Science.gov

Sample records for activates cellular signaling

  1. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  2. Cellular phosphatases facilitate combinatorial processing of receptor-activated signals

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dhiraj; Dua, Raina; Srikanth, Ravichandran; Jayaswal, Shilpi; Siddiqui, Zaved; Rao, Kanury VS

    2008-01-01

    Background Although reciprocal regulation of protein phosphorylation represents a key aspect of signal transduction, a larger perspective on how these various interactions integrate to contribute towards signal processing is presently unclear. For example, a key unanswered question is that of how phosphatase-mediated regulation of phosphorylation at the individual nodes of the signaling network translates into modulation of the net signal output and, thereby, the cellular phenotypic response. Results To address the above question we, in the present study, examined the dynamics of signaling from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) under conditions where individual cellular phosphatases were selectively depleted by siRNA. Results from such experiments revealed a highly enmeshed structure for the signaling network where each signaling node was linked to multiple phosphatases on the one hand, and each phosphatase to several nodes on the other. This resulted in a configuration where individual signaling intermediates could be influenced by a spectrum of regulatory phosphatases, but with the composition of the spectrum differing from one intermediate to another. Consequently, each node differentially experienced perturbations in phosphatase activity, yielding a unique fingerprint of nodal signals characteristic to that perturbation. This heterogeneity in nodal experiences, to a given perturbation, led to combinatorial manipulation of the corresponding signaling axes for the downstream transcription factors. Conclusion Our cumulative results reveal that it is the tight integration of phosphatases into the signaling network that provides the plasticity by which perturbation-specific information can be transmitted in the form of a multivariate output to the downstream transcription factor network. This output in turn specifies a context-defined response, when translated into the resulting gene expression profile. PMID:18798986

  3. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-25

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol. PMID:27545348

  4. Epigenomic Regulation of Smad1 Signaling During Cellular Senescence Induced by Ras Activation.

    PubMed

    Kaneda, Atsushi; Nonaka, Aya; Fujita, Takanori; Yamanaka, Ryota; Fujimoto, Mai; Miyazono, Kohei; Aburatani, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Epigenomic modification plays important roles in regulating gene expression during development, differentiation, and cellular senescence. When oncogenes are activated, cells fall into stable growth arrest to block cellular proliferation, which is called oncogene-induced senescence. We recently identified through genome-wide analyses that Bmp2-Smad1 signal and its regulation by harmonized epigenomic alteration play an important role in Ras-induced senescence of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We describe in this chapter the methods for analyses of epigenomic alteration and Smad1 targets on genome-wide scale. PMID:26520136

  5. Morbilliviruses Use Signaling Lymphocyte Activation Molecules (CD150) as Cellular Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Tatsuo, Hironobu; Ono, Nobuyuki; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2001-01-01

    Morbilliviruses comprise measles virus, canine distemper virus, rinderpest virus, and several other viruses that cause devastating human and animal diseases accompanied by severe immunosuppression and lymphopenia. Recently, we have shown that human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM) is a cellular receptor for measles virus. In this study, we examined whether canine distemper and rinderpest viruses also use canine and bovine SLAMs, respectively, as cellular receptors. The Onderstepoort vaccine strain and two B95a (marmoset B cell line)-isolated strains of canine distemper virus caused extensive cytopathic effects in normally resistant CHO (Chinese hamster ovary) cells after expression of canine SLAM. The Ako vaccine strain of rinderpest virus produced strong cytopathic effects in bovine SLAM-expressing CHO cells. The data on entry with vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes bearing measles, canine distemper, or rinderpest virus envelope proteins were consistent with development of cytopathic effects in SLAM-expressing CHO cell clones after infection with the respective viruses, confirming that SLAM acts at the virus entry step (as a cellular receptor). Furthermore, most measles, canine distemper, and rinderpest virus strains examined could any use of the human, canine, and bovine SLAMs to infect cells. Our findings suggest that the use of SLAM as a cellular receptor may be a property common to most, if not all, morbilliviruses and explain the lymphotropism and immunosuppressive nature of morbilliviruses. PMID:11390585

  6. Regulation of cellular signals from nutritional molecules: a specific role for phytochemicals, beyond antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Virgili, Fabio; Marino, Maria

    2008-11-01

    Phytochemicals (PhC) are a ubiquitous class of plant secondary metabolites. A "recommended" human diet should warrant a high proportion of energy from fruits and vegetables, therefore providing, among other factors, a huge intake of PhC, in general considered "health promoting" by virtue of their antioxidant activity and positive modulation, either directly or indirectly, of the cellular and tissue redox balance. Diet acts through multiple pathways and the association between the consumption of specific food items and the risk of degenerative diseases is extremely complex. Recent literature suggests that molecules having a chemical structure compatible with a putative antioxidant capacity can actually "perform" activities and roles independent of such capacity, interacting with cellular functions at different levels, such as affecting enzyme activities, binding to membrane or nuclear receptors as either an elective ligand or a ligand mimic. Inductive or signaling effects may occur at concentrations much lower than that required for effective antioxidant activity. Therefore, the "antioxidant hypothesis" is to be considered in some cases an intellectual "shortcut" possibly biasing the real understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of various classes of food items. In the past few years, many exciting new indications elucidating the mechanisms of polyphenols have been published. Here, we summarize the current knowledge of the mechanisms by which specific molecules of nutritional interest, and in particular polyphenols, play a role in cellular response and in preventing pathologies. In particular, their direct interaction with nuclear receptors and their ability to modulate the activity of key enzymes involved in cell signaling and antioxidant responses are presented and discussed. PMID:18762244

  7. mTORC1 signaling activates NRF1 to increase cellular proteasome levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinan; Manning, Brendan D

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the maintenance of protein homeostasis, or proteostasis, has emerged as an underlying feature of a variety of human pathologies, including aging-related diseases. Proteostasis is achieved through the coordinated action of cellular systems overseeing amino acid availability, mRNA translation, protein folding, secretion, and degradation. The regulation of these distinct systems must be integrated at various points to attain a proper balance. In a recent study, we found that the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway, well known to enhance the protein synthesis capacity of cells while concordantly inhibiting autophagy, promotes the production of more proteasomes. Activation of mTORC1 genetically, through loss of the tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) tumor suppressors, or physiologically, through growth factors or feeding, stimulates a transcriptional program involving the sterol-regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-related factor 1 (NRF1; also known as NFE2L1) transcription factors leading to an increase in cellular proteasome content. As discussed here, our findings suggest that this increase in proteasome levels facilitates both the maintenance of proteostasis and the recovery of amino acids in the face of an increased protein load consequent to mTORC1 activation. We also consider the physiological and pathological implications of this unexpected new downstream branch of mTORC1 signaling. PMID:26017155

  8. Special issue: redox active natural products and their interaction with cellular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Claus

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, "natural" cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature's treasure chest of "green gold". Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-)organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic "sensor/effector" anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s) of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for "intracellular diagnostics". In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur Species (RSS), such techniques have

  9. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  10. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammation and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) Family Proteins in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Witarama, Tuff; Caudill, Marissa; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbance and short sleep duration are associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and certain cancers. This study was undertaken to test the effects of experimental sleep loss on spontaneous cellular inflammation and activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family proteins, which together promote an inflammatory microenvironment. In 24 healthy adults (16 females; 8 males), spontaneous production of IL-6 and TNF in monocytes and spontaneous intranuclear expression of activated STAT1, STAT3, and STAT5 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), monocyte-, and lymphocyte populations were measured in the morning after uninterrupted baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (PSD, sleep period from 3 a.m. to 7 a.m.), and recovery sleep. Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of IL-6 and TNF-α was significantly greater after PSD (P<0.02) and after recovery sleep (P<0.01). Relative to baseline, spontaneous monocytic expression of activated STAT 1 and STAT 5 was significantly greater after recovery sleep (P<0.007P<0.02, respectively) but not STAT 3 (P=0.09). No changes in STAT1, STAT3, or STAT5 were found in lymphocyte populations. Sleep loss induces activation of spontaneous cellular innate immunity and of STAT family proteins, which together map the dynamics of sleep loss on the molecular signaling pathways that regulate inflammatory and other immune responses. Treatments that target short sleep duration have the potential to constrain inflammation and reduce the risk for inflammatory disorders and some cancers in humans. PMID:25451613

  11. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  12. Activation-dependent and biphasic electromagnetic field effects: Model based on cooperative enzyme kinetics in cellular signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Eichwald, C.; Walleczek, J.

    1996-12-31

    Experiments on field exposure effects of extremely-low-frequency electric and magnetic fields (EMFs) on biological systems have shown that, in many cases, the biological-functional status is of fundamental importance for an effective interaction. For example, studies of calcium uptake regulation in cells of the immune system, particularly in T lymphocytes, have revealed that, depending on the degree of cellular activation, either stimulatory, inhibitory, or no field exposure effects are observed for identical field parameters. A brief summary of the experimental findings is given, and a theoretical approach is presented that accounts in a qualitative manner for EMF exposure effects (1) that depend on the degree of cellular activation and (2) that exhibit a biphasic response behavior (stimulation/inhibition). In the model, biochemical stimulation of the cell results in activation of specific signaling pathways that regulate calcium dynamics in the cell (calcium release from intracellular calcium stores and capacitive calcium entry). The authors assume that, controlled by these pathways, a specific EMF-sensitive enzyme system becomes activated. The activated enzyme, in turn, exhibit a feedback control on the signal processes, thus leading to a modulation of calcium entry. This modulation may affect other cellular processes that are calcium dependent (e.g., DNA synthesis). Magnetic field exposure is assumed to alter the kinetics of a specific step within the enzyme-reaction cycle in accord with the radical-pair mechanism, although the formulism is not restricted to this specific example. Results show that inclusion of cooperative steps within the enzyme-reaction cycle provides a theoretical basis that enables a simple description of a biphasic response behavior to EMF exposure.

  13. Early cellular signaling responses to axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Thomas J; Wang, Ai Ling; Yuan, Ming; Neufeld, Arthur H

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used optic nerve injury as a model to study early signaling events in neuronal tissue following axonal injury. Optic nerve injury results in the selective death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The time course of cell death takes place over a period of days with the earliest detection of RGC death at about 48 hr post injury. We hypothesized that in the period immediately following axonal injury, there are changes in the soma that signal surrounding glia and neurons and that start programmed cell death. In the current study, we investigated early changes in cellular signaling and gene expression that occur within the first 6 hrs post optic nerve injury. Results We found evidence of cell to cell signaling within 30 min of axonal injury. We detected differences in phosphoproteins and gene expression within the 6 hrs time period. Activation of TNFα and glutamate receptors, two pathways that can initiate cell death, begins in RGCs within 6 hrs following axonal injury. Differential gene expression at 6 hrs post injury included genes involved in cytokine, neurotrophic factor signaling (Socs3) and apoptosis (Bax). Conclusion We interpret our studies to indicate that both neurons and glia in the retina have been signaled within 30 min after optic nerve injury. The signals are probably initiated by the RGC soma. In addition, signals activating cellular death pathways occur within 6 hrs of injury, which likely lead to RGC degeneration. PMID:19284657

  14. Domain-Specific Activation of Death-Associated Intracellular Signalling Cascades by the Cellular Prion Protein in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Vilches, Silvia; Vergara, Cristina; Nicolás, Oriol; Mata, Ágata; Del Río, José A; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-09-01

    The biological functions of the cellular prion protein remain poorly understood. In fact, numerous studies have aimed to determine specific functions for the different protein domains. Studies of cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) domains through in vivo expression of molecules carrying internal deletions in a mouse Prnp null background have provided helpful data on the implication of the protein in signalling cascades in affected neurons. Nevertheless, understanding of the mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by these PrP(C) deleted forms is far from complete. To better define the neurotoxic or neuroprotective potential of PrP(C) N-terminal domains, and to overcome the heterogeneity of results due to the lack of a standardized model, we used neuroblastoma cells to analyse the effects of overexpressing PrP(C) deleted forms. Results indicate that PrP(C) N-terminal deleted forms were properly processed through the secretory pathway. However, PrPΔF35 and PrPΔCD mutants led to death by different mechanisms sharing loss of alpha-cleavage and activation of caspase-3. Our data suggest that both gain-of-function and loss-of-function pathogenic mechanisms may be associated with N-terminal domains and may therefore contribute to neurotoxicity in prion disease. Dissecting the molecular response induced by PrPΔF35 may be the key to unravelling the physiological and pathological functions of the prion protein. PMID:26250617

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging of Cellular Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Keijzer, Sandra; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa; Spaink, Herman P.; Schmidt, Thomas

    Single-molecule microscopy is an emerging technique to understand the function of a protein in the context of its natural environment. In our laboratory this technique has been used to study the dynamics of signal transduction in vivo. A multitude of signal transduction cascades are initiated by interactions between proteins in the plasma membrane. These cascades start by binding a ligand to its receptor, thereby activating downstream signaling pathways which finally result in complex cellular responses. To fully understand these processes it is important to study the initial steps of the signaling cascades. Standard biological assays mostly call for overexpression of the proteins and high concentrations of ligand. This sets severe limits to the interpretation of, for instance, the time-course of the observations, given the large temporal spread caused by the diffusion-limited binding processes. Methods and limitations of single-molecule microscopy for the study of cell signaling are discussed on the example of the chemotactic signaling of the slime-mold Dictyostelium discoideum. Single-molecule studies, as reviewed in this chapter, appear to be one of the essential methodologies for the full spatiotemporal clarification of cellular signaling, one of the ultimate goals in cell biology.

  16. Integration of cellular signals in chattering environments.

    PubMed

    Rué, P; Domedel-Puig, N; Garcia-Ojalvo, J; Pons, A J

    2012-09-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to fluctuating environmental conditions. External signals are sensed, processed and integrated by cellular signal transduction networks, which translate input signals into specific cellular responses by means of biochemical reactions. These networks have a complex nature, and we are still far from having a complete characterization of the process through which they integrate information, specially given the noisy environment in which that information is embedded. Guided by the many instances of constructive influences of noise that have been reported in the physical sciences in the last decades, here we explore how multiple signals are integrated in an eukaryotic cell in the presence of background noise, or chatter. To that end, we use a Boolean model of a typical human signal transduction network. Despite its complexity, we find that the network is able to display simple patterns of signal integration. Furthermore, our computational analysis shows that these integration patterns depend on the levels of fluctuating background activity carried by other cell inputs. Taken together, our results indicate that signal integration is sensitive to environmental fluctuations, and that this background noise effectively determines the information integration capabilities of the cell. PMID:22584015

  17. Structure-activity relations of leucine derivatives reveal critical moieties for cellular uptake and activation of mTORC1-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Nagamori, Shushi; Wiriyasermkul, Pattama; Okuda, Suguru; Kojima, Naoto; Hari, Yoshiyuki; Kiyonaka, Shigeki; Mori, Yasuo; Tominaga, Hideyuki; Ohgaki, Ryuichi; Kanai, Yoshikatsu

    2016-04-01

    Among amino acids, leucine is a potential signaling molecule to regulate cell growth and metabolism by activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). To reveal the critical structures of leucine molecule to activate mTORC1, we examined the structure-activity relationships of leucine derivatives in HeLa S3 cells for cellular uptake and for the induction of phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K), a downstream effector of mTORC1. The activation of mTORC1 by leucine and its derivatives was the consequence of two successive events: the cellular uptake by L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) responsible for leucine uptake in HeLa S3 cells and the activation of mTORC1 following the transport. The structural requirement for the recognition by LAT1 was to have carbonyl oxygen, alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, amino group and hydrophobic side chain. In contrast, the requirement for mTORC1 activation was more rigorous. It additionally required fixed distance between carbonyl oxygen and alkoxy oxygen of carboxyl group, and amino group positioned at α-carbon. L-Configuration in chirality and appropriate length of side chain with a terminal isopropyl group were also important. This confirmed that LAT1 itself is not a leucine sensor. Some specialized leucine sensing mechanism with rigorous requirement for agonistic structures should exist inside the cells because leucine derivatives not transported by LAT1 did not activate mTORC1. Because LAT1-mTOR axis is involved in the regulation of cell growth and cancer progression, the results from this study may provide a new insight into therapeutics targeting both LAT1 and leucine sensor. PMID:26724922

  18. Human papillomavirus 16E6 and NFX1-123 potentiate notch signaling and differentiation without activating cellular arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.

    2015-04-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) oncoproteins bind host cell proteins to dysregulate and uncouple apoptosis, senescence, differentiation, and growth. These pathways are important for both the viral life cycle and cancer development. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and they collaboratively increase the growth and differentiation master regulator, Notch1. In 16E6 expressing keratinocytes (16E6 HFKs), the Notch canonical pathway genes Hes1 and Hes5 were increased with overexpression of NFX1-123, and their expression was directly linked to the activation or blockade of the Notch1 receptor. Keratinocyte differentiation genes Keratin 1 and Keratin 10 were also increased, but in contrast their upregulation was only indirectly associated with Notch1 receptor stimulation and was fully unlinked to growth arrest, increased p21{sup Waf1/CIP1}, or decreased proliferative factor Ki67. This leads to a model of 16E6, NFX1-123, and Notch1 differently regulating canonical and differentiation pathways and entirely uncoupling cellular arrest from increased differentiation. - Highlights: • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the Notch canonical pathway through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the differentiation pathway indirectly through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased differentiation gene expression without growth arrest. • Increased NFX1-123 with 16E6 may create an ideal cellular phenotype for HPV.

  19. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  20. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 7 (ERK7), a Novel ERK with a C-Terminal Domain That Regulates Its Activity, Its Cellular Localization, and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Mark K.; Kuo, Wen-Liang; Hershenson, Marc B.; Rosner, Marsha Rich

    1999-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases play distinct roles in a variety of cellular signaling pathways and are regulated through multiple mechanisms. In this study, a novel 61-kDa member of the MAP kinase family, termed extracellular signal-regulated kinase 7 (ERK7), has been cloned and characterized. Although it has the signature TEY activation motif of ERK1 and ERK2, ERK7 is not activated by extracellular stimuli that typically activate ERK1 and ERK2 or by common activators of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase. Instead, ERK7 has appreciable constitutive activity in serum-starved cells that is dependent on the presence of its C-terminal domain. Interestingly, the C-terminal tail, not the kinase domain, of ERK7 regulates its nuclear localization and inhibition of growth. Taken together, these results elucidate a novel type of MAP kinase whereby interactions via its C-terminal tail, rather than extracellular signal-mediated activation cascades, regulate its activity, localization, and function. PMID:9891064

  1. Cellular signaling in eclosion hormone action.

    PubMed

    Morton, David B.; Simpson, P Jeanette

    2002-01-01

    Eclosion hormone (EH) is a 62 amino acid neuropeptide that plays an integral role in triggering ecdysis behavior at the end of each molt. At least three populations of cells are thought to be targets for EH, each of which show an EH-stimulated increase in the intracellular messenger guanosine 3', 5' cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). These EH target cells are believed to include two pairs of neurons in each of the ganglia of the ventral nerve cord (VNC) that contain the neuropeptide crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP), the Inka cells of the peripheral epitracheal glands and intrinsic non-neuronal cells in the abdominal transverse nerves. This review describes likely signaling cascades that result in the EH-stimulated cGMP increase. Several lines of evidence suggest the involvement of a novel nitric oxide insensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC). A novel GC with these properties has recently been identified and we also present evidence to suggest that it is activated by EH and describe possible pathways for its activation. In addition, we review our current knowledge on the cellular and molecular events that take place downstream of the increase in cGMP. PMID:12770127

  2. SOD Therapeutics: Latest Insights into Their Structure-Activity Relationships and Impact on the Cellular Redox-Based Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tovmasyan, Artak; Roberts, Emily R. H.; Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Leong, Kam W.; Spasojevic, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes are indispensable and ubiquitous antioxidant defenses maintaining the steady-state levels of O2·−; no wonder, thus, that their mimics are remarkably efficacious in essentially any animal model of oxidative stress injuries thus far explored. Recent Advances: Structure-activity relationship (half-wave reduction potential [E1/2] versus log kcat), originally reported for Mn porphyrins (MnPs), is valid for any other class of SOD mimics, as it is dominated by the superoxide reduction and oxidation potential. The biocompatible E1/2 of ∼+300 mV versus normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) allows powerful SOD mimics as mild oxidants and antioxidants (alike O2·−) to readily traffic electrons among reactive species and signaling proteins, serving as fine mediators of redox-based signaling pathways. Based on similar thermodynamics, both SOD enzymes and their mimics undergo similar reactions, however, due to vastly different sterics, with different rate constants. Critical Issues: Although log kcat(O2·−) is a good measure of therapeutic potential of SOD mimics, discussions of their in vivo mechanisms of actions remain mostly of speculative character. Most recently, the therapeutic and mechanistic relevance of oxidation of ascorbate and glutathionylation and oxidation of protein thiols by MnP-based SOD mimics and subsequent inactivation of nuclear factor κB has been substantiated in rescuing normal and killing cancer cells. Interaction of MnPs with thiols seems to be, at least in part, involved in up-regulation of endogenous antioxidative defenses, leading to the healing of diseased cells. Future Directions: Mechanistic explorations of single and combined therapeutic strategies, along with studies of bioavailability and translational aspects, will comprise future work in optimizing redox-active drugs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2372–2415. PMID:23875805

  3. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M; Hiraragi, Hajime; Shen, Lei; Feuer, Gerold; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen; Lairmore, Michael D

    2004-01-01

    Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo. PMID:15560845

  4. Differential effects of carboxy-terminal sequence deletions on platelet-derived growth factor receptor signaling activities and interactions with cellular substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Seedorf, K; Millauer, B; Kostka, G; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1992-01-01

    Chimeric receptors composed of the human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) extracellular domain fused to wild-type and truncated platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R) intracellular sequences were stably expressed in NIH 3T3 cells devoid of endogenous EGF-Rs. This experimental system allowed us to investigate the biological activity of PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain mutants in PDGF-R-responsive NIH 3T3 cells by activating PDGF-specific signaling pathways with EGF. Deletion of 74 carboxy-terminal amino acids severely impaired the ability of the PDGF-R cytoplasmic domain to associate with cellular substrates in vitro. This deletion also inhibited receptor and substrate phosphorylation, reduced the receptor's mitogenic activity, and completely abolished its oncogenic signaling potential. Surprisingly, removal of only six additional amino acids, including Tyr-989, restored substantial receptor and substrate phosphorylation capacity as well as transforming potential and yielded a receptor with wild-type levels of ligand-induced mitogenic activity. However, the ability of this chimera to bind phospholipase C gamma was severely impaired in comparison with the ability of the wild-type receptor, while the association with other cellular proteins was not affected. Further deletion of 35 residues, including Tyr-977, nearly abolished all PDGF-R cytoplasmic-domain biological signaling activities. None of the three C-terminal truncations completely abolished the mitogenic potential of the receptors or had any influence on ligand binding or receptor down regulation. Together, these data implicate the 80 C-terminal-most residues of the PDGF-R, and possibly Tyr-989, in phospholipase C gamma binding, while receptor sequences upstream from Asp-988 appear to be essential for specific interactions with other cellular polypeptides such as ras GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase. Thus, the mutants described here allow the separation of distinct PDGF-activated

  5. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:22908014

  6. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Pauls, Samantha D.; Lafarge, Sandrine T.; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J.

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:22908014

  7. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling. PMID:26572502

  8. Native aggregation as a cause of origin of temporary cellular structures needed for all forms of cellular activity, signaling and transformations.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Vladimir V

    2010-01-01

    According to the hypothesis explored in this paper, native aggregation is genetically controlled (programmed) reversible aggregation that occurs when interacting proteins form new temporary structures through highly specific interactions. It is assumed that Anfinsen's dogma may be extended to protein aggregation: composition and amino acid sequence determine not only the secondary and tertiary structure of single protein, but also the structure of protein aggregates (associates). Cell function is considered as a transition between two states (two states model), the resting state and state of activity (this applies to the cell as a whole and to its individual structures). In the resting state, the key proteins are found in the following inactive forms: natively unfolded and globular. When the cell is activated, secondary structures appear in natively unfolded proteins (including unfolded regions in other proteins), and globular proteins begin to melt and their secondary structures become available for interaction with the secondary structures of other proteins. These temporary secondary structures provide a means for highly specific interactions between proteins. As a result, native aggregation creates temporary structures necessary for cell activity."One of the principal objects of theoretical research in any department of knowledge is to find the point of view from which the subject appears in its greatest simplicity."Josiah Willard Gibbs (1839-1903). PMID:20534114

  9. Native aggregation as a cause of origin of temporary cellular structures needed for all forms of cellular activity, signaling and transformations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    According to the hypothesis explored in this paper, native aggregation is genetically controlled (programmed) reversible aggregation that occurs when interacting proteins form new temporary structures through highly specific interactions. It is assumed that Anfinsen's dogma may be extended to protein aggregation: composition and amino acid sequence determine not only the secondary and tertiary structure of single protein, but also the structure of protein aggregates (associates). Cell function is considered as a transition between two states (two states model), the resting state and state of activity (this applies to the cell as a whole and to its individual structures). In the resting state, the key proteins are found in the following inactive forms: natively unfolded and globular. When the cell is activated, secondary structures appear in natively unfolded proteins (including unfolded regions in other proteins), and globular proteins begin to melt and their secondary structures become available for interaction with the secondary structures of other proteins. These temporary secondary structures provide a means for highly specific interactions between proteins. As a result, native aggregation creates temporary structures necessary for cell activity. "One of the principal objects of theoretical research in any department of knowledge is to find the point of view from which the subject appears in its greatest simplicity." Josiah Willard Gibbs (1839-1903) PMID:20534114

  10. Studying Cellular Signal Transduction with OMIC Technologies.

    PubMed

    Landry, Benjamin D; Clarke, David C; Lee, Michael J

    2015-10-23

    In the gulf between genotype and phenotype exists proteins and, in particular, protein signal transduction systems. These systems use a relatively limited parts list to respond to a much longer list of extracellular, environmental, and/or mechanical cues with rapidity and specificity. Most signaling networks function in a highly non-linear and often contextual manner. Furthermore, these processes occur dynamically across space and time. Because of these complexities, systems and "OMIC" approaches are essential for the study of signal transduction. One challenge in using OMIC-scale approaches to study signaling is that the "signal" can take different forms in different situations. Signals are encoded in diverse ways such as protein-protein interactions, enzyme activities, localizations, or post-translational modifications to proteins. Furthermore, in some cases, signals may be encoded only in the dynamics, duration, or rates of change of these features. Accordingly, systems-level analyses of signaling may need to integrate multiple experimental and/or computational approaches. As the field has progressed, the non-triviality of integrating experimental and computational analyses has become apparent. Successful use of OMIC methods to study signaling will require the "right" experiments and the "right" modeling approaches, and it is critical to consider both in the design phase of the project. In this review, we discuss common OMIC and modeling approaches for studying signaling, emphasizing the philosophical and practical considerations for effectively merging these two types of approaches to maximize the probability of obtaining reliable and novel insights into signaling biology. PMID:26244521

  11. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lovelace, Erica S; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard P; Zink, Erika M; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M; Waters, Katrina M; Metz, Thomas O; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H; Polyak, Stephen J

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin, a characterized extract of the seeds of milk thistle (Silybum marianum), suppresses cellular inflammation. To define how this occurs, transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies were performed in human liver and T cell lines. Cellular stress and metabolic pathways were modulated within 4 h of silymarin treatment: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed silymarin suppression of glycolytic, tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and amino acid metabolism. Anti-inflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e., 24 h) silymarin exposure, with suppression of multiple pro-inflammatory mRNAs and signaling pathways including nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO). Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that silymarin inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, whereas silymarin inhibition of mTOR required DDIT4. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Thus, natural products activate stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory cellular phenotype. Natural products like silymarin may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation. PMID:26186142

  12. Estrogen receptor beta signaling alters cellular inflammasomes activity after global cerebral ischemia in reproductively senescence female rats.

    PubMed

    de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Patel, Hersila H; Brand, Frank J; Perez-Pinzon, Miguel A; Bramlett, Helen M; Raval, Ami P

    2016-02-01

    Periodic treatments with estrogen receptor subtype-β (ER-β) agonist reduce post-ischemic hippocampal injury in ovariectomized rats. However, the underlying mechanism of how ER-β agonists protect the brain remains unknown. Global cerebral ischemia activates the innate immune response, and a key component of the innate immune response is the inflammasome. This study tests the hypothesis that ER-β regulates inflammasome activation in the hippocampus, thus reducing ischemic hippocampal damage in reproductively senescent female rats that received periodic ER-β agonist treatments. First, we determined the effect of hippocampal ER-β silencing on the expression of the inflammasome proteins caspase 1, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC), and interleukin (IL)-1β. Silencing of ER-β attenuated 17β-estradiol mediated decrease in caspase 1, ASC, and IL-1β. Next, we tested the hypothesis that periodic ER-β agonist treatment reduces inflammasome activation and ischemic damage in reproductively senescent female rats. Periodic ER-β agonist treatments significantly decreased inflammasome activation and increased post-ischemic live neuronal counts by 32% (p < 0.05) as compared to the vehicle-treated, reproductively senescent rats. Current findings demonstrated that ER-β activation regulates inflammasome activation and protects the brain from global ischemic damage in reproductively senescent female rats. Further investigation on the role of a periodic ER-β agonist regimen to reduce the innate immune response in the brain could help reduce the incidence and the impact of global cerebral ischemia in post-menopausal women. We propose that estrogen receptor subtype-β (ER-β) activation regulates inflammasome activation and protects the brain from global ischemic damage in reproductively senescent female rats. PMID:26490364

  13. Cellular Mechanisms Controlling Caspase Activation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Parrish, Amanda B.; Freel, Christopher D.; Kornbluth, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Caspases are the primary drivers of apoptotic cell death, cleaving cellular proteins that are critical for dismantling the dying cell. Initially translated as inactive zymogenic precursors, caspases are activated in response to a variety of cell death stimuli. In addition to factors required for their direct activation (e.g., dimerizing adaptor proteins in the case of initiator caspases that lie at the apex of apoptotic signaling cascades), caspases are regulated by a variety of cellular factors in a myriad of physiological and pathological settings. For example, caspases may be modified posttranslationally (e.g., by phosphorylation or ubiquitylation) or through interaction of modulatory factors with either the zymogenic or active form of a caspase, altering its activation and/or activity. These regulatory events may inhibit or enhance enzymatic activity or may affect activity toward particular cellular substrates. Finally, there is emerging literature to suggest that caspases can participate in a variety of cellular processes unrelated to apoptotic cell death. In these settings, it is particularly important that caspases are maintained under stringent control to avoid inadvertent cell death. It is likely that continued examination of these processes will reveal new mechanisms of caspase regulation with implications well beyond control of apoptotic cell death. PMID:23732469

  14. PIFs: pivotal components in a cellular signaling hub

    PubMed Central

    Leivar, Pablo; Quail, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    A small subset of basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors called PIFs [phytochrome (phy)-interacting factors] act to repress seed germination, promote seedling skotomorphogenesis and promote shade-avoidance through regulated expression of over a thousand genes. Light-activated phy molecules directly reverse these activities by inducing rapid degradation of the PIF proteins. Here, we review recent advances in dissecting this signaling pathway and examine emerging evidence that indicates that other pathways also converge to regulate PIF activity, including the gibberellin pathway, the circadian clock and high temperature. The PIFs thus have broader roles than previously appreciated, functioning as a cellular signaling hub that integrates multiple signals to orchestrate regulation of the transcriptional network that drives multiple facets of downstream morphogenesis. The relative contributions of the individual PIFs to this spectrum of regulatory functions ranges from quantitatively redundant to qualitatively distinct. PMID:20833098

  15. Structural, molecular and cellular functions of MSH2 and MSH6 during DNA mismatch repair, damage signaling and other noncanonical activities

    PubMed Central

    Edelbrock, Michael A.; Kaliyaperumal, Saravanan; Williams, Kandace J.

    2013-01-01

    The field of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) has rapidly expanded after the discovery of the MutHLS repair system in bacteria. By the mid 1990s yeast and human homologues to bacterial MutL and MutS had been identified and their contribution to hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome) was under intense investigation. The human MutS homologue 6 protein (hMSH6), was first reported in 1995 as a G:T binding partner (GTBP) of hMSH2, forming the hMutSα mismatch-binding complex. Signal transduction from each DNA-bound hMutSα complex is accomplished by the hMutLα heterodimer (hMLH1 and hPMS2). Molecular mechanisms and cellular regulation of individual MMR proteins are now areas of intensive research. This review will focus on molecular mechanisms associated with mismatch binding, as well as emerging evidence that MutSα and in particular, MSH6, is a key protein in MMR-dependent DNA damage response and communication with other DNA repair pathways within the cell. MSH6 is unstable in the absence of MSH2, however it is the DNA lesion-binding partner of this heterodimer. MSH6, but not MSH2, has a conserved Phe-X-Glu motif that recognizes and binds several different DNA structural distortions, initiating different cellular responses. hMSH6 also contains the nuclear localization sequences required to shuttle hMutSα into the nucleus. For example, upon binding to O6meG:T, MSH6 triggers a DNA damage response that involves altered phosphorylation within the N-terminal disordered domain of this unique protein. While many investigations have focused on MMR as a post-replication DNA repair mechanism, MMR proteins are expressed and active in all phases of the cell cycle. There is much more to be discovered about regulatory cellular roles that require the presence of MutSα and, in particular, MSH6. PMID:23391514

  16. Downregulation of TFAM inhibits the tumorigenesis of non-small cell lung cancer by activating ROS-mediated JNK/p38MAPK signaling and reducing cellular bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Shangguan, Fugeng; Lin, Xiaoming; Chen, Fuhong; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Ya; Chen, Zilei; Huang, Kate; Wang, Rongrong; Wang, Lu; Song, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yongzhang; Lu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is essential for the replication, transcription and maintenance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). The role of TFAM in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains largely unknown. Herein, we report that downregulation of TFAM in NSCLC cells resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and significantly blocked NSCLC cell growth and migration through the activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced c-Jun amino-terminal kinase(JNK)/p38 MAPK signaling and decreased cellular bioenergetics. We further found that TFAM downregulation in NSCLC cells led to increased apoptotic cell death and enhanced the sensitivity of NSCLC cells to cisplatin. Tissue microarray (TMA) data showed that elevated expression of TFAM was related to the histological grade and TNM stage of NSCLC patients. We also demonstrated that TFAM is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival of NSCLC patients. Taken together, our findings suggest that TFAM could serve as a potential diagnostic biomarker and molecular target for the treatment of NSCLC, as well as for prediction of the effectiveness of chemotherapy. PMID:26820294

  17. Neu1 desialylation of sialyl alpha-2,3-linked beta-galactosyl residues of TOLL-like receptor 4 is essential for receptor activation and cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Amith, Schammim Ray; Jayanth, Preethi; Franchuk, Susan; Finlay, Trisha; Seyrantepe, Volkan; Beyaert, Rudi; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2010-02-01

    The ectodomain of TOLL-like receptors (TLR) is highly glycosylated with several N-linked gylcosylation sites located in the inner concave surface. The precise role of these sugar N-glycans in TLR receptor activation is unknown. Recently, we have shown that Neu1 sialidase and not Neu2, -3 and -4 forms a complex with TLR-2, -3 and -4 receptors on the cell-surface membrane of naïve and activated macrophage cells (Glycoconj J DOI 10.1007/s10719-009-9239-8). Activation of Neu1 is induced by TLR ligands binding to their respective receptors. Here, we show that endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced MyD88/TLR4 complex formation and subsequent NFkappaB activation is dependent on the removal of alpha-2,3-sialyl residue linked to beta-galactoside of TLR4 by the Neu1 activity associated with LPS-stimulated live primary macrophage cells, macrophage and dendritic cell lines but not with primary Neu1-deficient macrophage cells. Exogenous alpha-2,3 sialyl specific neuraminidase (Streptoccocus pneumoniae) and wild-type T. cruzi trans-sialidase (TS) but not the catalytically inactive mutant TSAsp98-Glu mediate TLR4 dimerization to facilitate MyD88/TLR4 complex formation and NFkappaB activation similar to those responses seen with LPS. These same TLR ligand-induced NFkappaB responses are not observed in TLR deficient HEK293 cells, but are re-established in HEK293 cells stably transfected with TLR4/MD2, and are significantly inhibited by alpha-2,3-sialyl specific Maackia amurensis (MAL-2) lectin, alpha-2,3-sialyl specific galectin-1 and neuraminidase inhibitor Tamiflu but not by alpha-2,6-sialyl specific Sambucus nigra lectin (SNA). Taken together, the findings suggest that Neu1 desialylation of alpha-2,3-sialyl residues of TLR receptors enables in removing a steric hinderance to receptor association for TLR activation and cellular signaling. PMID:19796680

  18. Silymarin Suppresses Cellular Inflammation By Inducing Reparative Stress Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Wagoner, Jessica; MacDonald, James; Bammler, Theo; Bruckner, Jacob; Brownell, Jessica; Beyer, Richard; Zink, Erika M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Metz, Thomas O.; Farin, Federico; Oberlies, Nicholas H.; Polyak, Steve

    2015-08-28

    Silymarin (SM), a natural product, is touted as a liver protectant and preventer of both chronic inflammation and diseases. To define how SM elicits these effects at a systems level, we performed transcriptional profiling, metabolomics, and signaling studies in human liver and T cell lines. Multiple pathways associated with cellular stress and metabolism were modulated by SM treatment within 0.5 to four hours: activation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF-4) and adenosine monophosphate protein kinase (AMPK) and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, the latter being associated with induction of DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 (DDIT4). Metabolomics analyses revealed suppression of glycolytic, TCA cycle, and amino acid metabolism by SM treatment. Antiinflammatory effects arose with prolonged (i.e. 24 hours) SM exposure, with suppression of multiple proinflammatory mRNAs and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling. Studies with murine knock out cells revealed that SM inhibition of both mTOR and NF-κB was partially AMPK dependent, while SM inhibition of the mTOR pathway in part required DDIT4. Thus, SM activates stress and repair responses that culminate in an anti-inflammatory phenotype. Other natural products induced similar stress responses, which correlated with their ability to suppress inflammation. Therefore, natural products like SM may be useful as tools to define how metabolic, stress, and repair pathways regulate cellular inflammation.

  19. Timing in Cellular Ca2+ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Boulware, Michael J.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals are generated across a broad time range. Kinetic considerations impact how information is processed to encode and decode Ca2+ signals, the choreography of responses that ensure specific and efficient signaling and the overall temporal gearing such that ephemeral Ca2+ signals have lasting physiological value. The reciprocal importance of timing for Ca2+ signaling, and Ca2+ signaling for timing is exemplified by the altered kinetic profiles of Ca2+ signals in certain diseases and the likely role of basal Ca2+ fluctuations in the perception of time itself. PMID:18786382

  20. A Cellular System for Spatial Signal Decoding in Chemical Gradients.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, Björn; Unger, Michael; Lee, Sung Sik; Stoffel-Studer, Ingrid; van den Heuvel, Jasmin; Pelet, Serge; Koeppl, Heinz; Peter, Matthias

    2015-11-23

    Directional cell growth requires that cells read and interpret shallow chemical gradients, but how the gradient directional information is identified remains elusive. We use single-cell analysis and mathematical modeling to define the cellular gradient decoding network in yeast. Our results demonstrate that the spatial information of the gradient signal is read locally within the polarity site complex using double-positive feedback between the GTPase Cdc42 and trafficking of the receptor Ste2. Spatial decoding critically depends on low Cdc42 activity, which is maintained by the MAPK Fus3 through sequestration of the Cdc42 activator Cdc24. Deregulated Cdc42 or Ste2 trafficking prevents gradient decoding and leads to mis-oriented growth. Our work discovers how a conserved set of components assembles a network integrating signal intensity and directionality to decode the spatial information contained in chemical gradients. PMID:26585298

  1. Optimal Prediction by Cellular Signaling Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Nils B.; Mugler, Andrew; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2015-12-01

    Living cells can enhance their fitness by anticipating environmental change. We study how accurately linear signaling networks in cells can predict future signals. We find that maximal predictive power results from a combination of input-noise suppression, linear extrapolation, and selective readout of correlated past signal values. Single-layer networks generate exponential response kernels, which suffice to predict Markovian signals optimally. Multilayer networks allow oscillatory kernels that can optimally predict non-Markovian signals. At low noise, these kernels exploit the signal derivative for extrapolation, while at high noise, they capitalize on signal values in the past that are strongly correlated with the future signal. We show how the common motifs of negative feedback and incoherent feed-forward can implement these optimal response functions. Simulations reveal that E. coli can reliably predict concentration changes for chemotaxis, and that the integration time of its response kernel arises from a trade-off between rapid response and noise suppression.

  2. ROS and ROS-Mediated Cellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jixiang; Wang, Xiaoli; Vikash, Vikash; Ye, Qing; Wu, Dandan; Liu, Yulan; Dong, Weiguo

    2016-01-01

    It has long been recognized that an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can modify the cell-signaling proteins and have functional consequences, which successively mediate pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, diabetes, unchecked growth, neurodegeneration, inflammation, and aging. While numerous articles have demonstrated the impacts of ROS on various signaling pathways and clarify the mechanism of action of cell-signaling proteins, their influence on the level of intracellular ROS, and their complex interactions among multiple ROS associated signaling pathways, the systemic summary is necessary. In this review paper, we particularly focus on the pattern of the generation and homeostasis of intracellular ROS, the mechanisms and targets of ROS impacting on cell-signaling proteins (NF-κB, MAPKs, Keap1-Nrf2-ARE, and PI3K-Akt), ion channels and transporters (Ca2+ and mPTP), and modifying protein kinase and Ubiquitination/Proteasome System. PMID:26998193

  3. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  4. Cellular signalling effects in high precision radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahon, Stephen J.; McGarry, Conor K.; Butterworth, Karl T.; Jain, Suneil; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Hounsell, Alan R.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2015-06-01

    Radiotherapy is commonly planned on the basis of physical dose received by the tumour and surrounding normal tissue, with margins added to address the possibility of geometric miss. However, recent experimental evidence suggests that intercellular signalling results in a given cell’s survival also depending on the dose received by neighbouring cells. A model of radiation-induced cell killing and signalling was used to analyse how this effect depends on dose and margin choices. Effective Uniform Doses were calculated for model tumours in both idealised cases with no delivery uncertainty and more realistic cases incorporating geometric uncertainty. In highly conformal irradiation, a lack of signalling from outside the target leads to reduced target cell killing, equivalent to under-dosing by up to 10% compared to large uniform fields. This effect is significantly reduced when higher doses per fraction are considered, both increasing the level of cell killing and reducing margin sensitivity. These effects may limit the achievable biological precision of techniques such as stereotactic radiotherapy even in the absence of geometric uncertainties, although it is predicted that larger fraction sizes reduce the relative contribution of cell signalling driven effects. These observations may contribute to understanding the efficacy of hypo-fractionated radiotherapy.

  5. Cellular metabolites modulate in vivo signaling of Arabidopsis cryptochrome-1

    PubMed Central

    El-Esawi, Mohamed; Glascoe, Austin; Engle, Dorothy; Ritz, Thorsten; Link, Justin; Ahmad, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Cryptochromes are blue-light absorbing flavoproteins with multiple signaling roles. In plants, cryptochrome (cry1, cry2) biological activity has been linked to flavin photoreduction via an electron transport chain to the protein surface comprising 3 evolutionarily conserved tryptophan residues known as the ‘Trp triad.’ Mutation of any of the Trp triad residues abolishes photoreduction in isolated cryptochrome protein in vitro and therefore had been suggested as essential for electron transfer to the flavin. However, photoreduction of the flavin in Arabidopsis cry2 proteins occurs in vivo even with mutations in the Trp triad, indicating the existence of alternative electron transfer pathways to the flavin. These pathways are potentiated by metabolites in the intracellular environment including ATP, ADP, AMP, and NADH. In the present work we extend these observations to Arabidopsis cryptochrome 1 and demonstrate that Trp triad substitution mutants at W400F and W324F positions which are not photoreduced in vitro can be photoreduced in whole cell extracts, albeit with reduced efficiency. We further show that the flavin signaling state (FADH°) is stabilized in an in vivo context. These data illustrate that in vivo modulation by metabolites in the cellular environment may play an important role in cryptochrome signaling, and are discussed with respect to possible effects on the conformation of the C-terminal domain to generate the biologically active conformational state. PMID:26313597

  6. Targeting cancer by binding iron: Dissecting cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Goldie Y.L.; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Vera; Merlot, Angelica M.; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    Newer and more potent therapies are urgently needed to effectively treat advanced cancers that have developed resistance and metastasized. One such strategy is to target cancer cell iron metabolism, which is altered compared to normal cells and may facilitate their rapid proliferation. This is supported by studies reporting the anti-neoplastic activities of the clinically available iron chelators, desferrioxamine and deferasirox. More recently, ligands of the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone (DpT) class have demonstrated potent and selective anti-proliferative activity across multiple cancer-types in vivo, fueling studies aimed at dissecting their molecular mechanisms of action. In the past five years alone, significant advances have been made in understanding how chelators not only modulate cellular iron metabolism, but also multiple signaling pathways implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. Herein, we discuss recent research on the targeting of iron in cancer cells, with a focus on the novel and potent DpT ligands. Several key studies have revealed that iron chelation can target the AKT, ERK, JNK, p38, STAT3, TGF-β, Wnt and autophagic pathways to subsequently inhibit cellular proliferation, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. These developments emphasize that these novel therapies could be utilized clinically to effectively target cancer. PMID:26125440

  7. Mitochondrial Stress Signaling Promotes Cellular Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the aetiology of many complex diseases, as well as the ageing process. Much of the research on mitochondrial dysfunction has focused on how mitochondrial damage may potentiate pathological phenotypes. The purpose of this review is to draw attention to the less well-studied mechanisms by which the cell adapts to mitochondrial perturbations. This involves communication of stress to the cell and successful induction of quality control responses, which include mitophagy, unfolded protein response, upregulation of antioxidant and DNA repair enzymes, morphological changes, and if all else fails apoptosis. The mitochondrion is an inherently stressful environment and we speculate that dysregulation of stress signaling or an inability to switch on these adaptations during times of mitochondrial stress may underpin mitochondrial dysfunction and hence amount to pathological states over time. PMID:24587804

  8. Cellular activation, expression analysis and functional characterization of grass carp IκBα: evidence for its involvement in fish NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanan; Wei, He; Wang, Xinyan; Du, Linyong; Zhang, Anying; Zhou, Hong

    2015-02-01

    IκBα is a well-known member of the inhibitors of kappa B (IκB) family that controls NF-κB signaling by blocking NF-κB translocation from cytoplasm to nucleus. In the present study, an IκBα homologue was identified from grass carp (gcIκBα), showing the structural characteristics of IκB family. Moreover, mRNA expression of this molecule in grass carp periphery blood lymphocytes (PBLs) was enhanced significantly by both LPS and PHA in a time- and dose-dependent manner, indicating the involvement of gcIκBα in fish immune response. Further analysis demonstrated that LPS but not PHA induced gcIκBα phosphorylation and protein degradation in PBLs, implying different signaling pathways mediated by LPS and PHA in gcIκBα expression regulation in grass carp PBLs. In particular, the time-dependent oscillation of gcIκBα phosphorylation and total protein levels induced by LPS is in accordance with the characteristics of mammalian IκBα phosphorylation followed by protein degradation during NF-κB activation. In support of this notion, overexpression of gcIκBα was able to block both basal and LPS-stimulated NF-κB activity in grass carp kidney cell line, indicating the negatively regulatory role of gcIκBα in NF-κB activity as seen in mammals. Therefore, our results not only reveal a dynamic variation of NF-κB activity based on the activation and expression of IκBα for the first time, but also provide the direct evidence for the involvement of IκBα in NF-κB signaling in fish immune cells. PMID:25434741

  9. Low-coverage single-cell mRNA sequencing reveals cellular heterogeneity and activated signaling pathways in developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Shuga, Joe; Wang, Xiaohui; Leyrat, Anne A; Lui, Jan H; Li, Nianzhen; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Fowler, Brian; Chen, Peilin; Ramalingam, Naveen; Sun, Gang; Thu, Myo; Norris, Michael; Lebofsky, Ronald; Toppani, Dominique; Kemp, Darnell W; Wong, Michael; Clerkson, Barry; Jones, Brittnee N; Wu, Shiquan; Knutsson, Lawrence; Alvarado, Beatriz; Wang, Jing; Weaver, Lesley S; May, Andrew P; Jones, Robert C; Unger, Marc A; Kriegstein, Arnold R; West, Jay A A

    2014-10-01

    Large-scale surveys of single-cell gene expression have the potential to reveal rare cell populations and lineage relationships but require efficient methods for cell capture and mRNA sequencing. Although cellular barcoding strategies allow parallel sequencing of single cells at ultra-low depths, the limitations of shallow sequencing have not been investigated directly. By capturing 301 single cells from 11 populations using microfluidics and analyzing single-cell transcriptomes across downsampled sequencing depths, we demonstrate that shallow single-cell mRNA sequencing (~50,000 reads per cell) is sufficient for unbiased cell-type classification and biomarker identification. In the developing cortex, we identify diverse cell types, including multiple progenitor and neuronal subtypes, and we identify EGR1 and FOS as previously unreported candidate targets of Notch signaling in human but not mouse radial glia. Our strategy establishes an efficient method for unbiased analysis and comparison of cell populations from heterogeneous tissue by microfluidic single-cell capture and low-coverage sequencing of many cells. PMID:25086649

  10. Low-coverage single-cell mRNA sequencing reveals cellular heterogeneity and activated signaling pathways in developing cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Shuga, Joe; Wang, Xiaohui; Leyrat, Anne A; Lui, Jan H; Li, Nianzhen; Szpankowski, Lukasz; Fowler, Brian; Chen, Peilin; Ramalingam, Naveen; Sun, Gang; Thu, Myo; Norris, Michael; Lebofsky, Ronald; Toppani, Dominique; Kemp, Darnell; Wong, Michael; Clerkson, Barry; Jones, Brittnee N; Wu, Shiquan; Knutsson, Lawrence; Alvarado, Beatriz; Wang, Jing; Weaver, Lesley S; May, Andrew P; Jones, Robert C; Unger, Marc A; Kriegstein, Arnold R; West, Jay AA

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale surveys of single-cell gene expression have the potential to reveal rare cell populations and lineage relationships, but require efficient methods for cell capture and mRNA sequencing1–4. Although cellular barcoding strategies allow parallel sequencing of single cells at ultra-low depths5, the limitations of shallow sequencing have not been directly investigated. By capturing 301 single cells from 11 populations using microfluidics and analyzing single-cell transcriptomes across downsampled sequencing depths, we demonstrate that shallow single-cell mRNA sequencing (~50,000 reads per cell) is sufficient for unbiased cell-type classification and biomarker identification. In developing cortex we identify diverse cell types including multiple progenitor and neuronal subtypes, and we identify EGR1 and FOS as previously unreported candidate targets of Notch signaling in human but not mouse radial glia. Our strategy establishes an efficient method for unbiased analysis and comparison of cell populations from heterogeneous tissue by microfluidic single-cell capture and low-coverage sequencing of many cells. PMID:25086649

  11. Neohesperidin induces cellular apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells via activating the Bcl-2/Bax-mediated signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Zang, Jia; Chen, Daozhen; Zhang, Ting; Zhan, Huiying; Lu, Mudan; Zhuge, Hongxiang

    2012-11-01

    Neohesperidin, a flavonoid compound found in high amounts in Poncirus trifoliata, has free radical scavenging activity. For the first time, our study indicated that neohesperidin also induces cell apoptosis in human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells, which was possibly mediated by regulating the P53/Bcl-2/Bax pathway. MDA-MB-231 cells were subjected to treatment with neohesperidin. MTT and Trypan blue exclusion assays were applied to assess the cell viability. The morphological changes of cells were observed using an inverted microscope, and cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometric analysis. Immunoblot analysis was conducted to evaluate the protein expressions of apoptosis-related genes, including P53, Bcl-2 and Bax. Our results indicated that the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited by the treatment with neohesperidin in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The IC50 values of neohesperidin at 24 and 48 h were 47.4 +/- 2.6 microM and 32.5 +/- 1.8 microM, respectively. The expressions of P53 and Bax in the neohesperidin-treated cells were significantly up-regulated, while that of Bcl-2 was down-regulated. Our study suggested that neohesperidin could induce apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells, a process which was associated with the activation of the Bcl-2/Bax-mediated signaling pathway. PMID:23285810

  12. In search of cellular control: signal transduction in context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1998-01-01

    The field of molecular cell biology has experienced enormous advances over the last century by reducing the complexity of living cells into simpler molecular components and binding interactions that are amenable to rigorous biochemical analysis. However, as our tools become more powerful, there is a tendency to define mechanisms by what we can measure. The field is currently dominated by efforts to identify the key molecules and sequences that mediate the function of critical receptors, signal transducers, and molecular switches. Unfortunately, these conventional experimental approaches ignore the importance of supramolecular control mechanisms that play a critical role in cellular regulation. Thus, the significance of individual molecular constituents cannot be fully understood when studied in isolation because their function may vary depending on their context within the structural complexity of the living cell. These higher-order regulatory mechanisms are based on the cell's use of a form of solid-state biochemistry in which molecular components that mediate biochemical processing and signal transduction are immobilized on insoluble cytoskeletal scaffolds in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Key to the understanding of this form of cellular regulation is the realization that chemistry is structure and hence, recognition of the the importance of architecture and mechanics for signal integration and biochemical control. Recent work that has unified chemical and mechanical signaling pathways provides a glimpse of how this form of higher-order cellular control may function and where paths may lie in the future.

  13. mTOR Signaling from Cellular Senescence to Organismal Aging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaohua; Cai, Ying; Wei, Yuehua

    2014-08-01

    The TOR (target of rapamycin) pathway has been convincingly shown to promote aging in various model organisms. In mice, inhibiting mTOR (mammalian TOR) by rapamycin treatment later in life can significantly extend lifespan and mitigate multiple age-related diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Cellular senescence is strongly correlated to organismal aging therefore providing an attractive model to examine the mechanisms by which mTOR inhibition contributes to longevity and delaying the onset of related diseases. In this review, we examine the connections between mTOR and cellular senescence and discuss how understanding cellular senescence on the aspect of mTOR signaling may help to fully appreciate its role in the organismal aging. We also highlight the opposing roles of senescence in various human diseases and discuss the caveats in interpreting the emerging experimental data. PMID:25110610

  14. The shaping of nitric oxide signals by a cellular sink

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Charmaine; Garthwaite, John

    2001-01-01

    The functioning of nitric oxide (NO) as a biological messenger necessitates that there be an inactivation mechanism. Cell suspensions from a rat brain region rich in the NO signalling pathway (cerebellum) were used to investigate the existence of such a mechanism and to determine its properties.The cells consumed NO in a manner that could not be explained by reaction with O2, superoxide ions or contaminating red blood cells. Functionally, the mechanism was able to convert constant rates of NO formation into low steady-state NO concentrations. For example, with NO produced at 90 nm min−1, the cells (20 × 106 ml−1) held NO at 20 nm. Various other cell types behaved similarly.The influence of NO inactivation on the ability of NO to access its receptor, soluble guanylyl cyclase, was explored by measuring cGMP accumulation in response to the clamped NO concentrations. The extrapolated steady-state EC50 for NO was 2 nm, a concentration readily achieved by low NO release rates, despite inactivation.When confronted by higher NO release rates for several minutes, the clamping mechanism failed, resulting in a progressive rise in NO concentration. While the clamp was maintained, cellular respiration was unaffected but, as it failed, respiration became inhibited by NO. The IC50 was measured to be 120 nm (at 100–140 μm O2).It is concluded that cerebellar (and other) cells possess a powerful NO inactivation mechanism that, extrapolated to the whole tissue, would impose on NO a half-life of around 100 ms. This and other properties of the device appear ideal for shaping low-level NO signals for activating its receptor, soluble guanylyl cyclase, whilst avoiding adverse effects on mitochondrial function. The exhaustibility of the mechanism provides a scenario for NO to become toxic. PMID:11691877

  15. Quiescence and activation of stem and precursor cell populations in the subependymal zone of the mammalian brain are associated with distinct cellular and extracellular matrix signals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The subependymal zone (SEZ) of the lateral ventricles is one of the areas of the adult brain where new neurons are continuously generated from neural stem cells (NSCs), via rapidly dividing precursors. This neurogenic niche is a complex cellular and extracellular microenvironment, highly vascularize...

  16. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan. PMID:27193298

  17. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Relays Metabolic Signals to Promote Cellular Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Casado, Fanny L

    2016-01-01

    While sensing the cell environment, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) interacts with different pathways involved in cellular homeostasis. This review summarizes evidence suggesting that cellular regeneration in the context of aging and diseases can be modulated by AHR signaling on stem cells. New insights connect orphaned observations into AHR interactions with critical signaling pathways such as WNT to propose a role of this ligand-activated transcription factor in the modulation of cellular regeneration by altering pathways that nurture cellular expansion such as changes in the metabolic efficiency rather than by directly altering cell cycling, proliferation, or cell death. Targeting the AHR to promote regeneration might prove to be a useful strategy to avoid unbalanced disruptions of homeostasis that may promote disease and also provide biological rationale for potential regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27563312

  18. The Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Relays Metabolic Signals to Promote Cellular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    While sensing the cell environment, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) interacts with different pathways involved in cellular homeostasis. This review summarizes evidence suggesting that cellular regeneration in the context of aging and diseases can be modulated by AHR signaling on stem cells. New insights connect orphaned observations into AHR interactions with critical signaling pathways such as WNT to propose a role of this ligand-activated transcription factor in the modulation of cellular regeneration by altering pathways that nurture cellular expansion such as changes in the metabolic efficiency rather than by directly altering cell cycling, proliferation, or cell death. Targeting the AHR to promote regeneration might prove to be a useful strategy to avoid unbalanced disruptions of homeostasis that may promote disease and also provide biological rationale for potential regenerative medicine approaches. PMID:27563312

  19. [Cellular signal transduction pathways in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure].

    PubMed

    Lewartowski, Bohdan; Mackiewicz, Urszula

    2006-10-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure are characterized by significant changes of expression and function of many proteins. These changes are responsible for arrhythmias and haemodynamic disturbances. They are initiated by increased cardiac load, detected by cellular mechanoreceptors, and by activation of sarcolemmal chemoreceptors in myocytes and fibroblasts. In the present paper the authors describe the structure and function of molecular cellular pathways for transmission of the information generated by receptors to the nucleus, where it modifies the expression of genes coding for cellular proteins. The authors describe in detail: structure and function of Z-discs and integrins working as mechanoreceptors, calcineurin/NFAT pathways, MAP kinases pathways, pathway activated by AT1 receptors: protein kinase C pathways, AKT/mTHOR kinase pathway and EGRF/ERK1,2 pathway. Functional relationships between pathways mentioned and the results of studies analysing their role in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure are also presented. PMID:20527382

  20. Diversity training for signal transduction: leveraging cell-to-cell variability to dissect cellular signaling, differentiation and death

    PubMed Central

    Cotari, Jesse W.; Voisinne, Guillaume; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2013-01-01

    Populations of “identical” cells are rarely truly identical. Even when in the same state of differentiation, isogenic cells may vary in expression of key signaling regulators, activate signal transduction at different thresholds, and consequently respond heterogeneously to a given stimulus. Here, we review how new experimental and analytical techniques are suited to connect these different levels of variability, quantitatively mapping the effects of cell-to-cell variability on cellular decision-making. In particular, we summarize how this helps classify signaling regulators according to the impact of their variability on biological functions. We further discuss how variability can also be leveraged to shed light on the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular signaling, from the individual cell to the population of cells as a whole. PMID:23747193

  1. Cellular force signal integration through vector logic gates.

    PubMed

    Steward, Robert L; Tan, Cheemeng; Cheng, Chao-Min; LeDuc, Philip R

    2015-02-26

    The multi-signal mechanical environment mammalian cells experience is often unaccounted for in current mechanical stimulation studies. To address this we developed a novel technique to induce dual integrated force inputs, uniaxial stretch and fluid shear stress and present here for the first time a vector logic-gate framework to characterize cellular response as a function of cytoskeletal reorganization. Using this framework we found that under fluid shear stress and uniaxial stretch NIH 3T3 fibroblasts responded by the Stretch OR Shear vector logic-gate and HUVECs responded by the NOT Stretch OR Shear vector logic-gate. We further developed a parsimonious model of cellular response to multiple mechanical stimuli, which provides a unifying model that captured the experimental response of both cell types. PMID:25614090

  2. Nanostructures of Designed Geometry and Functionality Enable Regulation of Cellular Signaling Processes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie-Ren; Shi, Lifang; Deng, Zhao; Lo, Su Hao; Liu, Gang-yu

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrices (ECM) triggered cellular signaling processes often begin with the clustering of the cellular receptors such as integrin and FcεRI. The sizes of these initial protein complexes or clusters are tens to 100 nm in dimension; therefore, engineered nanostructures could provide effective mimics of ECM for investigation and control of the initial and downstream specific signaling process. This current topic discusses recent advances in nanotechnology in the context of design and production of matching chemical functionality and geometry for control of specific cellular signaling processes. Two investigations are reported to demonstrate this concept: (a) how the presentation of antigen at nanometer scale would influence the aggregation of FcεRI, which would impact the formation of activation complexes, leading to rearrangement of actin in cytoskeleton and degranulation or activation of mast cells; (b) how the engineered nanostructure could guide the initial integrin clustering, which would impact the formation of focal adhesion and downstream cell signaling cascades, leading to polarization, migration and morphological changes. Complimentary to engineered ECMs using synthetic ligands or peptides, or topographic control at micrometer scale, nanostructures of designed geometry and chemical functionality provide new and effective biochemical cues for regulation of cellular signaling processes and downstream behaviors. PMID:22783801

  3. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  4. System and method for monitoring cellular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor); Fraser, Scott E. (Inventor); Lansford, Russell D. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A system and method for monitoring cellular activity in a cellular specimen. According to one embodiment, a plurality of excitable markers are applied to the specimen. A multi-photon laser microscope is provided to excite a region of the specimen and cause fluorescence to be radiated from the region. The radiating fluorescence is processed by a spectral analyzer to separate the fluorescence into respective wavelength bands. The respective bands of fluorescence are then collected by an array of detectors, with each detector receiving a corresponding one of the wavelength bands.

  5. Identification of Protein Interactions Involved in Cellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Westermarck, Jukka; Ivaska, Johanna; Corthals, Garry L.

    2013-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions drive biological processes. They are critical for all intra- and extracellular functions, and the technologies to analyze them are widely applied throughout the various fields of biological sciences. This study takes an in-depth view of some common principles of cellular regulation and provides a detailed account of approaches required to comprehensively map signaling protein-protein interactions in any particular cellular system or condition. We provide a critical review of the benefits and disadvantages of the yeast two-hybrid method and affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometric procedures for identification of signaling protein-protein interactions. In particular, we emphasize the quantitative and qualitative differences between tandem affinity and one-step purification (such as FLAG and Strep tag) methods. Although applicable to all types of interaction studies, a special section is devoted in this review to aspects that should be considered when attempting to identify signaling protein interactions that often are transient and weak by nature. Finally, we discuss shotgun and quantitative information that can be gleaned by MS-coupled methods for analysis of multiprotein complexes. PMID:23481661

  6. Regulation of organismal proteostasis by trans-cellular chaperone signaling

    PubMed Central

    van Oosten-Hawle, Patricija; Porter, Robert S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge for metazoans is to ensure that different tissues each expressing distinctive proteomes are, nevertheless, well protected at an organismal level from proteotoxic stress. We have examined this and show that expression of endogenous metastable protein sensors in muscle cells induces a systemic stress response throughout multiple tissues of C. elegans. Suppression of misfolding in muscle cells can be achieved not only by enhanced expression of HSP90 in muscle cells, but as effective by elevated expression of HSP90 in intestine or neuronal cells. This cell-non-autonomous control of HSP90 expression relies upon transcriptional feedback between somatic tissues that is regulated by the FoxA transcription factor PHA-4. This trans-cellular chaperone signaling response maintains organismal proteostasis when challenged by a local tissue imbalance in folding and provides the basis for a novel form of organismal stress sensing surveillance. PMID:23746847

  7. ERM proteins: from cellular architecture to cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Louvet-Vallée, S

    2000-08-01

    ERM (ezrin/radixin/moesin) proteins, concentrated in actin rich cell-surface structures, cross-link actin filaments with the plasma membrane. They are involved in the formation of microvilli, cell-cell adhesion, maintenance of cell shape, cell motility and membrane trafficking. Recent analyses reveal that they are not only involved in cytoskeleton organization but also in signaling pathway. They play an important role in the activation of members of the Rho family by recruiting their regulators. The functions of ERM proteins are regulated by their conformational charges: the intramolecular interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains of ERM proteins charges masks several binding sites, leading to a dormant protein. Different activation signals regulate ERM proteins functions by modulating these intramolecular interactions. The involvement of ERM proteins in many signaling pathways has led to study their role during development of different species. PMID:11071040

  8. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Justin; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Scheel, Dierk

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554) in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins) as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression—including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding, and degradation) steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes. PMID:26579181

  9. Cellular defense processes regulated by pathogen-elicited receptor signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Rongcong; Goldsipe, Arthur; Schauer, David B.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2011-06-01

    Vertebrates are constantly threatened by the invasion of microorganisms and have evolved systems of immunity to eliminate infectious pathogens in the body. Initial sensing of microbial agents is mediated by the recognition of pathogens by means of molecular structures expressed uniquely by microbes of a given type. So-called 'Toll-like receptors' are expressed on host epithelial barrier cells play an essential role in the host defense against microbial pathogens by inducing cell responses (e.g., proliferation, death, cytokine secretion) via activation of intracellular signaling networks. As these networks, comprising multiple interconnecting dynamic pathways, represent highly complex multi-variate "information processing" systems, the signaling activities particularly critical for governing the host cell responses are poorly understood and not easily ascertained by a priori theoretical notions. We have developed over the past half-decade a "data-driven" computational modeling approach, on a 'cue-signal-response' combined experiment/computation paradigm, to elucidate key multi-variate signaling relationships governing the cell responses. In an example presented here, we study how a canonical set of six kinase pathways combine to effect microbial agent-induced apoptotic death of a macrophage cell line. One modeling technique, partial least-squares regression, yielded the following key insights: {a} signal combinations most strongly correlated to apoptotic death are orthogonal to those most strongly correlated with release of inflammatory cytokines; {b} the ratio of two key pathway activities is the most powerful predictor of microbe-induced macrophage apoptotic death; {c} the most influential time-window of this signaling activity ratio is surprisingly fast: less than one hour after microbe stimulation.

  10. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    particular, signaling cascades are initiated via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB). These signal transduction pathways in turn lead to increased cell proliferation and migration (particularly by fibroblasts), modulation in levels of cytokines, growth factors and inflammatory mediators, and increases in anti-apoptotic proteins. The results of these biochemical and cellular changes in animals and patients include such benefits as increased healing in chronic wounds, improvements in sports injuries and carpal tunnel syndrome, pain reduction in arthritis and neuropathies, and amelioration of damage after heart attacks, stroke, nerve injury and retinal toxicity.

  11. Paired inhibitory and activating receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L S; Paul, S P; McVicar, D W

    2000-01-01

    The immunological literature has become inundated with reports regarding paired inhibitory receptors. Paired inhibitory receptor systems are highly conserved families that contain receptors involved in either cellular inhibition or activation. In most cases the paired putative biochemical antagonists are co-expressed on a given cell and thought to bind similar, if not identical, ligands making their biological role difficult to understand. Examples of these systems include immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (Killer Ig Receptors, Immunoglobulin-like Transcripts/Leukocyte Ig-like Receptors/Monocyte Macrophage Ig Receptors, and Paired Ig-like Receptors), and type II lectin-like receptor systems (NKG2 and Ly49). General characteristics of these inhibitory receptors include a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The ITIM is phosphorylated upon engagement and recruits protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate cellular substrates that would otherwise mediate activation. In contrast, the activating receptors of these pairs use charged residues within their transmembrane domains to associate with various signal transduction chains including the gamma chain of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgE, DAP12 or DAP10. Once phosphorylated, these chains direct the signal transduction cascade resulting in cellular activation. Here we review the signaling of several paired systems and present the current models for their signal transduction cascades. PMID:11258418

  12. Abscisic-acid-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation in glioma via the retinoid acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Nan; Yao, Yu; Ye, Hongxing; Zhu, Wei; Chen, Liang; Mao, Ying

    2016-04-15

    Retinoid acid (RA) plays critical roles in regulating differentiation and apoptosis in a variety of cancer cells. Abscisic acid (ABA) and RA are direct derivatives of carotenoids and share structural similarities. Here we proposed that ABA may also play a role in cellular differentiation and apoptosis by sharing a similar signaling pathway with RA that may be involved in glioma pathogenesis. We reported for the first time that the ABA levels were twofold higher in low-grade gliomas compared with high-grade gliomas. In glioma tissues, there was a positive correlation between the ABA levels and the transcription of cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 2 (CRABP2) and a negative correlation between the ABA levels and transcription of fatty acid-binding protein 5 (FABP5). ABA treatment induced a significant increase in the expression of CRABP2 and a decrease in the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) in glioblastoma cells. Remarkably, both cellular apoptosis and differentiation were increased in the glioblastoma cells after ABA treatment. ABA-induced cellular apoptosis and differentiation were significantly reduced by selectively silencing RAR-α, while RAR-α overexpression exaggerated the ABA-induced effects. These results suggest that ABA may play a role in the pathogenesis of glioma by promoting cellular apoptosis and differentiation through the RA signaling pathway. PMID:26594836

  13. Cellular mechanisms of tissue fibrosis. 6. Purinergic signaling and response in fibroblasts and tissue fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, David; Insel, Paul A

    2014-05-01

    Tissue fibrosis occurs as a result of the dysregulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis. Tissue fibroblasts, resident cells responsible for the synthesis and turnover of ECM, are regulated via numerous hormonal and mechanical signals. The release of intracellular nucleotides and their resultant autocrine/paracrine signaling have been shown to play key roles in the homeostatic maintenance of tissue remodeling and in fibrotic response post-injury. Extracellular nucleotides signal through P2 nucleotide and P1 adenosine receptors to activate signaling networks that regulate the proliferation and activity of fibroblasts, which, in turn, influence tissue structure and pathologic remodeling. An important component in the signaling and functional responses of fibroblasts to extracellular ATP and adenosine is the expression and activity of ectonucleotideases that attenuate nucleotide-mediated signaling, and thereby integrate P2 receptor- and subsequent adenosine receptor-initiated responses. Results of studies of the mechanisms of cellular nucleotide release and the effects of this autocrine/paracrine signaling axis on fibroblast-to-myofibroblast conversion and the fibrotic phenotype have advanced understanding of tissue remodeling and fibrosis. This review summarizes recent findings related to purinergic signaling in the regulation of fibroblasts and the development of tissue fibrosis in the heart, lungs, liver, and kidney. PMID:24352335

  14. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  15. Magnetogenetics: Remote Control of Cellular Signaling with Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Jeremy P.

    Means for temporally regulating gene expression and cellular activity are invaluable for elucidating the underlying physiological processes and have therapeutic implications. Here we report the development of a system for remote regulation of gene expression by low frequency radiowaves (RF) or by a static magnetic field. We accomplished this by first adding iron oxide nanoparticles - either exogenously or as genetically encoded ferritin/ferric oxyhydroxide particle. These particles have been designed with affinity to the plasma membrane ion channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) by a conjugated antibody. Application of a magnetic field stimulates the particle to gate the ion channel and this, in turn, initiates calcium-dependent transgene expression. We first demonstrated in vitro that TRPV1 can be actuated to cause calcium flux into the cell by directly applying a localized magnetic field. In mice expressing these genetically encoded components, application of external magnetic field caused remote stimulation of insulin transgene expression and significantly lowered blood glucose. In addition, we are investigating mechanisms by which iron oxide nanoparticles can absorb RF, and transduce this energy to cause channel opening. This robust, repeatable method for remote cellular regulation in vivo may ultimately have applications in basic science, as well as in technology and therapeutics.

  16. Nitric oxide-based protein modification: formation and site-specificity of protein S-nitrosylation: Could protein S-nitrosylation be the unifying oxidative modification to explain the cellular signaling activity of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide?

    PubMed

    Clement, Marie-Veronique

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) function as signaling molecules in physiological settings by acting as second messengers in response to external stimuli such as growth factors, cytokines and hormones. The nature of the ROS involved in cell signaling as well as the underlying mechanisms by which ROS modify protein function to influence cellular processes have been unfolding over the past decade. ROS and RNS influence various cellular processes by altering the function of critical proteins via reversible oxidation of "reactive cysteine" residues. Protein S-nitrosylation is a mechanism of nitric oxide-based signaling, however, while the presence of NO is sufficient and may be a prerequisite for the formation of cysteine-SNO, we reasoned that if protein-SNO formation is a critical cystein modification for redox driven signal transduction, an increase in intracellular ROS such as H2O2 and O2(-), shown to be independently involved in cell signaling, might both promote the formation of protein-SNO. In this respect, the present study shows that an increase in protein-SNO was detected not only upon an increase in the intracellular level of nitric oxide (NO), but also following exposure to low concentration of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or upon inhibition of the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase that results in increased intracellular O2(-). PMID:26461291

  17. Modulation of cellular signaling by herpesvirus-encoded G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    de Munnik, Sabrina M.; Smit, Martine J.; Leurs, Rob; Vischer, Henry F.

    2015-01-01

    Human herpesviruses (HHVs) are widespread infectious pathogens that have been associated with proliferative and inflammatory diseases. During viral evolution, HHVs have pirated genes encoding viral G protein-coupled receptors (vGPCRs), which are expressed on infected host cells. These vGPCRs show highest homology to human chemokine receptors, which play a key role in the immune system. Importantly, vGPCRs have acquired unique properties such as constitutive activity and the ability to bind a broad range of human chemokines. This allows vGPCRs to hijack human proteins and modulate cellular signaling for the benefit of the virus, ultimately resulting in immune evasion and viral dissemination to establish a widespread and lifelong infection. Knowledge on the mechanisms by which herpesviruses reprogram cellular signaling might provide insight in the contribution of vGPCRs to viral survival and herpesvirus-associated pathologies. PMID:25805993

  18. Cellular signaling in normal and cancerous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Grinstein, Edgar; Wernet, Peter

    2007-12-01

    Self-renewing divisions of normal and cancerous stem cells are responsible for the initiation and maintenance of normal and certain cancerous tissues, respectively. Recent findings suggest that tumor surveillance mechanisms can reduce regenerative capacity and frequency of normal stem cells, thereby contributing to tissue aging. Signaling pathways promoting self-renewal of stem cells can also drive proliferation in cancer. The BMI-1 proto-oncogene is required for the maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells and is involved in carcinogenesis within the same tissues. BMI-1 promotes self-renewal of stem cells largely by interfering with two central cellular tumor suppressor pathways, p16(Ink4a)/retinoblastoma protein (Rb) and ARF/p53, whose disruption is a hallmark of cancer. Nucleolin, an Rb-associated protein, is abundant in proliferating cancerous cells and likely contributes to the maintenance of human CD34-positive stem/progenitor cells of hematopoiesis. Elucidation of the involvement of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors in the maintenance of stem cells might have therapeutic implications. PMID:17651940

  19. Total Cellular RNA Modulates Protein Activity.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Subhabrata; DeMott, Christopher M; Reverdatto, Sergey; Burz, David S; Shekhtman, Alexander

    2016-08-16

    RNA constitutes up to 20% of a cell's dry weight, corresponding to ∼20 mg/mL. This high concentration of RNA facilitates low-affinity protein-RNA quinary interactions, which may play an important role in facilitating and regulating biological processes. In the yeast Pichia pastoris, the level of ubiquitin-RNA colocalization increases when cells are grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol instead of methanol as the sole carbon source. Total RNA isolated from cells grown in methanol increases β-galactosidase activity relative to that seen with RNA isolated from cells grown in the presence of dextrose and methanol. Because the total cellular RNA content changes with growth medium, protein-RNA quinary interactions can alter in-cell protein biochemistry and may play an important role in cell adaptation, critical to many physiological and pathological states. PMID:27456029

  20. Synthetic mechanobiology: engineering cellular force generation and signaling.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Jasmine Hannah; Kumar, Sanjay

    2016-08-01

    Mechanobiology seeks to understand and control mechanical and related biophysical communication between cells and their surroundings. While experimental efforts in this field have traditionally emphasized manipulation of the extracellular force environment, a new suite of approaches has recently emerged in which cell phenotype and signaling are controlled by directly engineering the cell itself. One route is to control cell behavior by modulating gene expression using conditional promoters. Alternatively, protein activity can be actuated directly using synthetic protein ligands, chemically induced protein dimerization, optogenetic strategies, or functionalized magnetic nanoparticles. Proof-of-principle studies are already demonstrating the translational potential of these approaches, and future technological development will permit increasingly precise control over cell mechanobiology and improve our understanding of the underlying signaling events. PMID:27023733

  1. Toll-like receptors: cellular signal transducers for exogenous molecular patterns causing immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kirschning, C J; Bauer, S

    2001-09-01

    Innate immunity initiates protection of the host organism against invasion and subsequent multiplication of microbes by specific recognition. Germ line-encoded receptors have been identified for microbial products such as mannan, lipopeptide, peptidoglycan (PGN), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and CpG-DNA. The Drosophila Toll protein has been shown to be involved in innate immune response of the adult fruitfly. Members of the family of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in vertebrates have been implicated as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). Ten TLRs are known and six of these have been demonstrated to mediate cellular activation by distinct microbial products. TLR4 has been implicated as activator of adaptive immunity, and analysis of systemic LPS responses in mice led to the identification of LPS-resistant strains instrumental in its identification as a transmembrane LPS signal transducer. Structural similarities between TLRs and receptor molecules involved in immune responses such as CD14 and the IL-1 receptors (IL-1Rs), as well as functional analysis qualified TLR2 as candidate receptor for LPS and other microbial products. Targeted disruption of the TLR9 gene in mice led to identification of TLR9 as CpG-DNA signal transducer. Involvement of TLR5 in cell activation by bacterial flagellin has been demonstrated. Further understanding of recognition and cellular signaling activated through the ancient host defense system represented by Toll will eventually lead to means for its therapeutic modulation. PMID:11680785

  2. Cellular stress response and innate immune signaling: integrating pathways in host defense and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has identified innate immune recognition receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that culminate in inflammatory responses. Besides its role in cytoprotection, the importance of cell stress in inflammation and host defense against pathogens is emerging. Recent studies have shown that proteins in cellular stress responses, including the heat shock response, ER stress response, and DNA damage response, interact with and regulate signaling intermediates involved in the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The effect of such regulation by cell stress proteins may dictate the inflammatory profile of the immune response during infection and disease. In this review, we describe the regulation of innate immune cell activation by cell stress pathways, present detailed descriptions of the types of stress response proteins and their crosstalk with immune signaling intermediates that are essential in host defense, and illustrate the relevance of these interactions in diseases characteristic of aberrant immune responses, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Understanding the crosstalk between cellular stress proteins and immune signaling may have translational implications for designing more effective regimens to treat immune disorders. PMID:23990626

  3. Cellular Notch responsiveness is defined by phosphoinositide 3-kinase-dependent signals

    PubMed Central

    Mckenzie, Grahame; Ward, George; Stallwood, Yvette; Briend, Emmanuel; Papadia, Sofia; Lennard, Andrew; Turner, Martin; Champion, Brian; Hardingham, Giles E

    2006-01-01

    Background Notch plays a wide-ranging role in controlling cell fate, differentiation and development. The PI3K-Akt pathway is a similarly conserved signalling pathway which regulates processes such as differentiation, proliferation and survival. Mice with disrupted Notch and PI3K signalling show phenotypic similarities during haematopoietic cell development, suggesting functional interaction between these pathways. Results We show that cellular responsiveness to Notch signals depends on the activity of the PI3K-Akt pathway in cells as diverse as CHO cells, primary T-cells and hippocampal neurons. Induction of the endogenous PI3K-Akt pathway in CHO cells (by the insulin pathway), in T-cells (via TCR activation) or in neurons (via TrKB activation) potentiates Notch-dependent responses. We propose that the PI3K-Akt pathway exerts its influence on Notch primarily via inhibition of GSK3-beta, a kinase known to phosphorylate and regulate Notch signals. Conclusion The PI3K-Akt pathway acts as a "gain control" for Notch signal responses. Since physiological levels of intracellular Notch are often low, coincidence with PI3K-activation may be crucial for induction of Notch-dependent responses. PMID:16507111

  4. Cellular context–mediated Akt dynamics regulates MAP kinase signaling thresholds during angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hellesøy, Monica; Lorens, James B.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of new blood vessels by sprouting angiogenesis is tightly regulated by contextual cues that affect angiogeneic growth factor signaling. Both constitutive activation and loss of Akt kinase activity in endothelial cells impair angiogenesis, suggesting that Akt dynamics mediates contextual microenvironmental regulation. We explored the temporal regulation of Akt in endothelial cells during formation of capillary-like networks induced by cell–cell contact with vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs) and vSMC-associated VEGF. Expression of constitutively active Akt1 strongly inhibited network formation, whereas hemiphosphorylated Akt1 epi-alleles with reduced kinase activity had an intermediate inhibitory effect. Conversely, inhibition of Akt signaling did not affect endothelial cell migration or morphogenesis in vSMC cocultures that generate capillary-like structures. We found that endothelial Akt activity is transiently blocked by proteasomal degradation in the presence of SMCs during the initial phase of capillary-like structure formation. Suppressed Akt activity corresponded to the increased endothelial MAP kinase signaling that was required for angiogenic endothelial morphogenesis. These results reveal a regulatory principle by which cellular context regulates Akt protein dynamics, which determines MAP kinase signaling thresholds necessary drive a morphogenetic program during angiogenesis. PMID:26023089

  5. Method for analyzing signaling networks in complex cellular systems.

    PubMed

    Plavec, Ivan; Sirenko, Oksana; Privat, Sylvie; Wang, Yuker; Dajee, Maya; Melrose, Jennifer; Nakao, Brian; Hytopoulos, Evangelos; Berg, Ellen L; Butcher, Eugene C

    2004-02-01

    Now that the human genome has been sequenced, the challenge of assigning function to human genes has become acute. Existing approaches using microarrays or proteomics frequently generate very large volumes of data not directly related to biological function, making interpretation difficult. Here, we describe a technique for integrative systems biology in which: (i) primary cells are cultured under biologically meaningful conditions; (ii) a limited number of biologically meaningful readouts are measured; and (iii) the results obtained under several different conditions are combined for analysis. Studies of human endothelial cells overexpressing different signaling molecules under multiple inflammatory conditions show that this system can capture a remarkable range of functions by a relatively small number of simple measurements. In particular, measurement of seven different protein levels by ELISA under four different conditions is capable of reconstructing pathway associations of 25 different proteins representing four known signaling pathways, implicating additional participants in the NF-kappaBorRAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and defining additional interactions between these pathways. PMID:14745015

  6. Method for analyzing signaling networks in complex cellular systems

    PubMed Central

    Plavec, Ivan; Sirenko, Oksana; Privat, Sylvie; Wang, Yuker; Dajee, Maya; Melrose, Jennifer; Nakao, Brian; Hytopoulos, Evangelos; Berg, Ellen L.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2004-01-01

    Now that the human genome has been sequenced, the challenge of assigning function to human genes has become acute. Existing approaches using microarrays or proteomics frequently generate very large volumes of data not directly related to biological function, making interpretation difficult. Here, we describe a technique for integrative systems biology in which: (i) primary cells are cultured under biologically meaningful conditions; (ii) a limited number of biologically meaningful readouts are measured; and (iii) the results obtained under several different conditions are combined for analysis. Studies of human endothelial cells overexpressing different signaling molecules under multiple inflammatory conditions show that this system can capture a remarkable range of functions by a relatively small number of simple measurements. In particular, measurement of seven different protein levels by ELISA under four different conditions is capable of reconstructing pathway associations of 25 different proteins representing four known signaling pathways, implicating additional participants in the NF-κBorRAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and defining additional interactions between these pathways. PMID:14745015

  7. Modulation of 17β-Estradiol Signaling on Cellular Proliferation by Caveolin-2.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Gionfra, Fabio; Busonero, Claudia; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    The sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts pleiotropic effects by binding to the ligand-activated transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα). The E2:ERα complex regulates several physiological processes, including cell survival and proliferation, through transcriptional effects (i.e., estrogen responsive element [ERE]-based gene transcription) and non-transcriptional membrane-initiated effects (i.e., the activation of extra-nuclear signaling cascades), which derive from the activation of the pool of ERα that is localized to plasma membrane caveolae. Caveolae are ω-shaped membrane sub-domains that are composed of scaffold proteins named caveolins (i.e., caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3). Although caveolin-3 is exclusively expressed in muscles, caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 are co-expressed in all human tissues. From a functional point of view, caveolin-2 can operate both dependently on and independently of caveolin-1, which is the main coat component of caveolae. Interestingly, while a functional interplay between caveolin-1 and ERα has been reported in the control of E2-induced physiological effects, the role of caveolin-2 in E2:ERα signaling within the cell remains poorly understood. This study shows that siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion in breast ductal carcinoma cells (MCF-7) reduces E2-induced ERα phosphorylation at serine residue 118 (S118), controls intracellular receptor levels, precludes ERα-mediated extra-nuclear activation of signaling pathways, reduces ERα transcriptional activity, and prevents cellular proliferation. Meanwhile, the impact of caveolin-1 depletion on ERα signaling in MCF-7 cells is shown to be similar to that elicited by siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion. Altogether, these data demonstrate that caveolin-2 expression is necessary for the control of E2-dependent cellular proliferation. PMID:26480297

  8. Sub-cellular and Multi-cellular Signaling Mechanisms Revealed by Quantitative Laser Microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piston, David

    2005-03-01

    Newly developed instrumentation and optical probes allows us to image quantitatively dynamic processes within ever more complicated biological systems. Using methods such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) of GFPs fused to the glucose sensing enzyme glucokinase (GK), we have discovered that the location and activity of beta cell GK is acutely regulated by insulin. These findings provide a mechanism whereby the glucose sensing ability of the beta cell is tightly coupled to insulin signaling. We have also measured pancreatic β-cell metabolism during glucose stimulation by quantitative two-photon NAD(P)H imaging. We have developed methods to delineate quantitatively the NAD(P)H signals from the cytoplasm and mitochondria, and show that the metabolic response of these two compartments are differentially stimulated by glucose and other metabolites. Absolute levels of NAD(P)H were determined using two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM). These findings elucidate the relative contributions of glycolytic and citric acid cycle metabolism in normal and diabetic cells.

  9. Cellular Signal Mechanisms of Reward-Related Plasticity in the Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Isokawa, Masako

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus has the extraordinary capacity to process and store information. Consequently, there is an intense interest in the mechanisms that underline learning and memory. Synaptic plasticity has been hypothesized to be the neuronal substrate for learning. Ca2+ and Ca2+-activated kinases control cellular processes of most forms of hippocampal synapse plasticity. In this paper, I aim to integrate our current understanding of Ca2+-mediated synaptic plasticity and metaplasticity in motivational and reward-related learning in the hippocampus. I will introduce two representative neuromodulators that are widely studied in reward-related learning (e.g., ghrelin and endocannabinoids) and show how they might contribute to hippocampal neuron activities and Ca2+-mediated signaling processes in synaptic plasticity. Additionally, I will discuss functional significance of these two systems and their signaling pathways for its relevance to maladaptive reward learning leading to addiction. PMID:23213575

  10. Discrete spatial organization of TGFβ receptors couples receptor multimerization and signaling to cellular tension

    PubMed Central

    Rys, Joanna P; DuFort, Christopher C; Monteiro, David A; Baird, Michelle A; Oses-Prieto, Juan A; Chand, Shreya; Burlingame, Alma L; Davidson, Michael W; Alliston, Tamara N

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface receptors are central to the cell's ability to generate coordinated responses to the multitude of biochemical and physical cues in the microenvironment. However, the mechanisms by which receptors enable this concerted cellular response remain unclear. To investigate the effect of cellular tension on cell surface receptors, we combined novel high-resolution imaging and single particle tracking with established biochemical assays to examine TGFβ signaling. We find that TGFβ receptors are discretely organized to segregated spatial domains at the cell surface. Integrin-rich focal adhesions organize TβRII around TβRI, limiting the integration of TβRII while sequestering TβRI at these sites. Disruption of cellular tension leads to a collapse of this spatial organization and drives formation of heteromeric TβRI/TβRII complexes and Smad activation. This work details a novel mechanism by which cellular tension regulates TGFβ receptor organization, multimerization, and function, providing new insight into the mechanisms that integrate biochemical and physical cues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09300.001 PMID:26652004

  11. Hypoxic Signaling and the Cellular Redox Tumor Environment Determine Sensitivity to MTH1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bräutigam, Lars; Pudelko, Linda; Jemth, Ann-Sofie; Gad, Helge; Narwal, Mohit; Gustafsson, Robert; Karsten, Stella; Carreras Puigvert, Jordi; Homan, Evert; Berndt, Carsten; Berglund, Ulrika Warpman; Stenmark, Pål; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-04-15

    Cancer cells are commonly in a state of redox imbalance that drives their growth and survival. To compensate for oxidative stress induced by the tumor redox environment, cancer cells upregulate specific nononcogenic addiction enzymes, such as MTH1 (NUDT1), which detoxifies oxidized nucleotides. Here, we show that increasing oxidative stress in nonmalignant cells induced their sensitization to the effects of MTH1 inhibition, whereas decreasing oxidative pressure in cancer cells protected against inhibition. Furthermore, we purified zebrafish MTH1 and solved the crystal structure of MTH1 bound to its inhibitor, highlighting the zebrafish as a relevant tool to study MTH1 biology. Delivery of 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP to zebrafish embryos was highly toxic in the absence of MTH1 activity. Moreover, chemically or genetically mimicking activated hypoxia signaling in zebrafish revealed that pathologic upregulation of the HIF1α response, often observed in cancer and linked to poor prognosis, sensitized embryos to MTH1 inhibition. Using a transgenic zebrafish line, in which the cellular redox status can be monitored in vivo, we detected an increase in oxidative pressure upon activation of hypoxic signaling. Pretreatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine protected embryos with activated hypoxia signaling against MTH1 inhibition, suggesting that the aberrant redox environment likely causes sensitization. In summary, MTH1 inhibition may offer a general approach to treat cancers characterized by deregulated hypoxia signaling or redox imbalance. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2366-75. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26862114

  12. Differential contribution of key metabolic substrates and cellular oxygen in HIF signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhdanov, Alexander V.; Waters, Alicia H.C.; Golubeva, Anna V.; Papkovsky, Dmitri B.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in availability and utilisation of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates are common in ischemia and cancer. We examined effects of substrate deprivation on HIF signalling in PC12 cells exposed to different atmospheric O{sub 2}. Upon 2–4 h moderate hypoxia, HIF-α protein levels were dictated by the availability of glutamine and glucose, essential for deep cell deoxygenation and glycolytic ATP flux. Nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α dramatically decreased upon inhibition of glutaminolysis or glutamine deprivation. Elevation of HIF-2α levels was transcription-independent and associated with the activation of Akt and Erk1/2. Upon 2 h anoxia, HIF-2α levels strongly correlated with cellular ATP, produced exclusively via glycolysis. Without glucose, HIF signalling was suppressed, giving way to other regulators of cell adaptation to energy crisis, e.g. AMPK. Consequently, viability of cells deprived of O{sub 2} and glucose decreased upon inhibition of AMPK with dorsomorphin. The capacity of cells to accumulate HIF-2α decreased after 24 h glucose deprivation. This effect, associated with increased AMPKα phosphorylation, was sensitive to dorsomorphin. In chronically hypoxic cells, glutamine played no major role in HIF-2α accumulation, which became mainly glucose-dependent. Overall, the availability of O{sub 2} and metabolic substrates intricately regulates HIF signalling by affecting cell oxygenation, ATP levels and pathways involved in production of HIF-α. - Highlights: • Gln and Glc regulate HIF levels in hypoxic cells by maintaining low O{sub 2} and high ATP. • HIF-α levels under anoxia correlate with cellular ATP and critically depend on Glc. • Gln and Glc modulate activity of Akt, Erk and AMPK, regulating HIF production. • HIF signalling is differentially inhibited by prolonged Glc and Gln deprivation. • Unlike Glc, Gln plays no major role in HIF signalling in chronically hypoxic cells.

  13. The channel-kinase TRPM7, revealing the untold story of Mg(2+) in cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Carsten; Brandao, Katherine; Perraud, Anne-Laure

    2014-01-01

    Ion homeostasis dysregulations have severe effects on human health, impairing the effectiveness and appropriateness of major cellular events, including immune responses. The adverse effects of Mg(2+) deficiency on cellular physiology are well known and documented, but mechanistic insights into Mg(2+) sensitive signal transduction are still lacking. TRPM7 and its sister channel TRPM6 stand out as the only known fusions of an ion pore with a Ser/Thr kinase domain. Both channels are permeable to divalent cations and are central regulators of Mg(2+) homeostasis. One crucial aspect of TRPM7 function we have extensively studied is the relationship between its ion channel portion and its C-terminal Ser/Thr kinase domain. The modulation of ion channels by phosphorylation through exogenous kinases is common, however the covalent bound between the TRPM7 channel and its kinase suggests a novel kind of link between ion-entry and signal transduction events. Current knowledge supports a reciprocal "two-way street" model where TRPM7-kinase modulates ion transport function through Ser/Thr phosphorylation, and in turn, channel gating and ionic conditions in close proximity to the pore regulate TRPM7-kinase mediated signaling. We have shown that TRPM7 acts as a sensor of Mg(2+)-availability, adjusting key cellular functions such as the rate of cellular protein translation to the Mg(2+) nutritional status. Since molecular mechanisms controlling rates of protein translation are critical for cell growth and division in response to nutrient availability, this could have relevance for example for therapies targeted at molecules shaping the cancerous translational apparatus. In our quest to understand the biology of Mg(2+) in the context of immune responses, we found that TRPM7 associates with, and phosphorylates phospholipase C gamma 2 (PLCγ2), a pivotal molecule in the signaling pathway following B-cell receptor (BCR) activation. This contributes to the Mg(2+)-dependent modulation of

  14. Endocytic Control of Cellular Signaling at the Primary Cilium.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Lotte B; Mogensen, Johanne B; Christensen, Søren T

    2016-09-01

    Primary cilia are dynamic signaling organelles that project from the cell surface to sense diverse chemical, physical and morphogenetic cues. Ciliary defects therefore cause diseases (ciliopathies) that affect multiple organs in developing and adult organisms. Cilia-mediated signaling involves the orchestrated movement of signaling proteins in and out of the ciliary compartment, including movement of receptors such as the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) receptor Patched 1 (PTCH1), Smoothened (SMO), and various other G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as well as transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptors I and II (TGF-β-RI/II). We provide here a current understanding of trafficking events associated with cilia-mediated signaling, with emphasis on the involvement of clathrin-dependent receptor-mediated endocytosis in regulating ciliary Shh and TGF-β signaling. PMID:27364476

  15. The BK channel: a vital link between cellular calcium and electrical signaling.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, Brad S

    2012-12-01

    Large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated K⁺ channels (BK channels) constitute an key physiological link between cellular Ca²⁺ signaling and electrical signaling at the plasma membrane. Thus these channels are critical to the control of action potential firing and neurotransmitter release in several types of neurons, as well as the dynamic control of smooth muscle tone in resistance arteries, airway, and bladder. Recent advances in our understanding of K⁺ channel structure and function have led to new insight toward the molecular mechanisms of opening and closing (gating) of these channels. Here we will focus on mechanisms of BK channel gating by Ca²⁺, transmembrane voltage, and auxiliary subunit proteins. PMID:22996175

  16. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-Triphosphate and Cellular Signaling: Implications for Obesity and Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Prasenjit; Jain, Sushil K.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) is one of the most important phosphoinositides and is capable of activating a wide range of proteins through its interaction with their specific binding domains. Localization and activation of these effector proteins regulate a number of cellular functions, including cell survival, proliferation, cytoskeletal rearrangement, intracellular vesicle trafficking, and cell metabolism. Phosphoinositides have been investigated as an important agonist-dependent second messenger in the regulation of diverse physiological events depending upon the phosphorylation status of their inositol group. Dysregulation in formation as well as metabolism of phosphoinositides is associated with various pathophysiological disorders such as inflammation, allergy, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and metabolic diseases. Recent studies have demonstrated that the impaired metabolism of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is a prime mediator of insulin resistance associated with various metabolic diseases including obesity and diabetes. This review examines the current status of the role of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in the regulation of various cellular functions and the implications of dysregulated PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling in obesity, diabetes, and their associated complications. PMID:25721445

  17. The multifaceted roles of the HORMA domain in cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Scott C.

    2015-01-01

    The HORMA domain is a multifunctional protein–protein interaction module found in diverse eukaryotic signaling pathways including the spindle assembly checkpoint, numerous DNA recombination/repair pathways, and the initiation of autophagy. In all of these pathways, HORMA domain proteins occupy key signaling junctures and function through the controlled assembly and disassembly of signaling complexes using a stereotypical “safety belt” peptide interaction mechanism. A recent explosion of structural and functional work has shed new light on these proteins, illustrating how strikingly similar structural mechanisms give rise to radically different functional outcomes in each family of HORMA domain proteins. PMID:26598612

  18. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation-Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks.

    PubMed

    White, Forest M; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-12

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks. PMID:27049636

  19. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation–Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation–mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  20. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. PMID:25986976

  1. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Chou, Joshua; de Vega, Susana; Mizuniwa, Chihiro; Sekimoto, Kaori; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Teneurin-4 (Ten-4), a transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the central nervous system; however, its cellular and molecular function in neuronal differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in neurite outgrowth. Ten-4 expression was induced during neurite outgrowth of the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2a. Ten-4 protein was localized at the neurite growth cones. Knockdown of Ten-4 expression in Neuro-2a cells decreased the formation of the filopodia-like protrusions and the length of individual neurites. Conversely, overexpression of Ten-4 promoted filopodia-like protrusion formation. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of Ten-4 reduced and elevated the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-family small GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1, key molecules for the membranous protrusion formation downstream of FAK, respectively. Inhibition of the activation of FAK and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is a downstream regulator of FAK and Cdc42, blocked protrusion formation by Ten-4 overexpression. Further, Ten-4 colocalized with phosphorylated FAK in the filopodia-like protrusion regions. Together, our findings show that Ten-4 is a novel positive regulator of cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through the FAK signaling pathway.—Suzuki, N., Numakawa, T., Chou, J., de Vega, S., Mizuniwa, C., Sekimoto, K., Adachi, N., Kunugi, H., Arikawa-Hirasawa, E., Yamada, Y., Akazawa, C. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling. PMID:24344332

  2. Neurophysiological, metabolic and cellular compartments that drive neurovascular coupling and neuroimaging signals.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Andrea; Jego, Pierrick; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Canals, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Complete understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate work and energy supply of the brain, the so called neurovascular coupling, is fundamental to interpreting brain energetics and their influence on neuronal coding strategies, but also to interpreting signals obtained from brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Interactions between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow regulation are largely compartmentalized. First, there exists a functional compartmentalization in which glutamatergic peri-synaptic activity and its electrophysiological events occur in close proximity to vascular responses. Second, the metabolic processes that fuel peri-synaptic activity are partially segregated between glycolytic and oxidative compartments. Finally, there is cellular segregation between astrocytic and neuronal compartments, which has potentially important implications on neurovascular coupling. Experimental data is progressively showing a tight interaction between the products of energy consumption and neurotransmission-driven signaling molecules that regulate blood flow. Here, we review some of these issues in light of recent findings with special attention to the neuron-glia interplay on the generation of neuroimaging signals. PMID:23543907

  3. Neurophysiological, metabolic and cellular compartments that drive neurovascular coupling and neuroimaging signals

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Andrea; Jego, Pierrick; de la Cruz, Feliberto; Canals, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Complete understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate work and energy supply of the brain, the so called neurovascular coupling, is fundamental to interpreting brain energetics and their influence on neuronal coding strategies, but also to interpreting signals obtained from brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging. Interactions between neuronal activity and cerebral blood flow regulation are largely compartmentalized. First, there exists a functional compartmentalization in which glutamatergic peri-synaptic activity and its electrophysiological events occur in close proximity to vascular responses. Second, the metabolic processes that fuel peri-synaptic activity are partially segregated between glycolytic and oxidative compartments. Finally, there is cellular segregation between astrocytic and neuronal compartments, which has potentially important implications on neurovascular coupling. Experimental data is progressively showing a tight interaction between the products of energy consumption and neurotransmission-driven signaling molecules that regulate blood flow. Here, we review some of these issues in light of recent findings with special attention to the neuron-glia interplay on the generation of neuroimaging signals. PMID:23543907

  4. Cellular Architecture Regulates Collective Calcium Signaling and Cell Contractility

    PubMed Central

    Hoying, James B.; Deymier, Pierre A.; Zhang, Donna D.; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-01-01

    A key feature of multicellular systems is the ability of cells to function collectively in response to external stimuli. However, the mechanisms of intercellular cell signaling and their functional implications in diverse vascular structures are poorly understood. Using a combination of computational modeling and plasma lithography micropatterning, we investigate the roles of structural arrangement of endothelial cells in collective calcium signaling and cell contractility. Under histamine stimulation, endothelial cells in self-assembled and microengineered networks, but not individual cells and monolayers, exhibit calcium oscillations. Micropatterning, pharmacological inhibition, and computational modeling reveal that the calcium oscillation depends on the number of neighboring cells coupled via gap junctional intercellular communication, providing a mechanistic basis of the architecture-dependent calcium signaling. Furthermore, the calcium oscillation attenuates the histamine-induced cytoskeletal reorganization and cell contraction, resulting in differential cell responses in an architecture-dependent manner. Taken together, our results suggest that endothelial cells can sense and respond to chemical stimuli according to the vascular architecture via collective calcium signaling. PMID:27196735

  5. Driving Cellular Plasticity and Survival Through the Signal Transduction Pathways of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Maiese, Kenneth; Chong, Zhao Zhong; Li, Faqi

    2008-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) share a common molecular morphology with other G protein–linked receptors, but there expression throughout the mammalian nervous system places these receptors as essential mediators not only for the initial development of an organism, but also for the vital determination of a cell’s fate during many disorders in the nervous system that include amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, epilepsy, trauma, and stroke. Given the ubiquitous distribution of these receptors, the mGluR system impacts upon neuronal, vascular, and glial cell function and is activated by a wide variety of stimuli that includes neurotransmitters, peptides, hormones, growth factors, ions, lipids, and light. Employing signal transduction pathways that can modulate both excitatory and inhibitory responses, the mGluR system drives a spectrum of cellular pathways that involve protein kinases, endonucleases, cellular acidity, energy metabolism, mitochondrial membrane potential, caspases, and specific mitogen-activated protein kinases. Ultimately these pathways can converge to regulate genomic DNA degradation, membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) residue exposure, and inflammatory microglial activation. As we continue to push the envelope for our understanding of this complex and critical family of metabotropic receptors, we should be able to reap enormous benefits for both clinical disease as well as our understanding of basic biology in the nervous system. PMID:16375723

  6. Signaling pathways involved in PDGF-evoked cellular responses in human RPE cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hollborn, Margrit . E-mail: hollbm@medizin.uni-leipzig.de; Bringmann, Andreas; Faude, Frank; Wiedemann, Peter; Kohen, Leon

    2006-06-09

    We examined whether PDGF may directly stimulate the expression of VEGF by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro, and the involvement of three signal transduction pathways in the regulation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, migration, and production of VEGF-A was investigated. PDGF stimulated the gene and protein expression of VEGF-A by RPE cells, and increased cell proliferation and chemotaxis. PDGF activated all signaling pathways investigated, as determined by increased phosphorylation levels of ERK1/2, p38, and Akt proteins. The three signaling pathways were involved in the mediation of PDGF-evoked cell proliferation, while p38 and PI3K mediated cell migration, and PI3K mediated secretion of VEGF-A. In addition to VEGF-A, the cells expressed mRNAs for various members of the VEGF family and for their receptors, including VEGF-B, -C, -D, flt-1, and KDR. The data indicate that PDGF selectively stimulates the expression of VEGF-A in RPE cells. PDGF evokes at least three signal transduction pathways which are differentially involved in various cellular responses.

  7. Systematic Identification of Cellular Signals Reactivating Kaposi Sarcoma–Associated Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fuqu; Harada, Josephine N; Brown, Helen J; Deng, Hongyu; Song, Moon Jung; Wu, Ting-Ting; Kato-Stankiewicz, Juran; Nelson, Christian G; Vieira, Jeffrey; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Chanda, Sumit K; Sun, Ren

    2007-01-01

    The herpesvirus life cycle has two distinct phases: latency and lytic replication. The balance between these two phases is critical for viral pathogenesis. It is believed that cellular signals regulate the switch from latency to lytic replication. To systematically evaluate the cellular signals regulating this reactivation process in Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus, the effects of 26,000 full-length cDNA expression constructs on viral reactivation were individually assessed in primary effusion lymphoma–derived cells that harbor the latent virus. A group of diverse cellular signaling proteins were identified and validated in their effect of inducing viral lytic gene expression from the latent viral genome. The results suggest that multiple cellular signaling pathways can reactivate the virus in a genetically homogeneous cell population. Further analysis revealed that the Raf/MEK/ERK/Ets-1 pathway mediates Ras-induced reactivation. The same pathway also mediates spontaneous reactivation, which sets the first example to our knowledge of a specific cellular pathway being studied in the spontaneous reactivation process. Our study provides a functional genomic approach to systematically identify the cellular signals regulating the herpesvirus life cycle, thus facilitating better understanding of a fundamental issue in virology and identifying novel therapeutic targets. PMID:17397260

  8. Competing feedback loops shape IL-2 signaling between helper and regulatory T lymphocytes in cellular microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Busse, Dorothea; de la Rosa, Maurus; Hobiger, Kirstin; Thurley, Kevin; Flossdorf, Michael; Scheffold, Alexander; Höfer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic and readily diffusible messenger molecules, raising the question of how their action can be confined to specific target cells. The T cell cytokine interleukin-2 (IL-2) is essential for the homeostasis of regulatory T (Treg) cells that suppress (auto)immunity and stimulates immune responses mediated by conventional T cells. We combined mathematical modeling and experiments to dissect the dynamics of the IL-2 signaling network that links the prototypical IL-2 producers, conventional T helper (Th) cells, and Treg cells. We show how the IL-2-induced upregulation of high-affinity IL-2 receptors (IL-2R) establishes a positive feedback loop of IL-2 signaling. This feedback mediates a digital switch for the proliferation of Th cells and functions as an analog amplifier for the IL-2 uptake capacity of Treg cells. Unlike other positive feedbacks in cell signaling that augment signal propagation, the IL-2/IL-2R loop enhances the capture of the signal molecule and its degradation. Thus Treg and Th cells can compete for IL-2 and restrict its range of action through efficient cellular uptake. Depending on activation status and spatial localization of the cells, IL-2 may be consumed exclusively by Treg or Th cells, or be shared between them. In particular, a Treg cell can deprive a stimulated Th cell of its IL-2, but only when the cells are located in close proximity, within a few tens of micrometers. The present findings explain how IL-2 can play two disctinct roles in immune regulation and point to a hitherto largely unexplored spatiotemporal complexity of cytokine signaling. PMID:20133667

  9. Neu1 sialidase and matrix metalloproteinase-9 cross-talk regulates nucleic acid-induced endosomal TOLL-like receptor-7 and -9 activation, cellular signaling and pro-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Abdulkhalek, Samar; Szewczuk, Myron R

    2013-11-01

    The precise mechanism(s) by which intracellular TOLL-like receptors (TLRs) become activated by their ligands remains unclear. Here, we report a molecular organizational G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling platform to potentiate a novel mammalian neuraminidase-1 (Neu1) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) cross-talk in alliance with neuromedin B GPCR, all of which form a tripartite complex with TLR-7 and -9. siRNA silencing Neu1, MMP-9 and neuromedin-B GPCR in RAW-blue macrophage cells significantly reduced TLR7 imiquimod- and TLR9 ODN1826-induced NF-κB (NF-κB-pSer(536)) activity. Tamiflu, specific MMP-9 inhibitor, neuromedin B receptor specific antagonist BIM23127, and the selective inhibitor of whole heterotrimeric G-protein complex BIM-46174 significantly block nucleic acid-induced TLR-7 and -9 MyD88 recruitment, NF-κB activation and proinflammatory TNFα and MCP-1 cytokine responses. For the first time, Neu1 clearly plays a central role in mediating nucleic acid-induced intracellular TLR activation, and the interactions involving NMBR-MMP9-Neu1 cross-talk constitute a novel intracellular TLR signaling platform that is essential for NF-κB activation and pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:23827939

  10. Regulation of Cellular Communication by Signaling Microdomains in the Blood Vessel Wall

    PubMed Central

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Biwer, Lauren A.; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E.

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function. PMID:24671377

  11. Regulation of cellular communication by signaling microdomains in the blood vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Billaud, Marie; Lohman, Alexander W; Johnstone, Scott R; Biwer, Lauren A; Mutchler, Stephanie; Isakson, Brant E

    2014-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear that the accumulation of proteins in specific regions of the plasma membrane can facilitate cellular communication. These regions, termed signaling microdomains, are found throughout the blood vessel wall where cellular communication, both within and between cell types, must be tightly regulated to maintain proper vascular function. We will define a cellular signaling microdomain and apply this definition to the plethora of means by which cellular communication has been hypothesized to occur in the blood vessel wall. To that end, we make a case for three broad areas of cellular communication where signaling microdomains could play an important role: 1) paracrine release of free radicals and gaseous molecules such as nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species; 2) role of ion channels including gap junctions and potassium channels, especially those associated with the endothelium-derived hyperpolarization mediated signaling, and lastly, 3) mechanism of exocytosis that has considerable oversight by signaling microdomains, especially those associated with the release of von Willebrand factor. When summed, we believe that it is clear that the organization and regulation of signaling microdomains is an essential component to vessel wall function. PMID:24671377

  12. Aeromonas salmonicida Infection Only Moderately Regulates Expression of Factors Contributing to Toll-Like Receptor Signaling but Massively Activates the Cellular and Humoral Branches of Innate Immunity in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Brietzke, Andreas; Korytář, Tomáš; Jaros, Joanna; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom; Seyfert, Hans-Martin; Rebl, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are known to detect a defined spectrum of microbial structures. However, the knowledge about the specificity of teleost Tlr factors for distinct pathogens is limited so far. We measured baseline expression profiles of 18 tlr genes and associated signaling factors in four immune-relevant tissues of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. Intraperitoneal injection of a lethal dose of Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida induced highly increased levels of cytokine mRNAs during a 72-hour postinfection (hpi) period. In contrast, only the fish-specific tlr22a2 and the downstream factor irak1 featured clearly increased transcript levels, while the mRNA concentrations of many other tlr genes decreased. Flow cytometry quantified cell trafficking after infection indicating a dramatic influx of myeloid cells into the peritoneum and a belated low level immigration of lymphoid cells. T and B lymphocytes were differentiated with RT-qPCR revealing that B lymphocytes emigrated from and T lymphocytes immigrated into head kidney. In conclusion, no specific TLR can be singled out as a dominant receptor for A. salmonicida. The recruitment of cellular factors of innate immunity rather than induced expression of pathogen receptors is hence of key importance for mounting a first immune defense against invading A. salmonicida. PMID:26266270

  13. Antiviral chemotherapy facilitates control of poxvirus infections through inhibition of cellular signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hailin; Kim, Sung-Kwon; Kim, Mikyung; Reche, Pedro A; Morehead, Tiara J; Damon, Inger K; Welsh, Raymond M; Reinherz, Ellis L

    2005-02-01

    The EGF-like domain of smallpox growth factor (SPGF) targets human ErbB-1, inducing tyrosine phosphorylation of certain host cellular substrates via activation of the receptor's kinase domain and thereby facilitating viral replication. Given these findings, low molecular weight organic inhibitors of ErbB-1 kinases might function as antiviral agents against smallpox. Here we show that CI-1033 and related 4-anilinoquinazolines inhibit SPGF-induced human cellular DNA synthesis, protein tyrosine kinase activation, and c-Cbl association with ErbB-1 and resultant internalization. Infection of monkey kidney BSC-40 and VERO-E6 cells in vitro by variola strain Solaimen is blocked by CI-1033, primarily at the level of secondary viral spreading. In an in vivo lethal vaccinia virus pneumonia model, CI-1033 alone promotes survival of animals, augments systemic T cell immunity and, in conjunction with a single dose of anti-L1R intracellular mature virus particle-specific mAb, fosters virtually complete viral clearance of the lungs of infected mice by the eighth day after infection. Collectively, these findings show that chemical inhibitors of host-signaling pathways exploited by viral pathogens may represent potent antiviral therapies. PMID:15690085

  14. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen. PMID:26431585

  15. [Application of bio-mass spectrometry in cellular signal transduction].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-Min; Wei, Kai-Hua; Yang, Song-Cheng

    2002-09-01

    The quickly developing techniques of biological mass spectrometry (bio-MS) in recent years realized the high throughput identification of proteins by determining the accurate mass values of trypsin digested peptides and the randomly selected peptide sequence tags, and have been successfully used in the studies of protein interactions and post-translational modification such as the phosphorylation. Compared to the conventional approaches, the above techniques can identify all the phosphorylated proteins (including their phosphorylated amino acid sites) involved in a multi-signal pathway in a single experiment, and they have been developed into a hot-spot of proteomics. The three strategies for the application of bio-MS in the above fields are briefly reviewed. PMID:12198553

  16. Misconstrued versatility of Ganoderma lucidum: a key player in multi-targeted cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Gill, Balraj Singh; Sharma, Prateek; Kumar, Raj; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-03-01

    A Basidiomycetes fungus belonging to polypore family of mushrooms, Ganoderma lucidum (GL), has been known since a long time for their myriad therapeutic indications. Renowned as an invaluable resource of cardinal mycoconstituents they encompass numerous terpenoids polysaccharides and proteins. Possessing the therapeutically potent lanosteroidal skeleton, terpenoids are upheld for their invariable participation in therapeutically diverse bioactivities. Polysaccharides and proteins exhibiting distinguishable bioactivities provide this oriental mushroom with additional edges over immune function and anti-cancer potential. This review is a concerted effort to throw light upon the therapeutic versatility of the fungus, shadowed by various other natural products. An effort has been made towards conglomerating the mycoconstituents decisive for the many activities portrayed by this fungus. More importantly, this review seeks to fathom the inextricable role played by derivatives in modulating signaling cascades such as downregulation of various mitogenic pathways, inhibiting growth factors, or upregulating certain pathways enhancing cellular integrity. PMID:26715282

  17. Salmonella Manipulation of Host Signaling Pathways Provokes Cellular Transformation Associated with Gallbladder Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Scanu, Tiziana; Spaapen, Robbert M; Bakker, Jeroen M; Pratap, Chandra Bhan; Wu, Lin-en; Hofland, Ingrid; Broeks, Annegien; Shukla, Vijay Kumar; Kumar, Mohan; Janssen, Hans; Song, Ji-Ying; Neefjes-Borst, E Andra; te Riele, Hein; Holden, David W; Nath, Gopal; Neefjes, Jacques

    2015-06-10

    Cancer is fueled by deregulation of signaling pathways in control of cellular growth and proliferation. These pathways are also targeted by infectious pathogens en route to establishing infection. Gallbladder carcinoma (GBC) is frequent in the Indian subcontinent, with chronic Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi infection reported as a significant risk factor. However, direct association and causal mechanisms between Salmonella Typhi infection and GBC have not been established. Deconstructing the epidemiological association between GBC and Salmonella Typhi infection, we show that Salmonella enterica induces malignant transformation in predisposed mice, murine gallbladder organoids, and fibroblasts, with TP53 mutations and c-MYC amplification. Mechanistically, activation of MAPK and AKT pathways, mediated by Salmonella enterica effectors secreted during infection, is critical to both ignite and sustain transformation, consistent with observations in GBC patients from India. Collectively, our findings indicate that Salmonella enterica can promote transformation of genetically predisposed cells and is a causative agent of GBC. PMID:26028364

  18. Differential contribution of key metabolic substrates and cellular oxygen in HIF signalling.

    PubMed

    Zhdanov, Alexander V; Waters, Alicia H C; Golubeva, Anna V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2015-01-01

    Changes in availability and utilisation of O2 and metabolic substrates are common in ischemia and cancer. We examined effects of substrate deprivation on HIF signalling in PC12 cells exposed to different atmospheric O2. Upon 2-4h moderate hypoxia, HIF-α protein levels were dictated by the availability of glutamine and glucose, essential for deep cell deoxygenation and glycolytic ATP flux. Nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α dramatically decreased upon inhibition of glutaminolysis or glutamine deprivation. Elevation of HIF-2α levels was transcription-independent and associated with the activation of Akt and Erk1/2. Upon 2h anoxia, HIF-2α levels strongly correlated with cellular ATP, produced exclusively via glycolysis. Without glucose, HIF signalling was suppressed, giving way to other regulators of cell adaptation to energy crisis, e.g. AMPK. Consequently, viability of cells deprived of O2 and glucose decreased upon inhibition of AMPK with dorsomorphin. The capacity of cells to accumulate HIF-2α decreased after 24h glucose deprivation. This effect, associated with increased AMPKα phosphorylation, was sensitive to dorsomorphin. In chronically hypoxic cells, glutamine played no major role in HIF-2α accumulation, which became mainly glucose-dependent. Overall, the availability of O2 and metabolic substrates intricately regulates HIF signalling by affecting cell oxygenation, ATP levels and pathways involved in production of HIF-α. PMID:25447307

  19. Multifractal analyses of row sum signals of elementary cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murguía, J. S.; Rosu, H. C.

    2012-07-01

    We first apply the WT-MFDFA, MFDFA, and WTMM multifractal methods to binomial multifractal time series of three different binomial parameters and find that the WTMM method indicates an enhanced difference between the fractal components than the known theoretical result. Next, we make use of the same methods for the time series of the row sum signals of the two complementary ECA pairs of rules (90,165) and (150,105) for ten initial conditions going from a single 1 in the central position up to a set of ten 1's covering the ten central positions in the first row. Since the members of the pairs are actually similar from the statistical point of view, we can check which method is the most stable numerically by recording the differences provided by the methods between the two members of the pairs for various important quantities of the scaling analyses, such as the multifractal support, the most frequent Hölder exponent, and the Hurst exponent and considering as the better one the method that provides the minimum differences. According to this criterion, our results show that the MFDFA performs better than WT-MFDFA and WTMM in the case of the multifractal support, while for the other two scaling parameters the WT-MFDFA is the best. The employed set of initial conditions does not generate any specific trend in the values of the multifractal parameters.

  20. PTPN13 regulates cellular signalling and β-catenin function during megakaryocytic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Sardina, José L; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Prieto-Bermejo, Rodrigo; Sánchez-Sánchez, Beatriz; Pérez-Fernández, Alejandro; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; Pérez-Simón, José Antonio; Quintales, Luis; Sánchez-Yagüe, Jesús; Llanillo, Marcial; Antequera, Francisco; Hernández-Hernández, Angel

    2014-12-01

    PTPN13 is a high-molecular weight intracellular phosphatase with several isoforms that exhibits a highly modular structure. Although in recent years different roles have been described for PTPN13, we are still far from understanding its function in cell biology. Here we show that PTPN13 expression is activated during megakaryocytic differentiation at the protein and mRNA level. Our results show that the upregulation of PTPN13 inhibits megakaryocytic differentiation, while PTPN13 silencing triggers differentiation. The ability of PTPN13 to alter megakaryocytic differentiation can be explained by its capacity to regulate ERK and STAT signalling. Interestingly, the silencing of β-catenin produced the same effect as PTPN13 downregulation. We demonstrate that both proteins coimmunoprecipitate and colocalise. Moreover, we provide evidence showing that PTPN13 can regulate β-catenin phosphorylation, stability and transcriptional activity. Therefore, the ability of PTPN13 to control megakaryocytic differentiation must be intimately linked to the regulation of β-catenin function. Moreover, our results show for the first time that PTPN13 is stabilised upon Wnt signalling, which makes PTPN13 an important player in canonical Wnt signalling. Our results show that PTPN13 behaves as an important regulator of megakaryocytic differentiation in cell lines and also in murine haematopoietic progenitors. This importance can be explained by the ability of PTPN13 to regulate cellular signalling, and especially through the regulation of β-catenin stability and function. Our results hold true for different megakaryocytic cell lines and also for haematopoietic progenitors, suggesting that these two proteins may play a relevant role during in vivo megakaryopoiesis. PMID:25193362

  1. Reporters to monitor cellular MMP12 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobos-Correa, Amanda; Mall, Marcus A.; Schultz, Carsten

    2010-02-01

    Macrophage elastase, also called MMP12, belongs to a family of proteolytic enzymes whose best known physiological function is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Under certain pathological conditions, including inflammation, chronic overexpression of MMP12 has been observed and its elevated proteolytic activity has been suggested to be the cause of pulmonary emphysema. However, it was until recently impossible to monitor the activity of MMP12 under disease conditions, mainly due to a lack of detection methods. Recent development of new reporters for monitoring MMP12 activity in living cells, such as LaRee1, provided novel insights into the pathobiology of MMP12 in pulmonary inflammation.1 In the future, these reporters might contribute to improved diagnosis and in finding better treatments for chronic inflammatory lung diseases and emphysema. Our approach for visualizing MMP12 activity is based on peptidic, membrane-targeted FRET (Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer) reporters. Here we describe a set of new reporters containing different fluorophore pairs as well as modifications in the membrane-targeting lipid moiety. We studied the influence of these modifications on reporter performance and the reporter mobility on live cell membranes by FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). Finally, we generated several new fluorescently labeled MMP inhibitors based on the peptidic reporter structures as prototypes for future tools to inhibit and monitor MMP activity at the same time.

  2. [Progress of studies on acu-moxibustion stimulation-induced cellular transmembrane signal transduction of the target-organs].

    PubMed

    Yi, Shou-Xiang; Peng, Yan

    2009-10-01

    Abundant research results have shown that multiple levels and links of cellular transmembrane signal transduction pathways in the target organs were involved in the efficacy of acupuncture. For instance, 1) various extra-cellular growth factors for initiating signal transduction by activating tyrosine protein kinase and non-receptor tyrosine kinase, 2) G protein-coupled protein kinase-second signal messengers, 3) ligands acting on intra-nuclear receptors to activate transduction pathway of nuclear transcription factors of the target genes, have been demonstrated in the favorable regulating process of acupuncture and moxibustion in different pathological animal models. In the present paper, the authors review the progress of studies on the abovementioned mechanism of acu-moxibustion underlying improving some disorders as 1) pain, cerebral ischemia, and senile dementia, 2) inflammation and tumor, and 3) myocardial ischemia. Moreover, the authors also analyze the extant problems and make a prospect on the future studies about the cellular transmembrane signal transduction pathways involving the effects of acupuncture and moxibustion. PMID:20128298

  3. Infrared ATR: a probe for cellular activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Martin, Laura E.; Alam, M. Kathleen; Haaland, David M.; Garrison, Kristen; Lyons, C. Richard; Hjelle, Brian

    2002-02-01

    We employ infrared spectroscopy (IR) with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling technique to monitor live and dried RAW cells (a murine macrophage cell line) during activation with g-interferon and lipopolysaccharide. By comparing the spectra of activated cells at various time points to the spectra of healthy control cells, we identify spectral bands associated with nucleic acids that are markers for the cell activation process. These spectral changes are slight and can be complicated with the normal metabolic changes that occur within cells. We will discuss the use of data pretreatment strategies to accurately correct for the contribution of the buffer to the live cell spectra. We find the standard background correction method inadequate for concentrated solutions of cells. Data presented shows the severe effect incorrect background subtraction has on the cell spectra. We report a more accurate correction for phosphate buffer spectral contribution using an interactive subtraction of the buffer spectrum. We will show classification of dried control and activated macrophage cell spectra using partial-least squares analysis with multiplicative scatter correction.

  4. p21-Activated Kinase 1 Plays a Critical Role in Cellular Activation by Nef

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, Oliver T.; Lu, Xiaobin; Frost, Jeffrey A.; Geyer, Matthias; Jiang, Bing; Luo, Wen; Abo, Arie; Alberts, Arthur S.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2000-01-01

    The activation of Nef-associated kinase (NAK) by Nef from human and simian immunodeficiency viruses is critical for efficient viral replication and pathogenesis. This induction occurs via the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav and the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42. In this study, we identified NAK as p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). PAK1 bound to Nef in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the induction of cytoskeletal rearrangements such as the formation of trichopodia, the activation of Jun N-terminal kinase, and the increase of viral production were blocked by an inhibitory peptide that targets the kinase activity of PAK1 (PAK1 83-149). These results identify NAK as PAK1 and emphasize the central role its kinase activity plays in cytoskeletal rearrangements and cellular signaling by Nef. PMID:10713183

  5. Bunyamwera orthobunyavirus glycoprotein precursor is processed by cellular signal peptidase and signal peptide peptidase

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaohong; Botting, Catherine H.; Li, Ping; Niglas, Mark; Brennan, Benjamin; Shirran, Sally L.; Szemiel, Agnieszka M.; Elliott, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    The M genome segment of Bunyamwera virus (BUNV)—the prototype of both the Bunyaviridae family and the Orthobunyavirus genus—encodes the glycoprotein precursor (GPC) that is proteolytically cleaved to yield two viral structural glycoproteins, Gn and Gc, and a nonstructural protein, NSm. The cleavage mechanism of orthobunyavirus GPCs and the host proteases involved have not been clarified. In this study, we investigated the processing of BUNV GPC and found that both NSm and Gc proteins were cleaved at their own internal signal peptides (SPs), in which NSm domain I functions as SPNSm and NSm domain V as SPGc. Moreover, the domain I was further processed by a host intramembrane-cleaving protease, signal peptide peptidase, and is required for cell fusion activities. Meanwhile, the NSm domain V (SPGc) remains integral to NSm, rendering the NSm topology as a two-membrane-spanning integral membrane protein. We defined the cleavage sites and boundaries between the processed proteins as follows: Gn, from residue 17–312 or nearby residues; NSm, 332–477; and Gc, 478–1433. Our data clarified the mechanism of the precursor cleavage process, which is important for our understanding of viral glycoprotein biogenesis in the genus Orthobunyavirus and thus presents a useful target for intervention strategies. PMID:27439867

  6. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by cellular labile iron.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kyohei; Kawakami, Toru; Yamamoto, Naoki; Tomizawa, Miyu; Fujiwara, Tohru; Ishii, Tomonori; Harigae, Hideo; Ogasawara, Kouetsu

    2016-02-01

    Cellular labile iron, which contains chelatable redox-active Fe(2+), has been implicated in iron-mediated cellular toxicity leading to multiple organ dysfunction. Iron homeostasis is controlled by monocytes/macrophages through their iron recycling and storage capacities. Furthermore, iron sequestration by monocytes/macrophages is regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines including interleukin-1, highlighting the importance of these cells in the crosstalk between inflammation and iron homeostasis. However, a role for cellular labile iron in monocyte/macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses has not been defined. Here we describe how cellular labile iron activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes. Stimulation of lipopolysaccharide-primed peripheral blood mononuclear cells with ferric ammonium citrate increases the level of cellular Fe(2+) levels in monocytes and induces production of interleukin-1β in a dose-dependent manner. This ferric ammonium citrate-induced interleukin-1β production is dependent on caspase-1 and is significantly inhibited by an Fe(2+)-specific chelator. Ferric ammonium citrate consistently induced interleukin-1β secretion in THP1 cells, but not in NLRP3-deficient THP1 cells, indicating a requirement for the NLRP3 inflammasome. Additionally, activation of the inflammasome is mediated by potassium efflux, reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. Thus, these results suggest that monocytes/macrophages not only sequestrate iron during inflammation, but also mediate inflammation in response to cellular labile iron, which provides novel insights into the role of iron in chronic inflammation. PMID:26577567

  7. 1/ fα spectra in elementary cellular automata and fractal signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagler, Jan; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2005-06-01

    We systematically compute the power spectra of the one-dimensional elementary cellular automata introduced by Wolfram. On the one hand our analysis reveals that one automaton displays 1/f spectra though considered as trivial, and on the other hand that various automata classified as chaotic or complex display no 1/f spectra. We model the results generalizing the recently investigated Sierpinski signal to a class of fractal signals that are tailored to produce 1/fα spectra. From the widespread occurrence of (elementary) cellular automata patterns in chemistry, physics, and computer sciences, there are various candidates to show spectra similar to our results.

  8. Cellular signaling during the macrophage invasion by Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Mauricio; Dutra, Juliana M F; Carvalho, Tecia M U; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L; Souto-Padrón, Thaïs; Souza, Wanderley

    2002-12-01

    We have reported that protein tyrosine kinases play an important role in the invasion of Trypanosoma cruzi into primary resident macrophages. In the present study we carry out immunofluorescence assays, using monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies, to reveal an accumulation of tyrosine-phosphorylated residues at the site of parasite association with the macrophage surface, colocalizing with host cell F-actin-rich domains. SDS-PAGE analysis of macrophage cell line IC-21 tyrosine phosphoproteins, labeled with [(35)S] L-methionine, revealed several peptides with increased levels of phosphorylation upon interaction with the parasite. Among them, were detected bands of 140, 120, 112, 94, 73, 67, and 56 kDa that match the molecular weights of proteins described as being tyrosine phosphorylated during events that lead to actin assembly in mononuclear phagocytes. The pretreatment of IC-21 macrophages with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor tyrphostin 23 inhibited trypomastigote uptake showing that tyrosine phosphorylation is important for the parasite penetration in this particular cell line. Immunofluorescence microscopy, using antibodies against p85, the regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), placed this enzyme also in the same sites, in accordance to what is reported for phagocytosis. We suggest that once the components of T. cruzi trypomastigotes surface are recognized by macrophage receptors, they trigger the activation of a tyrosine phosphorylation cascade, PI 3-kinase recruitment, and assembly of actin filaments at the site of initial cell-to-cell contact, resembling the events described during phagocytosis. These achievements support the model for a phagocytic-like actin-dependent invasion mechanism for T. cruzi trypomastigotes into macrophages. PMID:12483314

  9. Cytoplasmic domains determine signal specificity, cellular routing characteristics and influence ligand binding of epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Riedel, H; Dull, T J; Honegger, A M; Schlessinger, J; Ullrich, A

    1989-01-01

    The cell surface receptors for insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF) both employ a tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity to fulfil their distinct biological roles. To identify the structural domains responsible for various receptor activities, we have generated chimeric receptor polypeptides consisting of major EGF and insulin receptor structural domains and examined their biochemical properties and cellular signalling activities. The EGF-insulin receptor hybrids are properly synthesized and transported to the cell surface, where they form binding competent structures that are defined by the origin of their extracellular domains. While their ligand binding affinities are altered, we find that these chimeric receptors are fully functional in transmitting signals across the plasma membrane and into the cell. Thus, EGF receptor and insulin receptor cytoplasmic domain signalling capabilities are independent of their new heterotetrameric or monomeric environments respectively. Furthermore, the cytoplasmic domains carry the structural determinants that define kinase specificity, mitogenic and transforming potential, and receptor routing. Images PMID:2583088

  10. A new cellular automaton for signal controlled traffic flow based on driving behaviors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Chen, Yan-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The complexity of signal controlled traffic largely stems from the various driving behaviors developed in response to the traffic signal. However, the existing models take a few driving behaviors into account and consequently the traffic dynamics has not been completely explored. Therefore, a new cellular automaton model, which incorporates the driving behaviors typically manifesting during the different stages when the vehicles are moving toward a traffic light, is proposed in this paper. Numerical simulations have demonstrated that the proposed model can produce the spontaneous traffic breakdown and the dissolution of the over-saturated traffic phenomena. Furthermore, the simulation results indicate that the slow-to-start behavior and the inch-forward behavior can foster the traffic breakdown. Particularly, it has been discovered that the over-saturated traffic can be revised to be an under-saturated state when the slow-down behavior is activated after the spontaneous breakdown. Finally, the contributions of the driving behaviors on the traffic breakdown have been examined. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grand No. 2012CB723303) and the Beijing Committee of Science and Technology, China (Grand No. Z1211000003120100).

  11. ECM signaling regulates collective cellular dynamics to control pancreas branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hung Ping; Panlasigui, Devin; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Sander, Maike

    2015-01-01

    Summary During pancreas development, epithelial buds undergo branching morphogenesis to form an exocrine and endocrine gland. Proper morphogenesis is necessary for correct lineage allocation of pancreatic progenitors; however, the cellular events underlying pancreas morphogenesis are unknown. Here, we employed time-lapse microscopy and fluorescent labeling of cells to analyze cell behaviors associated with pancreas morphogenesis. We observed that outer bud cells adjacent to the basement membrane are pleomorphic and rearrange frequently; as well, they largely remain in the outer cell compartment even after mitosis. These cell behaviors and pancreas branching depend on cell contacts with the basement membrane, which induce actomyosin cytoskeleton remodeling via integrin-mediated activation of FAK/Src signaling. We show that integrin signaling reduces E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion in outer cells, and provide genetic evidence that this regulation is necessary for initiation of branching. Our study suggests that regulation of cell motility and adhesion by local niche cues initiates pancreas branching morphogenesis. PMID:26748698

  12. Reverse Signaling by Semaphorin-6A Regulates Cellular Aggregation and Neuronal Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Branguli, Francesc; Zagar, Yvrick; Shanley, Daniel K.; Graef, Isabella A.; Chédotal, Alain; Mitchell, Kevin J.

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane semaphorin, Sema6A, has important roles in axon guidance, cell migration and neuronal connectivity in multiple regions of the nervous system, mediated by context-dependent interactions with plexin receptors, PlxnA2 and PlxnA4. Here, we demonstrate that Sema6A can also signal cell-autonomously, in two modes, constitutively, or in response to higher-order clustering mediated by either PlxnA2-binding or chemically induced multimerisation. Sema6A activation stimulates recruitment of Abl to the cytoplasmic domain of Sema6A and phos¡phorylation of this cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase, as well as phosphorylation of additional cytoskeletal regulators. Sema6A reverse signaling affects the surface area and cellular complexity of non-neuronal cells and aggregation and neurite formation of primary neurons in vitro. Sema6A also interacts with PlxnA2 in cis, which reduces binding by PlxnA2 of Sema6A in trans but not vice versa. These experiments reveal the complex nature of Sema6A biochemical functions and the molecular logic of the context-dependent interactions between Sema6A and PlxnA2. PMID:27392094

  13. Comparing the effects of nano-sized sugarcane fiber with cellulose and psyllium on hepatic cellular signaling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhong Q; Yu, Yongmei; Zhang, Xian H; Floyd, Z Elizabeth; Boudreau, Anik; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T

    2012-01-01

    Aim To compare the effects of dietary fibers on hepatic cellular signaling in mice. Methods Mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 9/group): high-fat diet (HFD) control, cellulose, psyllium, and sugarcane fiber (SCF) groups. All mice were fed a HFD with or without 10% dietary fiber (w/w) for 12 weeks. Body weight, food intake, fasting glucose, and fasting insulin levels were measured. At the end of the study, hepatic fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 21, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and insulin signaling protein content were determined. Results Hepatic FGF21 content was significantly lowered, but βKlotho, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha proteins were significantly increased in the SCF group compared with those in the HFD group (P < 0.01). SCF supplementation also significantly enhanced insulin and AMPK signaling, as well as decreased hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol in comparison with the HFD mice. The study has shown that dietary fiber, especially SCF, significantly attenuates lipid accumulation in the liver by enhancing hepatic FGF21, insulin, and AMPK signaling in mice fed a HFD. Conclusion This study suggests that the modulation of gastrointestinal factors by dietary fibers may play a key role in both enhancing hepatic multiple cellular signaling and reducing lipid accumulation. PMID:22787396

  14. The Roles of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cellular Signaling and Stress Response in Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaobai; Van Aken, Olivier; Schwarzländer, Markus; Belt, Katharina; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria produce ATP via respiratory oxidation of organic acids and transfer of electrons to O2 via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This process produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) at various rates that can impact respiratory and cellular function, affecting a variety of signaling processes in the cell. Roles in redox signaling, retrograde signaling, plant hormone action, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens have been attributed to ROS generated in plant mitochondria (mtROS). The shortcomings of the black box-idea of mtROS are discussed in the context of mechanistic considerations and the measurement of mtROS The overall aim of this update is to better define our current understanding of mtROS and appraise their potential influence on cellular function in plants. Furthermore, directions for future research are provided, along with suggestions to increase reliability of mtROS measurements. PMID:27021189

  15. Overexpression of Wnt-1 in thyrocytes enhances cellular growth but suppresses transcription of the thyroperoxidase gene via different signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Bae; Lewis, Christopher J; McCall, Kelly D; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Aimee D; Moon, Randall T; Kohn, Leonard D

    2007-04-01

    Wnt binding to cell surface receptors can activate a 'canonical' pathway that increases cellular beta-catenin or a 'noncanonical' Ca(++) pathway which can increase protein kinase C (PKC) activity. Although components of both Wnt/beta-catenin-signaling pathways exist in thyrocytes, their biological role is largely unknown. In evaluating the biological role of Wnt signaling in differentiated FRTL-5 thyroid cells, we showed that TSH increased canonical Wnt-1 but, surprisingly, decreased the active form of beta-catenin. Transient overexpression of Wnt-1 or beta-catenin in FRTL-5 cells increased active beta-catenin (ABC), decreased thyroperoxidase (TPO) mRNA, and suppressed TPO-promoter activity. The target of beta-catenin suppressive action was a consensus T cell factor/lymphoid enhancing factor (TCF/LEF)-binding site 5'-A/T A/T CAAAG-3', -137 to -129 bp on the rat TPO promoter. beta-Catenin overexpression significantly increased complex formation between beta-catenin/TCF-1 and an oligonucleotide containing the TCF/LEF sequence, suggesting that the beta-catenin/TCF-1 complex acts as a transcriptional repressor of the TPO gene. Stable over-expression of Wnt-1 in FRTL-5 cells significantly increased the growth rate without increasing beta-catenin levels. Increased growth was blunted by a PKC inhibitor, staurosporin. Wnt-1 overexpression increased serine phosphorylation, without affecting tyrosine phosphorylation, of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein. In addition, these final results suggest that TSH-induced increase in Wnt-1 levels in thyrocytes contributes to enhanced cellular growth via a PKC pathway that increases STAT3 serine phosphorylation and activation, whereas TSH-induced decrease in activation of beta-catenin simultaneously relieves transcriptional suppression of TPO. We hypothesize that Wnt signaling contributes to the ability of TSH to simultaneously increase cell growth and functional, thyroid-specific, gene expression

  16. Redox modulation of cellular metabolism through targeted degradation of signaling proteins by the proteasome

    SciTech Connect

    Squier, Thomas C.

    2006-02-01

    Under conditions of oxidative stress, the 20S proteasome plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis through the selective degradation of oxidized and damaged proteins. This adaptive stress response is distinct from ubiquitin-dependent pathways in that oxidized proteins are recognized and degraded in an ATP-independent mechanism, which can involve the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Like the regulatory complexes 19S and 11S REG, Hsp90 tightly associates with the 20S proteasome to mediate the recognition of aberrant proteins for degradation. In the case of the calcium signaling protein calmodulin, proteasomal degradation results from the oxidation of a single surface exposed methionine (i.e., Met145); oxidation of the other eight methionines has a minimal effect on the recognition and degradation of calmodulin by the proteasome. Since cellular concentrations of calmodulin are limiting, the targeted degradation of this critical signaling protein under conditions of oxidative stress will result in the downregulation of cellular metabolism, serving as a feedback regulation to diminish the generation of reactive oxygen species. The targeted degradation of critical signaling proteins, such as calmodulin, can function as sensors of oxidative stress to downregulate global rates of metabolism and enhance cellular survival.

  17. Imaging the coordination of multiple signaling activities in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Christopher M.; Elliott, Hunter; Danuser, Gaudenz; Hahn, Klaus M.

    2013-01-01

    Preface Cellular signal transduction occurs in complex and redundant interaction networks that are best examined at the level of single cells by simultaneously monitoring the activation dynamics of multiple components. Recent advances in biosensor technology have made it possible to visualize and quantify the activation of multiple network nodes in the same living cell. The precision and scope of this approach has been greatly extended by novel computational approaches to determine the relationships between different networks, studied in separate cells. PMID:22016058

  18. Shedding of glycan-modifying enzymes by signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) regulates cellular N-glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Matthias; Künzel, Ulrike; Higel, Fabian; Kuhn, Peer-Hendrik; Colombo, Alessio; Fukumori, Akio; Haug-Kröper, Martina; Klier, Bärbel; Grammer, Gudula; Seidl, Andreas; Schröder, Bernd; Obst, Reinhard; Steiner, Harald; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Haass, Christian; Fluhrer, Regina

    2014-01-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmunity, tumour progression and metastasis. Signal peptide peptidase-like 3 (SPPL3) is an intramembrane-cleaving aspartyl protease of the GxGD type. Its physiological function, however, has remained enigmatic, since presently no physiological substrates have been identified. We demonstrate that SPPL3 alters the pattern of cellular N-glycosylation by triggering the proteolytic release of active site-containing ectodomains of glycosidases and glycosyltransferases such as N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase V, β-1,3 N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 and β-1,4 galactosyltransferase 1. Cleavage of these enzymes leads to a reduction in their cellular activity. In line with that, reduced expression of SPPL3 results in a hyperglycosylation phenotype, whereas elevated SPPL3 expression causes hypoglycosylation. Thus, SPPL3 plays a central role in an evolutionary highly conserved post-translational process in eukaryotes. PMID:25354954

  19. Cellular Signaling Networks Function as Generalized Wiener-Kolmogorov Filters to Suppress Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-10-01

    Cellular signaling involves the transmission of environmental information through cascades of stochastic biochemical reactions, inevitably introducing noise that compromises signal fidelity. Each stage of the cascade often takes the form of a kinase-phosphatase push-pull network, a basic unit of signaling pathways whose malfunction is linked with a host of cancers. We show that this ubiquitous enzymatic network motif effectively behaves as a Wiener-Kolmogorov optimal noise filter. Using concepts from umbral calculus, we generalize the linear Wiener-Kolmogorov theory, originally introduced in the context of communication and control engineering, to take nonlinear signal transduction and discrete molecule populations into account. This allows us to derive rigorous constraints for efficient noise reduction in this biochemical system. Our mathematical formalism yields bounds on filter performance in cases important to cellular function—such as ultrasensitive response to stimuli. We highlight features of the system relevant for optimizing filter efficiency, encoded in a single, measurable, dimensionless parameter. Our theory, which describes noise control in a large class of signal transduction networks, is also useful both for the design of synthetic biochemical signaling pathways and the manipulation of pathways through experimental probes such as oscillatory input.

  20. Loss of a Conserved tRNA Anticodon Modification Perturbs Cellular Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zinshteyn, Boris; Gilbert, Wendy V.

    2013-01-01

    Transfer RNA (tRNA) modifications enhance the efficiency, specificity and fidelity of translation in all organisms. The anticodon modification mcm5s2U34 is required for normal growth and stress resistance in yeast; mutants lacking this modification have numerous phenotypes. Mutations in the homologous human genes are linked to neurological disease. The yeast phenotypes can be ameliorated by overexpression of specific tRNAs, suggesting that the modifications are necessary for efficient translation of specific codons. We determined the in vivo ribosome distributions at single codon resolution in yeast strains lacking mcm5s2U. We found accumulations at AAA, CAA, and GAA codons, suggesting that translation is slow when these codons are in the ribosomal A site, but these changes appeared too small to affect protein output. Instead, we observed activation of the GCN4-mediated stress response by a non-canonical pathway. Thus, loss of mcm5s2U causes global effects on gene expression due to perturbation of cellular signaling. PMID:23935536

  1. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on angiogenesis and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Bharathi Devi, S R; Dhivya M, Aloysius; Sulochana, K N

    2016-09-01

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studies have reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate copper trafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in relation to angiogenesis has to be further explored. The intracellular copper levels when in excess are deleterious and certain mutations of copper chaperones have been shown to induce cell death and influence various cellular metabolisms. The study of these chaperones will be helpful in understanding the players in the cascade of events in angiogenesis and their role in cellular metabolic pathways. In this review we have briefly listed the copper chaperones associated with angiogenic and metabolic signalling and their function. PMID:27581939

  2. Autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yihua; Wang, Xiao Dan; Lapi, Eleonora; Sullivan, Alexandra; Jia, Wei; He, You-Wen; Ratnayaka, Indrika; Zhong, Shan; Goldin, Robert D.; Goemans, Christoph G.; Tolkovsky, Aviva M.; Lu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    RAS is frequently mutated in human cancers and has opposing effects on autophagy and tumorigenesis. Identifying determinants of the cellular responses to RAS is therefore vital in cancer research. Here, we show that autophagic activity dictates the cellular response to oncogenic RAS. N-terminal Apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2) mediates RAS-induced senescence and inhibits autophagy. Oncogenic RAS-expressing ASPP2(Δ3/Δ3) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that escape senescence express a high level of ATG5/ATG12. Consistent with the notion that autophagy levels control the cellular response to oncogenic RAS, overexpressing ATG5, but not autophagy-deficient ATG5 mutant K130R, bypasses RAS-induced senescence, whereas ATG5 or ATG3 deficiency predisposes to it. Mechanistically, ASPP2 inhibits RAS-induced autophagy by competing with ATG16 to bind ATG5/ATG12 and preventing ATG16/ATG5/ATG12 formation. Hence, ASPP2 modulates oncogenic RAS-induced autophagic activity to dictate the cellular response to RAS: to proliferate or senesce. PMID:22847423

  3. IMPACT OF CELLULAR MICROENVIRONMENT AND MECHANICAL PERTURBATION ON CALCIUM SIGNALLING IN MENISCUS FIBROCHONDROCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Han, W.M.; Heo, S-J.; Driscoll, T.P.; Boggs, M.E.; Duncan, R.L.; Mauck, R.L.; Elliott, D.M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical signals regulate a multitude of cell functions and ultimately govern fibrous tissue growth, maintenance and repair. Such mechanotransduction processes often involve modulation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). However, most studies interrogate these responses in cells in simplified culture systems, thereby removing potentially important inputs from the native extracellular microenvironment. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the intracellular calcium response of meniscus fibrochondrocytes (MFCs) is dependent on both the microenvironmental context in which this perturbation is applied and on the tensile deformation. Using a custom micro-mechanical tester mounted on a confocal microscope, intracellular calcium activity in MFCs in response to incremental tissue strains (0, 3, 6 and 9 %) was monitored in situ (i.e., in the native tissues) on MFC-seeded aligned scaffolds and MFC-seeded silicone membranes. The [Ca2+]i regulation by MFCs within the native meniscus tissue microenvironment was considerably different from [Ca2+]i regulation by MFCs on either aligned nanofibrous scaffolds or flat silicone membranes. Additionally, increasing levels of tensile deformation resulted in a greater number of responding cells, both in situ and in vitro, while having no effects on temporal characteristics of [Ca2+]i signalling. Collectively, these findings have significant implications for mechanobiology of load-bearing fibrous tissues and their responses to injury and degeneration. In addition, from a tissue engineering perspective, the findings establish cellular benchmarks for maturing engineered constructs, where native tissue-like calcium mechano-regulation may be an important outcome parameter to achieve mechanical functionality comparable to native tissue. PMID:24908425

  4. Compartmentalized signaling by GPI-anchored ephrin-A5 requires the Fyn tyrosine kinase to regulate cellular adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Davy, Alice; Gale, Nicholas W.; Murray, Elizabeth W.; Klinghoffer, Richard A.; Soriano, Philippe; Feuerstein, Claude; Robbins, Stephen M.

    1999-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and their corresponding surface-bound ligands, the ephrins, provide cues to the migration of cells and growth cones during embryonic development. Here we show that ephrin-A5, which is attached to the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane by a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchor, induces compartmentalized signaling within a caveolae-like membrane microdomain when bound to the extracellular domain of its cognate Eph receptor. The physiological response induced by this signaling event is concomitant with a change in the cellular architecture and adhesion of the ephrin-A5-expressing cells and requires the activity of the Fyn protein tyrosine kinase. This study stresses the relevance of bidirectional signaling involving the ephrins and Eph receptors during brain development. PMID:10601038

  5. Label free detection of optogenetically stimulated cellular activity by low coherence interferometry (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Batabyal, Subrata; Dave, Digant P.; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2016-03-01

    Detecting cellular activity in sub-millisecond timescale and micrometer resolution without using invasive means has been a long standing goal in the study of cellular networks. Here, we have employed phase sensitive low coherence interferometry for detecting optogenetically stimulated activity of cells. Nanoscale changes in optical path length (due to change in refractive index and changes in cell thickness) occur when cells are activated, which we aim to detect by phase sensitive low coherence interferometry. A low coherence interferometry and patch-clamp electrophysiology systems were integrated with an inverted fluorescence microscope. Blue laser beam was coupled to the electrophysiology-interferometric detection system for optogenetic stimulation. The phase-sensitive measurements were carried out on Channelrhodopsin-2 sensitized cells (identified by YFP fluorescence) as well as control cells in reflection mode for different intensities and exposures of optogenetic stimulation beam. This method offers good temporal and spatial resolution without using exogenous labeling. Results of studies on all optical stimulation and detection of cellular activity will be presented. Interpretation of the optical activity signals will be discussed in context with changes in cell physiology during stimulation. We will also discuss the potential sources of various artifacts in optical/electrical detection of cellular activity during optical stimulation.

  6. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Protein Modifies Cell Membranes, Inhibits Cell Signaling, and Reduces Prion Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Clive; Williams, Alun

    2011-01-01

    Prion diseases occur following the conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into a disease related, protease-resistant isoform (PrPSc). In these studies, a cell painting technique was used to introduce PrPC to prion-infected neuronal cell lines (ScGT1, ScN2a, or SMB cells). The addition of PrPC resulted in increased PrPSc formation that was preceded by an increase in the cholesterol content of cell membranes and increased activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). In contrast, although PrPC lacking one of the two acyl chains from its glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (PrPC-G-lyso-PI) bound readily to cells, it did not alter the amount of cholesterol in cell membranes, was not found within detergent-resistant membranes (lipid rafts), and did not activate cPLA2. It remained within cells for longer than PrPC with a conventional GPI anchor and was not converted to PrPSc. Moreover, the addition of high amounts of PrPC-G-lyso-PI displaced cPLA2 from PrPSc-containing lipid rafts, reduced the activation of cPLA2, and reduced PrPSc formation in all three cell lines. In addition, ScGT1 cells treated with PrPC-G-lyso-PI did not transmit infection following intracerebral injection to mice. We propose that that the chemical composition of the GPI anchor attached to PrPC modified the local membrane microenvironments that control cell signaling, the fate of PrPC, and hence PrPSc formation. In addition, our observations raise the possibility that pharmacological modification of GPI anchors might constitute a novel therapeutic approach to prion diseases. PMID:21212283

  7. A new cellular nonlinear network emulation on FPGA for EEG signal processing in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Jens; Müller, Jan; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2011-05-01

    For processing of EEG signals, we propose a new architecture for the hardware emulation of discrete-time Cellular Nonlinear Networks (DT-CNN). Our results show the importance of a high computational accuracy in EEG signal prediction that cannot be achieved with existing analogue VLSI circuits. The refined architecture of the processing elements and its resource schedule, the cellular network structure with local couplings, the FPGA-based embedded system containing the DT-CNN, and the data flow in the entire system will be discussed in detail. The proposed DT-CNN design has been implemented and tested on an Xilinx FPGA development platform. The embedded co-processor with a multi-threading kernel is utilised for control and pre-processing tasks and data exchange to the host via Ethernet. The performance of the implemented DT-CNN has been determined for a popular example and compared to that of a conventional computer.

  8. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  9. The Carrying Capacity Under Four-Aspect Color Light Automatic Block Signaling Based on Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Yuan; Qian, Yong-Sheng; Guang, Xiao-Ping; Zeng, Jun-Wei; Jia, Zhi-Long; Wang, Xin

    2013-05-01

    With the application of the dynamic control system, Cellular Automata model has become a valued tool for the simulation of human behavior and traffic flow. As an integrated kind of railway signal-control pattern, the four-aspect color light automatic block signaling has accounted for 50% in the signal-control system in China. Thus, it is extremely important to calculate correctly its carrying capacity under the automatic block signaling. Based on this fact the paper proposes a new kind of "cellular automata model" for the four-aspect color light automatic block signaling under different speed states. It also presents rational rules for the express trains with higher speed overtaking trains with lower speed in a same or adjacent section and the departing rules in some intermediate stations. In it, the state of mixed-speed trains running in the section composed of many stations is simulated with CA model, and the train-running diagram is acquired accordingly. After analyzing the relevant simulation results, the needed data are achieved herewith for the variation of section carrying capacity, the average train delay, the train speed with the change of mixed proportion, as well as the distance between the adjacent stations.

  10. Optical Tools to Investigate Cellular Activity in the Intestinal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Boesmans, Werend; Hao, Marlene M; Berghe, Pieter Vanden

    2015-01-01

    Live imaging has become an essential tool to investigate the coordinated activity and output of cellular networks. Within the last decade, 2 Nobel prizes have been awarded to recognize innovations in the field of imaging: one for the discovery, use, and optimization of the green fluorescent protein (2008) and the second for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy (2014). New advances in both optogenetics and microscopy now enable researchers to record and manipulate activity from specific populations of cells with better contrast and resolution, at higher speeds, and deeper into live tissues. In this review, we will discuss some of the recent developments in microscope technology and in the synthesis of fluorescent probes, both synthetic and genetically encoded. We focus on how live imaging of cellular physiology has progressed our understanding of the control of gastrointestinal motility, and we discuss the hurdles to overcome in order to apply the novel tools in the field of neurogastroenterology and motility. PMID:26130630

  11. Osteoporosis and alzheimer pathology: Role of cellular stress response and hormetic redox signaling in aging and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Koverech, Guido; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Koverech, Angela; Lodato, Francesca; Scuto, Maria; Salinaro, Angela T.; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Calabrese, Edward J.; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and osteoporosis are multifactorial progressive degenerative disorders. Increasing evidence shows that osteoporosis and hip fracture are common complication observed in AD patients, although the mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging as intracellular redox signaling molecules involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include lipoperoxidation and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. ROS generation, which is implicated in the regulation of cellular stress response mechanisms, is an integrated, highly regulated, process under control of redox sensitive genes coding for redox proteins called vitagenes. Vitagenes, encoding for proteins such as heat shock proteins (Hsps) Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin, and the sirtuin protein, represent a systems controlling a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways relevant to life span and involved in the preservation of cellular homeostasis under stress conditions. Consistently, nutritional anti-oxidants have demonstrated their neuroprotective potential through a hormetic-dependent activation of vitagenes. The biological relevance of dose–response affects those strategies pointing to the optimal dosing to patients in the treatment of numerous diseases. Thus, the heat shock response has become an important hormetic target for novel cytoprotective strategies focusing on the pharmacological development of compounds capable of modulating stress response mechanisms. Here we discuss possible signaling mechanisms involved in the activation of vitagenes which, relevant to bone remodeling and through enhancement of cellular stress resistance provide a rationale to limit the deleterious consequences associated to homeostasis disruption with consequent impact on the aging process. PMID:24959146

  12. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of SETD8 with Cellular Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SETD8/SET8/Pr-SET7/KMT5A is the sole protein lysine methyltransferase (PKMT) known to monomethylate lysine 20 of histone H4 in vivo. SETD8’s methyltransferase activity has been implicated in many essential cellular processes including DNA replication, DNA damage response, transcription modulation, and cell cycle regulation. Developing SETD8 inhibitors with cellular activity is a key step toward elucidating the diverse roles of SETD8 via convenient pharmacological perturbation. From the hits of a prior high throughput screen (HTS), SPS8I1–3 (NSC663284, BVT948, and ryuvidine) were validated as potent SETD8 inhibitors. These compounds contain different structural motifs and inhibit SETD8 via distinct modes. More importantly, these compounds show cellular activity by suppressing the H4K20me1 mark of SETD8 and recapitulate characteristic S/G2/M-phase cell cycle defects as observed for RNAi-mediated SETD8 knockdown. The commonality of SPS8I1–3 against SETD8, together with their distinct structures and mechanisms for SETD8 inhibition, argues for the collective application of these compounds as SETD8 inhibitors. PMID:25137013

  13. Gβ4γ1 as a modulator of M3 muscarinic receptor signalling and novel roles of Gβ1 subunits in the modulation of cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahriar M; Min, Adam; Gora, Sarah; Houranieh, Geeda M; Campden, Rhiannon; Robitaille, Mélanie; Trieu, Phan; Pétrin, Darlaine; Jacobi, Ashley M; Behlke, Mark A; Angers, Stéphane; Hébert, Terence E

    2015-08-01

    Much is known about the how Gβγ subunits regulate effectors in response to G protein-coupled receptor stimulation. However, there is still a lot we don't know about how specific combinations of Gβ and Gγ are wired into different signalling pathways. Here, using an siRNA screen for different Gβ and Gγ subunits, we examined an endogenous M3 muscarinic receptor signalling pathway in HEK 293 cells. We observed that Gβ(4) subunits were critical for calcium signalling and a downstream surrogate measured as ERK1/2 MAP kinase activity. A number of Gγ subunits could partner with Gβ(4) but the best coupling was seen via Gβ(4)γ(1). Intriguingly, knocking down Gβ(1) actually increased signalling through the M3-mAChR most likely via an increase in Gβ(4) levels. We noted that Gβ(1) occupies the promoter of Gβ(4) and may participate in maturation of its mRNA. This highlights a new role for Gβγ signalling beyond their canonical roles in cellular signalling. PMID:25916507

  14. Chapter Three - Ubiquitination and Protein Turnover of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinases in GPCR Signaling and Cellular Regulation.

    PubMed

    Penela, P

    2016-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for regulating a wide variety of physiological processes, and distinct mechanisms for GPCR inactivation exist to guarantee correct receptor functionality. One of the widely used mechanisms is receptor phosphorylation by specific G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), leading to uncoupling from G proteins (desensitization) and receptor internalization. GRKs and β-arrestins also participate in the assembly of receptor-associated multimolecular complexes, thus initiating alternative G-protein-independent signaling events. In addition, the abundant GRK2 kinase has diverse "effector" functions in cellular migration, proliferation, and metabolism homeostasis by means of the phosphorylation or interaction with non-GPCR partners. Altered expression of GRKs (particularly of GRK2 and GRK5) occurs during pathological conditions characterized by impaired GPCR signaling including inflammatory syndromes, cardiovascular disease, and tumor contexts. It is increasingly appreciated that different pathways governing GRK protein stability play a role in the modulation of kinase levels in normal and pathological conditions. Thus, enhanced GRK2 degradation by the proteasome pathway occurs upon GPCR stimulation, what allows cellular adaptation to chronic stimulation in a physiological setting. β-arrestins participate in this process by facilitating GRK2 phosphorylation by different kinases and by recruiting diverse E3 ubiquitin ligase to the receptor complex. Different proteolytic systems (ubiquitin-proteasome, calpains), chaperone activities and signaling pathways influence the stability of GRKs in different ways, thus endowing specificity to GPCR regulation as protein turnover of GRKs can be differentially affected. Therefore, modulation of protein stability of GRKs emerges as a versatile mechanism for feedback regulation of GPCR signaling and basic cellular processes. PMID:27378756

  15. The cellular response to vascular endothelial growth factors requires co-ordinated signal transduction, trafficking and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Fearnley, Gareth W.; Tomlinson, Darren C.; Harrison, Michael A.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2015-01-01

    VEGFs (vascular endothelial growth factors) are a family of conserved disulfide-linked soluble secretory glycoproteins found in higher eukaryotes. VEGFs mediate a wide range of responses in different tissues including metabolic homoeostasis, cell proliferation, migration and tubulogenesis. Such responses are initiated by VEGF binding to soluble and membrane-bound VEGFRs (VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases) and co-receptors. VEGF and receptor splice isoform diversity further enhances complexity of membrane protein assembly and function in signal transduction pathways that control multiple cellular responses. Different signal transduction pathways are simultaneously activated by VEGFR–VEGF complexes with membrane trafficking along the endosome–lysosome network further modulating signal output from multiple enzymatic events associated with such pathways. Balancing VEGFR–VEGF signal transduction with trafficking and proteolysis is essential in controlling the intensity and duration of different intracellular signalling events. Dysfunction in VEGF-regulated signal transduction is important in chronic disease states including cancer, atherosclerosis and blindness. This family of growth factors and receptors is an important model system for understanding human disease pathology and developing new therapeutics for treating such ailments. PMID:26285805

  16. Cellular Signaling by Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) and Their Receptors (FGFRs) in Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotton, Leanne M.; O’Bryan, Moira K.; Hinton, Barry T.

    2008-01-01

    The major function of the reproductive system is to ensure the survival of the species by passing on hereditary traits from one generation to the next. This is accomplished through the production of gametes and the generation of hormones that function in the maturation and regulation of the reproductive system. It is well established that normal development and function of the male reproductive system is mediated by endocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), their receptors (FGFRs), and signaling cascades have been implicated in a diverse range of cellular processes including: proliferation, apoptosis, cell survival, chemotaxis, cell adhesion, motility, and differentiation. The maintenance and regulation of correct FGF signaling is evident from human and mouse genetic studies which demonstrate that mutations leading to disruption of FGF signaling cause a variety of developmental disorders including dominant skeletal diseases, infertility, and cancer. Over the course of this review, we will provide evidence for differential expression of FGFs/FGFRs in the testis, male germ cells, the epididymis, the seminal vesicle, and the prostate. We will show that this signaling cascade has an important role in sperm development and maturation. Furthermore, we will demonstrate that FGF/FGFR signaling is essential for normal epididymal function and prostate development. To this end, we will provide evidence for the involvement of the FGF signaling system in the regulation and maintenance of the male reproductive system. PMID:18216218

  17. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  18. Mitochondrial Ion Channels/Transporters as Sensors and Regulators of Cellular Redox Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Shin-Young; Jhun, Bong Sook; Hurst, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and the electron transport chain (ETC) serve as key sensors and regulators for cellular redox signaling, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) in mitochondria, and balancing cell survival and death. Although the functional and pharmacological characteristics of mitochondrial ion transport mechanisms have been extensively studied for several decades, the majority of the molecular identities that are responsible for these channels/transporters have remained a mystery until very recently. Recent Advances: Recent breakthrough studies uncovered the molecular identities of the diverse array of major mitochondrial ion channels/transporters, including the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter pore, mitochondrial permeability transition pore, and mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K+ channel. This new information enables us to form detailed molecular and functional characterizations of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and their roles in mitochondrial redox signaling. Critical Issues: Redox-mediated post-translational modifications of mitochondrial ion channels/transporters and ETC serve as key mechanisms for the spatiotemporal control of mitochondrial ROS/RNS generation. Future Directions: Identification of detailed molecular mechanisms for redox-mediated regulation of mitochondrial ion channels will enable us to find novel therapeutic targets for many diseases that are associated with cellular redox signaling and mitochondrial ion channels/transporters. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 987–1006. PMID:24180309

  19. Anchoring Dipalmitoyl Phosphoethanolamine to Nanoparticles Boosts Cellular Uptake and Fluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waiczies, Sonia; Lepore, Stefano; Sydow, Karl; Drechsler, Susanne; Ku, Min-Chi; Martin, Conrad; Lorenz, Dorothea; Schütz, Irene; Reimann, Henning M.; Purfürst, Bettina; Dieringer, Matthias A.; Waiczies, Helmar; Dathe, Margitta; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2015-02-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) methods to detect and quantify fluorine (19F) nuclei provide the opportunity to study the fate of cellular transplants in vivo. Cells are typically labeled with 19F nanoparticles, introduced into living organisms and tracked by 19F MR methods. Background-free imaging and quantification of cell numbers are amongst the strengths of 19F MR-based cell tracking but challenges pertaining to signal sensitivity and cell detection exist. In this study we aimed to overcome these limitations by manipulating the aminophospholipid composition of 19F nanoparticles in order to promote their uptake by dendritic cells (DCs). As critical components of biological membranes, phosphatidylethanolamines (PE) were studied. Both microscopy and MR spectroscopy methods revealed a striking (at least one order of magnitude) increase in cytoplasmic uptake of 19F nanoparticles in DCs following enrichment with 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE). The impact of enriching 19F nanoparticles with PE on DC migration was also investigated. By manipulating the nanoparticle composition and as a result the cellular uptake we provide here one way of boosting 19F signal per cell in order to overcome some of the limitations related to 19F MR signal sensitivity. The boost in signal is ultimately necessary to detect and track cells in vivo.

  20. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    PubMed

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response. PMID:18851081

  1. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  2. Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms Underpinning Macrophage Activation during Remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Amy F.; Miron, Veronique E.

    2016-01-01

    Remyelination is an example of central nervous system (CNS) regeneration, whereby myelin is restored around demyelinated axons, re-establishing saltatory conduction and trophic/metabolic support. In progressive multiple sclerosis, remyelination is limited or fails altogether which is considered to contribute to axonal damage/loss and consequent disability. Macrophages have critical roles in both CNS damage and regeneration, such as remyelination. This diverse range in functions reflects the ability of macrophages to acquire tissue microenvironment-specific activation states. This activation is dynamically regulated during efficient regeneration, with a switch from pro-inflammatory to inflammation-resolution/pro-regenerative phenotypes. Although, some molecules and pathways have been implicated in the dynamic activation of macrophages, such as NFκB, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning plasticity of macrophage activation are unclear. Identifying mechanisms regulating macrophage activation to pro-regenerative phenotypes may lead to novel therapeutic strategies to promote remyelination in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27446913

  3. In vitro Cellular Uptake and Dimerization of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (STAT3) Identify the Photosensitizing and Imaging-Potential of Isomeric Photosensitizers Derived from Chlorophyll-a and Bacteriochlorophyll-a

    PubMed Central

    Srivatsan, Avinash; Wang, Yanfang; Joshi, Penny; Sajjad, Munawwar; Chen, Yihui; Liu, Chao; Thankppan, Krishnakumar; Missert, Joseph R.; Tracy, Erin; Morgan, Janet; Rigual, Nestor; Baumann, Heinz; Pandey, Ravindra K.

    2011-01-01

    Among the photosensitizers investigated, both ring-D and ring-B reduced chlorins containing the m-iodobenzyloxyethyl group at position-3 and a carboxylic acid functionality at position-172 showed highest uptake by tumor cells and light-dependent photo reaction that correlated with maximal tumor-imaging [positron emission tomography (PET) and fluorescence] and long-term photodynamic therapy (PDT) efficacy in BALB/c mice bearing Colon26 tumors. However, among the ring-D reduced compounds, the isomer containing 1′-m-iobenzyloxyethyl group at position-3 was more effective than the corresponding 8-(1′-m-iodobenzyloxyethyl) derivative. All photosensitizers showed maximum uptake by tumor tissue 24h after injection and the tumors exposed with light at low fluence and fluence rates (128 J/cm2, 14 mW/cm2) produced significantly enhanced tumor eradication than those exposed at higher fluence and fluence rate (135 J/cm,2 75mW/cm2). Interestingly, dose-dependent cellular uptake of the compounds and light-dependent STAT3 dimerization have emerged as sensitive rapid indicators for PDT efficacy in vitro and in vivo and could be used as in vitro/in vivo biomarkers for evaluating and optimizing the in vivo treatment parameters of the existing and new PDT candidates. PMID:21842893

  4. Growth Hormone Effects in Immune Stress: AKT/eNOS Signaling Module in the Cellular Response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The activation of the constitutive endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) and expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) with subsequent nitric oxide production are among the early cellular responses that follow in a systemic exposure of animals to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Growth hormone (GH) has been sh...

  5. Thioredoxin-dependent Redox Regulation of Cellular Signaling and Stress Response through Reversible Oxidation of Methionines

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2011-06-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a common feature of many forms of stress to which plants are exposed. Successful adaptation to changing environmental conditions requires sensitive sensors of ROS such as protein-bound methionines that are converted to their corresponding methionine sulfoxides, which in turn can influence cellular signaling pathways. Such a signaling protein is calmodulin, which represents an early and central point in calcium signaling pathways important to stress response in plants. We describe recent work elucidating fundamental mechanisms of reversible methionine oxidation within calmodulin, including the sensitivity of individual methionines within plant and animal calmodulin to ROS, the structural and functional consequences of their oxidation, and the interactions of oxidized calmodulin with methionine sulfoxide reductase enzymes.

  6. Activation of Notch-Mediated Protective Signaling in the Myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Gude, Natalie A.; Emmanuel, Gregory; Wu, Weitao; Cottage, Christopher T.; Fischer, Kimberlee; Quijada, Pearl; Muraski, John A.; Alvarez, Roberto; Rubio, Marta; Schaefer, Eric; Sussman, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    The Notch network regulates multiple cellular processes, including cell fate determination, development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, and regeneration. These processes are regulated via Notch-mediated activity that involves hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-Met receptor and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling cascades. The impact of HGF on Notch signaling was assessed following myocardial infarction as well as in cultured cardiomyocytes. Notch1 is activated in border zone cardiomyocytes coincident with nuclear c-Met following infarction. Intramyocardial injection of HGF enhances Notch1 and Akt activation in adult mouse myocardium. Corroborating evidence in cultured cardiomyocytes shows treatment with HGF or insulin increases levels of Notch effector Hes1 in immunoblots, whereas overexpression of activated Notch intracellular domain prompts a 3-fold increase in phosphorylated Akt. Infarcted hearts injected with adenoviral vector expressing Notch intracellular domain treatment exhibit improved hemodynamic function in comparison with control mice after 4 weeks, implicating Notch signaling in a cardioprotective role following cardiac injury. These results indicate Notch activation in cardiomyocytes is mediated through c-Met and Akt survival signaling pathways, and Notch1 signaling in turn enhances Akt activity. This mutually supportive crosstalk suggests a positive survival feedback mechanism between Notch and Akt signaling in adult myocardium following injury. PMID:18369158

  7. Resistance exercise biology: manipulation of resistance exercise programme variables determines the responses of cellular and molecular signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Spiering, Barry A; Kraemer, William J; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Armstrong, Lawrence E; Nindl, Bradley C; Volek, Jeff S; Maresh, Carl M

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have elucidated some of the mechanisms that regulate skeletal muscle growth. Logically, muscle physiologists have applied these innovations to the study of resistance exercise (RE), as RE represents the most potent natural stimulus for growth in adult skeletal muscle. However, as this molecular-based line of research progresses to investigations in humans, scientists must appreciate the fundamental principles of RE to effectively design such experiments. Therefore, we present herein an updated paradigm of RE biology that integrates fundamental RE principles with the current knowledge of muscle cellular and molecular signalling. RE invokes a sequential cascade consisting of: (i) muscle activation; (ii) signalling events arising from mechanical deformation of muscle fibres, hormones, and immune/inflammatory responses; (iii) protein synthesis due to increased transcription and translation; and (iv) muscle fibre hypertrophy. In this paradigm, RE is considered an 'upstream' signal that determines specific downstream events. Therefore, manipulation of the acute RE programme variables (i.e. exercise choice, load, volume, rest period lengths, and exercise order) alters the unique 'fingerprint' of the RE stimulus and subsequently modifies the downstream cellular and molecular responses. PMID:18557656

  8. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Ekaterina A.; Orekhov, Alexander N.

    2016-01-01

    Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient's bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization. PMID:26885534

  9. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 couples cellular prion protein to intracellular signalling in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Haas, Laura T; Salazar, Santiago V; Kostylev, Mikhail A; Um, Ji Won; Kaufman, Adam C; Strittmatter, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease-related phenotypes in mice can be rescued by blockade of either cellular prion protein or metabotropic glutamate receptor 5. We sought genetic and biochemical evidence that these proteins function cooperatively as an obligate complex in the brain. We show that cellular prion protein associates via transmembrane metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 with the intracellular protein mediators Homer1b/c, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, and the Alzheimer's disease risk gene product protein tyrosine kinase 2 beta. Coupling of cellular prion protein to these intracellular proteins is modified by soluble amyloid-β oligomers, by mouse brain Alzheimer's disease transgenes or by human Alzheimer's disease pathology. Amyloid-β oligomer-triggered phosphorylation of intracellular protein mediators and impairment of synaptic plasticity in vitro requires Prnp-Grm5 genetic interaction, being absent in transheterozygous loss-of-function, but present in either single heterozygote. Importantly, genetic coupling between Prnp and Grm5 is also responsible for signalling, for survival and for synapse loss in Alzheimer's disease transgenic model mice. Thus, the interaction between metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and cellular prion protein has a central role in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis, and the complex is a potential target for disease-modifying intervention. PMID:26667279

  10. An increase in galectin-3 causes cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ-induced signal transduction and growth inhibition in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Po-Chun; Chen, Chia-Ling; Shan, Yan-Shen; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β facilitates interferon (IFN)-γ signaling by inhibiting Src homology-2 domain-containing phosphatase (SHP) 2. Mutated phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) cause AKT activation and GSK-3β inactivation to induce SHP2-activated cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ in human gastric cancer AGS cells. This study investigated the potential role of galectin-3, which acts upstream of AKT/GSK-3β/SHP2, in gastric cancer cells. Increasing or decreasing galectin-3 altered IFN-γ signaling. Following cisplatin-induced galectin-3 upregulation, surviving cells showed cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ. Galectin-3 induced IFN-γ resistance independent of its extracellular β-galactoside-binding activity. Galectin-3 expression was not regulated by PI3K activation or by a decrease in PTEN. Increased galectin-3 may cause GSK-3β inactivation and SHP2 activation by promoting PDK1-induced AKT phosphorylation at a threonine residue. Overexpression of AKT, inactive GSK-3βR96A, SHP2, or active SHP2D61A caused cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ in IFN-γ-sensitive MKN45 cells. IFN-γ-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in AGS cells were observed until galectin-3 expression was downregulated. These results demonstrate that an increase in galectin-3 facilitates AKT/GSK-3β/SHP2 signaling, causing cellular unresponsiveness to IFN-γ. PMID:26934444

  11. Study of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni antioxidant activities and cellular properties.

    PubMed

    Bender, Cecilia; Graziano, Sara; Zimmermann, Benno F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the antioxidant activities, cytotoxicity and proliferative properties in Stevia rebaudiana leaves and stems. Leaves extracts exhibited a higher antioxidant activity than stems extract, through oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. Stevioside and rebaudioside A, the main sweetening metabolites in stevia leaves, exhibited a low ORAC value in comparison with plant extracts, while did not elicit any CAA. Stevia rebaudiana did not exhibit toxicity against HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) human cells. No proliferative nor catalase modulations were observed in cells treated with such extracts. Our findings support the promising role of stevia that, apart from its sweetness, can act as a source of antioxidants, even at the intracellular level. This activity makes S. rebaudiana crude extract an interesting resource of natural sweetness with antioxidant properties which may find numerous applications in foods and nutritional supplements industries. PMID:26008718

  12. Cellular Interactions and Signaling in NeuroAIDS: Emerging Issues Colloquium

    PubMed Central

    Al-Harthi, Lena; Buch, Shilpa; Geiger, Jonathan D.; Gendelman, Howard E.; He, Johnny; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L.; Kolson, Dennis L.; Rappaport, Jay; Roy, Sabita; Zheng, Jialin; Fox, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    On May 23, 2013 scientific leaders in the neuroAIDS community met at the University of Nebraska Medical Center to discuss cellular interaction and signaling for the third annual human immunodeficiency virus and neuroAIDS colloquium. The meeting continues a series of contemporary scientific issues related to how virus effects the nervous system. In 2011 the focus was on animal models and in 2012 in biomarkers. Here, our 2013 meeting featured ten presentations from outstanding scientists examining how inter- and intra-cellular processes contribute to neuropathogenesis. Talks highlighted emerging issues, findings, and potential therapies, followed by a panel discussion in which controversies in the field and gaps in our current knowledge were identified. The panel discussion was transcribed into the article and published as a field perspective. A link is available where all of the presentations and the concluding discussion can be seen and heard. PMID:24789373

  13. Sprouty gain of function disrupts lens cellular processes and growth by restricting RTK signaling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Eun Hae; Zhao, Guannan; Wang, Qian; Lovicu, Frank J

    2015-10-15

    Sprouty proteins function as negative regulators of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK)-mediated Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway in many varied physiological and developmental processes, inhibiting growth factor-induced cellular proliferation, migration and differentiation. Like other negative regulators, Sprouty proteins are expressed in various organs during development, including the eye; ubiquitously expressed in the optic vesicle, lens pit, optic cup and lens vesicle. Given the synexpression of different antagonists (e.g, Sprouty, Sef, Spred) in the developing lens, to gain a better understanding of their specific role, in particular, their ability to regulate ocular growth factor signaling in lens cells, we characterized transgenic mice overexpressing Sprouty1 or Sprouty2 in the eye. Overexpression of Sprouty in the lens resulted in reduced lens and eye size during ocular morphogenesis, influenced by changes to the lens epithelium, aberrant fiber cell differentiation and compromised de novo maintenance of the lens capsule. Here we demonstrate an important inhibitory role for Sprouty in the regulation of lens cell proliferation and fiber differentiation in situ, potentially through its ability to modulate FGF- (and even EGF-) mediated MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling in lens cells. Whilst growth factor regulation of lens cell proliferation and fiber differentiation are required for orchestrating lens morphogenesis and growth, in turn, antagonists such as Sprouty are just as important for regulating the intracellular signaling pathways driving lens cellular processes. PMID:26375880

  14. On PAR with PARP: cellular stress signaling through poly(ADP-ribose) and PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; Kraus, W. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress responses are mediated through a series of regulatory processes that occur at the genomic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels. These responses require a complex network of sensors and effectors from multiple signaling pathways, including the abundant and ubiquitous nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 functions at the center of cellular stress responses, where it processes diverse signals and, in response, directs cells to specific fates (e.g., DNA repair vs. cell death) based on the type and strength of the stress stimulus. Many of PARP-1's functions in stress response pathways are mediated by its regulated synthesis of PAR, a negatively charged polymer, using NAD+ as a donor of ADP-ribose units. Thus, PARP-1's functions are intimately tied to nuclear NAD+ metabolism and the broader metabolic profile of the cell. Recent studies in cell and animal models have highlighted the roles of PARP-1 and PAR in the response to a wide variety of extrinsic and intrinsic stress signals, including those initiated by oxidative, nitrosative, genotoxic, oncogenic, thermal, inflammatory, and metabolic stresses. These responses underlie pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation-related diseases, and metabolic dysregulation. The development of PARP inhibitors is being pursued as a therapeutic approach to these conditions. In this review, we highlight the newest findings about PARP-1's role in stress responses in the context of the historical data. PMID:22391446

  15. Effect of Redox Balance Alterations on Cellular Localization of LAT and Downstream T-Cell Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gringhuis, Sonja I.; Papendrecht-van der Voort, Ellen A. M.; Leow, Angela; Levarht, E. W. Nivine; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Verweij, Cornelis L.

    2002-01-01

    The integral membrane protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a central adapter protein in the T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling pathways. The cellular localization of LAT is extremely sensitive to intracellular redox balance alterations. Reduced intracellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH), a hallmark of chronic oxidative stress, resulted in the membrane displacement of LAT, abrogated TCR-mediated signaling and consequently hyporesponsiveness of T lymphocytes. The membrane displacement of LAT is accompanied by a considerable difference in the mobility of LAT upon native and nonreducing denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, a finding indicative of a conformational change. Targeted mutation of redox-sensitive cysteine residues within LAT created LAT mutants which remain membrane anchored under conditions of chronic oxidative stress. The expression of redox-insensitive LAT mutants allows for restoration of TCR-mediated signal transduction, whereas CD28-mediated signaling pathways remained impaired. These results are indicative that the membrane displacement of LAT as a result of redox balance alterations is a consequence of a conformational change interfering with the insertion of LAT into the plasma membrane. Conclusively, the data suggest a role for LAT as a crucial intermediate in the sensitivity of TCR signaling and hence T lymphocytes toward chronic oxidative stress. PMID:11756537

  16. SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of CRABPII regulates cellular retinoic acid signaling and modulates embryonic stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Shuang; Huang, Gang; Fan, Wei; Chen, Yue; Ward, James M.; Xu, Xiaojiang; Xu, Qing; Kang, Ashley; McBurney, Michael W.; Fargo, David C.; Hu, Guang; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Zhao, Yingming; Li, Xiaoling

    2014-01-01

    Summary Retinoid homeostasis is critical for normal embryonic development. Both the deficiency and excess of these compounds are associated with congenital malformations. Here we demonstrate that SIRT1, the most conserved mammalian NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, contributes to homeostatic retinoic acid (RA) signaling and modulates mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation in part through deacetylation of cellular retinoic acid binding protein II (CRABPII). We show that RA-mediated acetylation of CRABPII at K102 is essential for its nuclear accumulation and subsequent activation of RA signaling. SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates CRABPII, regulating its subcellular localization. Consequently, SIRT1 deficiency induces hyper-acetylation and nuclear accumulation of CRABPII, enhancing RA signaling and accelerating mESC differentiation in response to RA. Consistently, SIRT1 deficiency is associated with elevated RA signaling and development defects in mice. Our findings reveal a novel molecular mechanism that regulates RA signaling, and highlight the importance of SIRT1 in regulation of ESC pluripotency and embryogenesis. PMID:25155613

  17. Liposome-Mediated Cellular Delivery of Active gp91phox

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Bruno; Liguori, Lavinia; Paclet, Marie-Hélène; Villegas-Mendéz, Ana; Rothe, Romy; Morel, Françoise; Lenormand, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    Background Gp91phox is a transmembrane protein and the catalytic core of the NADPH oxidase complex of neutrophils. Lack of this protein causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe and recurrent infections due to the incapacity of phagocytes to kill microorganisms. Methodology Here we optimize a prokaryotic cell-free expression system to produce integral mammalian membrane proteins. Conclusions Using this system, we over-express truncated forms of the gp91phox protein under soluble form in the presence of detergents or lipids resulting in active proteins with a “native-like” conformation. All the proteins exhibit diaphorase activity in the presence of cytosolic factors (p67phox, p47phox, p40phox and Rac) and arachidonic acid. We also produce proteoliposomes containing gp91phox protein and demonstrate that these proteins exhibit activities similar to their cellular counterpart. The proteoliposomes induce rapid cellular delivery and relocation of recombinant gp91phox proteins to the plasma membrane. Our data support the concept of cell-free expression technology for producing recombinant proteoliposomes and their use for functional and structural studies or protein therapy by complementing deficient cells in gp91phox protein. PMID:17848987

  18. Energy-Efficient Crowdsensing of Human Mobility and Signal Levels in Cellular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Foremski, Paweł; Gorawski, Michał; Grochla, Krzysztof; Polys, Konrad

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a practical application of the crowdsensing idea to measure human mobility and signal coverage in cellular networks. Currently, virtually everyone is carrying a mobile phone, which may be used as a sensor to gather research data by measuring, e.g., human mobility and radio signal levels. However, many users are unwilling to participate in crowdsensing experiments. This work begins with the analysis of the barriers for engaging people in crowdsensing. A survey showed that people who agree to participate in crowdsensing expect a minimum impact on their battery lifetime and phone usage habits. To address these requirements, this paper proposes an application for measuring the location and signal strength data based on energy-efficient GPS tracking, which allows one to perform the measurements of human mobility and radio signal levels with minimum energy utilization and without any engagement of the user. The method described combines measurements from the accelerometer with effective management of the GPS to monitor the user mobility with the decrease in battery lifetime by approximately 20%. To show the applicability of the proposed platform, the sample results of signal level distribution and coverage maps gathered for an LTE network and representing human mobility are shown. PMID:26340633

  19. Activation of hERG3 channel stimulates autophagy and promotes cellular senescence in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Neut, Mathew; Haar, Lauren; Rao, Vidhya; Santha, Sreevidya; Lansu, Katherine; Rana, Basabi; Jones, Walter K.; Gentile, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels play a major factor in maintaining cellular homeostasis but very little is known about the role of these proteins in cancer biology. In this work we have discovered that, the Kv11.3 (hERG3) a plasma-membrane potassium channel plays a critical role in the regulation of autophagy in a cancer cell model. We have found that pharmacologic stimulation of the Kv11.3 channel with a small molecule activator, NS1643 induced autophagy via activation of an AMPK-dependent signaling pathway in melanoma cell line. In addition, we have found that NS1643 produced a strong inhibition of cell proliferation by activating a cellular senescence program. Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy via siRNA targeting AMPK or treatment with hydroxychloroquine an autophagy inhibitor activates apoptosis in NS1643-treated cells. Thus, we propose that, Kv11.3 is a novel mediator of autophagy, autophagy can be a survival mechanism contributing to cellular senescence, and that use of a combinatorial pharmacologic approach of Kv11.3 activator with inhibitors of autophagy represents a novel therapeutic approach against melanoma. PMID:26942884

  20. Thresholds for cellular disruption and activation of the stress response in renal epithelia.

    PubMed

    van Why, S K; Kim, S; Geibel, J; Seebach, F A; Kashgarian, M; Siegel, N J

    1999-08-01

    Renal ischemia causes a rapid fall in cellular ATP, increased intracellular calcium (Ca(i)), and dissociation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase from the cytoskeleton along with initiation of a stress response. We examined changes in Ca(i), Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase detergent solubility, and activation of heat-shock transcription factor (HSF) in relation to graded reduction of ATP in LLC-PK(1) cells to determine whether initiation of the stress response was related to any one of these perturbations alone. Ca(i) increased first at 75% of control ATP. Triton X-100 solubility of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase increased below 70% control ATP. Reducing cellular ATP below 50% control consistently activated HSF. Stepped decrements in cellular ATP below the respective thresholds caused incremental increases in Ca(i), Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase solubility, and HSF activation. ATP depletion activated both HSF1 and HSF2. Proteasome inhibition caused activation of HSF1 and HSF2 in a pattern similar to ATP depletion. Lactate dehydrogenase release remained at control levels irrespective of the degree of ATP depletion. Progressive accumulation of nonnative proteins may be the critical signal for the adaptive induction of the stress response in renal epithelia. PMID:10444577

  1. Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway Induces Cementum Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, Pingping; Ivanovski, Saso; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is important in tooth development but it is unclear whether it can induce cementogenesis and promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues lost because of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of canonical Wnt signaling enhancers on human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLCs) cementogenic differentiation in vitro and cementum repair in a rat periodontal defect model. Canonical Wnt signaling was induced by (1) local injection of lithium chloride; (2) local injection of sclerostin antibody; and (3) local injection of a lentiviral construct overexpressing β-catenin. The results showed that the local activation of canonical Wnt signaling resulted in significant new cellular cementum deposition and the formation of well-organized periodontal ligament fibers, which was absent in the control group. In vitro experiments using hPDLCs showed that the Wnt signaling pathway activators significantly increased mineralization, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene and protein expression of the bone and cementum markers osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), and cementum attachment protein (CAP). Our results show that the activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway can induce in vivo cementum regeneration and in vitro cementogenic differentiation of hPDLCs. PMID:25556853

  2. Signal processing for molecular and cellular biological physics: an emerging field

    PubMed Central

    Little, Max A.; Jones, Nick S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in our ability to watch the molecular and cellular processes of life in action—such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers and Forster fluorescence resonance energy transfer—raise challenges for digital signal processing (DSP) of the resulting experimental data. This article explores the unique properties of such biophysical time series that set them apart from other signals, such as the prevalence of abrupt jumps and steps, multi-modal distributions and autocorrelated noise. It exposes the problems with classical linear DSP algorithms applied to this kind of data, and describes new nonlinear and non-Gaussian algorithms that are able to extract information that is of direct relevance to biological physicists. It is argued that these new methods applied in this context typify the nascent field of biophysical DSP. Practical experimental examples are supplied. PMID:23277603

  3. Signal processing for molecular and cellular biological physics: an emerging field.

    PubMed

    Little, Max A; Jones, Nick S

    2013-02-13

    Recent advances in our ability to watch the molecular and cellular processes of life in action--such as atomic force microscopy, optical tweezers and Forster fluorescence resonance energy transfer--raise challenges for digital signal processing (DSP) of the resulting experimental data. This article explores the unique properties of such biophysical time series that set them apart from other signals, such as the prevalence of abrupt jumps and steps, multi-modal distributions and autocorrelated noise. It exposes the problems with classical linear DSP algorithms applied to this kind of data, and describes new nonlinear and non-Gaussian algorithms that are able to extract information that is of direct relevance to biological physicists. It is argued that these new methods applied in this context typify the nascent field of biophysical DSP. Practical experimental examples are supplied. PMID:23277603

  4. Cellular automaton simulations of a four-leg intersection with two-phase signalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng-Jie; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Hao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we present a cellular automaton (CA) simulation of a signalized intersection. When there is no exclusive lane for left-turn vehicles, through vehicles and left-turn vehicles have to share one lane. Under such situation usually two-phase signalization is adopted, and the conflicts between the two traffic streams need to be analyzed. We use a refined configuration for the intersection simulation: the geometry of the intersection has been considered and vehicles are assumed to move along 1/4 circle arcs. We focus on the averaged travel times on left lanes and their distributions. The diagrams of intersection approach capacities (IACs) and the corresponding phase diagrams are also presented, which depend on the approach flow rates and the percentage of left-turn vehicles. Besides, we find that the minimum green time could be determined by finding out the critical value for the travel times.

  5. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Markers of Inflammation: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Given sex differences in the prevalence of inflammatory disorders with stronger associations in females, this study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on cellular mechanisms that contribute to proinflammatory cytokine activity. In 26 healthy adults (11 females; 15 males), monocyte intracellular proinflammatory cytokine production was repeatedly assessed at 08:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 23:00 h during a baseline period and after partial sleep deprivation (awake from 11 PM to 3 AM). In the morning after a night of sleep loss, monocyte production of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor- α differentially changed between the two sexes. Whereas both females and males showed a marked increase in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the morning immediately after PSD, production of these cytokines during the early- and late evening was increased in the females as compared to decreases in the males. Sleep loss induces a functional alteration of monocyte proinflammatory cytokine responses with females showing greater cellular immune activation as compared to changes in males. These results have implications for understanding the role of sleep disturbance in the differential risk profile for inflammatory disorders between the sexes. PMID:19520155

  6. Activation of cellular immune response in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Mora, A; Pérez-Mateo, M; Viedma, J A; Carballo, F; Sánchez-Payá, J; Liras, G

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammatory mediators have recently been implicated as potential markers of severity in acute pancreatitis. AIMS: To determine the value of neopterin and polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase as markers of activation of cellular immunity and as early predictors of disease severity. PATIENTS: Fifty two non-consecutive patients classified according to their clinical outcome into mild (n = 26) and severe pancreatitis (n = 26). METHODS: Neopterin in serum and the PMN elastase/A1PI complex in plasma were measured during the first three days of hospital stay. RESULTS: Within three days after the onset of acute pancreatitis, PMN elastase was significantly higher in the severe pancreatitis group. Patients with severe disease also showed significantly higher values of neopterin on days 1 and 2 but not on day 3 compared with patients with mild disease. There was a significant correlation between PMN elastase and neopterin values on days 1 and 2. PMN elastase on day 1 predicted disease severity with a sensitivity of 76.7% and a specificity of 91.6%. Neopterin did not surpass PMN elastase in the probability of predicting disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: These data show that activation of cellular immunity is implicated in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis and may be a main contributory factor to disease severity. Neopterin was not superior to PMN elastase in the prediction of severity. PMID:9245935

  7. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  8. Polarized cellular patterns of endocannabinoid production and detection shape cannabinoid signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ladarre, Delphine; Roland, Alexandre B.; Biedzinski, Stefan; Ricobaraza, Ana; Lenkei, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    Neurons display important differences in plasma membrane composition between somatodendritic and axonal compartments, potentially leading to currently unexplored consequences in G-protein-coupled-receptor signaling. Here, by using highly-resolved biosensor imaging to measure local changes in basal levels of key signaling components, we explored features of type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) signaling in individual axons and dendrites of cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Activation of endogenous CB1Rs led to rapid, Gi/o-protein- and cAMP-mediated decrease of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in the somatodendritic compartment. In axons, PKA inhibition was significantly stronger, in line with axonally-polarized distribution of CB1Rs. Conversely, inverse agonist AM281 produced marked rapid increase of basal PKA activation in somata and dendrites, but not in axons, removing constitutive activation of CB1Rs generated by local production of the endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Interestingly, somatodendritic 2-AG levels differently modified signaling responses to CB1R activation by Δ9-THC, the psychoactive compound of marijuana, and by the synthetic cannabinoids WIN55,212-2 and CP55,940. These highly contrasted differences in sub-neuronal signaling responses warrant caution in extrapolating pharmacological profiles, which are typically obtained in non-polarized cells, to predict in vivo responses of axonal (i.e., presynaptic) GPCRs. Therefore, our results suggest that enhanced comprehension of GPCR signaling constraints imposed by neuronal cell biology may improve the understanding of neuropharmacological action. PMID:25610369

  9. Sigma-1 Receptor Chaperone at the ER-Mitochondrion Interface Mediates the Mitochondrion-ER-Nucleus Signaling for Cellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Tomohisa; Hayashi, Teruo; Hayashi, Eri; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2013-01-01

    The membrane of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of a cell forms contacts directly with mitochondria whereby the contact is referred to as the mitochondrion-associated ER membrane or the MAM. Here we found that the MAM regulates cellular survival via an MAM-residing ER chaperone the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) in that the Sig-1R chaperones the ER stress sensor IRE1 to facilitate inter-organelle signaling for survival. IRE1 is found in this study to be enriched at the MAM in CHO cells. We found that IRE1 is stabilized at the MAM by Sig-1Rs when cells are under ER stress. Sig-1Rs stabilize IRE1 and thus allow for conformationally correct IRE1 to dimerize into the long-lasting, activated endonuclease. The IRE1 at the MAM also responds to reactive oxygen species derived from mitochondria. Therefore, the ER-mitochondrion interface serves as an important subcellular entity in the regulation of cellular survival by enhancing the stress-responding signaling between mitochondria, ER, and nucleus. PMID:24204710

  10. Mechanisms of Cardiovascular Homeostasis and Pathophysiology--From Gene Expression, Signal Transduction to Cellular Communication.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, progenitor cells are specified and differentiated into mature cardiomyocytes. Soon after birth, the ability of cardiomyocytes to proliferate is strongly restrained, and thereafter, they grow in size without cell division. Under pathological conditions, cardiomyocytes show adaptive and maladaptive responses through complex intracellular signaling pathways and cross-talking networks of intercellular and inter-tissue communications, but ultimately, they become dysfunctional and undergo cell death or degeneration. Cardiovascular diseases remain the most prevalent, costly, disabling, and deadly medical conditions. To develop novel therapies for them, it is important to elucidate the underlying mechanisms that govern gene expression, signal transduction to cellular communication. In this review article for the 2014 SATO Memorial Award, an approach to uncover molecular and cellular pathophysiology is summarized, focusing on homeobox transcription factor Nkx2-5 in the transcriptional regulation of the cardiac gene program, 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, in the regulation of postnatal cardiomyocyte growth, survival, and function, angiotensin II type 1 receptor in the development of pathological hypertrophy and remodeling, and mast cell infiltration in the pathogenesis of atrial remodeling and fibrillation. PMID:26538467

  11. CPSF30 at the Interface of Alternative Polyadenylation and Cellular Signaling in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Manohar; Hunt, Arthur G.

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing, involving cleavage of precursor messenger RNA (pre mRNA), and further incorporation of poly(A) tail to the 3' end is a key step in the expression of genetic information. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) serves as an important check point for the regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown widespread prevalence of APA in diverse systems. A considerable amount of research has been done in characterizing different subunits of so-called Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (CPSF). In plants, CPSF30, an ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of mammalian CPSF is a key polyadenylation factor. CPSF30 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was reported to possess unique biochemical properties. It was also demonstrated that poly(A) site choice in a vast majority of genes in Arabidopsis are CPSF30 dependent, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in APA and subsequent regulation of gene expression. There are also indications of this gene being involved in oxidative stress and defense responses and in cellular signaling, suggesting a role of CPSF30 in connecting physiological processes and APA. This review will summarize the biochemical features of CPSF30, its role in regulating APA, and possible links with cellular signaling and stress response modules. PMID:26061761

  12. CPSF30 at the Interface of Alternative Polyadenylation and Cellular Signaling in Plants.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Manohar; Hunt, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional processing, involving cleavage of precursor messenger RNA (pre mRNA), and further incorporation of poly(A) tail to the 3' end is a key step in the expression of genetic information. Alternative polyadenylation (APA) serves as an important check point for the regulation of gene expression. Recent studies have shown widespread prevalence of APA in diverse systems. A considerable amount of research has been done in characterizing different subunits of so-called Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (CPSF). In plants, CPSF30, an ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of mammalian CPSF is a key polyadenylation factor. CPSF30 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was reported to possess unique biochemical properties. It was also demonstrated that poly(A) site choice in a vast majority of genes in Arabidopsis are CPSF30 dependent, suggesting a pivotal role of this gene in APA and subsequent regulation of gene expression. There are also indications of this gene being involved in oxidative stress and defense responses and in cellular signaling, suggesting a role of CPSF30 in connecting physiological processes and APA. This review will summarize the biochemical features of CPSF30, its role in regulating APA, and possible links with cellular signaling and stress response modules. PMID:26061761

  13. Cellular Internalization of Fibroblast Growth Factor-12 Exerts Radioprotective Effects on Intestinal Radiation Damage Independently of FGFR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, Fumiaki; Umeda, Sachiko; Yasuda, Takeshi; Fujita, Mayumi; Asada, Masahiro; Meineke, Viktor; Imamura, Toru; Imai, Takashi

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: Several fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) were shown to inhibit radiation-induced tissue damage through FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling; however, this signaling was also found to be involved in the pathogenesis of several malignant tumors. In contrast, FGF12 cannot activate any FGFRs. Instead, FGF12 can be internalized readily into cells using 2 cell-penetrating peptide domains (CPP-M, CPP-C). Therefore, this study focused on clarifying the role of FGF12 internalization in protection against radiation-induced intestinal injury. Methods and Materials: Each FGF or peptide was administered intraperitoneally to BALB/c mice in the absence of heparin 24 hours before or after total body irradiation with γ rays at 9 to 12 Gy. Several radioprotective effects were examined in the jejunum. Results: Administration of FGF12 after radiation exposure was as effective as pretreatment in significantly promoting intestinal regeneration, proliferation of crypt cells, and epithelial differentiation. Two domains, comprising amino acid residues 80 to 109 and 140 to 169 of FGF12B, were identified as being responsible for the radioprotective activity, so that deletion of both domains from FGF12B resulted in a reduction in activity. Interestingly, these regions included the CPP-M and CPP-C domains, respectively; however, CPP-C by itself did not show an antiapoptotic effect. In addition, FGF1, prototypic FGF, possesses a domain corresponding to CPP-M, whereas it lacks CPP-C, so the fusion of FGF1 with CPP-C (FGF1/CPP-C) enhanced cellular internalization and increased radioprotective activity. However, FGF1/CPP-C reduced in vitro mitogenic activity through FGFRs compared with FGF1, implying that FGFR signaling might not be essential for promoting the radioprotective effect of FGF1/CPP-C. In addition, internalized FGF12 suppressed the activation of p38α after irradiation, resulting in reduced radiation-induced apoptosis. Conclusions: These findings indicate that FGF12 can protect the

  14. Enterovirus 71 inhibits cellular type I interferon signaling by downregulating JAK1 protein expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zhang, Zhe; Zhao, Xinghui; Yu, Rui; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Wu, Shipo; Liu, Ju; Chi, Xiangyang; Song, Xiaohong; Fu, Ling; Yu, Yingqun; Hou, Lihua; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection can cause severe disease and lead to death in children. Recurring outbreaks of EV71 have been reported in several countries. Interferons (IFNs) have been used for decades to treat several types of viral infection, but have a limited ability to inhibit EV71 replication. Herein, we intend to investigate the mechanisms by which EV71 inhibits the cellular type I IFN response. In this study, MRC-5 (human embryonic lung fibroblast) or RD (human rhabdomyosarcoma) cells were infected with EV71, and then treated with or without IFN-α2b. Cells were harvested and analyzed by flow cytometry to determine the level of IFNAR1. Cell lysis were prepared to detect the levels of STAT1, STAT2, phosphorylated STAT1, phosphorylated STAT2, IFNAR1, JAK1, and TYK2 by Western blotting. The phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2 induced by IFN were inhibited without significant downregulation of IFNAR1 in EV71-infected cells. The EV71-induced suppression of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation was not rescued by the protein tyrosine phosphatases inhibitor, and was independent of suppressor of cytokine signaling protein 1/3 levels. The phosphorylation of JAK1 and TYK2 were inhibited accompanied by EV71-induced downregulation of JAK1, which occurred at a post-transcriptional level and was proteasome independent. JAK1 expression did not decrease, and IFN-α-stimulated STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation were not blocked in HEK293T cells overexpressing the EV71 viral protein 2A or 3C. This study demonstrates that EV71 inhibits the cellular type I IFN antiviral pathway by downregulating JAK1, while the expression of IFNAR1 does not significantly alter in EV71-infected cells. Additionally, the EV71 viral proteins 2A and 3C do not act as antagonists of cellular type I IFN signaling. PMID:24905060

  15. The unfolded protein response and cellular senescence. A review in the theme: cellular mechanisms of endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Pluquet, Olivier; Pourtier, Albin; Abbadie, Corinne

    2015-03-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle critical for the proper folding and assembly of secreted and transmembrane proteins. Perturbations of ER functions cause ER stress, which activates a coordinated system of transcriptional and translational controls called the unfolded protein response (UPR), to cope with accumulation of misfolded proteins and proteotoxicity. It results in ER homeostasis restoration or in cell death. Senescence is a complex cell phenotype induced by several stresses such as telomere attrition, DNA damage, oxidative stress, and activation of some oncogenes. It is mainly characterized by a cell enlargement, a permanent cell-cycle arrest, and the production of a secretome enriched in proinflammatory cytokines and components of the extracellular matrix. Senescent cells accumulate with age in tissues and are suspected to play a role in age-associated diseases. Since senescence is a stress response, the question arises of whether an ER stress could occur concomitantly with senescence and participate in the onset or maintenance of the senescent features. Here, we described the interconnections between the UPR signaling and the different aspects of the cellular senescence programs and discuss the implication of UPR modulations in this context. PMID:25540175

  16. Cellular Links between Neuronal Activity and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pavan K.; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal activity, astrocytic responses to this activity, and energy homeostasis are linked together during baseline, conscious conditions, and short-term rapid activation (as occurs with sensory or motor function). Nervous system energy homeostasis also varies during long-term physiological conditions (i.e., development and aging) and with adaptation to pathological conditions, such as ischemia or low glucose. Neuronal activation requires increased metabolism (i.e., ATP generation) which leads initially to substrate depletion, induction of a variety of signals for enhanced astrocytic function, and increased local blood flow and substrate delivery. Energy generation (particularly in mitochondria) and use during ATP hydrolysis also lead to considerable heat generation. The local increases in blood flow noted following neuronal activation can both enhance local substrate delivery but also provides a heat sink to help cool the brain and removal of waste by-products. In this review we highlight the interactions between short-term neuronal activity and energy metabolism with an emphasis on signals and factors regulating astrocyte function and substrate supply. PMID:22470340

  17. Cellular signaling circuits interfaced with synthetic, post-translational, negating Boolean logic devices.

    PubMed

    Razavi, Shiva; Su, Steven; Inoue, Takanari

    2014-09-19

    A negating functionality is fundamental to information processing of logic circuits within cells and computers. Aiming to adapt unutilized electronic concepts to the interrogation of signaling circuits in cells, we first took a bottom-up strategy whereby we created protein-based devices that perform negating Boolean logic operations such as NOT, NOR, NAND, and N-IMPLY. These devices function in living cells within a minute by precisely commanding the localization of an activator molecule among three subcellular spaces. We networked these synthetic gates to an endogenous signaling circuit and devised a physiological output. In search of logic functions in signal transduction, we next took a top-down approach and computationally screened 108 signaling pathways to identify commonalities and differences between these biological pathways and electronic circuits. This combination of synthetic and systems approaches will guide us in developing foundations for deconstruction of intricate cell signaling, as well as construction of biomolecular computers. PMID:25000210

  18. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  19. Enhanced activation of cellular AMPK by dual-small molecule treatment: AICAR and A769662

    PubMed Central

    Ducommun, Serge; Ford, Rebecca J.; Bultot, Laurent; Deak, Maria; Bertrand, Luc; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key cellular energy sensor and regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Activation of AMPK provides beneficial outcomes in fighting against metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Currently, there is no allosteric AMPK activator available for the treatment of metabolic diseases, and limited compounds are available to robustly stimulate cellular/tissue AMPK in a specific manner. Here we investigated whether simultaneous administration of two different pharmacological AMPK activators, which bind and act on different sites, would result in an additive or synergistic effect on AMPK and its downstream signaling and physiological events in intact cells. We observed that cotreating primary hepatocytes with the AMP mimetic 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) and a low dose (1 μM) of the allosteric activator A769662 produced a synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation and catalytic activity, which was associated with a more profound increase/decrease in phosphorylation of downstream AMPK targets and inhibition of hepatic lipogenesis compared with single-compound treatment. Mechanistically, we found that cotreatment does not stimulate LKB1, upstream kinase for AMPK, but it protects against dephosphorylation of Thr172 phosphorylation by protein phosphatase PP2Cα in an additive manner in a cell-free assay. Collectively, we demonstrate that AICAR sensitizes the effect of A769662 and promotes AMPK activity and its downstream events. The study demonstrates the feasibility of promoting AMPK activity by using two activators with distinct modes of action in order to achieve a greater activation of AMPK and downstream signaling. PMID:24425763

  20. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  1. A theoretical study on cellular antioxidant activity of selected flavonoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Yuzhi; Wang, Zhengwu; Wu, Jinhong; Zhao, Bo

    The antioxidant capacities of the selected flavonoids quercetin, luteolin and taxifolin have been investigated at density functional level of theory with the aim of verifying the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) values representative of experimental findings. The selected flavonoids were believed to act through the H-atom transfer mechanism. Their potentiality of hydrogen abstraction was evaluated by computing the Osbnd H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) in gas-phase and in dimethylsulfoxide solution. Results indicate that the order of antioxidant efficacies calculated in this work is in agreement with that reported by experimental results of CAA. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were also performed both in gas-phase and in dimethylsulfoxide to reproduce the electronic UV-vis spectra of the selected flavonoids.

  2. Exploiting the yeast stress-activated signaling network to inform on stress biology and disease signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yi-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Healthy cells utilize intricate systems to monitor their environment and mount robust responses in the event of cellular stress. Whether stress arises from external insults or defects due to mutation and disease, cells must be able to respond precisely to mount the appropriate defenses. Multi-faceted stress responses are generally coupled with arrest of growth and cell-cycle progression, which both limits the transmission of damaged materials and serves to reallocate limited cellular resources toward defense. Therefore, stress defense versus rapid growth represent competing interests in the cell. How eukaryotic cells set the balance between defense versus proliferation, and in particular knowledge of the regulatory networks that control this decision, are poorly understood. In this perspective, we expand upon our recent work inferring the stress-activated signaling network in budding yeast, which captures pathways controlling stress defense and regulators of growth and cell-cycle progression. We highlight similarities between the yeast and mammalian stress responses and explore how stress-activated signaling networks in yeast can inform on signaling defects in human cancers. PMID:25957506

  3. Quantifying colocalization of a conditionally active transcription factor FOXP3 in three-dimensional cellular space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Thomas; Allan, Sarah E.; Levings, Megan K.

    2009-02-01

    Biological macromolecular interactions between proteins, transcription factors, DNA and other types of biomolecules, are fundamentally important to several cellular and biological processes. 3D Multi-channel confocal microscopy and colocalization analysis of fluorescent signals have proven to be invaluable tools for detecting such molecular interactions. The aim of this work was to quantify colocalization of the FOXP3 transcription factor in 3D cellular space generated from the confocal 3D image sets. 293T cells transfected with a conditionally active form of FOXP3 were stained for nuclei with Hoechst, for FOXP3 with anti-FOXP3 conjugated to PE, and 4-hydroxytamoxifen used as protein translocation and activation agent. Since the protein signal was weak and nonspecific intensity contributions were strong, it was difficult to perform colocalization analysis and estimate colocalization quantities. We performed 3D restoration by deconvolution method on the confocal images using experimentally measured point spread functions (PSFs) and subsequently a color shift correction. The deconvolution method eliminated nonspecific intensity contributions originating from PSF imposed by optical microscopy diffraction resolution limits and noise since these factors significantly affected colocalization analysis and quantification. Visual inspection of the deconvolved 3D image suggested that the FOXP3 molecules are predominantly colocalized within the nuclei although the fluorescent signals from FOXP3 molecules were also present in the cytoplasm. A close inspection of the scatter plot (colocalization map) and correlation quantities such as the Pearsons and colocalization coefficients showed that the fluorescent signals from the FOXP3 molecules and DNA are strongly correlated. In conclusion, our colocalization quantification approach confirms the preferential association of the FOXP3 molecules with the DNA despite the presence of fluorescent signals from the former one both in the

  4. Essential requirement of cytochrome c release for caspase activation by procaspase-activating compound defined by cellular models

    PubMed Central

    Seervi, M; Joseph, J; Sobhan, P K; Bhavya, B C; Santhoshkumar, T R

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt. c) release and caspase activation are often impaired in tumors with Bcl-2 overexpression or Bax and Bak-defective status. Direct triggering of cell death downstream of Bax and Bak is an attractive strategy to kill such cancers. Small molecule compounds capable of direct caspase activation appear to be the best mode for killing such tumors. However, there is no precise model to screen such compounds. The currently employed cell-free systems possess the inherent drawback of lacking cellular contents and organelles that operate in integrating cell death signaling. We have developed highly refined cell-based approaches to validate direct caspase activation in cancer cells. Using this approach, we show that PAC-1 (first procaspase-activating compound), the first direct activator of procaspases identified in a cell-free system, in fact requires mitochondrial cyt. c release for triggering caspase activation similar to other antitumor agents. It can induce significant caspase activation and cell death in the absence of Bax and Bak, and in cells overexpressing Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. This study for the first time defines precise criteria for the validation of direct caspase-activating compounds using specialized cellular models that is expected to accelerate the discovery of potential direct caspase activators. PMID:21900958

  5. Ultrasensitive proteomic quantitation of cellular signaling by digitized nanoparticle-protein counting

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Thomas; Agarwal, Anupriya; Ramunno-Johnson, Damien; O’Hare, Thomas; Gönen, Mehmet; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Druker, Brian J.; Vu, Tania Q.

    2016-01-01

    Many important signaling and regulatory proteins are expressed at low abundance and are difficult to measure in single cells. We report a molecular imaging approach to quantitate protein levels by digitized, discrete counting of nanoparticle-tagged proteins. Digitized protein counting provides ultrasensitive molecular detection of proteins in single cells that surpasses conventional methods of quantitating total diffuse fluorescence, and offers a substantial improvement in protein quantitation. We implement this digitized proteomic approach in an integrated imaging platform, the single cell-quantum dot platform (SC-QDP), to execute sensitive single cell phosphoquantitation in response to multiple drug treatment conditions and using limited primary patient material. The SC-QDP: 1) identified pAKT and pERK phospho-heterogeneity and insensitivity in individual leukemia cells treated with a multi-drug panel of FDA-approved kinase inhibitors, and 2) revealed subpopulations of drug-insensitive CD34+ stem cells with high pCRKL and pSTAT5 signaling in chronic myeloid leukemia patient blood samples. This ultrasensitive digitized protein detection approach is valuable for uncovering subtle but important differences in signaling, drug insensitivity, and other key cellular processes amongst single cells. PMID:27320899

  6. Signaling pathways activated by a protease allergen in basophils

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Rachel K.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Yu, Shuang; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a significant burden in industrialized countries, but why and how the immune system responds to allergens remain largely unknown. Because many clinically significant allergens have proteolytic activity, and many helminths express proteases that are necessary for their life cycles, host mechanisms likely have evolved to detect the proteolytic activity of helminth proteases, which may be incidentally activated by protease allergens. A cysteine protease, papain, is a prototypic protease allergen that can directly activate basophils and mast cells, leading to the production of cytokines, including IL-4, characteristic of the type 2 immune response. The mechanism of papain’s immunogenic activity remains unknown. Here we have characterized the cellular response activated by papain in basophils. We find that papain-induced IL-4 production requires calcium flux and activation of PI3K and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Interestingly, papain-induced IL-4 production was dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) adaptor protein Fc receptor γ-chain, even though the canonical ITAM signaling was not activated by papain. Collectively, these data characterize the downstream signaling pathway activated by a protease allergen in basophils. PMID:25369937

  7. Heterogeneous cellular automata model for straight-through bicycle traffic at signalized intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Gang; Jiang, Hang; Chen, Jingxu; Huang, Zhengfeng; Lu, Lili

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a cellular automata (CA) model to elucidate the straight-through movements of the heterogeneous bicycle traffic at signalized intersection. The CA model, via simulation, particularly exposits the dispersion phenomenon existing in the straight-through bicycle traffic. The nonlane-based cycling behavior and diverse bicycle properties are also incorporated in the CA model. A series of simulations are conducted to reveal the travel process, bicycles interaction and influence of the dispersion phenomenon. The simulation results show that the dispersion phenomenon significantly results in more bicycles interactions in terms of spilling maneuvers and overtaking maneuvers during the straight-through movements. Meanwhile, the dispersion phenomenon could contribute to the efficiency of the bicycle traffic, and straight-through bicycles need less time to depart the intersection under the circumstance of dispersion phenomenon. The simulation results are able to provide specific guideline for reasonably utilizing the dispersion phenomenon to improve the operational efficiency of straight-through bicycle traffic.

  8. Mapping the crossroads of immune activation and cellular stress response pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cláudio, Nuno; Dalet, Alexandre; Gatti, Evelina; Pierre, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The innate immune cell network detects specific microbes and damages to cell integrity in order to coordinate and polarize the immune response against invading pathogens. In recent years, a cross-talk between microbial-sensing pathways and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis has been discovered and have attracted the attention of many researchers from the inflammation field. Abnormal accumulation of proteins in the ER can be seen as a sign of cellular malfunction and triggers a collection of conserved emergency rescue pathways. These signalling cascades, which increase ER homeostasis and favour cell survival, are collectively known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). The induction or activation by microbial stimuli of several molecules linked to the ER stress response pathway have led to the conclusion that microbe sensing by immunocytes is generally associated with an UPR, which serves as a signal amplification cascade favouring inflammatory cytokines production. Induction of the UPR alone was shown to promote inflammation in different cellular and pathological models. Here we discuss how the innate immune and ER-signalling pathways intersect. Moreover, we propose that the induction of UPR-related molecules by microbial products does not necessarily reflect ER stress, but instead is an integral part of a specific transcription programme controlled by innate immunity receptors. PMID:23584529

  9. Cellular Interrogation: Exploiting Cell-to-Cell Variability to Discriminate Regulatory Mechanisms in Oscillatory Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Daniel; Chang, Frederick; Gnad, Florian; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    The molecular complexity within a cell may be seen as an evolutionary response to the external complexity of the cell’s environment. This suggests that the external environment may be harnessed to interrogate the cell’s internal molecular architecture. Cells, however, are not only nonlinear and non-stationary, but also exhibit heterogeneous responses within a clonal, isogenic population. In effect, each cell undertakes its own experiment. Here, we develop a method of cellular interrogation using programmable microfluidic devices which exploits the additional information present in cell-to-cell variation, without requiring model parameters to be fitted to data. We focussed on Ca2+ signalling in response to hormone stimulation, which exhibits oscillatory spiking in many cell types and chose eight models of Ca2+ signalling networks which exhibit similar behaviour in simulation. We developed a nonlinear frequency analysis for non-stationary responses, which could classify models into groups under parameter variation, but found that this question alone was unable to distinguish critical feedback loops. We further developed a nonlinear amplitude analysis and found that the combination of both questions ruled out six of the models as inconsistent with the experimentally-observed dynamics and heterogeneity. The two models that survived the double interrogation were mathematically different but schematically identical and yielded the same unexpected predictions that we confirmed experimentally. Further analysis showed that subtle mathematical details can markedly influence non-stationary responses under parameter variation, emphasising the difficulty of finding a “correct” model. By developing questions for the pathway being studied, and designing more versatile microfluidics, cellular interrogation holds promise as a systematic strategy that can complement direct intervention by genetics or pharmacology. PMID:27367445

  10. Cellular Interrogation: Exploiting Cell-to-Cell Variability to Discriminate Regulatory Mechanisms in Oscillatory Signalling.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Javier; Andrew, Natalie; Gibson, Daniel; Chang, Frederick; Gnad, Florian; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2016-07-01

    The molecular complexity within a cell may be seen as an evolutionary response to the external complexity of the cell's environment. This suggests that the external environment may be harnessed to interrogate the cell's internal molecular architecture. Cells, however, are not only nonlinear and non-stationary, but also exhibit heterogeneous responses within a clonal, isogenic population. In effect, each cell undertakes its own experiment. Here, we develop a method of cellular interrogation using programmable microfluidic devices which exploits the additional information present in cell-to-cell variation, without requiring model parameters to be fitted to data. We focussed on Ca2+ signalling in response to hormone stimulation, which exhibits oscillatory spiking in many cell types and chose eight models of Ca2+ signalling networks which exhibit similar behaviour in simulation. We developed a nonlinear frequency analysis for non-stationary responses, which could classify models into groups under parameter variation, but found that this question alone was unable to distinguish critical feedback loops. We further developed a nonlinear amplitude analysis and found that the combination of both questions ruled out six of the models as inconsistent with the experimentally-observed dynamics and heterogeneity. The two models that survived the double interrogation were mathematically different but schematically identical and yielded the same unexpected predictions that we confirmed experimentally. Further analysis showed that subtle mathematical details can markedly influence non-stationary responses under parameter variation, emphasising the difficulty of finding a "correct" model. By developing questions for the pathway being studied, and designing more versatile microfluidics, cellular interrogation holds promise as a systematic strategy that can complement direct intervention by genetics or pharmacology. PMID:27367445

  11. Synthesis of marmycin A and investigation into its cellular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañeque, Tatiana; Gomes, Filipe; Mai, Trang Thi; Maestri, Giovanni; Malacria, Max; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2015-09-01

    Anthracyclines such as doxorubicin are used extensively in the treatment of cancers. Anthraquinone-related angucyclines also exhibit antiproliferative properties and have been proposed to operate via similar mechanisms, including direct genome targeting. Here, we report the chemical synthesis of marmycin A and the study of its cellular activity. The aromatic core was constructed by means of a one-pot multistep reaction comprising a regioselective Diels-Alder cycloaddition, and the complex sugar backbone was introduced through a copper-catalysed Ullmann cross-coupling, followed by a challenging Friedel-Crafts cyclization. Remarkably, fluorescence microscopy revealed that marmycin A does not target the nucleus but instead accumulates in lysosomes, thereby promoting cell death independently of genome targeting. Furthermore, a synthetic dimer of marmycin A and the lysosome-targeting agent artesunate exhibited a synergistic activity against the invasive MDA-MB-231 cancer cell line. These findings shed light on the elusive pathways through which anthraquinone derivatives act in cells, pointing towards unanticipated biological and therapeutic applications.

  12. An automated programmable platform enabling multiplex dynamic stimuli delivery and cellular response monitoring for high-throughput suspension single-cell signaling studies.

    PubMed

    He, Luye; Kniss, Ariel; San-Miguel, Adriana; Rouse, Tel; Kemp, Melissa L; Lu, Hang

    2015-03-21

    Cell signaling events are orchestrated by dynamic external biochemical cues. By rapidly perturbing cells with dynamic inputs and examining the output from these systems, one could study the structure and dynamic properties of a cellular signaling network. Conventional experimental techniques limit the implementation of these systematic approaches due to the lack of sophistication in manipulating individual cells and the fluid microenvironment around them; existing microfluidic technologies thus far are mainly targeting adherent cells. In this paper we present an automated platform to interrogate suspension cells with dynamic stimuli while simultaneously monitoring cellular responses in a high-throughput manner at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate the use of this platform in an experiment to measure Jurkat T cells in response to distinct dynamic patterns of stimuli; we find cells exhibit highly heterogeneous responses under each stimulation condition. More interestingly, these cells act as low-pass filters, only entrained to the low frequency stimulus signals. We also demonstrate that this platform can be easily programmed to actively generate arbitrary dynamic signals. We envision our platform to be useful in other contexts to study cellular signaling dynamics, which may be difficult using conventional experimental methods. PMID:25609410

  13. Digital signaling decouples activation probability and population heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tian, Chengzhe; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Quake, Stephen R; Tay, Savaş

    2015-01-01

    Digital signaling enhances robustness of cellular decisions in noisy environments, but it is unclear how digital systems transmit temporal information about a stimulus. To understand how temporal input information is encoded and decoded by the NF-κB system, we studied transcription factor dynamics and gene regulation under dose- and duration-modulated inflammatory inputs. Mathematical modeling predicted and microfluidic single-cell experiments confirmed that integral of the stimulus (or area, concentration × duration) controls the fraction of cells that activate NF-κB in the population. However, stimulus temporal profile determined NF-κB dynamics, cell-to-cell variability, and gene expression phenotype. A sustained, weak stimulation lead to heterogeneous activation and delayed timing that is transmitted to gene expression. In contrast, a transient, strong stimulus with the same area caused rapid and uniform dynamics. These results show that digital NF-κB signaling enables multidimensional control of cellular phenotype via input profile, allowing parallel and independent control of single-cell activation probability and population heterogeneity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08931.001 PMID:26488364

  14. Digital signaling decouples activation probability and population heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tian, Chengzhe; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Quake, Stephen R; Tay, Savaş

    2015-01-01

    Digital signaling enhances robustness of cellular decisions in noisy environments, but it is unclear how digital systems transmit temporal information about a stimulus. To understand how temporal input information is encoded and decoded by the NF-κB system, we studied transcription factor dynamics and gene regulation under dose- and duration-modulated inflammatory inputs. Mathematical modeling predicted and microfluidic single-cell experiments confirmed that integral of the stimulus (or area, concentration × duration) controls the fraction of cells that activate NF-κB in the population. However, stimulus temporal profile determined NF-κB dynamics, cell-to-cell variability, and gene expression phenotype. A sustained, weak stimulation lead to heterogeneous activation and delayed timing that is transmitted to gene expression. In contrast, a transient, strong stimulus with the same area caused rapid and uniform dynamics. These results show that digital NF-κB signaling enables multidimensional control of cellular phenotype via input profile, allowing parallel and independent control of single-cell activation probability and population heterogeneity. PMID:26488364

  15. Activators of G Protein Signaling in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play a crucial role in regulating signal processing to maintain normal cellular homeostasis, and subtle perturbations in its activity can potentially lead to the pathogenesis of renal disorders or diseases. Cell-surface receptors and accessory proteins, which normally modify and organize the coupling of individual G protein subunits, contribute to the regulation of heterotrimeric G protein activity and their convergence and/or divergence of downstream signaling initiated by effector systems. Activators of G protein signaling (AGS) are a family of accessory proteins that intervene at multiple distinct points during the activation–inactivation cycle of G proteins, even in the absence of receptor stimulation. Perturbations in the expression of individual AGS proteins have been reported to modulate signal transduction pathways in a wide array of diseases and disorders within the brain, heart, immune system, and more recently, the kidney. This review will provide an overview of the expression profile, localization, and putative biologic role of the AGS family in the context of normal and diseased states of the kidney. PMID:25628392

  16. BMP2 Transfer to Neighboring Cells and Activation of Signaling.

    PubMed

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Shaikhkarami, Marjan; Hortschansky, Peter; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Morphogen gradients and concentration are critical features during early embryonic development and cellular differentiation. Previously we reported the preparation of biologically active, fluorescently labeled BMP2 and quantitatively analyzed their binding to the cell surface and followed BMP2 endocytosis over time on the level of single endosomes. Here we show that this internalized BMP2 can be transferred to neighboring cells and, moreover, also activates downstream BMP signaling in adjacent cells, indicated by Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and activation of the downstream target gene id1. Using a 3D matrix to modulate cell-cell contacts in culture we could show that direct cell-cell contact significantly increased BMP2 transfer. Using inhibitors of vesicular transport, transfer was strongly inhibited. Interestingly, cotreatment with the physiological BMP inhibitor Noggin increased BMP2 uptake and transfer, albeit activation of Smad signaling in neighboring cells was completely suppressed. Our findings present a novel and interesting mechanism by which morphogens such as BMP2 can be transferred between cells and how this is modulated by BMP antagonists such as Noggin, and how this influences activation of Smad signaling by BMP2 in neighboring cells. PMID:27306974

  17. Cellular signaling roles of TGF beta, TNF alpha and beta APP in brain injury responses and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattson, M P; Barger, S W; Furukawa, K; Bruce, A J; Wyss-Coray, T; Mark, R J; Mucke, L

    1997-02-01

    beta-Amyloid precursor protein (beta APP), transforming growth factor beta (TGF beta), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) are remarkably pleiotropic neural cytokines/neurotrophic factors that orchestrate intricate injury-related cellular and molecular interactions. The links between these three factors include: their responses to injury; their interactive effects on astrocytes, microglia and neurons; their ability to induce cytoprotective responses in neurons; and their association with cytopathological alterations in Alzheimer's disease. Astrocytes and microglia each produce and respond to TGF beta and TNF alpha in characteristic ways when the brain is injured. TGF beta, TNF alpha and secreted forms of beta APP (sAPP) can protect neurons against excitotoxic, metabolic and oxidative insults and may thereby serve neuroprotective roles. On the other hand, under certain conditions TNF alpha and the fibrillogenic amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) derivative of beta APP can promote damage of neuronal and glial cells, and may play roles in neurodegenerative disorders. Studies of genetically manipulated mice in which TGF beta, TNF alpha or beta APP ligand or receptor levels are altered suggest important roles for each factor in cellular responses to brain injury and indicate that mediators of neural injury responses also have the potential to enhance amyloidogenesis and/or to interfere with neuroregeneration if expressed at abnormal levels or modified by strategic point mutations. Recent studies have elucidated signal transduction pathways of TGF beta (serine/threonine kinase cascades), TNF alpha (p55 receptor linked to a sphingomyelin-ceramide-NF kappa B pathway), and secreted forms of beta APP (sAPP; receptor guanylate cyclase-cGMP-cGMP-dependent kinase-K+ channel activation). Knowledge of these signaling pathways is revealing novel molecular targets on which to focus neuroprotective therapeutic strategies in disorders ranging from stroke to Alzheimer's disease

  18. The EBI2 signalling pathway plays a role in cellular crosstalk between astrocytes and macrophages.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra; O'Sullivan, Sinead A; Christen, Isabelle; Zhang, Juan; Sailer, Andreas W; Dev, Kumlesh K

    2016-01-01

    EBI2 is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by oxysterol 7α, 25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α25HC) and regulates T cell-dependant antibody response and B cell migration. We recently found EBI2 is expressed in human astrocytes, regulates intracellular signalling and modulates astrocyte migration. Here, we report that LPS treatment of mouse astrocytes alters mRNA levels of EBI2 and oxysterols suggesting that the EBI2 signalling pathway is sensitive to LPS-mediated immune challenge. We also find that conditioned media obtained from LPS-stimulated mouse astrocytes induces macrophage migration, which is inhibited by the EBI2 antagonist NIBR189. These results demonstrate a role for the EBI2 signalling pathway in astrocytes as a sensor for immune challenge and for communication with innate immune cells such as macrophages. PMID:27166278

  19. LOV-based optogenetic devices: light-driven modules to impart photoregulated control of cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pudasaini, Ashutosh; El-Arab, Kaley K.; Zoltowski, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    The Light-Oxygen-Voltage domain family of proteins is widespread in biology where they impart sensory responses to signal transduction domains. The small, light responsive LOV modules offer a novel platform for the construction of optogenetic tools. Currently, the design and implementation of these devices is partially hindered by a lack of understanding of how light drives allosteric changes in protein conformation to activate diverse signal transduction domains. Further, divergent photocycle properties amongst LOV family members complicate construction of highly sensitive devices with fast on/off kinetics. In the present review we discuss the history of LOV domain research with primary emphasis on tuning LOV domain chemistry and signal transduction to allow for improved optogenetic tools. PMID:25988185

  20. The EBI2 signalling pathway plays a role in cellular crosstalk between astrocytes and macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Rutkowska, Aleksandra; O’Sullivan, Sinead A.; Christen, Isabelle; Zhang, Juan; Sailer, Andreas W.; Dev, Kumlesh K.

    2016-01-01

    EBI2 is a G protein-coupled receptor activated by oxysterol 7α, 25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α25HC) and regulates T cell-dependant antibody response and B cell migration. We recently found EBI2 is expressed in human astrocytes, regulates intracellular signalling and modulates astrocyte migration. Here, we report that LPS treatment of mouse astrocytes alters mRNA levels of EBI2 and oxysterols suggesting that the EBI2 signalling pathway is sensitive to LPS-mediated immune challenge. We also find that conditioned media obtained from LPS-stimulated mouse astrocytes induces macrophage migration, which is inhibited by the EBI2 antagonist NIBR189. These results demonstrate a role for the EBI2 signalling pathway in astrocytes as a sensor for immune challenge and for communication with innate immune cells such as macrophages. PMID:27166278

  1. Endocytosis and trafficking of BMP receptors: Regulatory mechanisms for fine-tuning the signaling response in different cellular contexts.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Marcelo

    2016-02-01

    Signaling by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors is regulated at multiple levels in order to ensure proper interpretation of BMP stimuli in different cellular settings. As with other signaling receptors, regulation of the amount of exposed and signaling-competent BMP receptors at the plasma-membrane is predicted to be a key mechanism in governing their signaling output. Currently, the endocytosis of BMP receptors is thought to resemble that of the structurally related transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) receptors, as BMP receptors are constitutively internalized (independently of ligand binding), with moderate kinetics, and mostly via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Also similar to TGF-β receptors, BMP receptors are able to signal from the plasma membrane, while internalization to endosomes may have a signal modulating effect. When at the plasma membrane, BMP receptors localize to different membrane domains including cholesterol rich domains and caveolae, suggesting a complex interplay between membrane distribution and internalization. An additional layer of complexity stems from the putative regulatory influence on the signaling and trafficking of BMP receptors exerted by ligand traps and/or co-receptors. Furthermore, the trafficking and signaling of BMP receptors are subject to alterations in cellular context. For example, genetic diseases involving changes in the expression of auxiliary factors of endocytic pathways hamper retrograde BMP signals in neurons, and perturb the regulation of synapse formation. This review summarizes current understanding of the trafficking of BMP receptors and discusses the role of trafficking in regulation of BMP signals. PMID:26776724

  2. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  3. Metabolic signals and innate immune activation in obesity and exercise.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a sedentary lifestyle and excess energy intake has led to an increased prevalence of obesity which constitutes a major risk factor for several co-morbidities including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research during the last two decades has revealed that a characteristic feature of obesity linking it to insulin resistance is the presence of chronic low-grade inflammation being indicative of activation of the innate immune system. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the innate immune system in the course of obesity is mediated by metabolic signals, such as free fatty acids (FFAs), being elevated in many obese subjects, through activation of pattern recognition receptors thereby leading to stimulation of critical inflammatory signaling cascades, like IκBα kinase/nuclear factor-κB (IKK/NF- κB), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) and NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway, that interfere with insulin signaling. Exercise is one of the main prescribed interventions in obesity management improving insulin sensitivity and reducing obesity- induced chronic inflammation. This review summarizes current knowledge of the cellular recognition mechanisms for FFAs, the inflammatory signaling pathways triggered by excess FFAs in obesity and the counteractive effects of both acute and chronic exercise on obesity-induced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways. A deeper understanding of the effects of exercise on inflammatory signaling pathways in obesity is useful to optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing incidence of obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:25825956

  4. Why cellular communication during plant reproduction is particularly mediated by CRP signalling.

    PubMed

    Bircheneder, Susanne; Dresselhaus, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Secreted cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs) represent one of the main classes of signalling peptides in plants. Whereas post-translationally modified small non-CRP peptides (psNCRPs) are mostly involved in signalling events during vegetative development and interactions with the environment, CRPs are overrepresented in reproductive processes including pollen germination and growth, self-incompatibility, gamete activation and fusion as well as seed development. In this opinion paper we compare the involvement of both types of peptides in vegetative and reproductive phases of the plant lifecycle. Besides their conserved cysteine pattern defining structural features, CRPs exhibit hypervariable primary sequences and a rapid evolution rate. As a result, CRPs represent a pool of highly polymorphic signalling peptides involved in species-specific functions during reproduction and thus likely represent key players to trigger speciation in plants by supporting reproductive isolation. In contrast, precursers of psNCRPs are proteolytically processed into small functional domains with high sequence conservation and act in more general processes. We discuss parallels in downstream processes of CRP signalling in both reproduction and defence against pathogenic fungi and alien pollen tubes, with special emphasis on the role of ROS and ion channels. In conclusion we suggest that CRP signalling during reproduction in plants has evolved from ancient defence mechanisms. PMID:27382112

  5. Mechanisms in photodynamic therapy: part two—cellular signaling, cell metabolism and modes of cell death

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has been known for over a hundred years, but is only now becoming widely used. Originally developed as a tumor therapy, some of its most successful applications are for non-malignant disease. In the second of a series of three reviews, we will discuss the mechanisms that operate in PDT on a cellular level. In Part I [Castano AP, Demidova TN, Hamblin MR. Mechanism in photodynamic therapy: part one—photosensitizers, photochemistry and cellular localization. Photodiagn Photodyn Ther 2004;1:279–93] it was shown that one of the most important factors governing the outcome of PDT, is how the photosensitizer (PS) interacts with cells in the target tissue or tumor, and the key aspect of this interaction is the subcellular localization of the PS. PS can localize in mitochondria, lysosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and plasma membranes. An explosion of investigation and explorations in the field of cell biology have elucidated many of the pathways that mammalian cells undergo when PS are delivered in tissue culture and subsequently illuminated. There is an acute stress response leading to changes in calcium and lipid metabolism and production of cytokines and stress proteins. Enzymes particularly, protein kinases, are activated and transcription factors are expressed. Many of the cellular responses are centered on mitochondria. These effects frequently lead to induction of apoptosis either by the mitochondrial pathway involving caspases and release of cytochrome c, or by pathways involving ceramide or death receptors. However, under certain circumstances cells subjected to PDT die by necrosis. Although there have been many reports of DNA damage caused by PDT, this is not thought to be an important cell-death pathway. This mechanistic research is expected to lead to optimization of PDT as a tumor treatment, and to rational selection of combination therapies that include PDT as a component. PMID:25048553

  6. Following the trail of lipids: Signals initiated by PI3K function at multiple cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Naguib, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3] is the signaling currency of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway; transduction through this axis depends on this signaling lipid. Formation of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 is dictated not only by PI3K activation but also by the localization and access of PI3K to its substrate PtdIns(4,5)P2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate). PI3K/AKT-mediated signaling is antagonized by PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation. Although previously typically considered an event associated with the plasma membrane, it is now appreciated that the formation and metabolism of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 occur on multiple membranes with distinct kinetics. Modulated activity of phosphatidylinositol lipid kinases and phosphatases contributes to intricately orchestrated lipid gradients that define the signaling status of the pathway at multiple sites within the cell. PMID:27188443

  7. Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain-mediated cellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-02-01

    Innate immunity, which is the first line of host defense against invading microbial pathogens in multicellular organisms, occurs through germline-encoded pattern-recognition receptors. The Toll-like receptor/Interleukin (IL)-1 receptor (TLR/IL-1R) superfamily comprises proteins that contain the phylogenetically conserved Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain, which is responsible for the propagation of downstream signaling through recruitment of TIR domain containing cytosolic adaptor proteins such as MyD88, TIRAP/MAL, TRIF, TRAM and SARM. These interactions activate transcription factors that regulate the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α) and chemokines. Activation of the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathway promotes the onset of inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases and cancer; therefore, this pathway can be used for the development of therapeutic strategies against these types of pathogenesis. In this review paper, we illustrate the role of the TIR-TIR domain interaction with the TLR/IL-1R signaling pathway in inflammation and apoptosis and recent therapeutic drugs targeted to inhibit the downstream signaling cascade for treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer. PMID:25563856

  8. Cell surface- and Rho GTPase-based auxin signaling controls cellular interdigitation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tongda; Wen, Mingzhang; Nagawa, Shingo; Fu, Ying; Chen, Jin-Gui; Wu, Ming-Jing; Perrot-Rechenmann, Catherine; Friml, Jiří; Jones, Alan M.; Yang, Zhenbiao

    2010-01-01

    Summary Auxin is a multi-functional hormone essential for plant development and pattern formation. A nuclear auxin signaling system controlling auxin-induced gene expression is well established, but cytoplasmic auxin signaling as in its coordination of cell polarization is unexplored. We found a cytoplasmic auxin signaling mechanism that modulates the interdigitated growth of Arabidopsis leaf epidermal pavement cells (PCs), which develop interdigitated lobes and indentations to form a puzzle-piece shape in a two-dimensional plane. PC interdigitation is compromised in leaves deficient in either auxin biosynthesis or its export mediated by PINFORMED 1 localized at the lobe tip. Auxin coordinately activates two Rho GTPases, ROP2 and ROP6, which promote the formation of complementary lobes and indentations, respectively. Activation of these ROPs by auxin occurs within 30 seconds and depends on AUXIN-BINDING PROTEIN 1. These findings reveal Rho GTPase-based novel auxin signaling mechanisms, which modulate the spatial coordination of cell expansion across a field of cells. PMID:20887895

  9. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many pathogenic fungi are becoming resistant to currently available drugs. Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that...

  10. Intrinsic noise, dissipation cost, and robustness of cellular networks: The underlying energy landscape of MAPK signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Lapidus, Saul; Han, Bo; Wang, Jin

    2008-01-01

    We develop a probabilistic method for analyzing global features of a cellular network under intrinsic statistical fluctuations, which is important when there are finite numbers of molecules. By making a self-consistent mean field approximation of splitting the variables in order to reduce the large number of degrees of freedom, which is reasonable for a not very strongly interacting network, we discovered that the underlying energy landscape of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signal transduction network (with experimentally measured or inferred parameters such as chemical reaction rate coefficients in the network) is funneled toward a global minimum characterized by the nonequilibrium steady-state fixed point of the system at the end of the signal transduction process. For this system, we also show that the energy landscape is robust against intrinsic fluctuations and random perturbation to the inherent chemical reaction rates. The ratio of the slope versus the roughness of the energy landscape becomes a quantitative measure of robustness and stability of the network. Furthermore, we quantify the dissipation cost of this nonequilibrium system through entropy production, caused by the nonequilibrium flux in the system. We found that a lower dissipation cost corresponds to a more robust network. This least dissipation property might provide a design principle for robust and functional networks. Finally, we find the possibility of bistable and oscillatory-like solutions, which are important for cell fate decisions, upon perturbations. The method described here can be used in a variety of biological networks. PMID:18420822

  11. Mitogen Activated Protein kinase signal transduction pathways in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Maroni, Paul D; Koul, Sweaty; Meacham, Randall B; Koul, Hari K

    2004-01-01

    The biochemistry of the mitogen activated protein kinases ERK, JNK, and p38 have been studied in prostate physiology in an attempt to elucidate novel mechanisms and pathways for the treatment of prostatic disease. We reviewed articles examining mitogen-activated protein kinases using prostate tissue or cell lines. As with other tissue types, these signaling modules are links/transmitters for important pathways in prostate cells that can result in cellular survival or apoptosis. While the activation of the ERK pathway appears to primarily result in survival, the roles of JNK and p38 are less clear. Manipulation of these pathways could have important implications for the treatment of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hypertrophy. PMID:15219238

  12. Regulators of G-protein signaling accelerate GPCR signaling kinetics and govern sensitivity solely by accelerating GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nevin A; Johnston, Christopher A; Cappell, Steven D; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Kimple, Adam J; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2010-04-13

    G-protein heterotrimers, composed of a guanine nucleotide-binding G alpha subunit and an obligate G betagamma dimer, regulate signal transduction pathways by cycling between GDP- and GTP-bound states. Signal deactivation is achieved by G alpha-mediated GTP hydrolysis (GTPase activity) which is enhanced by the GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity of "regulator of G-protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. In a cellular context, RGS proteins have also been shown to speed up the onset of signaling, and to accelerate deactivation without changing amplitude or sensitivity of the signal. This latter paradoxical activity has been variably attributed to GAP/enzymatic or non-GAP/scaffolding functions of these proteins. Here, we validated and exploited a G alpha switch-region point mutation, known to engender increased GTPase activity, to mimic in cis the GAP function of RGS proteins. While the transition-state, GDP x AlF(4)(-)-bound conformation of the G202A mutant was found to be nearly identical to wild-type, G alpha(i1)(G202A) x GDP assumed a divergent conformation more closely resembling the GDP x AlF(4)(-)-bound state. When placed within Saccharomyces cerevisiae G alpha subunit Gpa1, the fast-hydrolysis mutation restored appropriate dose-response behaviors to pheromone signaling in the absence of RGS-mediated GAP activity. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) readout of heterotrimer activation with high temporal resolution revealed that fast intrinsic GTPase activity could recapitulate in cis the kinetic sharpening (increased onset and deactivation rates) and blunting of sensitivity also engendered by RGS protein action in trans. Thus G alpha-directed GAP activity, the first biochemical function ascribed to RGS proteins, is sufficient to explain the activation kinetics and agonist sensitivity observed from G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in a cellular context. PMID:20351284

  13. Cadmium-induced effects on cellular signaling pathways in the liver of transgenic estrogen reporter mice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Damdimopoulou, Pauliina; Stenius, Ulla; Adamsson, Annika; Mäkelä, Sari I; Åkesson, Agneta; Berglund, Marika; Håkansson, Helen; Halldin, Krister

    2012-05-01

    Estrogen-like effects of cadmium (Cd) have been reported in several animal studies, and recent epidemiological findings suggest increased risk of hormone-dependent cancers after Cd exposure. The mechanisms underlying these effects are still under investigation. Our aim was to study the effects of Cd on cellular signaling pathways in vivo with special focus on estrogen signaling and to perform benchmark dose analysis on the effects. Transgenic adult ERE-luciferase male mice were exposed subcutaneously to 0.5-500 μg CdCl(2) per kg body weight (bw) or 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) for 3 days. These doses had no effects on organ and bw or testicular histology, indicating subtoxic exposure levels. The transgene luciferase, reporting genomic estrogen response, was significantly increased by EE2 but not by Cd. However, Cd significantly affected kinase phosphorylation and endogenous gene expression. Interestingly, gene expression changes displayed a traditional dose-response relationship, with benchmark dose levels for the expression of Mt1, Mt2, p53, c-fos, and Mdm2 being 92.9, 19.9, 7.6, 259, and 25.9 μg/kg bw, respectively, but changes in kinase phosphorylation were only detected at low exposure levels. Phosphorylation of Erk1/2 was significantly increased even in the lowest dose group, 0.5 μg/kg bw, rendering pErk1/2 a more sensitive sensor of exposure than changes in gene expression. Collectively, our data suggest that the effects triggered by Cd in vivo are markedly concentration dependent. Furthermore, we conclude that the estrogen-like effects of Cd are likely to result from a mechanism different from steroidal estrogens. PMID:22314386

  14. Redox Modulation of Cellular Signaling and Metabolism Through Reversible Oxidation of Methionine Sensors in Calcium Regulatory Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, Diana J.; Squier, Thomas C.

    2005-01-17

    Adaptive responses associated with environmental stressors are critical to cell survival. These involve the modulation of central signaling protein functions through site-specific and enzymatically reversible oxidative modifications of methionines to coordinate cellular metabolism, energy utilization, and calcium signaling. Under conditions when cellular redox and antioxidant defenses are overwhelmed, the selective oxidation of critical methionines within selected protein sensors functions to down-regulate energy metabolism and the further generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mechanistically, these functional changes within protein sensors take advantage of the helix-breaking character of methionine sulfoxide. Thus, depending on either the ecological niche of the organism or the cellular milieu of different organ systems, cellular metabolism can be fine-tuned to maintain optimal function in the face of variable amounts of collateral oxidative damage. The sensitivity of several calcium regulatory proteins to oxidative modification provides cellular sensors that link oxidative stress to cellular response and recovery. Calmodulin (CaM) is one such critical calcium regulatory protein, which is functionally sensitive to methionine oxidation. Helix destabilization resulting from the oxidation of either Met{sup 144} or Met{sup 145} results in the nonproductive association between CaM and target proteins. The ability of oxidized CaM to stabilize its target proteins in an inhibited state with an affinity similar to that of native (unoxidized) CaM permits this central regulatory protein to function as a cellular rheostat that down-regulates energy metabolism in response to oxidative stress. Likewise, oxidation of a methionine within a critical switch region of the regulatory protein phospholamban is expected to destabilize the phosphorylationdependent helix formation necessary for the release of enzyme inhibition, resulting in a down-regulation of the Ca-ATPase in

  15. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Saita, Y; Koizumi, T; Yazawa, H; Morita, T; Takenaka, T; Honda, K

    1997-06-01

    1. Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). 2. [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. 3. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. 4. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. 5. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. 6. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  16. Endothelin receptors and their cellular signal transduction mechanism in human cultured prostatic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Saita, Yuji; Koizumi, Tomonobu; Yazawa, Hidenori; Morita, Takashi; Takenaka, Toichi; Honda, Kazuo

    1997-01-01

    Endothelin (ET) receptors, and their cellular signal transduction mechanism, were characterized in a primary culture of human prostatic smooth muscle cells (HP cell). [125I]-ET-1 and [125I]-ET-3 binding studies revealed that both ETA and ETB receptors were present in the HP cells, and the ratio of ETA to ETB receptors was 1.4:1. Analysis of ET receptor mRNA by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction also demonstrated that HP cells express both ETA and ETB receptors. ET-1 and ET-3 increased intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in the HP cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Use of subtype selective antagonists BQ-123 and BQ-788, indicated that both ETA and ETB receptors were coupled to an increase in [Ca2+]i. Pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin resulted in a significant but partial attenuation of the [Ca2+]i increase mediated through the ETA and ETB receptors. However, sensitivity to pertussis toxin (PTX) was significantly different between them. In conclusion, HP cells possess ETA and ETB receptors. Further, these two endothelin receptor subtypes evoke an increase in [Ca2+]i possibly via the action of different GTP-binding proteins. PMID:9208135

  17. Oxidized phosphatidylcholines in membrane-level cellular signaling: from biophysics to physiology and molecular pathology.

    PubMed

    Volinsky, Roman; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2013-06-01

    The oxidation of lipids has been shown to impact virtually all cellular processes. The paradigm has been that this involvement is due to interference with the functions of membrane-associated proteins. It is only recently that methodological advances in molecular-level detection and identification have begun to provide insights into oxidative lipid modification and its involvement in cell signaling as well as in major diseases and inflammation. Extensive evidence suggests a correlation between lipid peroxidation and degenerative neurological diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, as well as type 2 diabetes and cancer. Despite the obvious relevance of understanding the molecular basis of the above ailments, the exact modes of action of oxidized lipids have remained elusive. In this minireview, we summarize recent findings on the biophysical characteristics of biomembranes following oxidative derivatization of their lipids, and how these altered properties are involved in both physiological processes and major pathological conditions. Lipid-bearing, oxidatively truncated and functionalized acyl chains are known to modify membrane bulk physical properties, such as thermal phase behavior, bilayer thickness, hydration and polarity profiles, as manifest in the altered structural dynamics of lipid bilayers, leading to augmented membrane permeability, fast lipid transbilayer diffusion (flip-flop), loss of lipid asymmetry (scrambling) and phase segregation (the formation of 'rafts'). These changes, together with the generated reactive lipid derivatives, can be further expected to interfere with lipid-protein interactions, influencing metabolic pathways, causing inflammation, the execution phase in apoptosis and initiating pathological processes. PMID:23506295

  18. BMP signaling and cellular dynamics during regeneration of airway epithelium from basal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Tomomi; Gao, Xia; Hong, Charles C.; Hotten, Danielle; Hogan, Brigid L. M.

    2016-01-01

    The pseudostratified epithelium of the lung contains ciliated and secretory luminal cells and basal stem/progenitor cells. To identify signals controlling basal cell behavior we screened factors that alter their self-renewal and differentiation in a clonal organoid (tracheosphere) assay. This revealed that inhibitors of the canonical BMP signaling pathway promote proliferation but do not affect lineage choice, whereas exogenous Bmp4 inhibits proliferation and differentiation. We therefore followed changes in BMP pathway components in vivo in the mouse trachea during epithelial regeneration from basal cells after injury. The findings suggest that BMP signaling normally constrains proliferation at steady state and this brake is released transiently during repair by the upregulation of endogenous BMP antagonists. Early in repair, the packing of epithelial cells along the basal lamina increases, but density is later restored by active extrusion of apoptotic cells. Systemic administration of the BMP antagonist LDN-193189 during repair initially increases epithelial cell number but, following the shedding phase, normal density is restored. Taken together, these results reveal crucial roles for both BMP signaling and cell shedding in homeostasis of the respiratory epithelium. PMID:26811382

  19. Phenylbutyric acid induces the cellular senescence through an Akt/p21{sup WAF1} signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hag Dong; Jang, Chang-Young; Choe, Jeong Min; Sohn, Jeongwon; Kim, Joon

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid induces cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phenylbutyric acid activates Akt kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The knockdown of PERK also can induce cellular senescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway activates in PERK knockdown induced cellular senescence. -- Abstract: It has been well known that three sentinel proteins - PERK, ATF6 and IRE1 - initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) in the presence of misfolded or unfolded proteins in the ER. Recent studies have demonstrated that upregulation of UPR in cancer cells is required to survive and proliferate. Here, we showed that long exposure to 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA), a chemical chaperone that can reduce retention of unfolded and misfolded proteins in ER, induced cellular senescence in cancer cells such as MCF7 and HT1080. In addition, we found that treatment with PBA activates Akt, which results in p21{sup WAF1} induction. Interestingly, the depletion of PERK but not ATF6 and IRE1 also induces cellular senescence, which was rescued by additional depletion of Akt. This suggests that Akt pathway is downstream of PERK in PBA induced cellular senescence. Taken together, these results show that PBA induces cellular senescence via activation of the Akt/p21{sup WAF1} pathway by PERK inhibition.

  20. Four-phase or two-phase signal plan? A study on four-leg intersection by cellular automaton simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng-Jie; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Rui

    2016-08-01

    The proper setting of traffic signals at signalized intersections is one of the most important tasks in traffic control and management. This paper has evaluated the four-phase traffic signal plans at a four-leg intersection via cellular automaton simulations. Each leg consists of three lanes, an exclusive left-turn lane, a through lane, and a through/right-turn lane. For a comparison, we also evaluate the two-phase signal plan. The diagram of the intersection states in the space of inflow rate versus turning ratio has been presented, which exhibits four regions: In region I/II/III, congestion will propagate upstream and laterally and result in queue spillover with both signal plans/two-phase signal plan/four-phase signal plan, respectively. Therefore, neither signal plan works in region I, and only the four-phase signal plan/two-phase signal plan works in region II/III. In region IV, both signal plans work, but two-phase signal plan performs better in terms of average delays of vehicles. Finally, we study the diagram of the intersection states and average delays in the asymmetrical configurations.

  1. Graphene Enhances Cellular Proliferation through Activating the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liao, Chunyang; Cui, Lin; Li, Haishan; Qu, Guangbo; Yu, Wenlian; Song, Naining; Cui, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Wenping; Chen, Huiming; Zhou, Qunfang

    2016-07-27

    Graphene has promising applications in food packaging, water purification, and detective sensors for contamination monitoring. However, the biological effects of graphene are not fully understood. It is necessary to clarify the potential risks of graphene exposure to humans through diverse routes, such as foods. In the present study, graphene, as the model nanomaterial, was used to test its potential effects on the cell proliferation based on multiple representative cell lines, including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cells. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, particle size analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular responses to graphene exposure were evaluated using flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and alamarBlue assays. Rat cerebral astrocyte cultures, as the non-cancer cells, were used to assess the potential cytotoxicity of graphene as well. The results showed that graphene stimulation enhanced cell proliferation in all tested cell cultures and the highest elevation in cell growth was up to 60%. A western blot assay showed that the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was upregulated upon graphene treatment. The phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and the downstream proteins, ShC and extracellular regulating kinase (ERK), were remarkably induced, indicating that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway was triggered. The activation of PI3 kinase p85 and AKT showed that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was also involved in graphene-induced cell proliferation, causing the increase of cell ratios in the G2/M phase. No influences on cell apoptosis were observed in graphene-treated cells when compared to the negative controls, proving the low cytotoxicity of this emerging nanomaterial. The findings in this study revealed the potential cellular biological effect of graphene, which may give useful hints on its biosafety

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus-induced pathology favored by cellular transmission and activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, D.E.; Yoffe, B.; Bosworth, C.G.; Hollinger, F.B.; Rich, R.R.

    1988-03-01

    Epidemiological data suggest that transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) occurs primarily by transference of virally infected cells. However, the efficiency of lytic productive infection induced by HIV after transmission of cell-associated virus vs. free virus is difficult to assess. The present studies compare the extent of depletion of CD4+ (helper/inducer) T cells after mixing uninfected cells with either free HIV or irradiated HIV-infected allogeneic or autologous cells in vitro. Rapid CD4+ cellular depletion occurred only in cultures containing allogeneic infected cells or after addition of a nonspecific T cell activation signal to cultures with autologous infected cells. These in vitro observations strongly support the epidemiological implication that interactions between infected and uninfected cells are the most efficient means of transmission and HIV-induced cytopathology in vivo. They also provide direct support for the concept that immunological stimulation by foreign cells infected with HIV dramatically increases the likelihood of transmission. These in vitro observations suggest a model for the acquisition of HIV in vivo and the role of cellular activation in dissemination of the virus to uninfected cells in an infected individual.

  3. The Roles of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cellular Signaling and Stress Response in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A. Harvey

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria produce ATP via respiratory oxidation of organic acids and transfer of electrons to O2 via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This process produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) at various rates that can impact respiratory and cellular function, affecting a variety of signaling processes in the cell. Roles in redox signaling, retrograde signaling, plant hormone action, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens have been attributed to ROS generated in plant mitochondria (mtROS). The shortcomings of the black box-idea of mtROS are discussed in the context of mechanistic considerations and the measurement of mtROS. The overall aim of this update is to better define our current understanding of mtROS and appraise their potential influence on cellular function in plants. Furthermore, directions for future research are provided, along with suggestions to increase reliability of mtROS measurements. PMID:27021189

  4. Combinatorial effects of continuous protein synthesis, ERK-signaling, and reactive oxygen species on induction of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Takauji, Yuki; En, Atsuki; Miki, Kensuke; Ayusawa, Dai; Fujii, Michihiko

    2016-07-15

    Mammalian cells, when treated with sub-lethal doses of genotoxic stresses, slow down DNA synthesis but continue protein synthesis. Thus, these cells show an accumulation of proteins and undergo unbalanced growth. In the previous studies, we have shown that HeLa cells treated with excess thymidine or camptothecin undergo unbalanced growth, and prolonged unbalanced growth causes induction of cellular senescence, which is suppressed by restriction of protein synthesis or inhibition of ERK-signaling. In this study, we found that restriction of protein synthesis, inhibition of ERK-signaling, and elimination of reactive oxygen species showed a combinatorial effect on suppression of cellular senescence induced by excess thymidine or camptothecin. Of these, restriction of protein synthesis most effectively suppressed cellular senescence. Importantly, a similar combinatorial effect was observed in replicative senescence in normal human diploid fibroblasts. Our findings suggested that various stresses were cumulatively involved in cellular senescence, and suppression of cellular senescence was improved by combining the treatments that reduce the stresses. PMID:27339653

  5. Excess of NPM-ALK oncogenic signaling promotes cellular apoptosis and drug dependency.

    PubMed

    Ceccon, M; Merlo, M E Boggio; Mologni, L; Poggio, T; Varesio, L M; Menotti, M; Bombelli, S; Rigolio, R; Manazza, A D; Di Giacomo, F; Ambrogio, C; Giudici, G; Casati, C; Mastini, C; Compagno, M; Turner, S D; Gambacorti-Passerini, C; Chiarle, R; Voena, C

    2016-07-21

    Most of the anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) cases carry the t(2;5; p23;q35) that produces the fusion protein NPM-ALK (nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase). NPM-ALK-deregulated kinase activity drives several pathways that support malignant transformation of lymphoma cells. We found that in ALK-rearranged ALCL cell lines, NPM-ALK was distributed in equal amounts between the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Only the cytoplasmic portion was catalytically active in both cell lines and primary ALCL, whereas the nuclear portion was inactive because of heterodimerization with NPM1. Thus, about 50% of the NPM-ALK is not active and sequestered as NPM-ALK/NPM1 heterodimers in the nucleus. Overexpression or relocalization of NPM-ALK to the cytoplasm by NPM genetic knockout or knockdown caused ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases 1 and 2) increased phosphorylation and cell death through the engagement of an ATM/Chk2- and γH2AX (phosphorylated H2A histone family member X)-mediated DNA-damage response. Remarkably, human NPM-ALK-amplified cell lines resistant to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) underwent apoptosis upon drug withdrawal as a consequence of ERK1/2 hyperactivation. Altogether, these findings indicate that an excess of NPM-ALK activation and signaling induces apoptosis via oncogenic stress responses. A 'drug holiday' where the ALK TKI treatment is suspended could represent a therapeutic option in cells that become resistant by NPM-ALK amplification. PMID:26657151

  6. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3, Inflammation, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Gupta, Shan R.; Tharakan, Sheeja T.; Koca, Cemile; Dey, Sanjit; Sung, Bokyung

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) is one of six members of a family of transcription factors. It was discovered almost 15 years ago as an acute-phase response factor. This factor has now been associated with inflammation, cellular transformation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer. Various types of carcinogens, radiation, viruses, growth factors, oncogenes, and inflammatory cytokines have been found to activate STAT-3. STAT-3 is constitutively active in most tumor cells but not in normal cells. Phosphorylation of STAT-3 at tyrosine 705 leads to its dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and gene transcription. The phosphorylation of STAT-3 at serine 727 may regulate its activity negatively or positively. STAT-3 regulates the expression of genes that mediate survival (survivin, bcl-xl, mcl-1, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein), proliferation (c-fos, c-myc, cyclin D1), invasion (matrix metalloproteinase-2), and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor). STAT-3 activation has also been associated with both chemoresistance and radioresistance. STAT-3 mediates these effects through its collaboration with various other transcription factors, including nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor-1, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ. Because of its critical role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors of this factor’s activation are being sought for both prevention and therapy of cancer. This has led to identification of small peptides, oligonucleotides, and small molecules as potential STAT-3 inhibitors. Several of these small molecules are chemo-preventive agents derived from plants. This review discusses the intimate relationship between STAT-3, inflammation, and cancer in more detail. PMID:19723038

  7. Genetic Algorithm Calibration of Probabilistic Cellular Automata for Modeling Mining Permit Activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Louis, S.J.; Raines, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate a spatially and temporally resolved cellular automata to model mining activity on public land in Idaho and western Montana. The genetic algorithm searches through a space of transition rule parameters of a two dimensional cellular automata model to find rule parameters that fit observed mining activity data. Previous work by one of the authors in calibrating the cellular automaton took weeks - the genetic algorithm takes a day and produces rules leading to about the same (or better) fit to observed data. These preliminary results indicate that genetic algorithms are a viable tool in calibrating cellular automata for this application. Experience gained during the calibration of this cellular automata suggests that mineral resource information is a critical factor in the quality of the results. With automated calibration, further refinements of how the mineral-resource information is provided to the cellular automaton will probably improve our model.

  8. The anticancer plant triterpenoid, avicin D, regulates glucocorticoid receptor signaling: implications for cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Haridas, Valsala; Xu, Zhi-Xiang; Kitchen, Doug; Jiang, Anna; Michels, Peter; Gutterman, Jordan U

    2011-01-01

    Avicins, a family of apoptotic triterpene electrophiles, are known to regulate cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis, by targeting the mitochondria. Having evolved from "ancient hopanoids," avicins bear a structural resemblance with glucocorticoids (GCs), which are the endogenous regulators of metabolism and energy balance. These structural and functional similarities prompted us to compare the mode of action of avicin D with dexamethasone (Dex), a prototypical GC. Using cold competition assay, we show that Avicin D competes with Dex for binding to the GC receptor (GR), leading to its nuclear translocation. In contrast to Dex, avicin-induced nuclear translocation of GR does not result in transcriptional activation of GC-dependent genes. Instead we observe a decrease in the expression of GC-dependent metabolic proteins such as PEPCK and FASN. However, like Dex, avicin D treatment does induce a transrepressive effect on the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB. While avicin's ability to inhibit NF-κB and its downstream targets appear to be GR-dependent, its pro-apoptotic effects were independent of GR expression. Using various deletion mutants of GR, we demonstrate the requirement of both the DNA and ligand binding domains of GR in mediating avicin D's transrepressive effects. Modeling of avicin-GR interaction revealed that avicin molecule binds only to the antagonist confirmation of GR. These findings suggest that avicin D has properties of being a selective GR modulator that separates transactivation from transrepression. Since the gene-activating properties of GR are mainly linked to its metabolic effects, and the negative interference with the activity of transcription factors to its anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effects, the identification of such a dissociated GR ligand could have great potential for therapeutic use. PMID:22132201

  9. Cellular Bioenergetics is an Important Determinant of the Molecular Imaging Signal Derived from Luciferase and the Sodium-Iodide Symporter

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Connie; Chan, Angel; Lin, Xiaoping; Higuchi, Takahiro; Terrovitis, John; Afzal, Junaid M.; Rittenbach, Andrew; Sun, Dongdong; Vakrou, Styliani; Woldemichael, Kirubel; O’Rourke, Brian; Wahl, Richard; Pomper, Martin; Tsui, Benjamin; Abraham, M. Roselle

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Molecular imaging is useful for longitudinal assessment of engraftment. However, it is not known which factors, other than cell number can influence the molecular imaging signal obtained from reporter genes. Objective The effects of cell dissociation/suspension on cellular bioenergetics and the signal obtained by firefly luciferase(fluc) and human Na-I symporter(hNIS) labeling of cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) was investigated. Methods and Results 18FDG uptake, ATP levels, 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake and bioluminescence were measured in vitro, in adherent and suspended CDCs. In vivo dual isotope SPECT-CT imaging or bioluminescence imaging (BLI) were performed 1hr and 24hrs following CDC transplantation. SPECT quantification was performed using a phantom for signal calibration. Cell loss between 1hr & 24hrs post-transplantation was quantified by qPCR and ex vivo luciferase assay. Cell dissociation followed by suspension for 1hr resulted in decreased glucose uptake, cellular ATP, 99mTc uptake and BLI signal by 82%, 43%, 42%, and 44% respectively, when compared to adherent cells, in vitro. In vivo 99mTc uptake was significantly lower at 1hr, when compared to 24hrs following cell transplantation in the non-infarct (p<0.001, n=3) and infarct (p<0.001, n =4) model, despite significant cell loss during this period. The in vivo BLI signal was significantly higher at 1hr than at 24hrs (p<0.01), with the BLI signal being higher when CDCs were suspended in glucose-containing medium compared to saline(PBS). Conclusion Adhesion is an important determinant of cellular bioenergetics, 99mTc-pertechnetate uptake and BLI signal. BLI and NIS imaging may be useful for in vivo optimization of bioenergetics in transplanted cells. PMID:23255420

  10. Cellular activity of bioactive nanograined/ultrafine-grained materials.

    PubMed

    Misra, R D K; Thein-Han, W W; Mali, S A; Somani, M C; Karjalainen, L P

    2010-07-01

    Our recent electron microscopy study on biomimetic nanostructured coatings on nanograined/ultrafine-grained (NG/UFG) substrates [Mater Sci Eng C 2009;29:2417-27] indicated that electrocrystallized nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) on phase-reversion-induced NG/UFG substrates exhibited a vein-type interconnected and fibrillar structure that closely mimicked the hierarchical structure of bone. The fibrillar structure on NG/UFG substrate is expected to be more favorable for cellular response than a planar surface. In contrast, hydroxyapatite (HA) coating on coarse-grained (CG) substrate more closely resembled a film rather than a fibrillar structure. Inspired by the differences in the structure of HA coating, we describe here the cell-substrate interactions of pre-osteoblasts (MC 3T3-E1) on bioactive NG/UFG and CG austenitic stainless steel substrates. NG/UFG austenitic stainless steel was obtained by a novel controlled phase-reversion annealing of cold-deformed austenite. This example provides an illustration of how a combination of cellular and molecular biology, materials science and engineering can advance our understanding of cell-substrate interactions. Interestingly, the cellular response of nanohydroxyapatite (nHA)-coated NG/UFG substrate demonstrated superior cytocompatibility, improved initial cell attachment, higher viability and proliferation, and well-spread morphology in relation to HA-coated CG substrate and their respective uncoated (bare) counterparts as implied by fluorescence and electron microscopy and MTT assay. Similar conclusions were derived from an immunofluorescence study that involved examination of the expression levels of vinculin focal adhesion contacts associated with dense actin stress fibers and fibronectin, protein analysis through protein bands in SDS-PAGE, and quantitative total protein assay. The enhancement of cellular response followed the sequence: nHA-coated NG/UFG>nHA-coated CG>NG/UFG>CG substrates. The outcomes of the study are

  11. Feeding rainbow trout with a lipid-enriched diet: effects on fatty acid sensing, regulation of food intake and cellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Librán-Pérez, Marta; Geurden, Inge; Dias, Karine; Corraze, Genevieve; Panserat, Stephane; Soengas, José L

    2015-08-01

    Using rainbow trout fed with low-fat or high-fat diets, we aimed to determine whether the response of food intake, mRNA abundance of hypothalamic neuropeptides involved in the metabolic regulation of food intake and fatty acid sensing systems in the hypothalamus and liver are similar to results previously observed when levels of specific fatty acids were raised by injection. Moreover, we also aimed to determine if the phosphorylation state of intracellular energy sensor 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and proteins involved in cellular signaling such as protein kinase B (Akt) and target of rapamycin (mTOR) display changes that could be related to fatty acid sensing and the control of food intake. The increased levels of fatty acids in the hypothalamus and liver of rainbow trout fed with a high-fat diet only partially activated fatty acid sensing systems and did not elicit changes in food intake, suggesting that the fatty acid sensing response in fish is more dependent on the presence of specific fatty acids, such as oleate or octanoate, rather than to the global increase in fatty acids. We also obtained, for the first time in fish, evidence for the presence and function of energy sensors such as AMPK and proteins involved in cellular signaling, like mTOR and Akt, in the hypothalamus. These proteins in the hypothalamus and liver were generally activated in fish fed the high-fat versus low-fat diet, suggesting that cellular signaling pathways are activated in response to the increased availability of fatty acids. PMID:26089527

  12. N-Terminal signal sequence is required for cellular trafficking and hyaluronan-depolymerization of KIAA1199.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Nagaoka, Aya; Nakamura, Sachiko; Tobiishi, Megumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Inoue, Shintaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we disclosed that KIAA1199-mediated hyaluronan (HA) depolymerization requires an acidic cellular microenvironment (e.g. clathrin-coated vesicles or early endosomes), but no information about the structural basis underlying the cellular targeting and functional modification of KIAA1199 was available. Here, we show that the cleavage of N-terminal 30 amino acids occurs in functionally matured KIAA1199, and the deletion of the N-terminal portion results in altered intracellular trafficking of the molecule and loss of cellular HA depolymerization. These results suggest that the N-terminal portion of KIAA1199 functions as a cleavable signal sequence required for proper KIAA1199 translocation and KIAA1199-mediated HA depolymerization. PMID:24269685

  13. Curcumin differs from tetrahydrocurcumin for molecular targets, signaling pathways and cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Deb, Lokesh; Prasad, Sahdeo

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a golden pigment from turmeric, has been linked with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, and antidiabetic properties. Most of the these activities have been assigned to methoxy, hydroxyl, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety or to diketone groups present in curcumin. One of the major metabolites of curcumin is tetrahydrocurcumin (THC), which lacks α,β-unsaturated carbonyl moiety and is white in color. Whether THC is superior to curcumin on a molecular level is unclear and thus is the focus of this review. Various studies suggest that curcumin is a more potent antioxidant than THC; curcumin (but not THC) can bind and inhibit numerous targets including DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase-1, heme oxygenase-1, Nrf2, β-catenin, cyclooxygenase-2, NF-kappaB, inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, amyloid plaques, reactive oxygen species, vascular endothelial growth factor, cyclin D1, glutathione, P300/CBP, 5-lipoxygenase, cytosolic phospholipase A2, prostaglandin E2, inhibitor of NF-kappaB kinase-1, -2, P38MAPK, p-Tau, tumor necrosis factor-α, forkhead box O3a, CRAC; curcumin can inhibit tumor cell growth and suppress cellular entry of viruses such as influenza A virus and hepatitis C virus much more effectively than THC; curcumin affects membrane mobility; and curcumin is also more effective than THC in suppressing phorbol-ester-induced tumor promotion. Other studies, however, suggest that THC is superior to curcumin for induction of GSH peroxidase, glutathione-S-transferase, NADPH: quinone reductase, and quenching of free radicals. Most studies have indicated that THC exhibits higher antioxidant activity, but curcumin exhibits both pro-oxidant and antioxidant properties. PMID:25547723

  14. Notum deacylates Wnts to suppress signalling activity

    PubMed Central

    Howell, Steve; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O’Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Signalling by Wnts is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnts from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity since glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which likely help Notum colocalise with Wnts. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnts and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  15. Kalkitoxin Inhibits Angiogenesis, Disrupts Cellular Hypoxic Signaling, and Blocks Mitochondrial Electron Transport in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, J. Brian; Liu, Yang; Coothankandaswamy, Veena; Mahdi, Fakhri; Jekabsons, Mika B.; Gerwick, William H.; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active lipopeptide kalkitoxin was previously isolated from the marine cyanobacterium Moorea producens (Lyngbya majuscula). Kalkitoxin exhibited N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-mediated neurotoxicity and acted as an inhibitory ligand for voltage-sensitive sodium channels in cultured rat cerebellar granule neurons. Subsequent studies revealed that kalkitoxin generated a delayed form of colon tumor cell cytotoxicity in 7-day clonogenic cell survival assays. Cell line- and exposure time-dependent cytostatic/cytotoxic effects were previously observed with mitochondria-targeted inhibitors of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1). The transcription factor HIF-1 functions as a key regulator of oxygen homeostasis. Therefore, we investigated the ability of kalkitoxin to inhibit hypoxic signaling in human tumor cell lines. Kalkitoxin potently and selectively inhibited hypoxia-induced activation of HIF-1 in T47D breast tumor cells (IC50 5.6 nM). Mechanistic studies revealed that kalkitoxin inhibits HIF-1 activation by suppressing mitochondrial oxygen consumption at electron transport chain (ETC) complex I (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase). Further studies indicate that kalkitoxin targets tumor angiogenesis by blocking the induction of angiogenic factors (i.e., VEGF) in tumor cells. PMID:25803180

  16. Cucurbitacin IIb exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors of mouse lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Zhao, Gao-Xiang; Xu, Li-Hui; Liu, Kun-Peng; Pan, Hao; He, Jian; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb) is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27(Kip1) and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3(+) T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65), it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65). In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24587010

  17. Cucurbitacin IIb Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity through Modulating Multiple Cellular Behaviors of Mouse Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kun-Peng; Pan, Hao; He, Jian; Cai, Ji-Ye; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb) is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A)-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27Kip1 and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3+ T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65), it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65). In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24587010

  18. Prion-like Polymerization Underlies Signal Transduction in Antiviral Immune Defense and Inflammasome Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xin; Chen, Jueqi; Xu, Hui; Liu, Siqi; Jiang, Qiu-Xing; Halfmann, Randal; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pathogens and cellular danger signals activate sensors such as RIG-I and NLRP3 to produce robust immune and inflammatory responses through respective adaptor proteins MAVS and ASC, which harbor essential N-terminal CARD and PYRIN domains, respectively. Here, we show that CARD and PYRIN function as bona fide prions in yeast and their prion forms are inducible by their respective upstream activators. Likewise, a yeast prion domain can functionally replace CARD and PYRIN in mammalian cell signaling. Mutations in MAVS and ASC that disrupt their prion activities in yeast also abrogate their ability to signal in mammalian cells. Furthermore, fibers of recombinant PYRIN can convert ASC into functional polymers capable of activating caspase-1. Remarkably, a conserved fungal NOD-like receptor and prion pair can functionally reconstitute signaling of NLRP3 and ASC PYRINs in mammalian cells. These results indicate that prion-like polymerization is a conserved signal transduction mechanism in innate immunity and inflammation. PMID:24630723

  19. Modest Interference with Actin Dynamics in Primary T Cell Activation by Antigen Presenting Cells Preferentially Affects Lamellal Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Kole T.; Mace, Emily M.; Clark, Danielle J.; Leard, Alan D.; Herman, Andrew; Verkade, Paul; Orange, Jordan S.; Wülfing, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic subcellular distributions of signaling system components are critical regulators of cellular signal transduction through their control of molecular interactions. Understanding how signaling activity depends on such distributions and the cellular structures driving them is required for comprehensive insight into signal transduction. In the activation of primary murine T cells by antigen presenting cells (APC) signaling intermediates associate with various subcellular structures, prominently a transient, wide, and actin-associated lamellum extending from an interdigitated T cell:APC interface several micrometers into the T cell. While actin dynamics are well established as general regulators of cellular organization, their role in controlling signaling organization in primary T cell:APC couples and the specific cellular structures driving it is unresolved. Using modest interference with actin dynamics with a low concentration of Jasplakinolide as corroborated by costimulation blockade we show that T cell actin preferentially controls lamellal signaling localization and activity leading downstream to calcium signaling. Lamellal localization repeatedly related to efficient T cell function. This suggests that the transient lamellal actin matrix regulates T cell signaling associations that facilitate T cell activation. PMID:26237588

  20. Extrasynaptic Glutamate Receptor Activation as Cellular Bases for Dynamic Range Compression in Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oikonomou, Katerina D.; Short, Shaina M.; Rich, Matthew T.; Antic, Srdjan D.

    2012-01-01

    Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate, for a brief period of time. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly non-linear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials) are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of “loud sounds” (i.e., strong glutamatergic inputs) and amplify “quiet sounds” (i.e., glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation). Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP

  1. Pharmacological Investigations of the Cellular Transduction Pathways Used by Cholecystokinin to Activate Nodose Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huan; Kinch, Dallas C.; Simasko, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) directly activates vagal afferent neurons resulting in coordinated gastrointestinal functions and satiation. In vitro, the effects of CCK on dissociated vagal afferent neurons are mediated via activation of the vanilloid family of transient receptor potential (TRPV) cation channels leading to membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic calcium. However, the cellular transduction pathway(s) involved in this process between CCK receptors and channel opening have not been identified. To address this question, we monitored CCK-induced cytosolic calcium responses in dissociated nodose neurons from rat in the presence or absence of reagents that interact with various intracellular signaling pathways. We found that the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U-73122 significantly attenuated CCK-induced responses, whereas the inactive analog U-73433 had no effect. Responses to CCK were also cross-desensitized by a brief pretreatment with m-3M3FBS, a PLC stimulator. Together these observations strongly support the participation of PLC in the effects of CCK on vagal afferent neurons. In contrast, pharmacological antagonism of phospholipase A2, protein kinase A, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase revealed that they are not critical in the CCK-induced calcium response in nodose neurons. Further investigations of the cellular pathways downstream of PLC showed that neither protein kinase C (PKC) nor generation of diacylglycerol (DAG) or release of calcium from intracellular stores participates in the response to CCK. These results suggest that alteration of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) content by PLC activity mediates CCK-induced calcium response and that this pathway may underlie the vagally-mediated actions of CCK to induce satiation and alter gastrointestinal functions. PMID:21664195

  2. Novel chlorinated dibenzofurans isolated from the cellular slime mold, Polysphondylium filamentosum, and their biological activities.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Haruhisa; Kubohara, Yuzuru; Nguyen, Van Hai; Katou, Yasuhiro; Oshima, Yoshiteru

    2013-08-01

    Cellular slime molds are expected to have the huge potential for producing secondary metabolites including polyketides, and we have studied the diversity of secondary metabolites of cellular slime molds for their potential utilization as new biological resources for natural product chemistry. From the methanol extract of fruiting bodies of Polysphondylium filamentosum, we obtained new chlorinated benzofurans Pf-1 (4) and Pf-2 (5) which display multiple biological activities; these include stalk cell differentiation-inducing activity in the well-studied cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, and inhibitory activities on cell proliferation in mammalian cells and gene expression in Drosophila melanogaster. PMID:23746784

  3. The role of nutraceuticals in pancreatic cancer prevention and therapy: Targeting cellular signaling, miRNAs and epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yiwei; Go, Vay Liang W.; Sarkar, Fazlul H.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive malignancies in US adults. The experimental studies have found that antioxidant nutrients could reduce oxidative DNA damage, suggesting that these antioxidants may protect against pancreatic carcinogenesis. Several epidemiologic studies showed that dietary intake of antioxidants was inversely associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer, demonstrating the inhibitory effects of antioxidants on pancreatic carcinogenesis. Moreover, nutraceuticals, the anti-cancer agents from diet or natural plants, have been found to inhibit the development and progression of pancreatic cancer through the regulation of cellular signaling pathways. Importantly, nutraceuticals also up-regulate the expression of tumor suppressive miRNAs and down-regulate the expression of oncogenic miRNAs, leading to the inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth and pancreatic Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) self-renewal through modulation of cellular signaling network. Furthermore, nutraceuticals also regulate epigenetically deregulated DNAs and miRNAs, leading to the normalization of altered cellular signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. Therefore, nutraceuticals could have much broader use in the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer in combination with conventional chemotherapeutics. However, more in vitro mechanistic experiments, in vivo animal studies, and clinical trials are needed to realize the true value of nutraceuticals in the prevention and/or treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25493373

  4. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ) and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ), indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC) or fungicidal (MFC) concentrations. Effective

  5. COX19 mediates the transduction of a mitochondrial redox signal from SCO1 that regulates ATP7A-mediated cellular copper efflux

    PubMed Central

    Leary, Scot C.; Cobine, Paul A.; Nishimura, Tamiko; Verdijk, Robert M.; de Krijger, Ronald; de Coo, René; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Winge, Dennis R.; Shoubridge, Eric A.

    2013-01-01

    SCO1 and SCO2 are metallochaperones whose principal function is to add two copper ions to the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, affected tissues of SCO1 and SCO2 patients exhibit a combined deficiency in COX activity and total copper content, suggesting additional roles for these proteins in the regulation of cellular copper homeostasis. Here we show that both the redox state of the copper-binding cysteines of SCO1 and the abundance of SCO2 correlate with cellular copper content and that these relationships are perturbed by mutations in SCO1 or SCO2, producing a state of apparent copper overload. The copper deficiency in SCO patient fibroblasts is rescued by knockdown of ATP7A, a trans-Golgi, copper-transporting ATPase that traffics to the plasma membrane during copper overload to promote efflux. To investigate how a signal from SCO1 could be relayed to ATP7A, we examined the abundance and subcellular distribution of several soluble COX assembly factors. We found that COX19 partitions between mitochondria and the cytosol in a copper-dependent manner and that its knockdown partially rescues the copper deficiency in patient cells. These results demonstrate that COX19 is necessary for the transduction of a SCO1-dependent mitochondrial redox signal that regulates ATP7A-mediated cellular copper efflux. PMID:23345593

  6. COX19 mediates the transduction of a mitochondrial redox signal from SCO1 that regulates ATP7A-mediated cellular copper efflux.

    PubMed

    Leary, Scot C; Cobine, Paul A; Nishimura, Tamiko; Verdijk, Robert M; de Krijger, Ronald; de Coo, René; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Winge, Dennis R; Shoubridge, Eric A

    2013-03-01

    SCO1 and SCO2 are metallochaperones whose principal function is to add two copper ions to the catalytic core of cytochrome c oxidase (COX). However, affected tissues of SCO1 and SCO2 patients exhibit a combined deficiency in COX activity and total copper content, suggesting additional roles for these proteins in the regulation of cellular copper homeostasis. Here we show that both the redox state of the copper-binding cysteines of SCO1 and the abundance of SCO2 correlate with cellular copper content and that these relationships are perturbed by mutations in SCO1 or SCO2, producing a state of apparent copper overload. The copper deficiency in SCO patient fibroblasts is rescued by knockdown of ATP7A, a trans-Golgi, copper-transporting ATPase that traffics to the plasma membrane during copper overload to promote efflux. To investigate how a signal from SCO1 could be relayed to ATP7A, we examined the abundance and subcellular distribution of several soluble COX assembly factors. We found that COX19 partitions between mitochondria and the cytosol in a copper-dependent manner and that its knockdown partially rescues the copper deficiency in patient cells. These results demonstrate that COX19 is necessary for the transduction of a SCO1-dependent mitochondrial redox signal that regulates ATP7A-mediated cellular copper efflux. PMID:23345593

  7. Pomegranate Extracts and Cancer Prevention: Molecular and Cellular Activities

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Deeba N.; Chamcheu, Jean-Christopher; Adhami, Vaqar M.; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2014-01-01

    There is increased appreciation by the scientific community that dietary phytochemicals can be potential weapons in the fight against cancer. Emerging data has provided new insights into the molecular and cellular framework needed to establish novel mechanism-based strategies for cancer prevention by selective bioactive food components. The unique chemical composition of the pomegranate fruit, rich in antioxidant tannins and flavonoids has drawn the attention of many investigators. Polyphenol rich fractions derived from the pomegranate fruit have been studied for their potential chemopreventive and/or cancer therapeutic effects in several animal models. Although data from in vitro and in vivo studies look convincing, well designed clinical trials in humans are needed to ascertain whether pomegranate can become part of our armamentarium against cancer. This review summarizes the available literature on the effects of pomegranate against various cancers. PMID:23094914

  8. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  9. Multi-scale continuum modeling of biological processes: from molecular electro-diffusion to sub-cellular signaling transduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Y.; Kekenes-Huskey, P.; Hake, J. E.; Holst, M. J.; McCammon, J. A.; Michailova, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a brief review of multi-scale modeling at the molecular to cellular scale, with new results for heart muscle cells. A finite element-based simulation package (SMOL) was used to investigate the signaling transduction at molecular and sub-cellular scales (http://mccammon.ucsd.edu/smol/, http://FETK.org) by numerical solution of the time-dependent Smoluchowski equations and a reaction-diffusion system. At the molecular scale, SMOL has yielded experimentally validated estimates of the diffusion-limited association rates for the binding of acetylcholine to mouse acetylcholinesterase using crystallographic structural data. The predicted rate constants exhibit increasingly delayed steady-state times, with increasing ionic strength, and demonstrate the role of an enzyme's electrostatic potential in influencing ligand binding. At the sub-cellular scale, an extension of SMOL solves a nonlinear, reaction-diffusion system describing Ca2+ ligand buffering and diffusion in experimentally derived rodent ventricular myocyte geometries. Results reveal the important role of mobile and stationary Ca2+ buffers, including Ca2+ indicator dye. We found that alterations in Ca2+-binding and dissociation rates of troponin C (TnC) and total TnC concentration modulate sub-cellular Ca2+ signals. The model predicts that reduced off-rate in the whole troponin complex (TnC, TnI, TnT) versus reconstructed thin filaments (Tn, Tm, actin) alters cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics under control conditions or in disease-linked TnC mutations. The ultimate goal of these studies is to develop scalable methods and theories for the integration of molecular-scale information into simulations of cellular-scale systems.

  10. Spatio-temporal analysis of brain electrical activity in epilepsy based on cellular nonlinear networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollas, Frank; Tetzlaff, Ronald

    2009-05-01

    Epilepsy is the most common chronic disorder of the nervous system. Generally, epileptic seizures appear without foregoing sign or warning. The problem of detecting a possible pre-seizure state in epilepsy from EEG signals has been addressed by many authors over the past decades. Different approaches of time series analysis of brain electrical activity already are providing valuable insights into the underlying complex dynamics. But the main goal the identification of an impending epileptic seizure with a sufficient specificity and reliability, has not been achieved up to now. An algorithm for a reliable, automated prediction of epileptic seizures would enable the realization of implantable seizure warning devices, which could provide valuable information to the patient and time/event specific drug delivery or possibly a direct electrical nerve stimulation. Cellular Nonlinear Networks (CNN) are promising candidates for future seizure warning devices. CNN are characterized by local couplings of comparatively simple dynamical systems. With this property these networks are well suited to be realized as highly parallel, analog computer chips. Today available CNN hardware realizations exhibit a processing speed in the range of TeraOps combined with low power consumption. In this contribution new algorithms based on the spatio-temporal dynamics of CNN are considered in order to analyze intracranial EEG signals and thus taking into account mutual dependencies between neighboring regions of the brain. In an identification procedure Reaction-Diffusion CNN (RD-CNN) are determined for short segments of brain electrical activity, by means of a supervised parameter optimization. RD-CNN are deduced from Reaction-Diffusion Systems, which usually are applied to investigate complex phenomena like nonlinear wave propagation or pattern formation. The Local Activity Theory provides a necessary condition for emergent behavior in RD-CNN. In comparison linear spatio

  11. Activation Mechanism of LRRK2 and Its Cellular Functions in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbusch, Katharina E.; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Human LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) has been associated with both familial and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several LRRK2 mediated pathways and interaction partners have been identified, the cellular functions of LRRK2 and LRRK2 mediated progression of PD are still only partially understood. LRRK2 belongs to the group of Roco proteins which are characterized by the presence of a Ras-like G-domain (Roc), a C-terminal of Roc domain (COR), a kinase, and several protein-protein interaction domains. Roco proteins exhibit a complex activation mechanism involving intramolecular signaling, dimerization, and substrate/effector binding. Importantly, PD mutations in LRRK2 have been linked to a decreased GTPase and impaired kinase activity, thus providing putative therapeutic targets. To fully explore these potential targets it will be crucial to understand the function and identify the pathways responsible for LRRK2-linked PD. Here, we review the recent progress in elucidating the complex LRRK2 activation mechanism, describe the accumulating evidence that link LRRK2-mediated PD to mitochondrial dysfunction and aberrant autophagy, and discuss possible ways for therapeutically targeting LRRK2. PMID:27293958

  12. Acetylation of MnSOD directs enzymatic activity responding to cellular nutrient status or oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ozkan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jiang, Haiyan; Coleman, Mitchell C; Spitz, Douglas R; Gius, David

    2011-02-01

    A fundamental observation in biology is that mitochondrial function, as measured by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), changes significantly with age, suggesting a potential mechanistic link between the cellular processes governing longevity and mitochondrial metabolism homeostasis. In addition, it is well established that altered ROS levels are observed in multiple age-related illnesses including carcinogenesis, neurodegenerative, fatty liver, insulin resistance, and cardiac disease, to name just a few. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is the primary mitochondrial ROS scavenging enzyme that converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently converted to water by catalase and other peroxidases. It has recently been shown that MnSOD enzymatic activity is regulated by the reversible acetylation of specific, evolutionarily conserved lysine(s) in the protein. These results, suggest for the first time, that the mitochondria contain bidirectional post-translational signaling networks, similar to that observed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and that changes in lysine acetylation alter MnSOD enzymatic activity. In addition, these new results demonstrate that the mitochondrial anti-aging or fidelity / sensing protein, SIRT3, responds to changes in mitochondrial nutrient and/or redox status to alter the enzymatic activity of specific downstream targets, including MnSOD that adjusts and/or maintains ROS levels as well as metabolic homeostatic poise. PMID:21386137

  13. Cilioplasm is a cellular compartment for calcium signaling in response to mechanical and chemical stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xingjian; Mohieldin, Ashraf M.; Muntean, Brian S.; Green, Jill A.; Shah, Jagesh V.; Mykytyn, Kirk; Nauli, Surya M.

    2013-01-01

    Primary cilia with a diameter of ~200 nm have been implicated in development and disease. Calcium signaling within a primary cilium has never been directly visualized and has therefore remained a speculation. Fluid-shear stress and dopamine receptor type-5 (DR5) agonist are among the few stimuli that require cilia for intracellular calcium signal transduction. However, it is not known if these stimuli initiate calcium signaling within the cilium, or if the calcium signal originates in the cytoplasm. Using an integrated single-cell imaging technique, we demonstrate for the first time that calcium signaling triggered by fluid-shear stress initiates in the primary cilium and can be distinguished from the subsequent cytosolic calcium response through the ryanodine receptor. Importantly, this flow-induced calcium signaling depends on the ciliary polycystin-2 calcium channel. While DR5-specific agonist induces calcium signaling mainly in the cilioplasm via ciliary CaV1.2, thrombin specifically induces cytosolic calcium signaling through the IP3 receptor. Furthermore, a non-specific calcium ionophore triggers both ciliary and cytosolic calcium responses. We suggest that cilia not only act as sensory organelles but also function as calcium signaling compartments. Cilium-dependent signaling can spread to the cytoplasm or be contained within the cilioplasm. Our study also provides the first model to understand signaling within the cilioplasm of a living cell. PMID:24104765

  14. ENHANCING FUNGICIDAL ACTIVITY OF FLUDIOXONIL BY DISRUPTING CELLULAR GLUTATHIONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fungicidal activity of fludioxonil, a phenylpyrrole fungicide, is elevated by co-application with the aspirin/salicylic acid metabolite, 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,5-DHBA). Fludioxonil fungicidal activity is potentiated through the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway regulating osmotic...

  15. Technology Learning Activities: Columbus Sailed the Ocean Blue, the Cellular Connection, Emergency Shelter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Etchison, Cindy; Deal, Walter F., III

    1992-01-01

    Presents learning activities such as planning and building a sailboat, manufacturing cellular phone cases, and designing and building emergency shelters. Includes the context, the challenge, resources used, objectives, materials needed, and an evaluation. (JOW)

  16. Learning about Cellular Respiration: An Active Approach Illustrating the Process of Scientific Inquiry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Margaret (Peg)

    1998-01-01

    Details the active-learning approach to teaching cellular respiration in an introductory, one-semester course for nonmajors. Focuses on a laboratory exercise designed to answer the question of what happens to food when eaten. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  17. ASPP1 and ASPP2 bind active RAS, potentiate RAS signalling and enhance p53 activity in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Godin-Heymann, N; Dan Wang, X; Bergamaschi, D; Llanos, S; Lu, X

    2013-01-01

    RAS mutations occur frequently in human cancer and activated RAS signalling contributes to tumour development and progression. Apart from its oncogenic effects on cell growth, active RAS has tumour-suppressive functions via its ability to induce cellular senescence and apoptosis. RAS is known to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest, yet its effect on p53-dependent apoptosis remains unclear. We report here that apoptosis-stimulating protein of p53 (ASPP) 1 and 2, two activators of p53, preferentially bind active RAS via their N-terminal RAS-association domains (RAD). Additionally, ASPP2 colocalises with and contributes to RAS cellular membrane localisation and potentiates RAS signalling. In cancer cells, ASPP1 and ASPP2 cooperate with oncogenic RAS to enhance the transcription and apoptotic function of p53. Thus, loss of ASPP1 and ASPP2 in human cancer cells may contribute to the full transforming property of RAS oncogene. PMID:23392125

  18. Antibacterial and Anti-inflammatory Activities of Ppc-1, Active Principle of the Cellular Slime Mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum.

    PubMed

    Azelmat, Jabrane; Fiorito, Serena; Genovese, Salvatore; Epifano, Francesco; Grenier, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The diisopentenyloxy quinolobactin derivative 3-methylbut-2-enyl-4-methoxy-8-[(3-methylbut-2-enyl)oxy] quinoline-2-carboxylate, also named as Ppc-1, has been initially isolated from the fruiting bodies of the cellular slime mold Polysphondylium pseudo-candidum. Given that few data are available in the literature concerning the biological properties of this compound, this study was undertaken to evaluate its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Ppc-1 exerted antibacterial activity on the Gram negative periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis, while it had no such effect on the other bacterial species tested. The antibacterial activity of Ppc-1 appeared to result from its ability to permeate the cell membrane. Using the U937-3xκB-LUC human monocytic cell line, Ppc-1 was found to dose-dependently inhibit the lipopolysaccharide-induced NF-κB activation, a signaling pathway that has been associated with inflammatory mediator secretion. In conclusion, Ppc-1, by exhibiting a dual mode of action including antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities, may represent a promising targeted therapeutic agent for periodontal diseases. PMID:25925558

  19. Cellular targets of estrogen signaling in regeneration of inner ear sensory epithelia

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen signaling in auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia is a newly emerging focus propelled by the role of estrogen signaling in many other proliferative systems. Understanding the pathways with which estrogen interacts can provide a means to identify how estrogen may modulate proliferative signaling in inner ear sensory epithelia. Reviewed herein are two signaling families, EGF and TGFβ. Both pathways are involved in regulating proliferation of supporting cells in mature vestibular sensory epithelia and have well characterized interactions with estrogen signaling in other systems. It is becoming increasingly clear that elucidating the complexity of signaling in regeneration will be necessary for development of therapeutics that can initiate regeneration and prevent progression to a pathogenic state. PMID:19450430

  20. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  1. Alternative Activation Mechanisms of Protein Kinase B Trigger Distinct Downstream Signaling Responses.

    PubMed

    Balzano, Deborah; Fawal, Mohamad-Ali; Velázquez, Jose V; Santiveri, Clara M; Yang, Joshua; Pastor, Joaquín; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Djouder, Nabil; Lietha, Daniel

    2015-10-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is an important mediator of signals that control various cellular processes including cell survival, growth, proliferation, and metabolism. PKB promotes these processes by phosphorylating many cellular targets, which trigger distinct downstream signaling events. However, how PKB is able to selectively target its substrates to induce specific cellular functions remains elusive. Here we perform a systematic study to dissect mechanisms that regulate intrinsic kinase activity versus mechanisms that specifically regulate activity toward specific substrates. We demonstrate that activation loop phosphorylation and the C-terminal hydrophobic motif are essential for high PKB activity in general. On the other hand, we identify membrane targeting, which for decades has been regarded as an essential step in PKB activation, as a mechanism mainly affecting substrate selectivity. Further, we show that PKB activity in cells can be triggered independently of PI3K by initial hydrophobic motif phosphorylation, presumably through a mechanism analogous to other AGC kinases. Importantly, different modes of PKB activation result in phosphorylation of distinct downstream targets. Our data indicate that specific mechanisms have evolved for signaling nodes, like PKB, to select between various downstream events. Targeting such mechanisms selectively could facilitate the development of therapeutics that might limit toxic side effects. PMID:26286748

  2. CD47 signaling pathways controlling cellular differentiation and responses to stress

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D.

    2016-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed integral membrane protein that serves as the counter-receptor for the inhibitory phagocyte receptor signal-regulatory protein-α (SIRPα) and as a signaling receptor for the secreted matricellular protein thrombospondin-1. Recent studies employing mice and somatic cells lacking CD47 have revealed important pathophysiological functions of CD47 in cardiovascular homeostasis, immune regulation, resistance of cells and tissues to stress, and chronic diseases of aging including cancer. With the emergence of experimental therapeutics targeting CD47, a more thorough understanding of CD47 signal transduction is essential. CD47 lacks a substantial cytoplasmic signaling domain, but several cytoplasmic binding partners have been identified, and lateral interactions of CD47 with other membrane receptors play important roles in mediating signaling resulting from the binding of thrombospondin-1. This review addresses recent advances in identifying the lateral binding partners, signal transduction pathways, and downstream transcription networks regulated through CD47 in specific cell lineages. Major pathways regulated by CD47 signaling include calcium homeostasis, cyclic nucleotide signaling, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis and signaling, and stem cell transcription factors. These pathways and other undefined proximal mediators of CD47 signaling regulate cell death and protective autophagy responses, mitochondrial biogenesis, cell adhesion and motility, and stem cell self-renewal. Although thrombospondin-1 is the best characterized agonist of CD47, the potential roles of other members of the thrombospondin family, SIRPα and SIRPγ binding, and homotypic CD47 interactions as agonists or antagonists of signaling through CD47 should also be considered. PMID:25708195

  3. A signal transduction score flow algorithm for cyclic cellular pathway analysis, which combines transcriptome and ChIP-seq data.

    PubMed

    Isik, Zerrin; Ersahin, Tulin; Atalay, Volkan; Aykanat, Cevdet; Cetin-Atalay, Rengul

    2012-10-30

    Determination of cell signalling behaviour is crucial for understanding the physiological response to a specific stimulus or drug treatment. Current approaches for large-scale data analysis do not effectively incorporate critical topological information provided by the signalling network. We herein describe a novel model- and data-driven hybrid approach, or signal transduction score flow algorithm, which allows quantitative visualization of cyclic cell signalling pathways that lead to ultimate cell responses such as survival, migration or death. This score flow algorithm translates signalling pathways as a directed graph and maps experimental data, including negative and positive feedbacks, onto gene nodes as scores, which then computationally traverse the signalling pathway until a pre-defined biological target response is attained. Initially, experimental data-driven enrichment scores of the genes were computed in a pathway, then a heuristic approach was applied using the gene score partition as a solution for protein node stoichiometry during dynamic scoring of the pathway of interest. Incorporation of a score partition during the signal flow and cyclic feedback loops in the signalling pathway significantly improves the usefulness of this model, as compared to other approaches. Evaluation of the score flow algorithm using both transcriptome and ChIP-seq data-generated signalling pathways showed good correlation with expected cellular behaviour on both KEGG and manually generated pathways. Implementation of the algorithm as a Cytoscape plug-in allows interactive visualization and analysis of KEGG pathways as well as user-generated and curated Cytoscape pathways. Moreover, the algorithm accurately predicts gene-level and global impacts of single or multiple in silico gene knockouts. PMID:23042589

  4. Thematic Minireview Series: Complexities of Cellular Signaling Revealed by Simple Model Organisms.

    PubMed

    Dohlman, Henrik G

    2016-04-01

    All cells discriminate environmental signals and generate appropriate intracellular responses. Our understanding of these signal transduction mechanisms has benefitted from studies across the kingdoms of life, from fungi and fish to mice and men. This thematic minireview series examines lessons learned from three of the simplest (and best understood) eukaryotic model organisms. The first article focuses on the mating pheromone pathway in budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae The second describes stress-mediated signaling in the roundwormCaenorhabditis elegans The third outlines some of the signaling pathways that dictate growth and development in the fruit flyDrosophila melanogaster Each system has provided unique insights into hormone and neurotransmitter signaling mechanisms, in particular those mediated by the MAPKs. The advances described in these articles will continue to improve our understanding of human physiology and pharmacology. PMID:26907688

  5. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  6. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jeffrey K; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S

    2015-08-18

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  7. Lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol Reduces Experimental Atherosclerosis through Activation of Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhekang; Chen, Minjie; Xie, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Desikan, Rajagopal; Mihai, Georgeta; Burns, Patrick; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and Nrf2 is the transcriptional factor central in cellular antioxidant responses. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a dihydrolipoic acid derivative lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol (LMDP) on the progression of atherosclerosis and test whether its effect on atherosclerosis is mediated by Nrf2. Methods and Results Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and en face analysis reveal that 14 weeks of treatment with LMDP markedly reduced atherosclerotic burden in a rabbit balloon vascular injury model. Myograph analyses show decreased aortic contractile response to phenylephrine and increased aortic response to acetylcholine and insulin in LMDP-treated animals, suggesting that LMDP inhibits atherosclerosis through improving vascular function. A role of Nrf2 signaling in mediating the amelioration of vascular function by LMDP was supported by increased Nrf2 translocation into nuclear and increased expression of Nrf2 target genes. Furthermore, chemotaxis analysis with Boydem chamber shows that leukocytes isolated from LMDP-treated rabbits had reduced chemotaxis, and knock-down of Nrf2 significantly reduced the effect of LMDP on the chemotaxis of mouse macrophages. Conclusion Our results support that LMDP has an anti-atherosclerotic effect likely through activation of Nrf2 signaling and subsequent inhibition of macrophage chemotaxis. PMID:26859892

  8. Evaluation of Cellular Antioxidant and Antiproliferative Activities of Five Main Phyllanthus Emblica L. Cultivars in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Y.; Sun, H. Y.; Yu, X. Y.; Liu, D.; Wan, H. X.

    2015-01-01

    The cell-based antioxidant activity assay as more biological relevant assay was considered to be more accurate to predict antioxidant activity in vivo than chemical activity assays. In the present study, the five main Phyllanthus emblica L. cultivars in China were subjected for cellular antioxidant activity based on HepG2 cells as well as antiproliferative activity. Total phenolics, total flavonoids and oxygen radical absorbance capacity were also measured. The results showed that Qingyougan, Binggan and Boligan (832±100, 774±52 and 704±28 μmol of quercetin equivalents/100 g) had higher cellular antioxidant activity than Tianyougan and Yougan (553±50 and 457±24 μmol of quercetin equivalents/100 g) in phosphate buffered saline wash protocol whereas, Boligan (3735±217 μmol of quercetin equivalents/100 g) had the highest cellular antioxidant activity and Tianyougan (2025±171 μmol of quercetin equivalents/100 g) had the lowest cellular antioxidant activity in no phosphate buffered saline wash protocol. The highest and lowest antiproliferative activities were observed in Binggan and Tianyougan (median effective dose: 6.95±0.11 and 14.03±0.10 mg/ml), respectively. The significant correlation was only observed between total flavonoids and cellular antioxidant activity from no phosphate buffered saline wash protocol (R2 =0.908, P<0.05), and total flavonoids and antiproliferative activity (R2 =0.887, P<0.05), suggesting the major contribution of flavonoids to the bioactivities of emblica. Overall, the data obtained revealed that different Phyllanthus emblica L. cultivars had strong cellular antioxidant and antiproliferative activities, thus should be recommended to increase consumption for health. PMID:26180272

  9. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Yeon-Jae; Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Su-Hyung; Park, Young Woo; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  10. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can detect, recognize, and

  11. Carbon nanotube-assisted optical activation of TGF-β signalling by near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Ling; Zhao, Bing; Xie, Ran; Lin, Wei; Li, He; Li, Yaya; Shi, Minlong; Chen, Ye-Guang; Springer, Timothy A.; Chen, Xing

    2015-05-01

    Receptor-mediated signal transduction modulates complex cellular behaviours such as cell growth, migration and differentiation. Although photoactivatable proteins have emerged as a powerful tool for controlling molecular interactions and signalling cascades at precise times and spaces using light, many of these light-sensitive proteins are activated by ultraviolent or visible light, which has limited tissue penetration. Here, we report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-assisted approach that enables near-infrared light-triggered activation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signal transduction, an important signalling pathway in embryonic development and cancer progression. The protein complex of TGF-β and its latency-associated peptide is conjugated onto SWCNTs, where TGF-β is inactive. Upon near-infrared irradiation, TGF-β is released through the photothermal effect of SWCNTs and becomes active. The released TGF-β activates downstream signal transduction in live cells and modulates cellular behaviours. Furthermore, preliminary studies show that the method can be used to mediate TGF-β signalling in living mice.

  12. Carbon nanotube-assisted optical activation of TGF-β signalling by near-infrared light.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Ling; Zhao, Bing; Xie, Ran; Lin, Wei; Li, He; Li, Yaya; Shi, Minlong; Chen, Ye-Guang; Springer, Timothy A; Chen, Xing

    2015-05-01

    Receptor-mediated signal transduction modulates complex cellular behaviours such as cell growth, migration and differentiation. Although photoactivatable proteins have emerged as a powerful tool for controlling molecular interactions and signalling cascades at precise times and spaces using light, many of these light-sensitive proteins are activated by ultraviolent or visible light, which has limited tissue penetration. Here, we report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-assisted approach that enables near-infrared light-triggered activation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signal transduction, an important signalling pathway in embryonic development and cancer progression. The protein complex of TGF-β and its latency-associated peptide is conjugated onto SWCNTs, where TGF-β is inactive. Upon near-infrared irradiation, TGF-β is released through the photothermal effect of SWCNTs and becomes active. The released TGF-β activates downstream signal transduction in live cells and modulates cellular behaviours. Furthermore, preliminary studies show that the method can be used to mediate TGF-β signalling in living mice. PMID:25775150

  13. A Fluorescent Reporter of AMPK activity and Cellular Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Peiling; Zheng, Bin; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Sasaki, Atsuo T; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated when the AMP/ATP ratio in cells is elevated due to energy stress. Here we describe a biosensor, AMPKAR, which exhibits enhanced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in response to phosphorylation by AMPK, allowing spatio-temporal monitoring of AMPK activity in single cells. We show that this reporter responds to a variety of stimuli that are known to induce energy stress and that the response is dependent on AMPK α1 & α2 and on the upstream kinase, LKB1. Interestingly we found that AMPK activation is confined to the cytosol in response to energy stress but can be observed in both the cytosol and nucleus in response to calcium elevation. Finally, using this probe with U2OS cells in a microfluidics device, we observed a very high cell-to-cell variability in the amplitude and time course of AMPK activation and recovery in response to pulses of glucose deprivation. PMID:21459332

  14. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  15. Sonic hedgehog promotes somitic chondrogenesis by altering the cellular response to BMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, L. Charles; Chyung, Jay H.; Lassar, Andrew B.

    1999-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that signals from the floor plate and notochord promote chondrogenesis of the somitic mesoderm. These tissues, acting through the secreted signaling molecule Sonic hedgehog (Shh), appear to be critical for the formation of the sclerotome. Later steps in the differentiation of sclerotome into cartilage may be independent of the influence of these axial tissues. Although the signals involved in these later steps have not yet been pinpointed, there is substantial evidence that the analogous stages of limb bud chondrogenesis require bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. We show here that presomitic mesoderm (psm) cultured in the presence of Shh will differentiate into cartilage, and that the later stages of this differentiation process specifically depend on BMP signaling. We find that Shh not only acts in collaboration with BMPs to induce cartilage, but that it changes the competence of target cells to respond to BMPs. In the absence of Shh, BMP administration induces lateral plate gene expression in cultured psm. After exposure to Shh, BMP signaling no longer induces expression of lateral plate markers but now induces robust chondrogenesis in cultured psm. Shh signals are required only transiently for somitic chondrogenesis in vitro, and act to provide a window of competence during which time BMP signals can induce chondrogenic differentiation. Our findings suggest that chondrogenesis of somitic tissues can be divided into two separate phases: Shh-mediated generation of precursor cells, which are competent to initiate chondrogenesis in response to BMP signaling, and later exposure to BMPs, which act to trigger chondrogenic differentiation. PMID:9925646

  16. Spontaneous Motion in Hierarchically Assembled Active Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently far-from-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for the development of soft materials with highly sought after biomimetic properties such as autonomous motility and self-healing. I will describe our exploration of such a class of biologically inspired soft active materials. Starting from extensile bundles comprised of microtubules and kinesin, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of polymeric gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubule bundles form an active gel network capable of generating internally driven chaotic flows that enhance transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, these 3D networks buckle onto the water-oil interface forming a dense thin film of bundles exhibiting cascades of collective buckling, fracture, and self-healing driven by internally generated stresses from the kinesin clusters. When compressed against surfaces, this active nematic cortex exerts traction stresses that propel the locomotion of the droplet. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblies of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are fundamentally distinct from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks. These assemblies, in turn, enable the generation of a new class of materials that exhibit macroscale flow phenomena emerging from nanoscale components.

  17. Signaling-mediated cooperativity between glycoprotein Ib-IX and protease-activated receptors in thrombin-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Brian; Kim, Kyungho; Delaney, M Keegan; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Shen, Bo; Ruan, Changgeng; Cho, Jaehyung; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Du, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    Thrombin-induced cellular response in platelets not only requires protease-activated receptors (PARs), but also involves another thrombin receptor, the glycoprotein Ib-IX complex (GPIb-IX). It remains controversial how thrombin binding to GPIb-IX stimulates platelet responses. It was proposed that GPIb-IX serves as a dock that facilitates thrombin cleavage of protease-activated receptors, but there are also reports suggesting that thrombin binding to GPIb-IX induces platelet activation independent of PARs. Here we show that GPIb is neither a passive thrombin dock nor a PAR-independent signaling receptor. We demonstrate a novel signaling-mediated cooperativity between PARs and GPIb-IX. Low-dose thrombin-induced PAR-dependent cell responses require the cooperativity of GPIb-IX signaling, and conversely, thrombin-induced GPIb-IX signaling requires cooperativity of PARs. This mutually dependent cooperativity requires a GPIb-IX-specific 14-3-3-Rac1-LIMK1 signaling pathway, and activation of this pathway also requires PAR signaling. The cooperativity between GPIb-IX signaling and PAR signaling thus drives platelet activation at low concentrations of thrombin, which are important for in vivo thrombosis. PMID:26585954

  18. RRM2 induces NF-{kappa}B-dependent MMP-9 activation and enhances cellular invasiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, Mark S.; Whang, Edward E. . E-mail: ewhang1@partners.org

    2007-03-02

    Ribonucleotide reductase is a dimeric enzyme that catalyzes conversion of ribonucleotide 5'-diphosphates to their 2'-deoxynucleotide forms, a rate-limiting step in the production of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside 5'-triphosphates required for DNA synthesis. The ribonucleotide reductase M2 subunit (RRM2) is a determinant of malignant cellular behavior in a range of human cancers. We examined the effect of RRM2 overexpression on pancreatic adenocarcinoma cellular invasiveness and nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) transcription factor activity. RRM2 overexpression increases pancreatic adenocarcinoma cellular invasiveness and MMP-9 expression in a NF-{kappa}B-dependent manner. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of RRM2 expression attenuates cellular invasiveness and NF-{kappa}B activity. NF-{kappa}B is a key mediator of the invasive phenotypic changes induced by RRM2 overexpression.

  19. Cell signaling through protein kinase C oxidation and activation.

    PubMed

    Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; Rocco-Machado, Nathália; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Due to the growing importance of cellular signaling mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), proteins that are reversibly modulated by these reactant molecules are of high interest. In this context, protein kinases and phosphatases, which act coordinately in the regulation of signal transduction through the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of target proteins, have been described to be key elements in ROS-mediated signaling events. The major mechanism by which these proteins may be modified by oxidation involves the presence of key redox-sensitive cysteine residues. Protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in a variety of cellular signaling pathways. These proteins have been shown to contain a unique structural feature that is susceptible to oxidative modification. A large number of scientific studies have highlighted the importance of ROS as a second messenger in numerous cellular processes, including cell proliferation, gene expression, adhesion, differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis. In this context, the goal of this review is to discuss the mechanisms by which PKCs are modulated by ROS and how these processes are involved in the cellular response. PMID:23109817

  20. Emerging proteomic technologies for elucidating context-dependent cellular signaling events: A big challenge of tiny proportions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Sarah J; Raedschelders, Koen; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2015-05-01

    Aberrant cell signaling events either drive or compensate for nearly all pathologies. A thorough description and quantification of maladaptive signaling flux in disease is a critical step in drug development, and complex proteomic approaches can provide valuable mechanistic insights. Traditional proteomics-based signaling analyses rely heavily on in vitro cellular monoculture. The characterization of these simplified systems generates a rich understanding of the basic components and complex interactions of many signaling networks, but they cannot capture the full complexity of the microenvironments in which pathologies are ultimately made manifest. Unfortunately, techniques that can directly interrogate signaling in situ often yield mass-limited starting materials that are incompatible with traditional proteomics workflows. This review provides an overview of established and emerging techniques that are applicable to context-dependent proteomics. Analytical approaches are illustrated through recent proteomics-based studies in which selective sample acquisition strategies preserve context-dependent information, and where the challenge of minimal starting material is met by optimized sensitivity and coverage. This review is organized into three major technological themes: (i) LC methods in line with MS; (ii) antibody-based approaches; (iii) MS imaging with a discussion of data integration and systems modeling. Finally, we conclude with future perspectives and implications of context-dependent proteomics. PMID:25545106

  1. Emerging proteomic technologies for elucidating context-dependent cellular signaling events: A big challenge of tiny proportions

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Sarah J; Raedschelders, Koen; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cell signaling events either drive or compensate for nearly all pathologies. A thorough description and quantification of maladaptive signaling flux in disease is a critical step in drug development, and complex proteomic approaches can provide valuable mechanistic insights. Traditional proteomics-based signaling analyses rely heavily on in vitro cellular monoculture. The characterization of these simplified systems generates a rich understanding of the basic components and complex interactions of many signaling networks, but they cannot capture the full complexity of the microenvironments in which pathologies are ultimately made manifest. Unfortunately, techniques that can directly interrogate signaling in situ often yield mass-limited starting materials that are incompatible with traditional proteomics workflows. This review provides an overview of established and emerging techniques that are applicable to context-dependent proteomics. Analytical approaches are illustrated through recent proteomics-based studies in which selective sample acquisition strategies preserve context-dependent information, and where the challenge of minimal starting material is met by optimized sensitivity and coverage. This review is organized into three major technological themes: (1) LC methods inline with mass spectrometry; (2) Antibody-based approaches; (3) MS Imaging with a discussion of data integration and systems modeling. Finally, we conclude with future perspectives and implications of context-dependent proteomics. PMID:25545106

  2. Statistics of cellular signal transduction as a race to the nucleus by multiple random walkers in compartment/phosphorylation space

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ting; Shen, Tongye; Zong, Chenghang; Hasty, Jeff; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Cellular signal transduction often involves a reaction network of phosphorylation and transport events arranged with a ladder topology. If we keep track of the location of the phosphate groups describing an abstract state space, a simple model of signal transduction involving enzymes can be mapped on to a problem of how multiple biased random walkers compete to reach their target in the nucleus yielding a signal. Here, the first passage time probability and the survival probability for multiple walkers can be used to characterize the response of the network. The statistics of the first passage through the network has an asymmetric distribution with a long tail arising from the hierarchical structure of the network. This distribution implies a significant difference between the mean and the most probable signal transduction time. The response patterns for various external inputs generated by our model agree with recent experiments. In addition, the model predicts that there is an optimal phosphorylation enzyme concentration for rapid signal transduction. PMID:17071742

  3. Oma1 Links Mitochondrial Protein Quality Control and TOR Signaling To Modulate Physiological Plasticity and Cellular Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Bohovych, Iryna; Kastora, Stavroula; Christianson, Sara; Topil, Danelle; Kim, Heejeong; Fangman, Teresa; Zhou, You J; Barrientos, Antoni; Lee, Jaekwon; Brown, Alistair J P; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2016-09-01

    A network of conserved proteases known as the intramitochondrial quality control (IMQC) system is central to mitochondrial protein homeostasis and cellular health. IMQC proteases also appear to participate in establishment of signaling cues for mitochondrion-to-nucleus communication. However, little is known about this process. Here, we show that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, inactivation of the membrane-bound IMQC protease Oma1 interferes with oxidative-stress responses through enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during logarithmic growth and reduced stress signaling via the TORC1-Rim15-Msn2/Msn4 axis. Pharmacological or genetic prevention of ROS accumulation in Oma1-deficient cells restores this defective TOR signaling. Additionally, inactivation of the Oma1 ortholog in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans also alters TOR signaling and, unexpectedly, leads to increased resistance to neutrophil killing and virulence in the invertebrate animal model Galleria mellonella Our findings reveal a novel and evolutionarily conserved link between IMQC and TOR-mediated signaling that regulates physiological plasticity and pancellular oxidative-stress responses. PMID:27325672

  4. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms for Trapping and Activating Emotional Memories.

    PubMed

    Rogerson, Thomas; Jayaprakash, Balaji; Cai, Denise J; Sano, Yoshitake; Lee, Yong-Seok; Zhou, Yu; Bekal, Pallavi; Deisseroth, Karl; Silva, Alcino J

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that memory allocation to specific neurons (i.e., neuronal allocation) in the amygdala is not random, but rather the transcription factor cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) modulates this process, perhaps by regulating the transcription of channels that control neuronal excitability. Here, optogenetic studies in the mouse lateral amygdala (LA) were used to demonstrate that CREB and neuronal excitability regulate which neurons encode an emotional memory. To test the role of CREB in memory allocation, we overexpressed CREB in the lateral amygdala to recruit the encoding of an auditory-fear conditioning (AFC) memory to a subset of neurons. Then, post-training activation of these neurons with Channelrhodopsin-2 was sufficient to trigger recall of the memory for AFC, suggesting that CREB regulates memory allocation. To test the role of neuronal excitability in memory allocation, we used a step function opsin (SFO) to transiently increase neuronal excitability in a subset of LA neurons during AFC. Post-training activation of these neurons with Volvox Channelrhodopsin-1 was able to trigger recall of that memory. Importantly, our studies show that activation of the SFO did not affect AFC by either increasing anxiety or by strengthening the unconditioned stimulus. Our findings strongly support the hypothesis that CREB regulates memory allocation by modulating neuronal excitability. PMID:27579481

  5. Inseparable tandem: evolution chooses ATP and Ca2+ to control life, death and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2016-08-01

    From the very dawn of biological evolution, ATP was selected as a multipurpose energy-storing molecule. Metabolism of ATP required intracellular free Ca(2+) to be set at exceedingly low concentrations, which in turn provided the background for the role of Ca(2+) as a universal signalling molecule. The early-eukaryote life forms also evolved functional compartmentalization and vesicle trafficking, which used Ca(2+) as a universal signalling ion; similarly, Ca(2+) is needed for regulation of ciliary and flagellar beat, amoeboid movement, intracellular transport, as well as of numerous metabolic processes. Thus, during evolution, exploitation of atmospheric oxygen and increasingly efficient ATP production via oxidative phosphorylation by bacterial endosymbionts were a first step for the emergence of complex eukaryotic cells. Simultaneously, Ca(2+) started to be exploited for short-range signalling, despite restrictions by the preset phosphate-based energy metabolism, when both phosphates and Ca(2+) interfere with each other because of the low solubility of calcium phosphates. The need to keep cytosolic Ca(2+) low forced cells to restrict Ca(2+) signals in space and time and to develop energetically favourable Ca(2+) signalling and Ca(2+) microdomains. These steps in tandem dominated further evolution. The ATP molecule (often released by Ca(2+)-regulated exocytosis) rapidly grew to be the universal chemical messenger for intercellular communication; ATP effects are mediated by an extended family of purinoceptors often linked to Ca(2+) signalling. Similar to atmospheric oxygen, Ca(2+) must have been reverted from a deleterious agent to a most useful (intra- and extracellular) signalling molecule. Invention of intracellular trafficking further increased the role for Ca(2+) homeostasis that became critical for regulation of cell survival and cell death. Several mutually interdependent effects of Ca(2+) and ATP have been exploited in evolution, thus turning an originally

  6. New Constitutively Active Phytochromes Exhibit Light-Independent Signaling Activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, A-Reum; Lee, Si-Seok; Han, Yun-Jeong; Shin, Ah-Young; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Keun Woo; Nagatani, Akira; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-08-01

    Plant phytochromes are photoreceptors that mediate a variety of photomorphogenic responses. There are two spectral photoisomers, the red light-absorbing Pr and far-red light-absorbing Pfr forms, and the photoreversible transformation between the two forms is important for the functioning of phytochromes. In this study, we isolated a Tyr-268-to-Val mutant of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsYVA) that displayed little photoconversion. Interestingly, transgenic plants of AsYVA showed light-independent phytochrome signaling with a constitutive photomorphogenic (cop) phenotype that is characterized by shortened hypocotyls and open cotyledons in the dark. In addition, the corresponding Tyr-303-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phytochrome B (AtYVB) exhibited nuclear localization and interaction with phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3) independently of light, conferring a constitutive photomorphogenic development to its transgenic plants, which is comparable to the first constitutively active version of phytochrome B (YHB; Tyr-276-to-His mutant). We also found that chromophore ligation was required for the light-independent interaction of AtYVB with PIF3. Moreover, we demonstrated that AtYVB did not exhibit phytochrome B activity when it was localized in the cytosol by fusion with the nuclear export signal and that AsYVA exhibited the full activity of phytochrome A when localized in the nucleus by fusion with the nuclear localization signal. Furthermore, the corresponding Tyr-269-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis phytochrome A (AtYVA) exhibited similar cop phenotypes in transgenic plants to AsYVA. Collectively, these results suggest that the conserved Tyr residues in the chromophore-binding pocket play an important role during the Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes, providing new constitutively active alleles of phytochromes by the Tyr-to-Val mutation. PMID:27325667

  7. A hypothesis about cellular signaling with nitric oxide in the earliest life forms in evolution.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ferid; Barber, Roger

    2009-11-01

    We propose that nitric oxide participated as an extracellular and intracellular messenger in the early evolution of life. From a toxic and noxious substance it evolved into an important material for cellular communication and regulation with unique chemistry and properties. The presence of some nitric oxide complexes in extraterrestrial samples may support evidence for life forms in the past or present. Although nitric oxide probably participated in the evolution and maintenance of life, if pollution continues at an ever-increasing rate, it could also end life on the planet as we know it today. PMID:19439177

  8. Key gravity-sensitive signaling pathways drive T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Boonyaratanakornkit, J B; Cogoli, A; Li, C-F; Schopper, T; Pippia, P; Galleri, G; Meloni, M A; Hughes-Fulford, M

    2005-12-01

    Returning astronauts have experienced altered immune function and increased vulnerability to infection during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab. Lack of immune response in microgravity occurs at the cellular level. We analyzed differential gene expression to find gravity-dependent genes and pathways. We found inhibited induction of 91 genes in the simulated freefall environment of the random positioning machine. Altered induction of 10 genes regulated by key signaling pathways was verified using real-time RT-PCR. We discovered that impaired induction of early genes regulated primarily by transcription factors NF-kappaB, CREB, ELK, AP-1, and STAT after crosslinking the T-cell receptor contributes to T-cell dysfunction in altered gravity environments. We have previously shown that PKA and PKC are key early regulators in T-cell activation. Since the majority of the genes were regulated by NF-kappaB, CREB, and AP-1, we studied the pathways that regulated these transcription factors. We found that the PKA pathway was down-regulated in vg. In contrast, PI3-K, PKC, and its upstream regulator pLAT were not significantly down-regulated by vectorless gravity. Since NF-kappaB, AP-1, and CREB are all regulated by PKA and are transcription factors predicted by microarray analysis to be involved in the altered gene expression in vectorless gravity, the data suggest that PKA is a key player in the loss of T-cell activation in altered gravity. PMID:16210397

  9. Studies of interactions between the receptor for immunoglobulin E and other cellular components during signal transduction

    SciTech Connect

    Estes, K.A.S.

    1988-01-01

    The high affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (IgE) on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells mediates antigen-triggered cellular degranulation. As a first step in developing a reconstitution system to test the structural requirements of receptors for triggering cellular degranulation, polyethylene glycol-induced membrane fusion methods were used to introduce exogenous IgE receptors into living RBL cells. In cell-cell fusion experiments, RBL cells with rat IgE bound to receptors and containing (5-1,2-{sup 3}H(N))hydroxytryptamine binoxalate (({sup 3}H)5HT) in their secretory granules were fused to cells with receptors occupied by anti-dinitrophenyl (DNP) mouse IgE. ({sup 3}H)5HT release could be triggered specifically by multivalent DNP antigen. In vesicle-cell fusion experiments, plasma membrane vesicles with receptors occupied by anti-DNP mouse IgE were fused with RBL cells, and DNP antigen was found to trigger ({sup 3}H)5HT release. Receptors for IgE in reformed vesicles, prepared by solubilizing vesicles and removing the detergent, could also be fused into cells and mediate the stimulation of ({sup 3}H)5HT release.

  10. Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Activators of β-Catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Verkaar, Folkert; van der Stelt, Mario; Blankesteijn, W. Matthijs; van der Doelen, Antoon A.; Zaman, Guido J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays a major role in embryonic development and adult stem cell maintenance. Reduced activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway underlies neurodegenerative disorders and aberrations in bone formation. Screening of a small molecule compound library with a β-galactosidase fragment complementation assay measuring β-catenin nuclear entry revealed bona fide activators of β-catenin signaling. The compounds stabilized cytoplasmic β-catenin and activated β–catenin-dependent reporter gene activity. Although the mechanism through which the compounds activate β-catenin signaling has yet to be determined, several key regulators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including glycogen synthase kinase 3 and Frizzled receptors, were excluded as the molecular target. The compounds displayed remarkable selectivity, as they only induced β-catenin signaling in a human osteosarcoma U2OS cell line and not in a variety of other cell lines examined. Our data indicate that differences in cellular Wnt/β-catenin signaling machinery can be exploited to identify cell type-specific activators of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:21559429

  11. Identification of a molecular signaling network that regulates a cellular necrotic cell death pathway by a genome wide siRNA screen

    PubMed Central

    Hitomi, Junichi; Christofferson, Dana E.; Ng, Aylwin; Yao, Jianhua; Degterev, Alexei; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Yuan, Junying

    2009-01-01

    Stimulation of death receptors by agonists such as FasL and TNFα activates apoptotic cell death in apoptotic competent conditions or a type of necrotic cell death dependent on RIP1 kinase, termed necroptosis, in apoptotic deficient conditions. In a genome-wide siRNA screen for regulators of necroptosis, we identify a set of 432 genes that regulate necroptosis, a subset of 32 genes that act downstream and/or as regulators of RIP1 kinase, 32 genes required for death receptor mediated apoptosis, and 7 genes involved in both necroptosis and apoptosis. We show that the expression of subsets of the 432 genes are enriched in the immune and nervous systems, and cellular sensitivity to necroptosis is regulated by an extensive signaling network mediating innate immunity. Interestingly, Bmf, a BH3-only Bcl-2 family member, is required for death receptor-induced necroptosis. Our study defines a cellular signaling network that regulates necroptosis and the molecular bifurcation that controls apoptosis and necroptosis. PMID:19109899

  12. Transient Inhibition of FGFR2b-ligands signaling leads to irreversible loss of cellular β-catenin organization and signaling in AER during mouse limb development.

    PubMed

    Danopoulos, Soula; Parsa, Sara; Al Alam, Denise; Tabatabai, Reza; Baptista, Sheryl; Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Wheeler, Matthew; Barreto, Guillermo; Braun, Thomas; Li, Xiaokun; Hajihosseini, Mohammad K; Bellusci, Saverio

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate limbs develop through coordinated series of inductive, growth and patterning events. Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b) signaling controls the induction of the Apical Ectodermal Ridge (AER) but its putative roles in limb outgrowth and patterning, as well as in AER morphology and cell behavior have remained unclear. We have investigated these roles through graded and reversible expression of soluble dominant-negative FGFR2b molecules at various times during mouse limb development, using a doxycycline/transactivator/tet(O)-responsive system. Transient attenuation (≤ 24 hours) of FGFR2b-ligands signaling at E8.5, prior to limb bud induction, leads mostly to the loss or truncation of proximal skeletal elements with less severe impact on distal elements. Attenuation from E9.5 onwards, however, has an irreversible effect on the stability of the AER, resulting in a progressive loss of distal limb skeletal elements. The primary consequences of FGFR2b-ligands attenuation is a transient loss of cell adhesion and down-regulation of P63, β1-integrin and E-cadherin, and a permanent loss of cellular β-catenin organization and WNT signaling within the AER. Combined, these effects lead to the progressive transformation of the AER cells from pluristratified to squamous epithelial-like cells within 24 hours of doxycycline administration. These findings show that FGFR2b-ligands signaling has critical stage-specific roles in maintaining the AER during limb development. PMID:24167544

  13. Transient Inhibition of FGFR2b-Ligands Signaling Leads to Irreversible Loss of Cellular β-Catenin Organization and Signaling in AER during Mouse Limb Development

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Reza; Baptista, Sheryl; Tiozzo, Caterina; Carraro, Gianni; Wheeler, Matthew; Barreto, Guillermo; Braun, Thomas; Li, Xiaokun; Hajihosseini, Mohammad K.; Bellusci, Saverio

    2013-01-01

    The vertebrate limbs develop through coordinated series of inductive, growth and patterning events. Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor 2b (FGFR2b) signaling controls the induction of the Apical Ectodermal Ridge (AER) but its putative roles in limb outgrowth and patterning, as well as in AER morphology and cell behavior have remained unclear. We have investigated these roles through graded and reversible expression of soluble dominant-negative FGFR2b molecules at various times during mouse limb development, using a doxycycline/transactivator/tet(O)-responsive system. Transient attenuation (≤24 hours) of FGFR2b-ligands signaling at E8.5, prior to limb bud induction, leads mostly to the loss or truncation of proximal skeletal elements with less severe impact on distal elements. Attenuation from E9.5 onwards, however, has an irreversible effect on the stability of the AER, resulting in a progressive loss of distal limb skeletal elements. The primary consequences of FGFR2b-ligands attenuation is a transient loss of cell adhesion and down-regulation of P63, β1-integrin and E-cadherin, and a permanent loss of cellular β-catenin organization and WNT signaling within the AER. Combined, these effects lead to the progressive transformation of the AER cells from pluristratified to squamous epithelial-like cells within 24 hours of doxycycline administration. These findings show that FGFR2b-ligands signaling has critical stage-specific roles in maintaining the AER during limb development. PMID:24167544

  14. Cellular uptake and anticancer activity of carboxylated gallium corroles.

    PubMed

    Pribisko, Melanie; Palmer, Joshua; Grubbs, Robert H; Gray, Harry B; Termini, John; Lim, Punnajit

    2016-04-19

    We report derivatives of gallium(III) tris(pentafluorophenyl)corrole, 1 [Ga(tpfc)], with either sulfonic (2) or carboxylic acids (3, 4) as macrocyclic ring substituents: the aminocaproate derivative, 3 [Ga(ACtpfc)], demonstrated high cytotoxic activity against all NCI60 cell lines derived from nine tumor types and confirmed very high toxicity against melanoma cells, specifically the LOX IMVI and SK-MEL-28 cell lines. The toxicities of 1, 2, 3, and 4 [Ga(3-ctpfc)] toward prostate (DU-145), melanoma (SK-MEL-28), breast (MDA-MB-231), and ovarian (OVCAR-3) cancer cells revealed a dependence on the ring substituent: IC50values ranged from 4.8 to >200 µM; and they correlated with the rates of uptake, extent of intracellular accumulation, and lipophilicity. Carboxylated corroles 3 and 4, which exhibited about 10-fold lower IC50values (<20 µM) relative to previous analogs against all four cancer cell lines, displayed high efficacy (Emax= 0). Confocal fluorescence imaging revealed facile uptake of functionalized gallium corroles by all human cancer cells that followed the order: 4 > 3 > 2 > 1 (intracellular accumulation of gallium corroles was fastest in melanoma cells). We conclude that carboxylated gallium corroles are promising chemotherapeutics with the advantage that they also can be used for tumor imaging. PMID:27044076

  15. Re-evaluation of the Role of Calcium Homeostasis Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein (CHERP) in Cellular Calcium Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Sebastian, Peter J.; Higgins, LeeAnn; Sampson, Natalie D.; Hewitt, Jane E.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, resulting from activation of intracellular Ca2+ channels within the endoplasmic reticulum, regulate several aspects of cellular growth and differentiation. Ca2+ homeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that has been proposed as a regulator of both major families of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channels, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs), with resulting effects on mitotic cycling. However, the manner by which CHERP regulates intracellular Ca2+ channels to impact cellular growth is unknown. Here, we challenge previous findings that CHERP acts as a direct cytoplasmic regulator of IP3Rs and RyRs and propose that CHERP acts in the nucleus to impact cellular proliferation by regulating the function of the U2 snRNA spliceosomal complex. The previously reported effects of CHERP on cellular growth therefore are likely indirect effects of altered spliceosomal function, consistent with prior data showing that loss of function of U2 snRNP components can interfere with cell growth and induce cell cycle arrest. PMID:23148228

  16. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  17. Cellular Factor XIIIA Transglutaminase Localizes in Caveolae and Regulates Caveolin-1 Phosphorylation, Homo-oligomerization and c-Src Signaling in Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuai; Kaartinen, Mari T

    2015-11-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are a family of widely distributed enzymes that catalyze protein crosslinking by forming a covalent isopeptide bond between the substrate proteins. We have shown that MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts express Factor XIII-A (FXIII-A), and that the extracellular crosslinking activity of FXIII-A is involved in regulating matrix secretion and deposition. In this study, we have investigated the localization and potential role of intracellular FXIII-A. Conventional immunofluorescence microscopy and TIRF microscopy analyses showed that FXIII-A co-localizes with caveolin-1 in specialized membrane structures, caveolae, in differentiating osteoblasts. The caveolae-disrupting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin abolished FXIII-A staining and co-localization with caveolin-1 from the osteoblast plasma membrane. The presence of FXIII-A in caveolae was confirmed by preparing caveolae-enriched cellular fractions using sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation followed by western blotting. Despite this association of FXIII-A with caveolae, there was no detectable transglutaminase activity in caveolae, as measured by monodansylcadaverine incorporation. TG inhibitor NC9--which can alter TG enzyme conformation--localized to caveolae and displaced FXIII-A from these structures when added to the osteoblast cultures. The decreased FXIII-A levels in caveolae after NC9 treatment increased c-Src activation, which resulted in caveolin-1 phosphorylation, homo-oligomerization and Akt phosphorylation, suggesting cellular FXIII-A has a role in regulating c-Src signaling in osteoblasts. PMID:26231113

  18. Inhibition of cytoplasmic p53 differentially modulates Ca(2+) signaling and cellular viability in young and aged striata.

    PubMed

    Ureshino, Rodrigo Portes; Hsu, Yi-Te; do Carmo, Lúcia Garcez; Yokomizo, César Henrique; Nantes, Iseli Lourenço; Smaili, Soraya Soubhi

    2014-10-01

    The p53 protein, a transcription factor with many gene targets, can also trigger apoptosis in the cytoplasm. The disruption of cell homeostasis, such as Ca(2+) signaling and mitochondrial respiration, contributes to the loss of viability and ultimately leads to cell death. However, the link between Ca(2+) signaling and p53 signaling remains unclear. During aging, there are alterations in cell physiology that are commonly associated with a reduced adaptive stress response, thus increasing cell vulnerability. In this work, we examined the effects of a cytoplasmic p53 inhibitor (pifithrin μ) in the striatum of young and aged rats by evaluating Ca(2+) signaling, mitochondrial respiration, apoptotic protein expression, and tissue viability. Our results showed that pifithrin μ differentially modulated cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca(2+) in young and aged rats. Cytoplasmic p53 inhibition appeared to reduce the mitochondrial respiration rate in both groups. In addition, p53 phosphorylation and Bax protein levels were elevated upon cytoplasmic p53 inhibition and could contribute to the reduction of tissue viability. Following glutamate challenge, pifithrin μ improved cell viability in aged tissue, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Taken together, these results indicate that cytoplasmic p53 may have a special role in cell viability by influencing cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis and respiration and may produce differential effects in the striatum of young and aged rats. PMID:25084214

  19. Ammonium Activates Ouabain-Activated Signalling Pathway in Astrocytes: Therapeutic Potential of Ouabain Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dan; Du, Ting

    2014-01-01

    The causal role of ammonium in hepatic encephalopathy was identified in 1930s. Astroglial cells are primary cellular elements of hepatic encephalopathy which conceptually, can be considered a toxic astrogliopathology. Previously we have reported that acute exposure to ammonium activated ouabain/Na,K-ATPase signalling pathway, which includes Src, EGF receptor, Raf, Ras, MEK and ERK1/2. Chronic incubation of astrocytes with ammonium increased production of endogenous ouabain-like compound. Ouabain antagonist canrenone abolished effects of ammonium on astrocytic swelling, ROS production, and upregulation of gene expression and function of TRPC1 and Cav1.2. However, ammonium induces multiple pathological modifications in astrocytes, and some of them may be not related to this signalling pathway. In this review, we focus on the effect of ammonium on ouabain/Na,K-ATPase signalling pathway and its involvement in ammonium-induced ROS production, cell swelling and aberration of Ca2+ signals in astrocytes. We also briefly discuss Na,K-ATPase, EGF receptor, endogenous ouabain and ouabain antagonist. PMID:25342941

  20. A novel nuclear export signal in Smad1 is essential for its signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhan; Brownawell, Amy M; Macara, Ian G; Lodish, Harvey F

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the subcellular distributions of Smad proteins, the intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor-beta family cytokines, we examined their sequences for nuclear export signals (NES). We found a leucine-rich NES-like motif (termed NES2) in the central linker region of the receptor-regulated Smads that is absent from the other two classes of Smads (Co-Smads and I-Smads). In microinjection assays, NES2 peptide caused nuclear export of a fused glutathione S-transferase protein. Mutations in NES2 converted Smad1 from an even distribution throughout the cells into an exclusive nuclear localization in both transiently and stably expressing cell lines, and this nuclear enrichment was more pronounced than that induced by mutations in NES1. Furthermore, overexpression of CRM1, the cellular export receptor, transforms Smad1 into a mostly cytoplasmic profile by enhancing its nuclear export. The Smad1 NES2 mutant but not the Smad1 NES1 mutant is mostly resistant to this cytoplasmic targeting, indicating that NES2, not NES1, is the major target for CRM1 in Smad1. We further confirmed the functionality of NES2 by a heterokaryon assay. The Smad1 NES1 mutant displays good ligand responsiveness and moderately lowered transcriptional activity compared with wild type Smad1. In contrast, the Smad1 NES2 mutant shows a severe disruption in reporter gene activation, minimal response to bone morphogenetic protein stimulation, and significantly lowered bone morphogenetic protein-induced phosphorylation, which may be the reason for its deficient transcription activity. Thus, we have defined a major NES in Smad1 that is essential for its ligand-induced coupling with cell surface receptors and hence, transcriptional activity. Our study, along with recent studies of the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Smad2 and Smad3 proteins, demonstrate that continued nucleocytoplasmic shuttling is a common requisite for the active signaling of R-Smads. Although conserved in other R

  1. Supramolecular organizing centers (SMOCs) as signaling machines in innate immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, QIAO; Hao, WU

    2016-01-01

    Innate immunity offers the first line of defense against infections and other types of danger such as tumorigenesis. Its discovery provides tremendous therapeutic opportunities for numerous human diseases. Delving into the structural basis of signal transduction by innate immune receptors, our lab has recently helped to establish the new paradigm in which innate immune receptors transduce ligand-binding signals through formation of higher-order assemblies containing intracellular adapters, signaling enzymes and their substrates. These large signalosome assemblies may be visible under light microscopy as punctate structures in the μm scale, connecting to the underlying molecular structures in the nm scale. They drive proximity-induced enzyme activation, and provide a mechanism for signaling amplification by nucleated polymerization. These supramolecular signaling complexes also open new questions on their cellular organization and mode of regulation, pose challenges to our methodology, and afford valuable implications in drug discovery against these medically important pathways. PMID:26511517

  2. Supramolecular organizing centers (SMOCs) as signaling machines in innate immune activation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Qi; Wu, Hao

    2015-11-01

    Innate immunity offers the first line of defense against infections and other types of danger such as tumorigenesis. Its discovery provides tremendous therapeutic opportunities for numerous human diseases. Delving into the structural basis of signal transduction by innate immune receptors, our lab has recently helped to establish the new paradigm in which innate immune receptors transduce ligand-binding signals through formation of higher-order assemblies containing intracellular adapters, signaling enzymes and their substrates. These large signalosome assemblies may be visible under light microscopy as punctate structures in the µm scale, connecting to the underlying molecular structures in the nm scale. They drive proximity-induced enzyme activation, and provide a mechanism for signaling amplification by nucleated polymerization. These supramolecular signaling complexes also open new questions on their cellular organization and mode of regulation, pose challenges to our methodology, and afford valuable implications in drug discovery against these medically important pathways. PMID:26511517

  3. Cellular signaling protective against noise-induced hearing loss – A role for novel intrinsic cochlear signaling involving corticotropin-releasing factor?

    PubMed

    Vetter, Douglas E

    2015-09-01

    Hearing loss afflicts approximately 15% of the world's population, and crosses all socioeconomic boundaries. While great strides have been made in understanding the genetic components of syndromic and non-syndromic hearing loss, understanding of the mechanisms underlying noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) have come much more slowly. NIHL is not simply a mechanism by which older individuals loose their hearing. Significantly, the incidence of NIHL is increasing, and is now involving ever younger populations. This may predict future increased occurrences of hearing loss. Current research has shown that even short-term exposures to loud sounds generating what was previously considered temporary hearing loss, actually produces an almost immediate and permanent loss of specific populations of auditory nerve fibers. Additionally, recurrent exposures to intense sound may hasten age-related hearing loss. While NIHL is a significant medical concern, to date, few compounds have delivered significant protection, arguing that new targets need to be identified. In this commentary, we will explore cellular signaling processes taking place in the cochlea believed to be involved in protection against hearing loss, and highlight new data suggestive of novel signaling not previously recognized as occurring in the cochlea, that is perhaps protective of hearing. This includes a recently described local hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA)-like signaling system fully contained in the cochlea. This system may represent a local cellular stress-response system based on stress hormone release similar to the systemic HPA axis. Its discovery may hold hope for new drug therapies that can be delivered directly to the cochlea, circumventing systemic side effects. PMID:26074267

  4. Detection of silent cells, synchronization and modulatory activity in developing cellular networks.

    PubMed

    Hjorth, Johannes J J; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Pires, Johny; Dassen, Valerie J; Berkhout, Janna A; Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aish G; Alevra, Mihai; Toonen, Ruud F; Heine, Vivi M; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2016-04-01

    Developing networks in the immature nervous system and in cellular cultures are characterized by waves of synchronous activity in restricted clusters of cells. Synchronized activity in immature networks is proposed to regulate many different developmental processes, from neuron growth and cell migration, to the refinement of synapses, topographic maps, and the mature composition of ion channels. These emergent activity patterns are not present in all cells simultaneously within the network and more immature "silent" cells, potentially correlated with the presence of silent synapses, are prominent in different networks during early developmental periods. Many current network analyses for detection of synchronous cellular activity utilize activity-based pixel correlations to identify cellular-based regions of interest (ROIs) and coincident cell activity. However, using activity-based correlations, these methods first underestimate or ignore the inactive silent cells within the developing network and second, are difficult to apply within cell-dense regions commonly found in developing brain networks. In addition, previous methods may ignore ROIs within a network that shows transient activity patterns comprising both inactive and active periods. We developed analysis software to semi-automatically detect cells within developing neuronal networks that were imaged using calcium-sensitive reporter dyes. Using an iterative threshold, modulation of activity was tracked within individual cells across the network. The distribution pattern of both inactive and active, including synchronous cells, could be determined based on distance measures to neighboring cells and according to different anatomical layers. PMID:26097169

  5. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury. PMID:26842916

  6. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks.

    PubMed

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  7. Mechanical signaling and the cellular response to extracellular matrix in angiogenesis and cardiovascular physiology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Great advances have been made in the identification of the soluble angiogenic factors, insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, and receptor signaling pathways that mediate control of angiogenesis--the growth of blood capillaries. This review focuses on work that explores how endothelial cells integrate these chemical signals with mechanical cues from their local tissue microenvironment so as to produce functional capillary networks that exhibit specialized form as well as function. These studies have revealed that ECM governs whether an endothelial cell will switch between growth, differentiation, motility, or apoptosis programs in response to a soluble stimulus based on its ability to mechanically resist cell tractional forces and thereby produce cell and cytoskeletal distortion. Transmembrane integrin receptors play a key role in this mechanochemical transduction process because they both organize a cytoskeletal signaling complex within the focal adhesion and preferentially focus mechanical forces on this site. Molecular filaments within the internal cytoskeleton--microfilaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments--also contribute to the cell's structural and functional response to mechanical stress through their role as discrete support elements within a tensegrity-stabilized cytoskeletal array. Importantly, a similar form of mechanical control also has been shown to be involved in the regulation of contractility in vascular smooth muscle cells and cardiac myocytes. Thus, the mechanism by which cells perform mechanochemical transduction and the implications of these findings for morphogenetic control are discussed in the wider context of vascular development and cardiovascular physiology.

  8. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-01-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains. PMID:26972968

  9. From Cellular Attractor Selection to Adaptive Signal Control for Traffic Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Daxin; Zhou, Jianshan; Sheng, Zhengguo; Wang, Yunpeng; Ma, Jianming

    2016-03-01

    The management of varying traffic flows essentially depends on signal controls at intersections. However, design an optimal control that considers the dynamic nature of a traffic network and coordinates all intersections simultaneously in a centralized manner is computationally challenging. Inspired by the stable gene expressions of Escherichia coli in response to environmental changes, we explore the robustness and adaptability performance of signalized intersections by incorporating a biological mechanism in their control policies, specifically, the evolution of each intersection is induced by the dynamics governing an adaptive attractor selection in cells. We employ a mathematical model to capture such biological attractor selection and derive a generic, adaptive and distributed control algorithm which is capable of dynamically adapting signal operations for the entire dynamical traffic network. We show that the proposed scheme based on attractor selection can not only promote the balance of traffic loads on each link of the network but also allows the global network to accommodate dynamical traffic demands. Our work demonstrates the potential of bio-inspired intelligence emerging from cells and provides a deep understanding of adaptive attractor selection-based control formation that is useful to support the designs of adaptive optimization and control in other domains.

  10. BDMC33, A Curcumin Derivative Suppresses Inflammatory Responses in Macrophage-Like Cellular System: Role of Inhibition in NF-κB and MAPK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ka-Heng; Chow, Yuh-Lit; Sharmili, Vidyadaran; Abas, Faridah; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu Mohamed; Shaari, Khozirah; Israf, Daud Ahmad; Lajis, Nordin Haji; Syahida, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Our preliminary screening has shown that curcumin derivative BDMC33 [2,6-bis(2,5-dimethoxybenzylidene)cyclohexanone] exerted promising nitric oxide inhibitory activity in activated macrophages. However, the molecular basis and mechanism for its pharmacological action is yet to be elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory properties of BDMC33 and elucidate its underlying mechanism action in macrophage cells. Our current study demonstrated that BDMC33 inhibits the secretion of major pro-inflammatory mediators in stimulated macrophages, and includes NO, TNF-α and IL-1β through interference in both nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) and mitogen activator protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade in IFN-γ/LPS-stimulated macrophages. Moreover, BDMC33 also interrupted LPS signaling through inhibiting the surface expression of CD-14 accessory molecules. In addition, the inhibitory action of BDMC33 not only restricted the macrophages cell (RAW264.7), but also inhibited the secretion of NO and TNF-α in IFN-γ/LPS-challenged microglial cells (BV-2). The experimental data suggests the inflammatory action of BDMC33 on activated macrophage-like cellular systems, which could be used as a future therapeutic agent in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22489138

  11. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Jereme G.; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure. PMID:25646076

  12. Cellular Antisense Activity of PNA-Oligo(bicycloguanidinium) Conjugates Forming Self-Assembled Nanoaggregates.

    PubMed

    Valero, Julián; Shiraishi, Takehiko; de Mendoza, Javier; Nielsen, Peter E

    2015-07-27

    A series of peptide nucleic acid-oligo(bicycloguanidinium) (PNA-BGn ) conjugates were synthesized and characterized in terms of cellular antisense activity by using the pLuc750HeLa cell splice correction assay. PNA-BG4 conjugates exhibited low micromolar antisense activity, and their cellular activity required the presence of a hydrophobic silyl terminal protecting group on the oligo(BG) ligand and a minimum of four guanidinium units. Surprisingly, a nonlinear dose-response with an activity threshold around 3-4 μM, indicative of large cooperativity, was observed. Supported by light scattering and electron microscopy analyses, we propose that the activity, and thus cellular delivery, of these lipo-PNA-BG4 conjugates is dependent on self-assembled nanoaggregates. Finally, cellular activity was enhanced by the presence of serum. Therefore we conclude that the lipo-BG-PNA conjugates exhibit an unexpected mechanism for cell delivery and are of interest for further in vivo studies. PMID:26010253

  13. Palmitoylation controls DLK localization, interactions and activity to ensure effective axonal injury signaling

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Sabrina M.; Collura, Kaitlin M.; Ketschek, Andrea; Noma, Kentaro; Ferguson, Toby A.; Jin, Yishi; Gallo, Gianluca; Thomas, Gareth M.

    2016-01-01

    Dual leucine-zipper kinase (DLK) is critical for axon-to-soma retrograde signaling following nerve injury. However, it is unknown how DLK, a predicted soluble kinase, conveys long-distance signals and why homologous kinases cannot compensate for loss of DLK. Here, we report that DLK, but not homologous kinases, is palmitoylated at a conserved site adjacent to its kinase domain. Using short-hairpin RNA knockdown/rescue, we find that palmitoylation is critical for DLK-dependent retrograde signaling in sensory axons. This functional importance is because of three novel cellular and molecular roles of palmitoylation, which targets DLK to trafficking vesicles, is required to assemble DLK signaling complexes and, unexpectedly, is essential for DLK’s kinase activity. By simultaneously controlling DLK localization, interactions, and activity, palmitoylation ensures that only vesicle-bound DLK is active in neurons. These findings explain how DLK specifically mediates nerve injury responses and reveal a novel cellular mechanism that ensures the specificity of neuronal kinase signaling. PMID:26719418

  14. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is required for porcine epidemic diarrhea virus replication.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngnam; Lee, Changhee

    2015-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) is a highly enteropathogenic coronavirus of swine that causes acute enteritis with high mortality in nursery piglets. To date, the cellular factors involved in PEDV replication have not been well defined. The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) that serves as a critical component of cellular signal transduction pathways to modulate a variety of cellular functions has been shown to regulate several viral infections. In the present study, we found that PEDV activates ERK1/2 early in infection independently of viral replication. The PEDV-induced ERK1/2 activation resulted in the phosphorylation of its downstream substrate Elk-1 in infected cells. Treatment with ERK inhibitors or ERK1/2 knockdown significantly suppressed viral progeny production. Inhibition of ERK activation also diminished viral protein expression and genomic and subgenomic RNA transcription. These findings indicate that the ERK signaling pathway plays an important role in the PEDV life cycle and beneficially contributes to viral infection. PMID:26115165

  15. p63 deficiency activates a program of cellular senescence and leads to accelerated aging

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, William M.; Wu, Ying; Vogel, Hannes; Guo, Xuecui; Lowe, Scott W.; Mills, Alea A.

    2005-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a key role in organismal aging. A cellular mechanism postulated to drive the aging process is cellular senescence, mediated in part by p53. Although senescent cells accumulate in elderly individuals, most studies have relied on correlating in vitro senescence assays with in vivo phenotypes of aging. Here, using two different mouse models in which the p53-related protein p63 is compromised, we demonstrate that cellular senescence and organismal aging are intimately linked and that these processes are mediated by p63 loss. We found that p63+/- mice have a shortened life span and display features of accelerated aging. Both germline and somatically induced p63 deficiency activates widespread cellular senescence with enhanced expression of senescent markers SA-β-gal, PML, and p16INK4a. Using an inducible tissue-specific p63 conditional model, we further show that p63 deficiency induces cellular senescence and causes accelerated aging phenotypes in the adult. Our results thus suggest a causative link between cellular senescence and aging in vivo, and demonstrate that p63 deficiency accelerates this process. PMID:16107615

  16. Cellular Telephones Measure Activity and Lifespace in Community-Dwelling Adults: Proof of Principle

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, Ana Katrin; Witbrodt, Bradley C.; Hoarty, Carrie A.; Carlson, Richard H.; Goulding, Evan H.; Potter, Jane F.; Bonasera, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe a system that uses off-the-shelf sensor and telecommunication technologies to continuously measure individual lifespace and activity levels in a novel way. DESIGN Proof of concept involving three field trials of 30, 30, and 21 days. SETTING Omaha, Nebraska, metropolitan and surrounding rural region. PARTICIPANTS Three participants (48-year-old man, 33-year-old woman, and 27-year-old male), none with any functional limitations. MEASUREMENTS Cellular telephones were used to detect in-home position and in-community location and to measure physical activity. Within the home, cellular telephones and Bluetooth transmitters (beacons) were used to locate participants at room-level resolution. Outside the home, the same cellular telephones and global positioning system (GPS) technology were used to locate participants at a community-level resolution. Physical activity was simultaneously measured using the cellular telephone accelerometer. RESULTS This approach had face validity to measure activity and lifespace. More importantly, this system could measure the spatial and temporal organization of these metrics. For example, an individual’s lifespace was automatically calculated across multiple time intervals. Behavioral time budgets showing how people allocate time to specific regions within the home were also automatically generated. CONCLUSION Mobile monitoring shows much promise as an easily deployed system to quantify activity and lifespace, important indicators of function, in community-dwelling adults. PMID:21288235

  17. IL-6 Trans-signaling-STAT3 Pathway Mediates ECM and Cellular Proliferation in Fibroblasts from Hypertrophic Scar

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sutapa; Ju, Xiaoxi; Sun, Hong; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Brasier, Allan R

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms behind the pathogenesis of post-burn hypertrophic scar (HS) remain unclear. Here, we investigate the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) trans-signaling-STAT3 pathway in HS fibroblasts (HSF) derived from burned-induced HS skin. HSF showed increased Tyr 705 STAT3 phosphorylation over normal fibroblast (NF) after IL-6•IL-6Rα stimulation by immunoassays. The endogenous STAT3 target gene, SOCS3, was upregulated in HSF and showed increased STAT3 binding on its promoter relative to NF in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay. We observed that the cell surface signaling transducer glycoprotein 130 is upregulated in HSF using Q-RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM), including the expression of alpha2 (1) procollagen (Col1A2) and fibronectin 1 (FN) were seen in HSFs. A STAT3 peptide inhibitor abrogated FN and Col1A2 gene expression in HSF indicating involvement of STAT3 in ECM production. The cellular proliferation markers Cyclin D1, Bcl-Xl and c-Myc were also upregulated in HSF and knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA attenuated c-Myc expression indicating the essential role of STAT3 in fibroblast proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that the IL-6-trans-signaling-STAT3 pathway may play an integral role in HS pathogenesis and disruption of this pathway could be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced HS. PMID:23303450

  18. Micro-simulation of vehicle conflicts involving right-turn vehicles at signalized intersections based on cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Chai, C; Wong, Y D

    2014-02-01

    At intersection, vehicles coming from different directions conflict with each other. Improper geometric design and signal settings at signalized intersection will increase occurrence of conflicts between road users and results in a reduction of the safety level. This study established a cellular automata (CA) model to simulate vehicular interactions involving right-turn vehicles (as similar to left-turn vehicles in US). Through various simulation scenarios for four case cross-intersections, the relationships between conflict occurrences involving right-turn vehicles with traffic volume and right-turn movement control strategies are analyzed. Impacts of traffic volume, permissive right-turn compared to red-amber-green (RAG) arrow, shared straight-through and right-turn lane as well as signal setting are estimated from simulation results. The simulation model is found to be able to provide reasonable assessment of conflicts through comparison of existed simulation approach and observed accidents. Through the proposed approach, prediction models for occurrences and severity of vehicle conflicts can be developed for various geometric layouts and traffic control strategies. PMID:24275720

  19. TGF-β and Iron Differently Alter HBV Replication in Human Hepatocytes through TGF-β/BMP Signaling and Cellular MicroRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun O.; Kumar, Mukesh; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2012-01-01

    The nature of host-virus interactions in hepatitis B virus infection is incompletely understood. Since soluble factors, e.g., cytokines and metals, may exacerbate liver injury in chronic hepatitis, we considered that defining the effects of receptor-mediated signaling upon viral replication will be significant. Consequently, we studied effects of iron or TGF-β-induced TGF-β/BMP signaling in the HepG2 2.2.15 cell model of hepatitis B virus replication. We found iron and TGF-β increased hepcidin mRNA expression or TGF-β receptor kinase activity, respectively, which indicated that 2.2.15 cells responded appropriately to these substances. However, iron increased but TGF-β decreased hepatitis B virus mRNA and DNA expression. TGF-β induced expression at the mRNA level of multiple TGF-β/BMP pathway genes. This change was not observed in iron-treated cells. On the other hand, presence of SMAD proteins in iron or TGF-β-treated cells, including of SMAD4, did confirm convergence of TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways under these conditions. Since transcription factors in TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways could not have directly targeted hepatitis B virus itself, we studied whether iron or TGF-β exerted their effects through alternative mechanisms, such as by involvement of antiviral cellular microRNAs. We discovered cellular microRNA expression profiles were significantly different in iron or TGF-β-treated cells compared with untreated control cells. In many cases, exposure to iron or TGF-β changed microRNA expression in opposite directions. Introduction in cells of sequences representing such differentially expressed microRNAs, e.g., hsa-miR-125a-5p and -151-5p, even reproduced effects on virus replication of iron- or TGF-β. We surmised that TGF-β/BMP pathway members, i.e., SMADs, likely governed iron or TGF-β-induced microRNA expression. Iron may have mediated Drosha/DGCR8/heme-mediated processing of microRNAs. In turn, cellular microRNAs regulated replication of

  20. The primary cilium is a self-adaptable, integrating nexus for mechanical stimuli and cellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, An M.; Young, Y.-N.; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mechanosensation is crucial for cells to sense and respond to mechanical signals within their local environment. While adaptation allows a sensor to be conditioned by stimuli within the environment and enables its operation in a wide range of stimuli intensities, the mechanisms behind adaptation remain controversial in even the most extensively studied mechanosensor, bacterial mechanosensitive channels. Primary cilia are ubiquitous sensory organelles. They have emerged as mechanosensors across diverse tissues, including kidney, liver and the embryonic node, and deflect with mechanical stimuli. Here, we show that both mechanical and chemical stimuli can alter cilium stiffness. We found that exposure to flow stiffens the cilium, which deflects less in response to subsequent exposures to flow. We also found that through a process involving acetylation, the cell can biochemically regulate cilium stiffness. Finally, we show that this altered stiffness directly affects the responsiveness of the cell to mechanical signals. These results demonstrate a potential mechanism through which the cell can regulate its mechanosensing apparatus. PMID:26603473

  1. Peptide Inhibitors Disrupt the Serotonin 5-HT2C Receptor Interaction with Phosphatase and Tensin Homolog to Allosterically Modulate Cellular Signaling and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Anastasio, Noelle C.; Gilbertson, Scott R.; Bubar, Marcy J.; Agarkov, Anton; Stutz, Sonja J.; Jeng, Yowjiun; Bremer, Nicole M.; Smith, Thressa D.; Fox, Robert G.; Swinford, Sarah E.; Seitz, Patricia K.; Charendoff, Marc N.; Craft, John W.; Laezza, Fernanda M.; Watson, Cheryl S.; Briggs, James M.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) signaling through the 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR) is essential in normal physiology, whereas aberrant 5-HT2CR function is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of multiple neural disorders. The 5-HT2CR interacts with specific protein partners, but the impact of such interactions on 5-HT2CR function is poorly understood. Here, we report convergent cellular and behavioral data that the interaction between the 5-HT2CR and protein phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) serves as a regulatory mechanism to control 5-HT2CR-mediated biology but not that of the closely homologous 5-HT2AR. A peptide derived from the third intracellular loop of the human 5-HT2CR [3L4F (third loop, fourth fragment)] disrupted the association, allosterically augmented 5-HT2CR-mediated signaling in live cells, and acted as a positive allosteric modulator in rats in vivo. We identified the critical residues within an 8 aa fragment of the 3L4F peptide that maintained efficacy (within the picomolar range) in live cells similar to that of the 3L4F peptide. Last, molecular modeling identified key structural features and potential interaction sites of the active 3L4F peptides against PTEN. These compelling data demonstrate the specificity and importance of this protein assembly in cellular events and behaviors mediated by 5-HT2CR signaling and provide a chemical guidepost to the future development of drug-like peptide or small-molecule inhibitors as neuroprobes to study 5-HT2CR allostery and therapeutics for 5-HT2CR-mediated disorders. PMID:23345234

  2. Secretory proteins characteristic of environmental changes in cellular signal transduction: Expression in oral fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mednieks, M. I.; Burke, J. C.; Sivakumar, T. P.; Hand, A. R.; Grindeland, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Past studies have shown that both hypo- and hyper-gravity have significant consequences on a variety of tissues and organ systems. It is not known if the effects of environmental stimuli such as altered gravity are beneficial or detrimental, and if the effects can be prevented or reversed. Animal experiments from the Space Lab and Cosmos missions indicate that events that are mediated by cyclic AMP, such as cellular responses to catecholamine and peptide hormone action, are significantly altered in a number of tissues as a consequence of space flight. A secretory cyclic AMP-receptor protein (cARP), is present in saliva, and can serve as an indicator of individual responses to physiologic and environmental stress. Animal experiments have shown that the hypergravity component of space flight is a significant stress factor. In humans, cARP levels in each individual are constant under normal conditions, but elevated after acute stress. Additionally, the levels of cARP in secreted saliva can be compared to those in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), which reflects the protein composition of serum. The ratio of cARP in saliva to that in GCF can be used as a measure of basal compared to hyper-or hypo-gravity values. An ultimate goal is to test hyper and zero G responses in human saliva to determine if cARP is a suitable index of acute and chronic stress. A miniaturized test kit for saliva collection has been designed. Samples can be collected and stored till analyses are carried out that will distinguish the effects of increased gravity from those of one and zero G. Such tests can serve as an individualized monitoring system for physiologic responses either in space or on earth. .

  3. Insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signals inversely regulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity to control human dental pulp stem cell quiescence, propagation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre; Polakowska, Renata

    2014-04-15

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Y(low) stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  4. Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1 Receptor and p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signals Inversely Regulate Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Activity to Control Human Dental Pulp Stem Cell Quiescence, Propagation, and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Vandomme, Jerome; Touil, Yasmine; Ostyn, Pauline; Olejnik, Cecile; Flamenco, Pilar; El Machhour, Raja; Segard, Pascaline; Masselot, Bernadette; Bailliez, Yves; Formstecher, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) remain quiescent until activated in response to severe dental pulp damage. Once activated, they exit quiescence and enter regenerative odontogenesis, producing reparative dentin. The factors and signaling molecules that control the quiescence/activation and commitment to differentiation of human DPSCs are not known. In this study, we determined that the inhibition of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) signaling commonly activates DPSCs and promotes their exit from the G0 phase of the cell cycle as well as from the pyronin Ylow stem cell compartment. The inhibition of these two pathways, however, inversely determines DPSC fate. In contrast to p38 MAPK inhibitors, IGF-1R inhibitors enhance dental pulp cell sphere-forming capacity and reduce the cells' colony-forming capacity without inducing cell death. The inverse cellular changes initiated by IGF-1R and p38 MAPK inhibitors were accompanied by inverse changes in the levels of active signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) factor, inactive glycogen synthase kinase 3, and matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein, a marker of early odontoblast differentiation. Our data suggest that there is cross talk between the IGF-1R and p38 MAPK signaling pathways in DPSCs and that the signals provided by these pathways converge at STAT3 and inversely regulate its activity to maintain quiescence or to promote self-renewal and differentiation of the cells. We propose a working model that explains the possible interactions between IGF-1R and p38 MAPK at the molecular level and describes the cellular consequences of these interactions. This model may inspire further fundamental study and stimulate research on the clinical applications of DPSC in cellular therapy and tissue regeneration. PMID:24266654

  5. Bitter melon juice activates cellular energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase causing apoptotic death of human pancreatic carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Prognosis of pancreatic cancer is extremely poor, suggesting critical needs for additional drugs to improve disease outcome. In this study, we examined efficacy and associated mechanism of a novel agent bitter melon juice (BMJ) against pancreatic carcinoma cells both in culture and nude mice. BMJ anticancer efficacy was analyzed in human pancreatic carcinoma BxPC-3, MiaPaCa-2, AsPC-1 and Capan-2 cells by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, cell death enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and annexin/propidium iodide assays. BMJ effect on apoptosis regulators was assessed by immunoblotting. In vivo BMJ efficacy was evaluated against MiaPaCa-2 tumors in nude mice, and xenograft was analyzed for biomarkers by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Results showed that BMJ (2–5% v/v) decreases cell viability in all four pancreatic carcinoma cell lines by inducing strong apoptotic death. At molecular level, BMJ caused caspases activation, altered expression of Bcl-2 family members and cytochrome-c release into the cytosol. Additionally, BMJ decreased survivin and X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein but increased p21, CHOP and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38) levels. Importantly, BMJ activated adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a biomarker for cellular energy status, and an AMPK inhibitor (Compound C) reversed BMJ-induced caspase-3 activation suggesting activated AMPK involvement in BMJ-induced apoptosis. In vivo, oral administration of lyophilized BMJ (5mg in 100 µl water/day/mouse) for 6 weeks inhibited MiaPaCa-2 tumor xenograft growth by 60% (P < 0.01) without noticeable toxicity in nude mice. IHC analyses of MiaPaCa-2 xenografts showed that BMJ also inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis and activates AMPK in vivo. Overall, BMJ exerts strong anticancer efficacy against human pancreatic carcinoma cells, both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting its clinical

  6. Array of amorphous calcium phosphate particles improves cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Kim, InAe; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2010-04-01

    Poor interaction between cells and surfaces, especially hydrophobic surfaces, results in delayed proliferation and increased apoptosis due to low cell adhesion signaling. To improve cell adhesion, hydrophilic array of amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) was fabricated on a surface. A phosphate-buffered solution containing calcium ions was prepared at low temperature to prevent spontaneous precipitation. Then, the ion solution was heated to generate nuclei of ACP nanoparticles. The ACP nanoparticles adhered to the hydrophobic polystyrene surface forming an array composed of ACP particles. Multiple treatments of these nuclei with fresh CaP ion solutions increased the diameter and decreased the solubility of ACP particles enough to mediate cellular adhesion. The particle density in the array was dependent on the ion concentration of the CaP ion solutions. The ACP array improved a wide variety of activities when osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were cultured on the ACP array fabricated on a hydrophobic bacteriological dish surface, compared to those cultured without the ACP array in vitro. The use of ACP array resulted in a lower apoptosis and also increased the spreading of cells to form stress fibers and focal contacts. Cells cultured on the ACP array proliferated more than cells cultured on a hydrophobic surface without the ACP array. The ACP array increased the expression of markers of differentiation in osteoblast. These results indicate that an array of ACP can be used as a coating material for enhancing biocompatibility in tissue engineering or biomaterials rather than modifying the surface with organic molecules. PMID:20119940

  7. Correlation between proliferative activity and cellular thickness of human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Katsube, Yoshihiro; Hirose, Motohiro Nakamura, Chikashi; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2008-04-04

    A cell's shape is known to be related to its proliferative activity. In particular, large and flat mammalian adult stem cells seem to show slow proliferation, however using quantitative analysis to prove the phenomenon is difficult. We measured the proliferation and cellular thickness of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by atomic force microscopy and found that MSCs with high proliferative activity were thick while those with low proliferative activity were thin, even though these MSCs were early passage cells. Further, low proliferative MSCs contained many senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positive cells together with high senescence-associated gene expression. These findings suggest that the measurement of cellular thickness is useful for estimating the proliferative activity of human MSCs and is expected to be a practical tool for MSC applications in regenerative medicine.

  8. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  9. Dietary nitrate improves cardiac contractility via enhanced cellular Ca²⁺ signaling.

    PubMed

    Pironti, Gianluigi; Ivarsson, Niklas; Yang, Jiangning; Farinotti, Alex Bersellini; Jonsson, William; Zhang, Shi-Jin; Bas, Duygu; Svensson, Camilla I; Westerblad, Håkan; Weitzberg, Eddie; Lundberg, Jon O; Pernow, John; Lanner, Johanna; Andersson, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    The inorganic anion nitrate (NO3 (-)), which is naturally enriched in certain vegetables (e.g., spinach and beetroot), has emerged as a dietary component that can regulate diverse bodily functions, including blood pressure, mitochondrial efficiency, and skeletal muscle force. It is not known if dietary nitrate improves cardiac contractility. To test this, mice were supplemented for 1-2 weeks with sodium nitrate in the drinking water at a dose similar to a green diet. The hearts from nitrate-treated mice showed increased left ventricular pressure and peak rate of pressure development as measured with the Langendorff heart technique. Cardiomyocytes from hearts of nitrate-treated and control animals were incubated with the fluorescent indicator Fluo-3 to measure cytoplasmic free [Ca(2+)] and fractional shortening. Cardiomyocytes from nitrate-treated mice displayed increased fractional shortening, which was linked to larger Ca(2+) transients. Moreover, nitrate hearts displayed increased protein expression of the L-type Ca(2+) channel/dihydropyridine receptor and peak L-type Ca(2+) channel currents. The nitrate-treated hearts displayed increased concentration of cAMP but unchanged levels of cGMP compared with controls. These findings provide the first evidence that dietary nitrate can affect the expression of important Ca(2+) handling proteins in the heart, resulting in increased cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) signaling and improved left ventricular contractile function. Our observation shows that dietary nitrate impacts cardiac function and adds understanding to inorganic nitrate as a physiological modulator. PMID:27071401

  10. At the interface of antioxidant signalling and cellular function: Key polyphenol effects.

    PubMed

    Kerimi, Asimina; Williamson, Gary

    2016-08-01

    The hypothesis that dietary (poly)phenols promote well-being by improving chronic disease-risk biomarkers, such as endothelial dysfunction, chronic inflammation and plasma uric acid, is the subject of intense current research, involving human interventions studies, animal models and in vitro mechanistic work. The original claim that benefits were due to the direct antioxidant properties of (poly)phenols has been mostly superseded by detailed mechanistic studies on specific molecular targets. Nevertheless, many proposed mechanisms in vivo and in vitro are due to modulation of oxidative processes, often involving binding to specific proteins and effects on cell signalling. We review the molecular mechanisms for 3 actions of (poly)phenols on oxidative processes where there is evidence in vivo from human intervention or animal studies. (1) Effects of (poly) phenols on pathways of chronic inflammation leading to prevention of some of the damaging effects associated with the metabolic syndrome. (2) Interaction of (poly)phenols with endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, leading to effects on blood pressure and endothelial dysfunction, and consequent reduction in cardiovascular disease risk. (3) The inhibition of xanthine oxidoreductase leading to modulation of intracellular superoxide and plasma uric acid, a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. PMID:26887821

  11. Cellular stress stimulates nuclear localization signal (NLS) independent nuclear transport of MRJ

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Joel F.; Sykora, Landon J.; Barik Letostak, Tiasha; Menezes, Mitchell E.; Mitra, Aparna; Barik, Sailen; Shevde, Lalita A.; Samant, Rajeev S.

    2012-06-10

    HSP40 family member MRJ (DNAJB6) has been in the spot light for its relevance to Huntington's, Parkinson's diseases, limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, placental development, neural stem cells, cell cycle and malignancies such as breast cancer and melanoma. This gene has two spliced variants coding for 2 distinct proteins with significant homology. However, MRJ(L) (large variant) is predominantly localized to the nucleus whereas MRJ(S) (small variant) is predominantly cytoplasmic. Interestingly MRJ(S) translocates to the nucleus in response to heat shock. The classical heat shock proteins respond to crises (stress) by increasing the number of molecules, usually by transcriptional up-regulation. Our studies imply that a quick increase in the molar concentration of MRJ in the nuclear compartment is a novel method by which MRJ responds to stress. We found that MRJ(S) shows NLS (nuclear localization signal) independent nuclear localization in response to heat shock and hypoxia. The specificity of this response is realized due to lack of such response by MRJ(S) when challenged by other stressors, such as some cytokines or UV light. Deletion analysis has allowed us to narrow down on a 20 amino acid stretch at the C-terminal region of MRJ(S) as a potential stress sensing region. Functional studies indicated that constitutive nuclear localization of MRJ(S) promoted attributes of malignancy such as proliferation and invasiveness overall indicating distinct phenotypic characteristics of nuclear MRJ(S).

  12. MECHANISTIC PATHWAYS AND BIOLOGICAL ROLES FOR RECEPTOR-INDEPENDENT ACTIVATORS OF G-PROTEIN SIGNALING

    PubMed Central

    Blumer, Joe B.; Smrcka, Alan V.; Lanier, S.M.

    2007-01-01

    Signal processing via heterotrimeric G-proteins in response to cell surface receptors is a central and much investigated aspect of how cells integrate cellular stimuli to produce coordinated biological responses. The system is a target of numerous therapeutic agents, plays an important role in adaptive processes of organs, and aberrant processing of signals through these transducing systems is a component of various disease states. In addition to GPCR-mediated activation of G-protein signaling, nature has evolved creative ways to manipulate and utilize the Gαβγ heterotrimer or Gα and Gαβγ subunits independent of the cell surface receptor stimuli. In such situations, the G-protein subunits (Gα and Gαβγ) may actually be complexed with alternative binding partners independent of the typical heterotrimeric Gαβγ. Such regulatory accessory proteins include the family of RGS proteins that accelerate the GTPase activity of Gα and various entities that influence nucleotide binding properties and/or subunit interaction. The latter group of proteins includes receptor independent activators of G-protein signaling or AGS proteins that play surprising roles in signal processing. This review provides an overview of our current knowledge regarding AGS proteins. AGS proteins are indicative of a growing number of accessory proteins that influence signal propagation, facilitate cross talk between various types of signaling pathways and provide a platform for diverse functions of both the heterotrimeric Gαβγ and the individual Gα and Gαβγ subunits. PMID:17240454

  13. Calcium signaling in mammalian egg activation and embryo development: Influence of subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yi-Liang; Williams, Carmen J.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) signals drive the fundamental events surrounding fertilization and the activation of development in all species examined to date. Initial studies of Ca2+ signaling at fertilization in marine animals were tightly linked to new discoveries of bioluminescent proteins and their use as fluorescent Ca2+ sensors. Since that time, there has been rapid progress in our understanding of the key functions for Ca2+ in many cell types and the impact of cellular localization on Ca2+ signaling pathways. In this review, which focuses on mammalian egg activation, we consider how Ca2+ is regulated and stored at different stages of oocyte development and examine the functions of molecules that serve as both regulators of Ca2+ release and effectors of Ca2+ signals. We then summarize studies exploring how Ca2+ directs downstream effectors mediating both egg activation and later signaling events required for successful preimplantation embryo development. Throughout this review, we focus attention on how localization of Ca2+ signals influences downstream signaling events, and attempt to highlight gaps in our knowledge that are ripe areas for future research. PMID:22888043

  14. Hyperactivated Wnt signaling induces synthetic lethal interaction with Rb inactivation by elevating TORC1 activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianyi; Liao, Yang; Hsu, Fu-Ning; Zhang, Robin; Searle, Jennifer S; Pei, Xun; Li, Xuan; Ryoo, Hyung Don; Ji, Jun-Yuan; Du, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Inactivation of the Rb tumor suppressor can lead to increased cell proliferation or cell death depending on specific cellular context. Therefore, identification of the interacting pathways that modulate the effect of Rb loss will provide novel insights into the roles of Rb in cancer development and promote new therapeutic strategies. Here, we identify a novel synthetic lethal interaction between Rb inactivation and deregulated Wg/Wnt signaling through unbiased genetic screens. We show that a weak allele of axin, which deregulates Wg signaling and increases cell proliferation without obvious effects on cell fate specification, significantly alters metabolic gene expression, causes hypersensitivity to metabolic stress induced by fasting, and induces synergistic apoptosis with mutation of fly Rb ortholog, rbf. Furthermore, hyperactivation of Wg signaling by other components of the Wg pathway also induces synergistic apoptosis with rbf. We show that hyperactivated Wg signaling significantly increases TORC1 activity and induces excessive energy stress with rbf mutation. Inhibition of TORC1 activity significantly suppressed synergistic cell death induced by hyperactivated Wg signaling and rbf inactivation, which is correlated with decreased energy stress and decreased induction of apoptotic regulator expression. Finally the synthetic lethality between Rb and deregulated Wnt signaling is conserved in mammalian cells and that inactivation of Rb and APC induces synergistic cell death through a similar mechanism. These results suggest that elevated TORC1 activity and metabolic stress underpin the evolutionarily conserved synthetic lethal interaction between hyperactivated Wnt signaling and inactivated Rb tumor suppressor. PMID:24809668

  15. A smart fluorescence nanoprobe for the detection of cellular alkaline phosphatase activity and early osteogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Feng-Yi; Fan, Jin-Xuan; Long, Yue; Zeng, Xuan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2016-07-01

    In the past decades, biomaterials were designed to induce stem cell toward osteogenic differentiation. However, conventional methods for evaluation osteogenic differentiation all required a process of cell fixation or lysis, which induce waste of a large number of cells. In this study, a fluorescence nanoprobe was synthesized by combining phosphorylated fluoresceinamine isomer I (FLA) on the surface of mesoporous silica-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4@mSiO2) nanoparticles. In the presence of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), the phosphorylated FLA on the nanoprobe would be hydrolyzed, resulting in a fluorescence recovery of FLA. During early osteogenic differentiation, a high-level expression of cellular ALP was induced, which accelerated the hydrolysis of phosphorylated FLA, resulting in an enhancement of cellular fluorescence intensity. This fluorescence nanoprobe provides us a rapid and non-toxic method for the detection of cellular ALP activity and early osteogenic differentiation. PMID:26961462

  16. The inactive-active phase transition in the noisy additive (exclusive-or) probabilistic cellular automaton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonça, J. Ricardo G.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the inactive-active phase transition in an array of additive (exclusive-or) cellular automata (CA) under noise. The model is closely related with the Domany-Kinzel (DK) probabilistic cellular automaton (PCA), for which there are rigorous as well as numerical estimates on the transition probabilities. Here, we characterize the critical behavior of the noisy additive cellular automaton by mean field analysis and finite-size scaling and show that its phase transition belongs to the directed percolation universality class of critical behavior. As a by-product of our analysis, we argue that the critical behavior of the noisy elementary CA 90 and 102 (in Wolfram’s enumeration scheme) must be the same. We also perform an empirical investigation of the mean field equations to assess their quality and find that away from the critical point (but not necessarily very far away) the mean field approximations provide a reasonably good description of the dynamics of the PCA.

  17. Quantitative structure-activity relationships for cellular uptake of surface-modified nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rong; Rallo, Robert; Bilal, Muhammad; Cohen, Yoram

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) were developed, for cellular uptake of nanoparticles (NPs) of the same iron oxide core but with different surface-modifying organic molecules, based on linear and non-linear (epsilon support vector regression (ε-SVR)). A linear QSAR provided high prediction accuracy of R2=0.751 (coefficient of determination) using 11 descriptors selected from an initial pool of 184 descriptors calculated for the NP surfacemodifying molecules, while a ε-SVR based QSAR with only 6 descriptors improved prediction accuracy to R2=0.806. The linear and ε-SVR based QSARs both demonstrated good robustness and well spanned applicability domains. It is suggested that the approach of evaluating pertinent descriptors and their significance, via QSAR analysis, to cellular NP uptake could support planning and interpretation of toxicity studies as well as provide guidance for the tailor-design NPs with respect to targeted cellular uptake for various applications. PMID:25747434

  18. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kwon, Shi-Nae; Kang, Ju-Il; Lee, Song Hee; Jang, Sung Key; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Kim, Yoon Ki . E-mail: yk-kim@korea.ac.kr

    2007-05-18

    Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway.

  19. Periostin Responds to Mechanical Stress and Tension by Activating the MTOR Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rosselli-Murai, Luciana K.; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Volk, Sarah L.; Murai, Marcelo J.; Rios, Hector F.; Squarize, Cristiane H.; Castilho, Rogerio M.

    2013-01-01

    Current knowledge about Periostin biology has expanded from its recognized functions in embryogenesis and bone metabolism to its roles in tissue repair and remodeling and its clinical implications in cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that Periostin plays a critical role in the mechanism of wound healing; however, the paracrine effect of Periostin in epithelial cell biology is still poorly understood. We found that epithelial cells are capable of producing endogenous Periostin that, unlike mesenchymal cell, cannot be secreted. Epithelial cells responded to Periostin paracrine stimuli by enhancing cellular migration and proliferation and by activating the mTOR signaling pathway. Interestingly, biomechanical stimulation of epithelial cells, which simulates tension forces that occur during initial steps of tissue healing, induced Periostin production and mTOR activation. The molecular association of Periostin and mTOR signaling was further dissected by administering rapamycin, a selective pharmacological inhibitor of mTOR, and by disruption of Raptor and Rictor scaffold proteins implicated in the regulation of mTORC1 and mTORC2 complex assembly. Both strategies resulted in ablation of Periostin-induced mitogenic and migratory activity. These results indicate that Periostin-induced epithelial migration and proliferation requires mTOR signaling. Collectively, our findings identify Periostin as a mechanical stress responsive molecule that is primarily secreted by fibroblasts during wound healing and expressed endogenously in epithelial cells resulting in the control of cellular physiology through a mechanism mediated by the mTOR signaling cascade. PMID:24349533

  20. Cellular electrical micro-impedance parameter artifacts produced by passive and active current regulation.

    PubMed

    English, Anthony E; Squire, James C; Moy, Alan B

    2008-03-01

    This study analyzes the cellular microelectrode voltage measurement errors produced by active and passive current regulation, and the propagation of these errors into cellular barrier function parameter estimates. The propagation of random and systematic errors into these parameters is accounted for within a Riemannian manifold framework consistent with information geometry. As a result, the full non-linearity of the model parameter state dependence, the instrumental noise distribution, and the systematic errors associated with the voltage to impedance conversion, are accounted for. Specifically, cellular model parameters are treated as the coordinates of a model space manifold that inherits a Riemannian metric from the data space. The model space metric is defined in terms of the pull back of an instrumental noise-dependent Fisher information metric. Additional noise sources produced by the evaluation of the cell-covered electrode model that is a function of a naked electrode random variable are also included in the analysis. Based on a circular cellular micro-impedance model in widespread use, this study shows that cellular barrier function parameter estimates are highly model state dependent. Systematic errors produced by coaxial lead capacitances and circuit loading can also lead to significant and model state-dependent parameter errors and should, therefore, be either reduced or corrected for analytically. PMID:18202917

  1. Endothelin-1 activation of ETB receptors leads to a reduced cellular proliferative rate and an increased cellular footprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Jamie L.; Taylor, Linda; Polgar, Peter

    2012-06-10

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a vasoactive peptide which signals through two G-protein coupled receptors, endothelin receptor A (ETA) and B (ETB). We determined that ET-1 activation of its ETB receptor in stably cDNA transfected CHO cells leads to a 55% reduction in cell number by end-point cell counting and a 35% decrease in cell growth by a real-time cell-substrate impedance-based assay after 24 h of cell growth. When CHO ETB cells were synchronized in the late G1 cell cycle phase, ET-1 delayed their S phase progression compared to control by 30% as determined by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation. On the other hand, no such delay was observed during late G2/M to G1 transit when cells were treated with ET-1 after release from mitotic arrest. Using the cell-substrate impedance-based assay, we observed that ET-1 induces opposing morphological changes in CHO ETA and CHO ETB cells with ETB causing an increase in the cell footprint and ETA a decrease. Likewise, in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, which express both ETA and ETB receptors, ET-1 induces an ETA-dependent contraction and an ETB dependent dilation. These results are shedding light on a possible beneficial role for ETB in diseases involving ET-1 dysfunction such as pulmonary hypertension. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ET- hinders cell proliferation in CHO cells transfected with ETB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ET-1 also decreases the rate of DNA synthesis in CHO ETB cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK and PI3K appear to be involved in this reduction of DNA synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETB activation in CHO ETB cells and hSMCs leads to dilatory morphological changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In CHO ETA and hSMCs, ETA activation leads to constrictive morphological changes.

  2. Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae infection affects the expression of genes involved in cellular signal transduction and iron metabolism in the kidney of the brown trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Sarker, Subhodeep; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is an enigmatic endoparasite which causes proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. The life cycle of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae generally completes in an invertebrate host freshwater bryozoan and vertebrate host brown trout (Salmo trutta) Linnaeus, 1758. Little is known about the gene expression in the kidney of brown trout during the developmental stages of T. bryosalmonae. In the present study, quantitative real-time PCR was applied to quantify the target genes of interest in the kidney of brown trout at different time points of T. bryosalmonae development. PCR primers specific for target genes were designed and optimized, and their gene expression levels were quantified in the cDNA kidney samples using SYBR Green Supermix. Expression of Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta, integral membrane protein 2B, NADH dehydrogenase 1 beta subcomplex subunit 6, and 26S protease regulatory subunit S10B were upregulated significantly in infected brown trout, while the expression of the ferritin M middle subunit was downregulated significantly. These results suggest that host genes involved in cellular signal transduction, proteasomal activities, including membrane transporters and cellular iron storage, are differentially upregulated or downregulated in the kidney of brown trout during parasite development. The gene expression pattern of infected renal tissue may support the development of intraluminal sporogonic stages of T. bryosalmonae in the renal tubular lumen of brown trout which may facilitate the release of viable parasite spores to transmit to the invertebrate host bryozoan. PMID:25786607

  3. HIV-1 Nef and KSHV oncogene K1 synergistically promote angiogenesis by inducing cellular miR-718 to regulate the PTEN/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Min; Yao, Shuihong; Hu, Minmin; Li, Wan; Hao, Tingting; Zhou, Feng; Zhu, Xiaofei; Lu, Hongmei; Qin, Di; Yan, Qin; Zhu, Jianzhong; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Lu, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an AIDS-defining cancer with aberrant neovascularization caused by KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Although the interaction between HIV-1 and KSHV plays a pivotal role in promoting the aggressive manifestations of KS, the pathogenesis underlying AIDS-KS remains largely unknown. Here we examined HIV-1 Nef protein promotion of KSHV oncoprotein K1-induced angiogenesis. We showed that both internalized and ectopic expression of Nef in endothelial cells synergized with K1 to facilitate vascular tube formation and cell proliferation, and enhance angiogenesis in a chicken CAM model. In vivo experiments further indicated that Nef accelerated K1-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis in athymic nu/nu mice. Mechanistic studies revealed that Nef and K1 synergistically activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling by downregulating PTEN. Furthermore, Nef and K1 induced cellular miR-718, which inhibited PTEN expression by directly targeting a seed sequence in the 3′ UTR of its mRNA. Inhibition of miR-718 expression increased PTEN synthesis and suppressed the synergistic effect of Nef- and K1-induced angiogenesis and tumorigenesis. These results indicate that, by targeting PTEN, miR-718 mediates Nef- and K1-induced angiogenesis via activation of AKT/mTOR signaling. Our results demonstrate an essential role of miR-718/AKT/mTOR axis in AIDS-KS and thus may represent an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:25104021

  4. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    PubMed Central

    Florea, Ana-Maria; Büsselberg, Dietrich

    2011-01-01

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects. PMID:24212665

  5. EDA-containing cellular fibronectin induces fibroblast differentiation through binding to alpha4beta7 integrin receptor and MAPK/Erk 1/2-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Kohan, Martin; Muro, Andres F; White, Eric S; Berkman, Neville

    2010-11-01

    Fibroblast differentiation is an essential step during wound healing and fibrosis. Fibronectin (FN) is a major component of the extracellular matrix and occurs in two main forms: plasma and cellular FN. The latter includes the alternatively spliced domain A (EDA). Although EDA-containing cellular fibronectin (EDA-FN) is associated with fibroblast differentiation, how EDA-FN promotes differentiation is incompletely understood. In this study, we investigate the mechanism by which EDA-FN contributes to fibroblast differentiation with emphasis on the characterization of the EDA-FN receptor. We show that EDA-FN increases α-SMA expression (immunofluorescence), collagen deposition, cell contractility, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) activation (immunoblotting); whereas plasma FN, a form lacking EDA, shows no effect. Primary lung fibroblasts constitutively express α(4)β(7) integrin receptor (FACS and RT-PCR). Blocking of α(4)β(7) reduces fibroblast adhesion to EDA-FN and inhibits α-SMA expression, collagen deposition, and FAK activation induced by EDA-FN. Using recombinant EDA-containing peptides, we demonstrate that the EDA segment is sufficient to induce fibroblast differentiation via binding to α(4)β(7). EDA-FN induces MAPK-Erk1/2 activation and inhibition of MEK1/2 attenuates EDA-FN-induced α-SMA expression. Our findings demonstrate that EDA-FN induces fibroblast differentiation by a mechanism that involves binding of EDA to α(4)β(7) integrin followed by activation of FAK and MAPK-associated signaling pathways. PMID:20643910

  6. Cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and their potential role in cellular differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    The formation of multicellular organisms requires genetically predefined signaling pathways in various cell types. Besides differences in size, energy balance and life time, cell types should be enable to modulate appropriate developmental and adaptive responses in ever-changing surrounding environment. One of the most important environmental cues is light which regulates a variety of physiological and cellular processes. During evolution, diverse light-sensitive proteins, so-called photoreceptors, and corresponding signaling pathways have evolved, in almost all kingdoms of life, to monitor light continuously and adjust their growth and development accordingly. However, considering the fact that different cell types should be enable to trigger distinct light signaling pathways according to their needs, cell-type specific light signaling pathways are required to guarantee cell type-matched modulation of cellular and developmental processes in response to different light signals. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri, which has only 2 cell types with clear division of labor, possesses cell-type specific photoreceptors and light signaling pathways which allow differential regulation of genes involved in various cellular and metabolic pathways in response to environmental light. The existence of cell-type specific light signaling pathways in multicellular organism like Volvox reflects an early development of cell-type specific signaling mechanisms during evolution to ensure maintenance of differentiation. PMID:25874475

  7. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  8. The Nrf2 Activator Vinylsulfone Reduces High Glucose-Induced Neural Tube Defects by Suppressing Cellular Stress and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2016-08-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling pathway is one of the primary pathways responsible for the cellular defense system against oxidative stress. Oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is a causal event in diabetic embryopathy. Thus, the Nrf2 pathway may play an important role in the induction of diabetic embryopathy. In the present study, we investigated the potentially protective effect of the Nrf2 activator, vinylsulfone, on high glucose-induced cellular stress, apoptosis, and neural tube defects (NTDs). Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) whole mouse embryos were cultured in normal (5 mmol/L) or high (16.7 mmol/L) glucose conditions, with or without vinylsulfone. At a concentration of 10 μmol/L, vinylsulfone had an inhibitory effect on high glucose-induced NTD formation, but it was not significant. At a concentration of 20 μmol/L, vinylsulfone significantly reduced high glucose-induced NTDs. In addition, 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone abrogated the high glucose-induced oxidative stress markers lipid hydroperoxide (LPO), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), and nitrotyrosine-modified proteins. The high glucose-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress biomarkers were also suppressed by 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone through the inhibition of phosphorylated protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring protein 1α (IRE1a), eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2a), upregulated C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP), and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) messenger RNA splicing. Furthermore, 20 μmol/L vinylsulfone abolished caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage, markers of apoptosis, in embryos cultured under high glucose conditions. The Nrf2 activator, vinylsulfone, is protective against high glucose-induced cellular stress, caspase activation, and subsequent NTD formation. Our data suggest that vinylsulfone supplementation is a potential therapy for diabetes-associated neurodevelopmental defects. PMID:26802109

  9. Crosstalk and Signaling Switches in Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Fey, Dirk; Croucher, David R.; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades control cell fate decisions, such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis by integrating and processing intra- and extracellular cues. However, similar MAPK kinetic profiles can be associated with opposing cellular decisions depending on cell type, signal strength, and dynamics. This implies that signaling by each individual MAPK cascade has to be considered in the context of the entire MAPK network. Here, we develop a dynamic model of feedback and crosstalk for the three major MAPK cascades; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and also include input from protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Focusing on the bistable activation characteristics of the JNK pathway, this model explains how pathway crosstalk harmonizes different MAPK responses resulting in pivotal cell fate decisions. We show that JNK can switch from a transient to sustained activity due to multiple positive feedback loops. Once activated, positive feedback locks JNK in a highly active state and promotes cell death. The switch is modulated by the ERK, p38, and AKT pathways. ERK activation enhances the dual specificity phosphatase (DUSP) mediated dephosphorylation of JNK and shifts the threshold of the apoptotic switch to higher inputs. Activation of p38 restores the threshold by inhibiting ERK activity via the PP1 or PP2A phosphatases. Finally, AKT activation inhibits the JNK positive feedback, thus abrogating the apoptotic switch and allowing only proliferative signaling. Our model facilitates understanding of how cancerous deregulations disturb MAPK signal processing and provides explanations for certain drug resistances. We highlight a critical role of DUSP1 and DUSP2 expression patterns in facilitating the switching of JNK activity and show how oncogene induced ERK hyperactivity prevents the normal apoptotic switch explaining the failure of certain drugs to

  10. Nitric oxide-induced cellular stress and p53 activation in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hofseth, Lorne J.; Saito, Shin'ichi; Hussain, S. Perwez; Espey, Michael G.; Miranda, Katrina M.; Araki, Yuzuru; Jhappan, Chamelli; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; He, Peijun; Linke, Steven P.; Quezado, Martha M.; Zurer, Irit; Rotter, Varda; Wink, David A.; Appella, Ettore; Harris, Curtis C.

    2003-01-01

    Free radical-induced cellular stress contributes to cancer during chronic inflammation. Here, we investigated mechanisms of p53 activation by the free radical, NO. NO from donor drugs induced both ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related-dependent p53 posttranslational modifications, leading to an increase in p53 transcriptional targets and a G2/M cell cycle checkpoint. Such modifications were also identified in cells cocultured with NO-releasing macrophages. In noncancerous colon tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis (a cancer-prone chronic inflammatory disease), inducible NO synthase protein levels were positively correlated with p53 serine 15 phosphorylation levels. Immunostaining of HDM-2 and p21WAF1 was consistent with transcriptionally active p53. Our study highlights a pivotal role of NO in the induction of cellular stress and the activation of a p53 response pathway during chronic inflammation. PMID:12518062

  11. K+ efflux agonists induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation independently of Ca2+ signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Katsnelson, Michael A.; Rucker, L. Graham; Russo, Hana M.; Dubyak, George R.

    2015-01-01

    Perturbation of intracellular ion homeostasis is a major cellular stress signal for activation of NLRP3 inflammasome signaling that results in caspase-1 mediated production of IL-1β and pyroptosis. However, the relative contributions of decreased cytosolic [K+] versus increased cytosolic [Ca2+] remain disputed and incompletely defined. We investigated roles for elevated cytosolic [Ca2+] in NLRP3 activation and downstream inflammasome signaling responses in primary murine dendritic cells and macrophages in response to two canonical NLRP3 agonists (ATP and nigericin) that facilitate primary K+ efflux by mechanistically distinct pathways or the lysosome-destabilizing agonist Leu-Leu-O-methyl ester (LLME). The study provides three major findings relevant to this unresolved area of NLRP3 regulation. First, increased cytosolic [Ca2+] was neither a necessary nor sufficient signal for the NLRP3 inflammasome cascade during activation by endogenous ATP-gated P2X7 receptor channels, the exogenous bacterial ionophore nigericin, or the lysosomotropic agent LLME. Second, agonists for three Ca2+-mobilizing G protein-coupled receptors (formyl peptide receptor/FPR; P2Y2 purinergic receptor/P2Y2R; calcium-sensing receptor/CaSR) expressed in murine dendritic cells were ineffective as activators of rapidly induced NLRP3 signaling when directly compared to the K+ efflux agonists. Third, the intracellular Ca2+ buffer, BAPTA, and the channel blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), widely used reagents for disruption of Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways, strongly suppressed nigericin-induced NLRP3 inflammasome signaling via mechanisms dissociated from their canonical or expected effects on Ca2+ homeostasis. The results indicate that the ability of K+ efflux agonists to activate NLRP3 inflammasome signaling can be dissociated from changes in cytosolic [Ca2+] as a necessary or sufficient signal. PMID:25762778

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates L-arginine mediated cellular responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our prior study revealed the loss in short-term L-Arginine (ARG) therapeutic efficacy after continuous exposure; resulting in tolerance development, mediated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) down-regulation, secondary to oxidative stress and induced glucose accumulation. However, the potential factor regulating ARG cellular response is presently unknown. Method Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with 100 μM ARG for 2 h in buffer (short-term or acute), or for 7 days in culture medium and challenged for 2 h in buffer (continuous or chronic), in the presence or absence of other agents. eNOS activity was determined by analyzing cellular nitrite/nitrate (NO2–/NO3–), and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity was assayed using SAMS peptide. 13C6 glucose was added to medium to measure glucose uptake during cellular treatments, which were determined by LC-MS/MS. Cellular glucose was identified by o-toluidine method. Superoxide (O2•–) was identified by EPR-spin-trap, and peroxynitrite (ONOO–) was measured by flow-cytometer using aminophenyl fluorescein dye. Results Short-term incubation of cells with 100 μM ARG in the presence or absence of 30 μM L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 30 μM AMPK inhibitor (compound C, CMP-C) increased cellular oxidative stress and overall glucose accumulation with no variation in glucose transporter-1 (GLUT-1), or AMPK activity from control. The increase in total NO2–/NO3– after 2 h 100 μM ARG exposure, was suppressed in cells co-incubated with 30 μM CMP-C or L-NAME. Long-term exposure of ARG with or without CMP-C or L-NAME suppressed NO2–/NO3–, glucose uptake, GLUT-1, AMPK expression and activity below control, and increased overall cellular glucose, O2•– and ONOO–. Gluconeogenesis inhibition with 30 μM 5-Chloro-2-N-2,5-dichlorobenzenesulfonamido-benzoxazole (CDB) during ARG exposure for 2 h maintained overall cellular glucose to control, but increased

  13. Treponema denticola Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signal Pathways through Toll-Like Receptor 2▿

    PubMed Central

    Ruby, John; Rehani, Kunal; Martin, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Treponema denticola, a spirochete indigenous to the oral cavity, is associated with host inflammatory responses to anaerobic polymicrobial infections of the root canal, periodontium, and alveolar bone. However, the cellular mechanisms responsible for the recognition of T. denticola by the innate immune system and the underlying cell signaling pathways that regulate the inflammatory response to T. denticola are currently unresolved. In this study, we demonstrate that T. denticola induces innate immune responses via the utilization of Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) but not TLR4. Assessment of TLR2/1 and TLR2/6 heterodimers revealed that T. denticola predominantly utilizes TLR2/6 for the induction of cellular responses. Analysis of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway in T. denticola-stimulated monocytes identified a prolonged up-regulation of the MAPK extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38, while no discernible increase in phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) levels was observed. With the aid of pharmacological inhibitors selectively targeting ERK1/2 via the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 kinase and p38, we further demonstrate that ERK1/2 and p38 play a major role in T. denticola-mediated pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:17923521

  14. Age-related changes in AMPK activation: Role for AMPK phosphatases and inhibitory phosphorylation by upstream signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Antero; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kauppinen, Anu

    2016-07-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a fundamental regulator of energy metabolism, stress resistance, and cellular proteostasis. AMPK signaling controls an integrated signaling network which is involved in the regulation of healthspan and lifespan e.g. via FoxO, mTOR/ULK1, CRCT-1/CREB, and SIRT1 signaling pathways. Several studies have demonstrated that the activation capacity of AMPK signaling declines with aging, which impairs the maintenance of efficient cellular homeostasis and enhances the aging process. However, it seems that the aging process affects AMPK activation in a context-dependent manner since occasionally, it can also augment AMPK activation, possibly attributable to the type of insult and tissue homeostasis. Three protein phosphatases, PP1, PP2A, and PP2C, inhibit AMPK activation by dephosphorylating the Thr172 residue of AMPKα, required for AMPK activation. In addition, several upstream signaling pathways can phosphorylate Ser/Thr residues in the β/γ interaction domain of the AMPKα subunit that subsequently blocks the activation of AMPK. These inhibitory pathways include the insulin/AKT, cyclic AMP/PKA, and RAS/MEK/ERK pathways. We will examine the evidence whether the efficiency of AMPK responsiveness declines during the aging process. Next, we will review the mechanisms involved in curtailing the activation of AMPK. Finally, we will elucidate the potential age-related changes in the inhibitory regulation of AMPK signaling that might be a part of the aging process. PMID:27060201

  15. Transcriptional control of HIV latency: Cellular signaling pathways, epigenetics, happenstance and the hope for a cure

    PubMed Central

    Mbonye, Uri; Karn, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Replication-competent latent HIV-1 proviruses that persist in the genomes of a very small subset of resting memory T cells in infected individuals under life-long antiretroviral therapy present a major barrier towards viral eradication. Multiple molecular mechanisms are required to repress the viral trans-activating factor Tat and disrupt the regulatory Tat feedback circuit leading to the establishment of the latent viral reservoir. In particular, latency is due to a combination of transcriptional silencing of proviruses via host epigenetic mechanisms and restrictions on the expression of P-TEFb, an essential co-factor for Tat. Induction of latent proviruses in the presence of antiretroviral therapy is expected to enable clearance of latently infected cells by viral cytopathic effects and host antiviral immune responses. An in-depth comprehensive understanding of the molecular control of HIV-1 transcription should inform the development of optimal combinatorial reactivation strategies that are intended to purge the latent viral reservoir. PMID:24565118

  16. Antioxidative Activity of Platinum Nanocolloid and Its Protective Effect Against Chemical-Induced Hepatic Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Choi, Mi-Ran; Do, Le Thanh; Chung, Yong-Hoon; Yoo, Hoon; Yu, Rina

    2015-08-01

    Oxidative stress, a major cause of cellular injuries, is closely associated with a variety of chronic diseases such as cancer, liver diseases, degenerative brain disease and aging. In this study, we investigated antioxidant properties of platinum nanocolloid (PNC) against various oxidative stress conditions in vitro/in vivo by treating PNC on liver cell or tissue. Antioxidant activities of the PNC were determined by measuring quenching capacity on reactive oxygen species and its protective action against hydrogen peroxide or CCl4-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 cell or liver tissue of mice. In vitro study, PNC markedly suppressed the production H2O2, ·OH, α,α-diphenyl-β-picrylhydrazyl radical and nitric oxide in a dose-dependent manner. PNC also inhibited hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative cellular damage in HepG2 hepatocytes. In vivo study with mice, PNC reduced hepatic lipid peroxidation and CCl4 induced toxicity. Our results support that platinum nanocolloid has antioxidant activities and protects hepatic cellular oxidative damage. Thus platinum nanocolloid may have a potential to be used as an antioxidant supplement. PMID:26369119

  17. A Trichoderma atroviride stress-activated MAPK pathway integrates stress and light signals.

    PubMed

    Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo Ulises; García-Esquivel, Mónica; Medina-Castellanos, Elizabeth; Correa-Pérez, Víctor Alejandro; Parra-Arriaga, Jorge Luis; Landeros-Jaime, Fidel; Cervantes-Chávez, José Antonio; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2016-06-01

    Cells possess stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) signalling pathways, which are activated practically in response to any cellular insult, regulating responses for survival and adaptation to harmful environmental changes. To understand the function of SAPK pathways in T. atroviride, mutants lacking the MAPKK Pbs2 and the MAPK Tmk3 were analysed under several cellular stresses, and in their response to light. All mutants were highly sensitive to cellular insults such as osmotic and oxidative stress, cell wall damage, high temperature, cadmium, and UV irradiation. Under oxidative stress, the Tmk3 pathway showed specific roles during development, which in conidia are essential for tolerance to oxidant agents and appear to play a minor role in mycelia. The function of this pathway was more evident in Δpbs2 and Δtmk3 mutant strains when combining oxidative stress or cell wall damage with light. Light stimulates tolerance to osmotic stress through Tmk3 independently of the photoreceptor Blr1. Strikingly, photoconidiation and expression of blue light regulated genes was severally affected in Δtmk3 and Δpbs2 strains, indicating that this pathway regulates light responses. Furthermore, Tmk3 was rapidly phosphorylated upon light exposure. Thus, our data indicate that Tmk3 signalling cooperates with the Blr photoreceptor complex in the activation of gene expression. PMID:26878111

  18. Dioscorea alata Attenuates Renal Interstitial Cellular Fibrosis by Regulating Smad- and Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shu-Fen; Chang, Shan-Yu; Lee, Tao-Chen; Chuang, Lea-Yea; Guh, Jinn-Yuh; Hung, Chien-Ya; Hung, Tsung-Jen; Hung, Yu-Ju; Chen, Po-Yi; Hsieh, Pei-fang; Yang, Yu-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Renal interstitial fibrosis is characterized by increased extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in kidneys is driven by regulated expression of fibrogenic cytokines such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β). Yam, or Dioscorea alata (DA) is an important herb in Chinese medicine widely used for the treatment of clinical diabetes mellitus. However, the fibrosis regulatory effect of DA is unclear. Thus, we examined TGF-β signaling mechanisms against EMT in rat fibroblast cells (NRK-49F). The characterization of DA water-extracts used various methods; after inducing cellular fibrosis in NRK-49F cells by treatment with β-hydroxybutyrate (β-HB) (10 mM), we used Western blotting to examine the protein expression in the TGF-β-related signal protein type I and type II TGF-β receptors, Smads2 and Smad3 (Smad2/3), pSmad2 and Smad3 (pSmad2/3), Smads4, Smads7, and EMT markers. These markers included E-cadherin, alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Bioactive TGF-β and fibronectin levels in the culture media were determined using ELISA. Expressions of fibronectin and Snail transcription factor, an EMT-regulatory transcription factor, were assessed by immunofluorescence staining. DA extract dose-dependently (50–200 µg/mL) suppressed β-HB-induced expression of fibronectin in NRK-49F cells concomitantly with the inhibition of Smad2/3, pSmad2/3, and Smad4. By contrast, Smad7 expression was significantly increased. DA extract caused a decrease in α-SMA (α-smooth muscle actin) and MMP-2 levels, and an increase in E-cadherin expression. We propose that DA extract might act as a novel fibrosis antagonist, which acts partly by down regulating the TGF-β/smad signaling pathway and modulating EMT expression. PMID:23144821

  19. The Canonical Notch Signaling Pathway: Unfolding the Activation Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kopan, Raphael; Ilagan, Ma. Xenia G.

    2009-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates many aspects of metazoan development and tissue renewal. Accordingly, misregulation or loss of Notch signaling underlies multiple human disorders, from developmental syndromes to adult onset diseases and cancer. Notch receptor activation is irreversible as it involves proteolysis-mediated release of the Notch intracellular domain, translocation to the nucleus, and association with a DNA-bound protein. Even though each Notch molecule signals only once without amplification by secondary messenger cascades, Notch signaling is remarkably robust in most tissues. In this review, we highlight the recent studies that reveal new molecular details involved in regulating ligand-mediated activation, receptor proteolysis and target selection. PMID:19379690

  20. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Liu, Dongmei; Gao, Bin; Zhang, Xiaohui; You, Minli; Ren, Hui; Zhang, Hongbo; Santos, Hélder A; Xu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Evodiamine (EVO) and rutaecarpine (RUT) are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs' IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4-44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8-138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds. PMID:27455219

  1. New Tricks From an Old Dog: Mitochondrial Redox Signaling in Cellular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Martin; Lepow, Talya S.; Billingham, Leah K.; Murphy, Michael P.; Siegel, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide (O2−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have long been implicated as pro-inflammatory, yet the sources of ROS and the molecular mechanisms by which they enhance inflammation have been less clear. Recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of inflammation mediated by the innate immune system have allowed these issues to be revisited. Although the Nox2 NADPH oxidases generate the bulk of ROS for antimicrobial host defense, recent studies have found that NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production can actually dampen macrophage inflammatory responses to sterile pro-inflammatory stimuli. Instead, production of mitochondrial ROS has emerged as an important factor in both host defense and sterile inflammation. Excess mitochondrial ROS can be generated by either damage to the respiratory chain or by alterations of mitochondrial function such as those that increase membrane potential and reduce respiratory electron carriers. In autoinflammatory diseases, where key components of innate immune responses are activated by genetic mutations or environmental stimuli, inflammation has been found to be particularly sensitive to inhibition of mitochondrial ROS production. These findings have highlighted mitochondrial ROS as a novel generator of pro-inflammatory ROS and a potential therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases. PMID:23391428

  2. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Patrick R.; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N.

    2016-01-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  3. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Patrick R; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N

    2016-05-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  4. LED-activated pheophorbide a induces cellular destruction of colon cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, C. S.; Leung, A. W. N.; Liu, L.; Xia, X. S.

    2010-07-01

    Pheophorbide a (Pa) from Chinese herbal medicine Scutellaria Barbata and Silkworm Excreta shows an important promise in the photodynamic therapy on malignant tumor. The present study investigated that LED-activated Pa induced the cellular destruction of colon cancer HT-29 cells. The results showed that Pa resulted in a drug-dose dependent photocytotoxicity in the HT-29 cells, meaning the photocytotoxicity of Pa depends on the drug concentration (0 - 2 μM). We further investigated the apoptosis of the HT-29 cells 18 hours after photosensitization of Pa using a confocal laser scanning microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. These data demonstrated that LED-activated Pa could significantly induce the cellular destruction of the HT-29 cells.

  5. SIRT1-dependent regulation of chromatin and transcription: linking NAD(+) metabolism and signaling to the control of cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Kraus, W Lee

    2010-08-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of NAD(+)-dependent protein deacetylases and ADP-ribosyltransferases. Mammalian SIRT1 - a homolog of yeast Sir2, the prototypical member of the sirtuin family - is an important regulator of metabolism, cell differentiation and senescence, stress response, and cancer. As an NAD(+)-dependent enzyme, SIRT1 regulates gene expression programs in response to cellular metabolic status, thereby coordinating metabolic adaptation of the whole organism. Several important mechanisms have emerged for SIRT1-dependent regulation of transcription. First, SIRT1 can modulate chromatin function through direct deacetylation of histones as well as by promoting alterations in the methylation of histones and DNA, leading to the repression of transcription. The latter is accomplished through the recruitment of other nuclear enzymes to chromatin for histone methylation and DNA CpG methylation, suggesting a broader role of SIRT1 in epigenetic regulation. Second, SIRT1 can interact and deacetylate a broad range of transcription factors and coregulators, thereby regulating target gene expression both positively and negatively. Cellular energy state, specifically NAD(+) metabolism, plays a major role in the regulation of SIRT1 activity. Recent studies on the NAD(+) biosynthetic enzymes in the salvage pathway, nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) and nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyltransferase 1 (NMNAT-1), have revealed important functions for these enzymes in SIRT1-dependent transcription regulation. The collective molecular actions of SIRT1 control specific patterns of gene expression that modulate a wide variety of physiological outcomes. PMID:19879981

  6. Wnt Signaling in Neurogenesis during Aging and Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Michael; Do, Huong

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, much progress has been made regarding our understanding of neurogenesis in both young and old animals and where it occurs throughout the lifespan, although the growth of new neurons declines with increasing age. In addition, physical activity can reverse this age-dependent decline in neurogenesis. Highly correlated with this decline is the degree of inter and intracellular Wnt signaling, the molecular mechanisms of which have only recently started to be elucidated. So far, most of what we know about intracellular signaling during/following exercise centers around the CREB/CRE initiated transcriptional events. Relatively little is known, however, about how aging and physical activity affect the Wnt signaling pathway. Herein, we briefly review the salient features of neurogenesis in young and then in old adult animals. Then, we discuss Wnt signaling and review the very few in vitro and in vivo studies that have examined the Wnt signaling pathways in aging and physical activity. PMID:24961268

  7. Preliminary cellular-automata forecast of permit activity from 1998 to 2010, Idaho and Western Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Raines, G.L.; Zientek, M.L.; Causey, J.D.; Boleneus, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    For public land management in Idaho and western Montana, the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) has requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) predict where mineral-related activity will occur in the next decade. Cellular automata provide an approach to simulation of this human activity. Cellular automata (CA) are defined by an array of cells, which evolve by a simple transition rule, the automaton. Based on exploration trends, we assume that future exploration will focus in areas of past exploration. Spatial-temporal information about mineral-related activity, that is permits issued by USFS and Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in the last decade, and spatial information about undiscovered resources, provide a basis to calibrate a CA. The CA implemented is a modified annealed voting rule that simulates mineral-related activity with spatial and temporal resolution of 1 mi2 and 1 year based on activity from 1989 to 1998. For this CA, the state of the economy and exploration technology is assumed constant for the next decade. The calibrated CA reproduces the 1989-1998-permit activity with an agreement of 94%, which increases to 98% within one year. Analysis of the confusion matrix and kappa correlation statistics indicates that the CA underestimates high activity and overestimates low activity. Spatially, the major differences between the actual and calculated activity are that the calculated activity occurs in a slightly larger number of small patches and is slightly more uneven than the actual activity. Using the calibrated CA in a Monte Carlo simulation projecting from 1998 to 2010, an estimate of the probability of mineral activity shows high levels of activity in Boise, Caribou, Elmore, Lincoln, and western Valley counties in Idaho and Beaverhead, Madison, and Stillwater counties in Montana, and generally low activity elsewhere. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  8. Activating Akt and the brain's resources to drive cellular survival and prevent inflammatory injury

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Z.Z.; Li, F.; Maiese, K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Protein kinase B, also known as Akt, is a serine/threonine kinase and plays a critical role in the modulation of cell development, growth, and survival. Interestingly, Akt is ubiquitously expressed throughout the body, but its expression in the nervous system is substantially up-regulated during cellular stress, suggesting a more expansive role for Akt in the nervous system that may involve cellular protection. In this regard, a body of recent work has identified a robust capacity for Akt and its downstream substrates to foster both neuronal and vascular survival during apoptotic injury. Cell survival by Akt is driven by the modulation of both intrinsic cellular pathways that oversee genomic DNA integrity and extrinsic mechanisms that control inflammatory microglial activation. A series of distinct pathways are regulated by Akt that include the Forkhead family of transcription factors, GSK-3ß, ß-catenin, c-Jun, CREB, Bad, IKK, and p53. Culminating below these substrates of Akt are the control of caspase mediated pathways that promote genomic integrity as well as prevent inflammatory cell demise. With further levels of progress in defining the cellular role of Akt, the attractiveness of Akt as a vital and broad cytoprotectant for both neuronal and vascular cell populations should continue to escalate. PMID:15578447

  9. Ras-activated Dsor1 promotes Wnt signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric T; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-12-15

    Wnt/Wingless (Wg) and Ras-MAPK signaling both play fundamental roles in growth and cell fate determination, and when dysregulated, can lead to tumorigenesis. Several conflicting modes of interaction between Ras-MAPK and Wnt signaling have been identified in specific cellular contexts, causing synergistic or antagonistic effects on target genes. We find novel evidence that the Drosophila homolog of the dual specificity kinases MEK1/2 (also known as MAP2K1/2), Downstream of Raf1 (Dsor1), is required for Wnt signaling. Knockdown of Dsor1 results in loss of Wg target gene expression, as well as reductions in stabilized Armadillo (Arm; Drosophila β-catenin). We identify a close physical interaction between Dsor1 and Arm, and find that catalytically inactive Dsor1 causes a reduction in active Arm. These results suggest that Dsor1 normally counteracts the Axin-mediated destruction of Arm. We find that Ras-Dsor1 activity is independent of upstream activation by EGFR, and instead it appears to be activated by the insulin-like growth factor receptor to promote Wg signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a new crosstalk pathway between insulin and Wg signaling that is mediated by Dsor1. PMID:26542023

  10. Differential Signaling by Protease-Activated Receptors: Implications for Therapeutic Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Sidhu, Tejminder S.; French, Shauna L.; Hamilton, Justin R.

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of four G protein-coupled receptors that exhibit increasingly appreciated differences in signaling and regulation both within and between the receptor class. By nature of their proteolytic self-activation mechanism, PARs have unique processes of receptor activation, “ligand” binding, and desensitization/resensitization. These distinctive aspects have presented both challenges and opportunities in the targeting of PARs for therapeutic benefit—the most notable example of which is inhibition of PAR1 on platelets for the prevention of arterial thrombosis. However, more recent studies have uncovered further distinguishing features of PAR-mediated signaling, revealing mechanisms by which identical proteases elicit distinct effects in the same cell, as well as how distinct proteases produce different cellular consequences via the same receptor. Here we review this differential signaling by PARs, highlight how important distinctions between PAR1 and PAR4 are impacting on the progress of a new class of anti-thrombotic drugs, and discuss how these more recent insights into PAR signaling may present further opportunities for manipulating PAR activation and signaling in the development of novel therapies. PMID:24733067

  11. Cellular trafficking and anticancer activity of Garcinia mangostana extract-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pan-In, Porntip; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason; Hanes, Justin; Kim, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Garcinia mangostana Linn extract (GME) is a natural product that has received considerable attention in cancer therapy, and has the potential to reduce side effects of chemotherapeutics and improve efficacy. We formulated GME-encapsulated ethyl cellulose (GME-EC) and a polymer blend of ethyl cellulose and methyl cellulose (GME-EC/MC) nanoparticles. We achieved high drug-loading and encapsulation efficiency using a solvent-displacement method with particle sizes around 250 nm. Cellular uptake and accumulation of GME was higher for GME-encapsulated nanoparticles compared to free GME. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis showed effective anticancer activity of GME-EC and GME-EC/MC nanoparticles in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. GME-EC/MC nanoparticles showed approximately twofold-higher anticancer activity compared to GME-EC nanoparticles, likely due to their enhanced bioavailability. GME-encapsulated nanoparticles primarily entered HeLa cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficked through the endolysosomal pathway. As far as we know, this is the first report on the cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking mechanism of drug-loaded cellulose-based nanoparticles. In summary, encapsulation of GME using cellulose-derivative nanoparticles - GME-EC and GME-EC/MC nanoparticles - successfully improved the bioavailability of GME in aqueous solution, enhanced cellular uptake, and displayed effective anticancer activity. PMID:25125977

  12. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains.

    PubMed

    Jason Gao, Guo-Jie; Holcomb, Michael C; Thomas, Jeffrey H; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-10-19

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. However, systematic methods of studying how mechanical stress and feedback help to harmonize cellular activities within a tissue have yet to be developed. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity. Our particle-based AGF model will be useful in analyzing mechanical feedback effects in a wide variety of morphogenesis and organogenesis phenomena. PMID:27545101

  13. Free-Radical-Scavenging, Antityrosinase, and Cellular Melanogenesis Inhibitory Activities of Synthetic Isoflavones.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tzy-Ming; Ko, Horng-Huey; Ng, Lean-Teik; Hsieh, Yen-Pin

    2015-06-01

    In this study, we examined the potential of synthetic isoflavones for application in cosmeceuticals. Twenty-five isoflavones were synthesized and their capacities of free-radical-scavenging and mushroom tyrosinase inhibition, as well as their impact on cell viability of B16F10 murine melanoma cells and HaCaT human keratinocytes were evaluated. Isoflavones that showed significant mushroom tyrosinase inhibitory activities were further studied on reduction of cellular melanin formation and antityrosinase activities in B16F10 melanocytes in vitro. Among the isoflavones tested, 6-hydroxydaidzein (2) was the strongest scavenger of both ABTS(.+) and DPPH(.) radicals with SC50 values of 11.3 ± 0.3 and 9.4 ± 0.1 μM, respectively. Texasin (20) exhibited the most potent inhibition of mushroom tyrosinase (IC50 14.9 ± 4.5 μM), whereas retusin (17) showed the most efficient inhibition both of cellular melanin formation and antityrosinase activity in B16F10 melanocytes, respectively. In summary, both retusin (17) and texasin (20) exhibited potent free-radical-scavenging capacities as well as efficient inhibition of cellular melanogenesis, suggesting that they are valuable hit compounds with potential for advanced cosmeceutical development. PMID:26080742

  14. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P.; Adams, Ralf H.; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  15. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P; Adams, Ralf H; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  16. PII signal transduction proteins are ATPases whose activity is regulated by 2-oxoglutarate

    PubMed Central

    Radchenko, Martha V.; Thornton, Jeremy; Merrick, Mike

    2013-01-01

    PII proteins are one of the most widespread families of signal transduction proteins in nature, being ubiquitous throughout bacteria, archaea, and plants. In all these organisms, PII proteins coordinate many facets of nitrogen metabolism by interacting with and regulating the activities of enzymes, transcription factors, and membrane transport proteins. The primary mode of signal perception by PII proteins derives from their ability to bind the effector molecules 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) and ATP or ADP. The role of 2-OG as an indicator of cellular nitrogen status is well understood, but the function of ATP/ADP binding has remained unresolved. We have now shown that the Escherichia coli PII protein, GlnK, has an ATPase activity that is inhibited by 2-OG. Hence, when a drop in the cellular 2-OG pool signals nitrogen sufficiency, 2-OG depletion of GlnK causes bound ATP to be hydrolyzed to ADP, leading to a conformational change in the protein. We propose that the role of ATP/ADP binding in E. coli GlnK is to effect a 2-OG-dependent molecular switch that drives a conformational change in the T loops of the PII protein. We have further shown that two other PII proteins, Azospirillum brasilense GlnZ and Arabidopsis thaliana PII, have a similar ATPase activity, and we therefore suggest that this switch mechanism is likely to be a general property of most members of the PII protein family. PMID:23818625

  17. Akt-mTORC1 signaling regulates Acly to integrate metabolic input to control of macrophage activation

    PubMed Central

    Covarrubias, Anthony J; Aksoylar, Halil Ibrahim; Yu, Jiujiu; Snyder, Nathaniel W; Worth, Andrew J; Iyer, Shankar S; Wang, Jiawei; Ben-Sahra, Issam; Byles, Vanessa; Polynne-Stapornkul, Tiffany; Espinosa, Erika C; Lamming, Dudley; Manning, Brendan D; Zhang, Yijing; Blair, Ian A; Horng, Tiffany

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage activation/polarization to distinct functional states is critically supported by metabolic shifts. How polarizing signals coordinate metabolic and functional reprogramming, and the potential implications for control of macrophage activation, remains poorly understood. Here we show that IL-4 signaling co-opts the Akt-mTORC1 pathway to regulate Acly, a key enzyme in Ac-CoA synthesis, leading to increased histone acetylation and M2 gene induction. Only a subset of M2 genes is controlled in this way, including those regulating cellular proliferation and chemokine production. Moreover, metabolic signals impinge on the Akt-mTORC1 axis for such control of M2 activation. We propose that Akt-mTORC1 signaling calibrates metabolic state to energetically demanding aspects of M2 activation, which may define a new role for metabolism in supporting macrophage activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11612.001 PMID:26894960

  18. Looking for a needle in a haystack: Cellular proteins that may interact with the tyrosine-based sorting signal of the TGEV S protein.

    PubMed

    Trincone, Anna; Schwegmann-Weßels, Christel

    2015-04-16

    The spike protein S of transmissible gastroenteritis virus, an Alphacoronavirus, contains a tyrosine-based sorting signal that is responsible for ERGIC retention and may be important for a correct viral assembly process. To find out whether the S protein interacts with cellular proteins via this sorting signal, a pulldown assay with GST fusion proteins was performed. Filamin A has been identified as a putative interaction candidate. Immunofluorescence assays confirmed a co-localization between the TGEV S protein and filamin A. Further experiments have to be performed to prove a significant impact of filamin A on TGEV infection. Different approaches of several researchers for the identification of cellular interaction candidates relevant for coronavirus replication are summarized. These results may help in the future to identify the role of cellular proteins during coronavirus assembly at the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment. PMID:25481285

  19. Active NF-kappaB signalling is a prerequisite for influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Nimmerjahn, Falk; Dudziak, Diana; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Hobom, Gerd; Riedel, Alexander; Schlee, Martin; Staudt, Louis M; Rosenwald, Andreas; Behrends, Uta; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2004-08-01

    Influenza virus still poses a major threat to human health. Despite widespread vaccination programmes and the development of drugs targeting essential viral proteins, the extremely high mutation rate of influenza virus still leads to the emergence of new pathogenic virus strains. Therefore, it has been suggested that cellular cofactors that are essential for influenza virus infection might be better targets for antiviral therapy. It has previously been reported that influenza virus efficiently infects Epstein-Barr virus-immortalized B cells, whereas Burkitt's lymphoma cells are virtually resistant to infection. Using this cellular system, it has been shown here that an active NF-kappaB signalling pathway is a general prerequisite for influenza virus infection of human cells. Cells with low NF-kappaB activity were resistant to influenza virus infection, but became susceptible upon activation of NF-kappaB. In addition, blocking of NF-kappaB activation severely impaired influenza virus infection of otherwise highly susceptible cells, including the human lung carcinoma cell lines A549 and U1752 and primary human cells. On the other hand, infection with vaccinia virus was not dependent on an active NF-kappaB signalling pathway, demonstrating the specificity of this pathway for influenza virus infection. These results might be of major importance for both the development of new antiviral therapies and the understanding of influenza virus biology. PMID:15269376

  20. α7 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Signaling Inhibits Inflammasome Activation by Preventing Mitochondrial DNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ben; Kwan, Kevin; Levine, Yaakov A; Olofsson, Peder S; Yang, Huan; Li, Jianhua; Joshi, Sonia; Wang, Haichao; Andersson, Ulf; Chavan, Sangeeta S; Tracey, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian immune system and the nervous system coevolved under the influence of cellular and environmental stress. Cellular stress is associated with changes in immunity and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, a key component of innate immunity. Here we show that α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAchR)-signaling inhibits inflammasome activation and prevents release of mitochondrial DNA, an NLRP3 ligand. Cholinergic receptor agonists or vagus nerve stimulation significantly inhibits inflammasome activation, whereas genetic deletion of α7 nAchR significantly enhances inflammasome activation. Acetylcholine accumulates in macrophage cytoplasm after adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stimulation in an α7 nAchR-independent manner. Acetylcholine significantly attenuated calcium or hydrogen oxide–induced mitochondrial damage and mitochondrial DNA release. Together, these findings reveal a novel neurotransmitter-mediated signaling pathway: acetylcholine translocates into the cytoplasm of immune cells during inflammation and inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation by preventing mitochondrial DNA release. PMID:24849809

  1. SIGNALING TO THE P53 TUMOR SUPPRESSOR THROUGH PATHWAYS ACTIVATED BY GENOTOXIC AND NON-GENOTOXIC STRESSES.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDERSON,C.W.APPELLA,E.

    2002-07-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a tetrameric transcription factor that is post-translational modified at {approx}18 different sites by phosphorylation, acetylation, or sumoylation in response to various cellular stress conditions. Specific posttranslational modifications, or groups of modifications, that result from the activation of different stress-induced signaling pathways are thought to modulate p53 activity to regulate cell fate by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or cellular senescence. Here we review the posttranslational modifications to p53 and the pathways that produce them in response to both genotoxic and non-genotoxic stresses.

  2. Macrophage response to bacteria: induction of marked secretory and cellular activities by lipoteichoic acids.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R; Fischer, W; Keist, R; Bassetti, S

    1992-01-01

    Lipoteichoic acids (LTAs) from various bacterial species, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, and Listeria monocytogenes, were examined for the ability to induce secretory and cellular responses in a pure population of bone marrow-derived mononuclear phagocytes. Some of the highly purified LTAs, in particular LTAs from Bacillus subtilis, S. pyogenes, E. faecalis, and Enterococcus hirae, were able to affect each of the macrophage parameters measured, i.e., reductive capacity, secretion of tumor necrosis factor and nitrite, and tumoricidal activity. As after stimulation with whole organisms or other bacterial products, secretion of tumor necrosis factor induced by these LTAs reached its maximum within the first few hours of the interaction, while secretion of nitrite and tumoricidal activity required 24 to 36 h for full expression. Other purified LTAs, i.e., LTAs from Streptococcus sanguis, S. pneumoniae, and L. monocytogenes, as well as lipomannan from Micrococcus luteus affected only some of these parameters, while native LTA from S. aureus was inactive. There was no obvious correlation between biological activity and chain length, kind of glycosyl substituents, glycolipid structures, or fatty acid composition of LTAs. Deacylation of LTAs resulted in a complete loss of activity, and deacylated LTAs did not impair the activity of their acylated counterparts, suggesting that acyl chains may be essential for binding of LTA to the cell surface. The results demonstrate that some LTA species are potent inducers of macrophage secretory and cellular activities. PMID:1500175

  3. A beacon of hope in stroke therapy-Blockade of pathologically activated cellular events in excitotoxic neuronal death as potential neuroprotective strategies.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Ashfaqul; Hossain, M Iqbal; Ameen, S Sadia; Ang, Ching-Seng; Williamson, Nicholas; Ng, Dominic C H; Chueh, Anderly C; Roulston, Carli; Cheng, Heung-Chin

    2016-04-01

    Excitotoxicity, a pathological process caused by over-stimulation of ionotropic glutamate receptors, is a major cause of neuronal loss in acute and chronic neurological conditions such as ischaemic stroke, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. Effective neuroprotective drugs to reduce excitotoxic neuronal loss in patients suffering from these neurological conditions are urgently needed. One avenue to achieve this goal is to clearly define the intracellular events mediating the neurotoxic signals originating from the over-stimulated glutamate receptors in neurons. In this review, we first focus on the key cellular events directing neuronal death but not involved in normal physiological processes in the neurotoxic signalling pathways. These events, referred to as pathologically activated events, are potential targets for the development of neuroprotectant therapeutics. Inhibitors blocking some of the known pathologically activated cellular events have been proven to be effective in reducing stroke-induced brain damage in animal models. Notable examples are inhibitors suppressing the ion channel activity of neurotoxic glutamate receptors and those disrupting interactions of specific cellular proteins occurring only in neurons undergoing excitotoxic cell death. Among them, Tat-NR2B9c and memantine are clinically effective in reducing brain damage caused by some acute and chronic neurological conditions. Our second focus is evaluation of the suitability of the other inhibitors for use as neuroprotective therapeutics. We also discuss the experimental approaches suitable for bridging our knowledge gap in our current understanding of the excitotoxic signalling mechanism in neurons and discovery of new pathologically activated cellular events as potential targets for neuroprotection. PMID:26899498

  4. The collagen triple helix repeat containing 1 facilitates hepatitis B virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma progression by regulating multiple cellular factors and signal cascades.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Cao, Yanhua; Bai, Lan; Zhu, Chengliang; Li, Rui; He, Hui; Liu, Yingle; Wu, Kailang; Liu, Fang; Wu, Jianguo

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the major causes of acute and chronic liver diseases, fulminant hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HCC accounts for more than 85% of primary liver cancers and is the seventh most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths. However, the mechanism by which HBV induces HCC is largely unknown. Collagen triple helixes repeat containing 1 (CTHRC1) is a secreted protein and has characteristics of a circulating hormone with potentially broad implications for cell metabolism and physiology. CTHRC1 is associated with human cancers, but its effect on HCC is unknown. Here, we revealed that CTHRC1 expression is highly correlated with HCC progression in HBV-infected patients, and demonstrated that HBV stimulates CTHRC1 expression by activating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), through extracellular signal-regulated kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (ERK/c-JNK) pathway. In addition, CTHRC1 activates hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) through regulating phosphoinosmde-3-kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI-3K/AKT/mTOR) pathway. More interestingly, CTHRC1 enhances colony formation, migration, and invasion of hepatoma cells by regulating p53 and stimulating matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) expression. In addition, knock-down of CTHRC1 results in the repression of HBV-associated carcinogenesis in nude mice. Thus, we revealed a novel mechanism by which HBV facilitates HCC development through activating the oncoprotein CTHRC1, which in turn enhances HBV-related HCC progression by stimulates colony formation, migration, and invasion of hepatoma cells through regulating multiple cellular factors and signal cascades. PMID:25263696

  5. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    PubMed Central

    West, Ewan; Osborne, Craig; Nolan, William; Bate, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage. PMID:26043272

  6. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage.

    PubMed

    West, Ewan; Osborne, Craig; Nolan, William; Bate, Clive

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound "natural Aβ", sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson's disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage. PMID:26043272

  7. Quantifying bursting neuron activity from calcium signals using blind deconvolution.

    PubMed

    Park, In Jun; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Ache, Barry W; Principe, Jose C

    2013-09-15

    Advances in calcium imaging have enabled studies of the dynamic activity of both individual neurons and neuronal assemblies. However, challenges, such as unknown nonlinearities in the spike-calcium relationship, noise, and the often relatively low temporal resolution of the calcium signal compared to the time-scale of spike generation, restrict the accurate estimation of action potentials from the calcium signal. Complex neuronal discharge, such as the activity demonstrated by bursting and rhythmically active neurons, represents an even greater challenge for reconstructing spike trains based on calcium signals. We propose a method using blind calcium signal deconvolution based on an information-theoretic approach. This model is meant to maximise the output entropy of a nonlinear filter where the nonlinearity is defined by the cumulative distribution function of the spike signal. We tested our maximum entropy (ME) algorithm using bursting olfactory receptor neurons (bORNs) of the lobster olfactory organ. The advantage of the ME algorithm is that the filter can be trained online based only on the statistics of the spike signal, without any assumptions regarding the unknown transfer function characterizing the relation between the spike and calcium signal. We show that the ME method is able to more accurately reconstruct the timing of the first and last spikes of a burst compared to other methods and that it improves the temporal precision fivefold compared to direct timing resolution of calcium signal. PMID:23711821

  8. Caffeic Acid Inhibits Chronic UVB-Induced Cellular Proliferation Through JAK-STAT3 Signaling in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Agilan, Balupillai; Rajendra Prasad, N; Kanimozhi, Govindasamy; Karthikeyan, Ramasamy; Ganesan, Muthusamy; Mohana, Shanmugam; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Ananthakrishnan, Dhanapalan

    2016-05-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) play a critical role in inflammation, proliferation and carcinogenesis. Inhibition of JAK-STAT3 signaling is proved to be a novel target for prevention of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. In this study, chronic UVB irradiation (180 mJ cm(-2) ; weekly thrice for 30 weeks) induces the expression of IL-10 and JAK1 that eventually activates the STAT3 which leads to the transcription of proliferative and antiapoptotic markers such as PCNA, Cyclin-D1, Bcl2 and Bcl-xl, respectively. Caffeic acid (CA) inhibits JAK-STAT3 signaling, thereby induces apoptotic cell death by upregulating Bax, Cytochrome-C, Caspase-9 and Caspase-3 expression in mouse skin. Furthermore, TSP-1 is an antiangiogeneic protein, which is involved in the inhibition of angiogenesis and proliferation. Chronic UVB exposure decreased the expression of TSP-1 and pretreatment with CA prevented the UVB-induced loss of TSP-1 in UVB-irradiated mouse skin. Thus, CA offers protection against UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis probably through modulating the JAK-STAT3 in the mouse skin. PMID:27029485

  9. Antioxidant activity, cellular bioavailability, and iron and calcium management of neuroprotective and nonneuroprotective flavones.

    PubMed

    Echeverry, Carolina; Arredondo, Florencia; Martínez, Marcela; Abin-Carriquiry, Juan Andrés; Midiwo, Jacob; Dajas, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have been undertaken on the relationship of the structure of flavones and neuroprotection. Previously, we described the structural determinants of the neuroprotective activity of some natural flavones in cerebellar granule neurons in culture against an oxidative insult (H2O2). In the present work, we analyzed anti-oxidant activity, cellular iron, and Ca(2+) levels and cellular bioavailability of neuroprotective and nonneuroprotective flavones in the same experimental paradigm. Oxidative cellular damage produced by H2O2 was prevented by all of the studied flavones with rather similar potency for all of them. Labile Iron Pool was neither affected by protective nor nonprotective flavones. Intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis was not affected by protective flavones either. Nonetheless, fisetin, the nonprotective flavone, decreased Ca(2+) levels modifying Ca(2+) homeostasis. Methylation of the catechol group, although weakens anti-oxidant capacity, keeps the neuroprotective capacity with less degradation and lower toxicity, constituting promising structural alternatives as leads for the design of neuroprotective molecules. PMID:24972590

  10. Interaction between insulin-like growth factor-I receptor and alphaVbeta3 integrin linked signaling pathways: cellular responses to changes in multiple signaling inputs.

    PubMed

    Clemmons, D R; Maile, L A

    2005-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric transmembrane proteins that mediate cell attachment to extracellular matrix, migration, division, and inhibition of apoptosis. Because growth factors are also important for these processes, there has been interest in cooperative signaling between growth factor receptors and integrins. IGF-I is an important growth factor for vascular cells. One integrin, alphaVbeta3, that is expressed in smooth muscle cells modulates IGF-I actions. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 is required for IGF-I to stimulate cell migration and division. Src homology 2 containing tyrosine phosphatase (SHP-2) is a tyrosine phosphatase whose recruitment to signaling molecules is stimulated by growth factors including IGF-I. If alphaVbeta3 ligand occupancy is inhibited, there is no recruitment of SHP-2 to alphaVbeta3 and its transfer to downstream signaling molecules is blocked. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation of the beta3-subunit, resulting in recruitment of SHP-2. This transfer is mediated by an insulin receptor substrate-1-related protein termed DOK-1. Subsequently, SHP-2 is transferred to another transmembrane protein, SHPS-1. This transfer requires IGF-I receptor-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of SHPS-1, which contains two YXXL motifs that mediate SHP-2 binding. The transfer of SHP-2 to SHPS-1 is also required for recruitment of Shc to SHPS-1. Ligand occupancy of alphaVbeta3 results in sustained Shc phosphorylation and enhanced Shc recruitment. Shc activation results in induction of MAPK. Inhibition of the Shc/SHPS-1 complex formation results in failure to achieve sustained MAPK activation and an attenuated mitogenic response. Thus, within the vessel wall, a mechanism exists whereby ligand occupancy of the alphaVbeta3 integrin is required for assembly of a multicomponent membrane signaling complex that is necessary for cells to respond optimally to IGF-I. PMID:15528274

  11. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase.

    PubMed

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G; Economou, Anastassios

    2009-11-19

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as 'preproteins' carrying amino-terminal, cleavable signal peptides and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides and chaperones like SecB. Here we show that signal peptides have a new role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. On docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, 'triggering' that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; second, 'trapping' that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus; and third, 'secretion' during which trapped mature domains undergo several turnovers of translocation in segments. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  12. Skeletal muscle plasticity: cellular and molecular responses to altered physical activity paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Kenneth M.; Haddad, Fadia

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this article is to examine our current understanding of the chain of events known to be involved in the adaptive process whereby specific genes and their protein products undergo altered expression; specifically, skeletal muscle adaptation in response to altered loading states will be discussed, with a special focus on the regulation of the contractile protein, myosin heavy chain gene expression. This protein, which is both an important structural and regulatory protein comprising the contractile apparatus, can be expressed as different isoforms, thereby having an impact on the functional diversity of the muscle. Because the regulation of the myosin gene family is under the control of a complex set of processes including, but not limited to, activity, hormonal, and metabolic factors, this protein will serve as a cellular "marker" for studies of muscle plasticity in response to various mechanical perturbations in which the quantity and type of myosin isoform, along with other important cellular proteins, are altered in expression.

  13. The Viral Oncoprotein LMP1 Exploits TRADD for Signaling by Masking Its Apoptotic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Frank; Neugebauer, Julia; Griese, Janine; Liefold, Nicola; Kutz, Helmut; Briseño, Cinthia; Kieser, Arnd

    2008-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor 1–associated death domain protein (TRADD) mediates induction of apoptosis as well as activation of NF-κB by cellular TNF-receptor 1 (TNFR1). TRADD is also recruited by the latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) oncoprotein of Epstein-Barr virus, but its role in LMP1 signaling has remained enigmatic. In human B lymphocytes, we have generated, to our knowledge, the first genetic knockout of TRADD to investigate TRADD's role in LMP1 signal transduction. Our data from TRADD-deficient cells demonstrate that TRADD is a critical signaling mediator of LMP1 that is required for LMP1 to recruit and activate I-κB kinase β (IKKβ). However, in contrast to TNFR1, LMP1-induced TRADD signaling does not induce apoptosis. Searching for the molecular basis for this observation, we characterized the 16 C-terminal amino acids of LMP1 as an autonomous and unique virus-derived TRADD-binding domain. Replacing the death domain of TNFR1 by LMP1′s TRADD-binding domain converts TNFR1 into a nonapoptotic receptor that activates NF-κB through a TRAF6-dependent pathway, like LMP1 but unlike wild-type TNFR1. Thus, the unique interaction of LMP1 with TRADD encodes the transforming phenotype of viral TRADD signaling and masks TRADD's pro-apoptotic function. PMID:18198944

  14. Focal Activation of Cells by Plasmon Resonance Assisted Optical Injection of Signaling Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Experimental methods for single cell intracellular delivery are essential for probing cell signaling dynamics within complex cellular networks, such as those making up the tumor microenvironment. Here, we show a quantitative and general method of interrogation of signaling pathways. We applied highly focused near-infrared laser light to optically inject gold-coated liposomes encapsulating bioactive molecules into single cells for focal activation of cell signaling. For this demonstration, we encapsulated either inositol trisphosphate (IP3), an endogenous cell signaling second messenger, or adenophostin A (AdA), a potent analogue of IP, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes, and injected these gold-coated liposomes and their contents into the cytosol of single ovarian carcinoma cells to initiate calcium (Ca2+) release from intracellular stores. Upon optical injection of IP3 or AdA at doses above the activation threshold, we observed increases in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration within the injected cell initiating the propagation of a Ca2+ wave throughout nearby cells. As confirmed by octanol-induced inhibition, the intercellular Ca2+ wave traveled via gap junctions. Optical injection of gold-coated liposomes represents a quantitative method of focal activation of signaling cascades of broad interest in biomedical research. PMID:24877558

  15. Recombinant TCR ligand induces early TCR signaling and a unique pattern of downstream activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunhe; Mooney, Jeffery L; Meza-Romero, Roberto; Chou, Yuan K; Huan, Jianya; Vandenbark, Arthur A; Offner, Halina; Burrows, Gregory G

    2003-08-15

    Recombinant TCR ligands (RTLs) consisting of covalently linked alpha(1) and beta(1) domains of MHC class II molecules tethered to specific antigenic peptides represent minimal TCR ligands. In a previous study we reported that the rat RTL201 construct, containing RT1.B MHC class II domains covalently coupled to the encephalitogenic guinea pig myelin basic protein (Gp-MBP(72-89)) peptide, could prevent and treat actively and passively induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in vivo by selectively inhibiting Gp-MBP(72-89) peptide-specific CD4(+) T cells. To evaluate the inhibitory signaling pathway, we tested the effects of immobilized RTL201 on T cell activation of the Gp-MBP(72-89)-specific A1 T cell hybridoma. Activation was exquisitely Ag-specific and could not be induced by RTL200 containing the rat MBP(72-89) peptide that differed by a threonine for serine substitution at position 80. Partial activation by RTL201 included a CD3zeta p23/p21 ratio shift, ZAP-70 phosphorylation, calcium mobilization, NFAT activation, and transient IL-2 production. In comparison, anti-CD3epsilon treatment produced stronger activation of these cellular events with additional activation of NF-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinases as well as long term increased IL-2 production. These results demonstrate that RTLs can bind directly to the TCR and modify T cell behavior through a partial activation mechanism, triggering specific downstream signaling events that deplete intracellular calcium stores without fully activating T cells. The resulting Ag-specific activation of the transcription factor NFAT uncoupled from the activation of NF-kappaB or extracellular signal-regulated kinases constitutes a unique downstream activation pattern that accounts for the inhibitory effects of RTL on encephalitogenic CD4(+) T cells. PMID:12902496

  16. Cellular recovery of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and thiol status after exposure to hydroperoxides

    SciTech Connect

    Brodie, A.E.; Reed, D.J. )

    1990-01-01

    The activity of the thiol-dependent enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD), in vertebrate cells, was modulated by a change in the intracellular thiol:disulfide redox status. Human lung carcinoma cells (A549) were incubated with 1-120 mM H2O2, 1-120 mM t-butyl hydroperoxide, 1-6 mM ethacrynic acid, or 0.1-10 mM N-ethylmaleimide for 5 min. Loss of reduced protein thiols, as measured by binding of the thiol reagent iodoacetic acid to GPD, and loss of GPD enzymatic activity occurred in a dose-dependent manner. Incubation of the cells, following oxidative treatment, in saline for 30 min or with 20 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) partially reversed both changes in GPD. The enzymatic recovery of GPD activity was observed either without addition of thiols to the medium or by incubation of a sonicated cell mixture with 2 mM cysteine, cystine, cysteamine, or glutathione (GSH); GSSG had no effect. Treatment of cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to decrease cellular GSH by varying amounts caused a dose-related increase in sensitivity of GPD activity to inactivation by H2O2 and decreased cellular ability for subsequent recovery. GPD responded in a similar fashion with oxidative treatment of another lung carcinoma cell line (A427) as well as normal lung tissue from human and rat. These findings indicate that the cellular thiol redox status can be important in determining GPD enzymatic activity.

  17. Two-Photon Enzymatic Probes Visualizing Sub-cellular/Deep-brain Caspase Activities in Neurodegenerative Models

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linghui; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Mao, Yanli; Li, Lin; Gao, Nengyue; Lim, Kah-Leong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Yao, Shao Q.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases work as a double-edged sword in maintaining cell homeostasis. Highly regulated caspase activities are essential during animal development, but dysregulation might lead to different diseases, e.g. extreme caspase activation is known to promote neurodegeneration. At present, visualization of caspase activation has mostly remained at the cellular level, in part due to a lack of cell-permeable imaging probes capable of direct, real-time investigations of endogenous caspase activities in deep tissues. Herein, we report a suite of two-photon, small molecule/peptide probes which enable sensitive and dynamic imaging of individual caspase activities in neurodegenerative models under physiological conditions. With no apparent toxicity and the ability of imaging endogenous caspases both in different subcellular organelles of mammalian cells and in brain tissues, these probes serve as complementary tools to conventional histological analysis. They should facilitate future explorations of caspases at molecular, cellular and organism levels and inspire development of novel two-photon probes against other enzymes. PMID:27210613

  18. Two-Photon Enzymatic Probes Visualizing Sub-cellular/Deep-brain Caspase Activities in Neurodegenerative Models.

    PubMed

    Qian, Linghui; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Mao, Yanli; Li, Lin; Gao, Nengyue; Lim, Kah-Leong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Yao, Shao Q

    2016-01-01

    Caspases work as a double-edged sword in maintaining cell homeostasis. Highly regulated caspase activities are essential during animal development, but dysregulation might lead to different diseases, e.g. extreme caspase activation is known to promote neurodegeneration. At present, visualization of caspase activation has mostly remained at the cellular level, in part due to a lack of cell-permeable imaging probes capable of direct, real-time investigations of endogenous caspase activities in deep tissues. Herein, we report a suite of two-photon, small molecule/peptide probes which enable sensitive and dynamic imaging of individual caspase activities in neurodegenerative models under physiological conditions. With no apparent toxicity and the ability of imaging endogenous caspases both in different subcellular organelles of mammalian cells and in brain tissues, these probes serve as complementary tools to conventional histological analysis. They should facilitate future explorations of caspases at molecular, cellular and organism levels and inspire development of novel two-photon probes against other enzymes. PMID:27210613

  19. The cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 has multiple functions in E2-mediated papillomavirus transcription activation.

    PubMed

    Helfer, Christine M; Yan, Junpeng; You, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    The cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 functions in multiple processes of the papillomavirus life cycle, including viral replication, genome maintenance, and gene transcription through its interaction with the viral protein, E2. However, the mechanisms by which E2 and Brd4 activate viral transcription are still not completely understood. In this study, we show that recruitment of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), a functional interaction partner of Brd4 in transcription activation, is important for E2's transcription activation activity. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses demonstrate that P-TEFb is recruited to the actual papillomavirus episomes. We also show that E2's interaction with cellular chromatin through Brd4 correlates with its papillomavirus transcription activation function since JQ1(+), a bromodomain inhibitor that efficiently dissociates E2-Brd4 complexes from chromatin, potently reduces papillomavirus transcription. Our study identifies a specific function of Brd4 in papillomavirus gene transcription and highlights the potential use of bromodomain inhibitors as a method to disrupt the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle. PMID:25140737

  20. Histone Chaperone SSRP1 is Essential for Wnt Signaling Pathway Activity During Osteoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hossan, Tareq; Nagarajan, Sankari; Baumgart, Simon J; Xie, Wanhua; Magallanes, Roberto Tirado; Hernandez, Céline; Chiaroni, Pierre-Marie; Indenbirken, Daniela; Spitzner, Melanie; Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Grade, Marian; Thieffry, Denis; Grundhoff, Adam; Wegwitz, Florian; Johnsen, Steven A

    2016-05-01

    Cellular differentiation is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin structure which direct the activation of lineage-specific transcriptional programs. Structure-specific recognition protein-1 (SSRP1) is a histone chaperone which is important for chromatin-associated processes such as transcription, DNA replication and repair. Since the function of SSRP1 during cell differentiation remains unclear, we investigated its potential role in controlling lineage determination. Depletion of SSRP1 in human mesenchymal stem cells elicited lineage-specific effects by increasing expression of adipocyte-specific genes and decreasing the expression of osteoblast-specific genes. Consistent with a role in controlling lineage specification, transcriptome-wide RNA-sequencing following SSRP1 depletion and the induction of osteoblast differentiation revealed a specific decrease in the expression of genes involved in biological processes related to osteoblast differentiation. Importantly, we observed a specific downregulation of target genes of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which was accompanied by decreased nuclear localization of active β-catenin. Together our data uncover a previously unknown role for SSRP1 in promoting the activation of the Wnt signaling pathway activity during cellular differentiation. Stem Cells 2016;34:1369-1376. PMID:27146025

  1. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    O’Meara, Teresa R.; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E.

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90’s functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  2. Mapping the Hsp90 Genetic Network Reveals Ergosterol Biosynthesis and Phosphatidylinositol-4-Kinase Signaling as Core Circuitry Governing Cellular Stress.

    PubMed

    O'Meara, Teresa R; Veri, Amanda O; Polvi, Elizabeth J; Li, Xinliu; Valaei, Seyedeh Fereshteh; Diezmann, Stephanie; Cowen, Leah E

    2016-06-01

    Candida albicans is a leading human fungal pathogen that causes life-threatening systemic infections. A key regulator of C. albicans stress response, drug resistance, morphogenesis, and virulence is the molecular chaperone Hsp90. Targeting Hsp90 provides a powerful strategy to treat fungal infections, however, the therapeutic utility of current inhibitors is compromised by toxicity due to inhibition of host Hsp90. To identify components of the Hsp90-dependent circuitry governing virulence and drug resistance that are sufficiently divergent for selective targeting in the pathogen, we pioneered chemical genomic profiling of the Hsp90 genetic network in C. albicans. Here, we screen mutant collections covering ~10% of the genome for hypersensitivity to Hsp90 inhibition in multiple environmental conditions. We identify 158 HSP90 chemical genetic interactors, most of which are important for growth only in specific environments. We discovered that the sterol C-22 desaturase gene ERG5 and the phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase (PI4K) gene STT4 are HSP90 genetic interactors under multiple conditions, suggesting a function upstream of Hsp90. By systematic analysis of the ergosterol biosynthetic cascade, we demonstrate that defects in ergosterol biosynthesis induce cellular stress that overwhelms Hsp90's functional capacity. By analysis of the phosphatidylinositol pathway, we demonstrate that there is a genetic interaction between the PI4K Stt4 and Hsp90. We also establish that Stt4 is required for normal actin polarization through regulation of Wal1, and suggest a model in which defects in actin remodeling induces stress that creates a cellular demand for Hsp90 that exceeds its functional capacity. Consistent with this model, actin inhibitors are synergistic with Hsp90 inhibitors. We highlight new connections between Hsp90 and virulence traits, demonstrating that Erg5 and Stt4 enable activation of macrophage pyroptosis. This work uncovers novel circuitry regulating Hsp90

  3. Canonical Wnt Signaling Activity in Early Stages of Chick Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    daMota, Paulo; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathway is an essential player during vertebrate embryonic development which has been associated with several developmental processes such as gastrulation, body axis formation and morphogenesis of numerous organs, namely the lung. Wnt proteins act through specific transmembrane receptors, which activate intracellular pathways that regulate cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation and death. Morphogenesis of the fetal lung depends on epithelial-mesenchymal interactions that are governed by several growth and transcription factors that regulate cell proliferation, fate, migration and differentiation. This process is controlled by different signaling pathways such as FGF, Shh and Wnt among others. Wnt signaling is recognized as a key molecular player in mammalian pulmonary development but little is known about its function in avian lung development. The present work characterizes, for the first time, the expression pattern of several Wnt signaling members, such as wnt-1, wnt-2b, wnt-3a, wnt-5a, wnt-7b, wnt-8b, wnt-9a, lrp5, lrp6, sfrp1, dkk1, β-catenin and axin2 at early stages of chick lung development. In general, their expression is similar to their mammalian counterparts. By assessing protein expression levels of active/total β-catenin and phospho-LRP6/LRP6 it is revealed that canonical Wnt signaling is active in this embryonic tissue. In vitro inhibition studies were performed in order to evaluate the function of Wnt signaling pathway in lung branching. Lung explants treated with canonical Wnt signaling inhibitors (FH535 and PK115-584) presented an impairment of secondary branch formation after 48 h of culture along with a decrease in axin2 expression levels. Branching analysis confirmed this inhibition. Wnt-FGF crosstalk assessment revealed that this interaction is preserved in the chick lung. This study demonstrates that Wnt signaling is crucial for precise chick lung branching and further supports the avian lung as a good

  4. Regulation of Ras Exchange Factors and Cellular Localization of Ras Activation by Lipid Messengers in T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Jesse E.; Rubio, Ignacio; Roose, Jeroen P.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs) catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and Son of Sevenless (SOS)-family GEFs. Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood. One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of RasGEFs functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells. PMID:24027568

  5. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes.

    PubMed

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García-Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  6. Correlating in Vitro and in Vivo Activities of Light-Inducible Dimers: A Cellular Optogenetics Guide.

    PubMed

    Hallett, Ryan A; Zimmerman, Seth P; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Bear, James E; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-15

    Light-inducible dimers are powerful tools for cellular optogenetics, as they can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins with high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the generality of the approach, application of light-inducible dimers is not always straightforward, as it is frequently necessary to test alternative dimer systems and fusion strategies before the desired biological activity is achieved. This process is further hindered by an incomplete understanding of the biophysical/biochemical mechanisms by which available dimers behave and how this correlates to in vivo function. To better inform the engineering process, we examined the biophysical and biochemical properties of three blue-light-inducible dimer variants (cryptochrome2 (CRY2)/CIB1, iLID/SspB, and LOVpep/ePDZb) and correlated these characteristics to in vivo colocalization and functional assays. We find that the switches vary dramatically in their dark and lit state binding affinities and that these affinities correlate with activity changes in a variety of in vivo assays, including transcription control, intracellular localization studies, and control of GTPase signaling. Additionally, for CRY2, we observe that light-induced changes in homo-oligomerization can have significant effects on activity that are sensitive to alternative fusion strategies. PMID:26474029

  7. PGA1-induced apoptosis involves specific activation of H-Ras and N-Ras in cellular endomembranes

    PubMed Central

    Anta, B; Pérez-Rodríguez, A; Castro, J; García- Domínguez, C A; Ibiza, S; Martínez, N; Durá, L M; Hernández, S; Gragera, T; Peña-Jiménez, D; Yunta, M; Zarich, N; Crespo, P; Serrador, J M; Santos, E; Muñoz, A; Oliva, J L; Rojas-Cabañeros, J M

    2016-01-01

    The cyclopentenone prostaglandin A1 (PGA1) is an inducer of cell death in cancer cells. However, the mechanism that initiates this cytotoxic response remains elusive. Here we report that PGA1 triggers apoptosis by a process that entails the specific activation of H- and N-Ras isoforms, leading to caspase activation. Cells without H- and N-Ras did not undergo apoptosis upon PGA1 treatment; in these cells, the cellular demise was rescued by overexpression of either H-Ras or N-Ras. Consistently, the mutant H-Ras-C118S, defective for binding PGA1, did not produce cell death. Molecular analysis revealed a key role for the RAF-MEK-ERK signaling pathway in the apoptotic process through the induction of calpain activity and caspase-12 cleavage. We propose that PGA1 evokes a specific physiological cell death program, through H- and N-Ras, but not K-Ras, activation at endomembranes. Our results highlight a novel mechanism that may be of potential interest for tumor treatment. PMID:27468687

  8. Imaging large-scale cellular activity in spinal cord of freely behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Kohei J; Shekhtmeyster, Pavel; Merten, Katharina; Arena, Alexander; Cook, Daniela; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Ngo, Alexander; Nimmerjahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information from mechanoreceptors and nociceptors in the skin plays key roles in adaptive and protective motor behaviours. To date, very little is known about how this information is encoded by spinal cord cell types and their activity patterns, particularly under freely behaving conditions. To enable stable measurement of neuronal and glial cell activity in behaving mice, we have developed fluorescence imaging approaches based on two- and miniaturized one-photon microscopy. We show that distinct cutaneous stimuli activate overlapping ensembles of dorsal horn neurons, and that stimulus type and intensity is encoded at the single-cell level. In contrast, astrocytes show large-scale coordinated calcium responses to intense but not weak sensory inputs. Sensory-evoked activity is potently suppressed by anaesthesia. By revealing the cellular and computational logic of spinal cord networks under behaving conditions, our approach holds promise for better understanding of healthy and aberrant spinal cord processes. PMID:27121084

  9. Synthesis of amphiphilic seleninic acid derivatives with considerable activity against cellular membranes and certain pathogenic microbes.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Viswanathan, Uma M; Xu, Zhanjie; Ebrahimnejad, Hadi; Hanf, Benjamin; Burkholz, Torsten; Schneider, Marc; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kirsch, Gilbert; Jacob, Claus

    2014-03-30

    Selenium compounds play a major role in Biology, where they are often associated with pronounced antioxidant activity or toxicity. Whilst most selenium compounds are not necessarily hazardous, their often selective cytotoxicity is interesting from a biochemical and pharmaceutical perspective. We have synthesized a series of amphiphilic molecules which combine a hydrophilic seleninic acid head group - which at the same time serves as thiol-specific warhead - with a hydrophobic tail. These molecules possess a surface activity similar to the one of SDS, yet their biological activity seems to exceed by far the one of a simple surfactant (e.g. SDS) or seleninic acid (e.g. phenyl seleninic acid). Such compounds effectively haemolyse Red Blood Cells and exhibit pronounced activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From a chemical perspective, the seleninic warheads are likely to attack crucial cysteine proteins of the cellular thiolstat. PMID:24491370

  10. Imaging large-scale cellular activity in spinal cord of freely behaving mice

    PubMed Central

    Sekiguchi, Kohei J.; Shekhtmeyster, Pavel; Merten, Katharina; Arena, Alexander; Cook, Daniela; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Ngo, Alexander; Nimmerjahn, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Sensory information from mechanoreceptors and nociceptors in the skin plays key roles in adaptive and protective motor behaviours. To date, very little is known about how this information is encoded by spinal cord cell types and their activity patterns, particularly under freely behaving conditions. To enable stable measurement of neuronal and glial cell activity in behaving mice, we have developed fluorescence imaging approaches based on two- and miniaturized one-photon microscopy. We show that distinct cutaneous stimuli activate overlapping ensembles of dorsal horn neurons, and that stimulus type and intensity is encoded at the single-cell level. In contrast, astrocytes show large-scale coordinated calcium responses to intense but not weak sensory inputs. Sensory-evoked activity is potently suppressed by anaesthesia. By revealing the cellular and computational logic of spinal cord networks under behaving conditions, our approach holds promise for better understanding of healthy and aberrant spinal cord processes. PMID:27121084

  11. Restriction on an Energy-Dense Diet Improves Markers of Metabolic Health and Cellular Aging in Mice Through Decreasing Hepatic mTOR Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, Anke; Campbell, Graeme; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dietary restriction (DR) on a normal low-fat diet improves metabolic health and may prolong life span. However, it is still uncertain whether restriction of an energy-dense, high-fat diet would also be beneficial and mitigate age-related processes. In the present study, we determined biomarkers of metabolic health, energy metabolism, and cellular aging in obesity-prone mice subjected to 30% DR on a high-fat diet for 6 months. Dietary-restricted mice had significantly lower body weights, less adipose tissue, lower energy expenditure, and altered substrate oxidation compared to their ad libitum–fed counterparts. Hepatic major urinary proteins (Mup) expression, which is linked to glucose and energy metabolism, and biomarkers of metabolic health, including insulin, glucose, cholesterol, and leptin/adiponectin ratio, were likewise reduced in high-fat, dietary-restricted mice. Hallmarks of cellular senescence such as Lamp2a and Hsc70 that mediate chaperone-mediated autophagy were induced and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling mitigated upon high-fat DR. In contrast to DR applied in low-fat diets, anti-oxidant gene expression, proteasome activity, as well as 5′-adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were not changed, suggesting that high-fat DR may attenuate some processes associated with cellular aging without the induction of cellular stress response or energy deprivation. PMID:25405871

  12. Angiostatin inhibits endothelial and melanoma cellular invasion by blocking matrix-enhanced plasminogen activation.

    PubMed Central

    Stack, M S; Gately, S; Bafetti, L M; Enghild, J J; Soff, G A

    1999-01-01

    Angiostatin, a kringle-containing fragment of plasminogen, is a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. The mechanism(s) responsible for the anti-angiogenic properties of angiostatin are unknown. We now report that human angiostatin blocks plasmin(ogen)-enhanced in vitro invasion of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA)-producing endothelial and melanoma cells. Kinetic analyses demonstrated that angiostatin functions as a non-competitive inhibitor of extracellular-matrix (ECM)-enhanced, t-PA-catalysed plasminogen activation, with a Ki of 0.9+/-0.03 microM. This mechanism suggests that t-PA has a binding site for the inhibitor angiostatin, as well as for its substrate plasminogen that, when occupied, prevents ternary complex formation between t-PA, plasminogen and matrix protein. Direct binding experiments confirmed that angiostatin bound to t-PA with an apparent Kd [Kd(app)] of 6.7+/-0.7 nM, but did not bind with high affinity to ECM proteins. Together, these data suggest that angiostatin in the cellular micro-environment can inhibit matrix-enhanced plasminogen activation, resulting in reduced invasive activity, and suggest a biochemical mechanism whereby angiostatin-mediated regulation of plasmin formation could influence cellular migration and invasion. PMID:10229661

  13. Opportunistic activation of TRP receptors by endogenous lipids: Exploiting lipidomics to understand TRP receptor cellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Heather B.; Raboune, Siham; Hollis, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) form a large family of ubiquitous non-selective cation channels that function as cellular sensors and in many cases regulate intracellular calcium. Identification of the endogenous ligands that activate these TRP receptors is still under intense investigation with the majority of these channels still remaining “orphans”. That these channels respond to a variety of external stimuli (e.g. plant-derived lipids, changes in temperature, and changes in pH) provides a framework for their abilities as cellular sensors, however, the mechanism of direct activation is still under much debate and research. In the cases where endogenous ligands (predominately lipids) have shown direct activation of a channel, multiple ligands have been shown to activate the same channel suggesting that these receptors are “promiscuous” in nature. Lipidomics of a growing class of endogenous lipids, N-acyl amides, the most famous of which is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (the endogenous cannabinoid, Anandamide) is providing a novel set of ligands that have been shown to activate some members of the TRP family and have the potential to deorphanize many more. Here it is argued that activation of TRPV receptors, a subset of the larger family of TRPs, by multiple endogenous lipids that are structurally analogous is a model system to drive our understanding that many TRP receptors are not promiscuous, but are more characteristically “opportunistic” in nature; exploiting the structural similarity and biosynthesis of a narrow range of analogous endogenous lipids. In addition, this manuscript will compare the activation properties of TRPC5 to the activity profile of an “orphan” lipid, N-palmitoyl glycine; further demonstrating that lipidomics aimed at expanding our knowledge of the family of N-acyl amides has the potential to provide novel avenues of research for TRP receptors. PMID:23178153

  14. Molecular and Cellular Regulation of Toll-Like Receptor-4 Activity Induced by Lipopolysaccharide Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Liaunardy-Jopeace, Ardiyanto; Gay, Nicholas J.

    2014-01-01

    As well as being the primary signaling receptor for bacterial endotoxin or lipopolysaccharide Toll-like receptor-4 function is modulated by numerous factors not only in the context of microbial pathogenesis but also autoimmune and allergic diseases. TLR4 is subject to multiple levels of endogenous control and regulation from biosynthesis and trafficking to signal transduction and degradation. On the other hand regulation of TLR4 activity breaks down during Gram −ve sepsis leading to systemic damage, multi organ failure, and death. In this article, we review how TLR4 traffics from the early secretory pathway, the cis/trans Golgi to the cell surface and endolysosomal compartments. We will present evidence about how these processes influence signaling and can potentially lead to increased sensitivity to ligand-dependent activation as well as ligand-independent constitutive activation that may contribute to pathogenesis in sepsis. We will also discuss how sustained signaling may be coupled to endocytosis and consider the potential molecular mechanisms of immuno-modulators that modify TLR4 signaling function including the cat allergen FelD1 and endogenous protein ligands such as the extracellular matrix protein tenascin C and calprotectin (MRP8/14). PMID:25339952

  15. Cutting edge: cell surface linker for activation of T cells is recruited to microclusters and is active in signaling.

    PubMed

    Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Barr, Valarie A; Kortum, Robert L; Park, Anna K; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2013-04-15

    A controversy has recently emerged regarding the location of the cellular pool of the adapter linker for activation of T cells (LAT) that participates in propagation of signals downstream of the TCR. In one model phosphorylation and direct recruitment of cell surface LAT to activation-induced microclusters is critical for T cell activation, whereas in the other model vesicular, but not surface, LAT participates in these processes. By using a chimeric version of LAT that can be tracked via an extracellular domain, we provide evidence that LAT located at the cell surface can be recruited efficiently to activation-induced microclusters within seconds of TCR engagement. Importantly, we also demonstrate that this pool of LAT at the plasma membrane is rapidly phosphorylated. Our results provide support for the model in which the cell utilizes LAT from the cell surface for rapid responses to TCR stimulation. PMID:23487428

  16. Apoptotic human neutrophil peptide-1 anti-tumor activity revealed by cellular biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Diana; Freire, João M; Pacheco, Teresa R; Barata, João T; Castanho, Miguel A R B

    2015-02-01

    Cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although progress has been made regarding chemotherapeutic agents, new therapies that combine increased selectivity and efficacy with low resistance are still needed. In the search for new anticancer agents, therapies based on biologically active peptides, in particular, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), have attracted attention for their decreased resistance development and low cytotoxicity. Many AMPs have proved to be tumoricidal agents against human cancer cells, but their mode of action is still controversial. The existence of common properties shared by the membranes of bacteria and tumor cells points to similar lipid-targeting mechanisms in both cases. On the other hand, anticancer peptides (ACPs) also induce apoptosis and inhibit angiogenesis. Human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) is an endogenous AMP that has been implicated in different cellular phenomena such as tumor proliferation. The presence of HNP-1 in the serum/plasma of oncologic patients turns this peptide into a potential tumor biomarker. The present work reveals the different effects of HNP-1 on the biophysical and nanomechanical properties of solid and hematological tumor cells. Studies on cellular morphology, cellular stiffness, and membrane ultrastructure and charge using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and zeta potential measurements show a preferential binding of HNP-1 to solid tumor cells from human prostate adenocarcinoma when compared to human leukemia cells. AFM also reveals induction of apoptosis with cellular membrane defects at very low peptide concentrations. Understanding ACPs mode(s) of action will certainly open innovative pathways for drug development in cancer treatment. PMID:25447543

  17. Cellular Localization of Dieldrin and Structure–Activity Relationship of Dieldrin Analogues in Dopaminergic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Erin M. G.; Florang, Virginia R.; Davenport, Laurie L.; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Doorn, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of Parkinson’s disease (PD) correlates with environmental exposure to pesticides, such as the organochlorine insecticide, dieldrin. Previous studies found an increased concentration of the pesticide in the striatal region of the brains of PD patients and also that dieldrin adversely affects cellular processes associated with PD. These processes include mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species production. However, the mechanism and specific cellular targets responsible for dieldrin-mediated cellular dysfunction and the structural components of dieldrin contributing to its toxicity (toxicophore) have not been fully defined. In order to identify the toxicophore of dieldrin, a structure–activity approach was used, with the toxicity profiles of numerous analogues of dieldrin (including aldrin, endrin, and cis-aldrin diol) assessed in PC6-3 cells. The MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were used to monitor cell viability and membrane permeability after treatment with each compound. Cellular assays monitoring ROS production and extracellular dopamine metabolite levels were also used. Structure and stereochemistry for dieldrin were found to be very important for toxicity and other end points measured. Small changes in structure for dieldrin (e.g., comparison to the stereoisomer endrin) yielded significant differences in toxicity. Interestingly, the cis-diol metabolite of dieldrin was found to be significantly more toxic than the parent compound. Disruption of dopamine catabolism yielded elevated levels of the neurotoxin, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, for many organochlorines. Comparisons of the toxicity profiles for each dieldrin analogue indicated a structure-specific effect important for elucidating the mechanisms of dieldrin neurotoxicity. PMID:23763672

  18. Coco is a dual activity modulator of TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Haremaki, Tomomi; Warmflash, Aryeh; Sorre, Benoit; Brivanlou, Ali H.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of developmental processes and disease. The activity of TGFβ ligands is modulated by various families of soluble inhibitors that interfere with the interactions between ligands and receptors. In an unbiased, genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes involved in ligand-dependent signaling, we unexpectedly identified the BMP/Activin/Nodal inhibitor Coco as an enhancer of TGFβ1 signaling. Coco synergizes with TGFβ1 in both cell culture and Xenopus explants. Molecularly, Coco binds to TGFβ1 and enhances TGFβ1 binding to its receptor Alk5. Thus, Coco acts as both an inhibitor and an enhancer of signaling depending on the ligand it binds. This finding raises the need for a global reconsideration of the molecular mechanisms regulating TGFβ signaling. PMID:26116664

  19. Physical exercise mitigates doxorubicin-induced brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial alterations and cellular quality control signaling.

    PubMed

    Marques-Aleixo, I; Santos-Alves, E; Balça, M M; Moreira, P I; Oliveira, P J; Magalhães, J; Ascensão, A

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective anti-neoplastic agent, whose clinical use is limited by a dose-dependent mitochondrial toxicity in non-target tissues, including the brain. Here we analyzed the effects of distinct exercise modalities (12-week endurance treadmill-TM or voluntary free-wheel activity-FW) performed before and during sub-chronic DOX treatment on brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial bioenergetics, oxidative stress, permeability transition pore (mPTP), and proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis, apoptosis and auto(mito)phagy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into saline-sedentary (SAL+SED), DOX-sedentary (DOX+SED; 7-week DOX (2 mg · kg(-1)per week)), DOX+TM and DOX+FW. Animal behavior and post-sacrifice mitochondrial function were assessed. Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) subunits, oxidative stress markers or related proteins (SIRT3, p66shc, UCP2, carbonyls, MDA, -SH, aconitase, Mn-SOD), as well as proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis (PGC1α and TFAM) were evaluated. Apoptotic signaling was followed through caspases 3, 8 and 9-like activities, Bax, Bcl2, CypD, ANT and cofilin expression. Mitochondrial dynamics (Mfn1, Mfn2, OPA1 and DRP1) and auto(mito)phagy (LC3II, Beclin1, Pink1, Parkin and p62)-related proteins were measured by semi-quantitative Western blotting. DOX impaired behavioral performance, mitochondrial function, including lower resistance to mPTP and increased apoptotic signaling, decreased the content in OXPHOS complex subunits and increased oxidative stress in brain cortex and cerebellum. Molecular markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy were also altered by DOX treatment in both brain subareas. Generally, TM and FW were able to mitigate DOX-related impairments in brain cortex and cerebellum mitochondrial activity, mPTP and apoptotic signaling. We conclude that the alterations in mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics and autophagy markers induced by exercise performed before and during

  20. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae assay system to investigate ligand/AdipoR1 interactions that lead to cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Aouida, Mustapha; Kim, Kangchang; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Pardo, Jose M; Eppinger, Jörg; Yun, Dae-Jin; Bressan, Ray A; Narasimhan, Meena L

    2013-01-01

    Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc) activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc) in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p). The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are homologous to

  1. Swelling-Activated Ca2+ Channels Trigger Ca2+ Signals in Merkel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Haeberle, Henry; Bryan, Leigh A.; Vadakkan, Tegy J.; Dickinson, Mary E.; Lumpkin, Ellen A.

    2008-01-01

    Merkel cell-neurite complexes are highly sensitive touch receptors comprising epidermal Merkel cells and sensory afferents. Based on morphological and molecular studies, Merkel cells are proposed to be mechanosensory cells that signal afferents via neurotransmission; however, functional studies testing this hypothesis in intact skin have produced conflicting results. To test this model in a simplified system, we asked whether purified Merkel cells are directly activated by mechanical stimulation. Cell shape was manipulated with anisotonic solution changes and responses were monitored by Ca2+ imaging with fura-2. We found that hypotonic-induced cell swelling, but not hypertonic solutions, triggered cytoplasmic Ca2+ transients. Several lines of evidence indicate that these signals arise from swelling-activated Ca2+-permeable ion channels. First, transients were reversibly abolished by chelating extracellular Ca2+, demonstrating a requirement for Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane. Second, Ca2+ transients were initially observed near the plasma membrane in cytoplasmic processes. Third, voltage-activated Ca2+ channel (VACC) antagonists reduced transients by half, suggesting that swelling-activated channels depolarize plasma membranes to activate VACCs. Finally, emptying internal Ca2+ stores attenuated transients by 80%, suggesting Ca2+ release from stores augments swelling-activated Ca2+ signals. To identify candidate mechanotransduction channels, we used RT-PCR to amplify ion-channel transcripts whose pharmacological profiles matched those of hypotonic-evoked Ca2+ signals in Merkel cells. We found 11 amplicons, including PKD1, PKD2, and TRPC1, channels previously implicated in mechanotransduction in other cells. Collectively, these results directly demonstrate that Merkel cells are activated by hypotonic-evoked swelling, identify cellular signaling mechanisms that mediate these responses, and support the hypothesis that Merkel cells contribute to touch reception

  2. The role of cellular coupling in the spontaneous generation of electrical activity in uterine tissue.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshan; Menon, Shakti N; Singh, Rajeev; Garnier, Nicolas B; Sinha, Sitabhra; Pumir, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous emergence of contraction-inducing electrical activity in the uterus at the beginning of labor remains poorly understood, partly due to the seemingly contradictory observation that isolated uterine cells are not spontaneously active. It is known, however, that the expression of gap junctions increases dramatically in the approach to parturition, by more than one order of magnitude, which results in a significant increase in inter-cellular electrical coupling. In this paper, we build upon previous studies of the activity of electrically excitable smooth muscle cells (myocytes) and investigate the mechanism through which the coupling of these cells to electrically passive cells results in the generation of spontaneous activity in the uterus. Using a recently developed, realistic model of uterine muscle cell dynamics, we investigate a system consisting of a myocyte coupled to passive cells. We then extend our analysis to a simple two-dimensional lattice model of the tissue, with each myocyte being coupled to its neighbors, as well as to a random number of passive cells. We observe that different dynamical regimes can be observed over a range of gap junction conductances: at low coupling strength, corresponding to values measured long before delivery, the activity is confined to cell clusters, while the activity for high coupling, compatible with values measured shortly before delivery, may spread across the entire tissue. Additionally, we find that the system supports the spontaneous generation of spiral wave activity. Our results are both qualitatively and quantitatively consistent with observations from in vitro experiments. In particular, we demonstrate that the increase in inter-cellular electrical coupling observed experimentally strongly facilitates the appearance of spontaneous action potentials that may eventually lead to parturition. PMID:25793276

  3. Buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of glutathione biosynthesis, induces expression of soluble epoxide hydrolase and markers of cellular hypertrophy in a rat cardiomyoblast cell line: roles of the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ghada; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2015-05-01

    Evidence suggests that upregulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) is associated with the development of myocardial infarction, dilated cardiomyopathy, cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure. However, the upregulation mechanism is still unknown. In this study, we treated H9C2 cells with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) to explore whether oxidative stress upregulates sEH gene expression and to identify the molecular and cellular mechanisms behind this upregulatory response. Real-time PCR and Western blot analyses were used to measure mRNA and protein expression, respectively. We demonstrated that BSO significantly upregulated sEH at mRNA levels in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, leading to a significant increase in the cellular hypertrophic markers, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Furthermore, BSO significantly increased the cytosolic phosphorylated IκB-α and translocation of NF-κB p50 subunits, as measured by Western blot analysis. This level of translocation was paralleled by an increase in the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB P50 subunits. Moreover, our results demonstrated that pretreatment with the NF-κB inhibitor PDTC significantly inhibited BSO-mediated induction of sEH and cellular hypertrophic marker gene expression in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were transiently phosphorylated by BSO treatment. To understand further the role of MAPKs pathway in BSO-mediated induction of sEH mRNA, we examined the role of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-JunN-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 MAPK. Indeed, treatment with the MEK/ERK signal transduction inhibitor, PD98059, partially blocked the activation of IκB-α and translocation of NF-κB p50 subunits induced by BSO. Moreover, pretreatment with MEK/ERK signal transduction inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, significantly inhibited BSO-mediated induction of sEH and cellular hypertrophic marker gene expression

  4. Inter-cellular adhesion disruption and the RAS/RAF and beta-catenin signalling in lung cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Cadherin cell adhesion molecules play an essential role in creating tight intercellular association and their loss has been correlated with poor prognosis in human cancer. Mutational activation of protein kinases and loss of cell adhesion occur together in human lung adenocarcinoma but how these two pathways interconnect is only poorly understood. Mouse models of human lung adenocarcinoma with oncogene expression targeted to subtypes of lung epithelial cells led to formation of adenomas or adenocarcinomas that lacked metastatic potential. Conditional genetic abrogation of epithelial tumour cell adhesion in mice with benign lung tumours induced by oncogenic RAF kinase has been demonstrated to induce intratumourous vascularization (angiogenic switch), progression to invasive adenocarcinoma and micrometastasis. Importantly, breaking cell adhesion in benign oncogene-driven lung tumour cells activated β-catenin signalling and induced the expression of several genes that are normally expressed in intestine rather than the lung. I will discuss potential routes to nuclear β-catenin signalling in cancer and how nuclear β-catenin may epigenetically alter the plasticity of tumour cells during malignant progression. PMID:18492263

  5. Concurrent measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin to evaluate the antioxidant activity of plants.

    PubMed

    Bellik, Yuva; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, a multitude of analytical methods for measuring antioxidant activity of plant extracts has been developed. However, when using methods to determine hemoglobin released from human erythrocytes treated with ginger extracts, we found hemoglobin concentrations were significantly higher than in untreated control samples. This suggests in the presence of antioxidants that measuring hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to determine hemolysis. We show concurrent measurement of erythrocyte concentration and hemoglobin is essential in such assays, and describe a new protocol based on simultaneous measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin. PMID:26212998

  6. Cellular activation in limbic brain systems during social play behaviour in rats

    PubMed Central

    van Kerkhof, Linda W.M.; Trezza, Viviana; Mulder, Tessa; Gao, Ping; Voorn, Pieter; Vanderschuren, Louk J.M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Positive social interactions during the juvenile and adolescent phases of life are essential for proper social and cognitive development in mammals, including humans. During this developmental period, there is a marked increase in peer-peer interactions, signified by the abundance of social play behaviour. Despite its importance for behavioural development, our knowledge of the neural underpinnings of social play behaviour is limited. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to map the neural circuits involved in social play behaviour in rats. This was achieved by examining cellular activity after social play using the immediate early gene c-fos as a marker. After a session of social play behaviour, pronounced increases in c-fos expression were observed in the medial prefrontal cortex, medial and ventral orbitofrontal cortex, dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens core and shell, lateral amygdala, several thalamic nuclei, dorsal raphe and the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus. Importantly, the cellular activity patterns after social play were topographically organised in this network, as indicated by play-specific correlations in c-fos activity between regions with known direct connections. These correlations suggest involvement in social play behaviour of the projections from the medial prefrontal cortex to the striatum, and of amygdala and monoaminergic inputs to frontal cortex and striatum. The analyses presented here outline a topographically organised neural network implicated in processes such as reward, motivation and cognitive control over behaviour, which mediates social play behaviour in rats. PMID:23670540

  7. Protease activated receptor-1 regulates macrophage-mediated cellular senescence: a risk for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cong; Rezaee, Farhad; Waasdorp, Maaike; Shi, Kun; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive disease in part resulting from premature or mature cellular aging. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) recently emerged as a critical component in the context of fibrotic lung diseases. Therefore, we aimed to study the role of macrophages in PAR-1-mediated idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The number of macrophages were significantly reduced in lungs of PAR-1 antagonist (P1pal-12) treated animals upon bleomycin instillation. In line with these data, PAR-1 stimulation increased monocyte/macrophage recruitment in response to epithelium injury in in vitro trans-well assays. Moreover, macrophages induced fibroblasts migration, differentiation and secretion of collagen, which were inhibited in the presence of TGF-β receptor inhibitors. Interestingly, these profibrotic effects were partially inhibited by treatment with the PAR-1 inhibitor P1pal-12. Using shRNA mediated PAR-1 knock down in fibroblasts, we demonstrate that fibroblast PAR-1 contributes to TGF-β activation and production. Finally, we show that the macrophage-dependent induction of PAR-1 driven TGF-β activation was mediated by FXa. Our data identify novel mechanisms by which PAR-1 stimulation on different cell types can contribute to IPF and identify macrophages as key players in PAR-1 dependent development of this devastating disease. IPF may result from cellular senescence mediated by macrophages in the lung. PMID:26474459

  8. How the Venus flytrap actively snaps: hydrodynamic measurements at the cellular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombani, Mathieu; Forterre, Yoel; GEP Team

    2012-11-01

    Although they lack muscle, plants have evolved a remarkable range of mechanisms to create rapid motion, from the rapid folding of sensitive plants to seed dispersal. Of these spectacular examples that have long fascinated scientists, the carnivorous plant Venus flytrap, whose leaves snap together in a fraction of second to capture insects, has long been a paradigm for study. Recently, we have shown that this motion involves a snap-buckling instability due to the shell-like geometry of the leaves of the trap. However, the origin of the movement that allows the plant to cross the instability threshold and actively bend remains largely unknown. In this study, we investigate this active motion using a micro-fluidic pressure probe that gives direct hydraulic and mechanical measurements at the cellular level (osmotic pressure, cell membrane permeability, cell wall elasticity). Our results challenge the role of osmotically-driven water flows usually put forward to explain Venus flytrap's active closure.

  9. Rapid estrogen signaling negatively regulates PTEN activity through phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Melanie M.; Palacios-Helgeson, Leslie K.; Wah, Lah S.; Jackson, Twila A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperestrogenicity is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to stimulate both genomic and nongenomic estrogen receptor-α (ERα) actions in a number of reproductive tissues. However, the contributions of transcription-independent ERα signaling on normal and malignant endometrium are not fully understood. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor that decreases cellular mitosis primarily through negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling axis. PTEN levels are elevated during the E2 dominated, mitotically active, proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle, indicating possible hormonal regulation of PTEN in the uterus. In order to determine if rapid E2 signaling regulates PTEN, we used ERα positive, PTEN positive, endometrial cells. We show that cytosolic E2/ERα signaling leads to increased phosphorylation of PTEN at key regulatory residues. Importantly, E2 stimulation decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity and caused consequent increases in phospho-AKT. We further demonstrate that cytosolic ERα forms a complex with PTEN in an E2-dependent manner, and that ERα constitutively complexes with protein kinase2-α (CK2α), a kinase previously shown to phosphorylate the C-terminal tail of PTEN. These results provide mechanistic support for an E2-dependent, ERα cytosolic signaling complex that negatively regulates PTEN activity through carboxy terminus phosphorylation. Using an animal model, we show that sustained E2 signaling results in increased phospho-PTEN (S380, T382, T383), total PTEN and phospho-AKT (S473). Taken together, we provide a novel mechanism in which transcription-independent E2/ERα signaling may promote a pro-tumorigenic environment in the endometrium. PMID:24844349

  10. Effect of Cellular Location of Human Carboxylesterase 2 on CPT-11 Hydrolysis and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Yuan-Ting; Lin, Hsuan-Pei; Chen, Bing-Mae; Huang, Ping-Ting; Roffler, Steve R.

    2015-01-01

    CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is clinically used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Hydrolysis of CPT-11 by human carboxylesterase 2 (CE2) generates SN-38, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that is the active anti-tumor agent. Expression of CE2 in cancer cells is under investigation for the tumor-localized activation of CPT-11. CE2 is normally expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells but can be engineered to direct expression of active enzyme on the plasma membrane or as a secreted form. Although previous studies have investigated different locations of CE2 expression in cancer cells, it remains unclear if CE2 cellular location affects CPT-11 anticancer activity. In the present study, we directly compared the influence of CE2 cellular location on substrate hydrolysis and CPT-11 cytotoxicity. We linked expression of CE2 and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) via a foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (F2A) peptide to facilitate fluorescence-activated cell sorting to achieve similar expression levels of ER-located, secreted or membrane-anchored CE2. Soluble CE2 was detected in the medium of cells that expressed secreted and membrane-anchored CE2, but not in cells that expressed ER-retained CE2. Cancer cells that expressed all three forms of CE2 were more sensitive to CPT-11 as compared to unmodified cancer cells, but the membrane-anchored and ER-retained forms of CE2 were consistently more effective than secreted CE2. We conclude that expression of CE2 in the ER or on the membrane of cancer cells is suitable for enhancing CPT-11 anticancer activity. PMID:26509550

  11. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  12. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  13. Stress-activated signaling responses leading to apoptosis following photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; He, Jin; Xue, Liang-yan; Separovic, Duska

    1998-05-01

    Photodynamic treatment with the phthalocyanine Pc 4, a mitochondrially localizing photosensitizer, is an efficient inducer of cell death by apoptosis, a cell suicide pathway that can be triggered by physiological stimuli as well as by various types of cellular damage. Upon exposure of the dye- loaded cells to red light, several stress signalling pathways are rapidly activated. In murine L5178Y-R lymphoblasts, caspase activation and other hallmarks of the final phase of apoptosis are observed within a few minutes post-PDT. In Chinese hamster CHO-K1 cells, the first signs of apoptosis are not observed for 1 - 2 hours. The possible involvement of three parallel mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathways has been investigated. The extracellular- regulated kinases (ERK-1 and ERK-2), that are thought to promote cell growth, are not appreciably altered by PDT. However, PDT causes marked activation of the stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) cascade in both cell types and of the p38/HOG-type kinase in CHO cells. Both of these latter pathways have been demonstrated to be associated with apoptosis. A specific inhibitor of the ERK pathway did not alter PDT-induced apoptosis; however, an inhibitor of the p38 pathway partially blocked PDT-induced apoptosis. Blockage of the SAPK pathway is being pursued by a genetic approach. It appears that the SAPK and p38 pathways may participate in signaling apoptosis in response to PDT with Pc 4.

  14. Correlation of nighttime MF signal strength with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohata, Hiroki; Kimura, Iwane; Wakai, Noboru; Ogawa, Tadahiko

    Observations of the signal strength of MF broadcasting signals (774/770 kHz) transmitted from Akita, Japan, on board the Japanese Antarctic ice breaker Fuji, bound from Japan to Syowa station, Antarctica, have revealed an interesting positive correlation between strengths of long distance signals propagating at night and solar activity. It is already known that MF propagation characteristics in North America show a negative correlation with solar activity. The present paper, interprets the results by using the multihop method with full-wave analysis. The difference in correlation with solar activity between the results of Fuji and those in North America can be elucidated if it is assumed that there is a ledge in the electron-density profile around an altitude range of 85 to 90 km and that the density of the ledge is smaller in the North American region than in the equatorial region.

  15. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  16. Specific cellular signal-transduction responses to in vivo combination therapy with ATRA, valproic acid and theophylline in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Skavland, J; Jørgensen, K M; Hadziavdic, K; Hovland, R; Jonassen, I; Bruserud, O; Gjertsen, B T

    2011-02-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) frequently comprises mutations in genes that cause perturbation in intracellular signaling pathways, thereby altering normal responses to growth factors and cytokines. Such oncogenic cellular signal transduction may be therapeutic if targeted directly or through epigenetic regulation. We treated 24 selected elderly AML patients with all-trans retinoic acid for 2 days before adding theophylline and the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00175812; EudraCT no. 2004-001663-22), and sampled 11 patients for peripheral blood at day 0, 2 and 7 for single-cell analysis of basal level and signal-transduction responses to relevant myeloid growth factors (granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor, interleukin-3, Flt3L, stem cell factor, erythropoietin, CXCL-12) on 10 signaling molecules (CREB, STAT1/3/5, p3