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Sample records for activates cyclic-amp response

  1. The Phosphorylation Status of a Cyclic AMP-Responsive Activator Is Modulated via a Chromatin-Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Laura F.; Asahara, Hiroshi; Shulman, Andrew I.; Kraus, W. Lee; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) stimulates the expression of numerous genes via the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133. Ser133 phosphorylation, in turn, promotes recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein and its paralog p300, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that have been proposed to mediate target gene activation, in part, by destabilizing promoter bound nucleosomes and thereby allowing assembly of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we show that although histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors potentiate target gene activation via cAMP, they do not stimulate transcription over the early burst phase, during which CREB phosphorylation and CBP/p300 recruitment are maximal. Rather, HDAC inhibitors augment CREB activity during the late attenuation phase by prolonging CREB phosphorylation on chromosomal but, remarkably, not on extrachromosomal templates. In reconstitution studies, assembly of periodic nucleosomal arrays on a cAMP-responsive promoter template potently inhibited CREB phosphorylation by PKA, and acetylation of these template-bound nucleosomes by p300 partially rescued CREB phosphorylation by PKA. Our results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which cellular HATs and HDACs modulate the phosphorylation status of nuclear activators in response to cellular signals. PMID:10669737

  2. Nucleoprotein structure influences the response of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter to activation of the cyclic AMP signalling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Pennie, W D; Hager, G L; Smith, C L

    1995-01-01

    Recent studies have provided evidence of crosstalk between steroid receptors and cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathways in the regulation of gene expression. A synergism between intracellular phosphorylation inducers and either glucocorticoids or progestins has been shown to occur during activation of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter. We have investigated the effect of 8-Br-cAMP and okadaic acid, modulators of cellular kinases and phosphatases, on the hormone-induced activation of the MMTV promoter in two forms: a transiently transfected template with a disorganized, accessible nucleoprotein structure and a stably replicating template with an ordered, inaccessible nucleoprotein structure. Both okadaic acid and 8-Br-cAMP synergize significantly with either glucocorticoids or progestins in activating the transiently transfected MMTV template. In contrast, 8-Br-cAMP, but not okadaic acid, is antagonistic to hormone-induced activation of the stably replicating MMTV template. Nuclear run-on experiments demonstrate that this inhibition is a transcriptional effect on both hormone-induced transcription and basal transcription. Surprisingly, 8-Br-cAMP does not inhibit glucocorticoid-induced changes in restriction enzyme access and nuclear factor 1 binding. However, association of a complex with the TATA box region is inhibited in the presence of 8-Br-cAMP. Thus, cAMP treatment interferes with the initiation process but does not inhibit interaction of the receptor with the template. Since the replicated, ordered MMTV templates and the transfected, disorganized templates show opposite responses to 8-Br-cAMP treatment, we conclude that chromatin structure can influence the response of a promoter to activation of the cAMP signalling pathway. PMID:7891707

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  4. The interplay between cyclic AMP, MAPK, and NF-κB pathways in response to proinflammatory signals in microglia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Aguirre, Vladimir; Wai, Khine; Felfly, Hady; Dietrich, W Dalton; Pearse, Damien D

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP is an important intracellular regulator of microglial cell homeostasis and its negative perturbation through proinflammatory signaling results in microglial cell activation. Though cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, decrease intracellular cyclic AMP, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. The current study examined which signaling pathways are responsible for decreasing cyclic AMP in microglia following TNF-α stimulation and sought to identify the role cyclic AMP plays in regulating these pathways. In EOC2 microglia, TNF-α produced a dramatic reduction in cyclic AMP and increased cyclic AMP-dependent PDE activity that could be antagonized by Rolipram, myristoylated-PKI, PD98059, or JSH-23, implicating a role for PDE4, PKA, MEK, and NF-κB in this regulation. Following TNF-α there were significant increases in iNOS and COX-2 immunoreactivity, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65, IκB degradation, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which were reduced in the presence of high levels of cyclic AMP, indicating that reductions in cyclic AMP during cytokine stimulation are important for removing its inhibitory action on NF-κB activation and subsequent proinflammatory gene expression. Further elucidation of the signaling crosstalk involved in decreasing cyclic AMP in response to inflammatory signals may provide novel therapeutic targets for modulating microglial cell activation during neurological injury and disease. PMID:25722974

  5. Mutants of PC12 cells with altered cyclic AMP responses

    SciTech Connect

    Block, T.; Kon, C.; Breckenridge, B.M.

    1984-10-01

    PCl2 cells, derived from a rat pheochromocytoma, were mutagenized and selected in media containing agents known to elevate intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP (cAMP). More than 40 clones were isolated by selection with cholera toxin or 2-chloroadenosine or both. The variants that were deficient in accumulating cAMP were obtained by using a protocol in which 1 ..mu..m 8-bromo-cAMP was included in addition to the agonist. Certain of these variants were partially characterized with respect to the site of altered cAMP metabolism. The profiles of adenylate cyclase activity responsiveness of certain variants to guanosine-5'-(BETA,..gamma..-imido) triphosphate and to forskolin resembled those of UNC and cyc phenotypes of S49 lymphoma cells, which are functionally deficient in the GTP-sensitive coupling protein, N/sub s/. Other variants were characterized by increased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity at low substrate concentration. Diverse morphological traits were observed among the variants, but it was not possible to assign them to a particular cAMP phenotype. Two revertants of a PCl2 mutant were isolated and observed to have regained a cellular cAMP response to 2-chloroadenosine and to forskolin. It is hoped that these PCl2 mutants will have utility for defining cAMP-mediated functions, including any links to the action of nerve growth factor, in cells derived from the neural crest.

  6. Induction of cyclooxygenase-2 by ginsenoside Rd via activation of CCAAT-enhancer binding proteins and cyclic AMP response binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Hye Gwang; Pokharel, Yuba Raj; Han, Eun Hee; Kang, Keon Wook . E-mail: kwkang@chosun.ac.kr

    2007-07-20

    Panax ginseng is a widely used herbal medicine in East Asia and is reported to have a variety of pharmacological effects against cardiovascular diseases and cancers. Here we show a unique effect of ginsenoside Rd (Rd) on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in RAW264.7 macrophages. Rd (100 {mu}g/ml), but not other ginsenosides induced COX-2 and increased prostaglandin E{sub 2} production. Gel shift and Western blot analyses using nuclear fractions revealed that Rd increased both the DNA binding of and the nuclear levels of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP){alpha}/{beta} and cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), but not of p65, in RAW264.7 cells. Moreover, Rd increased the luciferase reporter gene activity in cells transfected with a 574-bp mouse COX-2 promoter construct. Site-specific mutation analyses confirmed that Rd-mediated transcriptional activation of COX-2 gene was regulated by C/EBP and CREB. These results provide evidence that Rd activated C/EBP and CREB, and that the activation of C/EBP and CREB appears to be essential for induction of COX-2 in RAW264.7 cells.

  7. Direct activation of cardiac pacemaker channels by intracellular cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    DiFrancesco, D; Tortora, P

    1991-05-01

    Cyclic AMP acts as a second messenger in the modulation of several ion channels that are typically controlled by a phosphorylation process. In cardiac pacemaker cells, adrenaline and acetylcholine regulate the hyperpolarization-activated current (if), but in opposite ways; this current is involved in the generation and modulation of pacemaker activity. These actions are mediated by cAMP and underlie control of spontaneous rate by neurotransmitters. Whether the cAMP modulation of if is mediated by channel phosphorylation is, however, still unknown. Here we investigate the action of cAMP on if in excised patches of cardiac pacemaker cells and find that cAMP activates if by a mechanism independent of phosphorylation, involving a direct interaction with the channels at their cytoplasmic side. Cyclic AMP activates if by shifting its activation curve to more positive voltages, in agreement with whole-cell results. This is the first evidence of an ion channel whose gating is dually regulated by voltage and direct cAMP binding.

  8. The plasma cyclic AMP response to catecholamines as potentiated by phentolamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Kunitada, S; Ui, M

    1978-05-15

    Norepinephrine failed to increase plasma cyclic AMP when injected alone into fasted rats, in contrast with sharp increases elicited by isoproterenol, epinephrine or tyramine. In rats pretreated with 6-hydroxydopamine or cocain, however, there was significant increase in plasma cyclic AMP after norepinephrine injection, suggesting that the rapid neuronal catecholamine uptake was at least partly responsible for the lack of norepinephrine action. Phentolamine was very effective in enhancing the epinephrine-, norepinephrine- or tyramine-induced increase in plasma cyclic AMP but without effect on the isoproterenol-induced increase. Blockade of postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors, rather than of presynaptic receptors, is likely to be involved in the phentolamine potentiation, since it was even observed in rats treated with 6-hydroxydopamine or cocaine. A discussion is presented regarding the mechanism by which cyclic AMP generation is influenced by the alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor interaction on effector cell membranes.

  9. Cell behavior in Dictyostelium discoideum: preaggregation response to localized cyclic AMP pulses

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The motion of cells in the aggregation phase of Dictyostelium discoideum development is complex. To probe its mechanisms we applied precisely timed (+/- 1 s) and positioned (+/-2 micrometers) pulses of cyclic AMP to fields of cells of moderate density using a micropipette. We recorded cell behavior by time lapse microcinematography and extracted cell motion data from the film with our Galatea computer system. Analysis of these data reveals: (a) Chemotaxis lasts only about as long as the cyclic AMP signal; in particular, brief pulses (approximately 5 s) do not induce chemotaxis. (b) Chemotactic competence increases gradually from within an hour after the initiation of development (starvation) to full competence at approximately 15 h when aggregation begins under our conditions. (c) Cell motion reverses rapidly (within 20 s) when the external gradient is reversed. There is no refractory period for motion. We present a new description of the process of aggregation consistent with our result and other recent findings. (d) The behavioral response to cyclic AMP includes a phenomenon we call "cringing." In a prototypical cringe the cell speed drops within 3 s after a brief cyclic AMP stimulus, and the cell stops and rounds and then resumes motion after 25 s. (e) The development of the speed response in cringing as the cells age closely parallels the development of the cyclic AMP-induced light-scattering response of cells in suspension. (f) Cringing occurs in natural populations during weak oriented movement. The computerized analysis of cell behavior proves to be a powerful technique which can reveal significant phenomena that are not apparent to the eye even after repeated examination of the film. PMID:6282894

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence.

  11. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, D. R.; Guillemette, C.; Sirard, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3′5′-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca2+) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence. PMID:26082143

  12. Spatial Memory in the Morris Water Maze and Activation of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) Protein within the Mouse Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porte, Yves; Buhot, Marie Christine; Mons, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of learning-induced cAMP response element-binding protein activation/phosphorylation (pCREB) in mice trained in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined pCREB immunoreactivity (pCREB-ir) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and related brain structures. During the…

  13. Bacterial Cyclic AMP-Phosphodiesterase Activity Coordinates Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kalivoda, Eric J.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Schmitt, Matthew J.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm-related infections are a major contributor to human disease, and the capacity for surface attachment and biofilm formation are key attributes for the pathogenesis of microbes. Serratia marcescens type I fimbriae-dependent biofilms are coordinated by the adenylate cyclase, CyaA, and the cyclic 3′,5′-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. This study uses S. marcescens as a model system to test the role of cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity in controlling biofilm formation. Herein we describe the characterization of a putative S. marcescens cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene (SMA3506), designated as cpdS, and demonstrated to be a functional cAMP-phosphodiesterase both in vitro and in vivo. Deletion of cpdS resulted in defective biofilm formation and reduced type I fimbriae production, whereas multicopy expression of cpdS conferred a type I fimbriae-dependent hyper-biofilm. Together, these results support a model in which bacterial cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity modulates biofilm formation. PMID:23923059

  14. SCAP/SREBP pathway is required for the full steroidogenic response to cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Shimizu-Albergine, Masami; Van Yserloo, Brian; Golkowski, Martin G; Ong, Shao-En; Beavo, Joseph A; Bornfeldt, Karin E

    2016-09-20

    Luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulates steroidogenesis largely through a surge in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Steroidogenic rates are also critically dependent on the availability of cholesterol at mitochondrial sites of synthesis. This cholesterol is provided by cellular uptake of lipoproteins, mobilization of intracellular lipid, and de novo synthesis. Whether and how these pathways are coordinated by cAMP are poorly understood. Recent phosphoproteomic analyses of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites in MA10 Leydig cells suggested that cAMP regulates multiple steps in these processes, including activation of the SCAP/SREBP pathway. SCAP [sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) cleavage-activating protein] acts as a cholesterol sensor responsible for regulating intracellular cholesterol balance. Its role in cAMP-mediated control of steroidogenesis has not been explored. We used two CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR associated protein 9) knockout approaches to test the role of SCAP in steroidogenesis. Our results demonstrate that SCAP is required for progesterone production induced by concurrent inhibition of the cAMP phosphodiesterases PDE4 and PDE8. These inhibitors increased SCAP phosphorylation, SREBP2 activation, and subsequent expression of cholesterol biosynthetic genes, whereas SCAP deficiency largely prevented these effects. Reexpression of SCAP in SCAP-deficient cells restored SREBP2 protein expression and partially restored steroidogenic responses, confirming the requirement of SCAP-SREBP2 in steroidogenesis. Inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A reductase and isoprenylation attenuated, whereas exogenously provided cholesterol augmented, PDE inhibitor-induced steroidogenesis, suggesting that the cholesterol substrate needed for steroidogenesis is provided by both de novo synthesis and isoprenylation-dependent mechanisms. Overall, these results demonstrate a novel role for LH/cAMP in SCAP

  15. alpha-Tocopherol decreases the somatostatin receptor-effector system and increases the cyclic AMP/cyclic AMP response element binding protein pathway in the rat dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Pinto, A M; Puebla-Jiménez, L; Arilla-Ferreiro, E

    2009-08-01

    Neuronal survival has been shown to be enhanced by alpha-tocopherol and modulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP). Somatostatin (SST) receptors couple negatively to adenylyl cyclase (AC), thus leading to decreased cAMP levels. Whether alpha-tocopherol can stimulate neuronal survival via regulation of the somatostatinergic system, however, is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of alpha-tocopherol on the SST signaling pathway in the rat dentate gyrus. To that end, 15-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily for 1 week with (+)-alpha-tocopherol or vehicle and sacrificed on the day following the last administration. No changes in either SST-like immunoreactivity (SST-LI) content or SST mRNA levels were detected in the dentate gyrus as a result of alpha-tocopherol treatment. A significant decrease in the density of the SST binding sites and an increase in the dissociation constant, however, were detected. The lower SST receptor density in the alpha-tocopherol-treated rats correlated with a significant decrease in the protein levels of the SST receptor subtypes SSTR1-SSTR4, whereas the corresponding mRNA levels were unaltered. G-protein-coupled-receptor kinase 2 expression was decreased by alpha-tocopherol treatment. This vitamin induced a significant increase in both basal and forskolin-stimulated AC activity, as well as a decrease in the inhibitory effect of SST on AC. Whereas the protein levels of AC type V/VI were not modified by alpha-tocopherol administration, ACVIII expression was significantly enhanced, suggesting it might account for the increase in AC activity. In addition, this treatment led to a reduction in Gialpha1-3 protein levels and in Gi functionality. alpha-Tocopherol did not affect the expression of the regulator of G-protein signaling 6/7 (RGS6/7). Finally, alpha-tocopherol induced an increase in the levels of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (p-CREB) and total CREB in the dentate gyrus. Since CREB

  16. ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB in astrocytes via noncanonical Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Carriba, Paulina; Pardo, Luis; Parra-Damas, Arnaldo; Lichtenstein, Mathieu P; Saura, Carlos A; Pujol, Aurora; Masgrau, Roser; Galea, Elena

    2012-09-01

    In neurons, it is well established that CREB contributes to learning and memory by orchestrating the translation of experience into the activity-dependent (i.e., driven by neurotransmitters) transcription of plasticity-related genes. The activity-dependent CREB-triggered transcription requires the concerted action of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A and Ca(2+) /calcineurin via the CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC). It is not known, however, whether a comparable molecular sequence occurs in astrocytes, despite the unquestionable contribution of these cells to brain plasticity. Here we sought to determine whether and how ATP and noradrenaline cause CREB-dependent transcription in rat cortical astrocyte cultures. Both transmitters induced CREB phosphorylation (Western Blots), CREB-dependent transcription (CRE-luciferase reporter assays), and the transcription of Bdnf, a canonical regulator of synaptic plasticity (quantitative RT-PCR). We indentified a Ca(2+) and diacylglycerol-independent protein kinase C at the uppermost position of the cascade leading to CREB-dependent transcription. Notably, CREB-dependent transcription was partially dependent on ERK1/2 and CRTC, but independent of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A or Ca(2+) /calcineurin. We conclude that ATP and noradrenaline activate CREB-dependent transcription in cortical astrocytes via an atypical protein kinase C. It is of relevance that the signaling involved be starkly different to the one described in neurons since there is no convergence of Ca(2+) and cyclic AMP-dependent pathways on CRTC, which, moreover, exerts a modulatory rather than a central role. Our data thus point to the existence of an alternative, non-neuronal, glia-based role of CREB in plasticity.

  17. Histamine induced elevation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Holden, C A; Chan, S C; Norris, S; Hanifin, J M

    1987-10-01

    We have previously reported histamine desensitization of human blood mononuclear leukocytes resulting in reduced cAMP responses to beta-adrenergic agonists, histamine and prostaglandin E1. This heterologous desensitization occurred at low, micromolar histamine concentrations and was accompanied by elevation of cAMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity in these cells. We have now investigated the activity of PDE in the lymphocyte and monocyte fractions of mononuclear leukocytes to determine the site of histamine effect. PDE activity per cell was higher in monocytes (0.075 +/- 0.070 units) than lymphocytes (0.026 +/- 0.08) units). Monocytes responded to 10(-6) M histamine stimulation with a much greater increase in PDE activity (0.354 +/- 0.1 units) than did lymphocytes (0.047 +/- 0.015 units). Histamine receptor studies, using thiazolylethylamine and chlorpheniramine as H1-agonist and antagonist respectively and dimaprit and cimetidine as H2-agonists and antagonists respectively, indicated that the histamine stimulation of PDE activity is mediated predominantly through H1 histamine receptor in the monocytes and the H1 receptor in the lymphocytes. Previously histamine had been thought to increase cyclic AMP by acting on H2 receptors to activate adenylate cyclase. Our studies show that stimulation of H1 or H2 receptors by low histamine concentration can cause the opposite effect i.e. increased catabolism and a net reduction in cAMP levels. The localization of this effect predominantly to monocytes indicates a potentially important mechanism for histamine action on immune regulation. PMID:2891264

  18. Trehalase activity and cyclic AMP content during early development of Mucor rouxii spores.

    PubMed Central

    Dewerchin, M A; Van Laere, A J

    1984-01-01

    Incubation of Mucor rouxii sporangiospores in complex medium under aerobic conditions resulted in a transient 20-fold increase in trehalase activity. Maximum activity was reached after 15 min. Simultaneously, the cyclic AMP (cAMP) content increased approximately eightfold, reaching a maximum within 10 min. Increases in trehalase activity and cAMP content were also observed under anaerobic conditions (CO2). The extent of trehalase activation and the changes in cAMP content, during both aerobic and anaerobic incubation, varied with the medium used. Trehalase was activated in vitro by a cAMP- and ATP-dependent process. An even faster activation was obtained when cAMP was replaced by the catalytic subunit of beef heart protein kinase. The coincidence of, and the correlation between, increased cAMP contents and trehalase activities support the involvement of a cAMP-dependent phosphorylation in the in vivo regulation of trehalase activity. PMID:6327611

  19. Cross-talk between glucagon- and adenosine-mediated signalling systems in rat hepatocytes: effects on cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Flores, M; Allende, G; Piña, E; García-Sáinz, J A

    1995-01-01

    The effect of adenosine analogues on glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat hepatocytes was explored. N6-Cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine and N6-(R-phenylisopropyl)adenosine inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the cyclic AMP accumulation induced by glucagon. This effect seems to be mediated through A1 adenosine receptors. Pertussis toxin completely abolished the effect of CPA on glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in whole cells which suggested that a pertussis-toxin-sensitive G-protein was involved. On the other hand, this action of adenosine analogues on glucagon-induced cyclic AMP accumulation was reverted by the selective low-Km cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724. Analysis of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase activity in purified hepatocyte plasma membranes showed that glucagon in the presence of GTP inhibited basal PDE activity by 45% and that CPA reverted this inhibition in dose-dependent manner. In membranes derived from pertussis-toxin-treated rats, we observed no inhibition of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase activity by glucagon in the absence or presence of CPA. Our results indicate that in hepatocyte plasma membranes, stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity and inhibition of a low-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity are co-ordinately regulated by glucagon, and that A1 adenosine receptors can inhibit glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation by blocking glucagon's effect on phosphodiesterase activity. Images Figure 2 PMID:8554517

  20. Cyclic AMP level of lymphocytes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and its relation to disease activity.

    PubMed

    Phi, N C; Takáts, A; Binh, V H; Vien, C V; González-Cabello, R; Gergely, P

    1989-11-01

    The basal and stimulated intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 16 control subjects and 14 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), all fulfilling the ARA criteria, were studied. No significant difference in basal cAMP level was observed between SLE patients and controls. SLE lymphocytes (both active and inactive) elicited a diminished response to aminophylline and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). No correlation was seen between disease activity and either baseline cAMP levels or response to these stimulators. We suggest an intrinsic (not disease activity-related) impairment of the adenylate cyclase-dependent regulatory mechanism in the PBMC of SLE patients, which may result in a defective IL-2 production and IL-2 dependent biological functions. PMID:2558072

  1. Glucose-induced hyperaccumulation of cyclic AMP and defective glucose repression in yeast strains with reduced activity of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Mbonyi, K; van Aelst, L; Argüelles, J C; Jans, A W; Thevelein, J M

    1990-09-01

    Addition of glucose or related fermentable sugars to derepressed cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae triggers a RAS-mediated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal that induces a protein phosphorylation cascade. In yeast mutants (tpk1w1, tpk2w1, and tpk3w1) containing reduced activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, fermentable sugars, as opposed to nonfermentable carbon sources, induced a permanent hyperaccumulation of cAMP. This finding confirms previous conclusions that fermentable sugars are specific stimulators of cAMP synthesis in yeast cells. Despite the huge cAMP levels present in these mutants, deletion of the gene (BCY1) coding for the regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase severely reduced hyperaccumulation of cAMP. Glucose-induced hyperaccumulation of cAMP was also observed in exponential-phase glucose-grown cells of the tpklw1 and tpk2w1 strains but not the tpk3w1 strain even though addition of glucose to glucose-repressed wild-type cells did not induce a cAMP signal. Investigation of mitochondrial respiration by in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed the tpk1w1 and tpk2w1 strains, to be defective in glucose repression. These results are consistent with the idea that the signal transmission pathway from glucose to adenyl cyclase contains a glucose-repressible protein. They also show that a certain level of cAMP-dependent protein phosphorylation is required for glucose repression. Investigation of the glucose-induced cAMP signal and glucose-induced activation of trehalase in derepressed cells of strains containing only one of the wild-type TPK genes indicates that the transient nature of the cAMP signal is due to feedback inhibition by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  2. Phorbol esters modulate cyclic AMP accumulation in porcine thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Emoto, T.; Kasai, K.; Hiraiwa, M.; Shimoda, S.

    1988-01-01

    In cultured porcine thyroid cells, during 60 min incubation phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) had no effect on basal cyclic AMP accumulation and slightly stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) or forskolin. Cholera toxin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation was significantly stimulated by PMA. On the other hand, cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by prostaglandin E/sub 1/ or E/sub 2/ (PGE/sub 1/ and PGE/sub 2/) was markedly depressed by simultaneous addition of PMA. These opposing effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation evoked by PGE and cholera toxin were observed in a dose-related fashion, with half-maximal effect of around 10/sup -9/ M in either case. The almost same effects of PMA on cyclic AMP accumulation in basal and stimulated conditions were also observed in freshly prepared thyroid cells. The present study was performed in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-iso-butyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), indicating that PMA affected adenylate cyclase activity. Therefore, it is suggested that PMA may modulate the production of cyclic AMP in response to different stimuli, possibly by affecting several sites in the adenylate cyclase complex in thyroid cells.

  3. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-15

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells.

  4. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiali; Liu, Chengzhi; Lu, Huizhi; Liu, Mengjia; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998), Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974), NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506), thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531), the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819), PprA (dra0346), and RecN (dr1447), are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways. PMID:27182600

  5. Cholesterol ester hydrolase in pig liver is activated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.J.S.; Dubin, E.; Margolis, S.

    1986-05-01

    To examine whether hepatic neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase (CEH) is regulated by phosphorylation, the authors have assayed CEH activity from pig liver cytosol by measuring /sup 14/C-oleate release from labeled cholesteryl oleate at pH 7.4. When pig liver cytosol was incubated with 2 mM Mg and 0.5 mM ATP, CEH activity was increased (141 +/- 8% of control, mean +/- SEM). Addition of 25..mu..M cyclic AMP (cAMP) further activated CEH activity (164 +/- 4% of control) as compared to incubation with Mg and ATP (p < 0.02). In the presence of 5 mM EDTA or in the absence of either Mg or ATP, no activation of CEH was observed. The activation was completely abolished by further incubation of activated cytosol with E. coli alkaline phosphatase. Activation of CEH activity was partially prevented by the addition of protein kinase inhibitor (p < 0.02) and this effect was completely reversed in the presence of exogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase (p < 0.05). To examine further the role of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, CEH activity was purified 240-fold by 35% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ precipitation and Sepharose 4B chromatography. Incubation of partially purified CEH fractions with Mg, ATP and cAMP did not increase CEH activity. Addition of exogenous cAMP-dependent protein kinase activated CEH activity of partially purified fractions. The authors observations indicate that pig liver CEH is activated by phosphorylation mediated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase.

  6. Hypoxia induces phosphorylation of the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein by a novel signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1998-07-31

    To investigate signaling mechanisms by which hypoxia regulates gene expression, we examined the effect of hypoxia on the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in PC12 cells. Exposure to physiological levels of hypoxia (5% O2, approximately 50 mm Hg) rapidly induced a persistent phosphorylation of CREB on Ser133, an event that is required for CREB-mediated transcriptional activation. Hypoxia-induced phosphorylation of CREB was more robust than that induced by any other stimulus tested, including forskolin, depolarization, and osmotic stress. Furthermore, this effect was not mediated by any of the previously known signaling pathways that lead to phosphorylation of CREB, including protein kinase A, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, protein kinase C, ribosomal S6 kinase-2, and mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase-2. Hypoxic activation of a CRE-containing reporter (derived from the 5'-flanking region of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene) was attenuated markedly by mutation of the CRE. Thus, a physiological reduction in O2 levels induces a functional phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133 via a novel signaling pathway. PMID:9677418

  7. Cell cycle regulation of cyclin A gene expression by the cyclic AMP-responsive transcription factors CREB and CREM.

    PubMed Central

    Desdouets, C; Matesic, G; Molina, C A; Foulkes, N S; Sassone-Corsi, P; Brechot, C; Sobczak-Thepot, J

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin A is a pivotal regulatory protein which, in mammalian cells, is involved in the S phase of the cell cycle. Transcription of the human cyclin A gene is cell cycle regulated. We have investigated the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signalling pathway in this cell cycle-dependent control. In human diploid fibroblasts (Hs 27), induction of cyclin A gene expression at G1/S is stimulated by 8-bromo-cAMP and suppressed by the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, which was found to delay S phase entry. Transfection experiments showed that the cyclin A promoter is inducible by activation of the adenylyl cyclase signalling pathway. Stimulation is mediated predominantly via a cAMP response element (CRE) located at positions -80 to -73 with respect to the transcription initiation site and is able to bind CRE-binding proteins and CRE modulators. Moreover, activation by phosphorylation of the activators CRE-binding proteins and CRE modulator tau and levels of the inducible cAMP early repressor are cell cycle regulated, which is consistent with the pattern of cyclin A inducibility by cAMP during the cell cycle. These results suggest that the CRE is, at least partly, implicated in stimulation of cyclin A transcription at G1/S. PMID:7760825

  8. Enhanced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in Brain of mice following repetitive hypoxic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yanan; Gao Ge; Long Caixia; Han Song; Zu Pengyu; Fang Li . E-mail: lfang@utmb.edu; Li Junfa . E-mail: junfali@cpums.edu.cn

    2006-02-10

    Cerebral ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning (I/HPC) is a phenomenon of endogenous protection that renders Brain tolerant to sustained ischemia/hypoxia. This profound protection induced by I/HPC makes it an attractive target for developing potential clinical therapeutic approaches. However, the molecular mechanism of I/HPC is unclear. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a selective nuclear transcriptional factor, plays a key role in the neuronal functions. Phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-133 may facilitate its transcriptional activity in response to various stresses. In the current study, we observed the changes in CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) and protein expression in Brain of auto-hypoxia-induced HPC mice by using Western blot analysis. We found that the levels of phosphorylated CREB (Ser-133), but not protein expression of CREB, increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of mice after repetitive hypoxic exposure (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group), when compared to that of the normoxic (H0, n = 6) or hypoxic exposure once group (H1, n = 6). In addition, a significant enhancement (p < 0.05) of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) could also be found in the nuclear extracts from the whole hippocampus of hypoxic preconditioned mice (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group). These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB might be involved in the development of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning.

  9. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  10. Glial potassium channels activated by neuronal firing or intracellular cyclic AMP in Helix.

    PubMed Central

    Gommerat, I; Gola, M

    1996-01-01

    1. Cell-attached and whole cell patch clamp experiments were performed on satellite glial cells adhering to the cell body of neurones in situ within the nervous system of the snail Helix pomatia. The underlying neurone was under current or voltage-clamp control. 2. Neuronal firing induced a delayed (20-30 s) persistent (3-4 min) increase in the opening probability of glial K+ channels. The channels were also activated by perfusing the ganglion with a depolarizing high-K+ saline, except when the underlying neurone was prevented from depolarizing under voltage-clamp conditions. 3. Two K(+)-selective channels were detected in the glial membrane. The channel responding to neuronal firing was present in 95% of the patches (n = 393). It had a unitary conductance of 56 pS, a Na+ :K+ permeability ratio < 0.02 and displayed slight inward rectification in symmetrical [K+] conditions. It was sensitive to TEA, Ba2+ and Cs+. The following results refer to this channel as studied in the cell-attached configuration. 4. The glial K+ channel was activated by bath application of the membrane-permeant cyclic AMP derivatives 8-bromo-cAMP and dibutyryl-cAMP, the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and the diesterase inhibitors IBMX, theophylline and caffeine. It was insensitive to cyclic GMP activators and to conditions that might alter the intracellular [Ca2+] (ionomycin, low-Ca2+ saline and Ca2+ channel blockers). 5. The forskolin-induced changes in channel behaviour (open and closed time distributions, burst duration, short and long gaps within bursts) could be accounted for by a four-state model (3 closed states, 1 open state) by simply changing one of the six rate parameters. 6. The present results suggest that the signal sent by an active neurone to satellite glial cells is confined to the glial cells round that neurone. The effect of this signal on the class of glial K+ channels studied can be mimicked by an increase in glial cAMP concentration. The subsequent delayed opening

  11. Role of cyclo-oxygenase-2 induction in interleukin-1β induced attenuation of cultured human airway smooth muscle cell cyclic AMP generation in response to isoprenaline

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Linhua; Holland, Elaine; Knox, Alan J

    1998-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) in human asthma shows reduced relaxation and cyclic AMP generation in response to β-adrenoceptor agonists. IL-β attenuates cyclic AMP generation but the underlying mechanism is unclear. We have reported that IL-1β induces cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX-2) in human ASM cells and results in a marked increase in prostanoid generation with PGE2 and PGI2 as the major products.We investigated the role of COX-2 induction and prostanoid release (measured as PGE2) in IL-1β induced attenuation of cyclic AMP generation in response to the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline (ISO).Pre-treatment of human ASM cells with IL-1β significantly attenuated cyclic AMP generation in response to high concentrations of ISO (1.0–10.0 μM) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The effect was accompanied by a high concentration of PGE2 release. The non-selective COX inhibitor indomethacin (Ind), the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398, the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide (CHX) and actinomycin D and the steroid dexamethasone (Dex) all abolished the PGE2 release and prevented the attenuated cyclic AMP generation.COX substrate arachidonic acid time- and concentration-dependently mimicked IL-1β induced attenuation and the effect was prevented by the non-selective COX inhibitors Ind and flurbiprofen, but not by NS-398, CHX and Dex.In contrast to IL-1β, TNFα and IFNγ, which are ineffective in inducing COX-2 and releasing PGE2 from human ASM cells, did not affect the cyclic AMP formation.Our study demonstrates that COX-2 induction and the consequent release of prostanoids plays a crucial role in IL-1β induced attenuation of human ASM cell cyclic AMP response to ISO. PMID:9863663

  12. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide induces long-lasting neuroprotection through the induction of activity-dependent signaling via the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-regulated transcription co-activator 1

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S; Martel, Marc-Andre; McMahon, Aoife; Kind, Peter C; Hardingham, Giles E

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is a neuroprotective peptide which exerts its effects mainly through the cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, we show that in cortical neurons, PACAP-induced PKA signaling exerts a major part of its neuroprotective effects indirectly, by triggering action potential (AP) firing. Treatment of cortical neurons with PACAP induces a rapid and sustained PKA-dependent increase in AP firing and associated intracellular Ca2+ transients, which are essential for the anti-apoptotic actions of PACAP. Transient exposure to PACAP induces long-lasting neuroprotection in the face of apoptotic insults which is reliant on AP firing and the activation of cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein (CREB)-mediated gene expression. Although direct, activity-independent PKA signaling is sufficient to trigger phosphorylation on CREB’s activating serine-133 site, this is insufficient for activation of CREB-mediated gene expression. Full activation is dependent on CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 1 (CRTC1), whose PACAP-induced nuclear import is dependent on firing activity-dependent calcineurin signaling. Over-expression of CRTC1 is sufficient to rescue PACAP-induced CRE-mediated gene expression in the face of activity-blockade, while dominant negative CRTC1 interferes with PACAP-induced, CREB-mediated neuroprotection. Thus, the enhancement of AP firing may play a significant role in the neuroprotective actions of PACAP and other adenylate cyclase-coupled ligands. PMID:21623792

  13. Repression of protein kinase C and stimulation of cyclic AMP response elements by fumonisin, a fungal encoded toxin which is a carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Dickman, M; Henderson, G; Jones, C

    1995-04-15

    Fusarium moniliforme (FM) is a major fungal pathogen of corn and is involved with stalk rot disease. FM is widely spread throughout the world, including the United States. Most strains of FM produce several mycotoxins, the most prominent of which is called fumonisin. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that ingestion of fumonisin correlates with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer in Southern and Northern Africa and China. Furthermore, fumonisin causes a neurodegenerative disease in horses, induces hepatic cancer in rats, and induces pulmonary edema in swine. Considering that high levels of fumonisin have been detected in healthy and diseased corn grown in the United States, fumonisin may pose a health threat to humans and livestock animals. Structurally, fumonisin resembles sphingolipids which are present in the membranes of animal and plant cells. At the present time, very little is known concerning the mechanism by which fumonisin elicits its carcinogenic effect. Our studies indicate that fumonisin represses expression of protein kinase C and AP-1-dependent transcription. In contrast, fumonisin stimulated a simple promoter containing a single cyclic AMP response element. Since fumonisin did not alter protein kinase A activity, it appears that cyclic AMP response element activation was independent of protein kinase A. It is hypothesized that the ability of fumonisin to alter signal transduction pathways plays a role in carcinogenesis. PMID:7712470

  14. Repression of protein kinase C and stimulation of cyclic AMP response elements by fumonisin, a fungal encoded toxin which is a carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Dickman, M; Henderson, G; Jones, C

    1995-04-15

    Fusarium moniliforme (FM) is a major fungal pathogen of corn and is involved with stalk rot disease. FM is widely spread throughout the world, including the United States. Most strains of FM produce several mycotoxins, the most prominent of which is called fumonisin. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that ingestion of fumonisin correlates with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer in Southern and Northern Africa and China. Furthermore, fumonisin causes a neurodegenerative disease in horses, induces hepatic cancer in rats, and induces pulmonary edema in swine. Considering that high levels of fumonisin have been detected in healthy and diseased corn grown in the United States, fumonisin may pose a health threat to humans and livestock animals. Structurally, fumonisin resembles sphingolipids which are present in the membranes of animal and plant cells. At the present time, very little is known concerning the mechanism by which fumonisin elicits its carcinogenic effect. Our studies indicate that fumonisin represses expression of protein kinase C and AP-1-dependent transcription. In contrast, fumonisin stimulated a simple promoter containing a single cyclic AMP response element. Since fumonisin did not alter protein kinase A activity, it appears that cyclic AMP response element activation was independent of protein kinase A. It is hypothesized that the ability of fumonisin to alter signal transduction pathways plays a role in carcinogenesis.

  15. Cyclic AMP in prokaryotes.

    PubMed Central

    Botsford, J L; Harman, J G

    1992-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is found in a variety of prokaryotes including both eubacteria and archaebacteria. cAMP plays a role in regulating gene expression, not only for the classic inducible catabolic operons, but also for other categories. In the enteric coliforms, the effects of cAMP on gene expression are mediated through its interaction with and allosteric modification of a cAMP-binding protein (CRP). The CRP-cAMP complex subsequently binds specific DNA sequences and either activates or inhibits transcription depending upon the positioning of the complex relative to the promoter. Enteric coliforms have provided a model to explore the mechanisms involved in controlling adenylate cyclase activity, in regulating adenylate cyclase synthesis, and in performing detailed examinations of CRP-cAMP complex-regulated gene expression. This review summarizes recent work focused on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of CRP-cAMP complex-mediated processes. For other bacteria, less detail is known. cAMP has been implicated in regulating antibiotic production, phototrophic growth, and pathogenesis. A role for cAMP has been suggested in nitrogen fixation. Often the only data that support cAMP involvement in these processes includes cAMP measurement, detection of the enzymes involved in cAMP metabolism, or observed effects of high concentrations of the nucleotide on cell growth. PMID:1315922

  16. Differential activation of the 21-base-pair enhancer element of human T-cell leukemia virus type I by its own trans-activator and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, M; Niki, M; Ohtani, K; Sugamura, K

    1989-01-01

    A transcriptional trans-acting factor p40tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) functions as an inducer for expression of HTLV-I provirus via activation of the enhancer in the long terminal repeat of HTLV-I. In addition to p40tax and a tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), an activator of protein kinase C, we report here that forskolin, an activator of adenyl cyclase, also induces function of the HTLV-I enhancer. Experiments with mutants of the HTLV-I enhancer revealed that TPA-induced activation was not mediated by solely a 21-base-pair (bp) sequence that is repeated three times in the enhancer, whereas the 21-bp enhancer element can act as a sufficient cis-acting sequence for activation by both p40tax and forskolin. In addition, we found that nuclear factor(s) like the cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE) binding factor could bind to the HTLV-I 21-bp enhancer element. However, a difference was found in sequences required for activation by p40tax and forskolin. A CRE related sequence present in the 21-bp enhancer element was enough for forskolin-induced activation. On the other hand, p40tax required a much longer sequence that is overlapping but not identical to the CRE related sequence, suggesting that the forskolin-induced cyclic AMP pathway may be partly involved in, but not sufficient for p40tax-mediating trans-activation of the HTLV-I enhancer. Images PMID:2548156

  17. The cyclic AMP receptor protein is the main activator of pectinolysis genes in Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    PubMed

    Reverchon, S; Expert, D; Robert-Baudouy, J; Nasser, W

    1997-06-01

    The main virulence factors of the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi are pectinases that cleave pectin, a major constituent of the plant cell wall. Although physiological studies suggested that pectinase production in Erwinia species is subjected to catabolite repression, the direct implication of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) in this regulation has never been demonstrated. To investigate the role of CRP in pectin catabolism, we cloned the E. chrysanthemi crp gene by complementation of an Escherichia coli crp mutation and then constructed E. chrysanthemi crp mutants by reverse genetics. The carbohydrate fermentation phenotype of the E. chrysanthemi crp mutants is similar to that of an E. coli crp mutant. Furthermore, these mutants are unable to grow on pectin or polygalacturonate as the sole carbon source. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the E. chrysanthemi crp gene revealed the presence of a 630-bp open reading frame (ORF) that codes for a protein highly similar to the CRP of E. coli. Using a crp::uidA transcriptional fusion, we demonstrated that the E. chrysanthemi CRP represses its own expression, probably via a mechanism similar to that described for the E. coli crp gene. Moreover, in the E. chrysanthemi crp mutants, expression of pectinase genes (pemA, pelB, pelC, pelD, and pelE) and of genes of the intracellular part of the pectin degradation pathway (ogl, kduI, and kdgT), which are important for inducer formation and transport, is dramatically reduced in induced conditions. In contrast, expression of pelA, which encodes a pectate lyase important for E. chrysanthemi pathogenicity, seems to be negatively regulated by CRP. The E. chrysanthemi crp mutants have greatly decreased maceration capacity in potato tubers, chicory leaves, and celery petioles as well as highly diminished virulence on saintpaulia plants. These findings demonstrate that CRP plays a crucial role in expression of the pectinolysis genes and in the pathogenicity of E

  18. Different effect of prostaglandin E2 on B-cell activation by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2: selective inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced antibody response through increases in intracellular cyclic AMP levels

    PubMed Central

    Ishihara, K.; Ono, S.; Takahama, Y.; Hirayama, F.; Hirano, H.; Itoh, K.; Dobashi, K.; Murakami, S.; Katoh, Y.; Yamaguchi, M.; Hamaoka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on murine B-cell activation induced by two distinct B-cell differentiation factors, B151-TRF1/IL-5 and B151-TRF2, were examined. A final differentiation of unprimed B cells into IgM-producing cells induced by B151-TRF2 was markedly inhibited by PGE2 at physiological concentrations (around 10-8 M), whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-induced antibody responses of unprimed as well as activated B cells were not affected by PGE2, even at 10-6 M. B-cell responses induced by B151-TRF2-like factors from autoimmune-prone MRL/1pr mice were also inhibited by PGE2. Biphasic increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels were induced by culturing B cells with 10-6 or 10-8 M PGE2: rapid increases within 8 min and delayed increases around 16 hr. The direct addition of dibutyryl cAMP to cultures of B cells resulted in marked inhibition of antibody responses when stimulated with B151-TRF2 but not with B151-TRF1/IL-5. The B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses were also inhibited by cAMP-elevating reagents such as forskolin, cholera toxin and theophyline. Furthermore, 2′, 5′-dideoxyadenosine, which is an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, prevented the PGE2-mediated cAMP accumulation in unprimed B cells as well as the PGE2-mediated inhibition of B151-TRF2-induced B-cell responses when added at the initiation of culture. These results suggest that PGE2 inhibits B151-TRF2-induced antibody responses through the activation of adenylate cyclase and subsequent accumulation of intracellular cAMP, whereas B151-TRF1/IL-5-responsive B cells are resistant to the inhibitory effect of PGE2 and cAMP. PMID:2553585

  19. Identification of a cyclic-AMP-responsive element within the rat somatostatin gene.

    PubMed Central

    Montminy, M R; Sevarino, K A; Wagner, J A; Mandel, G; Goodman, R H

    1986-01-01

    We have examined the regulation of somatostatin gene expression by cAMP in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells transfected with the rat somatostatin gene. Forskolin at 10 microM caused a 4-fold increase in somatostatin mRNA levels within 4 hr of treatment in stably transfected cells. Chimeric genes containing the somatostatin gene promoter fused to the bacterial reporter gene encoding chloramphenicol acetyltransferase were also induced by cAMP in PC12 cells. To delineate the sequences required for response to cAMP, we constructed a series of promoter deletion mutants. Our studies defined a region between 60 and 29 base pairs upstream from the transcriptional initiation site that conferred cAMP responsiveness when placed adjacent to the simian virus 40 promoter. Within the cAMP-responsive element of the somatostatin gene, we observed an 8-base palindrome, 5'-TGACGTCA-3', which is highly conserved in many other genes whose expression is regulated by cAMP. cAMP responsiveness was greatly reduced when the somatostatin fusion genes were transfected into the mutant PC12 line A126-1B2, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase 2. Our studies indicate that transcriptional regulation of the somatostatin gene by cAMP requires protein kinase 2 activity and may depend upon a highly conserved promoter element. Images PMID:2875459

  20. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  1. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  2. Direct transcriptional control of the plasminogen activator gene of Yersinia pestis by the cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Jong; Chauhan, Sadhana; Motin, Vladimir L; Goh, Ee-Been; Igo, Michele M; Young, Glenn M

    2007-12-01

    Horizontal gene transfer events followed by proper regulatory integration of a gene drive rapid evolution of bacterial pathogens. A key event in the evolution of the highly virulent plague bacterium Yersinia pestis was the acquisition of plasmid pPCP1, which carries the plasminogen activator gene, pla. This promoted the bubonic form of the disease by increasing bacterial dissemination from flea bite sites and incidentally enhanced replication in respiratory airways during pneumonic infection. We determined that expression of pla is controlled by the global regulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (Crp). This transcription factor is well conserved among distantly related bacteria, where it acts as a soluble receptor for the ubiquitous signaling molecule cAMP and controls a global network of metabolic and stress-protective genes. Crp has a similar physiological role in Y. pestis since loss of its function resulted in an inability to metabolize a variety of nonglucose substrates. Activation of pla expression requires a transcription activation element of the pla promoter that serves as a Crp binding site. Crp interaction with this site was demonstrated to occur only in the presence of cAMP. Alteration of the Crp binding site nucleotide sequence prevented in vitro formation of Crp-DNA complexes and inhibited in vivo expression of pla. The placement of pla under direct regulatory control of Crp highlights how highly adapted pathogens integrate laterally acquired genes to coordinate virulence factor expression with global gene networks to maintain homeostasis through the infectious life cycle.

  3. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kwon, Shi-Nae; Kang, Ju-Il; Lee, Song Hee; Jang, Sung Key; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Kim, Yoon Ki . E-mail: yk-kim@korea.ac.kr

    2007-05-18

    Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway.

  4. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  5. Modification by phosphate of PTH-dependent renal cyclic AMP response.

    PubMed

    Guillemant, J; Guillemant, S

    1993-04-01

    The PTH response and the renal cAMP response obtained after oral administration of either tricalcium phosphate or calcium gluconolactate were compared in 12 young adult males. Each subject was studied during a control period of two hours before and during an experimental period of four hours after ingestion of a single oral dose of calcium salt. The respective dosages (1.2 g of calcium plus 0.6 g phosphorus for tricalcium phosphate; 0.5 g of calcium for gluconolactate calcium) were chosen to provide similar significant (p = 0.0001) increases in serum ionized calcium (from 1.23 to 1.29 mmol/l vs from 1.23 to 1.28 mmol/l). After tricalcium phosphate a modest (10%) but significant (p < 0.001) rise in serum phosphate was observed. In both series of experiments similar inhibitory effects on PTH circulating levels were obtained (from 22.6 to 12.4 pg/ml after tricalcium phosphate and from 24.1 to 10.6 pg/ml after calcium gluconolactate). After ingestion of calcium gluconolactate the renal secretion of cAMP fell from 12.68 to 8.64 nmol/l GF (p < 0.001), whereas no significant alterations of the mean values of nephrogenous cAMP were detected after ingestion of tricalcium phosphate. In accordance with the role of cAMP as a second messenger, after calcium gluconolactate we obtained a significant increase in tubular maximal reabsorption of phosphate (p < 0.0001) contrasting with the absence of significant effect after tricalcium phosphate. The present results confirm that suppression of PTH secretion only depends on the rise of serum ionized calcium and suggest that additional phosphate administration could have a decoupling effect between PTH and renal cAMP secretion. PMID:8390394

  6. A cyclic AMP receptor protein mutant that constitutively activates an Escherichia coli promoter disrupted by an IS5 insertion.

    PubMed

    Podolny, V; Lin, E C; Hochschild, A

    1999-12-01

    Previously an Escherichia coli mutant that had acquired the ability to grow on propanediol as the sole carbon and energy source was isolated. This phenotype is the result of the constitutive expression of the fucO gene (in the fucAO operon), which encodes one of the enzymes in the fucose metabolic pathway. The mutant was found to bear an IS5 insertion in the intergenic regulatory region between the divergently oriented fucAO and fucPIK operons. Though expression of the fucAO operon was constitutive, the fucPIK operon became noninducible such that the mutant could no longer grow on fucose. A fucose-positive revertant which was found to contain a suppressor mutation in the crp gene was selected. Here we identify this crp mutation, which results in a single amino acid substitution (K52N) that has been proposed previously to uncover a cryptic activating region in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). We show that the mutant CRP constitutively activates transcription from both the IS5-disrupted and the wild-type fucPIK promoters, and we identify the CRP-binding site that is required for this activity. Our results show that the fucPIK promoter, a complex promoter which ordinarily depends on both CRP and the fucose-specific regulator FucR for its activation, can be activated in the absence of FucR by a mutant CRP that uses three, rather than two, activating regions to contact RNA polymerase. For the IS5-disrupted promoter, which retains a single CRP-binding site, the additional activating region of the mutant CRP evidently compensates for the lack of upstream regulatory sequences. PMID:10601201

  7. Prostaglandins and muscarinic agonists induce cyclic AMP attenuation by two distinct mechanisms in the pregnant-rat myometrium. Interaction between cyclic AMP and Ca2+ signals.

    PubMed Central

    Goureau, O; Tanfin, Z; Harbon, S

    1990-01-01

    In pregnant-rat myometrium (day 21 of gestation), isoprenaline-induced cyclic AMP accumulation, resulting from receptor-mediated activation of adenylate cyclase, was negatively regulated by prostaglandins [PGE2, PGF2 alpha; EC50 (concn. giving 50% of maximal response) = 2 nM] and by the muscarinic agonist carbachol (EC50 = 2 microM). PG-induced inhibition was prevented by pertussis-toxin treatment, supporting the idea that it was mediated by the inhibitory G-protein Gi through the inhibitory pathway of the adenylate cyclase. Both isoprenaline-induced stimulation and PG-evoked inhibition of cyclic AMP were insensitive to Ca2+ depletion. By contrast, carbachol-evoked attenuation of cyclic AMP accumulation was dependent on Ca2+ and was insensitive to pertussis toxin. The inhibitory effect of carbachol was mimicked by ionomycin. Indirect evidence was thus provided for the enhancement of cyclic AMP degradation by a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity in the muscarinic-mediated effect. The attenuation of cyclic AMP elicited by carbachol coincided with carbachol-stimulated inositol phosphate (InsP3, InsP2 and InsP) generation, which displayed an almost identical EC50 (3 microM) and was similarly unaffected by pertussis toxin. Both carbachol effects were reproduced by oxotremorine, whereas pilocarpine (a partial muscarinic agonist) failed to induce any decrease in cyclic AMP accumulation and concurrently was unable to stimulate the generation of inositol phosphates. These data support our proposal for a carbachol-mediated enhancement of a Ca2(+)-dependent phosphodiesterase activity, compatible with the rises in Ca2+ associated with muscarinic-induced increased generation of inositol phosphates. They further illustrate that a cross-talk between the two major transmembrane signalling systems contributed to an ultimate decrease in cyclic AMP in the pregnant-rat myometrium near term. PMID:1700899

  8. Electrical transients in the cell-volume response to cyclic AMP of the tsetse fly Malpighian tubule

    PubMed

    Isaacson; Nicolson

    1996-01-01

    1. Using cyclic AMP to stimulate perfused tsetse fly Malpighian tubules bathed in SO42- Ringer frequently causes an immediate but transient peak in transtubular potential (Vt), before stabilisation of Vt at an increased value. 2. These transients were investigated by monitoring the associated changes in cable properties and current­voltage (I/V) relationships. Tubules were perfused and bathed in either Cl- Ringer or SO42- Ringer (containing 8 mmol l-1 Cl-). 3. Tubules bathed in Cl- Ringer showed a transient swelling of the cells on exposure to cyclic AMP. Cable analysis confirmed the visually observed narrowing of the tubular lumen and revealed transient increases in core resistance (Rc) and transtubular resistance (Rt). As the cells returned to their initial volume, the lumen became distended, and Rc and Rt fell below their initial levels. These changes were accompanied by an increase, and a subsequent decrease, in the slope of the I/V plot. 4. None of the above changes was apparent in SO42- Ringer, other than a fall in Rt and in the slope of the I/V plot. 5. The results suggest that, in Cl- Ringer, cyclic AMP induces swelling of the tubular cells by promoting increased basolateral solute (and water) entry and that the subsequent rapid return to normal cell volume, with a concomitant progressive increase in the rate of tubular secretion, reflects the operation of a specific cell-volume regulatory mechanism of transepithelial transport. 6. The cyclic-AMP-induced peak that occurs in Vt in SO42- Ringer appears to be primarily due to a transient overshoot in the fall in series resistance (i.e. an increase in basolateral Na+ conductance), accompanied by a proportionately lesser increase in shunt resistance.

  9. Role of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early promoter's 19-base-pair-repeat cyclic AMP-response element in acutely infected cells.

    PubMed

    Keller, M J; Wheeler, D G; Cooper, E; Meier, J L

    2003-06-01

    Prior studies have suggested a role of the five copies of the 19-bp-repeat cyclic AMP (cAMP)-response element (CRE) in major immediate-early (MIE) promoter activation, the rate-limiting step in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) replication. We used two different HCMV genome modification strategies to test this hypothesis in acutely infected cells. We report the following: (i) the CREs do not govern basal levels of MIE promoter activity at a high or low multiplicity of infection (MOI) in human foreskin fibroblast (HFF)- or NTera2-derived neuronal cells; (ii) serum and virion components markedly increase MIE promoter-dependent transcription at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI), but this increase is not mediated by the CREs; (iii) forskolin stimulation of the cAMP signaling pathway induces a two- to threefold increase in MIE RNA levels in a CRE-specific manner at a low MOI in both HFF- and NTera2-derived neuronal cells; and (iv) the CREs do not regulate basal levels of HCMV DNA replication at a high or low MOI in HFF. Their presence does impart a forskolin-induced increase in viral DNA replication at a low MOI but only when basal levels of MIE promoter activity are experimentally diminished. In conclusion, the 19-bp-repeat CREs add to the robust MIE promoter activity that occurs in the acutely infected stimulated cells, although the CREs' greater role may be in other settings.

  10. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity.

    PubMed

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie W C; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease.

  11. Polyphosphate, cyclic AMP, guanosine tetraphosphate, and c-di-GMP reduce in vitro Lon activity

    PubMed Central

    Osbourne, Devon O; Soo, Valerie WC; Konieczny, Igor; Wood, Thomas K

    2014-01-01

    Lon protease is conserved from bacteria to humans and regulates cellular processes by degrading different classes of proteins including antitoxins, transcriptional activators, unfolded proteins, and free ribosomal proteins. Since we found that Lon has several putative cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) binding sites and since Lon binds polyphosphate (polyP) and lipid polysaccharide, we hypothesized that Lon has an affinity for phosphate-based molecules that might regulate its activity. Hence we tested the effect of polyP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp), c-di-GMP, and GMP on the ability of Lon to degrade α-casein. Inhibition of in vitro Lon activity occurred for polyP, cAMP, ppGpp, and c-di-GMP. We also demonstrated by HPLC that Lon is able to bind c-di-GMP. Therefore, four cell signals were found to regulate the activity of Lon protease. PMID:24874800

  12. Role of nitric oxide/cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP in beta3 adrenoceptor-chronotropic response.

    PubMed

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Bernabeo, Gustavo; Ganzinelli, Sabrina; Joensen, Lilian; Borda, Enri

    2006-04-01

    In this study we determine different signaling pathways involved in beta(3) adrenoceptor (beta(3)-AR) dependent frequency stimulation in isolated rodent atria. Promiscuous coupling between different G-proteins and beta(3)-AR could explain the multiple functional effects of beta(3)-AR stimulation. We examine the mechanisms and functional consequences of dual adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase pathways coupling to beta(3)-AR in isolated rodent atria. The beta(3)-AR selective agonists ZD 7114 and ICI 215001 stimulated in a dose-dependent manner the contraction frequency that significantly correlated with cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase shifted the chronotropic effect to the right. On the other hand, the ZD 7114 activity on frequency was enhanced by the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylate cyclase. This countervailing negative chronotropic nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) significantly correlated with the increase on NOS activity and cGMP accumulation. Current analysis showed a negative cross talk between cAMP chronotropic and NO-cGMP effects by inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC), calcium/calmodulin (CaM), protein kinase C (PKC), NOS isoforms and Gi-protein on the effects of beta(3)-AR stimulation. RT-PCR detected both eNOS and nNOS in isolated rat atria. NOS isoforms performed independently. Only nNOS participated in limiting the effect of beta(3)-AR stimulation. In eNOS-KO (eNOS-/-) mice the chronotropic effect of beta(3)-AR agonists did not differ from wild type (WT) mice atria, but it was increased by the inhibition of nNOS activity. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency by beta(3)-AR activation on isolated rodent atria is associated to a parallel increases in cAMP. The nNOS-cGMP pathway negatively modulates beta(3)-AR activation. Multiple signal transduction pathways between G-protein and beta(3)-AR may protect myocardium from catecholamine-induced cardiotoxic effects. PMID:16510153

  13. The Role of Angiotensin II and Cyclic AMP in Alveolar Active Sodium Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ismael-Badarneh, Reem; Guetta, Julia; Klorin, Geula; Berger, Gidon; Abu-saleh, Niroz; Abassi, Zaid; Azzam, Zaher S.

    2015-01-01

    Active alveolar fluid clearance is important in keeping airspaces free of edema. Angiotensin II plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and others. However, little is known about its contribution to alveolar fluid clearance. Angiotensin II effects are mediated by two specific receptors; AT1 and AT2. The localization of these two receptors in the lung, specifically in alveolar epithelial cells type II, was recently reported. We hypothesize that Angiotensin II may have a role in the regulation of alveolar fluid clearance. We investigated the effect of Angiotensin II on alveolar fluid clearance in rats using the isolated perfused lung model and isolated rat alveolar epithelial cells. The rate of alveolar fluid clearance in control rats was 8.6% ± 0.1 clearance of the initial volume and decreased by 22.5%, 28.6%, 41.6%, 48.7% and 39% in rats treated with 10-10 M, 10-9 M, 10-8 M, 10-7 M or 10-6 M of Ang II respectively (P < 0.003). The inhibitory effect of Angiotensin II was restored in losartan, an AT1 specific antagonist, pretreated rats, indicating an AT1 mediated effect of Ang II on alveolar fluid clearance. The expression of Na,K-ATPase proteins and cAMP levels in alveolar epithelial cells were down-regulated following the administration of Angiotensin II; suggesting that cAMP may be involved in AngII-induced reduced Na,K-ATPase expression, though the contribution of additional factors could not be excluded. We herein suggest a novel mechanism of clinical relevance by which angiotensin adversely impairs the ability of the lungs to clear edema. PMID:26230832

  14. Role of Exchange Protein Directly Activated by Cyclic AMP Isoform 1 in Energy Homeostasis: Regulation of Leptin Expression and Secretion in White Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaohua; Robichaux, William G; Mei, Fang C; Kim, Eun Ran; Wang, Hui; Tong, Qingchun; Jin, Jianping; Xu, Mingxuan; Chen, Ju; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    Epacs (exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP [cAMP]) act as downstream effectors of cAMP and play important roles in energy balance and glucose homeostasis. While global deletion of Epac1 in mice leads to heightened leptin sensitivity in the hypothalamus and partial protection against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, the physiological functions of Epac1 in white adipose tissue (WAT) has not been explored. Here, we report that adipose tissue-specific Epac1 knockout (AEKO) mice are more prone to HFD-induced obesity, with increased food intake, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance. Despite the fact that AEKO mice on HFD display increased body weight, these mice have decreased circulating leptin levels compared to their wild-type littermates. In vivo and in vitro analyses further reveal that suppression of Epac1 in WAT decreases leptin mRNA expression and secretion by inhibiting cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein and AKT phosphorylation, respectively. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Epac1 plays an important role in regulating energy balance and glucose homeostasis by promoting leptin expression and secretion in WAT.

  15. Role of Exchange Protein Directly Activated by Cyclic AMP Isoform 1 in Energy Homeostasis: Regulation of Leptin Expression and Secretion in White Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yaohua; Robichaux, William G; Mei, Fang C; Kim, Eun Ran; Wang, Hui; Tong, Qingchun; Jin, Jianping; Xu, Mingxuan; Chen, Ju; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-10-01

    Epacs (exchange proteins directly activated by cyclic AMP [cAMP]) act as downstream effectors of cAMP and play important roles in energy balance and glucose homeostasis. While global deletion of Epac1 in mice leads to heightened leptin sensitivity in the hypothalamus and partial protection against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity, the physiological functions of Epac1 in white adipose tissue (WAT) has not been explored. Here, we report that adipose tissue-specific Epac1 knockout (AEKO) mice are more prone to HFD-induced obesity, with increased food intake, reduced energy expenditure, and impaired glucose tolerance. Despite the fact that AEKO mice on HFD display increased body weight, these mice have decreased circulating leptin levels compared to their wild-type littermates. In vivo and in vitro analyses further reveal that suppression of Epac1 in WAT decreases leptin mRNA expression and secretion by inhibiting cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein and AKT phosphorylation, respectively. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Epac1 plays an important role in regulating energy balance and glucose homeostasis by promoting leptin expression and secretion in WAT. PMID:27381457

  16. Expression of nitric oxide synthase in rat glomerular mesangial cells mediated by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Mühl, H.; Kunz, D.; Pfeilschifter, J.

    1994-01-01

    1. Treatment of rat mesangial cells with interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta) or tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) has been shown to induce a macrophage-type of nitric oxide (NO) synthase. Here we report that adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) is another mediator that triggers induction of NO synthase in mesangial cells. 2. Incubation of mesangial cells with the beta-adrenoceptor agonist, salbutamol, forskolin or cholera toxin, which all activate adenylate cyclase and increase intracellular cyclic AMP concentration, increased nitrite formation in a dose-dependent manner. Likewise, the addition of the membrane-permeable cyclic AMP analogue, N6, 0-2'-dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-phosphate (Bt2 cyclic AMP) or the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine enhanced NO synthase activity in a dose-dependent manner. 3. There was a lag period of about 8 h before a significantly enhanced secretion of nitrite could be detected upon exposure of cells to forskolin and for maximal stimulation, forskolin had to be present during the whole incubation period. 4. Treatment of mesangial cells with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or dexamethasone completely suppressed forskolin-stimulated NO-synthase activity, thus demonstrating that transcription and protein synthesis are necessary for nitrite formation. 5. Bt2 cyclic AMP, the most potent inducer of nitrite production, increased NO synthase mRNA levels in mesangial cells in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Dexamethasone completely inhibited the increase of NO synthase mRNA in response to Bt2 cyclic AMP. 6. Combination of Bt2 cyclic AMP and IL-1 beta or TNF alpha revealed a strong synergy in terms of nitrite formation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:7518300

  17. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    PubMed

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-01

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  18. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  19. A Ric8/synembryn homolog promotes Gpa1 and Gpa2 activation to respectively regulate cyclic AMP and pheromone signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jinjun; Grodsky, Jacob D; Zhang, Zhengguang; Wang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    The G protein α subunits Gpa1, Gpa2, and Gpa3 mediate signal transduction and are important in the growth and virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. To understand how Gpa1 functions without a conventional Gβ subunit, we characterized a resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (Ric8) homolog from C. neoformans, which shares amino acid sequence homology with other Ric8 proteins that exhibit guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward Gα. We found that the ric8 mutant was reduced in capsule size and melanin formation, which could be suppressed by cyclic AMP (cAMP) supplementation or by introducing the activated GPA1(Q284L) allele. Consistent with the fact that Ric8 participates in cAMP signaling to regulate virulence, the ric8 mutant was attenuated in virulence toward mice. Interestingly, disruption of RIC8 also resulted in opposing effects on pheromone signaling, as the ric8 mutant showed reduced mating but an enhanced ability to induce the pheromone response in the mating partner. To identify Ric8 functional mechanisms, we examined the interactions between Ric8 and the three Gα proteins. Ric8 interacted with Gpa1 and Gpa2, but not Gpa3. The presence of Gpa1(Q284L) negatively affected its interaction with Ric8, whereas the activated Gpa2(Q203L) allele abolished the interaction. Collectively, these findings suggest that Ric8 functions as a GEF to facilitate the activation of Gpa1-cAMP signaling and to promote Gpa2, affecting mating efficiency. Our study highlights the distinct and conserved characteristics associated with G protein signaling and contributes to our overall understanding of how G protein α subunits function with or without a canonical Gβ partner in C. neoformans.

  20. A Ric8/Synembryn Homolog Promotes Gpa1 and Gpa2 Activation To Respectively Regulate Cyclic AMP and Pheromone Signaling in Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jinjun; Grodsky, Jacob D.; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2014-01-01

    The G protein α subunits Gpa1, Gpa2, and Gpa3 mediate signal transduction and are important in the growth and virulence of Cryptococcus neoformans. To understand how Gpa1 functions without a conventional Gβ subunit, we characterized a resistance to inhibitors of cholinesterase 8 (Ric8) homolog from C. neoformans, which shares amino acid sequence homology with other Ric8 proteins that exhibit guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward Gα. We found that the ric8 mutant was reduced in capsule size and melanin formation, which could be suppressed by cyclic AMP (cAMP) supplementation or by introducing the activated GPA1Q284L allele. Consistent with the fact that Ric8 participates in cAMP signaling to regulate virulence, the ric8 mutant was attenuated in virulence toward mice. Interestingly, disruption of RIC8 also resulted in opposing effects on pheromone signaling, as the ric8 mutant showed reduced mating but an enhanced ability to induce the pheromone response in the mating partner. To identify Ric8 functional mechanisms, we examined the interactions between Ric8 and the three Gα proteins. Ric8 interacted with Gpa1 and Gpa2, but not Gpa3. The presence of Gpa1Q284L negatively affected its interaction with Ric8, whereas the activated Gpa2Q203L allele abolished the interaction. Collectively, these findings suggest that Ric8 functions as a GEF to facilitate the activation of Gpa1-cAMP signaling and to promote Gpa2, affecting mating efficiency. Our study highlights the distinct and conserved characteristics associated with G protein signaling and contributes to our overall understanding of how G protein α subunits function with or without a canonical Gβ partner in C. neoformans. PMID:25084863

  1. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, M I; Popova, I A; Grindeland, R E

    1991-10-01

    A frequent cellular response to organismal stress is the increase in ligand binding by beta-adrenergic receptors. The extracellular signal is amplified by intracellular increases in cyclic AMP and the ensuing activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK). The molecular mechanisms involve the binding of cyclic AMP to regulatory (R) subunits of cAPK, thus freeing the catalytic subunit for protein phosphorylation. This study was carried out to determine the cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 mission. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particulate cell fractions with an [32P]-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP was followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. The results showed that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins showed some variability in tissues of individual animals, but exhibited no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. These findings indicate that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions. There is, however, what appears to be an adaptive molecular response which can be detected using microanalytical methods, indicating that a major hormone regulated mechanism may be affected during some phase of travel in space.

  2. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Mednieks, M I; Popova, I A; Grindeland, R E

    1991-10-01

    A frequent cellular response to organismal stress is the increase in ligand binding by beta-adrenergic receptors. The extracellular signal is amplified by intracellular increases in cyclic AMP and the ensuing activation of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK). The molecular mechanisms involve the binding of cyclic AMP to regulatory (R) subunits of cAPK, thus freeing the catalytic subunit for protein phosphorylation. This study was carried out to determine the cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 mission. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particulate cell fractions with an [32P]-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP was followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. The results showed that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins showed some variability in tissues of individual animals, but exhibited no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. These findings indicate that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions. There is, however, what appears to be an adaptive molecular response which can be detected using microanalytical methods, indicating that a major hormone regulated mechanism may be affected during some phase of travel in space. PMID:1662483

  3. Cyclic AMP-induced G1 phase arrest mediated by an inhibitor (p27Kip1) of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Kato, J Y; Matsuoka, M; Polyak, K; Massagué, J; Sherr, C J

    1994-11-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) blocks the mitogenic effects of colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) in macrophages, inducing cell cycle arrest in mid-G1 phase. Complexes between cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (cdk4) assemble in growth arrested cells, but cdk4 is not phosphorylated in vivo by the cdk-activating kinase (CAK) and remains inactive. Although undetectable in lysates of cAMP-treated cells, active CAK is recovered after antibody precipitation, indicating that it is not the direct target of inhibition. Levels of the cdk inhibitor p27Klp1 increase in cAMP-treated cells, and its immunodepletion from inhibitory lysates restores CAK-mediated cdk4 activation. Kip1 does not bind to CAK, but its association with cyclin D-cdk4 prevents CAK from phosphorylating and activating the holoenzyme. PMID:7954814

  4. Conformational analysis of PKI(5-22)amide, the active inhibitory fragment of the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Reed, J; De Ropp, J S; Trewhella, J; Glass, D B; Liddle, W K; Bradbury, E M; Kinzel, V; Walsh, D A

    1989-12-01

    Fourier-transform i.r. spectroscopy, 1H-n.m.r. spectroscopy and X-ray scattering were used to study the conformation and shape of the peptide PKI(5-22)amide, which contains the active site of the inhibitor protein of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase [Cheng, Van Pattern, Smith & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 231, 655-661]. The X-ray-scattering solution studies show that the peptide has a compact structure with Rg 0.9 nm (9.0 A) and a linear maximum dimension of 2.5 nm (25A). Compatible with this, Fourier-transform i.r. and n.m.r. determinations indicate that the peptide contains approx. 26% alpha-helix located in the N-terminal one-third of the molecule. This region contains the phenylalanine residue that is one essential recognition determinant for high-affinity binding to the protein kinase catalytic site.

  5. Chlorotoxin does not inhibit volume-regulated, calcium-activated and cyclic AMP-activated chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Maertens, C; Wei, L; Tytgat, J; Droogmans, G; Nilius, B

    2000-02-01

    It was the aim of this study to look for a high-affinity and selective polypeptide toxin, which could serve as a probe for the volume-regulated anion channel (VRAC) or the calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC). We have partially purified chlorotoxin, including new and homologous short chain insectotoxins, from the crude venom of Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus (Lqq) by means of gel filtration chromatography. Material eluting between 280 and 420 min, corresponding to fractions 15-21, was lyophilized and tested on VRAC and CaCC, using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We have also tested the commercially available chlorotoxin on VRAC, CaCC, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and on the glioma specific chloride channel (GCC). VRAC and the correspondent current, I(Cl,swell), was activated in Cultured Pulmonary Artery Endothelial (CPAE) cells by a 25% hypotonic solution. Neither of the fractions 16-21 significantly inhibited I(Cl,swell) (n=4-5). Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents, I(Cl,Ca), activated by loading T84 cells via the patch pipette with 1 microM free Ca(2+), were not inhibited by any of the tested fractions (15-21), (n=2-5). Chlorotoxin (625 nM) did neither effect I(Cl,swell) nor I(Cl,Ca) (n=4-5). The CFTR channel, transiently transfected in COS cells and activated by a cocktail containing IBMX and forskolin, was not affected by 1.2 microM chlorotoxin (n=5). In addition, it did not affect currents through GCC. We conclude that submicromolar concentrations of chlorotoxin do not block volume-regulated, Ca(2+)-activated and CFTR chloride channels and that it can not be classified as a general chloride channel toxin.

  6. Activation of Exchange Protein Activated by Cyclic-AMP Enhances Long-Lasting Synaptic Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelinas, Jennifer N.; Banko, Jessica L.; Peters, Melinda M.; Klann, Eric; Weeber, Edwin J.; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    cAMP is a critical second messenger implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory in the mammalian brain. Substantial evidence links increases in intracellular cAMP to activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and subsequent phosphorylation of downstream effectors (transcription factors, receptors, protein kinases) necessary for long-term…

  7. Volume-activated Na/H exchange activity in fetal and adult pig red cells: inhibition by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, S; Sohn, D H; Kim, H D

    1989-08-01

    Hyposmotic swelling of pig red cells leads to a selective increase in K permeability, whereas hyperosmotic cell shrinkage augments the Na permeability. In this regard, the ouabain-resistant (OR) Na flux of red cells of newborn and adult pigs is characterized in detail. A reduction in cell volume by approximately 18% leads to an increase in the OR Na efflux of fetal and adult cells by 15- and fourfold, respectively. The OR Na influx in both cell types is equally influenced by cell shrinkage. Depletion of cellular K does not influence the volume-activated OR Na efflux. Nor does OR Na influx require external K. Both OR Na efflux and influx activated by shrinkage are inhibited by the diuretics furosemide and amiloride. The rank order of decreasing anion sensitivity for diuretic-sensitive Na efflux was acetate greater than chloride greater than gluconate greater than nitrate. Cell shrinkage induced by the addition of hypertonic salts results in an acidification of the unbuffered and CO2-free media, provided that both Na and DIDS are present. The acidification process can be reversed by either of the diuretic agents. These findings suggest that the shrinkage-activated OR Na flux is primarily mediated by a Na/H exchanger rather than by a Na/K/Cl cotransporter. Once loaded with either cAMP or cGMP, cell swelling can no longer activate the Na/H exchanger. The Na/H exchanger activity is detectable in the fetal cells of normal volume but quiescent in adult cells, indicating that the exchanger undergoes a developmental change during the transition from the fetal to adult stage. PMID:2552123

  8. Changes in nephrogenous cyclic AMP excretion and plasma cyclic AMP following treatment of hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Naafs, M A; van der Velden, P C; Fischer, H R; Koorevaar, G; van Duin, S; Hackeng, W H; Schopman, W; Silberbusch, J

    1984-08-01

    Plasma cyclic AMP (PcAMP) concentration and the excretion of cyclic AMP/dl GF were estimated in 11 thyrotoxic patients before and after medical treatment. PcAMP concentrations were significantly higher during hyperthyroidism (2.30 +/- 0.69 vs 1.88 +/- 0.71 nmol/dl; P less than 0.05), and total urinary cyclic AMP (TcAMP) excretion showed no significant changes (3.24 +/- 0.64 vs 3.44 +/- 1.77 nmol/dl GF). Nephrogenous (NcAMP) excretion rose significantly (1.00 +/- 0.82 vs 1.68 +/- 1.31 mmol/dl GF; P less than 0.025). The increase in NcAMP excretion correlated significantly with the decrease in serum T3 levels (r = -0.46; P less than 0.05). Serum iPTH levels showed no significant change. Both the serum Ca, corrected for serum total protein and TmPO4/GFR declined after treatment (respectively 2.44 +/- 0.13 vs 2.33 +/- 0.08 mmol/l; P less than 0.05 and 1.18 +/- 0.29 vs 1.05 +/- 0.22 mmol/l; P less than 0.05). It is concluded that the rise in NcAMP excretion corroborates the concept of increasing parathyroid activity following the treatment of hyperthyroidism. PMID:6206676

  9. Ethanol-induced loss of brain cyclic AMP binding proteins: correlation with growth suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, S.; Kalmus, G.

    1987-05-01

    Brain hypoplasia secondary to maternal ethanol consumption is a common fetal defect observed in all models of fetal alcohol syndrome. The molecular mechanism by which ethanol inhibits growth is unknown but has been hypothesized to involve ethanol-induced changes in the activity of cyclic-AMP stimulated protein kinase. Acute and chronic alcohol exposure elevate cyclic AMP level in many tissues, including brain. This increase in cyclic AMP should increase the phosphorylating activity of kinase by increasing the amount of dissociated (active) kinase catalytic subunit. In 7-day embryonic chick brains, ethanol-induced growth suppression was correlated with increased brain cyclic AMP content but neither basal nor cyclic AMP stimulated kinase catalytic activity was increased. However, the levels of cyclic AMP binding protein (kinase regulatory subunit) were significantly lowered by ethanol exposure. Measured as either /sup 3/H cyclic AMP binding or as 8-azido cyclic AM/sup 32/P labeling, ethanol-exposed brains had significantly less cyclic AMP binding activity (51 +/- 14 versus 29 +/- 10 units/..mu..g protein for 8-azido cyclic AMP binding). These findings suggest that ethanol's effect on kinase activity may involve more than ethanol-induced activation of adenylate cyclase.

  10. The plasma cyclic-AMP response to noise in humans and rats—short-term exposure to various noise levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, M.; Dodo, H.; Ishii, F.; Yoneda, J.; Yamazaki, S.; Goto, H.

    1988-12-01

    Rats were exposed to short-term noise which was found to activate the hypothalamohypophyseal-adrenal system and result in a decrease of adrenal ascorbic acid (AAA) and an increase of serum corticosterone (SCS). The threshold limit value lay between 60 and 70 dB(A). To characterize better the effect of noise on the human hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal system, a large group of subjects was exposed to short-term noise at 85 dB(A) and higher, and tested for levels of adrenocortical steroid (cortisol) and anterior pituitary hormones such as ACTH, growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL). Results in humans showed hyperfunction of the hypothalamo-pituitary system. However, as the responses in rats and humans differed, a further experiment was performed using C-AMP, a second messenger mediating many of the effects of a variety of hormones. Plasma C-AMP in humans and rats increased significantly after exposure to noise greater than 70 dB(A). We suggest that plasma C-AMP could be useful as a sensitive index for noise-related stress in the daily living environment of humans and rats.

  11. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    PubMed

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-01

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation. PMID:3000830

  12. Regulation of the Subcellular Localization of Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase in Response to Physiological Stresses and Sexual Differentiation in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yasuhiro; McInnis, Brittney; Marcus, Stevan

    2008-01-01

    We describe regulation of the subcellular localization of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory (Cgs1p) and catalytic (Pka1p) subunits in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe in response to physiological stresses and during sexual differentiation as determined by fluorescence microscopy of the Cgs1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Pka1-GFP fusion proteins, respectively. In wild-type S. pombe cells cultured to log phase under normal growth conditions, Cgs1p and Pka1p are concentrated in the nucleus and more diffusely present in the cytoplasm. Nuclear localization of both proteins is dependent on cAMP, since in cells lacking adenylate cyclase they are detectable only in the cytoplasm. In cells lacking Cgs1p or both Cgs1p and adenylate cyclase, Pka1p is concentrated in the nucleus, demonstrating a role for Cgs1p in the nuclear exclusion of Pka1p. Nuclear-cytoplasmic redistribution of Cgs1p and Pka1p is triggered by growth in glucose-limited or hyperosmotic media and in response to stationary-phase growth. In addition, both proteins are excluded from the nucleus in mating cells undergoing karyogamy and subsequently concentrated in postmeiotic spores. Cgs1p is required for subcellular redistribution of Pka1p induced by growth in glucose-limited and hyperosmotic media and during karyogamy but is not required for Pka1p redistribution triggered by stationary-phase growth or for the enrichment of Pka1p in spores. Our results demonstrate that PKA localization is regulated by cAMP and regulatory subunit-dependent and -independent mechanisms in S. pombe. PMID:18621924

  13. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  14. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Cureri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of cAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of cAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  15. ["E" rosette formation in "active" T lymphocytes: phenomenon modulated by intracellular level of cyclic AMP and GMP (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Machado, J A; Antunes, L J; Silva, E N

    1977-08-01

    The rosette formation envolving the binding of sheep red blood cells (SRBC) with active T lymphocytes was activated when the lymphocytes were incubated with levamisole, acetylcholine or carbamylcholine. Similar activation was seen when to the incubation medium was added substances of glucose metabolism (lactate, fumarate or succinate) or triphosphate de adenosina--ATP. The lymphocytes incubation with aminophyline, isoproterenol or 2-4-dinitrofenol--DNP--inhibited the rosette formation. The inhibition promoted by aminophyline was reversed by levamisole, acetylcholine or carbamylcholine, but not when lactate or ATP was used. When the rosette formation inhibition was caused by DNP, the reversion was only possible by ATP and no affect occurred if guanil cyclase activators were added to the incubation medium.

  16. Prostaglandin E2 Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation through EP4 Receptor and Intracellular Cyclic AMP in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sokolowska, Milena; Chen, Li-Yuan; Liu, Yueqin; Martinez-Anton, Asuncion; Qi, Hai-Yan; Logun, Carolea; Alsaaty, Sara; Park, Yong Hwan; Kastner, Daniel L; Chae, Jae Jin; Shelhamer, James H

    2015-06-01

    PGE2 is a potent lipid mediator involved in maintaining homeostasis but also promotion of acute inflammation or immune suppression in chronic inflammation and cancer. Nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat-containing protein (NLR)P3 inflammasome plays an important role in host defense. Uncontrolled activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome, owing to mutations in the NLRP3 gene, causes cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes. In this study, we showed that NLRP3 inflammasome activation is inhibited by PGE2 in human primary monocyte-derived macrophages. This effect was mediated through PGE2 receptor subtype 4 (EP4) and an increase in intracellular cAMP, independently of protein kinase A or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP. A specific agonist of EP4 mimicked, whereas its antagonist or EP4 knockdown reversed, PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. PGE2 caused an increase in intracellular cAMP. Blockade of adenylate cyclase by its inhibitor reversed PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Increase of intracellular cAMP by an activator of adenylate cyclase or an analog of cAMP, or a blockade of cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase inhibitor decreased NLRP3 activation. Protein kinase A or exchange protein directly activated by cAMP agonists did not mimic, and their antagonists did not reverse, PGE2-mediated NLRP3 inhibition. Additionally, constitutive IL-1β secretion from LPS-primed PBMCs of cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes patients was substantially reduced by high doses of PGE2. Moreover, blocking cytosolic phospholipase A2α by its inhibitor or small interfering RNA or inhibiting cyclooxygenase 2, resulting in inhibition of endogenous PGE2 production, caused an increase in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 might play a role in maintaining homeostasis during the resolution phase of inflammation and might serve as an autocrine and paracrine regulator.

  17. Adenylyl cyclase activation underlies intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation, cyclic AMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation evoked by beta-adrenergic receptor stimulation in mixed cultures of neurons and astrocytes derived from rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, P A; Li, Y

    1995-09-18

    We have previously shown that stimulation of cortical cultures containing both neurons and astrocytes with the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol (ISO) results in transport of cAMP from astrocytes followed by extracellular hydrolysis to adenosine [Rosenberg et al. J. Neurosci. 14 (1994) 2953-2965]. In this study we found that the endogenous catecholamines epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE), but not dopamine, serotonin, or histamine, all at 10 microM, significantly stimulated intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation in cortical cultures. Detailed dose-response experiments were performed for NE and EPI, as well as ISO. For each catecholamine, the potencies in evoking intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation were similar. These data provide additional evidence that a single common mechanism, namely beta-adrenergic mediated activation of adenylyl cyclase, underlies intracellular cAMP accumulation, cAMP transport, and extracellular adenosine accumulation. It appears that regulation of extracellular adenosine levels via cAMP transport and extracellular hydrolysis to adenosine may be a final common pathway of neuromodulation in cerebral cortex for catecholamines, and, indeed, any substance whose receptors are coupled to adenylyl cyclase.

  18. Cyclic AMP Analog Blocks Kinase Activation by Stabilizing Inactive Conformation: Conformational Selection Highlights a New Concept in Allosteric Inhibitor Design*

    PubMed Central

    Badireddy, Suguna; Yunfeng, Gao; Ritchie, Mark; Akamine, Pearl; Wu, Jian; Kim, Choel W.; Taylor, Susan S.; Qingsong, Lin; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam; Anand, Ganesh S.

    2011-01-01

    The regulatory (R) subunit of protein kinase A serves to modulate the activity of protein kinase A in a cAMP-dependent manner and exists in two distinct and structurally dissimilar, end point cAMP-bound “B” and C-subunit-bound “H”-conformations. Here we report mechanistic details of cAMP action as yet unknown through a unique approach combining x-ray crystallography with structural proteomics approaches, amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange and ion mobility mass spectrometry, applied to the study of a stereospecific cAMP phosphorothioate analog and antagonist((Rp)-cAMPS). X-ray crystallography shows cAMP-bound R-subunit in the B form but surprisingly the antagonist Rp-cAMPS-bound R-subunit crystallized in the H conformation, which was previously assumed to be induced only by C-subunit-binding. Apo R-subunit crystallized in the B form as well but amide exchange mass spectrometry showed large differences between apo, agonist and antagonist-bound states of the R-subunit. Further ion mobility reveals the apo R-subunit as an ensemble of multiple conformations with collisional cross-sectional areas spanning both the agonist and antagonist-bound states. Thus contrary to earlier studies that explained the basis for cAMP action through “induced fit” alone, we report evidence for conformational selection, where the ligand-free apo form of the R-subunit exists as an ensemble of both B and H conformations. Although cAMP preferentially binds the B conformation, Rp-cAMPS interestingly binds the H conformation. This reveals the unique importance of the equatorial oxygen of the cyclic phosphate in mediating conformational transitions from H to B forms highlighting a novel approach for rational structure-based drug design. Ideal inhibitors such as Rp-cAMPS are those that preferentially “select” inactive conformations of target proteins by satisfying all “binding” constraints alone without inducing conformational changes necessary for activation. PMID:21081668

  19. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways. PMID:25615818

  20. Rapid regulation of PDE-2 and PDE-4 cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity following ligation of the T cell antigen receptor on thymocytes: analysis using the selective inhibitors erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) and rolipram.

    PubMed

    Michie, A M; Lobban, M; Müller, T; Harnett, M M; Houslay, M D

    1996-02-01

    The PDE2, cyclic GMP-stimulated, and the PDE4, cyclic AMP-specific enzymes provide the major, detectable cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activities in murine thymocytes. In the absence of the cyclic GMP, PDE4 activity predominated (approximately 80% total) but in the presence of low (10 microM) cyclic GMP concentrations, PDE2 activity constituted the major PDE activity in thymocytes (approximately 80% total). The PDE4 selective inhibitor rolipram dose-dependently inhibited thymocyte PDE4 activity (IC50 approximately 65 nM). PDE2 was dose-dependently activated (EC50 approximately 1 microM) by cyclic GMP and inhibited by erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (EHNA) (IC50 approximately 4 microM). EHNA was shown to serve as a selective inhibitor of PDE-2 activity as assessed from studies using separated PDE1, PDE2, PDE3 and PDE4 species from hepatocytes as well as human PDE2 and PDE4 enzymes. EHNA completely ablated the ability of cyclic GMP to activate PDE2 activity, whilst having a much smaller inhibitory effect on the unstimulated PDE2 activity. EHNA exhibited normal Michaelian kinetics of inhibition for the cyclic GMP-stimulated PDE2 activity with Hill plots near unity. Apparent negative co-operative effect were seen in the absence of cyclic GMP with Hill coefficients of approximately 0.3 for inhibition of PDE2 activity. Within 5 min of challenge of thymocytes with the lectin phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) there was a transient decrease (approximately 83%) in PDE-4 activity and in PDE2 activity (approximately 40%). Both anti-TCR antibodies also caused an initial reduction in the PDE4 activity which was followed by a sustained and profound increase in activity. In contrast to that observed with PHA, anti-TCR/CD3 antisera had little effect on PDE2 activity. It is suggested that, dependent upon the intracellular concentrations of cyclic GMP, thymocyte cyclic AMP metabolism can be expected to switch from being under the predominant control of PDE4 activity to that determined

  1. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) attenuates morphine-induced inhibition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in opioid-responsive SK-N-SH cells.

    PubMed

    Ratka, A; Simpkins, J W

    1997-04-01

    SK-N-SH cells were used to assess the effects of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) on opioid receptor-mediated changes in cyclic AMP (cAMP). Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1, 1 microM) caused a dramatic increase in cAMP levels. Treatment with 10 microM morphine (MOR) significantly inhibited the stimulatory effect of PGE1, LHRH (0.8 microM) caused an increase in the basal level of intracellular cAMP and potentiated the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP accumulation. In cells pretreated with LHRH the inhibitory effect of MOR on cAMP accumulation was significantly attenuated. An LHRH antagonist had no effect on cAMP. The involvement of pertussis toxin (PTX)-sensitive G proteins in the actions of LHRH was studied. PTX increased the stimulatory effect of PGE1 on cAMP and attenuated the inhibitory effect of MOR. However, PTX pretreatment prevented the effects of LHRH on the intracellular actions of PGE1 but exerted an additive effect with LHRH in blocking the MOR-induced decrease in cAMP levels. We conclude that LHRH attenuates the inhibitory, opioid receptor-mediated effect of MOR on intracellular cAMP accumulation in SK-N-SH cells, and that the G protein-independent mechanism may be involved in LHRH-induced attenuation of the inhibitory effect of MOR on neuronal cAMP.

  2. Is a decrease in cyclic AMP a necessary and sufficient signal for maturation of amphibian oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Gelerstein, S.; Shapira, H.; Dascal, N.; Yekuel, R.; Oron, Y.

    1988-05-01

    Acetylcholine rapidly lowered the intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in stage 5 and 6 Xenopus laevis oocytes. Acetylcholine alone did not induce oocyte maturation, though it did accelerate maturation induced by progesterone. The effect of acetylcholine on oocyte maturation was independent of extracellular calcium concentration. Adenosine increased cyclic AMP and abolished the progesterone-induced decrease in cyclic AMP levels in follicles and in denuded oocytes. This effect of adenosine was blocked by the Ra purinergic receptor antagonist, theophylline. Despite those effects, adenosine alone induced maturation in stage 6 oocytes and accelerated progesterone-induced maturation in both stage 5 and 6 cells. Adenosine also induced a significant increase in the rate of /sup 45/Ca efflux from oocytes in the presence and the absence of external calcium. We suggest that the activation of cell surface receptors involved in the release of calcium from cellular stores may induce or accelerate oocyte maturation independently of small changes in intracellular cyclic AMP concentration.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1230 Cyclic AMP test system. (a) Identification. A cyclic AMP test system is a device intended...

  4. Role of ecdysone, pupariation factors, and cyclic AMP in formation and tanning of the puparium of the fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Seligman, M; Blechl, A; Blechl, J; Herman, P; Fraenkel, G

    1977-10-01

    Two pupariation factors, anterior retraction factor (ARF) and puparium tanning factor (PTF), are absent from the hemolymph of larvae at the time of tanning accelerated by ARF/PTF, cyclic AMP, or dopamine. ARF and PTF are not involved in derepression of dopa decarboxylase (aromatic L-amino-acid decarboxylase, aromatic L-amino-acid carboxy-lyase, EC 4.1.1.28) synthesis initiated by ecdysone. Tanning is entirely inhibited by injection of two transcriptional inhibitors, actinomycin and BrdUrd, and two translational inhibitors, puromycin and cycloheximide. Retraction activity is more severely inhibited by the transcriptional than by the translational inhibitors. A tanning response is initiated by cyclic AMP in the presence of the transcriptional but not the translational inhibitors. Dihydric tanning substances (dopa, dopamine) initiate tanning in the presence of both types of inhibitors. Release of ARF and PTF from the central nervous system is inhibited by the four inhibitors. ARF totally reverses the inhibitory effects on retraction, whereas PTF does not reverse inhibition of tanning. These data are interpreted to mean that PTF is concerned with the regulation of two components of the tanning response: (i) acceleration of synthesis of a particular protein (associated with the tyrosine hydroxylation complex), and (ii) activation via cyclic AMP of a component of the tyrosine hydroxylating system.

  5. 3':5'-cyclic AMP and hormonal control of puparium formation in the fleshfly Sarcophaga bullata.

    PubMed

    Fraenkel, G; Blechl, A; Blechl, J; Herman, P; Seligman, M I

    1977-05-01

    Injection of 3':5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP) into larvae of the fly Sarcophaga bullata 3-4 hr before the beginning of puparium formation (red-spiracle stage) greatly accelerates the onset of tanning without affecting initiation of puparium formation (anterior retraction). Accelerated tanning resembles real tanning in two important respects: the solubility of cuticular proteins becomes reduced and [U-14C]tyrosine is incorporated into the cuticle. Of a number of cAMP analogues tested, 3':5'- cyclic GMP, 2':3'-cyclic AMP, and 5'-AMP were inactive, dibutyryl-3':5'-cAMP had only slight activity, and cyclic IMP and deoxy-3':5'-cAMP showed some activity. Theophylline enhanced the effect of small doses of cAMP or of blood, diluted 1:8, active in the puparium tanning factor. Injection of dopa, dopamine, acetyldopamine, or epinephrine, but not of tyrosine, had an accelerating effect similar to that of cAMP. The tanning-inhibiting effect of DL-alpha-methyl-alpha-hydrazino-beta-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)propionic acid monohydrate is reversed by dopamine or epinephrine, but not by tyrosine, dopa, or cAMP. Evidence is presented to indicate that the responses to cAMP are not artifacts but reflect actual biochemical events during tanning.

  6. Epidermal chalone and cyclic AMP: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Elgjo, K

    1975-01-01

    Water extracts of skin contain two factors that inhibit epidermal cell proliferation: one substance inhibits epidermal cells in the G2 phase (the epidermal G2 inhibitor), and another inhibits the transit of cells from the G1 phase into the S phase (the epidermal G1 inhibitor). Pretreatment of mice with a beta-receptor antagonist (propranolol) abolished the activity of the G2 inhibitor but not that of the G1 inhibitor. After pretreatment with both propranolol and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (caffine)the G2 inhibitor had full effect. Cafine alone had a moderately inhibitory effect on epidermal G2 cells and enhanced the depressing effect of the G1 inhibitor on epidermal DNA synthesis. AMP level in epidermis to be active. Cyclic AMP is probably also involved in the regulation of the rate of transit of epidermal G1 cells into the S phase but the epidermal cyclic AMP level seems not to be so critical for the efficacy of the epidermal G2 inhibitor in epidermal cell differentiation. PMID:162919

  7. A functional cyclic AMP response element plays a crucial role in neuroendocrine cell type-specific expression of the secretory granule protein chromogranin A.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, H; Mahata, S K; Mahata, M; Webster, N J; Parmer, R J; O'Connor, D T

    1995-01-01

    Chromogranin A, a soluble acidic protein, is a ubiquitous component of secretory vesicles throughout the neuroendocrine system. We reported previously the cloning and initial characterization of the mouse chromogranin A gene promoter, which showed that the promoter contains both positive and negative domains and that a proximal promoter spanning nucleotides -147 to +42 bp relative to the transcriptional start site is sufficient for neuroendocrine cell type-specific expression. The current study was undertaken to identify the particular elements within this proximal promoter that control tissue-specific expression. We found that deletion or point mutations in the potential cAMP response element (CRE) site at -68 bp virtually abolished promoter activity specifically in neuroendocrine (PC12 chromaffin or AtT20 corticotrope) cells, with little effect on activity in control (NIH3T3 fibroblast) cells; thus, the CRE box is necessary for neuroendocrine cell type-specific activity of the chromogranin A promoter. Furthermore, the effect of the CRE site is enhanced in the context of intact (wild-type) promoter sequences between -147 and -100 bp. DNase I footprint analysis showed that these regions (including the CRE box) bind nuclear proteins present in both neuroendocrine (AtT20) and control (NIH3T3) cells. In AtT20 cells, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and factor-specific antibody supershifts showed that an oligonucleotide containing the chromogranin A CRE site formed a single, homogeneous protein-DNA complex containing the CRE-binding protein CREB. However, in control NIH3T3 cells we found evidence for an additional immunologically unrelated protein in this complex. A single copy of this oligonucleotide was able to confer neuroendocrine-specific expression to a heterologous (thymidine kinase) promoter, albeit with less fold selectivity than the full proximal chromogranin A promoter. Hence, the CRE site was partially sufficient to explain the neuroendocrine cell type

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation in isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Eddé, B; Prochiantz, A

    1989-03-01

    We have shown recently that neuronal growth cones isolated from developing rat forebrain possess an appreciable activity of adenylate cyclase, which produces cyclic AMP and can be stimulated by various neurotransmitter receptor agonists and by forskolin. To investigate cyclic AMP-mediated biochemical mechanisms in isolated growth cones, we have centered the present study on cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation. One-dimensional gel electrophoretic analysis showed that cyclic AMP analogs increased incorporation of 32P into several phosphoproteins in molecular mass ranges of 50-58 and 76-82 kilodaltons, including those of 82, 76, and 51 kilodaltons. Two-dimensional electrophoresis, using isoelectric focusing in the first dimension, resolved phosphorylated alpha- and beta-tubulin species, actin, a very acidic protein (isoelectric point 4.0) with a molecular mass of 93 kilodaltons, and two proteins (x and x') closely neighboring beta-tubulin. Two other phosphoproteins seen in the gels had molecular masses of 56 and 51 kilodaltons (respective isoelectric points, 4.5 and 4.4) and, along with the 93-kilodalton phosphoprotein, were highly enriched in the isolated growth cones. Only the tubulin and actin species were major proteins in the isolated growth cones. Cyclic AMP analogs enhanced incorporation of 32P into phosphoproteins x and x', and, as assessed by immunoprecipitation, into beta-tubulin. Peptide digest experiments suggested that phosphoproteins x and x' are unrelated to beta-tubulin. Nonequilibrium two-dimensional electrophoresis resolved many phosphoproteins, of which a 79- and 75-kilodalton doublet, a 74-kilodalton species, and a 58-kilodalton doublet showed enhanced incorporation of 32P in the presence of cyclic AMP.

  9. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  10. Pro-inflammatory cytokine regulation of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase 4 signaling in microglia in vitro and following CNS injury

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Garcia-Castillo, Daniela; Aguirre, Vladimir; Golshani, Roozbeh; Atkins, Coleen M.; Bramlett, Helen M.; Dietrich, W. Dalton; Pearse, Damien D.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP suppresses immune cell activation and inflammation. The positive feedback loop of pro-inflammatory cytokine production and immune activation implies that cytokines may not only be regulated by cyclic AMP but conversely regulate cyclic AMP. This study examined the effects of TNF-α and IL-1β on cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) signaling in microglia in vitro and after spinal cord or traumatic brain injury (SCI, TBI). TNF-α or IL-1β stimulation produced a profound reduction (>90%) of cyclic AMP within EOC2 microglia from 30min that then recovered after IL-1β but remained suppressed with TNF-α through 24h. Cyclic AMP was also reduced in TNF-α-stimulated primary microglia, albeit to a lesser extent. Accompanying TNF-α-induced cyclic AMP reductions, but not IL-1β, was increased cyclic AMP-PDE activity. The role of PDE4 activity in cyclic AMP reductions was confirmed by using Rolipram. Examination of pde4 mRNA revealed an immediate, persistent increase in pde4b with TNF-α; IL-1β increased all pde4 mRNAs. Immunoblotting for PDE4 showed that both cytokines increased PDE4A1, but only TNF-α increased PDE4B2. Immunocytochemistry revealed PDE4B nuclear translocation with TNF-α but not IL-1β. Acutely after SCI/TBI, where cyclic AMP levels are reduced, PDE4B was localized to activated OX-42+ microglia; PDE4B was absent in OX-42+ cells in uninjured spinal cord/cortex or inactive microglia. Immunoblotting showed PDE4B2 up-regulation from 24h to 1wk post-SCI, the peak of microglia activation. These studies show that TNF-α and IL-1β differentially affect cyclic AMP-PDE signaling in microglia. Targeting PDE4B2 may be a putative therapeutic direction for reducing microglia activation in CNS injury and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22865690

  11. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  12. Cyclic AMP in female mouse brain is altered by the adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) analogue organon 2766.

    PubMed

    Schneider, D R; Felt, B T; Murphy, S; Goldman, H

    1981-09-01

    Cyclic AMP content was determined in 12 brain regions of young adult female mice at 30 min and at 24 h following an intraperitoneal injection of the tri-substituted adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) [ACTH(4-9)] analogue Organon 2766 [ORG 2766]. Animals were killed by focused 3.5 kW microwave radiation applied for 350 ms. Unlike previously reported responses in male mice, at 30 min post-injection there were no detectable differences in cyclic AMP content between the placebo and ORG 2766-treated animals. By contrast, 24 h after injection, the content of cyclic AMP was changed significantly in 8 of the 12 brain regions examined: medulla-pons, septal area, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and parietal and occipital cortices. In most of the regions examined, differences consisted of 50% or greater reductions of tissue cyclic AMP content. The changes were unrelated to the estrus cycle of these animals.

  13. An AP-2 element acts synergistically with the cyclic AMP- and Phorbol ester-inducible enhancer of the human proenkephalin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, S.E.; Comb, M.; Pearlberg, J.; Goodman, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    An enhancer with two DNA elements, one containing the sequence CGTCA, is required for cyclic AMP-and phorbol ester-inducible transcription of the human proenkephalin gene. The authors report that an AP-2 element located adjacent to the enhancer acts synergistically with it to confer maximal response to cyclic AMP and phorbol esters.

  14. GPR26-deficient mice display increased anxiety- and depression-like behaviors accompanied by reduced phosphorylated cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein level in central amygdala.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L-L; Wang, J-J; Liu, Y; Lu, X-B; Kuang, Y; Wan, Y-H; Chen, Y; Yan, H-M; Fei, J; Wang, Z-G

    2011-11-24

    Anxiety disorders are among the most common and well studied psychiatric disorders in humans. A number of animal models have been established to study the mechanisms of anxiety and to test putative anxiolytic drugs. Gpr26 belongs to the G-protein-coupled receptor family and is exclusively expressed in brain tissue. To investigate the biological function of Gpr26 in vivo, we have generated Gpr26 knockout mice. The mutant mice grew and developed normally but displayed increased levels of anxiety-like behaviors in the open field and elevated plus maze tests, as well as a higher level of depression-like behaviors in the forced-swim and tail-suspension tests. Meanwhile, no significant alteration in spatial learning and memory abilities were found for Gpr26-deficient mice in the Morris water maze test. Previous studies demonstrated that lower protein kinase A (PKA)-cAMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB)-neuropeptide Y (NPY) signaling in the amygdala is linked to higher anxiety and excessive alcohol-drinking behaviors in rats. Therefore, we further examined the phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) and CREB levels in the brains of Gpr26-deficient mice. Reduced pCREB levels were observed in the central amygdala but not in the other regions, while total CREB levels remained comparable between wild-type and mutant mice. Combined, our data indicate that Gpr26 is important for emotion regulation in mice, a function probably mediated by the phosphorylation of CREB in the central amygdala.

  15. Heparin modulates intracellular cyclic AMP in human trabecular bone cells and adherent rheumatoid synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, A J; Roelke, M S; Goldring, S R; Krane, S M

    1984-01-01

    Cells were cultured from explants of human trabecular bone excised from eight patients and incubated usually for 20 minutes with bovine parathyroid hormone, salmon calcitonin, prostaglandin E2, or heparin. The intracellular content of cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay and was significantly increased by parathyroid hormone in four, by calcitonin in two, by prostaglandin E2 in eight, and by heparin in seven out of eight cultures. In the two cultures containing calcitonin-responsive cells heparin inhibited the cyclic AMP response induced by calcitonin. Heparin did not affect the cyclic AMP response to parathyroid hormone or prostaglandin E2. Heparin also increased the cyclic AMP content of cultured adherent rheumatoid synovial cells. It is proposed that, in certain situations of focal pathological bone resorption, although concentrations of circulating hormones may be normal, the local release of products such as heparin may modify the effect of hormones which regulate connective tissue homoeostasis. local changes in hormone responses could contribute to the enhanced bone resorption associated with inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:6089675

  16. Mlc is a transcriptional activator with a key role in integrating cyclic AMP receptor protein and integration host factor regulation of leukotoxin RNA synthesis in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a periodontal pathogen, synthesizes leukotoxin (LtxA), a protein that helps the bacterium evade the host immune response. Transcription of the ltxA operon is induced during anaerobic growth. The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) indirectly increases ltxA expression...

  17. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca2+]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca2+]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca2+]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca2+]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca2+, glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca2+]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor. PMID:26630567

  18. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca(2+)]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca(2+)]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca(2+)]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca(2+)]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca(2+), glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca(2+)]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor.

  19. Modulation of norepinephrine-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat pinealocytes by n-3 fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Delton-Vandenbroucke, I; Sarda, N; Molière, P; Lagarde, M; Gharib, A

    1996-10-01

    This work showed that docosahexaenoic (22:6n-3) and eicosapentaenoic (20:5n-3) acid supplementation for 48 h have opposite effects on the norepinephrine-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat pinealocytes. We found that 22:6n-3 supplementation of pineal cells, done by increasing specifically 22:6n-3 in phospholipid and triacylglycerol pools, led to inhibition of norepinephrine-stimulated cyclic AMP production whereas 20:5n-3 supplementation, by increasing 20:5n-3, and 22:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in the same pools, stimulated it. In contrast, direct treatment of pinealocytes with each fatty acid (50 microM) did not affect cyclic AMP production in the presence of (0.1-10 microM) norepinephrine. The results indicate that, using pharmacological agents such as forskolin or prazosin: (a) neither basal nor forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP levels were modified in fatty acid-supplemented cells compared to control cells; (b) in the presence of 1 microM prazosin, the activation by 20:5n-3 was still effective whereas no additional inhibition of norepinephrine stimulation was observed in 22:6n-3-supplemented cells. Taken together our results suggest that 22:6n-3 or 20:5n-3 supplementation modulates specifically the alpha 1- or beta-adrenoceptors in the rat pineal gland.

  20. Cyclic AMP, a nonessential regulator of the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Coffino, P; Gray, J W; Tomkins, G M

    1975-01-01

    Flow-microfluorimetric analysis has been carried out on populations of exponentially growing S49 mouse lymphoma cells treated with dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The drug produces a specific concentration-dependent block in the G-1 phase of the cell cycle while other phases of the cycle are not perceptibly altered. The cell cycle of a line of mutant cells lacking the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase is not affected by the drug. Since these mutant cells have been shown to maintain a normal cell cycle, even in the presence of high levels of cyclic AMP, periodic fluctuations in the levels of the cyclic nucleotide cannot be required for or determine progression through the cell cycle. PMID:165491

  1. Interaction of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, melatonin, cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in the control of melanogenesis in hair follicle melanocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Weatherhead, B; Logan, A

    1981-07-01

    In short-term (48 h) cultures of hair follicles alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and cyclic AMP stimulated melanogenesis through an increase in tyrosinase activity. In contrast cyclic GMP mimicked the effects of melatonin by inhibiting melanin production without causing a concomitant decrease in tyrosinase activity. Both cyclic GMP and melatonin blocked the stimulatory effects of cyclic AMP and alpha-MSH on melanin production but they left the increased levels of tyrosinase activity unaffected. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (3-isobutyl-1--methylxanthine and papaverine) simultaneously stimulated tyrosinase activity and inhibited melanin production, presumably by allowing endogenous cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP to accumulate intracellularly. It is suggested that whereas MSH stimulates melanogenesis through a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism there must also be an inhibitory cyclic GMP-dependent mechanism, perhaps activated by melatonin, which operates at some post-tyrosinase step in the melanin biosynthetic pathway. PMID:6267154

  2. Ethanol increases and vitamin D metabolites decrease the production of cyclic AMP by canine renal cortical membranes.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, P J; Nijs, N; Corvilain, J

    1988-12-01

    Ethanol 0.16% increased cyclic AMP production by canine renal cortical membranes in the basal state and when challenged with different parathyroid hormone or fluoride concentrations. 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25(OH)2D3) 40 pM completely inhibited this effect of ethanol and reversed cyclic AMP production to the level observed in buffer alone. The same inhibitory effect was observed with 25OHD3 and with 24,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (24,25(OH)2D3). The inhibitory effect was related to the vitamin D metabolites' concentration and was maximal for 160 pM; it was independent of their biological activity. This suggests that the effect is mediated through an interaction with the membrane lipids. The effect of vitamin D metabolites on cyclic AMP production was also observed in the presence of serum proteins and should be taken into account if unextracted plasma is assayed in the renal cortical membrane system for PTH bioactivity.

  3. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems §...

  7. From drought sensing to developmental control: evolution of cyclic AMP signaling in social amoebas.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Allyson V; van Es, Saskia; Fouquet, Celine; Schaap, Pauline

    2008-10-01

    Amoebas and other protists commonly encyst when faced with environmental stress. Although little is known of the signaling pathways that mediate encystation, the analogous process of spore formation in dictyostelid social amoebas is better understood. In Dictyostelium discoideum, secreted cyclic AMP (cAMP) mediates the aggregation of starving amoebas and induces the differentiation of prespore cells. Intracellular cAMP acting on cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) triggers the maturation of spores and prevents their germination under the prevalent conditions of high osmolality in the spore head. The osmolyte-activated adenylate cyclase, ACG, produces cAMP for prespore differentiation and inhibition of spore germination. To retrace the origin of ACG function, we investigated ACG gene conservation and function in species that span the dictyostelid phylogeny. ACG genes, osmolyte-activated ACG activity, and osmoregulation of spore germination were detected in species that represent the 4 major groups of Dictyostelia. Unlike the derived species D. discoideum, many basal Dictyostelia have retained the ancestral mechanism of encystation from solitary amoebas. In these species and in solitary amoebas, encystation is independently triggered by starvation or by high osmolality. Osmolyte-induced encystation was accompanied by an increase in cAMP and prevented by inhibition of PKA, indicating that ACG and PKA activation mediate this response. We propose that high osmolality signals drought in soil amoebas and that developmental cAMP signaling in the Dictyostelia has evolved from this stress response.

  8. Cyclic AMP and the mechanism of leucocyte lysosomal enzyme release during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Deporter, D A

    1977-11-01

    The pleural cavity of rats was used to study the effect of altering leucocyte cyclic AMP content on the release of B-glucuronidase activity during an immediate hypersensitivity reaction. The effect on intravenous colchicine was also studied. Despite an increase of 135 to 235% in leucocyte cyclic AMP content no decrease in B-glucuronidase release was observed. Similarly, colchicine had no effect on enzyme release. It was concluded that the cyclic nucleotides and leucocyte microtubules may have no significant role to play in the release of lysosomal enzymes during acute inflammation in vivo. PMID:201738

  9. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-09-25

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of (TH)PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. (TH) PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux.

  10. Posttranscriptional Regulation of the Yersinia pestis Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Crp and Impact on Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Lathem, Wyndham W.; Schroeder, Jay A.; Bellows, Lauren E.; Ritzert, Jeremy T.; Koo, Jovanka T.; Price, Paul A.; Caulfield, Adam J.; Goldman, William E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a transcriptional regulator that controls the expression of numerous bacterial genes, usually in response to environmental conditions and particularly by sensing the availability of carbon. In the plague pathogen Yersinia pestis, Crp regulates the expression of multiple virulence factors, including components of the type III secretion system and the plasminogen activator protease Pla. The regulation of Crp itself, however, is distinctly different from that found in the well-studied Escherichia coli system. Here, we show that at physiological temperatures, the synthesis of Crp in Y. pestis is positively regulated at the posttranscriptional level. The loss of the small RNA chaperone Hfq results in decreased Crp protein levels but not in steady-state Crp transcript levels, and this regulatory effect occurs within the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of the Crp mRNA. The posttranscriptional activation of Crp synthesis is required for the expression of pla, and decoupling crp from Hfq through the use of an exogenously controlled promoter and 5′ UTR increases Pla protein levels as well as partially rescues the growth defect associated with the loss of Hfq. Finally, we show that both Hfq and the posttranscriptional regulation of Crp contribute to the virulence of Y. pestis during pneumonic plague. The Hfq-dependent, posttranscriptional regulation of Crp may be specific to Yersinia species, and thus our data help explain the dramatic growth and virulence defects associated with the loss of Hfq in Y. pestis. PMID:24520064

  11. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  12. Downregulation of the Escherichia coli guaB promoter by upstream-bound cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Husnain, Seyyed I; Busby, Stephen J W; Thomas, Mark S

    2009-10-01

    The Escherichia coli guaB promoter (P(guaB)) is responsible for directing transcription of the guaB and guaA genes, which specify the biosynthesis of the nucleotide GMP. P(guaB) is subject to growth rate-dependent control (GRDC) and possesses an UP element that is required for this regulation. In addition, P(guaB) contains a discriminator, three binding sites for the nucleoid-associated protein FIS, and putative binding sites for the regulatory proteins DnaA, PurR, and cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). Here we show that the CRP-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex binds to a site located over 100 bp upstream of the guaB transcription start site, where it serves to downregulate P(guaB). The CRP-mediated repression of P(guaB) activity increases in media that support lower growth rates. Inactivation of the crp or cyaA gene or ablation/translocation of the CRP site relieves repression by CRP and results in a loss of GRDC of P(guaB). Thus, GRDC of P(guaB) involves a progressive increase in CRP-mediated repression of the promoter as the growth rate decreases. Our results also suggest that the CRP-cAMP complex does not direct GRDC at P(guaB) and that at least one other regulatory factor is required for conferring GRDC on this promoter. However, PurR and DnaA are not required for this regulatory mechanism.

  13. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  14. Partial characterization of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases in guinea-pig lung employing the synthetic heptapeptide substrate, kemptide. In vitro sensitivity of the soluble enzyme to isoprenaline, forskolin, methacholine and leukotriene D4.

    PubMed

    Giembycz, M A; Diamond, J

    1990-04-15

    inhibitor of cyclo-oxygenase in vitro, abolished the ability of LTD4 to increase the A-kinase activity ratio suggesting that this biochemical response was mediated indirectly through the stimulated biosynthesis and release of a prostanoid(s) able to activate adenylyl cyclase; the increase in tension induced by LTD4, however, was not significantly affected by flurbiprofen pre-treatment. Collectively, these data support the concept that soluble A-kinase activity in guinea-pig lung can be regulated by changes in intracellular cyclic AMP and that activation and/or inhibition of this biochemical cascade may influence alterations in lung contractility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  15. Distribution of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in microdissected periportal and perivenous rat liver tissue with different dietary states.

    PubMed

    Runge, D; Jungermann, K

    1991-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase was measured in liver homogenates and microdissected periportal and perivenous liver tissue from rats in different dietary states under different conditions of substrate saturation and effector stimulation. A radiochemical microtest, more sensitive by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the usual assay, was established for the determination of the activity in liver samples corresponding to 200-800 ng dry weight. At saturating cyclic AMP concentrations (46 microM) phosphodiesterase was homogeneously distributed within the liver acinus of fed rats. Starvation for 48 h led to a decrease in the overall activity and to a heterogenous distribution with slightly higher activities in the perivenous zone. At physiological cyclic AMP concentrations (1.8 microM) phosphodiesterase showed a flat zonal gradient in livers of fed rats with higher levels in the periportal zone; after 48 h starvation it was homogeneously distributed. In the presence of cyclic GMP (2 microM) the basal activity at physiological substrate concentrations was stimulated to a greater extent in the perivenous zone. This led to a homogeneous activity distribution in the fed state and to a heterogenous pattern with a slight perivenous maximum in the fasted state. Thus there was no or only a small zonal heterogeneity of signal transmitting enzymes such as cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase and glucagon-stimulated adenylate cyclase (Zierz and Jungermann 1984). This similar signal transducing capacity in the periportal and the perivenous area will contribute to maintain the zonation of signal input due to the hormone concentration gradients across the liver acinus.

  16. Human dermal microvascular endothelial cells in vitro: effect of cyclic AMP on cellular morphology and proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Davison, P M; Karasek, M A

    1981-02-01

    Macrovascular endothelial cells isolated from the human umbilical vein and microvessel endothelium from the newborn foreskin dermis differ in their requirements for optimal growth in vitro. In the presence of 5 X 10(-4) M dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP), human dermal microvessel endothelial cell proliferation rate increased to give a cell number of 203% of controls values by day 10 in culture. The cells retained their characteristic endothelial cell morphology, reached confluence, and could be serially passaged. Cells grown in the absence of Bt2cAMP did not proliferate readily and grew in a disorganized pattern. The effect of Bt2cAMP on microvascular endothelial cell proliferation rate and morphology could be duplicated by cholera toxin (CT) used together with isobutyl methylxanthine (IMX). These agents were found to elevate intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in microvascular endothelium over 40-fold. Human umbilical vein cells in culture failed to respond to either Bt2cAMP or CT together with IMX. The growth-promoting effect of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP) on human foreskin dermal microvascular endothelium in vitro is in marked contrast to the lack of response of human umbilical vein cells. These results provide further evidence of differences in the mechanisms that regulate macro and microvessel endothelial cell proliferation in vitro.

  17. On the mechanism of action of lead in the testis: in vitro suppression of FSH receptors, cyclic AMP and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wiebe, J P; Salhanick, A I; Myers, K I

    1983-04-25

    Previous evidence has shown that prenatal and neonatal exposure to low levels of Pb result in decreased FSH binding and steroidogenesis in the testes at the onset of puberty. The purpose of the present study was to determine by in vitro methods, if Pb acts by interfering directly with hormone binding, cyclic AMP production and steroidogenic enzyme activity. Sertoli cells were isolated from testes of prepubertal rats and cultured in the presence of 2.64 x 10(-4)M of either NaAc (control) or PbAc for 1, 4, 24, 48, 96 or 144 hr. There was no reduction in FSH binding and in FSH-induced cyclic AMP after a 1-4 hr exposure to Pb. After a 24-hr exposure to Pb, the cells exhibited a 10-20% decrease in FSH binding and cyclic AMP production and after 96 hr there was a 75% decrease in these 2 parameters. The inhibition was greater in cells from 16 day old than from 20 day old rats, so that in the former, after a 144 hr exposure the FSH-induced cyclic AMP of the Pb exposed cells was only 3% of the amount produced by the NaAc exposed cells (i.e. a 97% inhibition). After in vitro exposure to Pb for 48 hr, the steroidogenic activity (progesterone conversion to steroid metabolites) of Sertoli cells was significantly reduced and their steroidogenesis was no longer stimulated by FSH. A crude testicular enzyme preparation containing 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 beta-HSD) exhibited approximately 25% reduction in activity if the assay buffer contained PbCl2 instead of the equivalent in NaCl. Prolonged in vivo exposure to Pb resulted in approximately 50% reduction in 3 beta-HSD activity. This is the first indication that in the testis Pb may act directly (immediate effect) by suppressing enzyme activities, and indirectly (long term effect) by reducing gonadotropin-receptor binding and the resultant cyclic AMP production.

  18. Cyclic AMP Can Decrease Expression of Genes Subject to Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Zaragoza, Oscar; Lindley, Chris; Gancedo, Juana M.

    1999-01-01

    External cyclic AMP (cAMP) hindered the derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes in a pde2 mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but it did not prevent invertase derepression. cAMP reduced nearly 20-fold the transcription driven by upstream activation sequence (UAS1FBP1) from FBP1, encoding fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase; it decreased 2-fold the activation of transcription by UAS2FBP1. Nuclear extracts from cells derepressed in the presence of cAMP were impaired in the formation of specific UASFBP1-protein complexes in band shift experiments. cAMP does not appear to act through the repressing protein Mig1. Control of FBP1 transcription through cAMP is redundant with other regulatory mechanisms. PMID:10198033

  19. Cyclic AMP signalling pathways in the regulation of uterine relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei; López Bernal, Andrés

    2007-01-01

    Studying the mechanism(s) of uterine relaxation is important and will be helpful in the prevention of obstetric difficulties such as preterm labour, which remains a major cause of perinatal mortality and morbidity. Multiple signalling pathways regulate the balance between maintaining relative uterine quiescence during gestation, and the transition to the contractile state at the onset of parturition. Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP promotes myometrial relaxation, and thus quiescence, via effects on multiple intracellular targets including calcium channels, potassium channels and myosin light chain kinase. A complete understanding of cAMP regulatory pathways (synthesis and hydrolysis) would assist in the development of better tocolytics to delay or inhibit preterm labour. Here we review the enzymes involved in cAMP homoeostasis (adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases) and possible myometrial substrates for the cAMP dependent protein kinase. We must emphasise the need to identify novel pharmacological targets in human pregnant myometrium to achieve safe and selective uterine relaxation when this is indicated in preterm labour or other obstetric complications. PMID:17570154

  20. Fluorescence study of Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Wasylewski, M; Małecki, J; Wasylewski, Z

    1995-07-01

    Time-resolved, steady-state fluorescence and fluorescence-detected circular dichroism (FDCD) have been used to resolve the fluorescence contributions of the two tryptophan residues, Trp-13 and Trp-85, in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). The iodide and acrylamide quenching data show that in CRP one tryptophan residue, Trp-85, is buried within the protein matrix and the other, Trp-13, is moderately exposed on the surface of the protein. Fluorescence-quenching-resolved spectra show that Trp-13 has emission at about 350 nm and contributes 76-83% to the total fluorescence emission. The Trp-85, unquenchable by iodide and acrylamide, has the fluorescence emission at about 337 nm. The time-resolved fluorescence measurements show that Trp-13 has a longer fluorescence decay time. The Trp-85 exhibits a shorter fluorescence decay time. In the CRP-cAMP complex the Trp-85, previously buried in the apoprotein becomes totally exposed to the iodide and acrylamide quenchers. The FDCD spectra indicate that in the CRP-cAMP complex Trp-85 remains in the same environment as in the protein alone. It has been proposed that the binding of cAMP to CRP is accompanied by a hinge reorientation of two protein domains. This allows for penetration of the quencher molecules into the Trp-85 residue previously buried in the protein matrix. PMID:8590598

  1. Cyclic AMP negatively regulates prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens.

    PubMed

    Kalivoda, Eric J; Stella, Nicholas A; Aston, Marissa A; Fender, James E; Thompson, Paul P; Kowalski, Regis P; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2010-03-01

    Many Serratia marcescens strains produce the red pigment prodigiosin, which has antimicrobial and anti-tumor properties. Previous reports suggest that cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a positive regulator of prodigiosin production. Supporting this model, the addition of glucose to growth medium inhibited pigment production in rich and minimal media. Unexpectedly, we observed highly elevated levels of prodigiosin production in isogenic strains with mutations in genes involved in cAMP production (cyaA and crr) and in cAMP-dependent transcriptional signaling (crp). Multicopy expression of the Escherichia coli cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene, cpdA, also conferred a striking increase in prodigiosin production. Exogenous cAMP decreased both pigment production and pigA-lacZ transcription in the wild-type (WT) strain, and pigA-lacZ transcription was significantly increased in a crp mutant relative to WT. Suppressor and epistasis analysis indicate that the hyperpigment phenotype was dependent upon pigment biosynthetic genes (pigA, pigB, pigC, pigD and pigM). These experiments establish cAMP as a negative regulator of prodigiosin production in S. marcescens.

  2. EppA, a Putative Substrate of DdERK2, Regulates Cyclic AMP Relay and Chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Songyang; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2006-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase DdERK2 is critical for cyclic AMP (cAMP) relay and chemotaxis to cAMP and folate, but the details downstream of DdERK2 are unclear. To search for targets of DdERK2 in Dictyostelium discoideum,32PO43−-labeled protein samples from wild-type and Dderk2− cells were resolved by 2-dimensional electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry was used to identify a novel 45-kDa protein, named EppA (ERK2-dependent phosphoprotein A), as a substrate of DdERK2 in Dictyostelium. Mutation of potential DdERK2 phosphorylation sites demonstrated that phosphorylation on serine 250 of EppA is DdERK2 dependent. Changing serine 250 to alanine delayed development of Dictyostelium and reduced Dictyostelium chemotaxis to cAMP. Although overexpression of EppA had no significant effect on the development or chemotaxis of Dictyostelium, disruption of the eppA gene led to delayed development and reduced chemotactic responses to both cAMP and folate. Both eppA gene disruption and overexpression of EppA carrying the serine 250-to-alanine mutation led to inhibition of intracellular cAMP accumulation in response to chemoattractant cAMP, a pivotal process in Dictyostelium chemotaxis and development. Our studies indicate that EppA regulates extracellular cAMP-induced signal relay and chemotaxis of Dictyostelium. PMID:16835457

  3. Effect of Glucagon on Net Splanchnic Cyclic AMP Production in Normal and Diabetic Men

    PubMed Central

    Liljenquist, John E.; Bomboy, James D.; Lewis, Stephen B.; Sinclair-Smith, Bruce C.; Felts, Philip W.; Lacy, William W.; Crofford, Oscar B.; Liddle, Grant W.

    1974-01-01

    Glucagon activates hepatic adenylate cyclase, thereby increasing acutely the liver content of cyclic AMP (cAMP) as well as the release of cAMP into the hepatic vein. Insulin, on the other hand, antagonizes this glucagon-mediated cAMP production, thus providing a hypothetical mechanism through which insulin might correct some of the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes. To study this hormonal interaction in man, net splanchnic cAMP production (NScAMPP) was investigated in normal and insulin-dependent diabetic men under basal conditions and in response to intravenous glucagon, 50 ng/kg/min for 2 h. In normals (n=19), basal hepatic vein cAMP concentration was 23.6±1.1 nM and NScAMPP was 1.7±0.6 nmol/min. Glucagon stimulated NScAMPP in four normal subjects to a peak of 99.6±43 nmol/min at 25 min with a subsequent fall to 12.4±5.1 nmol/min by 90 min despite continuing glucagon infusion. Endogenous insulin secretion was stimulated as indicated by rising levels of immunoreactive insulin and C-peptide (connecting peptide) immunoreactivity, raising the possibility that endogenous insulin might be responsible for the fall in NScAMPP that followed the initial spike. In the diabetics (n=8), basal hepatic vein cAMP concentration was 24.7±1.2 nM and NScAMPP was undetectable. Glucagon stimulated NScAMPP in five diabetics to a peak of 169.9±42.6 with a subsequent fall to 17.4±3.9 nmol/min by 90 min even though endogenous insulin secretion was not stimulated (no rise in C-peptide immunoreactivity). Although the mean increase in NScAMPP was greater in the diabetics, the two groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions. In normal resting man the liver is a significant source of circulating cAMP. Diabetics do not release abnormally large amounts of hepatic cAMP under basal conditions. Glucagon markedly enhances hepatic cAMP release with a spike-decline pattern in both normal and diabetic men. The decline in hepatic cAMP release despite continuing glucagon stimulation is due

  4. Involvement of calyculin A inhibitable protein phosphatases in the cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway of mouse corticotroph tumour (AtT20) cells

    PubMed Central

    Antaraki, A; Ang, K L; Antoni, F A

    1997-01-01

    The role of non-calcineurin protein phosphatases in the cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway was examined in mouse pituitary corticotroph tumour (AtT20) cells. Blockers of protein phosphatases, calyculin A and okadaic acid, were applied in AtT20 cells depleted of rapidly mobilizable pools of intracellular calcium and activated by various cyclic AMP generating agonists. Inhibitors of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases were present throughout. The accumulation of cyclic AMP was monitored by radioimmunoassay, phosphodiesterase activity in cell homogenates was measured by radiometric assay. Neither calyculin A nor okadaic acid altered basal cyclic AMP levels but cyclic AMP formation induced by 41 amino acid residue corticotrophin releasing-factor (CRF) was strongly inhibited (up to 80%). 1-Norokadaone was inactive. Similar data were also obtained when isoprenaline or pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide1–38 were used as agonists. Pertussis toxin did not modify the inhibition of CRF-induced cyclic AMP production by calyculin A. Pretreatment with calyculin A completely prevented the stimulation of cyclic AMP formation by cholera toxin even in the presence of 0.5 mM isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) and 0.1 mM rolipram. Cholera toxin mediated ADP-ribosylation of the 45K and 52K molecular weight Gsα isoforms in membranes from calyculin A-pretreated cells was enhanced to 150–200% when compared with controls. Cholera toxin-induced cyclic AMP was reduced by calyculin A within 10 min when calyculin A was applied after a 90 min pretreatment with cholera toxin. Under these conditions the effect of calyculin A could be blocked by the combination of 0.5 mM IBMX and 0.1 mM rolipram, but not by 0.5 mM IBMX alone. Phosphodiesterase activity in AtT20 cell homogenates showed a significant, 2.7 fold increase after treatment with calyculin A. In control cells phosphodiesterase activity was blocked by 80% in the presence of IBMX (0.5 mM), or IBMX plus

  5. Human papillomavirus E5 protein induces expression of the EP4 subtype of prostaglandin E2 receptor in cyclic AMP response element-dependent pathways in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Min; Kim, Su-Hyeong; Lee, Yun-Il; Seo, Miran; Kim, So-Young; Song, Yong-Sang; Kim, Woo-Ho; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major cause of uterine cervical cancer, but the role of the HPV E5 in carcinogenesis is not clearly understood. Prostaglandins are known to contribute to carcinogenesis of cervical cancer, and we therefore investigated the effect of HPV16 E5 on the expression of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) receptors and underlying mechanisms. Stable expression of the E5 induced expression of the EP4 subtype of PGE2 receptors in C33A cervical cancer cells, and transfection of E5 small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased it. EP4 protein expression was increased in human cervical cancer tissues, and EP4 mediated E5-induced increase in anchorage-independent colony formation and vascular endothelial growth factor expression. E5 induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, and COX-2 increased PGE2 secretion and EP4 expression. The induction of EP4 by PGE2 and E5 was inhibited by an EP4 antagonist, inhibitors of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, and a cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element (CRE) decoy. E5 increased the luciferase expression controlled by a variant CRE of the EP4 promoter, and it also increased the binding of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) to oligonucleotides containing this CRE. We conclude that the HPV16 E5 protein induces EP4 receptor protein in cervical cancer cells and that this induction involves epidermal growth factor receptor, COX-2, PGE2, EP2 and EP4, protein kinase A, CREB and CRE.

  6. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  7. On the mechanism of action of lead in the testis: in vitro suppression of FSH receptors, cyclic AMP and steroidogenesis. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, J.P.; Salhanick, A.I.; Myers, K.I.

    1983-04-25

    The purpose of the present study was to determine by in vitro methods, if Pb acts by interfering directly with hormone binding, cyclic AMP production and steroidogenic enzyme activity. Sertoli cells were isolated from testes of prepubertal rats and cultured in the presence of 2.64 x 10/sup -4/ M of either NaAc (control) or PbAc for 1, 4, 24, 48, 96 or 144 hr. There was no reduction in FSH binding and in FSH-induced cyclic AMP after a 1-4 hr exposure to Pb. After a 24-hr exposure to Pb, the cells exhibited a 10-20% decrease in FSH binding and cyclic AMP production and after 96 hr there was a 75% decrease in these 2 parameters. The inhibition was greater in cells from 16 day old than from 20 day old rats, so that in the former, after a 144 hr exposure the FSH-induced cyclic AMP of the Pb exposed cells was only 3% of the amount produced by the NaAc exposed cells (i.e. a 97% inhibition). After in vitro exposure to Pb for 48 hr, the steroidogenic activity (progesterone conversion to steroid metabolites) of Sertoli cells was significantly reduced and their steroidogenesis was no longer stimulated by FSH. A crude testicular enzyme preparation containing 3..beta..-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3..beta..-HSD) exhibited approximately 25% reduction in activity if the assay buffer contained PbCl/sub 2/ instead of the equivalent in NaCl. Prolonged in vivo exposure to Pb resulted in approximately 50% reduction in 3..beta..-HSD activity. This is the first indication that in the testis Pb may act directly (immediate effect) by suppressing enzyme activities, and indirectly (long term effect) by reducing gonadotropin-receptor binding and the resultant cyclic AMP production.

  8. Cyclic AMP Control Measured in Two Compartments in HEK293 Cells: Phosphodiesterase KM Is More Important than Phosphodiesterase Localization

    PubMed Central

    Matthiesen, Karina; Nielsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDE). The knowledge of individual families and subtypes of PDEs is considerable, but how the different PDEs collaborate in the cell to control a cAMP signal is still not fully understood. In order to investigate compartmentalized cAMP signaling, we have generated a membrane-targeted variant of the cAMP Bioluminiscence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) sensor CAMYEL and have compared intracellular cAMP measurements with it to measurements with the cytosolic BRET sensor CAMYEL in HEK293 cells. With these sensors we observed a slightly higher cAMP response to adenylyl cyclase activation at the plasma membrane compared to the cytosol, which is in accordance with earlier results from Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors. We have analyzed PDE activity in fractionated lysates from HEK293 cells using selective PDE inhibitors and have identified PDE3 and PDE10A as the major membrane-bound PDEs and PDE4 as the major cytosolic PDE. Inhibition of membrane-bound or cytosolic PDEs can potentiate the cAMP response to adenylyl cyclase activation, but we see no significant difference between the potentiation of the cAMP response at the plasma membrane and in cytosol when membrane-bound and cytosolic PDEs are inhibited. When different levels of stimulation were tested, we found that PDEs 3 and 10 are mainly responsible for cAMP degradation at low intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas PDE4 is more important for control of cAMP at higher concentrations. PMID:21931705

  9. Adenylate cyclase and the cyclic AMP receptor protein modulate stress resistance and virulence capacity of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Grant T; Norton, J Paul; Bower, Jean M; Mulvey, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    In many bacteria, the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) interacts with the transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP), forming active cAMP-CRP complexes that can control a multitude of cellular activities, including expanded carbon source utilization, stress response pathways, and virulence. Here, we assessed the role of cAMP-CRP as a regulator of stress resistance and virulence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC), the principal cause of urinary tract infections worldwide. Deletion of genes encoding either CRP or CyaA, the enzyme responsible for cAMP synthesis, attenuates the ability of UPEC to colonize the bladder in a mouse infection model, dependent on intact innate host defenses. UPEC mutants lacking cAMP-CRP grow normally in the presence of glucose but are unable to utilize alternate carbon sources like amino acids, the primary nutrients available to UPEC within the urinary tract. Relative to the wild-type UPEC isolate, the cyaA and crp deletion mutants are sensitive to nitrosative stress and the superoxide generator methyl viologen but remarkably resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and acid stress. In the mutant strains, H(2)O(2) resistance correlates with elevated catalase activity attributable in part to enhanced translation of the alternate sigma factor RpoS. Acid resistance was promoted by both RpoS-independent and RpoS-dependent mechanisms, including expression of the RpoS-regulated DNA-binding ferritin-like protein Dps. We conclude that balanced input from many cAMP-CRP-responsive elements, including RpoS, is critical to the ability of UPEC to handle the nutrient limitations and severe environmental stresses present within the mammalian urinary tract.

  10. Trafficking and Gating of Hyperpolarization-activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Channels Are Regulated by Interaction with Tetratricopeptide Repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting Protein (TRIP8b) and Cyclic AMP at Distinct Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ye; Noam, Yoav; Lewis, Alan S.; Gallagher, Johnie J.; Wadman, Wytse J.; Baram, Tallie Z.; Chetkovich, Dane M.

    2011-01-01

    Ion channel trafficking and gating are often influenced by interactions with auxiliary subunits. Tetratricopeptide repeat-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) is an auxiliary subunit for neuronal hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. TRIP8b interacts directly with two distinct sites of HCN channel pore-forming subunits to control channel trafficking and gating. Here we use mutagenesis combined with electrophysiological studies to define and distinguish the functional importance of the HCN/TRIP8b interaction sites. Interaction with the last three amino acids of the HCN1 C terminus governed the effect of TRIP8b on channel trafficking, whereas TRIP8b interaction with the HCN1 cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD) affected trafficking and gating. Biochemical studies revealed that direct interaction between TRIP8b and the HCN1 CNBD was disrupted by cAMP and that TRIP8b binding to the CNBD required an arginine residue also necessary for cAMP binding. In accord, increasing cAMP levels in cells antagonized the up-regulation of HCN1 channels mediated by a TRIP8b construct binding the CNBD exclusively. These data illustrate the distinct roles of the two TRIP8b-HCN interaction domains and suggest that TRIP8b and cAMP may directly compete for binding the HCN CNBD to control HCN channel gating, kinetics, and trafficking. PMID:21504900

  11. Cyclic AMP regulation of early gene expression in Dictyostelium discoideum: mediation via the cell surface cyclic AMP receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mann, S K; Firtel, R A

    1987-01-01

    We examined two sets of genes expressed early in the developmental cycle of Dictyostelium discoideum that appear to be regulated by cyclic AMP (cAMP). The transcripts of both sets of genes were not detectable in vegetative cells. During normal development on filter pads, RNA complementary to these genes could be detected at about 2 h, peaked around 6 to 8 h, and decreased gradually thereafter. Expression of these genes upon starvation in shaking culture was stimulated by pulsing the cells with nanomolar levels of cAMP, a condition that mimics the in vivo pulsing during normal aggregation. Expression was inhibited by caffeine or by continuous levels of cAMP, a condition found later in development when in vivo expression of these genes decreased. The inhibition of caffeine could be overcome by pulsing cells with cAMP. These results suggest that the expression is mediated via the cell surface cAMP receptor, but does not require a rise in intracellular cAMP. mRNA from a gene of the second class was induced upon starvation, peaked by 2.5 h of development, and then declined. In contrast to the other genes, its expression was maintained by continuous levels of cAMP and repressed by cAMP pulses. These and other results on a number of classes of developmentally regulated genes indicates that changing levels of cAMP, acting via the cell surface cAMP receptor, are involved in controlling these groups of genes. We also examined the structure and partial sequence of the cAMP pulse-induced genes. The two tandemly duplicated M3 genes were almost continuously homologous over the sequenced portion of the protein-coding region except for a region near the N-terminal end. The two M3 genes had regions of homology in the 5' flanking sequence and showed slight homology to the same regions in gene D2, another cAMP pulse-induced gene. D2 showed extremely significant homology over its entire sequenced length to an acetylcholinesterase. The results presented here and by others suggest that

  12. Modulation of 3',5'-cyclic AMP homeostasis in human platelets by coffee and individual coffee constituents.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Gina A; Bakuradze, Tamara; Eirich, Marion; Erk, Thomas; Baum, Matthias; Habermeyer, Michael; Eisenbrand, Gerhard; Richling, Elke

    2014-11-14

    3',5'-Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is one of the most important second messengers in mammalian cells, mediating a multitude of diverse cellular signalling responses. Its homeostasis is primarily regulated by adenylate cyclases and phosphodiesterases (PDE), the activities of which are partially dependent on the downstream events of adenosine receptor signalling. The present study was conducted to determine whether coffee constituents other than caffeine can influence the homeostasis of intracellular cAMP in vitro and in vivo by evaluating the effects of selected constituents present in coffee, coffee brews and coffee extracts on platelet PDE activity. In addition, to evaluate the potential effects of these constituents on platelet cAMP concentrations and PDE activity in humans, a 7-week pilot intervention study with eight subjects was conducted. The subjects consumed a regular commercial coffee and a low-caffeine coffee at a rate of 750 ml/d for 2 weeks each. The in vivo results revealed a highly significant inhibition of PDE activity (P< 0·001) after coffee intervention that was not directly dependent on the caffeine content of coffee. Although our in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that caffeine plays some role in the modulation of platelet cAMP status, other natural and roasting-associated compounds such as pyrazines and other currently unidentified species also appear to contribute significantly. In conclusion, moderate consumption of coffee can modulate platelet PDE activity and cAMP concentrations in humans, which may contribute to the putative beneficial health effects of coffee. Further detailed mechanistic investigations will be required to substantiate these beneficial effects and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  13. Interleukin-6- and Cyclic AMP-Mediated Signaling Potentiates Neuroendocrine Differentiation of LNCaP Prostate Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deeble, Paul D.; Murphy, Daniel J.; Parsons, Sarah J.; Cox, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    Neuroendocrine (NE) differentiation in prostatic adenocarcinomas has been reported to be an early marker for development of androgen independence. Secretion of mitogenic peptides from nondividing NE cells is thought to contribute to a more aggressive disease by promoting the proliferation of surrounding tumor cells. We undertook studies to determine whether the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP could be induced to acquire NE characteristics by treatment with agents that are found in the complex environment in which progression of prostate cancer towards androgen independence occurs. We found that cotreatment of LNCaP cells with agents that signal through cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), such as epinephrine and forskolin, and with the cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) promoted the acquisition of an NE morphological phenotype above that seen with single agents. Convergent IL-6 and PKA signaling also resulted in potentiated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation without affecting the level of signal transducer and activator of transcription or PKA activation observed with these agents alone. Cotreatment with epinephrine and IL-6 synergistically increased c-fos transcription as well as transcription from the β4 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit promoter. Potentiated transcription from these elements was shown to be dependent on the MAPK pathway. Most importantly, cotreatment with PKA activators and IL-6 resulted in increased secretion of mitogenic neuropeptides. These results indicate that PKA and IL-6 signaling participates in gene transcriptional changes that reflect acquisition of an NE phenotype by LNCaP cells and suggest that similar signaling mechanisms, particularly at sites of metastasis, may be responsible for the increased NE content of many advanced prostate carcinomas. PMID:11713282

  14. Ecklonia cava Polyphenol Has a Protective Effect against Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in a Cyclic AMP-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Haruka; Goto, Mayu; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2015-06-18

    Previously, we showed that Ecklonia cava polyphenol (ECP) treatment suppressed ethanol-induced increases in hepatocyte death by scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and maintaining intracellular glutathione levels. Here, we examined the effects of ECP on the activities of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and their regulating mechanisms in ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated with or without 100 mM ethanol. ECP was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. ECP was added to cultured cells that had been incubated with or without ethanol. The cells were incubated for 0-24 h. In cultured hepatocytes, the ECP treatment with ethanol inhibited cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity, which is related to the production of ROS when large quantities of ethanol are oxidized. On the other hand, ECP treatment with ethanol increased the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These changes in activities of CYP2E1 and ADH were suppressed by treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. ECP treatment with ethanol enhanced cyclic AMP concentrations compared with those of control cells. ECP may be a candidate for preventing ethanol-induced liver injury via regulating alcohol metabolic enzymes in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner.

  15. Ecklonia cava Polyphenol Has a Protective Effect against Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in a Cyclic AMP-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Haruka; Goto, Mayu; Matsui-Yuasa, Isao; Kojima-Yuasa, Akiko

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we showed that Ecklonia cava polyphenol (ECP) treatment suppressed ethanol-induced increases in hepatocyte death by scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and maintaining intracellular glutathione levels. Here, we examined the effects of ECP on the activities of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and their regulating mechanisms in ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated with or without 100 mM ethanol. ECP was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. ECP was added to cultured cells that had been incubated with or without ethanol. The cells were incubated for 0–24 h. In cultured hepatocytes, the ECP treatment with ethanol inhibited cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) expression and activity, which is related to the production of ROS when large quantities of ethanol are oxidized. On the other hand, ECP treatment with ethanol increased the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These changes in activities of CYP2E1 and ADH were suppressed by treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. ECP treatment with ethanol enhanced cyclic AMP concentrations compared with those of control cells. ECP may be a candidate for preventing ethanol-induced liver injury via regulating alcohol metabolic enzymes in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner. PMID:26096275

  16. Biguanides suppress hepatic glucagon signalling by decreasing production of cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Miller, Russell A; Chu, Qingwei; Xie, Jianxin; Foretz, Marc; Viollet, Benoit; Birnbaum, Morris J

    2013-02-14

    Glucose production by the liver is essential for providing a substrate for the brain during fasting. The inability of insulin to suppress hepatic glucose output is a major aetiological factor in the hyperglycaemia of type-2 diabetes mellitus and other diseases of insulin resistance. For fifty years, one of the few classes of therapeutics effective in reducing glucose production has been the biguanides, which include phenformin and metformin, the latter the most frequently prescribed drug for type-2 diabetes. Nonetheless, the mechanism of action of biguanides remains imperfectly understood. The suggestion a decade ago that metformin reduces glucose synthesis through activation of the enzyme AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been challenged by genetic loss-of-function experiments. Here we provide a novel mechanism by which metformin antagonizes the action of glucagon, thus reducing fasting glucose levels. In mouse hepatocytes, metformin leads to the accumulation of AMP and related nucleotides, which inhibit adenylate cyclase, reduce levels of cyclic AMP and protein kinase A (PKA) activity, abrogate phosphorylation of critical protein targets of PKA, and block glucagon-dependent glucose output from hepatocytes. These data support a mechanism of action for metformin involving antagonism of glucagon, and suggest an approach for the development of antidiabetic drugs.

  17. Role of coronary endothelium in cyclic AMP formation by the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, K.; Schrader, J.

    1986-03-01

    In order to quantify the activation of adenylate cyclase of the coronary endothelium in vivo, endothelial adenine nucleotides of isolated guinea pig hearts were selectively pre-labeled by intracoronary infusion of tritiated (H3)-adenosine, and the coronary efflux of H3-cAMP was measured. The adenosine receptor agonist, NECA (12 ..mu..M), increased total cAMP release 4 fold, and raised H3-cAMP release 22 fold. Several classes of coronary vasodilators (adenosine, L-PIA, D-PIA, the beta 2-adrenergic agonist procaterol, and PGE1) caused dose-dependent increases in endothelial-derived H3-cAMP release. These increases were accompanied by decreases in vascular resistance, at agonist doses without positive intropic effects. Hypoxic perfusion also raised H3-cAMP release, and this was antagonized by theophylline. It is concluded: (1) cyclic AMP formation by coronary endothelium can dominate total cAMP production by the heart; (2) coronary endothelial adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors for adenosine (A2), catecholamines (beta2) and prostaglandins are activated in parallel with coronary vasodilation; (3) endothelial adenylate cyclase can be activated by endogenous adenosine.

  18. Increase in Endogenous and Exogenous Cyclic AMP Levels Inhibits Sclerotial Development in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    PubMed Central

    Rollins, Jeffrey A.; Dickman, Martin B.

    1998-01-01

    Growth and development of a wild-type Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolate were examined in the presence of various pharmacological compounds to investigate signal transduction pathways that influence the development of sclerotia. Compounds known to increase endogenous cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in other organisms by inhibiting phosphodiesterase activity (caffeine and 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine) or by activating adenylate cyclase (NaF) reduced or eliminated sclerotial development in S. sclerotiorum. Growth in the presence of 5 mM caffeine correlated with increased levels of endogenous cAMP in mycelia. In addition, incorporation of cAMP into the growth medium decreased or eliminated the production of sclerotia in a concentration-dependent manner and increased the accumulation of oxalic acid. Inhibition of sclerotial development was cAMP specific, as exogenous cyclic GMP, AMP, and ATP did not influence sclerotial development. Transfer of developing cultures to cAMP-containing medium at successive time points demonstrated that cAMP inhibits development prior to or during sclerotial initiation. Together, these results indicate that cAMP plays a role in the early transition between mycelial growth and sclerotial development. PMID:9647827

  19. Opposing actions of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and GMP on temperature in conscious guinea-pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williaes, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the intracerebroventricular administration of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Db-cAMP) induced hyperthermia in guinea pigs which was not mediated through prostaglandins or norepinephrine since a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor and an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocking agent did not antagonize the hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to Db-cAMP was attenuated by the central administration of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, which indicates that cAMP may be involved, through beta-adrenergic receptors, in the central regulation of heat production and conservation. The central administration of Db-cGMP produced hypothermia which was not mediated via histamine H1 or H2 receptors and serotonin. The antagonism of hypothermia induced by Db-cGMP and acetylcholine + physostigmine by central administration of a cholinergic muscarine receptor antagonist and not by a cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist suggests that cholinoceptive neurons and endogenous cGMP may regulate heat loss through cholinergic muscarine receptors. It is concluded that these results indicate a regulatory role in thermoregulation provided by a balance between opposing actions of cAMP and cGMP in guinea pigs.

  20. Serratia marcescens Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Controls Transcription of EepR, a Novel Regulator of Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nicholas A.; Lahr, Roni M.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Kalivoda, Eric J.; Hunt, Kristin M.; Kwak, Daniel H.; Liu, Xinyu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Serratia marcescens generates secondary metabolites and secreted enzymes, and it causes hospital infections and community-acquired ocular infections. Previous studies identified cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) as an indirect inhibitor of antimicrobial secondary metabolites. Here, we identified a putative two-component regulator that suppressed crp mutant phenotypes. Evidence supports that the putative response regulator eepR was directly transcriptionally inhibited by cAMP-CRP. EepR and the putative sensor kinase EepS were necessary for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, including prodigiosin- and serratamolide-dependent phenotypes, swarming motility, and hemolysis. Recombinant EepR bound to the prodigiosin and serratamolide promoters in vitro. Together, these data introduce a novel regulator of secondary metabolites that directly connects the broadly conserved metabolism regulator CRP with biosynthetic genes that may contribute to competition with other microbes. IMPORTANCE This study identifies a new transcription factor that is directly controlled by a broadly conserved transcription factor, CRP. CRP is well studied in its role to help bacteria respond to the amount of nutrients in their environment. The new transcription factor EepR is essential for the bacterium Serratia marcescens to produce two biologically active compounds, prodigiosin and serratamolide. These two compounds are antimicrobial and may allow S. marcescens to compete for limited nutrients with other microorganisms. Results from this study tie together the CRP environmental nutrient sensor with a new regulator of antimicrobial compounds. Beyond microbial ecology, prodigiosin and serratamolide have therapeutic potential; therefore, understanding their regulation is important for both applied and basic science. PMID:25897029

  1. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Aykaç Fas, Burcu; Tutar, Yusuf; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  2. Cyclic AMP Signaling through Epac Axis Modulates Human Hemogenic Endothelium and Enhances Hematopoietic Cell Generation.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shobhit; Rönn, Roger E; Guibentif, Carolina; Moraghebi, Roksana; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

    2016-05-10

    Hematopoietic cells emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the developing embryo. Mechanisms behind human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development remain unclear. Using a human pluripotent stem cell differentiation model, we report that cyclic AMP (cAMP) induction dramatically increases HSC-like cell frequencies. We show that hematopoietic cell generation requires cAMP signaling through the Exchange proteins activated by cAMP (cAMP-Epac) axis; Epac signaling inhibition decreased both hemogenic and non-hemogenic endothelium, and abrogated hematopoietic cell generation. Furthermore, in hematopoietic progenitor and stem-like cells, cAMP induction mitigated oxidative stress, created a redox-state balance, and enhanced C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression, benefiting the maintenance of these primitive cells. Collectively, our study provides insights and mechanistic details on the previously unrecognized role of cAMP signaling in regulating human hematopoietic development. These findings advance the mechanistic understanding of hematopoietic development toward the development of transplantable human hematopoietic cells for therapeutic needs. PMID:27117782

  3. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  4. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  5. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  6. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  7. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling.

  8. Inhibition of the Raf-1 kinase by cyclic AMP agonists causes apoptosis of v-abl-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Weissinger, E M; Eissner, G; Grammer, C; Fackler, S; Haefner, B; Yoon, L S; Lu, K S; Bazarov, A; Sedivy, J M; Mischak, H; Kolch, W

    1997-01-01

    Here we investigate the role of the Raf-1 kinase in transformation by the v-abl oncogene. Raf-1 can activate a transforming signalling cascade comprising the consecutive activation of Mek and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erks). In v-abl-transformed cells the endogenous Raf-1 protein was phosphorylated on tyrosine and displayed high constitutive kinase activity. The activities of the Erks were constitutively elevated in both v-raf- and v-abl-transformed cells. In both cell types the activities of Raf-1 and v-raf were almost completely suppressed after activation of the cyclic AMP-dependent kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]), whereas the v-abl kinase was not affected. Raf inhibition substantially diminished the activities of Erks in v-raf-transformed cells but not in v-abl-transformed cells, indicating that v-abl can activate Erks by a Raf-1-independent pathway. PKA activation induced apoptosis in v-abl-transformed cells while reverting v-raf transformation without severe cytopathic effects. Overexpression of Raf-1 in v-abl-transformed cells partially protected the cells from apoptosis induced by PKA activation. In contrast to PKA activators, a Mek inhibitor did not induce apoptosis. The diverse biological responses correlated with the status of c-myc gene expression. v-abl-transformed cells featured high constitutive levels of expression of c-myc, which were not reduced following PKA activation. Myc activation has been previously shown to be essential for transformation by oncogenic Abl proteins. Using estrogen-regulated c-myc and temperature-sensitive Raf-1 mutants, we found that Raf-1 activation could protect cells from c-myc-induced apoptosis. In conclusion, these results suggest (i) that Raf-1 participates in v-abl transformation via an Erk-independent pathway by providing a survival signal which complements c-myc in transformation, and (ii) that cAMP agonists might become useful for the treatment of malignancies where abl oncogenes are involved, such as

  9. Cyclic AMP efflux inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents for leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Dominique R.; Smagley, Yelena; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark B.; Evangelisti, Annette; Matlawska-Wasowska, Ksenia; Winter, Stuart S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Chigaev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Apoptotic evasion is a hallmark of cancer. We propose that some cancers may evade cell death by regulating 3′-5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), which is associated with pro-apoptotic signaling. We hypothesize that leukemic cells possess mechanisms that efflux cAMP from the cytoplasm, thus protecting them from apoptosis. Accordingly, cAMP efflux inhibition should result in: cAMP accumulation, activation of cAMP-dependent downstream signaling, viability loss, and apoptosis. We developed a novel assay to assess cAMP efflux and performed screens to identify inhibitors. In an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model, several identified compounds reduced cAMP efflux, appropriately modulated pathways that are responsive to cAMP elevation (cAMP-responsive element-binding protein phosphorylation, and deactivation of Very Late Antigen-4 integrin), and induced mitochondrial depolarization and caspase activation. Blocking adenylyl cyclase activity was sufficient to reduce effects of the most potent compounds. These compounds also decreased cAMP efflux and viability of B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) cell lines and primary patient samples, but not of normal primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our data suggest that cAMP efflux is a functional feature that could be therapeutically targeted in leukemia. Furthermore, because some of the identified drugs are currently used for treating other illnesses, this work creates an opportunity for repurposing. PMID:27129155

  10. Cyclic nucleotides of cone-dominant retinas. Reduction of cyclic AMP levels by light and by cone degeneration.

    PubMed

    Farber, D B; Souza, D W; Chase, D G; Lolley, R N

    1981-01-01

    Dark-adapted retinas or whole eyes of 13-line ground squirrels (Citellus tridecemlineatus) and western fence lizards (Sceloporus occidentalis) contain higher levels of cyclic AMP than of cyclic GMP. In these cone-dominant retinas, light reduces cyclic AMP content selectively. Freezing of dark- or light-adapted retinas or eyes also reduces cyclic AMP content, with only minimal changes in cyclic GMP levels. In addition, exposure of frozen retinas of dark-adapted ground squirrel to light results in a significant decrease in cyclic AMP content. The destruction of cone visual cells of ground squirrel retina by iodoacetic acid injection decreases the cyclic nucleotide content of the dark-adapted retina. Considering the relative loss of cyclic nucleotides from cone degeneration, we estimate that the content of cyclic AMP in visual cells of ground squirrel retina is about four times greater than that of cyclic GMP. PMID:6256308

  11. Effect of Electrical Stimulation on Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population and Cyclic AMP Production in Chicken and Rat Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Strietzel, Catherine J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (PAR) and its coupling to Adenosine 3'5' Cyclic Monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the PAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture, were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the PAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability, of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the PAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  12. Protein Kinase A-Dependent and -Independent Signaling Pathways Contribute to Cyclic AMP-Stimulated Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Cass, Lisa A.; Summers, Scott A.; Prendergast, Gregory V.; Backer, Jonathan M.; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Meinkoth, Judy L.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP) on cell proliferation are cell type specific. Although the growth-inhibitory effects of cAMP have been well studied, much less is known regarding how cAMP stimulates proliferation. We report that cAMP stimulates proliferation through both protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent and PKA-independent signaling pathways and that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) is required for cAMP-stimulated mitogenesis. In cells where cAMP is a mitogen, cAMP-elevating agents stimulate membrane ruffling, Akt phosphorylation, and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70s6k) activity. cAMP effects on ruffle formation and Akt were PKA independent but sensitive to wortmannin. In contrast, cAMP-stimulated p70s6k activity was repressed by PKA inhibitors but not by wortmannin or microinjection of the N-terminal SH2 domain of the p85 regulatory subunit of PI3K, indicating that p70s6k and Akt can be regulated independently. Microinjection of highly specific inhibitors of PI3K or Rac1, or treatment with the p70s6k inhibitor rapamycin, impaired cAMP-stimulated DNA synthesis, demonstrating that PKA-dependent and -independent pathways contribute to cAMP-mediated mitogenesis. Direct elevation of PI3K activity through microinjection of an antibody that stimulates PI3K activity or stable expression of membrane-localized p110 was sufficient to confer hormone-independent DNA synthesis when accompanied by elevations in p70s6k activity. These findings indicate that multiple pathways contribute to cAMP-stimulated mitogenesis, only some of which are PKA dependent. Furthermore, they demonstrate that the ability of cAMP to stimulate both p70s6k- and PI3K-dependent pathways is an important facet of cAMP-regulated cell cycle progression. PMID:10454535

  13. Nerve Growth Factor is Required for Induction of c-Fos Immunoreactivity by Serum, Depolarization, Cyclic AMP or Trauma in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Buckmaster, A; Nobes, C D; Edwards, S N; Tolkovsky, A M

    1991-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces transient Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) independently of any other factor, both in newly isolated rat sympathetic neurons and in established cultures after NGF deprivation. The same proportion of neurons that express Fos-IR in response to NGF also survive. In addition to direct stimulation of Fos-IR expression, the presence or recent exposure to NGF is required to obtain Fos-IR expression by other stimuli. In newly isolated neurons no Fos-IR is detected in response to stimulation by serum alone and a response to depolarization or cyclic AMP is obtained only if neurons are stimulated within a short period after ganglion excision. In established cultures none of these stimuli, nor the trauma of cutting neurites or spiking cell bodies with a microinjection needle induce Fos-IR unless NGF is present or had been removed for <8 - 16 h. The lack of response is not due to a general decrease in the rate of protein or RNA synthesis. These findings show that in regenerating sympathetic neurons NGF induces c-Fos and suggest that NGF may activate a master trigger that is required for c-Fos expression to be induced by other stimuli.

  14. Effects of flavonoids on cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase and lipid mobilization in rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kuppusamy, U R; Das, N P

    1992-10-01

    Thirty-one flavonoids were tested for their effects on low Km phosphodiesterase with cyclic AMP as the substrate. Quercetin, luteolin, scutellarein, phloretin and genistein showed inhibitory potencies comparable to or greater than 3-isobutyl-2-methylxanthine (EC50 30-50 microM). Only four compounds namely, catechin, epicatechin, taxifolin and fustin stimulated the enzyme activity (stimulatory EC50 130-240 microM). The most potent phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors were aglycones that had a C2.3 double bond, a keto group at C4 and hydroxyls at C3' and/or C4'. However, when the C-ring is opened then the requirement for the C2.3 double bond is eliminated. The same series of flavonoids were also tested for their lipolytic activity. The structural features required for effective synergistic lipolysis (with epinephrine) were generally similar to that required for potent PDE inhibition except that, for lipolytic activity, an intact C-ring was necessary. Fisetin and quercetin having the above-mentioned structure showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in lipolysis which was synergistic with epinephrine. Only butein and hesperetin showed inhibition of epinephrine-induced lipolysis, and their effect was dose-dependent. A time-course study indicated that hesperetin was able to delay the lipolytic action of epinephrine. It is most likely that the lipolytic effects of these compounds were not a result of PDE inhibition, as the orders of potency for the two activities had poor correlation. Apparently, the effective lipolytic flavonoids were also potent PDE inhibitors but not all the PDE inhibitors were able to induce lipolysis.

  15. Cyclic AMP modulates electrical signaling in a weakly electric fish.

    PubMed

    McAnelly, L; Silva, A; Zakon, H H

    2003-04-01

    Many species of electric fish show diurnal or socially elicited variation in electric organ discharge amplitude. In Sternopygus macrurus, activation of protein kinase A by 8-bromo-cAMP increases electrocyte sodium current magnitude. To determine whether the behavioral plasticity in electric organ discharge amplitude is controlled by electrocyte biophysical properties, we examined whether the effects of phosphorylation on ion currents in the electric organ translate directly into electric organ discharge changes. We injected the electric organ of restrained fish with 8-bromo-cAMP and monitored the electric organ discharge. The effect of protein kinase A activation on electrocyte action potentials was examined in isolated electric organ using two-electrode current clamp. Electric organ discharge and action potential amplitude and pulse duration increased in response to 8-bromo-cAMP. Pulse and action potential duration both increased by about 25%. However, the increase in electric organ discharge amplitude (approximately 400%) was several-fold greater than the action potential amplitude increase (approximately 40%). Resting membrane resistance decreased in electrocytes exposed to 8-bromo-cAMP. We propose that in the Thevenin equivalent circuit of the electric organ a moderate increase in action potential amplitude combined with a decrease in internal resistance produces a greater voltage drop across the external resistance (the water around the fish), accounting for the large increase in the externally recorded electric organ discharge.

  16. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase interferes with GTP. gamma. S stimulated IP sub 3 formation in differentiated HL-60 cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Misaki, Naoyuki; Imaizumi, Taro; Watanabe, Yashuiro )

    1989-01-01

    The effects of addition of activated cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the function of islet-activating protein (IAP)-sensitive GTP-binding (G) protein were studied in the plasma membranes of {sup 3}H-inositol-labeled differentiated human leukemic (HL-60) cells. Pretreatment of the membranes with activated PKA in the presence of MgATP for 15 min. at 37{degree}C decreased GTP {gamma}S-stimulated inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}) formation by about 30%, but had no influence on Ca{sup 2+}-stimulated IP{sub 3} formation. And autoradiography in the phosphorylation experiments of solubilized HL-60 cell membranes by PKA showed some {sup 32}P incorporated bands, and among them one of the major bands showed the migration at 40 kDa supporting that the G protein coupling with PI response was phosphorylated by PKA. These results showed that pretreatment with activated PKA inhibited the mediating function of the G protein between the fMLP receptor and phospholipase C by its phosphorylation.

  17. The Small Molecule Triclabendazole Decreases the Intracellular Level of Cyclic AMP and Increases Resistance to Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yong Joo; Shi, Runhua; Witt, Stephan N.

    2013-01-01

    The Ras-adenylyl cyclase-protein kinase A nutrient-sensing pathway controls metabolism, proliferation and resistance to stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genetic disruption of this pathway increases resistance to a variety of stresses. We show here that the pharmacological inhibition of this pathway by the drug triclabendazole increases resistance to oxidants, heat stress and extends the chronological life. Evidence is presented that triclabendazole decreases the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase and triggers the parallel rapid translocation of the stress-resistance transcription factor Msn2 from the cytosol into the nucleus, as deduced from experiments employing a strain in which MSN2 is replaced with MSN2-GFP (GFP, green fluorescent protein). Msn2 and Msn4 are responsible for activating the transcription of numerous genes that encode proteins that protect cells from stress. The results are consistent with triclabendazole either inhibiting the association of Ras with adenylyl cyclase or directly inhibiting adenylyl cyclase, which in turn triggers Msn2/4 to enter the nucleus and activate stress-responsible element gene expression. PMID:23667708

  18. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents down-regulate the oxidative burst induced by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in adherent neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Ottonello, L; Morone, M P; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1995-01-01

    Human neutrophils, plated on fibronectin-precoated wells, were found to release large quantities of superoxide anion (O2-) in response to GM-CSF. O2- production was reduced by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and the phosphodiesterase type IV (PDE IV) inhibitor RO 20-1724. Both agents are known to increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels by inducing its production (PGE2) or blocking its catabolism (RO 20-1724). When added in combination, PGE2 and RO 20-1724 had a marked synergistic inhibitory effect, which was reproduced by replacing PGE2 with a direct activator of adenylate cyclase, i.e. forskolin (FK). Moreover, the neutrophil response to GM-CSF was inhibited by a membrane-permeable analogue of cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. As GM-CSF and PGE2 are known to be generated at tissue sites of inflammation, the results suggest the existence of a PGE2-dependent regulatory pathway potentially capable of controlling the neutrophil response to GM-CSF, in turn limiting the risk of local oxidative tissue injury. Moreover, owing to its susceptibility to amplification by RO 20-1724, the PGE2-dependent pathway and in particular PDE-IV may represent a pharmacological target to reduce the generation of histotoxic oxidants by GM-CSF-responding neutrophils. PMID:7664497

  19. Carbachol and bradykinin elevate cyclic AMP and rapidly deplete ATP in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Suidan, H S; Murrell, R D; Tolkovsky, A M

    1991-01-01

    The agonists carbachol (CCh) and bradykinin (BK) and 54 mM KCl (high K+) were among the most potent stimulants of cyclic AMP (cAMP) production in cultured rat sympathetic neurons, measured with the use of a high-fidelity assay developed for small samples. The rise in cAMP evoked by CCh (through muscarinic receptors), BK, and high K+ was inhibited in Ca2(+)-depleted medium (1.3 mM Ca2+ and 2 mM BAPTA or EGTA), which also prevented the sustained rise in [Ca2+]i evoked by each of these stimuli, showing that elevation of cAMP requires extracellular Ca2+ and, possibly, Ca2+ influx. Preliminary results obtained with the novel calmodulin inhibitor CGS 9343B, which blocked the elevation of cAMP, and with the cyclogenase inhibitor indomethacin, which partially blocked the actions of the agonists but not those of high K+, suggest that calmodulin and arachidonate metabolites may be two components of the signaling pathway. In addition to their effects on cAMP metabolism, CCh, muscarine, and BK, but not nicotine, caused a 30-40% decrease in ATP levels. This effect was much greater than that evoked by high K+ and was largely inhibited by CGS 9343B but slightly enhanced in the Ca(+)-depleted medium, showing that agonists are still active in the absence of [Ca2+]o. Thus, agonists that activate phosphoinositide metabolism can also increase cAMP production and substantially deplete cells of ATP. These novel actions may have to be taken into account when the mechanisms by which such agonists regulate cell function are being considered. PMID:1848792

  20. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3', 3'-cGAMP).

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Zachary F; Wang, Xin C; Wright, Todd A; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C

    2016-02-16

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3', 3'-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling. PMID:26839412

  1. The tib adherence locus of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Espert, Shirley M; Elsinghorst, Eric A; Munson, George P

    2011-03-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is a Gram-negative enteric pathogen that causes profuse watery diarrhea through the elaboration of heat-labile and/or heat-stable toxins. Virulence is also dependent upon the expression of adhesive pili and afimbrial adhesins that allow the pathogen to adhere to the intestinal epithelium or mucosa. Both types of enterotoxins are regulated at the level of transcription by cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP). To further our understanding of virulence gene regulation, an in silico approach was used to identify putative CRP binding sites in the genome of H10407 (O78:H11), an ETEC strain that was originally isolated from the stool of a Bangledeshi patient with cholera-like symptoms circa 1971. One of the predicted binding sites was located within an intergenic region upstream of tibDBCA. TibA is an autotransporter and afimbrial adhesin that is glycosylated by TibC. Expression of the TibA glycoprotein was abolished in an H10407 crp mutant and restored when crp was provided in trans. TibA-dependent aggregation was also abolished in a cyaA::kan strain and restored by addition of exogenous cAMP to the growth medium. DNase I footprinting confirmed that the predicted site upstream of tibDBCA is bound by CRP. Point mutations within the CRP binding site were found to abolish or significantly impair CRP-dependent activation of the tibDB promoter. Thus, these studies demonstrate that CRP positively regulates the expression of the glycosylated afimbrial adhesin TibA through occupancy of a binding site within tibDBp. PMID:21216994

  2. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates apoptosis by stabilizing the BH3-only protein Bim.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; Weston, Ross; Anderton, Holly; Ninnis, Robert; Goel, Pranay; Coley, Andrew; Huang, David C S; Wu, Li; Strasser, Andreas; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2011-01-01

    The proapoptotic Bcl2 homology domain 3(BH3)-only protein Bim is controlled by stringent post-translational regulation, predominantly through alterations in phosphorylation status. To identify new kinases involved in its regulation, we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using a non-spliceable variant of the predominant isoform--Bim(EL)--as the bait and identified the regulatory subunit of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A--PRKAR1A--as an interacting partner. We also show that protein kinase A (PKA) is a Bim(EL) isoform-specific kinase that promotes its stabilization. Inhibition of PKA or mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site within Bim(EL) resulted in its accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation. These results might have implications for human diseases that are characterized by abnormally increased PKA activity, such as the Carney complex and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:21151042

  3. Nucleotide sequences of fic and fic-1 genes involved in cell filamentation induced by cyclic AMP in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Kawamukai, M; Matsuda, H; Fujii, W; Utsumi, R; Komano, T

    1989-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of fic-1 involved in the cell filamentation induced by cyclic AMP in Escherichia coli and its normal counterpart fic were analyzed. The open reading frame of both fic-1 and fic coded for 200 amino acids. The Gly at position 55 in the Fic protein was changed to Arg in the Fic-1 protein. The promoter activity of fic was confirmed by fusing fic and lacZ. The gene downstream from fic was found to be pabA (p-aminobenzoate). There is an open reading frame (ORF190) coding for 190 amino acids upstream from the fic gene. Computer-assisted analysis showed that Fic has sequence similarity with part of CDC28 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, CDC2 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and FtsA of E. coli. In addition, ORF190 has sequence similarity with the cyclosporin A-binding protein cyclophilin. PMID:2546924

  4. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kusama, Kazuya; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Isaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP), but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin) in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC), nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells. PMID:26161798

  5. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells.

    PubMed

    Kusama, Kazuya; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Imakawa, Kazuhiko; Isaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP), but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin) in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC), nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells. PMID:26161798

  6. Cloning and sequencing of a calcium-binding protein regulated by cyclic AMP in the thyroid.

    PubMed Central

    Lefort, A; Lecocq, R; Libert, F; Lamy, F; Swillens, S; Vassart, G; Dumont, J E

    1989-01-01

    p24 is a thyroid protein (Mr 24,000) identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis on the basis that its synthesis and phosphorylation are up-regulated by thyrotropin and cyclic AMP agonists. p24 cDNA was cloned from a lambda gt11 cDNA library using a polyclonal antibody raised against the protein recovered from a Western blot spot. The encoded polypeptide (189 residues) displays a putative target-site for phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and belongs to the superfamily of proteins binding Ca2+ through 'EF hand' domains. It presents four such domains of which two agree closely with the consensus. The ability of p24 to bind Ca2+ has been directly confirmed on Western blots. p24 was detected in many tissues including the salivary glands, the lung and the brain. The ubiquitous nature of p24, together with its regulatory and sequence characteristics suggest that it constitutes an important target common to the cyclic AMP and Ca2+-phosphatidylinositol cascades. Images PMID:2540953

  7. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mednieks, Maija I.; Popova, Irina A.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 is determined. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particular cell fractions with a (32P)-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP is followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. It is shown that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins exhibited some variability in tissues of individual animals, but showed no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. It is inferred that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions.

  8. Cyclic AMP inhibits secretion from electroporated human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Smolen, J E; Stoehr, S J; Kuczynski, B

    1991-02-01

    It has long been known that intracellular cAMP inhibits and cGMP enhances intact neutrophil function. However, these effects are modest and require relatively high concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides. We decided to re-examine the effects of cyclic nucleotides on Ca2(+)-induced secretion by electroporated cells. This system allowed us to bypass normal cell surface receptor-ligand interactions as well as to directly expose the intracellular space to native cyclic nucleotides. We found that concentrations of cAMP as low as 3 microM inhibited Ca2(+)-induced secretion; 30-300 microM cAMP was maximally inhibitory. cAMP was actually slightly more potent than dibutyryl cAMP, a membrane-permeant derivative. In contrast, cGMP was only slightly stimulatory at 3 microM and modestly inhibitory at 300 microM; dibutyryl cGMP was ineffective. A more detailed investigation of the effects of cAMP showed that inhibition was only obtained in the presence of Mg2+. Half-maximal inhibition by cAMP occurred at 10-30 microM. Inhibition by cAMP was achieved by shifting the Ca2+ dose-response curve for secretion to the right; this was observed for the release of both specific granules (vitamin B12 binding protein) and azurophil granules (B-glucuronidase). We previously showed that ATP could enhance Ca2(+)-induced secretion in the presence of Mg2+, apparently by interacting with a cell surface purine receptor. However, increasing concentrations of ATP could not overcome inhibition by cAMP; this suggested that cAMP acted at some site other than the purine receptor. Inhibition by cAMP was also less apparent in the presence of the protein kinase C agonist phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), suggesting that the cyclic nucleotide did not produce systemic desensitization of the neutrophils. In summary, these results demonstrate that low, physiologically relevant concentrations of cAMP can modulate neutrophil responsiveness. PMID:1846904

  9. Intraoperative urinary cyclic AMP monitoring in primary hyperparathyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Schenk, W G; Wills, M; MacLeod, M S; Hanks, J B

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study examined the utility of intraoperative urinary cyclic 3'5' adenosine monophosphate (UcAMP), an indicator of parathyroid (PTH) hormone end-organ activity, as a "biochemical frozen section," signaling the real-time resolution of PTH hyperactivity during surgery for primary hyperparathyroidism. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The unsuccessful initial neck exploration for primary hyperparathyroidism, leaving the patient with persistent hyperfunctioning parathyroid tissue, results in part from the surgeon's inability intraoperatively to correlate a gland's gross appearance and size estimation with physiologic function. Preoperative imaging, intraoperative imaging, and intraoperative histologic/cytologic surveillance have not resolved this dilemma. METHODS: Twenty-seven patients underwent a prospective intraoperative UcAMP monitoring protocol. The patients all had a clinical diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism and an average preoperative serum calcium of 12.0 +/- 0.3 mg/dl. UcAMP was assayed intraoperatively using 20-minute nonequilibrium radioimmunoassay providing real-time feedback to the operating team. RESULTS: All patients had an elevated UcAMP confirming PTh hyperactivity at the beginning of the procedure. One patient, subsequently found to have an supernumerary ectopic adenoma, had four normal glands identified intraoperatively, and his intraoperative UcAMP values corroborated persistent hyperparathyroidism, the UcAMP of the remaining 26 patients decreased from 7.0 +/- 1.1 to 2.7 +/- 0.7 nm.dl GF (p < .00005) after complete adenoma excision, and they remain normocalcemic. The protocol provided useful and relevant information to the operating team, and aided in surgical decision-making, in 10 of the 27 cases (37%). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative biochemical surveillance with ucAMP monitoring reliably signals resolution of PTH hyperfunction. It is a useful adjunct to the surgeon's skill, judgment, and experience in parathyroid surgery. PMID:8387765

  10. Second messenger-dependent protein kinases and protein synthesis regulate endogenous secretin receptor responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Ghadessy, Roxana S; Kelly, Eamonn

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of second messenger-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and C (PKC) in the regulation of endogenous secretin receptor responsiveness in NG108-15 mouse neuroblastoma×rat glioma hybrid cells. In whole cell cyclic AMP accumulation studies, activation of PKC either by phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) or by purinoceptor stimulation using uridine 5′-triphosphate (UTP) decreased secretin receptor responsiveness. PKC activation also inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation but did not affect cyclic AMP responses mediated by the prostanoid-IP receptor agonist iloprost, or the A2 adenosine receptor agonist 5′-(N-ethylcarboxamido) adenosine (NECA). In additivity experiments, saturating concentrations of secretin and iloprost were found to be additive in terms of cyclic AMP accumulation, whereas saturating concentrations of NECA and iloprost together were not. This suggests compartmentalization of Gs-coupling components in NG108-15 cells and possible heterologous regulation of secretin receptor responsiveness at the level of adenylyl cyclase activation. Cells exposed to the PKA inhibitor H-89, exhibited a time-dependent increase in secretin receptor responsiveness compared to control cells. This effect was selective since cyclic AMP responses to forskolin, iloprost and NECA were not affected by H-89 treatment. Furthermore, treatment with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide produced a time-dependent increase in secretin receptor responsiveness. Together these results indicate that endogenous secretin receptor responsiveness is regulated by PKC, PKA and protein neosynthesis in NG108-15 cells. PMID:11959806

  11. Cyclic AMP control measured in two compartments in HEK293 cells: phosphodiesterase K(M) is more important than phosphodiesterase localization.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Karina; Nielsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The intracellular second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) is degraded by phosphodiesterases (PDE). The knowledge of individual families and subtypes of PDEs is considerable, but how the different PDEs collaborate in the cell to control a cAMP signal is still not fully understood. In order to investigate compartmentalized cAMP signaling, we have generated a membrane-targeted variant of the cAMP Bioluminiscence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET) sensor CAMYEL and have compared intracellular cAMP measurements with it to measurements with the cytosolic BRET sensor CAMYEL in HEK293 cells. With these sensors we observed a slightly higher cAMP response to adenylyl cyclase activation at the plasma membrane compared to the cytosol, which is in accordance with earlier results from Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) sensors. We have analyzed PDE activity in fractionated lysates from HEK293 cells using selective PDE inhibitors and have identified PDE3 and PDE10A as the major membrane-bound PDEs and PDE4 as the major cytosolic PDE. Inhibition of membrane-bound or cytosolic PDEs can potentiate the cAMP response to adenylyl cyclase activation, but we see no significant difference between the potentiation of the cAMP response at the plasma membrane and in cytosol when membrane-bound and cytosolic PDEs are inhibited. When different levels of stimulation were tested, we found that PDEs 3 and 10 are mainly responsible for cAMP degradation at low intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas PDE4 is more important for control of cAMP at higher concentrations.

  12. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed Central

    Oset-Gasque, M. J.; Parramón, M.; González, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed. PMID:8306105

  13. The role of cyclic AMP and its protein kinase in mediating acetylcholine release and the action of adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, J. K.; Silinsky, E. M.; Solsona, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    1. The importance of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and its protein kinase (protein kinase A, PKA) in promoting acetylcholine (ACh) release was studied at frog motor nerve endings. The effects of cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation on the action of adenosine receptor agonists were also investigated. 2. Cyclic AMP was delivered to a local region of the cytoplasm just beneath the plasma membrane of motor nerve endings using phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as a vehicle. Cyclic AMP in liposomes produced a parallel reduction in the mean level of evoked ACh release (m) and spontaneous ACh release (miniature endplate potential frequency; m.e.p.p.f) in most experiments. These inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP on quantal ACh release resemble the action of adenosine. 3. The effects of global increases in cytoplasmic cyclic AMP concentrations using lipophilic cyclic AMP analogues were generally different from those observed with cyclic AMP. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio) cyclic AMP (CPT cyclic AMP) produced approximately two fold increases in m and m.e.p.p.f. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db cyclic AMP) also increased m and m.e.p.p.f, with the effect on m being smaller and more variable. 4. All three cyclic AMP analogues reduced the effects of adenosine receptor agonists on spontaneous and evoked ACh release. 5. The roles of protein phosphorylation in mediating ACh release and the inhibitory effects of adenosine were studied with the protein kinase inhibitor H7. H7 (30-100 microM) produced no consistent effect on evoked or spontaneous ACh release. At these concentrations, however, H7 exerted an unfortunate inhibitory action on the nicotinic ACh receptor/ion channel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2175231

  14. Regulation of hippocampus-dependent memory by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Ted; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2010-01-01

    The hippocampus is crucial for the consolidation of new declarative long-term memories. Genetic and behavioral experimentation have revealed that several protein kinases are critical for the formation of hippocampus-dependent long-term memories. Cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) is a serine–threonine kinase that has been strongly implicated in the expression of specific forms of hippocampus-dependent memory. We review evidence that PKA is required for hippocampus-dependent memory in mammals, and we highlight some of the proteins that have been implicated as targets of PKA. Future directions and open questions regarding the role of PKA in memory storage are also described. PMID:18394470

  15. Cyclic-AMP inhibition of fimbriae and prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens is strain-dependent.

    PubMed

    Stella, Nicholas A; Shanks, Robert M Q

    2014-05-01

    The cyclic-nucleotide 3',5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an ancient and widespread regulatory molecule. Previous studies have shown that fimbria production and secondary metabolite production are inhibited by cAMP in the prokaryote Serratia marcescens. This study used genetic manipulations to test the strain specificity of cAMP-cyclic-AMP receptor protein regulation of fimbria production and of the red pigment, prodigiosin. A surprising amount of variation was observed, as multicopy expression of the cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene, cpdS, conferred either an increase or decrease in fimbriae-dependent yeast agglutination and prodigiosin production depending upon the strain background. Mutation of crp, the gene coding for the cAMP-receptor protein, similarly conferred strain-dependent phenotypes. This study shows that three distinct biological properties, modulated by a conserved genetic regulatory molecule, can vary significantly among strains. Such variation can complicate the functional analysis of bacterial phenotypic properties which are dependent upon global genetic regulators such as cAMP.

  16. p54nrb/NONO Regulates Cyclic AMP-Dependent Glucocorticoid Production by Modulating Phosphodiesterase mRNA Splicing and Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia Yang

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid production in the adrenal cortex is activated in response to an increase in cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling. The nuclear protein p54nrb/NONO belongs to the Drosophila behavior/human splicing (DBHS) family and has been implicated in several nuclear processes, including transcription, splicing, and RNA export. We previously identified p54nrb/NONO as a component of a protein complex that regulates the transcription of CYP17A1, a gene required for glucocorticoid production. Based on the multiple mechanisms by which p54nrb/NONO has been shown to control gene expression and the ability of the protein to be recruited to the CYP17A1 promoter, we sought to further define the molecular mechanism by which p54nrb/NONO confers optimal cortisol production. We show here that silencing p54nrb/NONO expression in H295R human adrenocortical cells decreases the ability of the cells to increase intracellular cAMP production and subsequent cortisol biosynthesis in response to adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) stimulation. Interestingly, the expression of multiple phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoforms, including PDE2A, PDE3A, PDE3B, PDE4A, PDE4D, and PDE11A, was induced in p54nrb/NONO knockdown cells. Investigation of the mechanism by which silencing of p54nrb/NONO led to increased expression of select PDE isoforms revealed that p54nrb/NONO regulates the splicing of a subset of PDE isoforms. Importantly, we also identify a role for p54nrb/NONO in regulating the stability of PDE transcripts by facilitating the interaction between the exoribonuclease XRN2 and select PDE transcripts. In summary, we report that p54nrb/NONO modulates cAMP-dependent signaling, and ultimately cAMP-stimulated glucocorticoid biosynthesis by regulating the splicing and degradation of PDE transcripts. PMID:25605330

  17. Mechanisms of cyclic AMP/protein kinase A- and glucocorticoid-mediated apoptosis using S49 lymphoma cells as a model system

    PubMed Central

    Keshwani, Malik M.; Kanter, Joan R.; Ma, Yuliang; Wilderman, Andrea; Darshi, Manjula; Insel, Paul A.; Taylor, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) and glucocorticoids promote the death of many cell types, including cells of hematopoietic origin. In wild-type (WT) S49 T-lymphoma cells, signaling by cAMP and glucocorticoids converges on the induction of the proapoptotic B-cell lymphoma-family protein Bim to produce mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. Kin–, a clonal variant of WT S49 cells, lacks PKA catalytic (PKA-Cα) activity and is resistant to cAMP-mediated apoptosis. Using sorbitol density gradient fractionation, we show here that in kin– S49 cells PKA-Cα is not only depleted but the residual PKA-Cα mislocalizes to heavier cell fractions and is not phosphorylated at two conserved residues (Ser338 or Thr197). In WT S49 cells, PKA-regulatory subunit I (RI) and Bim coimmunoprecipitate upon treatment with cAMP analogs and forskolin (which increases endogenous cAMP concentrations). By contrast, in kin– cells, expression of PKA-RIα and Bim is prominently decreased, and increases in cAMP do not increase Bim expression. Even so, kin– cells undergo apoptosis in response to treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex). In WT cells, glucorticoid-mediated apoptosis involves an increase in Bim, but in kin– cells, Dex-promoted cell death appears to occur by a caspase 3-independent apoptosis-inducing factor pathway. Thus, although cAMP/PKA-Cα and PKA-R1α/Bim mediate apoptotic cell death in WT S49 cells, kin– cells resist this response because of lower levels of PKA-Cα and PKA-RIα subunits as well as Bim. The findings for Dex-promoted apoptosis imply that these lymphoma cells have adapted to selective pressure that promotes cell death by altering canonical signaling pathways. PMID:26417071

  18. Characterization of soluble cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases and partial purification of a major form in human leiomyoma of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M F; Levin, J; Savage, N

    1987-01-01

    Human leiomyoma of the uterus contained seven forms of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in the crude cytosol as revealed by a specific activity stain on non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The enzymes from human myometrium and normal uterus showed an identical activity pattern. Ferguson plot analysis showed four different molecular weight species of Mr 229,000 +/- 4,000, 186,000 +/- 4,000, 174,000 +/- 4,000 and 162,000 +/- 4,000. The Mr 174,000 species comprised four differently charged forms. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation of the crude cytosol revealed the presence of three molecular weight species sedimenting at 11.8S, 8.1S and 3.6S. The Michaelis constant (Km) for the band 1 form which displayed linear kinetics was 5 microM and the band 2 form which produced non-linear kinetics had Km values of 5.8 and 37 microM. PMID:2820644

  19. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  20. Thyroid-stimulating hormone stimulates increases in inositol phosphates as well as cyclic AMP in the FRTL-5 rat thyroid cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Field, J B; Ealey, P A; Marshall, N J; Cockcroft, S

    1987-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine whether thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; thyrotropin), a hormone known to increase cytosol concentrations of cyclic AMP, also stimulates the formation of inositol phosphates in thyroid cells. TSH and noradrenaline both stimulated [3H]inositol phosphate formation in a concentration-dependent manner in the rat thyroid cell line, FRTL-5 cells, which had been prelabelled with [3H]inositol. The threshold concentration of TSH required to stimulate inositol phosphate formation was more than 20 munits/ml, which is approx. 10(3)-fold greater than that required for cyclic AMP accumulation and growth in these cells. We also demonstrate that membranes prepared from FRTL-5 cells possess a guanine nucleotide-activatable polyphosphoinositide phosphodiesterase, which suggests that activation of inositide metabolism in these cells may be coupled to receptors by the G-protein, Gp. Our findings suggest that two second-messenger systems exist to mediate the action of TSH in the thyroid. PMID:2827631

  1. Roles of Intracellular Cyclic AMP Signal Transduction in the Capacitation and Subsequent Hyperactivation of Mouse and Boar Spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    HARAYAMA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is not until accomplishment of a variety of molecular changes during the transit through the female reproductive tract that mammalian spermatozoa are capable of exhibiting highly activated motility with asymmetric whiplash beating of the flagella (hyperactivation) and undergoing acrosomal exocytosis in the head (acrosome reaction). These molecular changes of the spermatozoa are collectively termed capacitation and promoted by bicarbonate, calcium and cholesterol acceptors. Such capacitation-promoting factors can stimulate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction in the spermatozoa. Meanwhile, hyperactivation and the acrosome reaction are essential to sperm fertilization with oocytes and are apparently triggered by a sufficient increase of intracellular Ca2+ in the sperm flagellum and head, respectively. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the relationship between cAMP signal transduction and calcium signaling cascades in the spermatozoa for the purpose of understanding the molecular basis of capacitation. In this review, I cover updated insights regarding intracellular cAMP signal transduction, the acrosome reaction and flagellar motility in mammalian spermatozoa and then account for possible roles of intracellular cAMP signal transduction in the capacitation and subsequent hyperactivation of mouse and boar spermatozoa. PMID:24162806

  2. Seventeen Sxy-Dependent Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Site-Regulated Genes Are Needed for Natural Transformation in Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Joshua C.; Redfield, Rosemary J.

    2012-01-01

    Natural competence is the ability of bacteria to actively take up extracellular DNA. This DNA can recombine with the host chromosome, transforming the host cell and altering its genotype. In Haemophilus influenzae, natural competence is induced by energy starvation and the depletion of nucleotide pools. This induces a 26-gene competence regulon (Sxy-dependent cyclic AMP receptor protein [CRP-S] regulon) whose expression is controlled by two regulators, CRP and Sxy. The role of most of the CRP-S genes in DNA uptake and transformation is not known. We have therefore created in-frame deletions of each CRP-S gene and studied their competence phenotypes. All but one gene (ssb) could be deleted. Although none of the remaining CRP-S genes were required for growth in rich medium or survival under starvation conditions, DNA uptake and transformation were abolished or reduced in most of the mutants. Seventeen genes were absolutely required for transformation, with 14 of these genes being specifically required for the assembly and function of the type IV pilus DNA uptake machinery. Only five genes were dispensable for both competence and transformation. This is the first competence regulon for which all genes have been mutationally characterized. PMID:22821979

  3. Prostaglandin E2 regulates Th17 cell differentiation and function through cyclic AMP and EP2/EP4 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Boniface, Katia; Bak-Jensen, Kristian S; Li, Ying; Blumenschein, Wendy M; McGeachy, Mandy J; McClanahan, Terrill K; McKenzie, Brent S; Kastelein, Robert A; Cua, Daniel J; de Waal Malefyt, René

    2009-03-16

    Prostaglandins, particularly prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), play an important role during inflammation. This is exemplified by the clinical use of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors, which interfere with PGE2 synthesis, as effective antiinflammatory drugs. Here, we show that PGE2 directly promotes differentiation and proinflammatory functions of human and murine IL-17-producing T helper (Th17) cells. In human purified naive T cells, PGE2 acts via prostaglandin receptor EP2- and EP4-mediated signaling and cyclic AMP pathways to up-regulate IL-23 and IL-1 receptor expression. Furthermore, PGE2 synergizes with IL-1beta and IL-23 to drive retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor (ROR)-gammat, IL-17, IL-17F, CCL20, and CCR6 expression, which is consistent with the reported Th17 phenotype. While enhancing Th17 cytokine expression mainly through EP2, PGE2 differentially regulates interferon (IFN)-gamma production and inhibits production of the antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 in Th17 cells predominantly through EP4. Furthermore, PGE2 is required for IL-17 production in the presence of antigen-presenting cells. Hence, the combination of inflammatory cytokines and noncytokine immunomodulators, such as PGE2, during differentiation and activation determines the ultimate phenotype of Th17 cells. These findings, together with the altered IL-12/IL-23 balance induced by PGE2 in dendritic cells, further highlight the crucial role of the inflammatory microenvironment in Th17 cell development and regulation.

  4. Effects of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and papaverine on intrahepatocytic bile acid transport. Role of vesicle transport.

    PubMed

    Hoshino, M; Ohiwa, T; Hayakawa, T; Kamiya, Y; Tanaka, A; Hirano, A; Kumai, T; Katagiri, K; Miyaji, M; Takeuchi, T

    1993-09-01

    The secondary messenger cyclic AMP plays an important role in regulating biliary excretory function by stimulating the transcytotic vesicle transport system, whereas papaverine exerts an inhibitory effect on this system. We therefore investigated their effects on bile acid-induced cytotoxicity and intrahepatocytic content of bile acid in primary cultured rat hepatocytes. Simultaneous addition of 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP), an analogue of cAMP, with 1 mM taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA) significantly decreased the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as compared with the case with 1 mM TCDCA alone (7.1 +/- 0.13% of total versus 10.7 +/- 0.3%). In contrast, 0.1 mM papaverine approximately doubled the amount of LDH (22.0 +/- 0.6% of total versus 10.7 +/- 0.3%; P < 0.01). The intracellular content of TCDCA 180 min after the administration of 1 mM TCDCA alone was 20.8 +/- 0.7 nmol/mg protein, that after simultaneous administration of 1 mM DBcAMP, 16.2 +/- 1.0 nmol/mg protein, and that after the simultaneous administration of 0.1 mM papaverine, 38.5 +/- 1.9 nmol/mg protein. A clear correlation between the release of LDH from hepatocytes and the intracellular content of TCDCA was thus observed. When given together with 1 mM taurocholic acid (TCA) or 1 mM tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), papaverine exerted little effect on cytotoxicity or intrahepatocytic bile acid content. When cells were bathed in a medium free of bile acid after pretreatment with 1 mM TCDCA and 1 mM DBcAMP, additional exposure to DBcAMP for 30 min significantly stimulated reduction of intracellular TCDCA content (30.2 +/- 0.4% of total versus 44.0 +/- 1.4%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Cyclic AMP inhibits and putrescine represses expression of the speA gene encoding biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, R C; Boyle, S M

    1991-01-01

    The speA gene of Escherichia coli encodes biosynthetic arginine decarboxylase (ADC), the first of two enzymes in a putrescine biosynthetic pathway. The activity of ADC is negatively regulated by mechanisms requiring cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP receptor protein (CRP) or putrescine. A 2.1-kb BamHI fragment containing the speA-metK intergenic region, speA promoter, and 1,389 bp of the 5' end of the speA coding sequence was used to construct transcriptional and translational speA-lacZ fusion plasmids. A single copy of either type of speA-lacZ fusion was transferred into the chromosomes of Escherichia coli KC14-1, CB806, and MC4100, using bacteriophage lambda. The speA gene in lysogenized strains remained intact and served as a control. Addition of 5 mM cAMP to lysogenic strains resulted in 10 to 37% inhibition of ADC activity, depending on the strain used. In contrast, the addition of 5 or 10 mM cAMP to these strains did not inhibit the activity of beta-galactosidase (i.e., ADC::beta-galactosidase). Addition of 10 mM putrescine to lysogenized strains resulted in 24 to 31% repression of ADC activity and 41 to 47% repression of beta-galactosidase activity. E. coli strains grown in 5 mM cAMP and 10 mM putrescine produced 46 to 61% less ADC activity and 41 to 52% less beta-galactosidase activity. cAMP (0.1 to 10 mM) did not inhibit ADC activity assayed in vitro. The effects of cAMP and putrescine on ADC activity were additive, indicating the use of independent regulatory mechanisms. These results show that cAMP acts indirectly to inhibit ADC activity and that putrescine causes repression of speA transcription. PMID:1646785

  6. Effects of cyclic AMP on growth and differentiation of rat retinoblastoma-like tumor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nishida, T; Mukai, N; Solish, S P; Pomeroy, M

    1982-02-01

    We examined the effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP) on the growth and differentiation of RAO 188 cells, a cultured cell line derived from a retinoblastoma-like tumor induced in an inbred rat by intravitreous inoculation with human adenovirus serotype 12. After adding cAMP analogs (dibutyryl cAMP and 8-bromo cAMP) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (theophylline, amino-phylline, and 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine) to the RAO 188 cell culture medium, we measured changes in cell incorporation of the DNA and RNA precursors 14C-thymidine and 3H-uridine, and we observed the morphologic alterations of RAO 188 by phase-contrast and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Incorporation of the labeled precursors decreased with increased concentrations of cAMP analogs and phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Incorporation of the labeled precursors was inhibited shortly after the addition of dibutyryl cAMP to the culture medium. The effect was maximal at 8 hr and was sustained for up to 48 hr. Reversibility of cAMP effects on incorporation gradually decreased for 10 days; at 10 days these effects were essentially irreversible. Neuritelike processes developed shortly after cAMP analog treatment and formed a network after 24 hr. Transmission electron microscopy disclosed changes in the cell membrane and cytoplasm of cells treated with 8-bromo cAMP and theophylline: perturbation of the cell membrane and the appearance of intercellular junctional devices and microfilaments. The activity of glutamate decarboxylase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid, was increased in treated cells. These results show that cAMP decreases DNA and RNA synthesis and cell proliferation and facilitates morphologic and biochemical differentiation of RAO 188 cells.

  7. Hybrid promiscuous (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes produce cyclic AMP-GMP (3′, 3′-cGAMP)

    PubMed Central

    Hallberg, Zachary F.; Wang, Xin C.; Wright, Todd A.; Nan, Beiyan; Ad, Omer; Yeo, Jongchan; Hammond, Ming C.

    2016-01-01

    Over 30 years ago, GGDEF domain-containing enzymes were shown to be diguanylate cyclases that produce cyclic di-GMP (cdiG), a second messenger that modulates the key bacterial lifestyle transition from a motile to sessile biofilm-forming state. Since then, the ubiquity of genes encoding GGDEF proteins in bacterial genomes has established the dominance of cdiG signaling in bacteria. However, the observation that proteobacteria encode a large number of GGDEF proteins, nearing 1% of coding sequences in some cases, raises the question of why bacteria need so many GGDEF enzymes. In this study, we reveal that a subfamily of GGDEF enzymes synthesizes the asymmetric signaling molecule cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG or 3′, 3′-cGAMP). This discovery is unexpected because GGDEF enzymes function as symmetric homodimers, with each monomer binding to one substrate NTP. Detailed analysis of the enzyme from Geobacter sulfurreducens showed it is a dinucleotide cyclase capable of switching the major cyclic dinucleotide (CDN) produced based on ATP-to-GTP ratios. We then establish through bioinformatics and activity assays that hybrid CDN-producing and promiscuous substrate-binding (Hypr) GGDEF enzymes are found in other deltaproteobacteria. Finally, we validated the predictive power of our analysis by showing that cAG is present in surface-grown Myxococcus xanthus. This study reveals that GGDEF enzymes make alternative cyclic dinucleotides to cdiG and expands the role of this widely distributed enzyme family to include regulation of cAG signaling. PMID:26839412

  8. A novel indirect sequence readout component in the E. coli cyclic AMP receptor protein operator.

    PubMed

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul; Møllegaard, Niels Erik

    2014-03-21

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid nucleobase interactions in the major groove of the two operator half-sites. Crystal structure analyses have revealed that the interaction results in two strong kinks at the TG/CA steps closest to the 6-base-pair spacer (N6). This spacer exhibits high sequence variability among the more than 100 natural binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold or abolished by varying the N6 spacer sequences. Furthermore, on the basis of sequence analysis and uranyl (UO2(2+)) probing data, we propose that the underlying mechanism relies on N6 deformability.

  9. Pharmacological elevation of cyclic AMP and transmitter release at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Dryden, W F; Singh, Y N; Gordon, T; Lazarenko, G

    1988-03-01

    Intracellular recordings of spontaneous and evoked end-plate potentials have been made at the neuromuscular junction of mouse hemidiaphragms to determine a possible role of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in the release of acetylcholine from presynaptic terminals. Spontaneous release, as determined from the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials, was increased by drugs that inhibit phosphodiesterase: isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), SQ 20,009, theophylline, and caffeine; drugs that stimulate adenylate cyclase: forskolin, fluoride, and cholera toxin, and the stable analogue of cAMP: 8-bromo-cAMP but not dibutyryl cAMP. Release increased with time during maintained exposure to the drugs and generally followed a simple exponential time course with time constants ranging from 8 to 17 min at 20 degrees C, except for SQ 20,009 and cholera toxin which required longer exposure times for effect. The order of potency of the phosphodiesterase inhibitors was IBMX = SQ 20,009 greater than theophylline = caffeine. This is consistent with an effect mediated by an increase in cAMP concentrations within the nerve terminal. Evoked release, determined from the quantal content of the end-plate potential, was increased to a lesser extent than spontaneous release. The results are discussed with reference to the possible involvement of second messengers in the release of vesicles from nerve terminals in vertebrate synapses.

  10. Cyclic-AMP inhibition of fimbriae and prodigiosin production by Serratia marcescens is strain-dependent

    PubMed Central

    Stella, Nicholas A.; Shanks, Robert M. Q.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic-nucleotide 3’,5’-cyclic AMP (cAMP) is an ancient and wide spread regulatory molecule. Previous studies have shown that fimbria production and secondary metabolite production are inhibited by cAMP in the prokaryote Serratia marcescens. This study used genetic manipulations to test the strain specificity of cAMP-CRP regulation of fimbria production and of the red pigment, prodigiosin. A surprising amount of variation was observed, as multicopy expression of the cAMP-phosphodiesterase gene, cpdS, conferred either an increase or decrease in fimbriae-dependent yeast agglutination and prodigiosin production depending upon the strain background. Mutation of crp, the gene coding for the cAMP-receptor protein similarly conferred strain-dependent phenotypes. This study shows that three distinct biological properties, modulated by a conserved genetic regulatory molecule, can vary significantly among strains. Such variation can complicate the functional analysis of bacterial phenotypic properties which are dependent upon global genetic regulators such as cAMP. PMID:24619531

  11. GEMM-I riboswitches from Geobacter sense the bacterial second messenger cyclic AMP-GMP

    PubMed Central

    Kellenberger, Colleen A.; Wilson, Stephen C.; Hickey, Scott F.; Gonzalez, Tania L.; Su, Yichi; Hallberg, Zachary F.; Brewer, Thomas F.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Carlson, Hans K.; Hsieh, Yu-Fang; Hammond, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic dinucleotides are an expanding class of signaling molecules that control many aspects of bacterial physiology. A synthase for cyclic AMP-GMP (cAG, also referenced as 3′-5′, 3′-5′ cGAMP) called DncV is associated with hyperinfectivity of Vibrio cholerae but has not been found in many bacteria, raising questions about the prevalence and function of cAG signaling. We have discovered that the environmental bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens produces cAG and uses a subset of GEMM-I class riboswitches (GEMM-Ib, Genes for the Environment, Membranes, and Motility) as specific receptors for cAG. GEMM-Ib riboswitches regulate genes associated with extracellular electron transfer; thus cAG signaling may control aspects of bacterial electrophysiology. These findings expand the role of cAG beyond organisms that harbor DncV and beyond pathogenesis to microbial geochemistry, which is important to environmental remediation and microbial fuel cell development. Finally, we have developed an RNA-based fluorescent biosensor for live-cell imaging of cAG. This selective, genetically encodable biosensor will be useful to probe the biochemistry and cell biology of cAG signaling in diverse bacteria. PMID:25848022

  12. Beta-adrenergic regulation of cyclic AMP synthesis in cultured human syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Grullon, K; Jacobs, M M; Li, S X; Illsley, N P

    1995-10-01

    Isolated elements of the beta-adrenergic/adenyl cyclase signal transduction system have been studied previously using purified membranes. We used cultured syncytiotrophoblast cells to identify components of this signalling system and the interactions which regulate syncytial adenyl cyclase. Generation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) was stimulated in these cells by both forskolin and isoproterenol but not by dopamine, adenosine, carbachol or prostaglandin E1. Synthesis was also stimulated by treatment with cholera toxin, indicating the involvement of the G-protein, Gs. Somatostatin inhibited isoproterenol- or forskolin-stimulated cAMP generation, an effect which could be blocked by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin, demonstrating the mediation of somatostatin action by Gi. Furthermore, secretion of human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) was increased significantly by isoproterenol while somatostatin blocked the isoproterenol-stimulated release of hCG. These results clearly demonstrate that adenyl cyclase in syncytiotrophoblast is controlled by a stimulatory pathway operating through Gs and inhibitory pathway acting through Gi.

  13. Changes in the cyclic AMP content during growth and development of Acetabularia.

    PubMed

    Minder, C; Vanden Driessche, T

    1978-05-26

    The 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic-AMP) content of the unicellular alga Acetabularia has been examined at various developmental stages. It has been found that very young algae, less than 10mm in length, have a high cAMP content [more than 7 pmoles per 100 mg wet weight (WW)], but that with the growth of the algae, the cAMP content decreases rapidly, reaching the low level of 0.5--1.0 pmoles per 100mg WW. The cAMP content remains at this level until cap differentiation, after which an increase in cAMP content accompanies cap enlargement. It has been shown that these results are unlikely to be affected by changes in the cAMP content induced by variations in circadian rhythm. Treatment with theophylline (2.10(-3) M), a phosphodieterase inhibitor, results in an increase in the cAMP content and delays growth and cap formation. Experiments on the effects of theophylline upon the circadian rhythm of oxygen evolution have shown that the continuous presence of theophylline in the culture medium does not induce a phase shift in the rhythm. The cAMP content of anucleate Acetabularia shows development stage variations parallel to that of the whole algae.

  14. The Role of Cyclic AMP in Normalizing the Function of Engineered Human Blood Microvessels in Microfluidic Collagen Gels

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Keith H. K.; Truslow, James G.; Tien, Joe

    2010-01-01

    Nearly all engineered tissues must eventually be vascularized to survive. To this end, we and others have recently developed methods to synthesize extracellular matrix-based scaffolds that contain open microfluidic networks. These scaffolds serve as templates for the formation of endothelial tubes that can be perfused; whether such microvascular structures are stable and/or functional is largely unknown. Here, we show that compounds that elevate intracellular concentrations of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) strongly normalize the phenotype of engineered human microvessels in microfluidic type I collagen gels. Cyclic AMP-elevating agents promoted vascular stability and barrier function, and reduced cellular turnover. Under conditions that induced the highest levels of cAMP, the physiology of engineered microvessels in vitro quantitatively mirrored that of native vessels in vivo. Computational analysis indicated that cAMP stabilized vessels partly via its enhancement of barrier function. PMID:20303168

  15. Cyclic AMP levels during induction and repression of cellulase biosynthesis in Thermomonospora curvata

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, W.E.; Neubauer, D.G.; Stutzenberger, F.J.

    1984-12-01

    Specific cellulase production rates (SCPR) were compared with intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata, during growth on several carbon sources in a chemically defined medium. SCPR and cAMP levels were 0.03 U (endoglucanase (EG) units) and 2 pmol per mg of dry cells, respectively, during exponential growth on glucose. These values increased to about 6 and 25, respectively, during growth on cellulose. Detectable EG production ceased when cAMP levels dropped below 10. Cellobiose (usually considered to be a cellulase inducer) caused a sharp decrease in cAMP levels and repressed EG production when added to cellulose-grown cultures. 2-deoxy-D-glucose, although nometabolizable in T. curvata, depressed cAMP to levels observed with glucose, but unlike glucose, the 2DG effect persisted until cells were washed and transferred to fresh medium. SCPR values and cAMP levels in cells grown in continuous culture under conditions of cellobiose limitation were markedly influenced by dilution rate (D). The maxima for both occurred at D = 0.085 (culture generation time of 11.8 h). When D was held constant and cellobiose concentration was increased over a 14-fold range to support higher steady state population levels, SCPR values decreased about fivefold, indicating that extracellular catabolite accumulation may be a factor in EG repression. The role of cAMP in the mechanism of this repression appears to be neither simple nor direct, since large changes (up to 200-fold) in SCPR accompany relatively small changes (10-fold) in cellular cAMP levels.

  16. Effect of triiodothyronine on cyclic AMP and pulmonary function tests in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    abdel Khalek, K; el Kholy, M; Rafik, M; Fathalla, M; Heikal, E

    1991-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of triiodothyronine, determined by pulmonary function tests and c-AMP plasma and sputum levels, in asthmatic children. Twenty-three children clinically euthyroid and complaining of chronic bronchial asthma were given a triiodothyronine (T3) supply for a period of 30 days. Pulmonary function tests, plasma and sputum cyclic AMP and plasma T3 levels were performed prior to and after T3 therapy. Patients were requested to continue on their usual antiasthma medicines and to try reduction of the doses of the drugs they needed as possible. All patients tolerated well the T3 regimen without any adverse effect. They all reported at the end of the 30 days an obvious subjective improvement of their asthmatic conditions with a decrease in the number of exacerbations. Seven patients stopped their usual antiasthmatic medicines, being maintained on T3 only and 3 have decreased the amount of bronchodilators needed. A significant improvement of pulmonary function tests was noted in all patients. Also, significantly increased levels of plasma and sputum c-AMP were observed after T3 administration in comparison to the control and pretest values. No statistical differences were found in plasma T3 between the control and the patients either before or after T3 therapy. The study revealed that T3 administration to clinically euthyroid chronic asthmatic children induced a beneficial effect. This might be through improvement of c-AMP synthesis. T3 in the doses used is devoid of side effects, proves to be a useful adjuvant to classic antiasthma therapy, and may reduce the amount of bronchodilators needed.

  17. Regulation of osteosarcoma EGF receptor affinity by phorbol ester and cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, S.E.; Catherwood, B.D. )

    1989-04-01

    We studied the binding and degradation of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) by UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells and the regulation of EGF receptor affinity for EGF by the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and by treatments that raise intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Cell surface binding of (125I)EGF to A431 cells reached a plateau after a 30 minute incubation at 37 degrees C but was undetectable in UMR-106 cells. Degradation of (125I)EGF proceeded at a 50-fold higher rate in A431 cells on a per cell basis, but receptor-bound (125I)EGF was internalized and degraded at a 3.5-fold higher rate by UMR-106 cells on a per receptor basis. At 4 degrees C, (125I)EGF labeled a single class of surface binding sites in the UMR-106 cell. Treatment with TPA at 37 degrees C reduced subsequent cell surface binding of (125I)EGF at 4 degrees C a maximum of 80% with an IC50 of 1.25 ng/ml. Maximal TPA reduction of (125I)EGF binding was observed within 5-15 minutes and was due to a reduction in the affinity of cell surface receptors of (125I)EGF without a change in receptor density. Pretreatment of the cells for 4 h with 30 microM forskolin, 1 mM isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX) plus 30 microM forskolin, or 1 mM IBMX plus 100 ng/ml parathyroid hormone (PTH) attenuated the loss in (125I)EGF binding caused by a subsequent dose of 10 ng/ml of TPA by 17% (p less than 0.0005), 39% (p less than 0.0002), and 35% (p less than 0.002), respectively.

  18. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c

  19. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c

  20. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Lin, Tien-Huang; Wu, Chien-Chen; Wan, Lei; Huang, Chun-Fa; Peng, Hwei-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP)-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP and c

  1. Involvement of cyclic AMP systems in morphine physical dependence in mice: prevention of development of morphine dependence by rolipram, a phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Mamiya, Takayoshi; Noda, Yukihiro; Ren, Xiuhai; Hamdy, Moustafa; Furukawa, Shoei; Kameyama, Tsutomu; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2001-01-01

    In this study, we examined whether morphine dependence was inhibited by rolipram, a cyclic AMP selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor in mice, since a role for the cyclic AMP systems in the development of morphine dependence has been reported. Mice, which received morphine (10 mg kg−1 s.c.) twice a day for 5 days showed withdrawal syndromes such as jumping, rearing and forepaw tremor following naloxone challenge (5 mg kg−1 i.p.) on the 6th day. Such mice exhibited a significant elevation of cyclic AMP levels in the thalamus compared to control mice. However, co-administration of rolipram (1 mg kg−1 i.p.) with morphine for 5 days significantly attenuated the severity of the withdrawal syndrome and the increase in the cyclic AMP levels after the administration of naloxone. In naïve mice, acute morphine treatment (10 mg kg−1 s.c.) decreased cyclic AMP levels in the thalamus and cerebral cortex 10 min later. The decrease of cyclic AMP levels induced by acute morphine treatment was blocked by co-administration of rolipram (1 mg kg−1 i.p.). However, acute rolipram did not affect the naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal syndrome. These results suggest that the elevation of the cyclic AMP levels is involved in the development of morphine withdrawal syndrome and that blockade of the morphine-induced reduction of cyclic AMP levels by chronic rolipram inhibits the development of dependence and the behavioural and biochemical changes induced by naloxone. Furthermore, rolipram may be a useful drug for attenuating the development of morphine dependence. PMID:11226142

  2. Toxoplasma gondii Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Subunit 3 Is Involved in the Switch from Tachyzoite to Bradyzoite Development

    PubMed Central

    Sugi, Tatsuki; Ma, Yan Fen; Tomita, Tadakimi; Murakoshi, Fumi; Eaton, Michael S.; Yakubu, Rama; Han, Bing; Tu, Vincent; Kato, Kentaro; Kawazu, Shin-Ichiro; Gupta, Nishith; Suvorova, Elena S.; White, Michael W.; Kim, Kami

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that infects warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans. Asexual reproduction in T. gondii allows it to switch between the rapidly replicating tachyzoite and quiescent bradyzoite life cycle stages. A transient cyclic AMP (cAMP) pulse promotes bradyzoite differentiation, whereas a prolonged elevation of cAMP inhibits this process. We investigated the mechanism(s) by which differential modulation of cAMP exerts a bidirectional effect on parasite differentiation. There are three protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunits (TgPKAc1 to -3) expressed in T. gondii. Unlike TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2, which are conserved in the phylum Apicomplexa, TgPKAc3 appears evolutionarily divergent and specific to coccidian parasites. TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2 are distributed in the cytomembranes, whereas TgPKAc3 resides in the cytosol. TgPKAc3 was genetically ablated in a type II cyst-forming strain of T. gondii (PruΔku80Δhxgprt) and in a type I strain (RHΔku80Δhxgprt), which typically does not form cysts. The Δpkac3 mutant exhibited slower growth than the parental and complemented strains, which correlated with a higher basal rate of tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite differentiation. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) treatment, which elevates cAMP levels, maintained wild-type parasites as tachyzoites under bradyzoite induction culture conditions (pH 8.2/low CO2), whereas the Δpkac3 mutant failed to respond to the treatment. This suggests that TgPKAc3 is the factor responsible for the cAMP-dependent tachyzoite maintenance. In addition, the Δpkac3 mutant had a defect in the production of brain cysts in vivo, suggesting that a substrate of TgPKAc3 is probably involved in the persistence of this parasite in the intermediate host animals. PMID:27247232

  3. Fluoride inhibition of the hydro-osmotic response of the toad urinary bladder to antidiuretic hormone.

    PubMed

    Yorio, T; Sinclair, R; Henry, S

    1981-11-01

    The hydro-osmotic response of the toad bladder to antidiuretic hormone and cyclic AMP was inhibited by the methoxyflurane metabolite, fluoride. The osmotic transfer of water in the absence of hormone was unaffected by fluoride as was the hydroosmotic response due to hypertonicity of the serosal bathing media. Osmotic water movements across N-ethylmaleimide-"fixed" vasopressin or cyclic AMP-stimulated bladders were likewise unchanged by fluoride, suggesting that fluoride is exerting an action subsequent to the endogenous formation of cyclic AMP but before the final effector mechanism. Fluoride increased intracellular cyclic AMP concentrations even in the presence of added hormone. Fluoride suppressed calmodulin activity and prevented its activation of phosphodiesterase. Fluoride had no effect on oxygen consumption of toad urinary bladder cells but reduced lactate formation and anerobic metabolism. This decrease in the glycolytic energy source did not contribute to the inhibition of the hormonal response since 2-deoxyglucose was without effect on hormonal mediated osmotic-water flow. It is postulated that the fluoride-induced polyuria after methoxyflurane anesthesia may be due in part to the ability of fluoride to interfere with calcium and calmodulin-initiated processes (other than phosphodiesterase activity) that may occur in the stimulus-reabsorption coupling response of antidiuretic hormone.

  4. Identification, characterization and regional distribution in brain of RPDE-6 (RNPDE4A5), a novel splice variant of the PDE4A cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase family.

    PubMed

    McPhee, I; Pooley, L; Lobban, M; Bolger, G; Houslay, M D

    1995-09-15

    COS-7 cells were transfected with a plasmid encoding a putative splice variant of PDE4A cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase, RPDE-6 (RNPDE4A5). This led to the expression of a novel, cyclic AMP-specific, rolipram-inhibited phosphodiesterase activity. In such transfected cells a novel approximately 109 kDa species was recognized by anti-peptide sera raised against a dodecapeptide whose sequence is found at the extreme C-terminus of both RPDE-6 and another PDE4A splice variant. RD1 (RNPDE4A1A). RPDE-6 activity and immunoreactivity was found distributed between both pellet (approximately 25%) and cytosol (approximately 75%) fractions of transfected COS-7 cells. Soluble and pellet RPDE-6 activities exhibited similar low Km values for cyclic AMP (approximately 2.4 microM) and were both inhibited by low concentrations of rolipram, with IC50 values for the soluble activity being lower (approximately 0.16 microM) than for the pellet activity (approximately 1.2 microM). Pellet RPDE-6 was resistant to release by either high NaCl concentrations or the detergent Triton X-100. Probing brain homogenates with the anti-(C-terminal peptide) sera identified two immunoreactive species, namely an approximately 79 kDa species reflecting RD1 and an approximately 109 kDa species that co-migrated with the immunoreactive species seen in COS cells transfected to express RPDE-6. The approximately 109 kDa species was found distributed between both the low-speed (P1) and high-speed (P2) pellet fractions as well as the cytosol fractions derived from both brain and RPDE-6-transfected COS cells. In contrast, RD1 was found exclusively in the P2 fraction. Phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity immuno-precipitated by these antisera from brain cytosol had the characteristics of COS cell-expressed RPDE-6 with KmcyclicAMP approximately 3.7 microM and IC50rolipram approximately 0.12 microM. The distribution of PDE activity immunoprecipitated from the cytosol of various brain regions paralleled that seen for

  5. Identification of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases 3, 4 and 7 in human CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes: role in regulating proliferation and the biosynthesis of interleukin-2.

    PubMed Central

    Giembycz, M. A.; Corrigan, C. J.; Seybold, J.; Newton, R.; Barnes, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases (PDE) expressed by CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes purified from the peripheral blood of normal adult subjects were identified and characterized, and their role in modulating proliferation and the biosynthesis of interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-gamma evaluated. 2. In lysates prepared from both subsets, SK&F 95654 (PDE3 inhibitor) and rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) suppressed cyclic AMP hydrolysis indicating the presence of PDE3 and PDE4 isoenzymes in these cells. Differential centrifugation and subsequent inhibitor and kinetic studies revealed that the particulate fraction contained, predominantly, a PDE3 isoenzyme. In contrast, the soluble fraction contained a PDE4 (approximately 65% of total activity) and, in addition, a novel enzyme that had the kinetic characteristics of the recently identified PDE7. 3. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies with primer pairs designed to recognise unique sequences in the human PDE4 and PDE7 genes amplified cDNA fragments that corresponded to the predicted sizes of HSPDE4A, HSPDE4B, HSPDE54D and HSPDE7. No message was detected for HSPDE4C after 35 cycles of amplification. 4. Functionally, rolipram inhibited phytohaemagglutinin- (PHA) and anti-CD3-induced proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, and the elaboration of IL-2, which was associated with a three to four fold increase in cyclic AMP mass. In all experiments, however, rolipram was approximately 60 fold more potent at suppressing IL-2 synthesis than at inhibiting mitogenesis. In contrast, SK&F 95654 failed to suppress proliferation and cytokine generation, and did not elevate the cyclic AMP content in T-cells. Although inactive alone, SK&F 95654 potentiated the ability of rolipram to suppress PHA- and anti-CD3-induced T-cell proliferation, and PHA-induced IL-2 release. 5. When a combination of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) and ionomycin were used as a co-mitogen, rolipram did not affect proliferation but

  6. Cyclic AMP signaling reduces sirtuin 6 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells by promoting ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation via inhibition of the Raf-MEK-ERK (Raf/mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Jun; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2015-04-10

    The cAMP signaling system regulates various cellular functions, including metabolism, gene expression, and death. Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) removes acetyl groups from histones and regulates genomic stability and cell viability. We hypothesized that cAMP modulates SIRT6 activity to regulate apoptosis. Therefore, we examined the effects of cAMP signaling on SIRT6 expression and radiation-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells. cAMP signaling in H1299 and A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells was activated via the expression of constitutively active Gαs plus treatment with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), isoproterenol, or forskolin. The expression of sirtuins and signaling molecules were analyzed by Western blotting. Activation of cAMP signaling reduced SIRT6 protein expression in lung cancer cells. cAMP signaling increased the ubiquitination of SIRT6 protein and promoted its degradation. Treatment with MG132 and inhibiting PKA with H89 or with a dominant-negative PKA abolished the cAMP-mediated reduction in SIRT6 levels. Treatment with PGE2 inhibited c-Raf activation by increasing inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser-259 in a PKA-dependent manner, thereby inhibiting downstream MEK-ERK signaling. Inhibiting ERK with inhibitors or with dominant-negative ERKs reduced SIRT6 expression, whereas activation of ERK by constitutively active MEK abolished the SIRT6-depleting effects of PGE2. cAMP signaling also augmented radiation-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells. This effect was abolished by exogenous expression of SIRT6. It is concluded that cAMP signaling reduces SIRT6 expression by promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation, a process mediated by the PKA-dependent inhibition of the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. Reduced SIRT6 expression mediates the augmentation of radiation-induced apoptosis by cAMP signaling in lung cancer cells.

  7. Expression and organization of BP74, a cyclic AMP-regulated gene expressed during Dictyostelium discoideum development.

    PubMed Central

    Hopkinson, S B; Pollenz, R S; Drummond, I; Chisholm, R L

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized a cDNA and the corresponding gene for a cyclic AMP-inducible gene expressed during Dictyostelium development. This gene, BP74, was found to be first expressed about the time of aggregate formation, approximately 6 h after starvation. Accumulation of BP74 mRNA did not occur in Dictyostelium cells that had been starved in fast-shaken suspension cultures but was induced in similar cultures to which cyclic AMP pulses had been added. The BP74 cDNA and gene were characterized by DNA sequence analysis and transcriptional mapping. When the BP74 promoter region was fused with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene and reintroduced into Dictyostelium cells, the transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene displayed the same developmentally regulated pattern of expression as did the endogenous BP74 gene, suggesting that all of the cis-acting elements required for regulated expression were carried by a 2-kilobase cloned genomic fragment. On the basis of sequence analysis, the gene appeared to encode a protein containing a 20-residue hydrophobic sequence at the amino-terminal end and 26 copies of a 20-amino-acid repeat. Images PMID:2555685

  8. Neutrophil beta-adrenergic receptor responses are potentiated by acute exposure to phorbol ester without changes in receptor distribution or coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kilfeather, S.A.; Stein, M.; O'Malley, K. )

    1991-01-01

    Exposure to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate for 10 minutes enhanced cyclic AMP accumulation in human neutrophils under basal conditions and in response to the beta-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO, 1{mu}M) and the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (FSK, 10mM). Potentiation of responses to ISO by PMA was dose-dependent between 0.1 and 100nM PMA. The diacylglycerol analogue, 1-oleoyl-2-actylgylcerol (OAG) (50 {mu}M) also elevated beta-receptor responses, but 4beta-phorbol (100nM), lacking the capacity to activate PMA, was ineffective. Short-term exposure to the peptide n-formylmethionine leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP, 1 {mu}M) also elevated neutrophil cyclic AMP accumulation. All potentiating effects of PMA on cyclic AMP production were inhibited by the protein kinase inhibitor 1-(5-isoquinolinylsulphonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H{sub 7}). PMA had no apparent effect on beta-receptor agonist-affinity, distribution between cell-surface and internalized compartments, or the capacity of ISO to induce beta-receptor internalization. Responses to FSK or ISO in terms of fold-stimulation of basal cyclic AMP accumulation int he presence of PMA were not elevated by PMA.

  9. Prostaglandin E2 and F2 alpha inhibit growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III with simultaneous stimulation of cyclic AMP production.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, A; Chiba, T; Yamatani, T; Yamaguchi, A; Inui, T; Morishita, T; Kadowaki, S; Fujita, T

    1989-01-01

    The effects of prostaglandins (PGs) on the growth of human gastric carcinoma cell line KATO III were investigated. PGE2 as well as PGF2 alpha significantly and dose-dependently inhibited the growth of this gastric carcinoma cell line (PGE2 greater than PGF2 alpha). This inhibition of cell growth by the PGs was associated with the increase in cyclic AMP production (PGE2 greater than PGF2 alpha), whereas inositol-phospholipid turnover was not affected by either PGE2 or PGF2 alpha as assessed by the formation of 3H-inositol phosphates. Furthermore, the proliferation of these gastric carcinoma cells was also suppressed by the administration of forskolin as well as of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. These results suggest that PGE2 and PGF2 alpha inhibit the growth of cultured human gastric carcinoma cells KATO III via stimulation of cyclic AMP production. PMID:2536452

  10. Presence of free cyclic AMP receptor protein and regulation of its level by cyclic AMP in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Walter, U; Costa, M R; Breakefield, X O; Greengard, P

    1979-01-01

    Neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells of line 108CC-5 were found to contain high levels of soluble adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase activity and high levels of two specific cAMP receptor proteins, RI and RII. Treatment of the hybrid cells with dibutyryl cAMP increased the level of RI but did not significantly affect the level either of RII or of cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity. The effect of dibutyryl cAMP could be mimicked by prostaglandin E1 and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, both of which are known to raise cAMP levels in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells. Both in control as well as in dibutyryl cAMP-treated cells, RII but not RI was associated with cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Several lines of evidence suggest that RI represents the free regulatory subunit of type I cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The presence of this regulatory subunit as free cAMP receptor protein in neuroblastoma-glioma hybrid cells may be of significance with respect to the regulation of growth and differentiation in tumor cells. Images PMID:226964

  11. Cholera toxin partially inhibits the T-cell response to phytohaemagglutinin through the ADP-ribosylation of a 45 kDa membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nel, A E; Vandenplas, M; Wooten, M M; Cooper, R; Vandenplas, S; Rheeder, A; Daniels, J

    1988-01-01

    This study examines the influence of cholera toxin (CT) on T lymphocyte activation by the mitogenic lectin phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). CT suppressed lectin-induced [3H]thymidine uptake in a dose-dependent fashion and acted synergistically with PHA in the generation of intracellular cyclic AMP. The toxin was assumed to act on Gs, because it also stimulated ADP-ribosylation of a 45 kDa membrane protein in vitro; no additional substrates were seen. The inhibitory effect of the adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP pathway was shown to be directed at a concomitant stimulatory pathway, namely inositol phospholipid turnover. Lectin-stimulated 32P incorporation into both phosphatidylinositol as well as its 4,5-biphosphate derivative was depressed in the presence of CT or exogenous dibutyryl cyclic AMP. This, in turn, was associated with reduced activation of C-kinase as determined by decreased lectin-induced translocation from the cytosol to the surface membrane. These results indicate that Gs probably acts as a transducer between the PHA receptor and adenylate cyclase and may give rise to an exaggerated adenylate cyclase response in the presence of CT. It would seem as if reduction in inositol phospholipid turnover is related to the elevation of cyclic AMP rather than a CT effect on a putative transducer which acts directly on phospholipase C. Our study does not exclude the existence of non-CT-sensitive transducers in this capacity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:2851989

  12. Modulation of a human lymphoblastoid B cell line by cyclic AMP. Ig secretion and phosphatidylcholine metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Shearer, W.T.; Patke, C.L.; Gilliam, E.B.; Rosenblatt, H.M.; Barron, K.S.; Orson, F.M.

    1988-09-01

    A transformed human B cell line, LA350, was found to be sensitive to cAMP-elevating agents by responding with rapid (0 to 2 h) severalfold elevations of intracellular cAMP to treatment with cholera toxin, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), forskolin, and dibutyryl cAMP (all p less than 0.001). These cAMP-elevating agents also produced significant inhibitions of subsequent (48 to 72 h) Ig secretion by the same B cells as measured by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay and an enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay for IgM (both p less than 0.001). PMA- and IBMX-treated cells were particularly responsive to the effects of cholera toxin, showing a doubling of cAMP content and profound decrease in Ig production (p less than 0.001). Because our previous studies had correlated activation of the metabolic turnover of the phosphatidylcholine (PC) fraction of membrane phospholipids with enhanced Ig secretion, we examined the sensitivity of PC metabolism to cAMP in control and PMA-stimulated cells. Formation of PC was found to be inhibited by forskolin and IBMX (both p less than 0.002) but breakdown of PC was stimulated (p less than 0.001). These findings imply that as the enzymatic products of PC, choline phosphate and diacylglycerol, are depleted due to the combined effects of cAMP upon synthesis and turnover of PC, there is a decrease in Ig secretion. Since diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, it appears reasonable that Ig secretion is at least partially regulated by cAMP-responsive alterations in PC metabolism produced by protein kinase C-induced phosphorylation. We conclude that the early cAMP-sensitive changes in PC metabolism in this activated B cell line may signal for subsequent alterations in Ig secretion.

  13. Regulation of the Dictyostelium glycogen phosphorylase 2 gene by cyclic AMP.

    PubMed

    Sucic, J F; Selmin, O; Rutherford, C L

    1993-01-01

    A crucial developmental event in the cellular slime mold, Dictyostelium discoideum, is glycogen degradation. The enzyme that catalyzes this degradation, glycogen phosphorylase 2 (gp-2), is developmentally regulated and cAMP appears to be involved in this regulation. We have examined several aspects of the cAMP regulation of gp-2. We show that addition of exogenous cAMP to aggregation competent amoebae induced the appearance of gp-2 mRNA. The induction of gp-2 mRNA occurred within 1 and 1.5 h after the initial exposure to cAMP. Exposure to exogenous cAMP concentrations as low as 1.0 microM could induce gp-2 mRNA. We also examined the molecular mechanism through which cAMP induction of gp-2 occurs. Induction of gp-2 appears to result from a mechanism that does not require intracellular cAMP signaling, and may occur directly through a cAMP binding protein without the requirement of any intracellular signalling. We also examined the promoter region of the gp-2 gene for cis-acting elements that are involved in the cAMP regulation of gp-2. A series of deletions of the promoter were fused to a luciferase reporter gene and then analyzed for cAMP responsiveness. The results indicated that a region from -258 nucleotides to the transcriptional start site is sufficient for essentially full activity and appears to carry all necessary cis-acting sites for cAMP induction. Further deletion of 58 nucleotides from the 5' end, results in fivefold less activity in the presence of cAMP. Deletion of the next 104 nucleotides eliminates the cAMP response entirely. PMID:8222346

  14. Cyclic AMP synergizes with butyrate in promoting β-defensin 9 expression in chickens.

    PubMed

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Zeng, Xiangfang; Curtis, Amanda R; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-02-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) have both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties. Specific induction of endogenous HDP synthesis has emerged as a novel approach to antimicrobial therapy. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and butyrate have been implicated in HDP induction in humans. However, the role of cAMP signaling and the possible interactions between cAMP and butyrate in regulating HDP expression in other species remain unknown. Here we report that activation of cAMP signaling induces HDP gene expression in chickens as exemplified by β-defensin 9 (AvBD9). We further showed that, albeit being weak inducers, cAMP agonists synergize strongly with butyrate or butyrate analogs in AvBD9 induction in macrophages and primary jejunal explants. Additionally, oral supplementation of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist in the form of a Coleus forskohlii extract, was found to induce AvBD9 expression in the crop of chickens. Furthermore, feeding with both forskolin and butyrate showed an obvious synergy in triggering AvBD9 expression in the crop and jejunum of chickens. Surprisingly, inhibition of the MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway augmented the butyrate-FSK synergy, whereas blocking JNK or p38 MAPK pathway significantly diminished AvBD9 induction in chicken macrophages and jejunal explants in response to butyrate and FSK individually or in combination. Collectively, these results suggest the potential for concomitant use of butyrate and cAMP signaling activators in enhancing HDP expression, innate immunity, and disease resistance in both animals and humans.

  15. Forskolin activation of an identified peptide-sensitive motoneurone in Aplysia.

    PubMed Central

    Ram, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    Activation of a physiological response by the adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, has been suggested as a new criterion for testing the role of cyclic AMP. In Aplysia, motoneurone B16, which innervates muscle 15, is activated by the peptide egg-laying hormone (ELH). In high magnesium-low calcium medium, used to block synaptic activity, forskolin produced a similar response to ELH. Forskolin, at a concentration of 100 microM, consistently activated the ELH-sensitive neurone; vehicle produced no response while 30 microM forskolin usually produced lower levels of activity than 100 microM. The data are consistent with cyclic AMP mediation of the ELH response. PMID:6317117

  16. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. {yields} Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1{Delta} cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1{Delta} cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1{sup +} or cyr1{Delta} S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  17. Influence of cyclic AMP, agmatine, and a novel protein encoded by a flanking gene on speB (agmatine ureohydrolase) in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Szumanski, M B; Boyle, S M

    1992-01-01

    The speB gene of Escherichia coli encodes agmatine ureohydrolase (AUH), a putrescine biosynthetic enzyme. The speB gene is transcribed either from its own promoter or as a polycistronic message from the promoter of the speA gene encoding arginine decarboxylase. Two open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2) are present on the strand complementary to speB; approximately 90% of ORF2 overlaps the speB coding region. Analysis of transcriptional and translational fusions of ORF1 or ORF2 to lacZ revealed that ORF1 encoded a novel protein while ORF2 was not transcribed. Deletion of ORF1 from a plasmid containing ORF1, ORF2, and speB reduced the activity of AUH by 83%. In contrast, the presence of plasmid-encoded ORF1 caused an 86% increase in chromosomally encoded AUH activity. ORF1 did not stimulate alkaline phosphatase expressed from a phi(speB-phoA) transcriptional fusion encoded on the same plasmid. Western analysis (immunoblot) of a phi(ORF1-lacZ) translational fusion revealed that ORF1 encodes a 25.3-kDa protein. Agmatine induced transcription of phi(speB-phoA) but not phi(speA-phoA) fusions. Consequently, agmatine affects selection between the monocistronic and the polycistronic modes of speB transcription. In contrast, cyclic AMP (cAMP) repressed AUH activity of chromosomally encoded AUH but had no effect on plasmid-borne speB nor phi(speB-phoA). It is concluded that ORF1 encodes a protein which is a posttranscriptional regulator of speB, agmatine induces speB independent of speA, and cAMP regulates speB indirectly. Images PMID:1310091

  18. Identification and characterization of the type-IVA cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase RD1 as a membrane-bound protein expressed in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Shakur, Y; Wilson, M; Pooley, L; Lobban, M; Griffiths, S L; Campbell, A M; Beattie, J; Daly, C; Houslay, M D

    1995-03-15

    An antiserum was generated against a dodecapeptide whose sequence is found at the C-terminus of a cyclic AMP (cAMP)-specific, type-IVA phosphodiesterase encoded by the rat 'dunc-like' cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (RD1) cDNA. This antiserum identified a single approximately 73 kDa protein species upon immunoblotting of cerebellum homogenates. This species co-migrated upon SDS/PAGE with a single immunoreactive species observed in COS cells transfected with the cDNA for RD1. Native RD1 in cerebellum was found to be predominantly (approximately 93%) membrane-associated and could be found in isolated synaptosome populations, in particular those enriched in post-synaptic densities. Fractionation of lysed synaptosomes on sucrose density gradients identified RD1 as co-migrating with the plasma membrane marker 5'-nucleotidase. Laser scanning confocal and digital deconvolution immunofluorescence studies done on intact COS cells transfected with RD1 cDNA showed RD1 to be predominantly localized to plasma membranes but also associated with the Golgi apparatus and intracellular vesicles. RD1-specific antisera immunoprecipitated phosphodiesterase activity from solubilized cerebellum membranes. This activity had the characteristics expected of the type-IV cAMP phosphodiesterase RD1 in that it was cAMP specific, exhibited a low Km cAMP of 2.3 microM, high sensitivity to inhibition by 4-[3-(cyclopentoxyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidone (rolipram) (Ki approximately 0.7 microM) and was unaffected by Ca2+/calmodulin and low concentrations of cyclic GMP. The phosphodiesterase activities of RD1 solubilized from both cerebellum and transfected COS cell membranes showed identical first-order thermal denaturation kinetics at 50 degrees C. Native RD1 from cerebellum was shown to be an integral protein in that it was solubilized using the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100 but not by either re-homogenization or high NaCl concentrations. The observation that hydroxylamine was unable to cause

  19. Macrophage growth arrest by cyclic AMP defines a distinct checkpoint in the mid-G1 stage of the cell cycle and overrides constitutive c-myc expression.

    PubMed

    Rock, C O; Cleveland, J L; Jackowski, S

    1992-05-01

    Proliferation of a murine macrophage cell line (BAC1.2F5) in response to colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) is inhibited by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-mediated elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP). When BAC1.2F5 cells were growth arrested in early G1 by CSF-1 starvation and stimulated to synchronously enter the cell cycle by readdition of growth factor, PGE2 inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation when added before mid-G1, but its addition at later times did not block the onset of S phase. Reversible cell cycle arrest mediated by a cAMP analog required the presence of CSF-1 for cells to initiate DNA synthesis, whereas cells released from an aphidicolin block at the G1/S boundary entered S phase in the absence of CSF-1. PGE2 or cAMP analogs did not block the initial induction of c-myc mRNA by CSF-1 but abolished the CSF-1-dependent expression of c-myc mRNA in the mid-G1 stage of the cell cycle. The cAMP-mediated reduction in c-myc RNA levels was due to decreased c-myc transcription. However, CSF-1-dependent BAC1.2F5 clones infected with a c-myc retrovirus were growth arrested by cAMP analogs despite constitutive c-myc expression. Therefore, the reduction of endogenous c-myc expression by cAMP is neither necessary nor sufficient for growth inhibition.

  20. The prostaglandin E2/EP4 receptor/cyclic AMP/T-type Ca(2+) channel pathway mediates neuritogenesis in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells.

    PubMed

    Mitani, Kenji; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Maeda, Takashi; Tanaka, Yukari; Yoshida, Shigeru; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-03-01

    We investigated mechanisms for the neuritogenesis caused by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) or intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) in sensory neuron-like ND7/23 cells. PGE2 caused neuritogenesis, an effect abolished by an EP4 receptor antagonist or inhibitors of adenylyl cyclase (AC) or protein kinase A (PKA) and mimicked by the AC activator forskolin, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), and selective activators of PKA or Epac. ND7/23 cells expressed both Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 T-type Ca(2+) channels (T-channels). The neuritogenesis induced by db-cAMP or PGE2 was abolished by T-channel blockers. T-channels were functionally upregulated by db-cAMP. The PGE2/EP4/cAMP/T-channel pathway thus appears to mediate neuritogenesis in sensory neurons.

  1. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  2. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    PubMed

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. PMID:26361388

  3. Puerarin, an isoflavonoid derived from Radix puerariae, potentiates endothelium-independent relaxation via the cyclic AMP pathway in porcine coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Dennis K Y; Leung, Susan W S; Xu, Yan Chun; Vanhoutte, Paul M; Man, Ricky Y K

    2006-12-15

    Puerarin, an isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medicinal herb Radix puerariae, has been suggested to be useful in the management of various cardiovascular disorders. The present study examined the effect of acute exposure (30 min) to puerarin on vascular relaxation. Rings from porcine coronary artery of either sex were used. The highest concentration of puerarin (100 microM) produced a small but statistically significant relaxation of U46619-contracted rings. Vascular relaxations were also studied in the presence of lower concentrations of puerarin (0.1, 1 and 10 microM) which had no direct relaxation effect. Puerarin enhanced vasorelaxation to endothelium-independent relaxing agents, sodium nitroprusside and cromakalim. However, puerarin had no effect on vasorelaxation induced by endothelium-dependent relaxing agents, bradykinin and calcium ionophore A23187. The potentiating action of puerarin (10 microM) on sodium nitroprusside-mediated relaxation was not affected by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 300 microM), or by the disruption of the endothelium with Triton X-100. The effect of puerarin was reversible following a washout period. The potentiating effects were comparable with the 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) analogues, 8-bromoadenosine-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic AMP; 10 muM) and Sp-isomer [S nomenclature refers to phosphorus] of adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Sp-cyclic AMPS; 3 microM), but not the 3'-5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP) analogue, 8-bromoguanosine-3'-5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic GMP; 3 microM). The cyclic AMP antagonist, Rp-isomer [R nomenclature refers to phosphorus] of 8-bromoadenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cyclic AMPS; 10 microM), but not cyclic GMP antagonist, Rp-isomer of 8-bromoguanosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cyclic GMPS; 10 microM), reversed the effects of puerarin (10

  4. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) Receptor Protein-cAMP Complex Regulates Heparosan Production in Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huihui; Bao, Feifei; Zhao, Liping; Yu, Yanying; Tang, Jiaqin; Zhou, Xianxuan

    2015-11-01

    Heparosan serves as the starting carbon backbone for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin, a widely used clinical anticoagulant drug. The availability of heparosan is a significant concern for the cost-effective synthesis of bioengineered heparin. The carbon source is known as the pivotal factor affecting heparosan production. However, the mechanism by which carbon sources control the biosynthesis of heparosan is unclear. In this study, we found that the biosynthesis of heparosan was influenced by different carbon sources. Glucose inhibits the biosynthesis of heparosan, while the addition of either fructose or mannose increases the yield of heparosan. Further study demonstrated that the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex binds to the upstream region of the region 3 promoter and stimulates the transcription of the gene cluster for heparosan biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CRP binding site abolished its capability of binding CRP and eliminated the stimulative effect on transcription. (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis was further performed to determine the Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) heparosan structure and quantify extracellular heparosan production. Our results add to the understanding of the regulation of heparosan biosynthesis and may contribute to the study of other exopolysaccharide-producing strains. PMID:26319872

  5. Action of 50 Hz magnetic fields on cyclic AMP and intercellular communication in monolayers and spheroids of mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schimmelpfeng, J.; Stein, J.C.; Dertinger, H.

    1995-12-31

    To investigate the influence of physiological parameters such as cell density and three-dimensional cell contact on the biological action of a 2mT/50 Hz magnetic field, mouse fibroblasts were exposed as monolayers and as multicellular spheroids. Changes in cyclic AMP content of cells and alterations in gap junction-mediated intercellular communication were measured immediately after 5 min of exposure to the field. In monolayers of intermediate cell density (1 {times} 10{sup 5} cells/cm{sup 2}), the field treatment caused an increase in cAMP to 121% of the control level, whereas, at 3 {times} 10{sup 5} cells/cm{sup 2} (near confluence), a decrease to 88% of the unexposed cells was observed. Furthermore, field exposure stimulated gap-junction communication to 160% of the control level as determined by Lucifer yellow dye exchange. In spheroids, alterations in the radial profile of cellular cAMP were observed that were due both to field-induced local cAMP changes and to increased gap-junction permeability for this second messenger, the latter causing radial cAMP gradients to be flattened. The results indicate a strong dependence of field action on physiological parameters of the system exposed.

  6. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) Receptor Protein-cAMP Complex Regulates Heparosan Production in Escherichia coli Strain Nissle 1917

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Huihui; Bao, Feifei; Zhao, Liping; Yu, Yanying; Tang, Jiaqin

    2015-01-01

    Heparosan serves as the starting carbon backbone for the chemoenzymatic synthesis of heparin, a widely used clinical anticoagulant drug. The availability of heparosan is a significant concern for the cost-effective synthesis of bioengineered heparin. The carbon source is known as the pivotal factor affecting heparosan production. However, the mechanism by which carbon sources control the biosynthesis of heparosan is unclear. In this study, we found that the biosynthesis of heparosan was influenced by different carbon sources. Glucose inhibits the biosynthesis of heparosan, while the addition of either fructose or mannose increases the yield of heparosan. Further study demonstrated that the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex binds to the upstream region of the region 3 promoter and stimulates the transcription of the gene cluster for heparosan biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis of the CRP binding site abolished its capability of binding CRP and eliminated the stimulative effect on transcription. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis was further performed to determine the Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) heparosan structure and quantify extracellular heparosan production. Our results add to the understanding of the regulation of heparosan biosynthesis and may contribute to the study of other exopolysaccharide-producing strains. PMID:26319872

  7. Ca/sup + +/- and cyclic AMP-induced changes in intact cell phosphorylation of ileal microvillus membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, G.W.G.; Hannah, C.M.; Cohen, M.; Donowitz, M.

    1986-03-05

    Pieces of rabbit distal ileal mucosa, with the muscularis propria and serosa removed, were incubated for 90 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarborate buffer (KRB) with /sup 32/PO/sub 4/ to label the intracellular nucleotide pools. After rinsing, the mucosal pieces were transferred to KRB in the absence and presence of 10 ..mu..M A23187 or 10 mM theophylline. After a further 10 minutes the cells were scraped off and microvillus membranes prepared. The membranes were solubilized, subjected to two dimensional gel electrophoresis and autoradiography, and analyzed by densitometry. A23187 increased the phosphorylation of four microvillus membrane proteins with M/sub r/ of 32, 52, 110 and 116K. Increased phosphorylation of the 52 and 116K proteins has also been detected in microvillus membranes subjected to Ca/sup + +/ and calmodulin in the presence of ..gamma..-/sup 32/P-ATP. Theophylline increased the phosphorylation of the same 32 and 52K proteins and, additionally, of a second 32K peptide. While any of these proteins could be involved in the control of electrolyte transport, it is noteworthy that increased Ca/sup + +/, and increased cyclic AMP levels exert similar effects upon intestinal electrolyte transport. That A23187 and theophylline both increase the phosphorylation of the 32 and 52K proteins increases the possibility that these are involved in ion transport.

  8. Calcium, cyclic AMP, and MAP kinases: dysregulation in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cowley, B D

    2008-02-01

    Low intracellular calcium, present in untreated polycystic kidney epithelia, results in a proliferative response to cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Treatment with a calcium channel blocker (CCB) caused exacerbation of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease in rats. Data regarding use of CCBs in human polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are limited and mixed. Thus, it is premature to extrapolate these findings to human PKD.

  9. Stimulation of T-cells with OKT3 antibodies increases forskolin binding and cyclic AMP accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kvanta, A; Gerwins, P; Jondal, M; Fredholm, B B

    1990-01-01

    It has recently been shown that elevation of cAMP by adenosine receptor stimulation may be potentiated by stimulation of the T-cell receptor/CD3 complex on human T-cells with the monoclonal antibody OKT3, and that this is mimicked by activation of protein kinase C [Kvanta, A. et al. (1989) Naunyn-Schmeideberg's Arch. Pharmac. 340, 715-717]. In this study the diterpene forskolin, which binds to and activates the adenylate cyclase, has been used to examine further how the CD3 complex may influence the adenylate cyclase pathway. Stimulation with OKT3 alone was found to cause a small dose-dependent increase in basal cAMP accumulation. When combining OKT3 with a concentration of forskolin (10 microM), which by itself had little effect on the cyclase activity, the cAMP accumulation was markedly potentiated. This potentiation was paralleled by an increase in [3H]forskolin binding to saponine permeabilized Jurkat cells from 24 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells. The OKT3 effect on cAMP was blocked by chelating extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA or intracellular Ca2+ with BAPTA and also by W-7, an inhibitor of calmodulin, but was unaffected by H-7, an inhibitor of protein kinase C. Even though OKT3 caused an increase in inositolphosphate turnover, and activated protein kinase C, neither phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate (PDBu) nor the Ca2(+)-ionophore A23187 could mimic the OKT3 effect, whereas a combination of PDBu and A23187 at high concentrations could potentiate forskolin stimulated cyclase activity. Together, these results indicated that stimulation of the CD3 complex could influence the adenylate cyclase by two different mechanisms, one involving activation of protein kinase C and another which does not. PMID:2177619

  10. Cyclic Amp-Dependent Resuscitation of Dormant Mycobacteria by Exogenous Free Fatty Acids

    PubMed Central

    Shleeva, Margarita; Goncharenko, Anna; Kudykina, Yuliya; Young, Danielle; Young, Michael; Kaprelyants, Arseny

    2013-01-01

    One third of the world population carries a latent tuberculosis (TB) infection, which may reactivate leading to active disease. Although TB latency has been known for many years it remains poorly understood. In particular, substances of host origin, which may induce the resuscitation of dormant mycobacteria, have not yet been described. In vitro models of dormant (“non-culturable”) cells of Mycobacterium smegmatis (mc2155) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv were used. We found that the resuscitation of dormant M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells in liquid medium was stimulated by adding free unsaturated fatty acids (FA), including arachidonic acid, at concentrations of 1.6–10 µM. FA addition enhanced cAMP levels in reactivating M. smegmatis cells and exogenously added cAMP (3–10 mM) or dibutyryl-cAMP (0.5–1 mM) substituted for FA, causing resuscitation of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis dormant cells. A M. smegmatis null-mutant lacking MSMEG_4279, which encodes a FA-activated adenylyl cyclase (AC), could not be resuscitated by FA but it was resuscitated by cAMP. M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells hyper-expressing AC were unable to form non-culturable cells and a specific inhibitor of AC (8-bromo-cAMP) prevented FA-dependent resuscitation. RT-PCR analysis revealed that rpfA (coding for resuscitation promoting factor A) is up-regulated in M. smegmatis in the beginning of exponential growth following the cAMP increase in lag phase caused by FA-induced cell activation. A specific Rpf inhibitor (4-benzoyl-2-nitrophenylthiocyanate) suppressed FA-induced resuscitation. We propose a novel pathway for the resuscitation of dormant mycobacteria involving the activation of adenylyl cyclase MSMEG_4279 by FAs resulted in activation of cellular metabolism followed later by increase of RpfA activity which stimulates cell multiplication in exponential phase. The study reveals a probable role for lipids of host origin in the resuscitation of dormant mycobacteria

  11. Relationship between inhibition of cyclic AMP production in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing the rat D2(444) receptor and antagonist/agonist binding ratios.

    PubMed Central

    Harley, E. A.; Middlemiss, D. N.; Ragan, C. I.

    1995-01-01

    1. Radioligand binding assays using [3H]-(-)-sulpiride, in the presence of 1 mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 100 microM guanylylimidodiphosphate (GppNHp) and [3H]-N0437 were developed to label the low and high agonist affinity states of the rD2(444) receptor (long form of the rat D2 receptor) respectively. The ratios of the affinities of compounds in these two assays (Kapp [3H]-(-)-supiride/Kapp [3H]-N-0437) were then calculated. 2. The prediction that the binding ratio reflected the functional efficacy of a compound was supported by measurement of the ability of a number of compounds acting at dopamine receptors to inhibit rD2(444)-mediated inhibition of cyclic AMP production. When the rank order of the ratios of a number of these compounds was compared to their ability to inhibit the production of cyclic AMP, a significant correlation was seen (Spearman rank correlation coefficient = 0.943, P = 0.01). 3. In conclusion, the sulpiride/N-0437 binding ratio reliably predicted the efficacy of compounds acting at dopamine receptors to inhibit cyclic AMP production mediated by the rD2(444) receptor. PMID:7582561

  12. Cyclic-AMP Mediated Regulation of ABCB mRNA Expression in Mussel Haemocytes

    PubMed Central

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Fabbri, Elena

    2013-01-01

    Background The multixenobiotic resistance system (MXR) allows aquatic organisms to cope with their habitat despite high pollution levels by over-expressing membrane and intracellular transporters, including the P-glycoprotein (Pgp). In mammals transcription of the ABCB1 gene encoding Pgp is under cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation; whether this is true in mollusks is not fully clarified. Methodology/Principal Findings cAMP/PKA regulation and ABCB mRNA expression were assessed in haemocytes from Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) exposed in vivo for 1 week to 0.3 ng/L fluoxetine (FX) alone or in combination with 0.3 ng/L propranolol (PROP). FX significantly decreased cAMP levels and PKA activity, and induced ABCB mRNA down-regulation. FX effects were abolished in the presence of PROP. In vitro experiments using haemocytes treated with physiological agonists (noradrenaline and serotonin) and pharmacological modulators (PROP, forskolin, dbcAMP, and H89) of the cAMP/PKA system were performed to obtain clear evidence about the involvement of the signaling pathway in the transcriptional regulation of ABCB. Serotonin (5-HT) decreased cAMP levels, PKA activity and ABCB mRNA expression but increased the mRNA levels for a putative 5-HT1 receptor. Interestingly, 5-HT1 was also over-expressed after in vivo exposures to FX. 5-HT effects were counteracted by PROP. Forskolin and dbcAMP increased PKA activity as well as ABCB mRNA expression; the latter effect was abolished in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H89. Conclusions This study provides the first direct evidence for the cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of ABCB transcription in mussels. PMID:23593491

  13. [Adrenaline and cyclic AMP stimulation of ketopentose and sedoheptulose formation in rat liver homogenates].

    PubMed

    Kolotilova, A I; Glushankov, E P; Epifanova, Iu E

    1976-01-01

    Formation of sedoheptulose-7-phosphate and ketopentose phosphate was studied in vitro as affected by epinephrine and cAMP. No effect of epinephrine on the activity of transketolase was found with ribose-5-phosphate as a substrate of the nonoxidative reactions of the pentose phosphate ccyle. Epinephrine and cAMP enhance the formation of ketopentoses and sedoheptulose with glycogen as a main carbohydrate source, which is most pronounced in the experiments with cold preincubation. The phosphorylase system mediate influence of epinephrine and cAMP on the nonoxidative reactions products may be assumed.

  14. A possible signal-coupling role for cyclic AMP during endocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Prusch, R D; Roscoe, J C

    1993-01-01

    Cytoplasmic levels of cAMP in Amoeba proteus were measured utilizing radioimmunoassays under control conditions and when stimulated by inducers of either pinocytosis or phagocytosis. In control cells, cytoplasmic cAMP levels were approximately 0.39 pM/mg cells. When exposed to either chemotactic peptide or mannose which stimulate phagocytosis in the amoeba, there is a rapid doubling of the cAMP level within 45 sec of stimulation which then returns to the control level within 3-5 min. Theophylline prolongs the elevation of cytoplasmic cAMP in stimulated cells and is also capable of eliciting food vacuole formation in the amoeba. In addition isoproterenol also causes food vacuole formation in the amoeba as well as a large and prolonged increase in cytoplasmic cAMP levels. Inducers of pinocytosis (BSA and Na Cl) also elicit changes in cytoplasmic cAMP in the amoeba, but the response appears to differ from that elicited by inducers of phagocytosis in that the peak cAMP levels are broader and biphasic. It is concluded that cAMP plays a signal-coupling role during the early phases of both forms of endocytosis in Amoeba proteus.

  15. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    PubMed Central

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhibitors but not by PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors. Stimulation of cAMP formation by forskolin also activates nNOS phosphorylation. Sustained penile erection elicited by either intracavernous forskolin injection, or augmented by forskolin during cavernous nerve electrical stimulation, is prevented by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME or in nNOS-deleted mice. Thus, nNOS mediates both initiation and maintenance of penile erection, implying unique approaches for treating erectile dysfunction. PMID:23012472

  16. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target. PMID:22808067

  17. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection.

    PubMed

    Hurt, K Joseph; Sezen, Sena F; Lagoda, Gwen F; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A; Snyder, Solomon H; Burnett, Arthur L

    2012-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhibitors but not by PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors. Stimulation of cAMP formation by forskolin also activates nNOS phosphorylation. Sustained penile erection elicited by either intracavernous forskolin injection, or augmented by forskolin during cavernous nerve electrical stimulation, is prevented by the NOS inhibitor L-NAME or in nNOS-deleted mice. Thus, nNOS mediates both initiation and maintenance of penile erection, implying unique approaches for treating erectile dysfunction.

  18. Cyclic AMP pathway modifies memory through neural cell adhesion molecule alterations in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Razmi, Ali; Sahebgharani, Mousa; Khani, Mohammad Hossein; Paylakhi, Seyed Hassan; Faizi, Mehrdad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules (NCAMs) are known to influence memory by affecting neural cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix junctions. This study investigated the possible role of cAMP pathway in the expression of hippocampal NCAM and its polysialylated derivative (PSA-NCAM). The following pharmacological tools were employed for manipulation of cAMP pathway: a) forskolin; the activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC), b) 8-Br-cAMP; a protein kinase A (PKA) agonist, c) 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP; a selective enhancer of exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) and d) Rp-cAMP; a PKA inhibitor. Memory acquisition was tested by passive avoidance paradigm after injecting the above compounds for three consecutive days into the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus of rats. Forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP enhanced memory retrieval while Rp-cAMP significantly reduced memory and NCAM levels. 8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP failed to alter memory performance or NCAM levels as compared to vehicle. We observed no significant changes in PSA-NCAM, however the expression of St8sia4 and St8sia2 (the polysialyltransferase isoforms) were altered. The mRNA levels of St8sia4 was down-regulated by 8-Br-cAMP, Rp-cAMP and 8-pCPT while forskolin led to almost 3 and 5 fold increase in mRNAs of St8sia2 and St8sia4, respectively. The current insight might endorse the predominant role of PKA as compared to Epac in cAMP pathway in expression of NCAM and memory function. PMID:24901853

  19. Xanthine effects on renal proximal tubular function and cyclic AMP metabolism.

    PubMed

    Coulson, R; Scheinman, S J

    1989-02-01

    We evaluated the renal effects of xanthines using two in vitro models: the isolated perfused rat kidney (IPRK) and cultured opossum kidney (OK) cells, a continuous cell line that resembles proximal tubule and responds to parathyroid hormone (PTH). 1,3-Diethyl-8-phenylxanthine (DPX) a potent adenosine receptor antagonist, increased urine volume, glomerular filtration rate, vascular resistance and the fractional excretions of Na, K, Ca and Pi in the IPRK. DPX lowered the Na-dependent uptake of Pi by OK cells. By comparison enprofylline, 3-propylxanthine (ENP), a weak adenosine receptor antagonist, produced a slight elevation in glomerular filtration rate but no changes in electrolyte excretion by IPRK or Pi uptake by OK cells. Both DPX and ENP produced negligible elevations in basal IPRK cAMP. A 1-nM bolus of PTH elevated urinary and perfusate cAMP 50- and 10-fold, respectively. PTH-elevated urinary and perfusate cAMP were augmented further 4- to 7-fold with DPX and 3- to 4-fold with ENP (All IPRK experiments used 50 microM xanthine). OK cells produced a 2-fold cAMP response to 10 nM PTH alone. OK cells treated with 50 microM DPX exhibited no increase in basal but a 13-fold increase in PTH-stimulated cell cAMP. The rank order of potency at 50 microM to augment OK cell cAMP with 10 nM PTH was DPX greater than 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (DPC) greater than 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine greater than theobromine greater than theophylline greater than caffeine greater than ENP = no effect.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2537403

  20. Role of cyclic AMP in pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism with special emphasis on benzo(a)pyrene

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, V.H.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis was intended to investigate the role of the intracellular regulator, cAMP, on pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism using the well-studied carcinogen, benzo(a)pyrene (BP) as a representative xenobiotic. Lung slices from rats administered N/sup 6/, O/sup 2/', dibutyryl cAMP (DcAMP), theophylline or forskolin, all of which elevated biologically reactive cAMP levels in the lung, showed an increased ability to metabolize (/sup 3/H)-BP. This effect occurred beyond 6 hr following treatment and reached a maximum at 12 hr, at a time when cAMP content had already peaked and returned to basal levels. The perfusion of BP through the isolated lungs of animals administered DcAMP in vivo indicated that the BP metabolites primarily responsible for the cyclic nucleotide-induced increase in metabolism were the 3-hydroxy BP, 9-hydroxy BP, BP 9, 10 diol, BP-glucuronides and BP-glutathione conjugates. Kinetic analysis indicated that the Km component of these reactions was altered without a corresponding change in Vmax, suggesting that elevated pulmonary cAMP content may be affecting the detoxication enzymes, UDP-glucuronyltransferase and sulfotransferase. Studies with pulmonary microsomes from DcAMP-treated animals indicated that the cyclic nucleotide not only enhanced the hydroxylation of BP but also the cytochrome P450-dependent hydroxylation of coumarin. This is supported by the fact that DcAMP administration in vivo also enhanced phosphorylation of two classes of nuclear proteins, histones and nuclear acidic proteins, believed to play a role in the transcription of RNA and DNA.

  1. Distribution and function of 3',5'-Cyclic-AMP phosphodiesterases in the human ovary.

    PubMed

    Petersen, T S; Kristensen, S G; Jeppesen, J V; Grøndahl, M L; Wissing, M L; Macklon, K T; Andersen, C Y

    2015-03-01

    The concentration of the important second messenger cAMP is regulated by phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and hence an attractive drug target. However, limited human data are available about the PDEs in the ovary. The aim of the present study was to describe and characterise the PDEs in the human ovary. Results were obtained by analysis of mRNA microarray data from follicles and granulosa cells (GCs), combined RT-PCR and enzymatic activity analysis in GCs, immunohistochemical analysis of ovarian sections and by studying the effect of PDE inhibitors on progesterone production from cultured GCs. We found that PDE3, PDE4, PDE7 and PDE8 are the major families present while PDE11A was not detected. PDE8B was differentially expressed during folliculogenesis. In cultured GCs, inhibition of PDE7 and PDE8 increased basal progesterone secretion while PDE4 inhibition increased forskolin-stimulated progesterone secretion. In conclusion, we identified PDE3, PDE4, PDE7 and PDE8 as the major PDEs in the human ovary.

  2. 8-Chloro-cyclic AMP inhibits autocrine and angiogenic growth factor production in human colorectal and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bianco, C; Tortora, G; Baldassarre, G; Caputo, R; Fontanini, G; Chinè, S; Bianco, A R; Ciardiello, F

    1997-03-01

    8-Chloro-cyclic AMP (8-Cl-cAMP) is a cAMP analogue that specifically down-regulates type I protein kinase A, a signaling protein directly involved in cell proliferation and neoplastic transformation, and that causes growth inhibition in a variety of human cancer cell types. In this report, we have investigated the effects of 8-Cl-cAMP on the expression of several growth factors in human colon (GEO and LS174T) and breast (MDA-MB468) cancer cell lines. 8-Cl-cAMP treatment caused in the three cancer cell lines a significant dose- and time-dependent inhibition in the expression of various endogenous autocrine growth factors, such as transforming growth factor alpha, amphiregulin, and CRIPTO, and of two angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor, at both the mRNA and protein levels. Furthermore, 8-Cl-cAMP treatment markedly inhibited the ability of all three cell lines to invade a basement membrane matrix in a chemoinvasion assay. Finally, 8-Cl-cAMP-induced inhibition of GEO tumor growth in nude mice was accompanied by a significant suppression of transforming growth factor alpha, amphiregulin, CRIPTO, basic fibroblast growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor production by the tumor cells, and of neoangiogenesis, as detected by factor VIII staining of host blood cells. These results demonstrate that 8-Cl-cAMP is a novel anticancer drug that inhibits the production of various autocrine and paracrine tumor growth factors that are important in sustaining autonomous local growth and facilitate invasion and metastasis.

  3. Hormone-induced intercellular signal transfer dissociates cyclic AMP- dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We used co-cultures of porcine ovarian granulosa cells and mouse adrenocortical tumor cells (Y-1) to examine the kinetics of contact- dependent intercellular signal transfer and to assess the molecular mechanisms employed by this process. Exposure to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) caused cAMP-dependent protein kinase dissociation in granulosa cells and, with time, in Y-1 cells if, and only if, they contacted a responding granulosa cell. Y-1 cells close to a granulosa cell but not touching it failed to respond similarly. In reciprocal experiments, co-cultures were stimulated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Y-1 cells dissociated protein kinase as did granulosa cells in contact with Y-1 cells; however, granulosa cells that were not in contact with Y-1 cells failed to respond to the hormone. Fluorogenic steroids were secreted by Y-1 cells cultured alone and stimulated with ACTH, but were not secreted by cultures exposed to FSH. Neither hormone caused fluorogenic steroid production by granulosa cells. On the other hand these steroids were secreted in co-cultures stimulated with ACTH and to a lesser degree in co-cultures exposed to FSH. Autoradiography revealed that I125-FSH bound only to granulosa cells, never to Y-1 cells, even if they were in contact with an ovarian cell. The possibility of cell fusion was tested by experiments in which Y-1 cell membranes were labeled with cationized ferritin. These cells were then placed in co-culture with ovarian granulosa cells that had previously been allowed to ingest latex spheres. At regions of gap junctions between Y-1 and granulosa cells ferritin remained attached to the adrenal cell membrane and was never observed to migrate to the granulosa cell membrane. From these data, we conclude that hormone specific stimulation of one cell type leads to protein kinase dissociation in heterotypic partners only if they contact a hormone responsive cell. This signal transfer is bidirectional, exhibits temporal kinetics and

  4. Cyclic AMP-mediated endocytosis of intestinal epithelial NHE3 requires binding to synaptotagmin 1

    PubMed Central

    Musch, Mark W.; Arvans, Donna L.; Wang, Yunwei; Nakagawa, Yasushi; Solomaha, Elena

    2010-01-01

    The apical membrane Na+-H+ exchanger (NHE)3 is regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation, which inhibits its activity through membrane endocytosis. The clathrin complex adaptor protein synaptotagmin 1 (Syt 1) appears to be essential to this process, but little is known about its expression in intestinal epithelial cells or interaction with NHE3. The intestinal epithelial expression and apical location of Syt 1 were determined by Syt 1 mRNA profiling and immunolocalization. Tandem mass spectrometry was used for protein identification. Bis(sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS3) cross linking suggested that NHE3 and Syt 1 were in a membrane complex following cAMP stimulation of Caco2BBE (Brush Border Expressions) cells. To investigate the regulation of NHE3 appearance in a Syt 1-containing membrane compartment, doxycycline-inducible hemaglutinin (HA)-tagged NHE3 was expressed in Caco2BBE cells. HA-NHE3 correctly targeted to the apical membrane, where, upon cAMP stimulation, it was internalized with a Syt 1-containing compartment. Site-directed mutagenesis of NHE3 showed that serine 605 (S605) was pivotal to NHE3 and Syt 1 association and internalization. Direct Syt 1 interaction with NHE3 was suggested by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis. The physiological role of S552 was less clear. By FRET, this serine residue appeared to be involved in cAMP-induced Syt 1 binding of NHE3. However, when HA-tagged NHE3 S552A was expressed in Caco2 cells, the mutated construct was not inserted into the apical membrane. We conclude that intestinal epithelial Syt 1 plays an important role in cAMP-stimulated endocytosis of apical NHE3 through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of S605 that is required for NHE3 and Syt 1 association. PMID:19926819

  5. Dose and Chemical Modification Considerations for Continuous Cyclic AMP Analog Delivery to the Injured CNS

    PubMed Central

    Fouad, Karim; Ghosh, Mousumi; Vavrek, Romana; Tse, Arthur D.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this investigation, two cell-permeable synthetic analogs of cAMP, dibutyryl-cAMP (db-cAMP) and 8-bromo-cAMP, which are widely used to elevate intracellular cAMP levels under experimental conditions, were investigated for their ability to dose-dependently improve histological and functional outcomes following continuous delivery in two models of incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). The cAMP analogs were delivered via osmotic minipumps at 1–250 mM through an indwelling cortical cannula or by intrathecal infusion for up to 4 weeks after either a T8 unilateral over-hemisection or a C2-3 dorsolateral quadrant lesion, respectively. In both SCI models, continuous db-cAMP delivery was associated with histopathological changes that included sporadic micro-hemorrhage formation and cavitation, enhanced macrophage infiltration and tissue damage at regions beyond the immediate application site; no deleterious or beneficial effect of agent delivery was observed at the spinal injury site. Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by pronounced behavioral deficits that included an absence of progressive locomotor recovery, increased extensor tone, paralysis, and sensory abnormalities. These deleterious effects were not observed in saline-treated animals, in animals in which the db-cAMP dose did not exceed 1 mM, or in those animals that received a high dose (250 mM) of the alternative cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP. These results demonstrate that, for continuous intraparenchymal or intrathecal administration of cAMP analogs for the study of biological or therapeutic effects within the central nervous system (CNS), consideration of the effective concentration applied as well as the potential toxicity of chemical moieties on the parent molecule and/or their activity needs to be taken into account. PMID:19397425

  6. Modulation of cardiac L-type Ca2+ channels by GTP gamma S in response to isoprenaline, forskolin and photoreleased nucleotides.

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, R. Z.; Goodstadt, L. J.; Twist, V. W.; Powell, T.

    1994-01-01

    1. Using the patch-clamp recording technique, we have investigated the effects of chronic intracellular application of guanosine thiotriphosphate (GTP gamma S) by cell dialysis, on the potentiation of L-type Ca2+ currents (ICa) by isoprenaline and forskolin and also by GTP gamma S and cyclic AMP released intracellularly by flash-photolysis of their caged derivatives. 2. GTP gamma S prevented enhancement of ICa by isoprenaline with an IC50 of approximately 10 microM and considerably reduced the ability of forskolin to increase ICa. In addition GTP gamma S also reduced the time-to-peak response for potentiation of ICa by forskolin. Responses to forskolin were abolished by co-dialysis of cells with the cyclic AMP antagonist, Rp-adenosine-3'-5'-mono-thionophosphate (Rp-cAMPS). 3. Photoreleased GTP gamma S (PR-GTP gamma S; approximately 23 microM) generally induced a biphasic increase in ICa. This response was also inhibited by chronic intracellular dialysis with GTP gamma S with an IC50 of approximately 1 microM. 4. Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin (PTX) reversed the inhibitory effect of 100 microM GTP gamma S on isoprenaline-induced stimulation of ICa. However, PTX pretreatment did not restore the activating action of PR-GTP gamma S inhibited by chronic application of GTP gamma S. 5. Photoreleased cyclic AMP (approximately 5 microM; PR-cyclic AMP) increased peak ICa. This effect was inhibited by dialysis of cells with Rp-cAMPS and by stimulation of ICa by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Co-dialysis of cells with uncaged GTP gamma S reduced the time-to-peak for PR-cyclic AMP mediated activation of ICa but did not affect the magnitude of the response. 6. It is concluded that chronically applied GTP gamma S can (i) inhibit activation of ICa by isoprenaline by interacting with a PTX-sensitive guanosine nucleotide binding (G-) protein located upstream of adenylate cyclase (possibly Gi) and (ii) accelerate the response to cyclic AMP

  7. Cyclic AMP and c-KIT Signaling in Familial Testicular Germ Cell Tumor Predisposition

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Monalisa F.; Horvath, Anelia; Bornstein, Ethan R.; Almeida, Madson Q.; Xekouki, Paraskevi; Faucz, Fabio R.; Gourgari, Evgenia; Nadella, Kiran; Remmers, Elaine F.; Quezado, Martha; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Bertollo; Kratz, Christian P.; Nesterova, Maria; Greene, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Familial testicular germ cell tumors (FTGCTs) are hypothesized to result from the combined interaction of multiple low-penetrance genes. We reported inactivating germline mutations of the cAMP-binding phosphodiesterase 11A (PDE11A) as modifiers of FTGCT risk. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the KITLG gene, the ligand for the cKIT tyrosine kinase receptor, as strong modifiers of susceptibility to both familial and sporadic testicular germ cell tumors. Design: We studied 94 patients with FTGCTs and 50 at-risk male relatives from 63 unrelated kindreds, in whom the PDE11A gene had been sequenced by investigating the association between KITLG genome-wide association study single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs3782179 and rs4474514 and FTGCT risk in these patients and in 692 controls. We also examined cAMP and c-KIT signaling in testicular tissues and cell lines and extended the studies to 2 sporadic cases, one with a PDE11A defect and one without, as a comparison. Results: We found a higher frequency of the KITLG risk alleles in FTGCT patients who also had a PDE11A sequence variant, compared with those with a wild-type PDE11A sequence. In NTERA-2 and Tcam-2 cells transfected with the mutated forms of PDE11A (R52T, F258Y, Y727C, R804H, V820M, R867G, and M878V), cAMP levels were significantly higher, and the relative phosphodiesterase activity was lower than in the wild-type cells. KITLG expression was consistently increased in the presence of PDE11A-inactivating defects, both at the RNA and protein levels, in familial testicular germ cell tumors. The 2 sporadic cases that were studied, one with a PDE11A defect and another without, agreed with the data in FTGTCT and in the cell lines. Conclusions: Patients with FTGCT and PDE11A defects also carry KITLG risk alleles more frequently. There may be an interaction between cAMP and c-KIT signaling in predisposition to testicular germ cell tumors. PMID:23771924

  8. Agonist trafficking of Gi/o-mediated α2A-adrenoceptor responses in HEL 92.1.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Jyrki P; Jansson, Christian C; Åkerman, Karl E O

    2001-01-01

    The ability of 19 agonists to elevate Ca2+ and inhibit forskolin-induced cyclic AMP elevation through α2A-adrenoceptors in HEL 92.1.7 cells was investigated. Ligands of catecholamine-like- (five), imidazoline- (nine) and non-catecholamine-non-imidazoline-type (five) were included. The relative maximum responses were similar in both assays. Five ligands were full or nearly full agonists, six produced 20 – 70% of the response to a full agonist and the remaining eight gave lower responses (<20%) so that their potencies were difficult to evaluate. Marked differences in the potencies of the agonists with respect to the two measured responses were seen. The catecholamines were several times less potent in decreasing cyclic AMP than in increasing Ca2+, whereas the other, both imidazoline and ox-/thiazoloazepine ligands, were several times more potent with respect to the former than the latter response. For instance, UK14,304 was more potent than adrenaline with respect to the cyclic AMP response but less potent than adrenaline with respect to the Ca2+ response. All the responses were sensitive to pertussis toxin-pretreatment. Also the possible role of PLA2, β-adrenoceptors or ligand transport or metabolism as a source of error could be excluded. The results suggest that the active receptor states produced by catecholamines and the other agonists are markedly different and therefore have different abilities to activate different signalling pathways. PMID:11264241

  9. Opposing functional effects of cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP may act through protein phosphorylation in rabbit cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Yan, L; Lee, H; Huang, M W; Scholz, P M; Weiss, H R

    2000-04-01

    1. We tested the hypothesis that the negative functional effects of cyclic GMP (cGMP) oppose the positive effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP) in cardiac myocytes through interaction at the level of their respective protein kinases. 2. Cell shortening was studied using a video-edge detector. The O2 consumption of a suspension of rabbit ventricular myocytes was measured using O2 electrodes. Protein phosphorylation was measured autoradiographically following SDS-PAGE. Data were collected with: (1) 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (2) 8-bromo-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP) 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (3) 8-Br-cAMP 10(-5) M followed by 8-Br-cGMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (4) 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M followed by 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M; (5) 8-Br-cGMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M followed by KT 5720 (cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor) or KT 5823 (cGMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor) 10(-6) M; and (6) 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M followed by KT 5720 or KT 5823 10(-6) M. 3. 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M decreased percent shortening (Pcs) from 6.3+/-0.6 to 3.6+/-0.4% and rate of shortening (Rs) from 66.7+/-4.4 to 41.8+/-4.2 microm s(-1). 8-Br-cAMP 10(-5) M increased Pcs (from 3.7+/-0.2 to 4.8+/-0.2) and Rs (from 50.0+/-3.0 to 60.0+/-3.1). With 8-Br-cAMP 10(-5) M, 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M decreased Pcs and Rs less. The positive functional effects of 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M were also diminished with 8-Br-cGMP 10(-5) M. Following 8-Br-cGMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M, KT 5720 10(-6) M further decreased Pcs to 2.5+/-0.3 and Rs to 30.0+/-4.1. KT 5823 10(-6) M returned Pcs to 4.7+/-0.4 and Rs to 61.3+/-5.3. Following 8-Br-cAMP 10(-7) or 10(-5) M, KT 5720 decreased the elevated Pcs and Rs significantly and KT 5823 10(-6) M further increased these parameters. 4. cGMP and cAMP phosphorylated the same five protein bands. With KT 5720 or KT 5823, all of the bands were lighter at the same concentration of 8-Br-cAMP and 8-Br-cGMP. 5. We conclude that, in rabbit ventricular myocytes, the opposing functional effects of cGMP and c

  10. Synthesis of glial fibrillary acidic protein in rat C6 glioma in chemically defined medium: cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional and translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Messens, J; Slegers, H

    1992-06-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFA) expression was induced in rat C6 glioma in chemically defined medium by the addition of N6, O2'-dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP). Induction was dependent on the increase in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP), which was linearly correlated with added dbcAMP. Contrary to GFA mRNA synthesis, which can be obtained by cAMP-dependent and -independent pathways, translation of mRNA into GFA was observed only above a cellular cAMP concentration of approximately 0.2 fmol/cell. dbcAMP stimulation did not affect the vimentin concentration, which remained at a low level, but changed the cellular morphology from a bipolar to a stellate shape. A similar morphological change was observed after stimulation of C6 with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, LPS did not significantly increase the intracellular concentration of cAMP and the LPS-induced mRNA was not translated into GFA. Our results indicate that GFA synthesis is regulated at the mRNA level and at the translational level and that a cAMP-dependent mechanism determines the ultimate synthesis of GFA by a yet unknown mechanism.

  11. Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) regulates the expression of cspA, cspB, cspG and cspI, members of cspA family, in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Uppal, Sheetal; Jawali, Narendra

    2015-04-01

    Escherichia coli K-12 contains nine paralogs of CspA, CspA-CspI, collectively known as CspA family of cold-shock proteins (CSPs). In spite of the high degree of similarity among themselves, only five (cspA, B, E, G and I) are induced during cold-stress. In the present study, we show that cspB, cspG and cspI, the members of cspA family, known to be induced in response to cold shock, are regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) , a global regulator involved in sugar metabolism, during growth at 37 °C as well as at 15 °C, as seen by green fluorescent protein (gfp) promoter fusions assays. Interestingly, cspA is selectively regulated by CRP during growth at 15 °C but not at 37 °C. The regulation of cspA, cspB, cspG and cspI by CRP was found to be through an indirect mechanism as determined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). These results substantiate our earlier study demonstrating a role for CRP during growth at low temperature. PMID:25637299

  12. Release of Ca2+ by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate in platelet membrane vesicles is not dependent on cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    O'Rourke, F; Zavoico, G B; Feinstein, M B

    1989-01-01

    In contrast with previous reports, it was found that membrane-protein phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit (CS) of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase had no effect on Ca2+ uptake into platelet membrane vesicles or on subsequent Ca2+ release by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). Furthermore, IP-20, a highly potent synthetic peptide inhibitor of CS, which totally abolished membrane protein phosphorylation by endogenous or exogenous CS, also had no effect on either Ca2+ uptake or release by IP3. Commercial preparations of protein kinase inhibitor protein (PKI) usually had no effect, but one preparation partially inhibited Ca2+ uptake, which is attributable to the gross impurity of the commercial PKI preparation. IP3-induced release of Ca2+ was also unaffected by the absence of ATP from the medium, supporting the conclusion that Ca2+ release by IP3 does not require the phosphorylation of membrane protein. Images Fig. 3. PMID:2784669

  13. Identification of two splice variant forms of type-IVB cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, DPD (rPDE-IVB1) and PDE-4 (rPDE-IVB2) in brain: selective localization in membrane and cytosolic compartments and differential expression in various brain regions.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M; Shakur, Y; Beattie, J; Houslay, M D

    1994-12-01

    In order to detect the two splice variant forms of type-IVB cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, DPD (type-IVB1) and PDE-4 (type-IVB2), anti-peptide antisera were generated. One set ('DPD/PDE-4-common'), generated against a peptide sequence found at the common C-terminus of these two PDEs, detected both PDEs. A second set was PDE-4 specific, being directed against a peptide sequence found within the unique N-terminal region of PDE-4. In brain, DPD was found exclusively in the cytosol and PDE-4 exclusively associated with membranes. Both brain DPD and PDE-4 activities, isolated by immunoprecipitation, were cyclic AMP-specific (KmcyclicAMP: approximately 5 microM for DPD; approximately 4 microM for PDE-4) and were inhibited by low rolipram concentrations (K1rolipram approximately 1 microM for both). Transient expression of DPD in COS-1 cells allowed identification of an approx. 64 kDa species which co-migrated on SDS/PAGE with the immunoreactive species identified in both brain cytosol and membrane fractions using the DPD/PDE-4-common antisera. The subunit size observed for PDE-4 (approx. 64 kDa) in brain membranes was similar to that predicted from the cDNA sequence, but that observed for DPD was approx. 4 kDa greater. Type-IV, rolipram-inhibited PDE activity was found in all brain regions except the pituitary, where it formed between 30 and 70% of the PDE activity in membrane and cytosolic fractions when assayed with 1 microM cyclic AMP, PDE-4 formed 40-50% of the membrane type-IV activity in all brain regions save the midbrain (approx. 20%). DPD distribution was highly restricted to certain regions, providing approx. 35% of the type-IV cytosolic activity in hippocampus and 13-21% in cortex, hypothalamus and striatum with no presence in brain stem, cerebellum, midbrain and pituitary. The combined type-IVB PDE activities of DPD and PDE-4 contributed approx. 10% of the total PDE activity in most brain regions except for the pituitary (zero) and the mid

  14. Membrane physical properties do not explain increased cyclic AMP production in hepatocytes from rats fed menhaden oil.

    PubMed

    Bizeau, M E; Hazel, J R

    2000-06-01

    To study the effect of altering plasma membrane fatty acid composition on the glucagon signal transduction pathway, cAMP accumulation was measured in hepatocytes from rats fed diets containing either menhaden oil (MO) or coconut oil (CO). Hepatocytes from MO-fed animals produced significantly more cAMP in response to glucagon and forskolin compared to CO-fed animals. Glucagon receptor number and affinity were similar in MO- and CO-fed rats. Liver plasma membranes from MO-fed animals were enriched in long-chain n-3 fatty acids and contained significantly lower amounts of saturated C10-C16 and 18:1n-9 than CO-fed animals. Membrane physical properties were examined using both Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and the fluorescent probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). FTIR analysis revealed that below 34 degrees C, CO membranes were more ordered than MO membranes. However, as assay temperature approached 37 degrees C, MO and CO membranes became similarly ordered. DPH polarization values indicated no differences in membrane order at 37 degrees C, whereas membrane order was decreased in CO-fed animals at 25 degrees C. These data indicate the importance of assay temperature in assessing the influence of membrane physical properties on the activity of signal transduction pathways. Whereas increased signal transduction activity has been correlated to reduced membrane order in MO-fed animals, these data indicate that at physiological temperatures membrane order did not vary between groups. Enhanced cAMP accumulation in response to forskolin indicates that adenylate cyclase activity or content may be elevated in MO- vs. CO-fed rats. Enhanced adenylate cyclase activity may result, in part, from changes in specific fatty acids in hepatocyte plasma membranes without demonstrable changes in membrane physical properties.

  15. Propofol reduced myocardial contraction of vertebrates partly by mediating the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xinyu; Bo, Qiyu; Meng, Tao; Lei, Zhen; Li, Jingxin; Hou, Yonghao; Yu, Xiaoqian; Yu, Jingui

    2016-07-15

    Propofol inhibits myocardial contraction in a dose dependent manner. The present study is designed to examine the effect of propofol on PKA mediated myocardial contraction in the absence of adrenoreceptor agonist. The contraction of isolated rat heart was measured in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using a pressure transducer. The levels of cAMP and PKA kinase activity were detected by ELISA. The mRNA and total protein or phosphorylation level of PKA and downstream proteins were tested in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using RT-PCR, QPCR and western blotting. The phosphorylation level of PKA was examined thoroughly using immunofluorescence and PKA activity non-radioactive detection kit. Propofol induced a dose-dependent negative contractile response on the rat heart. The inhibitory effect of high concentration propofol (50μM) with 45% decease of control could be partly reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89 (10μM) and the depressant effect of propofol decreased from 45% to 10%. PKA kinase activity was inhibited by propofol in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol also induced a decrease in phosphorylation of PKA, which was also inhibited by H89, but did not alter the production of cAMP and the mRNA levels of PKA. The downstream proteins of PKA, PLN and RyR2 were phosphorylated to a lesser extent with propofol or H89 than control. These results demonstrated that propofol induced a negative myocardial contractile response partly by mediating the PKA phosphorylation pathway. PMID:27495954

  16. CREB and the CRTC co-activators: sensors for hormonal and metabolic signals.

    PubMed

    Altarejos, Judith Y; Montminy, Marc

    2011-03-01

    The cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is phosphorylated in response to a wide variety of signals, yet target gene transcription is only increased in a subset of cases. Recent studies indicate that CREB functions in concert with a family of latent cytoplasmic co-activators called cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activators (CRTCs), which are activated through dephosphorylation. A dual requirement for CREB phosphorylation and CRTC dephosphorylation is likely to explain how these activator-co-activator cognates discriminate between different stimuli. Following their activation, CREB and CRTCs mediate the effects of fasting and feeding signals on the expression of metabolic programmes in insulin-sensitive tissues.

  17. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  18. Serum-stimulated cyclic-AMP production in S49 lymphoma cells grown in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Darfler, F J; Mullen, M D; Insel, P A

    1984-03-23

    Growth of S49 lymphoma cells with horse serum leads to an increase in cellular cAMP phosphodiesterase activity and a resultant loss of hormone- and cholera-toxin-stimulated cAMP accumulation. We now show that the serum requires protein synthesis to produce these effects. Further, we show that acute addition of serum to wild-type S49 cells, grown in serum-free medium, rapidly (under 2 min) and transiently (under 30 min) stimulates cellular cAMP, 10-fold over basal levels. This 'acute' effect of serum was not observed in UNC S49 cells, suggesting that a functional Ns, the guanine nucleotide regulatory component that mediates stimulation of adenylate cyclase, is required for the serum-mediated stimulation of cellular cAMP. Serum added acutely to wild-type S49 cells also augmented cAMP accumulation in response to isoproterenol and forskolin. The half-maximally effective concentrations of horse serum that acutely stimulated or more slowly decreased the cAMP accumulation were approx. 0.2% and 2.0%, respectively. Preliminary attempts to characterize further the serum factor indicate that it has a high (250 000-300 000) molecular weight and is insensitive to boiling; chromatography on Sepharose CL-6B yields a 100-fold purification. Thus, the serum contains one or more components that activate adenylate cyclase, increase cellular cAMP levels and ultimately induce cAMP phosphodiesterase in S49 lymphoma cells. PMID:6322858

  19. Cyclic AMP directs inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate-evoked Ca2+ signalling to different intracellular Ca2+ stores

    PubMed Central

    Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cholesterol depletion reversibly abolishes carbachol-evoked Ca2+ release from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores, without affecting the distribution of IP3 receptors (IP3R) or endoplasmic reticulum, IP3 formation or responses to photolysis of caged IP3. Receptors that stimulate cAMP formation do not alone evoke Ca2+ signals, but they potentiate those evoked by carbachol. We show that these potentiated signals are entirely unaffected by cholesterol depletion and that, within individual cells, different IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores are released by carbachol alone and by carbachol combined with receptors that stimulate cAMP formation. We suggest that muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in lipid rafts deliver IP3 at high concentration to associated IP3R, stimulating them to release Ca2+. Muscarinic receptors outside rafts are less closely associated with IP3R and provide insufficient local IP3 to activate IP3R directly. These IP3R, probably type 2 IP3R within a discrete Ca2+ store, are activated only when their sensitivity is increased by cAMP. Sensitization of IP3R by cAMP extends the effective range of signalling by phospholipase C, allowing muscarinic receptors that are otherwise ineffective to recruit additional IP3-sensitive Ca2+ stores. PMID:23525004

  20. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  1. Cyclic AMP and AKAP-mediated targeting of protein kinase A regulates lactate dehydrogenase subunit A mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Jungmann, Richard A; Kiryukhina, Olga

    2005-07-01

    Expression of the lactate dehydrogenase A subunit (ldh-A) gene is controlled through transcriptional as well as post-transcriptional mechanisms. Both mechanisms involve activation of protein kinase A (PKA) into its subunits and subsequent phosphorylation and activation of several key regulatory factors. In rat C6 glioma cells, post-transcriptional gene regulation occurs through PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA and subsequent increase of intracellular LDH-A mRNA levels. Previous studies have demonstrated a cAMP-stabilizing region (CSR) located in the LDH-A 3'-untranslated region which, in combination with several phosphorylated CSR-binding proteins (CSR-BP), regulates the PKA-mediated stabilization of LDH-A mRNA. However, the mechanistic details of interaction of CSR with proteins as they pertain to mRNA stabilization by PKA are so far largely unknown. In this study we tested the hypothesis that ribosomal protein extracts (RSW) from glioma cells contain PKA regulatory (RII) and catalytic (C) subunits that, in combination with a protein kinase A anchoring protein (AKAP 95) and CSR-BPs participate in forming CSR-protein complexes that are responsible for mRNA stability regulation. To demonstrate the importance of CSR-protein complex formation, the PKA subunits and AKAP 95 were removed from the RSW by immunoprecipitation, and the antigen-deleted RSW were subjected to CSR binding analysis using gel mobility shift and UV cross-linking. It was shown that AKAP 95 as well as RII formed a direct linkage with CSR during CSR-protein complex formation. In contrast, the catalytic subunit formed part of the CSR-protein complex but did not bind to CSR directly in a covalent linkage. To determine whether formation of CSR complexes that included C, RII, and AKAP 95 constituted a functional event and was necessary for mRNA stabilization, cell-free decay reactions were carried out with RSW extracts, and the kinetics of decay of LDH-A mRNA was determined. Depletion of PKA

  2. Species differences in the effects of prostaglandins on inositol trisphosphate accumulation, phosphatidic acid formation, myosin light chain phosphorylation and contraction in iris sphincter of the mammalian eye: interaction with the cyclic AMP system.

    PubMed

    Yousufzai, S Y; Chen, A L; Abdel-Latif, A A

    1988-12-01

    Comparative studies on the effects of prostaglandins (PGs) on 1,2-diacylglycerol, measured as phosphatidic acid (PA), and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) production, cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation, myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and contraction in the iris sphincter smooth muscle of rabbit, bovine and other mammalian species were undertaken and functional and biochemical relationships between the IP3-Ca++ and cAMP second messenger systems were demonstrated. The findings obtained from these studies can be summarized as follows: 1) all PGs investigated, including PGE2, PGF2 alpha, PGF2 alpha-ester, PGE1 and PGA2 increased IP3 accumulation and PA formation, and the extent of stimulation was dependent on the animal species. Thus, PGF2 alpha-ester (1 microM), the most potent of the PGs, increased IP3 accumulation in rabbit and bovine sphincters by 33 and 58%, respectively, and increased PA formation by 67 and 56%, respectively. The PG increased IP3 accumulation in both rabbit and bovine sphincters very rapidly (T1/2 values about 26 sec) and in a dose-dependent manner. 2) The PG had no effect on MLC phosphorylation in the rabbit sphincter, but it increased that of the bovine by 36%. 3) The PG increased cAMP formation by 75% in the rabbit sphincter but it had no effect on that of the bovine. 4) The PG induced a maximal contractile response in the bovine sphincter but it had no effect on that of the rabbit. 5) In the bovine, PGA2 induced IP3 accumulation and contraction, without an effect on cAMP formation; however, in the rabbit, cat and dog it increased cAMP formation and had no effect on IP3 accumulation and contraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Cyclic nucleotide responses and radiation-induced mitotic delay in Physarum polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-02-01

    The response of the plasmodial levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in Physarum polycephalum to several putative phosphodiesterase inhibitors and to ionizing radiation has been measured. Isobutylmethylxanthine (2 mM) induces a rapid transient threefold elevation of cyclic AMP alone, with maximum response in about 10 min and return to the base line in about 30 min. Theophylline (2 mM) induces a rapid, sustained twofold elevation of cyclic GMP only. Caffeine (2mM) and Ro-20-1724 (18 ..mu..M) both elicit a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP, resembling the isobutylmethylxanthine response, and a slow transient elevation of the cyclic GMP level. Of particular interest is the rapid threefold transient elevation of the cyclic AMP, but not of the cyclic GMP, level by ..gamma.. radiation.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A-regulated genes reveals the production of the novel natural compound fumipyrrole by Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Macheleidt, Juliane; Scherlach, Kirstin; Neuwirth, Toni; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Straßburger, Maria; Spraker, Joseph; Baccile, Joshua A; Schroeder, Frank C; Keller, Nancy P; Hertweck, Christian; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Brakhage, Axel A

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogenic fungus causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Adaptation to different habitats and also virulence of the fungus depends on signal perception and transduction by modules such as the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, by transcriptome analysis, 632 differentially regulated genes of this important signaling cascade were identified, including 23 putative transcriptional regulators. The highest upregulated transcription factor gene was located in a previously unknown secondary metabolite gene cluster, which we named fmp, encoding an incomplete non-ribosomal peptide synthetase, FmpE. Overexpression of the regulatory gene fmpR using the Tet(On) system led to the specific expression of the other six genes of the fmp cluster. Metabolic profiling of wild type and fmpR overexpressing strain by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-HRESI-MS and structure elucidation by NMR led to identification of 5-benzyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, which we named fumipyrrole. Fumipyrrole was not described as natural product yet. Chemical synthesis of fumipyrrole confirmed its structure. Interestingly, deletion of fmpR or fmpE led to reduced growth and sporulation of the mutant strains. Although fmp cluster genes were transcribed in infected mouse lungs, deletion of fmpR resulted in wild-type virulence in a murine infection model.

  5. Identification of sigma S-regulated genes in Salmonella typhimurium: complementary regulatory interactions between sigma S and cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Fang, F C; Chen, C Y; Guiney, D G; Xu, Y

    1996-09-01

    sigma S (RpoS)-regulated lacZ transcriptional fusions in Salmonella typhimurium were identified from a MudJ transposon library by placing the rpoS gene under the control of the araBAD promoter and detecting lacZ expression in the presence or absence of arabinose supplementation. Western blot (immunoblot) analysis of bacteria carrying PBAD::rpoS demonstrated arabinose-dependent rpoS expression during all phases of growth. sigma S-dependent gene expression of individual gene fusions was confirmed by P22-mediated transduction of the MudJ insertions into wild-type or rpoS backgrounds. Analysis of six insertions revealed the known sigma S-regulated gene otsA, as well as five novel loci. Each of these genes is maximally expressed in stationary phase, and all but one show evidence of cyclic AMP receptor protein-dependent repression during logarithmic growth which is relieved in stationary phase. For these genes, as well as for the sigma S-regulated spvB plasmid virulence gene, a combination of rpoS overexpression and crp inactivation can result in high-level expression during logarithmic growth. The approach used to identify sigma S-regulated genes in this study provides a general method for the identification of genes controlled by trans-acting regulatory factors.

  6. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  7. Boron and silicon: Effects on growth, plasma lipids, urinary cyclic AMP and bone and brain mineral composition of male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborn, C.D.; Nielsen, F.H. . Grand Forks Human Nutrition Research Center)

    1994-06-01

    Because boron resembles silicon in its chemical properties, an experiment was performed to determine if excessive dietary boron would affect the response to silicon deprivation and, conversely, if silicon would influence the effects of an excessive intake of boron. Male weanling Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to groups of 6 or 12 in a two-by-two factorially arranged experiment. Supplemented to a ground corn/casein diet containing 1.2 [mu]g silicon and 3 [mu]g boron per gram were silicon as sodium metasilicate at 0 or 50 [mu]g/g and boron as orthoboric acid at 0 or 500 [mu]g/g diet. At nine weeks, animals fed high dietary boron had significantly decreased final body weights, liver-weight-to-body-weight ratios, urinary cAMP concentrations, plasma triglyceride, cholesterol, glycine, valine, leucine, and lysine concentrations and skull copper, sodium, and manganese concentrations. High dietary boron also significantly increased brain-weight-to-body-weight ratios, magnesium concentrations of femur, brain, and plasma, zinc concentration of femur, and iron concentration of skull. The bone mineral findings suggest that excess dietary boron exerts subtle effects on bone composition. Dietary silicon affected blood urea nitrogen, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and the concentrations of plasma threonine and aspartic acid in animals fed excess boron. Depression of the testes-weight-to-body-weight ratio of animals fed 500 [mu]g boron per gram diet was most marked in animals not fed silicon. Although excessive dietary boron did not markedly enhanced the response of rats to silicon deprivation, dietary silicon affected their response to high dietary boron. Thus, dietary silicon apparently can influence boron toxicity.

  8. Aldo-keto reductase 1b7, a novel marker for renin cells, is regulated by cyclic AMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Eugene E.; Pentz, Ellen S.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified aldo-keto reductase 1b7 (AKR1B7) as a marker for juxtaglomerular renin cells in the adult mouse kidney. However, the distribution of renin cells varies dynamically, and it was unknown whether AKR1B7 maintains coexpression with renin in response to different developmental, physiological, and pathological situations, and furthermore, whether similar factor(s) simultaneously regulate both proteins. We show here that throughout kidney development, AKR1B7 expression—together with renin—is progressively restricted in the kidney arteries toward the glomerulus. Subsequently, when formerly renin-expressing cells reacquire renin expression, AKR1B7 is reexpressed as well. This pattern of coexpression persists in extreme pathological situations, such as deletion of the genes for aldosterone synthase or Dicer. However, the two proteins do not colocalize within the same organelles: renin is found in the secretory granules, whereas AKR1B7 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Interestingly, upon deletion of the renin gene, AKR1B7 expression is maintained in a pattern mimicking the embryonic expression of renin, while ablation of renin cells resulted in complete abolition of AKR1B7 expression. Finally, we demonstrate that AKR1B7 transcription is controlled by cAMP. Cultured cells of the renin lineage reacquire the ability to express both renin and AKR1B7 upon elevation of intracellular cAMP. In vivo, deleting elements of the cAMP-response pathway (CBP/P300) results in a stark decrease in AKR1B7- and renin-positive cells. In summary, AKR1B7 is expressed within the renin cell throughout development and perturbations to homeostasis, and AKR1B7 is regulated by cAMP levels within the renin cell. PMID:26180185

  9. Both cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP can act as regulators of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings.

    PubMed

    Pietrowska-Borek, Małgorzata; Nuc, Katarzyna

    2013-09-01

    Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) are important signaling molecules that control a range of cellular functions and modulate different reactions. It is known that under abiotic or biotic stress plant cells synthesize these nucleotides and that they also enhance the activity of the phenylpropanoid pathway. Wondering what is the relation between these two facts, we investigated how the exogenously applied membrane-permeable derivatives, 8-Br-cAMP or 8-Br-cGMP, which are believed to act as the original cyclic nucleotides, affect the expression of the genes for and the specific activity of three enzymes of the phenylpropanoid pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. We found that the expression of the genes of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL2), 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase (4CL1) and chalcone synthase (CHS), and the specific activities of PAL (EC 4.3.1.5), 4CL (EC 6.2.1.12) and CHS (EC 2.3.1.74) were induced in the same way by either of these cyclic nucleotides used at 5 μM concentration. None of the possible cAMP and cGMP degradation products (AMP, GMP, adenosine or guanosine) evoked such effects. Expression of PAL1, 4CL2 and 4CL3 were practically not affected. Although the investigated nucleotides induced rapid expression of the aforementioned enzymes, they did not affect the level of anthocyanins within the same period. We discuss the effects exerted by the exogenously administered cyclic nucleotides, their relation with stress and the role which the phenylpropanoid pathways the cyclic nucleotides may play in plants.

  10. Involvement of the cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway in thyroxine effects on calcitonin secretion from TT cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, C-C; Tsai, S-C

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that plasma calcitonin is lower in hypothyroid patients and that thyroxine stimulates the human thyroid to release calcitonin. Therefore, thyroid hormones may regulate the secretion of calcitonin, but further work is needed to address this possibility in more detail. TT cells, a model of human thyroid C cells, were incubated in a medium containing vehicle, thyroxine, or thyroxine methyl-hemisuccinate-bovine serum albumin (BSA-L-T(4), thyroxine was immobilized and linked to BSA); then, the levels of secreted calcitonin (hCT), calcitonin mRNA, and cAMP were measured. To study links that connect the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway to the observed thyroxine effects, cells were treated with either vehicle or thyroxine plus SQ22536 [an adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitor], KT5720 (a PKA inhibitor), or 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor). The activity levels of AC and PKA, and secreted calcitonin were then measured. The results indicate that thyroxine increases calcitonin secretion, cellular cAMP accumulation, and the activities of AC and PKA, but does not increase hCT mRNA levels in TT cells. BSA-L-T(4) also increases calcitonin secretion. These effects are inhibited by SQ22536, and KT5720 and suggest that the nongenomic thyroxine effects that stimulate calcitonin secretion from TT cells involve the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway.

  11. Downregulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene expression by cyclic AMP in cultured Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Benmessahel, Yasmina; Troadec, Jean-Denis; Cadepond, Françoise; Guennoun, Rachida; Hales, Dale Buchanan; Schumacher, Michael; Groyer, Ghislaine

    2004-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) plays a key role in the availability of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane, where the first step of steroidogenesis, its conversion to pregnenolone, takes place. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the StAR gene is also expressed in the rat sciatic nerve and in cultured Schwann cells. The addition to the culture medium of the cAMP-elevating agent forskolin or of the cAMP analogue 8Br-cAMP produced a time-course extinction of StAR gene expression. An inverse relationship was demonstrated between StAR gene expression and the intracellular cAMP content. Accordingly, pharmacological inhibition of the activities of Schwann cell adenylyl cyclase or of phosphodiesterase IV resulted in modifications of StAR gene expression. Since StAR gene expression is stimulated by cAMP in classical steroidogenic cells, our work is the first demonstration of a negative regulation of StAR gene by cAMP.

  12. Cyclic AMP-dependent constitutive expression of gal operon: use of repressor titration to isolate operator mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Irani, M; Orosz, L; Busby, S; Taniguchi, T; Adhya, S

    1983-01-01

    When the gal operator region is present in a multicopy plasmid it binds to all ("titrates") the gal repressor and "induces" the chromosomal gal operon. To make operator mutations (Oa) with reduced affinity toward the repressor, plasmid DNA was irradiated with UV light and mutant derivatives were isolated that were unable to release the chromosomal gal genes from repression. Then with such an Oa plasmid operator revertants were isolated that had reacquired the ability to release repression. Both sets of mutations have been localized by DNA sequence analysis. When the Oa mutations were transferred from the plasmid to the chromosome by recombination these mutant operators were found to make gal expression constitutive (independent of repressor) but still dependent on cAMP, whereas the previously reported gal operator mutants (Oc) are constitutive both in the presence and in the absence of cAMP. The titration method of isolating mutants enables the isolation of strains with operator mutations that also affect normal promoter activity, and it provides an easy way to isolate revertants of operator mutations. Images PMID:6308647

  13. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated by Increased Cyclic Amp Concentration in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.

  14. Regulation of vascular smooth muscle cell calcification by extracellular pyrophosphate homeostasis: synergistic modulation by cyclic AMP and hyperphosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    Prosdocimo, Domenick A.; Wyler, Steven C.; Romani, Andrea M.; O'Neill, W. Charles

    2010-01-01

    Vascular calcification is a multifaceted process involving gain of calcification inducers and loss of calcification inhibitors. One such inhibitor is inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and regulated generation and homeostasis of extracellular PPi is a critical determinant of soft-tissue mineralization. We recently described an autocrine mechanism of extracellular PPi generation in cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that involves both ATP release coupled to the ectophosphodiesterase/pyrophosphatase ENPP1 and efflux of intracellular PPi mediated or regulated by the plasma membrane protein ANK. We now report that increased cAMP signaling and elevated extracellular inorganic phosphate (Pi) act synergistically to induce calcification of these VSMC that is correlated with progressive reduction in ability to accumulate extracellular PPi. Attenuated PPi accumulation was mediated in part by cAMP-dependent decrease in ANK expression coordinated with cAMP-dependent increase in expression of TNAP, the tissue nonselective alkaline phosphatase that degrades PPi. Stimulation of cAMP signaling did not alter ATP release or ENPP1 expression, and the cAMP-induced changes in ANK and TNAP expression were not sufficient to induce calcification. Elevated extracellular Pi alone elicited only minor calcification and no significant changes in ANK, TNAP, or ENPP1. In contrast, combined with a cAMP stimulus, elevated Pi induced decreases in the ATP release pathway(s) that supports ENPP1 activity; this resulted in markedly reduced rates of PPi accumulation that facilitated robust calcification. Calcified VSMC were characterized by maintained expression of multiple SMC differentiation marker proteins including smooth muscle (SM) α-actin, SM22α, and calponin. Notably, addition of exogenous ATP (or PPi per se) rescued cAMP + phosphate-treated VSMC cultures from progression to the calcified state. These observations support a model in which extracellular PPi generation mediated

  15. Functional Similarities between the Listeria monocytogenes Virulence Regulator PrfA and Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein: the PrfA* (Gly145Ser) Mutation Increases Binding Affinity for Target DNA

    PubMed Central

    Vega, Yolanda; Dickneite, Carmen; Ripio, María-Teresa; Böckmann, Regine; González-Zorn, Bruno; Novella, Susana; Domínguez-Bernal, Gustavo; Goebel, Werner; Vázquez-Boland, José A.

    1998-01-01

    Most Listeria monocytogenes virulence genes are positively regulated by the PrfA protein, a transcription factor sharing sequence similarities with cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP). Its coding gene, prfA, is regulated by PrfA itself via an autoregulatory loop mediated by the upstream PrfA-dependent plcA promoter. We have recently characterized prfA* mutants from L. monocytogenes which, as a result of a single amino acid substitution in PrfA, Gly145Ser, constitutively overexpress prfA and the genes of the PrfA virulence regulon. Here, we show that about 10 times more PrfA protein is produced in a prfA* strain than in the wild type. Thus, the phenotype of prfA* mutants is presumably due to the synthesis of a PrfA protein with higher promoter-activating activity (PrfA*), which keeps its intracellular levels constantly elevated by positive feedback. We investigated the interaction of PrfA and PrfA* (Gly145Ser) with target DNA. Gel retardation assays performed with a DNA fragment carrying the PrfA binding site of the plcA promoter demonstrated that the PrfA* mutant form is much more efficient than wild-type PrfA at forming specific DNA-protein complexes. In footprinting experiments, the two purified PrfA forms interacted with the same nucleotides at the target site, although the minimum amount required for protection was 6 to 7 times lower with PrfA*. These results show that the primary functional consequence of the Gly145Ser mutation is an increase in the affinity of PrfA for its target sequence. Interestingly, similar mutations at the equivalent position in CRP result in a transcriptionally active, CRP* mutant form which binds with high affinity to target DNA in the absence of the activating cofactor, cAMP. Our observations suggest that the structural similarities between PrfA and CRP are also functionally relevant and support a model in which the PrfA protein, like CRP, shifts from transcriptionally inactive to active conformations by interaction with a

  16. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σS. Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a negative role of cAMP in natural transformation. Further study showed that crp and cyaA mutations conferred a higher transformation frequency, suggesting that the cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex has an inhibitory effect on transformation. Moreover, we observed that rpoS is negatively regulated by cAMP-CRP in early log phase and that both crp and cyaA mutants show no transformation superiority when rpoS is knocked out. Therefore, it can be concluded that both the crp and cyaA mutations derepress rpoS expression in early log phase, whereby they aid in the promotion of natural transformation ability. We also showed that the accumulation of RpoS during early log phase can account for the enhanced transformation aroused by additional carbon sources. Our results thus demonstrated that the presence of additional carbon sources promotes competence development and natural transformation by reducing cAMP-CRP and, thus, derepressing rpoS expression during log phase. This finding could contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrition state and competence, as well as the mechanism of natural plasmid transformation in E. coli. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli, which is not usually considered to be naturally transformable, was found to spontaneously take up plasmid DNA on agar plates. Researching the mechanism of natural transformation is important for understanding the role of transformation in evolution, as well as in the transfer of pathogenicity and

  17. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  18. Lipolysis in rat adipocytes during pregnancy and lactation. The response to noradrenaline.

    PubMed Central

    Aitchison, R E; Clegg, R A; Vernon, R G

    1982-01-01

    1. Lipolysis has been measured in parametrial adipocytes from virgin, pregnant and lactating rats. 2. The basal rate and the maximal rate of lipolysis, the latter measured in the presence of noradrenaline and theophylline, remained constant between the three experimental categories, with the exception of a significant transient increase in the basal rate at parturition. 3. The noradrenaline-stimulated lipolysis rate rose above the virgin rate during pregnancy and fell below it during lactation; inclusion of adenosine deaminase in incubations abolished these differences in response to noradrenaline. 4. Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity was lower in adipocytes during pregnancy and lactation than in virgin animals. PMID:6282271

  19. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP stimulation of a monocyte-like cell line, U937: a model for monocyte chemotaxis and Fc receptor-related functions.

    PubMed Central

    Sheth, B; Dransfield, I; Partridge, L J; Barker, M D; Burton, D R

    1988-01-01

    Treatment of the U937 cell line with 1 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Bt2cAMP) resulted in a reduction in cell size and inhibition of DNA synthesis, and morphologically the cells appeared similar to macrophages. Electron micrographs indicated an increase in intracellular apparatus, whilst histochemical studies revealed smaller, denser nuclei and a greater intensity of non-specific esterase staining. Ia-like antigens (HLA-DR and HLA-DC) and complement receptor CR1 were not detected on U937 cells by monoclonal antibodies, nor were they induced by Bt2cAMP. CR3 was present in small amounts on U937 cells, and stimulation with Bt2cAMP increased the expression of this molecule in the cytoplasm and on the cell surface. Leu M3, a monocyte-specific antibody, was weakly reactive on both unstimulated and stimulated cells, whereas transferrin receptors, present on 90% of U937 cells, were lost after 48-hr stimulation with Bt2cAMP. JW6 and NH6, two monoclonal antibodies raised in our laboratory and found to be against immature monocytic antigens, showed decreased expression on stimulation. Monomer IgG binding via Fc receptors decreased on stimulated cells, and a monoclonal antibody (32.2) specific for FcRI confirmed this to be due to a decrease in the number of high-affinity receptors, rather than a decrease in IgG-binding affinity. In contrast, expression of the low-affinity FcRII, monitored by monoclonal antibody IV3, increased dramatically after stimulation. Other functional changes included the production of superoxide anions and the induction of non-specific phagocytosis. Two dimensional gel analysis, of detergent soluble proteins from unstimulated and 48-hr stimulated U937 cells, showed many differences in protein expression. A detailed investigation of these changes will facilitate a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the differentiation of U937 cells. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:2832314

  20. Analysis of a novel cyclic Amp inducible prespore gene in Dictyostelium discoideum: evidence for different patterns of cAMP regulation.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, A; Sloger, M S; Oyama, M; Blumberg, D D

    1994-09-01

    The D7 cDNA clone hybridizes to a 2.8 kb mRNA which first appears at the mound stage of development in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum. This gene which is cyclic AMP (cAMP) inducible and is expressed specifically in the prespore cells contains an open reading frame interrupted by only one intron. The predicted amino acid sequence indicates a novel prespore protein which differs from all of the previously described prespore proteins in that it contains no internal repeats and does not share any homology with any of the other prespore genes. The amino acid sequence predicts a protein of 850 amino acids with a molecular weight of 95,343 daltons and an isoelectric point of 4.25. The protein is very rich in glutamine (13.8%), asparagine (10.6%) and glutamic acid (10.4%) with one potential glycosylation site and 28 possible sites for phosphorylation. The amino terminus is hydrophobic with characteristics of a signal sequence while the entire carboxyl half of the protein is notable for its hydrophilicity. Comparison of cAMP regulation of the D7 gene with the regulation of two other cAMP regulated prespore genes, the PL3(SP87) gene and the Psa(D19), reveals some striking differences. Disaggregation in the presence of cAMP results in transient degradation of mRNA for all three genes. The transcription rate for the D7 and PsA(D19) genes remains relatively unaffected by disaggregation but there is a rapid although transient decline in the transcription rate of the PL3(SP87) gene. Although the accumulation of all three mRNAs is first detectable at mound stage, transcription of the D7 and PsA(D19) genes is detected earlier in development, at rippling aggregate stage several hours prior to the earliest time when transcription of the PL3(SP87) gene is detected. Analysis of the promoter region of the D7 gene reveals three CA like boxes flanked by direct repeats as well as four G rich regions that may serve as regulatory elements. PMID:7988791

  1. PAC1hop, null and hip receptors mediate differential signaling through cyclic AMP and calcium leading to splice variant-specific gene induction in neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Holighaus, Yvonne; Mustafa, Tomris; Eiden, Lee E.

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)-mediated activation of its G protein-coupled receptor PAC1 results in activation of the two G proteins Gs and Gq to alter second messenger generation and gene transcription in the nervous system, important for homeostatic responses to stress and injury. Heterologous expression of the three major splice variants of the rat PAC1 receptor, PAC1hop, null and hip, in neural NG108-15 cells conferred PACAP-mediated intracellular cAMP generation, while elevation of [Ca2+]i occurred only in PAC1hop-, and to a lesser extent in PAC1null-expressing cells. Induction of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and stanniocalcin 1 (STC1), two genes potentially involved in PACAP’s homeostatic responses, was examined as a function of the expressed PAC1 variant. VIP induction was greatest in PAC1hop-expressing cells, suggesting that a maximal transcriptional response requires combinatorial signaling through both cAMP and Ca2+. STC1 induction was similar for all three receptor splice variants and was mimicked by the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin, indicating that cAMP elevation is sufficient to induce STC1. The degree of activation of two different second messenger pathways appears to determine the transcriptional response, suggesting that cellular responses to stressors are fine-tuned through differential receptor isoform expression. Signaling to the VIP gene proceeded through cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA) in these cells, independently of the MAP kinase ERK1/2. STC1 gene induction by PACAP was dependent on cAMP and ERK1/2, independently of PKA. Differential gene induction via different cAMP dependent signaling pathways potentially provides further targets for the design of treatments for stress-associated disorders. PMID:21693142

  2. Perinatal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in the lamb. IV. Testicular responsiveness to hCG from 1 through 28 days of life.

    PubMed

    Hamel, R; Forest, M G; Haour, F; Polychronakos, C; Charpenet, G; Gibb, W; Collu, R; Durcharme, J R

    1981-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have shown the existence of an early postnatal activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis (HPGA) in the male lamb which was present at 2 and 4 weeks of age. In order to define more precisely the time sequence of HPGA activity, we have studied the in vivo and in vitro testicular responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) of the immature lamb at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of life. Plasma testosterone (T) increments (delta) after hCG were lower in 1-day-old animals than in other age groups. Testicular concentrations of T, dehydroepiandrosterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone increased from 1 to 14 days. Testicular 17, 20 lyase activity rose significantly with age but was not influenced by hCG. hCG and dibutyryl cyclic AMP increased significantly the T production by enriched interstitial cell preparation at 1, 3, and 7 days, the greatest response being found at 7 days. hCG also increased significantly the T production at 14 days. These data suggest that the lamb testis has the capacity to respond to hCG in vivo and to various stimuli vitro from the 1st day of life and that the response reaches a plateau from 2 to 4 weeks after birth.

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation modifies the gating properties of L-type Ca2+ channels in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Doupnik, C A; Pun, R Y

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of cAMP-dependent phosphorylation on the voltage- and time-dependent gating properties of Ca2+ channel currents recorded from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells under whole-cell voltage clamp. Extracellular perfusion with the membrane-permeant activator of cAMP-dependent protein kinase, 8-bromo(8-Br)-cAMP (1 mM), caused a 49%, 29%, and 21% increase in Ca2+ current (ICa) amplitudes evoked by voltage steps to 0, +10, and +20 mV respectively (mean values from eight cells, p less than or equal to 0.05). Analysis of voltage-dependent steady-state activation (m infinity) curves revealed a 0.70 +/- 0.27 charge increase in the activation-gate valency (zm) following 8-Br-cAMP perfusion. Similar responses were observed when Ba2+ was the charge carrier, where zm was increased by 1.33 +/- 0.34 charges (n = 8). The membrane potential for half activation (V1/2) was also significantly shifted 6 mV more negative for IBa (mean, n = 8). The time course for IBa (and ICa) activation was well described by second-order m2 kinetics. The derived time constant for activation (tau m) was voltage-dependent, and the tau m/V relation shifted negatively after 8-Br-cAMP treatment. Ca2+ channel gating rates were derived from the tau m and m infinity 2 values according to a Hodgkin-Huxley type m2 activation process. The forward rate (alpha m) for channel activation was increased by 8-Br-cAMP at membrane potentials greater than or equal to 0 mV, and the backward rate (beta m) decreased at potentials less than or equal to + 10 mV. Time-dependent inactivation of ICa consisted of a slowly decaying component (tau h approximately 300 ms) and a "non-inactivating" steady-state component. The currents contributed by the two inactivation processes displayed different voltage dependences, the effects of 8-Br-cAMP being exclusively on the slowly inactivating L-type component.

  4. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 72 and 82 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Belduz, A O; Lee, E J; Harman, J G

    1993-01-01

    The 3', 5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute leucine, glutamine, or aspartate for glutamate 72; and lysine, histidine, leucine, isoleucine, or glutamine for arginine 82. Substitutions were made in wild-type CRP and in a CRP*, or cAMP-independent, form of the protein to assess the effects of the amino acid substitutions on CRP structure. Cells containing the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized through beta-galactosidase activity and by measurement of cAMP binding activity. This study confirms a role for both glutamate 72 and arginine 82 in cAMP binding and activation of CRP. Glutamine or leucine substitution of glutamate 72 produced forms of CRP having low affinity for the cAMP and unresponsive to the nucleotide. Aspartate substituted for glutamate 72 produced a low affinity cAMP-responsive form of CRP. CRP has a stringent requirement for the positioning of the position 72 glutamate carboxyl group within the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket. Results of this study also indicate that there are differences in the binding requirements of cAMP and cGMP, a competitive inhibitor of cAMP binding to CRP. PMID:8388097

  5. A polysaccharide from Ganoderma atrum inhibits tumor growth by induction of apoptosis and activation of immune response in CT26-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shenshen; Nie, Shaoping; Huang, Danfei; Huang, Jianqin; Feng, Yanling; Xie, Mingyong

    2014-09-24

    Ganoderma atrum is one species of edible and pharmaceutical mushroom with various biological activities. Recently, a novel polysaccharide, PSG-1, was purified from G. atrum. The antitumor activity and its mechanism of action were studied. In vitro, PSG-1 has little effect on inhibiting proliferation of CT26 tumor cells. However, the tumor size was significantly decreased in PSG-1-treated mice. The results showed that PSG-1 induced apoptosis in CT26 cells. Moreover, the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) level and protein kinase A (PKA) activity were markedly increased in PSG-1-treated mice. In contrast, the contents of cyclic GMP and DAG and the PKC activity were decreased. Similarly, the expression of PKA protein was upregulated, while PKC protein expression in PSG-1-treated group was lowered. Additionally, PSG-1 increased the immune organ index and serum biochemistry parameter. In general, PSG-1 enhances the antitumor immune response, induces apoptosis in CT26-bearing mice, and could be a safe and effective adjuvant for tumor therapy or functional food.

  6. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. PMID:25344550

  7. Follicle-stimulating hormone and cyclic AMP induce transcription from the human urokinase promoter in primary cultures of mouse Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P; Grimaldi, P; Blasi, F; Geremia, R; Verde, P

    1990-06-01

    The hormonal regulation of the human urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) gene has been studied by introducing into mouse and rat Sertoli cell primary cultures a recombinant plasmid, in which the transcription regulatory elements of the cloned human uPA gene drive the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol-acetyl-transferase gene. It was found to be expressed and regulated by FSH and (Bu)2cAMP in the mouse cells only, in agreement with data on the expression of the endogenous gene in rat and mouse gonads. The stimulation of transcription by FSH was evident in cultures from 13-day-old but not from 18-day-old mice, even though (Bu)2cAMP induction could be observed at both ages. Phorbol-myristate acetate was found to activate the human uPA promoter in Sertoli cell cultures from mice of both ages, even though the effect was less evident in cultures of 18-day-old animals. Deletion analysis of the human uPA 5'-flanking region showed that the distal enhancer element is not needed for (Bu)2cAMP induction, and that at least two promoter regions are involved in (Bu)2cAMP induced transcription. One of these cAMP responsive regions lies between nucleotides -72 and -29 from the CAP site. The sequence of this region would suggest the binding of transcription factor AP-2, a cell-specific mediator of both cAMP and phorbol esters action on gene expression. However, these sequences do not mediate phorbol ester activation of human uPA promoter in mouse Sertoli cells.

  8. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. PMID:25344550

  9. Heterozygous mutations in cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase-4D (PDE4D) and protein kinase A (PKA) provide new insights into the molecular pathology of acrodysostosis.

    PubMed

    Kaname, Tadashi; Ki, Chang-Seok; Niikawa, Norio; Baillie, George S; Day, Jonathan P; Yamamura, Ken-Ichi; Ohta, Tohru; Nishimura, Gen; Mastuura, Nobuo; Kim, Ok-Hwa; Sohn, Young Bae; Kim, Hyun Woo; Cho, Sung Yoon; Ko, Ah-Ra; Lee, Jin Young; Kim, Hyun Wook; Ryu, Sung Ho; Rhee, Hwanseok; Yang, Kap-Seok; Joo, Keehyoung; Lee, Jooyoung; Kim, Chi Hwa; Cho, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Dongsan; Yanagi, Kumiko; Naritomi, Kenji; Yoshiura, Ko-Ichiro; Kondoh, Tatsuro; Nii, Eiji; Tonoki, Hidefumi; Houslay, Miles D; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2014-11-01

    Acrodysostosis without hormone resistance is a rare skeletal disorder characterized by brachydactyly, nasal hypoplasia, mental retardation and occasionally developmental delay. Recently, loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding cAMP-hydrolyzing phosphodiesterase-4D (PDE4D) have been reported to cause this rare condition but the pathomechanism has not been fully elucidated. To understand the pathogenetic mechanism of PDE4D mutations, we conducted 3D modeling studies to predict changes in the binding efficacy of cAMP to the catalytic pocket in PDE4D mutants. Our results indicated diminished enzyme activity in the two mutants we analyzed (Gly673Asp and Ile678Thr; based on PDE4D4 residue numbering). Ectopic expression of PDE4D mutants in HEK293 cells demonstrated this reduction in activity, which was identified by increased cAMP levels. However, the cells from an acrodysostosis patient showed low cAMP accumulation, which resulted in a decrease in the phosphorylated cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein (pCREB)/CREB ratio. The reason for this discrepancy was due to a compensatory increase in expression levels of PDE4A and PDE4B isoforms, which accounted for the paradoxical decrease in cAMP levels in the patient cells expressing mutant isoforms with a lowered PDE4D activity. Skeletal radiographs of 10-week-old knockout (KO) rats showed that the distal part of the forelimb was shorter than in wild-type (WT) rats and that all the metacarpals and phalanges were also shorter in KO, as the name acrodysostosis implies. Like the G-protein α-stimulatory subunit and PRKAR1A, PDE4D critically regulates the cAMP signal transduction pathway and influences bone formation in a way that activity-compromising PDE4D mutations can result in skeletal dysplasia. We propose that specific inhibitory PDE4D mutations can lead to the molecular pathology of acrodysostosis without hormone resistance but that the pathological phenotype may well be dependent on an over-compensatory induction

  10. Studies of mice with cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) defects reveal the critical role of PKA's catalytic subunits in anxiety.

    PubMed

    Briassoulis, George; Keil, Margaret F; Naved, Bilal; Liu, Sophie; Starost, Matthew F; Nesterova, Maria; Gokarn, Nirmal; Batistatos, Anna; Wu, T John; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-07-01

    Cyclic adenosine mono-phosphate-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is critically involved in the regulation of behavioral responses. Previous studies showed that PKA's main regulatory subunit, R1α, is involved in anxiety-like behaviors. The purpose of this study was to determine how the catalytic subunit, Cα, might affect R1α's function and determine its effects on anxiety-related behaviors. The marble bury (MB) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests were used to assess anxiety-like behavior and the hotplate test to assess nociception in wild type (WT) mouse, a Prkar1a heterozygote (Prkar1a(+/-)) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the regulatory subunit (R1α), a Prkaca heterozygote (Prkaca(+/-)) mouse with haploinsufficiency for the catalytic subunit (Cα), and a double heterozygote mouse (Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-)) with haploinsufficiency for both R1α and Cα. We then examined specific brain nuclei involved in anxiety. Results of MB test showed a genotype effect, with increased anxiety-like behavior in Prkar1a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) compared to WT mice. In the EPM, Prkar1a(+/-) spent significantly less time in the open arms, while Prkaca(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) mice displayed less exploratory behavior compared to WT mice. The loss of one Prkar1a allele was associated with a significant increase in PKA activity in the basolateral (BLA) and central (CeA) amygdala and ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) in both Prkar1a(+/-) and Prkar1a(+/-)/Prkaca(+/-) mice. Alterations of PKA activity induced by haploinsufficiency of its main regulatory or most important catalytic subunits result in anxiety-like behaviors. The BLA, CeA, and VMH are implicated in mediating these PKA effects in brain. PMID:26992826

  11. Regulation by intracellular Ca sup 2+ and cyclic AMP of the growth factor-induced ruffling membrane formation and stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Yoshihiko Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Medical Science ); Nishida, Eisuke; Sakai, Hikoichi ); Koyasu, Shigeo; Yahara, Ichiro )

    1989-04-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) induce formation of ruffling membranes and stimulate the fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis in human epidermoid carcinoma KB cells. An increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration by treatment with A23187, a calcium ionophore, or an increase in intracellular cAMP level by treatment with dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin almost completely inhibited the insulin-, IGF-I-, or EGF-induced formation of ruffling membranes. Increases in Ca{sup 2+} or cAMP concentration also inhibited almost completely the stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis elicited by these growth factors. These results suggest that the growth factor-induced ruffling membrane formation and the stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis have a common regulatory mechanism involving intracellular concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP. {sup 125}I-EGF binding assays and immunoprecipitation experiments with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody revealed that treatment of KB cells with A23187, dibutyryl cAMP, or forskolin did not inhibit the EGF binding to the cells nor subsequent tyrosine autophosphorylation of its receptors. These results indicate that Ca{sup 2+}- and/or cAMP-sensitive intracellular reactions exist downstream from the receptor kinase activation in the process of these early cellular responses.

  12. Widespread receptivity to neuropeptide PDF throughout the neuronal circadian clock network of Drosophila revealed by real-time cyclic AMP imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Orie T.; Kim, Dong Jo; Dunbar-Yaffe, Richard; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Lohse, Martin J.; Taghert, Paul H.

    2008-01-01

    Summary The neuropeptide PDF is released by sixteen clock neurons in Drosophila and helps maintain circadian activity rhythms by coordinating a network of ~150 neuronal clocks. Whether PDF acts directly on elements of this neural network remains unknown. We address this question by adapting Epac1-camps, a genetically encoded cAMP FRET sensor, for use in the living brain. We find that a subset of the PDF-expressing neurons respond to PDF with long-lasting cAMP increases, and confirm that such responses require the PDF receptor. In contrast, an unrelated Drosophila neuropeptide, DH 31, stimulates large cAMP increases in all PDF-expressing clock neurons. Thus the network of ~150 clock neurons displays widespread, though not uniform, PDF receptivity. This work introduces a sensitive means of measuring cAMP changes in a living brain with sub-cellular resolution. Specifically, it experimentally confirms the longstanding hypothesis that PDF is a direct modulator of most neurons in the Drosophila clock network. PMID:18439407

  13. {alpha}MSH and Cyclic AMP elevating agents control melanosome pH through a protein kinase A-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Cheli, Yann; Luciani, Flavie; Khaled, Mehdi; Beuret, Laurent; Bille, Karine; Gounon, Pierre; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Bertolotto, Corine; Ballotti, Robert

    2009-07-10

    Melanins are synthesized in melanocytes within specialized organelles called melanosomes. Numerous studies have shown that the pH of melanosome plays a key role in the regulation of melanin synthesis. However, until now, acute regulation of melanosome pH by a physiological stimulus has never been demonstrated. In the present study, we show that the activation of the cAMP pathway by alphaMSH or forskolin leads to an alkalinization of melanosomes and a concomitant regulation of vacuolar ATPases and ion transporters of the solute carrier family. The solute carrier family members include SLC45A2, which is mutated in oculocutaneous albinism type IV, SLC24A4 and SLC24A5, proteins implicated in the control of eye, hair, and skin pigmentation, and the P protein, encoded by the oculocutaneous albinism type II locus. Interestingly, H89, a pharmacological inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), prevents the cAMP-induced pigmentation and induces acidification of melanosomes. The drastic depigmenting effect of H89 is not due to an inhibition of tyrosinase expression. Indeed, H89 blocks the induction of melanogenesis induced by LY294002, a potent inhibitor of the PI 3-kinase pathway, without any effect on tyrosinase expression. Furthermore, PKA is not involved in the inhibition of pigmentation promoted by H89 because LY294002 induces pigmentation independently of PKA. Also, other PKA inhibitors do not affect pigmentation. Taken together, our results strengthen the support for a key role of melanosome pH in the regulation of melanin synthesis and, for the first time, demonstrate that melanosome pH is regulated by cAMP and alphaMSH. Notably, these are both mediators of the response to solar UV radiation, the main physiological stimulus of skin pigmentation.

  14. Pleiotrophin mediates the neurotrophic effect of cyclic AMP on dopaminergic neurons: analysis of suppression-subtracted cDNA libraries and confirmation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mourlevat, Sophie; Debeir, Thomas; Ferrario, Juan E; Delbe, Jean; Caruelle, Daniele; Lejeune, Olivier; Depienne, Christel; Courty, José; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Ruberg, Merle

    2005-07-01

    To better understand the particular vulnerability of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons to toxins or gene mutations causing parkinsonism, we have taken advantage of a primary cell culture system in which these neurons die selectively. Antimitotic agents, such as cytosine arabinoside or cAMP, prevent the death of the neurons by arresting astrocyte proliferation. To identify factors implicated in either the death of the dopaminergic neurons or in the neuroprotective effect of cAMP, we constructed cDNA libraries enriched by subtractive hybridization and suppressive PCR in transcripts that are preferentially expressed in either control or cAMP-treated cultures. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified by hybridization of the enriched cDNAs with a commercially available cDNA expression array. The proteoglycan receptors syndecan-3 and the receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase zeta/beta were found among the transcripts preferentially expressed under control conditions, and their ligand, the cytokine pleiotrophin, was highly represented in the cDNA libraries for both conditions. Since pleiotrophin is expressed during embryonic and perinatal neural development and following lesions in the adult brain, we investigated its role in our cell culture model. Pleiotrophin was not responsible for the death of dopaminergic neurons under control conditions, or for their survival in cAMP-treated cultures. It was, however, implicated in the initial and cAMP-dependent enhancement of the differentiation of the dopaminergic neurons in our cultures. In addition, our experiments have provided evidence for a cAMP-dependent regulatory pathway leading to protease activation, and the identification of pleiotrophin as a target of this pathway.

  15. Histamine H(2) -like receptors in chick cerebral cortex: effects on cyclic AMP synthesis and characterization by [(3) H]tiotidine binding.

    PubMed

    Zawilska, Jolanta B; Woldan-Tambor, Agata; Nowak, Jerzy Z

    2002-06-01

    In this study, histamine (HA) receptors in chick cerebral cortex were characterized using two approaches: (1) analysis of the effects of HA-ergic drugs on the cAMP-generating system, and (2) radioreceptor binding of [(3) H]tiotidine, a selective H(2) antagonist. HA was a weak activator of adenylyl cyclase in a crude membrane preparation of chick cerebrum. On the other hand, HA (0.1-1000 microm) potently and concentration dependently stimulated cAMP production in [(3) H]adenine pre-labelled slices of chick cerebral cortex, displaying an EC(50) value (concentration that produces 50% of maximum response) of 2.65 microm. The effect of HA was mimicked by agonists of HA receptors with the following rank order of potency: HA >or= 4-methylHA (H(2)) >or= N alpha,N alpha-dimethylHA (H(3) > H(2) = H(1)) > 2-methylHA (H(1)) > 2-thiazolylethylamine (H(1)) >or= R alpha-methylHA (H(3)) > amthamine, dimaprit (H(2)), immepip (H(3), H(4)). The HA-evoked increase in cAMP production in chick cerebral cortex was antagonized by selective H(2) receptor blockers (aminopotentidine >or= tiotidine > ranitidine > zolantidine), and not significantly affected by mepyramine and thioperamide, selective H(1) and H(3) /H(4) receptor blockers, respectively. A detailed analysis of the antagonistic action of aminopotentidine (vs. HA) revealed a non-competitive mode of action. The binding of [(3) H]tiotidine to chick cortical membranes was rapid, stable and reversible. Saturation analysis resulted in a linear Scatchard plot, suggesting binding to a single class of receptor binding site with high affinity [equilibrium dissociation constant (K (d)) = 4.42 nm] and high capacity [maximum number of binding sites (B (max) ) = 362 fmol/mg protein]. The relative rank order of HA-ergic drugs to inhibit [(3) H]tiotidine binding to chick cerebrum was: antagonists - tiotidine > aminopotentidine = ranitidine >or= zolantadine > thioperamide - triprolidine; agonists - HA >or= 4-methylHA > 2-methylHA >or=R alpha

  16. CYCLIC AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE INDUCTION BY POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) STIMULATES CREB PHOSPHORYLATION VIA A CALCIUM-DEPENDENT, PKC-INDEPENDENT PATHWAY IN CORTICAL NEURONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously demonstrated that the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254 (A1254), increases the phosphorylated form of CREB (pCREB), the cAMP-responsive element binding protein. This transcription factor is important in nervous system development and plasticity. Phosphorylation
    of C...

  17. Enzyme Changes in the Offspring of Female Rats due to Long-Term Administration of Cyclic AMP and Insulin before Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Strumilo, S A; Czyzewska, U; Siemieniuk, M; Strumilo, J; Tylicki, A

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effects of insulin and cAMP on the offspring of female rats after daily treatment with these substances over 4 weeks. In adult offspring from cAMP-treated females, activities of pyruvate kinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase decreased in the liver and brain and activities of NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase decreased in the liver. In the offspring of insulin-treated females, we observed only activation of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase in the liver and only in females. Enzyme activity probably correlates with their content, as no changes in their kinetic properties were observed under these conditions. Long-term hormone treatment before pregnancy can affect the expression of genes for some enzymes in the offspring due to transmission of epigenetic signals by the ovum. However, further studies are required to confirm this mechanism. PMID:27502537

  18. Engineers and Active Responsibility.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Udo

    2015-08-01

    Knowing that technologies are inherently value-laden and systemically interwoven with society, the question is how individual engineers can take up the challenge of accepting the responsibility for their work? This paper will argue that engineers have no institutional structure at the level of society that allows them to recognize, reflect upon, and actively integrate the value-laden character of their designs. Instead, engineers have to tap on the different institutional realms of market, science, and state, making their work a 'hybrid' activity combining elements from the different institutional realms. To deal with this institutional hybridity, engineers develop routines and heuristics in their professional network, which do not allow societal values to be expressed in a satisfactory manner. To allow forms of 'active' responsibility, there have to be so-called 'accountability forums' that guide moral reflections of individual actors. The paper will subsequently look at the methodologies of value-sensitive design (VSD) and constructive technology assessment (CTA) and explore whether and how these methodologies allow engineers to integrate societal values into the design technological artifacts and systems. As VSD and CTA are methodologies that look at the process of technological design, whereas the focus of this paper is on the designer, they can only be used indirectly, namely as frameworks which help to identify the contours of a framework for active responsibility of engineers.

  19. Mutagenesis of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli: targeting positions 83, 127 and 128 of the cyclic nucleotide binding pocket.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, E J; Glasgow, J; Leu, S F; Belduz, A O; Harman, J G

    1994-01-01

    The cyclic 3', 5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) binding pocket of the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) of Escherichia coli was mutagenized to substitute cysteine or glycine for serine 83; cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine for threonine 127; and threonine or alanine for serine 128. Cells that expressed the binding pocket residue-substituted forms of CRP were characterized by measurements of beta-galactosidase activity. Purified wild-type and mutant CRP preparations were characterized by measurement of cAMP binding activity and by their capacity to support lacP activation in vitro. CRP structure was assessed by measurement of sensitivity to protease and DTNB-mediated subunit crosslinking. The results of this study show that cAMP interactions with serine 83, threonine 127 and serine 128 contribute to CRP activation and have little effect on cAMP binding. Amino acid substitutions that introduce hydrophobic amino acid side chain constituents at either position 127 or 128 decrease CRP discrimination of cAMP and cGMP. Finally, cAMP-induced CRP structural change(s) that occur in or near the CRP hinge region result from cAMP interaction with threonine 127; substitution of threonine 127 by cysteine, glycine, isoleucine, or serine produced forms of CRP that contained, independently of cAMP binding, structural changes similar to those of the wild-type CRP:cAMP complex. Images PMID:8065899

  20. Cyclooxygenase-2 expression in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocytes is modulated by cyclic AMP, prostaglandin E(2), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Hinz, B; Brune, K; Pahl, A

    2000-11-30

    Using human blood monocytes (for determination of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA by RT-PCR) and human whole blood (for prostanoid determination), the present study investigates the influence of the second messenger cAMP on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced COX-2 expression with particular emphasis on the role of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) in this process. Elevation of intracellular cAMP with a cell-permeable cAMP analogue (dibutyryl cAMP), an adenylyl cyclase activator (cholera toxin), or a phosphodiesterase inhibitor (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine) substantially enhanced LPS-induced PGE(2) formation and COX-2 mRNA expression, but did not modify COX-2 enzyme activity. Moreover, up-regulation of LPS-induced COX-2 expression was caused by PGE(2), butaprost (selective agonist of the adenylyl cyclase-coupled EP(2) receptor) and 11-deoxy PGE(1) (EP(2)/EP(4) agonist), whereas sulprostone (EP(3)/EP(1) agonist) left COX-2 expression unaltered. Abrogation of LPS-induced PGE(2) synthesis with the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 caused a decrease in COX-2 mRNA levels that was restored by exogenous PGE(2) and mimicked by S(+)-flurbiprofen and ketoprofen. Overall, these results indicate a modulatory role of cAMP in the regulation of COX-2 expression. PGE(2), a cAMP-elevating final product of the COX-2 pathway, may autoregulate COX-2 expression in human monocytes via a positive feedback mechanism.

  1. Effects of cold exposure on cyclic AMP concentration in plasma, liver, and brown and white adipose tissues in cold-acclimated rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habara, Yoshiaki

    1989-06-01

    Effects of acute cold exposure on plasma energy substrates and tissue 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) were analyzed in intact rats, to define an involvement of the nucleotide in nonshivering thermogenesis (NST) and resultant cold acclimation. After an acute cold exposure to -5°C, the plasma glucose level increased gradually in warm-kept control rats (C) while it decreased significantly in cold-acclimated rats (CA). However, it was increased considerably by an extreme cold exposure to -15°C in both C and CA. By contrast, plasma levels of free fatty acids (FFA) increased immediately after cold exposure and the release lasted during the period of exposure especially in C. The cold exposure also increased plasma cAMP concentration but no concomitant increase was found in the liver. In both brown (IBAT) and white (WAT) adipose tissues the nucleotide concentration showed a stepwise decrease. The observed correlation between lipolysis and plasma cAMP response after cold exposure suggests an involvement of the adenylate cyclase-cAMP system in NST via lipid metabolism, at least, in the early stages of cold acclimation.

  2. Rat neuropeptide Y precursor gene expression. mRNA structure, tissue distribution, and regulation by glucocorticoids, cyclic AMP, and phorbol ester.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, H; Yang, H Y; Sabol, S L

    1988-05-01

    Rat brain neuropeptide Y precursor (prepro-NPY) cDNA clones were isolated and sequenced in order to study regulation of the prepro-NPY gene. Rat prepro-NPY (98 amino acid residues) contains a 36-residue NPY sequence, followed by a proteolysis/amidation site Gly-Lys-Arg, followed by a 30-residue COOH-terminal sequence. The strong evolutionary conservation of rat and human sequences of NPY (100%) and COOH-terminal peptide (93%) suggests that both peptides have important biological functions. In the rat central nervous system, prepro-NPY mRNA (800 bases) is most abundant in the striatum and cortex and moderately abundant in the hippocampus, hypothalamus, and spinal cord. The rat adrenal, spleen, heart, and lung have significant levels of prepro-NPY mRNA. Regulation of the prepro-NPY mRNA abundance was studied in several rodent neural cell lines. PC12 rat pheochromocytoma and N18TG-2 mouse neuroblastoma cells possess low basal levels of prepro-NPY mRNA, while NG108-15 hybrid cells possess high levels. Treatment of PC12 cells with a glucocorticoid such as dexamethasone or elevation of cAMP by forskolin increased the prepro-NPY mRNA level 2-3-fold or 3-10-fold, respectively. In N18TG-2 cells dexamethasone and forskolin synergistically increased prepro-NPY mRNA 7-fold. Treatment of PC12 cells with the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate alone elevated prepro-NPY mRNA marginally, but the phorbol ester plus forskolin elicited 20-70-fold increases, which were further enhanced to over 200-fold by dexamethasone and the calcium ionophore A23187. These results indicate that NPY gene expression can be positively regulated by synergistic actions of glucocorticoids, cAMP elevation, and protein kinase C activation.

  3. Rescue of Cyclic AMP Mediated Long Term Potentiation Impairment in the Hippocampus of Mecp2 Knockout (Mecp2-/y) Mice by Rolipram

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Saju; Niebert, Marcus; Richter, Diethelm W.

    2016-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) patients experience learning difficulties and memory loss. Analogous deficits of hippocampal plasticity are reported in mouse models of RTT. To elucidate the underlying pathophysiology, we studied long term potentiation (LTP) at the CA3 to CA1 synapses in the hippocampus in acute brain slices from WT and Mecp2-/y mice, by either activating cAMP dependent pathway or using high frequency stimulation, by means of patch clamp. We have observed that, the NMDA channel current characteristics remain unchanged in the Mecp2-/y mice. The adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonist forskolin evoked a long lasting potentiation of evoked EPSCs in WT CA1 neurons, but only minimally enhanced the EPSCs in the Mecp2-/y mice. This weaker potentiation in Mecp2-/y mice was ameliorated by application of phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor rolipram. The hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide gated channel current (Ih) was potentiated to similar extent by forskolin in both phenotypes. Multiple tetanus induced cAMP-dependent plasticity was also impaired in the Mecp2-/y mice, and was also partially rescued by rolipram. Western blot analysis of CA region of Mecp2-/y mice hippocampus revealed more than twofold up-regulation of protein kinase A (PKA) regulatory subunits, while the expression of the catalytic subunit remained unchanged. We hypothesize that the overexpressed PKA regulatory subunits buffer cAMP and restrict the PKA mediated phosphorylation of target proteins necessary for LTP. Blocking the degradation of cAMP, thereby saturating the regulatory subunits alleviated this defect. PMID:26869885

  4. Cyclic AMP reduces adhesion of isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain to an astrocytic cell line from embryonic mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Autillo-Touati, A; Araud, D; Seite, R; Chneiweiss, H; Glowinski, J; Prochiantz, A

    1989-01-01

    We have recently shown that isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain possess an appreciable activity of adenylate cyclase, producing cyclic adenosine monophosphate, which can be stimulated by various neurotransmitter receptor agonists and by forskolin [Lockerbie R. O., Hervé D., Blanc G., Tassin J. P. and Glowinski J. (1988) Devl Brain Res. 38, 19-25]. In the present study, we have investigated the effect of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in an in vitro adhesion assay established between [3H]GABA-labelled isolated growth cones and a Simian virus-40 transformed astrocytic cell line from embryonic mouse striatum. Adhesion of the isolated growth cones onto the astrocytic clone increased steadily up to about 45 min before it began to level off at ca 16-18% of total [3H]GABA-labelled isolated growth cones added. Adhesion of the isolated growth cones onto the astrocytic clone was much superior to that seen on polyornithine and, in particular, on non-treated tissue culture wells. Adhesion "at plateau" was independent of both temperature and extracellular Ca2+ and was markedly reduced (ca 50%) by trypsin pre-treatment of the isolated growth cones. Pre-treatment of the isolated growth cones with either forskolin or lipophilic analogues of cyclic adenosine monophosphate attenuated adhesion in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Approximately 30% reduction in adhesion to the astrocytic clone "at plateau" was observed after a 15 min pre-treatment of the isolated growth cones with forskolin at 10(-4) M or cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogues at 10(-3) M. A cyclic guanosine monophosphate analogue was without effect on adhesion of isolated growth cones. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed that isolated growth cones pre-treated with either cyclic adenosine monophosphate analogues or forskolin had a simpler morphology when attached to the astrocytic clone than isolated growth cones under control conditions. Pre-treatment of the isolated

  5. Smooth muscle cell expression of type I cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase is suppressed by continuous exposure to nitrovasodilators, theophylline, cyclic GMP, and cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Soff, G A; Cornwell, T L; Cundiff, D L; Gately, S; Lincoln, T M

    1997-01-01

    A key component of the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in smooth muscle cells (SMC) is the type I GMP-dependent protein kinase (PK-G I). Activation of PK-G I mediates the reduction of cytoplasmic calcium concentrations and vasorelaxation. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that continuous exposure of SMC in culture to the nitrovasodilators S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) results in approximately 75% suppression of PK-G I mRNA by 48 h. PK-G I mRNA and protein were also suppressed by continuous exposure to cGMP analogues 8-bromo- and 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) guanosine-3,5-monophosphate or the cAMP analogue dibutyryl cAMP. These results suggest that activation of one or both of the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases mediates PK-G I mRNA suppression. Using isoform-specific cDNA probes, only the PK-G I alpha was detected in SMC, either at baseline or after suppression, while PK-G I beta was not detected, indicating that isoform switch was not contributing to the gene regulation. Using the transcription inhibitor actinomycin D, the PK-G I mRNA half-life in bovine SMC was observed to be 5 h. The half-life was not affected by the addition of SNAP to actinomycin D, indicating no effect on PK-G I mRNA stability. Nuclear runoff studies indicated a suppression of PK-G I gene transcription by SNAP. PK-G I suppression was also observed in vivo in rats given isosorbide dinitrate in the drinking water, with a dose-dependent suppression of PK-G I protein in the aorta. PK-G I antigen in whole rat lung extract was also suppressed by administration of isosorbide or theophylline in the drinking water. These data may contribute to our understanding of nitrovasodilator resistance, a phenomenon resulting from continuous exposure to nitroglycerin or other nitrovasodilators. PMID:9366573

  6. H2O2-induced filamin redistribution in endothelial cells is modulated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Hastie, L E; Patton, W F; Hechtman, H B; Shepro, D

    1997-09-01

    Hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in vitro causes endothelial cell cytoskeletal rearrangement that is related to increased monolayer permeability. Nonmuscle filamin (ABP-280) promotes orthogonal branching of F-actin and links microfilaments to membrane glycoproteins. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers are exposed to H2O2 (100 microM) for 1-60 min, with or without modulators of cAMP-dependent second-messenger pathways, and evaluated for changes in filamin distribution, cAMP levels, and the formation of gaps at interendothelial junctions. Filamin translocates from the membrane-cytoskeletal interface to the cytosol within 1 min of exposure to H2O2. This is associated with a decrease in endothelial cell cAMP levels from 83 pmoles/mg protein to 15 pmoles/mg protein. Intercellular gaps form 15 min after H2O2 treatment and progressively increase in number and diameter through 60 min. Both filamin redistribution and actin redistribution are associated with decreased phosphorylation of filamin and are prevented by activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway. A synthetic peptide corresponding to filamin's C-terminal, cAMP-dependent, protein kinase phosphorylation site effectively induces filamin translocation and intercellular gap formation, which suggests that decreased phosphorylation of filamin at this site causes filamin redistribution and destabilization of junctions. These data indicate that H2O2-induced filamin redistribution and interendothelial cell gap formation result from inhibition of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway.

  7. The role of the ERK1/2 pathway as an alternative to the aging-diminished cyclic AMP pathway in calcitonin-mediated chondrogenesis in human nucleus pulposus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Hong; Zeng, Rong; Lo, Wen-Cheng; Tina Chen, Szu-Yu; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Williams, David F; Deng, Win-Ping

    2012-11-01

    Human disc degeneration initiated by aging in the central nucleus pulposus (hNP) is an irreversible process and the recovery has become seriously emerging. In this study, the related mechanisms of calcitonin on the regeneration of hNP and the effects of calcitonin on the age-related alterations were examined. The harvested hNP population was designated as YhNP (from young donor, age <50) and OhNP (from old donor, age >50). Primary OhNP cells showed more hypertrophic phenotypes than YhNP. However, calcitonin (10(-8)-10(-6) M) was able to induce the same chondrogenesis in both YhNP and OhNP by elevating chondrogenic specific-mRNA and protein expressions. Their cell viabilities were increased with calcitonin treatment. No significant differences of calcitonin receptor (CTR) were expressed between YhNP and OhNP cells. Interestingly, in calcitonin-induced pathways for chondrogenesis, highly increased cyclic AMP (cAMP) was detected in YhNP but was strongly diminished by aging in OhNP after calcitonin treatment. However, to maintain the chondrogenesis, calcitonin-induced an alterative phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK) in both cells. After inhibiting ERK1/2 by PD98059, calcitonin-induced chondrogenesis in OhNP was almost restrained while YhNP cells were not affected. Our results demonstrated that the regeneration of calcitonin on hNP was maintained with aging which was satisfied by an alternative signaling pathway. Therefore, calcitonin shows great potential for clinical therapy for disc regeneration without aging considerations.

  8. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms That Cause Structural Changes in the Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Transcriptional Regulator of the Tuberculosis Vaccine Strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG Alter Global Gene Expression without Attenuating Growth▿

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Debbie M.; Saldanha, José W.; Brennan, John F.; Benjamin, Pearline; Strom, Molly; Cole, Jeffrey A.; Spreadbury, Claire L.; Buxton, Roger S.

    2008-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are present in the global transcriptional regulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) of the attenuated vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis, bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). We have found that these SNPs resulted in small but significant changes in the expression of a number of genes in M. tuberculosis when a deletion of the Rv3676 CRP was complemented by the BCG allele, compared to complementation by the M. tuberculosis allele. We can explain these changes in gene expression by modeling the structure of the mycobacterial protein on the known structure of CRP from Escherichia coli. Thus, the SNP change in the DNA-binding domain, Lys178, is predicted to form a hydrogen bond with the phosphate backbone of the DNA, as does the equivalent residue in E. coli, whereas Glu178 in M. tuberculosis/M. bovis does not, thus explaining the stronger binding reported for CRP of BCG to CRP-binding sites in mycobacterial DNA. In contrast, the SNP change in the nucleotide binding domain (Leu47Pro) is predicted to result in the loss of one hydrogen bond, which is accommodated by the structure, and would not therefore be expected to cause any change in function relating to cAMP binding. The BCG allele fully complemented the growth defect caused by the deletion of the Rv3676 protein in M. tuberculosis, both in vitro and in macrophage and mouse infections, suggesting that these SNPs do not play any role in the attenuation of BCG. However, they may have allowed BCG to grow better under the in vitro-selective conditions used in its derivation from the M. bovis wild type. PMID:18332206

  9. Modulatory effects of steroid hormones, oxytocin, arachidonic acid, forskolin and cyclic AMP on the expression of aquaporin 1 and aquaporin 5 in the porcine uterus during placentation.

    PubMed

    Skowronska, A; Mlotkowska, P; Okrasa, S; Nielsen, S; Skowronski, M T

    2016-04-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are proteins forming trans-membrane channels responsible for water transport. AQP1 and AQP5 are present in structures of the female reproductive system. In the uterus, these AQPs are involved in water movement between the intraluminal, interstitial and capillary compartments and their uterine expression is essential throughout the pregnancy, including its early stages. Thus, the study aimed to assess the influence of P4 (progesterone), E2 (estradiol), OT (oxytocin), AA (arachidonic acid), cAMP and FSK (forskolin) on the AQP1 and AQP5 mRNA and protein expression in the uterine tissue of gilts on Days 30 - 32 of gestation (the placentation period), following short (3 h) and long (24 h) incubations. Steroid hormones influenced the expression of AQP1 and AQP5; E2 up-regulated, but P4 down-regulated mRNAs of these AQPs, whereas the protein level of studied AQPs was increased by both steroids. OT treatment decreased AQP1 (after 24 h), but increased AQP5 (after 3 h) mRNA expression. Treatment with AA significantly reduced the AQP1 expression at the mRNA level, but stimulated at the protein level. The expression of AQP5 mRNA and protein was stimulated by AA. FSK markedly decreased AQP1 mRNA, but increased of AQP5 after 3-h incubation. In turn, cAMP stimulated and inhibited transcription of AQP5 after 3- and 24-h incubations, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the uterine localization of AQP1 in the apical and basal membranes of endothelial cells and AQP5 in the apical membranes of epithelial cells under control condition. Treatments with P4, E2, AA, cAMP or FSK have caused additional appearance of AQP5 labeling in the basolateral membranes of epithelial cells. These results suggest a participation of steroid hormones (P4 and E2), AA derivatives and cAMP in controlling the expression of AQP1 and AQP5 as well as the distribution of AQP5 in the uterine tissue of pregnant gilts during placentation (Days 30 - 32 of gestation). PMID:27226190

  10. Rapid glucocorticoid inhibition of vasoactive intestinal peptide-induced cyclic AMP accumulation and prolactin release in rat pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rotsztejn, W H; Dussaillant, M; Nobou, F; Rosselin, G

    1981-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) stimulates both adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and prolactin release in normal rat pituitary cells in culture. cAMP accumulation is significant (P less than 0.01) at VIP concentrations as low as 1 nM and reaches a maximum with 0.1 microM. Addition of dexamethasone as early as 15 min before VIP inhibits VIP stimulation of both cAMP production and PRL secretion. The rapid inhibition is dose-dependent: it appears at doses as low as 0.01 pM and is complete at 1 pM dexamethasone. Increasing concentrations of dexamethasone induce a noncompetitive type of inhibition, as shown by the decrease in Vmax with no change in the apparent Km for VIP. Cycloheximide (1 mM) counteracts the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VIP-induced cAMP production, which suggests the involvement of a rapid protein synthesis mechanism. Ru-26988, a specific glucocorticoid devoid of any mineralocorticoid activity and which does not bind to intracellular transcortin-like component, also produces an inhibition of VIP-induced cAMP accumulation. Corticosterone also inhibits VIP-induced cAMP production but at concentrations higher than those of dexamethasone. In contrast, aldosterone, progesterone, estradiol, and testosterone have no effect. These results demonstrate that, in normal rat pituitary cells in culture, glucocorticoids at physiological concentrations rapidly inhibit the cAMP production and prolactin release induced by VIP by acting through specific glucocorticoid receptors. PMID:6278481

  11. Characterization of prostanoid receptor-evoked responses in rat sensory neurones

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jacqueline A M; Amagasu, Shanti M; Eglen, Richard M; Hunter, John C; Bley, Keith R

    1998-01-01

    Prostanoid receptor-mediated sensitization, or excitation, of sensory nerve fibres contributes to the generation of hyperalgesia. To characterize the prostanoid receptors present on sensory neurones, biochemical assays were performed on primary cultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the F-11 (embryonic rat DRG×neuroblastoma hybrid) cell line.In DRG cultures, the IP receptor agonists, cicaprost and carbaprostacyclin (cPGI2) stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) also increased cyclic AMP levels, but to a lesser extent, while carbocyclic thromboxane A2 (cTxA2), PGD2 and PGF2α had negligible effects. The rank order of agonist potency was cicaprost >PGE2=BMY45778=cPGI2=PGI2. In the F-11 cells, the rank order of agonist potency for the stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation was: cicaprost>iloprost=cPGI2=PGI2=BMY45778>PGE2=cTXA2. In DRG cultures, cicaprost induced significantly more accumulation of inositol phosphates than PGE2.To examine the effects of prostanoids on C-fibre activity, extracellular recordings of d.c. potentials from the rat isolated vagus nerve were made with the ‘grease-gap' technique. PGI2 (0.1 nM–10 μM) produced the largest depolarizations of the nerve. The rank order of agonist potency was: PGI2=cPGI2=PGE1>cTXA2>PGE2=PGD2=TXB2>PGF2α.Prior depolarization of nerves with either forskolin (10 μM) or phorbol dibutyrate (1 μM) alone significantly reduced the response to PGI2 (10 μM), while simultaneous application of both forskolin and phorbol dibutyrate attenuated PGI2 responses almost completely.Putative EP1 and/or TP receptor-selective antagonists had no effect on the responses to PGI2, cPGI2 or PGE2 in the three preparations studied.Collectively, these data are consistent with a positive coupling of IP receptors to both adenylyl cyclase and phospholipase C in sensory neurones. These findings suggest that IP receptors play a major role in the sensitization of rat sensory neurones. PMID:9647476

  12. A CREB-Sirt1-Hes1 Circuitry Mediates Neural Stem Cell Response to Glucose Availability.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Salvatore; Leone, Lucia; Barbati, Saviana Antonella; Samengo, Daniela; Piacentini, Roberto; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Toietta, Gabriele; Spinelli, Matteo; McBurney, Michael; Pani, Giovambattista; Grassi, Claudio

    2016-02-01

    Adult neurogenesis plays increasingly recognized roles in brain homeostasis and repair and is profoundly affected by energy balance and nutrients. We found that the expression of Hes-1 (hairy and enhancer of split 1) is modulated in neural stem and progenitor cells (NSCs) by extracellular glucose through the coordinated action of CREB (cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein) and Sirt-1 (Sirtuin 1), two cellular nutrient sensors. Excess glucose reduced CREB-activated Hes-1 expression and results in impaired cell proliferation. CREB-deficient NSCs expanded poorly in vitro and did not respond to glucose availability. Elevated glucose also promoted Sirt-1-dependent repression of the Hes-1 promoter. Conversely, in low glucose, CREB replaced Sirt-1 on the chromatin associated with the Hes-1 promoter enhancing Hes-1 expression and cell proliferation. Thus, the glucose-regulated antagonism between CREB and Sirt-1 for Hes-1 transcription participates in the metabolic regulation of neurogenesis. PMID:26804914

  13. Long-Term Memory for Place Learning Is Facilitated by Expression of cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Smith, Clayton A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that the hippocampus is necessary for consolidation of long-term spatial memory in rodents. We reported previously that rats using a place strategy to solve a cross maze task showed sustained phosphorylation of hippocampus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor implicated in…

  14. Inhibition of histone deacetylase 6 activity reduces cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Cebotaru, Liudmila; Liu, Qiangni; Yanda, Murali K; Boinot, Clement; Outeda, Patricia; Huso, David L; Watnick, Terry; Guggino, William B; Cebotaru, Valeriu

    2016-07-01

    Abnormal proliferation of cyst-lining epithelium and increased intracystic fluid secretion via the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) are thought to contribute to cyst growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) expression and activity are increased in certain cancers, neurodegenerative diseases, and in Pkd1-mutant renal epithelial cells. Inhibition of HDAC6 activity with specific inhibitors slows cancer growth. Here we studied the effect of tubacin, a specific HDAC6 inhibitor, on cyst growth in polycystic kidney disease. Treatment with tubacin prevented cyst formation in MDCK cells, an in vitro model of cystogenesis. Cyclic AMP stimulates cell proliferation and activates intracystic CFTR-mediated chloride secretion in ADPKD. Treatment with tubacin downregulated cyclic AMP levels, inhibited cell proliferation, and inhibited cyclic AMP-activated CFTR chloride currents in MDCK cells. We also found that tubacin reduced cyst growth by inhibiting proliferation of cyst-lining epithelial cells, downregulated cyclic AMP levels, and improved renal function in a Pkd1-conditional mouse model of ADPKD. Thus, HDAC6 could play a role in cyst formation and could serve as a potential therapeutic target in ADPKD. PMID:27165822

  15. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  16. Vasorelaxant effect of isoliquiritigenin, a novel soluble guanylate cyclase activator, in rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S M; Kuo, S C

    1995-01-01

    1. The vasorelaxant activity of isoliquiritigenin, isolated from Dalbergia odorifera T, was investigated in the phenylephrine-precontracted rat aorta by measuring tension, guanylate and adenylate cyclase activities, guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels. 2. Isoliquiritigenin concentration-dependently relaxed rat aorta contracted with phenylephrine, KCl, U-46619, endothelin and 5-hydroxytryptamine, with EC50s of 7.4 +/- 1.6, 10.5 +/- 2.3, 14.3 +/- 3.3, 11.8 +/- 2.0 and 13.6 +/- 3.7 microM, respectively. 3. Isoliquiritigenin caused endothelium-independent relaxation of phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings. Neither NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA) (an inhibitor of the L-arginine-NO pathway) nor oxyhaemoglobin (which binds NO) modified the relaxant effect of isoliquiritigenin. The relaxant action of isoliquiritigenin also persisted in intact aorta in the presence of indomethacin or glibenclamide. However, methylene blue, an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase, abolished relaxation induced by isoliquiritigenin. 4. Incubation of rat aorta with isoliquiritigenin not only increased aortic cyclic GMP content but also caused small increases in aortic cyclic AMP content, and greatly potentiated the increases in cyclic AMP observed in the presence of forskolin. The maximum increase in cyclic GMP by isoliquiritigenin was reached earlier than the increase in cyclic AMP. This result suggests that the increases in cyclic GMP caused by isoliquiritigenin might stimulate the accumulation of cyclic AMP. 5. Concentration-dependent increases in soluble guanylate cyclase activity were observed in isoliquiritigenin (1-100 microM)- or sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-treated rat aortic smooth muscle cells, while adenylate cyclase activity was unchanged in isoliquiritigenin (100 microM)-treated cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7599926

  17. The bone resorbing activity released by gingival fibroblasts isolated from patients with periodontitis is independent of interleukin-1.

    PubMed

    Sjöström, S; Hänström, L; Lerner, U H

    2000-04-01

    Supernatants from gingival fibroblast cultures obtained from 14 patients with periodontal disease contained factor(s) capable of stimulating bone resorption in vitro, as assessed by the release of 45Ca from neonatal mouse calvariae. The possibility that the factor(s) was interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1 alpha), IL-1 beta or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was next investigated. The human fibroblast conditioned media (HFCM) stimulated PGE2 biosynthesis in bone. The stimulatory effect by HFCM on 45Ca release, however, was not affected by blocking prostaglandin biosynthesis with indomethacin. In contrast, 45Ca release induced by IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, thrombin and bradykinin was significantly reduced by indomethacin, whereas the effects of PTH and PTHrP were unaffected by indomethacin. The concentration of PGE2 in HFCM was too low to be solely responsible for the 45Ca release response. In addition, the amount of bone resorbing activity produced by the gingival fibroblasts was unaffected by cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors. Similar to IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta, the stimulatory effect of HFCM was inhibited by gamma-interferon. HFCM did not stimulate cyclic AMP formation in the mouse calvarial bones. Antisera which specifically blocked human IL-1 alpha or IL-1 beta induced 45Ca release, and the specific IL-1 receptor antagonistic protein, did not inhibit the stimulatory effect of HFCM. These data show that gingival fibroblasts secrete bone resorbing factor(s) which is not due to IL-1 and which stimulates bone resorption by a prostaglandin- and cyclic AMP-independent mechanism.

  18. Neural activation during response competition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hazeltine, E.; Poldrack, R.; Gabrieli, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    The flanker task, introduced by Eriksen and Eriksen [Eriksen, B. A., & Eriksen, C. W. (1974). Effects of noise letters upon the identification of a target letter in a nonsearch task. Perception & Psychophysics, 16, 143--149], provides a means to selectively manipulate the presence or absence of response competition while keeping other task demands constant. We measured brain activity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance of the flanker task. In accordance with previous behavioral studies, trials in which the flanking stimuli indicated a different response than the central stimulus were performed significantly more slowly than trials in which all the stimuli indicated the same response. This reaction time effect was accompanied by increases in activity in four regions: the right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the left superior parietal lobe, and the left anterior parietal cortex. The increases were not due to changes in stimulus complexity or the need to overcome previously learned associations between stimuli and responses. Correspondences between this study and other experiments manipulating response interference suggest that the frontal foci may be related to response inhibition processes whereas the posterior foci may be related to the activation of representations of the inappropriate responses.

  19. Sleep deprivation impairs contextual fear conditioning and attenuates subsequent behavioural, endocrine and neuronal responses.

    PubMed

    Hagewoud, Roelina; Bultsma, Lillian J; Barf, R Paulien; Koolhaas, Jaap M; Meerlo, Peter

    2011-06-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) affects hippocampus-dependent memory formation. Several studies in rodents have shown that brief SD immediately following a mild foot shock impairs consolidation of contextual fear memory as reflected in a reduced behavioural freezing response during re-exposure to the shock context later. In the first part of this study, we examined whether this reduced freezing response is accompanied by an attenuated fear-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Results show that 6h of SD immediately following the initial shock results in a diminished adrenal corticosterone (CORT) response upon re-exposure to the shock context the next day. In the second part, we established whether the attenuated freezing response in SD animals is associated with reduced activation of relevant brain areas known to be involved in the retrieval and expression of fear memory. Immunohistochemical analysis of brain slices showed that the normal increase in phosphorylation of the transcription factor 3',5'-cyclic AMP response-element binding protein (CREB) upon re-exposure to the shock context was reduced in SD animals in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and in the amygdala. In conclusion, brief SD impairs the consolidation of contextual fear memory. Upon re-exposure to the context, this is reflected in a diminished behavioural freezing response, an attenuated HPA axis response and a reduction of the normal increase of phosphorylated CREB expression in the hippocampus and amygdala. PMID:20946438

  20. Active Response Gravity Offload System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valle, Paul; Dungan, Larry; Cunningham, Thomas; Lieberman, Asher; Poncia, Dina

    2011-01-01

    The Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS) provides the ability to simulate with one system the gravity effect of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and microgravity, where the gravity is less than Earth fs gravity. The system works by providing a constant force offload through an overhead hoist system and horizontal motion through a rail and trolley system. The facility covers a 20 by 40-ft (approximately equals 6.1 by 12.2m) horizontal area with 15 ft (approximately equals4.6 m) of lifting vertical range.

  1. HAWC Response to Lighting Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lara, A.

    2014-12-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is being constructed at the Sierra Negra volcano (4100 m a.s.l.) in Mexico. HAWC's primary purpose is the study of both: galactic and extra-galactic sources of high energy gamma rays. HAWC will consist of 300 large water Cherenkov detectors (WCD), each instrumented with 4 photo-multipliers (PMTs). The Data taking has already started while construction continues, with the completion projected for late 2014. The HAWC scaler system records the rates of individual PMTs giving the opportunity of study relatively low energy transients as solar energetic particles and the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays. In this work, we present the observations of scaler rate enhancements associated with lightning activity observed close to HAWC (i. e. at high altitude). In particular, we present the time and space coincidence of the lighting strikes and the scaler enhancements and our preliminary speculations on the origin of the detector response to the lighting activity.

  2. Activating Transcription Factor 3 and the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, David; Raivich, Gennadij; Anderson, Patrick Norval

    2012-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) belongs to the ATF/cyclic AMP responsive element binding family of transcription factors and is often described as an adaptive response gene whose activity is usually regulated by stressful stimuli. Although expressed in a number of splice variants and generally recognized as a transcriptional repressor, ATF3 has the ability to interact with a number of other transcription factors including c-Jun to form complexes which not only repress, but can also activate various genes. ATF3 expression is modulated mainly at the transcriptional level and has markedly different effects in different types of cell. The levels of ATF3 mRNA and protein are normally very low in neurons and glia but their expression is rapidly upregulated in response to injury. ATF3 expression in neurons is closely linked to their survival and the regeneration of their axons following axotomy, and that in peripheral nerves correlates with the generation of a Schwann cell phenotype that is conducive to axonal regeneration. ATF3 is also induced by Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands but acts as a negative regulator of TLR signaling, suppressing the innate immune response which is involved in immuno-surveillance and can enhance or reduce the survival of injured neurons and promote the regeneration of their axons. PMID:22347845

  3. Allergic manifestations and cutaneous histamine responses in patients with McCune Albright syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background McCune Albright syndrome (MAS) is a rare disorder characterized by precocious puberty, café-au-lait spots, and fibrous dysplasia. Its cause is an activating mutation in the GNAS gene, encoding a subunit of the stimulatory G protein, Gsalpha (Gsα). The action of any mediator that signals via Gsα and cyclic AMP can be up regulated in MAS. We had observed gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, and anaphylaxis in McCune Albright patients. Objective As histamine is known to signal via histamine 1 (H1) and histamine 2 (H2) receptors, which couple with stimulatory G proteins, we attempted to mechanistically link histamine responsiveness to the activating GNAS mutation. We hypothesized that responsiveness to histamine skin testing would differ between MAS patients and healthy controls. Patients and methods After obtaining informed consent, we performed a systematic review of histamine responsiveness and allergic manifestations in 11 MAS patients and 11 sex-matched, Tanner-stage matched controls. We performed skin prick testing, quantifying the orthogonal diameters of wheals and erythema. We also quantitated G protein mRNA expression. Results The peak wheal and flare responses to histamine were significantly higher in MAS patients compared to controls. Conclusions This study suggests that MAS patients may be at risk for exaggerated histamine responsiveness compared to unaffected controls. PMID:23663565

  4. Regulation of Cardiac Calcium Channels in the Fight-or-Flight Response.

    PubMed

    Catterall, William A

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular calcium transients generated by activation of voltage-gated calcium (CaV) channels generate local signals, which initiate physiological processes such as secretion, synaptic transmission, and excitation-contraction coupling. Regulation of calcium entry through CaV channels is crucial for control of these physiological processes. In this article, I review experimental results that have emerged over several years showing that cardiac CaV1.2 channels form a local signaling complex, in which their proteolytically processed distal C-terminal domain, an A-Kinase Anchoring Protein, and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) interact directly with the transmembrane core of the ion channel through the proximal C-terminal domain. This signaling complex is the substrate for β-adrenergic up-regulation of the CaV1.2 channel in the heart during the fight-or-flight response. Protein phosphorylation of two sites at the interface between the distal and proximal C-terminal domains contributes importantly to control of basal CaV1.2 channel activity, and phosphorylation of Ser1700 by PKA at that interface up-regulates CaV1.2 activity in response to β-adrenergic signaling. Thus, the intracellular C-terminal domain of CaV1.2 channels serves as a signaling platform, mediating beat-to-beat physiological regulation of channel activity and up-regulation by β-adrenergic signaling in the fight-or-flight response.

  5. Bronchial responsiveness in active steelworkers.

    PubMed

    Corhay, J L; Bury, T; Louis, R; Delavignette, J P; Kayembe, J M; Weber, G; Albert, A; Radermecker, M F

    1998-02-01

    Coke-oven workers are exposed to dust and irritant gases. Therefore they are at risk of developing lung diseases including chronic bronchitis. Nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) has been advocated as a potential risk factor predisposing to the development of chronic bronchitis. In a previous study, we showed that prevalence of BHR was higher in retired coke-oven workers than in retired blast furnace workers. The present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of BHR in active steelworkers. Thus, 137 coke-oven workers and 150 blast furnace workers underwent clinical examination, a standardized questionnaire for the study of respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function testing and methacholine aerosol challenge. The study demonstrates a higher prevalence and degree of BHR [provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (PC20) < or = 8 mg x mL(-1)] in coke-oven workers than in blast furnace workers (31.4 versus 6.7%; p<0.001). Moreover, the frequency of respiratory symptoms and basal bronchial obstruction were greater among coke-oven workers with BHR in nonresponders. The basal maximum expiratory flow from 25-75% of forced vital capacity and the respiratory symptoms were correlated with bronchial responsiveness. The lack of correlation observed between BHR and the intensity of smoking or years spent in coke-oven environment may be explained by the high proportion of smokers, the worker turnover in the steel plant, and the "healthy worker effect". In conclusion, the higher prevalence and degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in coke-oven workers suggests that coke-oven pollutants are more intense irritants than those that escape from blast furnaces. PMID:9551724

  6. Bronchial responsiveness in active steelworkers.

    PubMed

    Corhay, J L; Bury, T; Louis, R; Delavignette, J P; Kayembe, J M; Weber, G; Albert, A; Radermecker, M F

    1998-02-01

    Coke-oven workers are exposed to dust and irritant gases. Therefore they are at risk of developing lung diseases including chronic bronchitis. Nonspecific bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) has been advocated as a potential risk factor predisposing to the development of chronic bronchitis. In a previous study, we showed that prevalence of BHR was higher in retired coke-oven workers than in retired blast furnace workers. The present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of BHR in active steelworkers. Thus, 137 coke-oven workers and 150 blast furnace workers underwent clinical examination, a standardized questionnaire for the study of respiratory symptoms, pulmonary function testing and methacholine aerosol challenge. The study demonstrates a higher prevalence and degree of BHR [provocative concentration of methacholine causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (PC20) < or = 8 mg x mL(-1)] in coke-oven workers than in blast furnace workers (31.4 versus 6.7%; p<0.001). Moreover, the frequency of respiratory symptoms and basal bronchial obstruction were greater among coke-oven workers with BHR in nonresponders. The basal maximum expiratory flow from 25-75% of forced vital capacity and the respiratory symptoms were correlated with bronchial responsiveness. The lack of correlation observed between BHR and the intensity of smoking or years spent in coke-oven environment may be explained by the high proportion of smokers, the worker turnover in the steel plant, and the "healthy worker effect". In conclusion, the higher prevalence and degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness in coke-oven workers suggests that coke-oven pollutants are more intense irritants than those that escape from blast furnaces.

  7. Sex differences in feeding behavior in rats: the relationship with neuronal activation in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Atsushi; Hagiwara, Hiroko; Fujioka, Hitomi; Kimura, Fukuko; Akema, Tatsuo; Funabashi, Toshiya

    2015-01-01

    There is general agreement that the central nervous system in rodents differs between sexes due to the presence of gonadal steroid hormone during differentiation. Sex differences in feeding seem to occur among species, and responses to fasting (i.e., starvation), gonadal steroids (i.e., testosterone and estradiol), and diet (i.e., western-style diet) vary significantly between sexes. The hypothalamus is the center for controlling feeding behavior. We examined the activation of feeding-related peptides in neurons in the hypothalamus. Phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a good marker for neural activation, as is the Fos antigen. Therefore, we predicted that sex differences in the activity of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons would be associated with feeding behavior. We determined the response of MCH neurons to glucose in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and our results suggested MCH neurons play an important role in sex differences in feeding behavior. In addition, fasting increased the number of orexin neurons harboring phosphorylated CREB in female rats (regardless of the estrous day), but not male rats. Glucose injection decreased the number of these neurons with phosphorylated CREB in fasted female rats. Finally, under normal spontaneous food intake, MCH neurons, but not orexin neurons, expressed phosphorylated CREB. These sex differences in response to fasting and glucose, as well as under normal conditions, suggest a vulnerability to metabolic challenges in females. PMID:25870535

  8. Induction of differentiation in v-Ha-ras-transformed MDCK cells by prostaglandin E2 and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP is associated with a decrease in steady-state level of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y Y; Lin, M C

    1990-01-01

    We used Ha-ras-transformed Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as a model to study possible signal transduction mechanisms underlying the induction of glucagon responsiveness by the differentiation inducers prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and 8-bromo-cyclic (8-Br-cAMP) AMP and the inhibition of induction by phorbol ester or a serum factor. The steady-state level of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was higher in Ha-ras-transformed MDCK cells than in parental MDCK cells. In contrast, the steady-state level of intracellular cAMP of transformed cells was similar to that of normal cells. PGE2 and 8-Br-cAMP increased cAMP content but decreased IP3 levels in a concentration-dependent fashion after 5 days of treatment. We examined the time course for effects of PGE2 and 8-Br-cAMP and found that there was a lag period of 8 to 16 h between elevation of cAMP after the addition of 8-Br-cAMP or PGE2 and the decrease of IP3 levels. Another lag period of 2 days existed before the induction of differentiation. Both the reduction of IP3 levels and the induction of glucagon responsiveness were blocked by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or serum, suggesting that a decrease in the IP3 level might be causally involved in induction of differentiation in transformed MDCK cells. However, induction of differentiation was not due to changes in the expression or guanine nucleotide-binding properties of p21 protein. It is likely that cAMP has a direct regulatory effect on the phospholipid signaling pathway. We conclude that perturbation of the inositol phosphate signaling pathway may be responsible for the induction of differentiation by PGE2 and 8-Br-cAMP in transformed MDCK cells. Images PMID:2152966

  9. Comparison of cellular responses induced by low level light in different cell types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ying-Ying; Chen, Aaron C.-H.; Sharma, Sulbha K.; Wu, Qiuhe; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Discoveries are rapidly being made in multiple laboratories that shed "light" on the fundamental molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying the use of low level light therapy (LLLT) in vitro, in animal models and in clinical practice. Increases in cellular levels of respiration, in cytochrome c oxidase activity, in ATP levels and in cyclic AMP have been found. Increased expression of reactive oxygen species and release of nitric oxide have also been shown. In order for these molecular changes to have a major effect on cell behavior, it is likely that various transcription factors will be activated, possibly via different signal transduction pathways. In this report we compare and contrast the effects of LLLT in vitro on murine embryonic fibroblasts, primary cortical neurons, cardiomyocytes and bone-marrow derived dendritic cells. We also examined two human cell lines, HeLa cancer cells and HaCaT keratinocytes. The effects of 810-nm near-infra-red light delivered at low and high fluences were addressed. Reactive oxygen species generation, transcription factor activation and ATP increases are reported. The data has led to the hypothesis that cells with a high level of mitochondrial activity (mitochondrial membrane potential) have a higher response to light than cells with low mitochondrial activity.

  10. Isolated neuronal growth cones from developing rat forebrain possess adenylate cyclase activity which can be augmented by various receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Lockerbie, R O; Hervé, D; Blanc, G; Tassin, J P; Glowinski, J

    1988-01-01

    Isolated neuronal growth cones from neonatal rat forebrain were found to contain a high specific activity of adenylate cyclase (61 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein) compared to the pelleted starting homogenate (5 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein). Forskolin at 10(-4) M increased adenylate cyclase activity in both the pelleted homogenate and growth cone fraction by 70 and 217 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein, respectively, over basal levels. The incremental effect of forskolin was 3-fold greater in the growth cone fraction than in the pelleted homogenate. However, relative to basal levels in each of the two fractions, forskolin increased adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction by only approx. 5-fold compared to 15-fold in the pelleted homogenate. Dopamine (10(-4) M), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (10(-6) M) and isoproterenol (10(-5) M) also augmented adenylate cyclase activity in the two fractions. In the growth cone fraction, dopamine and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide produced a stimulation over basal levels by approx. 20 pmol cyclic AMP/min/mg protein while isoproterenol produced a stimulation of approx. 10 pmol cAMP/min/mg protein. The incremental effects of these receptor agonists in the growth cone fraction are approx. 5-fold greater than in the pelleted homogenate. The dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction could be blocked by the compound SCH23390, a selective D1 receptor antagonist. At saturating concentrations, all combinations of dopamine, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and isoproterenol were found to be completely additive on adenylate cyclase activity in the growth cone fraction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Effect of Global Regulators RpoS and Cyclic-AMP/CRP on the Catabolome and Transcriptome of Escherichia coli K12 during Carbon- and Energy-Limited Growth

    PubMed Central

    Egli, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For heterotrophic microbes, limited availability of carbon and energy sources is one of the major nutritional factors restricting the rate of growth in most ecosystems. Physiological adaptation to this hunger state requires metabolic versatility which usually involves expression of a wide range of different catabolic pathways and of high-affinity carbon transporters; together, this allows for simultaneous utilization of mixtures of carbonaceous compounds at low concentrations. In Escherichia coli the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and the signal molecule cAMP are the major players in the regulation of transcription under such conditions; however, their interaction is still not fully understood. Therefore, during growth of E. coli in carbon-limited chemostat culture at different dilution rates, the transcriptomes, expression of periplasmic proteins and catabolomes of strains lacking one of these global regulators, either rpoS or adenylate cyclase (cya), were compared to those of the wild-type strain. The inability to synthesize cAMP exerted a strong negative influence on the expression of alternative carbon source uptake and degradation systems. In contrast, absence of RpoS increased the transcription of genes belonging to high-affinity uptake systems and central metabolism, presumably due to reduced competition of σD with σS. Phenotypical analysis confirmed this observation: The ability to respire alternative carbon substrates and to express periplasmic high-affinity binding proteins was eliminated in cya and crp mutants, while these properties were not affected in the rpoS mutant. As expected, transcription of numerous stress defence genes was negatively affected by the rpoS knock-out mutation. Interestingly, several genes of the RpoS stress response regulon were also down-regulated in the cAMP-negative strain indicating a coordinated global regulation. The results demonstrate that cAMP is crucial for catabolic flexibility during slow, carbon-limited growth

  12. Effect of Global Regulators RpoS and Cyclic-AMP/CRP on the Catabolome and Transcriptome of Escherichia coli K12 during Carbon- and Energy-Limited Growth.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Alessandro G; Ihssen, Julian; Egli, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    For heterotrophic microbes, limited availability of carbon and energy sources is one of the major nutritional factors restricting the rate of growth in most ecosystems. Physiological adaptation to this hunger state requires metabolic versatility which usually involves expression of a wide range of different catabolic pathways and of high-affinity carbon transporters; together, this allows for simultaneous utilization of mixtures of carbonaceous compounds at low concentrations. In Escherichia coli the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and the signal molecule cAMP are the major players in the regulation of transcription under such conditions; however, their interaction is still not fully understood. Therefore, during growth of E. coli in carbon-limited chemostat culture at different dilution rates, the transcriptomes, expression of periplasmic proteins and catabolomes of strains lacking one of these global regulators, either rpoS or adenylate cyclase (cya), were compared to those of the wild-type strain. The inability to synthesize cAMP exerted a strong negative influence on the expression of alternative carbon source uptake and degradation systems. In contrast, absence of RpoS increased the transcription of genes belonging to high-affinity uptake systems and central metabolism, presumably due to reduced competition of σ(D) with σ(S). Phenotypical analysis confirmed this observation: The ability to respire alternative carbon substrates and to express periplasmic high-affinity binding proteins was eliminated in cya and crp mutants, while these properties were not affected in the rpoS mutant. As expected, transcription of numerous stress defence genes was negatively affected by the rpoS knock-out mutation. Interestingly, several genes of the RpoS stress response regulon were also down-regulated in the cAMP-negative strain indicating a coordinated global regulation. The results demonstrate that cAMP is crucial for catabolic flexibility during slow, carbon

  13. Spatial learning associated with stimulus response in goldfish Carassius auratus: relationship to activation of CREB signalling.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel; Thangaleela, Subramanian; Balasundaram, Chellam

    2015-06-01

    Earlier, we reported spatial learning ability in goldfish (Carassius auratus) by using spatial paradigm with food reward. Therefore, we hypothesized that goldfish may use associated cue to integrate "where" and "what" for spatial memory. To test our hypothesis, we first trained goldfish to learn to cross the gate1, which is associated with spatial task. Subsequently, they were trained to learn to enter the task chamber and to identify the food reward chamber associated with visual cue (red/green light). Red and green lights were positioned randomly for each trial but always the food reward was kept in green chamber. In addition, to elucidate the role of the signalling cascade in spatial memory associated with visual cue, nicotinamide (NAM, 1000 mg/kg, i.p), a NAD(+) precursor, was used to inhibit the Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway. Fishes were trained for 5 days in a maze after treating with either vehicle (VEH, DD H2O) or NAM, and then, they were individually tested for memory. We found that VEH-treated fish learned and recalled the task successfully by showing less latency and making more correct choices than NAM-treated group. Subsequent analysis showed that NAM treatment significantly down-regulated the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), CREB, expression of SirT1 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) in telencephalon. Taken together, our results provide behavioural evidence of spatial memory associated with visual cue in C. auratus, which could be regulated by ERK1/2-CREB-SirT1-Bdnf pathway.

  14. The Neuroprotective Effect of Lithium in cannabinoid Dependence is Mediated through Modulation of Cyclic AMP, ERK1/2 and GSK-3β Phosphorylation in Cerebellar Granular Neurons of Rat.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Razmi, Ali; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Lithium (Li), a glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor, has used to attenuate the cannabinoid-induced dependence/withdrawal signs, but molecular mechanisms related to this are unclear. Recent studies indicate the involvement of upstream extracellular signal kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and downstream GSK-3β pathways in the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence. This is mediated through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) enriched in cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs). Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of modulatory/neuroprotective effects of Li on a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2 (WIN))-induced dependence, through quantitative analysis of some involved proteins such as ERK1/2, GSK-3β and related signaling pathways including their phosphorylated forms; and cAMP level as the other molecular mechanisms leading to dependence, in CGNs model. The CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pup in a 12-well plate, pretreated with Li (1mM) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor SL327 (SL, 10 µM). The WIN (1 µM) was added 30 minutes prior to treatment and AM251 (AM, 1 µM), as a cannabinoid antagonist was co-treated with WIN. The cAMP level, as an indicator of cannabinoid-induced dependence, was measured by ELISA following forskolin (FSK) stimulation. Western blot analyses determined the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), GSK-3β (p-GSK-3β) as well as their total expressions in various treatment times and doses in CGNs. WIN alone could down regulate the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade compared to AM treatment. However, P-GSK-3β was up-regulated with Li and WIN or with SL and Li pretreatment to AM-induced cellular response, which was the highest 60 minutes after CGNs exposure. Results further suggested the potential role of Li pretreatment to diminish the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence/neuronal injury through possible mechanisms of modulating the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade independent of p-GSK-3β signaling pathway in-vitro.

  15. The Neuroprotective Effect of Lithium in cannabinoid Dependence is Mediated through Modulation of Cyclic AMP, ERK1/2 and GSK-3β Phosphorylation in Cerebellar Granular Neurons of Rat

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad; Ejtemaei-Mehr, Shahram; Razmi, Ali; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Lithium (Li), a glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor, has used to attenuate the cannabinoid-induced dependence/withdrawal signs, but molecular mechanisms related to this are unclear. Recent studies indicate the involvement of upstream extracellular signal kinase1/2 (ERK1/2) and downstream GSK-3β pathways in the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence. This is mediated through cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) enriched in cerebellar granular neurons (CGNs). Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate the mechanism of modulatory/neuroprotective effects of Li on a cannabinoid agonist (WIN 55,212-2 (WIN))-induced dependence, through quantitative analysis of some involved proteins such as ERK1/2, GSK-3β and related signaling pathways including their phosphorylated forms; and cAMP level as the other molecular mechanisms leading to dependence, in CGNs model. The CGNs were prepared from 7-day-old Wistar rat pup in a 12-well plate, pretreated with Li (1mM) and an ERK1/2 inhibitor SL327 (SL, 10 µM). The WIN (1 µM) was added 30 minutes prior to treatment and AM251 (AM, 1 µM), as a cannabinoid antagonist was co-treated with WIN. The cAMP level, as an indicator of cannabinoid-induced dependence, was measured by ELISA following forskolin (FSK) stimulation. Western blot analyses determined the phosphorylated forms of ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2), GSK-3β (p-GSK-3β) as well as their total expressions in various treatment times and doses in CGNs. WIN alone could down regulate the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade compared to AM treatment. However, P-GSK-3β was up-regulated with Li and WIN or with SL and Li pretreatment to AM-induced cellular response, which was the highest 60 minutes after CGNs exposure. Results further suggested the potential role of Li pretreatment to diminish the development of cannabinoid-induced dependence/neuronal injury through possible mechanisms of modulating the cAMP/p-ERK1/2 cascade independent of p-GSK-3β signaling pathway in-vitro. PMID:26664379

  16. Small Stress Response Proteins in Escherichia coli: Proteins Missed by Classical Proteomic Studies ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hemm, Matthew R.; Paul, Brian J.; Miranda-Ríos, Juan; Zhang, Aixia; Soltanzad, Nima; Storz, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Proteins of 50 or fewer amino acids are poorly characterized in all organisms. The corresponding genes are challenging to reliably annotate, and it is difficult to purify and characterize the small protein products. Due to these technical limitations, little is known about the abundance of small proteins, not to mention their biological functions. To begin to characterize these small proteins in Escherichia coli, we assayed their accumulation under a variety of growth conditions and after exposure to stress. We found that many small proteins accumulate under specific growth conditions or are stress induced. For some genes, the observed changes in protein levels were consistent with known transcriptional regulation, such as ArcA activation of the operons encoding yccB and ybgT. However, we also identified novel regulation, such as Zur repression of ykgMO, cyclic AMP response protein (CRP) repression of azuC, and CRP activation of ykgR. The levels of 11 small proteins increase after heat shock, and induction of at least 1 of these, YobF, occurs at a posttranscriptional level. These results show that small proteins are an overlooked subset of stress response proteins in E. coli and provide information that will be valuable for determining the functions of these proteins. PMID:19734316

  17. Mutated human beta3-adrenergic receptor (Trp64Arg) lowers the response to beta3-adrenergic agonists in transfected 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Sasaki, N; Asano, A; Mizukami, J; Kayahashi, S; Kawada, T; Fushiki, T; Morimatsu, M; Yoshida, T; Saito, M

    2000-03-01

    Wild-type or mutated human beta3-adrenergic receptor (Trp64Arg) cDNAs were stably expressed in mouse 3T3-L1 cells. Saturation binding study using a beta-adrenergic ligand revealed that there was no significant difference in the receptor density and the equilibrium dissociation constant between the two cell lines. However, the ability of the mutant beta3-adrenergic receptor to accumulate cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to isoproterenol was much reduced and Kact for cAMP accumulation was lowered as compared to the wild type receptor. The amount of alpha subunit of stimulatory GTP-binding protein (GSalpha) and adenylyl cyclase activity in response to forskolin were not different in the two cell lines. The responses of the mutant receptor to epinephrine, norepinephrine and L-755,507, a highly specific agonist for human beta3-adrenergic receptor, were also reduced, but the reduction of Kact for L-755,507 was more evident than other agonists tested. The cAMP accumulation in response to some conventional beta3 agonists was less than 10% of that to isoproterenol even in the cells expressing the wild type receptor. These results suggest that the Trp64Arg mutant beta3-adrenergic receptor has less ability to stimulate adenylyl cyclase, and that lipolytic activity through the beta3-adrenergic receptor by catecholamines in subjects carrying this mutation might be suppressed. PMID:10786926

  18. Strain activation of bovine aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and alignment: study of strain dependency and the role of protein kinase A and C signaling pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, I.; Cohen, C. R.; Kamal, K.; Li, G.; Shin, T.; Du, W.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype can be altered by physical forces as demonstrated by cyclic strain-induced changes in proliferation, orientation, and secretion of macromolecules. However, the magnitude of strain required and the intracellular coupling pathways remain ill defined. To examine the strain requirements for SMC proliferation, we selectively seeded bovine aortic SMC either on the center or periphery of silastic membranes which were deformed with 150 mm Hg vacuum (0-7% center; 7-24% periphery). SMC located in either the center or peripheral regions showed enhanced proliferation compared to cells grown under the absence of cyclic strain. Moreover, SMC located in the center region demonstrated significantly (P < 0.005) greater proliferation as compared to those in the periphery. In contrast, SMC exposed to high strain (7-24%) demonstrated alignment perpendicular to the strain gradient, whereas SMC in the center (0-7%) remained aligned randomly. To determine the mechanisms of these phenomena, we examined the effect of cyclic strain on bovine aortic SMC signaling pathways. We observed strain-induced stimulation of the cyclic AMP pathway including adenylate cyclase activity and cyclic AMP accumulation. In addition, exposure of SMC to cyclic strain caused a significant increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity and enzyme translocation from the cytosol to a particulate fraction. Further study was conducted to examine the effect of strain magnitude on signaling, particularly protein kinase A (PKA) activity as well as cAMP response element (CRE) binding protein levels. We observed significantly (P < 0.05) greater PKA activity and CRE binding protein levels in SMC located in the center as compared to the peripheral region. However, inhibition of PKA (with 10 microM Rp-cAMP) or PKC (with 5-20 ng/ml staurosporine) failed to alter either the strain-induced increase in SMC proliferation or alignment. These data characterize the strain determinants for activation of

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae phospholipase C regulates transcription of Msn2p-dependent stress-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Demczuk, Agnieszka; Guha, Nilanjan; Nguyen, Peter H; Desai, Parima; Chang, Jennifer; Guzinska, Katarzyna; Rollins, Janet; Ghosh, Chandra C; Goodwin, Leslie; Vancura, Ales

    2008-06-01

    Phosphatidylinositol phosphates are involved in signal transduction, cytoskeletal organization, and membrane trafficking. Inositol polyphosphates, produced from phosphatidylinositol phosphates by the phospholipase C-dependent pathway, regulate chromatin remodeling. We used genome-wide expression analysis to further investigate the roles of Plc1p (phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and inositol polyphosphates in transcriptional regulation. Plc1p contributes to the regulation of approximately 2% of yeast genes in cells grown in rich medium. Most of these genes are induced by nutrient limitation and other environmental stresses and are derepressed in plc1 Delta cells. Surprisingly, genes regulated by Plc1p do not correlate with gene sets regulated by Swi/Snf or RSC chromatin remodeling complexes but show correlation with genes controlled by Msn2p. Our results suggest that the increased expression of stress-responsive genes in plc1 Delta cells is mediated by decreased cyclic AMP synthesis and protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Msn2p and increased binding of Msn2p to stress-responsive promoters. Accordingly, plc1 Delta cells display other phenotypes characteristic of cells with decreased PKA activity. Our results are consistent with a model in which Plc1p acts together with the membrane receptor Gpr1p and associated G(alpha) protein Gpa2p in a pathway separate from Ras1p/Ras2p and converging on PKA.

  20. Sucralose, an activator of the glucose-sensing receptor, increases ATP by calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Longfei; Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Nakagawa, Yuko; Masuda, Katsuyoshi; Kojima, Itaru

    2016-08-31

    Sucralose is an artificial sweetener and activates the glucose-sensing receptor expressed in pancreatic β-cells. Although sucralose does not enter β-cells nor acts as a substrate for glucokinase, it induces a marked elevation of intracellular ATP ([ATP]c). The present study was conducted to identify the signaling pathway responsible for the elevation of [ATP]c induced by sucralose. Previous studies have shown that sucralose elevates cyclic AMP (cAMP), activates phospholipase C (PLC) and stimulates Ca(2+) entry by a Na(+)-dependent mechanism in MIN6 cells. The addition of forskolin induced a marked elevation of cAMP, whereas it did not affect [ATP]c. Carbachol, an activator of PLC, did not increase [ATP]c. In addition, activation of protein kinase C by dioctanoylglycerol did not affect [ATP]c. In contrast, nifedipine, an inhibitor of the voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel, significantly reduced [ATP]c response to sucralose. Removal of extracellular Na(+) nearly completely blocked sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Stimulation of Na(+) entry by adding a Na(+) ionophore monensin elevated [ATP]c. The monensin-induced elevation of [ATP]c was only partially inhibited by nifedipine and loading of BAPTA, both of which completely abolished elevation of [Ca(2+)]c. These results suggest that Na(+) entry is critical for the sucralose-induced elevation of [ATP]c. Both calcium-dependent and -independent mechanisms are involved in the action of sucralose. PMID:27250218

  1. Physiological Response to Physical Activity in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliam, Thomas B.

    This is a report on research in the field of physical responses of children to strenuous activity. The paper is divided into three subtopics: (1) peak performance measure in children; (2) training effects on children; and (3) importance of physical activity for children. Measurements used are oxygen consumption, ventilation, heart rate, cardiac…

  2. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress. PMID:26649137

  3. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress.

  4. Neuropeptide FF activates ERK and NF kappa B signal pathways in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-long; Zhang, Xiao-yuan; He, Ning; Sun, Tao; Zhuang, Yan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Kai-rong; Wang, Rui

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been reported to play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes. However, little attention has been focused on the downstream signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Here, we used the differentiated neuroblastoma cell line, dSH-SY5Y, which endogenously expresses hNPFF2 receptor, to investigate the signal transduction downstream of NPFF. In particular we investigated the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways by NPFF in these cells. NPFF rapidly and transiently stimulated ERK. H89, a selective inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the NPFF-activated ERK pathway, indicating the involvement of PKA in the NPFF-induced ERK activation. Down-regulation of nitric oxide synthases also attenuated NPFF-induced ERK activation, suggesting that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent pathway is involved. Moreover, the core upstream components of the NF-κB pathway were also significantly activated in response to NPFF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Collectively, these data demonstrate that nitric oxide synthases are involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF, and provide the first evidence for the interaction between NPFF and the NF-κB pathway. These advances in our interpretation of the NPFF pathway mechanism will aid the comprehensive understanding of its function and provide novel molecular insight for further study of the NPFF system.

  5. Hypoxia-activated metabolic pathway stimulates phosphorylation of p300 and CBP in oxygen-sensitive cells

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewska, Adriana; Schnell, Phillip O.; Striet, Justin B.; Hui, Anna; Robbins, Jennifer R.; Petrovic, Milan; Conforti, Laura; Gozal, David; Wathelet, Marc G.; Czyzyk-Krzeska, Maria F.

    2006-01-01

    Transcription co-activators and histone acetyltransferases, p300 and cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP), participate in hypoxic activation of hypoxia-inducible genes. Here, we show that exposure of PC12 and cells to 1–10% oxygen results in hyperphosphorylation of p300/CBP. This response is fast, long lasting and specific for hypoxia, but not for hypoxia-mimicking agents such as desferioxamine or Co2+ ions. It is also cell-type specific and occurs in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells and the carotid body of rats but not in hepatoblastoma cells. The p300 hyperphosphorylation specifically depends on the release of intracellular calcium from inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores. However, it is not inhibited by pharmacological inhibitors of any of the kinases traditionally known to be directly or indirectly calcium regulated. On the other hand, p300 hyperphosphorylation is inhibited by several different inhibitors of the glucose metabolic pathway from generation of NADH by glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, through the transfer of NADH through the glycerol phosphate shuttle to ubiquinone and complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Inhibition of IP3-sensitive calcium stores decreases generation of ATP, and this inhibition is significantly stronger in hypoxia than in normoxia. We propose that the NADH glycerol phosphate shuttle participates in generating a pool of ATP that serves either as a co-factor or a modulator of the kinases involved in the phosphorylation of p300/CBP during hypoxia. PMID:16000154

  6. Parallel activation of Ca(2+)-induced survival and death pathways in cardiomyocytes by sorbitol-induced hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Chiong, M; Parra, V; Eisner, V; Ibarra, C; Maldonado, C; Criollo, A; Bravo, R; Quiroga, C; Contreras, A; Vicencio, J M; Cea, P; Bucarey, J L; Molgó, J; Jaimovich, E; Hidalgo, C; Kroemer, G; Lavandero, S

    2010-08-01

    Hyperosmotic stress promotes rapid and pronounced apoptosis in cultured cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigated if Ca(2+) signals contribute to this response. Exposure of cardiomyocytes to sorbitol [600 mosmol (kg water)(-1)] elicited large and oscillatory intracellular Ca(2+) concentration increases. These Ca(2+) signals were inhibited by nifedipine, Cd(2+), U73122, xestospongin C and ryanodine, suggesting contributions from both Ca(2+) influx through voltage dependent L-type Ca(2+) channels plus Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores mediated by IP(3) receptors and ryanodine receptors. Hyperosmotic stress also increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels, promoted mitochondrial depolarization, reduced intracellular ATP content, and activated the transcriptional factor cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB), determined by increased CREB phosphorylation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Incubation with 1 mM EGTA to decrease extracellular [Ca(2+)] prevented cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by hyperosmotic stress, while overexpression of an adenoviral dominant negative form of CREB abolished the cardioprotection provided by 1 mM EGTA. These results suggest that hyperosmotic stress induced by sorbitol, by increasing Ca(2+) influx and raising intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, activates Ca(2+) release from stores and causes cell death through mitochondrial function collapse. In addition, the present results suggest that the Ca(2+) increase induced by hyperosmotic stress promotes cell survival by recruiting CREB-mediated signaling. Thus, the fate of cardiomyocytes under hyperosmotic stress will depend on the balance between Ca(2+)-induced survival and death pathways. PMID:20454859

  7. Steroid hormone modulation of cAMP production in response to beta adrenergic receptor stimulation in genital tract myocytes.

    PubMed

    DiGiovanni, L; Austin, R; Phillippe, M

    1992-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic receptor stimulation results in smooth muscle relaxation through activation of adenylyl cyclase and subsequent cyclic AMP (cAMP) production. The present study was performed to evaluate the effects of steroid hormones (i.e. testosterone and hydrocortisone) on beta 2-adrenergic receptors and their signal transduction in the DDT1 MF-2 genital tract myocyte. Radioligand binding studies demonstrated that these two steroid hormones produced a 70 to 80% increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in these myocytes. Stimulation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptors with isoproterenol resulted in a significant increase of cAMP in control myocytes; cells treated with testosterone for 24 h demonstrated a comparable response to isoproterenol, whereas hydrocortisone for 24 h resulted in a 50% greater cAMP response. In contrast to the response at 24 h, stimulation of myocytes after testosterone treatment for 48 h resulted in a cAMP response comparable to that seen in response to hydrocortisone at 24 h. Studies performed using theophylline demonstrated similar cAMP responses at 24 h between the control and testosterone-treated myocytes, thereby ruling out the possibility that the delayed increase of the cAMP response after testosterone was caused by stimulation of phosphodiesterase. Direct stimulation with forskolin resulted in greater cAMP production in the testosterone-treated myocytes compared to controls, thereby refuting the possibility that testosterone directly suppresses adenylyl cyclase activity at 24 h. These findings suggest that although both testosterone and hydrocortisone produce a twofold increase in beta 2-adrenergic receptor density in the DDT1 myocytes, beta 2-adrenergic receptors expressed in response to hydrocortisone appear functional at 24 h resulting in increased cAMP production, whereas those expressed in response to testosterone require 48 h to demonstrate increased functional activity.

  8. [Role of "secondary transmitters" in the exocrine function of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Domshke, V; Konturek, S Ia; Domshke, S

    1981-03-01

    In animals, exogenous secretin produces dose--related increases in pancreatic tissue levels of cyclic AMP which are closely correlated with both bicarbonate and cyclic AMP outputs in pancreatic juice. These effects can be augmented by additional administration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as methylxanthines. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) produces similar though less pronounced effects than secretin. Following secretion or VIP the changes in pancreatic tissue cyclic AMP concentrations precede the physiological response, i.e. enhance water and electrolyte secretion. In man, bicarbonate and cyclic AMP concentrations of pure pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic cannulation of Vater's papilla are significantly correlated in response to both secretin and VIP. VIP however, has a lower efficacy and potency relative to secretin. There is no significant correlation between pancreatic juice cyclic GMP and bicarbonate concentrations or outputs. These observations suggest that cyclic AMP plays an important role in mediating the stimulatory effects of secretin and VIP on hydrokinetic pancreatic exocrine function. However, it still remains to be elucidated in which specific way cyclic AMP initiates the secretory process. In principle, the action of cyclic nucleotides on cell function is thought to occur from their ability to activate cyclic nucleotide--dependent protein kinases which in turn are capable of activating enzymes of protein synthesis by phosphorylation (19). With respect to pancreatic secretion, studies of this kind are currently under way.

  9. [Role of "secondary transmitters" in the exocrine function of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Domshke, V; Konturek, S Ia; Domshke, S

    1981-03-01

    In animals, exogenous secretin produces dose--related increases in pancreatic tissue levels of cyclic AMP which are closely correlated with both bicarbonate and cyclic AMP outputs in pancreatic juice. These effects can be augmented by additional administration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as methylxanthines. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) produces similar though less pronounced effects than secretin. Following secretion or VIP the changes in pancreatic tissue cyclic AMP concentrations precede the physiological response, i.e. enhance water and electrolyte secretion. In man, bicarbonate and cyclic AMP concentrations of pure pancreatic juice obtained by endoscopic cannulation of Vater's papilla are significantly correlated in response to both secretin and VIP. VIP however, has a lower efficacy and potency relative to secretin. There is no significant correlation between pancreatic juice cyclic GMP and bicarbonate concentrations or outputs. These observations suggest that cyclic AMP plays an important role in mediating the stimulatory effects of secretin and VIP on hydrokinetic pancreatic exocrine function. However, it still remains to be elucidated in which specific way cyclic AMP initiates the secretory process. In principle, the action of cyclic nucleotides on cell function is thought to occur from their ability to activate cyclic nucleotide--dependent protein kinases which in turn are capable of activating enzymes of protein synthesis by phosphorylation (19). With respect to pancreatic secretion, studies of this kind are currently under way. PMID:6265294

  10. Control of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels by depolarizing agents in fungi.

    PubMed

    Trevillyan, J M; Pall, M L

    1979-05-01

    It has been reported that diverse treatments which depolarize the plasma membrane of Neurospora crassa produce rapid increases in cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels. In the current study, membrane active antibiotics, which are known or putative depolarizing agents, were found to produce similar cyclic AMP increases, not only in N. crassa, but also in the distantly related fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mucor racemosus. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, which have been found to depolarize Neurospora, also produced cyclic AMP increases in all three fungi. The time course of the cyclic AMP response to these various treatments was similar in all three fungi. The fungal studies and studies on depolarized central nervous tissue suggest that cyclic AMP increases may be produced in response to plasma membrane depolarization in diverse eucaryotic cells. A model is proposed for eucaryotic microorganisms in which membrane depolarization serves as a signal of breakdown of the plasma membrane integrity. The subsequent cyclic AMP increase, in turn, may mediate cellular response to help protect the plasma membrane from chemical and mechanical threats to its integrity.

  11. Rigor and Responsiveness in Classroom Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomspon, Jessica; Hagenah, Sara; Kang, Hosun; Stroupe, David; Braaten, Melissa; Colley, Carolyn; Windschitl, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background/Context: There are few examples from classrooms or the literature that provide a clear vision of teaching that simultaneously promotes rigorous disciplinary activity and is responsive to all students. Maintaining rigorous and equitable classroom discourse is a worthy goal, yet there is no clear consensus of how this actually works in a…

  12. Low dielectric response in enzyme active site

    PubMed Central

    Mertz, Edward L.; Krishtalik, Lev I.

    2000-01-01

    The kinetics of charge transfer depend crucially on the dielectric reorganization of the medium. In enzymatic reactions that involve charge transfer, atomic dielectric response of the active site and of its surroundings determines the efficiency of the protein as a catalyst. We report direct spectroscopic measurements of the reorganization energy associated with the dielectric response in the active site of α-chymotrypsin. A chromophoric inhibitor of the enzyme is used as a spectroscopic probe. We find that water strongly affects the dielectric reorganization in the active site of the enzyme in solution. The reorganization energy of the protein matrix in the vicinity of the active site is similar to that of low-polarity solvents. Surprisingly, water exhibits an anomalously high dielectric response that cannot be described in terms of the dielectric continuum theory. As a result, sequestering the active site from the aqueous environment inside low-dielectric enzyme body dramatically reduces the dielectric reorganization. This reduction is particularly important for controlling the rate of enzymatic reactions. PMID:10681440

  13. Cognition-enhancing and neuroprotective activities of the standardized extract of Betula platyphylla bark and its major diarylheptanoids.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Yong; Jeong, Eun Ju; Huh, Jungmoo; Cho, Namki; Kim, Tae Bum; Jeon, Byung Ju; Kim, Seung Hyun; Kim, Hong Pyo; Sung, Sang Hyun

    2012-11-15

    Diarylheptanoids have been the center of the intensive research efforts for Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. The present study aimed to determine the effect of the standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and its major diarylheptanoids in scopolamine-induced amnesic mice through cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation. Oral administration of the standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark (100mg/kg body weight), aceroside VIII (1mg/kg body weight) and platyphylloside (1 or 2mg/kg body weight) significantly ameliorated scopolamine-induced amnesia in passive avoidance test. CREB phosphorylation and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression in the cortex and hippocampus of the scopolamine-treated mice were markedly increased by the treatment of the standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and platyphylloside. The standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and its major diarylheptanoids also significantly protected HT22 cells against neurotoxicity induced by glutamate insult. The standardized extract of B. platyphylla bark and platyphylloside may ameliorate memory deficits by activating the CREB-BDNF pathway and prevent a neurodegeneration by inhibiting neuronal cell death.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to purified muscarinic receptor display agonist-like activity.

    PubMed Central

    Leiber, D; Harbon, S; Guillet, J G; André, C; Strosberg, A D

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody M-35, which immunoprecipitates native calf brain acetylcholine muscarinic receptor, mimics agonist stimulation of the intact guinea pig myometrium: the antibody, just like carbamoylcholine hydrochloride, causes a rise in intracellular cyclic GMP content, an inhibition of cyclic AMP accumulation due to prostacyclin, and induces uterine contractions. Another antibody, M-23, which reacts with the denatured muscarinic receptor, is devoid of agonist-like activity at the cyclic nucleotide level but is still able to induce contractions of both rat and guinea pig myometrium. The cyclic nucleotide changes caused by both carbamoylcholine and antibody M-35 are inhibited by atropine; this antagonist, which blocks carbamoylcholine-mediated contractions, fails however, to prevent contractions induced by antibodies M-35 and M-23. These results suggest that the information necessary to transmit muscarinic signals is entirely contained in the receptor and that ligands only act to trigger the biological response. The data also imply that the muscarinic receptors of the myometrium are coupled to multiple effector systems. PMID:6087318

  15. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. PMID:27472900

  16. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-07-29

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits.

  17. Γ-Ionizing radiation-induced activation of the EGFR-p38/ERK-STAT3/CREB-1-EMT pathway promotes the migration/invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells and is inhibited by podophyllotoxin acetate.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong Hyun; Hong, Wan Gi; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jaeseok; Lee, Eunah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a new intracellular signaling pathway involved in γ-ionizing radiation (IR)-induced migration/invasion and show that podophyllotoxin acetate (PA) inhibits the IR-induced invasion and migration of A549 cells (a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line). Our results revealed that IR increased the invasion/migration of A549 cells, and this effect was decreased by 10 nM PA treatment. PA also inhibited the expressions/activities of matrix metalloprotase (MMP) -2, MMP-9, and vimentin, suggesting that PA could block the IR-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The IR-induced increases in invasion/migration were associated with the activation of EGFR-AKT, and PA inhibited this effect. P38 and p44/42 ERK were also involved in IR-induced invasion/migration, and combined treatments with PA plus inhibitors of each MAPK synergistically blocked this invasion/migration. In terms of transcription factors (TFs), IR-induced increases in cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-1 (CREB-1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) increased invasion/migration and EMT. PA also inhibited these transcription factors and then blocked IR-induced invasion/migration. Collectively, these results indicate that IR induces cancer cell invasion/migration by activating the EGFR-p38/ERK-CREB-1/STAT3-EMT pathway and that PA blocks this pathway to inhibit IR-induced invasion/migration.

  18. Propionate induces the bovine cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Koser, Stephanie L; Donkin, Shawn S

    2016-08-01

    Cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK1) is a critical enzyme within the metabolic networks for gluconeogenesis, hepatic energy metabolism, and tricarboxylic acid cycle function, and is controlled by several transcription factors including hepatic nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α). The primary objective of the present study was to determine whether propionate regulates bovine PCK1 transcription. The second objective was to determine the action of cyclic AMP (cAMP), glucocorticoids, and insulin, hormonal cues known to modulate glucose metabolism, on bovine PCK1 transcriptional activity. The proximal promoter of the bovine PCK1 gene was ligated to a Firefly luciferase reporter and transfected into H4IIE hepatoma cells. Cells were exposed to treatments for 23 h and luciferase activity was determined in cell lysates. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was linearly induced by propionate, and maximally increased 7-fold with 2.5 mM propionate, which was not muted by 100 nM insulin. Activity of the PCK1 promoter was increased 1-fold by either 1.0 mM cAMP or 5.0µM dexamethasone, and 2.2-fold by their combination. Induction by cAMP and dexamethasone was repressed 50% by 100 nM insulin. Propionate, cAMP, and dexamethasone acted synergistically to induce the PCK1 promoter activity. Propionate-responsive regions, identified by 5' deletion analysis, were located between -1,238 and -409 bp and between -85 and +221 bp. Deletions of the core sequences of the 2 putative HNF4α sites decreased the responsiveness to propionate by approximately 40%. These data indicate that propionate regulates its own metabolism through transcriptional stimulation of the bovine PCK1 gene. This induction is mediated, in part, by the 2 putative HNF4α binding sites in the bovine PCK1 promoter. PMID:27289145

  19. Differential expression of adenosine A3 receptors controls adenosine A2A receptor-mediated inhibition of TLR responses in microglia.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, Céline; Zuiderwijk-Sick, Ella A; van Straalen, Linda; de Geus, Eveline D; Boven, Leonie A; Kondova, Ivanela; IJzerman, Ad P; Bajramovic, Jeffrey J

    2009-06-15

    Microglia activation is a prominent feature in many neuroinflammatory disorders. Unrestrained activation can generate a chronic inflammatory environment that might lead to neurodegeneration and autoimmunity. Extracellular adenosine modulates cellular activation through adenosine receptor (ADORA)-mediated signaling. There are four ADORA subtypes that can either increase (A(2A) and A(2B) receptors) or decrease (A(1) and A(3) receptors) intracellular cyclic AMP levels. The expression pattern of the subtypes thus orchestrates the cellular response to extracellular adenosine. We have investigated the expression of ADORA subtypes in unstimulated and TLR-activated primary rhesus monkey microglia. Activation induced an up-regulation of A(2A) and a down-regulation of A(3) receptor (A(3)R) levels. The altered ADORA-expression pattern sensitized microglia to A(2A) receptor (A(2A)R)-mediated inhibition of subsequent TLR-induced cytokine responses. By using combinations of subtype-specific agonists and antagonists, we revealed that in unstimulated microglia, A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling was effectively counteracted by A(3)R-mediated signaling. In activated microglia, the decrease in A(3)R-mediated signaling sensitized them to A(2A)R-mediated inhibitory signaling. We report a differential, activation state-specific expression of ADORA in microglia and uncover a role for A(3)R as dynamically regulated suppressors of A(2A)R-mediated inhibition of TLR-induced responses. This would suggest exploration of combinations of A(2A)R agonists and A(3)R antagonists to dampen microglial activation during chronic neuroinflammatory conditions.

  20. Rapamycin induces mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression through activation of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Jiang, Zhongliang; Ahmad, Nisar; Rosati, Rita; Liu, Yusen; Beuret, Laurent; Monks, Robert; Charron, Jean; Birnbaum, Morris J; Samavati, Lobelia

    2013-11-22

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), also known as dual specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP-1), plays a crucial role in the deactivation of MAPKs. Several drugs with immune-suppressive properties modulate MKP-1 expression as part of their mechanism of action. We investigated the effect of mTOR inhibition through rapamycin and a dual mTOR inhibitor (AZD2014) on MKP-1 expression. Low dose rapamycin led to a rapid activation of both AKT and ERK pathways with a subsequent increase in MKP-1 expression. Rapamycin treatment led to phosphorylation of CREB, transcription factor 1 (ATF1), and ATF2, three transcription factors that bind to the cyclic AMP-responsive elements on the Mkp-1 promoter. Inhibition of either the MEK/ERK or the AKT pathway attenuated rapamycin-mediated MKP-1 induction. AZD2014 did not activate AKT but activated the ERK pathway, leading to a moderate MKP-1 induction. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) derived from wild-type (WT) mice or mice deficient in AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms or BMDM from targeted deficiency in MEK1 and MEK2, we show that rapamycin treatment led to an increased MKP1 expression in BMDM from WT but failed to do so in BMDMs lacking the AKT1 isoform or MEK1 and MEK2. Importantly, rapamycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-mediated p38 activation and decreased nitric oxide and IL-6 production. Our work provides a conceptual framework for the observed immune modulatory effect of mTOR inhibition.

  1. Influenza matrix protein 2 alters CFTR expression and function through its ion channel activity.

    PubMed

    Londino, James D; Lazrak, Ahmed; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Collawn, James F; Noah, James W; Matalon, Sadis

    2013-05-01

    The human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-activated chloride (Cl(-)) channel in the lung epithelium that helps regulate the thickness and composition of the lung epithelial lining fluid. We investigated whether influenza M2 protein, a pH-activated proton (H(+)) channel that traffics to the plasma membrane of infected cells, altered CFTR expression and function. M2 decreased CFTR activity in 1) Xenopus oocytes injected with human CFTR, 2) epithelial cells (HEK-293) stably transfected with CFTR, and 3) human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) expressing native CFTR. This inhibition was partially reversed by an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. Next we investigated whether the M2 inhibition of CFTR activity was due to an increase of secretory organelle pH by M2. Incubation of Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTR with ammonium chloride or concanamycin A, two agents that alkalinize the secretory pathway, inhibited CFTR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of M2- and CFTR-expressing oocytes with the M2 ion channel inhibitor amantadine prevented the loss in CFTR expression and activity; in addition, M2 mutants, lacking the ability to transport H(+), did not alter CFTR activity in Xenopus oocytes and HEK cells. Expression of an M2 mutant retained in the endoplasmic reticulum also failed to alter CFTR activity. In summary, our data show that M2 decreases CFTR activity by increasing secretory organelle pH, which targets CFTR for destruction by the ubiquitin system. Alteration of CFTR activity has important consequences for fluid regulation and may potentially modify the immune response to viral infection.

  2. Influenza matrix protein 2 alters CFTR expression and function through its ion channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Londino, James D.; Lazrak, Ahmed; Jurkuvenaite, Asta; Collawn, James F.; Noah, James W.

    2013-01-01

    The human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cyclic AMP-activated chloride (Cl−) channel in the lung epithelium that helps regulate the thickness and composition of the lung epithelial lining fluid. We investigated whether influenza M2 protein, a pH-activated proton (H+) channel that traffics to the plasma membrane of infected cells, altered CFTR expression and function. M2 decreased CFTR activity in 1) Xenopus oocytes injected with human CFTR, 2) epithelial cells (HEK-293) stably transfected with CFTR, and 3) human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o−) expressing native CFTR. This inhibition was partially reversed by an inhibitor of the ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1. Next we investigated whether the M2 inhibition of CFTR activity was due to an increase of secretory organelle pH by M2. Incubation of Xenopus oocytes expressing CFTR with ammonium chloride or concanamycin A, two agents that alkalinize the secretory pathway, inhibited CFTR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment of M2- and CFTR-expressing oocytes with the M2 ion channel inhibitor amantadine prevented the loss in CFTR expression and activity; in addition, M2 mutants, lacking the ability to transport H+, did not alter CFTR activity in Xenopus oocytes and HEK cells. Expression of an M2 mutant retained in the endoplasmic reticulum also failed to alter CFTR activity. In summary, our data show that M2 decreases CFTR activity by increasing secretory organelle pH, which targets CFTR for destruction by the ubiquitin system. Alteration of CFTR activity has important consequences for fluid regulation and may potentially modify the immune response to viral infection. PMID:23457187

  3. Trisomy 21 consistently activates the interferon response

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D; Lewis, Hannah C; Hill, Amanda A; Pandey, Ahwan; Jackson, Leisa P; Cabral, Joseph M; Smith, Keith P; Liggett, L Alexander; Gomez, Eliana B; Galbraith, Matthew D; DeGregori, James; Espinosa, Joaquín M

    2016-01-01

    Although it is clear that trisomy 21 causes Down syndrome, the molecular events acting downstream of the trisomy remain ill defined. Using complementary genomics analyses, we identified the interferon pathway as the major signaling cascade consistently activated by trisomy 21 in human cells. Transcriptome analysis revealed that trisomy 21 activates the interferon transcriptional response in fibroblast and lymphoblastoid cell lines, as well as circulating monocytes and T cells. Trisomy 21 cells show increased induction of interferon-stimulated genes and decreased expression of ribosomal proteins and translation factors. An shRNA screen determined that the interferon-activated kinases JAK1 and TYK2 suppress proliferation of trisomy 21 fibroblasts, and this defect is rescued by pharmacological JAK inhibition. Therefore, we propose that interferon activation, likely via increased gene dosage of the four interferon receptors encoded on chromosome 21, contributes to many of the clinical impacts of trisomy 21, and that interferon antagonists could have therapeutic benefits. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16220.001 PMID:27472900

  4. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  5. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  6. Actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists on CFTR antibody-inhibited β-adrenergic mucin secretion response

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, M M C; Lloyd Mills, C; Dormer, R L; McPherson, M A

    1998-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis gene protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) acts as a chloride channel and is a key regulator of mucin secretion. The mechanism by which 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) corrects the defect in CFTR mediated β-adrenergic stimulation of mucin secretion has not been determined. The present study has investigated the actions of adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists to determine whether ability to stimulate mucin secretion correlates with correction of CFTR antibody inhibited β-adrenergic response and whether excessive cyclic AMP rise is required.CFTR antibodies were introduced into living rat submandibular acini by hypotonic swelling. Following recovery, mucin secretion in response to isoproterenol was measured.The adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, 8 cyclopentyltheophylline (CPT) was a less potent stimulator of mucin secretion than was the A2 receptor antagonist dimethylpropargylxanthine (DMPX). A concentration of CPT close to the Ki for A1 receptor antagonism (10 nM) did not stimulate mucin secretion.DMPX, although a potent stimulator of mucin secretion, did not correct CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion.CPT corrected defective CFTR antibody inhibited mucin secretion at a high (1 mM) concentration, suggesting a mechanism other than adenosine receptor antagonism.DMPX potentiated the isoproterenol induced cyclic AMP rise, whereas CPT did not.Correction of the defective CFTR mucin secretion response did not correlate with ability to stimulate mucin secretion and did not require potentiation of β-adrenergic induced increases in cyclic AMP. This affords real promise for the development of a selective drug treatment for cystic fibrosis. PMID:9831904

  7. Adenosine modulates light responses of rat retinal ganglion cell photoreceptors througha cAMP-mediated pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sodhi, Puneet; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is an established neuromodulator in the mammalian retina, with A1 adenosine receptors being especially prevalent in the innermost ganglion cell layer. Activation of A1 receptors causes inhibition of adenylate cyclase, decreases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA). In this work, our aim was to characterize the effects of adenosine on the light responses of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) and to determine whether these photoreceptors are subject to neuromodulation through intracellular cAMP-related signalling pathways. Using multielectrode array recordings from postnatal and adult rat retinas, we demonstrated that adenosine significantly shortened the duration of ipRGC photoresponses and reduced the number of light-evoked spikes fired by these neurons. The effects were A1 adenosine receptor-mediated, and the expression of this receptor on melanopsin-containing ipRGCs was confirmed by calcium imaging experiments on isolated cells in purified cultures. While inhibition of the cAMP/PKA pathway by adenosine shortened ipRGC light responses, stimulation of this pathway with compounds such as forskolin had the opposite effect and lengthened the duration of ipRGC spiking. Our findings reveal that the modification of ipRGC photoresponses through a cAMP/PKA pathway is a general feature of rat ganglion cell photoreceptors, and this pathway can be inhibited through activation of A1 receptors by adenosine. As adenosine levels in the retina rise at night, adenosinergic modulation of ipRGCs may serve as an internal regulatory mechanism to limit transmission of nocturnal photic signals by ipRGCs to the brain. Targeting retinal A1 adenosine receptors for ipRGC inhibition represents a potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and migraine-associated photophobia. PMID:25038240

  8. Multiple MAPK cascades regulate the transcription of IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kahana-Edwin, Smadar; Stark, Michal; Kassir, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UAS)ru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i) The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs), Com2 and Sko1; (ii) high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii) elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv) the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v) the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis. PMID:24236068

  9. Multiple MAPK Cascades Regulate the Transcription of IME1, the Master Transcriptional Activator of Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kahana-Edwin, Smadar; Stark, Michal; Kassir, Yona

    2013-01-01

    The choice between alternative developmental pathways is primarily controlled at the level of transcription. Induction of meiosis in budding yeasts in response to nutrient levels provides a system to investigate the molecular basis of cellular decision-making. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, entry into meiosis depends on multiple signals converging upon IME1, the master transcriptional activator of meiosis. Here we studied the regulation of the cis-acting regulatory element Upstream Activation Signal (UAS)ru, which resides within the IME1 promoter. Guided by our previous data acquired using a powerful high-throughput screening system, here we provide evidence that UASru is regulated by multiple stimuli that trigger distinct signal transduction pathways as follows: (i) The glucose signal inhibited UASru activity through the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, targeting the transcription factors (TFs), Com2 and Sko1; (ii) high osmolarity activated UASru through the Hog1/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway and its corresponding TF Sko1; (iii) elevated temperature increased the activity of UASru through the cell wall integrity pathway and the TFs Swi4/Mpk1 and Swi4/Mlp1; (iv) the nitrogen source repressed UASru activity through Sum1; and (v) the absence of a nitrogen source was detected and transmitted to UASru by the Kss1 and Fus3 MAPK pathways through their respective downstream TFs, Ste12/Tec1 and Ste12/Ste12 as well as by their regulators Dig1/2. These signaling events were specific to UASru; they did not affect the mating and filamentation response elements that are regulated by MAPK pathways. The complex regulation of UASru through all the known vegetative MAPK pathways is unique to S. cerevisiae and is specific for IME1, likely because it is the master regulator of gametogenesis. PMID:24236068

  10. T3-induced liver AMP-activated protein kinase signaling: Redox dependency and upregulation of downstream targets

    PubMed Central

    Videla, Luis A; Fernández, Virginia; Cornejo, Pamela; Vargas, Romina; Morales, Paula; Ceballo, Juan; Fischer, Alvaro; Escudero, Nicolás; Escobar, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the redox dependency and promotion of downstream targets in thyroid hormone (T3)-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling as cellular energy sensor to limit metabolic stresses in the liver. METHODS: Fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single ip dose of 0.1 mg T3/kg or T3 vehicle (NaOH 0.1 N; controls) and studied at 8 or 24 h after treatment. Separate groups of animals received 500 mg N-acetylcysteine (NAC)/kg or saline ip 30 min prior T3. Measurements included plasma and liver 8-isoprostane and serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels (ELISA), hepatic levels of mRNAs (qPCR), proteins (Western blot), and phosphorylated AMPK (ELISA). RESULTS: T3 upregulates AMPK signaling, including the upstream kinases Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1, with T3-induced reactive oxygen species having a causal role due to its suppression by pretreatment with the antioxidant NAC. Accordingly, AMPK targets acetyl-CoA carboxylase and cyclic AMP response element binding protein are phosphorylated, with the concomitant carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (CPT-1α) activation and higher expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α and that of the fatty acid oxidation (FAO)-related enzymes CPT-1α, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and acyl-CoA thioesterase 2. Under these conditions, T3 induced a significant increase in the serum levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, a surrogate marker for hepatic FAO. CONCLUSION: T3 administration activates liver AMPK signaling in a redox-dependent manner, leading to FAO enhancement as evidenced by the consequent ketogenic response, which may constitute a key molecular mechanism regulating energy dynamics to support T3 preconditioning against ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25516653

  11. Inhibition by trifluoperazine of glycogenolytic effects of phenylephrine, vasopressin, and angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Koide, Y; Kimura, S; Tada, R; Kugai, N; Yamashita, K

    1982-06-01

    The effects of trifluoperazine on the activation of glycogenolysis by various hormones were studied in perfused rat liver. Trifluoperazine significantly inhibited glycogenolytic effect of phenylephrine and angiotensin II by lowering maximal response, and that of vasopressin by shifting the dose-response curve to the right, while alpha-antagonist phentolamine was inhibitory only to phenylephrine. Phosphorylase activation of phenylephrine was inhibited by trifluoperazine in parallel with glycogenolytic response. The increase in 45Ca2+ efflux induced by phenylephrine, angiotensin II, and vasopressin was also inhibited by the agent. These inhibitory effects of trifluoperazine were not related to the change in tissue cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP levels. On the other hand, neither the glycogenolytic effect of glucagon, cyclic AMP, and N6,O2-dibutyryl cyclic AMP nor phosphorylase activation by glucagon was affected by trifluoperazine. Thus, trifluoperazine specifically inhibits the activation of glycogenolysis by Ca2+-dependent hormones.

  12. Modulation of active Ca2+ uptake by the islet-cell endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Colca, J R; Kotagal, N; Lacy, P E; McDaniel, M L

    1983-01-01

    The possible effects of calmodulin and cyclic AMP on active Ca2+ uptake by the islet-cell endoplasmic reticulum were investigated. Neither calmodulin nor cyclic AMP affected the rate of active Ca2+ uptake, or the steady-state filling capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum when measured in the absence of oxalate. Consistent with these results, calmodulin did not activate the Ca2+-stimulated ATPase activity associated with this cell fraction. During the course of these experiments., it was unexpectedly discovered that the rate of Ca2+ uptake, as well as the steady-state Ca2+ filling capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, were markedly increased by unidentified factor(s) in the cytosol. This effect could be demonstrated by reconstitution of the membranes in cytosol, or by direct addition of fresh or dialysed cytosol to the Ca2+ uptake assays. The degree of activation by the cytosol indicates that the endoplasmic reticulum may play a prominent role in controlling beta-cell Ca2+ concentrations and that the unidentified activator(s) present in the cytosol may be involved in regulation of this function. PMID:6307286

  13. Blocking of Exchange Proteins Directly Activated by cAMP Leads to Reduced Replication of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Xinrong; Mei, Feng; Agrawal, Anurodh; Peters, Clarence J.; Ksiazek, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) infections and diseases represents a potential threat for worldwide spread and requires development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we revealed a novel positive function of an exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP 1 (cAMP-1; Epac-1) on MERS-CoV replication. Specifically, we have shown that Epac-specific inhibitor treatment or silencing Epac-1 gene expression rendered cells resistant to viral infection. We believe Epac-1 inhibitors deserve further study as potential therapeutic agents for MERS-CoV infection. PMID:24453361

  14. IP receptor-dependent activation of PPAR{gamma} by stable prostacyclin analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Falcetti, Emilia; Flavell, David M.; Staels, Bart; Tinker, Andrew; Haworth, Sheila G.; Clapp, Lucie H. . E-mail: l.clapp@ucl.ac.uk

    2007-09-07

    Stable prostacyclin analogues can signal through cell surface IP receptors or by ligand binding to nuclear peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). So far these agents have been reported to activate PPAR{alpha} and PPAR{delta} but not PPAR{gamma}. Given PPAR{gamma} agonists and prostacyclin analogues both inhibit cell proliferation, we postulated that the IP receptor might elicit PPAR{gamma} activation. Using a dual luciferase reporter gene assay in HEK-293 cells stably expressing the IP receptor or empty vector, we found that prostacyclin analogues only activated PPAR{gamma} in the presence of the IP receptor. Moreover, the novel IP receptor antagonist, RO1138452, but not inhibitors of the cyclic AMP pathway, prevented activation. Likewise, the anti-proliferative effects of treprostinil observed in IP receptor expressing cells, were partially inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist, GW9662. We conclude that PPAR{gamma} is activated through the IP receptor via a cyclic AMP-independent mechanism and contributes to the anti-growth effects of prostacyclin analogues.

  15. Pancreatic β-cell response to increased metabolic demand and to pharmacologic secretagogues requires EPAC2A.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Jin; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Lee, Suh Eun; Hussain, Mehboob A

    2013-08-01

    Incretin hormone action on β-cells stimulates in parallel two different intracellular cyclic AMP-dependent signaling branches mediated by protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP islet/brain isoform 2A (EPAC2A). Both pathways contribute toward potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, the overall functional role of EPAC2A in β-cells as it relates to in vivo glucose homeostasis remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we have examined in vivo GSIS in global EPAC2A knockout mice. Additionally, we have conducted in vitro studies of GSIS and calcium dynamics in isolated EPAC2A-deficient islets. EPAC2A deficiency does not impact GSIS in mice under basal conditions. However, when mice are exposed to diet-induced insulin resistance, pharmacologic secretagogue stimulation of β-cells with an incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 analog or with a fatty acid receptor 1/G protein-coupled receptor 40 selective activator, EPAC2A is required for the increased β-cell response to secretory demand. Under these circumstances, EPAC2A is required for potentiating the early dynamic increase in islet calcium levels after glucose stimulation, which is reflected in potentiated first-phase insulin secretion. These studies broaden our understanding of EPAC2A function and highlight its significance during increased secretory demand or drive on β-cells. Our findings advance the rationale for developing EPAC2A-selective pharmacologic activators for β-cell-targeted pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes.

  16. Pancreatic β-Cell Response to Increased Metabolic Demand and to Pharmacologic Secretagogues Requires EPAC2A

    PubMed Central

    Song, Woo-Jin; Mondal, Prosenjit; Li, Yuanyuan; Lee, Suh Eun; Hussain, Mehboob A.

    2013-01-01

    Incretin hormone action on β-cells stimulates in parallel two different intracellular cyclic AMP-dependent signaling branches mediated by protein kinase A and exchange protein activated by cAMP islet/brain isoform 2A (EPAC2A). Both pathways contribute toward potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, the overall functional role of EPAC2A in β-cells as it relates to in vivo glucose homeostasis remains incompletely understood. Therefore, we have examined in vivo GSIS in global EPAC2A knockout mice. Additionally, we have conducted in vitro studies of GSIS and calcium dynamics in isolated EPAC2A-deficient islets. EPAC2A deficiency does not impact GSIS in mice under basal conditions. However, when mice are exposed to diet-induced insulin resistance, pharmacologic secretagogue stimulation of β-cells with an incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 analog or with a fatty acid receptor 1/G protein–coupled receptor 40 selective activator, EPAC2A is required for the increased β-cell response to secretory demand. Under these circumstances, EPAC2A is required for potentiating the early dynamic increase in islet calcium levels after glucose stimulation, which is reflected in potentiated first-phase insulin secretion. These studies broaden our understanding of EPAC2A function and highlight its significance during increased secretory demand or drive on β-cells. Our findings advance the rationale for developing EPAC2A-selective pharmacologic activators for β-cell–targeted pharmacotherapy in type 2 diabetes. PMID:23578994

  17. Role of trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192 in the enzymatic and cytotonic activities of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, C C; Messer, R J; Cieplak, W

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies of cholera toxin and Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin have suggested that proteolytic cleavage plays an important role in the expression of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and toxicity. Specifically, several studies have implicated a trypsin-like cleavage at arginine 192, which lies within an exposed region subtended by a disulfide bond in the intact A subunit, in toxicity. To investigate the role of this modification in the enzymatic and cytotonic properties of heat-labile enterotoxin, the response of purified, recombinant A subunit to tryptic activation and the effect of substituting arginine 192 with glycine on the activities of the holotoxin were examined. The recombinant A subunit of heat-labile enterotoxin exhibited significant levels of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity that were only nominally increased (approximately twofold) by prior limited trypsinolysis. The enzymatic activity also did not appear to be affected by auto-ADP-ribosylation that occurs during the high-level synthesis of the recombinant A subunit in E. coli. A mutant form of the holotoxin containing the arginine 192-to-glycine substitution exhibited levels of cytotonic activity for CHO cells that were similar to that of the untreated, wild-type holotoxin but exhibited a marked delay in the ability to increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP in Caco-2 cells. The results indicate that trypsin-like cleavage of the A subunit of E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin at arginine 192 is not requisite to the expression of enzymatic activity by the A subunit and further reveal that this modification, although it enhances the biological and enzymatic activities of the toxin, is not absolutely required for the enterotoxin to elicit cytotonic effects. Images PMID:7927684

  18. Transplantation of Human Pericyte Progenitor Cells Improves the Repair of Infarcted Heart Through Activation of an Angiogenic Program Involving Micro-RNA-132

    PubMed Central

    Katare, Rajesh; Riu, Federica; Mitchell, Kathryn; Gubernator, Miriam; Campagnolo, Paola; Cui, Yuxin; Fortunato, Orazio; Avolio, Elisa; Cesselli, Daniela; Beltrami, Antonio Paolo; Angelini, Gianni; Emanueli, Costanza; Madeddu, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Pericytes are key regulators of vascular maturation, but their value for cardiac repair remains unknown. Objective We investigated the therapeutic activity and mechanistic targets of saphenous vein-derived pericyte progenitor cells (SVPs) in a mouse myocardial infarction (MI) model. Methods and Results SVPs have a low immunogenic profile and are resistant to hypoxia/starvation (H/S). Transplantation of SVPs into the peri-infarct zone of immunodeficient CD1/Foxn-1nu/nu or immunocompetent CD1 mice attenuated left ventricular dilatation and improved ejection fraction compared to vehicle. Moreover, SVPs reduced myocardial scar, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and interstitial fibrosis, improved myocardial blood flow and neovascularization, and attenuated vascular permeability. SVPs secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, angiopoietin-1, and chemokines and induce an endogenous angiocrine response by the host, through recruitment of vascular endothelial growth factor B expressing monocytes. The association of donor- and recipient-derived stimuli activates the proangiogenic and prosurvival Akt/eNOS/Bcl-2 signaling pathway. Moreover, microRNA-132 (miR-132) was constitutively expressed and secreted by SVPs and remarkably upregulated, together with its transcriptional activator cyclic AMP response element-binding protein, on stimulation by H/S or vascular endothelial growth factor B. We next investigated if SVP-secreted miR-132 acts as a paracrine activator of cardiac healing. In vitro studies showed that SVP conditioned medium stimulates endothelial tube formation and reduces myofibroblast differentiation, through inhibition of Ras-GTPase activating protein and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, which are validated miR-132 targets. Furthermore, miR-132 inhibition by antimiR-132 decreased SVP capacity to improve contractility, reparative angiogenesis, and interstitial fibrosis in infarcted hearts. Conclusion SVP transplantation produces long-term improvement of cardiac

  19. G-protein-mediated activation of turkey erythrocyte phospholipase C by beta-adrenergic and P2y-purinergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, C; Downes, C P

    1992-01-01

    Isoprenaline, previously known only to stimulate adenylate cyclase via the stimulatory G-protein, Gs, activates turkey erythrocyte ghost phospholipase C (PLC) in a dose-dependent manner when GTP or guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) is present. The effect is specific in that it is abolished by beta-adrenergic-receptor antagonists. Stimulation of adenosine receptors, which also couple to adenylate cyclase via Gs in turkey erythrocytes, does not activate PLC, indicating that the stimulation observed in the presence of isoprenaline is not due to Gs activation. Furthermore, the stimulation seen is independent of cyclic AMP production. Purified turkey erythrocyte PLC is activated in an adenosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (ADP[S]; a P2y-purinergic-receptor agonist)- or isoprenaline-regulated manner when reconstituted with turkey erythrocyte ghosts, demonstrating that a single species of PLC effector enzyme can be regulated by both the purinergic and the beta-adrenergic receptor populations present in turkey erythrocyte membranes. Pretreatment of intact turkey erythrocytes with the P2y agonist ADP[S] causes decreased PLC responsiveness of subsequent ghost preparations to ADP[S] stimulation, although responses to isoprenaline are unaffected (homologous desensitization). In contrast, pretreatment of intact erythrocytes with isoprenaline results in heterologous desensitization of both the P2y and the beta-adrenergic receptors. These effects occur at the level of receptor-G-protein coupling, since PLC stimulation by GTP[S] (which directly activates G-proteins) in the absence of agonists is unaffected. PMID:1352448

  20. Angelica sinensis polysaccharides promotes apoptosis in human breast cancer cells via CREB-regulated caspase-3 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wei-Jie; Wang, Sheng; Hu, Zhuang; Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Song, Cai-Juan

    2015-11-20

    Angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) is purified from the fresh roots of Angelica sinensis (AS). This traditional Chinese medicine has been used for thousands of years for treating gynecological diseases and used in functional foods for the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as inflammation and cancer. The antitumor activity of ASP is related to its biological activities, because it suppresses a variety of pro-proliferative or anti-apoptotic factors that are dramatically expressed in cancer cells of given types. In this study, we show that angelica sinensis polysaccharide induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells of T47D over-expressing the Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), inducing apoptosis-related signaling pathway activity. The result also found that ASP caused cell death was linked to caspase activity, accompanied by the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release, and Bax translocation from the cytosol to the mitochondria. We found that ASP significantly affected the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), Bcl-2 Associated X Protein (Bax), Bcl-2, Bcl-xL and apoptotic protease activating facter-1 (Apaf1) protein expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner. DAPI staining and Flow cytometry were used to analyze apoptosis. The nude mice xenograft model was used to evaluate the antitumor effect of ASP in vivo. ASP has profound antitumor effect on T47D cells, probably by inducing apoptosis through CREB signaling pathway. Thus, these results suggest that ASP would be a promising therapeutic agent for breast cancer.

  1. Functional selectivity of muscarinic receptor antagonists for inhibition of M3-mediated phosphoinositide responses in guinea pig urinary bladder and submandibular salivary gland.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Carl P; Gupta, Paul; Napier, Carolyn M; Nahorski, Stefan R; Challiss, R A John

    2004-09-01

    Binding and functional affinities of the muscarinic acetylcholine (mACh) receptor antagonists darifenacin, tolterodine, oxybutynin, and atropine were assessed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human recombinant M2 (CHO-m2) or M3 (CHO-m3) receptors, and in guinea pig bladder and submandibular gland. In [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride binding studies in CHO cells, darifenacin displayed selectivity (14.8-fold) for the M3 versus M2 mACh receptor subtype. Oxybutynin was nonselective, whereas atropine and tolterodine were weakly M2-selective (5.1- and 6.6-fold, respectively). Antagonist functional affinity estimates were determined by the inhibition of agonist-induced [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation in CHO-m3 cells and antagonism of the agonist-induced inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in CHO-m2 cells. Darifenacin was the most M3-selective antagonist (32.4-fold), whereas oxybutynin, atropine, and tolterodine exhibited lesser selectivity. Functional affinity estimates in guinea pig urinary bladder and submandibular salivary gland using indices of phosphoinositide turnover revealed that oxybutynin, darifenacin, and tolterodine each displayed selectivity for the response in the bladder, relative to that seen in the submandibular gland (9.3-, 7.9-, and 7.4-fold, respectively). In contrast, atropine displayed a similar affinity in both tissues. These data demonstrate that in bladder, compared with submandibular gland from a single species, the mACh receptor antagonists darifenacin, tolterodine, and oxybutynin display selectivity to inhibit agonist-mediated phosphoinositide responses. It is proposed that both responses are mediated via M3 mACh receptor activation and that differential functional affinities displayed by some, but not all, antagonists are indicative of the influence of cell background upon the pharmacology of the M3 mACh receptor. PMID:15140916

  2. Solar activity, the QBO, and tropospheric responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, Brian A.; Brown, Geoffrey M.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    1989-01-01

    The suggestion that galactic cosmic rays (GCR) as modulated by the solar wind are the carriers of the component of solar variability that affects weather and climate has been discussed in the literature for 30 years, and there is now a considerable body of evidence that supports it. Variations of GCR occur with the 11 year solar cycle, matching the time scale of recent results for atmospheric variations, as modulated by the quasibiennial oscillation of equatorial stratospheric winds (the QBO). Variations in GCR occur on the time scale of centuries with a well defined peak in the coldest decade of the little ice age. New evidence is presented on the meteorological responses to GCR variations on the time scale of a few days. These responses include changes in the vertical temperature profile in the troposphere and lower stratosphere in the two days following solar flare related high speed plasma streams and associated GCR decreases, and in decreases in Vorticity Area Index (VAI) following Forbush decreases of GCR. The occurrence of correlations of GCR and meteorological responses on all three time scales strengthens the hypothesis of GCR as carriers of solar variability to the lower atmosphere. Both short and long term tropospheric responses are understandable as changes in the intensity of cyclonic storms initiated by mechanisms involving cloud microphysical and cloud electrification processes, due to changes in local ion production from changes in GCR fluxes and other high energy particles in the MeV to low GeV range. The nature of these mechanisms remains undetermined. Possible stratospheric wind (particularly QBO) effects on the transport of HNO3 and other constituents incorporated in cluster ions and possible condensation and freezing nuclei are considered as relevant to the long term variations.

  3. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    PubMed Central

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  4. Phosphorylation within the transactivation domain of adenovirus E1A protein by mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates expression of early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Whalen, A; Ahn, N G; Ricciardi, R P; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    A critical role of the 289-residue (289R) E1A protein of human adenovirus type 5 during productive infection is to transactivate expression of all early viral transcription. Sequences within and proximal to conserved region 3 (CR3) promote expression of these viral genes through interactions with a variety of transcription factors requiring the zinc binding motif in CR3 and in some cases a region at the carboxy-terminal end of CR3, including residues 183 to 188. It is known that 3',5' cyclic AMP (cAMP) reduces the level of phosphorylation of the 289R E1A protein through the activation of protein phosphatase 2A by the E4orf4 protein. This study was designed to identify the E1A phosphorylation sites affected by E4orf4 expression and to determine their importance in regulation of E1A activity. We report here that two previously unidentified sites at Ser-185 and Ser-188 are the targets for decreased phosphorylation in response to cAMP. At least one of these sites, presumably Ser-185, is phosphorylated in vitro by purified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and both are hyperphosphorylated in cells which express a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase. Analysis of E1A-mediated transactivation activity indicated that elevated phosphorylation at these sites increased expression of the E4 promoter but not that of E3. We have recently shown that one or more E4 products induce cell death due to p53-independent apoptosis, and thus it seems likely that one role of the E4orf4 protein is to limit production of toxic E4 products by limiting expression of the E4 promoter. PMID:9094626

  5. Soluble factors released by Toxoplasma gondii-infected astrocytes down-modulate nitric oxide production by gamma interferon-activated microglia and prevent neuronal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Rozenfeld, Claudia; Martinez, Rodrigo; Figueiredo, Rodrigo T; Bozza, Marcelo T; Lima, Flávia R S; Pires, Ana Lúcia; Silva, Patrícia M; Bonomo, Adriana; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; De Souza, Wanderley; Moura-Neto, Vivaldo

    2003-04-01

    The maintenance of a benign chronic Toxoplasma gondii infection is mainly dependent on the persistent presence of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) in the central nervous system (CNS). However, IFN-gamma-activated microglia are paradoxically involved in parasitism control and in tissue damage during a broad range of CNS pathologies. In this way, nitric oxide (NO), the main toxic metabolite produced by IFN-gamma-activated microglia, may cause neuronal injury during T. gondii infection. Despite the potential NO toxicity, neurodegeneration is not a common finding during chronic T. gondii infection. In this work, we describe a significant down-modulation of NO production by IFN-gamma-activated microglia in the presence of conditioned medium of T. gondii-infected astrocytes (CMi). The inhibition of NO production was paralleled with recovery of neurite outgrowth when neurons were cocultured with IFN-gamma-activated microglia in the presence of CMi. Moreover, the modulation of NO secretion and the neuroprotective effect were shown to be dependent on prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) production by T. gondii-infected astrocytes and autocrine secretion of interleukin-10 (IL-10) by microglia. These events were partially eliminated when infected astrocytes were treated with aspirin and cocultures were treated with anti-IL-10 neutralizing antibodies and RP-8-Br cyclic AMP (cAMP), a protein kinase A inhibitor. Further, the modulatory effects of CMi were mimicked by the presence of exogenous PGE(2) and by forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator. Altogether, these data point to a T. gondii-triggered regulatory mechanism involving PGE(2) secretion by astrocytes and cAMP-dependent IL-10 secretion by microglia. This may reduce host tissue inflammation, thus avoiding neuron damage during an established Th1 protective immune response. PMID:12654825

  6. Fibroblasts contracting collagen matrices form transient plasma membrane passages through which the cells take up fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran and Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Y C; Ho, C H; Grinnell, F

    1997-01-01

    When fibroblasts contract collagen matrices, the cells activate a Ca(2+)-dependent cyclic AMP signaling pathway. We have found that contraction also stimulates uptake of fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran molecules from the medium. Our results indicate that fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran enters directly into the cell cytoplasm through 3- to 5-nm plasma membrane passages. These passages, which reseal in less than 5 s in the presence of divalent cations, also are likely sites of Ca2+ uptake during contraction and the first step in contraction-activated cyclic AMP signaling. The formation of plasma membrane passages during fibroblast contraction may reflect a general cellular response to rapid mechanical changes. Images PMID:9017595

  7. Ionospheric Response Due to Seismic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Signatures of the seismic activity in the ionospheric F2 region have been studied by analyzing the measurement of electron and ion temperatures during the occurrence of earthquake. The ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data recorded by the RPA payload aboard the Indian SROSS-C2 satellite during the period from January 1995 to December 2000 were used for the altitude range 430-630 km over Indian region. The normal day's electron and ion temperatures have been compared to the temperatures recorded during the seismic activity. The details of seismic events were obtained from USGS earthquake data information website. It has been found that the average electron temperature is enhanced during the occurrence of earthquakes by 1.2 to 1.5 times and this enhancement was for ion temperature ranging from 1.1to 1.3 times over the normal day's average temperatures. The above careful quantitative analysis of ionospheric electron and ion temperatures data shows the consistent enhancement in the ionospheric electron and ion temperatures. It is expected that the seismogenic vertical electrical field propagates up to the ionospheric heights and induces Joule heating that may cause the enhancement in ionospheric temperatures.

  8. Ricinoleic acid stimulation of active anion secretion in colonic mucosa of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Racusen, L C; Binder, H J

    1979-01-01

    Perfusion of the colon with ricinoleic acid produces fluid and electrolyte accumulation. The mechanism of these changes in water and electrolyte movement is uknown. These studies were designed to determine whether ricinoleic acid effects active ion transport across isolated rat colonic mucosa. 0.5 mM Na ricinoleate produced significant increases in potential difference (3.8 +/- 0.5 mV) and short-circuit current (Isc) (99.2 +/- 10.1 muA/cm2). The increases in Isc produced by Na ricinoleate were inhibited by both removal of bicarbonate and chloride and by the presence of theophylline. The hydroxy fatty acid also resulted in a significant decrease in net Na absorption from 4.7 +/- 0.8 to 0.1 +/- 0.7 mueq/h cm2 and reversed net Cl transport from absorption (+ 4.5 +/- 0.9) to secretion (-2.2 +/- mueq/h cm2). In parallel studies 0.5 mM Na ricinoleate increased mucosal cyclic AMP content by 58%. The concentrations of Na ricinoleate required to produce detectable and maximal increases in both Isc and cyclic AMP were the same. These results provide evidence in support of the concept that hydroxy fatty acid-induced fluid and electrolyte accumulation is driven by an active ion secretory process. PMID:220281

  9. P-glycoprotein activity and biological response

    SciTech Connect

    Vaalburg, W. . E-mail: w.vaalburg@pet.umcg.nl; Hendrikse, N.H.; Elsinga, P.H.; Bart, J.; Waarde, A. van

    2005-09-01

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a transmembrane drug efflux pump encoded by the MDR-1 gene in humans. Most likely P-gp protects organs against endogenous and exogenous toxins by extruding toxic compounds such as chemotherapeutics and other drugs. Many drugs are substrates for P-gp. Since P-gp is also expressed in the blood-brain barrier, P-gp substrates reach lower concentrations in the brain than in P-gp-negative tissues. Failure of response to chemotherapy of malignancies can be due to intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Many tumors are multidrug resistant (MDR); resistant to several structurally unrelated chemotherapeutic agents. Several mechanisms are involved in MDR of which P-gp is studied most extensively. P-gp extrudes drugs out of tumor cells resulting in decreased intracellular drug concentrations, leading to the MDR phenotype. Furthermore, the MDR-1 gene exhibits several single nucleotide polymorphisms, some of which result in different transport capabilities. P-gp functionality and the effect of P-gp modulation on the pharmacokinetics of novel and established drugs can be studied in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET) using carbon-11 and fluorine-18-labeled P-gp substrates and modulators. PET may demonstrate the consequences of genetic differences on tissue pharmacokinetics. Inhibitors such as calcium-channel blockers (verapamil), cyclosporin A, ONT-093, and XR9576 can modulate the P-gp functionality. With PET the effect of P-gp modulation on the bioavailability of drugs can be investigated in humans in vivo. PET also allows the measurement of the efficacy of newly developed P-gp modulators.

  10. Motor cortex activity predicts response alternation during sensorimotor decisions

    PubMed Central

    Pape, Anna-Antonia; Siegel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Our actions are constantly guided by decisions based on sensory information. The motor cortex is traditionally viewed as the final output stage in this process, merely executing motor responses based on these decisions. However, it is not clear if, beyond this role, the motor cortex itself impacts response selection. Here, we report activity fluctuations over motor cortex measured using MEG, which are unrelated to choice content and predict responses to a visuomotor task seconds before decisions are made. These fluctuations are strongly influenced by the previous trial's response and predict a tendency to switch between response alternatives for consecutive decisions. This alternation behaviour depends on the size of neural signals still present from the previous response. Our results uncover a response-alternation bias in sensorimotor decision making. Furthermore, they suggest that motor cortex is more than an output stage and instead shapes response selection during sensorimotor decision making. PMID:27713396

  11. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Enhances Neuronal Base Excision Repair via PI3K-AKT-Induced Expression of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yin-Ping; Kuo, Chao-Ying; Chen, Shang-Der

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal-secreted incretin that increases cellular glucose up-take to decrease blood sugar. Recent studies, however, suggest that the function of GLP-1 is not only to decrease blood sugar, but also acts as a neurotrophic factor that plays a role in neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and protects synaptic plasticity and memory formation from effects of β-amyloid. Oxidative DNA damage occurs during normal neuron-activity and in many neurological diseases. Our study describes how GLP-1 affected the ability of neurons to ameliorate oxidative DNA damage. We show that activation of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) protect cortical neurons from menadione induced oxidative DNA damage via a signaling pathway involving enhanced DNA repair. GLP-1 stimulates DNA repair by activating the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) which, consequently, induces the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a key enzyme in the base excision DNA repair (BER) pathway. In this study, APE1 expression was down-regulated as a consequence phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) suppression by the inhibitor LY294002, but not by the suppression of MEK activity. Ischemic stroke is typically caused by overwhelming oxidative-stress in brain cells. Administration of exentin-4, an analogue of GLP-1, efficiently enhanced DNA repair in brain cells of ischemic stroke rats. Our study suggests that a new function of GLP-1 is to elevate DNA repair by inducing the expression of the DNA repair protein APE1. PMID:27698937

  12. Activation of GLP-1 Receptor Enhances Neuronal Base Excision Repair via PI3K-AKT-Induced Expression of Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease 1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenq-Lin; Chen, Wei-Yu; Chen, Yin-Ping; Kuo, Chao-Ying; Chen, Shang-Der

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal-secreted incretin that increases cellular glucose up-take to decrease blood sugar. Recent studies, however, suggest that the function of GLP-1 is not only to decrease blood sugar, but also acts as a neurotrophic factor that plays a role in neuronal survival, neurite outgrowth, and protects synaptic plasticity and memory formation from effects of β-amyloid. Oxidative DNA damage occurs during normal neuron-activity and in many neurological diseases. Our study describes how GLP-1 affected the ability of neurons to ameliorate oxidative DNA damage. We show that activation of GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) protect cortical neurons from menadione induced oxidative DNA damage via a signaling pathway involving enhanced DNA repair. GLP-1 stimulates DNA repair by activating the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) which, consequently, induces the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), a key enzyme in the base excision DNA repair (BER) pathway. In this study, APE1 expression was down-regulated as a consequence phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) suppression by the inhibitor LY294002, but not by the suppression of MEK activity. Ischemic stroke is typically caused by overwhelming oxidative-stress in brain cells. Administration of exentin-4, an analogue of GLP-1, efficiently enhanced DNA repair in brain cells of ischemic stroke rats. Our study suggests that a new function of GLP-1 is to elevate DNA repair by inducing the expression of the DNA repair protein APE1.

  13. Pythium infection activates conserved plant defense responses in mosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens (P. patens) is a useful model to study abiotic stress responses since it is highly tolerant to drought, salt and osmotic stress. However, little is known about the defense mechanisms activated in this moss after pathogen assault. Here the induction of defense responses...

  14. [Individual response to treatments using Teuscher activator].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, I L; Lagerström, L O

    1991-12-01

    Variations in facial growth and dentoalveolar development were studied in a group of 40 patients treated with the Teuscher appliance, a functional appliance which is a combination of an activator and a high-pull headgear. Patients were selected for this study on the basis of an initial Class II Division 1 malocclusion and on being consecutively treated with this appliance. The results showed that in 80% of the patients the maxilla either remained unchanged in it's relationship to the anterior cranial base (NSL) or became more retrusive during the treatment period. The mandible in 70% of the patients became more prognathic, only in four cases did the mandible become slightly more retrognathic. The analysis further showed that no statistically significant change occurred in the inclination of the mandible during treatment. Correlation analysis of the association between pretreatment mandibular plane angle and the changes during treatment showed no association. The dentoalveolar changes were characterized by retroclination of the maxillary incisors in 90% of the patients which occurred in spite of the torque springs, intended to maintain the inclination of these teeth. In contrast, the mandibular incisors on average showed no statistically significant change during treatment. This may be attributed to the capping of these teeth. Analysis of the association between the pretreatment inclination and the change during treatment of the mandibular incisors showed an inverse relationship. Mandibular incisors, that initially were proclined, tended to become more upright which is in contrast to previous studies indicating that functional appliance treatment generally increases the inclination of these teeth. The results of this study suggest that the correction of the skeletal component of the Class II malocclusion with the Teuscher appliance in most instances takes place by restriction of forward development of the maxilla in combination with downward-forward growth of the

  15. Ginger improves cognitive function via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation in the hippocampus of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soonmin; Moon, Minho; Oh, Hyein; Kim, Hyo Geun; Kim, Sun Yeou; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-10-01

    Ginger (the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has been used worldwide for many centuries in cooking and for treatment of several diseases. The main pharmacological properties of ginger include anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antiarthritic, antiemetic and neuroprotective actions. Recent studies demonstrated that ginger significantly enhances cognitive function in various cognitive disorders as well as in healthy brain. However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying the ginger-mediated enhancement of cognition have not yet been studied in normal or diseased brain. In the present study, we assessed the memory-enhancing effects of dried ginger extract (GE) in a model of scopolamine-induced memory deficits and in normal animals by performing a novel object recognition test. We found that GE administration significantly improved the ability of mice to recognize novel objects, indicating improvements in learning and memory. Furthermore, to elucidate the mechanisms of GE-mediated cognitive enhancement, we focused on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced signaling pathways. NGF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that GE administration led to elevated NGF levels in both the mouse hippocampus and rat glioma C6 cells. GE administration also resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as revealed by Western blotting analysis. Neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody inhibited GE-triggered activation of ERK and CREB in the hippocampus. Also, GE treatment significantly increased pre- and postsynaptic markers, synaptophysin and PSD-95, which are related to synapse formation in the brain. These data suggest that GE has a synaptogenic effect via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation, resulting in memory enhancement. PMID:25049196

  16. Ginger improves cognitive function via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation in the hippocampus of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Lim, Soonmin; Moon, Minho; Oh, Hyein; Kim, Hyo Geun; Kim, Sun Yeou; Oh, Myung Sook

    2014-10-01

    Ginger (the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has been used worldwide for many centuries in cooking and for treatment of several diseases. The main pharmacological properties of ginger include anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycemic, antiarthritic, antiemetic and neuroprotective actions. Recent studies demonstrated that ginger significantly enhances cognitive function in various cognitive disorders as well as in healthy brain. However, the biochemical mechanisms underlying the ginger-mediated enhancement of cognition have not yet been studied in normal or diseased brain. In the present study, we assessed the memory-enhancing effects of dried ginger extract (GE) in a model of scopolamine-induced memory deficits and in normal animals by performing a novel object recognition test. We found that GE administration significantly improved the ability of mice to recognize novel objects, indicating improvements in learning and memory. Furthermore, to elucidate the mechanisms of GE-mediated cognitive enhancement, we focused on nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced signaling pathways. NGF enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis revealed that GE administration led to elevated NGF levels in both the mouse hippocampus and rat glioma C6 cells. GE administration also resulted in phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), as revealed by Western blotting analysis. Neutralization of NGF with a specific NGF antibody inhibited GE-triggered activation of ERK and CREB in the hippocampus. Also, GE treatment significantly increased pre- and postsynaptic markers, synaptophysin and PSD-95, which are related to synapse formation in the brain. These data suggest that GE has a synaptogenic effect via NGF-induced ERK/CREB activation, resulting in memory enhancement.

  17. Responsibility for children's physical activity: parental, child, and teacher perspectives.

    PubMed

    Cox, Michele; Schofield, Grant; Kolt, Gregory S

    2010-01-01

    Some large-scale child physical activity campaigns have focused on the concept of responsibility, however, there are no measures which establish a link between responsible behavior and physical activity levels. To provide the basis of information required for the development of relevant measurement tools, this study examined the meaning of personal, parental, and third party responsibility for children's physical activity. Eight focus groups, comprising children aged 11-12 yrs, their parents, and teachers from two upper primary schools in Auckland, New Zealand, were conducted. Children (four groups; n=32), their parents (two groups; n=13), and teachers (two groups; n=15) were separated by socio-economic status, and children also by gender. The transcripts from the focus group interviews were then analysed using thematic induction methodology. Across the groups, participants commonly identified a number of behaviors that they felt were indicative of personal, parental, and third party responsibility for children's physical activity. These behaviors formed natural groups with common themes (e.g., self-management, safety), which in most cases were not impacted on by socio-economic status or gender. Responsibility was therefore found to be a concept that could be related to children's physical activity. It was suggested that these behaviors could be used as a starting point in understanding the relationship between responsibility and physical activity, and to assist with the development of measurement tools assessing the relationship between responsibility and levels of physical activity in the future. In turn, this may lead to the development of more targeted messages for large-scale physical activity campaigns.

  18. The neurophysiology of response competition: motor cortex activation and inhibition following subliminal response priming.

    PubMed

    Praamstra, Peter; Seiss, Ellen

    2005-03-01

    Some widely used tasks in cognitive neuroscience depend on the induction of a response conflict between choice alternatives, involving partial activation of the incorrect response before the correct response is emitted. Although such ''conflict tasks'' are often used to investigate frontal-lobe-based conflict-monitoring processes, it is not known how response competition evolves in the motor cortex. To investigate the dynamics of motor cortex activation during response competition, we used a subliminal priming task that induced response competition while bypassing pre-response stage processing conflict. Analyses of movement-related EEG potentials supported an interaction between competing responses characterized by reciprocal inhibition. Inhibitory interactions between response channels contribute to the resolution of response conflict. However, the reciprocal inhibition at motor cortex level seemed to operate independent of higher level conflict-monitoring processes, which were relatively insensitive to response conflict induced by subliminal priming. These results elucidate how response conflict causes interference as well as the conditions under which frontal-lobe-based interference control processes are engaged.

  19. cAMP-responsive element binding protein mediates a cGMP/protein kinase G-dependent anti-apoptotic signal induced by nitric oxide in retinal neuro-glial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagai-Kusuhara, Azusa; Nakamura, Makoto; Mukuno, Hirokazu; Kanamori, Akiyasu; Negi, Akira; Seigel, Gail M

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is cytoprotective to certain types of neuronal cells. The neuroprotective ability of NO in the retina was reportedly mediated by the cyclic GMP (cGMP) to protein kinase G (PKG) pathway. Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) plays an essential role in the NO/cGMP/PKG-mediated survival of rat cerebellar granule cells. We tested whether CREB transduces the NO/cGMP/PKG anti-apoptotic cascade in R28 neuro-glial progenitor cells. Apoptosis was induced in R28 cells by serum deprivation for 24 h. Varying concentrations of two NO donors, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nipradilol, were added to medium with or without an NO scavenger, a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, or a PKG inhibitor. The cells were immunostained against activated caspase-3 and counterstained with Hoechst 33258. Apoptosis was quantified by counting activated caspase-3 positive or pyknotic cells. SNP and nipradilol rescued R28 cells from apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, at an optimal concentration of 1.0 microM and 10 microM, respectively. Higher concentrations were cytotoxic. The NO scavenger and the inhibitors decreased the anti-apoptotic effect of the NO donors. Intracellular cGMP levels were increased after exposure to SNP and nipradilol. Western blotting showed that both NO donors increased CREB phosphorylation, which was blocked when pre-exposed to the inhibitors. Transfection with a dominant negative CREB construct defective of phosphorylation at Ser-133 interfered with the anti-apoptotic activity of SNP. These results indicate that CREB at least in part mediates the cGMP/PKG-dependent anti-apoptotic signal induced by NO in R28 cells. PMID:17081519

  20. Rho5p is involved in mediating the osmotic stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and its activity is regulated via Msi1p and Npr1p by phosphorylation and ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Annan, Robert B; Wu, Cunle; Waller, Daniel D; Whiteway, Malcolm; Thomas, David Y

    2008-09-01

    Small GTPases of the Rho family act as molecular switches, and modulation of the GTP-bound state of Rho proteins is a well-characterized means of regulating their signaling activity in vivo. In contrast, the regulation of Rho-type GTPases by posttranslational modifications is poorly understood. Here, we present evidence of the control of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rho-type GTPase Rho5p by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Rho5p binds to Ste50p, and the expression of the activated RHO5(Q91H) allele in an Deltaste50 strain is lethal under conditions of osmotic stress. An overexpression screen identified RGD2 and MSI1 as being high-copy suppressors of the osmotic sensitivity of this lethality. Rgd2p had been identified as being a possible Rho5p GTPase-activating protein based on an in vitro assay; this result supports its function as a regulator of Rho5p activity in vivo. MSI1 was previously identified as being a suppressor of hyperactive Ras/cyclic AMP signaling, where it antagonizes Npr1p kinase activity and promotes ubiquitination. Here, we show that Msi1p also acts via Npr1p to suppress activated Rho5p signaling. Rho5p is ubiquitinated, and its expression is lethal in a strain that is compromised for proteasome activity. These data identify Rho5p as being a target of Msi1p/Npr1p regulation and describe a regulatory circuit involving phosphorylation and ubiquitination. PMID:18621925

  1. Mechanism of catabolite repression of tryptophanase synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Isaacs, H; Chao, D; Yanofsky, C; Saier, M H

    1994-08-01

    Repression of tryptophanase (tryptophan indole-lyase) by glucose and its non-metabolizable analogue methyl alpha-glucoside has been studied employing a series of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli lacking cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase and altered for two of the proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), Enzyme I and Enzyme IIAGlc. Basal activity of tryptophanase was depressed mildly by inclusion of glucose in the growth medium, but inducible tryptophanase synthesis was subject to strong glucose repression in the parental strain, which exhibited normal PTS enzyme activities. Methyl alpha-glucoside was without effect in this strain. Loss of Enzyme I decreased sensitivity to repression by glucose but enhanced sensitivity to repression by methyl alpha-glucoside. Loss of Enzyme IIAGlc activity largely abolished repression by methyl alpha-glucoside but had a less severe effect on glucose repression. The repressive effects of both sugars were fully reversed by inclusion of cyclic AMP in the growth medium. Tryptophan uptake under the same conditions was inhibited weakly by glucose and more strongly by methyl alpha-glucoside in the parental strain. Inhibition by both sugars was alleviated by partial loss of Enzyme I. Inhibition by methyl alpha-glucoside appeared to be largely due to energy competition and was not responsible for repression of tryptophanase synthesis. Measurement of net production of cyclic AMP as well as intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP revealed a good correlation with intensity of repression. The results suggest that while basal tryptophanase synthesis is relatively insensitive to catabolite repression, inducible synthesis is subject to strong repression by two distinct mechanisms, one dependent on enzyme IIAGlc of the PTS and the other independent of this protein. Both mechanisms are attributable to depressed rates of cyclic AMP synthesis. No evidence for a cyclic-AMP-independent mechanism of catabolite

  2. Participation in Peer Response as Activity: An Examination of Peer Response Stances from an Activity Theory Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Wei; Mitchell, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports a case study that examined English as a Second Language students' peer response stances from an activity theory perspective. More specifically, the study was guided by the constructs of activity and motive/object in Leont'ev's theory. Multiple sources of data were collected from two native Spanish-speaking students enrolled in…

  3. Topiramate protects against glutamate excitotoxicity via activating BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway in rodent hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-Yuan; Cao, Yong-Gang; Ji, Zhong; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Liu, Zhao-Qian; Sun, Hong-Li

    2015-07-01

    Topiramate (TPM) was previously found to have neuroprotection against neuronal injury in epileptic and ischemic models. However, whether TPM protects against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons is elusive. Our present work aimed to evaluate the protective effect of TPM against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal neurons and further figure out the potential molecular mechanisms. The in vitro glutamate excitotoxic model was prepared with 125μM glutamate for 20min. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) analysis and Hoechst 33342 staining were conducted to detect neuronal survival. The protein expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK), cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB), Bcl-2, Bax and β-actin were detected via Western blot assay. Our results demonstrated that TPM protected hippocampal neurons from glutamate toxicity. Meanwhile, the pretreatment of TPM for 10min significantly prevented the down-regulation of BDNF and the phosphorylation of TrkB. Furthermore, the elevation of phosphorylated EKR expression was significantly inhibited after blockade of TrkB by TrkB IgG, while no alterations of phosphorylated JNK and p38 MAPK were found in the cultured hippocampal neurons. Besides, it was also found that the enhanced phosphorylation of CREB was evidently reversed under excitotoxic conditions after treating with U0126 (the selective inhibitor of ERK). The protein level of Bcl-2 was also observed to be remarkably increased after TPM treatment. In conclusion, these findings implicate that TPM exerts neuroprotective effects against glutamate excitotoxicity in hippocampal neurons and its protection may be modulated through BDNF/TrkB-dependent ERK pathway.

  4. Viral and Cellular Genomes Activate Distinct DNA Damage Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Govind A.; O’Shea, Clodagh C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In response to cellular genome breaks, MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 (MRN) activates a global ATM DNA damage response (DDR) that prevents cellular replication. Here we show that MRN-ATM also has critical functions in defending the cell against DNA viruses. We reveal temporally distinct responses to adenovirus genomes: a critical MRN-ATM DDR that must be inactivated by E1B-55K/E4-ORF3 viral oncoproteins and a global MRN independent ATM DDR to viral nuclear domains that does not impact viral replication. We show that MRN binds to adenovirus genomes and activates a localized ATM response that specifically prevents viral DNA replication. In contrast to chromosomal breaks, ATM activation is not amplified by H2AX across megabases of chromatin to induce global signaling and replicative arrest. Thus, γH2AX foci discriminate ‘self’ and ‘non-self’ genomes and determine if a localized anti-viral or global ATM response is appropriate. This provides an elegant mechanism to neutralize viral genomes without jeopardizing cellular viability. PMID:26317467

  5. Circulatory response and autonomic nervous activity during gum chewing.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoko; Sakagami, Joe; Ono, Takahiro; Hori, Kazuhiro; Zhang, Min; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2009-08-01

    Mastication has been proven to enhance the systemic circulation, with circulatory responses seeming to be largely regulated by autonomic nervous activity via a more complex regulatory system than those of other activities. However, few studies have examined the relationships between changes in autonomic nervous activity and the systemic circulation that are induced by masticatory movement. We investigated changes in the systemic circulation and autonomic nervous activity during gum chewing to clarify the influence of mastication. Electrocardiograms, arterial blood pressure, and masseter electromyograms were taken while chewing gum continuously as indicators of systemic circulation in 10 healthy subjects with normal dentition. Cardiac sympathetic activity and vagus nervous activity, as well as vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity, were evaluated by fluctuation analysis of heart rate and blood pressure. Repeated analysis of variance and multiple comparisons were performed to determine chronological changes in each indicator during gum chewing. Gum chewing increased the heart rate and the mean arterial pressure. Although cardiac sympathetic activity and vagus nervous activity showed significant changes, vasomotor sympathetic nervous activity did not. These results suggest that changes in the autonomic nervous activity of the heart are mainly involved in the enhancement of systemic circulation with gum chewing. This explains some characteristics of autonomic nervous regulation in masticatory movement.

  6. 75 FR 32178 - Agency Information Collection Activities; OMB Responses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; OMB Responses AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for EPA regulations are listed in 40 CFR part 9 and 48 CFR chapter 15. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION...

  7. Educating for Political Activity: A Younger Generational Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mac an Ghaill, Mairtin

    2010-01-01

    This paper is a response to Professor Chitty's "Educational Review" Guest Lecture article, "Educating for political activity". I address the three sections of his paper: a global and national-based politics of war, corporate manipulation and parliamentary scandals. This provides a basis to draw upon empirical material from a recent critical…

  8. Sensorimotor-independent prefrontal activity during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cai, Weidong; Cannistraci, Christopher J; Gore, John C; Leung, Hoi-Chung

    2014-05-01

    A network of brain regions involving the ventral inferior frontal gyrus/anterior insula (vIFG/AI), presupplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and basal ganglia has been implicated in stopping impulsive, unwanted responses. However, whether this network plays an equal role in response inhibition under different sensorimotor contexts has not been tested systematically. Here, we conducted an fMRI experiment using the stop signal task, a sensorimotor task requiring occasional withholding of the planned response upon the presentation of a stop signal. We manipulated both the sensory modality of the stop signal (visual versus auditory) and the motor response modality (hand versus eye). Results showed that the vIFG/AI and the preSMA along with the right middle frontal gyrus were commonly activated in response inhibition across the various sensorimotor conditions. Our findings provide direct evidence for a common role of these frontal areas, but not striatal areas in response inhibition independent of the sensorimotor contexts. Nevertheless, these three frontal regions exhibited different activation patterns during successful and unsuccessful stopping. Together with the existing evidence, we suggest that the vIFG/AI is involved in the early stages of stopping such as triggering the stop process while the preSMA may play a role in regulating other cortical and subcortical regions involved in stopping. PMID:23798325

  9. Phase response curves in the characterization of epileptiform activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez Velazquez, J. L.; Galán, R. F.; Dominguez, L. Garcia; Leshchenko, Y.; Lo, S.; Belkas, J.; Erra, R. Guevara

    2007-12-01

    Coordinated cellular activity is a major characteristic of nervous system function. Coupled oscillator theory offers unique avenues to address cellular coordination phenomena. In this study, we focus on the characterization of the dynamics of epileptiform activity, based on some seizures that manifest themselves with very periodic rhythmic activity, termed absence seizures. Our approach consists in obtaining experimentally the phase response curves (PRCs) in the neocortex and thalamus, and incorporating these PRCs into a model of coupled oscillators. Phase preferences of the stationary states and their stability are determined, and these results from the model are compared with the experimental recordings, and interpreted in physiological terms.

  10. Bacterial lifestyle shapes the regulation of stringent response activation

    PubMed Central

    Boutte, Cara C.; Crosson, Sean

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria inhabit enormously diverse niches and have a correspondingly large array of regulatory mechanisms to adapt to often inhospitable and variable environments. The stringent response allows bacteria to quickly reprogram transcription in response to changes in nutrient availability. Although the proteins controlling this response are conserved in almost all bacterial species, recent work has illuminated considerable diversity in the starvation cues and regulatory mechanisms that activate stringent signaling proteins in bacteria from different environments. In this review we describe the signals and genetic circuitries that control the stringent signaling systems of a copiotroph, a bacteriovore, an oligotroph and a mammalian pathogen – Escherichia coli, Myxococcus xanthus, Caulobacter crescentus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, respectively – and discuss how control of the stringent response in these species is adapted to their particular lifestyles. PMID:23419217

  11. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses.

  12. Anticipating Human Activities Using Object Affordances for Reactive Robotic Response.

    PubMed

    Koppula, Hema S; Saxena, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    An important aspect of human perception is anticipation, which we use extensively in our day-to-day activities when interacting with other humans as well as with our surroundings. Anticipating which activities will a human do next (and how) can enable an assistive robot to plan ahead for reactive responses. Furthermore, anticipation can even improve the detection accuracy of past activities. The challenge, however, is two-fold: We need to capture the rich context for modeling the activities and object affordances, and we need to anticipate the distribution over a large space of future human activities. In this work, we represent each possible future using an anticipatory temporal conditional random field (ATCRF) that models the rich spatial-temporal relations through object affordances. We then consider each ATCRF as a particle and represent the distribution over the potential futures using a set of particles. In extensive evaluation on CAD-120 human activity RGB-D dataset, we first show that anticipation improves the state-of-the-art detection results. We then show that for new subjects (not seen in the training set), we obtain an activity anticipation accuracy (defined as whether one of top three predictions actually happened) of 84.1, 74.4 and 62.2 percent for an anticipation time of 1, 3 and 10 seconds respectively. Finally, we also show a robot using our algorithm for performing a few reactive responses. PMID:26656575

  13. Humpback Dolphin (Genus Sousa) Behavioural Responses to Human Activities.

    PubMed

    Piwetz, Sarah; Lundquist, David; Würsig, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) use shallow, near-shore waters throughout their range. This coastal distribution makes them vulnerable to recreational and commercial disturbances, especially near heavily populated and industrialized areas. Most research focusing on Sousa and human activities has emphasized direct impacts and threats, involving injury and death, with relatively little focus on indirect effects on dolphins, such as changes in behaviour that may lead to deleterious effects. Understanding behaviour is important in resolving human-wildlife conflict and is an important component of conservation. This chapter gives an overview of animal behavioural responses to human activity with examples from diverse taxa; reviews the scientific literature on behavioural responses of humpback dolphins to human activity throughout their range, including marine vessel traffic, dolphin tourism, cetacean-fishery interactions, noise pollution, and habitat alteration; and highlights information and data gaps for future humpback dolphin research to better inform behaviour-based management decisions that contribute to conservation efforts. PMID:26555621

  14. Humpback Dolphin (Genus Sousa) Behavioural Responses to Human Activities.

    PubMed

    Piwetz, Sarah; Lundquist, David; Würsig, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Humpback dolphins (genus Sousa) use shallow, near-shore waters throughout their range. This coastal distribution makes them vulnerable to recreational and commercial disturbances, especially near heavily populated and industrialized areas. Most research focusing on Sousa and human activities has emphasized direct impacts and threats, involving injury and death, with relatively little focus on indirect effects on dolphins, such as changes in behaviour that may lead to deleterious effects. Understanding behaviour is important in resolving human-wildlife conflict and is an important component of conservation. This chapter gives an overview of animal behavioural responses to human activity with examples from diverse taxa; reviews the scientific literature on behavioural responses of humpback dolphins to human activity throughout their range, including marine vessel traffic, dolphin tourism, cetacean-fishery interactions, noise pollution, and habitat alteration; and highlights information and data gaps for future humpback dolphin research to better inform behaviour-based management decisions that contribute to conservation efforts.

  15. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    PubMed

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis.

  16. Nonconscious activation of placebo and nocebo pain responses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Karin B; Kaptchuk, Ted J; Kirsch, Irving; Raicek, Jacqueline; Lindstrom, Kara M; Berna, Chantal; Gollub, Randy L; Ingvar, Martin; Kong, Jian

    2012-09-25

    The dominant theories of human placebo effects rely on a notion that consciously perceptible cues, such as verbal information or distinct stimuli in classical conditioning, provide signals that activate placebo effects. However, growing evidence suggest that behavior can be triggered by stimuli presented outside of conscious awareness. Here, we performed two experiments in which the responses to thermal pain stimuli were assessed. The first experiment assessed whether a conditioning paradigm, using clearly visible cues for high and low pain, could induce placebo and nocebo responses. The second experiment, in a separate group of subjects, assessed whether conditioned placebo and nocebo responses could be triggered in response to nonconscious (masked) exposures to the same cues. A total of 40 healthy volunteers (24 female, mean age 23 y) were investigated in a laboratory setting. Participants rated each pain stimulus on a numeric response scale, ranging from 0 = no pain to 100 = worst imaginable pain. Significant placebo and nocebo effects were found in both experiment 1 (using clearly visible stimuli) and experiment 2 (using nonconscious stimuli), indicating that the mechanisms responsible for placebo and nocebo effects can operate without conscious awareness of the triggering cues. This is a unique experimental verification of the influence of nonconscious conditioned stimuli on placebo/nocebo effects and the results challenge the exclusive role of awareness and conscious cognitions in placebo responses. PMID:23019380

  17. Delphinid behavioral responses to incidental mid-frequency active sonar.

    PubMed

    Henderson, E Elizabeth; Smith, Michael H; Gassmann, Martin; Wiggins, Sean M; Douglas, Annie B; Hildebrand, John A

    2014-10-01

    Opportunistic observations of behavioral responses by delphinids to incidental mid-frequency active (MFA) sonar were recorded in the Southern California Bight from 2004 through 2008 using visual focal follows, static hydrophones, and autonomous recorders. Sound pressure levels were calculated between 2 and 8 kHz. Surface behavioral responses were observed in 26 groups from at least three species of 46 groups out of five species encountered during MFA sonar incidents. Responses included changes in behavioral state or direction of travel, changes in vocalization rates and call intensity, or a lack of vocalizations while MFA sonar occurred. However, 46% of focal groups not exposed to sonar also changed their behavior, and 43% of focal groups exposed to sonar did not change their behavior. Mean peak sound pressure levels when a behavioral response occurred were around 122 dB re: 1 μPa. Acoustic localizations of dolphin groups exhibiting a response gave insight into nighttime movement patterns and provided evidence that impacts of sonar may be mediated by behavioral state. The lack of response in some cases may indicate a tolerance of or habituation to MFA sonar by local populations; however, the responses that occur at lower received levels may point to some sensitization as well.

  18. Characterizing wind turbine system response to lightning activity

    SciTech Connect

    McNiff, B.; LaWhite, N.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01

    A lightning protection research program was instituted by National Renewable Energy Laboratory to minimize lightning damage to wind turbines and to further the understanding of effective damage mitigation techniques. To that end, a test program is under way to observe lightning activity, protection system response, and damage at a wind power plant in the Department of Energy (DOE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Turbine Verification Program. The authors installed Lightning activated surveillance cameras along with a special storm tracking device to observe the activity in the wind plant area. They instrumented the turbines with lightning and ground current detection devices to log direct and indirect strike activity at each unit. They installed a surge monitor on the utility interface to track incoming activity from the transmission lines. Maintenance logs are used to verify damage and determine downtime and repair costs. Actual strikes to turbines were recorded on video and ancillary devices. The test setup and some results are discussed in this paper.

  19. Nimodipine activates TrkB neurotrophin receptors and induces neuroplastic and neuroprotective signaling events in the mouse hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Koskimäki, Janne; Matsui, Nobuaki; Umemori, Juzoh; Rantamäki, Tomi; Castrén, Eero

    2015-03-01

    The L-type calcium channel blocker nimodipine improves clinical outcome produced by delayed cortical ischemia or vasospasm associated with subarachnoid hemorrhage. While vasoactive mechanisms are strongly implicated in these therapeutic actions of nimodipine, we sought to test whether nimodipine might also regulate neurotrophic and neuroplastic signaling events associated with TrkB neurotrophin receptor activation. Adult male mice were acutely treated with vehicle or nimodipine (10 mg/kg, s.c., 1.5 h) after which the phosphorylation states of TrkB, cyclic-AMP response element binding protein (CREB), protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTor) and p70S6 kinase (p70S6k) from prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were assessed. Nimodipine increased the phosphorylation of the TrkB catalytic domain and the phosphoslipase-Cγ1 (PLCγ1) domain, whereas phosphorylation of the TrkB Shc binding site remained unaltered. Nimodipine-induced TrkB phosphorylation was associated with increased phosphorylation levels of Akt and CREB in the prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus whereas phosphorylation of ERK, mTor and p70S6k remained unaltered. Nimodipine-induced TrkB signaling was not associated with changes in BDNF mRNA or protein levels. These nimodipine-induced changes on TrkB signaling mimic those produced by antidepressant drugs and thus propose common mechanisms and long-term functional consequences for the effects of these medications. This work provides a strong basis for investigating the role of TrkB-associated signaling underlying the neuroprotective and neuroplastic effects of nimodipine in translationally relevant animal models of brain trauma or compromised synaptic plasticity.

  20. Amarogentin, a secoiridoid glycoside, abrogates platelet activation through PLC γ 2-PKC and MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Yen, Ting-Lin; Lu, Wan-Jung; Lien, Li-Ming; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Lee, Tzu-Yin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    Amarogentin, an active principle of Gentiana lutea, possess antitumorigenic, antidiabetic, and antioxidative properties. Activation of platelets is associated with intravascular thrombosis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study examined the effects of amarogentin on platelet activation. Amarogentin treatment (15~60  μM) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but not thrombin, arachidonic acid, and U46619. Amarogentin inhibited collagen-induced phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC) γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). It also inhibits in vivo thrombus formation in mice. In addition, neither the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ nor the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 affected the amarogentin-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation, which suggests that amarogentin does not regulate the levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP. In conclusion, amarogentin prevents platelet activation through the inhibition of PLC γ2-PKC cascade and MAPK pathway. Our findings suggest that amarogentin may offer therapeutic potential for preventing or treating thromboembolic disorders.

  1. T-cell activation and early gene response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Wei, Jerry; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    T-cells play a crucial role in canine immunoregulation and defence against invading pathogens. Proliferation is fundamental to T-cell differentiation, homeostasis and immune response. Initiation of proliferation following receptor mediated stimuli requires a temporally programmed gene response that can be identified as immediate-early, mid- and late phases. The immediate-early response genes in T-cell activation engage the cell cycle machinery and promote subsequent gene activation events. Genes involved in this immediate-early response in dogs are yet to be identified. The present study was undertaken to characterise the early T-cell gene response in dogs to improve understanding of the genetic mechanisms regulating immune function. Gene expression profiles were characterised using canine gene expression microarrays and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), and paired samples from eleven dogs. Significant functional annotation clusters were identified following stimulation with phytohemagluttinin (PHA) (5μg/ml), including the Toll-like receptor signaling pathway and phosphorylation pathways. Using strict statistical criteria, 13 individual genes were found to be differentially expressed, nine of which have ontologies that relate to proliferation and cell cycle control. These included, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2/COX2), early growth response 1 (EGR1), growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible gene (GADD45B), phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1), V-FOS FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS), early growth response 2 (EGR2), hemogen (HEMGN), polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) and polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3). Differential gene expression was re-examined using qRT-PCR, which confirmed that EGR1, EGR2, PMAIP1, PTGS2, FOS and GADD45B were significantly upregulated in stimulated cells and ALAS2 downregulated. PTGS2 and EGR1 showed the highest levels of response in these dogs. Both of these genes are involved in cell cycle

  2. Substance P primes lipoteichoic acid- and Pam3CysSerLys4-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating Toll-like receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Tancowny, Brian P; Karpov, Victor; Schleimer, Robert P; Kulka, Marianna

    2010-10-01

    Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide with neuroimmunoregulatory activity that may play a role in susceptibility to infection. Human mast cells, which are important in innate immune responses, were analysed for their responses to pathogen-associated molecules via Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the presence of SP. Human cultured mast cells (LAD2) were activated by SP and TLR ligands including lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Pam3CysSerLys4 (Pam3CSK4) and lipoteichoic acid (LTA), and mast cell leukotriene and chemokine production was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and gene expression by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Mast cell degranulation was determined using a β-hexosaminidase (β-hex) assay. SP treatment of LAD2 up-regulated mRNA for TLR2, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9 while anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) stimulation up-regulated expression of TLR4 only. Flow cytometry and western blot confirmed up-regulation of TLR2 and TLR8. Pretreatment of LAD2 with SP followed by stimulation with Pam3CSK4 or LTA increased production of leukotriene C4 (LTC(4) ) and interleukin (IL)-8 compared with treatment with Pam3CSK4 or LTA alone (>2-fold; P<0·01). SP alone activated 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) nuclear translocation but also augmented Pam3CSK4 and LTA-mediated 5-LO translocation. Pam3CSK4, LPS and LTA did not induce LAD2 degranulation. SP primed LTA and Pam3CSK4-mediated activation of JNK, p38 and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and activated the nuclear translocation of c-Jun, nuclear factor (NF)-κB, activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) and cyclic-AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) transcription factors. Pretreatment with SP followed by LTA stimulation synergistically induced production of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 8 (CXCL8)/IL-8, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2)/monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6 protein. SP primes TLR2-mediated activation of human mast cells by up-regulating TLR expression and

  3. Changes in thyroid peroxidase activity in response to various chemicals.

    PubMed

    Song, Mee; Kim, Youn-Jung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2012-08-01

    Thyroperoxidase (TPO) is a large heme-containing glycoprotein that catalyzes the transfer of iodine to thyroglobulin during thyroid hormone (TH) synthesis. Previously, we established an in vitro assay for TPO activity based on human recombinant TPO (hrTPO) stably transfected into human follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC-238) cells. It is important to determine whether environmental chemicals can disrupt TPO activity because it is an important factor in the TH axis. In this study, we used our assay to examine the changes in TPO activity in response to various chemicals, including benzophenones (BPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and persistent organic pollutants (POPs). Overall, BPs, PAHs, and POPs slightly altered TPO activity at low doses, as compared with the positive controls methimazole (MMI), genistein, and 2,2',4,4'-tetrahydroxy BP. Benzophenone, benzhydrol, 3-methylchloranthracene, pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(e)pyrene, perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and heptachlor decreased TPO activity, while 2,4-dihydroxy BP, 2,2'-dihydroxy-4-methoxy BP, and dibenzo(a,h)anthracene increased TPO activity. From these data, we can predict the disruption of TPO activity by various chemicals as a sensitive TH end point. TPO activity should be considered when enacting measures to regulate environmental exposure to thyroid-disrupting chemicals. PMID:22699773

  4. Response Activation in Overlapping Tasks and the Response-Selection Bottleneck

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Torsten; Fischer, Rico; Stelzel, Christine

    2008-01-01

    The authors investigated the impact of response activation on dual-task performance by presenting a subliminal prime before the stimulus in Task 2 (S2) of a psychological refractory period (PRP) task. Congruence between prime and S2 modulated the reaction times in Task 2 at short stimulus onset asynchrony despite a PRP effect. This Task 2…

  5. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition. PMID:26888566

  6. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  7. Photodynamic therapy for cancer and activation of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT for cancer due to the acute inflammatory response, exposure and presentation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins and other danger signals. Nevertheless effective, powerful tumor-specific immune response in both animal models and also in patients treated with PDT for cancer, is the exception rather than the rule. Research in our laboratory and also in others is geared towards identifying reasons for this sub-optimal immune response and discovering ways of maximizing it. Reasons why the immune response after PDT is less than optimal include the fact that tumor-antigens are considered to be self-like and poorly immunogenic, the tumor-mediated induction of CD4+CD25+foxP3+ regulatory T-cells (T-regs), that are able to inhibit both the priming and the effector phases of the cytotoxic CD8 T-cell anti-tumor response and the defects in dendritic cell maturation, activation and antigen-presentation that may also occur. Alternatively-activated macrophages (M2) have also been implicated. Strategies to overcome these immune escape mechanisms employed by different tumors include combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments such as products obtained from pathogenic microorganisms against which mammals have evolved recognition systems such as PAMPs and toll-like receptors (TLR). This paper will cover the use of CpG oligonucleotides (a TLR9 agonist found in bacterial DNA) to reverse dendritic cell dysfunction and methods to remove the immune suppressor effects of T-regs that are under active study.

  8. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  9. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    PubMed

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  10. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  11. Adrenalectomy mediated alterations in adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    El-Refai, M.; Chan, T.

    1986-05-01

    Adrenalectomy caused a large increase in the number of ..beta..-adrenergic binding sites on liver plasma membranes as measured by /sup 125/I-iodocyanopindolol (22 and 102 fmol/mg protein for control and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats). Concomitantly an increase in the number of binding sites for /sup 3/H-yohimbine was also observed (104 and 175 fmol/mg protein for control and adx membranes). Epinephrine-stimulated increase in cyclic AMP accumulation in isolated hepatocytes were greater in cells from ADX rats. This increase in ..beta..-adrenergic mediated action was much less than what may be expected as a result of the increase in the ..beta..-adrenergic binding in ADX membranes. In addition phenoxybenzamine (10 ..mu..M) further augmented this action of epinephrine in both control and ADX cells. To test the hypothesis that the increase in the number of the inhibitory ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in adrenalectomy is responsible for the muted ..beta..-adrenergic response, the authors injected rats with pertussis toxin (PT). This treatment may cause the in vivo ribosylation of the inhibitory binding protein (Ni). Adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in liver plasma membranes prepared from treated and untreated animals was measured. In contrast with control rats, treatment of ADX rats with PT resulted in a significant increase in the basal activity of AC (5.5 and 7.7 pmol/mg protein/min for untreated and treated rats respectively). Isoproterenol (10 ..mu..M), caused AC activity to increase to 6.5 and 8.4 pmol/mg protein/min for membranes obtained from ADX untreated and ADX treated rats respectively. The ..cap alpha..-adrenergic antagonists had no significant effect on the ..beta..-adrenergic-mediated activation of AC in liver plasma membranes from PT treated control and ADX rats. The authors conclude that the ..beta..-adrenergic activation of AC is attenuated by Ni protein both directly and as a result of activation of ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors.

  12. Spontaneous olfactory receptor neuron activity determines follower cell response properties

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Joby; Dunn, Felice A.; Stopfer, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Noisy or spontaneous activity is common in neural systems and poses a challenge to detecting and discriminating signals. Here we use the locust to answer fundamental questions about noise in the olfactory system: Where does spontaneous activity originate? How is this activity propagated or reduced throughout multiple stages of neural processing? What mechanisms favor the detection of signals despite the presence of spontaneous activity? We found that spontaneous activity long observed in the secondary projection neurons (PNs) originates almost entirely from the primary olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) rather than from spontaneous circuit interactions in the antennal lobe, and that spontaneous activity in ORNs tonically depolarizes the resting membrane potentials of their target PNs and local neurons (LNs), and indirectly tonically depolarizes tertiary Kenyon cells (KCs). However, because these neurons have different response thresholds, in the absence of odor stimulation, ORNs and PNs display a high spontaneous firing rate but KCs are nearly silent. Finally, we used a simulation of the olfactory network to show that discrimination of signal and noise in the KCs is best when threshold levels are set so that baseline activity in PNs persists. Our results show how the olfactory system benefits from making a signal detection decision after a point of maximal information convergence, e.g., after KCs pool inputs from many PNs. PMID:22357872

  13. The cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase RegA critically regulates encystation in social and pathogenic amoebas.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingyou; Schilde, Christina; Birgersson, Elin; Chen, Zhi-hui; McElroy, Stuart; Schaap, Pauline

    2014-02-01

    Amoebas survive environmental stress by differentiating into encapsulated cysts. As cysts, pathogenic amoebas resist antibiotics, which particularly counteracts treatment of vision-destroying Acanthamoeba keratitis. Limited genetic tractability of amoeba pathogens has left their encystation mechanisms unexplored. The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum forms spores in multicellular fruiting bodies to survive starvation, while other dictyostelids, such as Polysphondylium pallidum can additionally encyst as single cells. Sporulation is induced by cAMP acting on PKA, with the cAMP phosphodiesterase RegA critically regulating cAMP levels. We show here that RegA is deeply conserved in social and pathogenic amoebas and that deletion of the RegA gene in P. pallidum causes precocious encystation and prevents cyst germination. We heterologously expressed and characterized Acanthamoeba RegA and performed a compound screen to identify RegA inhibitors. Two effective inhibitors increased cAMP levels and triggered Acanthamoeba encystation. Our results show that RegA critically regulates Amoebozoan encystation and that components of the cAMP signalling pathway could be effective targets for therapeutic intervention with encystation.

  14. Phosphodiesterase 8B and cyclic AMP signaling in the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Leal, Leticia Ferro; Szarek, Eva; Faucz, Fabio; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2015-09-01

    Bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia (BAH) in humans and mice has been recently linked to phosphodiesterase (PDE) 8B (PDE8B) and 11 (PDE11A) defects. These findings have followed the discovery that defects of primary genes of the cyclic monophosphatase (cAMP) signaling pathway, such as guanine nucleotide binding alpha subunit and PRKAR1A, are involved in the pathogenesis of BAH in humans; complete absence of Prkar1a in the adrenal cortex of mice also led to pathology that mimicked the human disease. Here, we review the most recent findings in human and mouse studies on PDE8B, a cAMP-specific PDE that appears to be highly expressed in the adrenal cortex and whose deficiency may underlie predisposition to BAH and possibly other human diseases. PMID:25971952

  15. Regulation of laminin and entactin mRNA levels by retinoic acid and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    SciTech Connect

    Durkin, M.E.; Phillips, S.L.; Carlin, B.E.; Merlie, J.P.; Chung, A.E.

    1986-05-01

    Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP induced F9 embryonal carcinoma cells to differentiate to parietal endoderm; the morphological changes were accompanied by the increased synthesis of the basement membrane glycoproteins laminin and entactin. cDNA clones have been isolated for the A (400 kD), B1 (220 kD), and B2 (205 kD) chains of laminin. Northern blot analysis indicated that the A, B1, and B2 chains were encoded by RNA species of 9.8, 6.0, and 8.0 kb, respectively. The kinetics of induction of the laminin mRNAs were studied by dot-blotting dilutions of RNA extracted from F9 cells cultured in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP for increasing amounts of time and hybridizing to /sup 32/P-labeled recombinant plasmids. Very low levels of the A and B chain RNAs were found in uninduced cells, and a large increase occurred between 48 and 72 hr of growth in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP. A cDNA clone was also obtained for entactin, a 150 kD glycoprotein that forms a complex with laminin. Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP treatment also increased the amount of entactin RNA in F9 cells. These results suggested that a common mechanism may exist for the coordinate regulation of the 4 basement membrane protein genes during differentiation.

  16. Cyclic AMP Affects Oocyte Maturation and Embryo Development in Prepubertal and Adult Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bernal-Ulloa, Sandra Milena; Heinzmann, Julia; Herrmann, Doris; Hadeler, Klaus-Gerd; Aldag, Patrick; Winkler, Sylke; Pache, Dorit; Baulain, Ulrich; Lucas-Hahn, Andrea; Niemann, Heiner

    2016-01-01

    High cAMP levels during in vitro maturation (IVM) have been related to improved blastocyst yields. Here, we employed the cAMP/cGMP modulators, forskolin, IBMX, and cilostamide, during IVM to unravel the role of high cAMP in early embryonic development produced from prepubertal and adult bovine oocytes. Oocytes were collected via transvaginal aspiration and randomly assigned to three experimental groups: TCM24 (24h IVM/control), cAMP30 (2h pre-IVM (forskolin-IBMX), 30h IVM-cilostamide), and DMSO30 (Dimethyl Sulfoxide/vehicle control). After IVM, oocytes were fertilized in vitro and zygotes were cultured in vitro to blastocysts. Meiotic progression, cAMP levels, mRNA abundance of selected genes and DNA methylation were evaluated in oocytes. Blastocysts were used for gene expression or DNA methylation analyses. Blastocysts from the cAMP30 groups were transferred to recipients. The cAMP elevation delayed meiotic progression, but developmental rates were not increased. In immature oocytes, mRNA abundance of PRKACA was higher for cAMP30 protocol and no differences were found for PDE3A, SMAD2, ZAR1, PRDX1 and SLC2A8. EGR1 gene was up-regulated in prepubertal cAMP30 immature oocytes and down-regulated in blastocysts from all in vitro treatments. A similar gene expression profile was observed for DNMT3b, BCL2L1, PRDX1 and SLC2A8 in blastocysts. Satellite DNA methylation profiles were different between prepubertal and adult oocytes and blastocysts derived from the TCM24 and DMSO30 groups. Blastocysts obtained from prepubertal and adult oocytes in the cAMP30 treatment displayed normal methylation profiles and produced offspring. These data indicate that cAMP regulates IVM in prepubertal and adult oocytes in a similar manner, with impact on the establishment of epigenetic marks and acquisition of full developmental competency. PMID:26926596

  17. Cyclic AMP and its functional relationship in Tetrahymena: a comparison between phagocytosis and glucose uptake.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Nagy, S U; Lantos, T

    1978-01-01

    In Tetrahymena, an increase in the level of cAMP is accompanied by an increased phagocytotic rate, whereas increased sugar uptake is parallelled by a decreased cAMP level. The increase in cAMP level seems to be decisive with respect to phagocytosis as a basic phenomenon of life. In the action of epinephrine, however, some mechanism other than cAMP mediation may be involved. Depending on concentration, one hormone may provoke either an increase or a decrease in cAMP level, and this in turn triggers the corresponding function.

  18. Association of the cyclic AMP chemotaxis receptor with the detergent- insoluble cytoskeleton of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of 6-h differentiated Dictyostelium discoideum cells with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 dissolves away membranes and soluble components, as judged by marker enzyme distributions, leaving intact a cytoskeletal residue that contains approximately 10% of the cell protein and 50% of the actin. Nitrobenzooxadiazo-phallacidin staining for F-actin and electron microscopy of detergent-extracted whole-mounts indicate that the cytoskeletons retain the size and shape of intact cells and contain F-actin in cortical meshworks. The cytoskeletons contain little if any remaining membrane material by morphological criteria, and the plasma membrane enzymes cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and alkaline phosphatase are absent from the insoluble residue, which retains only 15% of the membrane concanavalin A-binding glycoproteins. This detergent-insoluble residue retains a specific [3H]cAMP-binding site with the nucleotide specificity, rapid kinetics and approximate affinity of the cAMP receptor on intact cells. Upon detergent extraction of cells, the number of cAMP-binding sites increases 20-70%. The binding site is attached to the insoluble residue whether or not the cAMP receptor is occupied at the time of detergent addition. The pH dependence for recovery of the insoluble cAMP-binding site is much sharper than that on intact cells or membranes with an optimum at pH 6.1. Conditions of pH and ionic composition that lead to disruption of the cytoskeleton upon detergent treatment also result in the loss of cAMP binding. During differentiation, the detergent- insoluble cAMP binding increases in parallel with cell surface cAMP receptors and chemotaxis to cAMP. PMID:6693497

  19. Export of cyclic AMP by avian red cells and inhibition by prostaglandin A/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Heasley, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which PGA/sub 1/ inhibits cAMP export by avian red cells was studied, to provide details on the molecular mechanism of a prostaglandin action and on the process of cAMP export itself. The interaction of PGA/sub 1/ with pigeon red cells is a multi-step process of uptake, metabolism and secretion. (/sup 3/H)PGA rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized (V/sub max/ greater than or equal to 1 nmol/min/10/sup 7/ cells) to a compound (5) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethyl acetate extraction. Chromatographic analyses, amino acid content and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry reveal that the polar metabolite is conjugated with glutathione (PGA/sub 1/-GSH) at C-11 via a thioether bond and is largely (80%) reduced to the C-9 hydroxyl derivative.

  20. Cyclic AMP regulates the biosynthesis of cellobiohydrolase in Cellulomonas flavigena growing in sugar cane bagasse.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Herrera, Jesús Antonio; Pérez-Avalos, Odilia; Salgado, Luis M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa

    2009-10-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena produces a battery of cellulase components that act concertedly to degrade cellulose. The addition of cAMP to repressed C. flavigena cultures released catabolic repression, while addition of cAMP to induced C. flavigena cultures led to a cellobiohydrolase hyperproduction. Exogenous cAMP showed positive regulation on cellobiohydrolase production in C. flavigena grown on sugar cane bagasse. A C. flavigena cellobiohydrolase gene was cloned (named celA), which coded for a 71- kDa enzyme. Upstream, a repressor celR1, identified as a 38 kDa protein, was monitored by use of polyclonal antibodies.

  1. Intracellular calcium measurements with arsenazo III during cyclic AMP injections into molluscan neurons.

    PubMed

    Hockberger, P; Connor, J A

    1983-02-18

    Injections of cyclic adenosine monophosphate into molluscan neurons often produce a transient membrane depolarization. By using the calcium indicator dye arsenazo III, it was found that cyclic nucleotide injections into neurons of Archidoris montereyensis resulted in elevation of internal calcium concentrations. However, this was demonstrated to be a secondary consequence of an induced increase in membrane sodium permeability, and not due to any direct effect of cyclic adenosine monophosphate on cellular calcium influx or internal calcium regulating processes.

  2. The cyclic AMP signaling pathway: Exploring targets for successful drug discovery (Review)

    PubMed Central

    YAN, KUO; GAO, LI-NA; CUI, YUAN-LU; ZHANG, YI; ZHOU, XIN

    2016-01-01

    During development of disease, complex intracellular signaling pathways regulate an intricate series of events, including resistance to external toxins, the secretion of cytokines and the production of pathological phenomena. Adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is a nucleotide that acts as a key second messenger in numerous signal transduction pathways. cAMP regulates various cellular functions, including cell growth and differentiation, gene transcription and protein expression. This review aimed to provide an understanding of the effects of the cAMP signaling pathway and the associated factors on disease occurrence and development by examining the information from a new perspective. These novel insights aimed to promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches and aid in the development of new drugs. PMID:27035868

  3. Placebo-Activated Neural Systems are Linked to Antidepressant Responses

    PubMed Central

    Peciña, Marta; Bohnert, Amy S. B.; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Mickey, Brian J.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2016-01-01

    Importance High placebo responses have been observed across a wide range of pathologies, severely impacting drug development. Objective Here we examined neurochemical mechanisms underlying the formation of placebo effects in patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Participants Thirty-five medication-free MDD patients. Design and Intervention We performed a single-blinded two-week cross-over randomized controlled trial of two identical oral placebos (described as having either “active” or “inactive” fast-acting antidepressant-like effects) followed by a 10-week open-label treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) or in some cases, another agent as clinically indicated. The volunteers were studied with PET and the μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil after each 1-week “inactive” and “active” oral placebo treatment. In addition, 1 mL of isotonic saline was administered intravenously (i.v.) within sight of the volunteer during PET scanning every 4 min over 20 min only after the 1-week active placebo treatment, with instructions that the compound may be associated with the activation of brain systems involved in mood improvement. This challenge stimulus was utilized to test the individual capacity to acutely activate endogenous opioid neurotransmision under expectations of antidepressant effect. Setting A University Health System. Main Outcomes and Measures Changes in depressive symptoms in response to “active” placebo and antidepressant. Baseline and activation measures of MOR binding. Results Higher baseline MOR binding in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was associated with better response to antidepressant treatment (r=0.48; p=0.02). Reductions in depressive symptoms after 1-week of “active” placebo treatment, compared to the “inactive”, were associated with increased placebo-induced μ-opioid neurotransmission in a network of regions implicated in emotion, stress regulation, and the

  4. Identification of cyclic GMP-activated nonselective Ca2+-permeable cation channels and associated CNGC5 and CNGC6 genes in Arabidopsis guard cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Fei; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nishimura, Noriyuki; Ren, Hui-Min; Robert, Nadia; Han, Michelle; Puzõrjova, Irina; Kollist, Hannes; Lee, Stephen; Mori, Izumi; Schroeder, Julian I

    2013-10-01

    Cytosolic Ca(2+) in guard cells plays an important role in stomatal movement responses to environmental stimuli. These cytosolic Ca(2+) increases result from Ca(2+) influx through Ca(2+)-permeable channels in the plasma membrane and Ca(2+) release from intracellular organelles in guard cells. However, the genes encoding defined plasma membrane Ca(2+)-permeable channel activity remain unknown in guard cells and, with some exceptions, largely unknown in higher plant cells. Here, we report the identification of two Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cation channel genes, CNGC5 and CNGC6, that are highly expressed in guard cells. Cytosolic application of cyclic GMP (cGMP) and extracellularly applied membrane-permeable 8-Bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate-cGMP both activated hyperpolarization-induced inward-conducting currents in wild-type guard cells using Mg(2+) as the main charge carrier. The cGMP-activated currents were strongly blocked by lanthanum and gadolinium and also conducted Ba(2+), Ca(2+), and Na(+) ions. cngc5 cngc6 double mutant guard cells exhibited dramatically impaired cGMP-activated currents. In contrast, mutations in CNGC1, CNGC2, and CNGC20 did not disrupt these cGMP-activated currents. The yellow fluorescent protein-CNGC5 and yellow fluorescent protein-CNGC6 proteins localize in the cell periphery. Cyclic AMP activated modest inward currents in both wild-type and cngc5cngc6 mutant guard cells. Moreover, cngc5 cngc6 double mutant guard cells exhibited functional abscisic acid (ABA)-activated hyperpolarization-dependent Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel currents, intact ABA-induced stomatal closing responses, and whole-plant stomatal conductance responses to darkness and changes in CO2 concentration. Furthermore, cGMP-activated currents remained intact in the growth controlled by abscisic acid2 and abscisic acid insensitive1 mutants. This research demonstrates that the CNGC5 and CNGC6 genes encode unique cGMP-activated nonselective Ca(2

  5. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  6. Response of Solar Oscillations to Magnetic Activity in Cycle 24

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, K.; Tripathy, S. C.; Hill, F.

    2015-12-01

    Acoustic mode parameters are generally used to study the variability of the solar interior in response to changing magnetic activity. While oscillation frequencies do vary in phase with the solar activity, the mode amplitudes are anti-correlated. Now, continuous measurements from ground and space allow us study the origin of such variability in detail. Here we use intermediate-dgree mode frequencies computed from a ground-based 6-site network ( GONG), covering almost two solar cycles from the minimum of cycle 23 to the declining phase of cycle 24, to investigate the effect of remarkably low solar activity on the solar oscillations in current cycle and the preceding minimum; is the response of acoustic oscillations to magnetic activity in cycle 24 similar to cycle 23 or there are differences between cycles 23 and 24? In this paper, we analyze results for both solar cycles, and try to understand the origin of similarities/differences between them. We will also compare our findings with the contemporaneous observations from space (SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI).

  7. Cinobufagin Modulates Human Innate Immune Responses and Triggers Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shanshan; Spelmink, Laura; Codemo, Mario; Subramanian, Karthik; Pütsep, Katrin; Henriques-Normark, Birgitta; Olliver, Marie

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Chinese medicine Chan-Su is widely used for treatment of cancer and cardiovascular diseases, but also as a remedy for infections such as furunculosis, tonsillitis and acute pharyngitis. The clinical use of Chan-Su suggests that it has anti-infective effects, however, the mechanism of action is incompletely understood. In particular, the effect on the human immune system is poorly defined. Here, we describe previously unrecognized immunomodulatory activities of cinobufagin (CBG), a major bioactive component of Chan-Su. Using human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs), we show that LPS-induced maturation and production of a number of cytokines was potently inhibited by CBG, which also had a pro-apoptotic effect, associated with activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, CBG triggered caspase-1 activation and significantly enhanced IL-1β production in LPS-stimulated cells. Finally, we demonstrate that CBG upregulates gene expression of the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) hBD-2 and hBD-3 in DCs, and induces secretion of HNP1-3 and hCAP-18/LL-37 from neutrophils, potentiating neutrophil antibacterial activity. Taken together, our data indicate that CBG modulates the inflammatory phenotype of DCs in response to LPS, and triggers an antibacterial innate immune response, thus proposing possible mechanisms for the clinical effects of Chan-Su in anti-infective therapy. PMID:27529866

  8. The effect of age on the renal response to PTH infusion.

    PubMed

    Naafs, M A; Fischer, H R; Koorevaar, G; Hackeng, W H; Schopman, W; Silberbusch, J

    1987-11-01

    The renal responses to PTH infusion were compared in two age groups of healthy subjects. Basal nephrogenous cyclic AMP (NcAMP) was higher (1.68 +/- 0.74 vs. 0.97 +/- 0.50 nmol/dl GF; P less than 0.05) and TmPO4/GFR was lower (0.93 +/- 0.21 vs. 1.16 +/- 0.14 mmol/liter; P less than 0.025) in 10 elderly subjects compared with 12 young adults. Creatinine clearance was decreased in the elderly (84.8 +/- 25.7 vs. 144.7 +/- 43.2 ml/min; P less than 0.005) and serum iPTH tended to be increased (0.15 +/- 0.11 vs. 0.11 +/- 0.03 pmol/liter). Following the infusion of 3 IU bPTH/kg bodyweight, no significant differences in delta NcAMP and delta TmPO4/GFR were seen between the groups. When responses were expressed as percentual change of basal level, elderly subjects showed a % NcAMP of 1831 +/- 1200 which was comparable with 2038 +/- 1503% in young adults. However, the percentual change in TmPO4/GFR was significantly higher in elderly persons (24.2 +/- 11.9 vs. 11.9 +/- 8.0%; P less than 0.01). In young subjects, virtually absent TmPO4/GFR responses were found in 3 cases with a relatively low basal TmPO4/GFR (between 0.92 and 0.98 mmol/liter), but these cases showed normal increases in NcAMP. Elderly subjects retained a considerable delta TmPO4/GFR notwithstanding a basal TmPO4/GFR below 0.92 in seven out of 10 cases. These results confirm the existence of a slight increase in parathyroid activity in the elderly. In addition, they suggest an augmented sensitivity of the renal tubule concerning PO4 reabsorption in elderly subjects. It is speculated that this phenomenon is related to the fall in bone mineral retention in senescence and might reflect a defense mechanism against phosphate overload. PMID:2825933

  9. Sensor web enables rapid response to volcanic activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davies, Ashley G.; Chien, Steve; Wright, Robert; Miklius, Asta; Kyle, Philip R.; Welsh, Matt; Johnson, Jeffrey B.; Tran, Daniel; Schaffer, Steven R.; Sherwood, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Rapid response to the onset of volcanic activity allows for the early assessment of hazard and risk [Tilling, 1989]. Data from remote volcanoes and volcanoes in countries with poor communication infrastructure can only be obtained via remote sensing [Harris et al., 2000]. By linking notifications of activity from ground-based and spacebased systems, these volcanoes can be monitored when they erupt.Over the last 18 months, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has implemented a Volcano Sensor Web (VSW) in which data from ground-based and space-based sensors that detect current volcanic activity are used to automatically trigger the NASA Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft to make highspatial-resolution observations of these volcanoes.

  10. 14-Deoxyandrographolide alleviates ethanol-induced hepatosteatosis through stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Samir; Mukhopadhyay, Sibabrata; Bandhopadhyay, Sukdeb; Sen, Gargi; Biswas, Tuli

    2014-03-01

    Andrographis paniculata (AP) is a traditional medicinal plant of Ayurveda. It grows widely in Asia and is prescribed in the treatment of liver diseases. Here we have investigated the beneficial role of 14-deoxyandrographolide (14-DAG), a bioactive diterpenoid from AP, against alcoholic steatosis in rats. 14-DAG was extracted from aerial parts (leaves and stems) of AP. Rats were fed with ethanol for 8 weeks. Animals were treated with 14-DAG during the last 4 weeks of ethanol treatment. In vitro studies were undertaken in a human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line culture. Hepatosteatosis was assessed from histopathological studies of liver sections. Acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and triglyceride contents were determined using commercially available kits. Fatty acid synthesis was evaluated from incorporation of 1-(14)C acetate.