, Balint; Szabadfi, Krisztina; Javor, Andras; Reglodi, Dora; Helyes, Zsuzsanna

    2011-05-15

    Milk contains a variety of proteins and peptides that possess biological activity. Growth factors, such as growth hormone, insulin-like, epidermal and nerve growth factors are important milk components which may regulate growth and differentiation in various neonatal tissues and also those of the mammary gland itself. We have recently shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), an important neuropeptide with neurotrophic actions, is present in the human milk in much higher concentration than in the plasma of lactating women. Investigation of growth factors in the milk of domestic animals is of utmost importance for their nutritional values and agricultural significance. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to determine the presence and concentration of PACAP in the plasma and milk of three ruminant animal species. Furthermore, the presence of PACAP and its specific PAC1 receptor were investigated in the mammary glands. Radioimmunoassay measurements revealed that PACAP was present in the plasma and the milk of the sheep, goat and the cow in a similar concentration to that measured previously in humans. PACAP38-like immunoreactivity (PACAP38-LI) was 5-20-fold higher in the milk than in the plasma samples of the respective animals, a similar serum/milk ratio was found in all the three species. The levels did not show significant changes within the examined 3-month-period of lactation after delivery. Similar PACAP38-LI was measured in the homogenates of the sheep mammary gland samples taken 7 and 30 days after delivery. PAC1 receptor expression was detected in these udder biopsies by fluorescent immunohistochemistry suggesting that this peptide might have an effect on the mammary glands themselves. These data show that PACAP is present in the milk of various ruminant domestic animal species at high concentrations, the physiological implications of which awaits further investigation.

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide prevents the effects of ceramides on migration, neurite outgrowth, and cytoskeleton remodeling.

    PubMed

    Falluel-Morel, Anthony; Vaudry, David; Aubert, Nicolas; Galas, Ludovic; Benard, Magalie; Basille, Magali; Fontaine, Marc; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Gonzalez, Bruno J

    2005-02-15

    During neuronal migration, cells that do not reach their normal destination or fail to establish proper connections are eliminated through an apoptotic process. Recent studies have shown that the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (and its second messengers ceramides) and the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) play a pivotal role in the histogenesis of the cerebellar cortex. However, the effects of ceramides and PACAP on migration of cerebellar granule cells have never been investigated. Time-lapse videomicroscopy recording showed that C2-ceramide, a cell-permeable ceramide analog, and PACAP induced opposite effects on cell motility and neurite outgrowth. C2-ceramide markedly stimulated cell movements during the first hours of treatment and inhibited neuritogenesis, whereas PACAP reduced cell migration and promoted neurite outgrowth. These actions of C2-ceramide on cell motility and neurite outgrowth were accompanied by a disorganization of the actin filament network, depolarization of tubulin, and alteration of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. In contrast, PACAP strengthened the polarization of actin at the emergence cone, increased Tau phosphorylation, and abolished C2-ceramide-evoked alterations of the cytoskeletal architecture. The caspase-inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK, like PACAP, suppressed the "dance of the death" provoked by C2-ceramide. Finally, Z-VAD-FMK and the PP2A inhibitor okadaic acid both prevented the impairment of Tau phosphorylation induced by C2-ceramide. Taken together, these data indicate that the reverse actions of C2-ceramide and PACAP on cerebellar granule cell motility and neurite outgrowth are attributable to their opposite effects on actin distribution, tubulin polymerization, and Tau phosphorylation.

  5. Cloning, tissue distribution and effects of fasting on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide in largemouth bass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shengjie; Han, Linqiang; Bai, Junjie; Ma, Dongmei; Quan, Yingchun; Fan, Jiajia; Jiang, Peng; Yu, Lingyun

    2015-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) has a wide range of biological functions. We cloned the full-length cDNAs encoding PACAP and PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from the brain of largemouth bass ( Micropterus salmoides) and used real-time quantitative PCR to detect PRP-PACAP mRNA expression. The PRP-PACAP cDNA has two variants expressed via alternative splicing: a long form, which encodes both PRP and PACAP, and a short form, which encodes only PACAP. Sequence analysis results are consistent with a higher conservation of PACAP than PRP peptide sequences. The expression of PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts was highest in the forebrain, followed by the medulla, midbrain, pituitary, stomach, cerebellum, intestine, and kidney; however, these transcripts were either absent or were weakly expressed in the muscle, spleen, gill, heart, fatty tissue, and liver. The level of PACAP-short transcript expression was significantly higher than expression of the long transcript in the forebrain, cerebella, pituitary and intestine, but lower than that of the long transcript in the stomach. PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts were first detected at the blastula stage of embryogenesis, and the level of expression increased markedly between the muscular contraction stage and 3 d post hatch (dph). The expression of PACAP-long and PACAP-short transcripts decreased significantly in the brain following 4 d fasting compared with the control diet group. The down-regulation effect was enhanced as fasting continued. Conversely, expression levels increased significantly after 3 d of re-feeding. Our results suggest that PRP-PACAP acts as an important factor in appetite regulation in largemouth bass.

  6. Characterization of the norepinephrine-activation of adenylate cyclase suggests a role in memory affirmation pathways. Overexposure to epinephrine inactivates adenylate cyclase, a causal pathway for stress-pathologies.

    PubMed

    Bennun, Alfred

    2010-05-01

    Incubation with noradrenaline (norepinephrine) of isolated membranes of rat's brain corpus striatum and cortex, showed that ionic-magnesium (Mg(2+)) is required for the neurotransmitter activatory response of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) (EC 4.6.1.1)], AC. An Mg(2+)-dependent response to the activatory effects of adrenaline, and subsequent inhibition by calcium, suggest capability for a turnover, associated with cyclic changes in membrane potential and participation in a short-term memory pathway. In the cell, the neurotransmitter by activating AC generates intracellular cyclic AMP. Calcium entrance in the cell inhibits the enzyme. The increment of cyclic AMP activates kinase A and their protein phosphorylating activity, allowing a long-term memory pathway. Hence, consolidating neuronal circuits, related to emotional learning and memory affirmation. The activatory effect relates to an enzyme-noradrenaline complex which may participate in the physiology of the fight or flight response, by prolonged exposure. However, the persistence of an unstable enzyme complex turns the enzyme inactive. Effect concordant, with the observation that prolonged exposure to adrenaline, participates in the etiology of stress triggered pathologies. At the cell physiological level AC responsiveness to hormones could be modulated by the concentration of chelating metabolites. These ones produce the release of free ATP(4-), a negative modulator of AC and the Mg(2+) activated insulin receptor tyrosine kinase (IRTK), thus, allowing an integration of the hormonal response of both enzymes by ionic controls. This effect could supersede the metabolic feedback control by energy charge. Accordingly, maximum hormonal response of both enzymes, to high Mg(2+) and low free ATP(4-), allows a correlation with the known effects of low caloric intake increasing average life expectancy.

  7. The relationship between the occupation of the D-1 dopamine receptor by [3H]piflutixol and the activity of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, S

    1991-07-05

    The relationship between occupation of the D-1 dopamine receptor by [3H]piflutixol and inhibition of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been studied. Experiments were performed in parallel; after the initial incubation to enable binding of [3H]piflutixol, half the tubes were assayed for [3H]piflutixol binding and the other half assayed for adenylate cyclase activity. The assay conditions for the two halves of the experiments were identical. (+/-)Sulpiride (3 x 10(-5)M) was present in all tubes to mask drug binding to the D-2 receptor. The inhibition of dopamine- (10(-3) and 10(-5)M) sensitive adenylate cyclase with increasing concentrations of [3H]piflutixol in the incubation mixture was compared to the saturation of specific [3H]piflutixol binding with those same concentrations of [3H]piflutixol. There was a linear relationship between receptor occupation by [3H]piflutixol and inhibition of dopamine sensitive adenylate cyclase. In a second experiment dopamine was present during the initial incubation with [3H]piflutixol. This resulted in a displacement of specific [3H]piflutixol binding and, as a consequence, a reduction of [3H]piflutixol's inhibition of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase. In the absence of GTP in the initial incubation dopamine produced a greater reduction of [3H]piflutixol's inhibition of dopamine adenylate cyclase than displacement of specific [3H]piflutixol binding. In the presence of GTP in the initial incubation both displacement curves were shifted to the right, i.e. dopamine was less potent. However, under these conditions dopamine produced less inhibition of [3H]piflutixol's inhibition of dopamine adenylate cyclase than displacement of specific [3H]piflutixol binding. These results are interpreted as resulting from changes in D-1high and D-1low ratios as a result of incubation in the presence or absence of GTP.

  8. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-06-25

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca/sup 2 +/ gating.

  9. Evidence for adenylate cyclase as a scaffold protein for Ras2-Ira interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisie.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Sonia; Paiardi, Chiara; Pardons, Katrien; Winderickx, Joris; Martegani, Enzo

    2014-05-01

    Data in literature suggest that budding yeast adenylate cyclase forms a membrane-associated complex with the upstream components of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Here we provide evidences that adenylate cyclase (Cyr1p) acts as a scaffold protein keeping Ras2 available for its regulatory factors. We show that in a strain with deletion of the CYR1 gene (cyr1Δ pde2Δ msn2Δ msn4Δ) the basal Ras2-GTP level is very high and this is independent on the lack of feedback inhibition that could result from the absence of adenylate cyclase activity. Moreover, strains effected either in the intrinsic adenylate cyclase activity (fil1 strain) or in the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by active G-proteins (lcr1 strain) had a normal basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level, indicating that adenylate cyclase activity does not influence the Ras2 activation state and suggesting that Cyr1 protein is required for the proper interaction between Ras2 and the Ira proteins. We also provide evidence that the two Ras-binding sites mapped on Cyr1p are required for the signalling complex assembly. In fact, we show that the cyr1Δ strain expressing CYR1 alleles lacking either the LRR region or the C-terminal domain still have a high basal and glucose-induced Ras2-GTP level. In contrast, a mutant expressing a Cyr1 protein only missing the N-terminal domain showed a normal Ras2 activation pattern. Likewise, the Ras2-GTP levels are comparable in the wild type strain and the srv2Δ strain, supporting the hypothesis that Cap is not essential for the Ras-adenylate cyclase interaction.

  10. Centrally acting hypotensive agents with affinity for 5-HT1A binding sites inhibit forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus.

    PubMed Central

    Schoeffter, P.; Hoyer, D.

    1988-01-01

    1. A number of centrally acting hypotensive agents and other ligands with high affinity for 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) recognition sites have been tested on forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in calf hippocampus, a functional model for 5-HT1A-receptors. 2. Concentration-dependent inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was elicited by the reference 5-HT1-receptor agonists (mean EC50 value, nM): 5-HT (22), 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT, 3.2), 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT, 8.6), N,N-dipropyl-5-carboxamidotryptamine (DP-5-CT, 2.3), 1-[2-(4-aminophenyl)ethyl]-4-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-piperazine (PAPP or LY 165163, 20), 5-methoxy-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridinyl)-1H indole (RU 24969, 20), buspirone (65) and ipsapirone (56). Emax amounted to 18-20% inhibition for all but the latter two agonists (14%). 3. The following hypotensive agents with high affinity for 5-HT1A sites were potent agonists in this system (mean EC50 value, nM): flesinoxan (24), indorenate (99), erythro-1-(1-[2-(1,4-benzodioxan-2-yl)-2-hydroxyethyl]-4-piperidyl )- 2-benzimidazolinone (R 28935, 2.5), urapidil (390) and 5-methyl-urapidil (3.5). The first two agents were full agonists, whereas the latter three acted as partial agonists with 60-80% efficacy. 4. Metergoline and methysergide behaved as full agonists and cyanopindolol as a partial agonist with low efficacy. Spiroxatrine and 2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)aminomethyl- 1,4-benzodioxane (WB 4101) which bind to 5-HT1A sites with nanomolar affinity, were agonists and inhibited potently forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in calf hippocampus, showing mean EC50 values of 23 and 15 nM, respectively. Spiroxatrine and WB 4101 yielded 90% and 50% efficacy, respectively. 5. Spiperone and methiothepin (each 1 microM) caused rightward shifts of the concentration-effect curve to 8-OH-DPAT, without loss of the maximal effect, as did the partial agonist cyanopindolol (0.1 microM) and the

  11. Effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) on chloride in HT29 cells studied by X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Roomans, G M

    1999-01-01

    The colon cancer cell line HT29 is a useful model to study intestinal chloride secretion. These cells have both cAMP-activated and calcium-activated chloride channels. Changes in elemental content of the cells after stimulation with agonists were determined by X-ray microanalysis in the scanning or scanning transmission electron microscope. Exposure of HT29 cells to pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide-27 (PACAP) caused a transient decrease in the cellular Cl and K concentrations, indicating (net) efflux of chloride. The effect of PACAP is inhibited by somatostatin, which is known to inhibit cAMP-activated as well as calcium-activated chloride secretion and by U-73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C. Alloxan, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, did not significantly affect the PACAP-induced loss of chloride. The calcium-chelating agent EGTA inhibited the PACAP-induced loss of chloride, indicating the need for extracellular calcium ions. Also vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) caused a decrease of the cellular chloride concentration in HT29 cells. VIP-induced loss of chloride could be inhibited by pre-treating the cells with somatostatin or UK14,304, an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist that has been shown previously to inhibit purinergically activated chloride efflux. Our results indicate that there is cross-talk between the cAMP- and the calcium-activated pathways for chloride secretion in HT29 cells.

  12. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of photo-activated adenylate cyclase nano-clusters from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.; Kateriya, S.

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopic characteristics of BLUF (BLUF = sensor of blue light using flavin) domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC = Naegleria photo-activated cyclase) samples from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain is studied at room temperature. The absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic development in the dark was investigated over two weeks. Attenuation coefficient spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence excitation distributions were measured. Thawing of frozen nPAC samples gave solutions with varying protein nano-cluster size and varying flavin, tyrosine, tryptophan, and protein color-center emission. Protein color-center emission was observed in the wavelength range of 360-900 nm with narrow emission bands of small Stokes shift and broad emission bands of large Stokes shift. The emission spectra evolved in time with protein nano-cluster aging.

  13. Characterization of the purine-reactive site of the rat testis cytosolic adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Onoda, J M; Braun, T; Wrenn, S M

    1987-06-15

    Naturally soluble rat germ cell adenylate cyclase was inhibited by adenosine and the adenosine analogs, 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyl adenine (AFA) and 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (DDA), all of which inhibited hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclases at the "P" site. The IC50 values for adenosine and DDA were approximately 0.1 and for AFA, 4.0 mM. The onset of adenosine inhibition was very rapid whether adenosine was added to the enzyme reactant mixture at time zero concomitantly with the addition of substrate or after the enzyme had been activated by the addition of substrate. The adenosine analogs, N6-methyladenosine (MeA) and N6-phenylisopropyl adenosine (PIA), which interact with plasma membrane receptors ("R" receptors) for hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase, had little effect on the activity of the cytosolic adenylate cyclase. Additionally, aminophylline, which has been shown to competitively antagonize adenosine interactions with the plasma membrane "R" receptors but not "P" site interactions, had no effect upon substrate activation of the soluble enzyme and did not prevent adenosine from inhibiting the activity of the enzyme. These data provide evidence for an adenosine regulatory site on the cytosolic enzyme which resembles the "P" site described for membrane bound-adenylate cyclase.

  14. Adenylate cyclase of human articular chondrocytes. Responsiveness to prostaglandins and other hormones.

    PubMed Central

    Houston, J P; McGuire, M K; Meats, J E; Ebsworth, N M; Russell, R G; Crawford, A; Mac Neil, S

    1982-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] was shown to be present in cultured human articular chondrocytes. Optimal conditions of incubation time, protein and substrate concentrations and pH were determined in whole cell lysates. Maximal activity occurred at pH 8.5 with no decrease in activity up to pH 10.0. Adenylate cyclase activity of particulate membrane preparations was enhanced by the addition of crude cytosol preparations. The prostaglandins E1, E2, F1 alpha, F2 alpha, D2, B1, B2, A1 and A2, as well as adrenaline and isoprenaline, stimulated adenylate cyclase derived from either adult or foetal chondrocytes. No significant stimulation was observed in the presence of human calcitonin or glucagon. Bovine parathyroid hormone always significantly stimulated the adenylate cyclase derived from foetal chondrocytes, but not from adult chondrocytes. Preincubation of the chondrocytes in culture with indomethacin and with or without supernatant medium from cultured mononuclear cells increased the responsiveness of the adenylate cyclase to prostaglandin E1. PMID:7159397

  15. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) dilates cerebellar arteries through activation of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated (BK) and ATP-sensitive (K ATP) K (+) channels.

    PubMed

    Koide, Masayo; Syed, Arsalan U; Braas, Karen M; May, Victor; Wellman, George C

    2014-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a potent vasodilator of numerous vascular beds, including cerebral arteries. Although PACAP-induced cerebral artery dilation is suggested to be cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent, the downstream intracellular signaling pathways are still not fully understood. In this study, we examined the role of smooth muscle K(+) channels and hypothesized that PACAP-mediated increases in cAMP levels and protein kinase A (PKA) activity result in the coordinate activation of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels for cerebral artery dilation. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we observed that PACAP enhanced whole-cell KATP channel activity and transient BK channel currents in freshly isolated rat cerebellar artery myocytes. The increased frequency of transient BK currents following PACAP treatment is indicative of increased intracellular Ca(2+) release events termed Ca(2+) sparks. Consistent with the electrophysiology data, the PACAP-induced vasodilations of cannulated cerebellar artery preparations were attenuated by approximately 50 % in the presence of glibenclamide (a KATP channel blocker) or paxilline (a BK channel blocker). Further, in the presence of both blockers, PACAP failed to cause vasodilation. In conclusion, our results indicate that PACAP causes cerebellar artery dilation through two mechanisms: (1) KATP channel activation and (2) enhanced BK channel activity, likely through increased Ca(2+) spark frequency.

  16. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  17. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and PACAP-receptor type 1 expression in rat and human placenta.

    PubMed

    Scaldaferri, M L; Modesti, A; Palumbo, C; Ulisse, S; Fabbri, A; Piccione, E; Frajese, G; Moretti, C

    2000-03-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), the new hypophysiotropic factor member of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/secretin/glucagon/GHRH family of neuropeptides, exerts its biological action by interacting with both PACAP-selective type I receptors (PAC1) and type II receptors (VPAC1), which bind both PACAP and VIP. The placenta is a site of production of hypophysiotropic factors that participate in the control of local hormone production, as well as the respective hypothalamic-pituitary neurohormones. In the present study, we show the expression of PACAP gene and irPACAP distribution within rat and human placental tissues, by means of RT-PCR and immunohystochemical experiments. In both rat and human placenta, we evaluated the expression of PAC1 gene by Northern hybridization analysis performed with a 32P-labeled 706 nt complementary DNA probe, derived from the full-length coding region of the rPAC1 complementary DNA. The results of these experiments demonstrate the presence, in both human and rat placenta, of a 7.5-kb transcript similar in size to those detected in the ovary, brain, and hypothalamus. Alternative splicing of two exons occurs in human and rat PAC1 gene generating splice variants with variable tissue-specific expression. To ascertain which of the splice variants were expressed in placental tissue we performed RT-nested PCR using primers flanking the insertion sequence termed hip/hop cassette in rat or SV1/SV2 box in human gene. Electrophoretic analysis of the PCR products showed a different pattern of expression of messenger RNA splicing variants in human and rat placenta. In particular, the rat placenta expresses the short PAC1 receptor (PAC1short), the rPAC1-hip or hop (which are indistinguishable with the primers used), and the rPAC1-hip-hop, whereas the human placenta expresses only the PAC1SV1 (or SV2) variant, structurally homologous to the rat PAC1 hip (or hop). Sequence analysis of the human PCR-amplified PAC1

  18. [Characteristics of interaction of adenylate cyclase modulators and phosphoinositide cell signaling systems with lipid langmuir monolayers].

    PubMed

    Liakhov, O M; Prokopenko, V V; Prokopenko, R A; Mohylevych, S Ie

    2006-01-01

    Interaction of two groups of bioregulators, which oppositely affect activity of adenylate cyclase and phosphoinositide cellular signaling systems, with the Langmuir monolayer films made of natural lecithin was studied. Most significant influence on the structural and energy characteristics of lipid monolayers was revealed for the group of bioregulators, which inhibit polyphosphoinositide signaling system or/and activate adenylate cyclase signaling system. It is shown, that using the cluster analysis the bioregulators can be divided into two groups according to general orientation of their action on the considered systems of transduction of a signal.

  19. Virulence of Bordetella bronchiseptica: role of adenylate cyclase-hemolysin.

    PubMed Central

    Gueirard, P; Guiso, N

    1993-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen of laboratory, domestic, and wild animals and sometimes of humans. In the present study some characteristics of the virulence of B. bronchiseptica isolates of different origin were studied. All isolates had similar phenotypes, similar bacteriological characters, and synthesized adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin and pertactin but not pertussis toxin. These isolates, however, differed in their ability to express dermonecrotic toxin and to cause a lethal infection, but no correlation was found with the human or animal origin of the isolates. The fact that the most virulent isolate did not express dermonecrotic toxin suggests that this toxin does not play an important role in the virulence of the bacteria in the murine model. After infection with virulent B. bronchiseptica a very early synthesis and a persistence of anti-adenylate cyclase-hemolysin and anti-filamentous hemagglutinin antibodies were observed in the sera of infected mice, suggesting a persistence of the bacteria or of its antigens. B. bronchiseptica adenylate cyclase-hemolysin was purified and was shown to be a major protective antigen against B. bronchiseptica infection. Furthermore, we showed that its immunological and protective properties were different from that of B. pertussis adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, confirming that Bordetella species are immunologically different. Images PMID:8406794

  20. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand (3H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ((3H)CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that (3H) CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for (3H) CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific (3H)CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid).

  1. Microscopical localization on adenylate cyclase: a historical review of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Richards, P A; Richards, P D

    1998-03-15

    The histochemistry technique for localizing adenylate cyclase has been developed over the past two decades. Early efforts were directed at overcoming the criticism of the lead capture technique, the inhibition of the enzyme by fixation, and problems associated with the substrate. The introduction of alternative metal ions, strontium and cerium, offered solutions to the criticism of the lead capture technique. The inhibition of the enzyme by the various fixation methods used has been rarely overcome satisfactorily and the use of non-fixed material during incubation is one of the alternatives that has been suggested. The introduction of adenylate (beta-gamma-methylene) diphosphate as an alternative substrate offers a solution to the problems associated with commercially available adenylyl imidodiphosphate. Although no standard medium or method has been accepted by all researchers, the histochemical technique still has a place in the arsenal of the modern cell biologist. The technique localizes the active enzyme, as opposed to the protein, active and nonactive, by immunocytochemistry and the precursors of the protein by in situ hybridization methods.

  2. Effect of the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide on the autophagic activation observed in in vitro and in vivo models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lamine-Ajili, Asma; Fahmy, Ahmed M; Létourneau, Myriam; Chatenet, David; Labonté, Patrick; Vaudry, David; Fournier, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to destruction of the midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. This phenomenon is related to apoptosis and its activation can be blocked by the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). Growing evidence indicates that autophagy, a self-degradation activity that cleans up the cell, is induced during the course of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the role of autophagy in the pathogenesis of neuronal disorders is yet poorly understood and the potential ability of PACAP to modulate the related autophagic activation has never been significantly investigated. Hence, we explored the putative autophagy-modulating properties of PACAP in in vitro and in vivo models of PD, using the neurotoxic agents 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), respectively, to trigger alterations of DA neurons. In both models, following the toxin exposure, PACAP reduced the autophagic activity as evaluated by the production of LC3 II, the modulation of the p62 protein levels, and the formation of autophagic vacuoles. The ability of PACAP to inhibit autophagy was also observed in an in vitro cell assay by the blocking of the p62-sequestration activity produced with the autophagy inducer rapamycin. Thus, the results demonstrated that autophagy is induced in PD experimental models and that PACAP exhibits not only anti-apoptotic but also anti-autophagic properties.

  3. The invasive adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis. Properties and penetration kinetics.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, E; Farfel, Z; Hanski, E

    1987-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative organism of whooping cough, produces a calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. Confer & Eaton [(1982) Science 217, 948-950] have shown that an extract from B. pertussis increases intracellular cyclic AMP levels in neutrophils and suggested that this increase is caused by the bacterial adenylate cyclase which penetrates these cells. We demonstrate in the present study that adenylate cyclase activity in lysates from lymphocytes exposed to a partially purified preparation of the bacterial enzyme has properties completely different from those of the intrinsic membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase activity in lysates from lymphocytes exposed to the invasive enzyme is insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide, readily inactivated by acetic anhydride and relatively stable to SDS. Similar properties are exhibited by the bacterial enzyme itself. By contrast, the intrinsic membrane-bound enzyme activated by forskolin and guanosine 5'-gamma-thiotriphosphate is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide and SDS and relatively stable to acetic anhydride. This strongly supports the notion that B. pertussis adenylate cyclase penetrates cells. Using the partially purified preparation of the invasive enzyme, we have studied the kinetics of its penetration. The intracellular catalytic activity reaches a steady state within 20 min, irrespective of enzyme or cell concentration. Steady-state levels are maintained for at least 2 h provided that the invasive enzyme is present in the incubation medium. Upon its removal, a rapid decrease (t1/2 approximately equal to 15 min) in the intracellular cyclase level is observed. This decrease reflects intracellular inactivation of the bacterial enzyme and is not caused by the release of the enzyme to the cell medium. PMID:2886119

  4. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Somogyi, Csilla Szűcs; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-07-29

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load.

  5. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Pathway Is Induced by Mechanical Load and Reduces the Activity of Hedgehog Signaling in Chondrogenic Micromass Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Szentléleky, Eszter; Szűcs Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Dobrosi, Nóra; Engler, Máté; Tamás, Andrea; Reglődi, Dóra; Zákány, Róza

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurohormone exerting protective function during various stress conditions either in mature or developing tissues. Previously we proved the presence of PACAP signaling elements in chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Since no data can be found if PACAP signaling is playing any role during mechanical stress in any tissues, we aimed to investigate its contribution in mechanotransduction during chondrogenesis. Expressions of the mRNAs of PACAP and its major receptor, PAC1 increased, while that of other receptors, VPAC1, VPAC2 decreased upon mechanical stimulus. Mechanical load enhanced the expression of collagen type X, a marker of hypertrophic differentiation of chondrocytes and PACAP addition attenuated this elevation. Moreover, exogenous PACAP also prevented the mechanical load evoked activation of hedgehog signaling: protein levels of Sonic and Indian Hedgehogs and Gli1 transcription factor were lowered while expressions of Gli2 and Gli3 were elevated by PACAP application during mechanical load. Our results suggest that mechanical load activates PACAP signaling and exogenous PACAP acts against the hypertrophy inducing effect of mechanical load. PMID:26230691

  6. The vasorelaxant effect of pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in isolated rat basilar arteries is partially mediated by activation of nitrergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Seebeck, Jörg; Löwe, Marcus; Kruse, Marie Luise; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Mehdorn, H Maximilian; Ziegler, Albrecht; Hempelmann, Ralf G

    2002-07-15

    The structurally related neuropeptides pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) are recognised by two G protein-coupled receptors, termed VPAC(1)-R and VPAC(2)-R, with equal affinity. PACAP and VIP have previously been shown to relax cerebral arteries in an endothelium-independent manner. The aim of the present study was to test if intramural neurons are involved in the mediation of PACAP/VIP-induced vasodilatory responses. Therefore, the vascular tone of isolated rat basilar arteries was measured by means of a myograph. The vasorelaxing effect of PACAP was assessed in arteries precontracted by serotonin in the absence or presence of different test compounds known to selectively inhibit certain signaling proteins. The vasorelaxant effect of PACAP could be significantly reduced by the inhibitor of neuronal N-type calcium channels omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTx), as well as by 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole (3Br-7-Ni), an inhibitor of the neuronal nitric oxide-synthase (nNOS). The localization of N-type calcium channels and VPAC-Rs within the rat basilar artery was investigated by confocal laser scanning microscopy using omega-CgTx- and VIP-analogs labelled with fluorescent dyes. These findings suggest that activation of intramural neurons may represent an important effector mechanism for mediation of the vasorelaxant PACAP-response.

  7. Alkaline phosphatase relieves desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled beta-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocyte membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Rebar, R.; Crooke, S.T.

    1987-05-01

    Desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes results in 40-65% decrease in agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and correlates with increased phosphorylation of ..beta..-adrenergic receptors. To assess the role of phosphorylation in desensitization, membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized turkey erythrocytes were incubated with alkaline phosphatase for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C, pH = 8.0. In both cases alkaline phosphatase treatment significantly reduced desensitization of agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by 40-60%. Similar results were obtained following alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from isoproterenol- and cAMP-desensitized duck erythrocytes. In addition, alkaline phosphatase treatment of membranes from duck erythrocytes desensitized with phorbol 12-mystrate 13-acetate returned adenylate cyclase activity to near control values. In all experiments inclusion of 20 mM NaPO/sub 4/ to inhibit alkaline phosphatase during treatment of membranes blocked the enzyme's effect on agonist-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results demonstrate a role for phosphorylation in desensitization of adenylate cyclase-coupled ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in avian erythrocytes.

  8. Hyaluronic acid as capacitation inductor: metabolic changes and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase regulation.

    PubMed

    Fernández, S; Córdoba, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effect of hyaluronic acid on bovine cryopreserved spermatozoa compared with heparin as regards the variation of capacitation induction, cellular oxidative metabolism and intracellular signal induced by membrane-associated adenylate cyclase to propose hyaluronic acid as a capacitation inductor. Heparin or hyaluronic acid and lysophosphatidylcholine were used to induce sperm capacitation and acrosome reaction, respectively. 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine was used as a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase inhibitor. The highest percentages of capacitated spermatozoa and live spermatozoa with acrosome integrity were obtained by incubating sperm for 60 min using 1000 μg/ml hyaluronic acid. In these conditions, capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid was lower compared with heparin; nonetheless both glycosaminoglycans promote intracellular changes that allow true acrosome reaction in vitro induced by lysophosphatidylcholine in bovine spermatozoa. Oxygen consumption in heparin-capacitated spermatozoa was significantly higher than in hyaluronic acid-treated spermatozoa. With all treatments, mitochondrial coupling was observed when a specific uncoupler of the respiratory chain was added. The inhibition of membrane-associated adenylate cyclase significantly blocked capacitation induction produced by hyaluronic acid, maintaining a basal sperm oxygen uptake in contrast to heparin effect in which both sperm parameters were inhibited, suggesting that the membrane-associated adenylate cyclase activation is involved in the intracellular signal mechanisms induced by both capacitation inductors, but only regulates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in heparin-capacitated spermatozoa.

  9. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Induces the Voltage-Independent Activation of Inward Membrane Currents and Elevation of Intracellular Calcium in HIT-T15 Insulinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    LEECH, COLIN A.; HOLZ, GEORGE G.; HABENER, JOEL F.

    2010-01-01

    The secretion of insulin by pancreatic β-cells is controlled by synergistic interactions of glucose and hormones of the glucagon-related peptide family, of which pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a member. Here we show by simultaneous recording of intracellular calcium ion ([Ca2+]i) and membrane potential that both PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 depolarize HIT-T15 cells and raise [Ca2+]i. PACAP stimulation can result in membrane depolarization by two distinct mechanisms: 1) PACAP reduces the membrane conductance and increases membrane excitability; and 2) PACAP activates a pronounced inward current that is predominantly a Na+ current, blockable by La3+, and which exhibits a reversal potential of about −28 mV. Activation of this current does not require membrane depolarization, because the response is observed when cells are held under voltage clamp at −70 mV. This current may result from the cAMP-dependent activation of nonspecific cation channels because the current is also observed in response to forskolin or membrane-permeant analogs of cAMP. We also suggest that PACAP raises [Ca2+]i and stimulates insulin secretion by three distinct mechanisms: 1) depolarization activates Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels, 2) mobilization of intracellular Ca2+ stores, and 3) entry of Ca2+ via voltage-independent Ca2+ channels. These effects of PACAP may play an important role in a neuro-entero-endocrine loop regulating insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells during the transition period from fasting to feeding. PMID:7895663

  10. [Adenylate cyclase. A possible factor in the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis].

    PubMed

    Michankin, B N; Chevchenko, L A; Asseeva, L E

    1992-01-01

    Biological effect of homogenous preparation of Y. pestis adenylate cyclase on eucaryotic cells was studied. Adenylate cyclase, added (7.5 x 10(8) g/ml) to guinea pig macrophages lowers the level of chemiluminescence to 50-70%, has an appreciable cytotoxic effect on peritoneal macrophages and suppresses phosphorylation processes of leucocyte proteins from white mice. The experimental results obtained allow to suggest Y. pestis adenylate cyclase to be a pathogenic factor, contributing to the development of plague infection.

  11. Spinal astrocytic activation contributes to both induction and maintenance of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide type 1 receptor-induced long-lasting mechanical allodynia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yokai, Masafumi; Miyata, Atsuro

    2016-01-01

    Background Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the spinal dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia, suggesting an important role of PACAP–PACAP receptors signaling system in the modulation of spinal nociceptive transmission. We have previously reported that a single intrathecal injection of PACAP or a PACAP specific (PAC1) receptor selective agonist, maxadilan, in mice induced dose-dependent aversive behaviors, which lasted more than 30 min, and suggested that the maintenance of the nociceptive behaviors was associated with the spinal astrocytic activation. Results We found that a single intrathecal administration of PACAP or maxadilan also produced long-lasting hind paw mechanical allodynia, which persisted at least 84 days without affecting thermal nociceptive threshold. In contrast, intrathecal application of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide did not change mechanical threshold, and substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or N-methyl-D-aspartate induced only transient mechanical allodynia, which disappeared within 21 days. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses with an astrocytic marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein, revealed that the spinal PAC1 receptor stimulation caused sustained astrocytic activation, which also lasted more than 84 days. Intrathecal co-administration of L-α-aminoadipate, an astroglial toxin, with PACAP or maxadilan almost completely prevented the induction of the mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, intrathecal treatment of L-α-aminoadipate at 84 days after the PAC1 stimulation transiently reversed the mechanical allodynia accompanied by the reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein expression level. Conclusion Our data suggest that spinal astrocytic activation triggered by the PAC1 receptor stimulation contributes to both induction and maintenance of the long-term mechanical allodynia. PMID:27175011

  12. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present and biochemically active in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Pirger, Zsolt; Laszlo, Zita; Hiripi, Laszlo; Hernadi, Laszlo; Toth, Gabor; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Kemenes, Gyorgy; Mark, Laszlo

    2010-11-01

    PACAP is a highly conserved adenylate cyclase (AC) activating polypeptide, which, along with its receptors (PAC1-R, VPAC1, and VPAC2), is expressed in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In vertebrates, PACAP has been shown to be involved in associative learning, but it is not known if it plays a similar role in invertebrates. To prepare the way for a detailed investigation into the possible role of PACAP and its receptors in a suitable invertebrate model of learning and memory, here, we undertook a study of their expression and biochemical role in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Lymnaea is one of the best established invertebrate model systems to study the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, including the role of cyclic AMP-activated signaling mechanisms, which crucially depend on the learning-induced activation of AC. However, there was no information available on the expression of PACAP and its receptors in sensory structures and central ganglia of the Lymnaea nervous system known to be involved in associative learning or whether or not PACAP can actually activate AC in these ganglia. Here, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and immunohistochemistry, we established the presence of PACAP-like peptides in the cerebral ganglia and the lip region of Lymnaea. The MALDI-TOF data indicated an identity with mammalian PACAP-27 and the presence of a squid-like PACAP-38 highly homologous to vertebrate PACAP-38. We also showed that PACAP, VIP, and maxadilan stimulated the synthesis of cAMP in Lymnaea cerebral ganglion homogenates and that this effect was blocked by the appropriate general and selective PACAP receptor antagonists.

  13. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ruth D T; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP ) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP , resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons.

  14. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Regulates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Exon IV Expression through the VPAC1 Receptor in the Amphibian Melanotrope Cell

    PubMed Central

    Kidane, Adhanet H.; Roubos, Eric W.; Jenks, Bruce G.

    2008-01-01

    In mammals, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors PAC1-R, VPAC1-R, and VPAC2-R play a role in various physiological processes, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene expression. We have previously found that PACAP stimulates POMC gene expression, POMC biosynthesis, and α-MSH secretion in the melanotrope cell of the amphibian Xenopus laevis. This cell hormonally controls the process of skin color adaptation to background illumination. Here, we have tested the hypothesis that PACAP is involved in the regulation of Xenopus melanotrope cell activity during background adaptation and that part of this regulation is through the control of the expression of autocrine acting BDNF. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have identified the Xenopus PACAP receptor, VPAC1-R, and show that this receptor in the melanotrope cell is under strong control of the background light condition, whereas expression of PAC1-R was absent from these cells. Moreover, we reveal by quantitative immunocytochemistry that the neural pituitary lobe of white-background adapted frogs possesses a much higher PACAP content than the neural lobe of black-background adapted frogs, providing evidence that PACAP produced in the hypothalamic magnocellular nucleus plays an important role in regulating the activity of Xenopus melanotrope cells during background adaptation. Finally, an in vitro study demonstrates that PACAP stimulates the expression of BDNF transcript IV. PMID:18450956

  15. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels and activities of adenylate cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate phosphodiesterase in Pseudomonas and Bacteroides.

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, L S; Hylemon, P B; Phibbs, P V

    1977-01-01

    A modified Gilman assay was used to determine the concentrations of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in rapidly filtered cells and in the culture filtrates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli K-12, and Bacteroides fragilis. In P. aeruginosa cultures, levels of cAMP in the filtrate increased with the culture absorbance (3.5 to 19.8 X 10(-9) M) but did not vary significantly with the carbon source used to support growth. Intracellular concentrations (0.8 to 3.2 X 10(-5) M) were substantially higher and did not vary appreciably during growth or with carbon source. Sodium cAMP (5 mM) failed to reverse the catabolite repression of inducible glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) synthesis caused by the addition of 10 mM succinate. Exogenous cAMP also had no discernible effect on the catabolite repression control of inducible mannitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.67). P. aeruginosa was found to contain both soluble cAMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17) and membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity, and these were compared to the activities detected in crude extracts of E. coli. B. fragilis crude cell extracts contain neither of these enzyme activities, and little or no cAMP was detected in cells or culture filtrates of this anaerobic bacterium. PMID:187575

  16. Molecular cloning and mRNA distribution of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide in the lungfish.

    PubMed

    Lee, L T O; Tam, J K V; Chan, D W; Chow, B K C

    2009-04-01

    In this article, we report the isolation of a full-length cDNA clone encoding pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PACAP-related peptide (PRP) from lungfish Protopterus dolloi. When comparing the deduced amino acid sequences, the lungfish PACAP was found to be highly conserved with other vertebrates; however, the PRP shares only lower levels of sequence identity with known PRP sequences. Consistently in phylogenetic analysis, the lungfish PRP, similar to sturgeon PRP, fails to cluster with other PRPs. In addition to the full-length clone, another cDNA encoding a short precursor that lacks the first 32 amino acids of the PRP was also isolated. Interestingly, similar isoforms were also identified in several nonmammalian vertebrates, and it was suggested that exon skipping of PRP/PACAP transcripts was a mechanism that regulated the expression ratio of PACAP to PRP in nonmammalian vertebrates. By real-time PCR, both long and short PRP/PACAP transcripts were found almost exclusively in the brain, and the short isoform is the more abundant transcript (3.7 times more), indicating that PACAP is the major product produced in lungfish brain. The expression patterns of lungfish and previously studied frog PRP/PACAP suggest that the PRP/PACAP gene in the tetrapod lineage may first express in the central nervous system; in the process of evolution, the functions of these peptides diversified and were later found in other tissues.

  17. Atomoxetine reverses locomotor hyperactivity, impaired novel object recognition, and prepulse inhibition impairment in mice lacking pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Y; Hayata-Takano, A; Hazama, K; Nakazawa, T; Shintani, N; Kasai, A; Nagayasu, K; Hashimoto, R; Tanida, M; Katayama, T; Matsuzaki, S; Yamada, K; Taniike, M; Onaka, Y; Ago, Y; Waschek, J A; Köves, K; Reglődi, D; Tamas, A; Matsuda, T; Baba, A; Hashimoto, H

    2015-06-25

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex neurobehavioral disorder that is characterized by attention difficulties, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. A non-stimulant drug, atomoxetine (ATX), which is a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, is widely used for ADHD because it exhibits fewer adverse effects compared to conventional psychostimulants. However, little is known about the therapeutic mechanisms of ATX. ATX treatment significantly alleviated hyperactivity of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-deficient (PACAP(-/-)) mice with C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEvTac hybrid background. ATX also improved impaired novel object recognition memory and prepulse inhibition in PACAP(-/-) mice with CD1 background. The ATX-induced increases in extracellular noradrenaline and dopamine levels were significantly higher in the prefrontal cortex of PACAP(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice with C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEvTac hybrid background. These results suggest that ATX treatment-induced increases in central monoamine metabolism may be involved in the rescue of ADHD-related abnormalities in PACAP(-/-) mice. Our current study suggests that PACAP(-/-) mice are an ideal rodent model with predictive validity for the study of ADHD etiology and drug development. Additionally, the potential effects of differences in genetic background of PACAP(-/-) mice on behaviors are discussed.

  18. Reduced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in mice deficient for pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide type-I-receptor.

    PubMed

    Zink, Mathias; Otto, Christiane; Zörner, Björn; Zacher, Christiane; Schütz, Günther; Henn, Fritz A; Gass, Peter

    2004-04-22

    In vitro pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) induces the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via its specific receptor PAC1. Since BDNF has been implicated in learning paradigms and mice lacking functional PAC1 have deficits in hippocampus-dependent associative learning, we investigated whether PAC1 mutants show alterations in hippocampal expression of BDNF and its receptor TrkB. Semi-quantitative in situ-hybridization using exon-specific BDNF-probes revealed significantly reduced expression of the exon-III and exon-V-specific transcripts within the hippocampal CA3 region in PAC1-deficient mice. A similar trend was observed for the exon-I-specific transcript. The expression of the exon-III-specific transcript was also reduced within the dentate gyrus, while Trk B-expression did not differ between genotypes. Our data demonstrate that even in vivo PAC1-mediated signaling seems to play a pivotal role for the transcriptional regulation of BDNF.

  19. Toxicity of Cry1A toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis to CF1 cells does not involve activation of adenylate cyclase/PKA signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Leivi; Muñóz-Garay, Carlos; Martínez de Castro, Diana L; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2017-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacteria produce Cry toxins that are able to kill insect pests. Different models explaining the mode of action of these toxins have been proposed. The pore formation model proposes that the toxin creates pores in the membrane of the larval midgut cells after interaction with different receptors such as cadherin, aminopeptidase N and alkaline phosphatase and that this pore formation activity is responsible for the toxicity of these proteins. The alternative model proposes that interaction with cadherin receptor triggers an intracellular cascade response involving protein G, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA). In addition, it was shown that Cry toxins induce a defense response in the larvae involving the activation of mitogen-activated kinases such as MAPK p38 in different insect orders. Here we analyzed the mechanism of action of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins and a collection of mutants from these toxins in the insect cell line CF1 from Choristoneura fumiferana, that is naturally sensitive to these toxins. Our results show that both toxins induced permeability of K(+) ions into the cells. The initial response after intoxication with Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins involves the activation of a defense response that involves the phosphorylation of MAPK p38. Analysis of activation of PKA and AC activities indicated that the signal transduction involving PKA, AC and cAMP was not activated during Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac intoxication. In contrast we show that Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac activate apoptosis. These data indicate that Cry toxins can induce an apoptotic death response not related with AC/PKA activation. Since Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac toxins affected K(+) ion permeability into the cells, and that mutant toxins affected in pore formation are not toxic to CF1, we propose that pore formation activity of the toxins is responsible of triggering cell death response in CF1cells.

  20. Stimulatory and inhibitory effects of forskolin on adenylate cyclase in rat normal hepatocytes and hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T; Hasegawa, T

    1989-02-01

    Forskolin synergistically potentiated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in rat normal hepatocytes freshly prepared by collagenase digestion and rat ascites hepatoma AH66 cells, but dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation by PGE1 in AH66F cells. Forskolin activated adenylate cyclase in a dose-dependent manner in homogenates of all cell lines. In normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, simultaneous addition of forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators [isoproterenol (IPN), PGE1, guanosine 5'-triphosphate sodium salt (GTP), 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate sodium salt (Gpp (NH)p), NaF, cholera toxin, islet activating protein and MnCl2] gave greater than additive responses. On the other hand, in AH66F cells, the effect of forskolin on adenylate cyclase was hardly influenced by GTP, but forskolin diminished the activities induced by high concentrations of GTP to that by the diterpene alone. Forskolin also significantly inhibited the PGE1-stimulated and the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein-stimulated activities. Because AH66F cells were insensitive to IPN, the combination with forskolin and IPN gave similar activity to that obtained with the diterpene alone. The effect of forskolin on the activation by manganese ion was neither synergistic nor inhibitory but was additive in AH66F cells. These results suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein and the catalytic unit in normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but in AH66F cells forskolin interferes with the coupling of the two components of adenylate cyclase.

  1. Leucine-rich repeats and carboxyl terminus are required for interaction of yeast adenylate cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, N; Choe, H R; Nishida, Y; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Ohnishi, S; Tamaoki, T; Kataoka, T

    1990-01-01

    A Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene encoding adenylate cyclase has been analyzed by deletion and insertion mutagenesis to localize regions required for activation by the Sa. cerevisiae RAS2 protein. The NH2-terminal 657 amino acids were found to be dispensable for the activation. However, almost all 2-amino acid insertions in the middle 600 residues comprising leucine-rich repeats and deletions in the COOH-terminal 66 residues completely abolished activation by the RAS2 protein, whereas insertion mutations in the other regions generally had no effect. Chimeric adenylate cyclases were constructed by swapping the upstream and downstream portions surrounding the catalytic domains between the Sa. cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylate cyclases and examined for activation by the RAS2 protein. We found that the fusion containing both the NH2-terminal 1600 residues and the COOH-terminal 66 residues of the Sa. cerevisiae cyclase rendered the catalytic domain of the Sc. pombe cyclase, which otherwise did not respond to RAS proteins, activatable by the RAS2 protein. Thus the leucine-rich repeats and the COOH terminus of the Sa. cerevisiae adenylate cyclase appear to be required for interaction with RAS proteins. Images PMID:2247439

  2. Influence of volatile anesthetics on muscarinic receptor adenylate cyclase coupling in brain and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Anthony, B.L.

    1988-01-01

    In the present study, the influence of four volatile anesthetics (enflurane, isoflurane, diethyl ether, and chloroform) on (1) muscarinic receptor binding parameters and (2) muscarnic regulation of adenylate cyclase activity was examined using membranes isolated from rat brain and heart. Membranes were equilibrated with each of the four anesthetics for 30 minutes and then during the binding assay. The data obtained can be summarized as follows: (1) volatile anesthetics increased receptor affinity for a radiolabeled antagonists, ({sup 3}H)N-methylscopolamine (({sup 3}H)MS), by decreasing its rate of dissociation in brain stem, but not in cardiac, membranes, (2) volatile anesthetics decreased high affinity ({sup 3}H)Oxotremorine-M binding, (3) volatile anesthetics depressed or eliminated the guanine nucleotide sensitivity of agonist binding. The influence of volatile anesthetics on muscarinic regulation of adenylate cyclase enzyme activity was studied using {alpha}({sup 32}P)ATP as the substrate.

  3. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) inhibits the slow afterhyperpolarizing current sIAHP in CA1 pyramidal neurons by activating multiple signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Ruth DT; Madsen, Marita Grønning; Krause, Michael; Sampedro-Castañeda, Marisol; Stocker, Martin; Pedarzani, Paola

    2014-01-01

    The slow afterhyperpolarizing current (sIAHP) is a calcium-dependent potassium current that underlies the late phase of spike frequency adaptation in hippocampal and neocortical neurons. sIAHP is a well-known target of modulation by several neurotransmitters acting via the cyclic AMP (cAMP) and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent pathway. The neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present in the hippocampal formation. In this study we have investigated the effect of PACAP on the sIAHP and the signal transduction pathway used to modulate intrinsic excitability of hippocampal pyramidal neurons. We show that PACAP inhibits the sIAHP, resulting in a decrease of spike frequency adaptation, in rat CA1 pyramidal cells. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP is mediated by PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Inhibition of PKA reduced the effect of PACAP on sIAHP, suggesting that PACAP exerts part of its inhibitory effect on sIAHP by increasing cAMP and activating PKA. The suppression of sIAHP by PACAP was also strongly hindered by the inhibition of p38 MAP kinase (p38 MAPK). Concomitant inhibition of PKA and p38 MAPK indicates that these two kinases act in a sequential manner in the same pathway leading to the suppression of sIAHP. Conversely, protein kinase C is not part of the signal transduction pathway used by PACAP to inhibit sIAHP in CA1 neurons. Our results show that PACAP enhances the excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons by inhibiting the sIAHP through the activation of multiple signaling pathways, most prominently cAMP/PKA and p38 MAPK. Our findings disclose a novel modulatory action of p38 MAPK on intrinsic excitability and the sIAHP, underscoring the role of this current as a neuromodulatory hub regulated by multiple protein kinases in cortical neurons. © 2013 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23996525

  4. A membrane-associated adenylate cyclase modulates lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase activities required for bull sperm capacitation induced by hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Silvina; Córdoba, Mariana

    2017-04-01

    Hyaluronic acid, as well as heparin, is a glycosaminoglycan present in the female genital tract of cattle. The aim of this study was to evaluate oxidative metabolism and intracellular signals mediated by a membrane-associated adenylate cyclase (mAC), in sperm capacitation with hyaluronic acid and heparin, in cryopreserved bull sperm. The mAC inhibitor, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine, was used in the present study. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine kinase (CK) activities and lactate concentration were determined spectrophotometrically in the incubation medium. Capacitation and acrosome reaction were evaluated by chlortetracycline technique, while plasma membrane and acrosome integrity were determined by trypan blue stain/differential interference contrast microscopy. Heparin capacitated samples had a significant decrease in LDH and CK activities, while in hyaluronic acid capacitated samples LDH and CK activities both increased compared to control samples, in heparin and hyaluronic acid capacitation conditions, respectively. A significant increase in lactate concentration in the incubation medium occurred in hyaluronic acid-treated sperm samples compared to heparin treatment, indicating this energetic metabolite is produced during capacitation. The LDH and CK enzyme activities and lactate concentrations in the incubation medium were decreased with 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine treatment in hyaluronic acid samples. The mAC inhibitor significantly inhibited heparin-induced capacitation of sperm cells, but did not completely inhibit hyaluronic acid capacitation. Therefore, hyaluronic acid and heparin are physiological glycosaminoglycans capable of inducing in vitro capacitation in cryopreserved bull sperm, stimulating different enzymatic pathways and intracellular signals modulated by a mAC. Hyaluronic acid induces sperm capacitation involving LDH and CK activities, thereby reducing oxidative metabolism, and this process is mediated by mAC.

  5. Persistent stimulation of adenylate cyclase and urea transport by an AVP photolabel

    SciTech Connect

    Eggena, P.; Ma, C.L.; Fahrenholz, F.; Schwartz, I.L.

    1985-07-01

    The effects of a photoaffinity label for arginine vasopressin receptors, (Phe2, Phe(p-N3)3)AVP (N3-AVP), on urea permeability and adenylate cyclase activity have been investigated in the toad urinary bladder. This compound, when activated by ultraviolet light, induced a maximal and persistent increase in the urea permeability of the intact bladder and a persistent increase in the adenylate cyclase activity of toad bladder epithelial cell homogenates. Covalent attachment of the analogue to target tissue during photolysis was equivalent at 4 and 20 degrees C. Bladders exposed to N3-AVP in the presence of AVP during photolysis were substantially less permeable to urea than controls that had been exposed to N3-AVP alone. These findings constitute further evidence in support of the previous suggestion that N3-AVP binds covalently to AVP receptors and, in addition, demonstrates that N3-AVP evokes a persistent increase in adenylate cyclase activity which, in turn, triggers a persistent increase in bladder permeability to urea.

  6. Muscarinic receptor binding and muscarinic receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase in rat brain myelin

    SciTech Connect

    Larocca, J.N.; Ledeen, R.W.; Dvorkin, B.; Makman, M.H.

    1987-12-01

    High-affinity muscarinic cholinergic receptors were detected in myelin purified from rat brain stem with use of the radioligands /sup 3/H-N-methylscopolamine (/sup 3/H-NMS), /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate (/sup 3/H-QNB), and /sup 3/H-pirenzepine. /sup 3/H-NMS binding was also present in myelin isolated from corpus callosum. In contrast, several other receptor types, including alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors, present in the starting brain stem, were not detected in myelin. Based on Bmax values from Scatchard analyses, /sup 3/H-pirenzepine, a putative M1 selective ligand, bound to about 25% of the sites in myelin labeled by /sup 3/H-NMS, a nonselective ligand that binds to both M1 and M2 receptor subtypes. Agonist affinity for /sup 3/H-NMS binding sites in myelin was markedly decreased by Gpp(NH)p, indicating that a major portion of these receptors may be linked to a second messenger system via a guanine-nucleotide regulatory protein. Purified myelin also contained adenylate cyclase activity; this activity was stimulated several fold by forskolin and to small but significant extents by prostaglandin E1 and the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Myelin adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited by carbachol and other muscarinic agonists; this inhibition was blocked by the antagonist atropine. Levels in myelin of muscarinic receptors were 20-25% and those of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase 10% of the values for total particulate fraction of whole brain stem. These levels in myelin are appreciably greater than would be predicted on the basis of contamination. Also, additional receptors and adenylate cyclase, added by mixing nonmyelin tissue with whole brain stem, were quantitatively removed during the purification procedure.

  7. The invasive adenylate cyclase of Bordetella pertussis. Intracellular localization and kinetics of penetration into various cells.

    PubMed Central

    Farfel, Z; Friedman, E; Hanski, E

    1987-01-01

    The penetration of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase into various mammalian cells exhibits similar kinetics; the accumulation of both intracellular cyclase activity and cyclic AMP is rapid, reaching constant levels after 15-60 min of incubation. The kinetics of enzyme penetration into turkey erythrocytes is different; cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulate linearly and do not reach constant levels even after 6 h of incubation. In the preceding paper [Friedman, Farfel & Hanski (1987) Biochem. J. 243, 145-151] we have suggested that the constant level of intracellular cyclase activity reflects a steady state formed by continuous penetration and intracellular inactivation of the enzyme. In contrast with other mammalian cells, no inactivation of cyclase is observed in turkey erythrocytes. These results further support the notion that there is continuous penetration and deactivation of the invasive enzyme in mammalian cells. A 5-6-fold increase in specific activity of the invasive cyclase is detected in a pellet fraction of human lymphocytes in which a similar increase in specific activity of the plasma-membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase is observed. A similar increase in the invasive-cyclase specific activity is detected in a membrane fraction of human erythrocytes. Cyclase activity in a membrane-enriched fraction of human lymphocytes reached a constant level after 20 min of cell exposure to the enzyme. Similar time courses were observed for accumulation of cyclase activity and cyclic AMP in whole lymphocytes [Friedman, Farfel & Hanski (1987) Biochem, J. 243, 145-151]. We suggest therefore that cyclic AMP generation by the invasive enzyme as well as the intracellular inactivation process occur while it is associated with a membrane fraction identical, or closely associated, with the plasma membrane. PMID:2886120

  8. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has a neuroprotective function in dopamine-based neurodegeneration in rat and snail parkinsonian models

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, Tibor; Jungling, Adel

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) rescues dopaminergic neurons from neurodegeneration and improves motor changes induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA) in rat parkinsonian models. Recently, we investigated the molecular background of the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in dopamine (DA)-based neurodegeneration using rotenone-induced snail and 6-OHDA-induced rat models of Parkinson's disease. Behavioural activity, monoamine (DA and serotonin), metabolic enzyme (S-COMT, MB-COMT and MAO-B) and PARK7 protein concentrations were measured before and after PACAP treatment in both models. Locomotion and feeding activity were decreased in rotenone-treated snails, which corresponded well to findings obtained in 6-OHDA-induced rat experiments. PACAP was able to prevent the behavioural malfunctions caused by the toxins. Monoamine levels decreased in both models and the decreased DA level induced by toxins was attenuated by ∼50% in the PACAP-treated animals. In contrast, PACAP had no effect on the decreased serotonin (5HT) levels. S-COMT metabolic enzyme was also reduced but a protective effect of PACAP was not observed in either of the models. Following toxin treatment, a significant increase in MB-COMT was observed in both models and was restored to normal levels by PACAP. A decrease in PARK7 was also observed in both toxin-induced models; however, PACAP had a beneficial effect only on 6-OHDA-treated animals. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different animal models of Parkinson's disease is thus well correlated with neurotransmitter, enzyme and protein levels. The models successfully mimic several, but not all etiological properties of the disease, allowing us to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as testing new drugs. The rotenone and 6-OHDA rat and snail in vivo parkinsonian models offer an alternative method for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective agents, including PACAP. PMID:28067625

  9. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has a neuroprotective function in dopamine-based neurodegeneration in rat and snail parkinsonian models.

    PubMed

    Maasz, Gabor; Zrinyi, Zita; Reglodi, Dora; Petrovics, Dora; Rivnyak, Adam; Kiss, Tibor; Jungling, Adel; Tamas, Andrea; Pirger, Zsolt

    2017-02-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) rescues dopaminergic neurons from neurodegeneration and improves motor changes induced by 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA) in rat parkinsonian models. Recently, we investigated the molecular background of the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in dopamine (DA)-based neurodegeneration using rotenone-induced snail and 6-OHDA-induced rat models of Parkinson's disease. Behavioural activity, monoamine (DA and serotonin), metabolic enzyme (S-COMT, MB-COMT and MAO-B) and PARK7 protein concentrations were measured before and after PACAP treatment in both models. Locomotion and feeding activity were decreased in rotenone-treated snails, which corresponded well to findings obtained in 6-OHDA-induced rat experiments. PACAP was able to prevent the behavioural malfunctions caused by the toxins. Monoamine levels decreased in both models and the decreased DA level induced by toxins was attenuated by ∼50% in the PACAP-treated animals. In contrast, PACAP had no effect on the decreased serotonin (5HT) levels. S-COMT metabolic enzyme was also reduced but a protective effect of PACAP was not observed in either of the models. Following toxin treatment, a significant increase in MB-COMT was observed in both models and was restored to normal levels by PACAP. A decrease in PARK7 was also observed in both toxin-induced models; however, PACAP had a beneficial effect only on 6-OHDA-treated animals. The neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different animal models of Parkinson's disease is thus well correlated with neurotransmitter, enzyme and protein levels. The models successfully mimic several, but not all etiological properties of the disease, allowing us to study the mechanisms of neurodegeneration as well as testing new drugs. The rotenone and 6-OHDA rat and snail in vivo parkinsonian models offer an alternative method for investigation of the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotective agents, including PACAP.

  10. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems.

    PubMed

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexia produced by PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a limbic structure implicated in the emotional components of ingestive behavior. Male rats were microinfused with PACAP (0-1 μg per rat) into the CeA and home-cage food intake, body weight change, microstructural analysis of food intake, and locomotor activity were assessed. Intra-CeA (but not intra-basolateral amygdala) PACAP dose-dependently induced anorexia and body weight loss without affecting locomotor activity. PACAP-treated rats ate smaller meals of normal duration, revealing that PACAP slowed feeding within meals by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet; postprandial satiety was unaffected. Intra-CeA PACAP-induced anorexia was blocked by coinfusion of either the melanocortin receptor 3/4 antagonist SHU 9119 or the tyrosine kinase B (TrKB) inhibitor k-252a, but not the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results indicate that the CeA is one of the brain areas through which the PACAP system promotes anorexia and that PACAP preferentially lessens the maintenance of feeding in rats, effects opposite to those of palatable food. We also demonstrate that PACAP in the CeA exerts its anorectic effects via local melanocortin and the TrKB systems, and independently from CRF.

  11. Role of protein kinase C on the acute desensitization of renal cortical adenylate cyclase to parathyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Bellorin-Font, E; López, C; Díaz, K; Pernalete, N; López, M; Starosta, R

    1995-01-01

    The mechanisms of adenylate cyclase desensitization to parathyroid hormone are still unclear. Current evidence suggest that the signal generated after PTH binding to receptors results in activation of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase C with subsequent activation of protein kinase C. Recent studies have suggested a role of protein kinase C on the regulation of the PTH-dependent receptor-adenylate cyclase system in cultured cells. Therefore, the present studies were conducted to examine the role of protein kinase C on the desensitization of canine renal cortical adenylate cyclase after an acute exposure in vivo to PTH. A group of normal dogs were treated with a single intravenous injection of 1 microgram/k of syn bPTH (1-34) or Nle bPTH (3-34). Ten minutes later, animals were subjected to bilateral nephrectomy and the kidney cortex processed for preparations of basolateral membranes for determinations of adenylate cyclase activity, as well as membrane and cytosolic fractions for analysis of protein kinase C activity. Animals not treated with PTH were used as controls. PTH administration in vivo resulted in a 46.9 +/- 9.3% decrease in maximal adenylate cyclase activity in vitro in response to syn bPTH (1-34) (P < 0.001). Likewise, PTH binding as measured with 125I-Nle8,18,Tyr34-bPTH (1-34)NH2 showed a 40 +/- 3% decrease. This alterations were associated with a marked translocation of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the membrane. Thus, protein kinase C activity in membrane fractions increased from 160.6 +/- 44.8 pmol Pi/min in controls to 500.4 +/- 123 in PTH treated dogs (P < 0.03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Pharmacological, molecular and functional characterization of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide receptors in the rat pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Simonneaux, V; Kienlen-Campard, P; Loeffler, J P; Basille, M; Gonzalez, B J; Vaudry, H; Robberecht, P; Pévet, P

    1998-08-01

    Melatonin secretion from the mammalian pineal gland is strongly stimulated by noradrenaline and also by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). Three types of receptors for VIP and PACAP have been characterized so far: VIP1/PACAP receptors and VIP2/PACAP receptors, which possess similar high affinities for VIP and PACAP, and PACAP1 receptors which exhibit a 100-1000-fold higher affinity for PACAP. The aim of the present study was to characterize the receptor subtype(s) mediating the stimulatory effects of VIP and PACAP on melatonin synthesis in the rat pineal gland. Autoradiographic studies showed that PACAP and VIP were equally potent in displacing binding of radioiodinated PACAP27 from pineal sections. Amplification of pineal complementary DNAs by polymerase chain reaction using specific primers for the different receptor subtypes revealed that all three receptor messenger RNAs are expressed and that VIP1/PACAP receptor messenger RNA was predominant over VIP2/PACAP receptor messenger RNA. In vitro, VIP and PACAP stimulated melatonin synthesis with similar high potency and the effect of the two peptides were not additive. The selective VIP1/PACAP receptor agonists [R16]chicken secretin (1-25) and [K15, R16, L27]VIP(1-7)/growth hormone releasing factor(8-27) were significantly more potent than the selective VIP2/PACAP receptor agonist RO 25-1553 in stimulating melatonin secretion. The stimulatory effects of VIP and PACAP were similarly inhibited by the VIP1/PACAP antagonist [acetyl-His1, D-Phe2, K15, R16, L27]VIP(3-7)/growth hormone releasing factor(8-27). These data strongly suggest that VIP and PACAP exert a stimulatory effect on melatonin synthesis mainly through activation of a pineal VIP1/PACAP receptor subtype.

  13. Chronic ghrelin treatment reduced photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors in nitroglycerin- induced migraine: role of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Farajdokht, Fereshteh; Babri, Shirin; Karimi, Pouran; Alipour, Mohammad Reza; Bughchechi, Ramin; Mohaddes, Gisou

    2017-03-01

    Chronic migraine is a debilitating disorder that has a significant impact on patients and society. Nearly all migraineurs frequently reported light sensitivity during a headache attack. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) plays an important role in the activation of trigeminal system and migraine pain. To identify the effect of chronic ghrelin treatment on endogenous PACAP and associated symptoms of migraine, an experimental chronic migraine model was induced by intermittent intraperitoneal (i.p) injection of nitroglycerin (NTG). Photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors were determined in the modified elevated plus maze on days 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 and in the light/dark box on days 3, 5, 7, 9, and 11. Blood levels of PACAP and cortisol were assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) kits. Chronic injection of NTG evoked photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors and treatment with ghrelin (150 μg/kg) for 11 days effectively attenuated photophobia and anxiety-like behaviors in the both paradigms. We further found that NTG increased the blood levels of PACAP and cortisol, which was significantly reduced by ghrelin treatment. Additionally, staining with Hematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) revealed that ghrelin reduced NTG-induced increase in the number of satellite glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion. Furthermore, for the first time we showed that repeated administrations of NTG increased white blood cell (WBC) counts and mean platelet volume (MPV), and decreased platelet counts. These results indicated that ghrelin decreased migraine associated symptoms possibly through attenuating endogenous PACAP and cortisol levels. Therefore, ghrelin may hold therapeutic potentialities in managing the chronic migraine.

  14. Adenylate cyclase and the search for new compounds with the clinical profile of lithium.

    PubMed

    Belmaker, R H

    1984-01-01

    It is possible to evaluate the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex in the human periphery by measuring the plasma cyclic AMP rise after adrenergic agonists. A clinical trial of the beta 2 adrenergic agonist salbutamol in depression provided an opportunity to test whether adrenergic receptor subsensitivity does occur during clinical antidepressant treatment. After 1 and 3 weeks of oral salbutamol treatment, depression scores declined significantly in 11 depressed patients, while the plasma cyclic AMP response to i.v. salbutamol declined over 60%. The results support the concept that receptor sensitivity changes occur during human antidepressant therapy. Data are presented that Li, too, markedly reduces activity of beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase in humans. The effect was evaluated by studying the effect of Li at therapeutic serum concentrations on the plasma cyclic AMP response to subcutaneous epinephrine. The Li effect is specific, since the plasma cyclic AMP response to glucagon is not inhibited. In rat cortical slices Li inhibition of noradrenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation is clearly demonstrable only at concentrations close to 2 mM Li. However, fresh human brain slices from edges of surgically-removed tumors show Li inhibition at 1 mM Li concentrations. These results imply that in brain as well as periphery, human noradrenergic adenylate cyclase is inhibited by therapeutic concentrations of Li. Demeclocyclin, a tetracycline-derived antibiotic, was found to inhibit noradrenaline-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat cortical slices and to inhibit amphetamine-induced hyperactivity in rats in an open field. Clinical trials should search for new compounds with the clinical profile of Li.

  15. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide, A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Diabetic Retinopathy in Rats: Focus on the Vertical Information Processing Pathway.

    PubMed

    Szabadfi, K; Reglodi, D; Szabo, A; Szalontai, B; Valasek, A; Setalo, Gy; Kiss, P; Tamas, A; Wilhelm, M; Gabriel, R

    2016-04-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neurotrophic and neuroprotective peptide that has been shown to exert protective effects in different neuronal injuries, such as retinal degenerations. Diabetic retinopathy (DR), the most common complication of diabetes, affects the microvasculature and neuronal architecture of the retina. We have proven earlier that PACAP is also protective in a rat model of DR. In this study, streptozotocin-induced DR was treated with intravitreal PACAP administration in order to further analyze the synaptic structure and proteins of PACAP-treated diabetic retinas, primarily in the vertical information processing pathway. Streptozotocin-treated Wistar rats received intravitreal PACAP injection three times into the right eye 2 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Morphological and molecular biological (qRT-PCR; Western blot) methods were used to analyze retinal synapses (ribbons, conventional) and related structures. Electron microscopic analysis revealed that retinal pigment epithelium, the ribbon synapses and other synaptic profiles suffered alterations in diabetes. However, in PACAP-treated diabetic retinas more bipolar ribbon synapses were found intact in the inner plexiform layer than in DR animals. The ribbon synapse was marked with C-terminal binding protein 2/Bassoon and formed horseshoe-shape ribbons, which were more retained in PACAP-treated diabetic retinas than in DR rats. These results are supported by molecular biological data. The selective degeneration of related structures such as bipolar and ganglion cells could be ameliorated by PACAP treatment. In summary, intravitreal administration of PACAP may have therapeutic potential in streptozotocin-induced DR through maintaining synapse integrity in the vertical pathway.

  16. Part I: Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 induced migraine-like attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Vollesen, Anne Luise Haulund; Hansen, Rikke Dyhr; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Amin, Faisal Mohammed; Christensen, Anne Francke; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-02-01

    Background Intravenous infusion of adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP38) provokes migraine-like attacks in 65-70% of migraine sufferers. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives contributes to this discrepancy in PACAP38-induced response is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and that migraine without aura patients with a high family load ( ≥ 2 first-degree relatives with migraine) would report more migraine-like attacks after intravenous infusion of human PACAP38. Methods In this study, we allocated 32 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 10 pmol/kg/min PACAP38 and recorded migraine-like attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial aggregation was obtained by telephone interview of first-degree relatives using a validated semi-structured questionnaire. Results PACAP38 infusion induced a migraine-like attack in 75% (nine out of 12) of patients with high family load compared to 70% (14 out of 20) with low family load ( P = 0.761). In an explorative investigation, we found that the migraine response after PACAP38 was not associated with the risk allele of rs2274316 ( MEF2D), which confers increased risk of migraine without aura and may regulate PACAP38 expression. Conclusion Migraine response to PACAP38 infusion in migraine without aura patients is not associated with high family load or the risk allele of rs2274316 ( MEF2D).

  17. Ventilatory and cardiovascular actions of centrally and peripherally administered trout pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the unanaesthetized trout.

    PubMed

    Le Mével, J-C; Lancien, F; Mimassi, N; Conlon, J M

    2009-12-01

    In mammals, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are involved in cardiovascular and respiratory regulation. Several studies have demonstrated the presence of PACAP, VIP and their receptors in various tissues of teleost fish, including the brain, but little is known about their respiratory and cardiovascular effects. The present study was undertaken to compare the central and peripheral actions of graded doses (25-100 pmol) of trout PACAP and trout VIP on ventilatory and cardiovascular variables in the unanaesthetized rainbow trout. Compared with vehicle, only intracerebroventricular injection of PACAP significantly (P<0.05) elevated the ventilation frequency and the ventilation amplitude, but both peptides significantly increased the total ventilation (total ventilation). However, the maximum hyperventilatory effect of PACAP was approximately 2.5-fold higher than the effect of VIP at the 100 pmol dose (PACAP, (total ventilation)=+5407+/-921 arbitrary units, a.u.; VIP, (total ventilation)=+2056+/-874 a.u.; means +/- s.e.m.). When injected centrally, only PACAP produced a significant increase in mean dorsal aortic blood pressure (P(DA)) (100 pmol: +21%) but neither peptide affected heart rate (f(H)). Intra-arterial injections of either PACAP or VIP were without effect on the ventilatory variables. PACAP was without significant action on P(DA) and f(H) while VIP significantly elevated P(DA) (100 pmol: +36%) without changing f(H). In conclusion, the selective central hyperventilatory actions of exogenously administered trout PACAP, and to a lesser extent VIP, suggest that the endogenous peptides may be implicated in important neuroregulatory functions related to the central control of ventilation in trout.

  18. Parabrachial nucleus (PBn) pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) signaling in the amygdala: implication for the sensory and behavioral effects of pain

    PubMed Central

    Missig, Galen A.; Roman, Carolyn W.; Vizzard, Margaret A.; Braas, Karen M.; May, Victor

    2015-01-01

    The intricate relationships that associate pain, stress responses and emotional behavior have been well established. Acute stressful situations can decrease nociceptive sensations and conversely, chronic pain can enhance other pain experiences and heighten the emotional and behavioral consequences of stress. Accordingly, chronic pain is comorbid with a number of behavioral disorders including depression, anxiety abnormalities and associated stress-related disorders including post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) represents a convergence of pathways for pain, stress and emotion, and we have identified pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) immunoreactivity in fiber elements in the lateral capsular division of the CeA (CeLC). The PACAP staining patterns colocalized in part with those for calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP); anterograde fiber tracing and excitotoxic lesion studies demonstrated that the CeLC PACAP/CGRP immunoreactivities represented sensory fiber projections from the lateral parabrachial nucleus (LPBn) along the spino-parabrachioamygdaloid tract. The same PBn PACAP/CGRP fiber system also projected to the BNST. As in the BNST, CeA PACAP signaling increased anxiety-like behaviors accompanied by weight loss and decreased feeding. But in addition to heightened anxiety-like responses, CeA PACAP signaling also altered nociception as reflected by decreased latency and threshold responses in thermal and mechanical sensitivity tests, respectively. From PACAP expression in major pain pathways, the current observations are novel and suggest that CeA PACAP nociceptive signaling and resulting neuroplasticity via the spino-parabrachioamygdaloid tract may represent mechanisms that associate chronic pain with sensory hypersensitivity, fear memory consolidation and severe behavioral disorders. PMID:24998751

  19. Bi-directional effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) on fear-related behavior and c-Fos expression after fear conditioning in rats

    PubMed Central

    Meloni, Edward G.; Venkataraman, Archana; Donahue, Rachel J.; Carlezon, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is implicated in stress regulation and learning and memory. PACAP has neuromodulatory actions on brain structures within the limbic system that could contribute to its acute and persistent effects in animal models of stress and anxiety-like behavior. Here, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular (ICV) cannula for infusion of PACAP-38 (0.5, 1, or 1.5 ug) or vehicle followed 30 min later by fear conditioning. Freezing was measured early (1, 4, and 7days) or following a delay (7, 10, and 13 days)after conditioning. PACAP (1.5 μg) produced a bi-phasic response in freezing behavior across test days: relative to controls, PACAP-treated rats showed a reduction in freezing when tested 1 or 7 Days after fear conditioning that evolved into a significant elevation in freezing by the third test session in the early, but not delayed, group. Corticosterone (CORT) levels were significantly elevated in PACAP-treated rats following fear conditioning, but not at the time of testing (Day 1). Brain c-Fos expression revealed PACAP-dependent alterations within, as well as outside of, areas typically implicated in fear conditioning. Our findings raise the possibility that PACAP disrupts fear memory consolidation by altering synaptic plasticity within neurocircuits normally responsible for encoding fear-related cues, producing a type of dissociation or peritraumatic amnesia often seen in people early after exposure to a traumatic event. However, fear memories are retained such that repeated testing and memory reactivation (e.g. re-experiencing) causes the freezing response to emerge and persist at elevated levels. PACAP systems may represent an axis on which stress and exposure to trauma converge to promote maladaptive behavioral responses characteristic of psychiatric illnesses such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PMID:26590791

  20. Presence of hormonally-sensitive adenylate cyclase receptors in capillary-enriched fractions from rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Baca, G M; Palmer, G C

    1978-01-01

    The 10 000 g particulate fraction from capillary-enriched fractions isolated from rat cerebral cortex was shown to possess an adenylate cyclase highly sensitive to activation by sodium fluoride, norepinephrine, epinephrine, isoproterenol and dopamine. To a lesser extent histamine and three dopamine agonists, namely M-7 (5,6-dihydroxy-2-dimethylamino tetralin), ET-495 (methane sulfonate of pyribedil), and S-584 (metabolite of pyribedil) stimulated the enzyme preparation. The action of norepinephrine was blocked by propanolol while phenotolamine and haloperidol were relatively ineffective except at highest concentrations. Phentolamine and propanolol at only highest concentrations (10(-4) M) antagonized the action of dopamine. Haloperidol was seen to be a potent inhibitor of either dopamine- or dopamine agonist-sensitive adenylate cyclase. No effects on the enzyme were observed with methoxamine, octopamine or serotonin. These preliminary data suggest the presence of a mixed population of receptors for adenylate cyclase in rat brain capillaries.

  1. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  2. Racemic Salsolinol and its Enantiomers Act as Agonists of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Activating the Gi Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Pathway.

    PubMed

    Berríos-Cárcamo, Pablo; Quintanilla, María E; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Rivera-Meza, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that the ethanol-derived metabolite salsolinol (SAL) can activate the mesolimbic system, suggesting that SAL is the active molecule mediating the rewarding effects of ethanol. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that SAL exerts its action on neuron excitability through a mechanism involving opioid neurotransmission. However, there is no direct pharmacologic evidence showing that SAL activates opioid receptors. Methods: The ability of racemic (R/S)-SAL, and its stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL, to activate the μ-opioid receptor was tested in cell-based (light-emitting) receptor assays. To further characterizing the interaction of SAL stereoisomers with the μ-opioid receptor, a molecular docking study was performed using the crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor. Results: This study shows that SAL activates the μ-opioid receptor by the classical G protein-adenylate cyclase pathway with an half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 2 × 10(-5) M. The agonist action of SAL was fully blocked by the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone. The EC50 for the purified stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL were 6 × 10(-4) M and 9 × 10(-6) M respectively. It was found that the action of racemic SAL on the μ-opioid receptor did not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin. Molecular docking studies showed that the interaction of (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor is similar to that predicted for the agonist morphine. Conclusions: It is shown that (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL are agonists of the μ-opioid receptor. (S)-SAL is a more potent agonist than the (R)-SAL stereoisomer. In silico analysis predicts a morphine-like interaction between (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor. These results suggest that an opioid action of SAL or its enantiomers is involved in the rewarding effects of ethanol.

  3. Racemic Salsolinol and its Enantiomers Act as Agonists of the μ-Opioid Receptor by Activating the Gi Protein-Adenylate Cyclase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Berríos-Cárcamo, Pablo; Quintanilla, María E.; Herrera-Marschitz, Mario; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Zapata-Torres, Gerald; Rivera-Meza, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several studies have shown that the ethanol-derived metabolite salsolinol (SAL) can activate the mesolimbic system, suggesting that SAL is the active molecule mediating the rewarding effects of ethanol. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that SAL exerts its action on neuron excitability through a mechanism involving opioid neurotransmission. However, there is no direct pharmacologic evidence showing that SAL activates opioid receptors. Methods: The ability of racemic (R/S)-SAL, and its stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL, to activate the μ-opioid receptor was tested in cell-based (light-emitting) receptor assays. To further characterizing the interaction of SAL stereoisomers with the μ-opioid receptor, a molecular docking study was performed using the crystal structure of the μ-opioid receptor. Results: This study shows that SAL activates the μ-opioid receptor by the classical G protein-adenylate cyclase pathway with an half-maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 2 × 10−5 M. The agonist action of SAL was fully blocked by the μ-opioid antagonist naltrexone. The EC50 for the purified stereoisomers (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL were 6 × 10−4 M and 9 × 10−6 M respectively. It was found that the action of racemic SAL on the μ-opioid receptor did not promote the recruitment of β-arrestin. Molecular docking studies showed that the interaction of (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor is similar to that predicted for the agonist morphine. Conclusions: It is shown that (R)-SAL and (S)-SAL are agonists of the μ-opioid receptor. (S)-SAL is a more potent agonist than the (R)-SAL stereoisomer. In silico analysis predicts a morphine-like interaction between (R)- and (S)-SAL with the μ-opioid receptor. These results suggest that an opioid action of SAL or its enantiomers is involved in the rewarding effects of ethanol. PMID:28167903

  4. Increased sensitivity in the interaction of the dopaminergic/adenosinergic system at the level of the adenylate cyclase activity in the striatum of the "weaver" mouse.

    PubMed

    K, Botsakis; V, Tondikidou; N, Panagopoulos; M, Margariti; N, Matsokis; F, Angelatou

    2016-10-01

    The specific antagonistic interaction between dopamine D1 and adenosine A1 receptors (D1/A1), as well as between dopamine D2 and adenosine A2a receptors (D2/A2a) exist not only at the receptor/receptor level, but also at the level of the secondary messengers. In this study, we examined the possible changes in these interactions at the level of cAMP formation in membrane preparation from "weaver" mouse striatum (a genetic model of Parkinson disease), by using specific agonists of these receptors. We also examined in the striatum of the "weaver" mouse the interaction between D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. Our results showed that in the striatum of "weaver" mice: a) the cAMP synthesis induced by D1 receptor activation (SKF 38393), was significantly reduced compared to control mice, while A1 receptor activation (L-PIA) leaded to a more intense inhibition of the D1-induced cAMP-formation compared to the controls, b) the cAMP synthesis which was induced by A2a receptor activation (CGS 21680), was significantly increased compared to the control mice. The specific D2 receptor agonist Quinpirole, added in low concentrations, caused a significant reduction of the A2a-induced cAMP formation, which was not observed in the control mouse. Furthermore, the D1 receptor induced cAMP synthesis was significantly higher in control compared to "weaver" striatum, which was more efficiently downregulated by D2 receptor agonist Quinpirole. These results suggest that the sensitivity to D1 and A2a receptor agonists is altered and that the interaction between D1/A1 and D2/A2a receptors is enhanced in the striatum of the "weaver" mutation, while an uncoupling between D1 and D2 receptors was observed. Since the adenylate cyclase basal activity did not differ between "weaver" and control striatum, the above-mentioned changes seem to be due to alterations in the function of the adenosine/dopamine receptors and their coupling to the G-proteins.

  5. Multiple nickel-sensitive targets elicit cardiac arrhythmia in isolated mouse hearts after pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-mediated chronotropy.

    PubMed

    Tevoufouet, Etienne E; Nembo, Erastus N; Distler, Fabian; Neumaier, Felix; Hescheler, Jürgen; Nguemo, Filomain; Schneider, Toni

    2017-03-01

    The pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-27 modulates various biological processes, from the cellular level to function specification. However, the cardiac actions of this neuropeptide are still under intense studies. Using control (+|+) and mice lacking (-|-) either R-type (Cav2.3) or T-type (Cav3.2) Ca(2+) channels, we investigated the effects of PACAP-27 on cardiac activity of spontaneously beating isolated perfused hearts. Superfusion of PACAP-27 (20nM) caused a significant increase of baseline heart frequency in Cav2.3(+|+) (156.9±10.8 to 239.4±23.4 bpm; p<0.01) and Cav2.3(-|-) (190.3±26.4 to 270.5±25.8 bpm; p<0.05) hearts. For Cav3.2, the heart rate was significantly increased in Cav3.2(-|-) (133.1±8.5 bpm to 204.6±27.9 bpm; p<0.05) compared to Cav3.2(+|+) hearts (185.7±11.2 bpm to 209.3±22.7 bpm). While the P wave duration and QTc interval were significantly increased in Cav2.3(+|+) and Cav2.3(-|-) hearts following PACAP-27 superfusion, there was no effect in Cav3.2(+|+) and Cav3.2(-|-) hearts. The positive chronotropic effects observed in the four study groups, as well as the effect on P wave duration and QTc interval were abolished in the presence of Ni(2+) (50μM) and PACAP-27 (20nM) in hearts from Cav2.3(+|+) and Cav2.3(-|-) mice. In addition to suppressing PACAP's response, Ni(2+) also induced conduction disturbances in investigated hearts. In conclusion, the most Ni(2+)-sensitive Ca(2+) channels (R- and T-type) may modulate the PACAP signaling cascade during cardiac excitation in isolated mouse hearts, albeit to a lesser extent than other Ni(2+)-sensitive targets.

  6. In vivo and in vitro models of demyelinating disease: activation of the adenylate cyclase system influences JHM virus expression in explanted rat oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Beushausen, S; Narindrasorasak, S; Sanwal, B D; Dales, S

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of JHM virus (JHMV) tropism for rat oligodendrocytes, as one of the primary host cells in the central nervous system, is maintained after explanation (S. Beushausen and S. Dales, Virology 141:89-101, 1985). The temporal correlation between onset of resistance to JHMV infection in vivo, completion of myelination, and maturation of the central nervous system can be simulated in vitro by inducers of oligodendrocyte differentiation (Beushausen and Dales, Virology, 1985). Stimulation of differentiation through the elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels suggests a possible connection between activation of the adenylate cyclase system and coronavirus expression. Chromatographic analysis of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity in cytosol extracts prepared from astrocytes or oligodendrocytes revealed that both glial cell types were deficient in protein kinase I, indicating that expression of coronavirus in differentiated cells was not contingent upon the presence of protein kinase I. However, treatment with N6,2'-O-dibutyryladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP) resulted in a severalfold enhancement of the free regulatory subunit (RI) in oligodendrocytes but not in astrocytes. The RII subunit in both neural cell types was relatively unaffected. Rapid increase in RI due to dbcAMP treatment was correlated with inhibition of JHMV expression. Other differentiation inducers, including 8-Br cAMP and forskolin which, by contrast, caused a decrease in detectable RI, also blocked JHMV expression. This apparent anomaly can be attributed to an increased turnover of RI due to destabilization of the molecule which occurs upon site-specific binding of the cyclic nucleotides. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that the state of oligodendrocyte differentiation manifested with the modulation of RI regulates JHMV expression. The differentiation process did not affect either virus adsorption or sequestration but appeared to inhibit the

  7. Heavy isotope labeling study of the turnover of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase in BC/sup 3/H1 cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Bouhelal, R.; Bockaert, J.; Mermet-Bouvier, R.; Guillon, G.; Homburger, V.

    1987-06-25

    We have used the method of heavy isotope labeling to study the metabolic turnover of adenylate cyclase in a nonfusing muscle cell line, the BC/sup 3/H1 cells. These cells contains an adenylate cyclase coupled to beta-adrenergic receptors and highly stimulated by forskolin, a potent activator of the enzyme. After transfer of the cells from normal medium to heavy medium (a medium containing heavy labeled amino acids, /sup 3/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N), heavy isotope-labeled adenylate cyclase molecules progressively replace pre-existing light molecules. In sucrose gradient differential sedimentation, after a 5-day switch in heavy medium, the enzyme exhibited a higher mass (s = 8.40 +/- 0.03 S, n = 13) compared to the control enzyme. Indeed, the increase in the sedimentation coefficient of the heavy molecules was due to the synthesis of new molecules of adenylate cyclase labeled with heavy isotope amino acids since in the presence of cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, no change in the sedimentation pattern of the forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase occurred. After incorporation of heavy isotope amino acids in the adenylate cyclase molecules, the kinetics parameters of the enzyme did not change. However, adenylate cyclase from cells incubated with heavy medium exhibits an activity about 2-fold lower than control. After switching the cells to the heavy medium, the decrease of the activity of the enzyme occurred during the first 24 h and thereafter remained at a steady state for at least 4 days. In contrast, 24 h after the switch, the sedimentation coefficient of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase was progressively shifted to a higher value.

  8. Age-related decline of autocrine pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide impairs angiogenic capacity of rat cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Banki, Eszter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Tamas, Andrea; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Reglodi, Dora; Sonntag, William E; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-06-01

    Aging impairs angiogenic capacity of cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs) promoting microvascular rarefaction, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. PACAP is an evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide secreted by endothelial cells and neurons, which confers important antiaging effects. To test the hypothesis that age-related changes in autocrine PACAP signaling contributes to dysregulation of endothelial angiogenic capacity, primary CMVECs were isolated from 3-month-old (young) and 24-month-old (aged) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats. In aged CMVECs, expression of PACAP was decreased, which was associated with impaired capacity to form capillary-like structures, impaired adhesiveness to collagen (assessed using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing [ECIS] technology), and increased apoptosis (caspase3 activity) when compared with young cells. Overexpression of PACAP in aged CMVECs resulted in increased formation of capillary-like structures, whereas it did not affect cell adhesion. Treatment with recombinant PACAP also significantly increased endothelial tube formation and inhibited apoptosis in aged CMVECs. In young CMVECs shRNA knockdown of autocrine PACAP expression significantly impaired tube formation capacity, mimicking the aging phenotype. Cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production (dihydroethidium and MitoSox fluorescence, respectively) were increased in aged CMVECs and were unaffected by PACAP. Collectively, PACAP exerts proangiogenic effects and age-related dysregulation of autocrine PACAP signaling may contribute to impaired angiogenic capacity of CMVECs in aging.

  9. Age-Related Decline of Autocrine Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide Impairs Angiogenic Capacity of Rat Cerebromicrovascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Banki, Eszter; Sosnowska, Danuta; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Gautam, Tripti; Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Tamas, Andrea; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Reglodi, Dora; Sonntag, William E.; Csiszar, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aging impairs angiogenic capacity of cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs) promoting microvascular rarefaction, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. PACAP is an evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide secreted by endothelial cells and neurons, which confers important antiaging effects. To test the hypothesis that age-related changes in autocrine PACAP signaling contributes to dysregulation of endothelial angiogenic capacity, primary CMVECs were isolated from 3-month-old (young) and 24-month-old (aged) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats. In aged CMVECs, expression of PACAP was decreased, which was associated with impaired capacity to form capillary-like structures, impaired adhesiveness to collagen (assessed using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing [ECIS] technology), and increased apoptosis (caspase3 activity) when compared with young cells. Overexpression of PACAP in aged CMVECs resulted in increased formation of capillary-like structures, whereas it did not affect cell adhesion. Treatment with recombinant PACAP also significantly increased endothelial tube formation and inhibited apoptosis in aged CMVECs. In young CMVECs shRNA knockdown of autocrine PACAP expression significantly impaired tube formation capacity, mimicking the aging phenotype. Cellular and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production (dihydroethidium and MitoSox fluorescence, respectively) were increased in aged CMVECs and were unaffected by PACAP. Collectively, PACAP exerts proangiogenic effects and age-related dysregulation of autocrine PACAP signaling may contribute to impaired angiogenic capacity of CMVECs in aging. PMID:25136000

  10. Cellular levels of feedback regulator of adenylate cyclase and the effect of epinephrine and insulin.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, R j; Russell, T R; Asakawa, T; Sutherland, E W

    1975-01-01

    We have obtained direct evidence that shows the cellular formation and subsequent release of a potent inhibitor (feedback regulator) of adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] by adipocytes, upon stimulation with epinephrine. The appearance of such a feedback regulator in adipocytes preceded its release into the medium. During a 30 min incubation, intracellular regulator levels rose rapidly and reached 39-61 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Release of inhibitor into the medium increased slowly and was 11-16 units/g of adipocyte at 10 min. Upon continued incubation, the cells at 30 min contained 30-41 units/g of ingibitor, slightly less than the content at 30 min; meanwhile, the medium content rose more than 3-fold. The inhibitor from both locations appeared to have the same characteristics, judging from the purification procedures and the biological activities on hormone-stimulated adenylate cyclase. Adenylate cyclase was inhibited by the feedback regulator in vitro when either epinephrine, corticotropin (ACTH), or glucagon was used as activator. The site of action of this inhibitor is therefore most likely beyond the specific hormone receptors. A new in vitro action of insulin has been found. Insulin, 50-500 microunits/ml, inhibited the formation and release of this factor from isolated rat or hamster adipocytes by 29-81% after these cells were stimulated by hormones that raise intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate. This factor enhaced the effect of insulin in lowering the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in fresh rat adipocytes. A reduced formation of such a factor may modify the metabolic events in adipocytes, and some as yet unexplained effects of insulin could therefore be linked to the metabolic effects of this factor. PMID:174073

  11. Adenylate cyclase regulation in the spermatogenic cell plasma membrane: Modulating effects of TPA and TCDD

    SciTech Connect

    Beebe, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    This research was designed to compare the effects of TPA, a phorbol ester, and TCDD in a spermatogenic cell population, a target of TCDD toxicity. Membrane-bound adenylate cyclase activity was used an index of membrane function, and was quantified by the amount of {sup 32}P-cAMP formed from {sup 32}P-ATP following chromatographic separation. Exposure to male germ cells in-vitro to TPA and TCDD followed by direct measurement of enzyme activity was used to investigate the potential of each agent to perturb membrane function. TPA and TCDD consistently inhibited adenylate cyclase activity at the levels of G{sub s}-catalytic unit coupling and hormone-receptor activation, as measured by the stimulation of enzyme activity by concomitant addition of forskolin and GTP and FSH and GTP, respectively. The effect on coupling required at least 60 minutes of exposure to TPA or TCDD. Concentration-response curves demonstrated a progressive desensitization with increasing TPA concentration, while TCDD exhibited consistent inhibition over the same concentration range.

  12. Increase in the amount of adenylate cyclase in rat gastrocnemius muscle after denervation

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Uchida, S.; Yoshida, H.

    1989-01-01

    After section of the sciatic nerve, the basal adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in rat gastrocnemius muscle increased 6-7 times per membrane protein and about 2 times per whole muscle in the following 30 or 40 days. The AC activity in the muscle 30 days after denervation was increased about 4 times by folskolin. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) also increased the adenylate cyclase activity in the denervated muscle. The binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin to cells isolated from gastrocnemius muscle was examined to determine the amount of AC molecules. Inhibition of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding by increasing amounts of unlabeled forskolin gave a sigmoid curve with a IC/sub 50/ value of 3/times/10/sup /minus/7/M. Results showed that the number of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding sites per cell was higher on the denervated side than on the control side, like the basal AC activity. The IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition by unlabeled forskolin of binding of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin were similar to muscles on the control and denervated sides. These results suggest that an increase in the AC activity induced by denervation was due to an increase in the numbers of AC molecules in the muscle.

  13. Adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) from Bordetella hinzii: characterization and differences from ACT of Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Donato, Gina M; Hsia, Hung-Lun J; Green, Candace S; Hewlett, Erik L

    2005-11-01

    Bordetella hinzii is a commensal respiratory microorganism in poultry but is increasingly being recognized as an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised humans. Although associated with a variety of disease states, practically nothing is known about the mechanisms employed by this bacterium. In this study, we show by DNA sequencing and reverse transcription-PCR that both commensal and clinical strains of B. hinzii possess and transcriptionally express cyaA, the gene encoding adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) in other pathogenic Bordetella species. By Western blotting, we also found that B. hinzii produces full-length ACT protein in quantities that are comparable to those made by B. pertussis. In contrast to B. pertussis ACT, however, ACT from B. hinzii is less extractable from whole bacteria, nonhemolytic, has a 50-fold reduction in adenylate cyclase activity, and is unable to elevate cyclic AMP levels in host macrophages (nontoxic). The decrease in enzymatic activity is attributable, at least in part, to a decreased binding affinity of B. hinzii ACT for calmodulin, the eukaryotic activator of B. pertussis ACT. In addition, we demonstrate that the lack of intoxication by B. hinzii ACT may be due to the absence of expression of cyaC, the gene encoding the accessory protein required for the acylation of B. pertussis ACT. These results demonstrate the expression of ACT by B. hinzii and represent the first characterization of a potential virulence factor of this organism.

  14. Binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to solubilized preparations of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, C.A.; Seamon, K.B.

    1988-01-01

    The binding of (/sup 3/H)forskolin to proteins solubilized from bovine brain membranes was studied by precipitating proteins with polyethylene glycol and separating (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to protein from free (/sup 3/H)forskolin by rapid filtration. The K/sub d/ for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to solubilized proteins was 14 nM which was similar to that for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites in membranes from rat brain and human platelets. Forskolin analogs competed for (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding sites with the same rank potency in both brain membranes and in proteins solubilized from brain membranes. (/sup 3/H)forskolin bound to proteins solubilized from membranes with a Bmax of 38 fmolmg protein which increased to 94 fmolmg protein when GppNHp was included in the binding assay. In contrast, GppNHp had no effect on (/sup 3/H)forskolin binding to proteins solubilized from membranes preactivated with GppNHp. Solubilized adenylate cyclase from non-preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 130 pmolmgmin which was increased 7-fold by GppNHp. In contrast, adenylate cyclase from preactivated membranes had a basal activity of 850 pmolmgmin which was not stimulated by GppNHp or forskolin

  15. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  16. Localization of nigrostriatal dopamine receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Filloux, F.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K.

    1988-04-01

    Quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390, (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride and (/sup 3/H)-forskolin was used to assess the effects of single and combined neurotoxin lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway in the rat brain on dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and adenylate cyclase (AC), respectively. Ibotenic acid (IA) lesions of the caudate-putamen (CPu) resulted in near total loss of both (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 and of (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding in the ipsilateral CPu and substantia nigra reticulata (SNR). (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu was only partially removed by this same lesion, and nigral (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding was virtually unchanged. 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and IA lesions of the substantia nigra compacta (SNC) did not affect (/sup 3/H)-SCH 23390 or (/sup 3/H)-forskolin binding, but largely removed (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the SNC. A 6-OHDA lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway followed by an ipsilateral IA injection of the CPu failed to further reduce (/sup 3/H)-sulpiride binding in the CPu. These results demonstrate that postsynaptic DA receptors in the CPu are of both the D1 and D2 variety; however, a portion of D2 receptors in the CPu may be presynaptic on afferent nerve terminals to this structure. D1 receptors in the SNR are presynaptic on striatonigral terminals, whereas the D2 receptors of the SNC are autoreceptors on nigral DA neurons. The existence of presynaptic D2 receptors on nigrostriatal DA-ergic terminals could not be confirmed by this study. Co-localization of D1 receptors and AC occurs in both the CPu and SNR.

  17. Adenylate cyclase regulates elongation of mammalian primary cilia

    SciTech Connect

    Ou, Young; Ruan, Yibing; Cheng, Min; Moser, Joanna J.; Rattner, Jerome B.; Hoorn, Frans A. van der

    2009-10-01

    The primary cilium is a non-motile microtubule-based structure that shares many similarities with the structures of flagella and motile cilia. It is well known that the length of flagella is under stringent control, but it is not known whether this is true for primary cilia. In this study, we found that the length of primary cilia in fibroblast-like synoviocytes, either in log phase culture or in quiescent state, was confined within a range. However, when lithium was added to the culture to a final concentration of 100 mM, primary cilia of synoviocytes grew beyond this range, elongating to a length that was on average approximately 3 times the length of untreated cilia. Lithium is a drug approved for treating bipolar disorder. We dissected the molecular targets of this drug, and observed that inhibition of adenylate cyclase III (ACIII) by specific inhibitors mimicked the effects of lithium on primary cilium elongation. Inhibition of GSK-3{beta} by four different inhibitors did not induce primary cilia elongation. ACIII was found in primary cilia of a variety of cell types, and lithium treatment of these cell types led to their cilium elongation. Further, we demonstrate that different cell types displayed distinct sensitivities to the lithium treatment. However, in all cases examined primary cilia elongated as a result of lithium treatment. In particular, two neuronal cell types, rat PC-12 adrenal medulla cells and human astrocytes, developed long primary cilia when lithium was used at or close to the therapeutic relevant concentration (1-2 mM). These results suggest that the length of primary cilia is controlled, at least in part, by the ACIII-cAMP signaling pathway.

  18. Dopamine inhibition of anterior pituitary adenylate cyclase is mediated through the high-affinity state of the D/sub 2/ receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Borgundvaag, B.; George, S.R.

    1985-07-29

    The diterpinoid forskolin stimulated adenylate cyclase activity (measured by conversion of (/sup 3/H)-ATP to (/sup 3/H)-cAMP) in anterior pituitary from male and female rats. Inhibition of stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by potent dopaminergic agonists was demonstrable only in female anterior pituitary. The inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity displayed a typically dopaminergic rank order of agonist potencies and could be completely reversed by a specific dopamine receptor antagonist. The IC/sub 50/ values of dopamine agonist inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity correlated with equal molarity with the dissociation constant of the high-affinity dopamine agonist-detected receptor binding site and with the IC/sub 50/ values for inhibition of prolactin secretion. These findings support the hypothesis that it is the high-affinity form of the D/sub 2/ dopamine receptor in anterior pituitary which is responsible for mediating the dopaminergic function of attenuating adenylate cyclase activity. 12 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  19. Bordetella adenylate cyclase toxin: a unique combination of a pore-forming moiety with a cell-invading adenylate cyclase enzyme.

    PubMed

    Masin, Jiri; Osicka, Radim; Bumba, Ladislav; Sebo, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT or AC-Hly) is a key virulence factor of the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis. CyaA targets myeloid phagocytes expressing the complement receptor 3 (CR3, known as αMβ2 integrin CD11b/CD18 or Mac-1) and translocates by a poorly understood mechanism directly across the cytoplasmic membrane into cell cytosol of phagocytes an adenylyl cyclase(AC) enzyme. This binds intracellular calmodulin and catalyzes unregulated conversion of cytosolic ATP into cAMP. Among other effects, this yields activation of the tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1, BimEL accumulation and phagocyte apoptosis induction. In parallel, CyaA acts as a cytolysin that forms cation-selective pores in target membranes. Direct penetration of CyaA into the cytosol of professional antigen-presenting cells allows the use of an enzymatically inactive CyaA toxoid as a tool for delivery of passenger antigens into the cytosolic pathway of processing and MHC class I-restricted presentation, which can be exploited for induction of antigen-specific CD8(+) cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immune responses.

  20. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  1. Characterization of a novel serotonin receptor coupled to adenylate cyclase in the hybrid neuroblastoma cell line NCB. 20

    SciTech Connect

    Conner, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pharmacological characterization of the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase in membrane preparation using over 40 serotonergic and non-serotonergic compounds demonstrated that the receptor mediating the response was distinct from previously described mammalian serotonin receptors. Agonist activity was only observed with tryptamine and ergoline derivatives. Potent antagonism was observed with several ergoline derivatives and with compounds such as mianserin and methiothepine. A comparison of the rank order of potency of a variety of compounds for the NCB.20 cell receptor with well characterized mammalian and non-mammalian serotonin receptors showed a pharmacological similarity, but not identity, with the mammalian 5-HT{sub 1C} receptor, which modulates phosphatidylinositol metabolism, and with serotonin receptors in the parasitic trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni, which are coupled to adenylate cyclase. Equilibrium binding analysis utilizing ({sup 3}H)serotonin, ({sup 3}H)lysergic acid diethylamide or ({sup 3}H)dihydroergotamine demonstrated that there are no abundant high affinity serotonergic sites, which implies that the serotonin activation of adenylate cyclase is mediated by receptors present in low abundance. Incubation of intact NCB.20 cells with serotinin resulted in a time and concentration dependent desensitization of the serotonin receptor.

  2. Forskolin inhibits the Gs-stimulated adenylate cyclase in rat ascites hepatoma AH66F cells.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Sanae, F; Koshiura, R; Matsunaga, T; Hasegawa, T; Takagi, K; Satake, T

    1989-09-01

    Forskolin increased intracellular cyclic AMP and augmented cyclic AMP formation by prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) in normal rat hepatocytes and ascites hepatoma AH66 cells. However, in AH66F cells which were derived from the AH66 cell line, the diterpene only slightly increased the cyclic AMP level, and dose-dependently inhibited the accumulation caused by PGE1. Forskolin dose-dependently activated adenylate cyclase in these membranes, and the magnitude of activation by forskolin was largest in the following order: hepatocytes, AH66 cells, and AH66F cells. This difference may be based on the number of forskolin-binding sites. The binding affinity of forskolin for each cell membrane was similar. The number and affinity of forskolin-binding sites in these cells were not influenced by 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p]. In hepatocytes and AH66 cells, forskolin and other adenylate cyclase activators such as PGE1, GTP, Gpp(NH)p, F-, and Mn2+ synergistically increased the enzyme activity. In AH66F cells, the forskolin-stimulated activity was hardly influenced by the GTP analog, and forskolin diminished the activities induced by the GTP analog in a manner similar to that of diterpene alone. Forskolin (10 microM) also significantly inhibited the activities induced by PGE1, GTP, and F-. The effect of forskolin with Mn2+ was additive in AH66F cells. The data suggest that forskolin promotes the interaction between the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and the catalytic unit in the membrane of normal hepatocytes and AH66 cells, but it interferes with the coupling in AH66F cells.

  3. Development of a novel photoreactive calmodulin derivative: Cross-linking of purified adenylate cyclase from bovine brain

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Lawton, R.G.; Gnegy, M.E. )

    1989-07-11

    A novel photoreactive calmodulin (CaM) derivative was developed and used to label the purified CaM-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex. {sup 125}I-CaM was conjugated with the heterobifunctional cross-linking agent p-nitrophenyl 3-diazopyruvate (DAPpNP). Spectral data indicated that diazopyruvoyl (DAP) groups were incorporated into the CaM molecule. Iodo-CaM-DAPs behaved like native CaM with respect to (1) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent enhanced mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels and (2) Ca{sup 2+}-dependent stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP photochemically cross-linked to CaM-binding proteins in a manner that was both Ca{sup 2+} dependent and CaM specific. Photolysis of forskolin-agarose-purified adenylate cyclase from bovine cortex with {sup 125}I-CaM-DAP produced a single cross-linked product which migrates on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels with an apparent molecular weight of approximately 140,000.

  4. Topographic separation of adenylate cyclase and hormone receptors in the plasma membrane of toad erythrocyte ghosts

    PubMed Central

    Sahyoun, N.; Hollenberg, M. D.; Bennett, V.; Cuatrecasas, P.

    1977-01-01

    Brief sonication of whole erythrocyte plasma membranes (ghosts) from toads at 4° does not inactivate adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); EC 4.6.1.1] or destroy the receptor binding properties of hydroxybenzylpindolol or insulin. The hormonal (but not the fluoride-induced) stimulation of this enzyme is, however, lost. Fractionation of the small, resealed membrane fragments (vesicles) on discontinuous sucrose gradients results in the separation of vesicle populations differing grossly in size and protein composition. In addition, the distribution of the β-adrenergic receptor, an insulin binding site, and adenylate cyclase among these vesicles fractions differs. The pattern of distribution of these functional structures can be altered differentially by manipulations of the ghosts before sonication. For example, brief preincubation with isoproterenol leads to a change in the relative distribution of β-receptor (but not adenylate cyclase) among the various vesicle fractions; this effect is not obtained with β-receptor antagonists, which block the isoproterenol effect. Exposure of the ghosts to different temperatures, changes in the divalent cation composition of the medium, or the addition of ATP also leads to changes in the distribution of surface markers of the subsequently formed vesicles. The results indicate gross asymmetries in the distribution of protein components within the plane of the membrane and raise important questions regarding the manner whereby functionally related and coupled components, such as hormone receptors and adenylate cyclase, interact. Images PMID:197522

  5. Histamine-, norepinephrine-, and dopamine-sensitive central adenylate cyclases: effects of chlorpromazine derivatives and butaclamol.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G C; Wagner, H R; Palmer, S J; Manian, A A

    1978-06-01

    A series of recently available derivatives (quaternary and hydroxylated) of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and butaclamol were evaluated with respect to antagonism of norepinephrine- (NE) (rat cerebral cortex), dopamine- (DA) (rat striatum) and histamine- (H) sensitive (rabbit cerebral cortex) adenylate cyclases. With incubated tissue slices (rat and rabbit cortices) CPZ-CH3, 7-OH-CPZ-CH3, beta-OH-CPZ and butaclamol displayed a capacity to inhibit either NE- or H- induced accumulation of adenosine cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP). With the broken cellular enzyme responsive to DA, rather potent inhibition of enzyme activity (IC50 less than 24 micron) occurred with butaclamol, beta-OH-CPZ, 7,8,beta-triOH-CPZ, 7,8-dioxo-beta-OH-CPZ and 3,7,8-triOH-CPZ. It is concluded that the metabolites of CPZ contribute to the central therapeutic and/or side effects of the parent compound.

  6. Adenylate cyclase A acting on PKA mediates induction of stalk formation by cyclic diguanylate at the Dictyostelium organizer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Singh, Reema; Cole, Christian; Lawal, Hajara Mohammed; Schilde, Christina; Febrer, Melanie; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Schaap, Pauline

    2017-01-01

    Coordination of cell movement with cell differentiation is a major feat of embryonic development. The Dictyostelium stalk always forms at the organizing tip, by a mechanism that is not understood. We previously reported that cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP), synthesized by diguanylate cyclase A (DgcA), induces stalk formation. Here we used transcriptional profiling of dgca− structures to identify target genes for c-di-GMP, and used these genes to investigate the c-di-GMP signal transduction pathway. We found that knockdown of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in prestalk cells reduced stalk gene induction by c-di-GMP, whereas PKA activation bypassed the c-di-GMP requirement for stalk gene expression. c-di-GMP caused a persistent increase in cAMP, which still occurred in mutants lacking the adenylate cyclases ACG or ACR, or the cAMP phosphodiesterase RegA. However, both inhibition of adenylate cyclase A (ACA) with SQ22536 and incubation of a temperature-sensitive ACA mutant at the restrictive temperature prevented c-di-GMP–induced cAMP synthesis as well as c-di-GMP–induced stalk gene transcription. ACA produces the cAMP pulses that coordinate Dictyostelium morphogenetic cell movement and is highly expressed at the organizing tip. The stalk-less dgca− mutant regained its stalk by expression of a light-activated adenylate cyclase from the ACA promoter and exposure to light, indicating that cAMP is also the intermediate for c-di-GMP in vivo. Our data show that the more widely expressed DgcA activates tip-expressed ACA, which then acts on PKA to induce stalk genes. These results explain why stalk formation in Dictyostelia always initiates at the site of the morphogenetic organizer. PMID:28057864

  7. Inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis block the entry of Bacillus anthracis adenylate cyclase toxin but not that of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, V M; Leppla, S H; Hewlett, E L

    1988-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis and Bacillus anthracis produce extracytoplasmic adenylate cyclase toxins (AC toxins) with shared features including activation by calmodulin and the ability to enter target cells and catalyze intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) production from host ATP. The two AC toxins were evaluated for sensitivities to a series of inhibitors of known uptake mechanisms. Cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of microfilament function, abrogated the cAMP response to B. anthracis AC toxin (93%) but not the cAMP response elicited by B. pertussis AC toxin. B. anthracis-mediated intoxication of CHO cells was completely inhibited by ammonium chloride (30 mM) and chloroquine (0.1 mM), whereas the cAMP accumulation produced by B. pertussis AC toxin remained unchanged. The block of target cell intoxication by cytochalasin D could be bypassed when cells were first treated with anthrax AC toxin and then exposed to an acidic medium. These data indicate that despite enzymatic similarities, these two AC toxins intoxicate target cells by different mechanisms, with anthrax AC toxin entering by means of receptor-mediated endocytosis into acidic compartments and B. pertussis AC toxin using a separate, and as yet undefined, mechanism. PMID:2895741

  8. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - past and present.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Chris

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins.

  9. Regulation of follitropin-sensitive adenylate cyclase by stimulatory and inhibitory forms of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in immature rat Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been designed to examine the role of guanine nucleotides in mediating FSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in Sertoli cell plasma membranes. Analysis of ({sup 3}H)GDP binding to plasma membranes suggested a single high affinity site with a K{sub d} = 0.24 uM. Competition studies indicated that GTP{sub {gamma}}S was 7-fold more potent than GDP{sub {beta}}S. Bound GDP could be released by FSH in the presence of GTP{sub {gamma}}S, but not by FSH alone. Adenylate cyclase activity was enhanced 5-fold by FSH in the presence of GTP. Addition of GDP{sub {beta}}S to the activated enzyme (FSH plus GTP) resulted in a time-dependent decay to basal activity within 20 sec. GDP{sub {beta}}S competitively inhibited GTP{sub {gamma}}S-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a K{sub i} = 0.18 uM. Adenylate cyclase activity was also demonstrated to be sensitive to the nucleotide bound state. In the presence of FSH, only the GTP{sub {gamma}}S-bound form persisted even if GDP{sub {beta}}S previously occupied all available binding sites. Two membrane proteins, M{sub r} = 43,000 and 48,000, were ADP{centered dot}ribosylated using cholera toxin and labeling was enhanced 2 to 4-fold by GTP{sub {gamma}}S but not by GDP{sub {beta}}S. The M{sub r} = 43,000 and 48,000 proteins represented variant forms of G{sub S}. A single protein of M{sub r} = 40,000 (G{sub i}) was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin in vitro. GTP inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with an IC{sub 50} = 0.1 uM. The adenosine analog, N{sup 6}{centered dot}phenylisopropyl adenosine enhanced GTP inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by an additional 15%. GTP-dependent inhibition of forskolin-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity was abolished in membranes prepared from Sertoli cells treated in culture with pertussis toxin.

  10. Characterizations of a synthetic pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide analog displaying potent neuroprotective activity and reduced in vivo cardiovascular side effects in a Parkinson's disease model.

    PubMed

    Lamine, Asma; Létourneau, Myriam; Doan, Ngoc Duc; Maucotel, Julie; Couvineau, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Chatenet, David; Vaudry, David; Fournier, Alain

    2016-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a steady loss of dopamine neurons through apoptotic, inflammatory and oxidative stress processes. In that line of view, the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), with its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and its anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties, has proven to offer potent neuroprotection in various PD models. Nonetheless, its peripheral actions, paired with low metabolic stability, hampered its clinical use. We have developed Ac-[Phe(pI)(6), Nle(17)]PACAP(1-27) as an improved PACAP-derived neuroprotective compound. In vitro, this analog stimulated cAMP production, maintained mitochondrial potential and protected SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells from 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) toxicity, as potently as PACAP. Furthermore, contrasting with PACAP, it is stable in human plasma and against dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity. When injected intravenously to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated mice, PACAP and Ac-[Phe(pI)(6), Nle(17)]PACAP(1-27) restored tyrosine hydoxylase expression into the substantia nigra and modulated the inflammatory response. Albeit falls of mean arterial pressure (MAP) were observed with both PACAP- and Ac-[Phe(pI)(6), Nle(17)]PACAP(1-27)-treated mice, the intensity of the decrease as well as its duration were significantly less marked after iv injections of the analog than after those of the native polypeptide. Moreover, no significant changes in heart rate were measured with the animals for both compounds. Thus, Ac-[Phe(pI)(6), Nle(17)]PACAP(1-27) appears as a promising lead molecule for the development of PACAP-derived drugs potentially useful for the treatment of PD or other neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Adenylate cyclase, cyclic AMP and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 in airway smooth muscle: modulation by protein kinase C and growth serum.

    PubMed Central

    Moughal, N; Stevens, P A; Kong, D; Pyne, S; Pyne, N J

    1995-01-01

    Bradykinin and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulate adenylate cyclase activity in serum-depleted cultured airway smooth muscle via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. The probable target is the type II adenylate cyclase, which can integrate coincident signals from both PKC and Gs. Therefore, activation of Gs (by cholera-toxin pre-treatment) amplified the bradykinin-stimulated cyclic AMP signal and concurrently attenuated the partial activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase-2 (ERK-2) by bradykinin. We have previously demonstrated that, in order to induce full activation of ERK-2 with bradykinin, it is necessary to obliterate PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP formation. We concluded that the cyclic AMP signal limits the magnitude of ERK-2 activation [Pyne, Moughal, Stevens, Tolan and Pyne (1994) Biochem. J. 304, 611-616]. The present study indicates that the bradykinin-stimulated ERK-2 pathway is entirely cyclic AMP-sensitive, and suggests that coincident signal detection by adenylate cyclase may be an important physiological route for the modulation of early mitogenic signalling. Furthermore, the direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity enables bradykinin to induce DNA synthesis, indicating that the PKC-dependent activation of adenylate cyclase limits entry of cells into the cell cycle. These studies suggest that the mitogenicity of an agonist may be governed, in part, by its ability to stimulate an inhibitory cyclic AMP signal pathway in the cell. The activation of adenylate cyclase by PKC appears to be downstream of phospholipase D. However, in cells that were maintained in growth serum (i.e. were not growth-arrested), bradykinin was unable to elicit a PKC-stimulated cyclic AMP response. The lesion in the signal-response coupling was not at the level of either the receptor or phospholipase D, which remain functionally operative and suggests modification occurs at either PKC or adenylate cyclase itself. These studies are discussed with

  12. Allosteric equilibrium model explains steady-state coupling of beta-adrenergic receptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes.

    PubMed

    Ugur, O; Onaran, H O

    1997-05-01

    We used a simple experimental approach to clarify some contradictory predictions of the collision coupling and equilibrium models (e.g. ternary complex, two-state ternary complex or quinternary complex), which describe G-protein-mediated beta-adrenergic receptor signalling in essentially different manners. Analysis of the steady-state coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to adenylate cyclase in turkey erythrocyte membranes showed that: (1) in the absence of an agonist, Gpp(NH)p (a hydrolysis-resistant analogue of GTP) can activate adenylate cyclase very slowly; (2) this activity reaches a steady state in approx. 5 h, the extent of activity depending on the concentration of the nucleotide; (3) isoprenaline-activated steady-state adenylate cyclase can be inactivated by propranolol (a competitive antagonist that relaxes the receptor activation), in the presence of Gpp(NH)p (which provides a virtual absence of GTPase) and millimolar concentrations of Mg2+ (the rate of this inactivation is relatively fast); (4) increasing the concentration of Gpp(NH)p can saturate the steady-state activity of adenylate cyclase. The saturated enzyme activity was lower than that induced by isoprenaline under the same conditions. This additional agonist-induced activation was reversible. In the light of these results, we conclude that agonist can also activate the guanine nucleotide-saturated system in the absence of GTPase by a mechanism other than guanine nucleotide exchange. We explain these phenomena in the framework of a quinternary complex model as an agonist-induced and receptor-mediated dissociation of guanine nucleotide-saturated residual heterotrimer, the equilibrium concentration of which is not necessarily zero. These results, which suggest a continuous interaction between receptor and G-protein, can hardly be accommodated by the collision coupling model that was originally suggested for the present experimental system and then applied to many other G-protein systems. Therefore we

  13. Changes in vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide and neuropeptide Y-ergic structures of the enteric nervous system in the carcinoma of the human large intestine.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Janusz; Łakomy, Ireneusz Mirosław

    2010-01-01

    This investigation was aimed at immunohistochemical analysis of potential changes in the enteric nervous system caused by cancer of the large intestine. In this purpose, neurons and nerve fibers of intestinal plexuses containing neuropeptides: vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), in pathologically changed part of the large intestine were microscpically observed and compared. Samples were taken from patients operated due to cancer of the sigmoid colon and rectum. The number of neurons and density of nerve fibres containing neuropeptides found in sections with cancer tissues were compared to those observed in sections from the uninvolved intestinal wall. Changes relating to reductions in the number of NPY-ergic neurons and density of nerve fibres in submucous and myenteric plexuses in the sections with cancer tissues (pathological sections) were statistically significant. A statistically similar presence of VIP-ergic and PACAP-ergic neurons in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses was observed in both the pathological and control sections. On the other hand, in the pathological sections, VIP-ergic nerve fibres in the myenteric plexuses and PACAP-ergic nerve fibres in the submucosal and myenteric plexuses were found to be less dense. Analysis revealed changes in pathologically affected part of the large intestine may caused disruption of proper intestinal function. Observed changes in the neural elements which are responsible for relaxation of the intestine may suggest dysfunction in the innervation of this part of the colon.

  14. Properties of the separated catalytic and regulatory units of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Strittmatter, S; Neer, E J

    1980-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase from bovine brain cortex was solubilized with 14 mM cholate and 1 M (NH4)2SO4. Gel filtration over a column of Sepharose 6B separated the catalytic unit (CU) from a factor (G/F) that confers responsiveness to 5'-guanylyl imidophosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. The separated CU, which elutes with a Kav, of 0.48 +/- 0.01 (n=5), is not responsive to p[NH]ppG or fluoride and is relatively inactive when Mg . ATP is the substrate but activated 8-15-fold by Mn2+. The separated G/F elutes with a Kav of 0.70 +/- 0.02 (n=4). It restores the responsiveness of the CU to p[NH]ppG and fluoride. Activation of the enzyme by p[NH]ppG before solubilization does not decrease the amount of G/F eluting with a Kav of 0.7. Therefore, the G/F is probably present in brain cortex in excess over the CU. p[NH]ppG stabilizes the G/F but not the CU against thermal inactivation, suggesting that it interacts with G/F and not with CU. Incubation of the G/F with p[NH]ppG before addition of CU markedly increases the rate of activation of the reconstituted enzyme by p[NH]ppG. We propose, therefore, that the rate-limiting step in adenylate cyclase activation is a process in G/F alone and not a slow conformational change in CU or a slow association of G/F with CU. Binding of p[NH]ppG to the isolated G/F appears to be readily reversible; the ability of fully activated G/F to stimulate CU can be blocked if GDP is added before CU. In contrast, after the CU has been activated by interaction with G/F, GDP cannot reverse the activation. This suggests that association with the CU increases the affinity of G/F for p[NH]ppG. PMID:6935648

  15. Relationship between muscarinic receptor occupancy and adenylate cyclase inhibition in the rabbit myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Ehlert, F.J.

    1985-11-01

    The muscarinic receptor-binding properties of a series of muscarinic drugs were compared with their effects on adenylate cyclase in membranes of the rabbit myocardium. When measured by competitive inhibition of (TH)-N-methylscopolamine binding, the competition curves of the various agonists were adequately described by the ternary complex model. This model assumes that the receptor can bind reversibly with a guanine nucleotide binding protein in the membrane and that the affinity of the agonist for the receptor-guanine nucleotide-binding protein complex is higher than that for the free receptor. A satisfactory fit of the ternary complex model to the data could only be achieved assuming that very little receptor is precoupled with the guanine nucleotide-binding protein in the absence of agonist. There was good agreement between the efficacy of each agonist as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the estimate of the positive cooperativity between the binding of the agonist receptor complex and the guanine nucleotide-binding protein. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate (0.1 mM) had no significant effect on the binding of (TH)N-methylscopolamine but caused an increase in the concentration of the various agonists required for half-maximal receptor occupancy. There was good correlation between efficacy as measured by inhibition of adenylate cyclase and the influence of guanosine 5'-triphosphate on binding properties.

  16. Cloned M1 muscarinic receptors mediate both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, R; Pinkas-Kramarski, R; Sokolovsky, M

    1988-01-01

    The rat M1 muscarinic receptor gene was cloned and expressed in a rat cell line lacking endogenous muscarinic receptors. Assignment of the cloned receptors to the M1 class was pharmacologically confirmed by their high affinity for the M1-selective muscarinic antagonist pirenzepine and low affinity for the M2-selective antagonist AF-DX-116. Guanylyl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p] converted agonist binding sites on the receptor, from high-affinity to the low-affinity state, thus indicating that the cloned receptors couple to endogenous G-proteins. The cloned receptors mediated both adenylate cyclase inhibition and phosphoinositide hydrolysis, but by different mechanisms. Pertussis toxin blocked the inhibition of adenylate cyclase (indicating coupling of the receptor to inhibitory G-protein), but did not affect phosphoinositide turnover. Furthermore, the stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis was less efficient than the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. These findings demonstrate that cloned M1 receptors are capable of mediating multiple responses in the cell by coupling to different effectors, possibly to different G-proteins. Images PMID:2846274

  17. Mutation in the β-hairpin of the Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates N-lobe conformation in calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, Tzvia I.; Goebel, Erich; Hariraju, Dinesh; Finley, Natosha L.

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin modulates bi-lobal structure of CaM. • The structure and stability of the complex rely on intermolecular associations. • A novel mode of CaM-dependent activation of the adenylate cyclase toxin is proposed. - Abstract: Bordetella pertussis, causative agent of whooping cough, produces an adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) that is an important virulence factor. In the host cell, the adenylate cyclase domain of CyaA (CyaA-ACD) is activated upon association with calmodulin (CaM), an EF-hand protein comprised of N- and C-lobes (N-CaM and C-CaM, respectively) connected by a flexible tether. Maximal CyaA-ACD activation is achieved through its binding to both lobes of intact CaM, but the structural mechanisms remain unclear. No high-resolution structure of the intact CaM/CyaA-ACD complex is available, but crystal structures of isolated C-CaM bound to CyaA-ACD shed light on the molecular mechanism by which this lobe activates the toxin. Previous studies using molecular modeling, biochemical, and biophysical experiments demonstrate that CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin participates in site-specific interactions with N-CaM. In this study, we utilize nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to probe the molecular association between intact CaM and CyaA-ACD. Our results indicate binding of CyaA-ACD to CaM induces large conformational perturbations mapping to C-CaM, while substantially smaller structural changes are localized primarily to helices I, II, and IV, and the metal-binding sites in N-CaM. Site-specific mutations in CyaA-ACD’s β-hairpin structurally modulate N-CaM, resulting in conformational perturbations in metal binding sites I and II, while no significant structural modifications are observed in C-CaM. Moreover, dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis reveals that mutation of the β-hairpin results in a decreased hydrodynamic radius (R{sub h}) and reduced thermal stability in the mutant complex. Taken

  18. Effects of UVB irradiation on epidermal adenylate cyclase responses in vitro: its relation to sunburn cell formation.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, H; Ishida-Yamamoto, A; Kajita, S; Tsutsui, M; Ohkuma, N

    1988-01-01

    UVB irradiation augmented the beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response of pig skin epidermis in vitro. The effect was observed 2-4 h following the irradiation and lasted at least for 48 h. There was no significant difference in cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity between control and UVB-irradiated epidermis at lower irradiation dose (150 mJ/cm2), which is the dose of the most marked beta-adrenergic augmentation effect. The augmentation effect was specific to the beta-adrenergic system; adenosine and histamine adenylate cyclase responses were unchanged or decreased depending on the irradiation dose. Histologically, marked sunburn-cell formation was observed following the UVB irradiation. It has been suggested that oxygen intermediates generated by ultraviolet radiation participate in sunburn-cell formation. The addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the incubation medium significantly inhibited sunburn-cell formation. On the other hand, the beta-adrenergic augmentation effect was not affected by the addition of SOD. Other scavengers of oxygen intermediates (catalase, catalase + SOD, xanthine, or mannitol) did not inhibit the UVB-induced beta-adrenergic augmentation effect. Further, superoxide-anion generating systems (hypoxanthine-xanthine oxidase system and acetaldehyde-xanthine oxidase system) revealed no stimulatory effect on the beta-adrenergic response of epidermis. These results indicate that (a) the UVB-induced beta-adrenergic augmentation effect is inherent to skin and does not depend on systemic factors such as inflammatory infiltrates following UVB irradiation; (b) in contrast to sunburn-cell formation, induction of the beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase response is not directly associated with oxygen intermediates generated by UVB irradiation.

  19. Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase: purification and characterization of the toxic form of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Rogel, A; Schultz, J E; Brownlie, R M; Coote, J G; Parton, R; Hanski, E

    1989-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis produces a calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) which is an essential virulence factor in mammalian pertussis. Here we report the purification and characterization of the toxic form of the enzyme, which penetrates eukaryotic cells and generates high levels of intracellular cAMP. This form was purified from an extract of B.pertussis strain carrying a recombinant plasmid which over-produced both enzymatic and toxic activities of the enzyme. Western blot analysis of the extract using anti-B.pertussis AC antibodies detected only one protein of 200 kd. However, gel filtration of the extract resolved two peaks of enzymatic activity. The first peak of aggregated material contained greater than 70% of the total enzymatic activity, and the second peak contained the majority of the toxic activity. Purification of the enzyme from both peaks yielded proteins of 200 kd, with similar biochemical and immunological properties. Yet only the enzyme purified from the second peak could penetrate human lymphocyte and catalyse the formation of intracellular cAMP. B.pertussis AC gene expressed in Escherichia coli produced a calmodulin-dependent enzyme of 200 kd, which lacked lymphocyte penetration capacity. It is proposed that a post-translational modification that occurs in B.pertussis but not in E.coli confers upon the 200 kd protein of B.pertussis AC the toxic properties. Images PMID:2555185

  20. The role of activation of the 5-HT1A receptor and adenylate cyclase in the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919, a dual 5-HT1A agonist and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Qin, Juan-Juan; Chen, Hong-Xia; Zhao, Nan; Yuan, Li; Zhang, You-Zhi; Yang, Ri-Fang; Zhang, Li-Ming; Li, Yun-Feng

    2014-10-17

    This study aimed to explore the possible mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919, a novel antidepressant candidate with dual activity as a 5-HT1A receptor agonist and a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. The animal models commonly used to evaluate potential antidepressants, i.e., tail suspension (TST) in mice and forced swimming test (FST) in mice were used to evaluate the antidepressant effect of YL-0919. The activity of adenylate cyclase (AC) on the synaptic membrane was determined by the homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) immunoassay. The results indicated that YL-0919 (1.25-2.5mg/kg, i.g.) significantly decreased the immobility time in both the tail suspension test and the forced swim test in a dose-dependent manner, demonstrating the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919. Furthermore, this effect was completely antagonized by the co-administration of WAY-100635 (0.3mg/kg, s.c.), a 5-HT1A selective antagonist. YL-0919 (10(-9)-10(-5)mol/L) was also shown to activate AC in vitro in a dose-dependent manner in synaptic membranes extracted from the rat prefrontal cortex, and this effect (10(-7)-10(-5)mol/L) was antagonized by WAY-100635 (10(-7)mol/L). Finally, the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919 (2.5mg/kg, i.g.) was also blocked by the co-administration of H-89 (3 μg/site, i.c.v.), a protein kinase A (PKA) selective inhibitor. These results indicate that the activation of 5-HT1A receptors and the subsequent activation of the AC-cAMP-PKA signaling pathway in the frontal cortex play a critical role in the antidepressant-like effect of YL-0919.

  1. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. III. Difference between the receptor-adenylate cyclase regulating systems in AH130 cells and cultured normal rat liver cells.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Matsunaga, T; Miyamoto, K; Koshiura, R

    1986-10-01

    The responsiveness to three beta-adrenergic agonists, isoproterenol (IPN), epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) in AH13O cells was examined compared with that in normal rat liver cells which were cultured for 24 hr after collagenase digestion. As regards to the activation of adenylate cyclase in the cell homogenates, the relative affinity of the three agonists was in order of IPN greater than NE greater than Epi in AH130 cells and IPN greater than Epi greater than NE in cultured normal liver cells. While the efficacies of the three agonists were similar in cultured liver cells, those of NE and Epi were markedly lower than that of IPN in AH13O cells and were increased to the similar level of IPN by pretreatment with phentolamine, but not with prazosin. Clonidine inhibited the activation of adenylate cyclase by IPN in AH13O cells. When cells were preincubated with islet-activating protein (IAP), the activity of adenylate cyclase in the presence or absence of agonist in both cell lines increased. In IAP-treated AH13O cells, the efficacies of NE and Epi became close to that of IPN. Adenylate cyclase in IAP-treated AH13O cells was activated by GTP in a dose-dependent manner, but that in IAP-treated cultured liver cells was not. In the presence of IPN, biphasic (activatory and inhibitory) effects of GTP on the cyclase were observed, and the inhibitory phase was eliminated by the IAP-treatment in both cell lines.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Examination of calcium-binding protein expression in the inner ear of wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-knockout mice in kanamycin-induced ototoxicity.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, A; Szabadfi, K; Fulop, B; Reglodi, D; Kiss, P; Farkas, J; Szalontai, B; Gabriel, R; Hashimoto, H; Tamas, A

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a neuropeptide with diverse biological effects. It also occurs and exerts protective effects in sensory organs; however, little is known about its effects in the auditory system. Recently, we have shown that PACAP protects cochlear cells against oxidative-stress-induced apoptosis and homozygous PACAP-deficient animals show stronger expression of Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the hair cells of the inner ear, but there are no data about the consequences of the lack of endogenous PACAP in different ototoxic insults such as aminoglycoside-induced toxicity. In this study, we examined the effect of kanamycin treatment on Ca(2+)-binding protein expression in hair cells of wild-type, heterozygous and homozygous PACAP-deficient mice. We treated 5-day-old mice with kanamycin, and 2 days later, we examined the Ca(2+)-binding protein expression of the hair cells with immunohistochemistry. We found stronger expression of Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the hair cells of control heterozygous and homozygous PACAP-deficient mice compared with wild-type animals. Kanamycin induced a significant increase in Ca(2+)-binding protein expression in wild-type and heterozygous PACAP-deficient mice, but the baseline higher expression in homozygous PACAP-deficient mice did not show further changes after the treatment. Elevated endolymphatic Ca(2+) is deleterious for the cochlear function, against which the high concentration of Ca(2+)-buffers in hair cells may protect. Meanwhile, the increased immunoreactivity of Ca(2+)-binding proteins in the absence of PACAP provide further evidence for the important protective role of PACAP in ototoxicity, but further investigations are necessary to examine the exact role of endogenous PACAP in ototoxic insults.

  3. Vibrio vulnificus Biotype 3 Multifunctional Autoprocessing RTX Toxin Is an Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Essential for Virulence in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ziolo, Kevin J.; Jeong, Hee-Gon; Kwak, Jayme S.; Yang, Shuangni; Lavker, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is an environmental organism that causes both food-borne and wound infections with high morbidity and mortality in humans. The annual incidence and global distribution of infections associated with this pathogen are increasing with climate change. In the late 1990s, an outbreak of tilapia-associated wound infections in Israel was linked to a previously unrecognized variant of V. vulnificus designated biotype 3. The sudden emergence and clonality of the outbreak suggest that this strain may be a true newly emergent pathogen with novel virulence properties compared to those of other V. vulnificus strains. In a subcutaneous infection model to mimic wound infection, the multifunctional autoprocessing RTX (MARTX) toxin of biotype 3 strains was shown to be an essential virulence factor contributing to highly inflammatory skin wounds with severe damage affecting every tissue layer. We conducted a sequencing-based analysis of the MARTX toxin and found that biotype 3 MARTX toxin has an effector domain structure distinct from that of either biotype 1 or biotype 2. Of the two new domains identified, a domain similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoY was shown to confer adenylate cyclase activity on the MARTX toxin. This is the first demonstration that the biotype 3 MARTX toxin is essential for virulence and that the ExoY-like MARTX effector domain is a catalytically active adenylate cyclase. PMID:24614656

  4. Vibrio vulnificus biotype 3 multifunctional autoprocessing RTX toxin is an adenylate cyclase toxin essential for virulence in mice.

    PubMed

    Ziolo, Kevin J; Jeong, Hee-Gon; Kwak, Jayme S; Yang, Shuangni; Lavker, Robert M; Satchell, Karla J F

    2014-05-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is an environmental organism that causes both food-borne and wound infections with high morbidity and mortality in humans. The annual incidence and global distribution of infections associated with this pathogen are increasing with climate change. In the late 1990s, an outbreak of tilapia-associated wound infections in Israel was linked to a previously unrecognized variant of V. vulnificus designated biotype 3. The sudden emergence and clonality of the outbreak suggest that this strain may be a true newly emergent pathogen with novel virulence properties compared to those of other V. vulnificus strains. In a subcutaneous infection model to mimic wound infection, the multifunctional autoprocessing RTX (MARTX) toxin of biotype 3 strains was shown to be an essential virulence factor contributing to highly inflammatory skin wounds with severe damage affecting every tissue layer. We conducted a sequencing-based analysis of the MARTX toxin and found that biotype 3 MARTX toxin has an effector domain structure distinct from that of either biotype 1 or biotype 2. Of the two new domains identified, a domain similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoY was shown to confer adenylate cyclase activity on the MARTX toxin. This is the first demonstration that the biotype 3 MARTX toxin is essential for virulence and that the ExoY-like MARTX effector domain is a catalytically active adenylate cyclase.

  5. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in mouse spleen cells: a potential mechanism for cannabinoid-mediated immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Schatz, A R; Kessler, F K; Kaminski, N E

    1992-01-01

    The ability of delta 9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) to modulate adenylate cyclase activity in mouse spleen cells was investigated. These studies were prompted by the recent identification and cloning of a G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor localized in certain regions of the brain and the potential for a common mechanism between cannabinoid-mediated CNS effects and immunosuppression. Temporal addition studies were initially performed to identify the period of time when spleen cells in culture were most susceptible to the inhibitory effects of delta 9-THC, as measured by the day 5 IgM antibody forming cell response. delta 9-THC was only inhibitory when added to spleen cell cultures during the first 2 hr following antigen sensitization. In light of this time course, adenylate cyclase activity was measured in spleen cells incubated in the presence of 22 microM delta 9-THC for 5 min and subsequently stimulated with forskolin. delta 9-THC treated spleen cells demonstrated a 33% inhibition and a 66% inhibition in intracellular cAMP after a 5 or 15 min stimulation with forskolin, respectively. These studies suggest that inhibition of immune function by delta 9-THC may be mediated through the inhibition of intracellular cAMP early after antigen stimulation.

  6. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide requires parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C to entrain circadian rhythms to a predictable phase

    PubMed Central

    An, Sungwon; Irwin, Robert P.; Allen, Charles N.; Tsai, Connie

    2011-01-01

    Circadian oscillations in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) depend on transcriptional repression by Period (PER)1 and PER2 proteins within single cells and on vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) signaling between cells. Because VIP is released by SCN neurons in a circadian pattern, and, after photic stimulation, it has been suggested to play a role in the synchronization to environmental light cycles. It is not known, however, if or how VIP entrains circadian gene expression or behavior. Here, we tested candidate signaling pathways required for VIP-mediated entrainment of SCN rhythms. We found that single applications of VIP reset PER2 rhythms in a time- and dose-dependent manner that differed from light. Unlike VIP-mediated signaling in other cell types, simultaneous antagonism of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities was required to block the VIP-induced phase shifts of SCN rhythms. Consistent with this, VIP rapidly increased intracellular cAMP in most SCN neurons. Critically, daily VIP treatment entrained PER2 rhythms to a predicted phase angle within several days, depending on the concentration of VIP and the interval between VIP applications. We conclude that VIP entrains circadian timing among SCN neurons through rapid and parallel changes in adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C activities. PMID:21389307

  7. Evidence for a presynaptic adenylate cyclase system facilitating (TH)norepinephrine release from rat brain neocortex slices and synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoffelmeer, A.N.; Hogenboom, F.; Mulder, A.H.

    1985-10-01

    The effects of drugs known to enhance intracellular cyclic AMP levels on depolarization-induced (TH)norepinephrine release from superfused rat neocortical slices and synaptosomes were investigated. The adenylate cyclase activator forskolin, the membrane-permeating cyclic AMP analogues 8-bromo-cyclic AMP and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, as well as the phosphodiesterase inhibitors isobutylmethylxanthine and 4-(3-cyclopentyloxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-pyrolidone (ZK 62771) enhanced the electrically evoked release of (TH)norepinephrine from superfused rat brain neocortex slices. 8-Bromo-cyclic GMP was without effect on the electrically evoked release. When (TH)norepinephrine release was enhanced by prolonging the electrical pulse duration from 2 msec to 10 msec, the relative inhibitory effect of the CaS channel blocker CdS and the relative facilitatory effect of the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine remained unaffected. In striking contrast, the relative facilitatory effects of forskolin and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP were strongly reduced, whereas the effect of ZK 62771 was almost doubled. When veratrine-induced release of (TH)norepinephrine from cortex synaptosomes was examined, the facilitatory effects of forskolin, 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, and ZK 62771 were even more pronounced than in brain slices. The data strongly support the hypothesis that a presynaptic adenylate cyclase system plays a facilitatory role in the stimulus-secretion coupling process in central noradrenergic nerve terminals.

  8. Involvement of a membrane-bound class III adenylate cyclase in regulation of anaerobic respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    PubMed

    Charania, M A; Brockman, K L; Zhang, Y; Banerjee, A; Pinchuk, G E; Fredrickson, J K; Beliaev, A S; Saffarini, D A

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  9. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 uses the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases, respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an Escherichia coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), or Fe(III), whereas deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III) and, to a lesser extent, with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways, such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagellum biosynthesis, and electron transport were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  10. Involvement of a Membrane-Bound Class III Adenylate Cyclase in Regulation of Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Charania, M.; Brockman, K.; Zhang, Yang; Banerjee, A.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Saffarini, Daad

    2009-07-01

    Unlike other bacteria that use FNR to regulate anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 uses the cAMP receptor protein, CRP, for this purpose. Three putative genes, cyaA, cyaB, and cyaC, predicted to encode class I, class IV, and class III adenylate cyclases respectively, have been identified in the genome sequence of this bacterium. Functional validation through complementation of an E. coli cya mutant confirmed that these genes encode proteins with adenylate cyclase activities. Chromosomal deletion of either cyaA or cyaB did not affect anaerobic respiration with fumarate, DMSO, or Fe(III), whereas the deletion of cyaC caused deficiencies in respiration with DMSO and Fe(III), and to a lesser extent with fumarate. A phenotype similar to that of a crp mutant, which lacks the ability to grow anaerobically with DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III), was obtained when both cyaA and cyaC were deleted. Microarray analysis of gene expression in the crp and the cyaC mutants revealed the involvement of both genes in the regulation of key respiratory pathways such as DMSO, fumarate, and Fe(III) reduction. Additionally, several genes associated with plasmid replication, flagella biosynthesis, and electron transport, were differentially expressed in the cyaC mutant, but not in the crp mutant. Our results indicated that CyaC plays a major role in regulating anaerobic respiration, and may contribute to additional signaling pathways independent of CRP.

  11. Biochemical mechanisms of myocardial adenylate cyclase subsensitivity to isoproterenol in cardiac hypertrophy of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Cheon, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The responsiveness of the myocardial adenylate cyclase (AC) system in generating cAMP was studied using isoproterenol (a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist), cholera toxin (a guanosinetriphosphatase inhibitor) and forskolin (a catalytic unit activator) in isolated myocytes of age-matched, 14-17 weeks old Wistar Kyoto normotensive rates (WKYs) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). We found a reduction in isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP formation in myocytes of SHRs compared with WKYs. This reduction was not due to changes in isoproterenol-receptor interactions. Scatchard plot analysis of (/sup 3/H)CGP 12177 binding to beta-adrenergic receptors in isolated myocytes of WKYs and SHRs revealed to significant differences in the maximum number of binding sites or dissociation constant. There were no significant differences in Ki and IC/sub 50/ calculated from the competitive displacement of (/sup 3/H)CGP 12177 binding by (-) isoproterenol, suggesting no change in the affinity of the beta-adrenergic receptors for isoproterenol. We found no significant differences in forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation between the two groups. This suggest that the reduction in isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP formation observed in myocytes of SHRs is not due to changes in the ability of catalytic unit to convert ATP to cAMP. Interestingly, cholera toxin-stimulated cAMP formation was increased in myocytes of SHRs. One possible explanation for these observations may be increased guanosinetriphosphatase (GTPase) activation by isoproterenol in myocytes of SHRs. The activation of GTPase by isoproterenol in myocytes of SHRs. The activation of GTPase by isoproterenol was measured as the release of Pi from (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)GTP. There was an increase in isoproterenol-stimulated GTPase activity in myocytes of SHRs compared with WKYs.

  12. Structural insight into photoactivation of an adenylate cyclase from a photosynthetic cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Ohki, Mio; Sugiyama, Kanako; Kawai, Fumihiro; Tanaka, Hitomi; Nihei, Yuuki; Unzai, Satoru; Takebe, Masumi; Matsunaga, Shigeru; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Shibayama, Naoya; Zhou, Zhiwen; Koyama, Ryuta; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Tame, Jeremy R. H.; Iseki, Mineo; Park, Sam-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic-AMP is one of the most important second messengers, regulating many crucial cellular events in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, and precise spatial and temporal control of cAMP levels by light shows great promise as a simple means of manipulating and studying numerous cell pathways and processes. The photoactivated adenylate cyclase (PAC) from the photosynthetic cyanobacterium Oscillatoria acuminata (OaPAC) is a small homodimer eminently suitable for this task, requiring only a simple flavin chromophore within a blue light using flavin (BLUF) domain. These domains, one of the most studied types of biological photoreceptor, respond to blue light and either regulate the activity of an attached enzyme domain or change its affinity for a repressor protein. BLUF domains were discovered through studies of photo-induced movements of Euglena gracilis, a unicellular flagellate, and gene expression in the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, but the precise details of light activation remain unknown. Here, we describe crystal structures and the light regulation mechanism of the previously undescribed OaPAC, showing a central coiled coil transmits changes from the light-sensing domains to the active sites with minimal structural rearrangement. Site-directed mutants show residues essential for signal transduction over 45 Å across the protein. The use of the protein in living human cells is demonstrated with cAMP-dependent luciferase, showing a rapid and stable response to light over many hours and activation cycles. The structures determined in this study will assist future efforts to create artificial light-regulated control modules as part of a general optogenetic toolkit. PMID:27247413

  13. Desensitization of adenylate cyclase in a human keratinocyte cell line by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, E.J.; Young, M.J.; Toscano, D.L.; Greenlee, W.F.; Toscano, W.A. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of adenylate cyclase in human keratinocyte cell line SCC 12 is altered after TCDD exposure. TCDD-treated cells show a 50% decrease in isoproterenol - stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. The reduced responsiveness of these cells to isoproterenol was concentration dependent on TCDD. The inactive TCDD analog, 2,7-dibenzo-p-dioxin did not affect isoproterenol activation. Altered hormone stimulation of adenylate cyclase can result from decreased receptor number or affinity, a defect in coupling of receptors via G/sub s/, or modification of the catalytic subunit. To distinguish between these possibilities, enzyme activity was assayed in the presence of different site-specific activators of this enzyme system. Cells exposed to TCDD for 24 hr showed a reduced response to the GTP analog, Gpp(NH)p. Forskolin stimulation was not affected by TCDD treatment. (/sup 125/I)-iodocyanopindolol (ICP) binding to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors was examined after TCDD treatment. The equilibrium dissociation constant (K/sub d/) for ICP was unaffected by TCDD treatment, whereas, the total number of specific ICP-binding sites was reduced from 1080 in control cells to 780 sites per cell in TCDD (10 nM) exposed cells.

  14. Follicle-stimulating hormone receptor-mediated uptake of sup 45 Ca sup 2+ by cultured rat Sertoli cells does not require activation of cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding proteins or adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1990-08-01

    We have previously reported that FSH stimulates flux of 45Ca2+ into cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats via voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. In the present study, we show that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin (CT)- or pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein or activation of adenylate cyclase (AC). Significant stimulation of 45Ca2+ influx was observed within 1 min, and maximal response (3.2-fold over basal levels) was achieved within 2 min after exposure to FSH. FSH-stimulated elevations in cellular cAMP paralleled increases in 45Ca2+ uptake, suggesting a possible coupling of AC activation to 45Ca2+ influx. (Bu)2cAMP, however, was not able to enhance 45Ca2+ uptake over basal levels at a final concentration of 1000 microM, although a concentration-related increase in androstenedione conversion to estradiol was evident. Exposure of Sertoli cells to CT (10 ng/ml) consistently stimulated basal levels of androstenedione conversion to estradiol but had no effect on basal levels of 45Ca2+ uptake. Similarly, CT had no effect on FSH-induced 45Ca2+ uptake, but potentiated FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis. PT (10 ng/ml) augmented basal and FSH-stimulated estradiol secretion without affecting 45Ca2+ influx. The adenosine analog N6-phenylisopropyladenosine, which binds to Gi-coupled adenosine receptors on Sertoli cells, inhibited FSH-stimulated androgen conversion to estradiol in a dose-related (1-1000 nM) manner, but FSH-stimulated 45Ca2+ influx remained unchanged. Our results show that in contrast to FSH-stimulated estradiol synthesis, the flux of 45Ca2+ into Sertoli cells in response to FSH is not mediated either directly or indirectly by CT- or PT-sensitive G protein, nor does it require activation of AC. Our data further suggest that the FSH receptor itself may function as a calcium channel.

  15. Phorbol esters alter adenylate cyclase responses to vasoactive intestinal peptide and forskolin in the GH cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, S.; Florio, T.; Cronin, M.

    1986-05-01

    Activation of protein kinase C with phorbol ester modifies cyclic AMP production in several anterior pituitary cell systems. In the GH cell line from a rat pituitary tumor, exposure to phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA: 100 nM) for 30 minutes significantly reduces vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP: 100 nM) stimulated adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in subsequent membrane preparations to 62 + 4% of control (n = 6 independent studies). In contrast, these same membrane preparations respond to forskolin (1 ..mu..M) with significantly more activity, 130 +/- 6% of controls (n = 6 independent studies). Finally, phorbol ester does not block an inhibitory hormone input into the AC system; somatostatin (100 nM) reduction of VIP-stimulated AC activity is not significantly different in membrane preparations from PMA treated and control cells (n = 3 independent studies). These other findings lead the authors to propose that protein kinase C can modify several sites in the AC complex in anterior pituitary cells.

  16. Homologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase: the role of. beta. -adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and dephosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Sibley, D.R.; Strasser, R.H.; Daniel, K.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    The authors utilized the frog erythrocyte (FE) as a ..beta..-adreneric receptor (..beta..AR) model system in which to study homologous desensitization. Preincubation with isoproterenol (ISO) leads to a 50% decline in ISO-stimulated adenylate cyclase (AC) activity without significant changes in basal, PGE/sub 1/-, NaF-, GppNHp-, forskolin-, or MnCl/sub 2/-stimulated AC activities. ISO treatment also induces the sequestration of ..beta..AR from the cell surface as evidenced by a 35% decline in (/sup 3/H)CGP-12177 binding sites on the surface of intact FE. Treatment of intact FE with ISO also promotes ..beta..AR phosphorylation to 2 mol PO/sub 4//mol of ..beta..AR. At 25/sup 0/C, the time courses of ISO-induced AC desensitization, ..beta..AR sequestration and ..beta..AR phosphorylation are identical occurring without a lag and exhibiting a t 1/2 of 30 min and a maximal response at 2.5 hrs. The sequestered ..beta..AR can be partially recovered upon cell lysis in a light membrane fraction (LMF), separable from the plasma membranes using sucrose gradients or differential centrifugation. ..beta..AR phosphorylation is reversed in the sequestered LMF exhibiting a PO/sub 4//..beta..AR stoichiometry of 0.7 mol/mol - similar to that observed under basal conditions. These data suggest that phosphorylation of ..beta..AR in the plasma membrane promotes their translocation away from the cell surface into a sequestered membrane domain where the phosphorylation is reversed, thus, enabling the return of ..beta..AR back to the cell surface and recoupling with AC.

  17. Human 5-HT7 receptor-induced inactivation of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase by risperidone, 9-OH-risperidone and other "inactivating antagonists".

    PubMed

    Toohey, Nicole; Klein, Michael T; Knight, Jessica; Smith, Carol; Teitler, Milt

    2009-09-01

    We have previously reported on the unusual human 5-hydroxytryptamine(7) (h5-HT(7)) receptor-inactivating properties of risperidone, 9-OH-risperidone, bromocriptine, methiothepin, metergoline, and lisuride. Inactivation was defined as the inability of 10 microM 5-HT to stimulate cAMP accumulation after brief exposure and thorough removal of the drugs from HEK293 cells expressing h5-HT(7) receptors. Herein we report that brief exposure of the h5-HT(7) receptor-expressing cells to inactivating drugs, followed by removal of the drugs, results in potent and efficacious irreversible inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Pretreatment, followed by removal of the inactivating drugs inhibited 10 microM forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with potencies similar to the drugs' affinities for the h5-HT(7) receptor. The actions of the inactivating drugs were pertussis toxin-insensitive, indicating the lack of G(i) in their mechanism(s) of action. Methiothepin and bromocriptine maximally inhibited 10 microM forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase, whereas the other drugs produced partial inhibition, indicating the drugs are inducing slightly different inactive conformations of the h5-HT(7) receptor. Maximal effects of these inactivating drugs occurred within 15 to 30 min of exposure of the cells to the drugs. A G(s)-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated activity has never been reported. The inactivating antagonists seem to induce a stable conformation of the h5-HT(7) receptor, which induces an altered state of G(s), which, in turn, inhibits forskolin-mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These and previous observations indicate that the inactivating antagonists represent a unique class of drugs and may reveal GPCR regulatory mechanisms previously unknown. These drugs may produce innovative approaches to the development of therapeutic drugs.

  18. Adenylate Cyclase AcyA Regulates Development, Aflatoxin Biosynthesis and Fungal Virulence in Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kunlong; Qin, Qiuping; Liu, Yinghang; Zhang, Limei; Liang, Linlin; Lan, Huahui; Chen, Chihao; You, Yunchao; Zhang, Feng; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is one of the most important opportunistic pathogens of crops and animals. The carcinogenic mycotoxin, aflatoxins produced by this pathogen cause a health problem to human and animals. Since cyclic AMP signaling controls a range of physiological processes, like fungal development and infection when responding to extracellular stimuli in fungal pathogens, in this study, we investigated the function of adenylate cyclase, a core component of cAMP signaling, in aflatoxins biosynthesis and virulence on plant seeds in A. flavus. A gene replacement strategy was used to generate the deletion mutant of acyA that encodes the adenylate cyclase. Severe defects in fungal growth, sporulation and sclerotia formation were observed in the acyA deletion mutant. The defect in radical growth could be partially rescued by exogenous cAMP analog. The acyA mutant was also significantly reduced in aflatoxins production and virulence. Similar to the former studies in other fungi, The acyA mutant showed enhancing tolerance to oxidative stress, but more sensitive to heat stress. Overall, the pleiotropic defects of the acyA deletion mutant indicates that the cAMP-PKA pathway is involved in fungal development, aflatoxins biosynthesis and plant seed invasion in A. flavus. PMID:28066725

  19. Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase toxin translocation across a tethered lipid bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Veneziano, Rémi; Rossi, Claire; Chenal, Alexandre; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Ladant, Daniel; Chopineau, Joel

    2013-01-01

    Numerous bacterial toxins can cross biological membranes to reach the cytosol of mammalian cells, where they exert their cytotoxic effects. Our model toxin, the adenylate cyclase (CyaA) from Bordetella pertussis, is able to invade eukaryotic cells by translocating its catalytic domain directly across the plasma membrane of target cells. To characterize its original translocation process, we designed an in vitro assay based on a biomimetic membrane model in which a tethered lipid bilayer (tBLM) is assembled on an amine-gold surface derivatized with calmodulin (CaM). The assembled bilayer forms a continuous and protein-impermeable boundary completely separating the underlying calmodulin (trans side) from the medium above (cis side). The binding of CyaA to the tBLM is monitored by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy. CyaA binding to the immobilized CaM, revealed by enzymatic activity, serves as a highly sensitive reporter of toxin translocation across the bilayer. Translocation of the CyaA catalytic domain was found to be strictly dependent on the presence of calcium and also on the application of a negative potential, as shown earlier in eukaryotic cells. Thus, CyaA is able to deliver its catalytic domain across a biological membrane without the need for any eukaryotic components besides CaM. This suggests that the calcium-dependent CyaA translocation may be driven in part by the electrical field across the membrane. This study’s in vitro demonstration of toxin translocation across a tBLM provides an opportunity to explore the molecular mechanisms of protein translocation across biological membranes in precisely defined experimental conditions. PMID:24297899

  20. Rapid kinetics of 2-adrenergic agonist binding and inhibition of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, W.; Neubig, R.R.

    1987-05-01

    Activation of 2-adrenergic receptors in human platelets results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase (AC). To elucidate the relation between agonist binding and response, the authors have used a novel rapid-mix quench method to compare the kinetics of binding and response. At functionally effective concentrations, the time course of binding of the full 2-agonist, (TH)UK14,304 (UK), to purified platelet membranes was faster than could be measured manually. Using the rapid-mix quench method, agonist binding was quantitated for times for 0.3 to 60 seconds. UK binding exhibited biexponential kinetics. The rate constant of the fast binding component increases linearly with agonist concentration from 1 to 100 nM with a second order rate constant and 7 x 10WM s (at 25C). The slow rate constant was nearly independent of agonist concentration. The half times of the fast and slow components of binding for 100 nM UK are 1.5 seconds and approximately 2 minutes respectively. The rate and magnitude of the fast binding was unaffected by 10 M GTP whereas the magnitude of the slow phase was markedly reduced. Inhibition of forskolin stimulated AC by 100 M epinephrine occurs with a lag of 5-10 seconds in the presence of 10 M GTP. At lower GTP concentrations, this lag is prolonged. The observation that the fast component of agonist binding precedes inhibition even at agonist concentrations 20-fold lower than the EC40 for responses indicates that the rate limiting step in inhibition of AC is distal to the binding of agonist.

  1. Cardiovascular and adenylate cyclase stimulating effects of colforsin daropate, a water-soluble forskolin derivative, compared with those of isoproterenol, dopamine and dobutamine.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Masahiko; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Satoh, Yoshioki; Takahara, Akira; Nakamura, Yuji; Hashimoto, Keitaro

    2002-12-01

    Colforsin daropate is a recently developed water-soluble derivative of forskolin that directly stimulates adenylate cyclase, unlike the catecholamines. The chronotropic, inotropic and coronary vasodilator actions of colforsin daropate were compared with those of isoproterenol, dopamine and dobutamine, using canine isolated, blood-perfused heart preparations. The stimulating effect of each drug on adenylate cyclase activity was also assessed. Colforsin daropate, as well as each of the catecholamines, exerted positive chronotropic, inotropic and coronary vasodilator actions. The order of selectivity for the cardiovascular variables of colforsin daropate was coronary vasodilation > positive inotropy > positive chronotropy; whereas that of isoproterenol, dopamine and dobutamine was positive inotropy > coronary vasodilation > positive chronotropy. Thus, a marked characteristic of colforsin daropate is its potent coronary vasodilator action. On the other hand, each drug significantly increased the adenylate cyclase activity in a dose-related manner: colforsin daropate > isoproterenol > dopamine = dobutamine. These results suggest that colforsin daropate may be preferable in the treatment of severe heart failure where the coronary blood flow is reduced and beta-adrenoceptor-dependent signal transduction pathway is down-regulated.

  2. The human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor 1 (VPAC1) promoter: characterization and role in receptor expression during enterocytic differentiation of the colon cancer cell line Caco-2Cl.20.

    PubMed Central

    Couvineau, A; Maoret, J J; Rouyer-Fessard, C; Carrero, I; Laburthe, M

    2000-01-01

    The basic organization of the human vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide receptor (VPAC) 1 promoter was investigated after cloning the 5'-flanking region (1.4 kb) of the VPAC1 gene from a human genomic library. Subsequent functional analysis of various deletions of the 5'-flanking sequence, subcloned upstream of a luciferase reporter gene, was carried out in HT-29 cells. The minimal promoter region identified encompasses the -205/+76 sequence and contains a crucial CCAAT box (-182/-178) and a GC-rich sequence. Moreover a region (-1348/-933) containing a silencer element was identified. We previously showed that the expression of the VPAC1 receptor binding site is strictly dependent upon the enterocytic differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2 cells [Laburthe, Rousset, Rouyer-Fessard, Couvineau, Chantret, Chevalier and Zweibaum (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 10180-10184]. In the present study we show that VPAC1 mRNA increases dramatically when Caco-2Cl.20 cells differentiate, as measured by RNase protection assays and reverse transcriptase-PCR. A single transcript species of 3 kb is detected in differentiated cells by Northern-blot analysis. Accumulation of VPAC1 receptor mRNA is due to a 5-fold increase of transcription rate (run-on assay) without a change in mRNA half-life (9 h). Stable transfections of various constructs in Caco-2Cl.20 cells and subsequent analysis of reporter gene expression, during the enterocytic differentiation process over 25 days of culture, further indicated that the -254/+76 5'-flanking sequence is endowed with the regulatory element(s) necessary for transcriptional regulation of VPAC1 during differentiation. Altogether, these observations provide the first characterization of the basic organization of the human VPAC1 gene promoter and unravel the crucial role of a short promoter sequence in the strict transcriptional control of VPAC1 expression during differentiation of human colon cancer Caco-2

  3. Roles for pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) expression and signaling in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) in mediating the behavioral consequences of chronic stress.

    PubMed

    Hammack, Sayamwong E; Roman, Carolyn W; Lezak, Kimberly R; Kocho-Shellenberg, Margaret; Grimmig, Bethany; Falls, William A; Braas, Karen; May, Victor

    2010-11-01

    Anxiety disorders are frequently long-lasting and debilitating for more than 40 million American adults. Although stressor exposure plays an important role in the etiology of some anxiety disorders, the mechanisms by which exposure to stressful stimuli alters central circuits that mediate anxiety-like emotional behavior are still unknown. Substantial evidence has implicated regions of the central extended amygdala, including the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) and the central nucleus of the amygdala as critical structures mediating fear- and anxiety-like behavior in both humans and animals. These areas organize coordinated fear- and anxiety-like behavioral responses as well as peripheral stress responding to threats via direct and indirect projections to the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and brainstem regions (Walker et al. Eur J Pharmacol 463:199-216, 2003, Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 33(8):1291-1308, 2009; Ulrich-Lai and Herman Nat Rev Neurosci 10:397-409, 2009). In particular, the BNST has been argued to mediate these central and peripheral responses when the perceived threat is of long duration (Waddell et al. Behav Neurosci 120:324-336, 2006) and/or when the anxiety-like response is sustained (Walker and Davis Brain Struct Funct 213:29-42, 2008); hence, the BNST may mediate pathological anxiety-like states that result from exposure to chronic stress. Indeed, chronic stress paradigms result in enhanced BNST neuroplasticity that has been associated with pathological anxiety-like states (Vyas et al. Brain Res 965:290-294, 2003; Pego et al. Eur J Neurosci 27:1503-1516, 2008). Here we review evidence that suggests that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) work together to modulate BNST function and increase anxiety-like behavior. Moreover, we have shown that BNST PACAP as well as its cognate PAC1 receptor is substantially upregulated following chronic stress

  4. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica Subspecies I Using Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Adenylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Zaid; Byers, Sara Overstreet; Kriebel, Patrick; Rothrock, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single-nucleotide polymorphisms were characterized within adenylate cyclase (cyaA). The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database had 378 cyaA sequences from S. enterica subspecies I, which included 42 unique DNA sequences and 19 different amino acid sequences. Five representative isolates, namely serotypes Typhimurium, Kentucky, Enteritidis phage type PT4, and two variants of Enteritidis phage type PT13a, were differentiated within a microsphere-based fluidics system in cyaA by allele-specific primer extension. Validation against 25 poultry-related environmental Salmonella isolates representing 11 serotypes yielded a ∼89% success rate at identifying the serotype of the isolate, and a different region could be targeted to achieve 100%. When coupled with ISR, all serotypes were differentiated. Phage lineages of serotype Enteritidis 13a and 4 were identified, and a biofilm-forming strain of PT13a was differentiated from a smooth phenotype within phage type. Comparative ranking of mutation indices to genes such as the tRNA transferases, the diguanylate cyclases, and genes used for multilocus sequence typing indicated that cyaA is an appropriate gene for assessing epidemiological trends of Salmonella because of its relative stability in nucleotide composition. PMID:27035032

  5. Guanine nucleotide binding regulatory proteins and adenylate cyclase in livers of streptozotocin- and BB/Wor-diabetic rats. Immunodetection of Gs and Gi with antisera prepared against synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, C J; Blackmore, P F; Johnson, E H; Wange, R L; Krone, P K; Exton, J H

    1989-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase in liver plasma membranes from streptozotocin-diabetic (STZ) or BB/Wor spontaneously diabetic rats showed increased responsiveness to GTP, glucagon, fluoroaluminate, and cholera toxin. Basal or forskolin-stimulated activity was unchanged in STZ rats, but increased in BB/Wor rats. No change in the alpha-subunit of Gi (alpha i) was observed in STZ or BB/Wor rats using pertussis toxin-stimulated [32P]ADP-ribosylation. Immunodetection using antibodies against the COOH-terminal decapeptides of alpha T and alpha i-3 showed no change in alpha i in STZ rats and a slight decrease in BB/Wor rats. Angiotensin II inhibition of hepatic adenylate cyclase was not altered in either diabetic rat. In both models of diabetes, Gs alpha-subunits were increased as measured by cholera toxin-stimulated [32P]-ADP-ribosylation of 43-47.5-kD peptides, reconstitution with membranes from S49 cyc- cells or immunoreactivity using antibodies against the COOH-terminal decapeptide of alpha s. These data indicate that STZ-diabetes increases hepatic Gs but does not change Gi or adenylate cyclase catalytic activity. In contrast, BB/Wor rats show increased hepatic Gs and adenylate cyclase. These changes could explain the increase in hepatic cAMP and related dysfunctions observed in diabetes. Images PMID:2498395

  6. Suppression of the humoral immune response by cannabinoids is partially mediated through inhibition of adenylate cyclase by a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein coupled mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, N E; Koh, W S; Yang, K H; Lee, M; Kessler, F K

    1994-11-16

    Cannabinoid compounds, including the major psychoactive component of marihuana, delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), have been widely established as being inhibitory on a broad array of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. The presence of cannabinoid receptors has been identified recently on mouse spleen cells, which possess structural and functional characteristics similar to those of the G-protein coupled cannabinoid receptor originally identified in rat brain. These findings, together with those demonstrating that delta 9-THC inhibits adenylate cyclase in splenocytes, strongly suggest that certain aspects of immune inhibition by cannabinoids may be mediated through a cannabinoid receptor-associated mechanism. The objective of the present studies was to determine whether inhibition of adenylate cyclase is relevant to mouse spleen cell immune function and, if so, whether this inhibition is mediated through a Gi-protein coupled mechanism as previously described in neuronal tissue. Spleen cell activation by the phorbol ester phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), plus the calcium ionophore ionomycin, produced a rapid but transient increase in cytosolic cAMP, which was inhibited completely by immunosuppressive concentrations of delta 9-THC (22 microM) and the synthetic bicyclic cannabinoid CP-55940 (5.2 microM), which produced no effect on cell viability. Inhibition by cannabinoids of lymphocyte proliferative responses to PMA plus ionomycin and sheep erythrocyte (sRBC) IgM antibody-forming cell (AFC) response, was abrogated completely by low concentrations of dibutyryl-cAMP (10-100 microM). Inhibition of the sRBC AFC response by both delta 9-THC (22 microM) and CP-55940 (5.2 microM) was also abrogated by preincubation of splenocytes for 24 hr with pertussis toxin (0.1-100 ng/mL). Pertussis toxin pretreatment of spleen cells was also found to directly abrogate cannabinoid inhibition of adenylate cyclase, as measured by forskolin-stimulated accumulation

  7. Adenylate Cyclase Type III Is Not a Ubiquitous Marker for All Primary Cilia during Development

    PubMed Central

    Antal, Maria Cristina; Bénardais, Karelle; Samama, Brigitte; Auger, Cyril; Schini-Kerth, Valérie; Ghandour, Said; Boehm, Nelly

    2017-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase type III (AC3) is localized in plasma membrane of neuronal primary cilium and can be used as a marker of this cilium. AC3 has also been detected in some other primary cilia such as those of fibroblasts, synoviocytes or astrocytes. Despite the presence of a cilium in almost all cell types, we show that AC3 is not a common marker of all primary cilia of different human and mouse tissues during development. In peripheral organs, AC3 is present mainly in primary cilia in cells of the mesenchymal lineage (fibroblasts, chondroblasts, osteoblasts-osteocytes, odontoblasts, muscle cells and endothelial cells). In epithelia, the apical cilium of renal and pancreatic tubules and of ductal plate in liver is AC3-negative whereas the cilium of basal cells of stratified epithelia is AC3-positive. Using fibroblasts cell culture, we show that AC3 appears at the plasma membrane of the primary cilium as soon as this organelle develops. The functional significance of AC3 localization at the cilium membrane in some cells but not others has to be investigated in relationship with cell physiology and expression at the cilium plasma membrane of specific upstream receptors. PMID:28122017

  8. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 2 is a novel prognostic marker in malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Masugi, Yohei; Tanese, Keiji; Emoto, Katsura; Yamazaki, Ken; Effendi, Kathryn; Funakoshi, Takeru; Mori, Mariko; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2015-12-01

    Malignant melanoma is one of the lethal malignant tumors worldwide. Previously we reported that adenylate cyclase-associated protein 2 (CAP2), which is a well-conserved actin regulator, was overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma; however, CAP2 expression in other clinical cancers remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to clarify the clinicopathological significance of CAP2 overexpression in malignant melanoma. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that many melanoma cells exhibited diffuse cytoplasmic expression of CAP2, whereas no normal melanocytes showed detectable immunostaining for CAP2. A high level of CAP2 expression was seen in 14 of 50 melanomas and was significantly correlated with greater tumor thickness and nodular melanoma subtypes. In addition, a high level of CAP2 expression was associated with poor overall survival in univariate and multivariate analyses. For 13 patients, samples of primary and metastatic melanoma tissue were available: four patients exhibited higher levels of CAP2 expression in metastatic tumor compared to the primary site, whereas no patient showed lower levels of CAP2 expression in metastatic melanomas. Our findings show that CAP2 overexpression is a novel prognostic marker in malignant melanoma and that CAP2 expression seems to increase stepwise during tumor progression, suggesting the involvement of CAP2 in the aggressive behavior of malignant melanoma.

  9. Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 overexpressed in pancreatic cancers is involved in cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Ken; Takamura, Masaaki; Masugi, Yohei; Mori, Taisuke; Du, Wenlin; Hibi, Taizo; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Ohta, Tsutomu; Ohki, Misao; Hirohashi, Setsuo; Sakamoto, Michiie

    2009-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer has the worst prognosis among cancers due to the difficulty of early diagnosis and its aggressive behavior. To characterize the aggressiveness of pancreatic cancers on gene expression, pancreatic cancer xenografts transplanted into severe combined immunodeficient mice served as a panel for gene-expression profiling. As a result of profiling, the adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) gene was shown to be overexpressed in all of the xenografts. The expression of CAP1 protein in all 73 cases of pancreatic cancer was recognized by immunohistochemical analyses. The ratio of CAP1-positive tumor cells in clinical specimens was correlated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and neural invasion, and also with the poor prognosis of patients. Immunocytochemical analyses in pancreatic cancer cells demonstrated that CAP1 colocalized to the leading edge of lamellipodia with actin. Knockdown of CAP1 by RNA interference resulted in the reduction of lamellipodium formation, motility, and invasion of pancreatic cancer cells. This is the first report demonstrating the overexpression of CAP1 in pancreatic cancers and suggesting the involvement of CAP1 in the aggressive behavior of pancreatic cancer cells.

  10. Effects of forskolin on cerebral blood flow: implications for a role of adenylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Wysham, D.G.; Brotherton, A.F.; Heistad, D.D.

    1986-11-01

    We have studied cerebral vascular effects of forskolin, a drug which stimulates adenylate cyclase and potentiates dilator effects of adenosine in other vascular beds. Our goals were to determine whether forskolin is a cerebral vasodilator and whether it potentiates cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine. We measured cerebral blood flow with microspheres in anesthetized rabbits. Forskolin (10 micrograms/kg per min) increased blood flow (ml/min per 100 gm) from 39 +/- 5 (mean +/- S.E.) to 56 +/- 9 (p less than 0.05) in cerebrum, and increased flow to myocardium and kidney despite a decrease in mean arterial pressure. Forskolin did not alter cerebral oxygen consumption, which indicates that the increase in cerebral blood flow is a direct vasodilator effect and is not secondary to increased metabolism. We also examined effects of forskolin on the response to infusion of adenosine. Cerebral blood flow was measured during infusion of 1-5 microM/min adenosine into one internal carotid artery, under control conditions and during infusion of forskolin at 3 micrograms/kg per min i.v. Adenosine alone increased ipsilateral cerebral blood flow from 32 +/- 3 to 45 +/- 5 (p less than 0.05). Responses to adenosine were not augmented during infusion of forskolin. We conclude that forskolin is a direct cerebral vasodilator and forskolin does not potentiate cerebral vasodilator responses to adenosine.

  11. Defective dopamine-1 receptor adenylate cyclase coupling in the proximal convoluted tubule from the spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, S; Sidhu, A; Felder, R A

    1989-01-01

    The natriuretic effect of DA-1 agonists is less in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) than its normotensive control, the Wistar-Kyoto rat (WKY). To determine a mechanism of the decreased effect of DA-1 agonists on sodium transport, DA-1 receptors in renal proximal convoluted tubule (PCT) were studied by radioligand binding and by adenylate cyclase (AC) determinations. Specific binding of 125I-SCH 23982 (defined by 10 microM SCH 23390, a DA-1 antagonist) was concentration dependent, saturable, and stereoselective. The dissociation constant, maximum receptor density, and DA-1 antagonist inhibition constant were similar in SHR and WKY. The apparent molecular weight of the DA-1 receptor determined by the photoaffinity D1 probe 125I-MAB was also similar in WKY and SHR. However, DA-1 agonists competed more effectively for specific 125I-SCH 23982 binding sites in WKY than in SHR. Basal as well as forskolin, parathyroid hormone, GTP and Gpp(NH)p-stimulated-AC activities were similar. In contrast DA-1 agonists (fenoldopam, SKF 38393, SND 911C12) stimulated AC activity to a lesser extent in SHR. GTP and Gpp(NH)p enhanced the ability of DA-1 agonists to stimulate AC activity in WKY but not in SHR. These data suggest a defect in the DA-1 receptor-second messenger coupling mechanism in the PCT of the SHR. Images PMID:2574187

  12. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase attenuates muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling by a PKA-independent mechanism in rat carotid body Type I cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Carrie M; Wyatt, Christopher N

    2011-01-31

    Carotid body (CB) Type I cells respond to hypoxia by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. This mechanism leads to increased firing of the carotid sinus nerve (CSN) which alters breathing to maintain blood gases within the physiological range. Acetylcholine targets both muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in the rat CB, acting postsynaptically on CSN and presynaptically on Type I cells. Muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling is inhibited by the activation of G(i)-coupled receptors including histamine H3 receptors. Here inhibition of adenylate cyclase with SQ22536 mimicked H3 receptor activation. Using Ca²(+) imaging techniques it was observed that inhibition of muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling was independent of protein kinase A (PKA) as PKA inhibitors H89 and KT5720 were without effect on the muscarinic Ca²(+) response. By contrast the Epac (exchange protein activated by cAMP) inhibitor brefeldin A inhibited muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling whereas the Epac activator 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP-AM potentiated Ca²(+) signaling. Thus in Type I cells inhibition of adenylate cyclase inhibited muscarinic Ca²(+) signaling via a PKA-independent pathway that may rely upon modulation of Epac.

  13. [The effect of hypoxia on the urokinase and adenylate cyclase systems in the culture of endothelial cells of the human umbilical vein].

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A N; Tishchenko, E P; Torosian, N A; Panina, O B; Tsokolaeva, Z I; Ratner, E I; Savel'eva, G M; Parfenova, E V

    2005-06-01

    Hypoxia induces angiogenesis in ischemized tissues by means of pro-angiogenic factor expression. The key role in the growth processes and blood vessel functioning belongs to the matrix metalloproteinases, plasminogen, and its activator systems. Effect of hypoxia on expression of the urokinase activating agent plasminogen and its receptor in endothelium was studied in human umbilical vein endothelial cell model. Incubation of the endothelial cells under the conditions of hypoxia proved to reduce both urokinase formation in these cells and its secreting into the culture medium. The hypoxia-induced reduction of urokinase contents was accompanied by enhancement of expression of the urokinase receptor. The hypoxia also entailed reduction of the adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP contents in the endothelial cells. The data obtained suggest that reduction of the adenylate cyclase activity and cAMP contents under the conditions of hypoxia provide basis for suppression of the urokinase expression by the endothelial cells and, consequently, inhibition of blood vessel formation in the ischemized tissue.

  14. Stress tolerance of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylate cyclase fil1 (CYR1) mutant depends on Hsp26.

    PubMed

    Vianna, Cristina R; Ferreira, Mariana C; Silva, Carol L C; Tanghe, An; Neves, Maria J; Thevelein, Johan M; Rosa, Carlos A; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Fermentation-induced loss of stress resistance in yeast is an important phenotype from an industrial point of view. It hampers optimal use of frozen dough applications as well as high gravity brewing fermentations because these applications require stress-tolerant yeast strains during active fermentation. Different mutants (e.g. fil1, an adenylate cyclase mutant CYR1(lys1682)) that are affected in this loss of stress resistance have been isolated, but so far the identification of the target genes important for the increased tolerance has failed. Previously we have shown that neither trehalose nor Hsp104 nor STRE-controlled genes are involved in the higher stress tolerance of the fil1 mutant. The contribution of other putative downstream factors of the PKA pathway was investigated and here we show that the small heat-shock protein Hsp26 is required for the high heat stress tolerance of the fil1 mutant, both in stationary phase cells as well as during active fermentation.

  15. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. )

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  16. Rapid, semi-automated, and inexpensive radioimmunoassay of cAMP: application in GPCR-mediated adenylate cyclase assays.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin T; Kant, Andrew; Mailman, Richard B

    2009-03-15

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an important signal transduction second messenger that is commonly used as a functional mirror on the actions of G protein-coupled receptors that can activate or inhibit adenylate cyclases. A radioimmunoassay for cAMP with femtomole sensitivity was first reported by Steiner more than 30 years ago, and there have been several subsequent modifications that have improved this assay in various ways. Here we describe additional improvement to existing methods that markedly improve speed and reduce cost without sacrificing sensitivity, and is also adaptable to analysis of cGMP. The primary antibody is coupled directly to magnetic beads that are then separated from unbound marker using filtration on microplates. This eliminates the need for a secondary antibody, and markedly increases throughput. In addition, we report a simple, reproducible, and inexpensive method to make the radiomarker used for this assay. Although still requiring the use of radioactivity, the resulting method retains a high degree of accuracy and precision, and is suitable for low-cost high throughput screening. Use of aspects of this method can also improve throughput in other radioimmunoassays.

  17. Role of Bordetella pertussis RseA in the cell envelope stress response and adenylate cyclase toxin release

    PubMed Central

    Hanawa, Tomoko; Yonezawa, Hideo; Kawakami, Hayato; Kamiya, Shigeru; Armstrong, Sandra K.

    2013-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis is the bacterial agent of the human disease, whooping cough. In many bacteria, the extracellular function sigma factor σE is central to the response to envelope stress, and its activity is negatively controlled by the RseA anti-sigma factor. In this study, the role of RseA in B. pertussis envelope stress responses was investigated. Compared with the wild-type strain, an rseA mutant showed elevated resistance to envelope stress and enhanced growth at 25°C. rpoH and other predicted σE target genes demonstrated increased transcription in the rseA mutant compared with the wild type parent. Transcription of those genes was also increased in wild type B. pertussis and Escherichia coli under envelope stress, whereas no stress-induced increase in transcription was observed in the rseA mutant. rseA inactivation was also associated with altered levels of certain proteins in culture supernatant fluids, which showed increased adenylate cyclase toxin (CyaA) levels. The increased CyaA in the mutant was correlated with an apparent increased stability of the extracellular toxin and increased production of CyaA-containing outer membrane vesicles. Consistent with this, compared with the wild type strain, rseA mutant cells produced increased numbers of large surface-associated vesicles. PMID:23821542

  18. Oxidative Stress Tolerance, Adenylate Cyclase, and Autophagy Are Key Players in the Chronological Life Span of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Winemaking

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Helena; Matallana, Emilia

    2012-01-01

    Most grape juice fermentation takes place when yeast cells are in a nondividing state called the stationary phase. Under such circumstances, we aimed to identify the genetic determinants controlling longevity, known as the chronological life span. We identified commercial strains with both short (EC1118) and long (CSM) life spans in laboratory growth medium and compared them under diverse conditions. Strain CSM shows better tolerance to stresses, including oxidative stress, in the stationary phase. This is reflected during winemaking, when this strain has an increased maximum life span. Compared to EC1118, CSM overexpresses a mitochondrial rhodanese gene-like gene, RDL2, whose deletion leads to increased reactive oxygen species production at the end of fermentation and a correlative loss of viability at this point. EC1118 shows faster growth and higher expression of glycolytic genes, and this is related to greater PKA activity due to the upregulation of the adenylate cyclase gene. This phenotype has been linked to the presence of a δ element in its promoter, whose removal increases the life span. Finally, EC1118 exhibits a higher level of protein degradation by autophagy, which might help achieve fast growth at the expense of cellular structures and may be relevant for long-term survival under winemaking conditions. PMID:22327582

  19. Reduced early and late phase insulin response to glucose in isolated spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) islets: a defective link between glycolysis and adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Nesher, R; Abramovitch, E; Cerasi, E

    1989-09-01

    The spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus) exhibits low insulin responsiveness to glucose with a nearly absent early phase release. The alternative fuel-secretagogue glyceraldehyde (10 mmol/l) produced a maximal early insulin response in rat islets but failed to affect early response in Acomys; however, it potentiated the late insulin response in both species alike. Glucagon (1.5 mumol/l) potentiated the early insulin response to intermediate (8.3 mmol/l) glucose in rat and Acomys islets by two- and four-fold, respectively. Glucose doubled cyclic AMP levels in rat islets but no significant response was noted in Acomys islets. Isobutylmethylxanthine (0.1 mmol/l) and forskolin (25 mumol/l) caused a significant rise in islet cyclic AMP levels in both types of islets; however, neither agent restored the glucose stimulation of cyclic AMP in spiny mouse islets. Forskolin and isobutylmethylxanthine potentiated early and late phase insulin release in both species; however, neither augmented the early response in the Acomys to the degree observed in rat islets. Thus: (1) A deficient link exists in Acomys between glycolysis and subsequent signals. (2) These islets contain a glucose-insensitive adenylate cyclase. (3) The early insulin response may be potentiated by direct activation of adenylate cyclase. (4) The glucose effects on early and late phase insulin release are probably mediated by distinct pathways. (5) In the spiny mouse the signals mediating the early response are deranged to a greater extent than those activating the late phase insulin release.

  20. D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic stimulation of adenylate cyclase in a clone derived from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM.

    PubMed

    Balmforth, A J; Ball, S G; Freshney, R I; Graham, D I; McNamee, H B; Vaughan, P F

    1986-09-01

    Clones have been isolated from the human astrocytoma cell line G-CCM. Homogenates of clone D384 contain an adenylate cyclase that is stimulated by 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine (dopamine), noradrenaline, and isoprenaline with Ka apparent values of 4, 56, and 2.7 microM, respectively. The Ka apparent value for dopamine was increased by the D-1 antagonist cis-flupenthixol, 25 and 100 nM, to 23 and 190 microM, respectively, but was unaffected by propranolol (1 microM). Noradrenaline stimulation of adenylate cyclase was only partially inhibited by either propranolol (10 microM) or cis-flupenthixol (1 microM). Propranolol (10 microM), but not cis-flupenthixol (1 microM), prevented stimulation by isoprenaline. The stimulation of adenylate cyclase by dopamine and noradrenaline remained unchanged in the presence of phentolamine (1 microM) and sulpiride (1 microM). These results suggest that clone D384 contains both D-1 dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic receptors coupled to adenylate cyclase. Dopamine stimulates D384 adenylate cyclase through D-1 receptors, isoprenaline via beta-receptors, and noradrenaline through both receptors.

  1. Identification of a prostacyclin receptor coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, H.; Negishi, M.; Ichikawa, A. )

    1990-11-01

    A stable analogue of prostacyclin, iloprost, specifically bound to 30,000 x g pellet (the membrane fraction) prepared from mouse mastocytoma P-815 cells. The binding was dependent on time, temperature and pH, and absolutely required a divalent cation. The equilibrium dissociation constant and the maximal concentration of the binding site as determined by Scatchard plot analysis were 10.4 nM and 1.12 pmol/mg of protein, respectively. The Hill coefficient was 1.0, indicating a single entity of binding site and no cooperativity. The binding site was highly specific for iloprost among PGs tested (iloprost much greater than PGE1 greater than carbacyclin greater than PGE2). In contrast, the membrane fraction had the binding site specific for PGE2 and PGE1, which was distinct from the prostacyclin receptor. The dissociation of bound (3H)iloprost from the membrane fraction was specifically enhanced by guanine nucleotides. Furthermore, iloprost dose-dependently enhanced the activity of adenylate cyclase in a GTP-dependent manner. These results indicate that a specific prostacyclin receptor is coupled to the adenylate cyclase system via a stimulatory GTP-binding protein in mastocytoma cells.

  2. Bisamidate Prodrugs of 2-Substituted 9-[2-(Phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir) as Selective Inhibitors of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin from Bordetella pertussis.

    PubMed

    Česnek, Michal; Jansa, Petr; Šmídková, Markéta; Mertlíková-Kaiserová, Helena; Dračínský, Martin; Brust, Tarsis F; Pávek, Petr; Trejtnar, František; Watts, Val J; Janeba, Zlatko

    2015-08-01

    Novel small-molecule agents to treat Bordetella pertussis infections are highly desirable, as pertussis (whooping cough) remains a serious health threat worldwide. In this study, a series of 2-substituted derivatives of 9-[2-(phosphonomethoxy)ethyl]adenine (PMEA, adefovir), in their isopropyl ester bis(L-phenylalanine) prodrug form, were designed and synthesized as potent inhibitors of adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT) isolated from B. pertussis. The series consists of PMEA analogues bearing either a linear or branched aliphatic chain or a heteroatom at the C2 position of the purine moiety. Compounds with a small C2 substituent showed high potency against ACT without cytotoxic effects as well as good selectivity over human adenylate cyclase isoforms AC1, AC2, and AC5. The most potent ACT inhibitor was found to be the bisamidate prodrug of the 2-fluoro PMEA derivative (IC50 =0.145 μM). Although the bisamidate prodrugs reported herein exhibit overall lower activity than the bis(pivaloyloxymethyl) prodrug (adefovir dipivoxil), their toxicity and plasma stability profiles are superior. Furthermore, the bisamidate prodrug was shown to be more stable in plasma than in macrophage homogenate, indicating that the free phosphonate can be effectively distributed to target tissues, such as the lungs. Thus, ACT inhibitors based on acyclic nucleoside phosphonates may represent a new strategy to treat whooping cough.

  3. Properties of rat erythrocyte membrane cytoskeletal structures produced by digitonin extraction: digitonin-insoluble beta-adrenergic receptor, adenylate cyclase, and cholera toxin substrate.

    PubMed

    LeVine, H; Sahyoun, N E; Cuatrecasas, P

    1982-01-01

    Rat erythrocyte plasma membranes have been extracted exhaustively with digitonin at low temperature, and the residual, detergent-extracted membrane cytoskeletal material is compared to that prepared with Triton X-100 with respect to protein, glycoprotein, phospholipid, and cholesterol content. Digitonin, a weaker detergent than Triton X-100, solubilizes only 26% of the phospholipids and none of the cholesterol. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis reveals that differences between the proteins extracted by the two detergents are primarily quantitative. In terms of functional preservation, digitonin retains in the cytoskeleton 28% of the beta-adrenergic receptor binding activity (with the balance accounted for in the supernatant), greater than 90% of the adenylate cyclase and greater than 90% of the 45,000 mol wt polypeptide cholera toxin substrate. The cytoskeletal-associated beat-adrenergic receptor retains binding properties for antagonist and agonist which are identical to those of the native membrane receptor. The digitonin-extracted cytoskeleton containing the beta-adrenergic receptor may provide a useful vehicle for the reconstitution of a hormone-sensitive adenylate cyclase.

  4. Role of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase isozymes in murine colonic glucagon-like peptide 1 secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Friedlander, Ronn S; Moss, Catherine E; Mace, Jessica; Parker, Helen E; Tolhurst, Gwen; Habib, Abdella M; Wachten, Sebastian; Cooper, Dermot M; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is secreted from enteroendocrine L-cells after food intake. Increasing GLP-1 signalling either through inhibition of the GLP-1 degrading enzyme dipeptidyl-peptidase IV or injection of GLP-1-mimetics has recently been successfully introduced for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Boosting secretion from the L-cell has so far not been exploited, due to our incomplete understanding of L-cell physiology. Elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to be a strong stimulus for GLP-1 secretion and here we investigate the activities of adenylate cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isozymes likely to shape cAMP responses in L-cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Expression of AC and PDE isoforms was quantified by RT-PCR. Single cell responses to stimulation or inhibition of AC and PDE isoforms were monitored with real-time cAMP probes. GLP-1 secretion was assessed by elisa. KEY RESULTS Quantitative PCR identified expression of protein kinase C- and Ca2+-activated ACs, corresponding with phorbolester and cytosolic Ca2+-stimulated cAMP elevation. Inhibition of PDE2, 3 and 4 were found to stimulate GLP-1 secretion from murine L-cells in primary culture. This corresponded with cAMP elevations monitored with a plasma membrane targeted cAMP probe. Inhibition of PDE3 but not PDE2 was further shown to prevent GLP-1 secretion in response to guanylin, a peptide secreted into the gut lumen, which had not previously been implicated in L-cell secretion. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results reveal several mechanisms shaping cAMP responses in GLP-1 secreting cells, with some of the molecular components specifically expressed in L-cells when compared with their epithelial neighbours, thus opening new strategies for targeting these cells therapeutically. PMID:21054345

  5. Structure of the RNA 30-Phosphate Cyclase-Adenylate Intermediate Illuminates Nucleotide Specificity and Covalent Nucleotidyl Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, N.; Smith, P; Shuman, S

    2010-01-01

    RNA 3-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) synthesizes RNA 2,3 cyclic phosphate ends via three steps: reaction with ATP to form a covalent RtcA-AMP intermediate; transfer of adenylate to an RNA 3-phosphate to form RNA(3)pp(5)A; and attack of the vicinal O2 on the 3-phosphorus to form a 2,3 cyclic phosphate. Here we report the 1.7 {angstrom} crystal structure of the RtcA-AMP intermediate, which reveals the mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer. Adenylate is linked via a phosphoamide bond to the His309 N{var_epsilon} atom. A network of hydrogen bonds to the ribose O2 and O3 accounts for the stringent ribonucleotide preference. Adenine is sandwiched in a hydrophobic pocket between Tyr284 and Pro131 and the preference for adenine is enforced by Phe135, which packs against the purine C2 edge. Two sulfates bound near the adenylate plausibly mimic the 3-terminal and penultimate phosphates of RNA. The structure illuminates how the four {alpha}2/{beta}4 domains contribute to substrate binding and catalysis.

  6. Stability, structural and functional properties of a monomeric, calcium–loaded adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, from Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Cannella, Sara E.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Davi, Marilyne; Malosse, Christian; Sotomayor Pérez, Ana Cristina; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, which invades eukaryotic cells and alters their physiology by cAMP overproduction. Calcium is an essential cofactor of CyaA, as it is the case for most members of the Repeat-in-ToXins (RTX) family. We show that the calcium-bound, monomeric form of CyaA, hCyaAm, conserves its permeabilization and haemolytic activities, even in a fully calcium-free environment. In contrast, hCyaAm requires sub-millimolar calcium in solution for cell invasion, indicating that free calcium in solution is involved in the CyaA toxin translocation process. We further report the first in solution structural characterization of hCyaAm, as deduced from SAXS, mass spectrometry and hydrodynamic studies. We show that hCyaAm adopts a compact and stable state that can transiently conserve its conformation even in a fully calcium-free environment. Our results therefore suggest that in hCyaAm, the C-terminal RTX-domain is stabilized in a high-affinity calcium-binding state by the N-terminal domains while, conversely, calcium binding to the C-terminal RTX-domain strongly stabilizes the N-terminal regions. Hence, the different regions of hCyaAm appear tightly connected, leading to stabilization effects between domains. The hysteretic behaviour of CyaA in response to calcium is likely shared by other RTX cytolysins. PMID:28186111

  7. Knocking down the expression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 inhibits the proliferation and migration of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xia-Fei; Ni, Qi-Chao; Chen, Jin-Peng; Xu, Jun-Fei; Jiang, Ying; Yang, Shu-Yun; Ma, Jing; Gu, Xiao-Ling; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) is a conserved protein that was found to be up-regulated in breast cancer and related to the migration of breast cancer. We verified its roles in breast cancer specimens and cell lines. In our results, 71 of 100 specimens of breast cancer showed high levels of CAP1 by immunohistochemistry. Associated with statistical analysis, we saw that CAP1 was related to the grade of breast cancer. In MDA-MB-231, the expression of CAP1 was the highest and by knocking down the expression of CAP1 in MDA-MB-231, its ability for proliferating and migrating apparently decreased and induced changes in morphology, which were related to the arrangement of F-actin. Therefore, CAP1 might be a potential molecular targeted therapy for surgery and immune treatment.

  8. Roles of Protein Kinase A and Adenylate Cyclase in Light-Modulated Cellulase Regulation in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, André; Tisch, Doris; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway represents a central signaling cascade with crucial functions in all organisms. Previous studies of Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina) suggested a function of cAMP signaling in regulation of cellulase gene expression. We were therefore interested in how the crucial components of this pathway, adenylate cyclase (ACY1) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), would affect cellulase gene expression. We found that both ACY1 and PKA catalytic subunit 1 (PKAC1) are involved in regulation of vegetative growth but are not essential for sexual development. Interestingly, our results showed considerably increased transcript abundance of cellulase genes in darkness compared to light (light responsiveness) upon growth on lactose. This effect is strongly enhanced in mutant strains lacking PKAC1 or ACY1. Comparison to the wild type showed that ACY1 has a consistently positive effect on cellulase gene expression in light and darkness, while PKAC1 influences transcript levels of cellulase genes positively in light but negatively in darkness. A function of PKAC1 in light-modulated cellulase gene regulation is also reflected by altered complex formation within the cel6a/cbh2 promoter in light and darkness and in the absence of pkac1. Analysis of transcript levels of cellulase regulator genes indicates that the regulatory output of the cAMP pathway may be established via adjustment of XYR1 abundance. Consequently, both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A are involved in light-modulated cellulase gene expression in T. reesei and have a dampening effect on the light responsiveness of this process. PMID:22286997

  9. Subtyping of Salmonella enterica subspecies I using single nucleotide polymorphisms in adenylate cyclase (cyaA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methods to rapidly identify serotypes of Salmonella enterica subspecies I are of vital importance for protecting the safety of food. To supplement the serotyping method dkgB-linked intergenic sequence ribotyping (ISR), single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were characterized within adenylate cyclas...

  10. High expression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 accelerates the proliferation, migration and invasion of neural glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Zhen; Qiu, Xiaojun; Wang, Donglin; Ban, Na; Fan, Shaochen; Chen, Wenjuan; Sun, Jie; Xing, Weikang; Wang, Yunfeng; Cui, Gang

    2016-04-01

    Adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1), a conserved member of cyclase-associated proteins was reported to be associated with the proliferation, migration or invasion of the tumors of pancreas, breast and liver, and was involved in astrocyte proliferation after acute Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). In this study, we sought to investigate the character of CAP1 in the pathological process of human glioma by detecting human glioma specimens and cell lines. 43 of 100 specimens showed high expression of CAP1 via immunohistochemistry. With statistics analysis, we found out the expression level of CAP1 was correlated with the WHO grades of human glioma and was great positively related to Ki-67 (p<0.01). In vitro, silencing CAP1 in U251 and U87MG, the glioma cell lines with the relatively higher expression of CAP1, induced the proliferation of the cells significantly retarded, migration and invasion as well. Obviously, our results indicated that CAP1 participated in the molecular pathological process of glioma indeed, and in a certain sense, CAP1 might be a potential and promising molecular target for glioma diagnosis and therapies in the future.

  11. Identification of bacterial guanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Min-Hyung; Youn, Hwan; Kang, In-Hye; Gomelsky, Mark

    2015-05-01

    The ability of bacteria to use cGMP as a second messenger has been controversial for decades. Recently, nucleotide cyclases from Rhodospirillum centenum, GcyA, and Xanthomonas campestris, GuaX, have been shown to possess guanylate cyclase activities. Enzymatic activities of these guanylate cyclases measured in vitro were low, which makes interpretation of the assays ambiguous. Protein sequence analysis at present is insufficient to distinguish between bacterial adenylate and guanylate cyclases, both of which belong to nucleotide cyclases of type III. We developed a simple method for discriminating between guanylate and adenylate cyclase activities in a physiologically relevant bacterial system. The method relies on the use of a mutant cAMP receptor protein, CRPG , constructed here. While wild-type CRP is activated exclusively by cAMP, CRPG can be activated by either cAMP or cGMP. Using CRP- and CRPG -dependent lacZ expression in two E. coli strains, we verified that R. centenum GcyA and X. campestris GuaX have primarily guanylate cyclase activities. Among two other bacterial nucleotide cyclases tested, one, GuaA from Azospillrillum sp. B510, proved to have guanylate cyclase activity, while the other one, Bradyrhizobium japonicum CyaA, turned out to function as an adenylate cyclase. The results obtained with this reporter system were in excellent agreement with direct measurements of cyclic nucleotides secreted by E. coli expressing nucleotide cyclase genes. The simple genetic screen developed here is expected to facilitate identification of bacterial guanylate cyclases and engineering of guanylate cyclases with desired properties.

  12. A FRET-Based Method for Probing the Conformational Behavior of an Intrinsically Disordered Repeat Domain from Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-22

    2003) Designing repeat proteins: Well-expressed, soluble and stable proteins from combinatorial libraries of consensus ankyrin repeat proteins. J. Mol...A FRET-Based Method for Probing the Conformational Behavior of an Intrinsically Disordered Repeat Domain from Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase...changes exhibited by intrinsically disordered proteins is necessary as we continue to unravel their myriad biological functions. In repeats in toxin

  13. On the role of adenylate cyclase, tyrosine kinase, and tyrosine phosphatase in the response of nerve and glial cells to photodynamic impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolosov, Mikhail S.; Bragin, D. E.; Dergacheva, Olga Y.; Vanzha, O.; Oparina, L.; Uzdensky, Anatoly B.

    2004-08-01

    The role of different intercellular signaling pathways involving adenylate cyclase (AC), receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), tyrosine and serine/threonine protein phosphatases (PTP or PP, respectively) in the response of crayfish mechanoreceptor neuron (MRN) and surrounding glial cells to photodynamic effect of aluminum phthalocyanine Photosens have been studied. AC inhibition by MDL-12330A decreased neuron lifetime, whereas AC activation by forskolin increase it. Thus, increase in cAMP produced by activated AC protects SRN against photodynamic inactivation. Similarly, RTK inhibition by genistein decreased neuron lifetime, while inhibition of PTP or PP that remove phosphate groups from proteins, prolonged neuronal activity. AC inhibition reduced photoinduced damage of the plasma membrane, and, therefore, necrosis in neuronal and glial cells. RTK inhibition protected only neurons against PDT-induced membrane permeabilization while glial cells became lesser permeable under ortovanadate-mediated PTP inhibition. AC activation also prevented PDT-induced apoptosis in glial cells. PP inhibition enhanced apoptotic processes in photosensitized glial cells. Therefore, both intercellular signaling pathways involving AC and TRK are involved in the maintenance of neuronal activity, integrity of the neuronal and glial plasma membranes and in apoptotic processes in glia under photosensitization.

  14. Effect of structural analogs of butaclamol (a new antipsychotic drug) on striatal homovanillic acid and adenyl cyclase of olfactory tubercle in rats.

    PubMed

    Pugsley, T A; Merker, J; Lippman, W

    1976-08-01

    The 3-isopropyl (I), 3-cyclohexyl (II) and 3-phenyl (III) analogs of the new antipsychotic drug butaclamol, which contains a 3-tertiary butyl group, and their respective (+)-enantiomers, but not (-)-enantiomers, caused a dose related elevation of rat striatal homovanillic acid concentration, indicative of an increased dopamine (DA) turnover; droperidol also exhibited this activity. The order of activity of the (+)-enantiomers was (butaclamol) approximately II greater than I greater than III. A decrease in striatal DA was observed with (+)-I and (+)-III at the highest dose used, but not at one-half the dose. Each analog antagonized the DA-induced increase in adenyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) activity of olfactory tubercle homogenates, the order of activity of the racemates (except for II) AND (+)-ENANTIOMERS BEING (BUTACLAMOL) APPROXIMATELY I greater than III greater than II. The (+)-enantiomers of butaclamol and analogs were two to four times more potent than their respective racemates, with (+)-butaclamol and (+)-I displaying activity generally equivalent to fluphenazine. The respective (-)-enantiomers were ineffective indicating a stereochemical specificity for DA-receptor blockade. Such analogs presented should be of value in elucidating dopaminergic mechansims.

  15. A cyanobacterial light activated adenylyl cyclase partially restores development of a Dictyostelium discoideum, adenylyl cyclase a null mutant.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi-Hui; Raffelberg, Sarah; Losi, Aba; Schaap, Pauline; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    A light-regulated adenylyl cyclase, mPAC, was previously identified from the cyanobacterium Microcoleus chthonoplastes PCC7420. MPAC consists of a flavin-based blue light-sensing LOV domain and a catalytic domain. In this work, we expressed mPAC in an adenylate cyclase A null mutant (aca-) of the eukaryote Dictyostelium discoideum and tested to what extent light activation of mPAC could restore the cAMP-dependent developmental programme of this organism. Amoebas of Dictyostelium, a well-established model organism, generate and respond to cAMP pulses, which cause them to aggregate and construct fruiting bodies. mPAC was expressed under control of a constitutive actin-15 promoter in D. discoideum and displayed low basal adenylyl cyclase activity in darkness that was about five-fold stimulated by blue light. mPAC expression in aca- cells marginally restored aggregation and fruiting body formation in darkness. However, more and larger fruiting bodies were formed when mPAC expressing cells were incubated in light. Extending former applications of light-regulated AC, these results demonstrate that mPAC can be used to manipulate multicellular development in eukaryotes in a light dependent manner.

  16. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-12-21

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 ..mu..M and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 ..mu..M and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 ..mu..M respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D/sub 2/-dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 ..mu..M. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, /sup 3/H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D/sup 1/- and D/sup 2/-dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  17. In vivo control of gluconeogenesis in wild-type Neurospora crassa and in the adenylate cyclase-deficient cr-1 (crisp) mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Neves, M J; Terenzi, H F

    1989-01-01

    The rate of cycloheximide-resistant incorporation of carbon from [14C]alanine and [14C]acetate into polysaccharidic material was used to study gluconeogenic activity in wild-type Neurospora crassa and in the adenylate cyclase-deficient cr-1 (crisp-1) mutant. The wild-type efficiently utilized alanine and acetate as gluconeogenic substrates, whereas the mutant used acetate efficiently but was unable to use alanine. Cycloheximide-resistant 14C-incorporating activity was sensitive to carbon catabolite effects (repression and inactivation) in the two strains, which suggested that cyclic AMP metabolism was not involved in these regulatory responses. In the wild type, gluconeogenesis was induced by incubation of the cells in the absence of a carbon source. In contrast, cr-1 required supplementation with acetate. This finding suggested that induction of gluconeogenesis in N. crassa could be mediated by metabolites formed in carbon-starved cells. The cr-1 mutant seemed to be deficient in this process and to depend on an exogenous effector to induce gluconeogenesis. Incubation of cr-1 with cyclic AMP partially overcame the acetate requirement for induction of gluconeogenesis. PMID:2522093

  18. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 is associated with metastasis of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Min; Song, Xiaolian; Zhang, Guoliang; Peng, Aimei; Li, Xuan; Li, Ming; Liu, Yang; Wang, Changhui

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer ranks first in both prevalence and mortality rates among all types of cancer. Metastasis is the main cause of treatment failure. Biomarkers are critical to early diagnosis and prediction and monitoring of progressive lesions. Several biomarkers have been identified for lung cancer but none have been routinely used clinically. The present study assessed the diagnostic and prognostic value of cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) for lung cancer. CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were determined by real-time PCR and western blot analysis and/or immunostaining in biopsy specimens (24 neoplastic and 6 non-neoplastic) freshly collected at surgical lung resection, in 82 pathologically banked lung cancer specimens and in cultured non-invasive (95-C) and invasive (95-D) lung cancer cells. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate immunoreactive CAP1 signal with cancer type and stage. In vitro cell migration was performed to determine the effect of RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing on invasiveness of 95-D cells. These analyses collectively demonstrated that: i) both CAP1 mRNA abundance and protein content were significantly higher in neoplastic compared to non-neoplastic specimens and in metastatic compared to non-metastatic specimens but not different between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma; ii) immunoreactive CAP1 signal was significantly stronger in metastatic specimens and 95-D cells compared to non-metastatic specimens and 95-C cells; and iii) RNA interference-mediated CAP1 gene silencing adequately attenuated the invasive capacity of 95-D cells in vitro. These findings suggest that overexpression of CAP1 in lung cancer cells, particularly at the metastatic stage, may have significant clinical implications as a diagnostic/prognostic factor for lung cancer.

  19. Actin activates Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoY nucleotidyl cyclase toxin and ExoY-like effector domains from MARTX toxins

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Raoux-Barbot, Dorothée; Saveanu, Cosmin; Namane, Abdelkader; Ogryzko, Vasily; Worpenberg, Lina; David, Violaine; Henriot, Veronique; Fellous, Souad; Merrifield, Christien; Assayag, Elodie; Ladant, Daniel; Renault, Louis; Mechold, Undine

    2016-01-01

    The nucleotidyl cyclase toxin ExoY is one of the virulence factors injected by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system into host cells. Inside cells, it is activated by an unknown eukaryotic cofactor to synthesize various cyclic nucleotide monophosphates. ExoY-like adenylate cyclases are also found in Multifunctional-Autoprocessing Repeats-in-ToXin (MARTX) toxins produced by various Gram-negative pathogens. Here we demonstrate that filamentous actin (F-actin) is the hitherto unknown cofactor of ExoY. Association with F-actin stimulates ExoY activity more than 10,000 fold in vitro and results in stabilization of actin filaments. ExoY is recruited to actin filaments in transfected cells and alters F-actin turnover. Actin also activates an ExoY-like adenylate cyclase MARTX effector domain from Vibrio nigripulchritudo. Finally, using a yeast genetic screen, we identify actin mutants that no longer activate ExoY. Our results thus reveal a new sub-group within the class II adenylyl cyclase family, namely actin-activated nucleotidyl cyclase (AA-NC) toxins. PMID:27917880

  20. Challenge of human Jurkat T-cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin elicits major changes in cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) expression by up-regulating PDE3 and inducing PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 splice variants as well as down-regulating a novel PDE4A splice variant.

    PubMed Central

    Erdogan, S; Houslay, M D

    1997-01-01

    The cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) 3 and PDE4 isoforms provide the major cAMP-hydrolysing PDE activities in Jurkat T-cells, with additional contributions from the PDE1 and PDE2 isoforms. Challenge of cells with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin led to a rapid, albeit transient, increase in PDE3 activity occurring over the first 45 min, followed by a sustained increase in PDE3 activity which began after approximately 3 h and continued for at least 24 h. Only this second phase of increase in PDE3 activity was blocked by the transcriptional inhibitor actinomycin D. After approximately 3 h of exposure to forskolin, PDE4 activity had increased, via a process that could be inhibited by actinomycin D, and it remained elevated for at least a 24 h period. Such actions of forskolin were mimicked by cholera toxin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Forskolin increased intracellular cAMP concentrations in a time-dependent fashion and its action was enhanced when PDE induction was blocked with actinomycin D. Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis, using generic primers designed to detect transcripts representing enzymically active products of the four PDE4 genes, identified transcripts for PDE4A and PDE4D but not for PDE4B or PDE4C in untreated Jurkat T-cells. Forskolin treatment did not induce transcripts for either PDE4B or PDE4C; however, it reduced the RT-PCR signal for PDE4A transcripts and markedly enhanced that for PDE4D transcripts. Using RT-PCR primers for PDE4 splice variants, a weak signal for PDE4D1 was evident in control cells whereas, in forskolin-treated cells, clear signals for both PDE4D1 and PDE4D2 were detected. RT-PCR analysis of the PDE4A species indicated that it was not the PDE4A isoform PDE-46 (PDE4A4B). Immunoblotting of control cells for PDE4 forms identified a single PDE4A species of approximately 118 kDa, which migrated distinctly from the PDE4A4B isoform PDE-46, with immunoprecipitation analyses showing that it provided all of the PDE4 activity in control

  1. Coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase activity in ABC transporters

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Hundeep; Lakatos-Karoly, Andrea; Vogel, Ramona; Nöll, Anne; Tampé, Robert; Glaubitz, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, a superfamily of integral membrane proteins, catalyse the translocation of substrates across the cellular membrane by ATP hydrolysis. Here we demonstrate by nucleotide turnover and binding studies based on 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy that the ABC exporter and lipid A flippase MsbA can couple ATP hydrolysis to an adenylate kinase activity, where ADP is converted into AMP and ATP. Single-point mutations reveal that both ATPase and adenylate kinase mechanisms are associated with the same conserved motifs of the nucleotide-binding domain. Based on these results, we propose a model for the coupled ATPase-adenylate kinase mechanism, involving the canonical and an additional nucleotide-binding site. We extend these findings to other prokaryotic ABC exporters, namely LmrA and TmrAB, suggesting that the coupled activities are a general feature of ABC exporters. PMID:28004795

  2. ASP-56, a new actin sequestering protein from pig platelets with homology to CAP, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein from yeast.

    PubMed

    Gieselmann, R; Mann, K

    1992-02-24

    A new 56 kDa actin-binding protein (ASP-56) was isolated from pig platelet lysate. In falling ball viscosimetry it caused a reduction in viscosity that could be attributed to a decrease in the concentration of polymeric actin. Fluorescence measurements with NBD-labelled actin showed reduction of polymeric actin, too. These results could be explained by sequestering of actin in a non-polymerizable 1:1 ASP-56/actin complex. Sequencing of about 20 tryptic peptides of ASP-56 and comparison with known sequences revealed about 60% homology to the adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP) from yeast.

  3. Negatively charged residues of the segment linking the enzyme and cytolysin moieties restrict the membrane-permeabilizing capacity of adenylate cyclase toxin

    PubMed Central

    Masin, Jiri; Osickova, Adriana; Sukova, Anna; Fiser, Radovan; Halada, Petr; Bumba, Ladislav; Linhartova, Irena; Osicka, Radim; Sebo, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The whooping cough agent, Bordetella pertussis, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA) that plays a crucial role in host respiratory tract colonization. CyaA targets CR3-expressing cells and disrupts their bactericidal functions by delivering into their cytosol an adenylate cyclase enzyme that converts intracellular ATP to cAMP. In parallel, the hydrophobic domain of CyaA forms cation-selective pores that permeabilize cell membrane. The invasive AC and pore-forming domains of CyaA are linked by a segment that is unique in the RTX cytolysin family. We used mass spectrometry and circular dichroism to show that the linker segment forms α-helical structures that penetrate into lipid bilayer. Replacement of the positively charged arginine residues, proposed to be involved in target membrane destabilization by the linker segment, reduced the capacity of the toxin to translocate the AC domain across cell membrane. Substitutions of negatively charged residues then revealed that two clusters of negative charges within the linker segment control the size and the propensity of CyaA pore formation, thereby restricting the cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA. The ‘AC to Hly-linking segment’ thus appears to account for the smaller size and modest cell-permeabilizing capacity of CyaA pores, as compared to typical RTX hemolysins. PMID:27581058

  4. Characteristics of muscarinic receptors that selectively couple to inhibition of adenylate cyclase or stimulation of phospholipase C on NG108-15 and 1321N1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to establish whether different muscarinic receptor proteins selectively couple to different second messenger response system. Although both second messenger response systems are fully functional in both cell lines, activation of muscarinic cholinergic receptors only results in inhibition of adenylate cyclase in NG108-15 neuroblastoma {times} glioma cells and stimulation of phosphoinositide hydrolysis in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell types were covalently labeled with ({sup 3}H)Propylbenzilylcholine mustard (({sup 3}H)PBCM) and the mobilities of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cells were compared by SDS-PAGE. 1321N1 and NG108-15 cells each primarily expressed a single ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species with an apparent size of approximately 92,000 and 66,000 Da, respectively. ({sup 3}H)PBCM labelling was completely inhibited by 1 {mu}M atropine or by down-regulation of muscarinic receptors by an overnight incubation with carbachol. The apparent size of the ({sup 3}H)PBCM-labelled species of both cell lines was not altered by treatment with a series of protease inhibitors or by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Another approach for determining differences in the muscarinic receptors of 2 cells lines was to study agonist-induced alteration of muscarinic receptor number. Exposure of both cell types to agonists resulted in rapid loss of muscarinic receptors from cell surface without change of total cellular muscarinic receptors followed by subsequently loss of receptors from cells. Muscarinic receptors on both cell lines were regulated by agonist with similar properties.

  5. Testosterone regulates levels of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles of orchidectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Ramli, Nur Siti Khadijah; Giribabu, Nelli; Muniandy, Sekaran; Salleh, Naguib

    2016-01-15

    Secretions of chloride (Cl(-))- and bicarbonate (HCO3(-))-rich fluid by the seminal vesicles could involve cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), which activity can be stimulated by cAMP generated from the reaction involving adenylate cyclase (AC). In this study, we investigated levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in the seminal vesicles under testosterone influence. Orchidectomized adult male rats received 7-day treatment with 125 or 250 μg/kg/day of testosterone with or without flutamide or finasteride. At the end of the treatment, animals were sacrificed and seminal vesicles were harvested for analyses of CFTR and AC protein expression level by Western blotting. Distribution of CFTR and AC in seminal vesicles was observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP and dihydrotestosterone in seminal vesicle homogenates were measured by ELISA. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, AC, and cAMP levels increased with increasing doses of testosterone (P < 0.05 compared to nontreated orchidectomized rats). Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator and AC were expressed at the apical membrane of the epithelium lining the seminal vesicle lumen with higher expression levels observed in testosterone-treated rats than in non-treated orchidectomized rats (P < 0.05). The inhibitory effects of flutamide or finasteride on these parameters were greater in 250 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats than their effects in 125 μg/kg/day testosterone-treated rats. Higher dihydrotestosterone levels were observed in seminal vesicle homogenates after treatment with 250 μg/kg/day than with 125 μg/kg/day of testosterone (P < 0.05). Increased levels of CFTR, AC, and cAMP in seminal vesicles might contribute toward an increase in Cl(-) and HCO3(-) concentrations in the seminal fluid as reported under testosterone influence.

  6. Plant growth-promoting hormones activate mammalian guanylate cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Hudson, J L; Pipkin, J L; Pack, L D; Meiners, S E

    1985-05-01

    In vivo injections of plant growth-promoting hormones increase the growth of animals as well as plants. Plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators are known to increase RNA and protein synthesis. Since cyclic GMP also increases RNA and protein synthesis, the object of the present investigation was to determine whether physiological levels of plant growth-promoting hormones and positive plant growth regulators have part of their mechanism(s) of action through stimulation of the guanylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.2)-cyclic GMP system. Representatives of the three classes of growth-promoting hormones were investigated. Thus, auxins (indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-butyric acid, beta-naphthoxyacetic acid, and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxy acetic acid), gibberellins (gibberellic acid), and cytokinins [N6-benzyl adenine, kinetin (6-furfuryl aminopurine), and beta-(2-furyl) acrylic acid] all increased rat lung, small intestine, liver, and renal cortex guanylate cyclase activity 2- to 4-fold at the 1 microM concentration. Dose response curves revealed that maximal stimulation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth regulators was at 1 microM; there was no augmented cyclase activity at 1 nM. The guanylate cyclase cationic cofactor manganese was not essential for augmentation of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting regulators. The antioxidant butylated hydroxytoluene did not block the enhancement of guanylate cyclase by these plant growth-promoting factors. These data suggest that guanylate cyclase may play a role in the mechanism of action of plant growth-promoting hormones and even of positive plant regulators at the cellular level.

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis of human beta-adrenergic receptors: substitution of aspartic acid-130 by asparagine produces a receptor with high-affinity agonist binding that is uncoupled from adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, C M; Chung, F Z; Wang, C D; Venter, J C

    1988-01-01

    By using oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis, we have produced a point mutation (guanine to adenine) at nucleotide 388 of the gene for human beta-adrenergic receptor (beta AR) that results in a substitution of asparagine for the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 130 in the putative third transmembrane domain of the human beta AR ([Asn130]beta AR). We have examined the functional significance of this mutation in B-82 cells continuously expressing the mutant [Asn130]beta AR. The mutant [Asn130]beta AR displayed normal antagonist binding but unusually high-affinity agonist binding (5- to 10-fold higher than wild-type beta AR), consistent with a single class of high-affinity binding sites. The mutant beta AR displayed guanine nucleotide-sensitive changes in agonist affinity (3- to 5-fold shift) implying an interaction between the beta AR and the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein; however, the ability of guanine nucleotides to alter agonist affinity was attenuated. Addition of saturating concentrations of isoproterenol to cell cultures expressing mutant [Asn130]-beta ARs had no effect on intracellular levels of cAMP, indicating that the mutant beta AR is unable to affect stimulation of adenylate cyclase. These results indicate that substitution of the aspartic acid with asparagine at residue 130 of the human beta AR dissociates the well-characterized guanine nucleotide effects on agonist affinity from those on activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein and adenylate cyclase and suggests the existence of two distinct counterions for the amine portion of catecholamines that are associated with high- and low-affinity agonist binding states of beta AR. Images PMID:2840663

  8. CAP1, an Adenylate Cyclase-Associated Protein Gene, Regulates Bud-Hypha Transitions, Filamentous Growth, and Cyclic AMP Levels and Is Required for Virulence of Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Sundstrom, Paula

    2001-01-01

    In response to a wide variety of environmental stimuli, the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans exits the budding cycle, producing germ tubes and hyphae concomitant with expression of virulence genes, such as that encoding hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1). Biochemical studies implicate cyclic AMP (cAMP) increases in promoting bud-hypha transitions, but genetic evidence relating genes that control cAMP levels to bud-hypha transitions has not been reported. Adenylate cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) of nonpathogenic fungi interact with Ras and adenylate cyclase to increase cAMP levels under specific environmental conditions. To initiate studies on the relationship between cAMP signaling and bud-hypha transitions in C. albicans, we identified, cloned, characterized, and disrupted the C. albicans CAP1 gene. C. albicans strains with inactivated CAP1 budded in conditions that led to germ tube formation in isogenic strains with CAP1. The addition of 10 mM cAMP and dibutyryl cAMP promoted bud-hypha transitions and filamentous growth in the cap1/cap1 mutant in liquid and solid media, respectively, showing clearly that cAMP promotes hypha formation in C. albicans. Increases in cytoplasmic cAMP preceding germ tube emergence in strains having CAP1 were markedly diminished in the budding cap1/cap1 mutant. C. albicans strains with deletions of both alleles of CAP1 were avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. The avirulence of a germ tube-deficient cap1/cap1 mutant coupled with the role of Cap1 in regulating cAMP levels shows that the Cap1-mediated cAMP signaling pathway is required for bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and the pathogenesis of candidiasis. PMID:11325951

  9. CAP1, an adenylate cyclase-associated protein gene, regulates bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and cyclic AMP levels and is required for virulence of Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Bahn, Y S; Sundstrom, P

    2001-05-01

    In response to a wide variety of environmental stimuli, the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans exits the budding cycle, producing germ tubes and hyphae concomitant with expression of virulence genes, such as that encoding hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1). Biochemical studies implicate cyclic AMP (cAMP) increases in promoting bud-hypha transitions, but genetic evidence relating genes that control cAMP levels to bud-hypha transitions has not been reported. Adenylate cyclase-associated proteins (CAPs) of nonpathogenic fungi interact with Ras and adenylate cyclase to increase cAMP levels under specific environmental conditions. To initiate studies on the relationship between cAMP signaling and bud-hypha transitions in C. albicans, we identified, cloned, characterized, and disrupted the C. albicans CAP1 gene. C. albicans strains with inactivated CAP1 budded in conditions that led to germ tube formation in isogenic strains with CAP1. The addition of 10 mM cAMP and dibutyryl cAMP promoted bud-hypha transitions and filamentous growth in the cap1/cap1 mutant in liquid and solid media, respectively, showing clearly that cAMP promotes hypha formation in C. albicans. Increases in cytoplasmic cAMP preceding germ tube emergence in strains having CAP1 were markedly diminished in the budding cap1/cap1 mutant. C. albicans strains with deletions of both alleles of CAP1 were avirulent in a mouse model of systemic candidiasis. The avirulence of a germ tube-deficient cap1/cap1 mutant coupled with the role of Cap1 in regulating cAMP levels shows that the Cap1-mediated cAMP signaling pathway is required for bud-hypha transitions, filamentous growth, and the pathogenesis of candidiasis.

  10. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. VI. Characteristics of adrenoceptors and adenylate cyclase response in rat ascites hepatoma cells and human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sanae, F; Kohei, K; Nomura, M; Miyamoto, K

    1992-06-01

    Alpha 1, alpha 2- and beta-Adrenoceptor densities and catecholamine responsiveness in established hepatoma cells, rat ascites hepatoma AH13, AH66, AH66F, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974 cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma HLF and HepG2 cells, were compared with those in normal rat hepatocytes and Chang liver cells. Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor densities measured by [3H]prazosin bindings were not detected in all hepatoma cell lines. Alpha 2-Adrenoceptor densities measured by [3H]clonidine bindings were also barely detected in hepatoma cell lines except for AH130 cells and HepG2 cells. Regarding beta-adrenoceptor, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974 cells had much more [125I]iodocyanopindolol binding sites than normal rat hepatocytes, although we could not detect the binding in HepG2 cells. Adenylate cyclase of normal rat hepatocyte and Chang liver cells were stimulated by beta 2-adrenergic agonist salbutamol, while the cyclase in hepatoma cells had no beta 2-adrenergic response but a beta 1-type response. These findings indicate that the characteristics of adrenergic response in hepatoma cell lines is very different from that in normal hepatocytes, suggesting a participation in the hepatocarcinogenesis and/or the autonomous proliferation of hepatoma cells.

  11. Saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity increases adenylate cyclase of myocardial β-adrenergic system and does not compromise cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Vileigas, Danielle F; de Deus, Adriana F; da Silva, Danielle C T; de Tomasi, Loreta C; de Campos, Dijon H S; Adorni, Caroline S; de Oliveira, Scarlet M; Sant'Ana, Paula G; Okoshi, Katashi; Padovani, Carlos R; Cicogna, Antonio C

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is a worldwide pandemic associated with high incidence of cardiovascular disease. The mechanisms by which the obesity leads cardiac dysfunction are not fully elucidated and few studies have evaluated the relationship between obesity and proteins involved in myocardial β-adrenergic (βA) system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cardiac function and βA pathway components in myocardium of obese rats. Male Wistar rats were distributed into two groups: control (n = 17; standard diet) and obese (n = 17; saturated high-fat diet) fed for 33 weeks. Nutritional profile and comorbidities were assessed. Cardiac structure and function was evaluated by macroscopic postmortem, echocardiographic and isolated papillary muscle analyzes. Myocardial protein expression of β1- and β2-adrenergic receptors, Gαs protein, adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) was performed by Western blot. Cardiac cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and PKA activity were assessed by ELISA Obese rats showed increased adiposity index (P < 0.001) and several comorbidities as hypertension, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, and dyslipidemia compared with control rats. Echocardiographic assessment revealed increased left atrium diameter (C: 4.98 ± 0.38 vs. Ob: 5.47 ± 0.53, P = 0.024) and posterior wall shortening velocity (C: 37.1 ± 3.6 vs. Ob: 41.8 ± 3.8, P = 0.007) in obese group. Papillary muscle evaluation indicated that baseline data and myocardial responsiveness to isoproterenol stimulation were similar between the groups. Protein expression of myocardial AC was higher in obese group than in the control (C: 1.00 ± 0.21 vs. Ob: 1.25 ± 0.10, P = 0.025), whereas the other components were unchanged. These results suggest that saturated high-fat diet-induced obesity was not effective in triggering cardiac dysfunction and impair the beta-adrenergic signaling.

  12. Overexpression of adenylate cyclase-associated protein 1 may predict brain metastasis in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shuan-Shuan; Tan, Min; Lin, Hai-Yan; Xu, Lei; Shen, Chang-Xing; Yuan, Qing; Song, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Chang-Hui

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to establish a biomarker risk model for predicting brain metastasis (BM) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The model comprises 120 cases of NSCLC that were treated and followed up for 4 years. The patients were divided into the BM (n=50) and non-BM (other visceral metastasis and those without recurrence) (n=70) groups. Immunohistochemical and western blot analyses were performed in metastatic tissues of NSCLC. Multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate the immunoreactive cyclase-associated protein 1 (CAP1) signal with BM. Survival analyses were performed by using the Kaplan-Meier method. CAP1 protein content and immunoreactivity were significantly increased in BM specimens compared to other-metastatic specimens. The survival analysis revealed that CAP1 overexpression was significantly associated with survival (P<0.05). The ROC test suggested that the area under the curve was 73.33% (P<0.001; 95% CI, 63.5-83.2%). When P=0.466, the sensitivity and specificity reached 79.5 and 67.1%, respectively. These findings suggested that CAP1 is involved in the BM of NSCLC, and that elevated levels of CAP1 expression may indicate a poor prognosis for patients with BM. The CAP1 molecular model may be useful in the prediction of the risk of BM in NSCLC.

  13. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  14. Structural characterization by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of a genetically engineered high-affinity calmodulin-binding peptide derived from Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munier, H; Bouhss, A; Gilles, A M; Palibroda, N; Bârzu, O; Mispelter, J; Craescu, C T

    1995-07-10

    This paper reports the solution conformation of a peptide (P196-267) derived from the calmodulin-binding domain of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase. P196-267 corresponding to the protein fragment situated between amino acid residues 196-267 was overproduced by a recombinant Escherichia coli strain. Its affinity for calmodulin is only one order of magnitude lower (Kd = 2.4 nM) than that of the whole bacterial enzyme (Kd = 0.2 nM). The proton resonances of the NMR spectra of P196-267 were assigned using homonuclear two-dimensional techniques (double-quantum-filtered J-correlated spectroscopy, total correlation spectroscopy, and nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy) and a standard assignment procedure. Analysis of the nuclear Overhauser effect connectivities and the secondary shift distribution of C alpha protons along the sequence allowed us to identify the elements of regular secondary structure. The peptide is flexible in solution, being in equilibrium between random coil and helical structures. Two segments of 11 amino acids (situated between V215 and A225) and 15 amino acids (situated between L233 and A247) populate in a significant proportion the helix conformational state. The two helices can be considerably stabilized in a mixed solvent, trifluoroethanol/water (30/70), suggesting that the corresponding fragment in the intact protein assumes a similar secondary conformation. No elements of tertiary structure organization were detected by the present experiments. The conformational properties of the isolated calmodulin target fragment are discussed in relation with the available NMR and X-ray data on various peptides complexed to calmodulin.

  15. Regulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase complex of 3T3-L1 fibroblasts by sodium butyrate

    SciTech Connect

    Stadel, J.M.; Poksay, K.S.; Nakada, M.T.; Crooke, S.T.

    1986-05-01

    Mouse 3T3-L1 fibroblasts contain beta-adrenergic receptors (BAR), predominantly of the B/sub 1/ subtype. Incubation of these cells with 2-10 mM sodium butyrate (SB) for 24-48 hr results in a switch in the BAR subtype from B/sub 1/ to B/sub 2/ and promotes a 1.5 to 2.5 fold increase in total BAR number. Other short chain acids were not as effective as SB in promoting changes in BAR. BAR were assayed in membranes prepared from the 3T3-L1 cells using the radiolabeled antagonist (/sup 125/I)-cyanopindolol and the B/sub 2/ selective antagonist ICI 118.551. BAR subtype switch was confirmed functionally by measuring cellular cAMP accumulation in response to agonists. The structure and amount of the alpha subunits of the guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ were determined by ADP-ribosylation using /sup 32/P-NAD and either cholera toxin or pertussis toxin for labeling of the respective subunits. Preincubation of cells with 5 mM SB for 48 hr resulted in a 2-3 fold increase in the labeling of the alpha subunits of both N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A protein of M/sub r/ = 44,000 showed enhanced labeling by cholera toxin following SB treatment of the cells. These data indicate SB concomitantly regulates expression of BAR subtype and components of the adenylate cyclase in 3T3-L1 cells.

  16. [Differentially expressed genes identified in the main olfactory epithelium of mice with deficiency of adenylate cyclase 3 by using suppression subtractive hybridization approach].

    PubMed

    Zhenlong, Cao; Jiangye, Hao; Yanfen, Zhou; Zhe, Zhang; Zhihua, Ni; Yuanxiang, Hu; Weili, Liu; Yongchao, Li; Daniel, R Storm; Runlin, Z Ma; Zhenshan, Wang

    2014-06-01

    Adenylate cyclase 3 (AC3) is one of the major players in the olfactory signaling within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of mice. However, we are not ascertained whether deficiency of AC3 will lead to the differential expression of related genes in the MOE. Forward and reverse subtractive libraries were constructed by suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) approach, with MOEs from AC3(-/-) and AC3(+/+) mice. These two libraries were primarily screened by Dot blot, differential expressed clones were sequenced and analyzed by bioinformatics, and differential expressed genes were verified by qRT-PCR. A total of 386 differentially expressed clones were picked out after Dot blot. The DNA sequences of 80 clones randomly selected were determined, and 62 clones were identified by blasting in GenBank. We found that 24 up-regulated clones were corresponded to genes of kcnk3, mapk7, megf11, and 38 down-regulated clones were corresponded to tmem88b, c-mip, skp1a, mlycd, etc. Their functions were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO) and found to be mainly focused on molecular binding, cell cycle, processes of biology and cells. Five genes (kcnk3, c-mip, mlycd, tmem88b and trappc5) were verified by qRT-PCR with individuals of AC3(+/+) and AC3(-/-) mice. The data indicate that kcnk3 gene is up-regulated significantly, increasing 1.27 folds compared to control mice, whereas c-mip, mlycd, tmem88b and trappc5 are down-regulated significantly, decreasing 20%, 7%, 32% and 29% compared to the AC3(+/+)mice. The functions of these genes are closely related with K(+) channels, cell differentiation, metabolism of fats, membrane transportation, and so on. It is tempting to speculate that these genes might work together with AC3 to orchestrate the olfactory transduction signaling in the MOE.

  17. Role for the beta-adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cyclase in the ontogenetic subsensitivity to isoproterenol in the embryonic chick ventricle

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Isoproterenol (ISO) increases contractility and cyclic AMP content in ventricles of embryonic and hatched chicks. A transient decrease in beta-agonist sensitivity for both effects is seen in 18 day embryos (10E). Beta-adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cylase (AC) and receptor binding were characterized in 14,000xg particulates and purified membranes from the ventricles of 10-11E, 17-19E and week-old chicks (5-6H). In crude particulates, the K/sub act/ for ISO (+100 ..mu..M Gpp(NH)p)-stimulated AC is greatest in the 17-19E. Maximal (ISO + Gpp(NH)p)-AC of the 11E is two-fold greater and NaF-AC is 30% greater than those of the 17-19E and 5-6 H. All age groups have comparable catalytic AC. All age groups have comparable K/sub d/'s for /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol (5-11 nM), while the 18E has 40% fewer receptors than the 11E and 5-6H. In particulates or membranes, K/sub act/ values for Gpp(NH)p, NaF, MnCl> and forskolin are unchanged with age. In membranes, K/sub act/ values for ISO plus guanine nucleotide (G) and maximal (ISO + G)-AC are similar in all ages. The net effect of ISO ((ISO + G) minus G) is least while that of G (G minus basal) is greatest in the 18E. Whereas /sup 32/P-labeling of a 42 kd protein by cholera toxin is lowest (25% decrease) in particulates of the 18E, labeling of a 39-41 kd doublet by pertussis toxin decreases continuously (by 50%) with age. All age groups have comparable K/sub d/'s (10-13 pM) for (/sup 125/I)-cyanopindolol (CYP). These data indicate that a transient decrease in receptor number and receptor-N/sub s/ (guanine nucleotide-sensitive) coupling in the 18E contribute to the subsensitivity to beta-agonist.

  18. Direct interaction between the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase from bovine brain with /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin and /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Minocherhomjee, A.M.; Selfe, S.; Flowers, N.J.; Storm, D.R.

    1987-07-14

    A calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been purified to apparent homogeneity from bovine cerebral cortex using calmodulin-Sepharose followed by forskolin-Sepharose and wheat germ agglutinin-Sepharose. The final product appeared as one major polypeptide of approximately 135,000 daltons on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This polypeptide was a major component of the protein purified through calmodulin-Sepharose. The catalytic subunit was stimulated 3-4-fold by calmodulin (CaM) with a turnover number greater than 1000 min/sup -1/ and was directly inhibited by adenosine. The catalytic subunit of the enzyme interacted directly with /sup 125/I-CaM on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay system, and this interaction was Ca/sup 2 +/ concentration dependent. In addition, the catalytic subunit was shown to directly bind /sup 125/I-labeled wheat germ agglutinin using a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel overlay technique, and N-acetylglucosamine inhibited binding of the lectin to the catalytic subunit. Calmodulin did not inhibit binding of wheat germ agglutinin to the catalytic subunit, and the binding of calmodulin was unaffected by wheat germ agglutinin. These data illustrate that the catalytic subunit of the calmodulin-sensitive adenylate cyclase is a glycoprotein which interacts directly with calmodulin and that adenosine can inhibit the enzyme without intervening receptors or G coupling proteins. It is concluded that the catalytic subunit of adenylate cyclase is a transmembrane protein with a domain accessible from the outer surface of the cell.

  19. Oligomeric state affects oxygen dissociation and diguanylate cyclase activity of globin coupled sensors.

    PubMed

    Burns, Justin L; Deer, D Douglas; Weinert, Emily E

    2014-11-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation is regulated by enzymes, such as diguanylate cyclases, that respond to environmental signals and alter c-di-GMP levels. Diguanylate cyclase activity of two globin coupled sensors is shown to be regulated by gaseous ligands, with cyclase activity and O2 dissociation affected by protein oligomeric state.

  20. Adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP receptor protein modulate stress resistance and virulence capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Grant T; Norton, J Paul; Bower, Jean M; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) interacts with the transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP), forming active cAMP-CRP complexes that can control a multitude of cellular activities, including expanded carbon source utilization, stress response pathways, and virulence. Here, we assessed the role of cAMP-CRP as a regulator of stress resistance and virulence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infections worldwide. Deletion of genes encoding either CRP or CyaA, the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis, attenuates the ability of UPEC to colonize the bladder in a mouse infection model, dependent on intact innate host defenses. UPEC mutants lacking cAMP-CRP grow normally in the presence of glucose but are unable to utilize alternate carbon sources like amino acids, the primary nutrients available to UPEC within the urinary tract. Relative to the wild-type UPEC isolate, the cyaA and crp deletion mutants are sensitive to nitrosative stress and the superoxide generator methyl viologen but remarkably resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and acid stress. In the mutant strains, H(2)O(2) resistance correlates with elevated catalase activity attributable in part to enhanced translation of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Acid resistance was promoted by both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms, including expression of the RpoS-regulated DNA-binding ferritin-like protein Dps. We conclude that balanced input from many cAMP-CRP-responsive elements, including RpoS, is critical to the ability of UPEC to handle the nutrient limitations and severe environmental stresses present within the mammalian urinary tract.

  1. Porcine CD38 exhibits prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Ting, Kai Yiu; Leung, Christina F P; Graeff, Richard M; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan; Kotaka, Masayo

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) stores and activates Ca(2+) influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. It is one of the products produced from the catalysis of NAD(+) by the multifunctional CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase superfamily. After elimination of the nicotinamide ring by the enzyme, the reaction intermediate of NAD(+) can either be hydrolyzed to form linear ADPR or cyclized to form cADPR. We have previously shown that human CD38 exhibits a higher preference towards the hydrolysis of NAD(+) to form linear ADPR while Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase prefers cyclizing NAD(+) to form cADPR. In this study, we characterized the enzymatic properties of porcine CD38 and revealed that it has a prominent secondary NAD(+) cyclase activity producing cADPR. We also determined the X-ray crystallographic structures of porcine CD38 and were able to observe conformational flexibility at the base of the active site of the enzyme which allow the NAD(+) reaction intermediate to adopt conformations resulting in both hydrolysis and cyclization forming linear ADPR and cADPR respectively.

  2. Potent Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activities of Oxidosqualene Cyclase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Frederick S.; Griffin, John H.; Wilson, Aaron J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.

    2001-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the protozoan agent that causes Chagas' disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Better drugs are needed to treat infected individuals. The sterol biosynthesis pathway is a potentially excellent target for drug therapy against T. cruzi. In this study, we investigated the antitrypanosomal activities of a series of compounds designed to inhibit a key enzyme in sterol biosynthesis, oxidosqualene cyclase. This enzyme converts 2,3-oxidosqualene to the tetracyclic product, lanosterol. The lead compound, N-(4E,8E)-5,9, 13-trimethyl-4,8, 12-tetradecatrien-1-ylpyridinium, is an electron-poor aromatic mimic of a monocyclized transition state or high-energy intermediate formed from oxidosqualene. This compound and 27 related compounds were tested against mammalian-stage T. cruzi, and 12 inhibited growth by 50% at concentrations below 25 nM. The lead compound was shown to cause an accumulation of oxidosqualene and decreased production of lanosterol and ergosterol, consistent with specific inhibition of the oxidosqualene cyclase. The data demonstrate potent anti-T. cruzi activity associated with inhibition of oxidosqualene cyclase. PMID:11257036

  3. Stress-related disorders, pituitary adenylate cyclase—activating peptide (PACAP)ergic system, and sex differences

    PubMed Central

    Ramikie, Teniel S.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2016-01-01

    Trauma-related disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are remarkably common and debilitating, and are often characterized by dysregulated threat responses. Across numerous epidemiological studies, females have been found to have an approximately twofold increased risk for PTSD and other stress-related disorders. Understanding the biological mechanisms of this differential risk is of critical importance. Recent data suggest that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) pathway is a critical regulator of the stress response across species. Moreover, increasing evidence suggests that this pathway is regulated by both stress and estrogen modulation and may provide an important window into understanding mechanisms of sex differences in the stress response. We have recently shown that PACAP and its receptor (PAC1R) are critical mediators of abnormal processes after psychological trauma. Notably, in heavily traumatized human subjects, there appears to be a robust sex-specific association of PACAP blood levels and PAC1R gene variants with fear physiology, PTSD diagnosis, and symptoms, specifically in females. The sex-specific association occurs within a single-nucleotide polymorphism (rs2267735) that resides in a putative estrogen response element involved in PAC1R gene regulation. Complementing these human data, the PAC1R messenger RNA is induced with fear conditioning or estrogen replacement in rodent models. These data suggest that perturbations in the PACAP-PAC1R pathway are regulated by estrogen and are involved in abnormal fear responses underlying PTSD. PMID:28179812

  4. The intact CFTR protein mediates ATPase rather than adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Ugwu, Francisca; Stratford, Fiona L L; Huan, Ling-Jun; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2008-06-01

    The two NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) proteins function in a complex to mediate ATPase activity and this activity has been linked to their regulated transport activity. A similar model has been proposed for CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the chloride channel defective in cystic fibrosis, wherein ATP binding and hydrolysis regulate the channel gate. Recently, it was shown that the individual NBDs isolated from CFTR primarily mediate adenylate kinase activity, raising the possibility that this activity may also contribute to gating of the CFTR channel. However, this present study shows that whereas the isolated NBDs exhibit adenylate kinase activity, the full-length purified and reconstituted CFTR protein functions as an ATPase, arguing that the enzymatic activity of the NBDs is dependent on their molecular context and appropriate domain-domain assembly. As expected, the disease-causing mutant bearing a mutation in the ABC signature motif, CFTR-G551D, exhibited a markedly reduced ATPase activity. Furthermore, mutation of the putative catalytic base in CFTR caused a reduction in ATPase activity, with the CFTR-E1371Q mutant supporting a low level of residual activity. Neither of these mutants exhibited detectable adenylate kinase activity. Together, these findings support the concept that the molecular mechanism of action of CFTR is dependent on ATP binding and hydrolysis, and that the structure of prokaryotic ABC ATPases provide a useful template for understanding their mechanism of action.

  5. Pituitary Adenlylate Cyclase Activating Peptide Protects Adult Neural Stem Cells from a Hypoglycaemic milieu

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Shiva; Lietzau, Grazyna; Lundberg, Mathias; Nathanson, David; Nyström, Thomas; Patrone, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycaemia is a common side-effect of glucose-lowering therapies for type-2 diabetic patients, which may cause cognitive/neurological impairment. Although the effects of hypoglycaemia in the brain have been extensively studied in neurons, how hypoglycaemia impacts the viability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) has been poorly investigated. In addition, the cellular and molecular mechanisms of how hypoglycaemia regulates NSCs survival have not been characterized. Recent work others and us have shown that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist Exendin-4 stimulate NSCs survival against glucolipoapoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish an in vitro system where to study the effects of hypoglycaemia on NSC survival. Furthermore, we determine the potential role of PACAP and Exendin-4 in counteracting the effect of hypoglycaemia. A hypoglycaemic in vitro milieu was mimicked by exposing subventricular zone-derived NSC to low levels of glucose. Moreover, we studied the potential involvement of apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress by quantifying protein levels of Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and mRNA levels of CHOP. We show that PACAP via PAC-1 receptor and PKA activation counteracts impaired NSC viability induced by hypoglycaemia. The protective effect induced by PACAP correlated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, Exendin-4 was ineffective. The results show that hypoglycaemia decreases NSC viability and that this effect can be substantially counteracted by PACAP via PAC-1 receptor activation. The data supports a potential therapeutic role of PAC-1 receptor agonists for the treatment of neurological complications, based on neurogenesis impairment by hypoglycaemia. PMID:27305000

  6. Role for Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) in Cystitis-induced Plasticity of Micturition Reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Braas, Karen M.; May, Victor; Zvara, Peter; Nausch, Bernhard; Kliment, Jan; Dunleavy, J. Dana; Nelson, Mark T.; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2006-01-01

    PACAP peptides are expressed and regulated in sensory afferents of the micturition pathway. Although these studies have implicated PACAP in bladder control, the physiological significance of these observations has not been firmly established. To clarify these issues, the roles of PACAP and PACAP signaling in micturition and cystitis were examined in receptor characterization and physiological assays. PACAP receptors were identified in various tissues of the micturition pathway including bladder detrusor smooth muscle and urothelium. Bladder smooth muscle expressed heterogeneously PAC1null, PAC1HOP1 and VPAC2 receptors; the urothelium was more restricted in expressing preferentially the PAC1 receptor subtype only. Immunocytochemical studies for PAC1 receptors were consistent with these tissue distributions. Furthermore, the addition of 50 – 100 nM PACAP27 or PACAP38 to isolated bladder strips elicited transient contractions and sustained increases in the amplitude of spontaneous phasic contractions. Treatment of the bladder strips with tetrodotoxin (1 μM) did not alter the spontaneous phasic contractions suggesting direct PACAP effects on bladder smooth muscle. PACAP also increased the amplitude of nerve-evoked contractions. By contrast, VIP had no direct effects on bladder smooth muscle. In a rat cyclophosphamide (CYP)-induced cystitis paradigm, intrathecal or intravesical administration of PAC1 receptor antagonist, PACAP6-38, reduced cystitis-induced bladder overactivity. In sum, these studies support roles for PACAP in micturition and suggest that inflammation-induced plasticity in PACAP expression in peripheral and central micturition pathways contribute to bladder dysfunction with cystitis. PMID:16322346

  7. Activity of squalene-hopene cyclases in bicontinuous microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Steudle, Anne K; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Stubenrauch, Cosima

    2015-11-01

    The paper at hand deals with biocatalysis in bicontinuous microemulsions. The latter consist of a dynamic network of oil and water domains separated by a monolayer of surfactant molecules, i.e. the interfacial layer. A microemulsion with the composition buffer--n-octane--nonionic surfactant was tested as reaction medium for an enzyme-catalysed reaction with a focus on the conversion of hydrophobic substrates, which are difficult to convert in aqueous buffer solutions. For the study at hand, we chose to investigate the activity of the squalene-hopene cyclase from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius (AacSHC) towards its natural substrate squalene in bicontinuous microemulsions. Firstly, the study revealed that the activity of AacSHC depends linearly on the enzyme concentration. Secondly, a hyperbolic curve was found for the dependence of the activity on the substrate concentration and a saturation of the AacSHC at substrate concentrations above 20mM was observed. Thirdly, the composition of the interfacial layer was found to have no significant influence on the activity or on the conformation of AacSHC. Surprisingly and unexpectedly, a distinctly enhanced selectivity towards hopene was discovered in the microemulsion. To conclude, bicontinuous microemulsions were found to be a suitable reaction medium for biocatalytic reactions with the enzyme AacSHC.

  8. Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase activity by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Karnam S

    2004-11-01

    The levels of the cGMP in smooth muscle of the gut reflect continued synthesis by soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) and breakdown by phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). Soluble GC is a haem-containing, heterodimeric protein consisting alpha- and beta-subunits: each subunit has N-terminal regulatory domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain. The haem moiety acts as an intracellular receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and determines the ability of NO to activate the enzyme and generate cGMP. In the present study the mechanism by which protein kinases regulate soluble GC in gastric smooth muscle was examined. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) acting as a NO donor stimulated soluble GC activity and increased cGMP levels. SNP induced soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation was abolished by the selective cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors, Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. In contrast, SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP levels were significantly enhanced by Rp-cGMPS and KT-5823. Phosphorylation and inhibition of soluble GC were PKG specific, as selective activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, Sp-5, 6-DCl-cBiMPS had no effect on SNP-induced soluble GC phosphorylation and activity. The ability of PKG to stimulate soluble GC phosphorylation was demonstrated in vitro by back phosphorylation technique. Addition of purified phosphatase 1 inhibited soluble GC phosphorylation in vitro, and inhibition was reversed by a high concentration (10 microM) of okadaic acid. In gastric smooth muscle cells, inhibition of phosphatase activity by okadaic acid increased soluble GC phosphorylation in a concentration-dependent fashion. The increase in soluble GC phosphorylation inhibited SNP-stimulated soluble GC activity and cGMP formation. The results implied the feedback inhibition of soluble GC activity by PKG-dependent phosphorylation impeded further formation of cGMP.

  9. Activation and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase isoforms by forskolin analogs.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele; Papa, Dan; Hübner, Melanie; Mou, Tung-Chung; Lushington, Gerald H; Seifert, Roland

    2008-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 to 9 are differentially expressed in tissues and constitute an interesting drug target. ACs 1 to 8 are activated by the diterpene, forskolin (FS). It is unfortunate that there is a paucity of AC isoform-selective activators. To develop such compounds, an understanding of the structure/activity relationships of diterpenes is necessary. Therefore, we examined the effects of FS and nine FS analogs on ACs 1, 2, and 5 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Diterpenes showed the highest potencies at AC1 and the lowest potencies at AC2. We identified full agonists, partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists, i.e., diterpenes that reduced basal AC activity. Each AC isoform exhibited a distinct pharmacological profile. AC2 showed the highest basal activity of all AC isoforms and highest sensitivity to inverse agonistic effects of 1-deoxy-forskolin, 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-forskolin, and, particularly, BODIPY-forskolin. In contrast, BODIPY-forskolin acted as partial agonist at the other ACs. 1-Deoxy-forskolin analogs were devoid of agonistic activity at ACs but antagonized the effects of FS in a mixed competitive/noncompetitive manner. At purified catalytic AC subunits, BODIPY-forskolin acted as weak partial agonist/strong partial antagonist. Molecular modeling revealed that the BODIPY group rotates promiscuously outside of the FS-binding site. Collectively, ACs are not uniformly activated and inhibited by FS and FS analogs, demonstrating the feasibility to design isoform-selective FS analogs. The two- and multiple-state models, originally developed to conceptualize ligand effects at G-protein-coupled receptors, can be applied to ACs to explain certain experimental data.

  10. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K; Makino, Clint L

    2015-04-24

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca(2+)]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mM for ROS-GC1 and 39 mM for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca(2+) nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca(2+)]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity.

  11. Bicarbonate Modulates Photoreceptor Guanylate Cyclase (ROS-GC) Catalytic Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Duda, Teresa; Wen, Xiao-Hong; Isayama, Tomoki; Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Makino, Clint L.

    2015-01-01

    By generating the second messenger cGMP in retinal rods and cones, ROS-GC plays a central role in visual transduction. Guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) link cGMP synthesis to the light-induced fall in [Ca2+]i to help set absolute sensitivity and assure prompt recovery of the response to light. The present report discloses a surprising feature of this system: ROS-GC is a sensor of bicarbonate. Recombinant ROS-GCs synthesized cGMP from GTP at faster rates in the presence of bicarbonate with an ED50 of 27 mm for ROS-GC1 and 39 mm for ROS-GC2. The effect required neither Ca2+ nor use of the GCAPs domains; however, stimulation of ROS-GC1 was more powerful in the presence of GCAP1 or GCAP2 at low [Ca2+]. When applied to retinal photoreceptors, bicarbonate enhanced the circulating current, decreased sensitivity to flashes, and accelerated flash response kinetics. Bicarbonate was effective when applied either to the outer or inner segment of red-sensitive cones. In contrast, bicarbonate exerted an effect when applied to the inner segment of rods but had little efficacy when applied to the outer segment. The findings define a new regulatory mechanism of the ROS-GC system that affects visual transduction and is likely to affect the course of retinal diseases caused by cGMP toxicity. PMID:25767116

  12. Crystal Structures of the Adenylate Sensor from Fission Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Townley,R.; Shapiro, L.

    2007-01-01

    The 5'-AMP (adenosine monophosphate)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) coordinates metabolic function with energy availability by responding to changes in intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and AMP levels. Here we report crystal structures at 2.6 and 2.9 Angstrom resolution for ATP- and AMP-bound forms of a core {alpha}{beta}{gamma} adenylate-binding domain from the fission yeast AMPK homologue. ATP and AMP bind competitively to a single site in the {gamma} subunit, with their respective phosphate groups positioned near function-impairing mutants. Surprisingly, ATP binds without counter ions, amplifying its electrostatic effects on a critical regulatory region where all three subunits converge.

  13. The PI3K-mediated activation of CRAC independently regulates adenylyl cyclase activation and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Comer, Frank I; Lippincott, Christopher K; Masbad, Joseph J; Parent, Carole A

    2005-01-26

    The ability of a cell to detect an external chemical signal and initiate a program of directed migration along a gradient comprises the fundamental process called chemotaxis. Investigations in Dictyostelium discoideum and neutrophils have established that pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins that bind to the PI3K products PI(3,4)P2 and PI(3,4,5)P3, such as CRAC (cytosolic regulator of adenylyl cyclase) and Akt/PKB, translocate specifically to the leading edge of chemotaxing cells. CRAC is essential for the chemoattractant-mediated activation of the adenylyl cyclase ACA, which converts ATP into cAMP, the primary chemoattractant for D. discoideum. The mechanisms by which CRAC activates ACA remain to be determined. We now show that in addition to its essential role in the activation of ACA, CRAC is involved in regulating chemotaxis. Through mutagenesis, we show that these two functions are independently regulated downstream of PI3K. A CRAC mutant that has lost the capacity to bind PI3K products does not support chemotaxis and shows minimal ACA activation. Finally, overexpression of CRAC and various CRAC mutants show strong effects on ACA activation with little effect on chemotaxis. These findings establish that chemoattractant-mediated activation of PI3K is important for the CRAC-dependent regulation of both chemotaxis and adenylyl cyclase activation.

  14. Formycin triphosphate as a probe for the ATP binding site involved in the activation of guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Chang, C H; Yu, Z N; Song, D L

    1992-10-01

    Formycin A triphosphate (FTP), a fluorescent analog of ATP, slightly increased basal guanylate cyclase activity, but significantly potentiated guanylate cyclase activity stimulated by atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) in rat lung membranes. FTP potentiated ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity with an EC50 at about 90 microM and inhibited ATP-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity with an IC50 at about 100 microM. These results indicate that FTP binds more tightly than ATP for the same binding site. Therefore, FTP would be an excellent tool for studying the ATP binding site.

  15. Active-site modifications of adenylation domains lead to hydrolysis of upstream nonribosomal peptidyl thioester intermediates.

    PubMed

    Uguru, Gabriel C; Milne, Claire; Borg, Matthew; Flett, Fiona; Smith, Colin P; Micklefield, Jason

    2004-04-28

    Site-directed mutagenesis of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) adenylation (A) domains was investigated as a means to engineer new calcium-dependent antibiotics (CDA) in Streptomyces coelicolor. Single- and double-point mutants of the CDA NRPS module 7, A-domain were generated, which were predicted to alter the specificity of this domain from Asp to Asn. The double-point mutant produced a new peptide CDA2a-7N containing Asn at position 7 as expected. However, in both the single- and the double-point mutants, significant hydrolysis of the CDA-6mer intermediate was evident. One explanation for this is that the mutant module 7 A-domain activates Asn instead of Asp; however, the Asn-thioester intermediate is only weakly recognized by the upstream C-domain acceptor site (a), allowing a water molecule to intercept the hexapeptidyl intermediate in the donor site (d).

  16. [Potentiation of nitric oxide-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by levomycetin, tetracycline, and oxolin].

    PubMed

    Shchegolev, A Iu; Sidorova, T A; Severina, I S

    2009-01-01

    The influence of antibiotics laevomycetin and tetracycline and the antivirus agent oxolin on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase, the stimulation of the enzyme by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and spermine nanoate (spermine NONO)) and the combination of spermine NONO and YC-1 was investigated. All preparations used in the concentration range 0,1-10 mM had no effect on the basal activity of guanylate cyclase but potentiated the SNP-induced activation of this enzyme. All preparations used synergistically increased (similar to YC-1) spermine NONO-induced activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. At the same time these compounds did not produce the leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve characteristic for YC-1. Moreover, all compounds used did not influence the leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve obtained in the presence of YC-1. This demonstrated that there was no competition between YC-1 and the drugs for interaction with the enzyme. The revealed regulatory phenomen of laevomycetin, tetracycline and oxolin to increase synergistically NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase may cause additional pharmacological effects during prolong treatment by these drugs. This fact is necessary taking into account.

  17. H3 receptor-mediated inhibition of noradrenaline release: an investigation into the involvement of Ca2+ and K+ ions, G protein and adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, E; Kathmann, M; Detzner, M; Exner, H J; Göthert, M

    1994-07-01

    The present study was aimed at the identification of mechanisms following the activation of histamine H3 receptors. Mouse brain cortex slices preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline were superfused and the (H3 receptor-mediated) effect of histamine on the electrically evoked tritium overflow was studied under a variety of conditions. The extent of inhibition produced by histamine was inversely related to the frequency of stimulation used to evoke tritium overflow and to the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium. An activator (levcromakalim) and blocker (glibenclamide) of ATP-dependent K+ channels did not affect the electrically evoked tritium overflow and its inhibition by histamine. A blocker of voltage-sensitive K+ channels, tetraethylammonium (TEA), increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine. TEA also reduced the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline and prostaglandin E2 on the evoked overflow. When the facilitatory effect of TEA on the evoked overflow was compensated for by reducing the Ca2+ concentration in the superfusion medium, TEA did no longer attenuate the effect of histamine. Exposure of the slices to the SH group-alkylating agent N-ethylmaleimide increased the evoked overflow and attenuated the inhibitory effect of histamine; both effects were counteracted by the SH group-protecting agent dithiothreitol, which, by itself, did not affect the evoked overflow and its inhibition by histamine. Mouse brain cortex membranes were used to study the effect of the H3 receptor agonist R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine on the basal cAMP accumulation and on the accumulation stimulated by forskolin or noradrenaline.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Cu-free cycloaddition for identifying catalytic active adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yekui; Yin, Jun

    2008-10-15

    To engineer the substrate specificities of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS), we developed a method to display NRPS modules on M13 phages and select catalytically active adenylation (A) domains that would load azide functionalized substrate analogs to the neighboring peptidyl carrier protein (PCP) domains. Biotin conjugated difluorinated cyclooctyne was used for copper free cycloaddition with an azide substituted substrate attached to PCP. Biotin-labeled phages were selected by binding to streptavidin.

  19. Determinants for the activation and autoinhibition of the diguanylate cyclase response regulator WspR.

    PubMed

    De, Nabanita; Navarro, Marcos V A S; Raghavan, Rahul V; Sondermann, Holger

    2009-10-30

    The bacterial second messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls secretion, cell adhesion, and motility, leading to biofilm formation and increased cytotoxicity. Diguanylate cyclases containing GGDEF and phosphodiesterases containing EAL or HD-GYP domains have been identified as the enzymes controlling cellular c-di-GMP levels, yet less is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing regulation and signaling specificity. We recently determined a product-inhibition pathway for the diguanylate cyclase response regulator WspR from Pseudomonas, a potent molecular switch that controls biofilm formation. In WspR, catalytic activity is modulated by a helical stalk motif that connects its phospho-receiver and GGDEF domains. The stalks facilitate the formation of distinct oligomeric states that contribute to both activation and autoinhibition. Here, we provide novel insights into the regulation of diguanylate cyclase activity in WspR based on the crystal structures of full-length WspR, the isolated GGDEF domain, and an artificially dimerized catalytic domain. The structures highlight that inhibition is achieved by restricting the mobility of rigid GGDEF domains, mediated by c-di-GMP binding to an inhibitory site at the GGDEF domain. Kinetic measurements and biochemical characterization corroborate a model in which the activation of WspR requires the formation of a tetrameric species. Tetramerization occurs spontaneously at high protein concentration or upon addition of the phosphomimetic compound beryllium fluoride. Our analyses elucidate common and WspR-specific mechanisms for the fine-tuning of diguanylate cyclase activity.

  20. Modulation of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium tunes adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ådén, Jörgen; Verma, Abhinav; Schug, Alexander; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2012-10-10

    Structural plasticity is often required for distinct microscopic steps during enzymatic reaction cycles. Adenylate kinase from Escherichia coli (AK(eco)) populates two major conformations in solution; the open (inactive) and closed (active) state, and the overall turnover rate is inversely proportional to the lifetime of the active conformation. Therefore, structural plasticity is intimately coupled to enzymatic turnover in AK(eco). Here, we probe the open to closed conformational equilibrium in the absence of bound substrate with NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The conformational equilibrium in absence of substrate and, in turn, the turnover number can be modulated with mutational- and osmolyte-driven perturbations. Removal of one hydrogen bond between the ATP and AMP binding subdomains results in a population shift toward the open conformation and a resulting increase of k(cat). Addition of the osmolyte TMAO to AK(eco) results in population shift toward the closed conformation and a significant reduction of k(cat). The Michaelis constants (K(M)) scale with the change in k(cat), which follows from the influence of the population of the closed conformation for substrate binding affinity. Hence, k(cat) and K(M) are mutually dependent, and in the case of AK(eco), any perturbation that modulates k(cat) is mirrored with a proportional response in K(M). Thus, our results demonstrate that the equilibrium constant of a pre-existing conformational equilibrium directly affects enzymatic catalysis. From an evolutionary perspective, our findings suggest that, for AK(eco), there exists ample flexibility to obtain a specificity constant (k(cat)/K(M)) that commensurate with the exerted cellular selective pressure.

  1. Clinical potential of nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activators.

    PubMed

    Doggrell, Sheila A

    2005-09-01

    A major problem with using nitrates in the treatment of ischemic heart disease is that tolerance develops to their vasodilatory actions. YC-1 was used as the lead compound to synthesize further nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activators, including BAY-41-2272 and BAY-41-8543. A nitric oxide and heme-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, BAY-58-2667, was subsequently discovered by high-throughput screening. Tolerance to the vasodilatory actions of BAY-41-8543 and BAY-58-2667 does not develop. Results from animal studies have suggested that these compounds may have potential in the treatment of ischemic heart disease, essential and pulmonary hypertension, congestive heart failure, glomerulonephritis and erectile dysfunction.

  2. Effects of dopamine on adenylyl cyclase activity and amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue.

    PubMed

    Hatta, S; Amemiya, N; Takemura, H; Ohshika, H

    1995-06-01

    Several previous studies have shown that dopamine causes amylase secretion from rat parotid tissue. However, the mechanism of this dopamine action is still unclear. The present study was designed to characterize dopamine action in rat parotid gland tissue by examining the effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release. Dopamine significantly enhanced accumulation of cyclic AMP in parotid slices and stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in parotid membrane preparations. It also significantly stimulated amylase release from parotid slices. The stimulatory effects of dopamine on cyclic AMP accumulation, adenylyl cyclase activity, and amylase release were effectively blocked with propranolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, but not by either SCH 23390, a preferential D1 antagonist, or butaclamol, a preferential D2 antagonist. No substantial specific binding sites for D1 receptors were detectable by [3H]SCH 23390 binding in parotid membranes. These results suggest that the stimulatory effect of dopamine on amylase secretion in rat parotid tissue is not mediated through specific D1 dopamine receptors but rather through beta-adrenergic receptors.

  3. p19 detected in the rat retina and pineal gland is a guanylyl cyclase-activating protein (GCAP).

    PubMed

    Dejda, Agnieszka; Matczak, Izabela; Gorczyca, Wojciech A

    2002-01-01

    The Ca(2+)-dependent activation of retina-specific guanylyl cyclase (retGC) is mediated by guanylyl cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). Here we report for the first time detection of a 19 kDa protein (p19) with GCAP properties in extracts of rat retina and pineal gland. Both extracts stimulate synthesis of cGMP in rod outer segment (ROS) membranes at low (30 nM) but not at high (1 microM) concentrations of Ca(2+). At low Ca(2+), immunoaffinity purified p19 activates guanylyl cyclase(s) in bovine ROS and rat retinal membranes. Moreover, p19 is recognized by antibodies against bovine GCAP1 and, similarly to other GCAPs, exhibits a Ca(2+)-dependent electrophoretic mobility shift.

  4. Central pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) decrease the baroreflex sensitivity in trout.

    PubMed

    Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Conlon, J Michael; Le Mével, Jean-Claude

    2011-04-01

    Although PACAP and VIP exert diverse actions on heart and blood vessels along the vertebrate phylum, no information is currently available concerning the potential role of these peptides on the regulation of the baroreflex response, a major mechanism for blood pressure homeostasis. Consequently, the goal of this study was to examine in our experimental model, the unanesthetized rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, whether PACAP and VIP are involved in the regulation of the cardiac baroreflex sensitivity (BRS). Cross-spectral analysis techniques using a fast Fourier transform algorithm were employed to calculate the coherence, phase and gain of the transfer function between spontaneous fluctuations of systolic arterial blood pressure and R-R intervals of the electrocardiogram. The BRS was estimated as the mean of the gain of the transfer function when the coherence between the two signals was high and the phase negative. Compared with vehicle, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of trout PACAP-27 and trout VIP (25-100 pmol) dose-dependently reduced the cardiac BRS to the same extent with a threshold dose of 50 pmol for a significant effect. When injected intra-arterially at the same doses as for i.c.v. injections, only the highest dose of VIP (100 pmol) significantly attenuated the BRS. These results suggest that the endogenous peptides PACAP and VIP might be implicated in the central control of cardiac baroreflex functions in trout.

  5. Regulation and therapeutic targeting of peptide-activated receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-04-01

    Cyclic GMP is a ubiquitous second messenger that regulates a wide array of physiologic processes such as blood pressure, long bone growth, intestinal fluid secretion, phototransduction and lipolysis. Soluble and single-membrane-spanning enzymes called guanylyl cyclases (GC) synthesize cGMP. In humans, the latter group consists of GC-A, GC-B, GC-C, GC-E and GC-F, which are also known as NPR-A, NPR-B, StaR, Ret1-GC and Ret2-GC, respectively. Membrane GCs are activated by peptide ligands such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), guanylin, uroguanylin, heat stable enterotoxin and GC-activating proteins. Nesiritide and carperitide are clinically approved peptide-based drugs that activate GC-A. CD-NP is an experimental heart failure drug that primarily activates GC-B but also activates GC-A at high concentrations and is resistant to degradation. Inactivating mutations in GC-B cause acromesomelic dysplasia type Maroteaux dwarfism and chromosomal mutations that increase CNP concentrations are associated with Marfanoid-like skeletal overgrowth. Pump-based CNP infusions increase skeletal growth in a mouse model of the most common type of human dwarfism, which supports CNP/GC-B-based therapies for short stature diseases. Linaclotide is a peptide activator of GC-C that stimulates intestinal motility and is in late-stage clinical trials for the treatment of chronic constipation. This review discusses the discovery of cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, the general characteristics and therapeutic applications of GC-A, GC-B and GC-C, and emphasizes the regulation of transmembrane guanylyl cyclases by phosphorylation and ATP.

  6. [Potentiation of NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase by 5-nitroisatin and antiviral preparatation arbidol].

    PubMed

    Severina, I S; Shchegolev, A Iu; Medvedev, A E

    2013-01-01

    Isatin (indole-dione) is an endogenous indole that exibits a wide range of biological and physiological activity. The influence of isatin derivatives 5-nitroisatin and arbidol (an antiviral preparatation) on spermine NONO-induced activation of human platelet soluble guanylyl cyclase was investigated. 5-nitroistnin and arbidol had no effect on basal activity, but synergistically increased in a concentration-dependent manner the spermine NONO-induced activation of this enzyme. 5-Nitroisatin and arbidol, like YC-1, sensitized guanylyl cyclase towards nitric oxide (NO) and produced a leftward shift of the spermine NONO concentration response curve. At the same time both compounds used did not influence the activation of guanylyl cyclase by YC-1 and did not change the synergistic increase of spermine NONO-induced activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase in the presence of YC-1. This suggests that 5-nitroisanin and arbidol did not compete with YC-1. Addition of isatin did not change the synergistic increase in the spermine NONO-induced guanylyl cyclase activation by 5-nitroisatin and arbidol and did not influence a leftward shift of spermine NONO concentration response curve produced by these compounds. These data suggest lack of competitive interaction between isatin and both its derivatives used.

  7. RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase activity and RNA ligation in HeLa cell extract.

    PubMed Central

    Filipowicz, W; Konarska, M; Gross, H J; Shatkin, A J

    1983-01-01

    HeLa cell extract contains RNA ligase activity that converts linear polyribonucleotides to covalently closed circles. RNA substrates containing 2',3'-cyclic phosphate and 5'-hydroxyl termini are circularized by formation of a normal 3',5' phosphodiester bond. This activity differs from a previously described wheat germ RNA ligase which circularizes molecules with 2',3'-cyclic and 5' phosphate ends by a 2'-phosphomonester, 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage (Konarska et al., Nature 293, 112-116, 1981; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 79, 1474-1478, 1982). The HeLa cell ligase can also utilize molecules with 3'-phosphate ends. However, in this case ligation is preceded by an ATP-dependent conversion of the 3'-terminal phosphate to the 2',3' cyclic form by a novel activity, RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase. Both RNA ligase and RNA 3'-terminal phosphate cyclase activities are also present in extract of Xenopus oocyte nuclei, consistent with a role in RNA processing. Images PMID:6828385

  8. Role of guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) in setting the flash sensitivity of rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ana; Burns, Marie E.; Sokal, Izabela; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Baylor, Denis A.; Chen, Jeannie

    2001-01-01

    The retina's photoreceptor cells adjust their sensitivity to allow photons to be transduced over a wide range of light intensities. One mechanism thought to participate in sensitivity adjustments is Ca2+ regulation of guanylate cyclase (GC) by guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). We evaluated the contribution of GCAPs to sensitivity regulation in rods by disrupting their expression in transgenic mice. The GC activity from GCAPs−/− retinas showed no Ca2+ dependence, indicating that Ca2+ regulation of GCs had indeed been abolished. Flash responses from dark-adapted GCAPs−/− rods were larger and slower than responses from wild-type rods. In addition, the incremental flash sensitivity of GCAPs−/− rods failed to be maintained at wild-type levels in bright steady light. GCAP2 expressed in GCAPs−/− rods restored maximal light-induced GC activity but did not restore normal flash response kinetics. We conclude that GCAPs strongly regulate GC activity in mouse rods, decreasing the flash sensitivity in darkness and increasing the incremental flash sensitivity in bright steady light, thereby extending the rod's operating range. PMID:11493703

  9. Inhibition of melanogenesis by 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) via blocking adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Rho, Seong-Hwan; Shin, Jae-Choen; Park, Hyun Ho; Kim, Dongjin

    2011-07-22

    Due to its multiple biological activities, 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (chrysin) in propolis has gained attention as potentially useful therapeutics for various diseases. However, the efficacy of chrysin for the use of dermatological health has not been fully explored. To clarify the action mechanism of the skin protecting property of chrysin, we firstly investigated the molecular docking property of chrysin on the mammalian adenylyl cyclase, which is the key enzyme of cAMP-induced melanogenesis. We also examined the involvement of chrysin in alpha-MSH and forskolin-induced cAMP signaling within a cell based assay. In addition, we inquired into the inhibitory effect of chrysin on melanogenesis and found that the pretreatment with chrysin inhibited the forskolin-induced melanin contents significantly without annihilating the cell viability. These results strongly suggest that chrysin directly inhibits the activity of adenylyl cyclase, downregulates forskolin-induced cAMP-production pathway, consequently inhibiting melanogenesis. Thus, chrysin may also be used as an effective inhibitor of hyperpigmentation.

  10. Association of yeast adenylyl cyclase with cyclase-associated protein CAP forms a second Ras-binding site which mediates its Ras-dependent activation.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Okada, T; Kido, M; Sen, H; Tanaka, Y; Tamada, M; Hu, C D; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    2000-01-01

    Posttranslational modification, in particular farnesylation, of Ras is crucial for activation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase (CYR1). Based on the previous observation that association of CYR1 with cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is essential for its activation by posttranslationally modified Ras, we postulated that the associated CAP might contribute to the formation of a Ras-binding site of CYR1, which mediates CYR1 activation, other than the primary Ras-binding site, the leucine-rich repeat domain. Here, we observed a posttranslational modification-dependent association of Ras with a complex between CAP and CYR1 C-terminal region. When CAP mutants defective in Ras signaling but retaining the CYR1-binding activity were isolated by screening of a pool of randomly mutagenized CAP, CYR1 complexed with two of the obtained three mutants failed to be activated efficiently by modified Ras and exhibited a severely impaired ability to bind Ras, providing a genetic evidence for the importance of the physical association with Ras at the second Ras-binding site. On the other hand, CYR1, complexed with the other CAP mutant, failed to be activated by Ras but exhibited a greatly enhanced binding to Ras. Conversely, a Ras mutant E31K, which exhibits a greatly enhanced binding to the CYR1-CAP complex, failed to activate CYR1 efficiently. Thus, the strength of interaction at the second Ras-binding site appears to be a critical determinant of CYR1 regulation by Ras: too-weak and too-strong interactions are both detrimental to CYR1 activation. These results, taken together with those obtained with mammalian Raf, suggest the importance of the second Ras-binding site in effector regulation.

  11. Inhibition of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin by MDL 12330A and chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Bitonti, A J

    1984-04-30

    ADP-ribosylation by cholera toxin of the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein (Gs) of rat liver membrane adenylate cyclase was inhibited by 0.1-1 mM MDL 12330A or 0.1-1 mM chlorpromazine. Basal as well as cholera toxin activated adenylate cyclase activity in liver membranes was also inhibited by the two drugs. NAD glycohydrolase activity and self-ADP-ribosylation of cholera toxin were also inhibited by MDL 12330A and chlorpromazine. These effects of MDL 12330A and chlorpromazine may be related to their effects on cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion in vivo.

  12. Receptor guanylyl cyclase-G is a novel thermosensory protein activated by cool temperatures.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ying-Chi; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lin, Yuh-Charn; Breer, Heinz; Fleischer, Joerg; Yang, Ruey-Bing

    2015-02-03

    Transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), with activity regulated by peptide ligands and/or calcium-binding proteins, are essential for various physiological and sensory processes. The mode of activation of the GC subtype GC-G, which is expressed in neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion that respond to cool temperatures, has been elusive. In searching for appropriate stimuli to activate GC-G, we found that its enzymatic activity is directly stimulated by cool temperatures. In this context, it was observed that dimerization/oligomerization of GC-G, a process generally considered as critical for enzymatic activity of GCs, is strongly enhanced by coolness. Moreover, heterologous expression of GC-G in cultured cells rendered these cells responsive to coolness; thus, the protein might be a sensor for cool temperatures. This concept is supported by the observation of substantially reduced coolness-induced response of Grueneberg ganglion neurons and coolness-evoked ultrasonic vocalization in GC-G-deficient mouse pups. GC-G may be a novel thermosensory protein with functional implications for the Grueneberg ganglion, a sensory organ responding to cool temperatures.

  13. Structures of glycosylated mammalian glutaminyl cyclases reveal conformational variability near the active center.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Carrillo, David; Koch, Birgit; Parthier, Christoph; Wermann, Michael; Dambe, Tresfore; Buchholz, Mirko; Ludwig, Hans-Henning; Heiser, Ulrich; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Stubbs, Milton T; Schilling, Stephan; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2011-07-19

    Formation of N-terminal pyroglutamate (pGlu or pE) from glutaminyl or glutamyl precursors is catalyzed by glutaminyl cyclases (QC). As the formation of pGlu-amyloid has been linked with Alzheimer's disease, inhibitors of QCs are currently the subject of intense development. Here, we report three crystal structures of N-glycosylated mammalian QC from humans (hQC) and mice (mQC). Whereas the overall structures of the enzymes are similar to those reported previously, two surface loops in the neighborhood of the active center exhibit conformational variability. Furthermore, two conserved cysteine residues form a disulfide bond at the base of the active center that was not present in previous reports of hQC structure. Site-directed mutagenesis suggests a structure-stabilizing role of the disulfide bond. At the entrance to the active center, the conserved tryptophan residue, W(207), which displayed multiple orientations in previous structure, shows a single conformation in both glycosylated human and murine QCs. Although mutagenesis of W(207) into leucine or glutamine altered substrate conversion significantly, the binding constants of inhibitors such as the highly potent PQ50 (PBD150) were minimally affected. The crystal structure of PQ50 bound to the active center of murine QC reveals principal binding determinants provided by the catalytic zinc ion and a hydrophobic funnel. This study presents a first comparison of two mammalian QCs containing typical, conserved post-translational modifications.

  14. In vivo control of soluble guanylate cyclase activation by nitric oxide: a kinetic analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Condorelli, P; George, S C

    2001-01-01

    Free nitric oxide (NO) activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), an enzyme, within both pulmonary and vascular smooth muscle. sGC catalyzes the cyclization of guanosine 5'-triphosphate to guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). Binding rates of NO to the ferrous heme(s) of sGC have been measured in vitro. However, a missing link in our understanding of the control mechanism of sGC by NO is a comprehensive in vivo kinetic analysis. Available literature data suggests that NO dissociation from the heme center of sGC is accelerated by its interaction with one or more cofactors in vivo. We present a working model for sGC activation and NO consumption in vivo. Our model predicts that NO influences the cGMP formation rate over a concentration range of approximately 5-100 nM (apparent Michaelis constant approximately 23 nM), with Hill coefficients between 1.1 and 1.5. The apparent reaction order for NO consumption by sGC is dependent on NO concentration, and varies between 0 and 1.5. Finally, the activation of sGC (half-life approximately 1-2 s) is much more rapid than deactivation (approximately 50 s). We conclude that control of sGC in vivo is most likely ultra-sensitive, and that activation in vivo occurs at lower NO concentrations than previously reported. PMID:11325714

  15. Stimulators and Activators of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase: Review and Potential Therapeutic Indications

    PubMed Central

    Nossaman, Bobby; Pankey, Edward; Kadowitz, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The heme-protein soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the intracellular receptor for nitric oxide (NO). sGC is a heterodimeric enzyme with α and β subunits and contains a heme moiety essential for binding of NO and activation of the enzyme. Stimulation of sGC mediates physiologic responses including smooth muscle relaxation, inhibition of inflammation, and thrombosis. In pathophysiologic states, NO formation and bioavailability can be impaired by oxidative stress and that tolerance to NO donors develops with continuous use. Two classes of compounds have been developed that can directly activate sGC and increase cGMP formation in pathophysiologic conditions when NO formation and bioavailability are impaired or when NO tolerance has developed. In this report, we review current information on the pharmacology of heme-dependent stimulators and heme-independent activators of sGC in animal and in early clinical studies and the potential role these compounds may have in the management of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22482042

  16. Drug Target Exploitable Structural Features of Adenylyl Cyclase Activity in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Mbah, Andreas N.; Kamga, Henri L.; Awofolu, Omotayo R.; Isokpehi, Raphael D.

    2012-01-01

    The draft genome sequence of the parasitic flatworm Schistosoma mansoni (S. mansoni), a cause of schistosomiasis, encodes a predicted guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding protein tagged Smp_059340.1. Smp_059340.1 is predicted to be a member of the G protein alpha-s subunit responsible for regulating adenylyl cyclase activity in S. mansoni and a possible drug target against the parasite. Our structural bioinformatics analyses identified key amino acid residues (Ser53, Thr188, Asp207 and Gly210) in the two molecular switches responsible for cycling the protein between active (GTP bound) and inactive (GDP bound) states. Residue Thr188 is located on Switch I region while Gly210 is located on Switch II region with Switch II longer than Switch I. The Asp207 is located on the G3 box motif and Ser53 is the binding residue for magnesium ion. These findings offer new insights into the dynamic and functional determinants of the Smp_059340.1 protein in regulating the S. mansoni life cycle. The binding interfaces and their residues could be used as starting points for selective modulations of interactions within the pathway using small molecules, peptides or mutagenesis. PMID:23133313

  17. NO and CO Differentially Activate Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase via a Heme Pivot-bend Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,X.; Sayed, N.; Beuve, A.; van den Akker, F.

    2007-01-01

    Diatomic ligand discrimination by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is paramount to cardiovascular homeostasis and neuronal signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates sGC activity 200-fold compared with only four-fold by carbon monoxide (CO). The molecular details of ligand discrimination and differential response to NO and CO are not well understood. These ligands are sensed by the heme domain of sGC, which belongs to the heme nitric oxide oxygen (H-NOX) domain family, also evolutionarily conserved in prokaryotes. Here we report crystal structures of the free, NO-bound, and CO-bound H-NOX domains of a cyanobacterial homolog. These structures and complementary mutational analysis in sGC reveal a molecular ruler mechanism that allows sGC to favor NO over CO while excluding oxygen, concomitant to signaling that exploits differential heme pivoting and heme bending. The heme thereby serves as a flexing wedge, allowing the N-terminal subdomain of H-NOX to shift concurrent with the transition of the six- to five-coordinated NO-bound state upon sGC activation. This transition can be modulated by mutations at sGC residues 74 and 145 and corresponding residues in the cyanobacterial H-NOX homolog.

  18. Replenishing the cyclic-di-AMP pool: regulation of diadenylate cyclase activity in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Huong; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Marcellin, Esteban; Turner, Mark S

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria can sense environmental cues and alter their physiology accordingly through the use of signal transduction pathways involving second messenger nucleotides. One broadly conserved second messenger is cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP) which regulates a range of processes including cell wall homeostasis, potassium uptake, DNA repair, fatty acid synthesis, biofilm formation and central metabolism in bacteria. The intracellular pool of c-di-AMP is maintained by the activities of diadenylate cyclase (DAC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzymes, as well as possibly via c-di-AMP export. Whilst extracellular stimuli regulating c-di-AMP levels in bacteria are poorly understood, recent work has identified effector proteins which directly interact and alter the activity of DACs. These include the membrane bound CdaR and the phosphoglucosamine mutase GlmM which both bind directly to the membrane bound CdaA DAC and the recombination protein RadA which binds directly to the DNA binding DisA DAC. The genes encoding these multiprotein complexes are co-localised in many bacteria providing further support for their functional connection. The roles of GlmM in peptidoglycan synthesis and RadA in Holliday junction intermediate processing suggest that c-di-AMP synthesis by DACs will be responsive to these cellular activities. In addition to these modulatory interactions, permanent dysregulation of DAC activity due to suppressor mutations can occur during selection to overcome growth defects, rapid cell lysis and osmosensitivity. DACs have also been investigated as targets for the development of new antibiotics and several small compound inhibitors have recently been identified. This review aims to provide an overview of how c-di-AMP synthesis by DACs can be regulated.

  19. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Gallagher, D.T.; Robinson, H.; Kim, S.-K.; Reddy, P. T.

    2011-01-21

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV)-two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  20. Active-Site Structure of Class IV Adenylyl Cyclase and Transphyletic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    D Gallagher; S Kim; H Robinson; P Reddy

    2011-12-31

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) belonging to three nonhomologous classes (II, III, and IV) have been structurally characterized, enabling a comparison of the mechanisms of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate biosynthesis. We report the crystal structures of three active-site complexes for Yersinia pestis class IV AC (AC-IV) - two with substrate analogs and one with product. Mn{sup 2+} binds to all three phosphates, and to Glu12 and Glu136. Electropositive residues Lys14, Arg63, Lys76, Lys111, and Arg113 also form hydrogen bonds to phosphates. The conformation of the analogs is suitable for in-line nucleophilic attack by the ribose O3' on {alpha}-phosphate (distance {approx} 4 {angstrom}). In the product complex, a second Mn ion is observed to be coordinated to both ribose 2' oxygen and ribose 3' oxygen. Observation of both metal sites, together with kinetic measurements, provides strong support for a two-cation mechanism. Eleven active-site mutants were also made and kinetically characterized. These findings and comparisons with class II and class III enzymes enable a detailed transphyletic analysis of the AC mechanism. Consistent with its lack of coordination to purine, Y. pestis AC-IV cyclizes both ATP and GTP. As in other classes of AC, the ribose is loosely bound, and as in class III, no base appears to ionize the O3' nucleophile. Different syn/anti conformations suggest that the mechanism involves a conformational transition, and further evidence suggests a role for ribosyl pseudorotation. With resolutions of 1.6-1.7 {angstrom}, these are the most detailed active-site ligand complexes for any class of this ubiquitous signaling enzyme.

  1. Stimulation of hippocampal adenylyl cyclase activity dissociates memory consolidation processes for response and place learning.

    PubMed

    Martel, Guillaume; Millard, Annabelle; Jaffard, Robert; Guillou, Jean-Louis

    2006-01-01

    Procedural and declarative memory systems are postulated to interact in either a synergistic or a competitive manner, and memory consolidation appears to be a highly critical stage for this process. However, the precise cellular mechanisms subserving these interactions remain unknown. To investigate this issue, 24-h retention performances were examined in mice given post-training intrahippocampal injections of forskolin (FK) aiming at stimulating hippocampal adenylyl cyclases (ACs). The injection was given at different time points over a period of 9 h following acquisition in either an appetitive bar-pressing task or water-maze tasks challenging respectively "response memory" and "place memory." Retention testing (24 h) showed that FK injection altered memory formation only when given within a 3- to 6-h time window after acquisition but yielded opposite memory effects as a function of task demands. Retention of the spatial task was impaired, whereas retention of both the cued-response in the water maze and the rewarded bar-press response were improved. Intrahippocampal injections of FK produced an increase in pCREB immunoreactivity, which was strictly limited to the hippocampus and lasted less than 2 h, suggesting that early effects (0-2 h) of FK-induced cAMP/CREB activation can be distinguished from late effects (3-6 h). These results delineate a consolidation period during which specific cAMP levels in the hippocampus play a crucial role in enhancing memory processes mediated by other brain regions (e.g., dorsal or ventral striatum) while eliminating interference by the formation of hippocampus-dependent memory.

  2. Hippocampal somatostatin receptors and modulation of adenylyl cyclase activity in histamine-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Puebla, L; Rodríguez-Martín, E; Arilla, E

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, the effects of an intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) dose of histamine (0.1, 1.0 or 10.0 micrograms) on the hippocampal somatostatin (SS) receptor/effector system in Wistar rats were investigated. In view of the rapid onset of histamine action, the effects of histamine on the somatostatinergic system were studied 2 h after its administration. Hippocampal SS-like immunoreactivity (SSLI) levels were not modified by any of the histamine doses studied. SS-mediated inhibition of basal and forskolin (FK)-stimulated adenylyl cyclase (AC) activity was markedly increased in hippocampal membranes from rats treated with 10 micrograms of histamine (23% +/- 1% vs. 17% +/- 1% and 37% +/- 2% vs. 23% +/- 1%, respectively). In contrast, neither the basal nor the FK-stimulated enzyme activities were affected by histamine administration. The functional activity of the hippocampal guanine-nucleotide binding inhibitory protein (Gi protein), as assessed by the capacity of the stable GTP analogue 5'-guanylylimidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) to inhibit FK-stimulated AC activity, was not modified by histamine administration. These data suggest that the increased response of the enzyme to SS was not related to an increased functional activity of Gi proteins. In fact, the increased AC response to SS in hippocampal membranes from histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats was associated with quantitative changes in the SS receptors. Equilibrium binding data obtained with [125I]Tyr11-SS indicate an increase in the number with specific SS receptors (541 +/- 24 vs. 365 +/- 16 fmol/mg protein, P < 0.001) together with a decrease in their apparent affinity (0.57 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.41 +/- 0.03 nM, P < 0.05) in rat hippocampal membranes from histamine (10 micrograms)-treated rats as compared to control animals. With the aim of determining if these changes were related to histamine binding to its specific receptor sites, the histaminergic H1 and H2 receptor antagonists mepyramine and cimetidine

  3. Modulation of Escherichia coli Adenylyl Cyclase Activity by Catalytic-Site Mutants of Protein IIAGlc of the Phosphoenolpyruvate:Sugar Phosphotransferase System

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Prasad; Kamireddi, Madhavi

    1998-01-01

    It is demonstrated here that in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated form of the glucose-specific phosphocarrier protein IIAGlc of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system is an activator of adenylyl cyclase and that unphosphorylated IIAGlc has no effect on the basal activity of adenylyl cyclase. To elucidate the specific role of IIAGlc phosphorylation in the regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity, both the phosphorylatable histidine (H90) and the interactive histidine (H75) of IIAGlc were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis to glutamine and glutamate. Wild-type IIAGlc and the H75Q mutant, in which the histidine in position 75 has been replaced by glutamine, were phosphorylated by the phosphohistidine-containing phosphocarrier protein (HPr∼P) and were equally potent activators of adenylyl cyclase. Neither the H90Q nor the H90E mutant of IIAGlc was phosphorylated by HPr∼P, and both failed to activate adenylyl cyclase. Furthermore, replacement of H75 by glutamate inhibited the appearance of a steady-state level of phosphorylation of H90 of this mutant protein by HPr∼P, yet the H75E mutant of IIAGlc was a partial activator of adenylyl cyclase. The H75E H90A double mutant, which cannot be phosphorylated, did not activate adenylyl cyclase. This suggests that the H75E mutant was transiently phosphorylated by HPr∼P but the steady-state level of the phosphorylated form of the mutant protein was decreased due to the repulsive forces of the negatively charged glutamate at position 75 in the catalytic pocket. These results are discussed in the context of the proximity of H75 and H90 in the IIAGlc structure and the disposition of the negative charge in the modeled glutamate mutants. PMID:9457881

  4. Conserved Chloroplast Open-reading Frame ycf54 Is Required for Activity of the Magnesium Protoporphyrin Monomethylester Oxidative Cyclase in Synechocystis PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hollingshead, Sarah; Kopečná, Jana; Jackson, Philip J.; Canniffe, Daniel P.; Davison, Paul A.; Dickman, Mark J.; Sobotka, Roman; Hunter, C. Neil

    2012-01-01

    The cyclase step in chlorophyll (Chl) biosynthesis has not been characterized biochemically, although there are some plausible candidates for cyclase subunits. Two of these, Sll1214 and Sll1874 from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803, were FLAG-tagged in vivo and used as bait in separate pulldown experiments. Mass spectrometry identified Ycf54 as an interaction partner in each case, and this interaction was confirmed by a reciprocal pulldown using FLAG-tagged Ycf54 as bait. Inactivation of the ycf54 gene (slr1780) in Synechocystis 6803 resulted in a strain that exhibited significantly reduced Chl levels. A detailed analysis of Chl precursors in the ycf54 mutant revealed accumulation of very high levels of Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyl ester and only traces of protochlorophyllide, the product of the cyclase, were detected. Western blotting demonstrated that levels of the cyclase component Sll1214 and the Chl biosynthesis enzymes Mg-protoporphyrin IX methyltransferase and protochlorophyllide reductase are significantly impaired in the ycf54 mutant. Ycf54 is, therefore, essential for the activity and stability of the oxidative cyclase. We discuss a possible role of Ycf54 as an auxiliary factor essential for the assembly of a cyclase complex or even a large multienzyme catalytic center. PMID:22711541

  5. Bifunctional homodimeric triokinase/FMN cyclase: contribution of protein domains to the activities of the human enzyme and molecular dynamics simulation of domain movements.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; Couto, Ana; Cabezas, Alicia; Pinto, Rosa María; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Canales, José; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2014-04-11

    Mammalian triokinase, which phosphorylates exogenous dihydroxyacetone and fructose-derived glyceraldehyde, is neither molecularly identified nor firmly associated to an encoding gene. Human FMN cyclase, which splits FAD and other ribonucleoside diphosphate-X compounds to ribonucleoside monophosphate and cyclic X-phosphodiester, is identical to a DAK-encoded dihydroxyacetone kinase. This bifunctional protein was identified as triokinase. It was modeled as a homodimer of two-domain (K and L) subunits. Active centers lie between K1 and L2 or K2 and L1: dihydroxyacetone binds K and ATP binds L in different subunits too distant (≈ 14 Å) for phosphoryl transfer. FAD docked to the ATP site with ribityl 4'-OH in a possible near-attack conformation for cyclase activity. Reciprocal inhibition between kinase and cyclase reactants confirmed substrate site locations. The differential roles of protein domains were supported by their individual expression: K was inactive, and L displayed cyclase but not kinase activity. The importance of domain mobility for the kinase activity of dimeric triokinase was highlighted by molecular dynamics simulations: ATP approached dihydroxyacetone at distances below 5 Å in near-attack conformation. Based upon structure, docking, and molecular dynamics simulations, relevant residues were mutated to alanine, and kcat and Km were assayed whenever kinase and/or cyclase activity was conserved. The results supported the roles of Thr(112) (hydrogen bonding of ATP adenine to K in the closed active center), His(221) (covalent anchoring of dihydroxyacetone to K), Asp(401) and Asp(403) (metal coordination to L), and Asp(556) (hydrogen bonding of ATP or FAD ribose to L domain). Interestingly, the His(221) point mutant acted specifically as a cyclase without kinase activity.

  6. Adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide reduces phosphorylation and toxicity of the polyglutamine-expanded androgen receptor in spinobulbar muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Polanco, Maria Josè; Parodi, Sara; Piol, Diana; Stack, Conor; Chivet, Mathilde; Contestabile, Andrea; Miranda, Helen C; Lievens, Patricia M-J; Espinoza, Stefano; Jochum, Tobias; Rocchi, Anna; Grunseich, Christopher; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Cato, Andrew C B; Lieberman, Andrew P; La Spada, Albert R; Sambataro, Fabio; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Gozes, Illana; Pennuto, Maria

    2016-12-21

    Spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion in the androgen receptor (AR) gene. SBMA belongs to the family of polyQ diseases, which are fatal neurodegenerative disorders mainly caused by protein-mediated toxic gain-of-function mechanisms and characterized by deposition of misfolded proteins in the form of aggregates. The neurotoxicity of the polyQ proteins can be modified by phosphorylation at specific sites, thereby providing the rationale for the development of disease-specific treatments. We sought to identify signaling pathways that modulate polyQ-AR phosphorylation for therapy development. We report that cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) phosphorylates polyQ-AR specifically at Ser(96) Phosphorylation of polyQ-AR by CDK2 increased protein stabilization and toxicity and is negatively regulated by the adenylyl cyclase (AC)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway. To translate these findings into therapy, we developed an analog of pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), a potent activator of the AC/PKA pathway. Chronic intranasal administration of the PACAP analog to knock-in SBMA mice reduced Ser(96) phosphorylation, promoted polyQ-AR degradation, and ameliorated disease outcome. These results provide proof of principle that noninvasive therapy based on the use of PACAP analogs is a therapeutic option for SBMA.

  7. Glucagon receptor of human liver. Studies of its molecular weight and binding properties, and its ability to activate hepatic adenylyl cyclase of non-obese and obese subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, J N; Einarsson, K; Backman, L; Ewerth, S; Arner, P

    1985-01-01

    The glucagon receptor and the adenylyl cyclase system of human liver membranes were studied in six non-obese and six obese subjects who had elevated insulin and plasma glucagon levels. Analysis of specific glucagon binding by the method of Scatchard demonstrated a linear (monocomponent) plot with a dissociation constant of 2-3 nM, and the binding at low hormone concentrations was sensitive to guanosine triphosphate (GTP). The molecular weight of the glucagon receptor was 63,000 D as determined by an affinity labeling procedure and sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. Affinity labeling of this structure was specific for glucagon and inhibited by GTP. Glucagon stimulated the production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) by human membranes with half-maximal activation elicited by 6 nM hormone. The human cyclase system required GTP to facilitate an optimal glucagon response. NaF (10 mM) also activated the cyclase system and produced the same magnitude of response as maximum glucagon activation. A comparison of the liver adenylyl cyclase system of non-obese and obese subjects was made using glucagon (5 nM and 1 microM) and NaF (10 mM). No significant differences in cAMP production were noted between the two groups, regardless of the agent used to activate the enzyme. These findings agree with the glucagon binding studies that showed similar amounts of binding activity in the membranes from the two groups. Also, there was no influence of either age or sex of the subjects on the adenylyl cyclase response. In conclusion, human liver membranes contain a glucagon receptor and an adenylyl cyclase system that correspond closely to the well-studied system in animal liver. This system in human obesity is not altered by the approximately twofold elevation in plasma glucagon that occurs in this metabolic disorder. Images PMID:2982913

  8. An actin monomer binding activity localizes to the carboxyl-terminal half of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Freeman, N L; Chen, Z; Horenstein, J; Weber, A; Field, J

    1995-03-10

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase complex contains at least two subunits, a 200-kDa catalytic subunit and a 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein, CAP (also called Srv2p). Genetic studies suggested two roles for CAP, one as a positive regulator of cAMP levels in yeast and a second role as a cytoskeletal regulator. We present evidence showing that CAP sequesters monomeric actin (Kd in the range of 0.5-5 microM), decreasing actin incorporation into actin filaments. Anti-CAP monoclonal antibodies co-immunoprecipitate a protein with a molecular size of about 46 kDa. When CAP was purified from yeast using an anti-CAP monoclonal antibody column, the 46-kDa protein co-purified with a stoichiometry of about 1:1 with CAP. Western blots identified the 46-kDa protein as yeast actin. CAP also bound to muscle actin in vitro in immunoprecipitation assays and falling ball viscometry assays. Experiments with pyrene-labeled actin demonstrated that CAP sequesters actin monomers. The actin monomer binding activity is localized to the carboxyl-terminal half of CAP. Together, these data suggest that yeast CAP regulates the yeast cytoskeleton by sequestering actin monomers.

  9. Nitric oxide inhibition of adenylyl cyclase type 6 activity is dependent upon lipid rafts and caveolin signaling complexes.

    PubMed

    Ostrom, Rennolds S; Bundey, Richard A; Insel, Paul A

    2004-05-07

    Several cell types, including cardiac myocytes and vascular endothelial cells, produce nitric oxide (NO) via both constitutive and inducible isoforms of NO synthase. NO attenuates cardiac contractility and contributes to contractile dysfunction in heart failure, although the precise molecular mechanisms for these effects are poorly defined. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms type 5 and 6, which are preferentially expressed in cardiac myocytes, may be inhibited via a direct nitrosylation by NO. Because endothelial NO synthase (eNOS and NOS3), beta-adrenergic (betaAR) receptors, and AC6 all can localize in lipid raft/caveolin-rich microdomains, we sought to understand the role of lipid rafts in organizing components of betaAR-G(s)-AC signal transduction together with eNOS. Using neonatal rat cardiac myocytes, we found that disruption of lipid rafts with beta-cyclodextrin inhibited forskolin-stimulated AC activity and cAMP production, eliminated caveolin-3-eNOS interaction, and increased NO production. betaAR- and G(s)-mediated activation of AC activity were inhibited by beta-cyclodextrin treatment, but prostanoid receptor-stimulated AC activity, which appears to occur outside caveolin-rich microdomains, was unaffected unless eNOS was overexpressed and lipid rafts were disrupted. An NO donor, SNAP, inhibited basal and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in both native cardiac myocytes and cardiac myocytes and pulmonary artery endothelial cells engineered to overexpress AC6. These effects of SNAP were independent of guanylyl cyclase activity and were mimicked by overexpression of eNOS. The juxtaposition of eNOS with betaAR and AC types 5 and 6 results in selective regulation of betaAR by eNOS activity in lipid raft domains over other G(s)-coupled receptors localized in nonraft domains. Thus co-localization of multiple signaling components in lipid rafts provides key spatial regulation of AC activity.

  10. Effect of gonadectomy of biochemical indices of striatal dopamine D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors, their activity and adaptive response to antipsychotic drug treatment in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, T.L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Endogenous gonadal steroids in male and female rats were removed by gonadectomy (Gnx). Striatal D/sub 1/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding parameters and D/sub 1/ receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Striatal D/sub 2/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters in striatal slices and D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade consisted of the administration of the D/sub 2/ specific antagonist sulpiride (20 mg/kg) or vehicle i.p., 2x daily for 21 days followed by a 3 day drug withdrawal period. Gnx of female rats had no affect on striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity nor on the striatal D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment produced no adaptive changes in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in sham-operated or Gnx female rats. Gnx of male rats produced a statistically significant 10% decrease in striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites with no change in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and no change in striatal(/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment of sham-operated male rats produced a desensitization of the striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with no change in the number of (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites and no change in (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Gnx of male rats blocked the development of the striatal D/sub 1/ receptor desensitization response elicited by sub-chronic sulpiride treatment, without affecting striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 or (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. We have demonstrated that sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade in sham-operated male rats results in the desensitization of striatal D/sub 1/ receptor activity.

  11. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role.

    PubMed

    Barott, K L; Helman, Y; Haramaty, L; Barron, M E; Hess, K C; Buck, J; Levin, L R; Tresguerres, M

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels.

  12. High adenylyl cyclase activity and in vivo cAMP fluctuations in corals suggest central physiological role

    PubMed Central

    Barott, K. L.; Helman, Y.; Haramaty, L.; Barron, M. E.; Hess, K. C.; Buck, J.; Levin, L. R.; Tresguerres, M.

    2013-01-01

    Corals are an ecologically and evolutionarily significant group, providing the framework for coral reef biodiversity while representing one of the most basal of metazoan phyla. However, little is known about fundamental signaling pathways in corals. Here we investigate the dynamics of cAMP, a conserved signaling molecule that can regulate virtually every physiological process. Bioinformatics revealed corals have both transmembrane and soluble adenylyl cyclases (AC). Endogenous cAMP levels in live corals followed a potential diel cycle, as they were higher during the day compared to the middle of the night. Coral homogenates exhibited some of the highest cAMP production rates ever to be recorded in any organism; this activity was inhibited by calcium ions and stimulated by bicarbonate. In contrast, zooxanthellae or mucus had >1000-fold lower AC activity. These results suggest that cAMP is an important regulator of coral physiology, especially in response to light, acid/base disturbances and inorganic carbon levels. PMID:23459251

  13. A subnanomolar concentration of Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) pre-synaptically modulates glutamatergic transmission in the rat hippocampus acting through acetylcholine.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Valeria; Sardone, Lara Maria; Chisari, Mariangela; Licata, Flora; Li Volsi, Guido; Perciavalle, Vincenzo; Ciranna, Lucia; Costa, Lara

    2017-01-06

    The neuropeptide PACAP modulates synaptic transmission in the hippocampus exerting multiple effects through different receptor subtypes: the underlying mechanisms have not yet been completely elucidated. The neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) also exerts a well-documented modulation of hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity. Since PACAP was shown to stimulate ACh release in the hippocampus, we tested whether PACAP acting through ACh might indirectly modulate glutamate-mediated synaptic transmission at a pre- and/or at a post-synaptic level. Using patch clamp on rat hippocampal slices, we tested PACAP effects on stimulation-evoked AMPA receptor-mediated excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCsAMPA) in the CA3-CA1 synapse and on spontaneous miniature EPSCs (mEPSCs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons. A subnanomolar dose of PACAP (0.5nM) decreased EPSCsAMPA amplitude, enhanced EPSC paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and reduced mEPSC frequency, indicating a pre-synaptic decrease of glutamate release probability: these effects were abolished by simultaneous blockade of muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptors, indicating the involvement of endogenous ACh. The effect of subnanomolar PACAP was abolished by a PAC1 receptor antagonist but not by a VPAC receptor blocker. At a higher concentration (10nM), PACAP inhibited EPSCsAMPA: this effect persisted in the presence of ACh receptor antagonists and did not involve any change in PPF or in mEPSC frequency, thus was not mediated by ACh and was exerted post- synaptically on CA1 pyramidal neurons. We suggest that a high-affinity PAC1 receptor pre-synaptically modulates hippocampal glutamatergic transmission acting through ACh. Therefore, administration of PACAP at very low doses might be envisaged in cognitive diseases with reduced cholinergic transmission.

  14. GABAB and adenosine receptors mediate enhancement of the K+ current, IAHP, by reducing adenylyl cyclase activity in rat CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gerber, U; Gähwiler, B H

    1994-11-01

    1. Gamma-aminobuturic acid-B (GABAB) and adenosine A1 receptors, which are expressed in hippocampal pyramidal cells, are linked to pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins known to be coupled negatively to the enzyme adenylyl cyclase. This study investigates the electrophysiological consequences of adenylyl cyclase inhibition in response to stimulation of these receptors. 2. Single-electrode voltage-clamp recordings were obtained from CA3 pyramidal cells in rat hippocampal slice cultures in presence of tetrodotoxin. The calcium-dependent potassium current (IAHP), which is very sensitive to intracellular levels of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used as an electrophysiological indicator of adenylyl cyclase activity. 3. Application of baclofen (10 microM), a selective agonist at GABAB receptors, or adenosine (50 microM) each resulted in a transient decrease followed by a significant enhancement in the amplitude of evoked IAHP. The initial reduction in amplitude of IAHP probably reflects inadequacies in voltage clamp of electronically distant dendritic sites, due to the shunting caused by concomitant activation of potassium conductance by baclofen/adenosine. Comparable increases in membrane conductance in response to the GABAA agonist, muscimol, caused a similar reduction in IAHP. The enhancement of IAHP is consistent with an inhibition of constitutively active adenylyl cyclase. 4. The receptor mediating the responses to adenosine was identified as belonging to the A1 subtype on the basis of its sensitivity to the selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Probing the Molecular Mechanism of Human Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activation by NO in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jie; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Zhang, Huijuan; Xu, Qiming; Zhou, Yajun; Tan, Li; Nagawa, Shingo; Huang, Zhong-Xian; Tan, Xiangshi

    2017-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heme-containing metalloprotein in NO-sGC-cGMP signaling. NO binds to the heme of sGC to catalyze the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP, which plays a critical role in several physiological processes. However, the molecular mechanism for sGC to mediate the NO signaling remains unclear. Here fluorophore FlAsH-EDT2 and fluorescent proteins were employed to study the NO-induced sGC activation. FlAsH-EDT2 labeling study revealed that NO binding to the H-NOX domain of sGC increased the distance between H-NOX and PAS domain and the separation between H-NOX and coiled-coil domain. The heme pocket conformation changed from “closed” to “open” upon NO binding. In addition, the NO-induced conformational change of sGC was firstly investigated in vivo through fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. The results both in vitro and in vivo indicated the conformational change of the catalytic domain of sGC from “open” to “closed” upon NO binding. NO binding to the heme of H-NOX domain caused breaking of Fe-N coordination bond, initiated the domain moving and conformational change, induced the allosteric effect of sGC to trigger the NO-signaling from H-NOX via PAS & coiled-coil to the catalytic domain, and ultimately stimulates the cyclase activity of sGC. PMID:28230071

  16. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E.; Lee, Y. C.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme.

  17. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Lee, Yu-Chen; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme. PMID:11687640

  18. Short- and long-term regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity by delta-opioid receptor are mediated by Galphai2 in neuroblastoma N2A cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tetrault, Joan; Wang, Wei; Loh, Horace H; Law, Ping-Yee

    2006-06-01

    Activation of the opioid receptor results in short-term inhibition of intracellular cAMP levels followed by receptor desensitization and subsequent increase of cAMP above the control level (adenylyl cyclase superactivation). Using adenovirus to deliver pertussis toxin-insensitive mutants of the alpha-subunits of G(i/o) that are expressed in neuroblastoma Neuro2A cells (Galpha(i2), Galpha(i3), and Galpha(o)), we examined the identities of the G proteins involved in the short- and long-term action of the delta-opioid receptor (DOR). Pertussis toxin pretreatment completely abolished the ability of [d-Pen(2), d-Pen(5)]-enkephalin (DPDPE) to inhibit forskolin-stimulated intracellular cAMP production. Expression of the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2), and not the C351L mutants of Galpha(i3) or Galpha(o), rescued the short-term effect of DPDPE after pertussis toxin treatment. The ability of Galpha(i2) in mediating DOR inhibition of adenylyl cyclase activity was also reflected in the ability of Galpha(i2), not Galpha(i3) or Galpha(o), to coimmunoprecipitate with DOR. Coincidently, after long-term DPDPE treatment, pertussis toxin treatment eliminated the antagonist naloxone-induced superactivation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Again, only the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2) restored the adenylyl cyclase superactivation after pertussis toxin treatment. More importantly, the C352L mutant of Galpha(i2) remained associated with DOR after long-term agonist and pertussis toxin treatment whereas the wild-type Galpha(i2) did not. These data suggest that Galpha(i2) serves as the signaling molecule in both DOR-mediated short- and long-term regulation of adenylyl cyclase activity.

  19. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 CruA (sll0147) encodes lycopene cyclase and requires bound chlorophyll a for activity.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Shen, Gaozhong; Bryant, Donald A

    2017-03-01

    The genome of the model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, encodes two paralogs of CruA-type lycopene cyclases, SynPCC7002_A2153 and SynPCC7002_A0043, which are denoted cruA and cruP, respectively. Unlike the wild-type strain, a cruA deletion mutant is light-sensitive, grows slowly, and accumulates lycopene, γ-carotene, and 1-OH-lycopene; however, this strain still produces β-carotene and other carotenoids derived from it. Expression of cruA from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (cruA 6803) in Escherichia coli strains that synthesize either lycopene or γ-carotene did not lead to the synthesis of either γ-carotene or β-carotene, respectively. However, expression of this orthologous cruA 6803 gene (sll0147) in the Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 cruA deletion mutant produced strains with phenotypic properties identical to the wild type. CruA6803 was purified from Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 by affinity chromatography, and the purified protein was pale yellow-green due to the presence of bound chlorophyll (Chl) a and β-carotene. Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the partly purified protein in the presence of lithium dodecylsulfate at 4 °C confirmed that the protein was yellow-green in color. When purified CruA6803 was assayed in vitro with either lycopene or γ-carotene as substrate, β-carotene was synthesized. These data establish that CruA6803 is a lycopene cyclase and that it requires a bound Chl a molecule for activity. Possible binding sites for Chl a and the potential regulatory role of the Chl a in coordination of Chl and carotenoid biosynthesis are discussed.

  20. Guanylyl cyclase structure, function and regulation.

    PubMed

    Potter, Lincoln R

    2011-12-01

    Nitric oxide, bicarbonate, natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), guanylins, uroguanylins and guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) activate a family of enzymes variously called guanyl, guanylyl or guanylate cyclases that catalyze the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and pyrophosphate. Intracellular cyclic GMP is a second messenger that modulates: platelet aggregation, neurotransmission, sexual arousal, gut peristalsis, blood pressure, long bone growth, intestinal fluid secretion, lipolysis, phototransduction, cardiac hypertrophy and oocyte maturation. This review briefly discusses the discovery of cGMP and guanylyl cyclases, then nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylyl cyclase are described in slightly greater detail. Finally, the structure, function, and regulation of the individual mammalian single membrane-spanning guanylyl cyclases GC-A, GC-B, GC-C, GC-D, GC-E, GC-F and GC-G are described in greatest detail as determined by biochemical, cell biological and gene-deletion studies.

  1. Properties of enzyme fraction A from Chlorella and copurification of 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase, adenosine 5'phosphosulfate sulfohydrolase and adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate cyclase activities.

    PubMed

    Lik-Shing Tsang, M; Schiff, J A

    1976-05-17

    Enzyme fraction A from Chlorella which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate from adenosine 3'-phosphate 5'-phosphosulfate is further characterized. Fraction A is found to contain an Mg2+ -activated and Ca2+ -inhibited 3' (2')-nucleotidase specific for 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleosides. This activity has been named 3' (2), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase. The A fraction is also found to contain an activity which catalyzes the formation of adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) from adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase). Under the same conditions of assay, 5'-ATP and 5'-ADP are not substrated for cyclic AMP formation. Unlike the 3' (2'), 5'-biphosphonucleoside 3' (2')-phosphohydrolase activity, the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase activity does not require Mg2+, requires NH+4 or Na+, and is not inhibited by Ca2+. The A fraction also contains an adenosine 5'-phospho sulfate sulfohydrolase activity which forms 5'-AMP and sulfate. The three activities remain together during purification and acrylamide gel electrophoresis of the purified preparation yields a pattern where only one protein band has all three activities. The phosphohydrolase can be separated from the other two activities by affinity chromatography on agarose-hexyl-adenosine 3'n5'-bisphosphate yielding a phosphohydrolase preparation showing a single band on gel electrophoresis. The adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate cyclase may provide an alternate route of cyclic AMP formation from sulfate via ATP sulfurylase, but its regulatory significance in Chlorella, if any, remains to be demonstrated. In sulfate reduction, the phosphohydrolase may serve to provide a readily utilized pool of adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate as needed by the adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate sulfotransferase. The cyclase and sulfohydrolase activities would be regarded as side reactions incidental to this pathway, but may be of importance in other metabolic and regulatory reactions.

  2. Protein kinase C and epidermal growth factor stimulation of Raf1 potentiates adenylyl cyclase type 6 activation in intact cells.

    PubMed

    Beazely, Michael A; Alan, Jamie K; Watts, Val J

    2005-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclase type 6 (AC6) activity is inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro; however, in intact cells, PKC activation does not inhibit the activity of transiently expressed AC6. To investigate the effects of PKC activation on AC6 activity in intact cells, we constructed human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells that stably express wild-type AC6 (AC6-WT) or an AC6 mutant lacking a PKC and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) phosphorylation site, Ser674 (AC6-S674A). In contrast to in vitro observations, we observed a PKC-mediated enhancement of forskolin- and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in HEK-AC6 cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate also potentiated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing endogenous AC6, including Chinese hamster ovary cells and differentiated Cath.a differentiated cells. In HEK-AC6-S674A cells, the potentiation of AC6 stimulation was significantly greater than in cells expressing AC6-WT. The positive effect of PKC activation on AC6 activity seemed to involve Raf1 kinase because the Raf1 inhibitor 3-(3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzylidene-5-iodo-1,3-dihydro-indol-2-one (GW5074) inhibited the PKC potentiation of AC6 activity. Furthermore, the forskolin-stimulated activity of a recombinant AC6 in which the putative Raf1 regulatory sites have been eliminated was not potentiated by activation of PKC. The ability of Raf1 to regulate AC6 may involve a direct interaction because AC6 and a constitutively active Raf1 construct were coimmunoprecipitated. In addition, we report that epidermal growth factor receptor activation also enhances AC6 signaling in a Raf1-dependent manner. These data suggest that Raf1 potentiates drug-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in cells expressing AC6 after activation of multiple signaling pathways.

  3. Catalytically Active Guanylyl Cyclase B Requires Endoplasmic Reticulum-mediated Glycosylation, and Mutations That Inhibit This Process Cause Dwarfism.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Deborah M; Edmund, Aaron B; Otto, Neil M; Chaffee, Thomas S; Robinson, Jerid W; Potter, Lincoln R

    2016-05-20

    C-type natriuretic peptide activation of guanylyl cyclase B (GC-B), also known as natriuretic peptide receptor B or NPR2, stimulates long bone growth, and missense mutations in GC-B cause dwarfism. Four such mutants (L658F, Y708C, R776W, and G959A) bound (125)I-C-type natriuretic peptide on the surface of cells but failed to synthesize cGMP in membrane GC assays. Immunofluorescence microscopy also indicated that the mutant receptors were on the cell surface. All mutant proteins were dephosphorylated and incompletely glycosylated, but dephosphorylation did not explain the inactivation because the mutations inactivated a "constitutively phosphorylated" enzyme. Tunicamycin inhibition of glycosylation in the endoplasmic reticulum or mutation of the Asn-24 glycosylation site decreased GC activity, but neither inhibition of glycosylation in the Golgi by N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I gene inactivation nor PNGase F deglycosylation of fully processed GC-B reduced GC activity. We conclude that endoplasmic reticulum-mediated glycosylation is required for the formation of an active catalytic, but not ligand-binding domain, and that mutations that inhibit this process cause dwarfism.

  4. Expression of guanylate cyclase-C, guanylin, and uroguanylin is downregulated proportionally to the ulcerative colitis disease activity index

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Danfeng; Niu, Junkun; Miao, Jiarong; Dong, Xiangqian; Wang, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Kunhua; Miao, Yinglei

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane receptor guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) signaling pathway has been implicated in several gastrointestinal disorders. Activation of GC-C via guanylin (Gn) and uroguanylin (Ugn) regulates intestinal fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. However, how it regulates the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unclear. Here, we investigated the activation of GC-C signaling in ulcerative colitis (UC) of different clinical severities. A total of 60 UC patients and 20 normal controls were recruited. Evaluation of the UC disease activity index (DAI) was performed using a modified Mayo scoring system. The expression of GC-C, Gn and Ugn in the colonic mucosa was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. We found that the UC patients had significantly lower expression of GC-C, Gn and Ugn than the controls. Furthermore, there were significant differences for GC-C, Gn and Ugn expression for the UC groups of Grade 1, 2 and 3, and their expression levels were reduced with increases in their DAI. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GC-C, Gn and Ugn are downregulated in UC, and this downregulation is more significant with aggravation of the clinical condition. Therefore, the GC-C signaling pathway may be implicated in the progression of UC. PMID:27125248

  5. Oscillation of ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity during the cell cycle and function of cyclic ADP-ribose in a unicellular organism, Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, W; Takenaka, S; Inageda, K; Nishina, H; Takahashi, K; Katada, T; Tsuyama, S; Inui, H; Miyatake, K; Nakano, Y

    1997-03-17

    In Euglena gracilis, the activity of ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which produces cyclic ADP-ribose, oscillated during the cell cycle in a synchronous culture induced by a light-dark cycle, and a marked increase in the activity was observed in the G2 phase. Similarly, the ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity rose extremely immediately before cell division started, when synchronous cell division was induced by adding cobalamin (which is an essential growth factor and participates in DNA synthesis in this organism) to its deficient culture. Further, cADPR in these cells showed a maximum level immediately before cell division started. A dose-dependent Ca2+ release was observed when microsomes were incubated with cADPR.

  6. Integrative Signaling Networks of Membrane Guanylate Cyclases: Biochemistry and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Rameshwar K.; Duda, Teresa; Makino, Clint L.

    2016-01-01

    This monograph presents a historical perspective of cornerstone developments on the biochemistry and physiology of mammalian membrane guanylate cyclases (MGCs), highlighting contributions made by the authors and their collaborators. Upon resolution of early contentious studies, cyclic GMP emerged alongside cyclic AMP, as an important intracellular second messenger for hormonal signaling. However, the two signaling pathways differ in significant ways. In the cyclic AMP pathway, hormone binding to a G protein coupled receptor leads to stimulation or inhibition of an adenylate cyclase, whereas the cyclic GMP pathway dispenses with intermediaries; hormone binds to an MGC to affect its activity. Although the cyclic GMP pathway is direct, it is by no means simple. The modular design of the molecule incorporates regulation by ATP binding and phosphorylation. MGCs can form complexes with Ca2+-sensing subunits that either increase or decrease cyclic GMP synthesis, depending on subunit identity. In some systems, co-expression of two Ca2+ sensors, GCAP1 and S100B with ROS-GC1 confers bimodal signaling marked by increases in cyclic GMP synthesis when intracellular Ca2+ concentration rises or falls. Some MGCs monitor or are modulated by carbon dioxide via its conversion to bicarbonate. One MGC even functions as a thermosensor as well as a chemosensor; activity reaches a maximum with a mild drop in temperature. The complexity afforded by these multiple limbs of operation enables MGC networks to perform transductions traditionally reserved for G protein coupled receptors and Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) ion channels and to serve a diverse array of functions, including control over cardiac vasculature, smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation, cellular growth, sensory transductions, neural plasticity and memory. PMID:27695398

  7. Increased activity of guanylate cyclase in the atherosclerotic rabbit aorta: role of non-endothelial nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed Central

    Rupin, A.; Behr, D.; Verbeuren, T. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed to examine the effects of putative non-endothelial nitric oxide on the soluble guanylate cyclase activity of severe atherosclerotic aortae from hypercholesterolaemic rabbits fed a cholesterol rich diet for 45 weeks. 2. The guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) content of aortae from rabbits fed either a control diet or a diet containing 0.3% cholesterol for 45 weeks was quantified in saline extracts or in trichloracetic acid/either extracts by use of a competitive immunoenzymatic assay. Rabbit anti-cyclic GMP immunoglobulin G was covalently linked to the solid phase, in order to avoid false positive results due to high rabbit immunoglobulin G concentrations in the atherosclerotic saline extracts. 3. Saline extracts of atherosclerotic aortae which were harvested immediately after death (intact aortae) contained about 6 fold more cyclic GMP than control aortae when expressed in pmol cyclic GMP mg-1 protein. The cyclic GMP concentrations in trichloracetic acid/ether extracts of atherosclerotic and control aortae expressed in pmol mg-1 fresh tissue were not significantly different. 4. Neointimal-medial explants from atherosclerotic and control aortae were placed in a physiological saline solution and incubated at 37 degrees C for six hours in an incubator gassed with 5% CO2. Before the incubation, the cyclic GMP concentrations in saline extracts of atherosclerotic explants (0.74 +/- 0.27 pmol mg-1) were found to be 17 fold higher than those of control explants (0.043 +/- 0.008 pmol mg-1). The cyclic GMP content of control explants decreased significantly after 6 h of incubation, while that of atherosclerotic explants remained elevated. 5. Chronic administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a non selective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthases, at 12 mg kg-1 day-1 subcutaneously for one month did not reduce the cyclic GMP concentration of intact atherosclerotic aortae, while that of intact aortae from control rabbits

  8. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  9. Bradykinin activates ADP-ribosyl cyclase in neuroblastoma cells: intracellular concentration decrease in NAD and increase in cyclic ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Salmina, Alla; Hashii, Minako; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Zhang, Jia-Sheng; Noda, Mami; Zhong, Zen-Guo; Jin, Duo

    2006-09-04

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in the crude membrane fraction of neuroblastomaxglioma NGPM1-27 hybrid cells was measured by monitoring [(3)H] cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) formation from [(3)H] NAD(+). Bradykinin (BK) at 100nM increased ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity by about 2.5-fold. Application of 300nM BK to living NGPM1-27 cells decreased NAD(+) to 78% of the prestimulation level at 30s. In contrast, intracellular cADPR concentrations were increased by 2-3-fold during the period from 30 to 120s after the same treatment. Our results suggest that cADPR is one of the second messengers downstream of B(2) BK receptors.

  10. Transcription initiation in vivo without classical transactivators: DNA kinks flanking the core promoter of the housekeeping yeast adenylate kinase gene, AKY2, position nucleosomes and constitutively activate transcription.

    PubMed

    Angermayr, Michaela; Oechsner, Ulrich; Gregor, Kerstin; Schroth, Gary P; Bandlow, Wolfhard

    2002-10-01

    The housekeeping gene of the major adenylate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AKY2, ADK1) is constitutively transcribed at a moderate level. The promoter has been dissected in order to define elements that effect constitutive transcription. Initiation of mRNA synthesis at the AKY2 promoter is shown to be mediated by a non-canonic core promoter, (TA)(6). Nucleotide sequences 5' of this element only marginally affect transcription suggesting that promoter activation can dispense with transactivators and essentially involves basal transcription. We show that the core promoter of AKY2 is constitutively kept free of nucleosomes. Analyses of permutated AKY2 promoter DNA revealed the presence of bent DNA. DNA structure analysis by computer and by mutation identified two kinks flanking an interstitial stretch of 65 bp of moderately bent core promoter DNA. Kinked DNA is likely incompatible with packaging into nucleosomes and responsible for positioning nucleosomes at the flanks allowing unimpeded access of the basal transcription machinery to the core promoter. The data show that in yeast, constitutive gene expression can dispense with classical transcriptional activator proteins, if two prerequisites are met: (i) the core promoter is kept free of nucleosomes; this can be due to structural properties of the DNA as an alternative to chromatin remodeling factors; and (ii) the core promoter is pre-bent to allow a high rate of basal transcription initiation.

  11. Pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, tolerability, and safety of the soluble guanylate cyclase activator cinaciguat (BAY 58-2667) in healthy male volunteers.

    PubMed

    Frey, Reiner; Mück, Wolfgang; Unger, Sigrun; Artmeier-Brandt, Ulrike; Weimann, Gerrit; Wensing, Georg

    2008-12-01

    Preclinical data indicate that the nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activator cinaciguat (BAY 58-2667), which is a new drug in development for patients with heart failure, induces vasodilation preferentially in diseased vessels. This study aimed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of cinaciguat. Seventy-six healthy volunteers were included in this randomized, placebo-controlled study. Cinaciguat (50-250 microg/h) was administered intravenously for up to 4 hours in a maximum of 6 individuals per dose group. No serious adverse events were reported. Four-hour infusions (50-250 microg/h) decreased diastolic blood pressure and increased heart rate (all P values < .05) versus placebo, without significantly reducing systolic blood pressure (P between 0.07 and 0.56). At higher doses (150-250 microg/h), 4-hour infusions decreased mean arterial pressure and increased plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels (all P values < .05). Pharmacokinetics showed dose-proportionality with low interindividual variability. Plasma concentrations declined below 1.0 microg/L within 30 minutes of cessation of infusion. Cinaciguat had potent cardiovascular effects reducing preload and afterload, warranting further investigation in patients with heart failure.

  12. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linda S.; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  13. Aldosterone Increases Oxidant Stress to Impair Guanylyl Cyclase Activity by Cysteinyl Thiol Oxidation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E.; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO·); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO· to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10-9-10-7 mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a β1-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO· sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC β1-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H2O2 did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO·-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC. PMID:19141618

  14. 4S-limonene synthase from the oil glands of spearmint (Mentha spicata). cDNA isolation, characterization, and bacterial expression of the catalytically active monoterpene cyclase.

    PubMed

    Colby, S M; Alonso, W R; Katahira, E J; McGarvey, D J; Croteau, R

    1993-11-05

    The committed step in the biosynthesis of monoterpenes in mint (Mentha) species is the cyclization of geranyl pyrophosphate to the olefin (-)-4S-limonene catalyzed by limonene synthase (cyclase). Internal amino acid sequences of the purified enzyme from spearmint oil glands were utilized to design three distinct oligonucleotide probes. These probes were subsequently employed to screen a spearmint leaf cDNA library, and four clones were isolated. Three of these cDNA isolates were full-length and were functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, yielding a peptide that is immunologically recognized by polyclonal antibodies raised against the purified limonene synthase from spearmint and that is catalytically active in generating from geranyl pyrophosphate a product distribution identical to that of the native enzyme (principally limonene with small amounts of the coproducts alpha- and beta-pinene and myrcene). The longest open reading frame is 1800 nucleotides and the deduced amino acid sequence contains a putative plastidial transit peptide of approximately 90 amino acids and a mature protein of about 510 residues corresponding to the native enzyme. Several nucleotide differences in the 5'-untranslated region of all three full-length clones suggest the presence of several limonene synthase genes and/or alleles in the allotetraploid spearmint genome. Sequence comparisons with a sesquiterpene cyclase, epi-aristolochene synthase from tobacco, and a diterpene cyclase, casbene synthase from castor bean, demonstrated a significant degree of similarity between these three terpenoid cyclase types, the first three examples of this large family of catalysts to be described from higher plants.

  15. Preconditioning with soluble guanylate cyclase activation prevents postischemic inflammation and reduces nitrate tolerance in heme oxygenase-1 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Walter Z.; Wang, Meifang; Durante, William; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown that, unlike wild-type mice (WT), heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1−/−) mice developed nitrate tolerance and were not protected from inflammation caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) when preconditioned with a H2S donor. We hypothesized that stimulation (with BAY 41-2272) or activation (with BAY 60-2770) of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) would precondition HO-1−/− mice against an inflammatory effect of I/R and increase arterial nitrate responses. Intravital fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize leukocyte rolling and adhesion to postcapillary venules of the small intestine in anesthetized mice. Relaxation to ACh and BAY compounds was measured on superior mesenteric arteries isolated after I/R protocols. Preconditioning with either BAY compound 10 min (early phase) or 24 h (late phase) before I/R reduced postischemic leukocyte rolling and adhesion to sham control levels and increased superior mesenteric artery responses to ACh, sodium nitroprusside, and BAY 41-2272 in WT and HO-1−/− mice. Late-phase preconditioning with BAY 60-2770 was maintained in HO-1−/− and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice pretreated with an inhibitor (dl-propargylglycine) of enzymatically produced H2S. Pretreatment with BAY compounds also prevented the I/R increase in small intestinal TNF-α. We speculate that increasing sGC activity and related PKG acts downstream to H2S and disrupts signaling processes triggered by I/R in part by maintaining low cellular Ca2+. In addition, BAY preconditioning did not increase sGC levels, yet increased the response to agents that act on reduced heme-containing sGC. Collectively these actions would contribute to increased nitrate sensitivity and vascular function. PMID:23771693

  16. The Cyclase-associated protein Cap1 is important for proper regulation of infection-related morphogenesis in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhang, Haifeng; Li, Guotian; Shaw, Brian; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2012-09-01

    Surface recognition and penetration are critical steps in the infection cycle of many plant pathogenic fungi. In Magnaporthe oryzae, cAMP signaling is involved in surface recognition and pathogenesis. Deletion of the MAC1 adenylate cyclase gene affected appressorium formation and plant infection. In this study, we used the affinity purification approach to identify proteins that are associated with Mac1 in vivo. One of the Mac1-interacting proteins is the adenylate cyclase-associated protein named Cap1. CAP genes are well-conserved in phytopathogenic fungi but none of them have been functionally characterized. Deletion of CAP1 blocked the effects of a dominant RAS2 allele and resulted in defects in invasive growth and a reduced intracellular cAMP level. The Δcap1 mutant was defective in germ tube growth, appressorium formation, and formation of typical blast lesions. Cap1-GFP had an actin-like localization pattern, localizing to the apical regions in vegetative hyphae, at the periphery of developing appressoria, and in circular structures at the base of mature appressoria. Interestingly, Cap1, similar to LifeAct, did not localize to the apical regions in invasive hyphae, suggesting that the apical actin cytoskeleton differs between vegetative and invasive hyphae. Domain deletion analysis indicated that the proline-rich region P2 but not the actin-binding domain (AB) of Cap1 was responsible for its subcellular localization. Nevertheless, the AB domain of Cap1 must be important for its function because CAP1(ΔAB) only partially rescued the Δcap1 mutant. Furthermore, exogenous cAMP induced the formation of appressorium-like structures in non-germinated conidia in CAP1(ΔAB) transformants. This novel observation suggested that AB domain deletion may result in overstimulation of appressorium formation by cAMP treatment. Overall, our results indicated that CAP1 is important for the activation of adenylate cyclase, appressorium morphogenesis, and plant infection in M

  17. Crystal structures of glutaminyl cyclases (QCs) from Drosophila melanogaster reveal active site conservation between insect and mammalian QCs.

    PubMed

    Koch, Birgit; Kolenko, Petr; Buchholz, Mirko; Carrillo, David Ruiz; Parthier, Christoph; Wermann, Michael; Rahfeld, Jens-Ulrich; Reuter, Gunter; Schilling, Stephan; Stubbs, Milton T; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2012-09-18

    Glutaminyl cyclases (QCs), which catalyze the formation of pyroglutamic acid (pGlu) at the N-terminus of a variety of peptides and proteins, have attracted particular attention for their potential role in Alzheimer's disease. In a transgenic Drosophila melanogaster (Dm) fruit fly model, oral application of the potent competitive QC inhibitor PBD150 was shown to reduce the burden of pGlu-modified Aβ. In contrast to mammals such as humans and rodents, there are at least three DmQC species, one of which (isoDromeQC) is localized to mitochondria, whereas DromeQC and an isoDromeQC splice variant possess signal peptides for secretion. Here we present the recombinant expression, characterization, and crystal structure determination of mature DromeQC and isoDromeQC, revealing an overall fold similar to that of mammalian QCs. In the case of isoDromeQC, the putative extended substrate binding site might be affected by the proximity of the N-terminal residues. PBD150 inhibition of DromeQC is roughly 1 order of magnitude weaker than that of the human and murine QCs. The inhibitor binds to isoDromeQC in a fashion similar to that observed for human QCs, whereas it adopts alternative binding modes in a DromeQC variant lacking the conserved cysteines near the active center and shows a disordered dimethoxyphenyl moiety in wild-type DromeQC, providing an explanation for the lower affinity. Our biophysical and structural data suggest that isoDromeQC and human QC are similar with regard to functional aspects. The two Dm enzymes represent a suitable model for further in-depth analysis of the catalytic mechanism of animal QCs, and isoDromeQC might serve as a model system for the structure-based design of potential AD therapeutics.

  18. An aberrant adenylate kinase isoenzyme from the serum of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Hamada, M; Okuda, H; Oka, K; Watanabe, T; Ueda, K; Nojima, M; Kuby, S A; Manship, M; Tyler, F H; Ziter, F A

    1981-08-13

    The sera from patients with human Duchenne (X-linked) progressive muscular dystrophy contain elevated adenylate kinase (ATP: AMP phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.4.3) activities, in addition to their characteristically high creatine kinase (ATP; creatine N-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.3.2) activities. By agarose gel electrophoresis of human Duchenne dystrophic serum, the presence of an apparently normal human serum adenylate kinase together with a variant species of adenylate kinase was detected. The latter enzyme species appeared, in its mobility, to be similar to that of the normal human liver-type adenylate kinase. The presence of this aberrant liver-type adenylate kinase could also be demonstrated by characteristic (for the liver type) inhibition patterns with P1,P5-di-(adenosine-5')pentaphosphate, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) and phosphoenolpyruvate. On the other hand, by inhibition titrations with an anti-muscle-type adenylate kinase, hemolysates from the erythrocytes of several Duchenne and Becker's dystrophics were found to contain approx. 96% muscle-type adenylate kinase and their serum approx. 97% muscle-type adenylate kinase. These same patients contained approx. 89% M-M type creatine kinase in their serum (by inhibition against anti-human muscle-type creatine kinase) indicative of the presence also of M-B plus B-B type active isoenzymes. All of these data can best be explained by the presence of a variant or mutant adenylate kinase isoenzyme in the dystrophic serum. This isoenzyme appears to resemble the liver type in its inhibition patterns with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5')pentaphosphate, 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) and phosphoenolpyruvate, and in its heat stability (compare also the agarose gel electrophoresis pattern); but structurally, it is a muscle type, or derived from a muscle type, as shown immunologically by inhibition reactions with anti-muscle-type adenylate kinase. Whether this is a fetal-type isoenzyme of adenylate kinase will require further

  19. Effect of association with adenylyl cyclase-associated protein on the interaction of yeast adenylyl cyclase with Ras protein.

    PubMed

    Shima, F; Yamawaki-Kataoka, Y; Yanagihara, C; Tamada, M; Okada, T; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1997-03-01

    Posttranslational modification of Ras protein has been shown to be critical for interaction with its effector molecules, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase. However, the mechanism of its action was unknown. In this study, we used a reconstituted system with purified adenylyl cyclase and Ras proteins carrying various degrees of the modification to show that the posttranslational modification, especially the farnesylation step, is responsible for 5- to 10-fold increase in Ras-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase activity even though it has no significant effect on their binding affinity. The stimulatory effect of farnesylation is found to depend on the association of adenylyl cyclase with 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP), which was known to be required for proper in vivo response of adenylyl cyclase to Ras protein, by comparing the levels of Ras-dependent activation of purified adenylyl cyclase with and without bound CAP. The region of CAP required for this effect is mapped to its N-terminal segment of 168 amino acid residues, which coincides with the region required for the in vivo effect. Furthermore, the stimulatory effect is successfully reconstituted by in vitro association of CAP with the purified adenylyl cyclase molecule lacking the bound CAP. These results indicate that the association of adenylyl cyclase with CAP is responsible for the stimulatory effect of posttranslational modification of Ras on its activity and that this may be the mechanism underlying its requirement for the proper in vivo cyclic AMP response.

  20. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric alphabeta soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the beta subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type alphabeta enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant alphabetaCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrim idin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the beta subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer.

  1. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): Implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric αβ soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the β subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type αβ enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant αβCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the β subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer. PMID:12883009

  2. Absence of the cbb3 Terminal Oxidase Reveals an Active Oxygen-Dependent Cyclase Involved in Bacteriochlorophyll Biosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guangyu E.; Martin, Elizabeth C.; Hunter, C. Neil

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The characteristic green color associated with chlorophyll pigments results from the formation of an isocyclic fifth ring on the tetrapyrrole macrocycle during the biosynthesis of these important molecules. This reaction is catalyzed by two unrelated cyclase enzymes employing different chemistries. Oxygenic phototrophs such as plants and cyanobacteria utilize an oxygen-dependent enzyme, the major component of which is a diiron protein named AcsF, while BchE, an oxygen-sensitive [4Fe-4S] cluster protein, dominates in phototrophs inhabiting anoxic environments, such as the purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We identify a potential acsF in this organism and assay for activity of the encoded protein in a strain lacking bchE under various aeration regimes. Initially, cells lacking bchE did not demonstrate AcsF activity under any condition tested. However, on removal of a gene encoding a subunit of the cbb3-type respiratory terminal oxidase, cells cultured under regimes ranging from oxic to micro-oxic exhibited cyclase activity, confirming the activity of the oxygen-dependent enzyme in this model organism. Potential reasons for the utilization of an oxygen-dependent enzyme in anoxygenic phototrophs are discussed. IMPORTANCE The formation of the E ring of bacteriochlorophyll pigments is the least well characterized step in their biosynthesis, remaining enigmatic for over 60 years. Two unrelated enzymes catalyze this cyclization step; O2-dependent and O2-independent forms dominate in oxygenic and anoxygenic phototrophs, respectively. We uncover the activity of an O2-dependent enzyme in the anoxygenic purple phototrophic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, initially by inactivation of the high-affinity terminal respiratory oxidase, cytochrome cbb3. We propose that the O2-dependent form allows for the biosynthesis of a low level of bacteriochlorophyll under oxic conditions, so that a rapid initiation of photosynthetic processes is possible for

  3. Crystallization of cyclase-associated protein from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Andreas; Hess, Sonja; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2002-10-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved two-domain protein that helps to activate the catalytic activity of adenylyl cyclase in the cyclase-bound state through interaction with Ras, which binds to the cyclase in a different region. With its other domain, CAP can bind monomeric actin and therefore also carries a cytoskeletal function. The protein is thus involved in Ras/cAMP-dependent signal transduction and most likely serves as an adapter protein translocating the adenylyl cyclase complex to the actin cytoskeleton. Crystals belonging to the orthorhombic space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 71.2, b = 75.1, c = 162.9 A, have been obtained from Dictyostelium discoideum CAP carrying a C-terminal His tag. A complete native data set extending to 2.2 A resolution was collected from a single crystal using an in-house X-ray system. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of CAP.

  4. YC-1, a nitric oxide-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, inhibits the spontaneous contractions of isolated pregnant rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Cetin, Ali; Kaya, Tijen; Demirkoprulu, Nihal; Karadas, Baris; Duran, Bulent; Cetin, Meral

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of YC-1 (3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole) on spontaneous contractions and levels of cyclic GMP (cGMP) of myometrial strips isolated from pregnant rats. It is a nitric oxide-independent soluble guanylate cyclase activator. Myometrial strips were obtained from eight pregnant Wistar albino rats and were mounted in organ baths for the recording of isometric tensions. We evaluated the effect of increasing concentrations of YC-1 on spontaneous myometrial contractions and on contractions of myometrial smooth muscle pretreated with methylene blue (10(-5) M), tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) (3 x 10(-4) M), and glibenclamide (10(-6) M). YC-1 (10(-9) - 3 x 10(-5) M) concentration-dependently decreased the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions of myometrial strips. The inhibition of the amplitude and frequency of spontaneous contractions by YC-1 were antagonized with methylene blue (10(-5) M) and TEA (3 x 10(-4) M), but they were not changed by glibenclamide (10(-6) M); however, the antagonistic effect of methylene blue was significantly more than that of TEA (P<0.05). We also evaluated the effect of YC-1 on the levels of cGMP in myometrial strips obtained from pregnant rat uterine horns. YC-1-stimulated myometrial strips showed an excessive elevation in myometrial cGMP that declined slowly during the subsequent washout period. These results show that YC-1 decreases spontaneous contractile activity of myometrial strips isolated from pregnant rat and causes elevation of myometrial cGMP levels in vivo. This effect of YC-1 is significantly reduced by the methylene blue and TEA, suggesting the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) channels as the mechanisms of action.

  5. 2'-Phosphate cyclase activity of RtcA: a potential rationale for the operon organization of RtcA with an RNA repair ligase RtcB in Escherichia coli and other bacterial taxa.

    PubMed

    Das, Ushati; Shuman, Stewart

    2013-10-01

    RNA terminal phosphate cyclase catalyzes the ATP-dependent conversion of a 3'-phosphate RNA end to a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate via covalent enzyme-(histidinyl-Nε)-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A intermediates. Here, we report that Escherichia coli RtcA (and its human homolog Rtc1) are capable of cyclizing a 2'-phosphate RNA end in high yield. The rate of 2'-phosphate cyclization by RtcA is five orders of magnitude slower than 3'-phosphate cyclization, notwithstanding that RtcA binds with similar affinity to RNA3'p and RNA2'p substrates. These findings expand the functional repertoire of RNA cyclase and suggest that phosphate geometry during adenylate transfer to RNA is a major factor in the kinetics of cyclization. RtcA is coregulated in an operon with an RNA ligase, RtcB, that splices RNA 5'-OH ends to either 3'-phosphate or 2',3'-cyclic phosphate ends. Our results suggest that RtcA might serve an end healing function in an RNA repair pathway, by converting RNA 2'-phosphates, which cannot be spliced by RtcB, to 2',3'-cyclic phosphates that can be sealed. The rtcBA operon is controlled by the σ(54) coactivator RtcR encoded by an adjacent gene. This operon arrangement is conserved in diverse bacterial taxa, many of which have also incorporated the RNA-binding protein Ro (which is implicated in RNA quality control under stress conditions) as a coregulated component of the operon.

  6. Nocturnal accumulation of cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the chick pineal organ is dependent on activation of guanylyl cyclase-B.

    PubMed

    Olcese, J; Majora, C; Stephan, A; Müller, D

    2002-01-01

    The role of cGMP in the avian pineal is not well understood. Although the light-sensitive secretion of melatonin is a well-known output of the circadian oscillator, pharmacologically elevated cGMP levels do not result in altered melatonin secretory amplitude or phase. This suggests that pineal cGMP signalling does not couple the endogenous circadian oscillator to the expression of melatonin rhythms. Nonetheless, the free-running rhythm of cGMP signalling implies a link to the circadian oscillator in chick pinealocytes. As the circadian rhythm of cGMP levels in vitro is not altered by pharmacological inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity, we infer that the synthesis, rather than the degradation of cGMP, is under circadian control. In vitro experiments with the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine as well as with an inhibitor of the NO-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), showed that the NOS-sGC pathway does not play a major role in the circadian control of cGMP generation. In organ culture experiments, we demonstrated that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), but not atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), elevated daytime levels of cGMP. As CNP acts on the membrane guanylyl cyclase isoform B (GC-B), which is expressed at very high levels in mammalian pineals, we investigated the effect of the membrane GC-specific inhibitor HS-142 on chick pineal cGMP levels. CNP-induced daytime cGMP levels were reduced by HS-142. More importantly, 'spontaneously' high nocturnal levels of cGMP in vitro were reduced to daytime levels by acute addition of HS-142. These data implicate endogenous nocturnal CNP release and subsequent activation of GC-B as the major input driving cGMP synthesis in the chick pineal organ.

  7. Isoform-targeted regulation of cardiac adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-01-01

    Numerous attempts have been made to develop strategies for regulating the intracellular cyclic AMP signal pharmacologically, with an intention to establish either new medical therapeutic methods or experimental tools. In the past decades, many pharmacological reagents have been identified that regulate this pathway at the level of the receptor. G protein, adenylyl cyclase, cyclic AMP, protein kinase A and phosphodiesterase. Since the cloning of adenylyl cyclase isoforms during the 1990s, investigators including ourselves have tried to find reagents that regulate the activity of this enzyme directly in an isoform-dependent manner. The ultimate goal of developing such reagents would be to regulate the cyclic AMP signal in an organ-dependent manner. Ourselves and other workers have reported that such reagents may vary from a simple cation to kinases. In a more recent study, using the results from crystallographic studies and computer-assisted drug design programs, we have identified subtype-selective regulators of adenylyl cyclase. Such regulators are mostly based upon forskolin, a diterpene compound obtained from Coleus forskolii, that acts directly on adenylyl cyclase to increase the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Similarly, novel reagents have been identified that inhibit a specific adenylyl cyclase isoform (e.g. type 5 adenylyl cyclase). Such reagents would potentially provide a new therapeutic strategy to treat hypertension, for example, as well as methods to selectively stimulate or inhibit this adenylyl cyclase isoform, which may be reminiscent of overexpression or knocking out of the cardiac adenylyl cyclase isoform by the use of a pharmacological method.

  8. The energy landscape of adenylate kinase during catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Kerns, S. Jordan; Agafonov, Roman V.; Cho, Young-Jin; Pontiggia, Francesco; Otten, Renee; Pachov, Dimitar V.; Kutter, Steffen; Phung, Lien A.; Murphy, Padraig N.; Thai, Vu; Alber, Tom; Hagan, Michael F.; Kern, Dorothee

    2014-01-01

    Kinases perform phosphoryl-transfer reactions in milliseconds; without enzymes, these reactions would take about 8000 years under physiological conditions. Despite extensive studies, a comprehensive understanding of kinase energy landscapes, including both chemical and conformational steps, is lacking. Here we scrutinize the microscopic steps in the catalytic cycle of adenylate kinase, through a combination of NMR measurements during catalysis, pre-steady-state kinetics, MD simulations, and crystallography of active complexes. We find that the Mg2+ cofactor activates two distinct molecular events, phosphoryl transfer (>105-fold) and lid-opening (103-fold). In contrast, mutation of an essential active-site arginine decelerates phosphoryl transfer 103-fold without substantially affecting lid-opening. Our results highlight the importance of the entire energy landscape in catalysis and suggest that adenylate kinases have evolved to activate key processes simultaneously by precise placement of a single, charged and very abundant cofactor in a pre-organized active site. PMID:25580578

  9. Adenylating Enzymes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis as Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Duckworth, Benjamin P.; Nelson, Kathryn M.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    Adenylation or adenylate-forming enzymes (AEs) are widely found in nature and are responsible for the activation of carboxylic acids to intermediate acyladenylates, which are mixed anhydrides of AMP. In a second reaction, AEs catalyze the transfer of the acyl group of the acyladenylate onto a nucleophilic amino, alcohol, or thiol group of an acceptor molecule leading to amide, ester, and thioester products, respectively. Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes for more than 60 adenylating enzymes, many of which represent potential drug targets due to their confirmed essentiality or requirement for virulence. Several strategies have been used to develop potent and selective AE inhibitors including high-throughput screening, fragment-based screening, and the rationale design of bisubstrate inhibitors that mimic the acyladenylate. In this review, a comprehensive analysis of the mycobacterial adenylating enzymes will be presented with a focus on the identification of small molecule inhibitors. Specifically, this review will cover the aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (aaRSs), MenE required for menaquinone synthesis, the FadD family of enzymes including the fatty acyl-AMP ligases (FAAL) and the fatty acyl-CoA ligases (FACLs) involved in lipid metabolism, and the nonribosomal peptide synthetase adenylation enzyme MbtA that is necessary for mycobactin synthesis. Additionally, the enzymes NadE, GuaA, PanC, and MshC involved in the respective synthesis of NAD, guanine, pantothenate, and mycothiol will be discussed as well as BirA that is responsible for biotinylation of the acyl CoA-carboxylases. PMID:22283817

  10. Binding of Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin and rise of guanylyl cyclase activity in the brush-border membranes of rabbit intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, J; Chakrabarti, M K

    1999-03-01

    The study examines the age-related differences in the density of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) receptors in the small intestine of rabbits. The number of STa receptors was found to be 1.7 x 10(12) in 14-day old rabbits compared to 2.4 x 10(9) in 14-week old rabbits per milligram brush-border membrane protein. The STa-induced guanylyl cyclase activity in the intestinal brush-border membranes was found to be stimulated by 6.2 folds over the basal enzyme activity in 14-day old rabbits, whereas in the 14-week old rabbits, it was 4 folds over the basal activity. Moreover, the enzyme activity remained lower in the adult rabbits compared to the younger ones. Autoradiographic analysis of sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed two STa-binding proteins of apparent molecular weights of 140 and 38 kDa in the intestinal brush-border membranes of rabbits.

  11. Activation of IKK/NF-κB provokes renal inflammatory responses in guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhankar; Periyasamy, Ramu

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the consequences of the disruption of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) on proinflammatory responses of nuclear factor kappa B, inhibitory kappa B kinase, and inhibitory kappa B alpha (NF-κB, IKK, IκBα) in the kidneys of mutant mice. The results showed that the disruption of Npr1 enhanced the renal NF-κB binding activity by 3.8-fold in 0-copy (−/−) mice compared with 2-copy (+/+) mice. In parallel, IKK activity and IκBα protein phosphorylation were increased by 8- and 11-fold, respectively, in the kidneys of 0-copy mice compared with wild-type mice. Interestingly, IκBα was reduced by 80% and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis were significantly enhanced in 0-copy mice than 2-copy mice. Treatment of 0-copy mice with NF-κB inhibitors andrographolide, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and etanercept showed a substantial reduction in renal fibrosis, attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines gene expression, and significantly reduced IKK activity and IkBα phosphorylation. These findings indicate that the systemic disruption of Npr1 activates the renal NF-κB pathways in 0-copy mice, which transactivates the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines to initiate renal remodeling; however, inhibition of NF-κB pathway repairs the abnormal renal pathology in mutant mice. PMID:22318993

  12. Activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by NO donors--S-nitrosothiols, and dinitrosyl-iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands.

    PubMed

    Severina, Irina S; Bussygina, Olga G; Pyatakova, Natalya V; Malenkova, Irina V; Vanin, Anatoly F

    2003-05-01

    We studied the capability of dimeric forms of dinitrosyl-iron complexes and S-nitrosothiols to activate soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) from human platelet cytosol. The dinitrosyl-iron complexes had the ligands glutathione (DNIC-GS) or N-acetylcysteine (DNIC-NAC). The S-nitrosothiols were S-nitrosoglutathione (GS-NO) or S-nitrosoacetylcysteine (SNAC). For both glutathione and N-acetylcysteine, the DNIC and S-nitrosothiol forms are equally effective activators of sGC. The activation mechanism is strongly affected by the presence of intrinsic metal ions. Pretreatment with the potent iron chelator, disodium salt of bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS), suppressed sGC activation by GS-NO: the concentration of GS-NO producing maximal sGC activation was increased by two orders of magnitude. In contrast, activation by DNIC-GS is strongly enhanced by BPDS. When BPDS was added 10 min after supplementation of DNIC-GS or GS-NO at 4 degrees C, it exerted a similar effect on sGC activation by either NO donor: BPDS only enhanced the sGC stimulation at low concentrations of the NO donors. Our experiments demonstrated that both Fe(2+) and Cu(2+) ions contribute to the decomposition of GS-NO in the presence of ascorbate. The decomposition of GS-NO induced by Fe(2+) ions was accompanied by formation of DNIC. BPDS protected GS-NO against the destructive action of Fe(2+) but not Cu(2+) ions. Additionally, BPDS is a sufficiently strong chelator to remove the iron from DNIC-GS complexes. Based on our data, we propose that S-nitrosothiols activate sGC via a two-step iron-mediated process: In the first step, intrinsic Fe(2+) ions catalyze the formation of DNICs from S-nitrosothiols. In the secondary step, these newly formed DNICs act as the real NO donors responsible for sGC activation.

  13. Aprataxin resolves adenylated RNA–DNA junctions to maintain genome integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Tumbale, Percy; Williams, Jessica S.; Schellenberg, Matthew J.; Kunkel, Thomas A.; Williams, R. Scott

    2013-12-22

    Faithful maintenance and propagation of eukaryotic genomes is ensured by three-step DNA ligation reactions used by ATP-dependent DNA ligases. Paradoxically, when DNA ligases encounter nicked DNA structures with abnormal DNA termini, DNA ligase catalytic activity can generate and/or exacerbate DNA damage through abortive ligation that produces chemically adducted, toxic 5'-adenylated (5'-AMP) DNA lesions. Aprataxin (APTX) reverses DNA adenylation but the context for deadenylation repair is unclear. Here we examine the importance of APTX to RNase-H2-dependent excision repair (RER) of a lesion that is very frequently introduced into DNA, a ribonucleotide. We show that ligases generate adenylated 5' ends containing a ribose characteristic of RNase H2 incision. APTX efficiently repairs adenylated RNA–DNA, and acting in an RNA–DNA damage response (RDDR), promotes cellular survival and prevents S-phase checkpoint activation in budding yeast undergoing RER. Structure–function studies of human APTX–RNA–DNA–AMP–Zn complexes define a mechanism for detecting and reversing adenylation at RNA–DNA junctions. This involves A-form RNA binding, proper protein folding and conformational changes, all of which are affected by heritable APTX mutations in ataxia with oculomotor apraxia 1. Together, these results indicate that accumulation of adenylated RNA–DNA may contribute to neurological disease.

  14. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na+ ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA–isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  15. The guanylyl cyclase-A receptor transduces an atrial natriuretic peptide/ATP activation signal in the absence of other proteins.

    PubMed

    Wong, S K; Ma, C P; Foster, D C; Chen, A Y; Garbers, D L

    1995-12-22

    Attempts to activate partially purified preparations of the guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have previously failed, leading to speculation that essential cofactors are lost during purification procedures. The receptor was modified to contain the FLAG epitope (DYKDDDDK), expressed in Sf9 cells, and purified to apparent homogeneity (4.3 mumol cyclic GMP formed/min/mg protein; 5.8 mmol 125I-ANP binding site/mg protein) by a combination of immunoaffinity, Q-Sepharose FF, and wheat germ agglutinin batch chromatography. High initial protein/detergent ratios, the presence of glycerol (40%), and the inclusion of protein phosphatase inhibitors in all buffers resulted in the purification of a receptor that continued to transduce the ANP/ATP activation signal. Both native and purified GC-A contained a single class of high affinity ANP binding sites (Kd = 60 pM) and an equivalent EC50 for ATP (0.3 mM). Positive cooperativity as a function of MnGTP was retained during purification. Thus, GC-A is capable of transducing a ligand binding signal in the absence of other proteins.

  16. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity.

    PubMed

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na(+) ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA-isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves.

  17. Classification of the adenylation and acyl-transferase activity of NRPS and PKS systems using ensembles of substrate specific hidden Markov models.

    PubMed

    Khayatt, Barzan I; Overmars, Lex; Siezen, Roland J; Francke, Christof

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the Non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) and polyketide synthases (PKSs) of microbes, fungi and plants because they can produce bioactive peptides such as antibiotics. The ability to identify the substrate specificity of the enzyme's adenylation (A) and acyl-transferase (AT) domains is essential to rationally deduce or engineer new products. We here report on a Hidden Markov Model (HMM)-based ensemble method to predict the substrate specificity at high quality. We collected a new reference set of experimentally validated sequences. An initial classification based on alignment and Neighbor Joining was performed in line with most of the previously published prediction methods. We then created and tested single substrate specific HMMs and found that their use improved the correct identification significantly for A as well as for AT domains. A major advantage of the use of HMMs is that it abolishes the dependency on multiple sequence alignment and residue selection that is hampering the alignment-based clustering methods. Using our models we obtained a high prediction quality for the substrate specificity of the A domains similar to two recently published tools that make use of HMMs or Support Vector Machines (NRPSsp and NRPS predictor2, respectively). Moreover, replacement of the single substrate specific HMMs by ensembles of models caused a clear increase in prediction quality. We argue that the superiority of the ensemble over the single model is caused by the way substrate specificity evolves for the studied systems. It is likely that this also holds true for other protein domains. The ensemble predictor has been implemented in a simple web-based tool that is available at http://www.cmbi.ru.nl/NRPS-PKS-substrate-predictor/.

  18. High Inorganic Triphosphatase Activities in Bacteria and Mammalian Cells: Identification of the Enzymes Involved

    PubMed Central

    Lakaye, Bernard; Servais, Anne-Catherine; Scholer, Georges; Fillet, Marianne; Elias, Benjamin; Derochette, Jean-Michel; Crommen, Jacques; Wins, Pierre; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently characterized a specific inorganic triphosphatase (PPPase) from Nitrosomonas europaea. This enzyme belongs to the CYTH superfamily of proteins. Many bacterial members of this family are annotated as predicted adenylate cyclases, because one of the founding members is CyaB adenylate cyclase from A. hydrophila. The aim of the present study is to determine whether other members of the CYTH protein family also have a PPPase activity, if there are PPPase activities in animal tissues and what enzymes are responsible for these activities. Methodology/Principal Findings Recombinant enzymes were expressed and purified as GST- or His-tagged fusion proteins and the enzyme activities were determined by measuring the release of inorganic phosphate. We show that the hitherto uncharacterized E. coli CYTH protein ygiF is a specific PPPase, but it contributes only marginally to the total PPPase activity in this organism, where the main enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of inorganic triphosphate (PPPi) is inorganic pyrophosphatase. We further show that CyaB hydrolyzes PPPi but this activity is low compared to its adenylate cyclase activity. Finally we demonstrate a high PPPase activity in mammalian and quail tissue, particularly in the brain. We show that this activity is mainly due to Prune, an exopolyphosphatase overexpressed in metastatic tumors where it promotes cell motility. Conclusions and General Significance We show for the first time that PPPase activities are widespread in bacteria and animals. We identified the enzymes responsible for these activities but we were unable to detect significant amounts of PPPi in E. coli or brain extracts using ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis. The role of these enzymes may be to hydrolyze PPPi, which could be cytotoxic because of its high affinity for Ca2+, thereby interfering with Ca2+ signaling. PMID:22984449

  19. Oxytocin-induced elevation of ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity, cyclic ADP-ribose or Ca(2+) concentrations is involved in autoregulation of oxytocin secretion in the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary in male mice.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Olga; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Amina, Sarwat; Hashii, Minako; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2010-01-01

    Locally released oxytocin (OT) activates OT receptors (2.1:OXY:1:OT:) in neighboring neurons in the hypothalamus and their terminals in the posterior pituitary, resulting in further OT release, best known in autoregulation occurring during labor or milk ejection in reproductive females. OT also plays a critical role in social behavior of non-reproductive females and even in males in mammals from rodents to humans. Social behavior is disrupted when elevation of free intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and OT secretion are reduced in male and female CD38 knockout mice. Therefore, it is interesting to investigate whether ADP-ribosyl cyclase-dependent signaling is involved in OT-induced OT release for social recognition in males, independent from female reproduction, and to determine its molecular mechanism. Here, we report that ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity was increased by OT in crude membrane preparations of the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary in male mice, and that OT elicited an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in the isolated terminals over a period of 5 min. The increases in cyclase and [Ca(2+)](i) were partially inhibited by nonspecific protein kinase inhibitors and a protein kinase C specific inhibitor, calphostin C. Subsequently, OT-induced OT release was also inhibited by calphostin C to levels inhibited by vasotocin, an OT receptor antagonist, and 8-bromo-cADP-ribose. These results demonstrate that OT receptors are functionally coupled to membrane-bound ADP-ribosyl cyclase and/or CD38 and suggest that cADPR-mediated intracellular calcium signaling is involved in autoregulation of OT release, which is sensitive to protein kinase C, in the hypothalamus and neurohypophysis in male mice.

  20. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  1. A new and simple method for delivering clamped nitric oxide concentrations in the physiological range: application to activation of guanylyl cyclase-coupled nitric oxide receptors.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Charmaine; Wykes, Victoria; Bellamy, Tomas C; Garthwaite, John

    2003-12-01

    The signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) could engage multiple pathways to influence cellular function. Unraveling their relative biological importance has been difficult because it has not been possible to administer NO under the steady-state conditions that are normally axiomatic for analyzing ligand-receptor interactions and downstream signal transduction. To address this problem, we devised a chemical method for generating constant NO concentrations, derived from balancing NO release from a NONOate donor with NO consumption by a sink. On theoretical grounds, 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (CPTIO) was selected as the sink. The mixture additionally contained urate to convert an unwanted product of the reaction (NO2) into nitrite ions. The method enabled NO concentrations covering the physiological range (0-100 nM) to be formed within approximately 1 s. Moreover, the concentrations were sufficiently stable over at least several minutes to be useful for biological purposes. When applied to the activation of guanylyl cyclase-coupled NO receptors, the method gave an EC50 of 1.7 nM NO for the protein purified from bovine lung, which is lower than estimated previously using a biological NO sink (red blood cells). The corresponding values for the alpha1beta1 and alpha2beta1 isoforms were 0.9 nM and 0.5 nM, respectively. The slopes of the concentration-response curves were more shallow than before (Hill coefficient of 1 rather than 2), questioning the need to consider the binding of more than one NO molecule for receptor activation. The discrepancies are ascribable to limitations of the earlier method. Other biological problems can readily be addressed by adaptations of the new method.

  2. The 70-kilodalton adenylyl cyclase-associated protein is not essential for interaction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Kataoka, T

    1992-11-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase is regulated by RAS proteins. We show here that the yeast adenylyl cyclase forms at least two high-molecular-weight complexes, one with the RAS protein-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity and the other with the Mn(2+)-dependent activity, which are separable by their size difference. The 70-kDa adenylyl cyclase-associated protein (CAP) existed in the former complex but not in the latter. Missense mutations in conserved motifs of the leucine-rich repeats of the catalytic subunit of adenylyl cyclase abolished the RAS-dependent activity, which was accompanied by formation of a very high molecular weight complex having the Mn(2+)-dependent activity. Contrary to previous results, disruption of the gene encoding CAP did not alter the extent of RAS protein-dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase, while a concomitant decrease in the size of the RAS-responsive complex was observed. These results indicate that CAP is not essential for interaction of the yeast adenylyl cyclase with RAS proteins even though it is an inherent component of the RAS-responsive adenylyl cyclase complex.

  3. The Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activator BAY 58-2667 Protects against Morbidity and Mortality in Endotoxic Shock by Recoupling Organ Systems

    PubMed Central

    Vandendriessche, Benjamin; Rogge, Elke; Goossens, Vera; Vandenabeele, Peter; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Brouckaert, Peter; Cauwels, Anje

    2013-01-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are associated with high mortality rates and the majority of sepsis patients die due to complications of multiple organ failure (MOF). The cyclic GMP (cGMP) producing enzyme soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is crucially involved in the regulation of (micro)vascular homeostasis, cardiac function and, consequently, organ function. However, it can become inactivated when exposed to reactive oxygen species (ROS). The resulting heme-free sGC can be reactivated by the heme- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent sGC activator BAY 58-2667 (Cinaciguat). We report that late (+8 h) post-treatment with BAY 58-2667 in a mouse model can protect against lethal endotoxic shock. Protection was associated with reduced hypothermia, circulating IL-6 levels, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and mortality. In contrast to BAY 58-2667, the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 and the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor Sildenafil did not have any beneficial effect on survival, emphasizing the importance of the selectivity of BAY 58-2667 for diseased vessels and tissues. Hemodynamic parameters (blood pressure and heart rate) were decreased, and linear and nonlinear indices of blood pressure variability, reflective for (un)coupling of the communication between the autonomic nervous system and the heart, were improved after late protective treatment with BAY 58-2667. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the pivotal role of the NO/sGC axis in endotoxic shock. Stabilization of sGC function with BAY 58-2667 can prevent mortality when given in the correct treatment window, which probably depends on the dynamics of the heme-free sGC pool, in turn influenced by oxidative stress. We speculate that, considering the central role of sGC signaling in many pathways required for maintenance of (micro)circulatory homeostasis, BAY 58-2667 supports organ function by recoupling inter-organ communication pathways. PMID:24015214

  4. Long-term enhancement of REM sleep by the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) in the pontine reticular formation of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; Basille, M; Gonzalez, B; Vaudry, H; Hamon, M; Adrien, J; Bourgin, P

    1999-11-01

    In rats, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep can be elicited by microinjection of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) into the oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO). In the present study, we investigated whether this area could also be a REM-promoting target for a peptide closely related to VIP: the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). When administered into the posterior part of the PnO, but not in nearby areas, of freely moving chronically implanted rats, PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 (0.3 and 3 pmol) induced a marked enhancement (60-85% over baseline) of REM sleep for 8 h that could be prevented by prior infusion of the antagonist PACAP-(6-27) (3 pmol) into the same site. Moreover, injections of PACAP into the centre of the posterior PnO resulted in REM sleep enhancement which could last for up to 11 consecutive days. Quantitative autoradiography using [125I]PACAP-27 revealed the presence in the PnO of specific binding sites with high affinity for PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 (IC50 = 2.4 and 3.2 nM, respectively), but very low affinity for VIP (IC50 > 1 microM). These data suggest that PACAP within the PnO may play a key role in REM sleep regulation, and provide evidence for long-term (several days) mechanisms involved in such a control. PAC1 receptors which have a much higher affinity for PACAP than for VIP might mediate this long-term action of PACAP on REM sleep.

  5. 17 beta-estradiol modifies nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase expression and down-regulates its activity in rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Cabilla, Jimena P; Díaz, María del Carmen; Machiavelli, Leticia I; Poliandri, Ariel H; Quinteros, Fernanda A; Lasaga, Mercedes; Duvilanski, Beatriz H

    2006-09-01

    Previous studies showed that 17 beta-estradiol (17 beta-E2) regulates the nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in many tissues. Evidence from our laboratory indicates that 17 beta-E2 disrupts the inhibitory effect of NO on prolactin release, decreasing sGC activity and affecting the cGMP pathway in anterior pituitary gland of adult ovariectomized and estrogenized rats. To ascertain the mechanisms by which 17 beta-E2 affects sGC activity, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro effects of 17 beta-E2 on sGC protein and mRNA expression in anterior pituitary gland from immature female rats. In the present work, we showed that 17 beta-E2 acute treatment exerted opposite effects on the two sGC subunits, increasing alpha1 and decreasing beta1 subunit protein and mRNA expression. This action on sGC protein expression was maximal 6-9 h after 17 beta-E2 administration. 17beta-E2 also caused the same effect on mRNA expression at earlier times. Concomitantly, 17 beta-E2 dramatically decreased sGC activity 6 and 9 h after injection. These effects were specific of 17 beta-E2, because they were not observed with the administration of other steroids such as progesterone and 17 alpha-estradiol. This inhibitory action of 17beta-E2 on sGC also required the activation of estrogen receptor (ER), because treatment with the pure ER antagonist ICI 182,780 completely blocked 17 beta-E2 action. 17 beta-E2 acute treatment caused the same effects on pituitary cells in culture. These results suggest that 17 beta-E2 exerts an acute inhibitory effect on sGC in anterior pituitary gland by down-regulating sGC beta 1 subunit and sGC activity in a specific, ER-dependent manner.

  6. Involvement of rhodopsin and ATP in the activation of membranous guanylate cyclase in retinal photoreceptor outer segments (ROS-GC) by GC-activating proteins (GCAPs): a new model for ROS-GC activation and its link to retinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Vladimir A; Hayashi, Fumio; Usukura, Jiro; Yamazaki, Akio

    2010-01-01

    Membranous guanylate cyclase in retinal photoreceptor outer segments (ROS-GC), a key enzyme for the recovery of photoreceptors to the dark state, has a topology identical to and cytoplasmic domains homologous to those of peptide-regulated GCs. However, under the prevailing concept, its activation mechanism is significantly different from those of peptide-regulated GCs: GC-activating proteins (GCAPs) function as the sole activator of ROS-GC in a Ca(2+)-sensitive manner, and neither reception of an outside signal by the extracellular domain (ECD) nor ATP binding to the kinase homology domain (KHD) is required for its activation. We have recently shown that ATP pre-binding to the KHD in ROS-GC drastically enhances its GCAP-stimulated activity, and that rhodopsin illumination, as the outside signal, is required for the ATP pre-binding. These results indicate that illuminated rhodopsin is involved in ROS-GC activation in two ways: to initiate ATP binding to ROS-GC for preparation of its activation and to reduce [Ca(2+)] through activation of cGMP phosphodiesterase. These two signal pathways are activated in a parallel and proportional manner and finally converge for strong activation of ROS-GC by Ca(2+)-free GCAPs. These results also suggest that the ECD receives the signal for ATP binding from illuminated rhodopsin. The ECD is projected into the intradiscal space, i.e., an intradiscal domain(s) of rhodopsin is also involved in the signal transfer. Many retinal disease-linked mutations are found in these intradiscal domains; however, their consequences are often unclear. This model will also provide novel insights into causal relationship between these mutations and certain retinal diseases.

  7. In vitro histamine H/sub 2/-antagonist activity of the novel compound HUK 978

    SciTech Connect

    Coombes, J.D.; Norris, D.B.; Rising, T.J.; Ross, B.C.; Steward, A.

    1985-11-04

    Histamine stimulated adenylate cyclase from guinea-pig fundic mucosa and /sup 3/H-tiotidine binding in guinea-pig cerebral cortex were used to assess the in-vitro histamine H/sub 2/-activity of the novel H/sub 2/-antagonist HUK 978. The results showed that HUK 978 was a more potent H/sub 2/-antagonist than either cimetidine or ranitidine. HUK 978 was also shown to be devoid of activity at the histamine H-/sub 1/-receptor, the muscarinic receptor and the ..cap alpha.. and ..beta..-adrenergic receptors.

  8. [Leukocyte mobility in modulation of activity of the cell signalling system].

    PubMed

    Luĭk, A I; Mogilevich, S E; Radchenko, I V; Kondrashova, L N

    1993-01-01

    The mobility of the rat polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL) has been studied. It was shown, that it is greatly determined by the balance of adenylate cyclase (AdC) and Ca-polyphosphoinositide (Ca-PPI) cell signalling systems. Various compounds whose action on the activity of the signalling systems was previously connected with the membrane receptors, proved to be capable to affect the activity of submembrane elements of these systems. It is concluded that multiple areas of bioregulators fixation within the limits of the signal cascades are available.

  9. Pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide and nerve growth factor use the proteasome to rescue nerve growth factor-deprived sympathetic neurons cultured from chick embryos.

    PubMed

    Przywara, D A; Kulkarni, J S; Wakade, T D; Leontiev, D V; Wakade, A R

    1998-11-01

    Removal of nerve growth factor (NGF) from sympathetic neurons initiates a neuronal death program and apoptosis. We show that pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) prevents apoptosis in NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons. PACAP (100 nM) added to culture medium at the time of plating failed to support neuronal survival. However, in neurons grown for 2 days with NGF and then deprived of NGF, PACAP prevented cell death for the next 24-48 h. Uptake of [3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) was used as an index of survival and decreased >50% in NGF-deprived cultures within 24 h. PACAP (1-100 nM) restored [3H]NE uptake to 92 +/- 8% of that of NGF-supported controls. Depolarization-induced [3H]NE release in neurons rescued by PACAP was the same as that in NGF-supported neurons. PACAP rescue was not mimicked by forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP and was not blocked by the protein kinase A inhibitor Rp-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphothioate. Mobilization of phosphatidylinositol by muscarine failed to support NGF-deprived neurons. Thus, PACAP may use novel signaling to promote survival of sympathetic neurons. The apoptosis-associated caspase CPP32 activity increased approximately fourfold during 6 h of NGF withdrawal (145 +/- 40 versus 38 +/- 17 nmol of substrate cleaved/min/mg of protein) and returned to even below the control level in NGF-deprived, PACAP-rescued cultures (14 +/- 7 nmol/min/mg of protein). Readdition of NGF or PACAP to NGF-deprived cultures reversed CPP32 activation, and this was blocked by lactacystin, a potent and specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, suggesting that NGF and PACAP target CPP32 for destruction by the proteasome. As PACAP is a preganglionic neurotransmitter in autonomic ganglia, we propose a novel function for this transmitter as an apoptotic rescuer of sympathetic neurons when the supply of NGF is compromised.

  10. Plecanatide-mediated activation of guanylate cyclase-C suppresses inflammation-induced colorectal carcinogenesis in Apc+/Min-FCCC mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wen-Chi L; Masih, Shet; Thadi, Anusha; Patwa, Viren; Joshi, Apoorva; Cooper, Harry S; Palejwala, Vaseem A; Clapper, Margie L; Shailubhai, Kunwar

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide on colorectal dysplasia in Apc+/Min-FCCC mice with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced inflammation. METHODS Inflammation driven colorectal carcinogenesis was induced in Apc+/Min-FCCC mice by administering DSS in their drinking water. Mice were fed a diet supplemented with plecanatide (0-20 ppm) and its effect on the multiplicity of histopathologically confirmed polypoid, flat and indeterminate dysplasia was evaluated. Plecanatide-mediated activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) signaling was assessed in colon tissues by measuring cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by ELISA, protein kinase G-II and vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein by immunoblotting. Ki-67, c-myc and cyclin D1 were used as markers of proliferation. Cellular levels and localization of β-catenin in colon tissues were assessed by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Uroguanylin (UG) and GC-C transcript levels were measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A mouse cytokine array panel was used to detect cytokines in the supernatant of colon explant cultures. RESULTS Oral treatment of Apc+/MinFCCC mice with plecanatide produced a statistically significant reduction in the formation of inflammation-driven polypoid, flat and indeterminate dysplasias. This anti-carcinogenic activity of plecanatide was accompanied by activation of cGMP/GC-C signaling mediated inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and reduced proliferation. Plecanatide also decreased secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL1 TNF), chemokines (MIP-1, IP-10) and growth factors (GCSF and GMCSF) from colon explants derived from mice with acute DSS-induced inflammation. The effect of plecanatide-mediated inhibition of inflammation/dysplasia on endogenous expression of UG and GC-C transcripts was measured in intestinal tissues. Although GC-C expression was not altered appreciably, a statistically significant

  11. Endothelium-Dependent Contractions of Isolated Arteries to Thymoquinone Require Biased Activity of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase with Subsequent Cyclic IMP Production.

    PubMed

    Detremmerie, Charlotte M; Chen, Zhengju; Li, Zhuoming; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Leung, Susan W S; Xu, Aimin; Gao, Yuansheng; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2016-09-01

    Preliminary experiments on isolated rat arteries demonstrated that thymoquinone, a compound widely used for its antioxidant properties and believed to facilitate endothelium-dependent relaxations, as a matter of fact caused endothelium-dependent contractions. The present experiments were designed to determine the mechanisms underlying this unexpected response. Isometric tension was measured in rings (with and without endothelium) of rat mesenteric arteries and aortae and of porcine coronary arteries. Precontracted preparations were exposed to increasing concentrations of thymoquinone, which caused concentration-dependent, sustained further increases in tension (augmentations) that were prevented by endothelium removal, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester [L-NAME; nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor], and 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; soluble guanylyl cyclase [sGC] inhibitor). In L-NAME-treated rings, the NO-donor diethylenetriamine NONOate restored the thymoquinone-induced augmentations; 5-[1-(phenylmethyl)-1H-indazol-3-yl]-2-furanmethanol (sGC activator) and cyclic IMP (cIMP) caused similar restorations. By contrast, in ODQ-treated preparations, the cell-permeable cGMP analog did not restore the augmentation by thymoquinone. The compound augmented the content (measured with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry) of cIMP, but not that of cGMP; these increases in cIMP content were prevented by endothelium removal, L-NAME, and ODQ. The augmentation of contractions caused by thymoquinone was prevented in porcine arteries, but not in rat arteries, by 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulfonyl)homopiperazine dihydrochloride and trans-4-[(1R)-1-aminoethyl]-N-4-pyridinylcyclohexanecarboxamide dihydrochloride (Rho-kinase inhibitors); in the latter, but not in the former, it was reduced by 3,5-dichloro-N-[[(1α,5α,6-exo,6α)-3-(3,3-dimethylbutyl)-3-azabicyclo[3.1.0]hex-6-yl]methyl]-benzamide hydrochloride (T-type calcium channel inhibitor

  12. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia.

  13. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  14. Identification of a D1 dopamine receptor, not linked to adenylate cyclase, on lactotroph cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schoors, D. F.; Vauquelin, G. P.; De Vos, H.; Smets, G.; Velkeniers, B.; Vanhaelst, L.; Dupont, A. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. We studied the lactotroph cells of the rat by both in vivo and in vitro pharmacological techniques for the presence of D1-receptors. Both approaches revealed the presence of D2-receptor, stimulated by quinpirole (resulting in an inhibition of prolactin secretion) and blocked by domperidone. 2. Administration of fenoldopam, the most selective D1-receptor agonist currently available, resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of prolactin secretion in vivo (after pretreatment with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine) and in vitro (cultured pituitary cells). This increase was dose-dependently blocked by the selective D1-receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, and although the effect of fenoldopam was less than that obtained by D2-receptor stimulation, these data suggest that a D1-receptor also controls prolactin secretion. 3. In order to detect the location of these dopamine receptors, autoradiographic studies were performed by use of [3H]-SCH 23390 and [3H]-spiperone as markers for D1- and D2-receptors, respectively. Specific binding sites for [3H]-SCH 23390 were demonstrated. Fenoldopam dose-dependently reduced [3H]-SCH 23390 binding, but had no effect on [3H]-spiperone binding. Immunocytochemical labelling of prolactin cells after incubation with [3H]-SCH 23390 revealed that the granulae and hence, D1 binding sites were present on the lactotroph cells. 4. Radioligand binding studies performed on membranes from anterior pituitary cells revealed the presence of the D2-receptor (54 fmol mg-1 protein) with a Kd of 0.58 nM for [3H]-spiperone, but failed to detect D1-receptors. 5. Finally, we studied the effect of dopamine and of fenoldopam on the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) content of anterior pituitary cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1833020

  15. Gustatory Habituation in "Drosophila" Relies on "Rutabaga" (Adenylate Cyclase)-Dependent Plasticity of GABAergic Inhibitory Neurons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paranjpe, Pushkar; Rodrigues, Veronica; VijayRaghavan, K.; Ramaswami, Mani

    2012-01-01

    In some situations, animals seem to ignore stimuli which in other contexts elicit a robust response. This attenuation in behavior, which enables animals to ignore a familiar, unreinforced stimulus, is called habituation. Despite the ubiquity of this phenomenon, it is generally poorly understood in terms of the underlying neural circuitry. Hungry…

  16. Replacement of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin in a Prominent Lineage of Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a gram negative respiratory pathogen that infects a wide-range of hosts and causes a diverse spectrum of disease that may be due in part to the set of virulence factors utilized by different strains. In a murine model of infection, we found that virulence, as measured by...

  17. α1 Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase (sGC) Splice Forms as Potential Regulators of Human sGC Activity*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Jelen, Filip; Bogatenkova, Elena P.; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key protein in the NO/cGMP signaling pathway, is an obligatory heterodimeric protein composed of one α- and one β-subunit. The α1/β1 sGC heterodimer is the predominant form expressed in various tissues and is regarded as the major isoform mediating NO-dependent effects such as vasodilation. We have identified three new α1 sGC protein variants generated by alternative splicing. The 363 residue N1-α1 sGC splice variant contains the regulatory domain, but lacks the catalytic domain. The shorter N2-α1 sGC maintains 126 N-terminal residues and gains an additional 17 unique residues. The C-α1 sGC variant lacks 240 N-terminal amino acids, but maintains a part of the regulatory domain and the entire catalytic domain. Q-PCR of N1-α1, N2-α1 sGC mRNA levels together with RT-PCR analysis for C-α1 sGC demonstrated that the expression of the α1 sGC splice forms vary in different human tissues indicative of tissue-specific regulation. Functional analysis of the N1-α1 sGC demonstrated that this protein has a dominant-negative effect on the activity of sGC when coexpressed with the α1/β1 heterodimer. The C-α1 sGC variant heterodimerizes with the β1 subunit and produces a fully functional NO- and BAY41-2272-sensitive enzyme. We also found that despite identical susceptibility to inhibition by ODQ, intracellular levels of the 54-kDa C-α1 band did not change in response to ODQ treatments, while the level of 83 kDa α1 band was significantly affected by ODQ. These studies suggest that modulation of the level and diversity of splice forms may represent novel mechanisms modulating the function of sGC in different human tissues. PMID:18381288

  18. [Potentiation of activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by YC-1, NO-donors and increase of the synergistic effect of YC-1 on NO-dependent activation of the enzyme by 1,2,3-triazolyl-1,2,5-oxadiazole derivatives].

    PubMed

    Severina, I S; Pyatakova, N V; Shchegolev, A Yu; Rozhkov, V Yu; Batog, L V; Makhova, N N

    2015-01-01

    The influence of (1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole derivatives: 4-amino-3-(5-methyl-4- ethoxycarbonyl-(1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-1,2,5-oxadiazole (TF4CH3) and 4,4'-bis(5-methel-4-ethoxycarbonyl-1H- 1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-3,3'-azo-1,2,5-oxadiazole (2TF4CH3) on stimulation of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase by YC-1, NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside, SNP, and spermine NONO) and on a synergistic increase of NO-dependent enzyme activation in the presence of YC-1 has been investigated. Both compounds increased guanylate cyclase activation by YC-1, potentiated guanylate cyclase stimulation by NO-donors and increased the synergistic effect of YC-1 on NO-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase. The similarity in the properties of the examined TF4CH3 and 2TF4CH3 with that of YC-1 and the possible mechanism underlying the revealed properties of compounds used are discussed.

  19. The polymerization of amino acid adenylates on sodium-montmorillonite with preadsorbed polypeptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, Mella; Eirich, Frederick R.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous polymerization of amino acid adenylates on Na-montmorillonite in dilute, neutral suspension, after polypeptides were adsorbed on the clay, is studied. It is found that the degrees of polymerization of the oligopeptides and polypeptides obtained is dependent on the amounts of polypeptides that were preadsorbed. It is concluded that a catalytic activity may derive from c-spacings that offer adsorption sites for the reagent amino acid adenylate within the peripheral recesses of irregularly stacked clay platelets by bringing the anhydride bonds and neutral amino groups into favorable reaction distances.

  20. The Crystal Structure of the Adenylation Enzyme VinN Reveals a Unique β-Amino Acid Recognition Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-01-01

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp230 residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes. PMID:25246523

  1. The crystal structure of the adenylation enzyme VinN reveals a unique β-amino acid recognition mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyanaga, Akimasa; Cieślak, Jolanta; Shinohara, Yuji; Kudo, Fumitaka; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2014-11-07

    Adenylation enzymes play important roles in the biosynthesis and degradation of primary and secondary metabolites. Mechanistic insights into the recognition of α-amino acid substrates have been obtained for α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. The Asp residue is invariant and is essential for the stabilization of the α-amino group of the substrate. In contrast, the β-amino acid recognition mechanism of adenylation enzymes is still unclear despite the importance of β-amino acid activation for the biosynthesis of various natural products. Herein, we report the crystal structure of the stand-alone adenylation enzyme VinN, which specifically activates (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartate (3-MeAsp) in vicenistatin biosynthesis. VinN has an overall structure similar to that of other adenylation enzymes. The structure of the complex with 3-MeAsp revealed that a conserved Asp(230) residue is used in the recognition of the β-amino group of 3-MeAsp similar to α-amino acid adenylation enzymes. A mutational analysis and structural comparison with α-amino acid adenylation enzymes showed that the substrate-binding pocket of VinN has a unique architecture to accommodate 3-MeAsp as a β-amino acid substrate. Thus, the VinN structure allows the first visualization of the interaction of an adenylation enzyme with a β-amino acid and provides new mechanistic insights into the selective recognition of β-amino acids in this family of enzymes.

  2. Distinct PKC isoforms mediate the activation of cPLA2 and adenylyl cyclase by phorbol ester in RAW264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wan-W; Chen, Bin C

    1998-01-01

    The modulatory effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on the activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and adenylyl cyclase (AC) have recently been described. Since the signalling cascades associated with these events play critical roles in various functions of macrophages, we set out to investigate the crosstalk between PKC and the cPLA2 and AC pathways in mouse RAW 264.7 macrophages and to determine the involvement of individual PKC isoforms. The cPLA2 and AC pathways were studied by measuring the potentiation by the phorbol ester PMA of ionomycin-induced arachidonic acid (AA) release and prostagladin E1 (PGE1)-stimulated cyclic AMP production, respectively.PMA at 1 μM caused a significant increase in AA release both in the presence (371%) and absence (67%) of ionomycin induction, while exposure of RAW 264.7 cells to PMA increased PGE1 stimulation of cyclic AMP levels by 208%.Treatment of cells with staurosporine and Ro 31-8220 inhibited the PMA-induced potentiation of both AA release and cyclic AMP accumulation, while Go 6976 (an inhibitor of classical PKC isoforms) and LY 379196 (a specific inhibitor of PKCβ) inhibited the AA response but failed to affect the enhancement of the cyclic AMP response by PMA.Long term pretreatment of cells with PMA abolished the subsequent effect of PMA in potentiating AA release, but only inhibited the cyclic AMP response by 42%.Neither PD 98059, an inhibitor of MEK, nor genistein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, had any effect on the ability of PMA to potentiate AA or cyclic AMP production.The potentiation of AA release, but not of cyclic AMP formation, by PMA was sensitive to inhibition by wortmannin. This effect was unrelated to the inhibition of PKC activation as deduced from the translocation of PKC activity to the cell membrane.Western blot analysis revealed the presence of eight PKC isoforms (α, βI, βII, δ, ε, μ λ and ξ) in RAW 264.7 cells and PMA was shown to induce the translocation of the α, βI, βII,

  3. Adenylate kinase 1 knockout mice have normal thiamine triphosphate levels.

    PubMed

    Makarchikov, Alexander F; Wins, Pierre; Janssen, Edwin; Wieringa, Bé; Grisar, Thierry; Bettendorff, Lucien

    2002-10-21

    Thiamine triphosphate (ThTP) is found at low concentrations in most animal tissues and it may act as a phosphate donor for the phosphorylation of proteins, suggesting a potential role in cell signaling. Two mechanisms have been proposed for the enzymatic synthesis of ThTP. A thiamine diphosphate (ThDP) kinase (ThDP+ATP if ThTP+ADP) has been purified from brewer's yeast and shown to exist in rat liver. However, other data suggest that, at least in skeletal muscle, adenylate kinase 1 (AK1) is responsible for ThTP synthesis. In this study, we show that AK1 knockout mice have normal ThTP levels in skeletal muscle, heart, brain, liver and kidney, demonstrating that AK1 is not responsible for ThTP synthesis in those tissues. We predict that the high ThTP content of particular tissues like the Electrophorus electricus electric organ, or pig and chicken skeletal muscle is more tightly correlated with high ThDP kinase activity or low soluble ThTPase activity than with non-stringent substrate specificity and high activity of adenylate kinase.

  4. Analysis of the function of the 70-kilodalton cyclase-associated protein (CAP) by using mutants of yeast adenylyl cyclase defective in CAP binding.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Suzuki, N; Nishida, Y; Kataoka, T

    1993-07-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase forms a complex with the 70-kDa cyclase-associated protein (CAP). By in vitro mutagenesis, we assigned a CAP-binding site of adenylyl cyclase to a small segment near its C terminus and created mutants which lost the ability to bind CAP. CAP binding was assessed first by observing the ability of the overproduced C-terminal 150 residues of adenylyl cyclase to sequester CAP, thereby suppressing the heat shock sensitivity of yeast cells bearing the activated RAS2 gene (RAS2Val-19), and then by immunoprecipitability of adenylyl cyclase activity with anti-CAP antibody and by direct measurement of the amount of CAP bound. Yeast cells whose chromosomal adenylyl cyclase genes were replaced by the CAP-nonbinding mutants possessed adenylyl cyclase activity fully responsive to RAS2 protein in vitro. However, they did not exhibit sensitivity to heat shock in the RAS2Val-19 background. When glucose-induced accumulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was measured in these mutants carrying RAS2Val-19, a rapid transient rise indistinguishable from that of wild-type cells was observed and a high peak level and following persistent elevation of the cAMP concentration characteristic of RAS2Val-19 were abolished. In contrast, in the wild-type RAS2 background, similar cyclase gene replacement did not affect the glucose-induced cAMP response. These results suggest that the association with CAP, although not involved in the in vivo response to the wild-type RAS2 protein, is somehow required for the exaggerated response of adenylyl cyclase to activated RAS2.

  5. Regulation and organization of adenylyl cyclases and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dermot M F

    2003-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a critically important family of multiply regulated signalling molecules. Their susceptibility to many modes of regulation allows them to integrate the activities of a variety of signalling pathways. However, this property brings with it the problem of imparting specificity and discrimination. Recent studies are revealing the range of strategies utilized by the cyclases to solve this problem. Microdomains are a consequence of these solutions, in which cAMP dynamics may differ from the broad cytosol. Currently evolving methodologies are beginning to reveal cAMP fluctuations in these various compartments. PMID:12940771

  6. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen

    2011-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cAMP. sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems which are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells. PMID:21490586

  7. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  8. Photoactivation mechanism of a bacterial light-regulated adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Lindner, Robert; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Winkler, Andreas; Frey, Daniel; Reinstein, Jochen; Meinhart, Anton; Schlichting, Ilme

    2017-03-20

    Light-regulated enzymes enable organisms to quickly respond to changing light conditions. We characterize a photoactivatable adenylyl cyclase from Beggiatoa sp. (bPAC) that translates a blue light signal into production of the second messenger cyclic AMP. bPAC contains a BLUF photoreceptor domain that senses blue light using a flavin chromophore, linked to an adenylyl cyclase (AC) domain. We present a dark state crystal structure of bPAC that closely resembles the recently published structure of the homologous OaPAC from Oscillatoria acuminata. To elucidate the structural mechanism of light-dependent AC activation by the BLUF domain, we determined crystal structures of illuminated bPAC and of a pseudo-lit state variant. We use hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements of secondary structure dynamics and hypothesis-driven point mutations to trace the activation pathway from the chromophore in the BLUF domain to the active site of the cyclase. The structural changes are relayed from the residues interacting with the excited chromophore through a conserved kink of the BLUF β-sheet to a tongue-like extrusion of the AC domain that regulates active site opening and repositions catalytic residues. Our findings not only show the specific molecular pathway of photoactivation in BLUF-regulated ACs, but they also have implications for the general understanding of signaling in BLUF domains and of the activation of adenylyl cyclases.

  9. Ca2+ signaling by plant Arabidopsis thaliana Pep peptides depends on AtPepR1, a receptor with guanylyl cyclase activity, and cGMP-activated Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhi; Verma, Rajeev; Gehring, Chris; Yamaguchi, Yube; Zhao, Yichen; Ryan, Clarence A.; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2010-01-01

    A family of peptide signaling molecules (AtPeps) and their plasma membrane receptor AtPepR1 are known to act in pathogen-defense signaling cascades in plants. Little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms that link these signaling peptides and their receptor, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, to downstream pathogen-defense responses. We identify some cellular activities of these molecules that provide the context for a model for their action in signaling cascades. AtPeps activate plasma membrane inwardly conducting Ca2+ permeable channels in mesophyll cells, resulting in cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. This activity is dependent on their receptor as well as a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2). We also show that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase receptor AtPepR1 has guanylyl cyclase activity, generating cGMP from GTP, and that cGMP can activate CNGC2-dependent cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. AtPep-dependent expression of pathogen-defense genes (PDF1.2, MPK3, and WRKY33) is mediated by the Ca2+ signaling pathway associated with AtPep peptides and their receptor. The work presented here indicates that extracellular AtPeps, which can act as danger-associated molecular patterns, signal by interaction with their receptor, AtPepR1, a plasma membrane protein that can generate cGMP. Downstream from AtPep and AtPepR1 in a signaling cascade, the cGMP-activated channel CNGC2 is involved in AtPep- and AtPepR1-dependent inward Ca2+ conductance and resulting cytosolic Ca2+ elevation. The signaling cascade initiated by AtPeps leads to expression of pathogen-defense genes in a Ca2+-dependent manner. PMID:21088220

  10. Site-specific N-linked glycosylation of receptor guanylyl cyclase C regulates ligand binding, ligand-mediated activation and interaction with vesicular integral membrane protein 36, VIP36.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Najla; Ballal, Suhas; Visweswariah, Sandhya S

    2013-02-08

    Guanylyl cyclase C (GC-C) is a multidomain, membrane-associated receptor guanylyl cyclase. GC-C is primarily expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, where it mediates fluid-ion homeostasis, intestinal inflammation, and cell proliferation in a cGMP-dependent manner, following activation by its ligands guanylin, uroguanylin, or the heat-stable enterotoxin peptide (ST). GC-C is also expressed in neurons, where it plays a role in satiation and attention deficiency/hyperactive behavior. GC-C is glycosylated in the extracellular domain, and differentially glycosylated forms that are resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (130 kDa) and the plasma membrane (145 kDa) bind the ST peptide with equal affinity. When glycosylation of human GC-C was prevented, either by pharmacological intervention or by mutation of all of the 10 predicted glycosylation sites, ST binding and surface localization was abolished. Systematic mutagenesis of each of the 10 sites of glycosylation in GC-C, either singly or in combination, identified two sites that were critical for ligand binding and two that regulated ST-mediated activation. We also show that GC-C is the first identified receptor client of the lectin chaperone vesicular integral membrane protein, VIP36. Interaction with VIP36 is dependent on glycosylation at the same sites that allow GC-C to fold and bind ligand. Because glycosylation of proteins is altered in many diseases and in a tissue-dependent manner, the activity and/or glycan-mediated interactions of GC-C may have a crucial role to play in its functions in different cell types.

  11. The natriuretic peptides BNP and CNP increase heart rate and electrical conduction by stimulating ionic currents in the sinoatrial node and atrial myocardium following activation of guanylyl cyclase-linked natriuretic peptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Springer, Jeremy; Azer, John; Hua, Rui; Robbins, Courtney; Adamczyk, Andrew; McBoyle, Sarah; Bissell, Mary Beth; Rose, Robert A

    2012-05-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are best known for their ability to regulate blood vessel tone and kidney function whereas their electrophysiological effects on the heart are less clear. Here, we measured the effects of BNP and CNP on sinoatrial node (SAN) and atrial electrophysiology in isolated hearts as well as isolated SAN and right atrial myocytes from mice. BNP and CNP dose-dependently increased heart rate and conduction through the heart as indicated by reductions in R-R interval, P wave duration and P-R interval on ECGs. In conjunction with these ECG changes BNP and CNP (100 nM) increased spontaneous action potential frequency in isolated SAN myocytes by increasing L-type Ca(2+) current (I(Ca,L)) and the hyperpolarization-activated current (I(f)). BNP had no effect on right atrial myocyte APs in basal conditions; however, in the presence of isoproterenol (10nM), BNP increased atrial AP duration and I(Ca,L). Quantitative gene expression and immunocytochemistry data show that all three NP receptors (NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C) are expressed in the SAN and atrium. The effects of BNP and CNP on SAN and right atrial myocytes were maintained in mutant mice lacking functional NPR-C receptors and blocked by the NPR-A antagonist A71915 indicating that BNP and CNP function through their guanylyl cyclase-linked receptors. Our data also show that the effects of BNP and CNP are completely absent in the presence of the phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor milrinone. Based on these data we conclude that NPs can increase heart rate and electrical conduction by activating the guanylyl cyclase-linked NPR-A and NPR-B receptors and inhibiting PDE3 activity.

  12. Cytokine-induced iNOS and ERK1/2 inhibit adenylyl cyclase type 5/6 activity and stimulate phosphodiesterase 4D5 activity in intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Sunila; Nalli, Ancy D; Kumar, Divya P; Hu, Wenhui; Kuemmerle, John F; Grider, John R; Murthy, Karnam S

    2014-08-15

    This study identified a distinctive pattern of expression and activity of adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms in mouse colonic longitudinal smooth muscle cells and determined the changes in their expression and/or activity in response to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and TNF-α) in vitro and 2,4,6 trinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (TNBS)-induced colonic inflammation in vivo. AC5/6 and PDE4D5, expressed in circular muscle cells, were also expressed in longitudinal smooth muscle. cAMP formation was tightly regulated via feedback phosphorylation of AC5/6 and PDE4D5 by PKA. Inhibition of PKA activity by myristoylated PKI blocked phosphorylation of AC5/6 and PDE4D5 and enhanced cAMP formation. TNBS treatment in vivo and IL-1β and TNF-α in vitro induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression, stimulated ERK1/2 activity, caused iNOS-mediated S-nitrosylation and inhibition of AC5/6, and induced phosphorylation of PDE4D5 and stimulated its activity. The resultant decrease in AC5/6 activity and increase in PDE4D5 activity decreased cAMP formation and smooth muscle relaxation. S-nitrosylation and inhibition of AC5/6 activity were reversed by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W, whereas phosphorylation and activation of PDE4D5 were reversed by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 and the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059. The effects of IL-1β or TNF-α on forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation and smooth muscle relaxation reflected inhibition of AC5/6 activity and activation of PDE4D5 and were partly reversed by 1400W or PD98059 and completely reversed by a combination of the two inhibitors. The changes in the cAMP/PKA signaling and smooth muscle relaxation contribute to colonic dysmotility during inflammation.

  13. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    PubMed

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin.

  14. Asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases (CrtLm) from non-photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Picataggio, S; Rouvière, P E; Cheng, Q

    2004-03-01

    Carotenoids have important functions in photosynthesis, nutrition, and protection against oxidative damage. Some natural carotenoids are asymmetrical molecules that are difficult to produce chemically. Biological production of carotenoids using specific enzymes is a potential alternative to extraction from natural sources. Here we report the isolation of lycopene beta-cyclases that selectively cyclize only one end of lycopene or neurosporene. The crtLm genes encoding the asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases were isolated from non-photosynthetic bacteria that produced monocyclic carotenoids. Co-expression of these crtLm genes with the crtEIB genes from Pantoea stewartii (responsible for lycopene synthesis) resulted in the production of monocyclic gamma-carotene in Escherichia coli. The asymmetric cyclization activity of CrtLm could be inhibited by the lycopene beta-cyclase inhibitor 2-(4-chlorophenylthio)-triethylamine (CPTA). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that bacterial CrtL-type lycopene beta-cyclases might represent an evolutionary link between the common bacterial CrtY-type of lycopene beta-cyclases and plant lycopene beta- and epsilon-cyclases. These lycopene beta-cyclases may be used for efficient production of high-value asymmetrically cyclized carotenoids.

  15. A lycopene β-cyclase/lycopene ε-cyclase/light-harvesting complex-fusion protein from the green alga Ostreococcus lucimarinus can be modified to produce α-carotene and β-carotene at different ratios.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Andreas; Bauch, Matthias E; Pörschke, Yvonne; Lohr, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Biosynthesis of asymmetric carotenoids such as α-carotene and lutein in plants and green algae involves the two enzymes lycopene β-cyclase (LCYB) and lycopene ε-cyclase (LCYE). The two cyclases are closely related and probably resulted from an ancient gene duplication. While in most plants investigated so far the two cyclases are encoded by separate genes, prasinophyte algae of the order Mamiellales contain a single gene encoding a fusion protein comprised of LCYB, LCYE and a C-terminal light-harvesting complex (LHC) domain. Here we show that the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Ostreococcus lucimarinus catalyzed the simultaneous formation of α-carotene and β-carotene when heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The stoichiometry of the two products in E. coli could be altered by gradual truncation of the C-terminus, suggesting that the LHC domain may be involved in modulating the relative activities of the two cyclase domains in the algae. Partial deletions of the linker region between the cyclase domains or replacement of one or both cyclase domains with the corresponding cyclases from the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii resulted in pronounced shifts of the α-carotene-to-β-carotene ratio, indicating that both the relative activities of the cyclase domains and the overall structure of the fusion protein have a strong impact on the product stoichiometry. The possibility to tune the product ratio of the lycopene cyclase fusion protein from Mamiellales renders it useful for the biotechnological production of the asymmetric carotenoids α-carotene or lutein in bacteria or fungi.

  16. Adenylyl cyclase G, an osmosensor controlling germination of Dictyostelium spores.

    PubMed

    van Es, S; Virdy, K J; Pitt, G S; Meima, M; Sands, T W; Devreotes, P N; Cotter, D A; Schaap, P

    1996-09-27

    Dictyostelium cells express a G-protein-coupled adenylyl cyclase, ACA, during aggregation and an atypical adenylyl cyclase, ACG, in mature spores. The ACG gene was disrupted by homologous recombination. acg- cells developed into normal fruiting bodies with viable spores, but spore germination was no longer inhibited by high osmolarity, a fairly universal constraint for spore and seed germination. ACG activity, measured in aca-/ACG cells, was strongly stimulated by high osmolarity with optimal stimulation occurring at 200 milliosmolar. RdeC mutants, which display unrestrained protein kinase A (PKA) activity and a cell line, which overexpresses PKA under a prespore specific promoter, germinate very poorly, both at high and low osmolarity. These data indicate that ACG is an osmosensor controlling spore germination through activation of protein kinase A.

  17. [The influence of two-month treatment with bromocryptine on activity of the adenylyl cyclase signaling system in the myocardium and testes of rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Derkach, K V; Bondareva, V M; Moyseyuk, I V; Shpakov, A O

    2014-01-01

    One of the common complications of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) are cardiovascular diseases and dysfunctions of the reproductive system, indicating the urgency of developing new approaches to their correction. Last years for the treatment of DM2 began to use bromocryptine (BC), the agonist of type 2 dopamine receptors, which not only restores the energy metabolism, but also prevents the development of cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms and targets of BC action are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of BC treatment on functional activity of adenylyl cyclase signaling system (ACSS) in the myocardium and testes of male rats with DM2, which is caused by high-fat diet and treatment with streptozotocin (25 mg/kg). The treatment with BC (60 days, orally at a dose of 0.6 mg/kg once every two days) was started 90 days after the beginning of high-fat diet. Diabetic rats had an increased body weight, elevated triglycerides level, impaired glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance. The treatment with BC resulted in the restoration of glycometabolic indicators and in the improvement of insulin sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp), relaxin, and agonists of β-adrenergic receptors (β3-AR)--isoproterenol and norepinephrine were decreased in the miocardium of the diabetic rats. The corresponding effects of the β-agonists BRL-37344 and CL-316243 was preserved. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on forskolin-stimulated AC activity was attenuated, while the inhibitory effect of noradrenaline mediated through α2-AR increased. The treatment with BC resulted in the normalization of the adrenergic signaling in the myocardium and partially restoration of AC effects of relaxin and somatostatin. In the testes of diabetic rats, the basal and stimulated by GppNHp, forskolin, human chorionic gonadotropin and pituitary AC-activating polypeptide AC activity were decreased, and the

  18. A Novel Mechanism for Adenylyl Cyclase Inhibition from the Crystal Structure of its Complex with Catechol Estrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Steegborn,C.; Litvin, T.; Hess, K.; Capper, A.; Taussig, R.; Buck, J.; Levin, L.; Wu, H.

    2005-01-01

    Catechol estrogens are steroid metabolites that elicit physiological responses through binding to a variety of cellular targets. We show here that catechol estrogens directly inhibit soluble adenylyl cyclases and the abundant trans-membrane adenylyl cyclases. Catechol estrogen inhibition is non-competitive with respect to the substrate ATP, and we solved the crystal structure of a catechol estrogen bound to a soluble adenylyl cyclase from Spirulina platensis in complex with a substrate analog. The catechol estrogen is bound to a newly identified, conserved hydrophobic patch near the active center but distinct from the ATP-binding cleft. Inhibitor binding leads to a chelating interaction between the catechol estrogen hydroxyl groups and the catalytic magnesium ion, distorting the active site and trapping the enzyme substrate complex in a non-productive conformation. This novel inhibition mechanism likely applies to other adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, and the identified ligand-binding site has important implications for the development of specific adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

  19. [Biosynthesis of cyclic GMP in plant cells - new insight into guanylate cyclases].

    PubMed

    Świeżawska, Brygida; Marciniak, Katarzyna; Szmidt-Jaworska, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is involved in many physiological processes in plants. Concentration of this second messenger in plant cell is determined by guanylyl cyclases (GCs) responsible for cGMP synthesis and phosphodiesterases (PDEs) involved in cGMP inactivation. First discovered plant GCs were localized in cytosol, but few years ago a new family of plasma membrane proteins with guanylyl cyclase activity was identified in Arabidopsis thaliana. These proteins belong to the family of a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLK) with extracellular leucine-rich repeat domain, a transmembrane-spanning domain, and an intracellular kinase domain. A novel class of guanylyl cyclases contain the GC catalytic center encapsulated within the intracellular kinase domain. These molecules are different to animal GCs in that the GC catalytic center is nested within the kinase domain. In presented paper we summarized the most recent data concerning plant guanylyl cyclases.

  20. Differences in type II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoform expression between rat preadipocytes and adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Serazin-Leroy, V; Morot, M; de Mazancourt, P; Giudicelli, Y

    2001-11-26

    Adenylyl cyclase catalytic activity is low in preadipocyte membranes when compared to adipocytes. Under conditions promoting inhibition of adipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity by Gpp(NH)p, a stable GTP analog, a paradoxical increase in preadipocyte adenylyl cyclase activity was obtained. In order to explain this contradiction, expression of types II, IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase isoforms was compared in adipocytes and undifferentiated preadipocytes both by western blots and by a semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. Type II, IV, V and VI mRNAs and proteins were present in both adipocytes and preadipocytes. However, in undifferentiated preadipocytes, expression of type II mRNA and protein were significantly higher whereas expression of type IV, V and VI adenylyl cyclase mRNAs and proteins were significantly weaker than in adipocytes. In late differentiated preadipocytes, the adenylyl cyclase subtype mRNA expression pattern was intermediary between the undifferentiated and the full differentiation states except for type IV which remained weakly expressed. Moreover, one of the representative regulators of G-protein signaling (RGS protein), RGS4, was less expressed in undifferentiated preadipocyte membranes and cytosol extracts, which contrasts with adipocytes where RGS4 is clearly expressed. Thus, the preferential expression of type II adenylyl cyclase (G(betagamma) subunit-stimulated) in preadipocytes might explain why Gpp(NH)p elicits stimulation of adenylyl cyclase under conditions designed to promote inhibition. Conversely, the preferential expression of type V and VI adenylyl cyclases and the slightly higher expression of type IV adenylyl cyclase in adipocytes could contribute to explain the elevated total catalytic activity observed in mature fat cells compared to their precursor cells.

  1. A non-canonical peptide synthetase adenylates 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid for auriculamide biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Braga, Daniel; Hoffmeister, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Auriculamide is the first natural product known from the predatory bacterium Herpetosiphon aurantiacus. It is composed of three unusual building blocks, including the non-proteinogenic amino acid 3-chloro-L-tyrosine, the α-hydroxy acid L-isoleucic acid, and a methylmalonyl-CoA-derived ethane unit. A candidate genetic locus for auriculamide biosynthesis was identified and encodes four enzymes. Among them, the non-canonical 199 kDa four-domain nonribosomal peptide synthetase, AulA, is extraordinary in that it features two consecutive adenylation domains. Here, we describe the functional characterization of the recombinantly produced AulA. The observed activation of 3-methyl-2-oxovaleric acid by the enzyme supports the hypothesis that it participates in the biosynthesis of auriculamide. An artificially truncated version of AulA that lacks the first adenylation domain activated this substrate like the full-length enzyme which shows that the first adenylation domain is dispensable. Additionally, we provide evidence that the enzyme tolerates structural variation of the substrate. α-Carbon substituents significantly affected the substrate turnover. While all tested aliphatic α-keto acids were accepted by the enzyme and minor differences in chain size and branches did not interfere with the enzymatic activity, molecules with methylene α-carbons led to low turnover. Such enzymatic plasticity is an important attribute to help in the perpetual search for novel molecules and to access a greater structural diversity by mutasynthesis. PMID:28144348

  2. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies to Soluble Rat Lung Guanylate Cyclase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandwein, Harvey; Lewicki, John; Murad, Ferid

    1981-07-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies to rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing) EC 4.6.1.2] have been produced by fusing spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice with SP-2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were detected by their ability to bind immobilized guanylate cyclase and by immunoprecipitation of purified enzyme in the presence of second (rabbit anti-mouse) antibody. After subcloning by limiting dilution, hybridomas were injected intraperitoneally into mice to produce ascitic fluid containing 2-5 mg of antibody per ml. The four antibodies obtained had titers of between 1:1580 and 1:3160 but were detectable at dilutions greater than 1:20,000. Soluble guanylate cyclase from several rat tissues were crossreactive with the four monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that the soluble enzyme from different rat tissues is antigenically similar. The antibodies also recognized soluble lung enzyme from rat, beef, and pig, while enzyme from rabbit was not crossreactive and mouse enzyme was recognized by only one of the antibodies. Particulate guanylate cyclase from a number of tissues had only minimal crossreactivity with the antibodies. Immunoprecipitated guanylate cyclase retained catalytic activity, could be activated with sodium nitroprusside, and was inhibited by cystamine. None of the antibodies were inhibitory under the conditions examined. These antibodies will be useful probes for the study of guanylate cyclase regulation and function under a variety of physiological conditions.

  3. Structural studies of intermediates along the cyclization pathway of Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Kotaka, Masayo; Graeff, Richard; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Li He; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan

    2012-01-20

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is a calcium messenger that can mobilize intracellular Ca²⁺ stores and activate Ca²⁺ influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Aplysia cyclase is the first member of the ADP-ribosyl cyclases identified to catalyze the cyclization of NAD⁺ into cADPR. The catalysis involves a two-step reaction, the elimination of the nicotinamide ring and the cyclization of the intermediate resulting in the covalent attachment of the purine ring to the terminal ribose. Aplysia cyclase exhibits a high degree of leniency towards the purine base of its substrate, and the cyclization reaction takes place at either the N1- or the N7-position of the purine ring. To decipher the mechanism of cyclization in Aplysia cyclase, we used a crystallization setup with multiple Aplysia cyclase molecules present in the asymmetric unit. With the use of natural substrates and analogs, not only were we able to capture multiple snapshots during enzyme catalysis resulting in either N1 or N7 linkage of the purine ring to the terminal ribose, we were also able to observe, for the first time, the cyclized products of both N1 and N7 cyclization bound in the active site of Aplysia cyclase.

  4. Purification and assay of cell-invasive form of calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis

    SciTech Connect

    Masure, H.R.; Donovan, M.G.; Storm, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    An invasive form of the CaM-sensitive adenylyl cyclase from Bordetella pertussis can be isolated from bacterial culture supernatants. This isolation is achieved through the use of QAE-Sephadex anion-exchange chromatography. It has been demonstrated that the addition of exogenous Ca{sup 2}{sup +} to the anion-exchange gradient buffers will affect elution from the column and will thereby affect the isolation of invasive adenylyl cyclase. This is probably due to a Ca2(+)-dependent interaction of the catalytic subunit with another component in the culture supernatant. Two peaks of adenylyl cyclase activity are obtained. The Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation is able to cause significant increases in intracellular cAMP levels in animal cells. This increase occurs rapidly and in a dose-dependent manner in both N1E-115 mouse neuroblastoma cells and human erythrocytes. The Pk2 adenylyl cyclase has catalytic activity but is not cell invasive. This material can serve, therefore, as a control to ensure that the cAMP which is measured is, indeed, intracellular. A second control is to add exogenous CaM to the Pk1 adenylyl cyclase preparation. The 45-kDa catalytic subunit-CaM complex is not cell invasive. Although the mechanism for membrane translocation of the adenylyl cyclase is unknown, there is evidence that the adenylyl cyclase enters animal cells by a mechanism distinct from receptor-mediated endocytosis. Calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase activity can be removed from preparations of the adenylyl cyclase that have been subjected to SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. This property of the enzyme has enabled purification of the catalytic subunit to apparent homogeneity. The purified catalytic subunit from culture supernatants has a predicted molecular weight of 45,000. This polypeptide interacts directly with Ca{sup 2}{sup +} and this interaction may be important for its invasion into animal cells.

  5. Intracellular cAMP signaling by soluble adenylyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen

    2011-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently identified source of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). sAC is distinct from the more widely studied source of cAMP, the transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs); its activity is uniquely regulated by bicarbonate anions, and it is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and in cellular organelles. Due to its unique localization and regulation, sAC has various functions in a variety of physiological systems that are distinct from tmACs. In this review, we detail the known functions of sAC, and we reassess commonly held views of cAMP signaling inside cells.

  6. Mechanistic investigations on six bacterial terpene cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Rabe, Patrick; Schmitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The products obtained by incubation of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with six purified bacterial terpene cyclases were characterised by one- and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopic methods, allowing for a full structure elucidation. The absolute configurations of four terpenes were determined based on their optical rotary powers. Incubation experiments with 13C-labelled isotopomers of FPP in buffers containing water or deuterium oxide allowed for detailed insights into the cyclisation mechanisms of the bacterial terpene cyclases. PMID:27829890

  7. Cloning, chromosomal mapping, and expression of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Villacres, E.C.; Xia, Z.; Bookbinder, L.H.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Storm, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The neural-specific calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (type I), which was first cloned from bovine brain, has been implicated in learning and memory. The objective of this study was to clone and determine the chromosomal localization of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase. A 3.8-kb cDNA clone was isolated that contained sequence coinciding with the 3{prime} end 2553 nucleotides of the bovine open reading frame. This clone shows 87% nucleotide and 92% translated amino acid sequence identity to the bovine clone. The most significant sequence differences were in the carboxy-terminal 100 amino acid residues. This region contains one of several possible calmodulin binding domains and the only putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase A phosphorylation site. A chimera was constructed that contained the 5{prime} half of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase and the 3{prime} half of the human type I adenylyl cyclase. The activity of the chimeric gene product and its sensitivity to calmodulin and calcium were indistinguishable from those of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase. In situ hybridization was used to localize the human type I adenylyl cyclase gene to the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Linkage between Fitness of Yeast Cells and Adenylate Kinase Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Tükenmez, Hasan; Magnussen, Helge Magnus; Kovermann, Michael; Byström, Anders; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have evolved with highly specific values of their catalytic parameters kcat and KM. This poses fundamental biological questions about the selection pressures responsible for evolutionary tuning of these parameters. Here we are address these questions for the enzyme adenylate kinase (Adk) in eukaryotic yeast cells. A plasmid shuffling system was developed to allow quantification of relative fitness (calculated from growth rates) of yeast in response to perturbations of Adk activity introduced through mutations. Biophysical characterization verified that all variants studied were properly folded and that the mutations did not cause any substantial differences to thermal stability. We found that cytosolic Adk is essential for yeast viability in our strain background and that viability could not be restored with a catalytically dead, although properly folded Adk variant. There exist a massive overcapacity of Adk catalytic activity and only 12% of the wild type kcat is required for optimal growth at the stress condition 20°C. In summary, the approach developed here has provided new insights into the evolutionary tuning of kcat for Adk in a eukaryotic organism. The developed methodology may also become useful for uncovering new aspects of active site dynamics and also in enzyme design since a large library of enzyme variants can be screened rapidly by identifying viable colonies. PMID:27642758

  9. Molecular and functional characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi nuclear adenylate kinase isoform.

    PubMed

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A; Canepa, Gaspar E; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3' UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes.

  10. Molecular and Functional Characterization of a Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Adenylate Kinase Isoform

    PubMed Central

    Cámara, María de los Milagros; Bouvier, León A.; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Miranda, Mariana R.; Pereira, Claudio A.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas' disease, is an early divergent eukaryote in which control of gene expression relies mainly in post-transcriptional mechanisms. Transcription levels are globally up and down regulated during the transition between proliferating and non-proliferating life-cycle stages. In this work we characterized a nuclear adenylate kinase isoform (TcADKn) that is involved in ribosome biogenesis. Nuclear adenylate kinases have been recently described in a few organisms, being all related to RNA metabolism. Depending on active transcription and translation, TcADKn localizes in the nucleolus or the cytoplasm. A non-canonical nuclear localization signal was mapped towards the N-terminal of the protein, being the phosphate-binding loop essential for its localization. In addition, TcADKn nuclear exportation depends on the nuclear exportation adapter CRM1. TcADKn nuclear shuttling is governed by nutrient availability, oxidative stress and by the equivalent in T. cruzi of the mammalian TOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway. One of the biological functions of TcADKn is ribosomal 18S RNA processing by direct interaction with ribosomal protein TcRps14. Finally, TcADKn expression is regulated by its 3′ UTR mRNA. Depending on extracellular conditions, cells modulate protein translation rates regulating ribosome biogenesis and nuclear adenylate kinases are probably key components in these processes. PMID:23409202

  11. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  12. Use of adenylate kinase as a solubility tag for high level expression of T4 DNA ligase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Huang, Anliang; Luo, Dan; Liu, Haipeng; Han, Huzi; Xu, Yang; Liang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of T4 DNA ligase in 1960s was pivotal in the spread of molecular biotechnology. The enzyme has become ubiquitous for recombinant DNA routinely practiced in biomedical research around the globe. Great efforts have been made to express and purify T4 DNA ligase to meet the world demand, yet over-expression of soluble T4 DNA ligase in E. coli has been difficult. Here we explore the use of adenylate kinase to enhance T4 DNA ligase expression and its downstream purification. E.coli adenylate kinase, which can be expressed in active form at high level, was fused to the N-terminus of T4 DNA ligase. The resulting His-tagged AK-T4 DNA ligase fusion protein was greatly over-expressed in E. coli, and readily purified to near homogeneity via two purification steps consisting of Blue Sepharose and Ni-NTA chromatography. The purified AK-T4 DNA ligase not only is fully active for DNA ligation, but also can use ADP in addition to ATP as energy source since adenylate kinase converts ADP to ATP and AMP. Thus adenylate kinase may be used as a solubility tag to facilitate recombinant protein expression as well as their downstream purification.

  13. Regulation of intestinal guanylate cyclase by the heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) and protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Crane, J K; Wehner, M S; Bolen, E J; Sando, J J; Linden, J; Guerrant, R L; Sears, C L

    1992-01-01

    The heat-stable enterotoxin of Escherichia coli (STa) stimulates membrane-bound guanylate cyclase in intestinal epithelium and induces fluid and ion secretion. Using the T84 human colon carcinoma cell line as a model, we observed that phorbol esters markedly enhanced STa-stimulated cyclic GMP accumulation in T84 cells (C. S. Weikel, C. L. Spann, C. P. Chambers, J. K. Crane, J. Linden, and E. L. Hewlett, Infect. Immun. 58:1402-1407, 1990). In this study we document that the phorbol ester treatment increases 125I-STa-binding sites as well as membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity in T84 cells and provide evidence that both effects are mediated by phosphorylation. Guanylate cyclase activity was increased approximately 50% in membranes prepared from intact T84 cells treated with phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (beta-PDB) and after treatment of homogenates with beta-PDB in a manner dependent on ATP, MgCl2, and cytosol. Similarly, treatment of membranes with purified bovine brain protein kinase C in the presence of appropriate cofactors and beta-PDB resulted in an increase in STa-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity of about 70%. Likewise, the number of 125I-STa-binding sites was increased by about 25 to 40% in membranes prepared from intact cells or homogenates treated with beta-PDB; no effect on binding affinity (Kd = 0.15 nM) was noted. These experiments suggest that protein kinase C may phosphorylate the STa receptor-guanylate cyclase or a closely related protein and increase guanylate cyclase activity. The stimulatory effects of protein kinase C on STa-sensitive guanylate cyclase are opposite in direction to the profound inhibitory effects of the kinase on atrial natriuretic peptide-stimulated guanylate cyclase, demonstrating differential regulation by protein kinases within the guanylate cyclase-receptor family. PMID:1360449

  14. Hydrolytic properties of phenylalanyl- and N-acetylphenylalanyl adenylate anhydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.; Senaratne, N.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrolysis of phenylalynyl- and N-acetylephenylalanyl adenylate anhydrides (AcPhe-AMP) is studied experimentally using a new spectrophotometric method. The hydrolysis process was analyzed at low concentrations (0.0001 M), constant temperature of 25 C, constant buffer concentration (0.05 M), and as a function of pH. It is found that while Phe-AMP is susceptible to attack by OH(-), AcPhe-AMP is susceptible to acid decomposition as well. At a pH of 4 to 8, Phe-AMP hydolyzes faster than AcPhe-AMP, but at pH less than four or greater than eight, the blocked form hydrolyzes faster. Both forms are attacked by H2O at the same rate. The rate laws for the various hydrolytic mechanisms and the activation energies for the hydrolyses at pH 7.1 are given in a table, and the possible relevance of the findings to the origin and evolution of the process of protein synthesis is discussed.

  15. Receptor Guanylyl Cyclases in Sensory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2017-01-01

    Invertebrate models have generated many new insights into transmembrane signaling by cell-surface receptors. This review focuses on receptor guanylyl cyclases (rGCs) and describes recent advances in understanding their roles in sensory processing in the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. A complete analysis of the C. elegans genome elucidated 27 rGCs, an unusually large number compared with mammalian genomes, which encode 7 rGCs. Most C. elegans rGCs are expressed in sensory neurons and play roles in sensory processing, including gustation, thermosensation, olfaction, and phototransduction, among others. Recent studies have found that by producing a second messenger, guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate, some rGCs act as direct sensor molecules for ions and temperatures, while others relay signals from G protein-coupled receptors. Interestingly, genetic and biochemical analyses of rGCs provide the first example of an obligate heterodimeric rGC. Based on recent structural studies of rGCs in mammals and other organisms, molecular mechanisms underlying activation of rGCs are also discussed in this review. PMID:28123378

  16. Key Role of the Adenylate Moiety and Integrity of the Adenylate-Binding Site for the NAD(+)/H Binding to Mitochondrial Apoptosis-Inducing Factor.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Luca; Calogero, Alessandra Maria; Pandini, Vittorio; Vanoni, Maria Antonietta; Sevrioukova, Irina F; Aliverti, Alessandro

    2015-12-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial flavoprotein with pro-life and pro-death activities, which plays critical roles in mitochondrial energy metabolism and caspase-independent apoptosis. Defects in AIF structure or expression can cause mitochondrial abnormalities leading to mitochondrial defects and neurodegeneration. The mechanism of AIF-induced apoptosis was extensively investigated, whereas the mitochondrial function of AIF is poorly understood. A unique feature of AIF is the ability to form a tight, air-stable charge-transfer (CT) complex upon reaction with NADH and to undergo a conformational switch leading to dimerization, proposed to be important for its vital and lethal functions. Although some aspects of interaction of AIF with NAD(+)/H have been analyzed, its precise mechanism is not fully understood. We investigated how the oxidized and photoreduced wild-type and G307A and -E variants of murine AIF associate with NAD(+)/H and nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN(+)/H) to determine the role of the adenylate moiety in the binding process. Our results indicate that (i) the adenylate moiety of NAD(+)/H is crucial for the association with AIF and for the subsequent structural reorganization of the complex, but not for protein dimerization, (ii) FAD reduction rather than binding of NAD(+)/H to AIF initiates conformational rearrangement, and (iii) alteration of the adenylate-binding site by the G307E (equivalent to a pathological G308E mutation in human AIF) or G307A replacements decrease the affinity and association rate of NAD(+)/H, which, in turn, perturbs CT complex formation and protein dimerization but has no influence on the conformational switch in the regulatory peptide.

  17. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 attenuates adenylyl cyclase activity in rat thyroid cells: reduction of thyrotropin receptor number and increase in guanine nucleotide-binding protein Gi-2 alpha.

    PubMed

    Berg, J P; Sandvik, J A; Ree, A H; Sørnes, G; Bjøro, T; Torjesen, P A; Gordeladze, J O; Haug, E

    1994-08-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] is the most potent of the naturally occurring vitamin D metabolites. In rat thyroid FRTL-5 cells, 1,25-(OH)2D3 attenuated the increase in TSH-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity obtained by removing TSH from the culture medium. When cells were incubated with 1,25-(OH)2D3 (10 nmol/liter; 4 days), the binding capacity for specific [125I]TSH binding decreased from 20.1 +/- 1.8 to 8.8 +/- 1.6 fmol/10(6) cells (mean +/- SEM; n = 4; P < 0.01) compared to that in control cells. The Kd did not change (mean +/- SEM, 0.46 +/- 0.09 vs. 0.25 +/- 0.07 nmol/liter; n = 4; P = NS). Western blotting revealed no change in the membrane content of the adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) alpha-subunit (Gs alpha) during 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment. Similarly, levels of the AC inhibitory G-protein Gi-3 alpha- and G-protein beta-subunits were not altered by 1,25-(OH)2D3. However, Western blotting with antibodies recognizing both Gi-1 alpha and Gi-2 alpha was augmented 4-fold, presumably representing an increase in Gi-2 alpha only, as Gi-1 alpha messenger RNA (mRNA) was not detected in FRTL-5 cells. 1,25-(OH)2D3 (10 nmol/liter; 4 days) reduced cholera toxin (10 nmol/liter)-stimulated AC activity to 85% of the control value (P < 0.05), whereas forskolin (100 mumol/liter)-stimulated direct activation of AC was inhibited by 39%. The TSH receptor mRNA level correlated to the beta-actin mRNA was 2-fold higher in control cells compared to that in 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated cells 12 h after TSH removal. Only minor alterations in the Gs alpha mRNA/beta-actin mRNA and Gi-3 alpha mRNA/beta-actin mRNA ratios were observed during 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment, whereas Gi-2 alpha mRNA increased 3-fold compared to that in control cells. No change in the resting intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be detected after 4 days of 1,25-(OH)2D3 treatment. Our studies show that 1,25-(OH)2D3 attenuates AC activity by reducing the TSH receptor

  18. Ethrel (Ethylene Releaser)-Induced Increases in the Adenylate Pool and Transtonoplast ΔpH within Hevea Latex Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amalou, Zakia; Bangratz, Jacques; Chrestin, Hervé

    1992-01-01

    The treatment of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) bark with chloro-2-ethyl phosphonic acid (ethrel), an ethylene-releasing chemical, induced, after a lag period of 13 to 21 hours, a marked increase in the total adenine nucleotides (essentially ATP and ADP) of latex cells. This rise in the latex adenylate pool was concomitant with a marked decrease in the [ATP]/[ADP] ratio without significant changes in the adenylate energy charge. The apparent equilibrium constant for the adenylate kinase, which appeared to behave as a key enzyme in maintaining the adenylate energy charge in the latex, was considerably reduced, probably as a consequence of the alkalinization of the latex cytosol induced by the treatment with ethrel. To reduce the “sink effect” and activation of the metabolism induced in Hevea bark by regular tapping, the latex was collected by micropuncture (few drops) at increasing distance (5-50 centimeters) above and below an ethrel-treated area on the virgin bark of resting trees. The effect of ethrel was shown to spread progressively along the trunk. The increase in the adenylate pool (essentially ATP) was detectable as early as 24 hours after the bark treatment and was maximum after 6 or 8 days, 5 centimeters as well as 50 centimeters above and below the stimulated bark ring. The correlative vacuolar acidification and cytosolic alkalinization, i.e. the increase in the transtonoplast ΔpH, induced in the latex cells by ethrel were shown to be concomitant with the rise in ATP content of the latex. This suggests that the tonoplast H+-pumping ATPase, which catalyzes vacuolar acidification in the latex, is directly and essentially under the control of the availability of its substrate (i.e. ATP) in the latex. The results are discussed in relation to energy-dependent activation of metabolism, and increased rubber production, as induced by the stimulation of rubber trees with ethrel. PMID:16668787

  19. Adenylation-Dependent Conformation and Unfolding Pathways of the NAD+-Dependent DNA Ligase from the Thermophile Thermus scotoductus

    PubMed Central

    Georlette, Daphné; Blaise, Vinciane; Bouillenne, Fabrice; Damien, Benjamin; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigridur H.; Depiereux, Eric; Gerday, Charles; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Feller, Georges

    2004-01-01

    In the last few years, an increased attention has been focused on NAD+-dependent DNA ligases. This is mostly due to their potential use as antibiotic targets, because effective inhibition of these essential enzymes would result in the death of the bacterium. However, development of an efficient drug requires that the conformational modifications involved in the catalysis of NAD+-dependent DNA ligases are understood. From this perspective, we have investigated the conformational changes occurring in the thermophilic Thermus scotoductus NAD+-DNA ligase upon adenylation, as well as the effect of cofactor binding on protein resistance to thermal and chemical (guanidine hydrochloride) denaturation. Our results indicate that cofactor binding induces conformational rearrangement within the active site and promotes a compaction of the enzyme. These data support an induced “open-closure” process upon adenylation, leading to the formation of the catalytically active enzyme that is able to bind DNA. These conformational changes are likely to be associated with the protein function, preventing the formation of nonproductive complexes between deadenylated ligases and DNA. In addition, enzyme adenylation significantly increases resistance of the protein to thermal denaturation and GdmCl-induced unfolding, establishing a thermodynamic link between ligand binding and increased conformational stability. Finally, chemical unfolding of deadenylated and adenylated enzyme is accompanied by accumulation of at least two equilibrium intermediates, the molten globule and premolten globule states. Maximal populations of these intermediates are shifted toward higher GdmCl concentrations in the case of the adenylated ligase. These data provide further insights into the properties of partially folded intermediates. PMID:14747344

  20. The cyclase-associated protein FgCap1 has both protein kinase A-dependent and -independent functions during deoxynivalenol production and plant infection in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong; Jiang, Cong

    2017-01-31

    Fusarium graminearum is a causal agent of wheat scab and a producer of the trichothecene mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON). The expression of trichothecene biosynthesis (TRI) genes and DON production are mainly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP-PKA) pathway and two pathway-specific transcription factors (TRI6 and TRI10). Interestingly, deletion mutants of TRI6 show reduced expression of several components of cAMP signalling, including the FgCAP1 adenylate-binding protein gene that has not been functionally characterized in F. graminearum. In this study, we show that FgCap1 interacts with Fac1 adenylate cyclase and that deletion of FgCAP1 reduces the intracellular cAMP level and PKA activity. The Fgcap1 deletion mutant is defective in vegetative growth, conidiogenesis and plant infection. It also shows significantly reduced DON production and TRI gene expression, which can be suppressed by exogenous cAMP, indicating a PKA-dependent regulation of DON biosynthesis by FgCap1. The wild-type, but not tri6 mutant, shows increased levels of intracellular cAMP and FgCAP1 expression under DON-producing conditions. Furthermore, the promoter of FgCAP1 contains one putative Tri6-binding site that is important for its function during DON biosynthesis, but is dispensable for hyphal growth, conidiogenesis and pathogenesis. In addition, FgCap1 shows an actin-like localization to the cortical patches at the apical region of hyphal tips. Phosphorylation of FgCap1 at S353 was identified by phosphoproteomics analysis. The S353A mutation in FgCAP1 has no effect on its functions during vegetative growth, conidiation and DON production. However, expression of the FgCAP1(S353A) allele fails to complement the defects of the Fgcap1 mutant in plant infection, indicating the importance of the phosphorylation of FgCap1 at S353 during pathogenesis. Taken together, our results suggest that FgCAP1 is involved in the regulation of DON production via cAMP signalling

  1. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field.

  2. Cloning and Functional Characterization of a Lycopene β-Cyclase from Macrophytic Red Alga Bangia fuscopurpurea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tian-Jun; Huang, Xing-Qi; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhuang, Zhong; Deng, Yin-Yin; Lu, Shan

    2017-04-11

    Lycopene cyclases cyclize the open ends of acyclic lycopene (ψ,ψ-carotene) into β- or ε-ionone rings in the crucial bifurcation step of carotenoid biosynthesis. Among all carotenoid constituents, β-carotene (β,β-carotene) is found in all photosynthetic organisms, except for purple bacteria and heliobacteria, suggesting a ubiquitous distribution of lycopene β-cyclase activity in these organisms. In this work, we isolated a gene (BfLCYB) encoding a lycopene β-cyclase from Bangia fuscopurpurea, a red alga that is considered to be one of the primitive multicellular eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms and accumulates carotenoid constituents with both β- and ε-rings, including β-carotene, zeaxanthin, α-carotene (β,ε-carotene) and lutein. Functional complementation in Escherichia coli demonstrated that BfLCYB is able to catalyze cyclization of lycopene into monocyclic γ-carotene (β,ψ-carotene) and bicyclic β-carotene, and cyclization of the open end of monocyclic δ-carotene (ε,ψ-carotene) to produce α-carotene. No ε-cyclization activity was identified for BfLCYB. Sequence comparison showed that BfLCYB shares conserved domains with other functionally characterized lycopene cyclases from different organisms and belongs to a group of ancient lycopene cyclases. Although B. fuscopurpurea also synthesizes α-carotene and lutein, its enzyme-catalyzing ε-cyclization is still unknown.

  3. Ischemic-LTP in striatal spiny neurons of both direct and indirect pathway requires the activation of D1-like receptors and NO/soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP transmission.

    PubMed

    Arcangeli, Sara; Tozzi, Alessandro; Tantucci, Michela; Spaccatini, Cristiano; de Iure, Antonio; Costa, Cinzia; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Picconi, Barbara; Giampà, Carmen; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Amoroso, Salvatore; Calabresi, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) are highly vulnerable to ischemia. A brief ischemic insult, produced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), can induce ischemic long-term potentiation (i-LTP) of corticostriatal excitatory postsynaptic response. Since nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia and the dopamine D1/D5-receptors (D1-like-R) are expressed in striatal NOS-positive interneurons, we hypothesized a relation between NOS-positive interneurons and striatal i-LTP, involving D1R activation and NO production. We investigated the mechanisms involved in i-LTP induced by OGD in corticostriatal slices and found that the D1-like-R antagonist SCH-23390 prevented i-LTP in all recorded MSNs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the induction of i-LTP in both substance P-positive, (putative D1R-expressing) and adenosine A2A-receptor-positive (putative D2R-expressing) MSNs. Furthermore, i-LTP was dependent on a NOS/cGMP pathway since pharmacological blockade of NOS, guanylate-cyclase, or PKG prevented i-LTP. However, these compounds failed to prevent i-LTP in the presence of a NO donor or cGMP analog, respectively. Interestingly, the D1-like-R antagonism failed to prevent i-LTP when intracellular cGMP was pharmacologically increased. We propose that NO, produced by striatal NOS-positive interneurons via the stimulation of D1-like-R located on these cells, is critical for i-LTP induction in the entire population of MSNs involving a cGMP-dependent pathway.

  4. Ischemic-LTP in striatal spiny neurons of both direct and indirect pathway requires the activation of D1-like receptors and NO/soluble guanylate cyclase/cGMP transmission

    PubMed Central

    Arcangeli, Sara; Tozzi, Alessandro; Tantucci, Michela; Spaccatini, Cristiano; de Iure, Antonio; Costa, Cinzia; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Picconi, Barbara; Giampà, Carmen; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Amoroso, Salvatore; Calabresi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) are highly vulnerable to ischemia. A brief ischemic insult, produced by oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD), can induce ischemic long-term potentiation (i-LTP) of corticostriatal excitatory postsynaptic response. Since nitric oxide (NO) is involved in the pathophysiology of brain ischemia and the dopamine D1/D5-receptors (D1-like-R) are expressed in striatal NOS-positive interneurons, we hypothesized a relation between NOS-positive interneurons and striatal i-LTP, involving D1R activation and NO production. We investigated the mechanisms involved in i-LTP induced by OGD in corticostriatal slices and found that the D1-like-R antagonist SCH-23390 prevented i-LTP in all recorded MSNs. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed the induction of i-LTP in both substance P-positive, (putative D1R-expressing) and adenosine A2A-receptor-positive (putative D2R-expressing) MSNs. Furthermore, i-LTP was dependent on a NOS/cGMP pathway since pharmacological blockade of NOS, guanylate-cyclase, or PKG prevented i-LTP. However, these compounds failed to prevent i-LTP in the presence of a NO donor or cGMP analog, respectively. Interestingly, the D1-like-R antagonism failed to prevent i-LTP when intracellular cGMP was pharmacologically increased. We propose that NO, produced by striatal NOS-positive interneurons via the stimulation of D1-like-R located on these cells, is critical for i-LTP induction in the entire population of MSNs involving a cGMP-dependent pathway. PMID:23149555

  5. Properties of adenyl cyclase and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein-deficient mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, S

    1976-01-01

    Several spontaneous cya and crp mutants of Escherichia coli have been selected as clones simultaneously resistant to phage lambda and nalidixic acid and characterized. Both cya and crp mutants have been found to grow as cocci with increased doubling times. They have increased resistance to some mutagens (methylmethanesulfonate, ultraviolet light, gamma rays), antibiotics (nalidixic acid, ampicillin), phages (lambda, T6), sublethal heat and hypotonic shock, and decreased resistance to neutral detergents (sodium dodecyl sulfate, sodium deoxycholate), a protein synthesis inhibitor (streptomycin), and a respiratory inhibitor (sodium azide). The nature of changes in cell parameters indicate fundamental alterations in the envelope structure of the cya and crp mutant cells. The new cya and crp mutants have been found to be multiply carbohydrate negative and nonmotile in conformity with similar previously isolated mutants. Studies of revertants and phi80 cya+ and phi80 cya transductants indicated that the pleiotropic phenotype is related to a single mutational event at the cya or the crp locus in the mutants. Images PMID:173710

  6. Structure-based inhibitor discovery against adenylyl cyclase toxins from pathogenic bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough.

    PubMed

    Soelaiman, Sandriyana; Wei, Binqing Q; Bergson, Pamela; Lee, Young-Sam; Shen, Yuequan; Mrksich, Milan; Shoichet, Brian K; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2003-07-11

    Edema factor (EF) and CyaA are adenylyl cyclase toxins secreted by pathogenic bacteria that cause anthrax and whooping cough, respectively. Using the structure of the catalytic site of EF, we screened a data base of commercially available, small molecular weight chemicals for those that could specifically inhibit adenylyl cyclase activity of EF. From 24 compounds tested, we have identified one quinazoline compound, ethyl 5-aminopyrazolo[1,5-a]quinazoline-3-carboxylate, that specifically inhibits adenylyl cyclase activity of EF and CyaA with approximately 20 microm Ki. This compound neither affects the activity of host resident adenylyl cyclases type I, II, and V nor exhibits promiscuous inhibition. The compound is a competitive inhibitor, consistent with the prediction that it binds to the adenine portion of the ATP binding site on EF. EF is activated by the host calcium sensor, calmodulin. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopic analysis shows that this compound does not affect the binding of calmodulin to EF. This compound is dissimilar from a previously described, non-nucleoside inhibitor of host adenylyl cyclase. It may serve as a lead to design antitoxins to address the role of adenylyl cyclase toxins in bacterial pathogenesis and to fight against anthrax and whooping cough.

  7. Genetic and biochemical analysis of the adenylyl cyclase-associated protein, cap, in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamukai, M; Gerst, J; Field, J; Riggs, M; Rodgers, L; Wigler, M; Young, D

    1992-01-01

    We have identified, cloned, and studied a gene, cap, encoding a protein that is associated with adenylyl cyclase in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This protein shares significant sequence homology with the adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. CAP is a bifunctional protein; the N-terminal domain appears to be involved in cellular responsiveness to RAS, whereas loss of the C-terminal portion is associated with morphological and nutritional defects. S. pombe cap can suppress phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal CAP domain in S. cerevisiae but does not suppress phenotypes associated with deletion of the N-terminal domain. Analysis of cap disruptants also mapped the function of cap to two domains. The functional loss of the C-terminal region of S. pombe cap results in abnormal cellular morphology, slow growth, and failure to grow at 37 degrees C. Increases in mating and sporulation were observed when the entire gene was disrupted. Overproduction of both cap and adenylyl cyclase results in highly elongated large cells that are sterile and have measurably higher levels of adenylyl cyclase activity. Our results indicate that cap is required for the proper function of S. pombe adenylyl cyclase but that the C-terminal domain of cap has other functions that are shared with the C-terminal domain of S. cerevisiae CAP. Images PMID:1550959

  8. Soluble adenylyl cyclase accounts for high basal cCMP and cUMP concentrations in HEK293 and B103 cells.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Alan; Danker, Kerstin Y; Wolter, Sabine; Bähre, Heike; Kaever, Volkhard; Seifert, Roland

    2014-05-30

    Intact HEK293 cells and B103 neuroblastoma cells possess high basal concentrations of the established second messengers cAMP and cGMP and of the emerging second messengers cCMP and cUMP. We asked the question which nucleotidyl cyclase accounts for the high basal cNMP concentrations. Activators and inhibitors of soluble guanylyl cyclase had no major effects on cNMPs, and the activator of membranous adenylyl cyclase forskolin increased only cAMP. Addition of bicarbonate to medium increased, whereas removal of bicarbonate decreased levels of all four cNMPs. The inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase, 2-(1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-ylthio)-N'-(5-bromo-2-hydroxybenzylidene) propanehydrazide (KH7), reduced bicarbonate-stimulated cNMPs. In conclusion, bicarbonate-stimulated soluble adenylyl cyclase plays an important role in the regulation of basal cellular cNMP levels, most notably cCMP and cUMP.

  9. Role of glutaminyl cyclases in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kehlen, Astrid; Haegele, Monique; Menge, Katja; Gans, Kathrin; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Hoang-Vu, Cuong; Klonisch, Thomas; Demuth, Hans-Ulrich

    2013-02-01

    CCL2 is a chemokine known to recruit monocytes/macrophages to sites of inflammation. CCL2 is also associated with tumor progression in several cancer types. Recently, we showed that the N-terminus of CCL2 is modified to a pyroglutamate (pE)-residue by both glutaminyl cyclases (QC (QPCT)) and its isoenzyme (isoQC (QPCTL)). The pE-residue increases stability against N-terminal degradation by aminopeptidases. Here, we report an upregulation of QPCT expression in tissues of patients with thyroid carcinomas compared with goiter tissues, whereas QPCTL was not regulated. In thyroid carcinoma cell lines, QPCT gene expression correlates with the mRNA levels of its substrate CCL2. Both QPCT and CCL2 are regulated in a NF-κB-dependent pathway shown by stimulation with TNFa and IL1b as well as by inhibition with the IKK2 inhibitor and RNAi of p50. In the culture supernatant of thyroid carcinoma cells, equal amounts of pECCL2 and total CCL2 were detected by two ELISAs discriminating between total CCL2 and pECCL2, concluding that all CCL2 is secreted as pECCL2. Activation of the CCL2/CCR2 pathway by recombinant CCL2 increased tumor cell migration of FTC238 cells in scratch assays as well as thyroid carcinoma cell-derived CCL2-induced migration of monocytic THP1 cells. Suppression of CCL2 signaling by CCR2 antagonist, IKK2 inhibitor, and QPCT RNAi reduced FTC238 cell growth measured by WST8 proliferation assays. Our results reveal new evidence for a novel role of QC in thyroid carcinomas and provide an intriguing rationale for the use of QC inhibitors as a means of blocking pECCL2 formation and preventing thyroid cancer metastasis.

  10. Nitric Oxide-Induced Conformational Changes in Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Underbakke, Eric S.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Chalmers, Michael J.; Pascal, Bruce D.; Novick, Scott; Griffin, Patrick R.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the primary mediator of nitric oxide (NO) signaling. NO binds the sGC heme cofactor stimulating synthesis of the second messenger cyclic-GMP (cGMP). As the central hub of NO/cGMP signaling pathways, sGC is important in diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation and neurotransmission. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying NO-induced cyclase activation in sGC remain unclear. Here, hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was employed to probe the NO-induced conformational changes of sGC. HDX-MS revealed NO-induced effects in several discrete regions. NO binding to the heme-NO/O2-binding (H-NOX) domain perturbs a signaling surface implicated in Per/Arnt/Sim (PAS) domain interactions. Furthermore, NO elicits striking conformational changes in the junction between the PAS and helical domains that propagate as perturbations throughout the adjoining helices. Ultimately, NO-binding stimulates the catalytic domain by contracting the active site pocket. Together, these conformational changes delineate an allosteric pathway linking NO-binding to activation of the catalytic domain. PMID:24560804

  11. Regulation of the activity of protein kinases by endogenous heat stable protein inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Szmigielski, A

    1985-01-01

    Protein kinase activities are regulated by endogenous thermostable protein inhibitors. Type I inhibitor is a protein of MW 22,000-24,000 which inhibits specifically cyclic AMP-(cAMP) dependent protein kinase (APK) as a competitive inhibitor of catalytic subunits of the enzyme. Type I inhibitor activity changes inversely according to the activation of adenylate cyclase and the changes in cAMP content in tissues. It seems that type I inhibitor serves as a factor preventing spontaneous cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in unstimulated cell. The other thermostable protein which inhibits APK activity has been found in Sertoli cell-enriched testis (testis inhibitor). Physiological role of the testis inhibitor is unknown. Type II inhibitor is a protein of MW 15,000 which blocks phosphorylation mediated by cAMP and cyclic GMP (cGMP) dependent (APK and GPK) and cyclic nucleotide independent protein kinases as a competitive inhibitor of substrate proteins. Activity of this inhibitor specifically changes in reciprocal manner to the changes in cGMP content. It seems that type II inhibitor serves as a factor preventing the phosphorylation catalyzed by GPK when cGMP content is low. Stimulation of guanylate cyclase and activation of GPK is followed by a decrease of type II inhibitor activity. This change in relationship between activities of GPK and type II inhibitor allows for effective phosphorylation catalyzed by this enzyme when cGMP content is increased.

  12. Adenylation by testis-specific cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase, PAPOLB/TPAP, is essential for spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    KASHIWABARA, Shin-ichi; TSURUTA, Satsuki; OKADA, Keitaro; YAMAOKA, Yutaro; BABA, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    The testis-specific cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase PAPOLB/TPAP is essential for spermatogenesis. Although this enzyme is responsible for poly(A) tail extension of a subset of mRNAs in round spermatids, the stability and translational efficiency of these mRNAs are unaffected by the absence of PAPOLB. To clarify the functional importance of this enzyme’s adenylation activity, we produced PAPOLB-null mice expressing a polyadenylation-defective PAPOLB mutant (PAPOLBD114A), in which the catalytic Asp at residue 114 was mutated to Ala. Introducing PAPOLBD114A failed to rescue PAPOLB-null phenotypes, such as reduced expression of haploid-specific mRNAs, spermiogenesis arrest, and male infertility. These results suggest that PAPOLB regulates spermatogenesis through its adenylation activity. PMID:27647534

  13. An unusual plant triterpene synthase with predominant α-amyrin-producing activity identified by characterizing oxidosqualene cyclases from Malus × domestica.

    PubMed

    Brendolise, Cyril; Yauk, Yar-Khing; Eberhard, Ellen D; Wang, Mindy; Chagne, David; Andre, Christelle; Greenwood, David R; Beuning, Lesley L

    2011-07-01

    The pentacyclic triterpenes, in particular ursolic acid and oleanolic acid and their derivatives, exist abundantly in the plant kingdom, where they are well known for their anti-inflammatory, antitumour and antimicrobial properties. α-Amyrin and β-amyrin are the precursors of ursolic and oleanolic acids, respectively, formed by concerted cyclization of squalene epoxide by a complex synthase reaction. We identified three full-length expressed sequence tag sequences in cDNA libraries constructed from apple (Malus × domestica 'Royal Gala') that were likely to encode triterpene synthases. Two of these expressed sequence tag sequences were essentially identical (> 99% amino acid similarity; MdOSC1 and MdOSC3). MdOSC1 and MdOSC2 were expressed by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves and by expression in the yeast Pichia methanolica. The resulting products were analysed by GC and GC-MS. MdOSC1 was shown to be a mixed amyrin synthase (a 5 : 1 ratio of α-amyrin to β-amyrin). MdOSC1 is the only triterpene synthase so far identified in which the level of α-amyrin produced is > 80% of the total product and is, therefore, primarily an α-amyrin synthase. No product was evident for MdOSC2 when expressed either transiently or in yeast, suggesting that this putative triterpene synthase is either encoded by a pseudogene or does not express well in these systems. Transcript expression analysis in Royal Gala indicated that the genes are mostly expressed in apple peel, and that the MdOSC2 expression level was much lower than that of MdOSC1 and MdOSC3 in all the tissues tested. Amyrin content analysis was undertaken by LC-MS, and demonstrated that levels and ratios differ between tissues, but that the true consequence of synthase activity is reflected in the ursolic/oleanolic acid content and in further triterpenoids derived from them. Phylogenetic analysis placed the three triterpene synthase sequences with other triterpene synthases that encoded either

  14. [A role of some intracellular signaling cascades in planarian regeneration activated under irradiation with low-temperature argon plasma].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Ermakova, O N; Maevskiĭ, E I

    2014-01-01

    Using inhibitory analysis the role of some intracellular signaling pathways in activation of planarian regeneration under the influence of low-temperature argon plasma (LTAP) has been investigated. Inactivation of specific inhibitors of intracellular signaling enzymes such as the receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR), TGF β receptor, calmodulin, adenylate cyclase, phospholipase A2, phospholipase C, cyclin-dependent protein kinase, JAK2-protein kinase, JNK-protein kinase MEK-protein kinase led to inhibition of the head growth during its regeneration in planarians. Pretreatment with LTAP irradiation provided no inhibitory action of some cascades regulating proliferation. However, the inhibitors of the key regulators of regeneration: TGF β receptor, calmodulin and MEK-protein kinase completely suppressed the activating effect of plasma. Thus, by the example of regenerating planarians it is shown, that biological activity of low-temperature argon plasma LTAP is caused by modulation of a plurality of cellular signaling systems.

  15. Study into the kinetic properties and surface attachment of a thermostable adenylate kinase

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, H.J.; Sutton, J.M.; Jenkins, A.T.A.

    2015-01-01

    A thermostable adenylate kinase (tAK) has been used as model protein contaminant on surfaces, so used because residual protein after high temperature wash steps can be detected at extremely low concentrations. This gives the potential for accurate, quantitative measurement of the effectiveness of different wash processes in removing protein contamination. Current methods utilise non-covalent (physisorbtion) of tAK to surfaces, but this can be relatively easily removed. In this study, the covalent binding of tAK to surfaces was studied to provide an alternative model for surface contamination. Kinetic analysis showed that the efficiency of the enzyme expressed as the catalytic rate over the Michaelis constant (kcat/KM) increased from 8.45±3.04 mM−1 s−1 in solution to 32.23±3.20 or 24.46±4.41 mM−1 s−1 when the enzyme was immobilised onto polypropylene or plasma activated polypropylene respectively. Maleic anhydride plasma activated polypropylene showed potential to provide a more robust challenge for washing processes as it retained significantly higher amounts of tAK enzyme than polypropylene in simple washing experiments. Inhibition of the coupled enzyme (luciferase/luciferin) system used for the detection of adenylate kinase activity, was observed for a secondary product of the reaction. This needs to be taken into consideration when using the assay to estimate cleaning efficacy. PMID:26339684

  16. Structural analysis of an oxygen-regulated diguanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Tarnawski, Miroslaw; Barends, Thomas R M; Schlichting, Ilme

    2015-11-01

    Cyclic di-GMP is a bacterial second messenger that is involved in switching between motile and sessile lifestyles. Given the medical importance of biofilm formation, there has been increasing interest in understanding the synthesis and degradation of cyclic di-GMPs and their regulation in various bacterial pathogens. Environmental cues are detected by sensing domains coupled to GGDEF and EAL or HD-GYP domains that have diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively, producing and degrading cyclic di-GMP. The Escherichia coli protein DosC (also known as YddV) consists of an oxygen-sensing domain belonging to the class of globin sensors that is coupled to a C-terminal GGDEF domain via a previously uncharacterized middle domain. DosC is one of the most strongly expressed GGDEF proteins in E. coli, but to date structural information on this and related proteins is scarce. Here, the high-resolution structural characterization of the oxygen-sensing globin domain, the middle domain and the catalytic GGDEF domain in apo and substrate-bound forms is described. The structural changes between the iron(III) and iron(II) forms of the sensor globin domain suggest a mechanism for oxygen-dependent regulation. The structural information on the individual domains is combined into a model of the dimeric DosC holoprotein. These findings have direct implications for the oxygen-dependent regulation of the activity of the cyclase domain.

  17. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation through EP4 receptor and intracellular cAMP in human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yueqin; Martinez-Anton, Asuncion; Qi, Hai-Yan; Logun, Carolea; Alsaaty, Sara; Park, Yong Hwan; Kastner, Daniel L.; Chae, Jae Jin; Shelhamer, James H.

    2015-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a potent lipid mediator involved in maintaining homeostasis but also promotion of acute inflammation or immune suppression in chronic inflammation and cancer. NLRP3 inflammasome plays an important role in host defense. Uncontrolled activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, due to mutations in the NLRP3 gene causes cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS). Here, we showed that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is inhibited by PGE2 in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was mediated through prostaglandin E receptor 4 (EP4) and an increase in intracellular cAMP, independently of protein kinase A (PKA) or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). A specific agonist of EP4 mimicked, while its antagonist or EP4 knockdown reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. PGE2 caused an increase in intracellular cAMP. Blockade of adenylate cyclase by its inhibitor reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Increase of intracellular cAMP by an activator of adenylate cyclase or an analog of cAMP, or a blockade of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase inhibitor decreased NLRP3 activation. PKA or Epac agonists did not mimic and their antagonists did not reverse PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. In addition, constitutive IL-1β secretion from LPS-primed PBMCs of CAPS patients was substantially reduced by high doses of PGE2. Moreover, blocking cytosolic phospholipase A2α by its inhibitor or siRNA or inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in inhibition of endogenous PGE2 production, caused an increase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 might play a role in maintaining homeostasis during the resolution phase of inflammation and might serve as an autocrine and paracrine regulator. PMID:25917098

  18. Differential expression of functional guanylyl cyclases in melanocytes: absence of nitric-oxide-sensitive isoform in metastatic cells.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, K; Das, P K; van den Wijngaard, R M; Lenz, W; Klockenbring, T; Malcharzyk, V; Drummer, C; Gerzer, R

    2001-03-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive endogenous molecule with multiple functions and its cellular signaling activity is mainly mediated by activation of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, a heterodimeric (alpha/beta) hemeprotein. The expression of the NO-sensitive soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase was studied in various cultured melanocytic cells by measuring the accumulation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in the presence and absence of NO donors. Here we report that 3-morpholino-sydnonimine, a donor of NO redox species, and (Z)-1-[2- (2-aminoethyl)-N-(2-ammonioethyl)amino]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, a direct NO donor, induced a 20-fold increase in intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in nonmetastatic melanoma cells and normal melanocytes in culture that could be related to cellular melanin content in a concentration-dependent manner. The increased intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate was due to stimulation of the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase as such increase was completely abolished by using a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase. The involvement of functional soluble guanylyl cyclase was further confirmed by the presence of alpha1 and beta1 subunits in these cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In contrast, none of the NO donors induced guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production in metastatic melanoma cells, which could be attributed to the absence of the beta1 subunit that is essential for catalytic activity of the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase. Metastatic melanoma cells produced higher levels of intracellular guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in response to natriuretic peptides than other cell types, however, due to upregulation of membrane-bound guanylyl cyclase activities, but they are less pigmented or unpigmented. The present finding suggests that NO signaling in association with melanogenesis is dependent on the soluble isoform of guanylyl cyclase, whereas absence of soluble guanylyl

  19. Diadenosine Homodinucleotide Products of ADP-ribosyl Cyclases Behave as Modulators of the Purinergic Receptor P2X7*

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzone, Santina; Basile, Giovanna; Chothi, Madhu Parakkottil; Nobbio, Lucilla; Usai, Cesare; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Schenone, Angelo; Guse, Andreas H.; Di Virgilio, Francesco; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosyl cyclases from both vertebrates and invertebrates were previously shown to produce two isomers of P1,P2 diadenosine 5′,5′"-P1, P2-diphosphate, P18 and P24, from cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and adenine. P18 and P24 are characterized by an unusual N-glycosidic linkage in one of the adenylic mononucleotides (Basile, G., Taglialatela-Scafati, O., Damonte, G., Armirotti, A., Bruzzone, S., Guida, L., Franco, L., Usai, C., Fattorusso, E., De Flora, A., and Zocchi, E. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 14509–14514). P24, but not P18, proved to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HeLa cells and to negatively affect mitochondrial function. Here we show that micromolar P24, but not P18, triggers a slow and sustained influx of extracellular Ca2+ through the opening of the purinergic receptor/channel P2X7. On the other hand, P18 inhibits the Ca2+ influx induced by 0.6 mm ATP in HEK293 cells stably transfected with P2X7, with an IC50 of ∼1 μm. Thus, P18 is devoid of intrinsic P2X7 stimulatory activity and behaves as an ATP antagonist. A P2X7-mediated increase of the basal [Ca2+]i has been demonstrated to negatively affect Schwann cell (SC) function in rats with the inherited, peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) (Nobbio, L., Sturla, L., Fiorese, F., Usai, C., Basile, G., Moreschi, I., Benvenuto, F., Zocchi, E., De Flora, A., Schenone, A., and Bruzzone S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 23146–23158). Preincubation of CMT1A SC with 200 nm P18 restored the basal [Ca2+]i to values similar to those recorded in wild-type SC. These results identify P18 as a new P2X7 antagonist, potentially useful in the treatment of CMT1A. PMID:20439466

  20. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of α-hydroxyacyl-AMS inhibitors of amino acid adenylation enzymes.

    PubMed

    Davis, Tony D; Mohandas, Poornima; Chiriac, Maria I; Bythrow, Glennon V; Quadri, Luis E N; Tan, Derek S

    2016-11-01

    Biosynthesis of bacterial natural-product virulence factors is emerging as a promising antibiotic target. Many such natural products are produced by nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) from amino acid precursors. To develop selective inhibitors of these pathways, we have previously described aminoacyl-AMS (sulfamoyladenosine) macrocycles that inhibit NRPS amino acid adenylation domains but not mechanistically-related aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. To improve the cell permeability of these inhibitors, we explore herein replacement of the α-amino group with an α-hydroxy group. In both macrocycles and corresponding linear congeners, this leads to decreased biochemical inhibition of the cysteine adenylation domain of the Yersina pestis siderophore synthetase HMWP2, which we attribute to loss of an electrostatic interaction with a conserved active-site aspartate. However, inhibitory activity can be regained by installing a cognate β-thiol moiety in the linear series. This provides a path forward to develop selective, cell-penetrant inhibitors of the biosynthesis of virulence factors to probe their biological functions and potential as therapeutic targets.

  1. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  2. Pharmacological profile of the abeorphine 201-678, a potent orally active and long lasting dopamine agonist

    SciTech Connect

    Jaton, A.L.; Giger, R.K.A.; Vigouret, J.M.; Enz, A.; Frick, W.; Closse, A.; Markstein, R.

    1986-01-13

    The central dopaminergic effects of an abeorphine derivative 201-678 were compared to those of apomorphine and bromocriptine in different model systems. After oral administration, this compound induced contralateral turning in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced nigral lesions and exhibited strong anti-akinetic properties in rats with 6-hydroxydopamine induced hypothalamic lesions. It decreased dopamine metabolism in striatum and cortex, but did not modify noradrenaline and serotonin metabolism in the rat brain. 201-678 counteracted the in vivo increase of tyrosine hydroxylase activity induced by ..gamma..-butyrolactone. In vitro it stimulated DA-sensitive adenylate cyclase and inhibited acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices. This compound had high affinity for /sup 3/H-dopamine and /sup 3/H-clonidine binding sites. These results indicate that 201-678 is a potent, orally active dopamine agonist with a long duration of action. Furthermore it appears more selective than other dopaminergic drugs. 29 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  3. Aminoacyl transfer from an adenylate anhydride to polyribonucleotides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, A. L.; Lacey, J. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Imidazole catalysis of phenylalanyl transfer from phenylalanine adenylate to hydroxyl groups of homopolyribonucleotides is studied as a possible chemical model of biochemical aminoacylation of transfer RNA (tRNA). The effect of pH on imidazole-catalyzed transfer of phenylalanyl residues to poly(U) and poly(A) double helix strands, the number of peptide linkages and their lability to base and neutral hydroxylamine, and the nature of adenylate condensation products are investigated. The chemical model entertained exhibits a constraint by not acylating the hydroxyl groups of polyribonucleotides in a double helix. The constraint is consistent with selective biochemical aminoacylation at the tRNA terminus. Interest in imidazole as a model of histidine residue in protoenzymes participating in prebiotic aminoacyl transfer to polyribonucleotides, and in rendering the tRNA a more efficient adaptor, is indicated.

  4. Functional and Phylogenetic Divergence of Fungal Adenylate-Forming Reductases

    PubMed Central

    Kalb, Daniel; Lackner, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    A key step in fungal l-lysine biosynthesis is catalyzed by adenylate-forming l-α-aminoadipic acid reductases, organized in domains for adenylation, thiolation, and the reduction step. However, the genomes of numerous ascomycetes and basidiomycetes contain an unexpectedly large number of additional genes encoding similar but functionally distinct enzymes. Here, we describe the functional in vitro characterization of four reductases which were heterologously produced in Escherichia coli. The Ceriporiopsis subvermispora serine reductase Nps1 features a terminal ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) domain and thus belongs to a hitherto undescribed class of fungal multidomain enzymes. The second major class is characterized by the canonical terminal short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase domain and represented by Ceriporiopsis subvermispora Nps3 as the first biochemically characterized l-α-aminoadipic acid reductase of basidiomycete origin. Aspergillus flavus l-tyrosine reductases LnaA and LnbA are members of a distinct phylogenetic clade. Phylogenetic analysis supports the view that fungal adenylate-forming reductases are more diverse than previously recognized and belong to four distinct classes. PMID:25085485

  5. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca(2+)](i) mobilization, thromboxane A(2) formation, hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A(2) formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca(2+)](i) and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. Xanthohumol, a Prenylated Flavonoid from Hops (Humulus lupulus), Prevents Platelet Activation in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye-Ming; Hsieh, Kuo-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chou, Hsiu-Chu; Chou, Duen-Suey; Lien, Li-Ming; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2012-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid in the hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.). Xanthohumol was found to be a very potent cancer chemopreventive agent through regulation of diverse mechanisms. However, no data are available concerning the effects of xanthohumol on platelet activation. The aim of this paper was to examine the antiplatelet effect of xanthohumol in washed human platelets. In the present paper, xanthohumol exhibited more-potent activity in inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen. Xanthohumol inhibited platelet activation accompanied by relative [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 formation, hydroxyl radical (OH●) formation, and phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and Akt phosphorylation. Neither SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, nor ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, reversed the xanthohumol-mediated inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. Furthermore, xanthohumol did not significantly increase nitrate formation in platelets. This study demonstrates for the first time that xanthohumol possesses potent antiplatelet activity which may initially inhibit the PI3-kinase/Akt, p38 MAPK, and PLCγ2-PKC cascades, followed by inhibition of the thromboxane A2 formation, thereby leading to inhibition of [Ca2+]i and finally inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, this novel role of xanthohumol may represent a high therapeutic potential for treatment or prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22611436

  7. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Stanley C.; Richards, David H.; Mitch, William A.; Wilson, Corey J.

    2016-01-01

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections, and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary-structure, protein hydrodynamics and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance. Namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites. PMID:26266833

  8. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  9. Purine and pyrimidine nucleosides preserve human astrocytoma cell adenylate energy charge under ischemic conditions.

    PubMed

    Balestri, Francesco; Giannecchini, Michela; Sgarrella, Francesco; Carta, Maria Caterina; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Camici, Marcella

    2007-02-01

    The brain depends on both glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation for maintenance of ATP pools. Astrocytes play an integral role in brain functions providing trophic supports and energy substrates for neurons. In this paper, we report that human astrocytoma cells (ADF) undergoing ischemic conditions may use both purine and pyrimidine nucleosides as energy source to slow down cellular damage. The cells are subjected to metabolic stress conditions by exclusion of glucose and incubation with oligomycin (an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation). This treatment brings about a depletion of the ATP pool, with a concomitant increase in the AMP levels, which results in a significant decrease of the adenylate energy charge. The presence of purine nucleosides in the culture medium preserves the adenylate energy charge, and improves cell viability. Besides purine nucleosides, also pyrimidine nucleosides, such as uridine and, to a lesser extent, cytidine, are able to preserve the ATP pool. The determination of lactate in the incubation medium indicates that nucleosides can preserve the ATP pool through anaerobic glycolysis, thus pointing to a relevant role of the phosphorolytic cleavage of the N-glycosidic bond of nucleosides which generates, without energy expense, the phosphorylated pentose, which through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis can be converted to energetic intermediates also in the absence of oxygen. In fact, ADF cells possess both purine nucleoside phosphorylase and uridine phosphorylase activities.

  10. Leveraging the Mechanism of Oxidative Decay for Adenylate Kinase to Design Structural and Functional Resistances.

    PubMed

    Howell, Stanley C; Richards, David H; Mitch, William A; Wilson, Corey J

    2015-10-16

    Characterization of the mechanisms underlying hypohalous acid (i.e., hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid) degradation of proteins is important for understanding how the immune system deactivates pathogens during infections and damages human tissues during inflammatory diseases. Proteins are particularly important hypohalous acid reaction targets in pathogens and in host tissues, as evidenced by the detection of chlorinated and brominated oxidizable residues. While a significant amount of work has been conducted for reactions of hypohalous acids with a range of individual amino acids and small peptides, the assessment of oxidative decay in full-length proteins has lagged in comparison. The most rigorous test of our understanding of oxidative decay of proteins is the rational redesign of proteins with conferred resistances to the decay of structure and function. Toward this end, in this study, we experimentally determined a putative mechanism of oxidative decay using adenylate kinase as the model system. In turn, we leveraged this mechanism to rationally design new proteins and experimentally test each system for oxidative resistance to loss of structure and function. From our extensive assessment of secondary structure, protein hydrodynamics, and enzyme activity upon hypochlorous acid or hypobromous acid challenge, we have identified two key strategies for conferring structural and functional resistance, namely, the design of proteins (adenylate kinase enzymes) that are resistant to oxidation requires complementary consideration of protein stability and the modification (elimination) of certain oxidizable residues proximal to catalytic sites.

  11. Biochemical Characterization of Putative Adenylate Dimethylallyltransferase and Cytokinin Dehydrogenase from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Frébortová, Jitka; Greplová, Marta; Seidl, Michael F.; Heyl, Alexander; Frébort, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    Cytokinins, a class of phytohormones, are adenine derivatives common to many different organisms. In plants, these play a crucial role as regulators of plant development and the reaction to abiotic and biotic stress. Key enzymes in the cytokinin synthesis and degradation in modern land plants are the isopentyl transferases and the cytokinin dehydrogenases, respectively. Their encoding genes have been probably introduced into the plant lineage during the primary endosymbiosis. To shed light on the evolution of these proteins, the genes homologous to plant adenylate isopentenyl transferase and cytokinin dehydrogenase were amplified from the genomic DNA of cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The putative isopentenyl transferase was shown to be functional in a biochemical assay. In contrast, no enzymatic activity was detected for the putative cytokinin dehydrogenase, even though the principal domains necessary for its function are present. Several mutant variants, in which conserved amino acids in land plant cytokinin dehydrogenases had been restored, were inactive. A combination of experimental data with phylogenetic analysis indicates that adenylate-type isopentenyl transferases might have evolved several times independently. While the Nostoc genome contains a gene coding for protein with characteristics of cytokinin dehydrogenase, the organism is not able to break down cytokinins in the way shown for land plants. PMID:26376297

  12. Crystal structure of histidyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli complexed with histidyl-adenylate.

    PubMed Central

    Arnez, J G; Harris, D C; Mitschler, A; Rees, B; Francklyn, C S; Moras, D

    1995-01-01

    The crystal structure at 2.6 A of the histidyl-tRNA synthetase from Escherichia coli complexed with histidyl-adenylate has been determined. The enzyme is a homodimer with a molecular weight of 94 kDa and belongs to the class II of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRS). The asymmetric unit is composed of two homodimers. Each monomer consists of two domains. The N-terminal catalytic core domain contains a six-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet sitting on two alpha-helices, which can be superposed with the catalytic domains of yeast AspRS, and GlyRS and SerRS from Thermus thermophilus with a root-mean-square difference on the C alpha atoms of 1.7-1.9 A. The active sites of all four monomers are occupied by histidyl-adenylate, which apparently forms during crystallization. The 100 residue C-terminal alpha/beta domain resembles half of a beta-barrel, and provides an independent domain oriented to contact the anticodon stem and part of the anticodon loop of tRNA(His). The modular domain organization of histidyl-tRNA synthetase reiterates a repeated theme in aaRS, and its structure should provide insight into the ability of certain aaRS to aminoacylate minihelices and other non-tRNA molecules. Images PMID:7556055

  13. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  14. Comparison of human CAP and CAP2, homologs of the yeast adenylyl cyclase-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, G; Swiston, J; Young, D

    1994-06-01

    We previously reported the identification of human CAP, a protein that is related to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe adenylyl cyclase-associated CAP proteins. The two yeast CAP proteins have similar functions: the N-terminal domains are required for the normal function of adenylyl cyclase, while loss of the C-terminal domains result in morphological and nutritional defects that are unrelated to the cAMP pathways. We have amplified and cloned cDNAs from a human glioblastoma library that encode a second CAP-related protein, CAP2. The human CAP and CAP2 proteins are 64% identical. Expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. cerevisiae cap- strains suppresses phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP, but does not restore hyper-activation of adenylyl cyclase by RAS2val19. Similarly, expression of either human CAP or CAP2 in S. pombe cap- strains suppresses the morphological and temperature-sensitive phenotypes associated with deletion of the C-terminal domain of CAP in this yeast. In addition, expression of human CAP, but not CAP2, suppresses the propensity to sporulate due to deletion of the N-terminal domain of CAP in S. pombe. This latter observation suggests that human CAP restores normal adenylyl cyclase activity in S. pombe cap- cells. Thus, functional properties of both N-terminal and C-terminal domains are conserved between the human and S. pombe CAP proteins.

  15. [Adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of the insulin superfamily peptide action and their impairment in myometrium of pregnant women with type 2 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Plesneva, S a; Kuznetsova, L A; Shpakov, A O; Sharova, T S; Pertseva, M N

    2008-10-01

    For the first time we found in myometrium of the women and pregnant women that adenylyl cyclase (AC) stimulating effects of relaxin, insulin and insulin growth factor 1 are realized via six-component AC signaling mechanisms involving the following signaling chain: receptor-tyrosine kinase ==> Gi protein (beta gamma dimmer) ==> phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase ==> protein kinase C (zeta) ==> Gs protein ==> adenylyl cyclase (AC), which are similar to the discovered adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of insulin and relaxin action in vertebrates (rat) and invertebrates (mollusk). The effect of relaxin is more pronounced as compared with other peptides (relaxin > insulin > insulin-like growth factor-1) in myometrium of pregnant women. It is connected with the specific role ofrelaxin as main regulator of reproductive functions. For the first time we revealed the functional defects in distal parts of adenylyl cyclase signaling mechanisms of the insulin superfamily peptides action in the condition type-2 diabetes (the increase of the basal adenylyl cyclase activity and decrease of the peptide-stimulated AX activity in presence of guanilylimidodiphosphate). The defects are localized on the level of Gs protein, adenylyl cyclase and their functional coupling. The data obtained confirm our conception about molecular defects in hormoneregulated adenylyl cyclase system as a key reason of type-2 diabetes.

  16. Identification of a mammalian glutaminyl cyclase converting glutaminyl into pyroglutamyl peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, W H; Spiess, J

    1987-01-01

    Extracts from bovine pituitary were found to contain an activity catalyzing the conversion of glutaminyl peptides such as [Gln1]gonadotropin-releasing hormone, [Gln1, Gly4]thyrotropin-releasing hormone (H-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-OH), and H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH to the respective pyroglutamyl peptides. The TRH precursor fragment H-Lys-Arg-Gln-His-Pro-Gly-Lys-Arg-OH and the D-glutaminyl stereoisomer of H-Gln-Tyr-Ala-OH did not react under the same conditions. The conversion products were identified by Edman degradation, amino acid analysis, and reversed-phase HPLC. That this activity was exhibited by an enzyme, glutaminyl cyclase, was concluded from the protein character of the activity (revealed by its abolition with trypsin and heat), the Michaelis-Menten relationship between substrate concentration and conversion rate, and the substrate specificity. It was determined that glutaminyl cyclase had a molecular weight of 43,000-50,000, a pH optimum at pH 8, and Km and Vmax values in the range of 60-130 microM and 390-690 pmol/microgram per hr, respectively. Glutaminyl cyclase was not observed to require ATP and could be inhibited with 1.0 M ammonium chloride, which increased the Km and decreased the Vmax value. The subcellular distribution of glutaminyl cyclase corresponded to the one of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase believed to catalyze C-terminal amidations during posttranslational precursor processing. It was also observed that the formation of pyroglutamyl from glutaminyl peptides occurred nonenzymatically; however, the enzymatic reaction carried out with crude extract was found to be approximately 70 times faster than the nonenzymatic reaction enhanced by phosphate. It is speculated that glutaminyl cyclase may participate in the posttranslational processing of hormonal precursors to pyroglutamyl peptides. PMID:3473473

  17. Mutation of His-105 in the beta 1 subunit yields a nitric oxide-insensitive form of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Wedel, B; Humbert, P; Harteneck, C; Foerster, J; Malkewitz, J; Böhme, E; Schultz, G; Koesling, D

    1994-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing); EC 4.6.1.2] is a hemoprotein that exists as a heterodimer; the heme moiety has been proposed to bind nitric oxide, resulting in a dramatic activation of the enzyme. Mutation of six conserved His residues reduced but did not abolish nitric oxide stimulation whereas a change of His-105 to Phe in the beta 1 subunit yielded a heterodimer that retained basal cyclase activity but failed to respond to nitric oxide. Heme was not detected as a component of the mutant heterodimer and protophorphyrin IX failed to stimulate enzyme activity. The activity of the His mutant was almost identical to that of the wild-type enzyme in the presence of KCN, suggesting that disruption of heme binding is the principal effect of the mutation. Thus, the mutation provides a means to inhibit the nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase signaling pathway. Images PMID:7908439

  18. SKF-83959 is not a highly-biased functionally selective D1 dopamine receptor ligand with activity at phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Min; Kant, Andrew; Blake, Daniel; Murthy, Vishakantha; Boyd, Kevin; Wyrick, Steven J; Mailman, Richard B

    2014-11-01

    SKF-83959 [6-chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-3-methyl-1-(3-methylphenyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine] is reported to be a functionally selective dopamine D1 receptor ligand with high bias for D1-mediated phospholipase C (PLC) versus D1-coupled adenylate cyclase signaling. This signaling bias is proposed to explain behavioral activity in both rat and primate Parkinson's disease models, and a D1-D2 heterodimer has been proposed as the underlying mechanism. We have conducted an in-depth pharmacological characterization of this compound in dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in both rat brain and heterologous systems expressing human D1 or D2 receptors. Contrary to common assumptions, SKF-83959 is similar to the classical, well-characterized partial agonist SKF38393 in all systems. It is a partial agonist (not an antagonist) at adenylate cyclase in vitro and ex vivo, and is a partial agonist in D1-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Contrary to earlier reports, it does not have D1-mediated effects on PLC signaling in heterologous systems. Because drug metabolites can also contribute, its 3-N-demethylated analog also was synthesized and tested. As expected from the known structure-activity relationships of the benzazepines, this compound also had high affinity for the D1 receptor and somewhat higher intrinsic activity than the parent ligand, and also might contribute to in vivo effects of SKF-83959. Together, these data demonstrate that SKF-83959 is not a highly-biased functionally selective D1 ligand, and that its reported behavioral data can be explained solely by its partial D1 agonism in canonical signaling pathway(s). Mechanisms that have been proposed based on the purported signaling novelty of SKF-83959 at PLC should be reconsidered.

  19. Cholera toxin, a potent inducer of epidermal hyperplasia but with no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuroki, T.; Chida, K.; Munakata, K.; Murakami, Y.

    1986-05-29

    Intracutaneous injection of cholera toxin into mice induced epidermal hyperplasia to a greater extent than 12-O-tetra-decanoylphorbol-13-acetate. It also induced adenylate cyclase and through weakly, ornithine decarboxylase of the epidermis. Cholera toxin, however, showed no tumor promoting activity in mouse skin carcinogenesis. In the single stage promotion, cholera toxin (50 ng) was injected once a week for 10 weeks into the skin of SENCAR mice initiated with 25 ..mu..g 7,12-dimethyl-benz(a)anthracene, but no tumors developed. In the two-stage promotion test, cholera toxin (10-100 ng) was injected for one or two weeks into the initiated skin and then mezerein (4 ..mu..g) was applied twice a week for 18 weeks, but the toxin did not increase incidence or numbers of papillomas.

  20. The cyclase-associated protein CAP as regulator of cell polarity and cAMP signaling in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Noegel, Angelika A; Blau-Wasser, Rosemarie; Sultana, Hameeda; Müller, Rolf; Israel, Lars; Schleicher, Michael; Patel, Hitesh; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2004-02-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is an evolutionarily conserved regulator of the G-actin/F-actin ratio and, in yeast, is involved in regulating the adenylyl cyclase activity. We show that cell polarization, F-actin organization, and phototaxis are altered in a Dictyostelium CAP knockout mutant. Furthermore, in complementation assays we determined the roles of the individual domains in signaling and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We studied in detail the adenylyl cyclase activity and found that the mutant cells have normal levels of the aggregation phase-specific adenylyl cyclase and that receptor-mediated activation is intact. However, cAMP relay that is responsible for the generation of propagating cAMP waves that control the chemotactic aggregation of starving Dictyostelium cells was altered, and the cAMP-induced cGMP production was significantly reduced. The data suggest an interaction of CAP with adenylyl cyclase in Dictyostelium and an influence on signaling pathways directly as well as through its function as a regulatory component of the cytoskeleton.