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Sample records for activates host defense

  1. The Inflammasome in Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Pedra, Joao H.F.

    2010-01-01

    Nod-like receptors have emerged as an important family of sensors in host defense. These receptors are expressed in macrophages, dendritic cells and monocytes and play an important role in microbial immunity. Some Nod-like receptors form the inflammasome, a protein complex that activates caspase-1 in response to several stimuli. Caspase-1 activation leads to processing and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18. Here, we discuss recent advances in the inflammasome field with an emphasis on host defense. We also compare differential requirements for inflammasome activation in dendritic cells, macrophages and monocytes. PMID:22315529

  2. Modulation of host defense peptide-mediated human mast cell activation by LPS

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kshitij; Subramanian, Hariharan; Ali, Hydar

    2016-01-01

    Human β-defensin3 (hBD3) and the cathelicidin LL-37 are host defense peptides (HDPs) that directly kill microbes and display immunomodulatory/wound healing properties via the activation of chemokine, formylpeptide and epidermal growth factor receptors on monocytes and epithelial cells. A C-terminal 14 amino acid hBD3 peptide with all Cys residues replaced with Ser (CHRG01) and an LL-37 peptide consisting of residues 17-29 (FK-13) display antimicrobial activity but lack immunomodulatory property. Surprisingly, we found that CHRG01 and FK-13 caused Ca2+ mobilization and degranulation in human mast cells via a novel G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) known as Mas-related gene-X2 (MrgX2). At local sites of bacterial infection, the negatively charged LPS likely interacts with cationic HDPs to inhibit their activity and thus providing a mechanism for pathogens to escape the host defense mechanisms. We found that LPS caused almost complete inhibition of hBD3 and LL-37-induced Ca2+ mobilization and mast cell degranulation. In contrast, it had no effect on CHRG01 and FK-13-induced mast cell responses. These findings suggest that HDP derivatives that kill microbes, harness mast cell’s host defense and wound healing properties via the activation of MrgX2 but are resistant to inhibition by LPS could be utilized for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant microbial infections. PMID:26511058

  3. Allergic Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Noah W.; Rosenstein, Rachel K.

    2012-01-01

    Allergies are generally thought to be a detrimental outcome of a mistargeted immune response that evolved to provide immunity to macro-parasites. Here we present arguments to suggest that allergic immunity plays an important role in host defense against noxious environmental substances, including venoms, hematophagous fluids, environmental xenobiotics and irritants. We argue that appropriately targeted allergic reactions are beneficial, although they can become detrimental when excessive. Furthermore, we suggest that allergic hypersensitivity evolved to elicit anticipatory responses and to promote avoidance of suboptimal environments. PMID:22538607

  4. Structural determinants of host defense peptides for antimicrobial activity and target cell selectivity.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daisuke; Shukla, Sanjeev K; Prakash, Om; Zhang, Guolong

    2010-09-01

    Antimicrobial host defense peptides (HDPs) are a critical component of the innate immunity with microbicidal, endotoxin-neutralizing, and immunostimulatory properties. HDPs kill bacteria primarily through non-specific membrane lysis, therefore with a less likelihood of provoking resistance. Extensive structure-activity relationship studies with a number of HDPs have revealed that net charge, amphipathicity, hydrophobicity, and structural propensity are among the most important physicochemical and structural parameters that dictate their ability to interact with and disrupt membranes. A delicate balance among these factors, rather than a mere alteration of a single factor, is critically important for HDPs to ensure the antimicrobial potency and target cell selectivity. With a better understanding of the structural determinants of HDPs for their membrane-lytic activities, it is expected that novel HDP-based antimicrobials with minimum toxicity to eukaryotic cells can be developed for resistant infections, which have become a global public health crisis.

  5. Immune regulatory activities of fowlicidin-1, a cathelicidin host defense peptide.

    PubMed

    Bommineni, Yugendar R; Pham, Giang H; Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Achanta, Mallika; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-05-01

    Appropriate modulation of immunity is beneficial in antimicrobial therapy and vaccine development. Host defense peptides (HDPs) constitute critically important components of innate immunity with both antimicrobial and immune regulatory activities. We previously showed that a chicken HDP, namely fowlicidin-1(6-26), has potent antibacterial activities in vitro and in vivo. Here we further revealed that fowl-1(6-26) possesses strong immunomodulatory properties. The peptide is chemotactic specifically to neutrophils, but not monocytes or lymphocytes, after injected into the mouse peritoneum. Fowl-1(6-26) also has the capacity to activate macrophages by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators including IL-1β, CCL2, and CCL3. However, unlike bacterial lipopolysaccharide that triggers massive production of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, fowl-1(6-26) only marginally increased their expression in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. Additionally, fowl-1(6-26) enhanced the surface expression of MHC II and CD86 on RAW264.7 cells, suggesting that it may facilitate development of adaptive immune response. Indeed, co-immunization of mice with chicken ovalbumin (OVA) and fowl-1(6-26) augmented both OVA-specific IgG1 and IgG2a titers, relative to OVA alone. We further showed that fowl-1(6-26) is capable of preventing a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection due to its enhancement of host defense. All mice survived from an otherwise lethal infection when the peptide was administered 1-2 days prior to MRSA infection, and 50% mice were protected if receiving the peptide 4 days before infection. Taken together, with a strong capacity to stimulate innate and adaptive immunity, fowl-1(6-26) may have potential to be developed as a novel antimicrobial and a vaccine adjuvant.

  6. Identification of Synthetic and Natural Host Defense Peptides with Leishmanicidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Marr, A. K.; Cen, S.; Hancock, R. E. W.

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania parasites are a major public health problem worldwide. Effective treatment of leishmaniasis is hampered by the high incidence of adverse effects to traditional drug therapy and the emergence of resistance to current therapeutics. A vaccine is currently not available. Host defense peptides have been investigated as novel therapeutic agents against a wide range of pathogens. Here we demonstrate that the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 and the three synthetic peptides E6, L-1018, and RI-1018 exhibit leishmanicidal activity against promastigotes and intramacrophage amastigotes of Leishmania donovani and Leishmania major. We also report that the Leishmania protease/virulence factor GP63 confers protection to Leishmania from the cytolytic properties of all l-form peptides (E6, L-1018, and LL-37) but not the d-form peptide RI-1018. The results suggest that RI-1018, E6, and LL-37 are promising peptides to develop further into components for antileishmanial therapy. PMID:26883699

  7. Human Macrophage SCN5A Activates an Innate Immune Signaling Pathway for Antiviral Host Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexis; Kainz, Danielle; Khan, Faatima; Lee, Cara; Carrithers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors contain a binding domain for pathogen-associated molecular patterns coupled to a signaling domain that regulates transcription of host immune response genes. Here, a novel mechanism that links pathogen recognition to channel activation and downstream signaling is proposed. We demonstrate that an intracellular sodium channel variant, human macrophage SCN5A, initiates signaling and transcription through a calcium-dependent isoform of adenylate cyclase, ADCY8, and the transcription factor, ATF2. Pharmacological stimulation with a channel agonist or treatment with cytoplasmic poly(I:C), a mimic of viral dsRNA, activates this pathway to regulate expression of SP100-related genes and interferon β. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that the SCN5A variant mediates nonselective outward currents and a small, but detectable, inward current. Intracellular poly(I:C) markedly augments an inward voltage-sensitive sodium current and inhibits the outward nonselective current. These results suggest human macrophage SCN5A initiates signaling in an innate immune pathway relevant to antiviral host defense. It is postulated that SCN5A is a novel pathogen sensor and that this pathway represents a channel activation-dependent mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:25368329

  8. Activity of potent and selective host defense peptide mimetics in mouse models of oral candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Lisa K; Freeman, Katie B; Masso-Silva, Jorge A; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W; Diamond, Gill

    2014-07-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis.

  9. Activity of Potent and Selective Host Defense Peptide Mimetics in Mouse Models of Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Lisa K.; Freeman, Katie B.; Masso-Silva, Jorge A.; Falkovsky, Klaudia; Aloyouny, Ashwag; Markowitz, Kenneth; Hise, Amy G.; Fatahzadeh, Mahnaz; Scott, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong need for new broadly active antifungal agents for the treatment of oral candidiasis that not only are active against many species of Candida, including drug-resistant strains, but also evade microbial countermeasures which may lead to resistance. Host defense peptides (HDPs) can provide a foundation for the development of such agents. Toward this end, we have developed fully synthetic, small-molecule, nonpeptide mimetics of the HDPs that improve safety and other pharmaceutical properties. Here we describe the identification of several HDP mimetics that are broadly active against C. albicans and other species of Candida, rapidly fungicidal, and active against yeast and hyphal cultures and that exhibit low cytotoxicity for mammalian cells. Importantly, specificity for Candida over commensal bacteria was also evident, thereby minimizing potential damage to the endogenous microbiome which otherwise could favor fungal overgrowth. Three compounds were tested as topical agents in two different mouse models of oral candidiasis and were found to be highly active. Following single-dose administrations, total Candida burdens in tongues of infected animals were reduced up to three logs. These studies highlight the potential of HDP mimetics as a new tool in the antifungal arsenal for the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:24752272

  10. NLRP7 and related inflammasome activating pattern recognition receptors and their function in host defense and disease.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; de Almeida, Lucia; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Host defense requires the maturation and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 and the induction of pyroptotic cell death, which depends on the activation of inflammatory Caspases within inflammasomes by innate immune cells. Several cytosolic pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) have been implicated in this process in response to infectious and sterile agonists. Here we summarize the current knowledge on inflammasome-organizing PRRs, emphasizing the recently described NLRP7, and their implications in human disease.

  11. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense.

  12. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  13. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  14. Obligate Biotroph Pathogens of the Genus Albugo Are Better Adapted to Active Host Defense Compared to Niche Competitors.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Jonas; Agler, Matthew T; Placzek, Aleksandra; Kramer, Katharina; Finkemeier, Iris; Kemen, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggested that plants behave differently under combined versus single abiotic and biotic stress conditions in controlled environments. While this work has provided a glimpse into how plants might behave under complex natural conditions, it also highlights the need for field experiments using established model systems. In nature, diverse microbes colonize the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis thaliana, including the obligate biotroph oomycete genus Albugo, causal agent of the common disease white rust. Biotrophic, as well as hemibiotrophic plant pathogens are characterized by efficient suppression of host defense responses. Lab experiments have even shown that Albugo sp. can suppress non-host resistance, thereby enabling otherwise avirulent pathogen growth. We asked how a pathogen that is vitally dependent on a living host can compete in nature for limited niche space while paradoxically enabling colonization of its host plant for competitors? To address this question, we used a proteomics approach to identify differences and similarities between lab and field samples of Albugo sp.-infected and -uninfected A. thaliana plants. We could identify highly similar apoplastic proteomic profiles in both infected and uninfected plants. In wild plants, however, a broad range of defense-related proteins were detected in the apoplast regardless of infection status, while no or low levels of defense-related proteins were detected in lab samples. These results indicate that Albugo sp. do not strongly affect immune responses and leave distinct branches of the immune signaling network intact. To validate our findings and to get mechanistic insights, we tested a panel of A. thaliana mutant plants with induced or compromised immunity for susceptibility to different biotrophic pathogens. Our findings suggest that the biotroph pathogen Albugo selectively interferes with host defense under different environmental and competitive pressures to maintain its ecological niche

  15. Obligate Biotroph Pathogens of the Genus Albugo Are Better Adapted to Active Host Defense Compared to Niche Competitors.

    PubMed

    Ruhe, Jonas; Agler, Matthew T; Placzek, Aleksandra; Kramer, Katharina; Finkemeier, Iris; Kemen, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggested that plants behave differently under combined versus single abiotic and biotic stress conditions in controlled environments. While this work has provided a glimpse into how plants might behave under complex natural conditions, it also highlights the need for field experiments using established model systems. In nature, diverse microbes colonize the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis thaliana, including the obligate biotroph oomycete genus Albugo, causal agent of the common disease white rust. Biotrophic, as well as hemibiotrophic plant pathogens are characterized by efficient suppression of host defense responses. Lab experiments have even shown that Albugo sp. can suppress non-host resistance, thereby enabling otherwise avirulent pathogen growth. We asked how a pathogen that is vitally dependent on a living host can compete in nature for limited niche space while paradoxically enabling colonization of its host plant for competitors? To address this question, we used a proteomics approach to identify differences and similarities between lab and field samples of Albugo sp.-infected and -uninfected A. thaliana plants. We could identify highly similar apoplastic proteomic profiles in both infected and uninfected plants. In wild plants, however, a broad range of defense-related proteins were detected in the apoplast regardless of infection status, while no or low levels of defense-related proteins were detected in lab samples. These results indicate that Albugo sp. do not strongly affect immune responses and leave distinct branches of the immune signaling network intact. To validate our findings and to get mechanistic insights, we tested a panel of A. thaliana mutant plants with induced or compromised immunity for susceptibility to different biotrophic pathogens. Our findings suggest that the biotroph pathogen Albugo selectively interferes with host defense under different environmental and competitive pressures to maintain its ecological niche

  16. Obligate Biotroph Pathogens of the Genus Albugo Are Better Adapted to Active Host Defense Compared to Niche Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Ruhe, Jonas; Agler, Matthew T.; Placzek, Aleksandra; Kramer, Katharina; Finkemeier, Iris; Kemen, Eric M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent research suggested that plants behave differently under combined versus single abiotic and biotic stress conditions in controlled environments. While this work has provided a glimpse into how plants might behave under complex natural conditions, it also highlights the need for field experiments using established model systems. In nature, diverse microbes colonize the phyllosphere of Arabidopsis thaliana, including the obligate biotroph oomycete genus Albugo, causal agent of the common disease white rust. Biotrophic, as well as hemibiotrophic plant pathogens are characterized by efficient suppression of host defense responses. Lab experiments have even shown that Albugo sp. can suppress non-host resistance, thereby enabling otherwise avirulent pathogen growth. We asked how a pathogen that is vitally dependent on a living host can compete in nature for limited niche space while paradoxically enabling colonization of its host plant for competitors? To address this question, we used a proteomics approach to identify differences and similarities between lab and field samples of Albugo sp.-infected and -uninfected A. thaliana plants. We could identify highly similar apoplastic proteomic profiles in both infected and uninfected plants. In wild plants, however, a broad range of defense-related proteins were detected in the apoplast regardless of infection status, while no or low levels of defense-related proteins were detected in lab samples. These results indicate that Albugo sp. do not strongly affect immune responses and leave distinct branches of the immune signaling network intact. To validate our findings and to get mechanistic insights, we tested a panel of A. thaliana mutant plants with induced or compromised immunity for susceptibility to different biotrophic pathogens. Our findings suggest that the biotroph pathogen Albugo selectively interferes with host defense under different environmental and competitive pressures to maintain its ecological niche

  17. Infection of goats with goatpox virus triggers host antiviral defense through activation of innate immune signaling.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Wang, Song; Chi, Xiaojuan; Chen, Shi-long; Huang, Shile; Lin, Qunqun; Xie, Baogui; Chen, Ji-Long

    2016-02-01

    Goatpox, caused by goatpox virus (GTPV), is one of the most serious infectious diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality in goats. However, little is known about involvement of host innate immunity during the GTPV infection. For this, goats were experimentally infected with GTPV. The results showed that GTPV infection significantly induced mRNA expression of type I interferon (IFN)-α and IFN-β in peripheral blood lymphocytes, spleen and lung. In addition, GTPV infection enhanced expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-18; and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Strikingly, infection with GTPV activated signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3), a critical cytokine signaling molecule. Interestingly, the virus infection induced expression of suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)-1. Importantly, the infection resulted in an increased expression of some critical interferon-stimulated genes, such as interferon-induced transmembrane protein (IFITM) 1, IFITM3, interferon stimulated gene (ISG) 15 and ISG20. Furthermore, we found that infection with GTPV up-regulated expression of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 and TLR9. These results revealed that GTPV infection activated host innate immune signaling and thereby triggered antiviral innate immunity. The findings provide novel insights into complex mechanisms underlying GTPV-host interaction and pathogenesis of GTPV. PMID:26850535

  18. Natural History of Innate Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Linde, A; Wachter, B; Höner, O P; Dib, L; Ross, C; Tamayo, A R; Blecha, F; Melgarejo, T

    2009-12-01

    Host defense peptides act on the forefront of innate immunity, thus playing a central role in the survival of animals and plants. Despite vast morphological changes in species through evolutionary history, all animals examined to date share common features in their innate immune defense strategies, hereunder expression of host defense peptides (HDPs). Most studies on HDPs have focused on humans, domestic and laboratory animals. More than a thousand different sequences have been identified, yet data on HDPs in wild-living animals are sparse. The biological functions of HDPs include broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and immunomodulation. Natural selection and coevolutionary host-pathogen arms race theory suggest that the extent and specificity of the microbial load influences the spectrum and potency of HDPs in different species. Individuals of extant species-that have lived for an extended period in evolutionary history amid populations with intact processes of natural selection-likely possess the most powerful and well-adapted "natural antibiotics". Research on the evolutionary history of the innate defense system and the host in context of the consequences of challenges as well as the efficacy of the innate immune system under natural conditions is therefore of immediate interest. This review focuses on evolutionary aspects of immunophysiology, with emphasis on innate effector molecules. Studies on host defense in wild-living animals may significantly enhance our understanding of inborn immune mechanisms, and help identify molecules that may assist us to cope better with the increasing microbial challenges that likely follow from the continuous amplification of biodiversity levels on Earth. PMID:26783164

  19. Fowlicidin-3 is an alpha-helical cationic host defense peptide with potent antibacterial and lipopolysaccharide-neutralizing activities.

    PubMed

    Bommineni, Yugendar R; Dai, Huaien; Gong, Yu-Xi; Soulages, Jose L; Fernando, Samodha C; Desilva, Udaya; Prakash, Om; Zhang, Guolong

    2007-01-01

    Cathelicidins are an important family of cationic host defense peptides in vertebrates with both antimicrobial and immunomodulatory activities. Fowlicidin-1 and fowlicidin-2 are two newly identified chicken cathelicidins with potent antibacterial activities. Here we report structural and functional characterization of the putatively mature form of the third chicken cathelicidin, fowlicidin-3, for exploration of its therapeutic potential. NMR spectroscopy revealed that fowlicidin-3 comprises 27 amino-acid residues and adopts a predominantly alpha-helical structure extending from residue 9 to 25 with a slight kink induced by a glycine at position 17. It is highly potent against a broad range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria in vitro, including antibiotic-resistant strains, with minimum inhibitory concentrations in the range 1-2 microM. It kills bacteria quickly, permeabilizing cytoplasmic membranes immediately on coming into contact with them. Unlike many other host defense peptides with antimicrobial activities that are diminished by serum or salt, fowlicidin-3 retains bacteria-killing activities in the presence of 50% serum or physiological concentrations of salt. Furthermore, it is capable of suppressing lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of proinflammatory genes in mouse macrophage RAW264.7 cells, with nearly complete blockage at 10 microM. Fowlicidin-3 appears to be an excellent candidate for future development as a novel antimicrobial and antisepsis agent, particularly against antibiotic-resistant pathogens.

  20. A Role for Host Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase in Innate Immune Defense against KSHV

    PubMed Central

    Bekerman, Elena; Jeon, Diana; Ardolino, Michele; Coscoy, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is specifically induced in germinal center B cells to carry out somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination, two processes responsible for antibody diversification. Because of its mutagenic potential, AID expression and activity are tightly regulated to minimize unwanted DNA damage. Surprisingly, AID expression has been observed ectopically during pathogenic infections. However, the function of AID outside of the germinal centers remains largely uncharacterized. In this study, we demonstrate that infection of human primary naïve B cells with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) rapidly induces AID expression in a cell intrinsic manner. We find that infected cells are marked for elimination by Natural Killer cells through upregulation of NKG2D ligands via the DNA damage pathway, a pathway triggered by AID. Moreover, without having a measurable effect on KSHV latency, AID impinges directly on the viral fitness by inhibiting lytic reactivation and reducing infectivity of KSHV virions. Importantly, we uncover two KSHV-encoded microRNAs that directly regulate AID abundance, further reinforcing the role for AID in the antiviral response. Together our findings reveal additional functions for AID in innate immune defense against KSHV with implications for a broader involvement in innate immunity to other pathogens. PMID:24244169

  1. Systemic Activation of TLR3-Dependent TRIF Signaling Confers Host Defense against Gram-Negative Bacteria in the Intestine.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jose; Kanagavelu, Saravana; Flores, Claudia; Romero, Laura; Riveron, Reldy; Shih, David Q; Fukata, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of Gram-negative bacteria by toll-like receptor (TLR)4 induces MyD88 and TRIF mediated responses. We have shown that TRIF-dependent responses play an important role in intestinal defense against Gram-negative enteropathogens. In the current study, we examined underlying mechanisms of how systemic TRIF activation enhances intestinal immune defense against Gram-negative bacteria. First we confirmed that the protective effect of poly I:C against enteric infection of mice with Yersinia enterocolitica was dependent on TLR3-mediated TRIF signaling by using TLR3-deficient mice. This protection was unique in TRIF-dependent TLR signaling because systemic stimulation of mice with agonists for TLR2 (Pam3CSK4) or TLR5 (flagellin) did not reduce mortality on Y. enterocolitica infection. Systemic administration of poly I:C mobilized CD11c+, F4/80+, and Gr-1(hi) cells from lamina propria and activated NK cells in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) within 24 h. This innate immune cell rearrangement was type I IFN dependent and mediated through upregulation of TLR4 followed by CCR7 expression in these innate immune cells found in the intestinal mucosa. Poly I:C induced IFN-γ expression by NK cells in the MLN, which was mediated through type I IFNs and IL-12p40 from antigen presenting cells and consequent activation of STAT1 and STAT4 in NK cells. This formation of innate immunity significantly contributed to the elimination of bacteria in the MLN. Our results demonstrated an innate immune network in the intestine that can be established by systemic stimulation of TRIF, which provides a strong host defense against Gram-negative pathogens. The mechanism underlying TRIF-mediated protective immunity may be useful to develop novel therapies for enteric bacterial infection.

  2. Parallel activities and interactions between antimicrobial peptides and complement in host defense at the airway epithelial surface.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, Pieter S

    2015-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides and complement components contribute to host defense as well as inflammation and tissue injury in the respiratory tract. The airway epithelial surface is the main site of action of these immune effectors, and airway epithelial cells contribute markedly to their local production. Whereas both antimicrobial peptides and complement display overlapping functions, it is increasingly clear that both effector mechanisms also interact. Furthermore, excessive or uncontrolled release of antimicrobial peptides as well as complement activation may contribute to inflammatory lung diseases. Therefore, further knowledge of interactions between these systems may provide more insight into the pathogenesis of a range of lung diseases. In this review, recent findings on the functions, collaborations and other interactions between antimicrobial peptides and complement are discussed with a specific focus on the airway epithelium.

  3. Host defenses trigger salmonella's arsenal.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-03-17

    Salmonella survives in macrophages by using a molecular syringe to deliver proteins into the host-cell cytosol where they manipulate phagocyte physiology. Arpaia and colleagues (Arpaia et al., 2011) show that deployment of this virulence factor is triggered by the very responses that are intended to confer host resistance. PMID:21402352

  4. Identification of Synthetic Host Defense Peptide Mimics That Exert Dual Antimicrobial and Anti-Inflammatory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Som, Abhigyan; Navasa, Nicolás; Percher, Avital; Scott, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    A group of synthetic antimicrobial oligomers, inspired by naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides, were analyzed for the ability to modulate innate immune responses to Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. These synthetic mimics of antimicrobial peptides (SMAMPs) specifically reduced cytokine production in response to Staphylococcus aureus and the S. aureus component lipoteichoic acid (LTA), a TLR2 agonist. Anti-inflammatory SMAMPs prevented the induction of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin 6 (IL-6), and IL-10 in response to S. aureus or LTA, but no other TLR2 ligands. We show that these SMAMPs bind specifically to LTA in vitro and prevent its interaction with TLR2. Importantly, the SMAMP greatly reduced the induction of TNF and IL-6 in vivo in mice acutely infected with S. aureus while simultaneously reducing bacterial loads dramatically (4 log10). Thus, these SMAMPs can eliminate the damage induced by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) while simultaneously eliminating infection in vivo. They are the first known SMAMPs to demonstrate anti-inflammatory and antibacterial activities in vivo. PMID:22956655

  5. Soluble Host Defense Lectins in Innate Immunity to Influenza Virus

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Wy Ching; Tate, Michelle D.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Reading, Patrick C.

    2012-01-01

    Host defenses against viral infections depend on a complex interplay of innate (nonspecific) and adaptive (specific) components. In the early stages of infection, innate mechanisms represent the main line of host defense, acting to limit the spread of virus in host tissues prior to the induction of the adaptive immune response. Serum and lung fluids contain a range of lectins capable of recognizing and destroying influenza A viruses (IAV). Herein, we review the mechanisms by which soluble endogenous lectins mediate anti-IAV activity, including their role in modulating IAV-induced inflammation and disease and their potential as prophylactic and/or therapeutic treatments during severe IAV-induced disease. PMID:22665991

  6. Interferon-γ Is a Crucial Activator of Early Host Immune Defense against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bieri, Raphael; Bolz, Miriam; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic necrotizing human skin disease associated with the production of the cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Despite extensive research, the type of immune responses elicited against this pathogen and the effector functions conferring protection against BU are not yet fully understood. While histopathological analyses of advanced BU lesions have demonstrated a mainly extracellular localization of the toxin producing acid fast bacilli, there is growing evidence for an early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This has led us to investigate whether interferon-γ might play an important role in containing M. ulcerans infections. In an experimental Buruli ulcer mouse model we found that interferon-γ is indeed a critical regulator of early host immune defense against M. ulcerans infections. Interferon-γ knockout mice displayed a faster progression of the infection compared to wild-type mice. This accelerated progression was reflected in faster and more extensive tissue necrosis and oedema formation, as well as in a significantly higher bacterial burden after five weeks of infection, indicating that mice lacking interferon-γ have a reduced capacity to kill intracellular bacilli during the early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This data demonstrates a prominent role of interferon-γ in early defense against M. ulcerans infection and supports the view that concepts for vaccine development against tuberculosis may also be valid for BU. PMID:26863011

  7. Interferon-γ Is a Crucial Activator of Early Host Immune Defense against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Raphael; Bolz, Miriam; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-02-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic necrotizing human skin disease associated with the production of the cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Despite extensive research, the type of immune responses elicited against this pathogen and the effector functions conferring protection against BU are not yet fully understood. While histopathological analyses of advanced BU lesions have demonstrated a mainly extracellular localization of the toxin producing acid fast bacilli, there is growing evidence for an early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This has led us to investigate whether interferon-γ might play an important role in containing M. ulcerans infections. In an experimental Buruli ulcer mouse model we found that interferon-γ is indeed a critical regulator of early host immune defense against M. ulcerans infections. Interferon-γ knockout mice displayed a faster progression of the infection compared to wild-type mice. This accelerated progression was reflected in faster and more extensive tissue necrosis and oedema formation, as well as in a significantly higher bacterial burden after five weeks of infection, indicating that mice lacking interferon-γ have a reduced capacity to kill intracellular bacilli during the early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This data demonstrates a prominent role of interferon-γ in early defense against M. ulcerans infection and supports the view that concepts for vaccine development against tuberculosis may also be valid for BU.

  8. A Diverse Family of Host-Defense Peptides (Piscidins) Exhibit Specialized Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Protozoal Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Salger, Scott A; Cassady, Katherine R; Reading, Benjamin J; Noga, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antibiotics and other chemical-based drugs are currently one of the most common methods used to control disease-related mortality in animal agriculture. Use of the innate immune system to decrease disease related mortalities is a novel alternative to conventional drugs. One component of the innate immune system is the host-defense peptides, also known as antimicrobial peptides. Host-defense peptides are typically small, amphipathic, α-helical peptides with a broad-spectrum of action against viral, bacterial, fungal, and/or protozoal pathogens. Piscidins are host-defense peptides first discovered in the hybrid striped bass (white bass, Morone chrysops, x striped bass, M. saxatilis). In this paper we identify four new piscidin isoforms in the hybrid striped bass and describe their tissue distributions. We also determine the progenitor species of origin of each piscidin (orthology) and propose a revised nomenclature for this newly described piscidin family based on a three class system. The Class I piscidins (22 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 1 and piscidin 3) show broad-spectrum activity against bacteria and ciliated protozoans, while the Class III piscidins (55 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 6 and striped bass piscidin 7) primarily show anti-protozoal activity. The Class II piscidins (44-46 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 4 and white bass piscidin 5) have a level of activity against bacteria and protozoans intermediate to Classes I and III. Knowledge of piscidin function and activity may help in the future development of disease-resistant lines of striped bass and white bass that could be used to produce superior hybrids for aquaculture. PMID:27552222

  9. A Diverse Family of Host-Defense Peptides (Piscidins) Exhibit Specialized Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Protozoal Activities in Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Cassady, Katherine R.; Noga, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antibiotics and other chemical-based drugs are currently one of the most common methods used to control disease-related mortality in animal agriculture. Use of the innate immune system to decrease disease related mortalities is a novel alternative to conventional drugs. One component of the innate immune system is the host-defense peptides, also known as antimicrobial peptides. Host-defense peptides are typically small, amphipathic, α-helical peptides with a broad-spectrum of action against viral, bacterial, fungal, and/or protozoal pathogens. Piscidins are host-defense peptides first discovered in the hybrid striped bass (white bass, Morone chrysops, x striped bass, M. saxatilis). In this paper we identify four new piscidin isoforms in the hybrid striped bass and describe their tissue distributions. We also determine the progenitor species of origin of each piscidin (orthology) and propose a revised nomenclature for this newly described piscidin family based on a three class system. The Class I piscidins (22 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 1 and piscidin 3) show broad-spectrum activity against bacteria and ciliated protozoans, while the Class III piscidins (55 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 6 and striped bass piscidin 7) primarily show anti-protozoal activity. The Class II piscidins (44–46 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 4 and white bass piscidin 5) have a level of activity against bacteria and protozoans intermediate to Classes I and III. Knowledge of piscidin function and activity may help in the future development of disease-resistant lines of striped bass and white bass that could be used to produce superior hybrids for aquaculture. PMID:27552222

  10. A Diverse Family of Host-Defense Peptides (Piscidins) Exhibit Specialized Anti-Bacterial and Anti-Protozoal Activities in Fishes.

    PubMed

    Salger, Scott A; Cassady, Katherine R; Reading, Benjamin J; Noga, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Conventional antibiotics and other chemical-based drugs are currently one of the most common methods used to control disease-related mortality in animal agriculture. Use of the innate immune system to decrease disease related mortalities is a novel alternative to conventional drugs. One component of the innate immune system is the host-defense peptides, also known as antimicrobial peptides. Host-defense peptides are typically small, amphipathic, α-helical peptides with a broad-spectrum of action against viral, bacterial, fungal, and/or protozoal pathogens. Piscidins are host-defense peptides first discovered in the hybrid striped bass (white bass, Morone chrysops, x striped bass, M. saxatilis). In this paper we identify four new piscidin isoforms in the hybrid striped bass and describe their tissue distributions. We also determine the progenitor species of origin of each piscidin (orthology) and propose a revised nomenclature for this newly described piscidin family based on a three class system. The Class I piscidins (22 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 1 and piscidin 3) show broad-spectrum activity against bacteria and ciliated protozoans, while the Class III piscidins (55 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 6 and striped bass piscidin 7) primarily show anti-protozoal activity. The Class II piscidins (44-46 amino acids in length; striped bass and white bass piscidin 4 and white bass piscidin 5) have a level of activity against bacteria and protozoans intermediate to Classes I and III. Knowledge of piscidin function and activity may help in the future development of disease-resistant lines of striped bass and white bass that could be used to produce superior hybrids for aquaculture.

  11. Dietary antioxidants: immunity and host defense.

    PubMed

    Puertollano, María A; Puertollano, Elena; de Cienfuegos, Gerardo Álvarez; de Pablo, Manuel A

    2011-01-01

    Natural antioxidants may be defined as molecules that prevent cell damage against free radicals and are critical for maintaining optimum health in both animals and humans. In all living systems, cells require adequate levels of antioxidant defenses in order to avoid the harmful effect of an excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to prevent damage to the immune cells. During the inflammatory processes, the activation of phagocytes and/or the action of bacterial products with specific receptors are capable of promoting the assembly of the multicomponent flavoprotein NADPH oxidase, which catalyzes the production of high amounts of the superoxide anion radical (O(2)(-)). Under these particular circumstances, neutrophils and macrophages are recognized to produce superoxide free radicals and H(2)O(2), which are essential for defence against phagocytized or invading microbes. In this state, antioxidants are absolutely necessary to regulate the reactions that release free radicals. Antioxidant nutrients commonly included in the diet such as vitamin E, vitamin C, β-carotene, selenium, copper, iron and zinc improve different immune function exhibiting an important protective role in infections caused by bacteria, viruses or parasites. As a result, dietary antioxidants have been related to modulate the host susceptibility or resistance to infectious pathogens. Overall, numerous studies have suggested that the development of tolerance, and control of inflammation are strongly correlated with specific immune mechanisms that may be altered by an inadequate supply of either macronutrients or micronutrients. Therefore, the present paper will review the effects of dietary antioxidants on immune cell function and the impact on protection against infectious microorganisms. PMID:21506934

  12. The myoepithelial defense: a host defense against cancer.

    PubMed

    Sternlicht, M D; Barsky, S H

    1997-01-01

    advance our hypothesis that host myoepithelial cells regulate the progression of in situ to invasive carcinoma by providing an important host defense against cancer invasion.

  13. Eosinophils versus Neutrophils in Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Bass, David A.; Szejda, Pamela

    1979-01-01

    Eosinophil leukocytes have been reported to have a major role in host defense against invasive, migratory phases of helminth infestations, yet the relative larvicidal abilities of eosinophils and neutrophils have not been thoroughly examined. This study examined the killing of newborn (migratory phase) larvae of Trichinella spiralis during incubation by human granulocytes in vitro. The assay employed cultue of larvae with cells, sera, and reagents in microtiter wells with direct counting of surviving larvae after incubation. Killed larvae appeared to be lysed. Verification of the microplate assay was obtained by demonstrating complete loss of infectivity of larvae incubated with leukocytes and immune serum. In the presence of optimal immune serum concentrations, purified neutrophils or eosinophils achieved ≥95% killing of larvae at cell:larva ratios of 2,000:1 or greater. Fresh normal serum prompted slight (19%) killing by leukocytes at a cell:larva ratio of 9,000:1. Cells plus heat-inactivated normal serum and all sera preparations in the absence of leukocytes killed <8% of the larvae. The activity of immune serum was opsonic. Cells adhered to larvae that had been preincubated in immune serum, and immunofluorescent studies indicated that such preopsonized larvae were coated with immunoglobulin (Ig)G. However, preopsonized larvae lost opsonic activity and surface IgG during incubation for 3 h in medium lacking immune serum. The rate of killing was dependent on the cell:larva ratio; at high leukocyte concentrations (4,200:1), 99% were killed within 7 h; at lower cell:larva ratios, killing increased steadily during a 20-h incubation period. Killing was inhibited by 20 μg catalase, 5 μg/ml cytochalasin B, or 5μM colchicine, but was unchanged by superoxide dismutase and was enhanced by azide or cyanide. Leukocytes from a patient with chronic granulomatous disease, lacking ability to mount a normal oxidative response, demonstrated a markedly suppressed larvicidal

  14. The roles of antimicrobial peptides in innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Gill; Beckloff, Nicholas; Weinberg, Aaron; Kisich, Kevin O

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are multi-functional peptides whose fundamental biological role in vivo has been proposed to be the elimination of pathogenic microorganisms, including Gram-positive and -negative bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Genes encoding these peptides are expressed in a variety of cells in the host, including circulating phagocytic cells and mucosal epithelial cells, demonstrating a wide range of utility in the innate immune system. Expression of these genes is tightly regulated; they are induced by pathogens and cytokines as part of the host defense response, and they can be suppressed by bacterial virulence factors and environmental factors which can lead to increased susceptibility to infection. New research has also cast light on alternative functionalities, including immunomodulatory activities, which are related to their unique structural characteristics. These peptides represent not only an important component of innate host defense against microbial colonization and a link between innate and adaptive immunity, but also form a foundation for the development of new therapeutic agents.

  15. Current concepts on pulmonary host defense mechanisms in children.

    PubMed

    Wilmott, R W; Khurana-Hershey, G; Stark, J M

    2000-06-01

    The respiratory tract is exposed continuously to noxious agents, microbial organisms, particles, and allergens. It has therefore evolved both innate and specific defense mechanisms. The innate host defense mechanisms include components such as collectins, beta-defensins, lactoferrin, and complement, all of which have an important role in modulating the immune response. Immune protection of the lungs by specific antibody is reviewed. The airways are protected by alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and lymphocytes, and their origins, regulation, functions, and antimicrobial activity are summarized. Antimicrobial peptides and immune-modulating peptides are likely to have a significant therapeutic role for infection and inflammation in the respiratory tract.

  16. New horizons for host defense peptides and lantibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Michael John; Scott, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides from either microbial sources, or based on host defense peptides (HDPs) from higher organisms, show promising activity against human pathogens. Lantibiotics have been extensively engineered by either molecular biology approaches or chemistry and both natural and modified entities have been shown to have good efficacy in animal models of infection. Amongst HDPs either truncated peptides or non-peptide mimetic molecules show substantial promise both for their direct antibiotic action and also modulation of host functions. Members of both classes have reached clinical development for therapy of systemic infections and Clostridium difficile infection of the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:22776251

  17. Pattern recognition receptors in innate immunity, host defense, and immunopathology.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Rahul; Mosser, David M

    2013-12-01

    Infection by pathogenic microbes initiates a set of complex interactions between the pathogen and the host mediated by pattern recognition receptors. Innate immune responses play direct roles in host defense during the early stages of infection, and they also exert a profound influence on the generation of the adaptive immune responses that ensue. An improved understanding of the pattern recognition receptors that mediate innate responses and their downstream effects after receptor ligation has the potential to lead to new ways to improve vaccines and prevent autoimmunity. This review focuses on the control of innate immune activation and the role that innate immune receptors play in helping to maintain tissue homeostasis.

  18. Evolution of Host Defense against Multiple Enemy Populations.

    PubMed

    Toor, Jaspreet; Best, Alex

    2016-03-01

    Natural and managed populations are embedded within complex ecological communities, where they face multiple enemies. Experimental studies have shown that the evolution of host defense mechanisms to a focal enemy is impacted by the surrounding enemy community. Theoretically, the evolution of host defenses against a single enemy population, typically parasites, has been widely studied, but only recently has the impact of community interactions on host-parasite evolution been looked at. In this article, we theoretically examine the evolutionary behavior of a host population that must allocate defenses between two enemy populations, parasites and predators, with defense against one enemy constraining defense against the other. We show that in simpler models the composition of the enemy community plays the key role in determining the defense strategy of the hosts, with the hosts building up defenses against the enemy population posing a larger threat. However, this simple driver is shown to break down when there is significant recovery and reproduction from infected hosts. Additionally, we find that most host diversity is likely to occur when there is a combined high risk of infection and predation, in common with experimental studies. Our results therefore provide vital insight into the ecological feedbacks that drive the evolution of host defense against multiple enemy populations.

  19. Avian Antimicrobial Host Defense Peptides: From Biology to Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guolong; Sunkara, Lakshmi T.

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are an important first line of defense with antimicrobial and immunomoduatory properties. Because they act on the microbial membranes or host immune cells, HDPs pose a low risk of triggering microbial resistance and therefore, are being actively investigated as a novel class of antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Cathelicidins and β-defensins are two major families of HDPs in avian species. More than a dozen HDPs exist in birds, with the genes in each HDP family clustered in a single chromosomal segment, apparently as a result of gene duplication and diversification. In contrast to their mammalian counterparts that adopt various spatial conformations, mature avian cathelicidins are mostly α-helical. Avian β-defensins, on the other hand, adopt triple-stranded β-sheet structures similar to their mammalian relatives. Besides classical β-defensins, a group of avian-specific β-defensin-related peptides, namely ovodefensins, exist with a different six-cysteine motif. Like their mammalian counterparts, avian cathelicidins and defensins are derived from either myeloid or epithelial origin expressed in a majority of tissues with broad-spectrum antibacterial and immune regulatory activities. Structure-function relationship studies with several avian HDPs have led to identification of the peptide analogs with potential for use as antimicrobials and vaccine adjuvants. Dietary modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis has also emerged as a promising alternative approach to disease control and prevention in chickens. PMID:24583933

  20. Microbial pathogenesis and host defense in the nematode C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lianne B.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells line the surfaces of the body, and are on the front lines of defense against microbial infection. Like many other metazoans, the nematode C. elegans lacks known professional immune cells and relies heavily on defense mediated by epithelial cells. New results indicate that epithelial defense in C. elegans can be triggered through detection of pathogen-induced perturbation of core physiology within host cells and through autophagic defense against intracellular and extracellular pathogens. Recent studies have also illuminated a diverse array of pathogenic attack strategies used against C. elegans. These findings are providing insight into the underpinnings of host/pathogen interactions in a simple animal host that can inform studies of infectious diseases in humans. PMID:25461579

  1. Insights from human studies into the host defense against candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Filler, Scott G

    2012-04-01

    Candida spp. are the most common cause of mucosal and disseminated fungal infections in humans. Studies using mutant strains of mice have provided initial information about the roles of dectin-1, CARD9, and Th17 cytokines in the host defense against candidiasis. Recent technological advances have resulted in the identification of mutations in specific genes that predispose humans to develop candidal infection. The analysis of individuals with these mutations demonstrates that dectin-1 is critical for the host defense against vulvovaginal candidiasis and candidal colonization of the gastrointestinal tract. They also indicate that CARD9 is important for preventing both mucosal and disseminated candidiasis, whereas the Th17 response is necessary for the defense against mucocutaneous candidiasis. This article reviews the recent studies of genetic defects in humans that result in an increased susceptibility to candidiasis and discusses how these studies provide new insight into the host defense against different types of candidal infections.

  2. Pattern Recognition Receptors in Innate Immunity, Host Defense, and Immunopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suresh, Rahul; Mosser, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by pathogenic microbes initiates a set of complex interactions between the pathogen and the host mediated by pattern recognition receptors. Innate immune responses play direct roles in host defense during the early stages of infection, and they also exert a profound influence on the generation of the adaptive immune responses that ensue.…

  3. Strategies of avoidance of host immune defenses in Asobara species.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Geneviève; Doury, Géraldine; Mabiala-Moundoungou, Alix D N; Cherqui, Anas; Eslin, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Eggs and larvae of endophagous parasitoids face the host's immunity reaction once they penetrate the insect host's hemocele. In order to overcome the host's immune barrier, endoparasitoids have developed various strategies. Conformer parasitoids hide and/or get protected from the attack by the host's immunity cells without interfering with the host's immune system. Differently, regulator parasitoids directly attack the host's hemocytes, therefore totally inhibiting the immunity reaction of encapsulation in the parasitized host. Female wasps may also discriminate immunoreactive hosts from nonreactive, permissive ones before laying an egg. These different strategies coexist within the same genus of the braconids Asobara, endoparasitoids of Drosophila larvae. The physiological mechanisms underlying the conformer and regulator strategies in Asobara are exposed. The factors which may contribute to the diversity of the means developed by Asobara parasitoids to overcome the hosts' immunity defenses are discussed.

  4. Intracellular demonstration of active TGFbeta1 in B cells and plasma cells of autoimmune mice. IgG-bound TGFbeta1 suppresses neutrophil function and host defense against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Caver, T E; O'Sullivan, F X; Gold, L I; Gresham, H D

    1996-01-01

    Infection remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with SLE. To investigate this, previously we assessed the host defense status of autoimmune MRL/lpr mice and found that elaboration of active TGFbeta suppressed neutrophil function and decreased survival in response to Staphylococcus aureus infection. The purpose of the present work was to elucidate the molecular form and the cellular source of the active TGFbeta involved. Here, we report for the first time that TGFbeta1 is found in the active form inside B cells and plasma cells and that it circulates in the plasma complexed with IgG in two murine models of systemic autoimmunity and in some patients with SLE. IgG-bound active TGFbeta1 is many times more potent than uncomplexed active TGFbeta1 for suppression of neutrophil function in vitro and host defense against S. aureus infection in vivo. These data indicate that TGFbeta1 is in the active form inside B cells and plasma cells, that the formation of a complex of IgG and active TGFbeta1 is greatly accelerated in autoimmunity, and that this complex is extremely potent for suppression of PMN function and host defense against bacterial infection. PMID:8958212

  5. Functions of Cationic Host Defense Peptides in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Hemshekhar, Mahadevappa; Anaparti, Vidyanand; Mookherjee, Neeloffer

    2016-01-01

    Cationic host defense peptides are a widely distributed family of immunomodulatory molecules with antimicrobial properties. The biological functions of these peptides include the ability to influence innate and adaptive immunity for efficient resolution of infections and simultaneous modulation of inflammatory responses. This unique dual bioactivity of controlling infections and inflammation has gained substantial attention in the last three decades and consequent interest in the development of these peptide mimics as immunomodulatory therapeutic candidates. In this review, we summarize the current literature on the wide range of functions of cationic host defense peptides in the context of the mammalian immune system. PMID:27384571

  6. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  7. Regulation of the Intestinal Barrier Function by Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Kelsy; Deng, Zhuo; Hou, Yongqing; Zhang, Guolong

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal barrier function is achieved primarily through regulating the synthesis of mucins and tight junction (TJ) proteins, which are critical for maintaining optimal gut health and animal performance. An aberrant expression of TJ proteins results in increased paracellular permeability, leading to intestinal and systemic disorders. As an essential component of innate immunity, host defense peptides (HDPs) play a critical role in mucosal defense. Besides broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities, HDPs promotes inflammation resolution, endotoxin neutralization, wound healing, and the development of adaptive immune response. Accumulating evidence has also indicated an emerging role of HDPs in barrier function and intestinal homeostasis. HDP deficiency in the intestinal tract is associated with barrier dysfunction and dysbiosis. Several HDPs were recently shown to enhance mucosal barrier function by directly inducing the expression of multiple mucins and TJ proteins. Consistently, dietary supplementation of HDPs often leads to an improvement in intestinal morphology, production performance, and feed efficiency in livestock animals. This review summarizes current advances on the regulation of epithelial integrity and homeostasis by HDPs. Major signaling pathways mediating HDP-induced mucin and TJ protein synthesis are also discussed. As an alternative strategy to antibiotics, supplementation of exogenous HDPs or modulation of endogenous HDP synthesis may have potential to improve intestinal barrier function and animal health and productivity. PMID:26664984

  8. FGF23 signaling impairs neutrophil recruitment and host defense during CKD

    PubMed Central

    Rossaint, Jan; Oehmichen, Jessica; Van Aken, Hugo; Reuter, Stefan; Pavenstädt, Hermann J.; Meersch, Melanie; Unruh, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has been associated with impaired host response and increased susceptibility to infections. Leukocyte recruitment during inflammation must be tightly regulated to protect the host against pathogens. FGF23 levels are increased in blood during CKD, and levels of this hormone have been associated with a variety of adverse effects in CKD patients. Here, we have shown that CKD impairs leukocyte recruitment into inflamed tissue and host defense in mice and humans. FGF23 neutralization during CKD in murine models restored leukocyte recruitment and host defense. Intravital microscopy of animals with chronic kidney failure showed that FGF23 inhibits chemokine-activated leukocyte arrest on the endothelium, and downregulation of FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) on PMNs rescued host defense in these mice. In vitro, FGF23 inhibited PMN adhesion, arrest under flow, and transendothelial migration. Mechanistically, FGF23 binding to FGFR2 counteracted selectin- and chemokine-triggered β2 integrin activation on PMNs by activating protein kinase A (PKA) and inhibiting activation of the small GTPase Rap1. Moreover, knockdown of PKA abolished the inhibitory effect of FGF23 on integrin activation. Together, our data reveal that FGF23 acts directly on PMNs and dampens host defense by direct interference with chemokine signaling and integrin activation. PMID:26878171

  9. Host defense mechanism-based rational design of live vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jang, Yo Han; Byun, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Park, Eun-Sook; Lee, Yun Ha; Lee, Yoon-Jae; Lee, Jinhee; Kim, Kyun-Hwan; Seong, Baik Lin

    2013-01-01

    Live attenuated vaccine (LAV), mimicking natural infection, provides an excellent protection against microbial infection. The development of LAV, however, still remains highly empirical and the rational design of clinically useful LAV is scarcely available. Apoptosis and caspase activation are general host antiviral responses in virus-infected cells. Utilizing these tightly regulated host defense mechanisms, we present a novel apoptosis-triggered attenuation of viral virulence as a rational design of live attenuated vaccine with desired levels of safety, efficacy, and productivity. Mutant influenza viruses carrying caspase recognition motifs in viral NP and the interferon-antagonist NS1 proteins were highly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo by caspase-mediated cleavage of those proteins in infected cells. Both viral replication and interferon-resistance were substantially reduced, resulting in a marked attenuation of virulence of the virus. Despite pronounced attenuation, the viruses demonstrated high growth phenotype in embryonated eggs at lower temperature, ensuring its productivity. A single dose vaccination with the mutant virus elicited high levels of systemic and mucosal antibody responses and provided complete protection against both homologous and heterologous lethal challenges in mouse model. While providing a practical means to generate seasonal or pandemic influenza live vaccines, the sensitization of viral proteins to pathogen-triggered apoptotic signals presents a potentially universal, mechanism-based rational design of live vaccines against many viral infections.

  10. Antimicrobial peptides in echinoderm host defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun; Blencke, Hans-Matti; Haug, Tor; Stensvåg, Klara

    2015-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are important effector molecules in innate immunity. Here we briefly summarize characteristic traits of AMPs and their mechanisms of antimicrobial activity. Echinoderms live in a microbe-rich marine environment and are known to express a wide range of AMPs. We address two novel AMP families from coelomocytes of sea urchins: cysteine-rich AMPs (strongylocins) and heterodimeric AMPs (centrocins). These peptide families have conserved preprosequences, are present in both adults and pluteus stage larvae, have potent antimicrobial properties, and therefore appear to be important innate immune effectors. Strongylocins have a unique cysteine pattern compared to other cysteine-rich peptides, which suggests a novel AMP folding pattern. Centrocins and SdStrongylocin 2 contain brominated tryptophan residues in their native form. This review also includes AMPs isolated from other echinoderms, such as holothuroidins, fragments of beta-thymosin, and fragments of lectin (CEL-III). Echinoderm AMPs are crucial molecules for the understanding of echinoderm immunity, and their potent antimicrobial activity makes them potential precursors of novel drug leads.

  11. Innate host defenses against Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Hole, Camaron; Wormley, Floyd L

    2016-03-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans, the predominant etiological agent of cryptococcosis, can cause life-threatening infections of the central nervous system in immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis is the most common disseminated fungal infection in AIDS patients, and remains the third most common invasive fungal infection among organ transplant recipients. The administration of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has resulted in a decrease in the number of cases of AIDS-related cryptococcosis in developed countries, but in developing countries where HAART is not readily available, Cryptococcus is still a major concern. Therefore, there is an urgent need for the development of novel therapies and/or vaccines to combat cryptococcosis. Understanding the protective immune responses against Cryptococcus is critical for development of vaccines and immunotherapies to combat cryptococcosis. Consequently, this review focuses on our current knowledge of protective immune responses to C. neoformans, with an emphasis on innate immune responses. PMID:26920880

  12. Host Defense at the Ocular Surface

    PubMed Central

    Pearlman, Eric; Sun, Yan; Roy, Sanhita; Karmakar, Mausita; Hise, Amy G.; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Chinnery, Holly R.; McMenamin, Paul G.; Rietsch, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Microbial infections of the cornea frequently cause painful, blinding and debilitating disease that is often diffcult to treat and may require corneal transplantation. In addition, sterile corneal infiltrates that are associated with contact lens wear cause pain, visual impairment and photophobia. In this article, we review the role of Toll-Like Receptors (TLR) in bacterial keratitis and sterile corneal infiltrates, and describe the role of MD-2 regulation in LPS responsiveness by corneal epithelial cells. We conclude that both live bacteria and bacterial products activate Toll-Like Receptors in the cornea, which leads to chemokine production and neutrophil recruitment to the corneal stroma. While neutrophils are essential for bacterial killing, they also cause tissue damage that results in loss of corneal clarity. These disparate outcomes, therefore, represent a spectrum of disease severity based on this pathway, and further indicate that targeting the TLR pathway is a feasible approach to treating inflammation caused by live bacteria and microbial products. Further, as the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS) also plays a critical role in disease pathogenesis by inducing neutrophil apoptosis and facilitating bacterial growth in the cornea, T3SS exotoxins are additional targets for therapy for P. aeruginosa keratitis. PMID:23360155

  13. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  14. The lactoperoxidase system links anion transport to host defense in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Conner, Gregory E; Wijkstrom-Frei, Corinne; Randell, Scott H; Fernandez, Vania E; Salathe, Matthias

    2007-01-23

    Chronic respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis result from CFTR channel mutations but how these impair antibacterial defense is less clear. Airway host defense depends on lactoperoxidase (LPO) that requires thiocyanate (SCN-) to function and epithelia use CFTR to concentrate SCN- at the apical surface. To test whether CFTR mutations result in impaired LPO-mediated host defense, CF epithelial SCN- transport was measured. CF epithelia had significantly lower transport rates and did not accumulate SCN- in the apical compartment. The lower CF [SCN-] did not support LPO antibacterial activity. Modeling of airway LPO activity suggested that reduced transport impairs LPO-mediated defense and cannot be compensated by LPO or H2O2 upregulation.

  15. Bioprospecting the American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) Host Defense Peptidome

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Barney M.; Juba, Melanie L.; Devine, Megan C.; Barksdale, Stephanie M.; Rodriguez, Carlos Alberto; Chung, Myung C.; Russo, Paul S.; Vliet, Kent A.; Schnur, Joel M.; van Hoek, Monique L.

    2015-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides and their therapeutic potential have garnered growing interest because of the proliferation of bacterial resistance. However, the discovery of new antimicrobial peptides from animals has proven challenging due to the limitations associated with conventional biochemical purification and difficulties in predicting active peptides from genomic sequences, if known. As an example, no antimicrobial peptides have been identified from the American alligator, Alligator mississippiensis, although their serum is antimicrobial. We have developed a novel approach for the discovery of new antimicrobial peptides from these animals, one that capitalizes on their fundamental and conserved physico-chemical properties. This sample-agnostic process employs custom-made functionalized hydrogel microparticles to harvest cationic peptides from biological samples, followed by de novo sequencing of captured peptides, eliminating the need to isolate individual peptides. After evaluation of the peptide sequences using a combination of rational and web-based bioinformatic analyses, forty-five potential antimicrobial peptides were identified, and eight of these peptides were selected to be chemically synthesized and evaluated. The successful identification of multiple novel peptides, exhibiting antibacterial properties, from Alligator mississippiensis plasma demonstrates the potential of this innovative discovery process in identifying potential new host defense peptides. PMID:25671663

  16. Herbivore Oral Secreted Bacteria Trigger Distinct Defense Responses in Preferred and Non-Preferred Host Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Chung, Seung Ho; Peiffer, Michelle; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Zeng, Rensen; Felton, Gary W

    2016-06-01

    Insect symbiotic bacteria affect host physiology and mediate plant-insect interactions, yet there are few clear examples of symbiotic bacteria regulating defense responses in different host plants. We hypothesized that plants would induce distinct defense responses to herbivore- associated bacteria. We evaluated whether preferred hosts (horsenettle) or non-preferred hosts (tomato) respond similarly to oral secretions (OS) from the false potato beetle (FPB, Leptinotarsa juncta), and whether the induced defense triggered by OS was due to the presence of symbiotic bacteria in OS. Both horsenettle and tomato damaged by antibiotic (AB) treated larvae showed higher polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity than those damaged by non-AB treated larvae. In addition, application of OS from AB treated larvae induced higher PPO activity compared with OS from non-AB treated larvae or water treatment. False potato beetles harbor bacteria that may provide abundant cues that can be recognized by plants and thus mediate corresponding defense responses. Among all tested bacterial isolates, the genera Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia were found to suppress PPO activity in tomato, while only Pantoea sp. among these four isolates was observed to suppress PPO activity in horsenettle. The distinct PPO suppression caused by symbiotic bacteria in different plants was similar to the pattern of induced defense-related gene expression. Pantoea inoculated FPB suppressed JA-responsive genes and triggered a SA-responsive gene in both tomato and horsenettle. However, Enterobacter inoculated FPB eliminated JA-regulated gene expression and elevated SA-regulated gene expression in tomato, but did not show evident effects on the expression levels of horsenettle defense-related genes. These results indicate that suppression of plant defenses by the bacteria found in the oral secretions of herbivores may be a more widespread phenomenon than previously indicated.

  17. Herbivore Oral Secreted Bacteria Trigger Distinct Defense Responses in Preferred and Non-Preferred Host Plants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Chung, Seung Ho; Peiffer, Michelle; Rosa, Cristina; Hoover, Kelli; Zeng, Rensen; Felton, Gary W

    2016-06-01

    Insect symbiotic bacteria affect host physiology and mediate plant-insect interactions, yet there are few clear examples of symbiotic bacteria regulating defense responses in different host plants. We hypothesized that plants would induce distinct defense responses to herbivore- associated bacteria. We evaluated whether preferred hosts (horsenettle) or non-preferred hosts (tomato) respond similarly to oral secretions (OS) from the false potato beetle (FPB, Leptinotarsa juncta), and whether the induced defense triggered by OS was due to the presence of symbiotic bacteria in OS. Both horsenettle and tomato damaged by antibiotic (AB) treated larvae showed higher polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity than those damaged by non-AB treated larvae. In addition, application of OS from AB treated larvae induced higher PPO activity compared with OS from non-AB treated larvae or water treatment. False potato beetles harbor bacteria that may provide abundant cues that can be recognized by plants and thus mediate corresponding defense responses. Among all tested bacterial isolates, the genera Pantoea, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, and Serratia were found to suppress PPO activity in tomato, while only Pantoea sp. among these four isolates was observed to suppress PPO activity in horsenettle. The distinct PPO suppression caused by symbiotic bacteria in different plants was similar to the pattern of induced defense-related gene expression. Pantoea inoculated FPB suppressed JA-responsive genes and triggered a SA-responsive gene in both tomato and horsenettle. However, Enterobacter inoculated FPB eliminated JA-regulated gene expression and elevated SA-regulated gene expression in tomato, but did not show evident effects on the expression levels of horsenettle defense-related genes. These results indicate that suppression of plant defenses by the bacteria found in the oral secretions of herbivores may be a more widespread phenomenon than previously indicated. PMID:27294415

  18. Respiratory infections may reflect deficiencies in host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, H Y

    1985-02-01

    Serious respiratory tract infections are rare in the healthy individual and most of the nuisance morbidity that occurs results from nasopharyngeal viral infections that many people get once or twice a year. The economic impact from these upper respiratory tract infections is appreciable, however, in terms of absenteeism from school or work, but unfortunately there is little that can be done to ward them off in a practical way. Pneumonia is an infrequent lifetime experience for most non-smoking adults and when it occurs, unusual circumstances may pertain--a particularly virulent microorganism is in circulation, or perhaps one has been exposed to a newly recognized germ, such as has occurred with Legionella species in the past 8 years or so. What protects us the great majority of the time is a very effective network of respiratory tract host defenses. These include many mechanical and anatomical barrier mechanisms concentrated in nose and throat; mucociliary clearance, coughing and mucosal immunoglobulins in the conducting airways and in the air-exchange region of the alveolar structures, phagocytes, opsonins, complement, surfactant and many other factors combine to clear infectious agents. The ability to mount an inflammatory response in the alveoli may represent the maximal and ultimate expression of local host defense. In some way these host defenses are combating constantly the influx of micro-organisms, usually inhaled or aspirated into the airways, that try to gain a foothold on the mucosal surface and colonize it. But many general changes in overall health such as debility, poor nutrition, metabolic derangements, bone marrow suppression and perhaps aging promote abnormal microbial colonization and undermine the body's defenses that try to cope with the situation. It is a dynamic struggle. The departure from normal respiratory health may not be obvious immediately to the patient or to the physician and repeated episodes of infection or persisting symptoms of

  19. Participation of the p38 pathway in Drosophila host defense against pathogenic bacteria and fungi.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianming; Xie, Changchuan; Tian, Lili; Hong, Lixin; Wu, Xiurong; Han, Jiahuai

    2010-11-30

    The signaling network of innate immunity in Drosophila is constructed by multiple evolutionarily conserved pathways, including the Toll- or Imd-regulated NF-κB and JNK pathways. The p38 MAPK pathway is evolutionarily conserved in stress responses, but its role in Drosophila host defense is not fully understood. Here we show that the p38 pathway also participates in Drosophila host defense. In comparison with wild-type flies, the sensitivity to microbial infection was slightly higher in the p38a mutant, significantly higher in the p38b mutant, but unchanged in the p38c mutant. The p38b;p38a double-mutant flies were hypersensitive to septic injury. The immunodeficiency of p38b;p38a mutant flies was also demonstrated by hindgut melanization and larvae stage lethality that were induced by microbes naturally presented in fly food. A canonical MAP3K-MKK cascade was found to mediate p38 activation in response to infection in flies. However, neither Toll nor Imd was required for microbe-induced p38 activation. We found that p38-activated heat-shock factor and suppressed JNK collectively contributed to host defense against infection. Together, our data demonstrate that the p38 pathway-mediated stress response contribute to Drosophila host defense against microbial infection.

  20. Salivary mucins in host defense and disease prevention

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel, Erica Shapiro; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Mucus forms a protective coating on wet epithelial surfaces throughout the body that houses the microbiota and plays a key role in host defense. Mucins, the primary structural components of mucus that creates its viscoelastic properties, are critical components of the gel layer that protect against invading pathogens. Altered mucin production has been implicated in diseases such as ulcerative colitis, asthma, and cystic fibrosis, which highlights the importance of mucins in maintaining homeostasis. Different types of mucins exist throughout the body in various locations such as the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and female genital tract, but this review will focus on mucins in the oral cavity. Salivary mucin structure, localization within the oral cavity, and defense mechanisms will be discussed. These concepts will then be applied to present what is known about the protective function of mucins in oral diseases such as HIV/AIDS, oral candidiasis, and dental caries. PMID:26701274

  1. Salivary mucins in host defense and disease prevention.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Erica Shapiro; Ribbeck, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Mucus forms a protective coating on wet epithelial surfaces throughout the body that houses the microbiota and plays a key role in host defense. Mucins, the primary structural components of mucus that creates its viscoelastic properties, are critical components of the gel layer that protect against invading pathogens. Altered mucin production has been implicated in diseases such as ulcerative colitis, asthma, and cystic fibrosis, which highlights the importance of mucins in maintaining homeostasis. Different types of mucins exist throughout the body in various locations such as the gastrointestinal tract, lungs, and female genital tract, but this review will focus on mucins in the oral cavity. Salivary mucin structure, localization within the oral cavity, and defense mechanisms will be discussed. These concepts will then be applied to present what is known about the protective function of mucins in oral diseases such as HIV/AIDS, oral candidiasis, and dental caries. PMID:26701274

  2. Unmasking host and microbial strategies in the Agrobacterium-plant defense tango

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Elizabeth E.; Wang, Melinda B.; Bravo, Janis E.; Banta, Lois M.

    2015-01-01

    Coevolutionary forces drive adaptation of both plant-associated microbes and their hosts. Eloquently captured in the Red Queen Hypothesis, the complexity of each plant–pathogen relationship reflects escalating adversarial strategies, but also external biotic and abiotic pressures on both partners. Innate immune responses are triggered by highly conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or PAMPs, that are harbingers of microbial presence. Upon cell surface receptor-mediated recognition of these pathogen-derived molecules, host plants mount a variety of physiological responses to limit pathogen survival and/or invasion. Successful pathogens often rely on secretion systems to translocate host-modulating effectors that subvert plant defenses, thereby increasing virulence. Host plants, in turn, have evolved to recognize these effectors, activating what has typically been characterized as a pathogen-specific form of immunity. Recent data support the notion that PAMP-triggered and effector-triggered defenses are complementary facets of a convergent, albeit differentially regulated, set of immune responses. This review highlights the key players in the plant’s recognition and signal transduction pathways, with a focus on the aspects that may limit Agrobacterium tumefaciens infection and the ways it might overcome those defenses. Recent advances in the field include a growing appreciation for the contributions of cytoskeletal dynamics and membrane trafficking to the regulation of these exquisitely tuned defenses. Pathogen counter-defenses frequently manipulate the interwoven hormonal pathways that mediate host responses. Emerging systems-level analyses include host physiological factors such as circadian cycling. The existing literature indicates that varying or even conflicting results from different labs may well be attributable to environmental factors including time of day of infection, temperature, and/or developmental stage of the host plant. PMID:25873923

  3. YopJ-Induced Caspase-1 Activation in Yersinia-Infected Macrophages: Independent of Apoptosis, Linked to Necrosis, Dispensable for Innate Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ying; Lilo, Sarit; Mena, Patricio; Bliska, James B.

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) is a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector of pathogenic Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis) that is secreted into host cells. YopJ inhibits survival response pathways in macrophages, causing cell death. Allelic variation of YopJ is responsible for differential cytotoxicity in Yersinia strains. YopJ isoforms in Y. enterocolitica O:8 (YopP) and Y. pestis KIM (YopJKIM) strains have high cytotoxic activity. In addition, YopJKIM-induced macrophage death is associated with caspase-1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β secretion. Here, the mechanism of YopJKIM-induced cell death, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β secretion in primary murine macrophages was examined. Caspase-3/7 activity was low and the caspase-3 substrate poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was not cleaved in Y. pestis KIM5-infected macrophages. In addition, cytotoxicity and IL-1β secretion were not reduced in the presence of a caspase-8 inhibitor, or in B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax)/Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak) knockout macrophages, showing that YopJKIM-mediated cell death and caspase-1 activation occur independent of mitochondrial-directed apoptosis. KIM5-infected macrophages released high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a marker of necrosis, and microscopic analysis revealed that necrotic cells contained active caspase-1, indicating that caspase-1 activation is associated with necrosis. Inhibitor studies showed that receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not required for cytotoxicity or IL-β release in KIM5-infected macrophages. IL-1β secretion was reduced in the presence of cathepsin B inhibitors, suggesting that activation of caspase-1 requires cathepsin B activity. Ectopically-expressed YopP caused higher cytotoxicity and secretion of IL-1β in Y. pseudotuberculosis-infected macrophages than YopJKIM. Wild-type and congenic

  4. YopJ-induced caspase-1 activation in Yersinia-infected macrophages: independent of apoptosis, linked to necrosis, dispensable for innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ying; Lilo, Sarit; Mena, Patricio; Bliska, James B

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia outer protein J (YopJ) is a type III secretion system (T3SS) effector of pathogenic Yersinia (Yersinia pestis, Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis) that is secreted into host cells. YopJ inhibits survival response pathways in macrophages, causing cell death. Allelic variation of YopJ is responsible for differential cytotoxicity in Yersinia strains. YopJ isoforms in Y. enterocolitica O:8 (YopP) and Y. pestis KIM (YopJ(KIM)) strains have high cytotoxic activity. In addition, YopJ(KIM)-induced macrophage death is associated with caspase-1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β secretion. Here, the mechanism of YopJ(KIM)-induced cell death, caspase-1 activation, and IL-1β secretion in primary murine macrophages was examined. Caspase-3/7 activity was low and the caspase-3 substrate poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) was not cleaved in Y. pestis KIM5-infected macrophages. In addition, cytotoxicity and IL-1β secretion were not reduced in the presence of a caspase-8 inhibitor, or in B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax)/Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak) knockout macrophages, showing that YopJ(KIM)-mediated cell death and caspase-1 activation occur independent of mitochondrial-directed apoptosis. KIM5-infected macrophages released high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1), a marker of necrosis, and microscopic analysis revealed that necrotic cells contained active caspase-1, indicating that caspase-1 activation is associated with necrosis. Inhibitor studies showed that receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) kinase and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not required for cytotoxicity or IL-β release in KIM5-infected macrophages. IL-1β secretion was reduced in the presence of cathepsin B inhibitors, suggesting that activation of caspase-1 requires cathepsin B activity. Ectopically-expressed YopP caused higher cytotoxicity and secretion of IL-1β in Y. pseudotuberculosis-infected macrophages than YopJ(KIM). Wild-type and

  5. Functions of antimicrobial peptides in host defense and immunity.

    PubMed

    Beisswenger, Christoph; Bals, Robert

    2005-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are effector molecules of the innate immune system. AMPs have a broad antimicrobial spectrum and lyse microbial cells by interaction with biomembranes. Besides their direct antimicrobial function, they have multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis, immune induction, and protease-antiprotease balance. Furthermore, AMPs qualify as prototypes of innovative drugs that may be used as antibiotics, anti-lipopolysaccharide drugs, or modifiers of inflammation. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the basic and applied biology of antimicrobial peptides and discusses features of AMPs in host defense and inflammation.

  6. Non-host defense response in a novel Arabidopsis-Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri pathosystem.

    PubMed

    An, Chuanfu; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus. Progress of breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties is modest due to limited resistant germplasm resources and lack of candidate genes for genetic manipulation. The objective of this study is to establish a novel heterologous pathosystem between Xcc and the well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana for defense mechanism dissection and resistance gene identification. Our results indicate that Xcc bacteria neither grow nor decline in Arabidopsis, but induce multiple defense responses including callose deposition, reactive oxygen species and salicylic aicd (SA) production, and defense gene expression, indicating that Xcc activates non-host resistance in Arabidopsis. Moreover, Xcc-induced defense gene expression is suppressed or attenuated in several well-characterized SA signaling mutants including eds1, pad4, eds5, sid2, and npr1. Interestingly, resistance to Xcc is compromised only in eds1, pad4, and eds5, but not in sid2 and npr1. However, combining sid2 and npr1 in the sid2npr1 double mutant compromises resistance to Xcc, suggesting genetic interactions likely exist between SID2 and NPR1 in the non-host resistance against Xcc in Arabidopsis. These results demonstrate that the SA signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating non-host defense against Xcc in Arabidopsis and suggest that the SA signaling pathway genes may hold great potential for breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties through modern gene transfer technology.

  7. Fibrinogen Is at the Interface of Host Defense and Pathogen Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Flick, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    Fibrinogen not only plays a pivotal role in hemostasis but also serves key roles in antimicrobial host defense. As a rapidly assembled provisional matrix protein, fibrin(ogen) can function as an early line of host protection by limiting bacterial growth, suppressing dissemination of microbes to distant sites, and mediating host bacterial killing. Fibrinogen-mediated host antimicrobial activity occurs predominantly through two general mechanisms, namely, fibrin matrices functioning as a protective barrier and fibrin(ogen) directly or indirectly driving host protective immune function. The potential of fibrin to limit bacterial infection and disease has been countered by numerous bacterial species evolving and maintaining virulence factors that engage hemostatic system components within vertebrate hosts. Bacterial factors have been isolated that simply bind fibrinogen or fibrin, promote fibrin polymer formation, or promote fibrin dissolution. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic gram-positive bacterium, the causative agent of a wide range of human infectious diseases, and a prime example of a pathogen exquisitely sensitive to host fibrinogen. Indeed, current data suggest fibrinogen serves as a context-dependent determinant of host defense or pathogen virulence in Staphylococcus infection whose ultimate contribution is dictated by the expression of S. aureus virulence factors, the path of infection, and the tissue microenvironment. PMID:27056151

  8. Chronic pyelonephritis: Modulation of host defenses by cyclosporin A

    SciTech Connect

    Findon, G.; Miller, T.E. )

    1989-08-01

    Chronic experimental pyelonephritis is characterized by a stable level of infection, which persists for many months. Administration of cyclosporin A (CsA) reactivated previously healed renal lesions and caused a marked increase in bacterial numbers in the kidney. Studies were then carried out to compare the effects of CsA, and the nonselective cytodepletive agents irradiation and cyclophosphamide, on both host defenses and the bacteriologic status of chronically infected kidneys. Two different responses were observed. In animals treated with CsA, bacterial numbers increased markedly, although circulating neutrophil numbers were relatively unaffected. This observation was in contrast to the severe ablation of leukocyte numbers and competence needed to achieve an equivalent effect when irradiation and cyclophosphamide were used. One possible explanation for the adverse effect of CsA on the host-parasite balance in chronic pyelonephritis is that CsA affects mediators that control the inflammatory response or induces a qualitative change in a critical cellular defense compartment.

  9. Glutathione Reductase Is Essential for Host Defense against Bacterial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jing; Ralston, Melissa M.; Meng, Xiaomei; Bongiovanni, Kathleen D.; Jones, Amanda L.; Benndorf, Rainer; Nelin, Leif D.; Frazier, W. Joshua; Rogers, Lynette K.; Smith, Charles V.; Liu, Yusen

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (Gsr)1 catalyzes the reduction of glutathione disulfide to glutathione, a major cellular antioxidant. We have recently shown that Gsr is essential for host defense against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli in a mouse model of sepsis. While we have demonstrated that Gsr is required for sustaining the oxidative burst and the development of neutrophil extracellular traps, the role of Gsr in other phagocytic functions remains unclear. It is also unclear whether Gsr-deficient mice exhibit host defense defects against Gram-positive bacteria. In the present study, we characterized the effects of Gsr deficiency on the innate immune responses to a Gram-positive bacterium, group B Streptococcus, and to the Gram-negative bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that like, E. coli, group B Streptococcus resulted in a substantially more robust cytokine response and a markedly higher morbidity and mortality in Gsr-deficient mice than in wildtype mice. The increased morbidity and mortality were associated with greater bacterial burden in the Gsr-deficient mice. Interestingly, Gsr-deficient mice did not exhibit a greater sensitivity to LPS than did wildtype mice. Analysis of the neutrophils of Gsr-deficient mice revealed impaired phagocytosis. In response to thioglycollate stimulation, Gsr-deficient mice mobilized far fewer phagocytes, including neutrophils, macrophages, and eosinophils, into their peritoneal cavities than did wildtype mice. The defective phagocyte mobilization is associated with profound oxidation and aggregation of ascitic proteins, particularly albumin. Our results indicate that the oxidative defense mechanism mediated by Gsr is required for an effective innate immune response against bacteria, likely by preventing phagocyte dysfunction due to oxidative damage. PMID:23623936

  10. A cupin domain-containing protein with a quercetinase activity (VdQase) regulates Verticillium dahliae's pathogenicity and contributes to counteracting host defenses

    PubMed Central

    El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Islam, Md. Rashidul; Adam, Lorne R.; Daayf, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified rutin as part of potato root responses to its pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Rutin was directly toxic to the pathogen at doses greater than 160 μM, a threshold below which many V. dahliae pathogenicity-related genes were up-regulated. We identified and characterized a cupin domain-containing protein (VdQase) with a dioxygenase activity and a potential role in V. dahliae-potato interactions. The pathogenicity of VdQase knock-out mutants generated through Agrobacterium tumefasciens-mediated transformation was significantly reduced on susceptible potato cultivar Kennebec compared to wild type isolates. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a higher accumulation of flavonols in the stems of infected potatoes and a higher concentration of rutin in the leaves in response to the VdQase mutants as compared to wild type isolates. This, along with the HPLC characterization of high residual and non-utilized quercetin in presence of the knockout mutants, indicates the involvement of VdQase in the catabolism of quercetin and possibly other flavonols in planta. Quantification of Salicylic and Jasmonic Acids (SA, JA) in response to the mutants vs. wild type isolates revealed involvement of VdQase in the interference with signaling, suggesting a role in pathogenicity. It is hypothesized that the by-product of dioxygenation 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinolcarboxylic acid, after dissociating into phloroglucinol and protocatechuoyl moieties, becomes a starting point for benzoic acid and SA, thereby interfering with the JA pathway and affecting the interaction outcome. These events may be key factors for V. dahliae in countering potato defenses and becoming notorious in the rhizosphere. PMID:26113857

  11. Host defense peptides and their antimicrobial-immunomodulatory duality.

    PubMed

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Kraneburg, Ursula; Jacobsen, Frank; Al-Benna, Sammy

    2011-03-01

    Host defence peptides (HDPs) are short cationic molecules produced by the immune systems of most multicellular organisms and play a central role as effector molecules of innate immunity. Host defence peptides have a wide range of biological activities from direct killing of invading pathogens to modulation of immunity and other biological responses of the host. HDPs have important functions in multiple, clinically relevant disease processes and their imbalanced expression is associated with pathology in different organ systems and cell types. Furthermore, HDPs are now evaluated as model molecules for the development of novel natural antibiotics and immunoregulatory compounds. This review provides an overview of HDPs focused on their antimicrobial-immunomodulatory duality.

  12. Antimicrobial and host-defense peptides as new anti-infective therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Robert E W; Sahl, Hans-Georg

    2006-12-01

    Short cationic amphiphilic peptides with antimicrobial and/or immunomodulatory activities are present in virtually every life form, as an important component of (innate) immune defenses. These host-defense peptides provide a template for two separate classes of antimicrobial drugs. Direct-acting antimicrobial host-defense peptides can be rapid-acting and potent, and possess an unusually broad spectrum of activity; consequently, they have prospects as new antibiotics, although clinical trials to date have shown efficacy only as topical agents. But for these compounds to fulfill their therapeutic promise and overcome clinical setbacks, further work is needed to understand their mechanisms of action and reduce the potential for unwanted toxicity, to make them more resistant to protease degradation and improve serum half-life, as well as to devise means of manufacturing them on a large scale in a consistent and cost-effective manner. In contrast, the role of cationic host-defense peptides in modulating the innate immune response and boosting infection-resolving immunity while dampening potentially harmful pro-inflammatory (septic) responses gives these peptides the potential to become an entirely new therapeutic approach against bacterial infections.

  13. An Evolutionarily Conserved PLC-PKD-TFEB Pathway for Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Mehran; Labed, Sid Ahmed; Visvikis, Orane; Irazoqui, Javier Elbio

    2016-05-24

    The mechanisms that tightly control the transcription of host defense genes have not been fully elucidated. We previously identified TFEB as a transcription factor important for host defense, but the mechanisms that regulate TFEB during infection remained unknown. Here, we used C. elegans to discover a pathway that activates TFEB during infection. Gene dkf-1, which encodes a homolog of protein kinase D (PKD), was required for TFEB activation in nematodes infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Conversely, pharmacological activation of PKD was sufficient to activate TFEB. Furthermore, phospholipase C (PLC) gene plc-1 was also required for TFEB activation, downstream of Gαq homolog egl-30 and upstream of dkf-1. Using reverse and chemical genetics, we discovered a similar PLC-PKD-TFEB axis in Salmonella-infected mouse macrophages. In addition, PKCα was required in macrophages. These observations reveal a previously unknown host defense signaling pathway, which has been conserved across one billion years of evolution.

  14. An Evolutionarily Conserved PLC-PKD-TFEB Pathway for Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Najibi, Mehran; Labed, Sid Ahmed; Visvikis, Orane; Irazoqui, Javier Elbio

    2016-05-24

    The mechanisms that tightly control the transcription of host defense genes have not been fully elucidated. We previously identified TFEB as a transcription factor important for host defense, but the mechanisms that regulate TFEB during infection remained unknown. Here, we used C. elegans to discover a pathway that activates TFEB during infection. Gene dkf-1, which encodes a homolog of protein kinase D (PKD), was required for TFEB activation in nematodes infected with Staphylococcus aureus. Conversely, pharmacological activation of PKD was sufficient to activate TFEB. Furthermore, phospholipase C (PLC) gene plc-1 was also required for TFEB activation, downstream of Gαq homolog egl-30 and upstream of dkf-1. Using reverse and chemical genetics, we discovered a similar PLC-PKD-TFEB axis in Salmonella-infected mouse macrophages. In addition, PKCα was required in macrophages. These observations reveal a previously unknown host defense signaling pathway, which has been conserved across one billion years of evolution. PMID:27184844

  15. A Review of Ribonuclease 7’s Structure, Regulation, and Contributions to Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Becknell, Brian; Spencer, John David

    2016-01-01

    The Ribonuclease A Superfamily is composed of a group of structurally similar peptides that are secreted by immune cells and epithelial tissues. Several members of the Ribonuclease A Superfamily demonstrate antimicrobial activity, and it has been suggested that some of these ribonucleases play an essential role in host defense. Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is an epithelial-derived secreted peptide with potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. This review summarizes the published literature on RNase 7’s antimicrobial properties, structure, regulation, and contributions to host defense. In doing so, we conclude by highlighting key knowledge gaps that must be investigated to completely understand the potential of developing RNase 7 as a novel therapeutic for human infectious diseases. PMID:27011175

  16. A Review of Ribonuclease 7's Structure, Regulation, and Contributions to Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Brian; Spencer, John David

    2016-01-01

    The Ribonuclease A Superfamily is composed of a group of structurally similar peptides that are secreted by immune cells and epithelial tissues. Several members of the Ribonuclease A Superfamily demonstrate antimicrobial activity, and it has been suggested that some of these ribonucleases play an essential role in host defense. Ribonuclease 7 (RNase 7) is an epithelial-derived secreted peptide with potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. This review summarizes the published literature on RNase 7's antimicrobial properties, structure, regulation, and contributions to host defense. In doing so, we conclude by highlighting key knowledge gaps that must be investigated to completely understand the potential of developing RNase 7 as a novel therapeutic for human infectious diseases. PMID:27011175

  17. Addicted? Reduced host resistance in populations with defensive symbionts

    PubMed Central

    Cogni, Rodrigo; Cao, Chuan; Smith, Sophie; Illingworth, Christopher J. R.; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2016-01-01

    Heritable symbionts that protect their hosts from pathogens have been described in a wide range of insect species. By reducing the incidence or severity of infection, these symbionts have the potential to reduce the strength of selection on genes in the insect genome that increase resistance. Therefore, the presence of such symbionts may slow down the evolution of resistance. Here we investigated this idea by exposing Drosophila melanogaster populations to infection with the pathogenic Drosophila C virus (DCV) in the presence or absence of Wolbachia, a heritable symbiont of arthropods that confers protection against viruses. After nine generations of selection, we found that resistance to DCV had increased in all populations. However, in the presence of Wolbachia the resistant allele of pastrel—a gene that has a major effect on resistance to DCV—was at a lower frequency than in the symbiont-free populations. This finding suggests that defensive symbionts have the potential to hamper the evolution of insect resistance genes, potentially leading to a state of evolutionary addiction where the genetically susceptible insect host mostly relies on its symbiont to fight pathogens. PMID:27335421

  18. Granzyme A impairs host defense during Streptococcus pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    van den Boogaard, Florry E; van Gisbergen, Klaas P J M; Vernooy, Juanita H; Medema, Jan P; Roelofs, Joris J T H; van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Endeman, Henrik; Biesma, Douwe H; Boon, Louis; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2016-08-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common causative pathogen in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Granzyme A (GzmA) is a serine protease produced by a variety of cell types involved in the immune response. We sought to determine the role of GzmA on the host response during pneumococcal pneumonia. GzmA was measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from CAP patients from the infected and contralateral uninfected side and in lung tissue slides from CAP patients and controls. In CAP patients, GzmA levels were increased in BALF obtained from the infected lung. Human lungs showed constitutive GzmA expression by both parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells. In an experimental setting, pneumonia was induced in wild-type (WT) and GzmA-deficient (GzmA(-/-)) mice by intranasal inoculation of S. pneumoniae In separate experiments, WT and GzmA(-/-) mice were treated with natural killer (NK) cell depleting antibodies. Upon infection with S. pneumoniae, GzmA(-/-) mice showed a better survival and lower bacterial counts in BALF and distant body sites compared with WT mice. Although NK cells showed strong GzmA expression, NK cell depletion did not influence bacterial loads in either WT or GzmA(-/-) mice. These results implicate that GzmA plays an unfavorable role in host defense during pneumococcal pneumonia by a mechanism that does not depend on NK cells. PMID:27343190

  19. Function of Nod-like Receptors in Microbial Recognition and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Franchi, Luigi; Warner, Neil; Viani, Kyle; Nuñez, Gabriel

    2009-01-01

    Summary Nucleotide oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are a specialized group of intracellular proteins that play a critical role in the regulation of the host innate immune response. NLRs act as scaffolding proteins that assemble signaling platforms that trigger nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and control the activation of inflammatory caspases. Importantly, mutations in several members of the NLR family have been linked to a variety of inflammatory diseases consistent with these molecules playing an important role in host-pathogen interactions and the inflammatory response. In this review, we focus on the role of Nod1 and Nod2 in host defense and in particular discuss recent finding regarding the role of Nlrc4, Nlpr1, and Nlrp3 inflammasomes in caspase-1 activation and subsequent release of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β. PMID:19120480

  20. Comparative proteome analysis of the strawberry-Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae pathosystem reveals early activation of defense responses as a crucial determinant of host resistance.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xiangling; Jost, Ricarda; Finnegan, Patrick M; Barbetti, Martin J

    2013-04-01

    Fusarium wilt on strawberry caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. fragariae (Fof) is a serious threat to commercial strawberry production worldwide. However, resistance mechanisms of strawberry against Fof remain unknown. To reveal the defense responses of strawberry against Fof, comparative proteome analyses were conducted to determine temporal changes in root proteomes of the resistant cv. Festival and susceptible cv. Camarosa from 4 to 72 h post inoculation with Fof. Analysis of proteins separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis revealed 79 Fof-responsive proteins with significant differences in abundance (P < 0.05 and greater than 2-fold) in the resistant and/or susceptible cultivar. The 79 proteins were identified through MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS analysis, and were mainly involved in primary, secondary and protein metabolism, stress and defense responses, antioxidant and detoxification mechanisms, and hormone biosynthesis. Among these, pathogenesis-related proteins and proteins involved in reactive oxygen species detoxification, ethylene/jasmonic acid signaling pathways, secondary metabolite biosynthesis, glycolysis and/or ubiquitin/26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation have great potential in mediating strawberry resistance against Fof. Protein modification may also have an important contribution. This study provides the first insights into strawberry resistance mechanisms against Fof, opening novel avenues to engineer new strawberry cultivars with improved disease resistance and to develop more effective and sustainable disease management strategies. PMID:23495785

  1. Platelets as immune mediators: their role in host defense responses and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenyu; Yang, Fanmuyi; Dunn, Steve; Gross, A Kendall; Smyth, Susan S

    2011-03-01

    Platelets occupy a central role at the interface between thrombosis and inflammation. At sites of vascular damage, adherent platelets physically and functionally interact with circulating leukocytes. Activated platelets release soluble factors into circulation that may have local and systemic effects on blood and vascular cells. Platelets can also interact with a wide variety of microbial pathogens. Emerging evidence from animal models suggests that platelets may participate in a wide variety of processes involving tissue injury, immune responses and repair that underlie diverse diseases such as atherosclerosis, autoimmune disorders, inflammatory lung and bowel disorders, host-defense responses and sepsis. In this review, we summarize the general mechanisms by which platelets may contribute to immune function, and then discuss evidence for their role in host defense responses and sepsis from preclinical and clinical studies.

  2. Cationic host defense peptides; novel antimicrobial therapeutics against Category A pathogens and emerging infections.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Fern; Proudfoot, Lorna; Stevens, Craig; Barlow, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Cationic Host Defense Peptides (HDP, also known as antimicrobial peptides) are crucial components of the innate immune system and possess broad-spectrum antibacterial, antiviral, and immunomodulatory activities. They can contribute to the rapid clearance of biological agents through direct killing of the organisms, inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators such as lipopolysaccharide, and by modulating the inflammatory response to infection. Category A biological agents and materials, as classified by the United States National Institutes for Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Department of Homeland Security, carry the most severe threat in terms of human health, transmissibility, and preparedness. As such, there is a pressing need for novel frontline approaches for prevention and treatment of diseases caused by these organisms, and exploiting the broad antimicrobial activity exhibited by cationic host defense peptides represents an exciting priority area for clinical research. This review will summarize what is known about the antimicrobial and antiviral effects of the two main families of cationic host defense peptides, cathelicidins, and defensins in the context of Category A biological agents which include, but are not limited to; anthrax (Bacillus anthracis), plague (Yersinia pestis), smallpox (Variola major), tularemia (Francisella tularensis). In addition, we highlight priority areas, particularly emerging viral infections, where more extensive research is urgently required. PMID:27315342

  3. Cationic host defense peptides; novel antimicrobial therapeutics against Category A pathogens and emerging infections.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Fern; Proudfoot, Lorna; Stevens, Craig; Barlow, Peter G

    2016-01-01

    Cationic Host Defense Peptides (HDP, also known as antimicrobial peptides) are crucial components of the innate immune system and possess broad-spectrum antibacterial, antiviral, and immunomodulatory activities. They can contribute to the rapid clearance of biological agents through direct killing of the organisms, inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators such as lipopolysaccharide, and by modulating the inflammatory response to infection. Category A biological agents and materials, as classified by the United States National Institutes for Health, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the US Department of Homeland Security, carry the most severe threat in terms of human health, transmissibility, and preparedness. As such, there is a pressing need for novel frontline approaches for prevention and treatment of diseases caused by these organisms, and exploiting the broad antimicrobial activity exhibited by cationic host defense peptides represents an exciting priority area for clinical research. This review will summarize what is known about the antimicrobial and antiviral effects of the two main families of cationic host defense peptides, cathelicidins, and defensins in the context of Category A biological agents which include, but are not limited to; anthrax (Bacillus anthracis), plague (Yersinia pestis), smallpox (Variola major), tularemia (Francisella tularensis). In addition, we highlight priority areas, particularly emerging viral infections, where more extensive research is urgently required.

  4. The transcriptional responses of respiratory epithelial cells to Bordetella pertussis reveal host defensive and pathogen counter-defensive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Belcher, Christopher E.; Drenkow, Jörg; Kehoe, Bettina; Gingeras, Thomas R.; McNamara, Nancy; Lemjabbar, Hassan; Basbaum, Carol; Relman, David A.

    2000-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, has many well-studied virulence factors and a characteristic clinical presentation. Despite this information, it is not clear how B. pertussis interaction with host cells leads to disease. In this study, we examined the interaction of B. pertussis with a human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) and measured host transcriptional profiles by using high-density DNA microarrays. The early transcriptional response to this pathogen is dominated by altered expression of cytokines, DNA-binding proteins, and NFκB-regulated genes. This previously unrecognized response to B. pertussis was modified in similar but nonidentical fashions by the antiinflammatory agents dexamethasone and sodium salicylate. Cytokine protein expression was confirmed, as was neutrophil chemoattraction. We show that B. pertussis induces mucin gene transcription by BEAS-2B cells then counters this defense by using mucin as a binding substrate. A set of genes is described for which the catalytic activity of pertussis toxin is both necessary and sufficient to regulate transcription. Host genomic transcriptional profiling, in combination with functional assays to evaluate subsequent biological events, provides insight into the complex interaction of host and pathogen. PMID:11087813

  5. Cuckoos combat socially transmitted defenses of reed warbler hosts with a plumage polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Thorogood, Rose; Davies, Nicholas B

    2012-08-01

    In predator-prey and host-parasite interactions, an individual's ability to combat an opponent often improves with experience--for example, by learning to identify enemy signals. Although learning occurs through individual experience, individuals can also assess threats from social information. Such recognition could promote the evolution of polymorphisms if socially transmitted defenses depend on enemy morph frequency. This would allow rare variants to evade detection. Female brood parasitic common cuckoos, Cuculus canorus, are either gray or rufous. The gray morph is a Batesian mimic whose hawk-like appearance deters host attack. Hosts reject this disguise through social learning, increasing their own defenses when they witness neighbors mobbing a cuckoo. Our experiments reveal that social learning is specific to the cuckoo morph that neighbors mob. Therefore, while neighbors alert hosts to local cuckoo activity, frequency-dependent social information selects for a cuckoo plumage polymorphism to thwart host detection. Our results suggest that selection for mimicry and polymorphisms comes not only from personal experience but also from social learning. PMID:22859487

  6. Non-Host Defense Response in a Novel Arabidopsis-Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri Pathosystem

    PubMed Central

    An, Chuanfu; Mou, Zhonglin

    2012-01-01

    Citrus canker, caused by Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (Xcc), is one of the most destructive diseases of citrus. Progress of breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties is modest due to limited resistant germplasm resources and lack of candidate genes for genetic manipulation. The objective of this study is to establish a novel heterologous pathosystem between Xcc and the well-established model plant Arabidopsis thaliana for defense mechanism dissection and resistance gene identification. Our results indicate that Xcc bacteria neither grow nor decline in Arabidopsis, but induce multiple defense responses including callose deposition, reactive oxygen species and salicylic aicd (SA) production, and defense gene expression, indicating that Xcc activates non-host resistance in Arabidopsis. Moreover, Xcc-induced defense gene expression is suppressed or attenuated in several well-characterized SA signaling mutants including eds1, pad4, eds5, sid2, and npr1. Interestingly, resistance to Xcc is compromised only in eds1, pad4, and eds5, but not in sid2 and npr1. However, combining sid2 and npr1 in the sid2npr1 double mutant compromises resistance to Xcc, suggesting genetic interactions likely exist between SID2 and NPR1 in the non-host resistance against Xcc in Arabidopsis. These results demonstrate that the SA signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating non-host defense against Xcc in Arabidopsis and suggest that the SA signaling pathway genes may hold great potential for breeding citrus canker-resistant varieties through modern gene transfer technology. PMID:22299054

  7. Host defense peptides as effector molecules of the innate immune response: a sledgehammer for drug resistance?

    PubMed

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Kraneburg, Ursula M; Hirsch, Tobias; Kesting, Marco; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobsen, Frank; Al-Benna, Sammy

    2009-09-09

    Host defense peptides can modulate the innate immune response and boost infection-resolving immunity, while dampening potentially harmful pro-inflammatory (septic) responses. Both antimicrobial and/or immunomodulatory activities are an integral part of the process of innate immunity, which itself has many of the hallmarks of successful anti-infective therapies, namely rapid action and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activities. This gives these peptides the potential to become an entirely new therapeutic approach against bacterial infections. This review details the role and activities of these peptides, and examines their applicability as development candidates for use against bacterial infections.

  8. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition

    PubMed Central

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  9. Guardian of the Human Genome: Host Defense Mechanisms against LINE-1 Retrotransposition.

    PubMed

    Ariumi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Long interspersed element type 1 (LINE-1, L1) is a mobile genetic element comprising about 17% of the human genome, encoding a newly identified ORF0 with unknown function, ORF1p with RNA-binding activity and ORF2p with endonuclease and reverse transcriptase activities required for L1 retrotransposition. L1 utilizes an endonuclease (EN) to insert L1 cDNA into target DNA, which induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is activated by DSBs and subsequently the ATM-signaling pathway plays a role in regulating L1 retrotransposition. In addition, the host DNA repair machinery such as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair pathway is also involved in L1 retrotransposition. On the other hand, L1 is an insertional mutagenic agent, which contributes to genetic change, genomic instability, and tumorigenesis. Indeed, high-throughput sequencing-based approaches identified numerous tumor-specific somatic L1 insertions in variety of cancers, such as colon cancer, breast cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In fact, L1 retrotransposition seems to be a potential factor to reduce the tumor suppressive property in HCC. Furthermore, recent study demonstrated that a specific viral-human chimeric transcript, HBx-L1, contributes to hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated HCC. In contrast, host cells have evolved several defense mechanisms protecting cells against retrotransposition including epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation and host defense factors, such as APOBEC3, MOV10, and SAMHD1, which restrict L1 mobility as a guardian of the human genome. In this review, I focus on somatic L1 insertions into the human genome in cancers and host defense mechanisms against deleterious L1 insertions. PMID:27446907

  10. NLRP12 Modulates Host Defense through IL-17A-CXCL1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shanshan; Batra, Sanjay; Piero, Fabio Del; Jeyaseelan, Samithamby

    2015-01-01

    We used an extracellular pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae to determine the role of NLRP12 since this bacterium is associated with devastating pulmonary infections. We found human myeloid cells (neutrophils and macrophages) and non-myeloid cells (epithelial cells) show upregulation of NLRP12 in human pneumonic lungs. NLRP12 silenced human macrophages and murine Nlrp12−/− macrophages displayed reduced activation of NF-κB and MAPK and expression of HDACs following K. pneumoniae infection. NLRP12 is important for the production of IL-1β in human and murine macrophages following K. pneumoniae infection. Furthermore, host survival, bacterial clearance and neutrophil recruitment are dependent on NLRP12 following K. pneumoniae infection. Using bone marrow chimeras, we showed that hematopoietic cell driven NLRP12 signaling predominantly contributes to host defense against K. pneumoniae. Intratracheal administration of either IL-17A+ CD4 T cells or CXCL1+ macrophages rescues host survival, bacterial clearance, and neutrophil recruitment in Nlrp12−/− mice following K. pneumoniae infection. These novel findings reveal the critical role of NLRP12-IL-17A-CXCL1 axis in host defense via modulating neutrophil recruitment against this extracellular pathogen. PMID:26349659

  11. Identification and characterization of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 from Litopenaeus vannamei involved in anti-bacterial host defense.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng; Li, Haoyang; Lǚ, Kai; Qian, Zhe; Weng, Shaoping; He, Jianguo; Li, Chaozheng

    2016-05-01

    LvTAK1, a member of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) families, has been identified from Litopenaeus vannamei in this study. The full length of LvTAK1 is 2670 bp, including a 2277 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encoded a putative protein of 758 amino acids with a calculated molecular weight of ∼83.4 kDa LvTAK1 expression was most abundant in muscles and was up-regulated in gills after LPS, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Staphylococcus aureus, Poly (I:C) and WSSV challenge. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments indicated that LvTAK1 could activate the expression of several antimicrobial peptide genes (AMPs). In addition, the dsRNA-mediated knockdown of LvTAK1 enhanced the susceptibility of shrimps to Vibrio parahaemolyticus, a kind of Gram-negative bacteria. These results suggested LvTAK1 played important roles in anti-bacterial infection. CoIP and subcellular localization assay demonstrated that LvTAK1 could interact with its binding protein LvTAB2, a key component of IMD pathway. Moreover, over-expression of LvTAK1 in Drosophila S2 cell could strongly induce the promoter activity of Diptericin (Dpt), a typical AMP which is used to read out of the activation of IMD pathway. These findings suggested that LvTAK1 could function as a component of IMD pathway. Interestingly, with the over-expression of LvTAK1 in S2 cell, the promoter activity of Metchnikowin (Mtk), a main target gene of Toll/Dif pathway, was up-regulated over 30 times, suggesting that LvTAK1 may also take part in signal transduction of the Toll pathway. In conclusion, we provided some evidences that the involvement of LvTAK1 in the regulation of both Toll and IMD pathways, as well as innate immune against bacterial infection in shrimp.

  12. Complementary Effects of Host Defense Peptides Piscidin 1 and Piscidin 3 on DNA and Lipid Membranes: Biophysical Insights into Contrasting Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Robert M; Goldberg, Gina K; Ferguson, Bryan M; Schoeneck, Mason W; Libardo, M Daben J; Mayeux, Sophie E; Shrestha, Akritee; Bogardus, Kimberly A; Hammer, Janet; Pryshchep, Sergey; Lehman, Herman K; McCormick, Michael L; Blazyk, Jack; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M; Fu, Riqiang; Cotten, Myriam L

    2015-12-10

    Piscidins were the first antimicrobial peptides discovered in the mast cells of vertebrates. While two family members, piscidin 1 (p1) and piscidin 3 (p3), have highly similar sequences and α-helical structures when bound to model membranes, p1 generally exhibits stronger antimicrobial and hemolytic activity than p3 for reasons that remain elusive. In this study, we combine activity assays and biophysical methods to investigate the mechanisms underlying the cellular function and differing biological potencies of these peptides, and report findings spanning three major facets. First, added to Gram-positive (Bacillus megaterium) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria at sublethal concentrations and imaged by confocal microscopy, both p1 and p3 translocate across cell membranes and colocalize with nucleoids. In E. coli, translocation is accompanied by nonlethal permeabilization that features more pronounced leakage for p1. Second, p1 is also more disruptive than p3 to bacterial model membranes, as quantified by a dye-leakage assay and (2)H solid-state NMR-monitored lipid acyl chain order parameters. Oriented CD studies in the same bilayers show that, beyond a critical peptide concentration, both peptides transition from a surface-bound state to a tilted orientation. Third, gel retardation experiments and CD-monitored titrations on isolated DNA demonstrate that both peptides bind DNA but p3 has stronger condensing effects. Notably, solid-state NMR reveals that the peptides are α-helical when bound to DNA. Overall, these studies identify two polyreactive piscidin isoforms that bind phosphate-containing targets in a poised amphipathic α-helical conformation, disrupt bacterial membranes, and access the intracellular constituents of target cells. Remarkably, the two isoforms have complementary effects; p1 is more membrane active, while p3 has stronger DNA-condensing effects. Subtle differences in their physicochemical properties are highlighted to help explain

  13. IgE and mast cells in host defense against parasites and venoms.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Kaori; Tsai, Mindy; Starkl, Philipp; Marichal, Thomas; Galli, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    IgE-dependent mast cell activation is a major effector mechanism underlying the pathology associated with allergic disorders. The most dramatic of these IgE-associated disorders is the fatal anaphylaxis which can occur in some people who have developed IgE antibodies to otherwise innocuous antigens, such as those contained in certain foods and medicines. Why would such a highly "maladaptive" immune response develop in evolution and be retained to the present day? Host defense against parasites has long been considered the only beneficial function that might be conferred by IgE and mast cells. However, recent studies have provided evidence that, in addition to participating in host resistance to certain parasites, mast cells and IgE are critical components of innate (mast cells) and adaptive (mast cells and IgE) immune responses that can enhance host defense against the toxicity of certain arthropod and animal venoms, including enhancing the survival of mice injected with such venoms. Yet, in some people, developing IgE antibodies to insect or snake venoms puts them at risk for having a potentially fatal anaphylactic reaction upon subsequent exposure to such venoms. Delineating the mechanisms underlying beneficial versus detrimental innate and adaptive immune responses associated with mast cell activation and IgE is likely to enhance our ability to identify potential therapeutic targets in such settings, not only for reducing the pathology associated with allergic disorders but perhaps also for enhancing immune protection against pathogens and animal venoms. PMID:27225312

  14. Polyamines Can Increase Resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to Mediators of the Innate Human Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Goytia, Maira; Shafer, William M.

    2010-01-01

    Polyamines are biogenic polycationic molecules involved in key cellular functions. Extracellular polyamines found in bodily fluids or laboratory media can be imported by bacteria or bind to negatively charged bacterial surface structures, where they can impair binding of antimicrobials. We hypothesized that the presence of polyamines in fluids that bathe urogenital mucosal surfaces could alter the susceptibility of the sexually transmitted strict human pathogen Neisseria gonorrhoeae to mediators of the innate host defense. Herein we report that polyamines can significantly increase gonococcal resistance to two structurally diverse cationic antimicrobial peptides (polymyxin B and LL-37) but not to antibiotics that exert activity in the cytosol or periplasm (e.g., ciprofloxacin, spectinomycin, or penicillin). The capacity of polyamines to increase gonococcal resistance to cationic antimicrobial peptides was dose dependent, correlated with the degree of cationicity, independent of a polyamine transport system involving the polyamine permeases PotH and PotI, and was reversible. In addition, we found that polyamines increase gonococcal resistance to complement-mediated killing by normal human serum. We propose that polyamines in genital mucosal fluids may enhance gonococcal survival during infection by reducing bacterial susceptibility to host-derived antimicrobials that function in innate host defense. PMID:20439477

  15. IL-32 is a molecular marker of a host defense network in human tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Montoya, Dennis; Inkeles, Megan S.; Liu, Phillip T.; Realegeno, Susan; Teles, Rosane M. B.; Vaidya, Poorva; Munoz, Marcos A.; Schenk, Mirjam; Swindell, William R.; Chun, Rene; Zavala, Kathryn; Hewison, Martin; Adams, John S.; Horvath, Steve; Pellegrini, Matteo; Bloom, Barry R.; Modlin, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of infectious disease–related death worldwide; however, only 10% of people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis develop disease. Factors that contribute to protection could prove to be promising targets for M. tuberculosis therapies. Analysis of peripheral blood gene expression profiles of active tuberculosis patients has identified correlates of risk for disease or pathogenesis. We sought to identify potential human candidate markers of host defense by studying gene expression profiles of macrophages, cells that, upon infection by M. tuberculosis, can mount an antimicrobial response. Weighted gene coexpression network analysis revealed an association between the cytokine interleukin-32 (IL-32) and the vitamin D antimicrobial pathway in a network of interferon-γ– and IL-15–induced “defense response” genes. IL-32 induced the vitamin D–dependent antimicrobial peptides cathelicidin and DEFB4 and to generate antimicrobial activity in vitro, dependent on the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. In addition, the IL-15–induced defense response macrophage gene network was integrated with ranked pairwise comparisons of gene expression from five different clinical data sets of latent compared with active tuberculosis or healthy controls and a coexpression network derived from gene expression in patients with tuberculosis undergoing chemotherapy. Together, these analyses identified eight common genes, including IL-32, as molecular markers of latent tuberculosis and the IL-15–induced gene network. As maintaining M. tuberculosis in a latent state and preventing transition to active disease may represent a form of host resistance, these results identify IL-32 as one functional marker and potential correlate of protection against active tuberculosis. PMID:25143364

  16. Signal Integration by the IκB Protein Pickle Shapes Drosophila Innate Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Morris, Otto; Liu, Xi; Domingues, Celia; Runchel, Christopher; Chai, Andrea; Basith, Shaherin; Tenev, Tencho; Chen, Haiyang; Choi, Sangdun; Pennetta, Giuseppa; Buchon, Nicolas; Meier, Pascal

    2016-09-14

    Pattern recognition receptors are activated following infection and trigger transcriptional programs important for host defense. Tight regulation of NF-κB activation is critical to avoid detrimental and misbalanced responses. We describe Pickle, a Drosophila nuclear IκB that integrates signaling inputs from both the Imd and Toll pathways by skewing the transcriptional output of the NF-κB dimer repertoire. Pickle interacts with the NF-κB protein Relish and the histone deacetylase dHDAC1, selectively repressing Relish homodimers while leaving other NF-κB dimer combinations unscathed. Pickle's ability to selectively inhibit Relish homodimer activity contributes to proper host immunity and organismal health. Although loss of pickle results in hyper-induction of Relish target genes and improved host resistance to pathogenic bacteria in the short term, chronic inactivation of pickle causes loss of immune tolerance and shortened lifespan. Pickle therefore allows balanced immune responses that protect from pathogenic microbes while permitting the establishment of beneficial commensal host-microbe relationships. PMID:27631699

  17. Strong down-regulation of glycophorin genes: A host defense mechanism against rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio; Marco-Puche, Guillermo; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Cebey-López, Miriam; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Vilanova-Trillo, Lucía; Rodríguez-Tenreiro, Carmen; Gómez-Rial, José; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms of rotavirus (RV) infection have been analyzed from different angles but the way in which RV modifies the transcriptome of the host is still unknown. Whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing of peripheral blood samples was used to reveal patterns of expression from the genome of RV-infected patients. RV provokes global changes in the transcriptome of infected cells, involving an over-expression of genes involved in cell cycle and chromatin condensation. While interferon IFI27 was hyper-activated, interferon type II was not suggesting that RV has developed mechanisms to evade the innate response by host cells after virus infection. Most interesting was the inhibition of genes of the glycophorins A and B (GYPA/B) family, which are the major sialoglycoproteins of the human erythrocyte membrane and receptor of several viruses for host invasion. RV infection induces a complex and global response in the host. The strong inhibition of glycophorins suggests a novel defense mechanism of the host to prevent viral infection, inhibiting the expression of receptors used by the virus for infection. The present results add further support to the systemic nature of RV infection.

  18. Strong down-regulation of glycophorin genes: A host defense mechanism against rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Salas, Antonio; Marco-Puche, Guillermo; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Gómez-Carballa, Alberto; Cebey-López, Miriam; Rivero-Calle, Irene; Vilanova-Trillo, Lucía; Rodríguez-Tenreiro, Carmen; Gómez-Rial, José; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms of rotavirus (RV) infection have been analyzed from different angles but the way in which RV modifies the transcriptome of the host is still unknown. Whole transcriptome shotgun sequencing of peripheral blood samples was used to reveal patterns of expression from the genome of RV-infected patients. RV provokes global changes in the transcriptome of infected cells, involving an over-expression of genes involved in cell cycle and chromatin condensation. While interferon IFI27 was hyper-activated, interferon type II was not suggesting that RV has developed mechanisms to evade the innate response by host cells after virus infection. Most interesting was the inhibition of genes of the glycophorins A and B (GYPA/B) family, which are the major sialoglycoproteins of the human erythrocyte membrane and receptor of several viruses for host invasion. RV infection induces a complex and global response in the host. The strong inhibition of glycophorins suggests a novel defense mechanism of the host to prevent viral infection, inhibiting the expression of receptors used by the virus for infection. The present results add further support to the systemic nature of RV infection. PMID:27491455

  19. Salmonella exploits NLRP12-dependent innate immune signaling to suppress host defenses during infection.

    PubMed

    Zaki, Md Hasan; Man, Si Ming; Vogel, Peter; Lamkanfi, Mohamed; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2014-01-01

    The nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 12 (NLRP12) plays a protective role in intestinal inflammation and carcinogenesis, but the physiological function of this NLR during microbial infection is largely unexplored. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is a leading cause of food poisoning worldwide. Here, we show that NLRP12-deficient mice were highly resistant to S. typhimurium infection. Salmonella-infected macrophages induced NLRP12-dependent inhibition of NF-κB and ERK activation by suppressing phosphorylation of IκBα and ERK. NLRP12-mediated down-regulation of proinflammatory and antimicrobial molecules prevented efficient clearance of bacterial burden, highlighting a role for NLRP12 as a negative regulator of innate immune signaling during salmonellosis. These results underscore a signaling pathway defined by NLRP12-mediated dampening of host immune defenses that could be exploited by S. typhimurium to persist and survive in the host.

  20. The late endosomal adaptor p14 is a macrophage host-defense factor against Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Taub, Nicole; Nairz, Manfred; Hilber, Diana; Hess, Michael W; Weiss, Günter; Huber, Lukas A

    2012-06-01

    The outcome of an infection depends on the balance between host resistance and bacterial virulence. Here, we show that the late endosomal adaptor p14 (also known as LAMTOR2) is one of the components for cellular host defense against the intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. During Salmonella infection, the complex of p14 and MP1 is required for the accurately timed transport of Salmonella through the endolysosomal system. Loss of p14 opens a time window that allows Salmonella to populate a replication niche, in which early and late antimicrobial effector systems, comprising NADPH phagocytic oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase, respectively, are inappropriately activated. Thus, p14 supports the accurate transport of Salmonella through the endolysosomal system, thereby limiting bacterial replication in both, professional phagocytes and in non-phagocytic cells in vitro, and helps mice to successfully battle Salmonella infection in vivo.

  1. The Hypervariable Amino-Terminus of P1 Protease Modulates Potyviral Replication and Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Pasin, Fabio; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; García, Juan Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The replication of many RNA viruses involves the translation of polyproteins, whose processing by endopeptidases is a critical step for the release of functional subunits. P1 is the first protease encoded in plant potyvirus genomes; once activated by an as-yet-unknown host factor, it acts in cis on its own C-terminal end, hydrolyzing the P1-HCPro junction. Earlier research suggests that P1 cooperates with HCPro to inhibit host RNA silencing defenses. Using Plum pox virus as a model, we show that although P1 does not have a major direct role in RNA silencing suppression, it can indeed modulate HCPro function by its self-cleavage activity. To study P1 protease regulation, we used bioinformatic analysis and in vitro activity experiments to map the core C-terminal catalytic domain. We present evidence that the hypervariable region that precedes the protease domain is predicted as intrinsically disordered, and that it behaves as a negative regulator of P1 proteolytic activity in in vitro cleavage assays. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic regulator is associated with greater symptom severity, induction of salicylate-dependent pathogenesis-related proteins, and reduced viral loads. We suggest that fine modulation of a viral protease activity has evolved to keep viral amplification below host-detrimental levels, and thus to maintain higher long-term replicative capacity. PMID:24603811

  2. Chemical inhibition of RNA viruses reveals REDD1 as a host defense factor.

    PubMed

    Mata, Miguel A; Satterly, Neal; Versteeg, Gijs A; Frantz, Doug; Wei, Shuguang; Williams, Noelle; Schmolke, Mirco; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Brugarolas, James; Forst, Christian V; White, Michael A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Roth, Michael G; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2011-10-01

    A chemical genetics approach was taken to identify inhibitors of NS1, a major influenza A virus virulence factor that inhibits host gene expression. A high-throughput screen of 200,000 synthetic compounds identified small molecules that reversed NS1-mediated inhibition of host gene expression. A counterscreen for suppression of influenza virus cytotoxicity identified naphthalimides that inhibited replication of influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The mechanism of action occurs through activation of REDD1 expression and concomitant inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) via TSC1-TSC2 complex. The antiviral activity of naphthalimides was abolished in REDD1(-/-) cells. Inhibition of REDD1 expression by viruses resulted in activation of the mTORC1 pathway. REDD1(-/-) cells prematurely upregulated viral proteins via mTORC1 activation and were permissive to virus replication. In contrast, cells conditionally expressing high concentrations of REDD1 downregulated the amount of viral protein. Thus, REDD1 is a new host defense factor, and chemical activation of REDD1 expression represents a potent antiviral intervention strategy.

  3. Chemical inhibition of RNA viruses reveals REDD1 as a host defense factor.

    PubMed

    Mata, Miguel A; Satterly, Neal; Versteeg, Gijs A; Frantz, Doug; Wei, Shuguang; Williams, Noelle; Schmolke, Mirco; Peña-Llopis, Samuel; Brugarolas, James; Forst, Christian V; White, Michael A; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Roth, Michael G; Fontoura, Beatriz M A

    2011-10-01

    A chemical genetics approach was taken to identify inhibitors of NS1, a major influenza A virus virulence factor that inhibits host gene expression. A high-throughput screen of 200,000 synthetic compounds identified small molecules that reversed NS1-mediated inhibition of host gene expression. A counterscreen for suppression of influenza virus cytotoxicity identified naphthalimides that inhibited replication of influenza virus and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). The mechanism of action occurs through activation of REDD1 expression and concomitant inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) via TSC1-TSC2 complex. The antiviral activity of naphthalimides was abolished in REDD1(-/-) cells. Inhibition of REDD1 expression by viruses resulted in activation of the mTORC1 pathway. REDD1(-/-) cells prematurely upregulated viral proteins via mTORC1 activation and were permissive to virus replication. In contrast, cells conditionally expressing high concentrations of REDD1 downregulated the amount of viral protein. Thus, REDD1 is a new host defense factor, and chemical activation of REDD1 expression represents a potent antiviral intervention strategy. PMID:21909097

  4. Cellular stress response and innate immune signaling: integrating pathways in host defense and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Sujatha; Mandrekar, Pranoti

    2013-01-01

    Extensive research in the past decade has identified innate immune recognition receptors and intracellular signaling pathways that culminate in inflammatory responses. Besides its role in cytoprotection, the importance of cell stress in inflammation and host defense against pathogens is emerging. Recent studies have shown that proteins in cellular stress responses, including the heat shock response, ER stress response, and DNA damage response, interact with and regulate signaling intermediates involved in the activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. The effect of such regulation by cell stress proteins may dictate the inflammatory profile of the immune response during infection and disease. In this review, we describe the regulation of innate immune cell activation by cell stress pathways, present detailed descriptions of the types of stress response proteins and their crosstalk with immune signaling intermediates that are essential in host defense, and illustrate the relevance of these interactions in diseases characteristic of aberrant immune responses, such as chronic inflammatory diseases, autoimmune disorders, and cancer. Understanding the crosstalk between cellular stress proteins and immune signaling may have translational implications for designing more effective regimens to treat immune disorders. PMID:23990626

  5. A Bacterial Inhibitor of Host Programmed Cell Death Defenses is an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Janjusevic,R.; Abramovitch, R.; Martin, G.; Stebbins, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae protein AvrPtoB is translocated into plant cells, where it inhibits immunity-associated programmed cell death (PCD). The structure of a C-terminal domain of AvrPtoB that is essential for anti-PCD activity reveals an unexpected homology to the U-box and RING-finger components of eukaryotic E3 ubiquitin ligases, and we show that AvrPtoB has ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutation of conserved residues involved in the binding of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes abolishes this activity in vitro, as well as anti-PCD activity in tomato leaves, which dramatically decreases virulence. These results show that Pseudomonas syringae uses a mimic of host E3 ubiquitin ligases to inactivate plant defenses.

  6. In Defense of Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pica, Rae

    2008-01-01

    Effective early childhood teachers use what they know about and have observed in young children to design programs to meet children's developmental needs. Play and active learning are key tools to address those needs and facilitate children's early education. In this article, the author discusses the benefits of active learning in the education of…

  7. Massive Activation of Archaeal Defense Genes during Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Voet, Marleen; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnes; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Sezonov, Guennadi; Forterre, Patrick; van der Oost, John; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea. It is a lytic virus that exploits a unique egress mechanism based on the formation of remarkable pyramidal structures on the host cell envelope. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we present here a global map defining host and viral gene expression during the infection cycle of SIRV2 in its hyperthermophilic host S. islandicus LAL14/1. This information was used, in combination with a yeast two-hybrid analysis of SIRV2 protein interactions, to advance current understanding of viral gene functions. As a consequence of SIRV2 infection, transcription of more than one-third of S. islandicus genes was differentially regulated. While expression of genes involved in cell division decreased, those genes playing a role in antiviral defense were activated on a large scale. Expression of genes belonging to toxin-antitoxin and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems was specifically pronounced. The observed different degree of activation of various CRISPR-Cas systems highlights the specialized functions they perform. The information on individual gene expression and activation of antiviral defense systems is expected to aid future studies aimed at detailed understanding of the functions and interplay of these systems in vivo. PMID:23698312

  8. Ubiquitination of pathogen-containing vacuoles promotes host defense to Chlamydia trachomatis and Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Coers, Jörn; Haldar, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Many intracellular bacterial and protozoan pathogens reside within host cell vacuoles customized by the microbial invaders to fit their needs. Within such pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) microbes procure nutrients and simultaneously hide from cytosolic host defense systems. Among the many PV-resident human pathogens are the bacterium Chlamydia trachomatis and the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. Immune responses directed against their PVs are poorly characterized. We reported that activation of host cells with IFNγ triggers the attachment of polyubiquitin chains to Toxoplasma- and Chlamydia-containing vacuoles and thereby marks PVs for destruction. In murine cells PV ubiquitination is dependent on IFNγ-inducible Immunity Related GTPases (IRGs). Human cells also decorate PVs with ubiquitin upon IFNγ priming; however, the molecular machinery promoting PV ubiquitination in human cells remains unknown and is likely to be distinct from the IRG-dependent pathway we described in murine cells. Thus, IFNγ-inducible PV ubiquitination constitutes a critical event in cell-autonomous immunity to C. trachomatis and T. gondii in mice and humans, but the molecular machinery underlying PV ubiquitination is expected to be multifaceted and possibly host species-specific. PMID:27066178

  9. IL-36γ Augments Host Defense and Immune Responses in Human Female Reproductive Tract Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Winkle, Sean M; Throop, Andrea L; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M

    2016-01-01

    IL-36γ is a proinflamatory cytokine which belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines. It is expressed in the skin and by epithelial cells (ECs) lining lung and gut tissue. We used human 3-D organotypic cells, that recapitulate either in vivo human vaginal or cervical tissue, to explore the possible role of IL-36γ in host defense against pathogens in the human female reproductive tract (FRT). EC were exposed to compounds derived from virus or bacterial sources and induction and regulation of IL-36γ and its receptor was determined. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flagellin, and synthetic lipoprotein (FSL-1) significantly induced expression of IL-36γ in a dose-dependent manner, and appeared to be TLR-dependent. Recombinant IL-36γ treatment resulted in self-amplification of IL-36γ and its receptor (IL-36R) via increased gene expression, and promoted other inflammatory signaling pathways. This is the first report to demonstrate that the IL-36 receptor and IL-36γ are present in the human FRT EC and that they are differentially induced by microbial products at this site. We conclude that IL-36γ is a driver for epithelial and immune activation following microbial insult and, as such, may play a critical role in host defense in the FRT. PMID:27379082

  10. IL-36γ Augments Host Defense and Immune Responses in Human Female Reproductive Tract Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Winkle, Sean M.; Throop, Andrea L.; Herbst-Kralovetz, Melissa M.

    2016-01-01

    IL-36γ is a proinflamatory cytokine which belongs to the IL-1 family of cytokines. It is expressed in the skin and by epithelial cells (ECs) lining lung and gut tissue. We used human 3-D organotypic cells, that recapitulate either in vivo human vaginal or cervical tissue, to explore the possible role of IL-36γ in host defense against pathogens in the human female reproductive tract (FRT). EC were exposed to compounds derived from virus or bacterial sources and induction and regulation of IL-36γ and its receptor was determined. Polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly I:C), flagellin, and synthetic lipoprotein (FSL-1) significantly induced expression of IL-36γ in a dose-dependent manner, and appeared to be TLR-dependent. Recombinant IL-36γ treatment resulted in self-amplification of IL-36γ and its receptor (IL-36R) via increased gene expression, and promoted other inflammatory signaling pathways. This is the first report to demonstrate that the IL-36 receptor and IL-36γ are present in the human FRT EC and that they are differentially induced by microbial products at this site. We conclude that IL-36γ is a driver for epithelial and immune activation following microbial insult and, as such, may play a critical role in host defense in the FRT. PMID:27379082

  11. Neutrophil-Mediated Phagocytic Host Defense Defect in Myeloid Cftr-Inactivated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Hang Pong; Zhou, Yun; Song, Kejing; Hodges, Craig A.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Wang, Guoshun

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common and deadly inherited disease, caused by mutations in the CFTR gene that encodes a cAMP-activated chloride channel. One outstanding manifestation of the disease is the persistent bacterial infection and inflammation in the lung, which claims over 90% of CF mortality. It has been debated whether neutrophil-mediated phagocytic innate immunity has any intrinsic defect that contributes to the host lung defense failure. Here we compared phagosomal CFTR targeting, hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production, and microbial killing of the neutrophils from myeloid Cftr-inactivated (Myeloid-Cftr−/−) mice and the non-inactivated control (Cftrfl10) mice. We found that the mutant CFTR that lacked Exon-10 failed to target to the neutrophil phagosomes. This dysfunction resulted in impaired intraphagosomal HOCl production and neutrophil microbial killing. In vivo lung infection with a lethal dose of Pseudomonas aeruginosa caused significantly higher mortality in the myeloid CF mice than in the controls. The myeloid-Cftr−/− lungs were deficient in bacterial clearance, and had sustained neutrophilic inflammation and stalled transition from early to late immunity. These manifestations recapitulated the symptoms of human CF lungs. The data altogether suggest that myeloid CFTR expression is critical to normal host lung defense. CFTR dysfunction in neutrophils compromises the phagocytic innate immunity, which may predispose CF lungs to infection. PMID:25184794

  12. A Systems Biology Approach to the Coordination of Defensive and Offensive Molecular Mechanisms in the Innate and Adaptive Host-Pathogen Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chia-Chou; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Infected zebrafish coordinates defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms in response to Candida albicans infections, and invasive C. albicans coordinates corresponding molecular mechanisms to interact with the host. However, knowledge of the ensuing infection-activated signaling networks in both host and pathogen and their interspecific crosstalk during the innate and adaptive phases of the infection processes remains incomplete. In the present study, dynamic network modeling, protein interaction databases, and dual transcriptome data from zebrafish and C. albicans during infection were used to infer infection-activated host-pathogen dynamic interaction networks. The consideration of host-pathogen dynamic interaction systems as innate and adaptive loops and subsequent comparisons of inferred innate and adaptive networks indicated previously unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways and suggested roles of immunological memory in the coordination of host defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms to achieve specific and powerful defense against pathogens. Moreover, pathogens enhance intraspecific crosstalk and abrogate host apoptosis to accommodate enhanced host defense mechanisms during the adaptive phase. Accordingly, links between physiological phenomena and changes in the coordination of defensive and offensive molecular mechanisms highlight the importance of host-pathogen molecular interaction networks, and consequent inferences of the host-pathogen relationship could be translated into biomedical applications.

  13. Two Human Host Defense Ribonucleases against Mycobacteria, the Eosinophil Cationic Protein (RNase 3) and RNase 7

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, David; Torrent, Marc; Andreu, David; Nogués, M. Victoria

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop new agents against mycobacterial infections, such as tuberculosis and other respiratory tract or skin affections. In this study, we have tested two human antimicrobial RNases against mycobacteria. RNase 3, also called the eosinophil cationic protein, and RNase 7 are two small cationic proteins secreted by innate cells during host defense. Both proteins are induced upon infection displaying a wide range of antipathogen activities. In particular, they are released by leukocytes and epithelial cells, contributing to tissue protection. Here, the two RNases have been proven effective against Mycobacterium vaccae at a low micromolar level. High bactericidal activity correlated with their bacterial membrane depolarization and permeabilization activities. Further analysis on both protein-derived peptides identified for RNase 3 an N-terminus fragment that is even more active than the parental protein. Also, a potent bacterial agglutinating activity was unique to RNase 3 and its derived peptide. The particular biophysical properties of the RNase 3 active peptide are envisaged as a suitable reference for the development of novel antimycobacterial drugs. The results support the contribution of secreted RNases to the host immune response against mycobacteria. PMID:23716047

  14. Host differentially expressed genes during association with its defensive endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Meril; Lopanik, Nicole B

    2014-04-01

    Mutualism, a beneficial relationship between two species, often requires intimate interaction between the host and symbiont to establish and maintain the partnership. The colonial marine bryozoan Bugula neritina harbors an as yet uncultured endosymbiont, "Candidatus Endobugula sertula," throughout its life stages. The bacterial symbiont is the putative source of bioactive complex polyketide metabolites, the bryostatins, which chemically defend B. neritina larvae from predation. Despite the presence of "Ca. Endobugula sertula" in all life stages of the host, deterrent bryostatins appear to be concentrated in reproductive portions of the host colony, suggesting an interaction between the two partners to coordinate production and distribution of the metabolites within the colony. In this study, we identified host genes that were differentially expressed in control colonies and in colonies cured of the symbiont. Genes that code for products similar to glycosyl hydrolase family 9 and family 20 proteins, actin, and a Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor were significantly downregulated (more than twice) in antibiotic-cured non-reproductive zooids compared to control symbiotic ones. Differential expression of these genes leads us to hypothesize that the host B. neritina may regulate the distribution of the symbiont within the colony via mechanisms of biofilm degradation and actin rearrangement, and consequently, influences bryostatin localization to bestow symbiont-associated protection to larvae developing in the reproductive zooids.

  15. Host differentially expressed genes during association with its defensive endosymbiont.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Meril; Lopanik, Nicole B

    2014-04-01

    Mutualism, a beneficial relationship between two species, often requires intimate interaction between the host and symbiont to establish and maintain the partnership. The colonial marine bryozoan Bugula neritina harbors an as yet uncultured endosymbiont, "Candidatus Endobugula sertula," throughout its life stages. The bacterial symbiont is the putative source of bioactive complex polyketide metabolites, the bryostatins, which chemically defend B. neritina larvae from predation. Despite the presence of "Ca. Endobugula sertula" in all life stages of the host, deterrent bryostatins appear to be concentrated in reproductive portions of the host colony, suggesting an interaction between the two partners to coordinate production and distribution of the metabolites within the colony. In this study, we identified host genes that were differentially expressed in control colonies and in colonies cured of the symbiont. Genes that code for products similar to glycosyl hydrolase family 9 and family 20 proteins, actin, and a Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitor were significantly downregulated (more than twice) in antibiotic-cured non-reproductive zooids compared to control symbiotic ones. Differential expression of these genes leads us to hypothesize that the host B. neritina may regulate the distribution of the symbiont within the colony via mechanisms of biofilm degradation and actin rearrangement, and consequently, influences bryostatin localization to bestow symbiont-associated protection to larvae developing in the reproductive zooids. PMID:24797097

  16. Increased host aggression as an induced defense against slave-making ants

    PubMed Central

    Pennings, Pleuni S.; Foitzik, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    Slave-making ants reduce the fitness of surrounding host colonies through regular raids, causing the loss of brood and frequently queen and worker death. Consequently, hosts developed defenses against slave raids such as specific recognition and aggression toward social parasites, and indeed, we show that host ants react more aggressively toward slavemakers than toward nonparasitic competitors. Permanent behavioral defenses can be costly, and if social parasite impact varies in time and space, inducible defenses, which are only expressed after slavemaker detection, can be adaptive. We demonstrate for the first time an induced defense against slave-making ants: Cues from the slavemaker Protomognathus americanus caused an unspecific but long-lasting behavioral response in Temnothorax host ants. A 5-min within-nest encounter with a dead slavemaker raised the aggression level in T. longispinosus host colonies. Contrarily, encounters with nonparasitic competitors did not elicit aggressive responses toward non-nestmates. Increased aggression can be adaptive if a slavemaker encounter reliably indicates a forthcoming attack and if aggression increases postraid survival. Host aggression was elevated over 3 days, showing the ability of host ants to remember parasite encounters. The response disappeared after 2 weeks, possibly because by then the benefits of increased aggression counterbalance potential costs associated with it. PMID:22476194

  17. Increased host aggression as an induced defense against slave-making ants.

    PubMed

    Pamminger, Tobias; Scharf, Inon; Pennings, Pleuni S; Foitzik, Susanne

    2011-03-01

    Slave-making ants reduce the fitness of surrounding host colonies through regular raids, causing the loss of brood and frequently queen and worker death. Consequently, hosts developed defenses against slave raids such as specific recognition and aggression toward social parasites, and indeed, we show that host ants react more aggressively toward slavemakers than toward nonparasitic competitors. Permanent behavioral defenses can be costly, and if social parasite impact varies in time and space, inducible defenses, which are only expressed after slavemaker detection, can be adaptive. We demonstrate for the first time an induced defense against slave-making ants: Cues from the slavemaker Protomognathus americanus caused an unspecific but long-lasting behavioral response in Temnothorax host ants. A 5-min within-nest encounter with a dead slavemaker raised the aggression level in T. longispinosus host colonies. Contrarily, encounters with nonparasitic competitors did not elicit aggressive responses toward non-nestmates. Increased aggression can be adaptive if a slavemaker encounter reliably indicates a forthcoming attack and if aggression increases postraid survival. Host aggression was elevated over 3 days, showing the ability of host ants to remember parasite encounters. The response disappeared after 2 weeks, possibly because by then the benefits of increased aggression counterbalance potential costs associated with it.

  18. Multifunctional host defense peptides: antimicrobial peptides, the small yet big players in innate and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Auvynet, Constance; Rosenstein, Yvonne

    2009-11-01

    The term 'antimicrobial peptides' refers to a large number of peptides first characterized on the basis of their antibiotic and antifungal activities. In addition to their role as endogenous antibiotics, antimicrobial peptides, also called host defense peptides, participate in multiple aspects of immunity (inflammation, wound repair, and regulation of the adaptive immune system) as well as in maintaining homeostasis. The possibility of utilizing these multifunctional molecules to effectively combat the ever-growing group of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has intensified research aimed at improving their antibiotic activity and therapeutic potential, without the burden of an exacerbated inflammatory response, but conserving their immunomodulatory potential. In this minireview, we focus on the contribution of small cationic antimicrobial peptides - particularly human cathelicidins and defensins - to the immune response and disease, highlighting recent advances in our understanding of the roles of these multifunctional molecules.

  19. The Cnes2 locus on mouse chromosome 17 regulates host defense against cryptococcal infection through pleiotropic effects on host immunity.

    PubMed

    Shourian, Mitra; Flaczyk, Adam; Angers, Isabelle; Mindt, Barbara C; Fritz, Jörg H; Qureshi, Salman T

    2015-12-01

    The genetic basis of natural susceptibility to progressive Cryptococcus neoformans infection is not well understood. Using C57BL/6 and CBA/J inbred mice, we previously identified three chromosomal regions associated with C. neoformans susceptibility (Cnes1, Cnes2, and Cnes3). To validate and characterize the role of Cnes2 during the host response, we constructed a congenic strain on the C57BL/6 background (B6.CBA-Cnes2). Phenotypic analysis of B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice 35 days after C. neoformans infection showed a significant reduction of fungal burden in the lungs and spleen with higher pulmonary expression of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), lower expression of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, and an absence of airway epithelial mucus production compared to that in C57BL/6 mice. Multiparameter flow cytometry of infected lungs also showed a significantly higher number of neutrophils, exudate macrophages, CD11b(+) dendritic cells, and CD4(+) cells in B6.CBA-Cnes2 than in C57BL/6 mice. The activation state of recruited macrophages and dendritic cells was also significantly increased in B6.CBA-Cnes2 mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that the Cnes2 interval is a potent regulator of host defense, immune responsiveness, and differential Th1/Th2 polarization following C. neoformans infection.

  20. Elicitation of jasmonate-mediated host defense in Brassica juncea (L.) attenuates population growth of mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.).

    PubMed

    Koramutla, Murali Krishna; Kaur, Amandeep; Negi, Manisha; Venkatachalam, Perumal; Bhattacharya, Ramcharan

    2014-07-01

    The productivity of Brassica oilseeds is severely affected by its major pest: aphids. Unavailability of resistance source within the crossable germplasms has stalled the breeding efforts to derive aphid resistant cultivars. In this study, jasmonate-mediated host defense in Indian mustard Brassica juncea (L.) Czern. was evaluated and compared with regard to its elicitation in response to mustard aphid Lipaphis erysimi (Kalt.) and the defense elicitor methyl jasmonate (MeJ). Identification of jasmonate-induced unigenes in B. juncea revealed that most are orthologous to aphid-responsive genes, identified in taxonomically diverse plant-aphid interactions. The unigenes largely represented genes related to signal transduction, response to biotic and abiotic stimuli and homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS), in addition to genes related to cellular and metabolic processes involved in cell organization, biogenesis, and development. Gene expression studies revealed induction of the key jasmonate biosynthetic genes (LOX, AOC, 12-OPDR), redox genes (CAT3 and GST6), and other downstream defense genes (PAL, ELI3, MYR, and TPI) by several folds, both in response to MeJ and plant-wounding. However, interestingly aphid infestation even after 24 h did not elicit any activation of these genes. In contrast, when the jasmonate-mediated host defense was elicited by exogenous application of MeJ the treated B. juncea plants showed a strong antibiosis effect on the infesting aphids and reduced the growth of aphid populations. The level of redox enzymes CAT, APX, and SOD, involved in ROS homeostasis in defense signaling, and several defense enzymes viz. POD, PPO, and PAL, remained high in treated plants. We conclude that in B. juncea, the jasmonate activated endogenous-defense, which is not effectively activated in response to mustard aphids, has the potential to reduce population growth of mustard aphids. PMID:24771023

  1. Saliva-Induced Clotting Captures Streptococci: Novel Roles for Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Host Defense and Immune Evasion

    PubMed Central

    Mohanty, Tirthankar; Karlsson, Christofer; Mörgelin, Matthias; Frick, Inga-Maria; Malmström, Johan; Björck, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcal pharyngitis is among the most common bacterial infections, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the interactions among three major players in streptococcal pharyngitis: streptococci, plasma, and saliva. We find that saliva activates the plasma coagulation system through both the extrinsic and the intrinsic pathways, entrapping the bacteria in fibrin clots. The bacteria escape the clots by activating host plasminogen. Our results identify a potential function for the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in host defense and a corresponding role for fibrinolysis in streptococcal immune evasion. PMID:27456827

  2. Saliva-Induced Clotting Captures Streptococci: Novel Roles for Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Host Defense and Immune Evasion.

    PubMed

    Wollein Waldetoft, Kristofer; Mohanty, Tirthankar; Karlsson, Christofer; Mörgelin, Matthias; Frick, Inga-Maria; Malmström, Johan; Björck, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Streptococcal pharyngitis is among the most common bacterial infections, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. Here we investigate the interactions among three major players in streptococcal pharyngitis: streptococci, plasma, and saliva. We find that saliva activates the plasma coagulation system through both the extrinsic and the intrinsic pathways, entrapping the bacteria in fibrin clots. The bacteria escape the clots by activating host plasminogen. Our results identify a potential function for the intrinsic pathway of coagulation in host defense and a corresponding role for fibrinolysis in streptococcal immune evasion. PMID:27456827

  3. Neutrophils in host defense: new insights from zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Harvie, Elizabeth A.; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are highly motile phagocytic cells that play a critical role in the immune response to infection. Zebrafish (Danio rerio) are increasingly used to study neutrophil function and host-pathogen interactions. The generation of transgenic zebrafish lines with fluorescently labeled leukocytes has made it possible to visualize the neutrophil response to infection in real time by use of optically transparent zebrafish larvae. In addition, the genetic tractability of zebrafish has allowed for the generation of models of inherited neutrophil disorders. In this review, we discuss several zebrafish models of infectious disease, both in the context of immunocompetent, as well as neutrophil-deficient hosts and how these models have shed light on neutrophil behavior during infection. PMID:25717145

  4. Covert operations: cancer's many subversive tactics in overcoming host defenses.

    PubMed

    Longo, Dan L

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to use the patient's T cells to fight his or her own cancer, we inadvertently discovered a distinctive form of tumor-induced immune suppression. T cells from tumor-bearing patients are often defective in signaling. They lack the zeta chain of the T-cell receptor and the src kinases crucial for its downstream effects including lck. They truncate the carboxy terminal of the p50 NF-kappaB transcription factor. At the population level, CD4 T cells are polarized toward the Th2 subtype and inhibitory Tregs expand. These T cells can recover after several days of culture outside of the tumor-bearing host environment. The effect is mediated by one or more factors made by the tumor given that the same T-cell defects occur in mice with tumors implanted in hollow fibers that never directly contact cells of the host. Several promising strategies may overcome these immunosuppressive effects.

  5. Activation of Hepatic STAT3 Maintains Pulmonary Defense during Endotoxemia

    PubMed Central

    Hilliard, Kristie L.; Allen, Eri; Traber, Katrina E.; Kim, Yuri; Wasserman, Gregory A.; Jones, Matthew R.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumonia and infection-induced sepsis are worldwide public health concerns. Both pathologies elicit systemic inflammation and induce a robust acute-phase response (APR). Although APR activation is well regarded as a hallmark of infection, the direct contributions of liver activation to pulmonary defense during sepsis remain unclear. By targeting STAT3-dependent acute-phase changes in the liver, we evaluated the role of liver STAT3 activity in promoting host defense in the context of sepsis and pneumonia. We employed a two-hit endotoxemia/pneumonia model, whereby administration of 18 h of intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 mg/kg of body weight) was followed by intratracheal Escherichia coli (106 CFU) in wild-type mice or those lacking hepatocyte STAT3 (hepSTAT3−/−). Pneumonia alone (without endotoxemia) was effectively controlled in the absence of liver STAT3. Following endotoxemia and pneumonia, however, hepSTAT3−/− mice, with significantly reduced levels of circulating and airspace acute-phase proteins, exhibited significantly elevated lung and blood bacterial burdens and mortality. These data suggested that STAT3-dependent liver responses are necessary to promote host defense. While neither recruited airspace neutrophils nor lung injury was altered in endotoxemic hepSTAT3−/− mice, alveolar macrophage reactive oxygen species generation was significantly decreased. Additionally, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from this group of hepSTAT3−/− mice allowed greater bacterial growth ex vivo. These results suggest that hepatic STAT3 activation promotes both cellular and humoral lung defenses. Taken together, induction of liver STAT3-dependent gene expression programs is essential to countering the deleterious consequences of sepsis on pneumonia susceptibility. PMID:26216424

  6. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Contain Calprotectin, a Cytosolic Protein Complex Involved in Host Defense against Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Constantin F.; Ermert, David; Schmid, Monika; Abu-Abed, Ulrike; Goosmann, Christian; Nacken, Wolfgang; Brinkmann, Volker; Jungblut, Peter R.; Zychlinsky, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of defense at the site of an infection. They encounter and kill microbes intracellularly upon phagocytosis or extracellularly by degranulation of antimicrobial proteins and the release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs). NETs were shown to ensnare and kill microbes. However, their complete protein composition and the antimicrobial mechanism are not well understood. Using a proteomic approach, we identified 24 NET-associated proteins. Quantitative analysis of these proteins and high resolution electron microscopy showed that NETs consist of modified nucleosomes and a stringent selection of other proteins. In contrast to previous results, we found several NET proteins that are cytoplasmic in unstimulated neutrophils. We demonstrated that of those proteins, the antimicrobial heterodimer calprotectin is released in NETs as the major antifungal component. Absence of calprotectin in NETs resulted in complete loss of antifungal activity in vitro. Analysis of three different Candida albicans in vivo infection models indicated that NET formation is a hitherto unrecognized route of calprotectin release. By comparing wild-type and calprotectin-deficient animals we found that calprotectin is crucial for the clearance of infection. Taken together, the present investigations confirmed the antifungal activity of calprotectin in vitro and, moreover, demonstrated that it contributes to effective host defense against C. albicans in vivo. We showed for the first time that a proportion of calprotectin is bound to NETs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19876394

  7. Extreme Resistance as a Host Counter-counter Defense against Viral Suppression of RNA Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Sansregret, Raphaël; Dufour, Vanessa; Langlois, Mathieu; Daayf, Fouad; Dunoyer, Patrice; Voinnet, Olivier; Bouarab, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    RNA silencing mediated by small RNAs (sRNAs) is a conserved regulatory process with key antiviral and antimicrobial roles in eukaryotes. A widespread counter-defensive strategy of viruses against RNA silencing is to deploy viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs), epitomized by the P19 protein of tombusviruses, which sequesters sRNAs and compromises their downstream action. Here, we provide evidence that specific Nicotiana species are able to sense and, in turn, antagonize the effects of P19 by activating a highly potent immune response that protects tissues against Tomato bushy stunt virus infection. This immunity is salicylate- and ethylene-dependent, and occurs without microscopic cell death, providing an example of “extreme resistance” (ER). We show that the capacity of P19 to bind sRNA, which is mandatory for its VSR function, is also necessary to induce ER, and that effects downstream of P19-sRNA complex formation are the likely determinants of the induced resistance. Accordingly, VSRs unrelated to P19 that also bind sRNA compromise the onset of P19-elicited defense, but do not alter a resistance phenotype conferred by a viral protein without VSR activity. These results show that plants have evolved specific responses against the damages incurred by VSRs to the cellular silencing machinery, a likely necessary step in the never-ending molecular arms race opposing pathogens to their hosts. PMID:23785291

  8. Biomembrane interactions reveal the mechanism of action of surface-immobilized host defense IDR-1010 peptide.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangzheng; Cheng, John T J; Kindrachuk, Jason; Hancock, Robert E W; Straus, Suzana K; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N

    2012-02-24

    Dissecting the mechanism of action of surface-tethered antimicrobial and immunomodulatory peptides is critical to the design of optimized anti-infection coatings on biomedical devices. To address this, we compared the biomembrane interactions of host defense peptide IDR-1010cys (1) in free form, (2) as a soluble polymer conjugate, and (3) with one end tethered to a solid support with model bacterial and mammalian lipid membranes. Our results show that IDR-1010cys in all three distinct forms interacted with bacterial and mammalian lipid vesicles, but the extent of the interactions as monitored by the induction of secondary structure varied. The enhanced interaction of surface-tethered peptides is well correlated with their very good antimicrobial activities. Our results demonstrate that there may be a difference in the mechanism of action of surface-tethered versus free IDR-1010cys.

  9. Host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires ceramide-rich membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Grassmé, H; Jendrossek, V; Riehle, A; von Kürthy, G; Berger, J; Schwarz, H; Weller, M; Kolesnick, R; Gulbins, E

    2003-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a serious complication in patients with cystic fibrosis and in immunocompromised individuals. Here we show that P. aeruginosa infection triggers activation of the acid sphingomyelinase and the release of ceramide in sphingolipid-rich rafts. Ceramide reorganizes these rafts into larger signaling platforms that are required to internalize P. aeruginosa, induce apoptosis and regulate the cytokine response in infected cells. Failure to generate ceramide-enriched membrane platforms in infected cells results in an unabated inflammatory response, massive release of interleukin (IL)-1 and septic death of mice. Our findings show that ceramide-enriched membrane platforms are central to the host defense against this potentially lethal pathogen. PMID:12563314

  10. Hepatocyte-mediated cytotoxicity and host defense mechanisms in the alcohol-injured liver.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Benita L; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Tuma, Dean J; Casey, Carol A

    2014-09-01

    The consumption of alcohol is associated with many health issues including alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The natural history of ALD involves the development of steatosis, inflammation (steatohepatitis), fibrosis and cirrhosis. During the stage of steatohepatitis, the combination of inflammation and cellular damage can progress to a severe condition termed alcoholic hepatitis (AH). Unfortunately, the pathogenesis of AH remains uncharacterized. Some modulations have been identified in host defense and liver immunity mechanisms during AH that highlight the role of intrahepatic lymphocyte accumulation and associated inflammatory cytokine responses. Also, it is hypothesized that alcohol-induced injury to liver cells may significantly contribute to the aberrant lymphocytic distribution that is seen in AH. In particular, the regulation of lymphocytes by hepatocytes may be disrupted in the alcoholic liver resulting in altered immunologic homeostasis and perpetuation of disease. In recent studies, it was demonstrated that the direct killing of activated T lymphocytes by hepatocytes is facilitated by the asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR). The ASGPR is a well-characterized glycoprotein receptor that is exclusively expressed by hepatocytes. This hepatic receptor is known for its role in the clearance of desialylated glycoproteins or cells, yet neither its physiological function nor its role in disease states has been determined. Interestingly, alcohol markedly impairs ASGPR function; however, the effect alcohol has on ASGPR-mediated cytotoxicity of lymphocytes remains to be elucidated. This review discusses the contribution of hepatocytes in immunological regulation and, importantly, how pathological effects of ethanol disrupt hepatocellular-mediated defense mechanisms.

  11. Bemisia tabaci Q carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus strongly suppresses host plant defenses

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiaobin; Pan, Huipeng; Zhang, Hongyi; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Fang, Yong; Chen, Gong; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    The concurrence of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) with the spread of its vector Bemisia tabaci Q rather than B in China suggests a more mutualistic relationship between TYLCV and Q. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that viruliferous B and Q have different effects on plant defenses. We found the fecundity of nonviruliferous B, nonviruliferous Q, viruliferous Q and viruliferous B was 11.080, 12.060, 10.760, and 11.220 respectively on plants previously attacked by the other biotype, however, on their respective noninfested control leaves fecundity was 12.000, 10.880, 9.760, and 8.020 respectively. Only viruliferous B had higher fecundity on viruliferous Q-infested plants than on control plants. The longevity of viruliferous B showed the same phenomenon. At 1 d infestion, the jasmonic acid content in leaves noninfested and in leaves infested with nonviruliferous B, nonviruliferous Q, viruliferous B and viruliferous Q was 407.000, 281.333, 301.333, 266.667 and 134.000 ng/g FW, respectively. The JA content was lowest in viruliferous Q-infested leaves. The proteinase inhibitor activity and expression of JA-related upstream gene LOX and downstream gene PI II showed the same trend. The substantial suppression of host defenses by Q carrying TYLCV probably enhances the spread of Q and TYLCV in China. PMID:24912756

  12. Bemisia tabaci Q carrying tomato yellow leaf curl virus strongly suppresses host plant defenses.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaobin; Pan, Huipeng; Zhang, Hongyi; Jiao, Xiaoguo; Xie, Wen; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Fang, Yong; Chen, Gong; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2014-01-01

    The concurrence of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) with the spread of its vector Bemisia tabaci Q rather than B in China suggests a more mutualistic relationship between TYLCV and Q. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that viruliferous B and Q have different effects on plant defenses. We found the fecundity of nonviruliferous B, nonviruliferous Q, viruliferous Q and viruliferous B was 11.080, 12.060, 10.760, and 11.220 respectively on plants previously attacked by the other biotype, however, on their respective noninfested control leaves fecundity was 12.000, 10.880, 9.760, and 8.020 respectively. Only viruliferous B had higher fecundity on viruliferous Q-infested plants than on control plants. The longevity of viruliferous B showed the same phenomenon. At 1 d infestion, the jasmonic acid content in leaves noninfested and in leaves infested with nonviruliferous B, nonviruliferous Q, viruliferous B and viruliferous Q was 407.000, 281.333, 301.333, 266.667 and 134.000 ng/g FW, respectively. The JA content was lowest in viruliferous Q-infested leaves. The proteinase inhibitor activity and expression of JA-related upstream gene LOX and downstream gene PI II showed the same trend. The substantial suppression of host defenses by Q carrying TYLCV probably enhances the spread of Q and TYLCV in China. PMID:24912756

  13. Hyperleptinemia is associated with impaired pulmonary host defense

    PubMed Central

    Ubags, Niki D.J.; Stapleton, Renee D.; Vernooy, Juanita H.J.; Burg, Elianne; Bement, Jenna; Hayes, Catherine M.; Ventrone, Sebastian; Zabeau, Lennart; Tavernier, Jan; Poynter, Matthew E.; Parsons, Polly E.; Dixon, Anne E.; Wargo, Matthew J.; Littenberg, Benjamin; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Suratt, Benjamin T.

    2016-01-01

    We have previously reported that obesity attenuates pulmonary inflammation in both patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and in mouse models of the disease. We hypothesized that obesity-associated hyperleptinemia, and not body mass per se, drives attenuation of the pulmonary inflammatory response and that this e_ect could also impair the host response to pneumonia. We examined the correlation between circulating leptin levels and risk, severity, and outcome of pneumonia in 2 patient cohorts (NHANES III and ARDSNet-ALVEOLI) and in mouse models of diet-induced obesity and lean hyperleptinemia. Plasma leptin levels in ambulatory subjects (NHANES) correlated positively with annual risk of respiratory infection independent of BMI. In patients with severe pneumonia resulting in ARDS (ARDSNet-ALVEOLI), plasma leptin levels were found to correlate positively with subsequent mortality. In obese mice with pneumonia, plasma leptin levels were associated with pneumonia severity, and in obese mice with sterile lung injury, leptin levels were inversely related to bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophilia, as well as to plasma IL-6 and G-CSF levels. These results were recapitulated in lean mice with experimentally induced hyperleptinemia. Our findings suggest that the association between obesity and elevated risk of pulmonary infection may be driven by hyperleptinemia. PMID:27347561

  14. p53 integrates host defense and cell fate during bacterial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Madenspacher, Jennifer H.; Azzam, Kathleen M.; Gowdy, Kymberly M.; Malcolm, Kenneth C.; Nick, Jerry A.; Dixon, Darlene; Aloor, Jim J.; Draper, David W.; Guardiola, John J.; Shatz, Maria; Menendez, Daniel; Lowe, Julie; Lu, Jun; Bushel, Pierre; Li, Leping; Merrick, B. Alex; Resnick, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer and infection are predominant causes of human mortality and derive, respectively, from inadequate genomic and host defenses against environmental agents. The transcription factor p53 plays a central role in human tumor suppression. Despite its expression in immune cells and broad responsiveness to stressors, it is virtually unknown whether p53 regulates host defense against infection. We report that the lungs of naive p53−/− mice display genome-wide induction of NF-κB response element–enriched proinflammatory genes, suggestive of type 1 immune priming. p53-null and p53 inhibitor–treated mice clear Gram-negative and -positive bacteria more effectively than controls after intrapulmonary infection. This is caused, at least in part, by cytokines produced by an expanded population of apoptosis-resistant, TLR-hyperresponsive alveolar macrophages that enhance airway neutrophilia. p53−/− neutrophils, in turn, display heightened phagocytosis, Nox-dependent oxidant generation, degranulation, and bacterial killing. p53 inhibition boosts bacterial killing by mouse neutrophils and oxidant generation by human neutrophils. Despite enhanced bacterial clearance, infected p53−/− mice suffer increased mortality associated with aggravated lung injury. p53 thus modulates host defense through regulating microbicidal function and fate of phagocytes, revealing a fundamental link between defense of genome and host during environmental insult. PMID:23630228

  15. Reed warbler hosts fine-tune their defenses to track three decades of cuckoo decline.

    PubMed

    Thorogood, Rose; Davies, Nicholas B

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between avian hosts and brood parasites can provide a model for how animals adapt to a changing world. Reed warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) hosts employ costly defenses to combat parasitism by common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus). During the past three decades cuckoos have declined markedly across England, reducing parasitism at our study site (Wicken Fen) from 24% of reed warbler nests in 1985 to 1% in 2012. Here we show with experiments that host mobbing and egg rejection defenses have tracked this decline in local parasitism risk: the proportion of reed warbler pairs mobbing adult cuckoos (assessed by responses to cuckoo mounts and models) has declined from 90% to 38%, and the proportion rejecting nonmimetic cuckoo eggs (assessed by responses to model eggs) has declined from 61% to 11%. This is despite no change in response to other nest enemies or mimetic model eggs. Individual variation in both defenses is predicted by parasitism risk during the host's egg-laying period. Furthermore, the response of our study population to temporal variation in parasitism risk can also explain spatial variation in egg rejection behavior in other populations across Europe. We suggest that spatial and temporal variation in parasitism risk has led to the evolution of plasticity in reed warbler defenses. PMID:24299407

  16. Reed warbler hosts fine-tune their defenses to track three decades of cuckoo decline.

    PubMed

    Thorogood, Rose; Davies, Nicholas B

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between avian hosts and brood parasites can provide a model for how animals adapt to a changing world. Reed warbler (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) hosts employ costly defenses to combat parasitism by common cuckoos (Cuculus canorus). During the past three decades cuckoos have declined markedly across England, reducing parasitism at our study site (Wicken Fen) from 24% of reed warbler nests in 1985 to 1% in 2012. Here we show with experiments that host mobbing and egg rejection defenses have tracked this decline in local parasitism risk: the proportion of reed warbler pairs mobbing adult cuckoos (assessed by responses to cuckoo mounts and models) has declined from 90% to 38%, and the proportion rejecting nonmimetic cuckoo eggs (assessed by responses to model eggs) has declined from 61% to 11%. This is despite no change in response to other nest enemies or mimetic model eggs. Individual variation in both defenses is predicted by parasitism risk during the host's egg-laying period. Furthermore, the response of our study population to temporal variation in parasitism risk can also explain spatial variation in egg rejection behavior in other populations across Europe. We suggest that spatial and temporal variation in parasitism risk has led to the evolution of plasticity in reed warbler defenses.

  17. Expression of proteins involved in host plant defense against greenbug infestation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), has been recognized as a major pest of small grains, including sorghum and wheat. To understand the molecular mechanisms involved in host plant defense against greenbug aphids, a proteomic analysis of greenbug-induced proteins in the seedlings of sorghum...

  18. Role of nitric oxide in host defense against an extracellular, metazoan parasite, Brugia malayi.

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, T V; Porte, P; Yates, J A; Keefer, L; Shultz, L D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanisms by which mammalian hosts eliminate microparasites such as bacteria and viruses are well established. In viral infections, these mechanisms include the interferons, neutralizing and opsonizing antibodies, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In bacterial infections, polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages, often facilitated by opsonizing antibodies, ingest the infectious agent and mediate host defense. In addition, complement, in the presence of specific antibodies directed against surface antigens, can lyse certain bacterial pathogens. In contrast, our understanding of the host defenses against metazoan, extracellular parasites is less well grounded. We obtained data by two different approaches to document the role of nitric oxide (NO) as a mediator of host defense against a human nematode parasite. First, treatment of immunocompetent, nonpermissive mice with an inhibitor of NO synthase abrogated resistance to Brugia malayi, one of the causative agents of human lymphatic filariasis. Second, treatment of permissive, immunodeficient mice with a compound that releases NO conferred resistance to infection. These data reinforce studies by James and her coworkers (I. P. Oswald, T. A. Wynn, A. Sher, and S. L. James, Comp. Biochem. Physiol. Pharmacol. Toxicol. Endocrinol. 108:11-18, 1994) on the role of NO in defense against trematode parasites and of Kanazawa et al. (T. Kanazawa, H. Asahi, H. Hata; K. Machida, N. Kagei, and M. J. Stadecker, Parasite Immunol. 15: 619-623, 1993) on cestode parasites. PMID:8757874

  19. A proteomics perspective on viral DNA sensors in host defense and viral immune evasion mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Crow, Marni S; Javitt, Aaron; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-01

    The sensing of viral DNA is an essential step of cellular immune response to infections with DNA viruses. These human pathogens are spread worldwide, triggering a wide range of virus-induced diseases, and are associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite similarities between DNA molecules, mammalian cells have the remarkable ability to distinguish viral DNA from their own DNA. This detection is carried out by specialized antiviral proteins, called DNA sensors. These sensors bind to foreign DNA to activate downstream immune signaling pathways and alert neighboring cells by eliciting the expression of antiviral cytokines. The sensing of viral DNA was shown to occur both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of infected cells, disproving the notion that sensing occurred by simple spatial separation of viral and host DNA. A number of omic approaches, in particular, mass-spectrometry-based proteomic methods, have significantly contributed to the constantly evolving field of viral DNA sensing. Here, we review the impact of omic methods on the identification of viral DNA sensors, as well as on the characterization of mechanisms involved in host defense or viral immune evasion.

  20. Suppression of Soft Tissue Sarcoma Growth by a Host Defense-Like Lytic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hauk, Jennifer; Schubert, Cornelius; Al-Benna, Sammy; Stricker, Ingo; Hatt, Hanns; Shai, Yechiel; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Jacobsen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Background Soft tissue sarcoma (STS) is an anatomically and histologically heterogeneous neoplasia that shares a putative mesenchymal cell origin. The treatment with common chemotherapeutics is still unsatisfying because of association with poor response rates. Although evidence is accumulating for potent oncolytic activity of host defense peptides (HDPs), their potential therapeutic use is often limited by poor bioavailability and inactivation in serum. Therefore, we tested the designer host defense-like lytic D,L-amino acid peptide [D]-K3H3L9 on two STS cell lines in vitro and also in an athymic and syngeneic mouse model. In recent studies the peptide could show selectivity against prostate carcinoma cells and also an active state in serum. Methods In vitro the human synovial sarcoma cell line SW982, the murine fibrosarcoma cell line BFS-1 and primary human fibroblasts as a control were exposed to [D]-K3H3L9, a 15mer D,L-amino acid designer HDP. Cell vitality in physiological and acidic conditions (MTT-assay), cell growth (BrdU) and DNA-fragmentation (TUNEL) were investigated. Membrane damage at different time points could be analyzed with LDH assay. An antibody against the tested peptide and recordings using scanning electron microscopy could give an inside in the mode of action. In vivo [D]-K3H3L9 was administered intratumorally in an athymic and syngeneic (immunocompetent) mouse model with SW982 and BFS-1 cells, respectively. After three weeks tumor sections were histologically analyzed. Results The peptide exerts rapid and high significant cytotoxicity and antiproliferating activity against the malignant cell lines, apparently via a membrane disrupting mode of action. The local intratumoral administration of [D]-K3H3L9 in the athymic and syngeneic mice models significantly inhibited tumor progression. The histological analyses of the tumor sections revealed a significant antiproliferative, antiangiogenic activity of the treatment group. Conclusion These

  1. Developmental strategy of the endoparasite Xenos vesparum (strepsiptera, Insecta): host invasion and elusion of its defense reactions.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Fabio; Giusti, Fabiola; Beani, Laura; Dallai, Romano

    2007-07-01

    To successfully complete its endoparasitic development, the strepsipteran Xenos vesparum needs to elude the defense mechanisms of its host, the wasp Polistes dominulus. SEM and TEM observations after artificial infections allow us to outline the steps of this intimate host-parasite association. Triungulins, the mobile 1st instar larvae of this parasite, are able to "softly" overcome structural barriers of the larval wasp (cuticle and epidermis) without any traumatic reaction at the entry site, to reach the hemocoel where they settle. The parasite molts 48 h later to a 2nd instar larva, which moves away from the 1st instar exuvium, molts twice more without ecdysis (a feature unique to Strepsiptera) and pupates, if male, or develops into a neotenic female. Host encapsulation involves the abandoned 1st larval exuvium, but not the living parasite. In contrast to the usual process of encapsulation, it occurs only 48 h after host invasion or later, and without any melanization. In further experiments, first, we verified Xenos vesparum's ability to reinfect an already parasitized wasp larva. Second, 2nd instar larvae implanted in a new host did not evoke any response by hemocytes. Third, we tested the efficiency of host defense mechanisms by implanting nylon filaments in control larval wasps, excluding any effect due the dynamic behavior of a living parasite; within a few minutes, we observed the beginning of a typical melanotic encapsulation plus an initial melanization in the wound site. We conclude that the immune response of the wasp is manipulated by the parasite, which is able to delay and redirect encapsulation towards a pseudo-target, the exuvia of triungulins, and to elude hemocyte attack through an active suppression of the immune defense and/or a passive avoidance of encapsulation by peculiar surface chemical properties. PMID:17437299

  2. Defense-Inducing Volatiles: In Search of the Active Motif

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Ulrich; Boland, Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Herbivore-induced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are widely appreciated as an indirect defense mechanism since carnivorous arthropods use VOCs as cues for host localization and then attack herbivores. Another function of VOCs is plant–plant signaling. That VOCs elicit defensive responses in neighboring plants has been reported from various species, and different compounds have been found to be active. In order to search for a structural motif that characterizes active VOCs, we used lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus), which responds to VOCs released from damaged plants with an increased secretion of extrafloral nectar (EFN). We exposed lima bean to (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate, a substance naturally released from damaged lima bean and known to induce EFN secretion, and to several structurally related compounds. (E)-3-hexenyl acetate, (E)-2-hexenyl acetate, 5-hexenyl acetate, (Z)-3-hexenylisovalerate, and (Z)-3-hexenylbutyrate all elicited significant increases in EFN secretion, demonstrating that neither the (Z)-configuration nor the position of the double-bond nor the size of the acid moiety are critical for the EFN-inducing effect. Our result is not consistent with previous concepts that postulate reactive electrophile species (Michael-acceptor-systems) for defense-induction in Arabidopsis. Instead, we postulate that physicochemical processes, including interactions with odorant binding proteins and resulting in changes in transmembrane potentials, can underlie VOCs-mediated signaling processes. PMID:18408973

  3. Role of enteric neurotransmission in host defense and protection of the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Sharkey, Keith A.; Savidge, Tor C.

    2014-01-01

    Host defense is a vital role played by the gastrointestinal tract. As host to an enormous and diverse microbiome, the gut has evolved an elaborate array of chemical and physicals barriers that allow the digestion and absorption of nutrients without compromising the mammalian host. The control of such barrier functions requires the integration of neural, humoral, paracrine and immune signaling, involving redundant and overlapping mechanisms to ensure, under most circumstances, the integrity of the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier. Here we focus on selected recent developments in the autonomic neural control of host defense functions used in the protection of the gut from luminal agents, and discuss how the microbiota may potentially play a role in enteric neurotransmission. Key recent findings include: the important role played by subepithelial enteric glia in modulating intestinal barrier function, identification of stress-induced mechanisms evoking barrier breakdown, neural regulation of epithelial cell proliferation, the role of afferent and efferent vagal pathways in regulating barrier function, direct evidence for bacterial communication to the enteric nervous system, and microbial sources of enteric neurotransmitters. We discuss these new and interesting developments in our understanding of the role of the autonomic nervous system in gastrointestinal host defense. PMID:24412639

  4. SIM2 maintains innate host defense of the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Jung; Lizaso, Analyn; Lee, Ying-Hue

    2014-12-01

    The single-minded 2 (SIM2) protein is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor regulating central nervous system (CNS) development in Drosophila. In humans, SIM2 is located within the Down syndrome critical region on chromosome 21 and may be involved in the development of mental retardation phenotype in Down syndrome. In this study, knockout of SIM2 expression in mice resulted in a gas distention phenotype in the gastrointestinal tract. We found that SIM2 is required for the expression of all cryptdins and numerous other antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) expressed in the small intestine. The mechanism underlying how SIM2 controls AMP expression involves both direct and indirect regulations. For the cryptdin genes, SIM2 regulates their expression by modulating transcription factor 7-like 2, a crucial regulator in the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, while for other AMP genes, such as RegIIIγ, SIM2 directly activates their promoter activity. Our results establish that SIM2 is a crucial regulator in controlling expression of intestinal AMPs to maintain intestinal innate immunity against microbes.

  5. Flagellum-Mediated Biofilm Defense Mechanisms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa against Host-Derived Lactoferrin ▿

    PubMed Central

    Leid, Jeff G.; Kerr, Mathias; Selgado, Candice; Johnson, Chelsa; Moreno, Gabriel; Smith, Alyssa; Shirtliff, Mark E.; O'Toole, George A.; Cope, Emily K.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic infection with the gram-negative organism Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in human patients, despite high doses of antibiotics used to treat the various diseases this organism causes. These infections are chronic because P. aeruginosa readily forms biofilms, which are inherently resistant to antibiotics as well as the host's immune system. Our laboratory has been investigating specific mutations in P. aeruginosa that regulate biofilm bacterial susceptibility to the host. To continue our investigation of the role of genetics in bacterial biofilm host resistance, we examined P. aeruginosa biofilms that lack the flgK gene. This mutant lacks flagella, which results in defects in early biofilm development (up to 36 h). For these experiments, the flgK-disrupted strain and the parental strain (PA14) were used in a modified version of the 96-well plate microtiter assay. Biofilms were challenged with freshly isolated human leukocytes for 4 to 6 h and viable bacteria enumerated by CFU. Subsequent to the challenge, both mononuclear cells (monocytes and lymphocytes) and neutrophils, along with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), were required for optimal killing of the flgK biofilm bacteria. We identified a cytokine cross talk network between mononuclear cells and neutrophils that was essential to the production of lactoferrin and bacterial killing. Our data suggest that TNF-α is secreted from mononuclear cells, causing neutrophil activation, resulting in the secretion of bactericidal concentrations of lactoferrin. These results extend previous studies of the importance of lactoferrin in the innate immune defense against bacterial biofilms. PMID:19651866

  6. Bacterial meningitis in the patient at risk: intrinsic risk factors and host defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Scheld, W M

    1984-05-15

    Bacterial meningitis remains a relatively common disease worldwide (40,000 cases per year in the United States) and the mortality rate has not improved in over 30 years. Certain host factors increase the risk of acquiring meningitis and include: age (increased at extremes of life), male sex, low socioeconomic status (crowding), black race, recent nasopharyngeal carriage of a virulent strain, absence of specific bactericidal antibody, maternal factors at birth (neonatal disease), various immunologic defects (neonates, antibody or terminal complement component deficiency, splenectomy, and immunosuppression including the acquired immune deficiency syndrome), and certain chronic diseases (such as alcoholism, cirrhosis, and diabetes mellitus). Bacterial meningitis represents an infection in an area of impaired host resistance. The blood-brain barrier is a major protective mechanism for the central nervous system against circulating bacteria. However, once bacteria gain entry into the subarachnoid space, host defenses are inadequate. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes are at a disadvantage in the fluid medium of the cerebrospinal fluid and surface phagocytosis is inefficient. In addition, antibody and complement concentrations are low (or absent) in purulent cerebrospinal fluid early in the disease course. Functional opsonic and bactericidal activity is lacking; therefore, efficient phagocytosis of encapsulated meningeal pathogens is limited. The result is huge population densities (often 10(7) to 10(8) cfu per milliliter) of bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid. This finding suggests that bactericidal antibiotics with cerebrospinal fluid concentrations much greater than the minimal bacterial concentration of the pathogen are optimal for therapy of meningitis; this principle has been shown in experimental animal models and supported by therapeutic studies in human subjects.

  7. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  8. Host-Defense Peptides with Therapeutic Potential from Skin Secretions of Frogs from the Family Pipidae

    PubMed Central

    Conlon, J. Michael; Mechkarska, Milena

    2014-01-01

    Skin secretions from frogs belonging to the genera Xenopus, Silurana, Hymenochirus, and Pseudhymenochirus in the family Pipidae are a rich source of host-defense peptides with varying degrees of antimicrobial activities and cytotoxicities to mammalian cells. Magainin, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa), caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF), and xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF) peptides have been isolated from norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from several species of Xenopus and Silurana. Hymenochirins and pseudhymenochirins have been isolated from Hymenochirus boettgeri and Pseudhymenochirus merlini. A major obstacle to the development of these peptides as anti-infective agents is their hemolytic activities against human erythrocytes. Analogs of the magainins, CPF peptides and hymenochirin-1B with increased antimicrobial potencies and low cytotoxicities have been developed that are active (MIC < 5 μM) against multidrug-resistant clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter baumannii, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Despite this, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents has not been realized so that alternative clinical applications as anti-cancer, anti-viral, anti-diabetic, or immunomodulatory drugs are being explored. PMID:24434793

  9. Multitasking antimicrobial peptides in plant development and host defense against biotic/abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Ravinder K; Mattoo, Autar K

    2014-11-01

    Crop losses due to pathogens are a major threat to global food security. Plants employ a multilayer defense against a pathogen including the use of physical barriers (cell wall), induction of hypersensitive defense response (HR), resistance (R) proteins, and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Unlike a complex R gene-mediated immunity, AMPs directly target diverse microbial pathogens. Many a times, R-mediated immunity breaks down and plant defense is compromised. Although R-gene dependent pathogen resistance has been well studied, comparatively little is known about the interactions of AMPs with host defense and physiology. AMPs are ubiquitous, low molecular weight peptides that display broad spectrum resistance against bacteria, fungi and viruses. In plants, AMPs are mainly classified into cyclotides, defensins, thionins, lipid transfer proteins, snakins, and hevein-like vicilin-like and knottins. Genetic distance lineages suggest their conservation with minimal effect of speciation events during evolution. AMPs provide durable resistance in plants through a combination of membrane lysis and cellular toxicity of the pathogen. Plant hormones - gibberellins, ethylene, jasmonates, and salicylic acid, are among the physiological regulators that regulate the expression of AMPs. Transgenically produced AMP-plants have become a means showing that AMPs are able to mitigate host defense responses while providing durable resistance against pathogens.

  10. A Bacterial Pathogen Targets a Host Rab-Family GTPase Defense Pathway with a GAP.

    PubMed

    Spanò, Stefania; Gao, Xiang; Hannemann, Sebastian; Lara-Tejero, María; Galán, Jorge E

    2016-02-10

    Cell-autonomous defense mechanisms are potent strategies that protect individual cells against intracellular pathogens. The Rab-family GTPase Rab32 was previously shown to restrict the intracellular human pathogen Salmonella Typhi, but its potential broader role in antimicrobial defense remains unknown. We show that Rab32 represents a general cell-autonomous, antimicrobial defense that is counteracted by two Salmonella effectors. Mice lacking Rab-32 or its nucleotide exchange factor BLOC-3 are permissive to S. Typhi infection and exhibit increased susceptibility to S. Typhimurium. S. Typhimurium counters this defense pathway by delivering two type III secretion effectors, SopD2, a Rab32 GAP, and GtgE, a specific Rab32 protease. An S. Typhimurium mutant strain lacking these two effectors exhibits markedly reduced virulence, which is fully restored in BLOC-3-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that a cell-autonomous, Rab32-dependent host defense pathway plays a central role in the defense against vacuolar pathogens and describe a mechanism evolved by a bacterial pathogen to counter it.

  11. Lifestyle and Host Defense Mechanisms of the Dung Beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius: The Toll Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Alaouna, Mohamed; Khanyile, Lucky; Byrne, Marcus; Ntwasa, Monde

    2013-01-01

    The dung beetle, Euoniticellus intermedius (Reiche) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is an important ecological and agricultural agent. Their main activity, the burying of dung, improves quality of the soil and reduces pests that could cause illness in animals. E. intermedius are therefore important for agriculture and for good maintenance of the environment, and are regarded as effective biological control agents for parasites of the gastrointestinal tract in livestock. The ability of E. intermedius to co-exist comfortably with many microorganisms, some of which are important human pathogens, stimulated our interest in its host defense strategies. The aim of this study was to investigate the Toll signaling pathway, which is strongly activated by fungi. Gene expression associated with fungal infection was analyzed by using 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectroscopy. Furthermore, the partial adult transcriptome was investigated for the presence of known immune response genes by using high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics. The results presented here suggest that E. intermedius responds to fungal challenge via the Toll signaling pathway. PMID:24735102

  12. Butyrate upregulates endogenous host defense peptides to enhance disease resistance in piglets via histone deacetylase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Haitao; Guo, Bingxiu; Gan, Zhenshun; Song, Deguang; Lu, Zeqing; Yi, Hongbo; Wu, Yueming; Wang, Yizhen; Du, Huahua

    2016-01-01

    Butyrate has been used to treat different inflammatory disease with positive outcomes, the mechanisms by which butyrate exerts its anti-inflammatory effects remain largely undefined. Here we proposed a new mechanism that butyrate manipulate endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) which contributes to the elimination of Escherichia coli O157:H7, and thus affects the alleviation of inflammation. An experiment in piglets treated with butyrate (0.2% of diets) 2 days before E. coli O157:H7 challenge was designed to investigate porcine HDP expression, inflammation and E. coli O157:H7 load in feces. The mechanisms underlying butyrate-induced HDP gene expression and the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of macrophage 3D4/2 cells in vitro were examined. Butyrate treatment (i) alleviated the clinical symptoms of E. coli O157:H7-induced hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) and the severity of intestinal inflammation; (ii) reduced the E. coli O157:H7 load in feces; (iii) significantly upregulated multiple, but not all, HDPs in vitro and in vivo via histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibition; and (iv) enhanced the antibacterial activity and bacterial clearance of 3D4/2 cells. Our findings indicate that butyrate enhances disease resistance, promotes the clearance of E. coli O157:H7, and alleviates the clinical symptoms of HUS and inflammation, partially, by affecting HDP expression via HDAC inhibition. PMID:27230284

  13. Viral RNA silencing suppressors (RSS): novel strategy of viruses to ablate the host RNA interference (RNAi) defense system.

    PubMed

    Bivalkar-Mehla, Shalmali; Vakharia, Janaki; Mehla, Rajeev; Abreha, Measho; Kanwar, Jagat Rakesh; Tikoo, Akshay; Chauhan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic viruses have developed a molecular defense arsenal for their survival by counteracting the host anti-viral system known as RNA interference (RNAi). Cellular RNAi, in addition to regulating gene expression through microRNAs, also serves as a barrier against invasive foreign nucleic acids. RNAi is conserved across the biological species, including plants, animals and invertebrates. Viruses in turn, have evolved mechanisms that can counteract this anti-viral defense of the host. Recent studies of mammalian viruses exhibiting RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity have further advanced our understanding of RNAi in terms of host-virus interactions. Viral proteins and non-coding viral RNAs can inhibit the RNAi (miRNA/siRNA) pathway through different mechanisms. Mammalian viruses having dsRNA-binding regions and GW/WG motifs appear to have a high chance of conferring RSS activity. Although, RSSs of plant and invertebrate viruses have been well characterized, mammalian viral RSSs still need in-depth investigations to present the concrete evidences supporting their RNAi ablation characteristics. The information presented in this review together with any perspective research should help to predict and identify the RSS activity-endowed new viral proteins that could be the potential targets for designing novel anti-viral therapeutics.

  14. Rampant host- and defensive phenotype-associated diversification in a goldenrod gall midge.

    PubMed

    Stireman, J O; Devlin, H; Abbot, P

    2012-10-01

    Natural selection can play an important role in the genetic divergence of populations and their subsequent speciation. Such adaptive diversification, or ecological speciation, might underlie the enormous diversity of plant-feeding insects that frequently experience strong selection pressures associated with host plant use as well as from natural enemies. This view is supported by increasing documentation of host-associated (genetic) differentiation in populations of plant-feeding insects using alternate hosts. Here, we examine evolutionary diversification in a single nominal taxon, the gall midge Asteromyia carbonifera (O.S.), with respect to host plant use and gall phenotype. Because galls can be viewed as extended defensive phenotypes of the midges, gall morphology is likely to be a reflection of selective pressures by enemies. Using phylogenetic and comparative analyses of mtDNA and nuclear sequence data, we find evidence that A. carbonifera populations are rapidly diversifying along host plant and gall morphological lines. At a broad scale, geography explains surprisingly little genetic variation, and there is little evidence of strict co-cladogenesis with their Solidago hosts. Gall morphology is relatively labile, distinct gall morphs have evolved repeatedly and colonized multiple hosts, and multiple genetically and morphologically distinct morphs frequently coexist on a single host plant species. These results suggest that Asteromyia carbonifera is in the midst of an adaptive radiation driven by multitrophic selective pressures. Similar complex community pressures are likely to play a role in the diversification of other herbivorous insect groups.

  15. Host-defense peptides of the skin with therapeutic potential: From hagfish to human.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael

    2015-05-01

    It is now well established that peptides that were first identified on the basis of their ability to inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi are multifunctional and so are more informatively described as host-defense peptides. In some cases, their role in protecting the organism against pathogenic microorganisms, although of importance, may be secondary. A previous article in the journal (Peptides 2014; 57:67-77) assessed the potential of peptides present in the skin secretions of frogs for development into anticancer, antiviral, immunomodulatory and antidiabetic drugs. This review aims to extend the scope of this earlier article by focusing upon therapeutic applications of host-defense peptides present in skin secretions and/or skin extracts of species belonging to other vertebrate classes (Agnatha, Elasmobranchii, Teleostei, Reptilia, and Mammalia as represented by the human) that supplement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  16. Depression as sickness behavior? A test of the host defense hypothesis in a high pathogen population.

    PubMed

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Trumble, Benjamin C; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Blackwell, Aaron D; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Sadness is an emotion universally recognized across cultures, suggesting it plays an important functional role in regulating human behavior. Numerous adaptive explanations of persistent sadness interfering with daily functioning (hereafter "depression") have been proposed, but most do not explain frequent bidirectional associations between depression and greater immune activation. Here we test several predictions of the host defense hypothesis, which posits that depression is part of a broader coordinated evolved response to infection or tissue injury (i.e. "sickness behavior") that promotes energy conservation and reallocation to facilitate immune activation. In a high pathogen population of lean and relatively egalitarian Bolivian forager-horticulturalists, we test whether depression and its symptoms are associated with greater baseline concentration of immune biomarkers reliably associated with depression in Western populations (i.e. tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1 beta [IL-1β], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and C-reactive protein [CRP]). We also test whether greater pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to ex vivo antigen stimulation are associated with depression and its symptoms, which is expected if depression facilitates immune activation. These predictions are largely supported in a sample of older adult Tsimane (mean±SD age=53.2±11.0, range=34-85, n=649) after adjusting for potential confounders. Emotional, cognitive and somatic symptoms of depression are each associated with greater immune activation, both at baseline and in response to ex vivo stimulation. The association between depression and greater immune activation is therefore not unique to Western populations. While our findings are not predicted by other adaptive hypotheses of depression, they are not incompatible with those hypotheses and future research is necessary to isolate and test competing predictions. PMID:26044086

  17. DEPRESSION AS SICKNESS BEHAVIOR? A TEST OF THE HOST DEFENSE HYPOTHESIS IN A HIGH PATHOGEN POPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Stieglitz, Jonathan; Trumble, Benjamin C.; Thompson, Melissa Emery; Blackwell, Aaron D.; Kaplan, Hillard; Gurven, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sadness is an emotion universally recognized across cultures, suggesting it plays an important functional role in regulating human behavior. Numerous adaptive explanations of persistent sadness interfering with daily functioning (hereafter “depression”) have been proposed, but most do not explain frequent bidirectional associations between depression and greater immune activation. Here we test several predictions of the host defense hypothesis, which posits that depression is part of a broader coordinated evolved response to infection or tissue injury (i.e. “sickness behavior”) that promotes energy conservation and reallocation to facilitate immune activation. In a high pathogen population of lean and relatively egalitarian Bolivian foragerhorticulturalists, we test whether depression and its symptoms are associated with greater baseline concentration of immune biomarkers reliably associated with depression in Western populations (i.e. tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1 beta [IL-1β], interleukin-6 [IL-6], and C-reactive protein [CRP]). We also test whether greater pro-inflammatory cytokine responses to ex vivo antigen stimulation are associated with depression and its symptoms, which is expected if depression facilitates immune activation. These predictions are largely supported in a sample of older adult Tsimane (mean±SD age=53.2±11.0, range=34-85, n=649) after adjusting for potential confounders. Emotional, cognitive and somatic symptoms of depression are each associated with greater immune activation, both at baseline and in response to ex vivo stimulation. The association between depression and greater immune activation is therefore not unique to Western populations. While our findings are not predicted by other adaptive hypotheses of depression, they are not incompatible with those hypotheses and future research is necessary to isolate and test competing predictions. PMID:26044086

  18. Mast cells: Versatile regulators of inflammation, tissue remodeling, host defense and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Stephen J.; Tsai, Mindy

    2009-01-01

    Summary The possible roles of mast cells in heath and disease have been a topic of interest for over one hundred and twenty five years. Many adaptive or pathological processes affecting the skin or other anatomical sites have been associated with morphological evidence of mast cell activation, and/or with changes in mast cell numbers or phenotype. Such observations, taken together with the known functions of the diverse mediators, cytokines and growth factors which can be secreted by mast cells, have suggested many potential functions for mast cells in health and disease. Definitively identifying the importance of mast cells in biological responses in humans is difficult. However, mutant mice which are profoundly mast cell-deficient, especially those which can undergo engraftment with wild type or genetically-altered mast cells, provide an opportunity to investigate the importance of mast cells, and specific mast cell functions or products, in various adaptive or pathological responses in mice. Such work has shown that mast cells can significantly influence multiple features of inflammatory or immune responses, through diverse effects that can either promote or, surprisingly, suppress, aspects of these responses. Through such functions, mast cells can significantly influence inflammation, tissue remodeling, host defense and homeostasis. PMID:18024086

  19. The DNA Sensor AIM2 Maintains Intestinal Homeostasis via Regulation of Epithelial Antimicrobial Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuiqing; Peng, Lan; Kwak, Youn-Tae; Tekippe, Erin McElvania; Pasare, Chandrashekhar; Malter, James S; Hooper, Lora V; Zaki, Md Hasan

    2015-12-01

    Microbial pattern molecules in the intestine play immunoregulatory roles via diverse pattern recognition receptors. However, the role of the cytosolic DNA sensor AIM2 in the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis is unknown. Here, we show that Aim2(-/-) mice are highly susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis that is associated with microbial dysbiosis as represented by higher colonic burden of commensal Escherichia coli. Colonization of germ-free mice with Aim2(-/-) mouse microbiota leads to higher colitis susceptibility. In-depth investigation of AIM2-mediated host defense responses reveals that caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 production are compromised in Aim2(-/-) mouse colons, consistent with defective inflammasome function. Moreover, IL-18 infusion reduces E. coli burden as well as colitis susceptibility in Aim2(-/-) mice. Altered microbiota in inflammasome-defective mice correlate with reduced expression of several antimicrobial peptides in intestinal epithelial cells. Together, these findings implicate DNA sensing by AIM2 as a regulatory mechanism for maintaining intestinal homeostasis.

  20. PLGA nanoparticles loaded with host defense peptide LL37 promote wound healing.

    PubMed

    Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Her, Charles-Henry; Comune, Michela; Moia, Claudia; Lopes, Alessandra; Porporato, Paolo E; Vanacker, Julie; Lam, Martin C; Steinstraesser, Lars; Sonveaux, Pierre; Zhu, Huijun; Ferreira, Lino S; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle; Préat, Véronique

    2014-11-28

    Wound treatment remains one of the most prevalent and economically burdensome healthcare issues in the world. Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) supplies lactate that accelerates neovascularization and promotes wound healing. LL37 is an endogenous human host defense peptide that modulates wound healing and angiogenesis and fights infection. Hence, we hypothesized that the administration of LL37 encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles (PLGA-LL37 NP) promotes wound closure due to the sustained release of both LL37 and lactate. In full thickness excisional wounds, the treatment with PLGA-LL37 NP significantly accelerated wound healing compared to PLGA or LL37 administration alone. PLGA-LL37 NP-treated wounds displayed advanced granulation tissue formation by significant higher collagen deposition, re-epithelialized and neovascularized composition. PLGA-LL37 NP improved angiogenesis, significantly up-regulated IL-6 and VEGFa expression, and modulated the inflammatory wound response. In vitro, PLGA-LL37 NP induced enhanced cell migration but had no effect on the metabolism and proliferation of keratinocytes. It displayed antimicrobial activity on Escherichia coli. In conclusion, we developed a biodegradable drug delivery system that accelerated healing processes due to the combined effects of lactate and LL37 released from the nanoparticles.

  1. Host plant invests in growth rather than chemical defense when attacked by a specialist herbivore.

    PubMed

    Arab, Alberto; Trigo, José Roberto

    2011-05-01

    Plant defensive compounds may be a cost rather than a benefit when plants are attacked by specialist insects that may overcome chemical barriers by strategies such as sequestering plant compounds. Plants may respond to specialist herbivores by compensatory growth rather than chemical defense. To explore the use of defensive chemistry vs. compensatory growth we studied Brugmansia suaveolens (Solanaceae) and the specialist larvae of the ithomiine butterfly Placidina euryanassa, which sequester defensive tropane alkaloids (TAs) from this host plant. We investigated whether the concentration of TAs in B. suaveolens was changed by P. euryanassa damage, and whether plants invest in growth, when damaged by the specialist. Larvae feeding during 24 hr significantly decreased TAs in damaged plants, but they returned to control levels after 15 days without damage. Damaged and undamaged plants did not differ significantly in leaf area after 15 days, indicating compensatory growth. Our results suggest that B. suaveolens responds to herbivory by the specialist P. euryanassa by investing in growth rather than chemical defense.

  2. NIK1, a host factor specialized in antiviral defense or a novel general regulator of plant immunity?

    PubMed

    Machado, Joao P B; Brustolini, Otavio J B; Mendes, Giselle C; Santos, Anésia A; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2015-11-01

    NIK1 is a receptor-like kinase involved in plant antiviral immunity. Although NIK1 is structurally similar to the plant immune factor BAK1, which is a key regulator in plant immunity to bacterial pathogens, the NIK1-mediated defenses do not resemble BAK1 signaling cascades. The underlying mechanism for NIK1 antiviral immunity has recently been uncovered. NIK1 activation mediates the translocation of RPL10 to the nucleus, where it interacts with LIMYB to fully down-regulate translational machinery genes, resulting in translation inhibition of host and viral mRNAs and enhanced tolerance to begomovirus. Therefore, the NIK1 antiviral immunity response culminates in global translation suppression, which represents a new paradigm for plant antiviral defenses. Interestingly, transcriptomic analyses in nik1 mutant suggest that NIK1 may suppress antibacterial immune responses, indicating a possible opposite effect of NIK1 in bacterial and viral infections.

  3. Is the pathogenic ergot fungus a conditional defensive mutualist for its host grass?

    PubMed

    Wäli, Pauliina P; Wäli, Piippa R; Saikkonen, Kari; Tuomi, Juha

    2013-01-01

    It is well recognized, that outcomes of mutualistic plant-microorganism interactions are often context dependent and can range from mutualistic to antagonistic depending on conditions. Instead, seemingly pathogenic associations are generally considered only harmful to plants. The ergot fungus (Claviceps purpurea) is a common seed pathogen of grasses and cereals. Ergot sclerotia contain alkaloids which can cause severe toxicity in mammals when ingested, and thus the fungal infection might provide protection for the host plant against mammalian herbivores. Theoretically, the net effect of ergot infection would positively affect host seed set if the cost is not too high and the defensive effect is strong enough. According to our empirical data, this situation is plausible. First, we found no statistically significant seed loss in wild red fescue (Festuca rubra) inflorescences due to ergot infection, but the seed succession decreased along increasing number of sclerotia. Second, in a food choice experiment, sheep showed avoidance against forage containing ergot. Third, the frequency of ergot-infected inflorescences was higher in sheep pastures than surrounding ungrazed areas, indicating a protective effect against mammalian grazing. We conclude that, although ergot can primarily be categorized as a plant pathogen, ergot infection may sometimes represent indirect beneficial effects for the host plant. Ergot may thus serve as a conditional defensive mutualist for its host grass, and the pathogenic interaction may range from antagonistic to mutualistic depending on the situation. PMID:23874924

  4. Host-virus interaction: the antiviral defense function of small interfering RNAs can be enhanced by host microRNA-7 in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Dongyun; Zhang, Sheng; Wei, Xiujuan; Song, Jie; Zhang, Yupei; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xinwei; Feng, Zhichun; Li, Junwen

    2015-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against poliovirus (PV) and other viruses effectively inhibit viral replication and have been developed as antiviral agents. Here, we demonstrate that a specific siRNA targeting the region between nucleotides 100–125 (siRNA-100) from the 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR) of PV plays a critical role in inhibiting PV replication. Our data demonstrate that siRNA-100 treatment can greatly reduce PV titers, resulting in up-regulation of host microRNA-7 (miR-7), which in turn, leads to enhance inhibition of PV infection further. Moreover, our results suggest that siRNA-100 can also impair the spread of PV to uninfected cells by increasing host resistance to PV, resulting in decreasing necrosis and cytopathic effects (CPE) levels, as well as prolonging the survival of infected cells. Indeed, the active antiviral effect of siRNA-100 was potentially supplemented by the activity of miR-7, and both of them can serve as stabilizing factors for maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Results of this study identify a molecular mechanism of RNAi for antiviral defense, and extend our knowledge of the complex interplay between host and PV, which will provide a basis for the development of effective RNAi-based therapies designed to inhibit PV replication and protect host cells. PMID:26067353

  5. The Front Line of Enteric Host Defense against Unwelcome Intrusion of Harmful Microorganisms: Mucins, Antimicrobial Peptides, and Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liévin-Le Moal, Vanessa; Servin, Alain L.

    2006-01-01

    The intestinal tract is a complex ecosystem that combines resident microbiota and the cells of various phenotypes with complex metabolic activities that line the epithelial wall. The intestinal cells that make up the epithelium provide physical and chemical barriers that protect the host against the unwanted intrusion of microorganisms that hijack the cellular molecules and signaling pathways of the host and become pathogenic. Some of the organisms making up the intestinal microbiota also have microbicidal effects that contribute to the barrier against enteric pathogens. This review describes the two cell lineages present in the intestinal epithelium: the goblet cells and the Paneth cells, both of which play a pivotal role in the first line of enteric defense by producing mucus and antimicrobial peptides, respectively. We also analyze recent insights into the intestinal microbiota and the mechanisms by which some resident species act as a barrier to enteric pathogens. Moreover, this review examines whether the cells producing mucins or antimicrobial peptides and the resident microbiota act in partnership and whether they function individually and/or synergistically to provide the host with an effective front line of defense against harmful enteric pathogens. PMID:16614252

  6. Induced plant defenses, host-pathogen interactions, and forest insect outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Elderd, Bret D; Rehill, Brian J; Haynes, Kyle J; Dwyer, Greg

    2013-09-10

    Cyclic outbreaks of defoliating insects devastate forests, but their causes are poorly understood. Outbreak cycles are often assumed to be driven by density-dependent mortality due to natural enemies, because pathogens and predators cause high mortality and because natural-enemy models reproduce fluctuations in defoliation data. The role of induced defenses is in contrast often dismissed, because toxic effects of defenses are often weak and because induced-defense models explain defoliation data no better than natural-enemy models. Natural-enemy models, however, fail to explain gypsy moth outbreaks in North America, in which outbreaks in forests with a higher percentage of oaks have alternated between severe and mild, whereas outbreaks in forests with a lower percentage of oaks have been uniformly moderate. Here we show that this pattern can be explained by an interaction between induced defenses and a natural enemy. We experimentally induced hydrolyzable-tannin defenses in red oak, to show that induction reduces variability in a gypsy moth's risk of baculovirus infection. Because this effect can modulate outbreak severity and because oaks are the only genus of gypsy moth host tree that can be induced, we extended a natural-enemy model to allow for spatial variability in inducibility. Our model shows alternating outbreaks in forests with a high frequency of oaks, and uniform outbreaks in forests with a low frequency of oaks, matching the data. The complexity of this effect suggests that detecting effects of induced defenses on defoliator cycles requires a combination of experiments and models. PMID:23966566

  7. The adaptor molecule Trif contributes to murine host defense during Leptospiral infection.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Priya A; Devlin, Amy A; Miller, Jennifer C; Scholle, Frank

    2016-09-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease and is caused by pathogenic species of the Leptospira genus, including Leptospira interrogans (L. interrogans). Humans, domestic and wild animals are susceptible to acute or chronic infection. The innate immune response is a critical defense mechanism against Leptospira interrogans, and has been investigated in mouse models. Murine Toll-like receptors (TLRs) have been shown to be key factors in sensing and responding to L. interrogans infection. Specifically, TLR2, TLR4 and the TLR adaptor molecule MyD88 are essential for host defense against L. interrogans; however, the role of the TLR adaptor molecule TIR-domain-containing adaptor-inducing interferon β (TRIF) in the response to L. interrogans has not been previously determined. In the present study, TRIF was found to play an important role during leptospiral infection. Following challenge with L. interrogans, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited delayed weight gain compared to wild-type mice. Moreover, Trif(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in L. interrogans burden in the kidneys, lungs, and blood at early time points (less than 7days post infection). Multiple components of the innate immune responses were dampened in response to leptospiral infection including transcription and production of cytokines, and the humoral response, which suggested that TRIF contributes to expression and production of cytokines important for the host defense against L. interrogans. PMID:27259371

  8. The role of mammalian antimicrobial peptides and proteins in awakening of innate host defenses and adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Yang, D; Chertov, O; Oppenheim, J J

    2001-06-01

    Since we live in a dirty environment, we have developed many host defenses to contend with microorganisms. The epithelial lining of our skin, gastrointestinal tract and bronchial tree produces a number of antibacterial peptides, and our phagocytic neutrophils rapidly ingest and enzymatically degrade invading organisms, as well as produce peptides and enzymes with antimicrobial activities. Some of these antimicrobial moieties also appear to alert host cells involved in both innate host defense and adaptive immune responses. The epithelial cells are a source of constitutively produced beta defensin (HBD1) and proinflammatory cytokine-inducible beta defensins (HBD2 and -3) and cathelicidin (LL37). The neutrophils-derived antimicrobial peptides are released on demand from their cytoplasmic granules. They include the enzymes cathepsin G and chymase, azurocidin, a defensins and cathelicidin. In contrast, C5a and C3b are produced by activation of the serum complement cascade. The antimicrobial moieties direct the migration and activate target cells by interacting with selected G-protein-coupled seven-transmembrane receptors (GPCRs) on cell surfaces. The beta defensins interact with the CCR6 chemokine GPCRs, whereas cathelicidins interact with the low-affinity FPRL-1 receptors. The neutrophil-derived cathepsin G acts on the high-affinity FMLP receptor (GPCR) known as FPR, while the receptors for chymase and azurocidin have not been identified as yet. The serum-derived C5a uses a GPCR known as C5aR to mediate its chemotactic and cell-activating effects. Consequently, all these ligand-receptor interactions in addition to mediating chemotaxis also activate receptor-expressing cells to produce other mediators of inflammation.

  9. Selective Chemical Inhibition of agr Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Host Defense with Minimal Impact on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O.; Alexander, Susan M.; Femling, Jon K.; Gray, Brian M.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Hall, Pamela R.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  10. Selective chemical inhibition of agr quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus promotes host defense with minimal impact on resistance.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O; Alexander, Susan M; Femling, Jon K; Gray, Brian M; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Horswill, Alexander R; Hall, Pamela R; Gresham, Hattie D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  11. Relationships among CFTR expression, HCO3- secretion, and host defense may inform gene- and cell-based cystic fibrosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Viral S; Ernst, Sarah; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Karp, Philip H; Parker, Connor P; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-05-10

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. Airway disease is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Successful implementation of gene- and cell-based therapies for CF airway disease requires knowledge of relationships among percentages of targeted cells, levels of CFTR expression, correction of electrolyte transport, and rescue of host defense defects. Previous studies suggested that, when ∼10-50% of airway epithelial cells expressed CFTR, they generated nearly wild-type levels of Cl(-) secretion; overexpressing CFTR offered no advantage compared with endogenous expression levels. However, recent discoveries focused attention on CFTR-mediated HCO3 (-) secretion and airway surface liquid (ASL) pH as critical for host defense and CF pathogenesis. Therefore, we generated porcine airway epithelia with varying ratios of CF and wild-type cells. Epithelia with a 50:50 mix secreted HCO3 (-) at half the rate of wild-type epithelia. Likewise, heterozygous epithelia (CFTR(+/-) or CFTR(+/∆F508)) expressed CFTR and secreted HCO3 (-) at ∼50% of wild-type values. ASL pH, antimicrobial activity, and viscosity showed similar relationships to the amount of CFTR. Overexpressing CFTR increased HCO3 (-) secretion to rates greater than wild type, but ASL pH did not exceed wild-type values. Thus, in contrast to Cl(-) secretion, the amount of CFTR is rate-limiting for HCO3 (-) secretion and for correcting host defense abnormalities. In addition, overexpressing CFTR might produce a greater benefit than expressing CFTR at wild-type levels when targeting small fractions of cells. These findings may also explain the risk of airway disease in CF carriers. PMID:27114540

  12. Relationships among CFTR expression, HCO3- secretion, and host defense may inform gene- and cell-based cystic fibrosis therapies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Viral S; Ernst, Sarah; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Karp, Philip H; Parker, Connor P; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Welsh, Michael J

    2016-05-10

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. Airway disease is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Successful implementation of gene- and cell-based therapies for CF airway disease requires knowledge of relationships among percentages of targeted cells, levels of CFTR expression, correction of electrolyte transport, and rescue of host defense defects. Previous studies suggested that, when ∼10-50% of airway epithelial cells expressed CFTR, they generated nearly wild-type levels of Cl(-) secretion; overexpressing CFTR offered no advantage compared with endogenous expression levels. However, recent discoveries focused attention on CFTR-mediated HCO3 (-) secretion and airway surface liquid (ASL) pH as critical for host defense and CF pathogenesis. Therefore, we generated porcine airway epithelia with varying ratios of CF and wild-type cells. Epithelia with a 50:50 mix secreted HCO3 (-) at half the rate of wild-type epithelia. Likewise, heterozygous epithelia (CFTR(+/-) or CFTR(+/∆F508)) expressed CFTR and secreted HCO3 (-) at ∼50% of wild-type values. ASL pH, antimicrobial activity, and viscosity showed similar relationships to the amount of CFTR. Overexpressing CFTR increased HCO3 (-) secretion to rates greater than wild type, but ASL pH did not exceed wild-type values. Thus, in contrast to Cl(-) secretion, the amount of CFTR is rate-limiting for HCO3 (-) secretion and for correcting host defense abnormalities. In addition, overexpressing CFTR might produce a greater benefit than expressing CFTR at wild-type levels when targeting small fractions of cells. These findings may also explain the risk of airway disease in CF carriers.

  13. Toxoplasma gondii TgIST co-opts host chromatin repressors dampening STAT1-dependent gene regulation and IFN-γ-mediated host defenses.

    PubMed

    Gay, Gabrielle; Braun, Laurence; Brenier-Pinchart, Marie-Pierre; Vollaire, Julien; Josserand, Véronique; Bertini, Rose-Laurence; Varesano, Aurélie; Touquet, Bastien; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Coute, Yohann; Tardieux, Isabelle; Bougdour, Alexandre; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali

    2016-08-22

    An early hallmark of Toxoplasma gondii infection is the rapid control of the parasite population by a potent multifaceted innate immune response that engages resident and homing immune cells along with pro- and counter-inflammatory cytokines. In this context, IFN-γ activates a variety of T. gondii-targeting activities in immune and nonimmune cells but can also contribute to host immune pathology. T. gondii has evolved mechanisms to timely counteract the host IFN-γ defenses by interfering with the transcription of IFN-γ-stimulated genes. We now have identified TgIST (T. gondii inhibitor of STAT1 transcriptional activity) as a critical molecular switch that is secreted by intracellular parasites and traffics to the host cell nucleus where it inhibits STAT1-dependent proinflammatory gene expression. We show that TgIST not only sequesters STAT1 on dedicated loci but also promotes shaping of a nonpermissive chromatin through its capacity to recruit the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD) transcriptional repressor. We found that during mice acute infection, TgIST-deficient parasites are rapidly eliminated by the homing Gr1(+) inflammatory monocytes, thus highlighting the protective role of TgIST against IFN-γ-mediated killing. By uncovering TgIST functions, this study brings novel evidence on how T. gondii has devised a molecular weapon of choice to take control over a ubiquitous immune gene expression mechanism in metazoans, as a way to promote long-term parasitism. PMID:27503074

  14. NLRC4 and TLR5 each contribute to host defense in respiratory melioidosis.

    PubMed

    West, T Eoin; Myers, Nicolle D; Chantratita, Narisara; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Miao, Edward A; Hajjar, Adeline M; Peacock, Sharon J; Liggitt, H Denny; Skerrett, Shawn J

    2014-09-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the tropical infection melioidosis. Pneumonia is a common manifestation of melioidosis and is associated with high mortality. Understanding the key elements of host defense is essential to developing new therapeutics for melioidosis. As a flagellated bacterium encoding type III secretion systems, B. pseudomallei may trigger numerous host pathogen recognition receptors. TLR5 is a flagellin sensor located on the plasma membrane. NLRC4, along with NAIP proteins, assembles a canonical caspase-1-dependent inflammasome in the cytoplasm that responds to flagellin (in mice) and type III secretion system components (in mice and humans). In a murine model of respiratory melioidosis, Tlr5 and Nlrc4 each contributed to survival. Mice deficient in both Tlr5 and Nlrc4 were not more susceptible than single knockout animals. Deficiency of Casp1/Casp11 resulted in impaired bacterial control in the lung and spleen; in the lung much of this effect was attributable to Nlrc4, despite relative preservation of pulmonary IL-1β production in Nlrc4(-/-) mice. Histologically, deficiency of Casp1/Casp11 imparted more severe pulmonary inflammation than deficiency of Nlrc4. The human NLRC4 region polymorphism rs6757121 was associated with survival in melioidosis patients with pulmonary involvement. Co-inheritance of rs6757121 and a functional TLR5 polymorphism had an additive effect on survival. Our results show that NLRC4 and TLR5, key components of two flagellin sensing pathways, each contribute to host defense in respiratory melioidosis. PMID:25232720

  15. The role of NOD1 and NOD2 in host defense against chlamydial infection.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yan; Lei, Wenbo; He, Zhansheng; Li, Zhongyu

    2016-09-01

    Chlamydial species are common intracellular parasites that cause various diseases, mainly characterized by persistent infection, which lead to inflammatory responses modulated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The best understood PRRs are the extracellular Toll-like receptors, but recent significant advances have focused on two important proteins, NOD1 and NOD2, which are members of the intracellular nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain receptor family and are capable of triggering the host innate immune signaling pathways. This results in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which is vital for an adequate host defense against intracellular chlamydial infection. NOD1/2 ligands are known to derive from peptidoglycan, and the latest research has resolved the paradox of whether chlamydial species possess this bacterial cell wall component; this finding is likely to promote in-depth investigations into the interaction between the NOD proteins and chlamydial pathogens. In this review, we summarize the basic characteristics and signal transduction functions of NOD1 and NOD2 and highlight the new research on the roles of NOD1 and NOD2 in the host defense against chlamydial infection.

  16. NLRC4 and TLR5 Each Contribute to Host Defense in Respiratory Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    West, T. Eoin; Myers, Nicolle D.; Chantratita, Narisara; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Miao, Edward A.; Hajjar, Adeline M.; Peacock, Sharon J.; Liggitt, H. Denny; Skerrett, Shawn J.

    2014-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei causes the tropical infection melioidosis. Pneumonia is a common manifestation of melioidosis and is associated with high mortality. Understanding the key elements of host defense is essential to developing new therapeutics for melioidosis. As a flagellated bacterium encoding type III secretion systems, B. pseudomallei may trigger numerous host pathogen recognition receptors. TLR5 is a flagellin sensor located on the plasma membrane. NLRC4, along with NAIP proteins, assembles a canonical caspase-1-dependent inflammasome in the cytoplasm that responds to flagellin (in mice) and type III secretion system components (in mice and humans). In a murine model of respiratory melioidosis, Tlr5 and Nlrc4 each contributed to survival. Mice deficient in both Tlr5 and Nlrc4 were not more susceptible than single knockout animals. Deficiency of Casp1/Casp11 resulted in impaired bacterial control in the lung and spleen; in the lung much of this effect was attributable to Nlrc4, despite relative preservation of pulmonary IL-1β production in Nlrc4−/− mice. Histologically, deficiency of Casp1/Casp11 imparted more severe pulmonary inflammation than deficiency of Nlrc4. The human NLRC4 region polymorphism rs6757121 was associated with survival in melioidosis patients with pulmonary involvement. Co-inheritance of rs6757121 and a functional TLR5 polymorphism had an additive effect on survival. Our results show that NLRC4 and TLR5, key components of two flagellin sensing pathways, each contribute to host defense in respiratory melioidosis. PMID:25232720

  17. Black Yeasts and Their Filamentous Relatives: Principles of Pathogenesis and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Netea, Mihai G.; Mouton, Johan W.; Melchers, Willem J. G.; Verweij, Paul E.; de Hoog, G. Sybren

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Among the melanized fungi, the so-called “black yeasts” and their filamentous relatives are particularly significant as agents of severe phaeohyphomycosis, chromoblastomycosis, and mycetoma in humans and animals. The pathogenicity and virulence of these fungi may differ significantly between closely related species. The factors which probably are of significance for pathogenicity include the presence of melanin and carotene, formation of thick cell walls and meristematic growth, presence of yeast-like phases, thermo- and perhaps also osmotolerance, adhesion, hydrophobicity, assimilation of aromatic hydrocarbons, and production of siderophores. Host defense has been shown to rely mainly on the ingestion and elimination of fungal cells by cells of the innate immune system, especially neutrophils and macrophages. However, there is increasing evidence supporting a role of T-cell-mediated immune responses, with increased interleukin-10 (IL-10) and low levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) being deleterious during the infection. There are no standardized therapies for treatment. It is therefore important to obtain in vitro susceptibilities of individual patients' fungal isolates in order to provide useful information for selection of appropriate treatment protocols. This article discusses the pathogenesis and host defense factors for these fungi and their severity, chronicity, and subsequent impact on treatment and prevention of diseases in human or animal hosts. PMID:24982320

  18. Geminivirus-encoded TrAP suppressor inhibits the histone methyltransferase SUVH4/KYP to counter host defense

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-González, Claudia; Liu, Xiuying; Huang, Changjun; Zhao, Changjiang; Ma, Zeyang; Hu, Tao; Sun, Feng; Zhou, Yijun; Zhou, Xueping; Wang, Xiu-Jie; Zhang, Xiuren

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) can serve as an innate immunity against invading DNA viruses throughout Eukaryotes. Geminivirus code for TrAP protein to suppress the TGS pathway. Here, we identified an Arabidopsis H3K9me2 histone methyltransferase, Su(var)3-9 homolog 4/Kryptonite (SUVH4/KYP), as a bona fide cellular target of TrAP. TrAP interacts with the catalytic domain of KYP and inhibits its activity in vitro. TrAP elicits developmental anomalies phenocopying several TGS mutants, reduces the repressive H3K9me2 mark and CHH DNA methylation, and reactivates numerous endogenous KYP-repressed loci in vivo. Moreover, KYP binds to the viral chromatin and controls its methylation to combat virus infection. Notably, kyp mutants support systemic infection of TrAP-deficient Geminivirus. We conclude that TrAP attenuates the TGS of the viral chromatin by inhibiting KYP activity to evade host surveillance. These findings provide new insight on the molecular arms race between host antiviral defense and virus counter defense at an epigenetic level. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06671.001 PMID:26344546

  19. The evolutionary significance of depression in Pathogen Host Defense (PATHOS-D)

    PubMed Central

    Raison, C L; Miller, A H

    2013-01-01

    Given the manifold ways that depression impairs Darwinian fitness, the persistence in the human genome of risk alleles for the disorder remains a much debated mystery. Evolutionary theories that view depressive symptoms as adaptive fail to provide parsimonious explanations for why even mild depressive symptoms impair fitness-relevant social functioning, whereas theories that suggest that depression is maladaptive fail to account for the high prevalence of depression risk alleles in human populations. These limitations warrant novel explanations for the origin and persistence of depression risk alleles. Accordingly, studies on risk alleles for depression were identified using PubMed and Ovid MEDLINE to examine data supporting the hypothesis that risk alleles for depression originated and have been retained in the human genome because these alleles promote pathogen host defense, which includes an integrated suite of immunological and behavioral responses to infection. Depression risk alleles identified by both candidate gene and genome-wide association study (GWAS) methodologies were found to be regularly associated with immune responses to infection that were likely to enhance survival in the ancestral environment. Moreover, data support the role of specific depressive symptoms in pathogen host defense including hyperthermia, reduced bodily iron stores, conservation/withdrawal behavior, hypervigilance and anorexia. By shifting the adaptive context of depression risk alleles from relations with conspecifics to relations with the microbial world, the Pathogen Host Defense (PATHOS-D) hypothesis provides a novel explanation for how depression can be nonadaptive in the social realm, whereas its risk alleles are nonetheless represented at prevalence rates that bespeak an adaptive function. PMID:22290120

  20. Conventional NK cells can produce IL-22 and promote host defense in Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Weiss, Ido D; Zhang, Hongwei H; Singh, Satya P; Wynn, Thomas A; Wilson, Mark S; Farber, Joshua M

    2014-02-15

    It was reported that host defense against pulmonary Klebsiella pneumoniae infection requires IL-22, which was proposed to be of T cell origin. Supporting a role for IL-22, we found that Il22(-/-) mice had decreased survival compared with wild-type mice after intratracheal infection with K. pneumoniae. Surprisingly, however, Rag2(-/-) mice did not differ from wild-type mice in survival or levels of IL-22 in the lungs postinfection with K. pneumoniae. In contrast, K. pneumoniae-infected Rag2(-/-)Il2rg(-/-) mice failed to produce IL-22. These data suggested a possible role for NK cells or other innate lymphoid cells in host defense and production of IL-22. Unlike NK cell-like innate lymphoid cells that produce IL-22 and display a surface phenotype of NK1.1(-)NKp46(+)CCR6(+), lung NK cells showed the conventional phenotype, NK1.1(+)NKp46(+)CCR6(-). Mice depleted of NK cells using anti-asialo GM1 showed decreased survival and higher lung bacterial counts, as well as increased dissemination of K. pneumoniae to blood and liver, compared with control-treated mice. NK cell depletion also led to decreased production of IL-22 in the lung. Within 1 d postinfection, although there was no increase in the number of lung NK cells, a subset of lung NK cells became competent to produce IL-22, and such cells were found in both wild-type and Rag2(-/-) mice. Our data suggest that, during pulmonary infection of mice with K. pneumoniae, conventional NK cells are required for optimal host defense, which includes the production of IL-22.

  1. Host-defense peptides in skin secretions of African clawed frogs (Xenopodinae, Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; King, Jay D

    2012-05-01

    African clawed frogs of the Xenopodinae (Xenopus+Silurana) constitute a well-defined system in which to study the evolutionary trajectory of duplicated genes and are a source of antimicrobial peptides with therapeutic potential. Allopolyploidization events within the Xenopodinae have given rise to tetraploid, octoploid, and dodecaploid species. The primary structures and distributions of host-defense peptides from the tetraploid frogs Xenopus borealis, Xenopus clivii, Xenopus laevis, Xenopus muelleri, "X. muelleri West", and Xenopus petersii may be compared with those from the octoploid frogs Xenopus amieti and X. andrei. Similarly, components in skin secretions from the diploid frog Silurana tropicalis may be compared with those from the tetraploid frog Silurana paratropicalis. All Xenopus antimicrobial peptides may be classified in the magainin, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa), caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF), and xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF) families. However, the numbers of paralogs from the octoploid frogs were not significantly greater than the corresponding numbers from the tetraploid frogs. Magainins were not identified in skin secretions of Silurana frogs and the multiplicity of the PGLa, CPF, and XPF peptides from S. paratropicalis was not greater than that of S. tropicalis. The data indicate, therefore, that nonfunctionalization (gene silencing) has been the most common fate of antimicrobial peptide genes following polyploidization. While some duplicated gene products retain high antimicrobial potency (subfunctionalization), the very low activity of others suggests that they may be evolving towards a new biological role (neofunctionalization). CPF-AM1 and PGLa-AM1 from X. amieti show potential for development into anti-infective agents for use against antibiotic-resistant gram-negative bacteria. PMID:22036891

  2. Parasitism by Cuscuta pentagona Attenuates Host Plant Defenses against Insect Herbivores1

    PubMed Central

    Runyon, Justin B.; Mescher, Mark C.; De Moraes, Consuelo M.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable research has examined plant responses to concurrent attack by herbivores and pathogens, but the effects of attack by parasitic plants, another important class of plant-feeding organisms, on plant defenses against other enemies has not been explored. We investigated how attack by the parasitic plant Cuscuta pentagona impacted tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) defenses against the chewing insect beet armyworm (Spodoptera exigua; BAW). In response to insect feeding, C. pentagona-infested (parasitized) tomato plants produced only one-third of the antiherbivore phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) produced by unparasitized plants. Similarly, parasitized tomato, in contrast to unparasitized plants, failed to emit herbivore-induced volatiles after 3 d of BAW feeding. Although parasitism impaired antiherbivore defenses, BAW growth was slower on parasitized tomato leaves. Vines of C. pentagona did not translocate JA from BAW-infested plants: amounts of JA in parasite vines grown on caterpillar-fed and control plants were similar. Parasitized plants generally contained more salicylic acid (SA), which can inhibit JA in some systems. Parasitized mutant (NahG) tomato plants deficient in SA produced more JA in response to insect feeding than parasitized wild-type plants, further suggesting cross talk between the SA and JA defense signaling pathways. However, JA induction by BAW was still reduced in parasitized compared to unparasitized NahG, implying that other factors must be involved. We found that parasitized plants were capable of producing induced volatiles when experimentally treated with JA, indicating that resource depletion by the parasite does not fully explain the observed attenuation of volatile response to herbivore feeding. Collectively, these findings show that parasitic plants can have important consequences for host plant defense against herbivores. PMID:18165323

  3. Roles of Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor X2 on mast cell-mediated host defense, pseudoallergic drug reactions, and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Gupta, Kshitij; Ali, Hydar

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs), which are granulated tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic lineage, contribute to vascular homeostasis, innate/adaptive immunity, and wound healing. However, MCs are best known for their roles in allergic and inflammatory diseases, such as anaphylaxis, food allergy, rhinitis, itch, urticaria, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. In addition to the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI), MCs express numerous G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the largest group of membrane receptor proteins and the most common targets of drug therapy. Antimicrobial host defense peptides, neuropeptides, major basic protein, eosinophil peroxidase, and many US Food and Drug Administration-approved peptidergic drugs activate human MCs through a novel GPCR known as Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor X2 (MRGPRX2; formerly known as MrgX2). Unique features of MRGPRX2 that distinguish it from other GPCRs include their presence both on the plasma membrane and intracellular sites and their selective expression in MCs. In this article we review the possible roles of MRGPRX2 on host defense, drug-induced anaphylactoid reactions, neurogenic inflammation, pain, itch, and chronic inflammatory diseases, such as urticaria and asthma. We propose that host defense peptides that kill microbes directly and activate MCs through MRGPRX2 could serve as novel GPCR targets to modulate host defense against microbial infection. Furthermore, mAbs or small-molecule inhibitors of MRGPRX2 could be developed for the treatment of MC-dependent allergic and inflammatory disorders.

  4. Roles of Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor X2 on mast cell-mediated host defense, pseudoallergic drug reactions, and chronic inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Gupta, Kshitij; Ali, Hydar

    2016-09-01

    Mast cells (MCs), which are granulated tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic lineage, contribute to vascular homeostasis, innate/adaptive immunity, and wound healing. However, MCs are best known for their roles in allergic and inflammatory diseases, such as anaphylaxis, food allergy, rhinitis, itch, urticaria, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. In addition to the high-affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI), MCs express numerous G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the largest group of membrane receptor proteins and the most common targets of drug therapy. Antimicrobial host defense peptides, neuropeptides, major basic protein, eosinophil peroxidase, and many US Food and Drug Administration-approved peptidergic drugs activate human MCs through a novel GPCR known as Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor X2 (MRGPRX2; formerly known as MrgX2). Unique features of MRGPRX2 that distinguish it from other GPCRs include their presence both on the plasma membrane and intracellular sites and their selective expression in MCs. In this article we review the possible roles of MRGPRX2 on host defense, drug-induced anaphylactoid reactions, neurogenic inflammation, pain, itch, and chronic inflammatory diseases, such as urticaria and asthma. We propose that host defense peptides that kill microbes directly and activate MCs through MRGPRX2 could serve as novel GPCR targets to modulate host defense against microbial infection. Furthermore, mAbs or small-molecule inhibitors of MRGPRX2 could be developed for the treatment of MC-dependent allergic and inflammatory disorders. PMID:27448446

  5. Interferon-Inducible CXC Chemokines Directly Contribute to Host Defense against Inhalational Anthrax in a Murine Model of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Matthew A.; Burdick, Marie D.; Glomski, Ian J.; Boyer, Anne E.; Barr, John R.; Mehrad, Borna; Strieter, Robert M.; Hughes, Molly A.

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines have been found to exert direct, defensin-like antimicrobial activity in vitro, suggesting that, in addition to orchestrating cellular accumulation and activation, chemokines may contribute directly to the innate host response against infection. No observations have been made, however, demonstrating direct chemokine-mediated promotion of host defense in vivo. Here, we show that the murine interferon-inducible CXC chemokines CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11 each exert direct antimicrobial effects in vitro against Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores and bacilli including disruptions in spore germination and marked reductions in spore and bacilli viability as assessed using CFU determination and a fluorometric assay of metabolic activity. Similar chemokine-mediated antimicrobial activity was also observed against fully virulent Ames strain spores and encapsulated bacilli. Moreover, antibody-mediated neutralization of these CXC chemokines in vivo was found to significantly increase host susceptibility to pulmonary B. anthracis infection in a murine model of inhalational anthrax with disease progression characterized by systemic bacterial dissemination, toxemia, and host death. Neutralization of the shared chemokine receptor CXCR3, responsible for mediating cellular recruitment in response to CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, was not found to increase host susceptibility to inhalational anthrax. Taken together, our data demonstrate a novel, receptor-independent antimicrobial role for the interferon-inducible CXC chemokines in pulmonary innate immunity in vivo. These data also support an immunomodulatory approach for effectively treating and/or preventing pulmonary B. anthracis infection, as well as infections caused by pathogenic and potentially, multi-drug resistant bacteria including other spore-forming organisms. PMID:21124994

  6. NOD2, an Intracellular Innate Immune Sensor Involved in Host Defense and Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strober, Warren; Watanabe, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    Nucleotide binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) is an intracellular sensor for small peptides derived from the bacterial cell wall component, peptidoglycan. Recent studies have uncovered unexpected functions of NOD2 in innate immune responses such as induction of type I IFN and facilitation of autophagy; moreover, they have disclosed extensive cross-talk between NOD2 and Toll-like receptors which plays an indispensable role both in host defense against microbial infection and in the development of autoimmunity. Of particular interest, polymorphisms of CARD15 encoding NOD2 are associated with Crohn's disease and other autoimmune states such as graft versus host disease. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding normal functions of NOD2 and discuss the mechanisms by which NOD2 polymorphisms associated with Crohn's disease lead to intestinal inflammation. PMID:21750585

  7. Celecoxib Improves Host Defense through Prostaglandin Inhibition during Histoplasma capsulatum Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Priscilla Aparecida Tartari; Trindade, Bruno Caetano; Secatto, Adriana; Nicolete, Roberto; Peres-Buzalaf, Camila; Ramos, Simone Gusmão; Sadikot, Ruxana; Bitencourt, Claudia da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Prostaglandins act as mediators of inflammation and, similar to cytokines, function as immune modulators during innate and adaptive immune responses. Therefore, using a pharmacological inhibitor, celecoxib, we investigated the role of prostaglandins in host defense against Histoplasma capsulatum infection in C57BL/6 mice. Our results showed that treatment with celecoxib inhibited cyclooxygenase 2, reduced the total fungal burden, and reduced the concentration of PGE2, cytokines, lymphocytes, neutrophils, and mononuclear cells in the bronchoalveolar space and lung parenchyma. In addition, celecoxib treatment increased the synthesis of nitric oxide, IFN-γ, LTB4, and the phagocytic capacity of alveolar macrophages. Moreover, celecoxib treatment increased the survival of mice after infection with a lethal inoculum of H. capsulatum. These results suggest that prostaglandins alter the host immune response and play an important role in the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Thus, the inhibition of prostaglandins could be a valuable immunomodulatory strategy and antifungal therapy for histoplasmosis treatment. PMID:23818746

  8. Lipoxin A4 augments host defense in sepsis and reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence through quorum sensing inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wu, Benedict; Capilato, Joseph; Pham, Michelle P; Walker, Jean; Spur, Bernd; Rodriguez, Ana; Perez, Lark J; Yin, Kingsley

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial infections can quickly turn into sepsis, with its attendant clinical sequelae of inflammation, tissue injury, and organ failure. Paradoxically, sustained inflammation in sepsis may lead to immune suppression, because of which the host is unable to clear the existing infection. Use of agents that suppress the inflammatory response may accelerate host immune suppression, whereas use of traditional antibiotics does not significantly affect inflammation. In this study, we investigated whether lipoxin A4 (LXA4), a specialized, proresolution lipid mediator, could increase neutrophil phagocytic activity as well as reduce bacterial virulence. Using the mouse cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model of sepsis, the administration of LXA4 (7 μg/kg i.v.) 1 h after surgery increased neutrophil phagocytic ability and Fcγ receptor I (CD64) expression. Ex vivo studies have confirmed that the direct addition of LXA4 to CLP neutrophils increased phagocytic ability but not CD64 expression. LXA4 did not affect neutrophils taken from control mice in which CD64 expression was minimal. Taken together with in vivo data, these results suggest that LXA4 directly augments CD64-mediated neutrophil phagocytic ability but does not directly increase neutrophil CD64 expression. Bacterial communication and virulence is regulated by quorum sensing inducers. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, virulence is induced with release of various virulence factors, by N-3-oxododecanolyl homoserine lactone binding to the quorum sensing receptor, LasR. We show that LXA4 is an inhibitor of LasR in P. aeruginosa and that it decreases the release of pyocyanin exotoxin. These results suggest that LXA4 has the novel dual properties of increasing host defense and decreasing pathogen virulence by inhibiting quorum sensing.-Wu, B., Capilato, J., Pham, M. P., Walker, J., Spur, B., Rodriguez, A., Perez, L. J., Yin, K. Lipoxin A4 augments host defense in sepsis and reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence through

  9. Cutaneous Na+ storage strengthens the antimicrobial barrier function of the skin and boosts macrophage-driven host defense.

    PubMed

    Jantsch, Jonathan; Schatz, Valentin; Friedrich, Diana; Schröder, Agnes; Kopp, Christoph; Siegert, Isabel; Maronna, Andreas; Wendelborn, David; Linz, Peter; Binger, Katrina J; Gebhardt, Matthias; Heinig, Matthias; Neubert, Patrick; Fischer, Fabian; Teufel, Stefan; David, Jean-Pierre; Neufert, Clemens; Cavallaro, Alexander; Rakova, Natalia; Küper, Christoph; Beck, Franz-Xaver; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Muller, Dominik N; Schuler, Gerold; Uder, Michael; Bogdan, Christian; Luft, Friedrich C; Titze, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Immune cells regulate a hypertonic microenvironment in the skin; however, the biological advantage of increased skin Na(+) concentrations is unknown. We found that Na(+) accumulated at the site of bacterial skin infections in humans and in mice. We used the protozoan parasite Leishmania major as a model of skin-prone macrophage infection to test the hypothesis that skin-Na(+) storage facilitates antimicrobial host defense. Activation of macrophages in the presence of high NaCl concentrations modified epigenetic markers and enhanced p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38/MAPK)-dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells 5 (NFAT5) activation. This high-salt response resulted in elevated type-2 nitric oxide synthase (Nos2)-dependent NO production and improved Leishmania major control. Finally, we found that increasing Na(+) content in the skin by a high-salt diet boosted activation of macrophages in a Nfat5-dependent manner and promoted cutaneous antimicrobial defense. We suggest that the hypertonic microenvironment could serve as a barrier to infection. PMID:25738463

  10. Department of Defense Education Activity. An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Defense, 2004

    2004-01-01

    DoDEA operates 223 public schools in 16 districts located in seven states, Puerto Rico, Guam, and 13 foreign countries to serve the children of military service members and Department of Defense civilian employees. Approximately 104,935 students are enrolled in DoDEA schools, with approximately 73,200 students in the DoDDS system, and…

  11. Pythium infection activates conserved plant defense responses in mosses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The moss Physcomitrella patens (P. patens) is a useful model to study abiotic stress responses since it is highly tolerant to drought, salt and osmotic stress. However, little is known about the defense mechanisms activated in this moss after pathogen assault. Here the induction of defense responses...

  12. Manipulation of Host Quality and Defense by a Plant Virus Improves Performance of Whitefly Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Qi; Preisser, Evan L; Zhou, Xiao Mao; Xie, Wen; Liu, Bai Ming; Wang, Shao Li; Wu, Qing Jun; Zhang, You Jun

    2015-02-01

    Pathogen-mediated interactions between insect vectors and their host plants can affect herbivore fitness and the epidemiology of plant diseases. While the role of plant quality and defense in mediating these tripartite interactions has been recognized, there are many ecologically and economically important cases where the nature of the interaction has yet to be characterized. The Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) cryptic species Mediterranean (MED) is an important vector of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), and performs better on virus-infected tomato than on uninfected controls. We assessed the impact of TYLCV infection on plant quality and defense, and the direct impact of TYLCV infection on MED feeding. We found that although TYLCV infection has a minimal direct impact on MED, the virus alters the nutritional content of leaf tissue and phloem sap in a manner beneficial to MED. TYLCV infection also suppresses herbivore-induced production of plant defensive enzymes and callose deposition. The strongly positive net effect on TYLCV on MED is consistent with previously reported patterns of whitefly behavior and performance, and provides a foundation for further exploration of the molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects and the evolutionary processes that shape them. PMID:26470098

  13. IL-17 is essential for host defense against cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Cho, John S; Pietras, Eric M; Garcia, Nairy C; Ramos, Romela Irene; Farzam, David M; Monroe, Holly R; Magorien, Julie E; Blauvelt, Andrew; Kolls, Jay K; Cheung, Ambrose L; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2010-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin and soft tissue infections, and rapidly emerging antibiotic-resistant strains are creating a serious public health concern. If immune-based therapies are to be an alternative to antibiotics, greater understanding is needed of the protective immune response against S. aureus infection in the skin. Although neutrophil recruitment is required for immunity against S. aureus, a role for T cells has been suggested. Here, we used a mouse model of S. aureus cutaneous infection to investigate the contribution of T cells to host defense. We found that mice deficient in gammadelta but not alphabeta T cells had substantially larger skin lesions with higher bacterial counts and impaired neutrophil recruitment compared with WT mice. This neutrophil recruitment was dependent upon epidermal Vgamma5+ gammadelta T cell production of IL-17, but not IL-21 and IL-22. Furthermore, IL-17 induction required IL-1, TLR2, and IL-23 and was critical for host defense, since IL-17R-deficient mice had a phenotype similar to that of gammadelta T cell-deficient mice. Importantly, gammadelta T cell-deficient mice inoculated with S. aureus and treated with a single dose of recombinant IL-17 had lesion sizes and bacterial counts resembling those of WT mice, demonstrating that IL-17 could restore the impaired immunity in these mice. Our study defines what we believe to be a novel role for IL-17-producing epidermal gammadelta T cells in innate immunity against S. aureus cutaneous infection.

  14. Exploring the Pharmacological Potential of Promiscuous Host-Defense Peptides: From Natural Screenings to Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Osmar N.; Mulder, Kelly C. L.; Barbosa, Aulus E. A. D.; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J.; Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Rezende, Taia M. B.; Dias, Simoni C.; Franco, Octávio L.

    2011-01-01

    In the last few years, the number of bacteria with enhanced resistance to conventional antibiotics has dramatically increased. Most of such bacteria belong to regular microbial flora, becoming a real challenge, especially for immune-depressed patients. Since the treatment is sometimes extremely expensive, and in some circumstances completely inefficient for the most severe cases, researchers are still determined to discover novel compounds. Among them, host-defense peptides (HDPs) have been found as the first natural barrier against microorganisms in nearly all living groups. This molecular class has been gaining attention every day for multiple reasons. For decades, it was believed that these defense peptides had been involved only with the permeation of the lipid bilayer in pathogen membranes, their main target. Currently, it is known that these peptides can bind to numerous targets, as well as lipids including proteins and carbohydrates, from the surface to deep within the cell. Moreover, by using in vivo models, it was shown that HDPs could act both in pathogens and cognate hosts, improving immunological functions as well as acting through multiple pathways to control infections. This review focuses on structural and functional properties of HDP peptides and the additional strategies used to select them. Furthermore, strategies to avoid problems in large-scale manufacture by using molecular and biochemical techniques will also be explored. In summary, this review intends to construct a bridge between academic research and pharmaceutical industry, providing novel insights into the utilization of HDPs against resistant bacterial strains that cause infections in humans. PMID:22125552

  15. Current and Potential Applications of Host-Defense Peptides and Proteins in Urology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The use of antibiotics has become increasingly disfavored as more multidrug resistant pathogens are on the rise. A promising alternative to the use of these conventional drugs includes antimicrobial peptides or host-defense peptides. These peptides typically consist of short amino acid chains with a net cationic charge and a substantial portion of hydrophobic residues. They mainly target the bacterial cell membrane but are also capable of translocating through the membrane and target intracellular components, making it difficult for bacteria to gain resistance as multiple essential cellular processes are being targeted. The use of these peptides in the field of biomedical therapies has been examined, and the different approaches to using them under various settings are constantly being discovered. In this review, we discuss the current and potential applications of these host-defense peptides in the field of urology. Besides the use of these peptides as antimicrobial agents, the value of these biological molecules has recently been expanded to their use as antitumor and anti-kidney-stone agents. PMID:25815308

  16. Priming of the neutrophil respiratory burst: role in host defense and inflammation.

    PubMed

    El-Benna, Jamel; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Marzaioli, Viviana; Marie, Jean-Claude; Gougerot-Pocidalo, Marie-Anne; Dang, Pham My-Chan

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophils are the major circulating white blood cells in humans. They play an essential role in host defense against pathogens. In healthy individuals, circulating neutrophils are in a dormant state with very low efficiency of capture and arrest on the quiescent endothelium. Upon infection and subsequent release of pro-inflammatory mediators, the vascular endothelium signals to circulating neutrophils to roll, adhere, and cross the endothelial barrier. Neutrophils migrate toward the infection site along a gradient of chemo-attractants, then recognize and engulf the pathogen. To kill this pathogen entrapped inside the vacuole, neutrophils produce and release high quantities of antibacterial peptides, proteases, and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The robust ROS production is also called 'the respiratory burst', and the NADPH oxidase or NOX2 is the enzyme responsible for the production of superoxide anion, leading to other ROS. In vitro, several soluble and particulate agonists induce neutrophil ROS production. This process can be enhanced by prior neutrophil treatment with 'priming' agents, which alone do not induce a respiratory burst. In this review, we will describe the priming process and discuss the beneficial role of controlled neutrophil priming in host defense and the detrimental effect of excessive neutrophil priming in inflammatory diseases. PMID:27558335

  17. Innate antiviral host defense attenuates TGF-β function through IRF3-mediated suppression of Smad signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pinglong; Bailey-Bucktrout, Samantha; Xi, Ying; Xu, Daqi; Du, Dan; Zhang, Qian; Xiang, Weiwen; Liu, Jianming; Melton, Andrew; Sheppard, Dean; Chapman, Harold A.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Derynck, Rik

    2014-01-01

    Summary TGF-β signaling is essential in many processes, including immune surveillance, and its dysregulation controls various diseases, including cancer, fibrosis, and inflammation. Studying the innate host defense, which functions in most cell types, we found that RLR signaling represses TGF-β responses. This regulation is mediated by activated IRF3, using a dual mechanism of IRF3-directed suppression. Activated IRF3 interacts with Smad3, thus inhibiting TGF-β-induced Smad3 activation, and, in the nucleus, disrupts functional Smad3 transcription complexes by competing with co-regulators. Consequently, IRF3 activation by innate antiviral signaling represses TGF-β-induced growth inhibition, gene regulation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and the generation of Treg effector lymphocytes from naïve CD4+ lymphocytes. Conversely, silencing IRF3 expression enhances epithelial-mesenchymal transition, TGF-β-induced Treg cell differentiation upon virus infection, and Treg cell generation in vivo. We present a novel mode of regulation of TGF-β signaling by the antiviral defense, with evidence for its role in immune tolerance and cancer cell behavior. PMID:25526531

  18. Feeding on Host Plants with Different Concentrations and Structures of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids Impacts the Chemical-Defense Effectiveness of a Specialist Herbivore

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Beatriz P.; Solferini, Vera N.

    2015-01-01

    Sequestration of chemical defenses from host plants is a strategy widely used by herbivorous insects to avoid predation. Larvae of the arctiine moth Utetheisa ornatrix feeding on unripe seeds and leaves of many species of Crotalaria (Leguminosae) sequester N-oxides of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) from these host plants, and transfer them to adults through the pupal stage. PAs confer protection against predation on all life stages of U. ornatrix. As U. ornatrix also uses other Crotalaria species as host plants, we evaluated whether the PA chemical defense against predation is independent of host plant use. We fed larvae from hatching to pupation with either leaves or seeds of one of eight Crotalaria species (C. incana, C. juncea, C. micans, C. ochroleuca, C. pallida, C. paulina, C. spectabilis, and C. vitellina), and tested if adults were preyed upon or released by the orb-weaving spider Nephila clavipes. We found that the protection against the spider was more effective in adults whose larvae fed on seeds, which had a higher PA concentration than leaves. The exceptions were adults from larvae fed on C. paulina, C. spectabilis and C. vitellina leaves, which showed high PA concentrations. With respect to the PA profile, we describe for the first time insect-PAs in U. ornatrix. These PAs, biosynthesized from the necine base retronecine of plant origin, or monocrotaline- and senecionine-type PAs sequestered from host plants, were equally active in moth chemical defense, in a dose-dependent manner. These results are also partially explained by host plant phylogeny, since PAs of the host plants do have a phylogenetic signal (clades with high and low PA concentrations in leaves) which is reflected in the adult defense. PMID:26517873

  19. Feeding on Host Plants with Different Concentrations and Structures of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids Impacts the Chemical-Defense Effectiveness of a Specialist Herbivore.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carlos H Z; Cunha, Beatriz P; Solferini, Vera N; Trigo, José R

    2015-01-01

    Sequestration of chemical defenses from host plants is a strategy widely used by herbivorous insects to avoid predation. Larvae of the arctiine moth Utetheisa ornatrix feeding on unripe seeds and leaves of many species of Crotalaria (Leguminosae) sequester N-oxides of pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) from these host plants, and transfer them to adults through the pupal stage. PAs confer protection against predation on all life stages of U. ornatrix. As U. ornatrix also uses other Crotalaria species as host plants, we evaluated whether the PA chemical defense against predation is independent of host plant use. We fed larvae from hatching to pupation with either leaves or seeds of one of eight Crotalaria species (C. incana, C. juncea, C. micans, C. ochroleuca, C. pallida, C. paulina, C. spectabilis, and C. vitellina), and tested if adults were preyed upon or released by the orb-weaving spider Nephila clavipes. We found that the protection against the spider was more effective in adults whose larvae fed on seeds, which had a higher PA concentration than leaves. The exceptions were adults from larvae fed on C. paulina, C. spectabilis and C. vitellina leaves, which showed high PA concentrations. With respect to the PA profile, we describe for the first time insect-PAs in U. ornatrix. These PAs, biosynthesized from the necine base retronecine of plant origin, or monocrotaline- and senecionine-type PAs sequestered from host plants, were equally active in moth chemical defense, in a dose-dependent manner. These results are also partially explained by host plant phylogeny, since PAs of the host plants do have a phylogenetic signal (clades with high and low PA concentrations in leaves) which is reflected in the adult defense.

  20. Inbreeding compromises host plant defense gene expression and improves herbivore survival.

    PubMed

    Portman, Scott L; Kariyat, Rupesh R; Johnston, Michelle A; Stephenson, Andrew G; Marden, James H

    2015-01-01

    Inbreeding commonly occurs in flowering plants and often results in a decline in the plant's defense response. Insects prefer to feed and oviposit on inbred plants more than outbred plants--suggesting that selecting inbred host plants offers them fitness benefits. Until recently, no studies have examined the effects of host plant inbreeding on insect fitness traits such as growth and dispersal ability. In a recent article, we documented that tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta L.) larvae that fed on inbred horsenettle (Solanum carolinense L.) plants exhibited accelerated larval growth and increased adult flight capacity compared to larvae that fed on outbred plants. Here we report that M. sexta mortality decreased by 38.2% when larvae were reared on inbred horsenettle plants compared to larvae reared on outbreds. Additionally, inbred plants showed a notable reduction in the average relative expression levels of lipoxygenease-D (LoxD) and 12-oxophytodienoate reductase-3 (OPR3), two genes in the jasmonic acid signaling pathway that are upregulated in response to herbivore damage. Our study presents evidence that furthers our understanding of the biochemical mechanism responsible for differences in insect performance on inbred vs. outbred host plants. PMID:26039489

  1. Peripheral blood leukocyte count as an index of defense status in the leukopenic host

    SciTech Connect

    Cawley, S.; Findon, G.; Miller, T.E.

    1988-07-01

    These experimental studies have investigated the reliability of the peripheral blood leukocyte count to predict whether the leukopenic host can contain or eliminate infection. Additionally, we have investigated the possibility that determination of leukocyte recruitment, supplementary to peripheral blood leukocyte counts, might allow individuals with neutropenia at risk from serious infection to be distinguished with greater certainty. Varying doses of radiation, cyclophosphamide, and methylprednisolone were used to induce distinct levels of leukopenia in rats. Leukocyte recruitment was measured by quantifying the response of neutropenic animals to evocative, subcutaneous stimuli, and the results of this assay were then compared with circulating leukocyte counts in the same individuals. Six models of experimentally induced infection were used to compare circulating and recruitable leukocytes as indicators of the susceptibility of the leukopenic host to infection. Response curves relating leukocyte numbers to host resistance were similar when circulating or recruitable leukocytes were used as an index of defense capability. These findings support the use of peripheral blood leukocyte numbers as an index of resistance to infection in individuals with leukopenia and suggest that functional analyses such as leukocyte recruitment are unlikely to provide additional information.

  2. Inbreeding compromises host plant defense gene expression and improves herbivore survival

    PubMed Central

    Portman, Scott L; Kariyat, Rupesh R; Johnston, Michelle A; Stephenson, Andrew G; Marden, James H

    2015-01-01

    Inbreeding commonly occurs in flowering plants and often results in a decline in the plant's defense response. Insects prefer to feed and oviposit on inbred plants more than outbred plants – suggesting that selecting inbred host plants offers them fitness benefits. Until recently, no studies have examined the effects of host plant inbreeding on insect fitness traits such as growth and dispersal ability. In a recent article, we documented that tobacco hornworm (Manduca sexta L.) larvae that fed on inbred horsenettle (Solanum carolinense L.) plants exhibited accelerated larval growth and increased adult flight capacity compared to larvae that fed on outbred plants. Here we report that M. sexta mortality decreased by 38.2% when larvae were reared on inbred horsenettle plants compared to larvae reared on outbreds. Additionally, inbred plants showed a notable reduction in the average relative expression levels of LIPOXYGENEASE-D (LoxD) and 12-OXOPHYTODIENOATE REDUCTASE-3 (OPR3), two genes in the jasmonic acid signaling pathway that are upregulated in response to herbivore damage. Our study presents evidence that furthers our understanding of the biochemical mechanism responsible for differences in insect performance on inbred vs. outbred host plants. PMID:26039489

  3. Non-canonical inflammasome activation of caspase-4/caspase-11 mediates epithelial defenses against enteric bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Knodler, Leigh A.; Crowley, Shauna M.; Sham, Ho Pan; Yang, Hyungjun; Wrande, Marie; Ma, Caixia; Ernst, Robert K.; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia; Celli, Jean; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Inflammasome-mediated host defenses have been extensively studied in innate immune cells. Whether inflammasomes function for innate defense in intestinal epithelial cells, which represent the first line of defense against enteric pathogens, remains unknown. We observed enhanced Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium colonization in the intestinal epithelium of caspase-11 deficient mice, but not at systemic sites. In polarized epithelial monolayers, siRNA-mediated depletion of caspase-4, a human orthologue of caspase-11, also led to increased bacterial colonization. Decreased rates of pyroptotic cell death, a host defense mechanism that extrudes S. Typhimurium infected cells from the polarized epithelium, accounted for increased pathogen burdens. The caspase-4 inflammasome also governs activation of the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-18, in response to intracellular (S. Typhimurium) and extracellular (enteropathogenic Escherichia coli) enteric pathogens, via intracellular LPS sensing. Therefore an epithelial cell intrinsic non-canonical inflammasome plays a critical role in antimicrobial defense at the intestinal mucosal surface. PMID:25121752

  4. Regulation of lung immunity and host defense by the intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, Derrick R.; Welsh, David A.; Shellito, Judd E.

    2015-01-01

    Every year in the United States approximately 200,000 people die from pulmonary infections, such as influenza and pneumonia, or from lung disease that is exacerbated by pulmonary infection. In addition, respiratory diseases such as, asthma, affect 300 million people worldwide. Therefore, understanding the mechanistic basis for host defense against infection and regulation of immune processes involved in asthma are crucial for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. The identification, characterization, and manipulation of immune regulatory networks in the lung represents one of the biggest challenges in treatment of lung associated disease. Recent evidence suggests that the gastrointestinal (GI) microbiota plays a key role in immune adaptation and initiation in the GI tract as well as at other distal mucosal sites, such as the lung. This review explores the current research describing the role of the GI microbiota in the regulation of pulmonary immune responses. Specific focus is given to understanding how intestinal “dysbiosis” affects lung health. PMID:26500629

  5. Roles of d-Amino Acids on the Bioactivity of Host Defense Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hao; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E. S.; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are positively-charged and amphipathic components of the innate immune system that have demonstrated great potential to become the next generation of broad spectrum therapeutic agents effective against a vast array of pathogens and tumor. As such, many approaches have been taken to improve the therapeutic efficacy of HDPs. Amongst these methods, the incorporation of d-amino acids (d-AA) is an approach that has demonstrated consistent success in improving HDPs. Although, virtually all HDP review articles briefly mentioned about the role of d-AA, however it is rather surprising that no systematic review specifically dedicated to this topic exists. Given the impact that d-AA incorporation has on HDPs, this review aims to fill that void with a systematic discussion of the impact of d-AA on HDPs. PMID:27376281

  6. Roles of d-Amino Acids on the Bioactivity of Host Defense Peptides.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Anuwongcharoen, Nuttapat; Malik, Aijaz Ahmad; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Wikberg, Jarl E S; Nantasenamat, Chanin

    2016-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are positively-charged and amphipathic components of the innate immune system that have demonstrated great potential to become the next generation of broad spectrum therapeutic agents effective against a vast array of pathogens and tumor. As such, many approaches have been taken to improve the therapeutic efficacy of HDPs. Amongst these methods, the incorporation of d-amino acids (d-AA) is an approach that has demonstrated consistent success in improving HDPs. Although, virtually all HDP review articles briefly mentioned about the role of d-AA, however it is rather surprising that no systematic review specifically dedicated to this topic exists. Given the impact that d-AA incorporation has on HDPs, this review aims to fill that void with a systematic discussion of the impact of d-AA on HDPs. PMID:27376281

  7. The multifunctional host defense peptide SPLUNC1 is critical for homeostasis of the mammalian upper airway.

    PubMed

    McGillivary, Glen; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2010-10-07

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent pediatric disease caused by normal flora of the nasopharynx that ascend the Eustachian tube and enter the middle ear. As OM is a disease of opportunity, it is critical to gain an increased understanding of immune system components that are operational in the upper airway and aid in prevention of this disease. SPLUNC1 is an antimicrobial host defense peptide that is hypothesized to contribute to the health of the airway both through bactericidal and non-bactericidal mechanisms. We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology to knock down expression of the chinchilla ortholog of human SPLUNC1 (cSPLUNC1) to begin to determine the role that this protein played in prevention of OM. We showed that knock down of cSPLUNC1 expression did not impact survival of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, a predominant causative agent of OM, in the chinchilla middle ear under the conditions tested. In contrast, expression of cSPLUNC1 was essential for maintenance of middle ear pressure and efficient mucociliary clearance, key defense mechanisms of the tubotympanum. Collectively, our data have provided the first in vivo evidence that cSPLUNC1 functions to maintain homeostasis of the upper airway and, thereby, is critical for protection of the middle ear.

  8. Triggering Receptor Expressed on Myeloid Cells (TREM)-2 Impairs Host Defense in Experimental Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Weehuizen, Tassili A. F.; Hommes, Tijmen J.; Lankelma, Jacqueline M.; de Jong, Hanna K.; Roelofs, Joris. J.T.H.; de Vos, Alex F.; Colonna, Marco; van der Poll, Tom; Wiersinga, W. Joost

    2016-01-01

    Background Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM) -1 and TREM-2 are key regulators of the inflammatory response that are involved in the clearance of invading pathogens. Melioidosis, caused by the "Tier 1" biothreat agent Burkholderia pseudomallei, is a common form of community-acquired sepsis in Southeast-Asia. TREM-1 has been suggested as a biomarker for sepsis and melioidosis. We aimed to characterize the expression and function of TREM-1 and TREM-2 in melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Wild-type, TREM-1/3 (Trem-1/3-/-) and TREM-2 (Trem-2-/-) deficient mice were intranasally infected with live B. pseudomallei and killed after 24, and/or 72 h for the harvesting of lungs, liver, spleen, and blood. Additionally, survival studies were performed. Cellular functions were further analyzed by stimulation and/or infection of isolated cells. TREM-1 and TREM-2 expression was increased both in the lung and liver of B. pseudomallei-infected mice. Strikingly, Trem-2-/-, but not Trem-1/3-/-, mice displayed a markedly improved host defense as reflected by a strong survival advantage together with decreased bacterial loads, less inflammation and reduced organ injury. Cellular responsiveness of TREM-2, but not TREM-1, deficient blood and bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) was diminished upon exposure to B. pseudomallei. Phagocytosis and intracellular killing of B. pseudomallei by BMDM and alveolar macrophages were TREM-1 and TREM-2-independent. Conclusions/Significance We found that TREM-2, and to a lesser extent TREM-1, plays a remarkable detrimental role in the host defense against a clinically relevant Gram-negative pathogen in mice: TREM-2 deficiency restricts the inflammatory response, thereby decreasing organ damage and mortality. PMID:27253382

  9. A miniature mimic of host defense peptides with systemic antibacterial efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Sarig, Hadar; Livne, Liran; Held-Kuznetsov, Victoria; Zaknoon, Fadia; Ivankin, Andrey; Gidalevitz, David; Mor, Amram

    2010-01-01

    Oligomers of acylated lysines (OAKs) are synthetic mimics of host defense peptides (HDPs) with promising antimicrobial properties. Here we challenged the OAK concept for its ability to generate both systemically efficient and economically viable lead compounds for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. We describe the design and characterization of a miniature OAK composed of only 3 lysyls and 2 acyls (designated C12(ω7)K-β12) that preferentially targets gram-positive species by a bacteriostatic mode of action. To gain insight into the mechanism of action, we examined the interaction of OAK with various potential targets, including phospholipid bilayers, using surface plasmon resonance, and Langmuir monolayers, using insertion assays, epifluorescence microscopy, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, in a complementary manner. Collectively, the data support the notion that C12(ω7)K-β12 damages the plasma-membrane architecture similarly to HDPs, that is, following a near-classic 2-step interaction including high-affinity electrostatic adhesion and a subsequent shallow insertion that was limited to the phospholipid head group region. Notably, preliminary acute toxicity and efficacy studies performed with mouse models of infection have consolidated the potential of OAK for treating bacterial infections, including systemic treatments of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Such simple yet robust chemicals might be useful for various antibacterial applications while circumventing potential adverse effects associated with cytolytic compounds.—Sarig, H., Livne, L., Held-Kuznetsov, V., Zaknoon, F., Ivankin, A., Gidalevitz, D., Mor, A. A miniature mimic of host defense peptides with systemic antibacterial efficacy. PMID:20124435

  10. Activated chemical defenses suppress herbivory on freshwater red algae.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Keri M; Hay, Mark E

    2013-04-01

    The rapid life cycles of freshwater algae are hypothesized to suppress selection for chemical defenses against herbivores, but this notion remains untested. Investigations of chemical defenses are rare for freshwater macrophytes and absent for freshwater red algae. We used crayfish to assess the palatability of five freshwater red algae relative to a palatable green alga and a chemically defended aquatic moss. We then assessed the roles of structural, nutritional, and chemical traits in reducing palatability. Both native and non-native crayfish preferred the green alga Cladophora glomerata to four of the five red algae. Batrachospermum helminthosum, Kumanoa holtonii, and Tuomeya americana employed activated chemical defenses that suppressed feeding by 30-60 % following damage to algal tissues. Paralemanea annulata was defended by its cartilaginous structure, while Boldia erythrosiphon was palatable. Activated defenses are thought to reduce ecological costs by expressing potent defenses only when actually needed; thus, activation might be favored in freshwater red algae whose short-lived gametophytes must grow and reproduce rapidly over a brief growing season. The frequency of activated chemical defenses found here (three of five species) is 3-20× higher than for surveys of marine algae or aquatic vascular plants. If typical for freshwater red algae, this suggests that (1) their chemical defenses may go undetected if chemical activation is not considered and (2) herbivory has been an important selective force in the evolution of freshwater Rhodophyta. Investigations of defenses in freshwater rhodophytes contribute to among-system comparisons and provide insights into the generality of plant-herbivore interactions and their evolution.

  11. Potential of host defense peptide prodrugs as neutrophil elastase-dependent anti-infective agents for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Forde, Eanna; Humphreys, Hilary; Greene, Catherine M; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Devocelle, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides (HDPs) are short antimicrobial peptides of the innate immune system. Deficiencies in HDPs contribute to enhanced susceptibility to infections, e.g., in cystic fibrosis (CF). Exogenous HDPs can compensate for these deficiencies, but their development as antimicrobials is limited by cytotoxicity. Three HDP prodrugs were designed so their net positive charge is masked by a promoiety containing a substrate for the enzyme neutrophil elastase (NE). This approach can confine activation to sites with high NE levels. Enzyme-labile peptides were synthesized, and their activation was investigated using purified NE. Susceptibilities of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to parent and prodrug peptides in the presence and absence of NE-rich CF human bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and different NaCl concentrations were compared. The effect of the HDP promoiety on cytotoxicity was determined with cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial (CFBE41o-) cells. NE in CF BAL fluids activated the HDP prodrugs, restoring bactericidal activity against reference and clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa. However, activation also required the addition of 300 mM NaCl. Under these conditions, the bactericidal activity levels of the HDP prodrugs differed, with pro-P18 demonstrating the greatest activity (90% to 100% of that of the parent, P18, at 6.25 μg/ml). Cytotoxic effects on CFBE41o- cells were reduced by the addition of the promoiety to HDPs. We demonstrate here for the first time the selective activation of novel HDP prodrugs by a host disease-associated enzyme at in vivo concentrations of the CF lung. This approach may lead to the development of novel therapeutic agents with low toxicity that are active under the challenging conditions of the CF lung.

  12. Cutting edge: IL-17-secreting innate lymphoid cells are essential for host defense against fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Gladiator, André; Wangler, Nicolette; Trautwein-Weidner, Kerstin; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2013-01-15

    IL-17-mediated immunity has emerged as a crucial host defense mechanism against fungal infections. Although Th cells are generally thought to act as the major source of IL-17 in response to Candida albicans, we show that fungal control is mediated by IL-17-secreting innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and not by Th17 cells. By using a mouse model of oropharyngeal candidiasis we found that IL-17A and IL-17F, which are both crucial for pathogen clearance, are produced promptly upon infection in an IL-23-dependent manner, and that ILCs in the oral mucosa are the main source for these cytokines. Ab-mediated depletion of ILCs in RAG1-deficient mice or ILC deficiency in retinoic acid-related orphan receptor c(-/-) mice resulted in a complete failure to control the infection. Taken together, our data uncover the cellular basis for the IL-23/IL-17 axis, which acts right at the onset of infection when it is most needed for fungal control and host protection.

  13. SP-A and SP-D in host defense against fungal infections and allergies.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Hrishikesh; Madhukaran, Shanmuga P; Nayak, Annapurna; Madan, Taruna

    2012-01-01

    Innate immunity mediated by pattern recognition proteins is relevant in the host defense against fungi. SP-A and SP-D are two such proteins belonging to the class of collagen domain containing C-type lectins, or collectins. They bind to the sugar moieties present on the cell walls of various fungi in a dose dependent manner via their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). SP-A and SP-D directly interact with alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, lymphocytes. We review these roles of SP-A and SP-D against various clinically relevant fungal pathogens and fungal allergens. SP-A and SP-D gene deficient mice showed increased susceptibility/ resistance to various fungal infections. Patients of fungal infections and allergies are reported with alterations in the serum or lung lavage levels of SP-A and SP-D. There are studies associating the gene polymorphisms in SP-A and SP-D with alterations in their levels or functions or susceptibility of the host to fungal diseases. In view of the protective role of SP-D in murine models of Aspergillus fumigatus infections and allergies, therapeutic use of SP-D could be explored further.

  14. White Spot Syndrome Virus Protein Kinase 1 Defeats the Host Cell's Iron-Withholding Defense Mechanism by Interacting with Host Ferritin

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shin-Jen; Lee, Der-Yen; Wang, Hao-Ching; Kang, Shih-Ting; Hwang, Pung-Pung; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Huang, Ming-Fen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Iron is an essential nutrient for nearly all living organisms, including both hosts and invaders. Proteins such as ferritin regulate the iron levels in a cell, and in the event of a pathogenic invasion, the host can use an iron-withholding mechanism to restrict the availability of this essential nutrient to the invading pathogens. However, pathogens use various strategies to overcome this host defense. In this study, we demonstrated that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) protein kinase 1 (PK1) interacted with shrimp ferritin in the yeast two-hybrid system. A pulldown assay and 27-MHz quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis confirmed the interaction between PK1 and both ferritin and apoferritin. PK1 did not promote the release of iron ions from ferritin, but it prevented apoferritin from binding ferrous ions. When PK1 was overexpressed in Sf9 cells, the cellular labile iron pool (LIP) levels were elevated significantly. Immunoprecipitation and atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) further showed that the number of iron ions bound by ferritin decreased significantly at 24 h post-WSSV infection. Taken together, these results suggest that PK1 prevents apoferritin from iron loading, and thus stabilizes the cellular LIP levels, and that WSSV uses this novel mechanism to counteract the host cell's iron-withholding defense mechanism. IMPORTANCE We show here that white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) ensures the availability of iron by using a previously unreported mechanism to defeat the host cell's iron-withholding defense mechanism. This defense is often implemented by ferritin, which can bind up to 4,500 iron atoms and acts to sequester free iron within the cell. WSSV's novel counterstrategy is mediated by a direct protein-protein interaction between viral protein kinase 1 (PK1) and host ferritin. PK1 interacts with both ferritin and apoferritin, suppresses apoferritin's ability to sequester free iron ions, and maintains the intracellular labile iron pool (LIP

  15. Modulation of host immune defenses by Aeromonas and Yersinia species: convergence on toxins secreted by various secretion systems

    PubMed Central

    Rosenzweig, Jason A.; Chopra, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Like other pathogenic bacteria, Yersinia and Aeromonas species have been continuously co-evolving with their respective hosts. Although the former is a bonafide human pathogen, the latter has gained notararity as an emerging disease-causing agent. In response to immune cell challenges, bacterial pathogens have developed diverse mechanism(s) enabling their survival, and, at times, dominance over various host immune defense systems. The bacterial type three secretion system (T3SS) is evolutionarily derived from flagellar subunits and serves as a vehicle by which microbes can directly inject/translocate anti-host factors/effector proteins into targeted host immune cells. A large number of Gram-negative bacterial pathogens possess a T3SS empowering them to disrupt host cell signaling, actin cytoskeleton re-arrangements, and even to induce host-cell apoptotic and pyroptotic pathways. All pathogenic yersiniae and most Aeromonas species possess a T3SS, but they also possess T2- and T6-secreted toxins/effector proteins. This review will focus on the mechanisms by which the T3SS effectors Yersinia outer membrane protein J (YopJ) and an Aeromonas hydrophila AexU protein, isolated from the diarrheal isolate SSU, mollify host immune system defenses. Additionally, the mechanisms that are associated with host cell apoptosis/pyroptosis by Aeromonas T2SS secreted Act, a cytotoxic enterotoxin, and Hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), an A. hydrophila T6SS effector, will also be discussed. PMID:24199174

  16. Racing against host's immunity defenses: a likely strategy for passive evasion of encapsulation in Asobara tabida parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Eslin; Prévost

    2000-08-01

    The hymenopteran Asobara tabida Nees (Braconidae, Alysiinae) develops as a solitary endophagous parasite in larvae of several Drosophila species. Most A. tabida eggs possess a sticky chorion which attaches to the tissue of the host organs within a few hours following oviposition. A. tabida sticky eggs usually avoid encapsulation, though the probability of survival decreases in hosts carrying a larger number of circulating hemocytes. Here, we hypothesized that the elicitation of the encapsulation reaction may result from a race between two phenomena: the host's hemocytic reaction and the embedment of the parasitic egg within the host tissues. In order to test this hypothesis, we measured the speed of capsule formation in D. melanogaster larvae of different ages, knowing that the number of circulating hemocytes increases with the age of the larvae. Using a non-virulent A. tabida strain, the eggs of which do not attach to the host tissue, we found that the speed of capsule formation increased correlatively with the age of the D. melanogaster larva. Therefore, the hypothesis of a physiological race between host's immunity defenses and parasite's avoidance of host's defenses is strongly supported by our results. Also, A. tabida eggs which attach to the host's tissue before the attack by the hemocytes has taken place may be considered as a strategy of passive evasion from encapsulation.

  17. Roles of MAS-related G protein coupled receptor-X2 (MRGPRX2) on mast cell-mediated host defense, pseudoallergic drug reactions and chronic inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Hariharan; Gupta, Kshitij; Ali, Hydar

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs), which are granulated tissue-resident cells of hematopoietic lineage, contribute to vascular homeostasis, innate/adaptive immunity and wound healing. MCs are, however, best known for their roles in allergic and inflammatory diseases such as anaphylaxis, food allergy, rhinitis, itch, urticaria, atopic dermatitis and asthma. In addition to the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI), MCs express numerous G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are the largest group of membrane receptor proteins and are the most common targets of drug therapy. Antimicrobial host defense peptides (HDPs), neuropeptides (NPs), major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and many FDA approved peptidergic drugs activate human MCs via a novel GPCR known as MAS-related G protein coupled receptor-X2 (MRGPRX2; formerly known as MrgX2). Unique features of MRGPRX2 that distinguish it from other GPCRs include their presence both on plasma membrane and intracellular sites and their selective expression in MCs. In this article, we review the possible roles of MRGPRX2 on host defense, drug-induced anaphylactoid reactions, neurogenic inflammation, pain, itch and chronic inflammatory diseases such as urticaria and asthma. We propose that HDPs that kill microbes directly and activate MCs via MRGPRX2 could serve as novel GPCR targets to modulate host defense against microbial infection. Furthermore, monoclonal antibodies or small molecule inhibitors of MRGPRX2 could be developed for the treatment of MC-dependent allergic and inflammatory disorders. PMID:27448446

  18. Delayed Hypersensitivity: Indicator of Acquired Failure of Host Defenses in Sepsis and Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Meakins, Jonathan L.; Pietsch, John B.; Bubenick, Oldrich; Kelly, Ralph; Rode, Harold; Gordon, Julius; MacLean, Lloyd D.

    1977-01-01

    Primary failure of host defense mechanisms has been associated with increased infection and mortality. Anergy, the failure of delayed hypersensitivity response, has been shown to identify surgical patients at increased risk for sepsis and related mortality. The anergic and relatively anergic patients whose skin tests failed to improve had a mortality rate of 74.4%, whereas those who improved their responses had a mortality rate of 5.1% (P < 0.001). This study documents abnormalities of neutrophil chemotaxis, T-lymphocyte rosetting in anergic patients and the effect of autologous serum. These abnormalities may account for the increased infection and mortality rates in anergic patients. Skin testing with five standard antigens has identified 110 anergic (A) or relatively anergic (RA) patients in whom neutrophil chemotaxis (CTX) and bactericidal function (NBF), T-lymphocyte rosettes, mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), cell-mediated lympholysis (CML), and blastogenic factor (BF) were studied. The MLC, CML and BF were normal in the patients studied, and were not clinically helpful. Neutrophil CTX in 19 controls was 117.5 ± 1.6 u whereas in 40 A patients, neutrophils migrated 81.7 ± 2.3 u and in 15 RA patients 97.2 ± 3.8 u (P < 0.01). In 14 patients whose skin tests converted to normal, neutrophil migration improved from 78.2 ± 5.4 u to 107.2 ± 4.0 u (P < 0.01). Incubation of A or control neutrophils in A serum reduced migration in A patients from 93 ± 3.7 u to 86.2 ± 3.5 u (P < 0.01) and in normals from 121.2 ± 1.6 u to 103.6 ± 2.6 u (P < 0.001). The per cent rosette forming cells in 66 A patients was 42.5 ± 3.1 compared to 53.6 ± 2.8 in normal responders (P < 0.02). Incubation of normal lymphocytes in anergic serum further reduced rosetting by 30%. Restoration of delayed hypersensitivity responses and concurrent improvement in cellular and serum components of host defense were correlated with maintenance of adequate nutrition and aggressive surgical drainage

  19. Increased Host Investment in Extrafloral Nectar (EFN) Improves the Efficiency of a Mutualistic Defensive Service

    PubMed Central

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Silva Bueno, Juan Carlos; Heil, Martin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Extrafloral nectar (EFN) plays an important role as plant indirect defence through the attraction of defending ants. Like all rewards produced in the context of a mutualism, however, EFN is in danger of being exploited by non-ant consumers that do not defend the plant against herbivores. Here we asked whether plants, by investing more in EFN, can improve their indirect defence, or rather increase the risk of losing this investment to EFN thieves. We used the obligate plant-ant Acacia-Pseudomyrmex system and examined experimentally in the field during the dry and the rainy seasons how variations in EFN secretion are related to (i) ant activity, to (ii) the ant-mediated defence against herbivores and (iii) the exploitation of EFN by non-ant consumers. Extrafloral investment enhanced ant recruitment and was positively related to the ant mediated defence against herbivores. The ant-mediated protection from exploiters also increased in proportion to the nectar sugar concentration. Although the daily peak of EFN production coincided with the highest activity of EFN thieves, Pseudomyrmex ferrugineus ants protected this resource effectively from exploiters. Nevertheless, the defensive effects by ants differed among seasons. During the dry season, plants grew slower and secreted more EFN than in the rainy season, and thus, experienced a higher level of ant-mediated indirect defence. Our results show that an increased plant investment in an indirect defence trait can improve the resulting defensive service against both herbivores and exploiters. EFN secretion by obligate ant-plants represents a defensive trait for which the level of investment correlates positively with the beneficial effects obtained. PMID:23056362

  20. Increased host investment in extrafloral nectar (EFN) improves the efficiency of a mutualistic defensive service.

    PubMed

    González-Teuber, Marcia; Silva Bueno, Juan Carlos; Heil, Martin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Extrafloral nectar (EFN) plays an important role as plant indirect defence through the attraction of defending ants. Like all rewards produced in the context of a mutualism, however, EFN is in danger of being exploited by non-ant consumers that do not defend the plant against herbivores. Here we asked whether plants, by investing more in EFN, can improve their indirect defence, or rather increase the risk of losing this investment to EFN thieves. We used the obligate plant-ant Acacia-Pseudomyrmex system and examined experimentally in the field during the dry and the rainy seasons how variations in EFN secretion are related to (i) ant activity, to (ii) the ant-mediated defence against herbivores and (iii) the exploitation of EFN by non-ant consumers. Extrafloral investment enhanced ant recruitment and was positively related to the ant mediated defence against herbivores. The ant-mediated protection from exploiters also increased in proportion to the nectar sugar concentration. Although the daily peak of EFN production coincided with the highest activity of EFN thieves, Pseudomyrmex ferrugineus ants protected this resource effectively from exploiters. Nevertheless, the defensive effects by ants differed among seasons. During the dry season, plants grew slower and secreted more EFN than in the rainy season, and thus, experienced a higher level of ant-mediated indirect defence. Our results show that an increased plant investment in an indirect defence trait can improve the resulting defensive service against both herbivores and exploiters. EFN secretion by obligate ant-plants represents a defensive trait for which the level of investment correlates positively with the beneficial effects obtained.

  1. POU2AF1 Functions in the Human Airway Epithelium To Regulate Expression of Host Defense Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haixia; Brekman, Angelika; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Ou, Xuemei; Shaykhiev, Renat; Agosto-Perez, Francisco J; Wang, Rui; Walters, Matthew S; Salit, Jacqueline; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Staudt, Michelle R; Kaner, Robert J; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G; Wang, Guoqing

    2016-04-01

    In the process of seeking novel lung host defense regulators by analyzing genome-wide RNA sequence data from normal human airway epithelium, we detected expression of POU domain class 2-associating factor 1 (POU2AF1), a known transcription cofactor previously thought to be expressed only in lymphocytes. Lymphocyte contamination of human airway epithelial samples obtained by bronchoscopy and brushing was excluded by immunohistochemistry staining, the observation of upregulation of POU2AF1 in purified airway basal stem/progenitor cells undergoing differentiation, and analysis of differentiating single basal cell clones. Lentivirus-mediated upregulation of POU2AF1 in airway basal cells induced upregulation of host defense genes, including MX1, IFIT3, IFITM, and known POU2AF1 downstream genes HLA-DRA, ID2, ID3, IL6, and BCL6. Interestingly, expression of these genes paralleled changes of POU2AF1 expression during airway epithelium differentiation in vitro, suggesting POU2AF1 helps to maintain a host defense tone even in pathogen-free condition. Cigarette smoke, a known risk factor for airway infection, suppressed POU2AF1 expression both in vivo in humans and in vitro in human airway epithelial cultures, accompanied by deregulation of POU2AF1 downstream genes. Finally, enhancing POU2AF1 expression in human airway epithelium attenuated the suppression of host defense genes by smoking. Together, these findings suggest a novel function of POU2AF1 as a potential regulator of host defense genes in the human airway epithelium. PMID:26927796

  2. POU2AF1 Functions in the Human Airway Epithelium To Regulate Expression of Host Defense Genes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haixia; Brekman, Angelika; Zuo, Wu-Lin; Ou, Xuemei; Shaykhiev, Renat; Agosto-Perez, Francisco J; Wang, Rui; Walters, Matthew S; Salit, Jacqueline; Strulovici-Barel, Yael; Staudt, Michelle R; Kaner, Robert J; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G; Wang, Guoqing

    2016-04-01

    In the process of seeking novel lung host defense regulators by analyzing genome-wide RNA sequence data from normal human airway epithelium, we detected expression of POU domain class 2-associating factor 1 (POU2AF1), a known transcription cofactor previously thought to be expressed only in lymphocytes. Lymphocyte contamination of human airway epithelial samples obtained by bronchoscopy and brushing was excluded by immunohistochemistry staining, the observation of upregulation of POU2AF1 in purified airway basal stem/progenitor cells undergoing differentiation, and analysis of differentiating single basal cell clones. Lentivirus-mediated upregulation of POU2AF1 in airway basal cells induced upregulation of host defense genes, including MX1, IFIT3, IFITM, and known POU2AF1 downstream genes HLA-DRA, ID2, ID3, IL6, and BCL6. Interestingly, expression of these genes paralleled changes of POU2AF1 expression during airway epithelium differentiation in vitro, suggesting POU2AF1 helps to maintain a host defense tone even in pathogen-free condition. Cigarette smoke, a known risk factor for airway infection, suppressed POU2AF1 expression both in vivo in humans and in vitro in human airway epithelial cultures, accompanied by deregulation of POU2AF1 downstream genes. Finally, enhancing POU2AF1 expression in human airway epithelium attenuated the suppression of host defense genes by smoking. Together, these findings suggest a novel function of POU2AF1 as a potential regulator of host defense genes in the human airway epithelium.

  3. The transcriptional repressor BLIMP1 curbs host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

    PubMed

    Severa, Martina; Islam, Sabina A; Waggoner, Stephen N; Jiang, Zhaozhao; Kim, Nancy D; Ryan, Glennice; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Charo, Israel; Caffrey, Daniel R; Boyartchuk, Victor L; Luster, Andrew D; Fitzgerald, Katherine A

    2014-03-01

    The transcriptional repressor B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (BLIMP1) is a master regulator of B and T cell differentiation. To examine the role of BLIMP1 in innate immunity, we used a conditional knockout (CKO) of Blimp1 in myeloid cells and found that Blimp1 CKO mice were protected from lethal infection induced by Listeria monocytogenes. Transcriptome analysis of Blimp1 CKO macrophages identified the murine chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 8, CCL8, as a direct target of Blimp1-mediated transcriptional repression in these cells. BLIMP1-deficient macrophages expressed elevated levels of Ccl8, and consequently Blimp1 CKO mice had higher levels of circulating CCL8, resulting in increased neutrophils in the peripheral blood, promoting a more aggressive antibacterial response. Mice lacking the Ccl8 gene were more susceptible to L. monocytogenes infection than were wild-type mice. Although CCL8 failed to recruit neutrophils directly, it was chemotactic for γ/δ T cells, and CCL8-responsive γ/δ T cells were enriched for IL-17F. Finally, CCL8-mediated enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes was dependent on γ/δ T cells. Collectively, these data reveal an important role for BLIMP1 in modulating host defenses by suppressing expression of the chemokine CCL8.

  4. Assessment of antimicrobial (host defense) peptides as anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Susan; Hoskin, David W; Hilchie, Ashley L

    2014-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial (host defense) peptides (CAPs) are able to kill microorganisms and cancer cells, leading to their consideration as novel candidate therapeutic agents in human medicine. CAPs can physically associate with anionic membrane structures, such as those found on cancer cells, causing pore formation, intracellular disturbances, and leakage of cell contents. In contrast, normal cells are less negatively-charged and are typically not susceptible to CAP-mediated cell death. Because the interaction of CAPs with cells is based on charge properties rather than cell proliferation, both rapidly dividing and quiescent cancer cells, as well as multidrug-resistant cancer cells, are targeted by CAPs, making CAPS potentially valuable as anti-cancer agents. CAPs often exist as families of peptides with slightly different amino acid sequences. In addition, libraries of synthetic peptide variants based on naturally occurring CAP templates can be generated in order to improve upon their action. High-throughput screens are needed to quickly and efficiently assess the suitability of each CAP variant. Here we present the methods for assessing CAP-mediated cytotoxicity against cancer cells (suspension and adherent) and untransformed cells (measured using the tritiated thymidine-release or MTT assay), and for discriminating between cell death caused by necrosis (measured using lactate dehydrogenase- or (51)Cr-release assays), or apoptosis and necrosis (single-stranded DNA content measured by flow cytometry). In addition the clonogenic assay, which assesses the ability of single transformed cells to multiply and produce colonies, is described.

  5. Skin microbiome imbalance in patients with STAT1/STAT3 defects impairs innate host defense responses

    PubMed Central

    Smeekens, Sanne P.; Huttenhower, Curtis; Riza, Anca; van de Veerdonk, Frank; Zeeuwen, Patrick L.J.M.; Schalkwijk, Joost; van der Meer, Jos W.M.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Netea, Mihai G.; Gevers, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) and hyper IgE syndrome (HIES) are primary immunodeficiencies mainly caused by mutations in STAT1 and STAT3, respectively. CMC and HIES patients have an increased risk for skin and mucosal infections with fungal pathogens and Staphylococcus aureus. However, it is unknown whether the genetic defects in these patients also affect the skin and mucosal microbiome, which in turn may influence host defense mechanisms. Methods The skin and oral microbiome of CMC and HIES patients was compared to that of healthy controls at five body sites using 16S rRNA sequencing. The influence of skin colonizers on the immune response was investigated using in-vitro experiments. Results The microbiome of CMC and HIES patients contained more Gram-negative bacteria, especially Acinetobacter spp, and less of the normal Corynebacterium spp., compared to healthy controls. Exposure of human primary leukocytes to Acinetobacter suppressed the cytokine response to C. albicans and S. aureus, while the normal Corynebacteria did not suppress cytokine responses. Discussion These results demonstrate that central mediators of immune responses like STAT1 and STAT3 not only directly influence immune responses, but also result in changes of the skin microbiome that in turn can amplify the defective immune response against fungal and microbial pathogens. PMID:23796786

  6. A miniature mimic of host defense peptides with systemic antibacterial efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Sarig, Hadar; Livne, Liran; Held-Kuznetsov, Victoria; Zaknoon, Fadia; Ivankin, Andrey; Gidalevitz, David; Mor, Amram

    2010-08-23

    Oligomers of acylated lysines (OAKs) are synthetic mimics of host defense peptides (HDPs) with promising antimicrobial properties. Here we challenged the OAK concept for its ability to generate both systemically efficient and economically viable lead compounds for fighting multidrug-resistant bacteria. We describe the design and characterization of a miniature OAK composed of only 3 lysyls and 2 acyls (designated C{sub 12({omega}7)}K-{beta}{sub 12}) that preferentially targets gram-positive species by a bacteriostatic mode of action. To gain insight into the mechanism of action, we examined the interaction of OAK with various potential targets, including phospholipid bilayers, using surface plasmon resonance, and Langmuir monolayers, using insertion assays, epifluorescence microscopy, and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, in a complementary manner. Collectively, the data support the notion that C{sub 12({omega}7)}K-{beta}{sub 12} damages the plasma-membrane architecture similarly to HDPs, that is, following a near-classic 2-step interaction including high-affinity electrostatic adhesion and a subsequent shallow insertion that was limited to the phospholipid head group region. Notably, preliminary acute toxicity and efficacy studies performed with mouse models of infection have consolidated the potential of OAK for treating bacterial infections, including systemic treatments of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Such simple yet robust chemicals might be useful for various antibacterial applications while circumventing potential adverse effects associated with cytolytic compounds.

  7. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de Los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  8. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction.

    PubMed

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de Los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen.

  9. Partial Activation of SA- and JA-Defensive Pathways in Strawberry upon Colletotrichum acutatum Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Amil-Ruiz, Francisco; Garrido-Gala, José; Gadea, José; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Mérida, Antonio; Trelles, Oswaldo; de los Santos, Berta; Arroyo, Francisco T.; Aguado-Puig, Ana; Romero, Fernando; Mercado, José-Ángel; Pliego-Alfaro, Fernando; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan; Caballero, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the nature of pathogen host interaction may help improve strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) cultivars. Plant resistance to pathogenic agents usually operates through a complex network of defense mechanisms mediated by a diverse array of signaling molecules. In strawberry, resistance to a variety of pathogens has been reported to be mostly polygenic and quantitatively inherited, making it difficult to associate molecular markers with disease resistance genes. Colletotrichum acutatum spp. is a major strawberry pathogen, and completely resistant cultivars have not been reported. Moreover, strawberry defense network components and mechanisms remain largely unknown and poorly understood. Assessment of the strawberry response to C. acutatum included a global transcript analysis, and acidic hormones SA and JA measurements were analyzed after challenge with the pathogen. Induction of transcripts corresponding to the SA and JA signaling pathways and key genes controlling major steps within these defense pathways was detected. Accordingly, SA and JA accumulated in strawberry after infection. Contrastingly, induction of several important SA, JA, and oxidative stress-responsive defense genes, including FaPR1-1, FaLOX2, FaJAR1, FaPDF1, and FaGST1, was not detected, which suggests that specific branches in these defense pathways (those leading to FaPR1-2, FaPR2-1, FaPR2-2, FaAOS, FaPR5, and FaPR10) were activated. Our results reveal that specific aspects in SA and JA dependent signaling pathways are activated in strawberry upon interaction with C. acutatum. Certain described defense-associated transcripts related to these two known signaling pathways do not increase in abundance following infection. This finding suggests new insight into a specific putative molecular strategy for defense against this pathogen. PMID:27471515

  10. Plant defense activators: applications and prospects in cereal crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review addresses the current understanding of the plant immune response and the molecular mechanisms responsible for systemic acquired resistance as well as the phenomenon of "priming" in plant defense. A detailed discussion of the role of salicylic acid in activating the plant transcription c...

  11. Herbivore Diet Breadth and Host Plant Defense Mediate the Tri-Trophic Effects of Plant Toxins on Multiple Coccinellid Predators

    PubMed Central

    Katsanis, Angelos; Rasmann, Sergio; Mooney, Kailen A.

    2016-01-01

    Host plant defenses are known to cascade up food chains to influence herbivores and their natural enemies, but how herbivore and predator traits and identity mediate such tri-trophic dynamics is largely unknown. We assessed the influence of plant defense on aphid and coccinellid performance in laboratory trials with low- vs. high-glucosinolate varieties of Brassica napus, a dietary specialist (Brevicoryne brassicae) and generalist (Myzus persicae) aphid, and five species of aphidophagous coccinellids. The performance of the specialist and generalist aphids was similar and unaffected by variation in plant defense. Aphid glucosinolate concentration and resistance to predators differed by aphid species and host plant defense, and these effects acted independently. With respect to aphid species, the dietary generalist aphid (vs. specialist) had 14% lower glucosinolate concentration and coccinellid predators ate three-fold more aphids. With respect to host plant variety, the high-glucosinolate plants (vs. low) increased aphid glucosinolate concentration by 21%, but had relatively weak effects on predation by coccinellids and these effects varied among coccinellid species. In turn, coccinellid performance was influenced by the interactive effects of plant defense and aphid species, as the cascading, indirect effect of plant defense was greater when feeding upon the specialist than generalist aphid. When feeding upon specialist aphids, low- (vs. high-) glucosinolate plants increased coccinellid mass gain by 78% and accelerated development by 14%. In contrast, when feeding upon generalist aphids, low- (vs. high-) glucosinolate plants increased coccinellid mass gain by only 11% and had no detectable effect on development time. These interactive effects of plant defense and aphid diet breadth on predator performance also varied among coccinellid species; the indirect negative effects of plant defenses on predator performance was consistent among the five predators when

  12. Herbivore Diet Breadth and Host Plant Defense Mediate the Tri-Trophic Effects of Plant Toxins on Multiple Coccinellid Predators.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, Angelos; Rasmann, Sergio; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Host plant defenses are known to cascade up food chains to influence herbivores and their natural enemies, but how herbivore and predator traits and identity mediate such tri-trophic dynamics is largely unknown. We assessed the influence of plant defense on aphid and coccinellid performance in laboratory trials with low- vs. high-glucosinolate varieties of Brassica napus, a dietary specialist (Brevicoryne brassicae) and generalist (Myzus persicae) aphid, and five species of aphidophagous coccinellids. The performance of the specialist and generalist aphids was similar and unaffected by variation in plant defense. Aphid glucosinolate concentration and resistance to predators differed by aphid species and host plant defense, and these effects acted independently. With respect to aphid species, the dietary generalist aphid (vs. specialist) had 14% lower glucosinolate concentration and coccinellid predators ate three-fold more aphids. With respect to host plant variety, the high-glucosinolate plants (vs. low) increased aphid glucosinolate concentration by 21%, but had relatively weak effects on predation by coccinellids and these effects varied among coccinellid species. In turn, coccinellid performance was influenced by the interactive effects of plant defense and aphid species, as the cascading, indirect effect of plant defense was greater when feeding upon the specialist than generalist aphid. When feeding upon specialist aphids, low- (vs. high-) glucosinolate plants increased coccinellid mass gain by 78% and accelerated development by 14%. In contrast, when feeding upon generalist aphids, low- (vs. high-) glucosinolate plants increased coccinellid mass gain by only 11% and had no detectable effect on development time. These interactive effects of plant defense and aphid diet breadth on predator performance also varied among coccinellid species; the indirect negative effects of plant defenses on predator performance was consistent among the five predators when

  13. Herbivore Diet Breadth and Host Plant Defense Mediate the Tri-Trophic Effects of Plant Toxins on Multiple Coccinellid Predators.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, Angelos; Rasmann, Sergio; Mooney, Kailen A

    2016-01-01

    Host plant defenses are known to cascade up food chains to influence herbivores and their natural enemies, but how herbivore and predator traits and identity mediate such tri-trophic dynamics is largely unknown. We assessed the influence of plant defense on aphid and coccinellid performance in laboratory trials with low- vs. high-glucosinolate varieties of Brassica napus, a dietary specialist (Brevicoryne brassicae) and generalist (Myzus persicae) aphid, and five species of aphidophagous coccinellids. The performance of the specialist and generalist aphids was similar and unaffected by variation in plant defense. Aphid glucosinolate concentration and resistance to predators differed by aphid species and host plant defense, and these effects acted independently. With respect to aphid species, the dietary generalist aphid (vs. specialist) had 14% lower glucosinolate concentration and coccinellid predators ate three-fold more aphids. With respect to host plant variety, the high-glucosinolate plants (vs. low) increased aphid glucosinolate concentration by 21%, but had relatively weak effects on predation by coccinellids and these effects varied among coccinellid species. In turn, coccinellid performance was influenced by the interactive effects of plant defense and aphid species, as the cascading, indirect effect of plant defense was greater when feeding upon the specialist than generalist aphid. When feeding upon specialist aphids, low- (vs. high-) glucosinolate plants increased coccinellid mass gain by 78% and accelerated development by 14%. In contrast, when feeding upon generalist aphids, low- (vs. high-) glucosinolate plants increased coccinellid mass gain by only 11% and had no detectable effect on development time. These interactive effects of plant defense and aphid diet breadth on predator performance also varied among coccinellid species; the indirect negative effects of plant defenses on predator performance was consistent among the five predators when

  14. Anatomy and Physiology of the Urinary Tract: Relation to Host Defense and Microbial Infection

    PubMed Central

    HICKLING, DUANE R.; SUN, TUNG-TIEN; WU, XUE-RU

    2015-01-01

    The urinary tract exits to a body surface area that is densely populated by a wide range of microbes. Yet, under most normal circumstances, it is typically considered sterile, i.e., devoid of microbes, a stark contrast to the gastrointestinal and upper respiratory tracts where many commensal and pathogenic microbes call home. Not surprisingly, infection of the urinary tract over a healthy person’s lifetime is relatively infrequent, occurring once or twice or not at all for most people. For those who do experience an initial infection, the great majority (70% to 80%) thankfully do not go on to suffer from multiple episodes. This is a far cry from the upper respiratory tract infections, which can afflict an otherwise healthy individual countless times. The fact that urinary tract infections are hard to elicit in experimental animals except with inoculum 3–5 orders of magnitude greater than the colony counts that define an acute urinary infection in humans (105 cfu/ml), also speaks to the robustness of the urinary tract defense. How can the urinary tract be so effective in fending off harmful microbes despite its orifice in a close vicinity to that of the microbe-laden gastrointestinal tract? While a complete picture is still evolving, the general consensus is that the anatomical and physiological integrity of the urinary tract is of paramount importance in maintaining a healthy urinary tract. When this integrity is breached, however, the urinary tract can be at a heightened risk or even recurrent episodes of microbial infections. In fact, recurrent urinary tract infections are a significant cause of morbidity and time lost from work and a major challenge to manage clinically. Additionally, infections of the upper urinary tract often require hospitalization and prolonged antibiotic therapy. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the basic anatomy and physiology of the urinary tract with an emphasis on their specific roles in host defense. We also highlight the

  15. Using antimicrobial host defense peptides as anti-infective and immunomodulatory agents.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Thomas; Kristensen, Hans-Henrik

    2008-12-01

    Virtually all life forms express short antimicrobial cationic peptides as an important component of their innate immune defenses. They serve as endogenous antibiotics that are able to rapidly kill an unusually broad range of bacteria, fungi and viruses. Consequently, considerable efforts have been expended to exploit the therapeutic potential of these antimicrobial peptides. Within the last couple of years, it has become increasingly clear that many of these peptides, in addition to their direct antimicrobial activity, also have a wide range of functions in modulating both innate and adaptive immunity. For one class of antimicrobial peptides, such as the human defensins, their primary role may even be as immunomodulators. These properties potentially provide entirely new therapeutic approaches to anti-infective therapy.

  16. Venom of Parasitoid Pteromalus puparum Impairs Host Humoral Antimicrobial Activity by Decreasing Host Cecropin and Lysozyme Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Qi; Wang, Bei-Bei; Ye, Xin-Hai; Wang, Fei; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Insect host/parasitoid interactions are co-evolved systems in which host defenses are balanced by parasitoid mechanisms to disable or hide from host immune effectors. Here, we report that Pteromalus puparum venom impairs the antimicrobial activity of its host Pieris rapae. Inhibition zone results showed that bead injection induced the antimicrobial activity of the host hemolymph but that venom inhibited it. The cDNAs encoding cecropin and lysozyme were screened. Relative quantitative PCR results indicated that all of the microorganisms and bead injections up-regulated the transcript levels of the two genes but that venom down-regulated them. At 8 h post bead challenge, there was a peak in the transcript level of the cecropin gene, whereas the peak of lysozyme gene occurred at 24 h. The transcripts levels of the two genes were higher in the granulocytes and fat body than in other tissues. RNA interference decreased the transcript levels of the two genes and the antimicrobial activity of the pupal hemolymph. Venom injections similarly silenced the expression of the two genes during the first 8 h post-treatment in time- and dose-dependent manners, after which the silence effects abated. Additionally, recombinant cecropin and lysozyme had no significant effect on the emergence rate of pupae that were parasitized by P. puparum females. These findings suggest one mechanism of impairing host antimicrobial activity by parasitoid venom. PMID:26907346

  17. Differential response of diverse solanaceous hosts to tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus infection indicates coordinated action of NBS-LRR and RNAi-mediated host defense.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Nirbhay; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Basu, Saumik; Chakraborty, Supriya

    2015-06-01

    Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) is a bipartite begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) that infects a wide range of plants. ToLCNDV has emerged as an important pathogen and a serious threat to tomato production in India. A comparative and molecular analysis of ToLCNDV pathogenesis was performed on diverse solanaceous hosts (Capsicum annuum, Nicotiana benthamiana, N. tabacum, and Solanum lycopersicum). N. benthamiana was found to be the most susceptible host, whereas C. annuum showed resistance against an isolate of ToLCNDV collected in New Delhi from tomato (GenBank accession no. U15015 and U15017). S. lycopersicum and N. tabacum developed conspicuous symptoms and allowed virus to accumulate to significantly high titers. The viral DNA level was concurrent with symptom severity. ToLCNDV-specific siRNA levels were directly proportional to the amount of viral DNA. To investigate the basis for the differences in response of these hosts to ToLCNDV, a comparative expression analysis of selected defense-related genes was carried out. The results indicated differences in expression levels of genes involved in the posttranscriptional gene silencing machinery (RDR6, AGO1 and SGS3) as well as basal host defense responses (nucleotide-binding site and leucine-rich repeat [NBS-LRR] proteins and lipid transfer protein [LTP]). Among these, expression of NBS-LRR genes was found to be significantly higher in C. annuum following ToLCNDV infection. Our analyses suggest that the expression of host defense responses determines the level of ToLCNDV accumulation and degree of symptom development.

  18. Design of host defence peptides for antimicrobial and immunity enhancing activities.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Joseph B; Scott, Monisha G; Hancock, Robert E W

    2005-05-01

    Host defense peptides are a vital component of the innate immune systems of humans, other mammals, amphibians, and arthropods. The related cationic antimicrobial peptides are also produced by many species of bacteria and function as part of the antimicrobial arsenal to help the producing organism reduce competition for resources from sensitive species. The antimicrobial activities of many of these peptides have been extensively characterized and the structural requirements for these activities are also becoming increasingly clear. In addition to their known antimicrobial role, many host defense peptides are also involved in a plethora of immune functions in the host. In this review, we examine the role of structure in determining antimicrobial activity of certain prototypical cationic peptides and ways that bacteria have evolved to usurp these activities. We also review recent literature on what structural components are related to these immunomodulatory effects. It must be stressed however that these studies, and the area of peptide research, are still in their infancy.

  19. Erwinia carotovora elicitors and Botrytis cinerea activate defense responses in Physcomitrella patens

    PubMed Central

    Ponce de León, Inés; Oliver, Juan Pablo; Castro, Alexandra; Gaggero, Carina; Bentancor, Marcel; Vidal, Sabina

    2007-01-01

    Background Vascular plants respond to pathogens by activating a diverse array of defense mechanisms. Studies with these plants have provided a wealth of information on pathogen recognition, signal transduction and the activation of defense responses. However, very little is known about the infection and defense responses of the bryophyte, Physcomitrella patens, to well-studied phytopathogens. The purpose of this study was to determine: i) whether two representative broad host range pathogens, Erwinia carotovora ssp. carotovora (E.c. carotovora) and Botrytis cinerea (B. cinerea), could infect Physcomitrella, and ii) whether B. cinerea, elicitors of a harpin (HrpN) producing E.c. carotovora strain (SCC1) or a HrpN-negative strain (SCC3193), could cause disease symptoms and induce defense responses in Physcomitrella. Results B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora were found to readily infect Physcomitrella gametophytic tissues and cause disease symptoms. Treatments with B. cinerea spores or cell-free culture filtrates from E.c. carotovoraSCC1 (CF(SCC1)), resulted in disease development with severe maceration of Physcomitrella tissues, while CF(SCC3193) produced only mild maceration. Although increased cell death was observed with either the CFs or B. cinerea, the occurrence of cytoplasmic shrinkage was only visible in Evans blue stained protonemal cells treated with CF(SCC1) or inoculated with B. cinerea. Most cells showing cytoplasmic shrinkage accumulated autofluorescent compounds and brown chloroplasts were evident in a high proportion of these cells. CF treatments and B. cinerea inoculation induced the expression of the defense-related genes: PR-1, PAL, CHS and LOX. Conclusion B. cinerea and E.c. carotovora elicitors induce a defense response in Physcomitrella, as evidenced by enhanced expression of conserved plant defense-related genes. Since cytoplasmic shrinkage is the most common morphological change observed in plant PCD, and that harpins and B. cinerea induce this

  20. Resistance and Susceptibility to Malarial Infection: A Host Defense Strategy against Malaria

    PubMed Central

    BAKIR, Hanaa; YONES, Doaa; GALAL, Lamia; HUSEEIN, Enas

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an effort to understand what limits the virulence of malaria parasites in relation to the host genetic and immunogenic background, we investigated the possibility that the parasite and host genotype crossover interactions constrain virulence. Methods: Two groups of mice from different genotypes were used (C57BL/6 (B6) and DBA/2 mice). The mice were infected with a virulent parasite line Plasmodium yoelii 17XL (P. yoelii 17XL). Parasitemia, hematocrit value and lymphocytes yielded by livers and spleens were evaluated. Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) analysis illustrated phenotypic characterization of lymphocytes. Results: Infection with P. yoelii 17XL did not result in the death of DBA/2 mice. In contrast, B6 mice developed significantly high parasitemia and succumbed to death. Using (FACS) analysis, DBA/2 mice were found to experience a marked expansion of interleukin (IL)-2Rβ+ CD3int cells and γδ T cells in the liver, especially in the recovery phase. The expansion of unconventional T cells (i.e. B220+ T cells) was also marked in DBA/2 mice. Conclusion: The outcome of murine malaria infections depends on the dynamic interplay between the immune-mediator and the genotype of the host. PMID:26811732

  1. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

    PubMed

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications.

  2. Neonatal host defense mechanisms against Listeria monocytogenes infection: the role of lipopolysaccharides and interferons.

    PubMed

    Bortolussi, R; Issekutz, T; Burbridge, S; Schellekens, H

    1989-03-01

    The human newborn infant is susceptible to lethal infection caused by a number of bacterial species including Listeria monocytogenes, a gram-positive rod which is pathogenic by virtue of its ability to survive intracellularly. In adult animals interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta and IFN-gamma or agents that induce or augment IFN production confer protection against lethal L. monocytogenes infection. Regulation and production of IFN is poorly understood during the neonatal period. We therefore evaluated the role of IFN-alpha/beta and IFN-gamma, IFN-inducers (polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, amino-bromo-phenyl-pyrimidinone, amino-iodophenyl pyrimidinone) and lipopolysaccharide in modifying neonatal L. monocytogenes infection. Pretreatment of juvenile rats with polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or lipopolysaccharide protected them against a lethal challenge with L. monocytogenes. Among newborn rats, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid, amino-iodo-phenyl pyrimidinone and amino-bromophenyl-pyrimidinone gave significant protection, however, lipopolysaccharide did not influence survival. The role of IFN was further examined. Pretreatment of 3-d-old rats with purified IFN-alpha/beta, native rat IFN-gamma or rDNA rat IFN-gamma protected them against the lethality of subsequent L. monocytogenes injection. At 3 d after bacterial challenge, bacterial content in the spleens of 3-d-old rats pretreated with rIFN-gamma were significantly decreased compared to controls: IFN-alpha/beta-pretreated animals had less of a decrease, which become significant only 5 d after challenge. Our experiments indicate a role for IFN in neonatal host defense against L. monocytogenes infection.

  3. Magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poppenhaeger, Katja

    2011-05-01

    Magnetic activity in cool stars is a widely observed phenomenon, however it is still far from being understood. How fundamental stellar parameters like mass and rotational period quantitatively cause a stellar magnetic field which manifests itself in features such as spots, flares and high-energy coronal emission is a lively area of research in solar and stellar astrophysics. Especially for planet-hosting stars, stellar activity profiles are very interesting as exoplanets are affected by high-energy radiation, both at the time of planet formation as well as during the further lifetime of a star-planet system. In extreme cases, the atmosphere of a planet very close to its host star can be strongly heated by the stellar X-ray and EUV emission and finally escape the planet's gravitational attraction, so that the atmosphere of the planet evaporates over time. Theoretically, planets can also affect their host star's magnetic activity. In analogy to processes in binary stars which lead to enhanced - both overall and periodically varying - activity levels, also giant planets might influence the stellar activity by tidal or magnetic interaction processes, however on a weaker level than in binaries. Some indications for such interactions exist from chromospheric measurements in stars with Hot Jupiters. In this thesis I investigate the magnetic activity of planet-hosting stars and especially possible effects from star-planet interactions with an emphasis on stellar coronae in X-rays. I tested a complete sample of all known planet-hosting stars within 30 pc distance from the Sun for correlations of stellar X-ray properties with planetary parameters. A significant correlation exists between the stellar X-ray luminosity and the product of planetary mass and inverse semimajor axis. However, this could be traced back to a selection effect introduced by planetary detection methods. For stars in the solar neighborhood, planets are mainly detected by radial velocity shifts in the

  4. Multitasking antimicrobial peptides, plant development, and host defense against biotic/abiotic stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crop losses due to pathogens are a major threat to global food security. Plants employ a multilayer defense system against pathogens including use of physical barriers (cell wall), induction of hypersensitive defense response (HR), resistance (R) proteins, and synthesis of antimicrobial peptides (AM...

  5. Transplantation from a symptomatic carrier sister restores host defenses but does not prevent colitis in NEMO deficiency.

    PubMed

    Klemann, Christian; Pannicke, Ulrich; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J; Vlantis, Katerina; Rizzi, Marta; Uhlig, Holm; Vraetz, Thomas; Speckmann, Carsten; Strahm, Brigitte; Pasparakis, Manolis; Schwarz, Klaus; Ehl, Stephan; Rohr, Jan C

    2016-03-01

    NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) deficiency causes ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency in males, while manifesting as incontinentia pigmenti in heterozygous females. We report a family with NEMO deficiency, in which a female carrier displayed skewed X-inactivation favoring the mutant NEMO allele associated with symptoms of Behçet's disease. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation of an affected boy from this donor reconstituted an immune system with retained skewed X-inactivation. After transplantation no more severe infections occurred, indicating that an active wild-type NEMO allele in only 10% of immune cells restores host defense. Yet he developed inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While gut infiltrating immune cells stained strongly for nuclear p65 indicating restored NEMO function, this was not the case in intestinal epithelial cells - in contrast to cells from conventional IBD patients. These results extend murine observations that epithelial NEMO-deficiency suffices to cause IBD. High anti-TNF doses controlled the intestinal inflammation and symptoms of Behçet's disease. PMID:26812624

  6. Skin Electroporation of a Plasmid Encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 Host Defense Peptide Promotes Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Lam, Martin C; Jacobsen, Frank; Porporato, Paolo E; Chereddy, Kiran Kumar; Becerikli, Mustafa; Stricker, Ingo; Hancock, Robert EW; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Sonveaux, Pierre; Préat, Véronique; Vandermeulen, Gaëlle

    2014-01-01

    Host defense peptides, in particular LL-37, are emerging as potential therapeutics for promoting wound healing and inhibiting bacterial growth. However, effective delivery of the LL-37 peptide remains limiting. We hypothesized that skin-targeted electroporation of a plasmid encoding hCAP-18/LL-37 would promote the healing of wounds. The plasmid was efficiently delivered to full-thickness skin wounds by electroporation and it induced expression of LL-37 in the epithelium. It significantly accelerated reepithelialization of nondiabetic and diabetic wounds and caused a significant VEGFa and interleukin (IL)-6 induction. IL-6 was involved in LL-37–mediated keratinocyte migration in vitro and IL-6 neutralizing antibodies delivered to mice were able to suppress the wound healing activity of the hCAP-18/LL-37 plasmid. In a hindlimb ischemia model, electroporation of the hCAP-18/LL-37 plasmid increased blood perfusion, reduced muscular atrophy, and upregulated the angiogenic chemokines VEGFa and SDF-1a, and their receptors VEGF-R and CXCR-4. These findings demonstrate that a localized gene therapy with LL-37 is a promising approach for the treatment of wounds. PMID:24394186

  7. A novel form of bacterial resistance to the action of eukaryotic host defense peptides, the use of a lipid receptor.

    PubMed

    Dennison, Sarah R; Harris, Frederick; Mura, Manuela; Morton, Leslie H G; Zvelindovsky, Andrei; Phoenix, David A

    2013-09-01

    Host defense peptides show great potential for development as new antimicrobial agents with novel mechanisms of action. However, a small number of resistance mechanisms to their action are known, and here, we report a novel bacterial resistance mechanism mediated by a lipid receptor. Maximin H5 from Bombina maxima bound anionic and zwitterionic membranes with low affinity (Kd > 225 μM) while showing a strong ability to lyse (>55%) and penetrate (π > 6.0 mN m(-1)) these membranes. However, the peptide bound Escherichia coli and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DMPE) membranes with higher affinity (Kd < 65 μM) and showed a very low ability for bilayer lysis (<8%) and partitioning (π > 1.0 mN m(-1)). Increasing levels of membrane DMPE correlated with enhanced binding by the peptide (R(2) = 0.96) but inversely correlated with its lytic ability (R(2) = 0.98). Taken with molecular dynamic simulations, these results suggest that maximin H5 possesses membranolytic activity, primarily involving bilayer insertion of its strongly hydrophobic N-terminal region. However, this region was predicted to form multiple hydrogen bonds with phosphate and ammonium groups within PE head-groups, which in concert with charge-charge interactions anchor the peptide to the surface of E. coli membranes, inhibiting its membranolytic action.

  8. Mobilization of lipids and fortification of cell wall and cuticle are important in host defense against Hessian fly

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Wheat – Hessian fly interaction follows a typical gene-for-gene model. Hessian fly larvae die in wheat plants carrying an effective resistance gene, or thrive in susceptible plants that carry no effective resistance gene. Results Gene sets affected by Hessian fly attack in resistant plants were found to be very different from those in susceptible plants. Differential expression of gene sets was associated with differential accumulation of intermediates in defense pathways. Our results indicated that resources were rapidly mobilized in resistant plants for defense, including extensive membrane remodeling and release of lipids, sugar catabolism, and amino acid transport and degradation. These resources were likely rapidly converted into defense molecules such as oxylipins; toxic proteins including cysteine proteases, inhibitors of digestive enzymes, and lectins; phenolics; and cell wall components. However, toxicity alone does not cause immediate lethality to Hessian fly larvae. Toxic defenses might slow down Hessian fly development and therefore give plants more time for other types of defense to become effective. Conclusion Our gene expression and metabolic profiling results suggested that remodeling and fortification of cell wall and cuticle by increased deposition of phenolics and enhanced cross-linking were likely to be crucial for insect mortality by depriving Hessian fly larvae of nutrients from host cells. The identification of a large number of genes that were differentially expressed at different time points during compatible and incompatible interactions also provided a foundation for further research on the molecular pathways that lead to wheat resistance and susceptibility to Hessian fly infestation. PMID:23800119

  9. Phagoptosis - Cell Death By Phagocytosis - Plays Central Roles in Physiology, Host Defense and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brown, G C; Vilalta, A; Fricker, M

    2015-01-01

    Cell death by phagocytosis - termed 'phagoptosis' for short - is a form of cell death caused by the cell being phagocytosed i.e. recognised, engulfed and digested by another cell. Phagocytes eat cells that: i) expose 'eat-me' signals, ii) lose 'don't-eat-me' signals, and/or iii) bind opsonins. Live cells may express such signals as a result of cell stress, damage, activation or senescence, which can result in phagoptosis. Phagoptosis may be the most abundant form of cell death physiologically as it mediates erythrocyte turnover. It also regulates: reproduction by phagocytosis of sperm, development by removal stem cells and excess cells, and immunity by removal of activated neutrophils and T cells. Phagoptosis mediates the recognition of non-self and host defence against pathogens and cancer cells. However, in inflammatory conditions, excessive phagoptosis may kill our cells, leading to conditions such as hemophagy and neuronal loss.

  10. The Cladosporium fulvum virulence protein Avr2 inhibits host proteases required for basal defense.

    PubMed

    van Esse, H Peter; Van't Klooster, John W; Bolton, Melvin D; Yadeta, Koste A; van Baarlen, Peter; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2008-07-01

    Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Passalora fulva) is a biotrophic fungal pathogen that causes leaf mold of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). During growth in the apoplast, the fungus establishes disease by secreting effector proteins, 10 of which have been characterized. We have previously shown that the Avr2 effector interacts with the apoplastic tomato Cys protease Rcr3, which is required for Cf-2-mediated immunity. We now show that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum. Heterologous expression of Avr2 in Arabidopsis thaliana causes enhanced susceptibility toward extracellular fungal pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea and Verticillium dahliae, and microarray analysis showed that Avr2 expression triggers a global transcriptome reflecting pathogen challenge. Cys protease activity profiling showed that Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Arabidopsis Cys proteases. In tomato, Avr2 expression caused enhanced susceptibility toward Avr2-defective C. fulvum strains and also toward B. cinerea and V. dahliae. Cys protease activity profiling in tomato revealed that, in this plant also, Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Cys proteases, including Rcr3 and its close relative Pip1. Finally, silencing of Avr2 significantly compromised C. fulvum virulence on tomato. We conclude that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum that inhibits several Cys proteases required for plant basal defense.

  11. Identification and analysis of a Sciaenops ocellatus ISG15 homologue that is involved in host immune defense against bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; Sun, Yun; Zhang, Min; Sun, Li

    2010-07-01

    ISG15 is an interferon-stimulated gene that encodes a ubiquitin-like protein. ISG15 homologues have been identified in a number of fish species, some of which are known to be regulated at expression level by virus infection and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment. However, the relationship between ISG15 and live bacterial infection has not been investigated in piscine models. In this study, an ISG15 homologue, SoISG15, was identified from red drum Sciaenops ocellatus and analyzed at expression and functional levels. The open reading frame of SoISG15 is 477 base pairs (bp) and intronless, with a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 91 bp and a 3'-UTR of 415 bp. The deduced amino acid sequence of SoISG15 shares 60-67% overall identities with the ISG15 of several fish species. SoISG15 possesses two conserved ubiquitin-like domains and the canonical ubiquitin conjugation motif, LRGG, at the C-terminus. Expressional analysis showed that constitutive expression of SoISG15 was highest in blood and lowest in kidney. Experimental challenges with LPS and bacterial pathogens induced significant SoISG15 expression in the kidney but not in the liver. Similar differential induction was also observed at cellular level with primary hepatocytes and head kidney (HK) lymphocytes. Poly(I:C), however, effected drastic induction of SoISG15 expression in kidney and liver at both tissue and cellular levels. Immunoblot analysis showed that SoISG15 was secreted by cultured HK lymphocytes into the extracellular milieu. Recombinant SoISG15 expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli was able to enhance the respiratory burst activity, acid phosphatase activity, and bactericidal activity of HK macrophages. Taken together, the results of this study indicated that SoISG15 possesses apparent immunological property and is likely to be involved in host immune defense against bacterial infection. PMID:20385242

  12. Host-defense peptides from skin secretions of the octoploid frogs Xenopus vestitus and Xenopus wittei (Pipidae): insights into evolutionary relationships.

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Michalak, Katarzyna; Michalak, Pawel; Conlon, J Michael

    2014-09-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides have proved useful in elucidating the evolution history of frogs. Peptidomic analysis was used to compare the diversity of host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid frogs, Xenopus vestitus (Kivu clawed frog) and Xenopus wittei (De Witte's clawed frog) in the family Pipidae. Structural characterization demonstrated that the X. vestitus peptides belong to the magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 4 peptides), xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF; 1 peptide), and caerulein-precursor fragment (CPF; 5 peptides) families. The X. wittei peptides comprise magainin (4 peptides), PGLa (1 peptide), XPF (2 peptides), and CPF (7 peptides). In addition, secretions from both species contain caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, but X. wittei secretions contains the novel peptide [R4K]xenopsin. The variability in the numbers of paralogs in each peptide family indicates a selective silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following the polyploidization events. The primary structures of the peptides provide insight into phylogenetic relationships among the octoploid Xenopus frogs. The data support a sister-group relationship between X. vestitus and Xenopus lenduensis, suggestive of bifurcating speciation after allopolyploidization, whereas X. wittei is more closely related to the Xenopus amieti-Xenopus andrei group suggesting a common tetraploid ancestor. Consistent with previous data, the CPF peptides showed the highest growth inhibitory activity against bacteria with CPF-W6 (GIGSLLAKAAKLAAGLV.NH2) combining high antimicrobial potency against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=4 μM) with relatively low hemolytic activity (LC50=190 μM). PMID:25086320

  13. Physcomitrella patens Activates Defense Responses against the Pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides

    PubMed Central

    Reboledo, Guillermo; del Campo, Raquel; Alvarez, Alfonso; Montesano, Marcos; Mara, Héctor; Ponce de León, Inés

    2015-01-01

    The moss Physcomitrella patens is a suitable model plant to analyze the activation of defense mechanisms after pathogen assault. In this study, we show that Colletotrichum gloeosporioides isolated from symptomatic citrus fruit infects P. patens and cause disease symptoms evidenced by browning and maceration of tissues. After C. gloeosporioides infection, P. patens reinforces the cell wall by the incorporation of phenolic compounds and induces the expression of a Dirigent-protein-like encoding gene that could lead to the formation of lignin-like polymers. C. gloeosporioides-inoculated protonemal cells show cytoplasmic collapse, browning of chloroplasts and modifications of the cell wall. Chloroplasts relocate in cells of infected tissues toward the initially infected C. gloeosporioides cells. P. patens also induces the expression of the defense genes PAL and CHS after fungal colonization. P. patens reporter lines harboring the auxin-inducible promoter from soybean (GmGH3) fused to β-glucuronidase revealed an auxin response in protonemal tissues, cauloids and leaves of C. gloeosporioides-infected moss tissues, indicating the activation of auxin signaling. Thus, P. patens is an interesting plant to gain insight into defense mechanisms that have evolved in primitive land plants to cope with microbial pathogens. PMID:26389888

  14. Treatment with Interleukin-7 Restores Host Defense against Pneumocystis in CD4+ T-Lymphocyte-Depleted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Samuelson, D. R.; Assouline, B.; Morre, M.; Shellito, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. CD4+ T lymphocytes are critical for host defense against this infection, but in the absence of CD4+ T lymphocytes, CD8+ T lymphocytes may provide limited host defense. The cytokine interleukin-7 (IL-7) functions to enhance lymphocyte proliferation, survival, and recruitment of immune cells to sites of infection. However, there is little known about the role of IL-7 in PCP or its potential use as an immunotherapeutic agent. We hypothesized that treatment with recombinant human IL-7 (rhIL-7) would augment host defense against Pneumocystis and accelerate pathogen clearance in CD4-depleted mice. Control and CD4-depleted mice were infected with Pneumocystis, and rhIL-7 was administered via intraperitoneal injection. Our studies indicate that endogenous murine IL-7 is part of the normal host response to Pneumocystis murina and that administration of rhIL-7 markedly enhanced clearance of Pneumocystis in CD4-depleted mice. Additionally, we observed increased recruitment of CD8+ T lymphocytes to the lungs and decreased apoptosis of pulmonary CD8+ T lymphocytes in rhIL-7-treated animals compared to those in untreated mice. The antiapoptotic effect of rhIL-7 was associated with increased levels of Bcl-2 protein in T lymphocytes. rhIL-7 immunotherapy in CD4-depleted mice also increased the number of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-positive CD8+ central memory T lymphocytes in the lungs. We conclude that rhIL-7 has a potent therapeutic effect in the treatment of murine Pneumocystis pneumonia in CD4-depleted mice. This therapeutic effect is mediated through enhanced recruitment of CD8+ T cells and decreased apoptosis of lung T lymphocytes, with a preferential action on central memory CD8+ T lymphocytes. PMID:26483405

  15. An essential role for the NLRP3 inflammasome in host defense against the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Hise, Amy G.; Tomalka, Jeffrey; Ganesan, Sandhya; Patel, Krupen; Hall, Brian A.; Brown, Gordon D.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen causing life-threatening mucosal and systemic infections in immunocompromised humans. Using a murine model of mucosal Candida infection we investigated the role of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β in host-defense to Candida albicans. We find that the synthesis, processing and release of IL-1β in response to Candida are tightly controlled and first require transcriptional induction, followed by a second signal leading to caspase-1 mediated cleavage of the pro-IL1β cytokine. The known fungal pattern recognition receptorsTLR2 and Dectin-1 regulate IL-1β gene transcription, while the NLRP3 containing pro-inflammatory multiprotein complex, the NLRP3 inflammasome, controls caspase-1 mediated cleavage of pro-IL1β. Furthermore, we show that TLR2, Dectin-1 and NLRP3 are essential for defense against dissemination of mucosal infection and mortality in vivo. Therefore, in addition to sensing bacterial and viral pathogens, the NLRP3 inflammasome senses fungal pathogens and is critical in host defense against Candida. PMID:19454352

  16. Stennis hosts Space Day activities at USM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Fallon Nettles (left), an Astro Camp counselor at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center, assists a young fan attending the University of Southern Mississippi football game in Hattiesburg, Miss., on Oct. 17 in launching a balloon 'rocket.' Prior to the game, Stennis Space Center hosted hands-on activities and exhibits for families as part of its first-ever Space Day at USM. The activities were versions of those featured in the daylong and weeklong Astro Camp sessions sponsored by Stennis throughout each year. Stennis Space Center is located in nearby Hancock County and is the nation's premier rocket engine testing facility. The USM activities were part of Stennis' ongoing effort to educate people about the NASA mission and to introduce children and young people to space and space exploration.

  17. Relationships among CFTR expression, HCO3− secretion, and host defense may inform gene- and cell-based cystic fibrosis therapies

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Viral S.; Ernst, Sarah; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Karp, Philip H.; Parker, Connor P.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. Airway disease is the major source of morbidity and mortality. Successful implementation of gene- and cell-based therapies for CF airway disease requires knowledge of relationships among percentages of targeted cells, levels of CFTR expression, correction of electrolyte transport, and rescue of host defense defects. Previous studies suggested that, when ∼10–50% of airway epithelial cells expressed CFTR, they generated nearly wild-type levels of Cl− secretion; overexpressing CFTR offered no advantage compared with endogenous expression levels. However, recent discoveries focused attention on CFTR-mediated HCO3− secretion and airway surface liquid (ASL) pH as critical for host defense and CF pathogenesis. Therefore, we generated porcine airway epithelia with varying ratios of CF and wild-type cells. Epithelia with a 50:50 mix secreted HCO3− at half the rate of wild-type epithelia. Likewise, heterozygous epithelia (CFTR+/− or CFTR+/∆F508) expressed CFTR and secreted HCO3− at ∼50% of wild-type values. ASL pH, antimicrobial activity, and viscosity showed similar relationships to the amount of CFTR. Overexpressing CFTR increased HCO3− secretion to rates greater than wild type, but ASL pH did not exceed wild-type values. Thus, in contrast to Cl− secretion, the amount of CFTR is rate-limiting for HCO3− secretion and for correcting host defense abnormalities. In addition, overexpressing CFTR might produce a greater benefit than expressing CFTR at wild-type levels when targeting small fractions of cells. These findings may also explain the risk of airway disease in CF carriers. PMID:27114540

  18. Cell-type deconvolution with immune pathways identifies gene networks of host defense and immunopathology in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; Teles, Rosane M.B.; Pouldar, Delila; Andrade, Priscila R.; Madigan, Cressida A.; Ambrose, Mike; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Swindell, William R.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Geluk, Annemieke; Bloom, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome profiles derived from the site of human disease have led to the identification of genes that contribute to pathogenesis, yet the complex mixture of cell types in these lesions has been an obstacle for defining specific mechanisms. Leprosy provides an outstanding model to study host defense and pathogenesis in a human infectious disease, given its clinical spectrum, which interrelates with the host immunologic and pathologic responses. Here, we investigated gene expression profiles derived from skin lesions for each clinical subtype of leprosy, analyzing gene coexpression modules by cell-type deconvolution. In lesions from tuberculoid leprosy patients, those with the self-limited form of the disease, dendritic cells were linked with MMP12 as part of a tissue remodeling network that contributes to granuloma formation. In lesions from lepromatous leprosy patients, those with disseminated disease, macrophages were linked with a gene network that programs phagocytosis. In erythema nodosum leprosum, neutrophil and endothelial cell gene networks were identified as part of the vasculitis that results in tissue injury. The present integrated computational approach provides a systems approach toward identifying cell-defined functional networks that contribute to host defense and immunopathology at the site of human infectious disease. PMID:27699251

  19. Engagement of the pathogen survival response used by group A Streptococcus to avert destruction by innate host defense.

    PubMed

    Voyich, Jovanka M; Braughton, Kevin R; Sturdevant, Daniel E; Vuong, Cuong; Kobayashi, Scott D; Porcella, Stephen F; Otto, Michael; Musser, James M; DeLeo, Frank R

    2004-07-15

    Neutrophils are a critical component of human innate host defense and efficiently kill the vast majority of invading microorganisms. However, bacterial pathogens such as group A Streptococcus (GAS) successfully avert destruction by neutrophils to cause human infections. Relatively little is known about how pathogens detect components of the innate immune system to respond and survive within the host. In this study, we show that inactivation of a two-component gene regulatory system designated Ihk-Irr significantly attenuates streptococcal virulence in mouse models of soft tissue infection and bacteremia. Microarray analysis of wild-type and irr-negative mutant (irr mutant) GAS strains revealed that Ihk-Irr influenced expression of 20% of all transcripts in the pathogen genome. Notably, at least 11 genes involved in cell wall synthesis, turnover, and/or modification were down-regulated in the irr mutant strain. Compared with the wild-type strain, significantly more of the irr mutant strain was killed by human neutrophil components that destroy bacteria by targeting the cell envelope (cell wall and/or membrane). Unexpectedly, expression of ihk and irr was dramatically increased in the wild-type strain exposed to these same neutrophil products under conditions that favored cell envelope damage. We report a GAS mechanism for detection of innate host defense that initiates the pathogen survival response, in which cell wall synthesis is critical. Importantly, our studies identify specific genes in the pathogen survival response as potential targets to control human infections.

  20. Cell-type deconvolution with immune pathways identifies gene networks of host defense and immunopathology in leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; Teles, Rosane M.B.; Pouldar, Delila; Andrade, Priscila R.; Madigan, Cressida A.; Ambrose, Mike; Sarno, Euzenir N.; Rea, Thomas H.; Ochoa, Maria T.; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Swindell, William R.; Ottenhoff, Tom H.M.; Geluk, Annemieke; Bloom, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome profiles derived from the site of human disease have led to the identification of genes that contribute to pathogenesis, yet the complex mixture of cell types in these lesions has been an obstacle for defining specific mechanisms. Leprosy provides an outstanding model to study host defense and pathogenesis in a human infectious disease, given its clinical spectrum, which interrelates with the host immunologic and pathologic responses. Here, we investigated gene expression profiles derived from skin lesions for each clinical subtype of leprosy, analyzing gene coexpression modules by cell-type deconvolution. In lesions from tuberculoid leprosy patients, those with the self-limited form of the disease, dendritic cells were linked with MMP12 as part of a tissue remodeling network that contributes to granuloma formation. In lesions from lepromatous leprosy patients, those with disseminated disease, macrophages were linked with a gene network that programs phagocytosis. In erythema nodosum leprosum, neutrophil and endothelial cell gene networks were identified as part of the vasculitis that results in tissue injury. The present integrated computational approach provides a systems approach toward identifying cell-defined functional networks that contribute to host defense and immunopathology at the site of human infectious disease.

  1. Disentangling Detoxification: Gene Expression Analysis of Feeding Mountain Pine Beetle Illuminates Molecular-Level Host Chemical Defense Detoxification Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jeanne A.; Pitt, Caitlin; Bonnett, Tiffany R.; Yuen, Macaire M. S.; Keeling, Christopher I.; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P. W.

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a native species of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that caused unprecedented damage to the pine forests of British Columbia and other parts of western North America and is currently expanding its range into the boreal forests of central and eastern Canada and the USA. We conducted a large-scale gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of mountain pine beetle male and female adults either starved or fed in male-female pairs for 24 hours on lodgepole pine host tree tissues. Our aim was to uncover transcripts involved in coniferophagous mountain pine beetle detoxification systems during early host colonization. Transcripts of members from several gene families significantly increased in insects fed on host tissue including: cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and one ABC transporter. Other significantly increasing transcripts with potential roles in detoxification of host defenses included alcohol dehydrogenases and a group of unexpected transcripts whose products may play an, as yet, undiscovered role in host colonization by mountain pine beetle. PMID:24223726

  2. Disentangling detoxification: gene expression analysis of feeding mountain pine beetle illuminates molecular-level host chemical defense detoxification mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jeanne A; Pitt, Caitlin; Bonnett, Tiffany R; Yuen, Macaire M S; Keeling, Christopher I; Bohlmann, Jörg; Huber, Dezene P W

    2013-01-01

    The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a native species of bark beetle (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) that caused unprecedented damage to the pine forests of British Columbia and other parts of western North America and is currently expanding its range into the boreal forests of central and eastern Canada and the USA. We conducted a large-scale gene expression analysis (RNA-seq) of mountain pine beetle male and female adults either starved or fed in male-female pairs for 24 hours on lodgepole pine host tree tissues. Our aim was to uncover transcripts involved in coniferophagous mountain pine beetle detoxification systems during early host colonization. Transcripts of members from several gene families significantly increased in insects fed on host tissue including: cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and glutathione S-transferases, esterases, and one ABC transporter. Other significantly increasing transcripts with potential roles in detoxification of host defenses included alcohol dehydrogenases and a group of unexpected transcripts whose products may play an, as yet, undiscovered role in host colonization by mountain pine beetle.

  3. Isolation, identification, and quantification of potential defensive compounds in the viceroy butterfly and its larval host-plant, Carolina willow.

    PubMed

    Prudic, Kathleen L; Khera, Smriti; Sólyom, Anikó; Timmermann, Barbara N

    2007-06-01

    The viceroy-monarch and viceroy-queen butterfly associations are classic examples of mimicry. These relationships were originally classified as Batesian, or parasitic, but were later reclassified as Müllerian, or mutalistic, based on predator bioassays. The Müllerian reclassification implies that viceroy is unpalatable because it too is chemically defended like the queen and the monarch. However, unlike the queen and the monarch, the viceroy defensive chemistry has remained uncharacterized. We demonstrate that the viceroy butterfly (Limenitis archippus, Nymphalidae) not only sequesters nonvolatile defensive compounds from its larval host-plant, the Carolina willow (Salix caroliniana, Salicaceae), but also secretes volatile defensive compounds when disturbed. We developed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry methods to identify a set of phenolic glycosides shared between the adult viceroy butterfly and the Carolina willow, and solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods to identify volatile phenolic compounds released from stressed viceroy butterflies. In both approaches, all structures were characterized based on their mass spectral fragmentation patterns and confirmed with authentic standards. The phenolics we found are known to deter predator attack in other prey systems, including other willow-feeding insect species. Because these compounds have a generalized defensive function at the concentrations we described, our results are consistent with the Müllerian reclassification put forth by other researchers based on bioassay results. It seems that the viceroy butterfly possesses chemical defenses different from its monarch and queen butterfly counterparts (phenolic glycosides vs. cardiac glycosides, respectively), an unusual phenomenon in mimicry warranting future study.

  4. Effects of parasite pressure on parasite mortality and reproductive output in a rodent-flea system: inferring host defense trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Elizabeth M; Kam, Michael; Bar-Shira, Enav; Friedman, Aharon; Khokhlova, Irina S; Koren, Lee; Asfur, Mustafa; Geffen, Eli; Kiefer, Daniel; Krasnov, Boris R; Degen, A Allan

    2016-09-01

    Evaluating host resistance via parasite fitness helps place host-parasite relationships within evolutionary and ecological contexts; however, few studies consider both these processes simultaneously. We investigated how different levels of parasite pressure affect parasite mortality and reproductive success in relationship to host defense efforts, using the rodent Gerbillus nanus and the flea Xenopsylla conformis as a host-parasite system. Fifteen immune-naïve male rodents were infested with 20, 50, or 100 fleas for four weeks. During this time number of new imagoes produced per adult flea (our flea reproductive output metric), flea mortality, and change in circulating anti-flea immunoglobulin G (our measure of adaptive immune defense) were monitored. Three hypotheses guided this work: (1) increasing parasite pressure would heighten host defenses; (2) parasite mortality would increase and parasite reproductive output would decrease with increasing investment in host defense; and (3) hosts under high parasite pressure could invest in behavioral and/or immune responses. We predicted that at high infestation levels (a) parasite mortality would increase; (b) flea reproductive output per individual would decrease; and (c) host circulating anti-flea antibody levels would increase. The hypotheses were partially supported. Flea mortality significantly increased and flea reproductive output significantly decreased as flea pressure increased. Host adaptive immune defense did not significantly change with increasing flea pressure. Therefore, we inferred that investment in host behavioral defense, either alone or in combination with density-dependent effects, may be more efficient at increasing flea mortality and decreasing flea reproductive output than antibody production during initial infestation in this system. PMID:27130319

  5. Effects of parasite pressure on parasite mortality and reproductive output in a rodent-flea system: inferring host defense trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Elizabeth M; Kam, Michael; Bar-Shira, Enav; Friedman, Aharon; Khokhlova, Irina S; Koren, Lee; Asfur, Mustafa; Geffen, Eli; Kiefer, Daniel; Krasnov, Boris R; Degen, A Allan

    2016-09-01

    Evaluating host resistance via parasite fitness helps place host-parasite relationships within evolutionary and ecological contexts; however, few studies consider both these processes simultaneously. We investigated how different levels of parasite pressure affect parasite mortality and reproductive success in relationship to host defense efforts, using the rodent Gerbillus nanus and the flea Xenopsylla conformis as a host-parasite system. Fifteen immune-naïve male rodents were infested with 20, 50, or 100 fleas for four weeks. During this time number of new imagoes produced per adult flea (our flea reproductive output metric), flea mortality, and change in circulating anti-flea immunoglobulin G (our measure of adaptive immune defense) were monitored. Three hypotheses guided this work: (1) increasing parasite pressure would heighten host defenses; (2) parasite mortality would increase and parasite reproductive output would decrease with increasing investment in host defense; and (3) hosts under high parasite pressure could invest in behavioral and/or immune responses. We predicted that at high infestation levels (a) parasite mortality would increase; (b) flea reproductive output per individual would decrease; and (c) host circulating anti-flea antibody levels would increase. The hypotheses were partially supported. Flea mortality significantly increased and flea reproductive output significantly decreased as flea pressure increased. Host adaptive immune defense did not significantly change with increasing flea pressure. Therefore, we inferred that investment in host behavioral defense, either alone or in combination with density-dependent effects, may be more efficient at increasing flea mortality and decreasing flea reproductive output than antibody production during initial infestation in this system.

  6. Evidence for alteration of fungal endophyte community assembly by host defense compounds.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Megan; Kohn, Linda Myra

    2009-01-01

    * Plant defense compounds are common stressors encountered by endophytes. Fungi readily evolve tolerance to these compounds, yet few studies have addressed the influence of intraspecific variation in defense compound production on endophyte colonization. We compared the influence of defense compound production on the composition of fungal endophyte communities in replicated field experiments. * Maize (Zea mays) produces benzoxazinoids (BXs), compounds with antifungal byproducts persistent in the environment. Fungi were isolated from leaf and root tissue of two maize genotypes that produce BXs, and a natural mutant that does not. Isolates representing the species recovered were tested for tolerance to 2-benzoxazolinone (BOA), a toxic BX byproduct. * In seedling roots and mature leaves, the community proportion with low BOA tolerance was significantly greater in BX nonproducers than producers. Mean isolation frequency of Fusarium species was up to 35 times higher in mature leaves of BX producers than nonproducers. * Fungal species with relatively high tolerance to BOA are more abundant in BX producing than BX nonproducing maize. Production of BXs may increase colonization by Fusarium species in maize, including agents of animal toxicosis and yield-reducing disease in maize. Overall, results indicate that production of defense compounds can significantly alter endophyte community assembly.

  7. Porcine antimicrobial peptides: new prospects for ancient molecules of host defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Ross, C R; Blecha, F

    2000-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, endogenous, polycationic molecules that constitute a ubiquitous and significant component of innate immunity. These natural antibiotics have broad microbicidal activity against various bacteria, fungi, and enveloped viruses. Because most AMPs kill bacteria by physical disruption of cell membranes, which may prevent microorganisms from developing resistance against these agents, they are being explored as possible alternatives to conventional antibiotics. Pigs, like many other mammals, produce an impressive array of AMPs, which are synthesized predominantly by host leukocytic phagocytes or mucosal epithelial cells. Currently, more than a dozen distinct porcine AMPs have been identified and a majority belongs to the cathelicidin family. This review briefly summarizes recent advances in porcine AMP research with an emphasis on the diverse biological functions of each peptide. Mechanisms of action of these AMPs and their role in the resistance to infections are considered. Finally, the current status of pharmaceutical and agricultural uses of AMPs as well as future prospects for their application in the food animal industry is discussed.

  8. The effects of malnutrition on variables of host defense in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Wunder, J A; Stinnett, J D; Alexander, J W

    1978-10-01

    Studies were conducted in young guinea pigs to determine the effects of malnutrition on selected variables of host resistance. Malnutrition was produced differently in two experiments. In the first the quantity of a standard, normal diet was reduced progressively so that test groups were fed 25% less each week over a 4 week period. Control groups were fed ad libitum. In the subsequent experiment, animals were fed defined guinea pig diets containing 5%, 30%, and 60% casein, respectively, which were similar in caloric content, vitamins, and minerals. Measurements of phagocytic bactericidal activity, serum opsonization, serum IgG and C3 levels, and mitogenic response of lymphocytes were made at weekly intervals. Results obtained from both experiments were comparable. There was a significant decline in phagocyte function by the third week in malnourished animals while the numbers of phagocytes per milliliter of peritoneal washings were similar to controls at all time periods. A depression of serum opsonization was observed when animals became moribund even though serum IgG levels remained unchanged. Serum C3 levels in malnourished animals were significantly lower than controls. Mitogenic response of lymphocytes to phytohemagglutinin was 85% lower in the 5% casein group after the third week. These results indicated that a marasmus-like condition and protein malnutrition depress critical functions of resistance.

  9. Active, Non-Intrusive Inspection Technologies for Homeland Defense

    SciTech Connect

    James L. Jones

    2003-06-01

    Active, non-intrusive inspection or interrogation technologies have been used for 100 years - with the primary focus being radiographic imaging. During the last 50 years, various active interrogation systems have been investigated and most have revealed many unique and interesting capabilities and advantages that have already benefited the general public. Unfortunately, except for medical and specific industrial applications, these unique capabilities have not been widely adopted, largely due to the complexity of the technology, the overconfident reliance on passive detection systems to handle most challenges, and the unrealistic public concerns regarding radiation safety issues for a given active inspection deployment. The unique homeland security challenges facing the United States today are inviting more "out-of-the-box" solutions and are demanding the effective technological solutions that only active interrogation systems can provide. While revolutionary new solutions are always desired, these technology advancements are rare, and when found, usually take a long time to fully understand and implement for a given application. What's becoming more evident is that focusing on under-developed, but well-understood, active inspection technologies can provide many of the needed "out-of-the-box" solutions. This paper presents a brief historical overview of active interrogation. It identifies some of the major homeland defense challenges being confronted and the commercial and research technologies presently available and being pursued. Finally, the paper addresses the role of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and its partner, the Idaho Accelerator Center at Idaho State University, in promoting and developing active inspection technologies for homeland defense.

  10. Immunomodulation of Fungal β-Glucan in Host Defense Signaling by Dectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Batbayar, Sainkhuu; Lee, Dong Hee; Kim, Ha Won

    2012-01-01

    During the course of evolution, animals encountered the harmful effects of fungi, which are strong pathogens. Therefore, they have developed powerful mechanisms to protect themselves against these fungal invaders. β-Glucans are glucose polymers of a linear β(1,3)-glucan backbone with β(1,6)-linked side chains. The immunostimulatory and antitumor activities of β-glucans have been reported; however, their mechanisms have only begun to be elucidated. Fungal and particulate β-glucans, despite their large size, can be taken up by the M cells of Peyer's patches, and interact with macrophages or dendritic cells (DCs) and activate systemic immune responses to overcome the fungal infection. The sampled β-glucans function as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and are recognized by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) on innate immune cells. Dectin-1 receptor systems have been incorporated as the PRRs of β-glucans in the innate immune cells of higher animal systems, which function on the front line against fungal infection, and have been exploited in cancer treatments to enhance systemic immune function. Dectin-1 on macrophages and DCs performs dual functions: internalization of β-glucan-containing particles and transmittance of its signals into the nucleus. This review will depict in detail how the physicochemical nature of β-glucan contributes to its immunostimulating effect in hosts and the potential uses of β-glucan by elucidating the dectin-1 signal transduction pathway. The elucidation of β-glucan and its signaling pathway will undoubtedly open a new research area on its potential therapeutic applications, including as immunostimulants for antifungal and anti-cancer regimens. PMID:24009832

  11. Host defense peptides in skin secretions of Odorrana tiannanensis: Proof for other survival strategy of the frog than merely anti-microbial.

    PubMed

    He, Weiyu; Feng, Feifei; Huang, Yong; Guo, Huanhuan; Zhang, Songyan; Li, Zheng; Liu, Jingze; Wang, Yipeng; Yu, Haining

    2012-03-01

    Genus Odorrana, among all amphibians studied, is generally reported to have the most abundant and diversified anti-microbial peptides even from a single individual frog. In our previous work, 46 cDNA sequences encoding precursors of 22 different anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) were characterized from the skin of frog, Odorrana tiannanensis. In this work, we reported the purification of three AMPs from skin secretions of O. tiannanensis. Their amino acid sequences matched well with the sequences deduced from cDNAs and they were designated as Odorranain-C7HSa, Brevinin-1-OT2 and Odorranain-G-OT, respectively. Furthermore, we selected to analyze the four most structurally diversified sequences among the 22 AMPs that are significantly different from all reported AMPs. By structural characterization, three of them were designated as pleurain-E-OT, odorranain-G-OT, odorranain-A-OT, belonging to AMP families already identified. The forth one with a unique 14-mer sequence of AILTTLANWARKFLa and C-terminal amidation represents the prototypes of a new class of amphibian AMP, and thereby named tiannanensin. Such broad diversity in sequences and structures are consistent with other species in Genus Odorrana. Multi-functions of the synthesized four special AMPs were screened, including anti-microbial, antioxidant, cytotoxic and hemolytic activities. The results suggest that these AMPs may employ sophisticated mechanisms of action in host defense in addition to anti-microbial, although their precise contribution to host defense still seems unclear. PMID:21963433

  12. Cheaper is not always worse: strongly protective isolates of a defensive symbiont are less costly to the aphid host

    PubMed Central

    Cayetano, Luis; Rothacher, Lukas; Simon, Jean-Christophe; Vorburger, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Defences against parasites are typically associated with costs to the host that contribute to the maintenance of variation in resistance. This also applies to the defence provided by the facultative bacterial endosymbiont Hamiltonella defensa, which protects its aphid hosts against parasitoid wasps while imposing life-history costs. To investigate the cost–benefit relationship within protected hosts, we introduced multiple isolates of H. defensa to the same genetic backgrounds of black bean aphids, Aphis fabae, and we quantified the protection against their parasitoid Lysiphlebus fabarum as well as the costs to the host (reduced lifespan and reproduction) in the absence of parasitoids. Surprisingly, we observed the opposite of a trade-off. Strongly protective isolates of H. defensa reduced lifespan and lifetime reproduction of unparasitized aphids to a lesser extent than weakly protective isolates. This finding has important implications for the evolution of defensive symbiosis and highlights the need for a better understanding of how strain variation in protective symbionts is maintained. PMID:25473015

  13. Effects of the virus satellite gene βC1 on host plant defense signaling and volatile emission

    PubMed Central

    Salvaudon, Lucie; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Yang, Jun-Yi; Chua, Nam-Hai; Mescher, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl China virus spreads together with its invasive vector, the silverleaf whitefly B biotype, which exhibits higher growth rates on infected plants. Previous studies indicate that the virus satellite gene βC1 accounts for the visible symptoms of infection and inhibits the constitutive expression of jasmonic acid (JA)—a phytohormone involved in plant defense against whiteflies—and of some JA-regulated genes. Here we present new details of the effects of on plant signaling and defense, obtained with (non-host) transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana plants. We found that JA induction in response to wounding was reduced in plants expressing βC1. This result implies that βC1 acts on conserved plant regulation mechanisms and might impair the entire JA defense pathway. Furthermore, transformed N. benthamiana plants exhibited elevated emissions of the volatile compound linalool, suggesting that βC1 also influences plant-derived olfactory cues available to vector and non-vector insects. PMID:23299332

  14. OsRDR6 plays role in host defense against double-stranded RNA virus, Rice Dwarf Phytoreovirus

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Wei; Qian, Dan; Sun, Runhong; Jiang, Lin; Wang, Yu; Wei, Chunhong; Zhang, Zhongkai; Li, Yi

    2015-01-01

    RNAi is a major antiviral defense response in plant and animal model systems. RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) is an essential component of RNAi, which plays an important role in the resistance against viruses in the model plants. We found previously that rice RDR6 (OsRDR6) functioned in the defense against Rice stripe virus (RSV), and Rice Dwarf Phytoreovirus (RDV) infection resulted in down-regulation of expression of RDR6. Here we report our new findings on the function of OsRDR6 against RDV. Our result showed that down-regulation of OsRDR6 through the antisense (OsRDR6AS) strategy increased rice susceptibility to RDV infection while over-expression of OsRDR6 had no effect on RDV infection. The accumulation of RDV vsiRNAs was reduced in the OsRDR6AS plants. In the OsRDR6 over-expressed plants, the levels of OsRDR6 RNA transcript and protein were much higher than that in the control plants. Interestingly, the accumulation level of OsRDR6 protein became undetectable after RDV infection. This finding indicated that the translation and/or stability of OsRDR6 protein were negatively impacted upon RDV infection. This new finding provides a new light on the function of RDR6 in plant defense response and the cross-talking between factors encoded by host plant and double-stranded RNA viruses. PMID:26165755

  15. Temporal and Spatial Resolution of Activated Plant Defense Responses in Leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana Infected with Dickeya dadantii

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Bueno, María L.; Granum, Espen; Pineda, Mónica; Flors, Víctor; Rodriguez-Palenzuela, Pablo; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Barón, Matilde

    2016-01-01

    The necrotrophic bacteria Dickeya dadantii is the causal agent of soft-rot disease in a broad range of hosts. The model plant Nicotiana benthamiana, commonly used as experimental host for a very broad range of plant pathogens, is susceptible to infection by D. dadantii. The inoculation with D. dadantii at high dose seems to overcome the plant defense capacity, inducing maceration and death of the tissue, although restricted to the infiltrated area. By contrast, the output of the defense response to low dose inoculation is inhibition of maceration and limitation in the growth, or even eradication, of bacteria. Responses of tissue invaded by bacteria (neighboring the infiltrated areas after 2–3 days post-inoculation) included: (i) inhibition of photosynthesis in terms of photosystem II efficiency; (ii) activation of energy dissipation as non-photochemical quenching in photosystem II, which is related to the activation of plant defense mechanisms; and (iii) accumulation of secondary metabolites in cell walls of the epidermis (lignins) and the apoplast of the mesophyll (phytoalexins). Infiltrated tissues showed an increase in the content of the main hormones regulating stress responses, including abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid. We propose a mechanism involving the three hormones by which N. benthamiana could activate an efficient defense response against D. dadantii. PMID:26779238

  16. Dual ligand/receptor interactions activate urothelial defenses against uropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Mémet, Sylvie; Saban, Ricardo; Kong, Xiangpeng; Aprikian, Pavel; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Sun, Tung-Tien; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2015-11-09

    During urinary tract infection (UTI), the second most common bacterial infection, dynamic interactions take place between uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) and host urothelial cells. While significant strides have been made in the identification of the virulence factors of UPEC, our understanding of how the urothelial cells mobilize innate defenses against the invading UPEC remains rudimentary. Here we show that mouse urothelium responds to the adhesion of type 1-fimbriated UPEC by rapidly activating the canonical NF-κB selectively in terminally differentiated, superficial (umbrella) cells. This activation depends on a dual ligand/receptor system, one between FimH adhesin and uroplakin Ia and another between lipopolysaccharide and Toll-like receptor 4. When activated, all the nuclei (up to 11) of a multinucleated umbrella cell are affected, leading to significant amplification of proinflammatory signals. Intermediate and basal cells of the urothelium undergo NF-κB activation only if the umbrella cells are detached or if the UPEC persistently express type 1-fimbriae. Inhibition of NF-κB prevents the urothelium from clearing the intracellular bacterial communities, leading to prolonged bladder colonization by UPEC. Based on these data, we propose a model of dual ligand/receptor system in innate urothelial defenses against UPEC.

  17. NVLAP activities at Department of Defense calibration laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Schaeffer, D.M.

    1993-12-31

    There are 367 active radiological instrument calibration laboratories within the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Each of the four services in DoD manages, operates, and certifies the technical proficiency and competency of those laboratories under their cognizance. Each service has designated secondary calibration laboratories to trace all calibration source standards to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Individual service radiological calibration programs and capabilities, present and future, are described, as well as the measurement quality assurance (MQA) processes for their traceability. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) programs for dosimetry systems are briefly summarized. Planned NVLAP accreditation of secondary laboratories is discussed in the context of current technical challenges and future efforts.

  18. Chemical defenses of the sacoglossan mollusk Elysia rufescens and its host Alga bryopsis sp.

    PubMed

    Becerro, M A; Goetz, G; Paul, V J; Scheuer, P J

    2001-11-01

    Sacoglossans are a group of opisthobranch mollusks that have been the source of numerous secondary metabolites; however, there are few examples where a defensive ecological role for these compounds has been demonstrated experimentally. We investigated the deterrent properties of the sacoglossan Elysia rufescens and its food alga Bryopsis sp. against natural fish predators. Bryopsis sp. produces kahalalide F, a major depsipeptide that is accumulated by the sacoglossan and that shows in vitro cytotoxicity against several cancer cell lines. Our data show that both Bryopsis sp. and Elysia rufescens are chemically protected against fish predators, as indicated by the deterrent properties of their extracts at naturally occurring concentrations. Following bioassay-guided fractionation, we observed that the antipredatory compounds of Bryopsis sp. were present in the butanol and chloroform fractions, both containing the depsipeptide kahalalide F. Antipredatory compounds of Elysia rufescens were exclusively present in the dichloromethane fraction. Further bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of kahalalide F as the only compound responsible for the deterrent properties of the sacoglossan. Our data show that kahalalide F protects both Brvopsis sp. and Elysia rufescens from fish predation. This is the first report of a diet-derived depsipeptide used as a chemical defense in a sacoglossan.

  19. The GraS Sensor in Staphylococcus aureus Mediates Resistance to Host Defense Peptides Differing in Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Chaili, Siyang; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Waring, Alan J.; Memmi, Guido; Donegan, Niles; Yang, Soo-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus uses the two-component regulatory system GraRS to sense and respond to host defense peptides (HDPs). However, the mechanistic impact of GraS or its extracellular sensing loop (EL) on HDP resistance is essentially unexplored. Strains with null mutations in the GraS holoprotein (ΔgraS) or its EL (ΔEL) were compared for mechanisms of resistance to HDPs of relevant immune sources: neutrophil α-defensin (human neutrophil peptide 1 [hNP-1]), cutaneous β-defensin (human β-defensin 2 [hBD-2]), or the platelet kinocidin congener RP-1. Actions studied by flow cytometry included energetics (ENR); membrane permeabilization (PRM); annexin V binding (ANX), and cell death protease activation (CDP). Assay conditions simulated bloodstream (pH 7.5) or phagolysosomal (pH 5.5) pH contexts. S. aureus strains were more susceptible to HDPs at pH 7.5 than at pH 5.5, and each HDP exerted a distinct effect signature. The impacts of ΔgraS and ΔΕL on HDP resistance were peptide and pH dependent. Both mutants exhibited defects in ANX response to hNP-1 or hBD-2 at pH 7.5, but only hNP-1 did so at pH 5.5. Both mutants exhibited hyper-PRM, -ANX, and -CDP responses to RP-1 at both pHs and hypo-ENR at pH 5.5. The actions correlated with ΔgraS or ΔΕL hypersusceptibility to hNP-1 or RP-1 (but not hBD-2) at pH 7.5 and to all study HDPs at pH 5.5. An exogenous EL mimic protected mutant strains from hNP-1 and hBD-2 but not RP-1, indicating that GraS and its EL play nonredundant roles in S. aureus survival responses to specific HDPs. These findings suggest that GraS mediates specific resistance countermeasures to HDPs in immune contexts that are highly relevant to S. aureus pathogenesis in humans. PMID:26597988

  20. Infiltration with Agrobacterium tumefaciens induces host defense and development-dependent responses in the infiltrated zone.

    PubMed

    Pruss, Gail J; Nester, Eugene W; Vance, Vicki

    2008-12-01

    Despite the widespread use of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to transfer genes into plant systems, host responses to this plant pathogen are not well understood. The present study shows that disarmed strains of Agrobacterium induce distinct host responses when infiltrated into leaves of Nicotiana tabacum. The responses are limited to the infiltrated zone and consist of i) induction of pathogenesis-related (PR) gene PR-1 expression and resistance to subsequent infection with tobacco mosaic virus, ii) chlorosis and loss of chloroplast rRNAs, and iii) inhibition of leaf expansion. Induction of the latter two sets of responses depends on the age of the leaf and is most apparent in young leaves. Strains with or without binary vectors induce all the responses, showing that DNA transfer is neither required nor inhibitory. A. tumefaciens cured of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid is slightly defective for induction of the three responses, showing that Ti plasmid-encoded factors produced by the disarmed strains contribute only slightly. However, T-DNA-encoded factors alter at least one of the host responses, because infiltration with the oncogenic strain C58 induced more pronounced chlorosis than the disarmed control. Auxin is one of the T-DNA products responsible for disease induction by oncogenic A. tumefaciens. We found that C58-infiltrated zones-but not those infiltrated with the disarmed control-have increased levels of miR393, a microRNA that represses auxin signaling and contributes to antibacterial resistance. PMID:18986249

  1. Ubiquitin systems mark pathogen-containing vacuoles as targets for host defense by guanylate binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Arun K.; Foltz, Clémence; Finethy, Ryan; Piro, Anthony S.; Feeley, Eric M.; Pilla-Moffett, Danielle M.; Komatsu, Masaki; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Coers, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Many microbes create and maintain pathogen-containing vacuoles (PVs) as an intracellular niche permissive for microbial growth and survival. The destruction of PVs by IFNγ-inducible guanylate binding protein (GBP) and immunity-related GTPase (IRG) host proteins is central to a successful immune response directed against numerous PV-resident pathogens. However, the mechanism by which IRGs and GBPs cooperatively detect and destroy PVs is unclear. We find that host cell priming with IFNγ prompts IRG-dependent association of Toxoplasma- and Chlamydia-containing vacuoles with ubiquitin through regulated translocation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6). This initial ubiquitin labeling elicits p62-mediated escort and deposition of GBPs to PVs, thereby conferring cell-autonomous immunity. Hypervirulent strains of Toxoplasma gondii evade this process via specific rhoptry protein kinases that inhibit IRG function, resulting in blockage of downstream PV ubiquitination and GBP delivery. Our results define a ubiquitin-centered mechanism by which host cells deliver GBPs to PVs and explain how hypervirulent parasites evade GBP-mediated immunity. PMID:26417105

  2. Root border cells and secretions as critical elements in plant host defense.

    PubMed

    Driouich, Azeddine; Follet-Gueye, Marie-Laure; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hawes, Martha

    2013-08-01

    Border cells and border-like cells are released from the root tip as individual cells and small aggregates, or as a group of attached cells. These are viable components of the root system that play a key role in controlling root interaction with living microbes of the rhizosphere. As their separation from root tip proceeds, the cells synthesize and secrete a hydrated mucilage that contains polysaccharides, secondary metabolites, antimicrobial proteins and extracellular DNA (exDNA). This exDNA-based matrix seems to function in root defense in a way similar to that of recently characterized neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in mammalian cells. This review discusses the role of the cells and secreted compounds in the protection of root tip against microbial infections.

  3. The role of Staphylococcal carotenogenesis in resistance to host defense peptides and in vivo virulence in experimental endocarditis model.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan Q; Yang, Soo-Jin; Tong, Steven Y C; Alvarez, Danya N; Mishra, Nagendra N

    2015-10-01

    The defining hallmark of the newly described species, Staphylococcus argenteus, in comparison to its sister species, S. aureus and S. schweitzeri, is the absence of production of the carotenoid pigment, staphyloxanthin. Staphylococcus argenteus lacks the responsible genetic locus crtOPQMN. We examined the impact of carotenoid synthesis in two non-pigmented S. argenteus strains, MSHR1132 and SCC1165. Following complementation with a plasmid containing the carotenoid operon (pTX-crtOPQMN), compared to wild type, both complemented strains showed substantial carotenoid production, with a resultant increase in cell membrane rigidity. Surprisingly, both crtOPQMN-complemented strains exhibited increased susceptibility to the host defense peptides, LL-37 and hNP-1 in vitro, and reduced virulence in an experimental rabbit endocarditis model.

  4. Comprehensive transcript profiling of Pto- and Prf-mediated host defense responses to infection by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    PubMed

    Mysore, Kirankumar S; Crasta, Oswald R; Tuori, Robert P; Folkerts, Otto; Swirsky, Peter B; Martin, Gregory B

    2002-11-01

    The disease resistance gene Pto encodes a serine/threonine protein kinase that confers resistance in tomato to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato strains that express the effector protein AvrPto. Pto-mediated resistance to bacterial speck disease also requires Prf, a protein with leucine-rich repeats and a putative nucleotide-binding site, although the role of Prf in the defense pathway is not known. We used GeneCalling, an open-architecture, mRNA-profiling technology, to identify genes that are either induced or suppressed in leaves 4 h after bacterial infection in the Pto- and Prf-mediated tomato-Pseudomonas(avrPto) interaction. Over 135 000 individual cDNA fragments representing an estimated 90% of the transcripts expressed in tomato leaves were examined and 432 differentially expressed genes were identified. The genes encode over 25 classes of proteins including 11 types of transcription factors and many signal transduction components. Differential expression of 91% of the genes required both Pto and Prf. Interestingly, differential expression of 32 genes did not require Pto but was dependent on Prf. Thus, our data support a role for Prf early in the Pto pathway and indicate that Prf can also function as an independent host recognition determinant of bacterial infection. Comprehensive expression profiling of the Pto-mediated defense response allows the development of many new hypotheses about the molecular basis of resistance to bacterial speck disease.

  5. Pseudomonas fluorescens induces strain-dependent and strain-independent host plant responses in defense networks, primary metabolism and photosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Dale A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Karve, Abhijit A; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Chen, Jay; Martin, Madhavi Z; Jawdy, Sara; Weston, David; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Schadt, Christopher Warren

    2012-01-01

    Colonization of plants by nonpathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens strains can confer enhanced defense capacity against a broad spectrum of pathogens. Few studies, however, have linked defense pathway regulation to primary metabolism and physiology. In this study, physiological data, metabolites, and transcript profiles are integrated to elucidate how molecular networks initiated at the root-microbe interface influence shoot metabolism and whole-plant performance. Experiments with Arabidopsis thaliana were performed using the newly identified P. fluorescens GM30 or P. fluorescens Pf-5 strains. Co-expression networks indicated that Pf-5 and GM30 induced a subnetwork specific to roots enriched for genes participating in RNA regulation, protein degradation, and hormonal metabolism. In contrast, only GM30 induced a subnetwork enriched for calcium signaling, sugar and nutrient signaling, and auxin metabolism, suggesting strain dependence in network architecture. In addition, one subnetwork present in shoots was enriched for genes in secondary metabolism, photosynthetic light reactions, and hormone metabolism. Metabolite analysis indicated that this network initiated changes in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. Consistent with this, we observed strain-specific responses in tryptophan and phenylalanine abundance. Both strains reduced host plant carbon gain and fitness, yet provided a clear fitness benefit when plants were challenged with the pathogen P. syringae DC3000.

  6. Chlamydial Lung Infection Induces Transient IL-9 Production Which Is Redundant for Host Defense against Primary Infection

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoling; Yang, Jie; Shekhar, Sudhanshu; Wang, Shuhe; Fan, Yijun; Yang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    IL-9/Th9 responses are recently found to be important for innate and adaptive immunity particularly in parasitic infections. To date, the study on the role of IL-9 in bacterial infections is limited and the reported data are contradictory. One reported function of IL-9/Th9 is to modulate Th1/Th17 responses. Since our and others’ previous work has shown a critical role of Th1 and Th17 cells in host defense against chlamydial lung infection, we here examined the role of IL-9 responses in Chlamydia muridarum (Cm) lung infection, particularly its effect on Th1 and Th17 responses and outcome infection. Our data showed quick but transient IL-9 production in the lung following infection, peaking at day 3 and back to baseline around day 7. CD4+ T cell was the major source of IL-9 production in the lung infection. Blockade of endogenous IL-9 using neutralizing antibody failed to change Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17 production by cultured spleen mononuclear cells isolated from Cm infected mice. Similarly, in vivo neutralization of IL-9 failed to show significant effect on T cell (Th1 and Th17) and antibody responses (IgA, IgG1 and IgG2a). Consistently, the neutralization of IL-9 had no significant effect on disease process, including body weight change, bacterial burden and histopathological score. The data suggest that IL-9 production following chlamydial lung infection is redundant for host defense against the intracellular bacteria. PMID:25646821

  7. Lipopolysaccharide neutralization by antimicrobial peptides: a gambit in the innate host defense strategy.

    PubMed

    Pulido, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Boix, Ester; Torrent, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are nowadays understood as broad multifunctional tools of the innate immune system to fight microbial infections. In addition to its direct antimicrobial action, AMPs can modulate the host immune response by promoting or restraining the recruitment of cells and chemicals to the infection focus. Binding of AMPs to lipopolysaccharide is a critical step for both their antimicrobial action and their immunomodulatory properties. On the one hand, removal of Gram-negative bacteria by AMPs can be an effective strategy to prevent a worsened inflammatory response that may lead to septic shock. On the other hand, by neutralizing circulating endotoxins, AMPs can successfully reduce nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production, hence preventing severe tissue damage. Furthermore, AMPs can also interfere with the Toll-like receptor 4 recognition system, suppressing cytokine production and contributing to modulate the inflammatory response. Here, we review the immune system strategies devised by AMPs to avoid an exacerbated inflammatory response and thus prevent a fatal end to the host.

  8. Streptomyces-induced resistance against oak powdery mildew involves host plant responses in defense, photosynthesis, and secondary metabolism pathways.

    PubMed

    Kurth, Florence; Mailänder, Sarah; Bönn, Markus; Feldhahn, Lasse; Herrmann, Sylvie; Große, Ivo; Buscot, François; Schrey, Silvia D; Tarkka, Mika T

    2014-09-01

    Rhizobacteria are known to induce defense responses in plants without causing disease symptoms, resulting in increased resistance to plant pathogens. This study investigated how Streptomyces sp. strain AcH 505 suppressed oak powdery mildew infection in pedunculate oak, by analyzing RNA-Seq data from singly- and co-inoculated oaks. We found that this Streptomyces strain elicited a systemic defense response in oak that was, in part, enhanced upon pathogen challenge. In addition to induction of the jasmonic acid/ethylene-dependent pathway, the RNA-Seq data suggests the participation of the salicylic acid-dependent pathway. Transcripts related to tryptophan, phenylalanine, and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis were enriched and phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity increased, indicating that priming by Streptomyces spp. in pedunculate oak shares some determinants with the Pseudomonas-Arabidopsis system. Photosynthesis-related transcripts were depleted in response to powdery mildew infection, but AcH 505 alleviated this inhibition, which suggested there is a fitness benefit for primed plants upon pathogen challenge. This study offers novel insights into the mechanisms of priming by actinobacteria and highlights their capacity to activate plant defense responses in the absence of pathogen challenge. PMID:24779643

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus ingestion promotes innate host defense in an enteric parasitic infection.

    PubMed

    McClemens, Jessica; Kim, Janice J; Wang, Huaqing; Mao, Yu-Kang; Collins, Matthew; Kunze, Wolfgang; Bienenstock, John; Forsythe, Paul; Khan, Waliul I

    2013-06-01

    Enteric parasite infections around the world are a huge economic burden and decrease the quality of life for many people. The use of beneficial bacteria has attracted attention for their potential therapeutic applications in various diseases. However, the effects of beneficial bacteria in enteric parasitic infections remain largely unexplored. We investigated the effects of ingestion of Lactobacillus rhamnosus (JB-1) in a model of enteric nematode (Trichuris muris) infection. C57BL/6 (resistant to infection), AKR (susceptible to infection), interleukin 10 (IL-10) knockout (KO), and mucin Muc2 KO mice were infected with T. muris and treated orally with probiotic JB-1 or medium. The mice were sacrificed on various days postinfection to examine goblet cells, epithelial cell proliferation, cytokines, and worm burdens. Treatment with JB-1 significantly enhanced worm expulsion in resistant C57BL/6 mice, and this was associated with increases in IL-10 levels, goblet cell numbers, and epithelial cell proliferation. Beneficial effects of JB-1 were absent in IL-10 KO and resistant mice treated with γ-irradiated bacteria. Live JB-1 treatment also expedited worm expulsion in Muc2 KO mice and, more importantly, in AKR mice (susceptible to infection). Injection of IL-10 directly into the colonic tissue of uninfected mice induced goblet cell hyperplasia. These findings demonstrate that JB-1 modulates goblet cell biology and promotes parasite expulsion via an IL-10-mediated pathway and provide novel insights into probiotic effects on innate defense in nematode infection.

  10. Hepatitis C virus, mitochondria and auto/mitophagy: exploiting a host defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ruggieri, Vitalba; Mazzoccoli, Carmela; Pazienza, Valerio; Andriulli, Angelo; Capitanio, Nazzareno; Piccoli, Claudia

    2014-03-14

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the major reason for liver transplantation and the main cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality in a great number of countries. As for the other viruses, this pathogen interferes in more than one process and in more than one way with host cell biology. A mounting body of evidence points, in particular, toward the drastic alterations of mitochondrial physiology and functions that virus is able to induce, albeit the mechanisms have partly remained elusive. Role of the mitochondria in immunity and in quality control systems, as autophagy, as well as the strategies that HCV has evolved to evade and even to manipulate mitochondrial surveillance for its benefit, highlights the importance of deepening the mechanisms that modulate this virus-mitochondrion interaction, not only to intensify our knowledge of the HCV infection pathogenesis but also to design efficient antiviral strategies.

  11. Secretory phospholipase A2 in dromedary tears: a host defense against staphylococci and other gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ben Bacha, Abir; Abid, Islem

    2013-03-01

    The best known physiologic function of secreted phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) group IIA (sPLA2-IIA) is defense against bacterial infection through hydrolytic degradation of bacterial membrane phospholipids. In fact, sPLA2-IIA effectively kills Gram-positive bacteria and to a lesser extent Gram-negative bacteria and is considered a major component of the eye's innate immune defense system. The antibacterial properties of sPLA2 have been demonstrated in rabbit and human tears. In this report, we have analyzed the bactericidal activity of dromedary tears and the subsequently purified sPLA2 on several Gram-positive bacteria. Our results showed that the sPLA2 displays a potent bactericidal activity against all the tested bacteria particularly against the Staphylococcus strains when tested in the ionic environment of tears. There is a synergic action of the sPLA2 with lysozyme when added to the bacteria culture prior to sPLA2. Interestingly, lysozyme purified from dromedary tears showed a significant bactericidal activity against Listeria monocytogene and Staphylococcus epidermidis, whereas the one purified from human tears displayed no activity against these two strains. We have also demonstrated that Ca(2+) is crucial for the activity of dromedary tear sPLA2 and to a less extent Mg(2+) ions. Given the presence of sPLA2 in tears and intestinal secretions, this enzyme may play a substantial role in innate mucosal and systemic bactericidal defenses against Gram-positive bacteria.

  12. Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lassowskat, Ines; Böttcher, Christoph; Eschen-Lippold, Lennart; Scheel, Dierk; Lee, Justin

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) target a variety of protein substrates to regulate cellular signaling processes in eukaryotes. In plants, the number of identified MAPK substrates that control plant defense responses is still limited. Here, we generated transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana plants with an inducible system to simulate in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3, and MPK6. Metabolome analysis revealed that this artificial MPK3/6 activation (without any exposure to pathogens or other stresses) is sufficient to drive the production of major defense-related metabolites, including various camalexin, indole glucosinolate and agmatine derivatives. An accompanying (phospho)proteome analysis led to detection of hundreds of potential phosphoproteins downstream of MPK3/6 activation. Besides known MAPK substrates, many candidates on this list possess typical MAPK-targeted phosphosites and in many cases, the corresponding phosphopeptides were detected by mass spectrometry. Notably, several of these putative phosphoproteins have been reported to be associated with the biosynthesis of antimicrobial defense substances (e.g., WRKY transcription factors and proteins encoded by the genes from the “PEN” pathway required for penetration resistance to filamentous pathogens). Thus, this work provides an inventory of candidate phosphoproteins, including putative direct MAPK substrates, for future analysis of MAPK-mediated defense control. (Proteomics data are available with the identifier PXD001252 via ProteomeXchange, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org). PMID:25368622

  13. NODULES WITH ACTIVATED DEFENSE 1 is required for maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Haixiang; Luo, Li; Duan, Liujian; Cai, Liuyang; He, Xinxing; Wen, Jiangqi; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Li, Guoliang; Xiao, Aifang; Duanmu, Deqiang; Cao, Yangrong; Hong, Zonglie; Zhang, Zhongming

    2016-10-01

    The symbiotic interaction between legume plants and rhizobia results in the formation of root nodules, in which symbiotic plant cells host and harbor thousands of nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Here, a Medicago truncatula nodules with activated defense 1 (nad1) mutant was identified using reverse genetics methods. The mutant phenotype was characterized using cell and molecular biology approaches. An RNA-sequencing technique was used to analyze the transcriptomic reprogramming of nad1 mutant nodules. In the nad1 mutant plants, rhizobial infection and propagation in infection threads are normal, whereas rhizobia and their symbiotic plant cells become necrotic immediately after rhizobia are released from infection threads into symbiotic cells of nodules. Defense-associated responses were detected in nad1 nodules. NAD1 is specifically present in root nodule symbiosis plants with the exception of Morus notabilis, and the transcript is highly induced in nodules. NAD1 encodes a small uncharacterized protein with two predicted transmembrane helices and is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Our data demonstrate a positive role for NAD1 in the maintenance of rhizobial endosymbiosis during nodulation. PMID:27245091

  14. Effect of sublethal gamma radiation on host defenses in experimental scrub typhus

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.J.; Rees, J.C.

    1986-06-01

    The effect of sublethal gamma radiation on inbred mice chronically infected with scrub typhus rickettsiae was examined. Inbred mice which were inoculated with the Gilliam or Karp strain of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi by the subcutaneous route harbored the infection for at least 1 year. Irradiation of these animals at 12 or 52 weeks postinoculation with normally sublethal levels induced a significantly higher percentage of rickettsemic mice (recrudescence) than was seen in the unirradiated, similarly infected control animals. In addition, sublethal irradiation at 12 weeks induced a quantitative increase in total rickettsiae. Homologous antibody titers to the rickettsiae were examined for 5 weeks after irradiation to determine the role of the humoral response in radiation-induced recrudescence. Unirradiated, infected mice showed consistent titers of about 320 throughout the 5-week observation period, and the titer was not affected by exposure of up to 500 rads of gamma radiation. Drug dose-dependent radioprotection and modification of recrudescence was noted in infected, irradiated mice treated with the antiradiation compound S-2-(3-aminopropylamino)ethyl phosphorothioic acid. The results of this investigation supported the conclusion that the recrudescence of a chronic rickettsial infection in the appropriate host after immunological impairment due to gamma radiation can result in an acute, possibly lethal rickettsemia.

  15. Host defenses in experimental scrub typhus: effect of sublethal gamma radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of sublethal gamma radiation on inbred mice chronically infected with scrub typhus rickettsiae was examined. Inbred mice which have been inoculated with Gilliam or Karp strain of Rickettsia tsutsugamushi by the subcutaneous route harbored the infection for at least one year. Irradiation of these animals at 12 or 52 weeks post inoculation at normally sublethal levels induced a significantly higher percentage of rickettsemic mice (recrudescence) than in the unirradiated similarly infected control animals. In addition, sublethal irradiation at 12 weeks also induced a quantitative increase in total rickettsiae. Homologous antibody titers to the rickettsiae were examined for five weeks following irradiation to determine the role of the humoral response in radiation induced recrudescence. Modification of recrudescence was investigated using radioprotective drugs. The expected results of this investigation supported the conclusion that the recrudescence of a chronic rickettsial infection in the appropriate host following immunological impairment due to battlefield or clinical exposure to gamma radiation can result in an acute, possibly lethal rickettsemia.

  16. Lipocalin-2 ensures host defense against Salmonella Typhimurium by controlling macrophage iron homeostasis and immune response

    PubMed Central

    Nairz, Manfred; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Dichtl, Stefanie; Sonnweber, Thomas; Theurl, Igor; Theurl, Milan; Lindner, Ewald; Demetz, Egon; Aβhoff, Malte; Bellmann-Weiler, Rosa; Müller, Raphael; Gerner, Romana R.; Moschen, Alexander R.; Baumgartner, Nadja; Moser, Patrizia L.; Talasz, Heribert; Tilg, Herbert; Fang, Ferric C.; Weiss, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) is an innate immune peptide with pleiotropic effects. Lcn2 binds iron-laden bacterial siderophores, chemo-attracts neutrophils and has immunomodulatory and apoptosis-regulating effects. In this study we show that upon infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Lcn2 promotes iron export from Salmonella-infected macrophages, which reduces cellular iron content and enhances the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Lcn2 represses IL-10 production while augmenting Nos2, TNF-α and IL-6 expression. Lcn2-/- macrophages have elevated IL-10 levels as a consequence of increased iron content. The crucial role of Lcn-2/IL-10 interactions was further demonstrated by the greater ability of Lcn2-/- IL-10-/- macrophages and mice to control intracellular Salmonella proliferation in comparison to Lcn2-/- counterparts. Over-expression of the iron exporter ferroportin-1 in Lcn2-/- macrophages represses IL-10 and restores TNF-α and IL-6 production to the levels found in wild-type macrophages, so that killing and clearance of intracellular Salmonella is promoted. Our observations suggest that Lcn2 promotes host resistance to Salmonella Typhimurium infection by binding bacterial siderophores and suppressing IL-10 production, and that both functions are linked to its ability to shuttle iron from macrophages. PMID:26332507

  17. A Beneficial Role for Immunoglobulin E in Host Defense against Honeybee Venom Authors

    PubMed Central

    Marichal, Thomas; Starkl, Philipp; Reber, Laurent L.; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Oettgen, Hans C.; Tsai, Mindy; Metz, Martin; Galli, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Allergies are widely considered to be misdirected type 2 immune responses, in which IgE antibodies are produced against any of a broad range of seemingly harmless antigens. However, components of insect venoms also can sensitize individuals to develop severe IgE-associated allergic reactions, including fatal anaphylaxis, upon subsequent venom exposure. We found that mice injected with amounts of honeybee venom similar to that which could be delivered in one or two stings developed a specific type 2 immune response which increased their resistance to subsequent challenge with potentially lethal amounts of the venom. Our data indicate that IgE antibodies and the high affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, were essential for such acquired resistance to honeybee venom. The evidence that IgE-dependent immune responses against venom can enhance survival in mice supports the hypothesis that IgE, which also contributes to allergic disorders, has an important function in protection of the host against noxious substances. PMID:24210352

  18. Analysis of Putative Apoplastic Effectors from the Nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, and Identification of an Expansin-Like Protein That Can Induce and Suppress Host Defenses

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Côté, Olivier; Stare, Barbara Gerič; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, is an important pest of potato. Like other pathogens, plant parasitic nematodes are presumed to employ effector proteins, secreted into the apoplast as well as the host cytoplasm, to alter plant cellular functions and successfully infect their hosts. We have generated a library of ORFs encoding putative G. rostochiensis putative apoplastic effectors in vectors for expression in planta. These clones were assessed for morphological and developmental effects on plants as well as their ability to induce or suppress plant defenses. Several CLAVATA3/ESR-like proteins induced developmental phenotypes, whereas predicted cell wall-modifying proteins induced necrosis and chlorosis, consistent with roles in cell fate alteration and tissue invasion, respectively. When directed to the apoplast with a signal peptide, two effectors, an ubiquitin extension protein (GrUBCEP12) and an expansin-like protein (GrEXPB2), suppressed defense responses including NB-LRR signaling induced in the cytoplasm. GrEXPB2 also elicited defense response in species- and sequence-specific manner. Our results are consistent with the scenario whereby potato cyst nematodes secrete effectors that modulate host cell fate and metabolism as well as modifying host cell walls. Furthermore, we show a novel role for an apoplastic expansin-like protein in suppressing intra-cellular defense responses. PMID:25606855

  19. Analysis of putative apoplastic effectors from the nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, and identification of an expansin-like protein that can induce and suppress host defenses.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shawkat; Magne, Maxime; Chen, Shiyan; Côté, Olivier; Stare, Barbara Gerič; Obradovic, Natasa; Jamshaid, Lubna; Wang, Xiaohong; Bélair, Guy; Moffett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The potato cyst nematode, Globodera rostochiensis, is an important pest of potato. Like other pathogens, plant parasitic nematodes are presumed to employ effector proteins, secreted into the apoplast as well as the host cytoplasm, to alter plant cellular functions and successfully infect their hosts. We have generated a library of ORFs encoding putative G. rostochiensis putative apoplastic effectors in vectors for expression in planta. These clones were assessed for morphological and developmental effects on plants as well as their ability to induce or suppress plant defenses. Several CLAVATA3/ESR-like proteins induced developmental phenotypes, whereas predicted cell wall-modifying proteins induced necrosis and chlorosis, consistent with roles in cell fate alteration and tissue invasion, respectively. When directed to the apoplast with a signal peptide, two effectors, an ubiquitin extension protein (GrUBCEP12) and an expansin-like protein (GrEXPB2), suppressed defense responses including NB-LRR signaling induced in the cytoplasm. GrEXPB2 also elicited defense response in species- and sequence-specific manner. Our results are consistent with the scenario whereby potato cyst nematodes secrete effectors that modulate host cell fate and metabolism as well as modifying host cell walls. Furthermore, we show a novel role for an apoplastic expansin-like protein in suppressing intra-cellular defense responses.

  20. Gall insects and indirect plant defenses: A case of active manipulation?

    PubMed

    Tooker, John F; De Moraes, Consuelo M

    2008-07-01

    Many plants can defend themselves against insect herbivory by attracting natural enemies that kill feeding herbivores and limit the damage they inflict. Such "indirect defenses" can be induced by insects feeding on different plant tissues and using a variety of feeding styles. However, we have recently shown that gall-inducing insect species can avoid the indirect defenses of their host plant species and even alter volatile emissions following subsequent herbivory. One of the species we studied, Eurosta solidaginis, induces galls on goldenrod (Solidago altissima) and appears to exert a unique influence over the indirect defenses of its host plant that is not readily explained by levels of defense-related phytohormones, gall formation or resource depletion. Our evidence suggests that this gall-insect species may be able to manipulate its host plant species to avoid and/or modify its defensive responses. The results also provide insight into gall induction because the gall-insect species that we screened did not increase levels of jasmonic acid, which, in addition to triggering volatile emissions, is a powerful growth regulator that could prevent the cell growth and division that leads to gall formation.

  1. Orientations of psychotic activity in defensive pathological organizations.

    PubMed

    Williams, Paul

    2014-06-01

    The author reviews some clinical experiences of the treatment of personality disordered patients suffering from internal domination of ego functioning by a defensive pathological organization. In particular, the function and purpose of perverse, sadistic attacks by the organization on the ego are considered and questions pertaining to technique are raised. It is suggested that different forms of sadistic, subjugating activity by pathological organizations may denote differences in intent borne of the type and severity of the psychopathology of the individual. Patients with severe narcissistic psychopathology for whom object contact has become associated with the arousal of intense psychotic anxieties seem more likely to be subjected to an invasive, annihilatory imperative by the pathological organization, the purpose of which appears to be to obliterate the experience of contact with any differentiated object, to avoid emotion and to use coercion to enforce a primitive identification by the ego with the psychotic organization in the mind. Certain patients with less severe narcissistic psychopathology, yet for whom object contact can also be associated with the arousal of psychotic anxieties due to intense or persistent conflict with the object, sometimes expressed as organized sadomasochistic clinging to a punishing and punished object (for example, in certain borderline or depressed patients) exhibit sadistic attacks that serve less to annihilate object contact and more to intrusively control and punish the object. Observations of these phenomena have been made by a number of psychoanalysts in recent decades and these contributions are discussed. This paper is addressed primarily to the implications for technique with such patients, particularly a need for triangulation of their experiences of oppression in order to loosen the controls over the ego by the pathological organization. PMID:24620792

  2. C1 inhibitor treatment improves host defense in pneumococcal meningitis in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Zwijnenburg, Petra J G; van der Poll, Tom; Florquin, Sandrine; Polfliet, Machteld M J; van den Berg, Timo K; Dijkstra, Christine D; Roord, John J; Hack, C Erik; van Furth, A Marceline

    2007-07-01

    In spite of antibiotic treatment, pneumococcal meningitis continues to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The complement system is a key component of innate immunity against invading pathogens. However, activation of complement is also involved in tissue damage, and complement inhibition by C1 inhibitor (C1-inh) is beneficial in animal models of endotoxemia and sepsis. In the present study, we demonstrate classical pathway complement activation during pneumococcal meningitis in rats. We also evaluate the effect of C1-inh treatment on clinical illness, bacterial clearance, and inflammatory responses in rats and mice with pneumococcal meningitis. C1-inh treatment was associated with reduced clinical illness, a less-pronounced inflammatory infiltrate around the meninges, and lower brain levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. C1-inh treatment increased bacterial clearance, possibly through an up-regulation of CR3. Hence, C1-inh may be a useful agent in the treatment of pneumococcal meningitis.

  3. Effects of inhalation of organic chemical air contaminants on murine lung host defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Aranyi, C.; O'Shea, W.J.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.

    1986-05-01

    The potential health hazards of exposure to threshold limit value (TLV) concentrations of acetaldehyde, acrolein, propylene oxide, chloroform, methyl chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, allyl chloride, methylene chloride, ethylene trichloride, perchloroethylene, benzene, phenol, monochlorobenzene, and benzyl chloride, compounds which may be present in the ambient or work room atmosphere were investigated. The effects of single and multiple 3-hr inhalation exposures were evaluated in mice by monitoring changes in their susceptibility to experimentally induced streptococcus aerosol infection and pulmonary bactericidal activity to inhaled Klebsiella pneumoniae. When significant changes in these parameters were found, further exposures were performed at reduced vapor concentrations until the no-measurable-effect level was reached. Multiple exposures on 5 consecutive days were then performed at this concentration. Significant increases in susceptibility to respiratory streptococcus infection were observed after single 3-hr exposure to TLV concentrations of methylene chloride, perchloroethylene, and ethylene trichloride. For methylene chloride and perchloroethylene, these exposure conditions also resulted in significantly decreased pulmonary bactericidal activity.

  4. Effects of inhalation of organic chemical air contaminants on murine lung host defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Aranyi, C.; O'Shea, W.J.; Graham, J.A.; Miller, F.J.

    1986-01-01

    The potential health hazards of exposure to threshold limit value (TLV) concentrations of acetaldehyde, acrolein, propylene oxide, chloroform, methyl chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, allyl chloride, methylene chloride, ethylene trichloride, perchloroethylene, benzene, phenol, monochlorobenzene, and benzyl chloride, compounds which may be present in the ambient or work room atmosphere were investigated. The effects of single and multiple 3-hr inhalation exposures were evaluated in mice by monitoring changes in their susceptibility to experimentally induced streptococcus aerosol infection and pulmonary bactericidal activity to inhaled Klebsiella pneumoniae. When significant changes in these parameters were found, further exposures were performed at reduced vapor concentrations until the no-measurable-effect level was reached. Multiple exposures on 5 consecutive days were then performed at the concentration. Significant increases in susceptibility to respiratory streptococcus infection were observed after single 3-hr exposure to TLV concentrations of methylene chloride, perchloroethylene, and ethylene trichloride. For methylene chloride and perchloroethylene, these exposure conditions also resulted in significantly decreased pulmonary bactericidal activity.

  5. The baculovirus uses a captured host phosphatase to induce enhanced locomotory activity in host caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Katsuma, Susumu; Koyano, Yasue; Kang, Wonkyung; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Kamita, Shizuo George; Shimada, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus is a classic example of a parasite that alters the behavior or physiology of its host so that progeny transmission is maximized. Baculoviruses do this by inducing enhanced locomotory activity (ELA) that causes the host caterpillars to climb to the upper foliage of plants. We previously reported that this behavior is not induced in silkworms that are infected with a mutant baculovirus lacking its protein tyrosine phosphatase (ptp) gene, a gene likely captured from an ancestral host. Here we show that the product of the ptp gene, PTP, associates with baculovirus ORF1629 as a virion structural protein, but surprisingly phosphatase activity associated with PTP was not required for the induction of ELA. Interestingly, the ptp knockout baculovirus showed significantly reduced infectivity of larval brain tissues. Collectively, we show that the modern baculovirus uses the host-derived phosphatase to establish adequate infection for ELA as a virion-associated structural protein rather than as an enzyme.

  6. The Baculovirus Uses a Captured Host Phosphatase to Induce Enhanced Locomotory Activity in Host Caterpillars

    PubMed Central

    Katsuma, Susumu; Koyano, Yasue; Kang, WonKyung; Kokusho, Ryuhei; Kamita, Shizuo George; Shimada, Toru

    2012-01-01

    The baculovirus is a classic example of a parasite that alters the behavior or physiology of its host so that progeny transmission is maximized. Baculoviruses do this by inducing enhanced locomotory activity (ELA) that causes the host caterpillars to climb to the upper foliage of plants. We previously reported that this behavior is not induced in silkworms that are infected with a mutant baculovirus lacking its protein tyrosine phosphatase (ptp) gene, a gene likely captured from an ancestral host. Here we show that the product of the ptp gene, PTP, associates with baculovirus ORF1629 as a virion structural protein, but surprisingly phosphatase activity associated with PTP was not required for the induction of ELA. Interestingly, the ptp knockout baculovirus showed significantly reduced infectivity of larval brain tissues. Collectively, we show that the modern baculovirus uses the host-derived phosphatase to establish adequate infection for ELA as a virion-associated structural protein rather than as an enzyme. PMID:22496662

  7. Mitochondrial respiratory-chain adaptations in macrophages contribute to antibacterial host defense.

    PubMed

    Garaude, Johan; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Martínez-Cano, Sarai; Enamorado, Michel; Ugolini, Matteo; Nistal-Villán, Estanislao; Hervás-Stubbs, Sandra; Pelegrín, Pablo; Sander, Leif E; Enríquez, José A; Sancho, David

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages tightly scale their core metabolism after being activated, but the precise regulation of the mitochondrial electron-transport chain (ETC) and its functional implications are currently unknown. Here we found that recognition of live bacteria by macrophages transiently decreased assembly of the ETC complex I (CI) and CI-containing super-complexes and switched the relative contributions of CI and CII to mitochondrial respiration. This was mediated by phagosomal NADPH oxidase and the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent tyrosine kinase Fgr. It required Toll-like receptor signaling and the NLRP3 inflammasome, which were both connected to bacterial viability-specific immune responses. Inhibition of CII during infection with Escherichia coli normalized serum concentrations of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and IL-10 to those in mice treated with dead bacteria and impaired control of bacteria. We have thus identified ETC adaptations as an early immunological-metabolic checkpoint that adjusts innate immune responses to bacterial infection.

  8. Host Defenses in Murine Malaria: Immunological Characteristics of a Protracted State of Immunity to Plasmodium yoelii

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James R.

    1980-01-01

    Random-bred ICR mice recovered from infection with avirulent Plasmodium yoelii were challenged at various later times with virulent P. yoelii or with another species of Plasmodium, P. berghei, to characterize the immunological nature of the long-term state of immunity generated in response to the avirulent infection. It was found that recovered mice resisted lethal challenge with virulent P. yoelii through at least 416 days after primary infection. However, the quality of this immunity changed as the time after avirulent infection increased. Mice challenged early after recovery were able to prevent the development of patent parasitemia. Later, these immune animals lost this capacity and after challenge infections progressed to patency at the same rate as did nonimmune controls. However, after the establishment of parasitemia, those animals which had encountered the homologous parasite a long time before controlled, and then eliminated, blood infection and survived. The “early” state of immunity was expressed by animals which may have harbored small numbers of viable avirulent parasites and possessed a protective humoral factor which could passively transfer anti-P. yoelii activity to naive recipients. In contrast, animals with “late” immunity showed evidence of neither persisting avirulent parasites nor serum anti-P. yoelii activity. The results support the proposition that immunity to this parasite exists as two distinct but interrelated states of immunological reactivity: an early “active” immunity and a later state which has characteristics suggestive of a state of immunological memory wherewith the animals were capable of anamnestically responding to P. yoelii challenge. Little evidence of heterologous immunity to P. berghei was observed for animals recovered from P. yoelii. PMID:6987179

  9. Analysis of the roles of NrdR and DnaB from Streptococcus pyogenes in response to host defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Okada, Ryo; Isaka, Masanori; Tatsuno, Ichiro; Isobe, Ken-Ichi; Hasegawa, Tadao

    2015-03-01

    Toxic shock syndrome caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (S. pyogenes) is a re-emerging infectious disease. Many virulence-associated proteins play important roles in its pathogenesis and the production of these proteins is controlled by many regulatory factors. CovS is one of the most important two-component sensor proteins in S. pyogenes, and it has been analyzed extensively. Our recent analyses revealed the existence of a transposon between covS and nrdR in several strains, and we speculated that this insertion has some importance. Hence, we examined the significances of the NrdR stand-alone regulator and DnaB, which is encoded by the gene located immediately downstream of nrdR in S. pyogenes infection. We established an nrdR-only knockout strain, and both nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain. These established knockout strains exhibited a deteriorated response to H2 O2 exposure. nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain was more easily killed by human polynuclear blood cells, but the nrdR-only knockout strain had no significant difference compared to wild type in contrast to the combined knockout strain. In addition, the mouse infection model experiment illustrated that nrdR and partial dnaB knockout strain, but not the nrdR-only knockout strain, was less virulent compared with the parental strain. These results suggest that DnaB is involved in response to host defense.

  10. Host-defense and trefoil factor family peptides in skin secretions of the Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Leprince, Jérôme; Coquet, Laurent; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2015-10-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from the octoploid Mawa clawed frog Xenopus boumbaensis Loumont, 1983 led to the identification and characterization of 15 host-defense peptides belonging to the magainin (two peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; three peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; three peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; two peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; five peptides) families. In addition, caerulein and three peptides with structural similarity to the trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides, xP2 and xP4 from Xenopus laevis were also present in the secretions. Consistent with data from comparisons of the nucleotides sequence of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, the primary structures of the peptides suggest a close phylogenetic relationship between X. boumbaensis and the octoploid frogs Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei. As the three species occupy disjunct ranges within Cameroon, it is suggested that they diverged from a common ancestor by allopatric speciation. PMID:25849343

  11. Targeted deletion of tumor suppressor PTEN augments neutrophil function and enhances host defense in neutropenia-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yitang; Jia, Yonghui; Pichavant, Muriel; Loison, Fabien; Sarraj, Bara; Kasorn, Anongnard; You, Jian; Robson, Bryanne E.; Umetsu, Dale T.; Mizgerd, Joseph P.; Ye, Keqiang

    2009-01-01

    Neutropenia and related infections are the most important dose-limiting toxicities in anticancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this study, we explored a new strategy for augmenting host defense in neutropenia-related pneumonia. Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) signaling in neutrophils was elevated by depleting PTEN, a phosphatidylinositol 3′-phosphatase that hydrolyzes PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. In myeloid-specific PTEN knockout mice, significantly more neutrophils were recruited to the inflamed lungs during neutropenia-associated pneumonia. Using an adoptive transfer technique, we demonstrated that this enhancement could be caused directly by PTEN depletion in neutrophils. In addition, disruption of PTEN increased the recruitment of macrophages and elevated proinflammatory cytokines/chemokine levels in the inflamed lungs, which could also be responsible for the enhanced neutrophil recruitment. Depleting PTEN also significantly delayed apoptosis and enhanced the bacteria-killing capability of the recruited neutrophils. Finally, we provide direct evidence that enhancement of neutrophil function by elevating PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling can alleviate pneumonia-associated lung damage and decrease pneumonia-elicited mortality. Collectively, these results not only provide insight into the mechanism of action of PTEN and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 signaling pathway in modulating neutrophil function during lung infection and inflammation, but they also establish PTEN and related pathways as potential therapeutic targets for treating neutropenia-associated pneumonia. PMID:19286998

  12. Characterization of a variant of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri that triggers a host-specific defense response.

    PubMed

    Chiesa, María A; Siciliano, María F; Ornella, Leonardo; Roeschlin, Roxana A; Favaro, María A; Delgado, Natalia Pino; Sendín, Lorena N; Orce, Ingrid G; Ploper, L Daniel; Vojnov, Adrian A; Vacas, José Gadea; Filippone, María P; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Marano, María R

    2013-06-01

    Citrus is an economically important fruit crop that is severely afflicted by Asiatic citrus bacterial canker (CBC), a disease caused by the phytopathogen Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri (X. citri). To gain insight into the molecular epidemiology of CBC, 42 Xanthomonas isolates were collected from a range of Citrus spp. across 17 different orchards in Tucumán, Argentina and subjected to molecular, biochemical, and pathogenicity tests. Analysis of genome-specific X. citri markers and DNA polymorphisms based on repetitive elements-based polymerase chain reaction showed that all 42 isolates belonged to X. citri. Interestingly, pathogenicity tests showed that one isolate, which shares >90% genetic similarity to the reference strain X. citri T, has host range specificity. This new variant of X. citri subsp. citri, named X. citri A(T), which is deficient in xanthan production, induces an atypical, noncankerous chlorotic phenotype in Citrus limon and C. paradisi and weak cankerous lesions in C. aurantifolia and C. clementina leaves. In C. limon, suppression of canker development is concomitant with an oxidative burst; xanthan is not implicated in the phenotype induced by this interaction, suggesting that other bacterial factors would be involved in triggering the defense response.

  13. Atg7 deficiency impairs host defense against Klebsiella pneumoniae by impacting bacterial clearance, survival and inflammatory responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Ye, Yan; Li, Xuefeng; Wang, Wenxue; Ouedraogo, Kiswendsida Claude; Li, Yi; Gan, Changpei; Tan, Shirui; Zhou, Xikun; Wu, Min

    2014-09-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp) is a Gram-negative bacterium that can cause serious infections in humans. Autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7) has been implicated in certain bacterial infections; however, the role of Atg7 in macrophage-mediated immunity against Kp infection has not been elucidated. Here we showed that Atg7 expression was significantly increased in murine alveolar macrophages (MH-S) upon Kp infection, indicating that Atg7 participated in host defense. Knocking down Atg7 with small-interfering RNA increased bacterial burdens in MH-S cells. Using cell biology assays and whole animal imaging analysis, we found that compared with wild-type mice atg7 knockout (KO) mice exhibited increased susceptibility to Kp infection, with decreased survival rates, decreased bacterial clearance, and intensified lung injury. Moreover, Kp infection induced excessive proinflammatory cytokines and superoxide in the lung of atg7 KO mice. Similarly, silencing Atg7 in MH-S cells markedly increased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Collectively, these findings reveal that Atg7 offers critical resistance to Kp infection by modulating both systemic and local production of proinflammatory cytokines.

  14. Commensal enteric bacteria lipopolysaccharide impairs host defense against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Jiang, T T; Chaturvedi, V; Ertelt, J M; Xin, L; Clark, D R; Kinder, J M; Way, S S

    2015-07-01

    Commensal enteric bacteria maintain systemic immune responsiveness that protects against disseminated or localized infection in extra-intestinal tissues caused by pathogenic microbes. However, as shifts in infection susceptibility after commensal bacteria eradication have primarily been probed using viruses, the broader applicability to other pathogen types remains undefined. In sharp contrast to diminished antiviral immunity, we show commensal bacteria eradication bolsters protection against disseminated Candida albicans fungal infection. Enhanced antifungal immunity reflects more robust systemic expansion of Ly6G(hi)Ly6C(int) neutrophils, and their mobilization into infected tissues among antibiotic-treated compared with commensal bacteria-replete control mice. Reciprocally, depletion of neutrophils from expanded levels or intestinal lipopolysaccharide reconstitution overrides the antifungal protective benefits conferred by commensal bacteria eradication. This discordance in antifungal compared with antiviral immunity highlights intrinsic differences in how commensal bacteria control responsiveness for specific immune cell subsets, because pathogen-specific CD8(+) T cells that protect against viruses were suppressed similarly after C. albicans and influenza A virus infection. Thus, positive calibration of antiviral immunity by commensal bacteria is counterbalanced by restrained activation of other immune components that confer antifungal immunity.

  15. Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. Hydroalcoholic Extract Inhibits Neutrophil Functions Related to Innate Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Barioni, Eric Diego; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes de Paula; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Wagner, Theodoro Marcel; Cogliati, Bruno; Corrêa dos Santos, Matheus; Machado, Marina da Silva; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Niero, Rivaldo; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2013-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. is a herb native to South America, and its inflorescences are popularly employed to treat inflammatory diseases. Here, the effects of the in vivo actions of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from inflorescences of A. satureioides on neutrophil trafficking into inflamed tissue were investigated. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with A. satureioides extract, and inflammation was induced one hour later by lipopolysaccharide injection into the subcutaneous tissue. The number of leukocytes and the amount of chemotactic mediators were quantified in the inflammatory exudate, and adhesion molecule and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expressions and phorbol-myristate-acetate- (PMA-) stimulated oxidative burst were quantified in circulating neutrophils. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions were quantified in the mesentery tissue. Enzymes and tissue morphology of the liver and kidney were evaluated. Treatment with A. satureioides extract reduced neutrophil influx and secretion of leukotriene B4 and CINC-1 in the exudates, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in the mesentery postcapillary venules, neutrophil L-selectin, β2-integrin and TLR-4 expression, and oxidative burst, but did not cause an alteration in the morphology and activities of liver and kidney. Together, the data show that A. satureioides extract inhibits neutrophil functions related to the innate response and does not cause systemic toxicity. PMID:23476704

  16. Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. Hydroalcoholic Extract Inhibits Neutrophil Functions Related to Innate Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Barioni, Eric Diego; Santin, José Roberto; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Rodrigues, Stephen Fernandes de Paula; Ferraz-de-Paula, Viviane; Wagner, Theodoro Marcel; Cogliati, Bruno; Corrêa Dos Santos, Matheus; Machado, Marina da Silva; de Andrade, Sérgio Faloni; Niero, Rivaldo; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli

    2013-01-01

    Achyrocline satureioides (Lam.) D.C. is a herb native to South America, and its inflorescences are popularly employed to treat inflammatory diseases. Here, the effects of the in vivo actions of the hydroalcoholic extract obtained from inflorescences of A. satureioides on neutrophil trafficking into inflamed tissue were investigated. Male Wistar rats were orally treated with A. satureioides extract, and inflammation was induced one hour later by lipopolysaccharide injection into the subcutaneous tissue. The number of leukocytes and the amount of chemotactic mediators were quantified in the inflammatory exudate, and adhesion molecule and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expressions and phorbol-myristate-acetate- (PMA-) stimulated oxidative burst were quantified in circulating neutrophils. Leukocyte-endothelial interactions were quantified in the mesentery tissue. Enzymes and tissue morphology of the liver and kidney were evaluated. Treatment with A. satureioides extract reduced neutrophil influx and secretion of leukotriene B4 and CINC-1 in the exudates, the number of rolling and adhered leukocytes in the mesentery postcapillary venules, neutrophil L-selectin, β 2-integrin and TLR-4 expression, and oxidative burst, but did not cause an alteration in the morphology and activities of liver and kidney. Together, the data show that A. satureioides extract inhibits neutrophil functions related to the innate response and does not cause systemic toxicity.

  17. Role of primary human alveolar epithelial cells in host defense against Francisella tularensis infection.

    PubMed

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-08-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-kappaB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-kappaB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  18. Role of Primary Human Alveolar Epithelial Cells in Host Defense against Francisella tularensis Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Gentry, Megan; Taormina, Joanna; Pyles, Richard B.; Yeager, Linsey; Kirtley, Michelle; Popov, Vsevolod L.; Klimpel, Gary; Eaves-Pyles, Tonyia

    2007-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, an intracellular pathogen, is highly virulent when inhaled. Alveolar epithelial type I (ATI) and type II (ATII) cells line the majority of the alveolar surface and respond to inhaled pathogenic bacteria via cytokine secretion. We hypothesized that these cells contribute to the lung innate immune response to F. tularensis. Results demonstrated that the live vaccine strain (LVS) contacted ATI and ATII cells by 2 h following intranasal inoculation of mice. In culture, primary human ATI or ATII cells, grown on transwell filters, were stimulated on the apical (AP) surface with virulent F. tularensis Schu 4 or LVS. Basolateral (BL) conditioned medium (CM), collected 6 and 24 h later, was added to the BL surfaces of transwell cultures of primary human pulmonary microvasculature endothelial cells (HPMEC) prior to the addition of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) or dendritic cells (DCs) to the AP surface. HPMEC responded to S4- or LVS-stimulated ATII, but not ATI, CM as evidenced by PMN and DC migration. Analysis of the AP and BL ATII CM revealed that both F. tularensis strains induced various levels of a variety of cytokines via NF-κB activation. ATII cells pretreated with an NF-κB inhibitor prior to F. tularensis stimulation substantially decreased interleukin-8 secretion, which did not occur through Toll-like receptor 2, 2/6, 4, or 5 stimulation. These data indicate a crucial role for ATII cells in the innate immune response to F. tularensis. PMID:17502386

  19. The Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) V2 protein inhibits enzymatic activity of the host papain-like cysteine protease CYP1.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ziv, Amalia; Levy, Yael; Citovsky, Vitaly; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-05-01

    The viral V2 protein is one of the key factors that Tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen worldwide, utilizes to combat the host defense. Besides suppressing the plant RNA silencing defense by targeting the host SGS3 component of the silencing machinery, V2 also interacts with the host CYP1 protein, a papain-like cysteine protease likely involved in hypersensitive response reactions. The biological effects of the V2-CYP1 interaction, however, remain unknown. We addressed this question by demonstrating that V2 inhibits the enzymatic activity of CYP1, but does not interfere with post-translational maturation of this protein. PMID:25797621

  20. The Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) V2 protein inhibits enzymatic activity of the host papain-like cysteine protease CYP1

    PubMed Central

    Bar-Ziv, Amalia; Levy, Yael; Citovsky, Vitaly; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-01-01

    The viral V2 protein is one of the key factors that Tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen worldwide, utilizes to combat the host defense. Besides suppressing the plant RNA silencing defense by targeting the host SGS3 component of the silencing machinery, V2 also interacts with the host CYP1 protein, a papain-like cysteine protease likely involved in hypersensitive response reactions. The biological effects of the V2-CYP1 interaction, however, remain unknown. We addressed this question by demonstrating that V2 inhibits the enzymatic activity of CYP1, but does not interfere with post-translational maturation of this protein. PMID:25797621

  1. The Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) V2 protein inhibits enzymatic activity of the host papain-like cysteine protease CYP1.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ziv, Amalia; Levy, Yael; Citovsky, Vitaly; Gafni, Yedidya

    2015-05-01

    The viral V2 protein is one of the key factors that Tomato yellow leaf curl geminivirus (TYLCV), a major tomato pathogen worldwide, utilizes to combat the host defense. Besides suppressing the plant RNA silencing defense by targeting the host SGS3 component of the silencing machinery, V2 also interacts with the host CYP1 protein, a papain-like cysteine protease likely involved in hypersensitive response reactions. The biological effects of the V2-CYP1 interaction, however, remain unknown. We addressed this question by demonstrating that V2 inhibits the enzymatic activity of CYP1, but does not interfere with post-translational maturation of this protein.

  2. A fossil antibacterial peptide gives clues to structural diversity of cathelicidin-derived host defense peptides.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shunyi; Gao, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Cathelicidins, a group of vertebrate- specific immune effector molecules, developed into a multigene family through gene duplication in the Cetartiodactyla lineage, in which structural changes of the antimicrobial domains (AMDs) among paralogs during evolution are clearly associated with functional diversification of cathelicidins. However, the evolutionary mechanism for such structural diversity remains largely unsolved. Although at the genomic level, the 3'-exon alone encoding the variable AMD repertoire would favor a role of exon shuffling, the observation that two structurally unrelated subfamilies of AMDs (protegrins and prophenins) display high similarity in some nucleotide regions of the 3'-exons of their genes provides evidence for postduplication sequence remodeling. This opinion is further strengthened by finding a proline-arginine-rich antibacterial peptide of 38 residues (named PR-38) encoded by an open reading frame located in the 3' untranslated region of protegrins, which is in frame with prophenins. The latter appears to have undergone internal motif repeats in the region corresponding to PR-38. PR-38 exhibits similar amino acid sequence and carboxyl-terminal amidation feature to PR-39s, a subfamily of cathelicidin peptides conserved across Cetartiodactyla. Functional assays of the chemically synthesized PR-38 confirmed its antibacterial activity with a similar action mode to PR-39 against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria at micromolar concentrations, supporting an ancient functional link among cathelicidin members belonging to different subfamilies. Resurrecting the fossil peptide highlights the evolutionary position of PR-39 in generating structurally variable subfamilies of porcine cathelicidins through postduplication sequence remodeling. PMID:18796560

  3. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms. PMID:24793775

  4. Potential therapeutic applications of multifunctional host-defense peptides from frog skin as anti-cancer, anti-viral, immunomodulatory, and anti-diabetic agents.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Lukic, Miodrag L; Flatt, Peter R

    2014-07-01

    Frog skin constitutes a rich source of peptides with a wide range of biological properties. These include host-defense peptides with cytotoxic activities against bacteria, fungi, protozoa, viruses, and mammalian cells. Several hundred such peptides from diverse species have been described. Although attention has been focused mainly on antimicrobial activity, the therapeutic potential of frog skin peptides as anti-infective agents remains to be realized and no compound based upon their structures has yet been adopted in clinical practice. Consequently, alternative applications are being explored. Certain naturally occurring frog skin peptides, and analogs with improved therapeutic properties, show selective cytotoxicity against tumor cells and viruses and so have potential for development into anti-cancer and anti-viral agents. Some peptides display complex cytokine-mediated immunomodulatory properties. Effects on the production of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood mononuclear cells have been observed so that clinical applications as anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and immunostimulatory agents are possible. Several frog skin peptides, first identified on the basis of antimicrobial activity, have been shown to stimulate insulin release both in vitro and in vivo and so show potential as incretin-based therapies for treatment of patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review assesses the therapeutic possibilities of peptides from frogs belonging to the Ascaphidae, Alytidae, Pipidae, Dicroglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Hylidae, and Ranidae families that complement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  5. Aphanomyces euteiches Cell Wall Fractions Containing Novel Glucan-Chitosaccharides Induce Defense Genes and Nuclear Calcium Oscillations in the Plant Host Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Nars, Amaury; Lafitte, Claude; Chabaud, Mireille; Drouillard, Sophie; Mélida, Hugo; Danoun, Saïda; Le Costaouëc, Tinaig; Rey, Thomas; Benedetti, Julie; Bulone, Vincent; Barker, David George; Bono, Jean-Jacques; Dumas, Bernard; Jacquet, Christophe; Heux, Laurent; Fliegmann, Judith; Bottin, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine-based saccharides (chitosaccharides) are components of microbial cell walls and act as molecular signals during host-microbe interactions. In the legume plant Medicago truncatula, the perception of lipochitooligosaccharide signals produced by symbiotic rhizobia and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi involves the Nod Factor Perception (NFP) lysin motif receptor-like protein and leads to the activation of the so-called common symbiotic pathway. In rice and Arabidopsis, lysin motif receptors are involved in the perception of chitooligosaccharides released by pathogenic fungi, resulting in the activation of plant immunity. Here we report the structural characterization of atypical chitosaccharides from the oomycete pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches, and their biological activity on the host Medicago truncatula. Using a combination of biochemical and biophysical approaches, we show that these chitosaccharides are linked to β-1,6-glucans, and contain a β-(1,3;1,4)-glucan backbone whose β-1,3-linked glucose units are substituted on their C-6 carbon by either glucose or N-acetylglucosamine residues. This is the first description of this type of structural motif in eukaryotic cell walls. Glucan-chitosaccharide fractions of A. euteiches induced the expression of defense marker genes in Medicago truncatula seedlings independently from the presence of a functional Nod Factor Perception protein. Furthermore, one of the glucan-chitosaccharide fractions elicited calcium oscillations in the nucleus of root cells. In contrast to the asymmetric oscillatory calcium spiking induced by symbiotic lipochitooligosaccharides, this response depends neither on the Nod Factor Perception protein nor on the common symbiotic pathway. These findings open new perspectives in oomycete cell wall biology and elicitor recognition and signaling in legumes. PMID:24086432

  6. Identification of a novel molluscan short-type peptidoglycan recognition protein in disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) involved in host antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Premachandra, H K A; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2014-07-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs) are a widely studied group of pattern recognition receptors found in invertebrate as well as vertebrate lineages, and are involved in bacterial pathogen sensing. However, in addition to this principal role, they can also function in multiple host defense processes, including cell phagocytosis and hydrolysis of peptidoglycans (PGNs). In this study, a novel invertebrate short-type PGRP was identified in disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) designated as AbPGRP. The complete coding sequence of AbPGRP was 534 bp, encoding a 178-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 20 kDa. The AbPGRP gene had a bipartite arrangement consisting of two exons separated by a single intron. Homology analysis revealed that AbPGRP shares conserved features, including amino acid residues critical for substrate and ion binding as well as for its amidase activity, with homologs of other species. Phylogenetic analysis of AbPGRP revealed that it likely evolved from a common ancestor of invertebrates, having significant homology with other molluscan PGRPs. Recombinant AbPGRP exhibited detectable, dose-dependent PGN-hydrolyzing activity with the presence of Zn(2+), and strong antibacterial activity against Vibrio tapetis, consistent with the functional properties previously reported for PGRPs in other mollusks. Moreover, AbPGRP transcription was induced upon treatment of healthy abalones with bacterial peptidoglycan and lipopolysaccharide, although the expression profiles differed with treatment, suggesting a capacity for discriminating between bacterial pathogens through molecular pattern recognition. Collectively, the findings of this study indicate that AbPGRP is a true homolog of invertebrate PGRPs and likely plays an indispensable role in host immunity.

  7. Phyllotreta striolata flea beetles use host plant defense compounds to create their own glucosinolate-myrosinase system.

    PubMed

    Beran, Franziska; Pauchet, Yannick; Kunert, Grit; Reichelt, Michael; Wielsch, Natalie; Vogel, Heiko; Reinecke, Andreas; Svatoš, Aleš; Mewis, Inga; Schmid, Daniela; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Ulrichs, Christian; Hansson, Bill S; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G

    2014-05-20

    The ability of a specialized herbivore to overcome the chemical defense of a particular plant taxon not only makes it accessible as a food source but may also provide metabolites to be exploited for communication or chemical defense. Phyllotreta flea beetles are adapted to crucifer plants (Brassicales) that are defended by the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, the so-called "mustard-oil bomb." Tissue damage caused by insect feeding brings glucosinolates into contact with the plant enzyme myrosinase, which hydrolyzes them to form toxic compounds, such as isothiocyanates. However, we previously observed that Phyllotreta striolata beetles themselves produce volatile glucosinolate hydrolysis products. Here, we show that P. striolata adults selectively accumulate glucosinolates from their food plants to up to 1.75% of their body weight and express their own myrosinase. By combining proteomics and transcriptomics, a gene responsible for myrosinase activity in P. striolata was identified. The major substrates of the heterologously expressed myrosinase were aliphatic glucosinolates, which were hydrolyzed with at least fourfold higher efficiency than aromatic and indolic glucosinolates, and β-O-glucosides. The identified beetle myrosinase belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 1 and has up to 76% sequence similarity to other β-glucosidases. Phylogenetic analyses suggest species-specific diversification of this gene family in insects and an independent evolution of the beetle myrosinase from other insect β-glucosidases. PMID:24799680

  8. Phyllotreta striolata flea beetles use host plant defense compounds to create their own glucosinolate-myrosinase system.

    PubMed

    Beran, Franziska; Pauchet, Yannick; Kunert, Grit; Reichelt, Michael; Wielsch, Natalie; Vogel, Heiko; Reinecke, Andreas; Svatoš, Aleš; Mewis, Inga; Schmid, Daniela; Ramasamy, Srinivasan; Ulrichs, Christian; Hansson, Bill S; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Heckel, David G

    2014-05-20

    The ability of a specialized herbivore to overcome the chemical defense of a particular plant taxon not only makes it accessible as a food source but may also provide metabolites to be exploited for communication or chemical defense. Phyllotreta flea beetles are adapted to crucifer plants (Brassicales) that are defended by the glucosinolate-myrosinase system, the so-called "mustard-oil bomb." Tissue damage caused by insect feeding brings glucosinolates into contact with the plant enzyme myrosinase, which hydrolyzes them to form toxic compounds, such as isothiocyanates. However, we previously observed that Phyllotreta striolata beetles themselves produce volatile glucosinolate hydrolysis products. Here, we show that P. striolata adults selectively accumulate glucosinolates from their food plants to up to 1.75% of their body weight and express their own myrosinase. By combining proteomics and transcriptomics, a gene responsible for myrosinase activity in P. striolata was identified. The major substrates of the heterologously expressed myrosinase were aliphatic glucosinolates, which were hydrolyzed with at least fourfold higher efficiency than aromatic and indolic glucosinolates, and β-O-glucosides. The identified beetle myrosinase belongs to the glycoside hydrolase family 1 and has up to 76% sequence similarity to other β-glucosidases. Phylogenetic analyses suggest species-specific diversification of this gene family in insects and an independent evolution of the beetle myrosinase from other insect β-glucosidases.

  9. Changes in host chitinase isoforms in relation to wounding and colonization by Heterobasidion annosum: early and strong defense response in 33-year-old resistant Norway spruce clone.

    PubMed

    Fossdal, Carl Gunnar; Hietala, Ari M; Kvaalen, Harald; Solheim, Halvor

    2006-02-01

    We studied the defense reactions of 33-year-old susceptible and resistant clones of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) to the major root-rot fungus Heterobasidion annosum (Fr.) Bref. and determined if tissue cultures can be used as a model system for studying defense responses of mature trees at the molecular level. Quantitative PCR analysis of genomic DNA obtained from samples taken at different times along the lesion length in living bark indicated that the fungus was present in higher amounts and extended further into the host tissue in the susceptible clone than in the resistant clone. In protein extracts from the same lesion samples, there were differences in temporal and spatial changes in host chitinase isoform profiles between the resistant and susceptible clones. Host chitinase isoforms with pI values approximately 4.8, 4.4 and 3.7 increased more during the first 7 days after wounding and inoculation and extended further along the lesion length in the resistant clone than in the susceptible clone. These results suggest that the time from wounding and infection to induction of defense-related expression is shorter in the resistant clone indicating a more efficient host defense response than in the susceptible clone. Tissue cultures from the same clones were not resistant to H. annosum and showed no difference in the timing of the increase in chitinase isoforms in response to the pathogen. However, tissue cultures from both clones showed an increase in chitinase isoforms within 6 to 24 h past inoculation, indicating that increased chitinase expression in response to the pathogen is part of a general defense response common to both mature clones and tissue cultures.

  10. Plant Defense Mechanisms Are Activated during Biotrophic and Necrotrophic Development of Colletotricum graminicola in Maize1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Walter A.; Martín, José M. Sanz; Rech, Gabriel E.; Rivera, Lina P.; Benito, Ernesto P.; Díaz-Mínguez, José M.; Thon, Michael R.; Sukno, Serenella A.

    2012-01-01

    Hemibiotrophic plant pathogens first establish a biotrophic interaction with the host plant and later switch to a destructive necrotrophic lifestyle. Studies of biotrophic pathogens have shown that they actively suppress plant defenses after an initial microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered activation. In contrast, studies of the hemibiotrophs suggest that they do not suppress plant defenses during the biotrophic phase, indicating that while there are similarities between the biotrophic phase of hemibiotrophs and biotrophic pathogens, the two lifestyles are not analogous. We performed transcriptomic, histological, and biochemical studies of the early events during the infection of maize (Zea mays) with Colletotrichum graminicola, a model pathosystem for the study of hemibiotrophy. Time-course experiments revealed that mRNAs of several defense-related genes, reactive oxygen species, and antimicrobial compounds all begin to accumulate early in the infection process and continue to accumulate during the biotrophic stage. We also discovered the production of maize-derived vesicular bodies containing hydrogen peroxide targeting the fungal hyphae. We describe the fungal respiratory burst during host infection, paralleled by superoxide ion production in specific fungal cells during the transition from biotrophy to a necrotrophic lifestyle. We also identified several novel putative fungal effectors and studied their expression during anthracnose development in maize. Our results demonstrate a strong induction of defense mechanisms occurring in maize cells during C. graminicola infection, even during the biotrophic development of the pathogen. We hypothesize that the switch to necrotrophic growth enables the fungus to evade the effects of the plant immune system and allows for full fungal pathogenicity. PMID:22247271

  11. Active-passive bistatic surveillance for long range air defense

    SciTech Connect

    Wardrop, B.; Molyneux-Berry, M.R.B. )

    1992-06-01

    A hypothetical mobile support receiver capable of working within existing and future air defense networks as a means to maintain essential surveillance functions is considered. It is shown how multibeam receiver architecture supported by digital signal processing can substantially improve surveillance performance against chaff and jamming threats. A dual-mode support receiver concept is proposed which is based on the state-of-the-art phased-array technology, modular processing in industry standard hardware and existing networks. 20 refs.

  12. Host-defense peptides from skin secretions of the tetraploid frogs Xenopus petersii and Xenopus pygmaeus, and the octoploid frog Xenopus lenduensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    King, Jay D; Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Takada, Koji; Conlon, J Michael

    2012-01-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions led to the identification of host-defense peptides belonging to the magainin, peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa), and caerulein precursor fragment (CPF) families from the tetraploid frogs, Xenopus petersii (Peters' clawed frog) and Xenopus pygmaeus (Bouchia clawed frog), and the octoploid frog Xenopus lenduensis (Lendu Plateau clawed frog). Xenopsin-precursor fragment (XPF) peptides were not detected. The primary structures of the antimicrobial peptides from X. petersii demonstrate a close, but not conspecific relationship, with Xenopus laevis whereas the X. pygmaeus peptides show appreciable variation from previously characterized orthologs from other Xenopus species. Polyploidization events within the Xenopodinae (Silurana+Xenopus) are associated with extensive gene silencing (nonfunctionization) but unexpectedly the full complement of four PGLa paralogs were isolated from X. lenduendis secretions. Consistent with previous data, the CPF peptides showed the highest growth-inhibitory activity against bacteria with CPF-PG1 (GFGSLLGKALKIGTNLL.NH(2)) from X. pygmaeus combining high antimicrobial potency against Staphylococcus aureus (MIC=6 μM) with relatively low hemolytic activity (LC(50)=145 μM). PMID:22123629

  13. Leaf-mining by Phyllonorycter blancardella reprograms the host-leaf transcriptome to modulate phytohormones associated with nutrient mobilization and plant defense.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Body, Mélanie; Glevarec, Gaëlle; Reichelt, Michael; Unsicker, Sybille; Bruneau, Maryline; Renou, Jean-Pierre; Huguet, Elisabeth; Dubreuil, Géraldine; Giron, David

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormones have long been hypothesized to play a key role in the interactions between plant-manipulating organisms and their host-plants such as insect-plant interactions that lead to gall or 'green-islands' induction. However, mechanistic understanding of how phytohormones operate in these plant reconfigurations is lacking due to limited information on the molecular and biochemical phytohormonal modulation following attack by plant-manipulating insects. In an attempt to fill this gap, the present study provides an extensive characterization of how the leaf-miner Phyllonorycter blancardella modulates the major phytohormones and the transcriptional activity of plant cells in leaves of Malus domestica. We show here, that cytokinins strongly accumulate in mined tissues despite a weak expression of plant cytokinin-related genes. Leaf-mining is also associated with enhanced biosynthesis of jasmonic acid precursors but not the active form, a weak alteration of the salicylic acid pathway and a clear inhibition of the abscisic acid pathway. Our study consolidates previous results suggesting that insects may produce and deliver cytokinins to the plant as a strategy to manipulate the physiology of the leaf to create a favorable nutritional environment. We also demonstrate that leaf-mining by P. blancardella leads to a strong reprogramming of the plant phytohormonal balance associated with increased nutrient mobilization, inhibition of leaf senescence and mitigation of plant direct and indirect defense.

  14. Activated chemical defense in marine sponges--a case study on Aplysinella rhax.

    PubMed

    Thoms, Carsten; Schupp, Peter J

    2008-09-01

    Activated chemical defense, i.e., the rapid conversion of precursor molecules to defensive compounds following tissue damage, has been well documented for terrestrial and marine plants; but evidence for its presence in sessile marine invertebrates remains scarce. We observed a wound-activated conversion of psammaplin A sulfate to psammaplin A in tissue of the tropical sponge Aplysinella rhax. The conversion is rapid (requiring only seconds), the turnover rate increases with increasing wounding activity (e.g., approximately 20% after tissue stabbing vs. approximately 85% after tissue grinding), and is likely enzyme-catalyzed (no reaction in the absence of water and inhibition of the conversion by heat). Fish feeding assays with the pufferfish Canthigaster solandri, an omnivorous sponge predator, revealed an increased anti-feeding activity by the conversion product psammaplin A compared to the precursor psammaplin A sulfate. We propose that the wound-activated formation of psammaplin A in A. rhax is an activated defense targeted against predator species that are not efficiently repelled by the sponge's constitutive chemical defense. Recent observations of conversion reactions also in other sponge species indicate that more activated defenses may exist in this phylum. Based on the findings of this study, we address the question whether activated defenses may be more common in sponges--and perhaps also in other sessile marine invertebrates--than hitherto believed.

  15. Characterization of Oyster Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2) Suggests Its Involvement in Apoptosis and Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxiang; Zhang, Linlin; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic studies have revealed a sophisticated and powerful apoptosis regulation network in oyster, highlighting its adaptation to sessile life in a highly stressful intertidal environment. However, the functional molecular basis of apoptosis remains largely unexplored in oysters. In this study, we focused on a representative apoptotic gene encoding voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2), a porin that abounds at the mitochondrial outer membrane. This is the first report on the identification and characterization of a VDAC gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (CgVDAC2). The full length of CgVDAC2 was 1,738 bp with an open reading frame of 843 bp that encoded a protein of 281 amino acids. A four-element eukaryotic porin signature motif, a conserved ATP binding motif, and a VKAKV-like sequence were identified in the predicted CgVDAC2. Expression pattern analysis in different tissues and developmental stages as well as upon infection by ostreid herpesvirus 1 revealed the energy supply-related and immunity-related expression of CgVDAC2. CgVDAC2 was co-localized with mitochondria when it was transiently transfected into HeLa cells. Overexpression of CgVDAC2 in HEK293T cells suppressed the UV irradiation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic function of CgBak. RNA interference induced reduction in CgVDAC2 expression showed a promoted apoptosis level upon UV light irradiation in hemocytes. The yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated a direct interaction between CgVDAC2 and the pro-apoptotic protein CgBak. This study revealed the function of VDAC2 in oyster and provided new insights into its involvement in apoptosis modulation and host defense in mollusks.

  16. The Hexahistidine Motif of Host-Defense Protein Human Calprotectin Contributes to Zinc Withholding and Its Functional Versatility.

    PubMed

    Nakashige, Toshiki G; Stephan, Jules R; Cunden, Lisa S; Brophy, Megan Brunjes; Wommack, Andrew J; Keegan, Brenna C; Shearer, Jason M; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2016-09-21

    Human calprotectin (CP, S100A8/S100A9 oligomer, MRP-8/MRP-14 oligomer) is an abundant host-defense protein that is involved in the metal-withholding innate immune response. CP coordinates a variety of divalent first-row transition metal ions, which is implicated in its antimicrobial function, and its ability to sequester nutrient Zn(II) ions from microbial pathogens has been recognized for over two decades. CP has two distinct transition-metal-binding sites formed at the S100A8/S100A9 dimer interface, including a histidine-rich site composed of S100A8 residues His17 and His27 and S100A9 residues His91 and His95. In this study, we report that CP binds Zn(II) at this site using a hexahistidine motif, completed by His103 and His105 of the S100A9 C-terminal tail and previously identified as the high-affinity Mn(II) and Fe(II) coordination site. Zn(II) binding at this unique site shields the S100A9 C-terminal tail from proteolytic degradation by proteinase K. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Zn(II) competition titrations support the formation of a Zn(II)-His6 motif. Microbial growth studies indicate that the hexahistidine motif is important for preventing microbial Zn(II) acquisition from CP by the probiotic Lactobacillus plantarum and the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans. The Zn(II)-His6 site of CP expands the known biological coordination chemistry of Zn(II) and provides new insight into how the human innate immune system starves microbes of essential metal nutrients. PMID:27541598

  17. Induction of porcine host defense peptide gene expression by short-chain fatty acids and their analogs.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangfang; Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Jiang, Weiyu; Bible, Megan; Carter, Scott; Ma, Xi; Qiao, Shiyan; Zhang, Guolong

    2013-01-01

    Dietary modulation of the synthesis of endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) represents a novel antimicrobial approach for disease control and prevention, particularly against antibiotic-resistant infections. However, HDP regulation by dietary compounds such as butyrate is species-dependent. To examine whether butyrate could induce HDP expression in pigs, we evaluated the expressions of a panel of porcine HDPs in IPEC-J2 intestinal epithelial cells, 3D4/31 macrophages, and primary monocytes in response to sodium butyrate treatment by real-time PCR. We revealed that butyrate is a potent inducer of multiple, but not all, HDP genes. Porcine β-defensin 2 (pBD2), pBD3, epididymis protein 2 splicing variant C (pEP2C), and protegrins were induced markedly in response to butyrate, whereas pBD1 expression remained largely unaltered in any cell type. Additionally, a comparison of the HDP-inducing efficacy among saturated free fatty acids of different aliphatic chain lengths revealed that fatty acids containing 3-8 carbons showed an obvious induction of HDP expression in IPEC-J2 cells, with butyrate being the most potent and long-chain fatty acids having only a marginal effect. We further investigated a panel of butyrate analogs for their efficacy in HDP induction, and found glyceryl tributyrate, benzyl butyrate, and 4-phenylbutyrate to be comparable with butyrate. Identification of butyrate and several analogs with a strong capacity to induce HDP gene expression in pigs provides attractive candidates for further evaluation of their potential as novel alternatives to antibiotics in augmenting innate immunity and disease resistance of pigs. PMID:24023657

  18. Characterization of Oyster Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2) Suggests Its Involvement in Apoptosis and Host Defense.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingxiang; Zhang, Linlin; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic studies have revealed a sophisticated and powerful apoptosis regulation network in oyster, highlighting its adaptation to sessile life in a highly stressful intertidal environment. However, the functional molecular basis of apoptosis remains largely unexplored in oysters. In this study, we focused on a representative apoptotic gene encoding voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2), a porin that abounds at the mitochondrial outer membrane. This is the first report on the identification and characterization of a VDAC gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (CgVDAC2). The full length of CgVDAC2 was 1,738 bp with an open reading frame of 843 bp that encoded a protein of 281 amino acids. A four-element eukaryotic porin signature motif, a conserved ATP binding motif, and a VKAKV-like sequence were identified in the predicted CgVDAC2. Expression pattern analysis in different tissues and developmental stages as well as upon infection by ostreid herpesvirus 1 revealed the energy supply-related and immunity-related expression of CgVDAC2. CgVDAC2 was co-localized with mitochondria when it was transiently transfected into HeLa cells. Overexpression of CgVDAC2 in HEK293T cells suppressed the UV irradiation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic function of CgBak. RNA interference induced reduction in CgVDAC2 expression showed a promoted apoptosis level upon UV light irradiation in hemocytes. The yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated a direct interaction between CgVDAC2 and the pro-apoptotic protein CgBak. This study revealed the function of VDAC2 in oyster and provided new insights into its involvement in apoptosis modulation and host defense in mollusks. PMID:26727366

  19. Characterization of Oyster Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel 2 (VDAC2) Suggests Its Involvement in Apoptosis and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yingxiang; Zhang, Linlin; Qu, Tao; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2016-01-01

    Genomic and transcriptomic studies have revealed a sophisticated and powerful apoptosis regulation network in oyster, highlighting its adaptation to sessile life in a highly stressful intertidal environment. However, the functional molecular basis of apoptosis remains largely unexplored in oysters. In this study, we focused on a representative apoptotic gene encoding voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2), a porin that abounds at the mitochondrial outer membrane. This is the first report on the identification and characterization of a VDAC gene in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas (CgVDAC2). The full length of CgVDAC2 was 1,738 bp with an open reading frame of 843 bp that encoded a protein of 281 amino acids. A four-element eukaryotic porin signature motif, a conserved ATP binding motif, and a VKAKV-like sequence were identified in the predicted CgVDAC2. Expression pattern analysis in different tissues and developmental stages as well as upon infection by ostreid herpesvirus 1 revealed the energy supply-related and immunity-related expression of CgVDAC2. CgVDAC2 was co-localized with mitochondria when it was transiently transfected into HeLa cells. Overexpression of CgVDAC2 in HEK293T cells suppressed the UV irradiation-induced apoptosis by inhibiting the pro-apoptotic function of CgBak. RNA interference induced reduction in CgVDAC2 expression showed a promoted apoptosis level upon UV light irradiation in hemocytes. The yeast two-hybrid system and co-immunoprecipitation assay indicated a direct interaction between CgVDAC2 and the pro-apoptotic protein CgBak. This study revealed the function of VDAC2 in oyster and provided new insights into its involvement in apoptosis modulation and host defense in mollusks. PMID:26727366

  20. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans-understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies.

    PubMed

    Dühring, Sybille; Germerodt, Sebastian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important human pathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within the human host for a long time. However, alterations in the host environment can render C. albicans virulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and the human innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategies including immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation, pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. Furthermore, Computational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactions are highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. An outlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defense and evasion mechanisms is given.

  1. Host-pathogen interactions between the human innate immune system and Candida albicans—understanding and modeling defense and evasion strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dühring, Sybille; Germerodt, Sebastian; Skerka, Christine; Zipfel, Peter F.; Dandekar, Thomas; Schuster, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The diploid, polymorphic yeast Candida albicans is one of the most important human pathogenic fungi. C. albicans can grow, proliferate and coexist as a commensal on or within the human host for a long time. However, alterations in the host environment can render C. albicans virulent. In this review, we describe the immunological cross-talk between C. albicans and the human innate immune system. We give an overview in form of pairs of human defense strategies including immunological mechanisms as well as general stressors such as nutrient limitation, pH, fever etc. and the corresponding fungal response and evasion mechanisms. Furthermore, Computational Systems Biology approaches to model and investigate these complex interactions are highlighted with a special focus on game-theoretical methods and agent-based models. An outlook on interesting questions to be tackled by Systems Biology regarding entangled defense and evasion mechanisms is given. PMID:26175718

  2. Molecular insights into a molluscan transferrin homolog identified from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) evidencing its detectable role in host antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Herath, H M L P B; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Godahewa, G I; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2015-11-01

    The basic function of transferrin is to bind iron (III) ions in the medium and to deliver them to the locations where they are required for metabolic processes. It also takes part in the host immune defense mainly via its ability to bind to iron (III) ions. Hence, transferrin is also identified as an important acute-phase protein in host immunity. Abalones are major shellfish aquaculture crops that are susceptible to a range of marine microbial infections. Since transferrin is known to be a major player in innate immunity, in the present study we sought to identify, and molecularly and functionally characterize a transferrin-like gene from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) named as AbTrf. AbTrf consisted of a 2187-bp open reading frame (ORF) which encodes a 728 amino acid (aa) protein. The putative amino acid sequence of AbTrf harbored N- and C-terminal transferrin-like domains, active sites for iron binding, and conserved cysteine residues. A constitutive tissue specific AbTrf expression pattern was detected by qPCR in abalones where mantle and muscle showed high AbTrf expression levels. Three immune challenge experiments were conducted using Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes and LPS as stimuli and, subsequently, AbTrf mRNA expression levels were quantified in gill and hemocytes in a time-course manner. The mRNA expression was greatly induced in both tissues in response to both challenges. Evidencing the functional property of transferrins, recombinant AbTrf N-terminal domain (AbTrf-N) showed dose-dependent iron (III) binding activity detected by chrome azurol S (CAS) assay system. Moreover, recombinant AbTrf-N could significantly inhibit the growth of iron-dependent bacterium, Escherichia coli in a dose-dependent manner. However, AbTrf-N was unable to show any detectable bacteriostatic activity against iron-independent bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) even at its highest concentration. Collectively, our results suggest that Ab

  3. Molecular insights into a molluscan transferrin homolog identified from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) evidencing its detectable role in host antibacterial defense.

    PubMed

    Herath, H M L P B; Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Godahewa, G I; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2015-11-01

    The basic function of transferrin is to bind iron (III) ions in the medium and to deliver them to the locations where they are required for metabolic processes. It also takes part in the host immune defense mainly via its ability to bind to iron (III) ions. Hence, transferrin is also identified as an important acute-phase protein in host immunity. Abalones are major shellfish aquaculture crops that are susceptible to a range of marine microbial infections. Since transferrin is known to be a major player in innate immunity, in the present study we sought to identify, and molecularly and functionally characterize a transferrin-like gene from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus) named as AbTrf. AbTrf consisted of a 2187-bp open reading frame (ORF) which encodes a 728 amino acid (aa) protein. The putative amino acid sequence of AbTrf harbored N- and C-terminal transferrin-like domains, active sites for iron binding, and conserved cysteine residues. A constitutive tissue specific AbTrf expression pattern was detected by qPCR in abalones where mantle and muscle showed high AbTrf expression levels. Three immune challenge experiments were conducted using Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Listeria monocytogenes and LPS as stimuli and, subsequently, AbTrf mRNA expression levels were quantified in gill and hemocytes in a time-course manner. The mRNA expression was greatly induced in both tissues in response to both challenges. Evidencing the functional property of transferrins, recombinant AbTrf N-terminal domain (AbTrf-N) showed dose-dependent iron (III) binding activity detected by chrome azurol S (CAS) assay system. Moreover, recombinant AbTrf-N could significantly inhibit the growth of iron-dependent bacterium, Escherichia coli in a dose-dependent manner. However, AbTrf-N was unable to show any detectable bacteriostatic activity against iron-independent bacterium Lactobacillus plantarum (L. plantarum) even at its highest concentration. Collectively, our results suggest that Ab

  4. The Bark-Beetle-Associated Fungus, Endoconidiophora polonica, Utilizes the Phenolic Defense Compounds of Its Host as a Carbon Source.

    PubMed

    Wadke, Namita; Kandasamy, Dineshkumar; Vogel, Heiko; Lah, Ljerka; Wingfield, Brenda D; Paetz, Christian; Wright, Louwrance P; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Hammerbacher, Almuth

    2016-06-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) is periodically attacked by the bark beetle Ips typographus and its fungal associate, Endoconidiophora polonica, whose infection is thought to be required for successful beetle attack. Norway spruce produces terpenoid resins and phenolics in response to fungal and bark beetle invasion. However, how the fungal associate copes with these chemical defenses is still unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in the phenolic content of Norway spruce bark upon E. polonica infection and the biochemical factors mediating these changes. Although genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes in Norway spruce stilbene and flavonoid biosynthesis were actively transcribed during fungal infection, there was a significant time-dependent decline of the corresponding metabolites in fungal lesions. In vitro feeding experiments with pure phenolics revealed that E. polonica transforms both stilbenes and flavonoids to muconoid-type ring-cleavage products, which are likely the first steps in the degradation of spruce defenses to substrates that can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Four genes were identified in E. polonica that encode catechol dioxygenases carrying out these reactions. These enzymes catalyze the cleavage of phenolic rings with a vicinal dihydroxyl group to muconoid products accepting a wide range of Norway spruce-produced phenolics as substrates. The expression of these genes and E. polonica utilization of the most abundant spruce phenolics as carbon sources both correlated positively with fungal virulence in several strains. Thus, the pathways for the degradation of phenolic compounds in E. polonica, initiated by catechol dioxygenase action, are important to the infection, growth, and survival of this bark beetle-vectored fungus and may play a major role in the ability of I. typographus to colonize spruce trees. PMID:27208235

  5. Two interferon-independent double-stranded RNA-induced host defense strategies suppress the common cold virus at warm temperature.

    PubMed

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Vanaja, Kiran; Levchenko, Andre; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-07-26

    Most strains of rhinovirus (RV), the common cold virus, replicate better at cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at lung temperature (37 °C). Recent studies found that although 37 °C temperature suppressed RV growth largely by engaging the type 1 IFN response in infected epithelial cells, a significant temperature dependence to viral replication remained in cells devoid of IFN induction or signaling. To gain insight into IFN-independent mechanisms limiting RV replication at 37 °C, we studied RV infection in human bronchial epithelial cells and H1-HeLa cells. During the single replication cycle, RV exhibited temperature-dependent replication in both cell types in the absence of IFN induction. At 37 °C, earlier signs of apoptosis in RV-infected cells were accompanied by reduced virus production. Furthermore, apoptosis of epithelial cells was enhanced at 37 °C in response to diverse stimuli. Dynamic mathematical modeling and B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) overexpression revealed that temperature-dependent host cell death could partially account for the temperature-dependent growth observed during RV amplification, but also suggested additional mechanisms of virus control. In search of a redundant antiviral pathway, we identified a role for the RNA-degrading enzyme RNAseL. Simultaneous antagonism of apoptosis and RNAseL increased viral replication and dramatically reduced temperature dependence. These findings reveal two IFN-independent mechanisms active in innate defense against RV, and demonstrate that even in the absence of IFNs, temperature-dependent RV amplification is largely a result of host cell antiviral restriction mechanisms operating more effectively at 37 °C than at 33 °C. PMID:27402752

  6. Two interferon-independent double-stranded RNA-induced host defense strategies suppress the common cold virus at warm temperature.

    PubMed

    Foxman, Ellen F; Storer, James A; Vanaja, Kiran; Levchenko, Andre; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2016-07-26

    Most strains of rhinovirus (RV), the common cold virus, replicate better at cool temperatures found in the nasal cavity (33-35 °C) than at lung temperature (37 °C). Recent studies found that although 37 °C temperature suppressed RV growth largely by engaging the type 1 IFN response in infected epithelial cells, a significant temperature dependence to viral replication remained in cells devoid of IFN induction or signaling. To gain insight into IFN-independent mechanisms limiting RV replication at 37 °C, we studied RV infection in human bronchial epithelial cells and H1-HeLa cells. During the single replication cycle, RV exhibited temperature-dependent replication in both cell types in the absence of IFN induction. At 37 °C, earlier signs of apoptosis in RV-infected cells were accompanied by reduced virus production. Furthermore, apoptosis of epithelial cells was enhanced at 37 °C in response to diverse stimuli. Dynamic mathematical modeling and B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) overexpression revealed that temperature-dependent host cell death could partially account for the temperature-dependent growth observed during RV amplification, but also suggested additional mechanisms of virus control. In search of a redundant antiviral pathway, we identified a role for the RNA-degrading enzyme RNAseL. Simultaneous antagonism of apoptosis and RNAseL increased viral replication and dramatically reduced temperature dependence. These findings reveal two IFN-independent mechanisms active in innate defense against RV, and demonstrate that even in the absence of IFNs, temperature-dependent RV amplification is largely a result of host cell antiviral restriction mechanisms operating more effectively at 37 °C than at 33 °C.

  7. Peptidomic analysis of the extensive array of host-defense peptides in skin secretions of the dodecaploid frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Coquet, Laurent; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Jouenne, Thierry; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2016-09-01

    The Uganda clawed frog Xenopus ruwenzoriensis with a karyotype of 2n=108 is one of the very few vertebrates with dodecaploid status. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from this species led to the isolation and structural characterization of 23 host-defense peptides belonging to the following families: magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide (PGLa; 6 peptides), xenopsin precursor fragment (XPF; 3 peptides), caerulein precursor fragment (CPF; 8 peptides), and caerulein precursor fragment-related peptide (CPF-RP; 3 peptides). In addition, the secretions contained caerulein, identical to the peptide from Xenopus laevis, and two peptides that were identified as members of the trefoil factor family (TFF). The data indicate that silencing of the host-defense peptide genes following polyploidization has been appreciable and non-uniform. Consistent with data derived from comparison of nucleotide sequences of mitochrondrial and nuclear genes, cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of the host-defense peptides provide support for an evolutionary scenario in which X. ruwenzoriensis arose from an allopolyploidization event involving an octoploid ancestor of the present-day frogs belonging to the Xenopus amieti species group and a tetraploid ancestor of Xenopus pygmaeus. PMID:27290612

  8. The Cladosporium fulvum Virulence Protein Avr2 Inhibits Host Proteases Required for Basal Defense[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    van Esse, H. Peter; van't Klooster, John W.; Bolton, Melvin D.; Yadeta, Koste A.; van Baarlen, Peter; Boeren, Sjef; Vervoort, Jacques; de Wit, Pierre J.G.M.; Thomma, Bart P.H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cladosporium fulvum (syn. Passalora fulva) is a biotrophic fungal pathogen that causes leaf mold of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). During growth in the apoplast, the fungus establishes disease by secreting effector proteins, 10 of which have been characterized. We have previously shown that the Avr2 effector interacts with the apoplastic tomato Cys protease Rcr3, which is required for Cf-2–mediated immunity. We now show that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum. Heterologous expression of Avr2 in Arabidopsis thaliana causes enhanced susceptibility toward extracellular fungal pathogens, including Botrytis cinerea and Verticillium dahliae, and microarray analysis showed that Avr2 expression triggers a global transcriptome reflecting pathogen challenge. Cys protease activity profiling showed that Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Arabidopsis Cys proteases. In tomato, Avr2 expression caused enhanced susceptibility toward Avr2-defective C. fulvum strains and also toward B. cinerea and V. dahliae. Cys protease activity profiling in tomato revealed that, in this plant also, Avr2 inhibits multiple extracellular Cys proteases, including Rcr3 and its close relative Pip1. Finally, silencing of Avr2 significantly compromised C. fulvum virulence on tomato. We conclude that Avr2 is a genuine virulence factor of C. fulvum that inhibits several Cys proteases required for plant basal defense. PMID:18660430

  9. Jasmonic acid and salicylic acid activate a common defense system in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, Daisuke; Seo, Shigemi; Yamada, Shoko; Kano, Akihito; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Shishido, Hodaka; Miyoshi, Seika; Taniguchi, Shiduku; Akimitsu, Kazuya; Gomi, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) play important roles in plant defense systems. JA and SA signaling pathways interact antagonistically in dicotyledonous plants, but, the status of crosstalk between JA and SA signaling is unknown in monocots. Our rice microarray analysis showed that more than half of the genes upregulated by the SA analog BTH are also upregulated by JA, suggesting that a major portion of the SA-upregulated genes are regulated by JA-dependent signaling in rice. A common defense system that is activated by both JA and SA is thus proposed which plays an important role in pathogen defense responses in rice. PMID:23518581

  10. A defense in depth approach to radiation protection for 125I production activities.

    PubMed

    Culp, T; Potter, C A

    2001-08-01

    Not all operational radiation protection situations lend themselves to simple solutions. Often a Radiation Protection Program must be developed and implemented for difficult situations. A defense in depth approach to radiation protection was developed for 125I production activities. Defense in depth relies on key radiation protection elements that tend to be mutually supportive and in combination provide reasonable assurance that the overall desired level of protection has been provided. For difficult situations, defense in depth can provide both a reasonable and appropriate approach to radiation protection.

  11. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera

    PubMed Central

    Hatzios, Stavroula K.; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T.; Davis, Brigid M.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human cholera stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, while genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance and binding of an intestinal lectin—intelectin—to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialogue in an animal model of infection. PMID:26900865

  12. Dual role for Fcγ receptors in host defense and disease in Borrelia burgdorferi-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Belperron, Alexia A.; Liu, Nengyin; Booth, Carmen J.; Bockenstedt, Linda K.

    2014-01-01

    Arthritis in mice infected with the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, results from the influx of innate immune cells responding to the pathogen in the joint and is influenced in part by mouse genetics. Production of inflammatory cytokines by innate immune cells in vitro is largely mediated by Toll-like receptor (TLR) interaction with Borrelia lipoproteins, yet surprisingly mice deficient in TLR2 or the TLR signaling molecule MyD88 still develop arthritis comparable to that seen in wild type mice after B. burgdorferi infection. These findings suggest that other, MyD88-independent inflammatory pathways can contribute to arthritis expression. Clearance of B. burgdorferi is dependent on the production of specific antibody and phagocytosis of the organism. As Fc receptors (FcγR) are important for IgG-mediated clearance of immune complexes and opsonized particles by phagocytes, we examined the role that FcγR play in host defense and disease in B. burgdorferi-infected mice. B. burgdorferi-infected mice deficient in the Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcεRγ−/− mice) harbored ~10 fold more spirochetes than similarly infected wild type mice, and this was associated with a transient increase in arthritis severity. While the elevated pathogen burdens seen in B. burgdorferi-infected MyD88−/− mice were not affected by concomitant deficiency in FcγR, arthritis was reduced in FcεRγ−/−MyD88−/− mice in comparison to wild type or single knockout mice. Gene expression analysis from infected joints demonstrated that absence of both MyD88 and FcγR lowers mRNA levels of proteins involved in inflammation, including Cxcl1 (KC), Xcr1 (Gpr5), IL-1beta, and C reactive protein. Taken together, our results demonstrate a role for FcγR-mediated immunity in limiting pathogen burden and arthritis in mice during the acute phase of B. burgdorferi infection, and further suggest that this pathway contributes to the arthritis that develops in B. burgdorferi

  13. Staphylokinase Control of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and Detachment Through Host Plasminogen Activation.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Peetermans, Marijke; Liesenborghs, Laurens; Na, Manli; Björnsdottir, Halla; Zhu, Xuefeng; Jacobsson, Gunnar; Johansson, Bengt R; Geoghegan, Joan A; Foster, Timothy J; Josefsson, Elisabet; Bylund, Johan; Verhamme, Peter; Jin, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, a leading cause of persistent infections, are highly resistant to immune defenses and antimicrobial therapies. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of fibrin and staphylokinase (Sak) to biofilm formation. In both clinical S. aureus isolates and laboratory strains, high Sak-producing strains formed less biofilm than strains that lacked Sak, suggesting that Sak prevents biofilm formation. In addition, Sak induced detachment of mature biofilms. This effect depended on plasminogen activation by Sak. Host-derived fibrin, the main substrate cleaved by Sak-activated plasminogen, was a major component of biofilm matrix, and dissolution of this fibrin scaffold greatly increased susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and neutrophil phagocytosis. Sak also attenuated biofilm-associated catheter infections in mouse models. In conclusion, our results reveal a novel role for Sak-induced plasminogen activation that prevents S. aureus biofilm formation and induces detachment of existing biofilms through proteolytic cleavage of biofilm matrix components.

  14. A teleostan homolog of catalase from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii): insights into functional roles in host antioxidant defense and expressional responses to septic conditions.

    PubMed

    Elvitigala, Don Anushka Sandaruwan; Priyathilaka, Thanthrige Thiunuwan; Whang, Ilson; Nam, Bo-Hye; Lee, Jehee

    2015-05-01

    Antioxidative defense renders a significant protection against environmental stress in organisms and maintains the correct redox balance in cells, thereby supporting proper immune function. Catalase is an indispensable antioxidant in organisms that detoxifies hydrogen peroxides produced in cellular environments. In this study, we sought to molecularly characterize a homolog of catalase (RfCat), identified from black rockfish (Sebastes schlegelii). RfCat consists of a 1581 bp coding region for a protein of 527 amino acids, with a predicted molecular weight of 60 kD. The protein sequence of RfCat harbored similar domain architecture to known catalases, containing a proximal active site signature and proximal heme ligand signature, and further sharing prominent homology with its teleostan counterparts. As affirmed by multiple sequence alignments, most of the functionally important residues were well conserved in RfCat. Furthermore, our phylogenetic analysis indicates its common vertebrate ancestral origin and a close evolutionary relationship with teleostan catalases. Recombinantly expressed RfCat demonstrated prominent peroxidase activity that varied with different substrate and protein concentrations, and protected against DNA damage. RfCat mRNA was ubiquitously expressed among different tissues examined, as detected by qPCR. In addition, RfCat mRNA expression was modulated in response to pathogenic stress elicited by Streptococcus iniae and poly I:C in blood and spleen tissues. Collectively, our findings indicate that RfCat may play an indispensable role in host response to oxidative stress and maintain a correct redox balance after a pathogen invasion.

  15. Analysis of Active Sensor Discrimination Requirements for Various Defense Missile Defense Scenarios Final Report 1999(99-ERD-080)

    SciTech Connect

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.; Gaughan, R.J.

    2000-02-15

    During FY99, we have explored and analyzed a combined passive/active sensor concept to support the advanced discrimination requirements for various missile defense scenario. The idea is to combine multiple IR spectral channels with an imaging LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) behind a common optical system. The imaging LIDAR would itself consist of at least two channels; one at the fundamental laser wavelength (e.g., the 1.064 {micro}m for Nd:YAG) and one channel at the frequency doubled (at 532 nm for Nd:YAG). two-color laser output would, for example, allow the longer wavelength for a direct detection time of flight ranger and an active imaging channel at the shorter wavelength. The LIDAR can function as a high-resolution 2D spatial image either passively or actively with laser illumination. Advances in laser design also offer three color (frequency tripled) systems, high rep-rate operation, better pumping efficiencies that can provide longer distance acquisition, and ranging for enhanced discrimination phenomenology. New detector developments can enhance the performance and operation of both LIDAR channels. A real time data fusion approach that combines multi-spectral IR phenomenology with LIDAR imagery can improve both discrimination and aim-point selection capability.

  16. Nonredundant Roles of Interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 in Murine Host Defense against Cutaneous and Hematogenous Infection Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Liana C.; Chaili, Siyang; Filler, Scott G.; Barr, Kevin; Wang, Huiyuan; Kupferwasser, Deborah; Edwards, John E.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Ibrahim, Ashraf S.; Miller, Lloyd S.; Schmidt, Clint S.; Hennessey, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the leading cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) in humans. Moreover, the high frequency of recurring SSSI due to S. aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, suggests that infection induces suboptimal anamnestic defenses. The present study addresses the hypothesis that interleukin-17A (IL-17A) and IL-22 play distinct roles in immunity to cutaneous and invasive MRSA infection in a mouse model of SSSI. Mice were treated with specific neutralizing antibodies against IL-17A and/or IL-22 and infected with MRSA, after which the severity of infection and host immune response were determined. Neutralization of either IL-17A or IL-22 reduced T cell and neutrophil infiltration and host defense peptide elaboration in lesions. These events corresponded with increased abscess severity, MRSA viability, and CFU density in skin. Interestingly, combined inhibition of IL-17A and IL-22 did not worsen abscesses but did increase gamma interferon (IFN-γ) expression at these sites. The inhibition of IL-22 led to a reduction in IL-17A expression, but not vice versa. These results suggest that the expression of IL-17A is at least partially dependent on IL-22 in this model. Inhibition of IL-17A but not IL-22 led to hematogenous dissemination to kidneys, which correlated with decreased T cell infiltration in renal tissue. Collectively, these findings indicate that IL-17A and IL-22 have complementary but nonredundant roles in host defense against cutaneous versus hematogenous infection. These insights may support targeted immune enhancement or other novel approaches to address the challenge of MRSA infection. PMID:26351278

  17. Secreted effectors of the tomato leaf mould fungus Cladosporium fulvum are virulence factors that target host defense

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cladosporium fulvum is a biotrophic fungal pathogen that causes leaf mould of tomato. Inside the leaf, C. fulvum does not penetrate host cells or develop haustoria but remains confined to the intercellular space between mesophyll cells. Ten effector proteins that are secreted during host colonizatio...

  18. Arginase II Restricts Host Defense to Helicobacter pylori by Attenuating Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Translation in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Nuruddeen D.; Asim, Mohammad; Barry, Daniel P.; Singh, Kshipra; de Sablet, Thibaut; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Gobert, Alain P.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2010-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection of the stomach causes peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Despite eliciting a vigorous immune response, the bacterium persists for the life of the host. An important antimicrobial mechanism is the production of NO derived from inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We have reported that macrophages can kill H. pylori in vitro by an NO-dependent mechanism, but supraphysiologic levels of the iNOS substrate L-arginine are required. Because H. pylori induces arginase activity in macrophages, we determined if this restricts NO generation by reducing L-arginine availability. Inhibition of arginase with S-(2-boronoethyl)-L-cysteine (BEC) significantly enhanced NO generation in H. pylori-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages by enhancing iNOS protein translation but not iNOS mRNA levels. This effect resulted in increased killing of H. pylori that was attenuated with an NO scavenger. In contrast, inhibition of arginase in macrophages activated by the colitis-inducing bacterium Citrobacter rodentium increased NO without affecting iNOS levels. H. pylori upregulated levels of arginase II (Arg2) mRNA and protein, which localized to mitochondria, whereas arginase I was not induced. Increased iNOS protein and NO levels were also demonstrated by small interfering RNA knockdown of Arg2 and in peritoneal macrophages from C57BL/6 Arg2−/− mice. In H. pylori-infected mice, treatment with BEC or deletion of Arg2 increased iNOS protein levels and NO generation in gastric macrophages, but treatment of Arg2−/− mice with BEC had no additional effect. These studies implicate Arg2 in the immune evasion of H. pylori by causing intracellular depletion of L-arginine and thus reduction of NO-dependent bactericidal activity. PMID:20097867

  19. A zinc-binding citrus protein metallothionein can act as a plant defense factor by controlling host-selective ACR-toxin production.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Tatano, Satoshi; Miyamoto, Yoko; Ohtani, Kouhei; Fukumoto, Takeshi; Gomi, Kenji; Tada, Yasuomi; Ichimura, Kazuya; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Metallothionein is a small cysteine-rich protein known to have a metal-binding function. We isolated three different lengths of rough lemon cDNAs encoding a metallothionein (RlemMT1, RlemMT2 and RlemMT3), and only RlemMT1-recombinant protein had zinc-binding activity. Appropriate concentration of zinc is an essential micronutrient for living organisms, while excess zinc is toxic. Zinc also stimulates the production of host-selective ACR-toxin for citrus leaf spot pathogen of Alternaria alternata rough lemon pathotype. Trapping of zinc by RlemMT1-recombinant protein or by a zinc-scavenging agent in the culture medium caused suppression of ACR-toxin production by the fungus. Since ACR-toxin is the disease determinant for A. alternata rough lemon pathotype, addition of RlemMT1 to the inoculum suspension led to a significant decrease in symptoms on rough lemon leaves as a result of reduced ACR-toxin production from the zinc trap around infection sites. RlemMT1-overexpression mutant of A. alternata rough lemon pathotype also produced less ACR-toxin and reduced virulence on rough lemon. This suppression was caused by an interruption of zinc absorption by cells from the trapping of the mineral by RlemMT1 and an excess supplement of ZnSO(4) restored toxin production and pathogenicity. Based on these results, we propose that zinc adsorbents including metallothionein likely can act as a plant defense factor by controlling toxin biosynthesis via inhibition of zinc absorption by the pathogen.

  20. Geodetic activities of the Department of Defense under IGY programs

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, O.W.; Daugherty, K.I.

    1983-10-16

    Attention is given to the U.S. Department of Defence (DOD) activities that contributed to the International Geophysical Year's active, passive, and cooperative satellite programs. The DOD continues to support the deployment, enhancement, and application of novel technology in such areas as satellite altimetry, gravity radiometry, inertial surveying, interferometry, airborne gravimetry, inertial surveying, and CCD and laser methods for geodetic astronomy. Also noted are such major department initiatives as the Global Positioning System, which will become operational toward the end of this decade.

  1. Chemoproteomic profiling of host and pathogen enzymes active in cholera.

    PubMed

    Hatzios, Stavroula K; Abel, Sören; Martell, Julianne; Hubbard, Troy; Sasabe, Jumpei; Munera, Diana; Clark, Lars; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Qadri, Firdausi; Ryan, Edward T; Davis, Brigid M; Weerapana, Eranthie; Waldor, Matthew K

    2016-04-01

    Activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) is a chemoproteomic tool for detecting active enzymes in complex biological systems. We used ABPP to identify secreted bacterial and host serine hydrolases that are active in animals infected with the cholera pathogen Vibrio cholerae. Four V. cholerae proteases were consistently active in infected rabbits, and one, VC0157 (renamed IvaP), was also active in human choleric stool. Inactivation of IvaP influenced the activity of other secreted V. cholerae and rabbit enzymes in vivo, and genetic disruption of all four proteases increased the abundance of intelectin, an intestinal lectin, and its binding to V. cholerae in infected rabbits. Intelectin also bound to other enteric bacterial pathogens, suggesting that it may constitute a previously unrecognized mechanism of bacterial surveillance in the intestine that is inhibited by pathogen-secreted proteases. Our work demonstrates the power of activity-based proteomics to reveal host-pathogen enzymatic dialog in an animal model of infection. PMID:26900865

  2. Fiscal Year 1985 Congressional budget request. Volume 1. Atomic energy defense activities

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-02-01

    Contents include: summaries of estimates by appropriation, savings from management initiatives, staffing by subcommittee, staffing appropriation; appropriation language; amounts available for obligation; estimates by major category; program overview; weapons activities; verification and control technology; materials production; defense waste and by-products management; nuclear safeguards and security; security investigations; and naval reactors development.

  3. Host defense peptides from Lithobates forreri, Hylarana luctuosa, and Hylarana signata (Ranidae): phylogenetic relationships inferred from primary structures of ranatuerin-2 and brevinin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nielsen, Per F; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2014-03-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides present in frog skin secretions constitute useful molecular markers for establishing taxonomic classifications and investigating phylogenetic relationships between species within a particular genus. Peptidomic analysis has led to the characterization of multiple host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of three species of frogs from the family Ranidae: Lithobates forreri (Boulenger, 1883), Hylarana luctuosa (Peters, 1871), and Hylarana signata (Günther, 1872). The L. forreri secretions contain ranatuerin-2 (2 peptides), brevinin-1 (4 peptides), and temporin (1 peptide). The H. luctuosa secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), esculentin-1 (1 peptide), esculentin-2 (1 peptide), palustrin-2 (2 peptides), and temporin (2 peptides). The H. signata secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), brevinin-1 (5 peptides), palustrin-2 (1 peptide), and temporin (2 peptides). Cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 44 ranatuerin-2 peptides from 20 Lithobates species indicates a close phylogenetic relationship between L. forreri, Lithobates onca, and Lithobates yavapaiensis. A similar cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 27 brevinin-2 peptides from 8 Hylarana species provides support for a close phylogenetic relationship between H. signata and Hylarana picturata, while showing that the species are not conspecific, with H. luctuosa more distantly related. PMID:24463457

  4. Pregnane X Receptor Regulates Pathogen-Induced Inflammation and Host Defense against an Intracellular Bacterial Infection through Toll-like Receptor 4

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhijuan; Cervantes, Jorge L.; Cicek, Basak B.; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Maher, Leigh A.; Salazar, Juan C.; Mani, Sridhar; Khanna, Kamal M.

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pregnane X receptor (PXR) plays a central role in regulating xenobiotic metabolism. We now report a novel role for PXR as a critical negative regulator of innate immunity after infection. Pxr−/− mice exhibited remarkably elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production following infection with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Despite the more robust innate immune response, Pxr−/− mice were highly susceptible to Lm infection. Surprisingly, disruption of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) but not TLR2 signaling restored the inflammation to normal levels and the ability to clear Lm in Pxr−/− mice. Mechanistically, the heightened inflammation in Pxr−/− mice resulted in the death of inflammatory monocytes that led to the enhanced susceptibility to Lm infection. These data demonstrated that PXR regulated pathogen-induced inflammation and host defense against Lm infection through modulating the TLR4 pathway. In summary, we discovered an apical role for PXR in regulating innate immunity. In addition, we uncovered a remarkable negative impact of the TLR4 pathway in controlling the quality of the inflammatory response and host defense against a gram-positive bacterial infection. PMID:27550658

  5. Host defense peptides from Lithobates forreri, Hylarana luctuosa, and Hylarana signata (Ranidae): phylogenetic relationships inferred from primary structures of ranatuerin-2 and brevinin-2 peptides.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Mechkarska, Milena; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; Nielsen, Per F; Nowotny, Norbert; King, Jay D

    2014-03-01

    The primary structures of host-defense peptides present in frog skin secretions constitute useful molecular markers for establishing taxonomic classifications and investigating phylogenetic relationships between species within a particular genus. Peptidomic analysis has led to the characterization of multiple host-defense peptides in norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of three species of frogs from the family Ranidae: Lithobates forreri (Boulenger, 1883), Hylarana luctuosa (Peters, 1871), and Hylarana signata (Günther, 1872). The L. forreri secretions contain ranatuerin-2 (2 peptides), brevinin-1 (4 peptides), and temporin (1 peptide). The H. luctuosa secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), esculentin-1 (1 peptide), esculentin-2 (1 peptide), palustrin-2 (2 peptides), and temporin (2 peptides). The H. signata secretions contain brevinin-2 (4 peptides), brevinin-1 (5 peptides), palustrin-2 (1 peptide), and temporin (2 peptides). Cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 44 ranatuerin-2 peptides from 20 Lithobates species indicates a close phylogenetic relationship between L. forreri, Lithobates onca, and Lithobates yavapaiensis. A similar cladistic analysis based upon the primary structures of 27 brevinin-2 peptides from 8 Hylarana species provides support for a close phylogenetic relationship between H. signata and Hylarana picturata, while showing that the species are not conspecific, with H. luctuosa more distantly related.

  6. Pregnane X Receptor Regulates Pathogen-Induced Inflammation and Host Defense against an Intracellular Bacterial Infection through Toll-like Receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhijuan; Cervantes, Jorge L; Cicek, Basak B; Mukherjee, Subhajit; Venkatesh, Madhukumar; Maher, Leigh A; Salazar, Juan C; Mani, Sridhar; Khanna, Kamal M

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear pregnane X receptor (PXR) plays a central role in regulating xenobiotic metabolism. We now report a novel role for PXR as a critical negative regulator of innate immunity after infection. Pxr(-/-) mice exhibited remarkably elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production following infection with Listeria monocytogenes (Lm). Despite the more robust innate immune response, Pxr(-/-) mice were highly susceptible to Lm infection. Surprisingly, disruption of the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) but not TLR2 signaling restored the inflammation to normal levels and the ability to clear Lm in Pxr(-/-) mice. Mechanistically, the heightened inflammation in Pxr(-/-) mice resulted in the death of inflammatory monocytes that led to the enhanced susceptibility to Lm infection. These data demonstrated that PXR regulated pathogen-induced inflammation and host defense against Lm infection through modulating the TLR4 pathway. In summary, we discovered an apical role for PXR in regulating innate immunity. In addition, we uncovered a remarkable negative impact of the TLR4 pathway in controlling the quality of the inflammatory response and host defense against a gram-positive bacterial infection. PMID:27550658

  7. Discrimination of Arabidopsis PAD4 activities in defense against green peach aphid and pathogens.

    PubMed

    Louis, Joe; Gobbato, Enrico; Mondal, Hossain A; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E; Shah, Jyoti

    2012-04-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lipase-like protein PHYTOALEXIN DEFICIENT4 (PAD4) is essential for defense against green peach aphid (GPA; Myzus persicae) and the pathogens Pseudomonas syringae and Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis. In basal resistance to virulent strains of P. syringae and H. arabidopsidis, PAD4 functions together with its interacting partner ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY1 (EDS1) to promote salicylic acid (SA)-dependent and SA-independent defenses. By contrast, dissociated forms of PAD4 and EDS1 signal effector-triggered immunity to avirulent strains of these pathogens. PAD4-controlled defense against GPA requires neither EDS1 nor SA. Here, we show that resistance to GPA is unaltered in an eds1 salicylic acid induction deficient2 (sid2) double mutant, indicating that redundancy between EDS1 and SID2-dependent SA, previously reported for effector-triggered immunity conditioned by certain nucleotide-binding-leucine-rich repeat receptors, does not explain the dispensability of EDS1 and SID2 in defense against GPA. Mutation of a conserved serine (S118) in the predicted lipase catalytic triad of PAD4 abolished PAD4-conditioned antibiosis and deterrence against GPA feeding, but S118 was dispensable for deterring GPA settling and promoting senescence in GPA-infested plants as well as for pathogen resistance. These results highlight distinct molecular activities of PAD4 determining particular aspects of defense against aphids and pathogens.

  8. Active Galactic Nucleus Host Galaxy Morphologies in COSMOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, J. M.; Impey, C. D.; Jahnke, K.; Simmons, B. D.; Trump, J. R.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Brusa, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Schinnerer, E.; Smolčić, V.; Salvato, M.; Rhodes, J. D.; Mobasher, B.; Capak, P.; Massey, R.; Leauthaud, A.; Scoville, N.

    2009-01-01

    We use Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys images and a photometric catalog of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field to analyze morphologies of the host galaxies of ~400 active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates at redshifts 0.3 < z < 1.0. We compare the AGN hosts with a sample of nonactive galaxies drawn from the COSMOS field to match the magnitude and redshift distribution of the AGN hosts. We perform two-dimensional surface brightness modeling with GALFIT to yield host galaxy and nuclear point source magnitudes. X-ray-selected AGN host galaxy morphologies span a substantial range that peaks between those of early-type, bulge-dominated and late-type, disk-dominated systems. We also measure the asymmetry and concentration of the host galaxies. Unaccounted for, the nuclear point source can significantly bias results of these measured structural parameters, so we subtract the best-fit point source component to obtain images of the underlying host galaxies. Our concentration measurements reinforce the findings of our two-dimensional morphology fits, placing X-ray AGN hosts between early- and late-type inactive galaxies. AGN host asymmetry distributions are consistent with those of control galaxies. Combined with a lack of excess companion galaxies around AGN, the asymmetry distributions indicate that strong interactions are no more prevalent among AGN than normal galaxies. In light of recent work, these results suggest that the host galaxies of AGN at these X-ray luminosities may be in a transition from disk-dominated to bulge-dominated, but that this transition is not typically triggered by major mergers. Based on observations with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA Inc, under NASA contract NAS 5-26555; also based on data collected at: the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the XMM-Newton, an ESA science mission with

  9. Human and Animal Isolates of Yersinia enterocolitica Show Significant Serotype-Specific Colonization and Host-Specific Immune Defense Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schaake, Julia; Kronshage, Malte; Uliczka, Frank; Rohde, Manfred; Knuuti, Tobias; Strauch, Eckhard; Fruth, Angelika; Wos-Oxley, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a human pathogen that is ubiquitous in livestock, especially pigs. The bacteria are able to colonize the intestinal tract of a variety of mammalian hosts, but the severity of induced gut-associated diseases (yersiniosis) differs significantly between hosts. To gain more information about the individual virulence determinants that contribute to colonization and induction of immune responses in different hosts, we analyzed and compared the interactions of different human- and animal-derived isolates of serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8, and O:9 with murine, porcine, and human intestinal cells and macrophages. The examined strains exhibited significant serotype-specific cell binding and entry characteristics, but adhesion and uptake into different host cells were not host specific and were independent of the source of the isolate. In contrast, survival and replication within macrophages and the induced proinflammatory response differed between murine, porcine, and human macrophages, suggesting a host-specific immune response. In fact, similar levels of the proinflammatory cytokine macrophage inflammatory protein 2 (MIP-2) were secreted by murine bone marrow-derived macrophages with all tested isolates, but the equivalent interleukin-8 (IL-8) response of porcine bone marrow-derived macrophages was strongly serotype specific and considerably lower in O:3 than in O:8 strains. In addition, all tested Y. enterocolitica strains caused a considerably higher level of secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 by porcine than by murine macrophages. This could contribute to limiting the severity of the infection (in particular of serotype O:3 strains) in pigs, which are the primary reservoir of Y. enterocolitica strains pathogenic to humans. PMID:23959720

  10. The Ustilago maydis effector Pep1 suppresses plant immunity by inhibition of host peroxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Hemetsberger, Christoph; Herrberger, Christian; Zechmann, Bernd; Hillmer, Morten; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2012-01-01

    The corn smut Ustilago maydis establishes a biotrophic interaction with its host plant maize. This interaction requires efficient suppression of plant immune responses, which is attributed to secreted effector proteins. Previously we identified Pep1 (Protein essential during penetration-1) as a secreted effector with an essential role for U. maydis virulence. pep1 deletion mutants induce strong defense responses leading to an early block in pathogenic development of the fungus. Using cytological and functional assays we show that Pep1 functions as an inhibitor of plant peroxidases. At sites of Δpep1 mutant penetrations, H₂O₂ strongly accumulated in the cell walls, coinciding with a transcriptional induction of the secreted maize peroxidase POX12. Pep1 protein effectively inhibited the peroxidase driven oxidative burst and thereby suppresses the early immune responses of maize. Moreover, Pep1 directly inhibits peroxidases in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Using fluorescence complementation assays, we observed a direct interaction of Pep1 and the maize peroxidase POX12 in vivo. Functional relevance of this interaction was demonstrated by partial complementation of the Δpep1 mutant defect by virus induced gene silencing of maize POX12. We conclude that Pep1 acts as a potent suppressor of early plant defenses by inhibition of peroxidase activity. Thus, it represents a novel strategy for establishing a biotrophic interaction.

  11. A Role for the Anti-Viral Host Defense Mechanism in the Phylogenetic Divergence in Baculovirus Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Although phylogenic analysis often suggests co-evolutionary relationships between viruses and host organisms, few examples have been reported at the microevolutionary level. Here, we show a possible example in which a species-specific anti-viral response may drive phylogenic divergence in insect virus evolution. Two baculoviruses, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), have a high degree of DNA sequence similarity, but exhibit non-overlapping host specificity. In our study of their host-range determination, we found that BmNPV replication in B. mori cells was prevented by AcMNPV-P143 (AcP143), but not BmNPV-P143 (BmP143) or a hybrid P143 protein from a host-range expanded phenotype. This suggests that AcMNPV resistance in B. mori cells depends on AcP143 recognition and that BmNPV uses BmP143 to escapes this recognition. Based on these data, we propose an insect-baculovirus co-evolution scenario in which an ancestor of silkworms exploited an AcMNPV-resistant mechanism; AcMNPV counteracted this resistance via P143 mutations, resulting in the birth of BmNPV. PMID:27244571

  12. A Role for the Anti-Viral Host Defense Mechanism in the Phylogenetic Divergence in Baculovirus Evolution.

    PubMed

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Sako, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    Although phylogenic analysis often suggests co-evolutionary relationships between viruses and host organisms, few examples have been reported at the microevolutionary level. Here, we show a possible example in which a species-specific anti-viral response may drive phylogenic divergence in insect virus evolution. Two baculoviruses, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV), have a high degree of DNA sequence similarity, but exhibit non-overlapping host specificity. In our study of their host-range determination, we found that BmNPV replication in B. mori cells was prevented by AcMNPV-P143 (AcP143), but not BmNPV-P143 (BmP143) or a hybrid P143 protein from a host-range expanded phenotype. This suggests that AcMNPV resistance in B. mori cells depends on AcP143 recognition and that BmNPV uses BmP143 to escapes this recognition. Based on these data, we propose an insect-baculovirus co-evolution scenario in which an ancestor of silkworms exploited an AcMNPV-resistant mechanism; AcMNPV counteracted this resistance via P143 mutations, resulting in the birth of BmNPV. PMID:27244571

  13. Modeling Host Disk Kinematics of Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machuca, Camilo; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work by our group has shown that, although the kinematics of many active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be modeled by biconal outflow, most AGN have kinematics that are too convolved with other forms of motion to be modeled so simply, such as the rotation of the host disk. To disentangle these rotational components from the outflowing ionized gas due to AGN "feedback" in the narrow-line region (NLR) and understand the AGN's relationship with the host galaxy at extended distances, we present this study on two Seyfert 2 galaxies, Markarian 3 and Markarian 573, based on two-dimensional long-slit spectra taken with the ARC 3.5m telescope at Apache-Point Observatory. The two targets were observed multiple times at varying position angles (in order to trace the kinematics of the host disk at multiple points) and their total kinematics were analyzed and modeled using DiskFit, a publicly available code that fits given velocity fields. We compare the results of DiskFit to observed velocities and consider the applications of this technique to the kinematic fitting of other nearby AGN with convolved motions.

  14. Modulation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity differentially activates wound and pathogen defense responses in tomato plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, A; Oecking, C

    1999-01-01

    Systemin is an important mediator of wound-induced defense gene activation in tomato plants, and it elicits a rapid alkalinization of the growth medium of cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells. A possible mechanistic link between proton fluxes across the plasma membrane and the induction of defense genes was investigated by modulating plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity. Inhibitors of H+-ATPase (erythrosin B, diethyl stilbestrol, and vanadate) were found to alkalinize the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and to induce wound response genes in whole tomato plants. Conversely, an activator of the H+-ATPase (fusicoccin) acidified the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and suppressed systemin-induced medium alkalinization. Likewise, in fusicoccin-treated tomato plants, the wound- and systemin-triggered accumulation of wound-responsive mRNAs was found to be suppressed. However, fusicoccin treatment of tomato plants led to the accumulation of salicylic acid and the expression of pathogenesis-related genes. Apparently, the wound and pathogen defense signaling pathways are differentially regulated by changes in the proton electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In addition, alkalinization of the L. peruvianum cell culture medium was found to depend on the influx of Ca2+ and the activity of a protein kinase. Reversible protein phosphorylation was also shown to be involved in the induction of wound response genes. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase as a possible target of a Ca2+-activated protein kinase and its role in defense signaling are discussed. PMID:9927643

  15. AN ULTRAVIOLET INVESTIGATION OF ACTIVITY ON EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2013-03-20

    Using the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) photometry from the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we searched for evidence of increased stellar activity due to tidal and/or magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) in the 272 known FGK planetary hosts observed by GALEX. With the increased sensitivity of GALEX, we are able probe systems with lower activity levels and at larger distances than what has been done to date with X-ray satellites. We compared samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.1 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 0.5 AU) and looked for correlations of excess activity with other system parameters. This statistical investigation found no clear correlations with a, M{sub p} , or M{sub p} /a, in contrast to some X-ray and Ca II studies. However, there is tentative evidence (at a level of 1.8{sigma}) that stars with radial-velocity-(RV)-detected close-in planets are more FUV-active than stars with far-out planets, in agreement with several published X-ray and Ca II results. The case is strengthened to a level of significance to 2.3{sigma} when transit-detected close-in planets are included. This is most likely because the RV-selected sample of stars is significantly less active than the field population of comparable stars, while the transit-selected sample is similarly active. Given the factor of 2-3 scatter in fractional FUV luminosity for a given stellar effective temperature, it is necessary to conduct a time-resolved study of the planet hosts in order to better characterize their UV variability and generate a firmer statistical result.

  16. Cement-based radioactive waste hosts formed under elevated temperatures and pressures (FUETAP concretes) for Savannah River Plant high-level defense waste

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, L.R.; Rogers, G.C.; Morgan, M.T.; Stinton, D.P.; Kessler, J.H.; Robinson, S.M.; Moore, J.G.

    1983-03-01

    Concretes that are formed under elevated temperatures and pressures (called FUETAP) are effective hosts for high-level radioactive defense wastes. Tailored concretes developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been prepared from common Portland cements, fly ash, sand, clays, and waste products. These concretes are produced by accelerated curing under mild autoclave conditions (85 to 200/sup 0/C, 0.1 to 1.5 MPa) for 24 h. The solids are subsequently dewatered (to remove unbound water) at 250/sup 0/C for 24 h. The resulting products are strong (compressive strength, 40 to 100 MPa), leach resistant (plutonium leaches at the rate of 10 pg/(cm/sup 2/.d)), and radiolytically stable, monolithic waste forms (total gas value = 0.005 molecule/100 eV). This report summarizes the results of a 4-year FUETAP development program for Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level defense wastes. It addresses the major questions concerning the performance of concretes as radioactive waste forms. These include leachability, radiation stability, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, impact strength, permeability, phase complexity, and effect of waste composition.

  17. The human host as active agent in malaria epidemiology.

    PubMed

    MacCormack, C P

    1987-09-01

    The literature on malaria epidemiology tends to view the human host as a passive or constant factor. However, for at least 2000 years people have been an active factor, causing vast changes in epidemiological patterns. They have cut forest and increased the breeding area of An. gambiae, or changed salinity in rice swamps causing a different change in the dominant vector. Human activity not only increases risk, but influences control by killing mosquito larvae, killing adult mosquitos or preventing mosquitos from feeding. For example, people prefer chloroquine or other anti-malarials to traditional herbal remedies that do not kill parasites, and in some areas introduce larvivorous fish into swamp rice fields and cattle ponds. Bed nets impregnated with residual insecticide simultaneously prevent mosquitos from feeding on people and kill adult mosquitos. Preferences and practices in bed net use in the Gambia are described. PMID:3432961

  18. Cosmic bombardment V: Threat object-dispersing approaches to active planetary defense

    SciTech Connect

    Teller, E.; Wood, L. |; Ishikawa, M. |; Hyde, R.

    1995-05-24

    Earth-impacting comets and asteroids with diameters {approx}0.03 - 10 km pose the greatest threats to the terrestrial biosphere in terms of impact frequency-weighted impact consequences, and thus are of most concern to designers of active planetary defenses. Specific gravitational binding energies of such objects range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -2} J/gm, and are small compared with the specific energies of 1x10{sup 3} to 3x10{sup 3} J/gm required to vaporize objects of typical composition or the specific energies required to pulverize them, which are 10{sup -1} to 10 J/gm. All of these are small compared to the specific kinetic energy of these objects in the Earth- centered frame, which is 2x10{sup 5} to 2x10{sup 6} J/gm. The prospect naturally arises of negating all such threats by deflecting, pulverizing or vaporizing the objects. Pulverization-with-dispersal is an attractive option of reasonable defensive robustness. Examples of such equipments - which employ no explosives of any type - are given. Vaporization is the maximally robust defensive option, and may be invoked to negate threat objects not observed until little time is left until Earth-strike, and pulverization-with-dispersal has proven inadequate. Physically larger threats may be vaporized with nuclear explosives. No contemporary technical means of any kind appear capable of directly dispersing the -100 km diameter scale Charon- class cometary objects recently observed in the outer solar system, although such objects may be deflected to defensively useful extents. Means of implementing defenses of each of these types are proposed for specificity, and areas for optimization noted. Biospheric impacts of threat object debris are briefly considered, for bounding purposes. Experiments are suggested on cometary and asteroidal objects.

  19. Activation of defense response pathways by OGs and Flg22 elicitors in Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Denoux, Carine; Galletti, Roberta; Mammarella, Nicole; Gopalan, Suresh; Werck, Danièle; De Lorenzo, Giulia; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M.; Dewdney, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We carried out transcriptional profiling analysis in 10 day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings treated with oligogalacturonides (OGs), oligosaccharides derived from the plant cell wall, or the bacterial flagellin peptide Flg22, general elicitors of the basal defense response in plants. Although detected by different receptors, both OGs and Flg22 trigger a fast and transient response that is both similar and comprehensive, and characterized by activation of early stages of multiple defense signaling pathways, particularly JA-associated processes. However, the response to Flg22 is stronger in both the number of genes differentially expressed and the amplitude of change. The magnitude of induction of individual genes is in both cases dose dependent, but even at very high concentrations, OGs do not induce a response that is as comprehensive as that seen with Flg22. While high doses of either microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP) elicit a late response that includes activation of senescence processes, SA-dependent secretory pathway genes and PR1 expression are substantially induced only by Flg22. These results suggest a lower threshold for activation of early responses than for sustained or SA-mediated late defenses. Expression patterns of aminocyclopropane-carboxylate synthase genes also implicate ethylene biosynthesis in regulation of the late innate immune response. PMID:19825551

  20. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P.; Pothier, Joël F.; Smits, Theo H. M.; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora. PMID:26883568

  1. Fire blight disease reactome: RNA-seq transcriptional profile of apple host plant defense responses to Erwinia amylovora pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Kamber, Tim; Buchmann, Jan P; Pothier, Joël F; Smits, Theo H M; Wicker, Thomas; Duffy, Brion

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of resistance and susceptibility of host plants to fire blight, a major disease threat to pome fruit production globally, is largely unknown. RNA-sequencing data from challenged and mock-inoculated flowers were analyzed to assess the susceptible response of apple to the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora. In presence of the pathogen 1,080 transcripts were differentially expressed at 48 h post inoculation. These included putative disease resistance, stress, pathogen related, general metabolic, and phytohormone related genes. Reads, mapped to regions on the apple genome where no genes were assigned, were used to identify potential novel genes and open reading frames. To identify transcripts specifically expressed in response to E. amylovora, RT-PCRs were conducted and compared to the expression patterns of the fire blight biocontrol agent Pantoea vagans strain C9-1, another apple pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. papulans, and mock inoculated apple flowers. This led to the identification of a peroxidase superfamily gene that was lower expressed in response to E. amylovora suggesting a potential role in the susceptibility response. Overall, this study provides the first transcriptional profile by RNA-seq of the host plant during fire blight disease and insights into the response of susceptible apple plants to E. amylovora. PMID:26883568

  2. Recognition of fungal RNA by TLR7 has a nonredundant role in host defense against experimental candidiasis.

    PubMed

    Biondo, Carmelo; Malara, Antonio; Costa, Alessandro; Signorino, Giacomo; Cardile, Francesco; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Papasergi, Salvatore; Domina, Maria; Pugliese, Michela; Teti, Giuseppe; Mancuso, Giuseppe; Beninati, Concetta

    2012-10-01

    Despite convincing evidence for involvement of members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family in fungal recognition, little is known of the functional role of individual TLRs in antifungal defenses. We found here that TLR7 was partially required for the induction of IL-12 (IL-12p70) by Candida albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Moreover, the IL-12p70 response was completely abrogated in cells from 3d mice, which are unable to mobilize TLRs to endosomal compartments, as well as in cells from mice lacking either the TLR adaptor MyD88 or the IRF1 transcription factor. Notably, purified fungal RNA recapitulated IL-12p70 induction by whole yeast. Although RNA could also induce moderate TLR7-dependent IL-23 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) secretion, TLR7 and other endosomal TLRs were redundant for IL-23 or TNF-α induction by whole fungi. Importantly, mice lacking TLR7 or IRF1 were hypersusceptible to systemic C. albicans infection. Our data suggest that IRF1 is downstream of a novel, nonredundant fungal recognition pathway that has RNA as a major target and requires phagosomal recruitment of intracellular TLRs. This pathway differs from those involved in IL-23 or TNF-α responses, which we show here to be independent from translocation of intracellular TLRs, phagocytosis, or phagosomal acidification.

  3. MAGNETIC ACTIVITY CYCLES IN THE EXOPLANET HOST STAR {epsilon} ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe, T. S.; Mathur, S.; Buccino, A. P.; Mauas, P. J. D.; Petrucci, R.; Brown, B. P.; Soderblom, D. R.; Henry, T. J.; Hall, J. C.; Basu, S.

    2013-02-01

    The active K2 dwarf {epsilon} Eri has been extensively characterized both as a young solar analog and more recently as an exoplanet host star. As one of the nearest and brightest stars in the sky, it provides an unparalleled opportunity to constrain stellar dynamo theory beyond the Sun. We confirm and document the 3-year magnetic activity cycle in {epsilon} Eri originally reported by Hatzes and coworkers, and we examine the archival data from previous observations spanning 45 years. The data show coexisting 3-year and 13-year periods leading into a broad activity minimum that resembles a Maunder minimum-like state, followed by the resurgence of a coherent 3-year cycle. The nearly continuous activity record suggests the simultaneous operation of two stellar dynamos with cycle periods of 2.95 {+-} 0.03 years and 12.7 {+-} 0.3 years, which, by analogy with the solar case, suggests a revised identification of the dynamo mechanisms that are responsible for the so-called 'active' and 'inactive' sequences as proposed by Boehm-Vitense. Finally, based on the observed properties of {epsilon} Eri, we argue that the rotational history of the Sun is what makes it an outlier in the context of magnetic cycles observed in other stars (as also suggested by its Li depletion), and that a Jovian-mass companion cannot be the universal explanation for the solar peculiarities.

  4. The star formation rates of active galactic nuclei host galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Sara L.; Teimoorinia, Hossen; Rosario, David J.; Mendel, J. Trevor

    2016-05-01

    Using artificial neural network predictions of total infrared luminosities (LIR), we compare the host galaxy star formation rates (SFRs) of ˜21 000 optically selected active galactic nuclei (AGN), 466 low-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs) and 721 mid-IR-selected AGN. SFR offsets (ΔSFR) relative to a sample of star-forming `main-sequence' galaxies (matched in M⋆, z and local environment) are computed for the AGN hosts. Optically selected AGN exhibit a wide range of ΔSFR, with a distribution skewed to low SFRs and a median ΔSFR = -0.06 dex. The LERGs have SFRs that are shifted to even lower values with a median ΔSFR = -0.5 dex. In contrast, mid-IR-selected AGN have, on average, SFRs enhanced by a factor of ˜1.5. We interpret the different distributions of ΔSFR amongst the different AGN classes in the context of the relative contribution of triggering by galaxy mergers. Whereas the LERGs are predominantly fuelled through low accretion rate secular processes which are not accompanied by enhancements in SFR, mergers, which can simultaneously boost SFRs, most frequently lead to powerful, obscured AGN.

  5. [Defense mechanism to prevent ectopic activation of pancreatic digestive enzymes under physiological conditions and its breakdown in acute pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Kaku, Midori; Otsuko, Makoto

    2004-11-01

    Independent of the etiology, acute pancreatitis is associated with significant morbidity and the potential for mortality. In most patients, acute pancreatitis follows an uncomplicated or mild course. Recent studies in hereditary pancreatitis have clearly revealed that trypsin is the key enzyme at the onset of pancreatitis. However, there are several defense mechanisms to prevent ectopic activation of trypsin under physiological conditions. If the defense mechanisms failed or activation of trypsin occurred over defense ability, trypsin would activate other digestive enzymes and self-digestion of the pancreas would occur.

  6. Mammalian apoptotic signalling pathways: multiple targets of protozoan parasites to activate or deactivate host cell death.

    PubMed

    Graumann, Kristin; Hippe, Diana; Gross, Uwe; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2009-11-01

    Programmed cell death is an essential mechanism of the host to combat infectious agents and to regulate immunity during infection. Consequently, activation and deactivation of the hosts' cell death pathways by protozoan parasites play critical roles in parasite control, pathogenesis, immune evasion and parasite dissemination within the host. Here, we discuss advances in the understanding of these fascinating host-parasite interactions with special emphasis on how protozoa can modulate the cell death apparatus of its host.

  7. Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 mediates biotic defense responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Galon, Yael; Nave, Roy; Boyce, Joy M; Nachmias, Dikla; Knight, Marc R; Fromm, Hillel

    2008-03-19

    Calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) 3 (also called SR1) is a calmodulin-binding transcription factor in Arabidopsis. Two homozygous T-DNA insertion mutants (camta3-1, camta3-2) showed enhanced spontaneous lesions. Transcriptome analysis of both mutants revealed 6 genes with attenuated expression and 99 genes with elevated expression. Of the latter, 32 genes are related to defense against pathogens (e.g. WRKY33, PR1 and chitinase). Propagation of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea were attenuated in both mutants. Moreover, both mutants accumulated high levels of H2O2. We suggest that CAMTA3 regulates the expression of a set of genes involved in biotic defense responses.

  8. CD103+ Conventional Dendritic Cells Are Critical for TLR7/9-Dependent Host Defense against Histoplasma capsulatum, an Endemic Fungal Pathogen of Humans

    PubMed Central

    Van Prooyen, Nancy; Henderson, C. Allen; Hocking Murray, Davina; Sil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Innate immune cells shape the host response to microbial pathogens. Here we elucidate critical differences in the molecular response of macrophages vs. dendritic cells (DCs) to Histoplasma capsulatum, an intracellular fungal pathogen of humans. It has long been known that macrophages are permissive for Histoplasma growth and succumb to infection, whereas DCs restrict fungal growth and survive infection. We used murine macrophages and DCs to identify host pathways that influence fungal proliferation and host-cell viability. Transcriptional profiling experiments revealed that DCs produced a strong Type I interferon (IFN-I) response to infection with Histoplasma yeasts. Toll-like receptors 7 and 9 (TLR7/9), which recognize nucleic acids, were required for IFN-I production and restriction of fungal growth in DCs, but mutation of TLR7/9 had no effect on the outcome of macrophage infection. Moreover, TLR7/9 were essential for the ability of infected DCs to elicit production of the critical cytokine IFNγ from primed CD4+ T cells in vitro, indicating the role of this pathway in T cell activation. In a mouse model of infection, TLR7/9 were required for optimal production of IFN-I and IFNγ, host survival, and restriction of cerebral fungal burden. These data demonstrate the critical role of this pathway in eliciting an appropriate adaptive immune response in the host. Finally, although other fungal pathogens have been shown to elicit IFN-I in mouse models, the specific host cell responsible for producing IFN-I has not been elucidated. We found that CD103+ conventional DCs were the major producer of IFN-I in the lungs of wild-type mice infected with Histoplasma. Mice deficient in this DC subtype displayed reduced IFN-I production in vivo. These data reveal a previously unknown role for CD103+ conventional DCs and uncover the pivotal function of these cells in modulating the host immune response to endemic fungi. PMID:27459510

  9. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins in inflammasome activation and host defense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D; Bradfield, Clinton J; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D

    2016-05-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight the assembly of pre-existing core components shortly after infection or tissue damage. Emerging work, however, suggests that the inflammasome machinery is also subject to 'tunable' or inducible signals that might accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these signals operate downstream of interferon receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of interferon-induced GTPases called 'guanylate-binding proteins' (GBPs). Here we investigate the critical roles of interferon-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential effect of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases. PMID:27092805

  10. Interferon-induced guanylate-binding proteins in inflammasome activation and host defense.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D; Bradfield, Clinton J; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D

    2016-05-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight the assembly of pre-existing core components shortly after infection or tissue damage. Emerging work, however, suggests that the inflammasome machinery is also subject to 'tunable' or inducible signals that might accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these signals operate downstream of interferon receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of interferon-induced GTPases called 'guanylate-binding proteins' (GBPs). Here we investigate the critical roles of interferon-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential effect of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases.

  11. IFN-induced Guanylate Binding Proteins in Inflammasome Activation and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight pre-existing core components being assembled under basal conditions shortly after infection or tissue damage. Recent work, however, suggests the inflammasome machinery is also subject to tunable or inducible signals that may accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these immune signals operate downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of IFN-induced GTPases termed guanylate binding proteins (GBPs). Here, we examine the critical roles for IFN-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity against a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential impact of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases. PMID:27092805

  12. Activation of defense mechanism in wheat by polyphenol oxidase from aphid saliva.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Chen, Ju-Lian; Cheng, Deng-Fa; Sun, Jing-Rui

    2010-02-24

    The saliva of two cereal aphids, Sitobion avenae and Schizaphis graminum in third-instar nymphs, was collected after 24 h of feeding by 30 aphids, separately, on artificial diet sachets, and the salivary enzymes were determined. The result showed that polyphenol oxidase (PPO) existed in the saliva of both aphid species, and the enzymatic activities were 6.2 x 10(-3) U/g for S. avenae and 2.37 x 10(-1) U/g for S. graminum, revealing a 38-fold higher activity in the saliva of S. graminum than in the saliva of S. avenae. It was speculated that the higher PPO activity in S. graminum saliva was a contributing factor to the light yellow spot left on the feeding site of the wheat leaf by S. graminum; no such spot was left by S. avenae. After treatment of a wheat seedling with the saliva of S. avenae and S. graminum and PPO at the concentration of aphid saliva, transcript profiling data showed that aphid saliva and PPO significantly induced expression of the genes aos and fps. Because genes aos and fps encode the key enzymes in the defense signal pathways jasmonic acid and terpene signal pathways, respectively, it was deduced that PPO from aphid saliva, as the main elicitor, triggers an appropriate defense response in wheat through jasmonic acid and terpene signal pathways. PMID:20112908

  13. Effect of probiotic bacteria on microbial host defense, growth, and immune function in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Ahrné, Siv; Johann-Liang, Rosemary; Abuav, Rachel; Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Grassey, Claudia; Bengmark, Stig; Cervia, Joseph S

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1) infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg) cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to formula alone

  14. Effect of Probiotic Bacteria on Microbial Host Defense, Growth, and Immune Function in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Ahrné, Siv; Johann-Liang, Rosemary; Abuav, Rachel; Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Grassey, Claudia; Bengmark, Stig; Cervia, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1) infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg) cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to formula alone

  15. Activation of Molecular Signatures for Antimicrobial and Innate Defense Responses in Skin with Transglutaminase 1 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Haneda, Takashi; Imai, Yasutomo; Uchiyama, Ryosuke; Jitsukawa, Orie; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) are a major cause of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCIs) that are associated with defects in skin barrier structure and function. However, the molecular processes induced by the transglutaminase 1 deficiency are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to uncover those processes by analysis of cutaneous molecular signatures. Gene expression profiles of wild-type and Tgm1-/-epidermis were assessed using microarrays. Gene ontology analysis of the data showed that genes for innate defense responses were up-regulated in Tgm1-/-epidermis. Based on that result, the induction of Il1b and antimicrobial peptide genes, S100a8, S100a9, Defb14, Camp, Slpi, Lcn2, Ccl20 and Wfdc12, was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. A protein array revealed that levels of IL-1β, G-CSF, GM-CSF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL9 and CCL2 were increased in Tgm1-/-skin. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand genes, Hbegf, Areg and Ereg, were activated in Tgm1-/-epidermis. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of an epidermal extract from Tgm1-/-mice was significantly increased against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In the epidermis of ichthyosiform skins from patients with TGM1 mutations, S100A8/9 was strongly positive. The expression of those antimicrobial and defense response genes was also increased in the lesional skin of an ARCI patient with TGM1 mutations. These results suggest that the up-regulation of molecular signatures for antimicrobial and innate defense responses is characteristic of skin with a transglutaminase 1 deficiency, and this autonomous process might be induced to reinforce the defective barrier function of the skin. PMID:27442430

  16. Activation of Molecular Signatures for Antimicrobial and Innate Defense Responses in Skin with Transglutaminase 1 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Ryosuke; Jitsukawa, Orie; Yamanishi, Kiyofumi

    2016-01-01

    Mutations of the transglutaminase 1 gene (TGM1) are a major cause of autosomal recessive congenital ichthyoses (ARCIs) that are associated with defects in skin barrier structure and function. However, the molecular processes induced by the transglutaminase 1 deficiency are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to uncover those processes by analysis of cutaneous molecular signatures. Gene expression profiles of wild-type and Tgm1–/–epidermis were assessed using microarrays. Gene ontology analysis of the data showed that genes for innate defense responses were up-regulated in Tgm1–/–epidermis. Based on that result, the induction of Il1b and antimicrobial peptide genes, S100a8, S100a9, Defb14, Camp, Slpi, Lcn2, Ccl20 and Wfdc12, was confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. A protein array revealed that levels of IL-1β, G-CSF, GM-CSF, CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL9 and CCL2 were increased in Tgm1–/–skin. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand genes, Hbegf, Areg and Ereg, were activated in Tgm1–/–epidermis. Furthermore, the antimicrobial activity of an epidermal extract from Tgm1–/–mice was significantly increased against both Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. In the epidermis of ichthyosiform skins from patients with TGM1 mutations, S100A8/9 was strongly positive. The expression of those antimicrobial and defense response genes was also increased in the lesional skin of an ARCI patient with TGM1 mutations. These results suggest that the up-regulation of molecular signatures for antimicrobial and innate defense responses is characteristic of skin with a transglutaminase 1 deficiency, and this autonomous process might be induced to reinforce the defective barrier function of the skin. PMID:27442430

  17. The hymenochirins: a family of host-defense peptides from the Congo dwarf clawed frog Hymenochirus boettgeri (Pipidae).

    PubMed

    Mechkarska, Milena; Prajeep, Manju; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert; King, Jay D; Conlon, J Michael

    2012-06-01

    Skin secretions of frogs from the subfamily Xenopodinae (Xenopus+Silurana) within the family Pipidae are a rich source of antimicrobial peptides with therapeutic potential but species from the sister taxon Hymenochirus in the subfamily Pipinae (Hymenochirus+Pseudhymenochirus+Pipa) have not been investigated. Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions from two distinct populations of the Congo dwarf clawed frog Hymenochirus boettgeri (Tornier, 1896) has led to identification of five structurally related peptides with broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. Hymenochirin-1B (IKLSPETKDNLKKVLKGAIKGAIAVAKMV.NH(2)) is C-terminally α-amidated whereas hymenochirins-2B-5B have the general structure XKIPX(2)VKDTLKKVAKGX(2)SX(2)AGAX(3).COOH. Hymenochirin-3B (IKIPAVVKDTLKKVAKGVLSAVAGALTQ) was the most abundant peptide in the secretions. The hymenochirins show very low structural similarity with the antimicrobial peptides isolated from skin secretions of Silurana tropicalis and Xenopus laevis consistent with the proposed ancient divergence of the Pipinae and Xenopodinae. Synthetic replicates of hymenochirin-1B-4B inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Staphylococcus aureus (MIC in the range 10-40 μM) and Candida albicans (MIC=80 μM). The peptides display relatively weak hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes (LC(50) in the range 160 to >300 μM).

  18. Progestin-Containing Contraceptives Alter Expression of Host Defense-Related Genes of the Endometrium and Cervix

    PubMed Central

    Goldfien, Gabriel A.; Barragan, Fatima; Chen, Joseph; Takeda, Margaret; Irwin, Juan C.; Perry, Jean; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Smith-McCune, Karen K.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that progestin-containing contraceptives increase susceptibility to HIV, although the underlying mechanisms involving the upper female reproductive tract are undefined. To determine the effects of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on gene expression and physiology of human endometrial and cervical transformation zone (TZ), microarray analyses were performed on whole tissue biopsies. In endometrium, activated pathways included leukocyte chemotaxis, attachment, and inflammation in DMPA and LNG-IUS users, and individual genes included pattern recognition receptors, complement components, and other immune mediators. In cervical TZ, progestin treatment altered expression of tissue remodeling and viability but not immune function genes. Together, these results indicate that progestins influence expression of immune-related genes in endometrium relevant to local recruitment of HIV target cells with potential to increase susceptibility and underscore the importance of the upper reproductive tract when assessing the safety of contraceptive products. PMID:25634912

  19. Progestin-Containing Contraceptives Alter Expression of Host Defense-Related Genes of the Endometrium and Cervix.

    PubMed

    Goldfien, Gabriel A; Barragan, Fatima; Chen, Joseph; Takeda, Margaret; Irwin, Juan C; Perry, Jean; Greenblatt, Ruth M; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Giudice, Linda C

    2015-07-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that progestin-containing contraceptives increase susceptibility to HIV, although the underlying mechanisms involving the upper female reproductive tract are undefined. To determine the effects of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on gene expression and physiology of human endometrial and cervical transformation zone (TZ), microarray analyses were performed on whole tissue biopsies. In endometrium, activated pathways included leukocyte chemotaxis, attachment, and inflammation in DMPA and LNG-IUS users, and individual genes included pattern recognition receptors, complement components, and other immune mediators. In cervical TZ, progestin treatment altered expression of tissue remodeling and viability but not immune function genes. Together, these results indicate that progestins influence expression of immune-related genes in endometrium relevant to local recruitment of HIV target cells with potential to increase susceptibility and underscore the importance of the upper reproductive tract when assessing the safety of contraceptive products.

  20. LPS inmobilization on porous and non-porous supports as an approach for the isolation of anti-LPS host-defense peptides

    PubMed Central

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; del Monte-Martínez, Alberto; Reyes-Acosta, Osvaldo; Franco, Octavio L.; Otero-González, Anselmo J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major molecular component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This molecule is recognized as a sign of bacterial infection, responsible for the development of local inflammatory response and, in extreme cases, septic shock. Unfortunately, despite substantial advances in the pathophysiology of sepsis, there is no efficacious therapy against this syndrome yet. As a consequence, septic shock syndrome continues to increase, reaching mortality rates over 50% in some cases. Even though many preclinical studies and clinical trials have been conducted, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug yet that interacts directly against LPS. Cationic host-defense peptides (HDPs) could be an alternative solution since they possess both antimicrobial and antiseptic properties. HDPs are small, positively charged peptides which are evolutionarily conserved components of the innate immune response. In fact, binding to diverse chemotypes of LPS and inhibition of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages have been demonstrated for different HDPs. Curiously, none of them have been isolated by their affinity to LPS. A diversity of supports could be useful for such biological interaction and suitable for isolating HDPs that recognize LPS. This approach could expand the rational search for anti-LPS HDPs. PMID:24409171

  1. Chlorisondamine, a sympathetic ganglionic blocker, moderates the effects of whole-body irradiation (WBI) on early host defense to a live bacterial challenge.

    PubMed

    Pecaut, Michael J; Mehrotra, Shalini; Luo-Owen, Xian; Bayeta, Erben J M; Bellinger, Denise L; Gridley, Daila S

    2015-10-01

    There is a growing consensus that long-term deficits in the brain are due to dynamic interactions between multiple neural and immune cell types. Specifically, radiation induces an inflammatory response, including changes in neuromodulatory pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion. The purpose of this study was to establish that there is sympathetic involvement in radiation-induced decrements early in in vivo immune function host defense. Female, 8-9 week-old C57BL/6J mice were exposed to whole-body irradiation (WBI). There were 8 groups with radiation (0 vs. 3 Gy protons), immune challenge (Escherichia coli) and exposure to the sympathetic ganglionic blocker, chlorisondamine (1 mg/kg weight, i.p.), as independent variables. Ten days post-irradiation, mice were inoculated with E. coli intraperitoneally and sacrificed 90-120 min later. The data suggest that radiation-induced changes in immune function may in part be mediated by the sympathetic nervous system. Briefly, we found that radiation augments the bacteria-induced inflammatory cytokine response, particularly those cytokines involved in innate immunity. However, this augmentation can be reduced by the ganglionic blockade. PMID:26235133

  2. Host-defense peptides from skin secretions of Fraser's clawed frog Xenopus fraseri (Pipidae): Further insight into the evolutionary history of the Xenopodinae.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael; Mechkarska, Milena; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Nowotny, Norbert; Coquet, Laurent; Leprince, Jérôme; Jouenne, Thierry; Vaudry, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    Peptidomic analysis of norepinephrine-stimulated skin secretions of the tetraploid frog Xenopus fraseri Boulenger, 1905 (Pipidae) led to identification of 13 host-defense peptides. The primary structures of the peptides demonstrate that they belong to the magainin (3 peptides), peptide glycine-leucine-amide, PGLa (4 peptides), and xenopsin-precursor fragment, XPF (2 peptides) families, first identified in Xenopus laevis, together with caerulein precursor fragment-related peptides, CPF-RP (4 peptides), first identified in Silurana tropicalis. In addition, the secretions contain a molecular variant of xenopsin displaying the substitution Arg(4)→Lys compared with X. laevis xenopsin and peptide glycine-tyrosine-amide (PGYa) (GRIIPIYPEFERVFA KKVYPLY.NH2) whose function is unknown. The most potent antimicrobial peptide identified is CPF-RP-F1 (GFGSVLGKALKFGANLL.NH2) with MIC=12.5μM against Staphylococcus aureus and 50μM against Escherichia coli. On the basis of similarities in morphology and advertisement calls, X. fraseri has been placed in a species group that includes the octoploids Xenopus amieti and Xenopus andrei, and the tetraploid Xenopus pygmaeus. Cladistic analyses based upon the primary structures of magainin, PGLa, and CPF-RP peptides support a close evolutionary relationship between X. fraseri, X. amieti and X. andrei but suggest a more distant relationship with X. pygmaeus. PMID:25463057

  3. LPS inmobilization on porous and non-porous supports as an approach for the isolation of anti-LPS host-defense peptides.

    PubMed

    López-Abarrategui, Carlos; Del Monte-Martínez, Alberto; Reyes-Acosta, Osvaldo; Franco, Octavio L; Otero-González, Anselmo J

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) are the major molecular component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. This molecule is recognized as a sign of bacterial infection, responsible for the development of local inflammatory response and, in extreme cases, septic shock. Unfortunately, despite substantial advances in the pathophysiology of sepsis, there is no efficacious therapy against this syndrome yet. As a consequence, septic shock syndrome continues to increase, reaching mortality rates over 50% in some cases. Even though many preclinical studies and clinical trials have been conducted, there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved drug yet that interacts directly against LPS. Cationic host-defense peptides (HDPs) could be an alternative solution since they possess both antimicrobial and antiseptic properties. HDPs are small, positively charged peptides which are evolutionarily conserved components of the innate immune response. In fact, binding to diverse chemotypes of LPS and inhibition of LPS-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines from macrophages have been demonstrated for different HDPs. Curiously, none of them have been isolated by their affinity to LPS. A diversity of supports could be useful for such biological interaction and suitable for isolating HDPs that recognize LPS. This approach could expand the rational search for anti-LPS HDPs. PMID:24409171

  4. Arabidopsis sigma factor binding proteins are activators of the WRKY33 transcription factor in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-10-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif-containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens.

  5. A background traffic activity analysis in a canonical NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) defense

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.N.; Tooman, T.P.

    1989-04-01

    A canonical defense study in a NATO brigade sector on the northern flank of the US V Corps sector in the Federal Republic of Germany is wargamed to depict the expected vehicular movements during a 24 hour time period. All NATO and Warsaw Pact situations and forces played intentionally portray a ''normal'' battlefield situation, that is one in which events occur according to the established tactics and doctrines for both NATO and WP forces. Activity details which are almost always ignored in broader studies are included. The periodic displacement of high value units (e.g., artillery, air defense, headquarters and target acquisition) to preclude enemy fixing and targeting; the resupply down to company and occasionally platoon level of ammunition, petroleum, rations, etc.; the movement of commanders and staffs; the activity of combat engineers to include site preparation, construction and minefield emplacement; the action of reconnaissance and patrol units; the security of the rear area and POW processing; and the evacuation of casualties are analyzed. The resulting database records the position for every vehicle in both forces at each minute during the period of analysis and is thus an ideal framework for a variety of further studies, such as analyses of intelligence collection devices and modern ordinances. 9 refs., 30 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. [Features of brain oscillatory activity and cardiac defense in treatment arterial hypertensives].

    PubMed

    Aftanas, L I; Brak, I V; Gilinskaia, O M; Pavlov, S V; Reva, N V

    2014-01-01

    Stress reactivity of the motivational system of defense can be assessed with the aid the cardiac defense response (CDR) - the reaction of the cardiovascular system to unexpected aversive unconditioned stimulus. The main objective of the study was revealing putative contribution of oscillatory systems of the brain into central pathogenic mechanisms of enhanced blood pressure (BP) stress-reactivity in naive patients with arterial hypertension (AH) of the 1st-2nd degrees (n = 17) and healthy control (n = 19) subjects. Using dynamic registration "beat-by-beat" arterial pressure, and oscillatory activity related EEG (64 channels) is estimated using the event-related synchronization/desynchronization (ERD/ERS). Along with abnormally high blood pressure in patients with hypertension background set significantly lower concentrations of serotonin blood platelets and increased tonic activation of the left hemisphere, reflected in the asymmetric reduction of delta- (2-4 Hz) and theta-1 (4-6 Hz) power in the central and parietal cortex in the hemisphere CDR of the patients are characterized by hyperactivity both short- and long-latency components of blood pressure. According to the dynamic analysis of the concomitant EEG, long-latency BP components may be accounted by, among other mechanisms, weakening of the descending ("top-down") inhibitory control, hypothetically implemented with the high-frequency EEG alpha (10-12 Hz) oscillations from the medial central-parietal cortex of both hemispheres of the brain. PMID:25464727

  7. An R2R3 MYB transcription factor in wheat, TaPIMP1, mediates host resistance to Bipolaris sorokiniana and drought stresses through regulation of defense- and stress-related genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengyan; Liu, Xin; Wang, Xindong; Zhou, Miaoping; Zhou, Xianyao; Ye, Xingguo; Wei, Xuening

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we report new insights into the function of a wheat (Triticum aestivum) MYB gene TaPIMP1 through overexpression and underexpression, and its underlying mechanism in wheat. Electrophoretic mobility shift and yeast-one-hybrid assays indicated that TaPIMP1 can bind to five MYB-binding sites including ACI, and activate the expression of the genes with the cis-element, confirming that TaPIMP1 is an MYB transcription activator. TaPIMP1-overexpressing transgenic wheat exhibited significantly enhanced resistance to the fungal pathogen Bipolaris sorokiniana and drought stresses, whereas TaPIMP1-underexpressing transgenic wheat showed more susceptibility to the stresses compared with untransformed wheat, revealing that TaPIMP1 positively modulates host-defense responses to B. sorokiniana and drought stresses. Microarray analysis showed that a subset of defense- and stress-related genes were up-regulated by TaPIMP1. These genes, including TaPIMP1, RD22, TLP4 and PR1a, were regulated by ABA and salicylic acid (SA). TaPIMP1-underexpressing transgenic wheat showed compromised induction of these stress-responsive genes following ABA and SA treatments. In summary, TaPIMP1, as a positive molecular linker, mediates resistance to B. sorokiniana and drought stresses by regulation of stress-related genes in ABA- and SA-signaling pathways in wheat. Furthermore, TaPIMP1 may provide a transgenic tool for engineering multiple-resistance wheat in breeding programs.

  8. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide) neutralization by innate immunity host-defense peptides. Peptide properties and plausible modes of action.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Yosef; Papo, Niv; Shai, Yechiel

    2006-01-20

    Binding of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to macrophages results in proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In extreme cases it leads to endotoxic shock. A few innate immunity antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) neutralize LPS activity. However, the underlying mechanism and properties of the peptides are not yet clear. Toward meeting this goal we investigated four AMPs and their fluorescently labeled analogs. These AMPs varied in composition, length, structure, and selectivity toward cells. The list included human LL-37 (37-mer), magainin (24-mer), a 15-mer amphipathic alpha-helix, and its D,L-amino acid structurally altered analog. The peptides were investigated for their ability to inhibit LPS-mediated cytokine release from RAW264.7 and bone marrow-derived primary macrophages, to bind LPS in solution, and when LPS is already bound to macrophages (fluorescence spectroscopy and confocal microscopy), to compete with LPS for its binding site on the CD14 receptor (flow cytometry) and affect LPS oligomerization. We conclude that a strong binding of a peptide to LPS aggregates accompanied by aggregate dissociation prevents LPS from binding to the carrier protein lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, or alternatively to its receptor, and hence inhibits cytokine secretion.

  9. Activity of Uncleaved Caspase-8 Controls Anti-bacterial Immune Defense and TLR-Induced Cytokine Production Independent of Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    DeLaney, Alexandra; Santos-Marrero, Melanie; Grier, Jennifer T.; Sun, Yan; Zwack, Erin E.; Hu, Baofeng; Olsen, Tayla M.; Rongvaux, Anthony; López, Carolina B.; Oberst, Andrew; Beiting, Daniel P.; Brodsky, Igor E.

    2016-01-01

    Caspases regulate cell death programs in response to environmental stresses, including infection and inflammation, and are therefore critical for the proper operation of the mammalian immune system. Caspase-8 is necessary for optimal production of inflammatory cytokines and host defense against infection by multiple pathogens including Yersinia, but whether this is due to death of infected cells or an intrinsic role of caspase-8 in TLR-induced gene expression is unknown. Caspase-8 activation at death signaling complexes results in its autoprocessing and subsequent cleavage and activation of its downstream apoptotic targets. Whether caspase-8 activity is also important for inflammatory gene expression during bacterial infection has not been investigated. Here, we report that caspase-8 plays an essential cell-intrinsic role in innate inflammatory cytokine production in vivo during Yersinia infection. Unexpectedly, we found that caspase-8 enzymatic activity regulates gene expression in response to bacterial infection as well as TLR signaling independently of apoptosis. Using newly-generated mice in which caspase-8 autoprocessing is ablated (Casp8DA/DA), we now demonstrate that caspase-8 enzymatic activity, but not autoprocessing, mediates induction of inflammatory cytokines by bacterial infection and a wide variety of TLR stimuli. Because unprocessed caspase-8 functions in an enzymatic complex with its homolog cFLIP, our findings implicate the caspase-8/cFLIP heterodimer in control of inflammatory cytokines during microbial infection, and provide new insight into regulation of antibacterial immune defense. PMID:27737018

  10. Cumberlandian Mollusk Conservation Program. Activity 2: potential fish hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, L.M.; Hickman, G.D.; Swor, C.T.

    1986-02-01

    Fish species from sand/gravel substrates and from rubble substrates which are the most likely hosts for Cumberlandian mussel fauna, C. caelata and Q. intermedia, from the Clinch, Duck, Elk, and Powell Rivers are reported. Infection with mollusk glochidia was used with overlap and occurrences to develop a ranking of each species potential as a suitable host for Cumberlandian mollusks. 12 ref., 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. Defense/stress responses activated by chitosan in sycamore cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Malerba, Massimo; Crosti, Paolo; Cerana, Raffaella

    2012-01-01

    Chitosan (CHT) is a natural, non-toxic, and inexpensive compound obtained by partial alkaline deacetylation of chitin, the main component of the exoskeleton of crustaceans and other arthropods. The unique physiological and biological properties of CHT make this polymer useful for a wide range of industries. In agriculture, CHT is used to control numerous pre- and postharvest diseases on various horticultural commodities. In recent years, much attention has been devoted to CHT as an elicitor of defense responses in plants, which include raising of cytosolic Ca(2+), activation of MAP kinases, callose apposition, oxidative burst, hypersensitive response, synthesis of abscisic acid, jasmonate, phytoalexins, and pathogenesis-related proteins. In this work, we investigated the effects of different CHT concentrations on some defense/stress responses of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cultured cells. CHT induced accumulation of dead cells, and of cells with fragmented DNA, production of H(2)O(2) and nitric oxide, release of cytochrome c from the mitochondrion, accumulation of regulative 14-3-3 proteins in the cytosol and of HSP70 molecular chaperone binding protein in the endoplasmic reticulum, accompanied by marked modifications in the architecture of this cell organelle.

  12. Temporal accumulation of salicylic acid activates the defense response against Colletotrichum in strawberry.

    PubMed

    Grellet-Bournonville, Carlos F; Martinez-Zamora, Martín G; Castagnaro, Atilio P; Díaz-Ricci, Juan Carlos

    2012-05-01

    Many authors have reported interactions between strawberry cultivars and pathogenic microorganisms, yet little is known about the mechanisms triggered in the plant. In this paper we examine the participation of the salicylic acid (SA) signaling pathway involved in the response of Fragaria x ananassa cv. Pájaro plants to pathogens. Strawberry plants were challenged with the virulent strain M11 of Colletotrichum acutatum, or with the avirulent strain M23 of Colletotrichum fragariae which confers resistance to the former. Our study showed that the isolate M23 induced a temporal SA accumulation that was accompanied with the induction of PR-1 gene expression in strawberry plants. Such events occured after the oxidative burst, evaluated as the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion, and many hours before the protection could be detected. Similar results were obtained with exogenously applied SA. Results obtained supports the hypothesis that strawberry plants activate a SA mediated defense mechanisms that is effective against a causal agent of anthracnose. In contrast, plants inoculated with M11 did not show oxidative burst, SA accumulation or PR1 gene induction. This is the first report about a defense response signaling pathway studied in strawberry plants. PMID:22366637

  13. Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis Induces a Unique Pulmonary Inflammatory Response: Role of Bacterial Gene Expression in Temporal Regulation of Host Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Kathie-Anne; Olsufka, Rachael; Kuestner, Rolf E.; Cho, Ji Hoon; Li, Hong; Zornetzer, Gregory A.; Wang, Kai; Skerrett, Shawn J.; Ozinsky, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary exposure to Francisella tularensis is associated with severe lung pathology and a high mortality rate. The lack of induction of classical inflammatory mediators, including IL1-β and TNF-α, during early infection has led to the suggestion that F. tularensis evades detection by host innate immune surveillance and/or actively suppresses inflammation. To gain more insight into the host response to Francisella infection during the acute stage, transcriptomic analysis was performed on lung tissue from mice exposed to virulent (Francisella tularensis ssp tularensis SchuS4). Despite an extensive transcriptional response in the lungs of animals as early as 4 hrs post-exposure, Francisella tularensis was associated with an almost complete lack of induction of immune-related genes during the initial 24 hrs post-exposure. This broad subversion of innate immune responses was particularly evident when compared to the pulmonary inflammatory response induced by other lethal (Yersinia pestis) and non-lethal (Legionella pneumophila, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) pulmonary infections. However, the unique induction of a subset of inflammation-related genes suggests a role for dysregulation of lymphocyte function and anti-inflammatory pathways in the extreme virulence of Francisella. Subsequent activation of a classical inflammatory response 48 hrs post-exposure was associated with altered abundance of Francisella-specific transcripts, including those associated with bacterial surface components. In summary, virulent Francisella induces a unique pulmonary inflammatory response characterized by temporal regulation of innate immune pathways correlating with altered bacterial gene expression patterns. This study represents the first simultaneous measurement of both host and Francisella transcriptome changes that occur during in vivo infection and identifies potential bacterial virulence factors responsible for regulation of host inflammatory pathways. PMID:23690939

  14. Host site of activity and cytological effects of histone-like proteins on the parasitic dinoflagellate Amyloodinium ocellatum.

    PubMed

    Noga, Edward J; Fan, Zhiqin; Silphaduang, Umaporn

    2002-12-10

    Histone-like proteins (HLPs) are broad-spectrum, endogenously produced antibiotics which we have isolated from tissues of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis male x M. chrysops female). Here, we show that HLP-1, which has high sequence homology to histone H2B, equally inhibited both young and mature trophonts of the important ectoparasite Amyloodinium ocellatum. In addition to direct killing of Amyloodinium trophonts, there was evidence that HLP-1 from both rainbow trout and hybrid striped bass caused severe developmental abnormalities, including delayed development, in both the parasitic trophont stage as well as the reproductive tomont stage. The deleterious effects of HLP-1 also were manifested in what appeared to be 'delayed mortality', where parasites of normal appearance would die later in development. Similar serious damage was also seen with calf histone H2B and the unrelated peptide antibiotic magainin 2. A comparison of the antibiotic activity in mucus versus epidermis compartments of the skin of hybrid striped bass suggested that the majority of antibiotic (including HLP-1) activity resided in the epidermis, although some activity was present in the mucus. These data suggest that normal, nonimmune fish skin contains potent defenses against protozoan ectoparasites and that the effects of these defenses may extend beyond their transient interactions with the parasites, which has important implications for this host-parasite relationship.

  15. Host suitability and diet mixing influence activities of detoxification enzymes in adult Japanese beetles.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Adekunle; Liu, Nannan; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450, glutathione S transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CoE) activity was measured in guts of the scarab Popillia japonica Newman, after consumption of single or mixed plant diets of previously ranked preferred (rose, Virginia creeper, crape myrtle and sassafras) or non-preferred hosts (boxelder, riverbirch and red oak). The goal of this study was to quantify activities of P450, GST and CoE enzymes in the midgut of adult P. japonica using multiple substrates in response to host plant suitability (preferred host vs non-preferred hosts), and single and mixed diets. Non-preferred hosts were only sparingly fed upon, and as a group induced higher activities of P450, GST and CoE than did preferred hosts. However, enzyme activities for some individual plant species were similar across categories of host suitability. Similarly, beetles tended to have greater enzyme activities after feeding on a mixture of plants compared to a single plant type, but mixing per se does not seem as important as the species represented in the mix. Induction of detoxification enzymes on non-preferred hosts, or when switching between hosts, may explain, in part, the perceived feeding preferences of this polyphagous insect. The potential consequences of induced enzyme activities on the ecology of adult Japanese beetles are discussed.

  16. Host suitability and diet mixing influence activities of detoxification enzymes in adult Japanese beetles.

    PubMed

    Adesanya, Adekunle; Liu, Nannan; Held, David W

    2016-05-01

    Induction of cytochrome P450, glutathione S transferase (GST), and carboxylesterase (CoE) activity was measured in guts of the scarab Popillia japonica Newman, after consumption of single or mixed plant diets of previously ranked preferred (rose, Virginia creeper, crape myrtle and sassafras) or non-preferred hosts (boxelder, riverbirch and red oak). The goal of this study was to quantify activities of P450, GST and CoE enzymes in the midgut of adult P. japonica using multiple substrates in response to host plant suitability (preferred host vs non-preferred hosts), and single and mixed diets. Non-preferred hosts were only sparingly fed upon, and as a group induced higher activities of P450, GST and CoE than did preferred hosts. However, enzyme activities for some individual plant species were similar across categories of host suitability. Similarly, beetles tended to have greater enzyme activities after feeding on a mixture of plants compared to a single plant type, but mixing per se does not seem as important as the species represented in the mix. Induction of detoxification enzymes on non-preferred hosts, or when switching between hosts, may explain, in part, the perceived feeding preferences of this polyphagous insect. The potential consequences of induced enzyme activities on the ecology of adult Japanese beetles are discussed. PMID:26964493

  17. Antioxidant defense parameters as predictive biomarkers for fermentative capacity of active dried wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The production of active dried yeast (ADY) is a common practice in industry for the maintenance of yeast starters and as a means of long term storage. The process, however, causes multiple cell injuries, with oxidative damage being one of the most important stresses. Consequentially, dehydration tolerance is a highly appreciated property in yeast for ADY production. In this study we analyzed the cellular redox environment in three Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains, which show markedly different fermentative capacities after dehydration. To measure/quantify the effect of dehydration on the S. cerevisiae strains, we used: (i) fluorescent probes; (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities; (ii) intracellular damage; (iii) antioxidant metabolites; and (iv) gene expression, to select a minimal set of biochemical parameters capable of predicting desiccation tolerance in wine yeasts. Our results show that naturally enhanced antioxidant defenses prevent oxidative damage after wine yeast biomass dehydration and improve fermentative capacity. Based on these results we chose four easily assayable parameters/biomarkers for the selection of industrial yeast strains of interest for ADY production: trehalose and glutathione levels, and glutathione reductase and catalase enzymatic activities. Yeast strains selected in accordance with this process display high levels of trehalose, low levels of oxidized glutathione, a high induction of glutathione reductase activity, as well as a high basal level and sufficient induction of catalase activity, which are properties inherent in superior ADY strains.

  18. Low Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide Activate the Antioxidant Defense System in Human Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Barinova, K V; Turovetskii, V B; Muronetz, V I; Schmalhausen, E V

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (10-100 µM) on sperm motility and on the activity of the sperm enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) was investigated. Incubation of semen samples with 10 and 100 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of spermatozoa with progressive motility by 20 and 18%, respectively, and enhanced the activity of GAPDS in the sperm cells by 27 and 20% compared to a semen sample incubated without additions. It was also found that incubation with 10 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) in sperm cells by 50% on average compared to that in the control samples. It is supposed that low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide activate the pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in NADPH synthesis and the reduction of the oxidized glutathione by glutathione reductase yielding GSH. The formed GSH reduces the oxidized cysteine residues of the GAPDS active site, increasing the activity of the enzyme, which in turn enhances the content of sperm cells with progressive motility. Thus, the increase in motile spermatozoa in the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can serve as an indicator of normal functioning of the antioxidant defense system in sperm cells.

  19. Antioxidant defense parameters as predictive biomarkers for fermentative capacity of active dried wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Gamero-Sandemetrio, Esther; Gómez-Pastor, Rocío; Matallana, Emilia

    2014-08-01

    The production of active dried yeast (ADY) is a common practice in industry for the maintenance of yeast starters and as a means of long term storage. The process, however, causes multiple cell injuries, with oxidative damage being one of the most important stresses. Consequentially, dehydration tolerance is a highly appreciated property in yeast for ADY production. In this study we analyzed the cellular redox environment in three Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains, which show markedly different fermentative capacities after dehydration. To measure/quantify the effect of dehydration on the S. cerevisiae strains, we used: (i) fluorescent probes; (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities; (ii) intracellular damage; (iii) antioxidant metabolites; and (iv) gene expression, to select a minimal set of biochemical parameters capable of predicting desiccation tolerance in wine yeasts. Our results show that naturally enhanced antioxidant defenses prevent oxidative damage after wine yeast biomass dehydration and improve fermentative capacity. Based on these results we chose four easily assayable parameters/biomarkers for the selection of industrial yeast strains of interest for ADY production: trehalose and glutathione levels, and glutathione reductase and catalase enzymatic activities. Yeast strains selected in accordance with this process display high levels of trehalose, low levels of oxidized glutathione, a high induction of glutathione reductase activity, as well as a high basal level and sufficient induction of catalase activity, which are properties inherent in superior ADY strains. PMID:24644263

  20. Tetraploidization of diploid Dioscorea results in activation of the antioxidant defense system and increased heat tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yi; Hu, Chun-Gen; Yao, Jia-Ling

    2010-01-15

    Polyploidy is reported to show increased tolerance to environmental stress. In this work, tetraploid plants of Dioscorea zingiberensis were obtained by colchicine treatment of shoots propagated in vitro. The highest tetraploid induction rate was achieved by treatment with 0.15% colchicine for 24h. Diploid and tetraploid plants were exposed to normal (28 degrees C) and high temperature (42 degrees C) for 5d during which physiological indices were measured. Compared with diploid plants, relative electrolyte leakage and contents of malondialdehyde, superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide were lower in tetraploids, while activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, peroxidase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase, were stimulated and antioxidants (ascorbic acid and glutathione) were maintained at high concentrations. These results indicate that tetraploid plants possess a stronger antioxidant defense system and increased heat tolerance. PMID:19692145

  1. Defensive activation during the rubber hand illusion: Ownership versus proprioceptive drift.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Martin; Bublatzky, Florian; Trojan, Jörg; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-07-01

    A strong link between body perception and emotional experience has been proposed. To examine the interaction between body perception and anticipatory anxiety, two well-established paradigms were combined: The rubber hand illusion (RHI) and the threat-of-shock paradigm. An artificial hand and the participants' own hand (hidden from sight) were touched synchronously or asynchronously, while either threat-of-shock or safety was cued. Potentiated startle reflexes and enhanced skin conductance responses were observed during threat as compared to safety conditions, but threat conditions did not interact with illusory body perceptions. Thus, defense system activation was not modulated by altered body representations. Physiological responses increased with the sense of ownership for the artificial limb, but not with proprioceptive drift towards its location. The results indicate that ownership ratings and proprioceptive drift capture different aspects of the RHI. The study presents a new approach to investigate the relationship between body representations and emotional states.

  2. Defensive activation during the rubber hand illusion: Ownership versus proprioceptive drift.

    PubMed

    Riemer, Martin; Bublatzky, Florian; Trojan, Jörg; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-07-01

    A strong link between body perception and emotional experience has been proposed. To examine the interaction between body perception and anticipatory anxiety, two well-established paradigms were combined: The rubber hand illusion (RHI) and the threat-of-shock paradigm. An artificial hand and the participants' own hand (hidden from sight) were touched synchronously or asynchronously, while either threat-of-shock or safety was cued. Potentiated startle reflexes and enhanced skin conductance responses were observed during threat as compared to safety conditions, but threat conditions did not interact with illusory body perceptions. Thus, defense system activation was not modulated by altered body representations. Physiological responses increased with the sense of ownership for the artificial limb, but not with proprioceptive drift towards its location. The results indicate that ownership ratings and proprioceptive drift capture different aspects of the RHI. The study presents a new approach to investigate the relationship between body representations and emotional states. PMID:25960069

  3. Programmed cell death in plants: a pathogen-triggered response activated coordinately with multiple defense functions.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J T; Guo, A; Klessig, D F; Ausubel, F M

    1994-05-20

    In plants, the hypersensitive response (HR) to pathogens involves rapid cell death, which is hypothesized to arise from the activation of a cell death program. We describe mutant A. thaliana plants that contain lesions in a single accelerated cell death (ACD) gene called ACD2 and that bypass the need for pathogen exposure to induce the HR. acd2 plants that develop spontaneous lesions show typical HR characteristics both within the necrotic tissue and within the healthy part of the plant, including: modification of plant cell walls, resistance to bacterial pathogens, and accumulation of defense-related gene transcripts, the signal molecule salicylic acid and an antimicrobial compound. We propose that the ACD2 gene is involved in a pathway(s) that negatively regulates a genetically programmed HR.

  4. Disease Interactions in a Shared Host Plant: Effects of Pre-Existing Viral Infection on Cucurbit Plant Defense Responses and Resistance to Bacterial Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mauck, Kerry E.; Pulido, Hannier; De Moraes, Consuelo M.; Stephenson, Andrew G.; Mescher, Mark C.

    2013-01-01

    Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana) contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila) at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA) in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant quality for (and

  5. Reduced Susceptibility to Host-Defense Cationic Peptides and Daptomycin Coemerge in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus From Daptomycin-Naive Bacteremic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Nagendra N.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Moise, Pamela A.; Yeaman, Michael R.; Sakoulas, George

    2012-01-01

    Background. We hypothesized that, for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in vitro daptomycin susceptibility could be influenced by exposures to endogenous host defense peptides (HDPs) prior to clinical exposure to daptomycin. Methods. Two endovascular HDPs were used: thrombin-induced platelet microbicidal protein (tPMP) and human neutrophil defensin-1 (hNP-1) from neutrophils. Forty-seven unique MRSA isolates obtained from bacteremic patients in multicenter prospective clinical trials were studied. Clinical characteristics, microbiologic parameters, prior vancomycin therapy, and susceptibilities to tPMP, hNP-1, and daptomycin were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Results. All strains were daptomycin susceptible. Daptomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were inversely related to in vitro tPMP (but not hNP-1) killing. Strains with a daptomycin MIC of 1 mg/L exhibited significantly less killing by tPMP, compared with strains with an MIC of ≤ 0.5 mg/L. Prior vancomycin therapy did not influence this relationship. Regression tree modeling confirmed that reduced tPMP-induced killing in vitro was the strongest predictor of higher daptomycin MICs within the daptomycin-susceptible range. Conclusions. Among daptomycin-susceptible MRSA isolates from patients who had never received daptomycin, higher daptomycin MICs tracked with increased resistance to killing by platelet-derived but not neutrophil-derived HDPs. These findings support the notion that endogenous exposure of MRSA to specific HDPs may play a role in selecting strains with an intrinsically higher daptomycin MIC phenotype. PMID:22904338

  6. Disease interactions in a shared host plant: effects of pre-existing viral infection on cucurbit plant defense responses and resistance to bacterial wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Lori R; Salvaudon, Lucie; Mauck, Kerry E; Pulido, Hannier; De Moraes, Consuelo M; Stephenson, Andrew G; Mescher, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    Both biotic and abiotic stressors can elicit broad-spectrum plant resistance against subsequent pathogen challenges. However, we currently have little understanding of how such effects influence broader aspects of disease ecology and epidemiology in natural environments where plants interact with multiple antagonists simultaneously. In previous work, we have shown that healthy wild gourd plants (Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana) contract a fatal bacterial wilt infection (caused by Erwinia tracheiphila) at significantly higher rates than plants infected with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). We recently reported evidence that this pattern is explained, at least in part, by reduced visitation of ZYMV-infected plants by the cucumber beetle vectors of E. tracheiphila. Here we examine whether ZYMV-infection may also directly elicit plant resistance to subsequent E. tracheiphila infection. In laboratory studies, we assayed the induction of key phytohormones (SA and JA) in single and mixed infections of these pathogens, as well as in response to the feeding of A. vittatum cucumber beetles on healthy and infected plants. We also tracked the incidence and progression of wilt disease symptoms in plants with prior ZYMV infections. Our results indicate that ZYMV-infection slightly delays the progression of wilt symptoms, but does not significantly reduce E. tracheiphila infection success. This observation supports the hypothesis that reduced rates of wilt disease in ZYMV-infected plants reflect reduced visitation by beetle vectors. We also documented consistently strong SA responses to ZYMV infection, but limited responses to E. tracheiphila in the absence of ZYMV, suggesting that the latter pathogen may effectively evade or suppress plant defenses, although we observed no evidence of antagonistic cross-talk between SA and JA signaling pathways. We did, however, document effects of E. tracheiphila on induced responses to herbivory that may influence host-plant quality for (and

  7. The Bark-Beetle-Associated Fungus, Endoconidiophora polonica, Utilizes the Phenolic Defense Compounds of Its Host as a Carbon Source1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wadke, Namita; Kandasamy, Dineshkumar; Vogel, Heiko; Wingfield, Brenda D.; Paetz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Norway spruce (Picea abies) is periodically attacked by the bark beetle Ips typographus and its fungal associate, Endoconidiophora polonica, whose infection is thought to be required for successful beetle attack. Norway spruce produces terpenoid resins and phenolics in response to fungal and bark beetle invasion. However, how the fungal associate copes with these chemical defenses is still unclear. In this study, we investigated changes in the phenolic content of Norway spruce bark upon E. polonica infection and the biochemical factors mediating these changes. Although genes encoding the rate-limiting enzymes in Norway spruce stilbene and flavonoid biosynthesis were actively transcribed during fungal infection, there was a significant time-dependent decline of the corresponding metabolites in fungal lesions. In vitro feeding experiments with pure phenolics revealed that E. polonica transforms both stilbenes and flavonoids to muconoid-type ring-cleavage products, which are likely the first steps in the degradation of spruce defenses to substrates that can enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Four genes were identified in E. polonica that encode catechol dioxygenases carrying out these reactions. These enzymes catalyze the cleavage of phenolic rings with a vicinal dihydroxyl group to muconoid products accepting a wide range of Norway spruce-produced phenolics as substrates. The expression of these genes and E. polonica utilization of the most abundant spruce phenolics as carbon sources both correlated positively with fungal virulence in several strains. Thus, the pathways for the degradation of phenolic compounds in E. polonica, initiated by catechol dioxygenase action, are important to the infection, growth, and survival of this bark beetle-vectored fungus and may play a major role in the ability of I. typographus to colonize spruce trees. PMID:27208235

  8. Mechanisms of intracellular defense and activity of free radical oxidation in rat myocardium in the dynamics of chronic fluorine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Zhukova, A G; Alekhina, D A; Sazontova, T G; Prokop'ev, Yu A; Gorokhova, L G; Stryapko, N V; Mikhailova, N N

    2013-12-01

    The mechanisms of intracellular defense and activity of free radical oxidation in the myocardium were studied in the dynamics of chronic fluorine intoxication. At the early stages of fluorine intoxication (day 3-week 3), the concentrations of defense proteins HIF-1α, HSC73, and HOx-2 and activity of the main metabolic enzymes increased, which promoted maintenance of cardiomyocyte structure and function at the normal physiological level. At late stages of fluorine intoxication (weeks 6 and 9), metabolic changes in the myocardium attest to high strain of the adaptive mechanisms.

  9. Sulforaphane prevents pulmonary damage in response to inhaled arsenic by activating the Nrf2-defense response

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Yi; Tao, Shasha; Lian, Fangru; Chau, Binh T.; Chen, Jie; Sun, Guifan; Fang, Deyu; Lantz, R. Clark; Zhang, Donna D.

    2012-12-15

    Exposure to arsenic is associated with an increased risk of lung disease. Novel strategies are needed to reduce the adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure in the lung. Nrf2, a transcription factor that mediates an adaptive cellular defense response, is effective in detoxifying environmental insults and prevents a broad spectrum of diseases induced by environmental exposure to harmful substances. In this report, we tested whether Nrf2 activation protects mice from arsenic-induced toxicity. We used an in vivo arsenic inhalation model that is highly relevant to low environmental human exposure to arsenic-containing dusts. Two-week exposure to arsenic-containing dust resulted in pathological alterations, oxidative DNA damage, and mild apoptotic cell death in the lung; all of which were blocked by sulforaphane (SF) in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Mechanistically, SF-mediated activation of Nrf2 alleviated inflammatory responses by modulating cytokine production. This study provides strong evidence that dietary intervention targeting Nrf2 activation is a feasible approach to reduce adverse health effects associated with arsenic exposure. -- Highlights: ► Exposed to arsenic particles and/or SF have elevated Nrf2 and its target genes. ► Sulforaphane prevents pathological alterations, oxidative damage and cell death. ► Sulforaphane alleviates infiltration of inflammatory cells into the lungs. ► Sulforaphane suppresses arsenic-induced proinflammatory cytokine production.

  10. Arrestins in host-pathogen interactions

    PubMed Central

    Marullo, Stefano; Coureuil, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    In the context of host-pathogen interaction, host cell receptors and signaling pathways are essential for both invading pathogens, which exploit them at their own profit, and the defending organism, which activates early mechanism of defense, known as innate immunity, to block the aggression. Because of their central role as scaffolding proteins downstream of activated receptors, β-arrestins are involved in multiple signaling pathways activated in host cells by pathogens. Some of these pathways participate to the innate immunity and the inflammatory response. Other β-arrestin-dependent pathways are actually hijacked by microbes and toxins to penetrate into host cells and spread in the organism. PMID:24292839

  11. Subchronic atrazine exposure changes defensive behaviour profile and disrupts brain acetylcholinesterase activity of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Schmidel, Ademir J; Assmann, Karla L; Werlang, Chariane C; Bertoncello, Kanandra T; Francescon, Francini; Rambo, Cassiano L; Beltrame, Gabriela M; Calegari, Daiane; Batista, Cibele B; Blaser, Rachel E; Roman Júnior, Walter A; Conterato, Greicy M M; Piato, Angelo L; Zanatta, Leila; Magro, Jacir Dal; Rosemberg, Denis B

    2014-01-01

    Animal behaviour is the interaction between environment and an individual organism, which also can be influenced by its neighbours. Variations in environmental conditions, as those caused by contaminants, may lead to neurochemical impairments altering the pattern of the behavioural repertoire of the species. Atrazine (ATZ) is an herbicide widely used in agriculture that is frequently detected in surface water, affecting non-target species. The zebrafish is a valuable model organism to assess behavioural and neurochemical effects of different contaminants since it presents a robust behavioural repertoire and also all major neurotransmitter systems described for mammalian species. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effects of subchronic ATZ exposure in defensive behaviours of zebrafish (shoaling, thigmotaxis, and depth preference) using the split depth tank. Furthermore, to investigate a putative role of cholinergic signalling on ATZ-mediated effects, we tested whether this herbicide alters acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in brain and muscle preparations. Fish were exposed to ATZ for 14days and the following groups were tested: control (0.2% acetone) and ATZ (10 and 1000μg/L). The behaviour of four animals in the same tank was recorded for 6min and biological samples were prepared. Our results showed that 1000μg/L ATZ significantly increased the inter-fish distance, as well as the nearest and farthest neighbour distances. This group also presented an increase in the shoal area with decreased social interaction. No significant differences were detected for the number of animals in the shallow area, latency to enter the shallow and time spent in shallow and deep areas of the apparatus, but the ATZ 1000 group spent significantly more time near the walls. Although ATZ did not affect muscular AChE, it significantly reduced AChE activity in brain. Exposure to 10μg/L ATZ did not affect behaviour or AChE activity. These data suggest that ATZ impairs defensive

  12. Alternative activation deprives macrophages of a coordinated defense program to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kahnert, Antje; Seiler, Peter; Stein, Maik; Bandermann, Silke; Hahnke, Karin; Mollenkopf, Hans; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2006-03-01

    A potent Th1 immune response is critical to the control of tuberculosis. The impact of an additive Th2 response on the course of disease has so far been insufficiently characterized, despite increased morbidity after co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Th2-eliciting helminths and possible involvement of Th2 polarization in reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Here, we describe the gene expression profile of murine bone marrow-derived macrophages alternatively activated by IL-4 in response to infection with M. tuberculosis. Comparison of transcriptional profiles of infected IL-4- and IFN-gamma-activated macrophages revealed delayed and partially diminished responses to intracellular bacteria in alternatively activated macrophages, characterized by reduced exposure to nitrosative stress and increased iron availability, respectively. Alternative activation of host macrophages correlated with elevated expression of the M. tuberculosis iron storage protein bacterioferritin as well as reduced expression of the mycobactin synthesis genes mbtI and mbtJ. The extracellular matrix-remodeling enzyme matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 was induced in alternatively activated macrophages in vitro, and MMP-12-expressing macrophages were abundant at late, but not early, stages of tuberculosis in murine lungs. Our findings emphasize that alternative activation deprives macrophages of control mechanisms that limit mycobacterial growth in vivo, thus supporting intracellular persistence of M. tuberculosis. PMID:16479545

  13. Intracellular Oxidant Activity, Antioxidant Enzyme Defense System, and Cell Senescence in Fibroblasts with Trisomy 21

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS. PMID:25852816

  14. Intracellular oxidant activity, antioxidant enzyme defense system, and cell senescence in fibroblasts with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sureda, Víctor; Vilches, Ángel; Sánchez, Olga; Audí, Laura; Domínguez, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Down's syndrome (DS) is characterized by a complex phenotype associated with chronic oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. Overexpression of genes on chromosome-21 is thought to underlie the pathogenesis of the major phenotypic features of DS, such as premature aging. Using cultured fibroblasts with trisomy 21 (T21F), this study aimed to ascertain whether an imbalance exists in activities, mRNA, and protein expression of the antioxidant enzymes SOD1, SOD2, glutathione-peroxidase, and catalase during the cell replication process in vitro. T21F had high SOD1 expression and activity which led to an interenzymatic imbalance in the antioxidant defense system, accentuated with replicative senescence. Intracellular ROS production and oxidized protein levels were significantly higher in T21F compared with control cells; furthermore, a significant decline in intracellular ATP content was detected in T21F. Cell senescence was found to appear prematurely in DS cells as shown by SA-β-Gal assay and p21 assessment, though not apoptosis, as neither p53 nor the proapoptotic proteins cytochrome c and caspase 9 were altered in T21F. These novel findings would point to a deleterious role of oxidatively modified molecules in early cell senescence of T21F, thereby linking replicative and stress-induced senescence in cultured cells to premature aging in DS.

  15. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. 50.13 Section 50.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF PRODUCTION AND UTILIZATION FACILITIES Requirement of License, Exceptions § 50.13 Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United...

  16. 10 CFR 50.13 - Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attacks and destructive acts by enemies of the United... destructive acts by enemies of the United States; and defense activities. An applicant for a license to... an enemy of the United States, whether a foreign government or other person, or (b) use or...

  17. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  18. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  19. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  20. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. 2.60 Section 2.60 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  1. 18 CFR 2.60 - Facilities and activities during an emergency-accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Natural Gas Act § 2.60 Facilities and activities during an emergency—accounting treatment of defense-related expenditures. The Commission, cognizant of the need of the natural gas industry for advice with respect to the applicability of the Natural Gas Act and the Commission's regulations thereunder...

  2. When Threat Is Near, Get Out of Here: Dynamics of Defensive Behavior During Freezing and Active Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Löw, Andreas; Weymar, Mathias; Hamm, Alfons O

    2015-11-01

    When detecting a threat, humans and other animals engage in defensive behaviors and supporting physiological adjustments that vary with threat imminence and potential response options. In the present study, we shed light on the dynamics of defensive behaviors and associated physiological adjustments in humans using multiple psychophysiological and brain measures. When participants were exposed to a dynamically approaching, uncontrollable threat, attentive freezing was augmented, as indicated by an increase in skin conductance, fear bradycardia, and potentiation of the startle reflex. In contrast, when participants had the opportunity to actively avoid the approaching threat, attention switched to response preparation, as indicated by an inhibition of the startle magnitude and by a sharp drop of the probe-elicited P3 component of the evoked brain potentials. These new findings on the dynamics of defensive behaviors form an important intersection between animal and human research and have important implications for understanding fear and anxiety-related disorders.

  3. Combined Activity of DCL2 and DCL3 Is Crucial in the Defense against Potato Spindle Tuber Viroid

    PubMed Central

    Katsarou, Konstantina; Mavrothalassiti, Eleni; Dermauw, Wannes; Van Leeuwen, Thomas; Kalantidis, Kriton

    2016-01-01

    Viroids are self replicating non-coding RNAs capable of infecting a wide range of plant hosts. They do not encode any proteins, thus the mechanism by which they escape plant defenses remains unclear. RNAi silencing is a major defense mechanism against virus infections, with the four DCL proteins being principal components of the pathway. We have used Nicotiana benthamiana as a model to study Potato spindle tuber viroid infection. This viroid is a member of the Pospiviroidae family and replicates in the nucleus via an asymmetric rolling circle mechanism. We have created knock-down plants for all four DCL genes and their combinations. Previously, we showed that DCL4 has a positive effect on PSTVd infectivity since viroid levels drop when DCL4 is suppressed. Here, we show that PSTVd levels remain decreased throughout infection in DCL4 knockdown plants, and that simultaneous knockdown of DCL1, DCL2 or DCL3 together with DCL4 cannot reverse this effect. Through infection of plants suppressed for multiple DCLs we further show that a combined suppression of DCL2 and DCL3 has a major effect in succumbing plant antiviral defense. Based on our results, we further suggest that Pospoviroids may have evolved to be primarily processed by DCL4 as it seems to be a DCL protein with less detrimental effects on viroid infectivity. These findings pave the way to delineate the complexity of the relationship between viroids and plant RNA silencing response. PMID:27732664

  4. Detection of neural activity in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a "hot defensive bee ball".

    PubMed

    Ugajin, Atsushi; Kiya, Taketoshi; Kunieda, Takekazu; Ono, Masato; Yoshida, Tadaharu; Kubo, Takeo

    2012-01-01

    Anti-predator behaviors are essential to survival for most animals. The neural bases of such behaviors, however, remain largely unknown. Although honeybees commonly use their stingers to counterattack predators, the Japanese honeybee (Apis cerana japonica) uses a different strategy to fight against the giant hornet (Vespa mandarinia japonica). Instead of stinging the hornet, Japanese honeybees form a "hot defensive bee ball" by surrounding the hornet en masse, killing it with heat. The European honeybee (A. mellifera ligustica), on the other hand, does not exhibit this behavior, and their colonies are often destroyed by a hornet attack. In the present study, we attempted to analyze the neural basis of this behavior by mapping the active brain regions of Japanese honeybee workers during the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. First, we identified an A. cerana homolog (Acks = Apis cerana kakusei) of kakusei, an immediate early gene that we previously identified from A. mellifera, and showed that Acks has characteristics similar to kakusei and can be used to visualize active brain regions in A. cerana. Using Acks as a neural activity marker, we demonstrated that neural activity in the mushroom bodies, especially in Class II Kenyon cells, one subtype of mushroom body intrinsic neurons, and a restricted area between the dorsal lobes and the optic lobes was increased in the brains of Japanese honeybee workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball. In addition, workers exposed to 46°C heat also exhibited Acks expression patterns similar to those observed in the brains of workers involved in the formation of a hot defensive bee ball, suggesting that the neural activity observed in the brains of workers involved in the hot defensive bee ball mainly reflects thermal stimuli processing. PMID:22431987

  5. Involvement of Trichoderma Trichothecenes in the Biocontrol Activity and Induction of Plant Defense-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Malmierca, M. G.; Cardoza, R. E.; Alexander, N. J.; McCormick, S. P.; Hermosa, R.; Monte, E.

    2012-01-01

    Trichoderma species produce trichothecenes, most notably trichodermin and harzianum A (HA), by a biosynthetic pathway in which several of the involved proteins have significant differences in functionality compared to their Fusarium orthologues. In addition, the genes encoding these proteins show a genomic organization differing from that of the Fusarium tri clusters. Here we describe the isolation of Trichoderma arundinaceum IBT 40837 transformants which have a disrupted or silenced tri4 gene, a gene encoding a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase that oxygenates trichodiene to give rise to isotrichodiol, and the effect of tri4 gene disruption and silencing on the expression of other tri genes. Our results indicate that the tri4 gene disruption resulted in a reduced antifungal activity against Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani and also in a reduced ability to induce the expression of tomato plant defense-related genes belonging to the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonate (JA) pathways against B. cinerea, in comparison to the wild-type strain, indicating that HA plays an important function in the sensitization of Trichoderma-pretreated plants against this fungal pathogen. Additionally, the effect of the interaction of T. arundinaceum with B. cinerea or R. solani and with tomato seedlings on the expressions of the tri genes was studied. PMID:22562989

  6. Chitosan controls postharvest anthracnose in bell pepper by activating defense-related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Madushani; Ali, Asgar; Maqbool, Mehdi; Alderson, Peter G

    2014-12-01

    Anthracnose, a postharvest disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum capsici is the most devastating disease of bell pepper that causes great economic losses especially in tropical climates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of chitosan (low molecular weight from crab shell, Mw: 50 kDa and 75-85 % deacetylated) against anthracnose by inducing defense-related enzymes. The concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan were used to control the fungus in vitro and postharvest. There was a reduction in C. capsici mycelial growth and the highest chitosan concentration (2.0 %) reduced the growth by 70 % after 7 days incubation. In germination test, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan reduced spore germination in C. capsici between 80 % and 84 %, respectively. In postharvest trial the concentration of 1.5 % decreased the anthracnose severity in pepper fruit by approximately 76 % after 28 days of storage (10 ± 1 °C; 80 % RH). For enzymatic activities, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan increased the polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD) and total phenolics in inoculated bell pepper during storage. Based on these results, the chitosan presents antifungal properties against C. capsici, as well as potential to induce resistance on bell pepper.

  7. Sulforaphane protects Microcystin-LR-induced toxicity through activation of the Nrf2-mediated defensive response

    SciTech Connect

    Gan Nanqin; Mi Lixin; Sun Xiaoyun; Dai Guofei; Chung Funglung; Song Lirong

    2010-09-01

    Microcystins (MCs), a cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxins, are mainly produced by the bloom-forming cyanobacerium Microcystis, which has become an environmental hazard worldwide. Long term consumption of MC-contaminated water may induce liver damage, liver cancer, and even human death. Therefore, in addition to removal of MCs in drinking water, novel strategies that prevent health damages are urgently needed. Sulforaphane (SFN), a natural-occurring isothiocyanate from cruciferous vegetables, has been reported to reduce and eliminate toxicities from xenobiotics and carcinogens. The purpose of the present study was to provide mechanistic insights into the SFN-induced antioxidative defense system against MC-LR-induced cytotoxicity. We performed cell viability assays, including MTS assay, colony formation assay and apoptotic cell sorting, to study MC-LR-induced cellular damage and the protective effects by SFN. The results showed that SFN protected MC-LR-induced damages at a nontoxic and physiological relevant dose in HepG2, BRL-3A and NIH 3 T3 cells. The protection was Nrf2-mediated as evident by transactivation of Nrf2 and activation of its downstream genes, including NQO1 and HO-1, and elevated intracellular GSH level. Results of our studies indicate that pretreatment of cells with 10 {mu}M SFN for 12 h significantly protected cells from MC-LR-induced damage. SFN-induced protective response was mediated through Nrf2 pathway.

  8. Ozone Sensitivity in Hybrid Poplar Is Correlated with a Lack of Defense-Gene Activation1

    PubMed Central

    Riehl Koch, Jennifer; Scherzer, Amy J.; Eshita, Steven M.; Davis, Keith R.

    1998-01-01

    Ozone is a major gaseous pollutant thought to contribute to forest decline. Although the physiological and morphological responses of forest trees to ozone have been well characterized, little is known about the molecular basis for these responses. Our studies compared the response to ozone of ozone-sensitive and ozone-tolerant clones of hybrid poplar (Populus maximowizii × Populus trichocarpa) at the physiological and molecular levels. Gas-exchange analyses demonstrated clear differences between the ozone-sensitive clone 388 and the ozone-tolerant clone 245. Although ozone induced a decrease in photosynthetic rate and stomatal conductance in both clones, the magnitude of the decrease in stomatal conductance was significantly greater in the ozone-tolerant clone. RNA-blot analysis established that ozone-induced mRNA levels for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, O-methyltransferase, a pathogenesis-related protein, and a wound-inducible gene were significantly higher in the ozone-tolerant than in the ozone-sensitive plants. Wound- and pathogen-induced levels of these mRNAs were also higher in the ozone-tolerant compared with the ozone-sensitive plants. The different physiological and molecular responses to ozone exposure exhibited by clones 245 and 388 suggest that ozone tolerance involves the activation of salicylic-acid- and jasmonic-acid-mediated signaling pathways, which may be important in triggering defense responses against oxidative stress. PMID:9847098

  9. Chitosan controls postharvest anthracnose in bell pepper by activating defense-related enzymes.

    PubMed

    Edirisinghe, Madushani; Ali, Asgar; Maqbool, Mehdi; Alderson, Peter G

    2014-12-01

    Anthracnose, a postharvest disease caused by the fungus Colletotrichum capsici is the most devastating disease of bell pepper that causes great economic losses especially in tropical climates. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the antifungal properties of chitosan (low molecular weight from crab shell, Mw: 50 kDa and 75-85 % deacetylated) against anthracnose by inducing defense-related enzymes. The concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan were used to control the fungus in vitro and postharvest. There was a reduction in C. capsici mycelial growth and the highest chitosan concentration (2.0 %) reduced the growth by 70 % after 7 days incubation. In germination test, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan reduced spore germination in C. capsici between 80 % and 84 %, respectively. In postharvest trial the concentration of 1.5 % decreased the anthracnose severity in pepper fruit by approximately 76 % after 28 days of storage (10 ± 1 °C; 80 % RH). For enzymatic activities, the concentration of 1.5 and 2.0 % chitosan increased the polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POD) and total phenolics in inoculated bell pepper during storage. Based on these results, the chitosan presents antifungal properties against C. capsici, as well as potential to induce resistance on bell pepper. PMID:25477684

  10. Dynamic defense workshop :

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, Sean Michael; Doak, Justin E.; Haas, Jason Juedes.; Helinski, Ryan; Lamb, Christopher C.

    2013-02-01

    On September 5th and 6th, 2012, the Dynamic Defense Workshop: From Research to Practice brought together researchers from academia, industry, and Sandia with the goals of increasing collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories and external organizations, de ning and un- derstanding dynamic, or moving target, defense concepts and directions, and gaining a greater understanding of the state of the art for dynamic defense. Through the workshop, we broadened and re ned our de nition and understanding, identi ed new approaches to inherent challenges, and de ned principles of dynamic defense. Half of the workshop was devoted to presentations of current state-of-the-art work. Presentation topics included areas such as the failure of current defenses, threats, techniques, goals of dynamic defense, theory, foundations of dynamic defense, future directions and open research questions related to dynamic defense. The remainder of the workshop was discussion, which was broken down into sessions on de ning challenges, applications to host or mobile environments, applications to enterprise network environments, exploring research and operational taxonomies, and determining how to apply scienti c rigor to and investigating the eld of dynamic defense.

  11. Seasonal variations of the activity of antioxidant defense enzymes in the red mullet (Mullus barbatus l.) from the Adriatic Sea.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Sladjan Z; Borković Mitić, Slavica S; Radovanović, Tijana B; Perendija, Branka R; Despotović, Svetlana G; Gavrić, Jelena P; Saicić, Zorica S

    2010-02-26

    This study investigated seasonal variations of antioxidant defense enzyme activities: total, manganese, copper zinc containing superoxide dismutase (Tot SOD, Mn SOD, CuZn SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and biotransformation phase II enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity in the liver and white muscle of red mullet (Mullus barbatus). The investigations were performed in winter and spring at two localities: Near Bar (NB) and Estuary of the River Bojana (EB) in the Southern Adriatic Sea. At both sites, Mn SOD, GSH-Px, GR and GST activities decreased in the liver in spring. In the white muscle, activities of Mn SOD, GSH-Px, GR and GST in NB decreased in spring. GR decreased in spring in EB, while CAT activity was higher in spring at both sites. The results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) based on correlations indicated a clear separation of various sampling periods for both investigated tissues and a marked difference between two seasons. Our study is the first report on antioxidant defense enzyme activities in the red mullet in the Southern Adriatic Sea. It indicates that seasonal variations of antioxidant defense enzyme activities should be used in further biomonitoring studies in fish species.

  12. Annual Report To Congress. Department of Energy Activities Relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2004-02-28

    The Department of Energy (Department) submits an Annual Report to Congress each year detailing the Department’s activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board), which provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy (Secretary) regarding public health and safety issues at the Department’s defense nuclear facilities. In 2003, the Department continued ongoing activities to resolve issues identified by the Board in formal recommendations and correspondence, staff issue reports pertaining to Department facilities, and public meetings and briefings. Additionally, the Department is implementing several key safety initiatives to address and prevent safety issues: safety culture and review of the Columbia accident investigation; risk reduction through stabilization of excess nuclear materials; the Facility Representative Program; independent oversight and performance assurance; the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP); executive safety initiatives; and quality assurance activities. The following summarizes the key activities addressed in this Annual Report.

  13. Passive and active defense in toads: the parotoid macroglands in Rhinella marina and Rhaebo guttatus.

    PubMed

    Mailho-Fontana, Pedro L; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Toledo, Luís F; Verdade, Vanessa K; Sciani, Juliana M; Barbaro, Katia C; Pimenta, Daniel C; Rodrigues, Miguel T; Jared, Carlos

    2014-02-01

    Amphibians have many skin poison glands used in passive defense, in which the aggressor causes its own poisoning when biting prey. In some amphibians the skin glands accumulate in certain regions forming macroglands, such as the parotoids of toads. We have discovered that the toad Rhaebo guttatus is able to squirt jets of poison towards the aggressor, contradicting the typical amphibian defense. We studied the R. guttatus chemical defense, comparing it with Rhinella marina, a sympatric species showing typical toad passive defense. We found that only in R. guttatus the parotoid is adhered to the scapula and do not have a calcified dermal layer. In addition, in this species, the plugs obstructing the glandular ducts are more fragile when compared to R. marina. As a consequence, the manual pressure necessary to extract the poison from the parotoid is twice as high in R. marina when compared to that used in R. guttatus. Compared to R. marina, the poison of R. guttatus is less lethal, induces edema and provokes nociception four times more intense. We concluded that the ability of R. guttatus to voluntary squirt poison is directly related to its stereotyped defensive behavior, together with the peculiar morphological characteristics of its parotoids. Since R. guttatus poison is practically not lethal, it is possibly directed to predators' learning, causing disturbing effects such as pain and edema. The unique mechanism of defense of R. guttatus may mistakenly justify the popular myth that toads, in general, squirt poison into people's eyes. PMID:24130001

  14. Pulmonary defense mechanisms against opportunistic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Waldorf, A R

    1989-01-01

    Though of critical importance, nonimmune host defense mechanisms against aspergillosis and mucormycosis are not completely understood. Prevention of these infections presumably requires control of either spore germination and/or hyphal growth by the host. The data suggest that the host provides an important barrier to infection by control of spore or conidia germination, the critical step involving conversion of the fungus to its tissue-invasive form. The mechanisms of host defense against A. fumigatus are not strictly dependent on inhibition of conidia germination. Rather, pulmonary defense against Aspergillus appears to depend to a greater degree on early killing of fungal conidia by alveolar macrophages. In contrast, prevention of mucormycosis appears to require inhibition of fungal spore germination by the bronchoalveolar macrophage, thereby preventing conversion of the fungus to its hyphal form, although resident bronchoalveolar macrophages are unable to kill R. oryzae spores. Thus, host pulmonary defenses to Rhizopus and Aspergillus vary, even in normal animals. The tissue-invasive hyphal forms of the fungi which cause aspergillosis and mucormycosis are too large to be ingested by phagocytic cells. Although macrophages and monocytes can damage hyphae, the bulk of this role appears to fall upon the neutrophil. However, antihyphal mechanisms of neutrophils may not necessarily be identical for all types of hyphae. Moreover, interactions of several potential oxidative and nonoxidative antihyphal mechanisms may define the host's ability to limit fungal infections. In individuals where concentrations of oxidative or nonoxidative substances are limiting or suboptimal, interactions of mechanisms may be required for antihyphal activity, and studies of these interactions are important to gain better knowledge of the defense mechanisms against opportunistic mycoses in the intact host. In summary, at least two distinct lines of defense against Aspergillus and Rhizopus

  15. A subtilisin-like protein from soybean contains an embedded, cryptic signal that activates defense-related genes

    PubMed Central

    Pearce, Gregory; Yamaguchi, Yube; Barona, Guido; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2010-01-01

    Among the arsenal of plant-derived compounds activated upon attack by herbivores and pathogens are small peptides that initiate and amplify defense responses. However, only a handful of plant signaling peptides have been reported. Here, we have isolated a 12-aa peptide from soybean (Glycine max) leaves that causes a pH increase of soybean suspension-cultured cell media within 10 min at low nanomolar concentrations, a response that is typical of other endogenous peptide elicitors and pathogen-derived elicitors. The amino acid sequence was determined and was found to be derived from a member of the subtilisin-like protease (subtilase) family. The sequence of the peptide was located within a region of the protein that is unique to subtilases in legume plants and not found within any other plant subtilases thus far identified. We have named this peptide signal Glycine max Subtilase Peptide (GmSubPep). The gene (Glyma18g48580) was expressed in all actively growing tissues of the soybean plant. Although transcription of Glyma18g48580 was not induced by wounding, methyl jasmonate, methyl salicylate, or ethephon, synthetic GmSubPep peptide, when supplied to soybean cultures, induced the expression of known defense-related genes, such as Cyp93A1, Chib-1b, PDR12, and achs. GmSubPep is a unique plant defense peptide signal, cryptically embedded within a plant protein with an independent metabolic role, providing insights into plant defense mechanisms. PMID:20679205

  16. The nuclear immune receptor RPS4 is required for RRS1SLH1-dependent constitutive defense activation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Kee Hoon; Segonzac, Cécile; Rallapalli, Ghanasyam; Sarris, Panagiotis F; Woo, Joo Yong; Williams, Simon J; Newman, Toby E; Paek, Kyung Hee; Kobe, Bostjan; Jones, Jonathan D G

    2014-10-01

    Plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) disease resistance (R) proteins recognize specific "avirulent" pathogen effectors and activate immune responses. NB-LRR proteins structurally and functionally resemble mammalian Nod-like receptors (NLRs). How NB-LRR and NLR proteins activate defense is poorly understood. The divergently transcribed Arabidopsis R genes, RPS4 (resistance to Pseudomonas syringae 4) and RRS1 (resistance to Ralstonia solanacearum 1), function together to confer recognition of Pseudomonas AvrRps4 and Ralstonia PopP2. RRS1 is the only known recessive NB-LRR R gene and encodes a WRKY DNA binding domain, prompting suggestions that it acts downstream of RPS4 for transcriptional activation of defense genes. We define here the early RRS1-dependent transcriptional changes upon delivery of PopP2 via Pseudomonas type III secretion. The Arabidopsis slh1 (sensitive to low humidity 1) mutant encodes an RRS1 allele (RRS1SLH1) with a single amino acid (leucine) insertion in the WRKY DNA-binding domain. Its poor growth due to constitutive defense activation is rescued at higher temperature. Transcription profiling data indicate that RRS1SLH1-mediated defense activation overlaps substantially with AvrRps4- and PopP2-regulated responses. To better understand the genetic basis of RPS4/RRS1-dependent immunity, we performed a genetic screen to identify suppressor of slh1 immunity (sushi) mutants. We show that many sushi mutants carry mutations in RPS4, suggesting that RPS4 acts downstream or in a complex with RRS1. Interestingly, several mutations were identified in a domain C-terminal to the RPS4 LRR domain. Using an Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay system, we demonstrate that the P-loop motif of RPS4 but not of RRS1SLH1 is required for RRS1SLH1 function. We also recapitulate the dominant suppression of RRS1SLH1 defense activation by wild type RRS1 and show this suppression requires an intact RRS1 P-loop. These analyses of RRS1SLH1 shed new light

  17. THE PROPERTIES OF QUASAR HOSTS AT THE PEAK OF THE QUASAR ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Kotilainen, Jari K.; Falomo, Renato; Decarli, Roberto; Treves, Aldo; Uslenghi, Michela; Scarpa, Riccardo E-mail: renato.falomo@oapd.inaf.i E-mail: aldo.treves@uninsubria.i E-mail: riccardo.scarpa@gtc.iac.e

    2009-10-01

    We present near-infrared imaging obtained with ESO VLT/ISAAC of a sample of 16 low luminosity radio-quiet quasars (RQQs) at the epoch around the peak of the quasar activity (2 < z < 3), aimed at investigating their host galaxies. For 11 quasars, we are able to detect the host galaxies and derive their properties, while for the other 5 quasars, upper limits to the host luminosity are estimated. The luminosities of the host galaxies of RQQs at high redshift are in the range of those of massive inactive elliptical galaxies. This work complements our previous systematic study of quasar hosts aimed to trace the cosmological luminosity evolution of the host galaxies up to z approx 2 and extends our pilot study of a few luminous quasars at z > 2. The luminosity trend with a cosmic epoch resembles that observed for massive inactive galaxies, suggesting a similar star formation history. In particular, both quasar host galaxies and massive inactive galaxies appear mostly assembled already at the peak age of the quasar activity. This result is of key importance for testing the models of joint formation and evolution of galaxies and their active nuclei.

  18. Lysozyme- and chitinase activity in latex bearing plants of genus Euphorbia--A contribution to plant defense mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sytwala, Sonja; Günther, Florian; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-10-01

    Occurrence of latices in plants is widespread, there are 40 families of plants characterized to establish lactiferous structures. Latices exhibit a constitutive part of plant defense due to the stickiness. The appearance of proteins incorporated in latices is well characterized, and hydrolytic active proteins are considerable. A lot of plants constitute so-called pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins, to overcome stressful conditions. In our investigation we are focused on latex bearing plants of Euphorbiaceae Juss., and investigated the appearance of chitinase- and lysozyme activity in particular. The present outcomes represent a comprehensive study, relating to the occurrence of lysozyme and chitinase activity of genus Euphorbia at the first time. 110 different species of genus Euphorbia L. were tested, and the appearance of chitinase and lysozyme were determined in different quantities. The appearance itself, and the physicochemical properties of latices indicate an efficient interaction for plant defense against pathogen attack.

  19. Autophagy as an innate defense against mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eun-Kyeong

    2013-03-01

    Over the past several years, much has been revealed about the roles of autophagy and the mechanisms by which the autophagic pathway activates the host innate effector response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection. In response to invading mycobacteria, the host innate immune system not only recognizes pathogen motifs through innate receptors, it also produces appropriate effector proteins, including cytokines. These innate signals activate or regulate autophagic pathways during infection. It is now clear that vitamin D and functional vitamin D receptor signaling are critical in the activation of autophagic defenses against Mtb in human cells. Immunity-related GTPase family M proteins, including the cationic antimicrobial protein cathelicidin and autophagic receptor p62, participate in autophagic pathways that enhance antimicrobial activity against mycobacteria. Moreover, reactive oxygen species mediate antibacterial autophagy and successful antimicrobial responses during antibiotic chemotherapy. Recent work has also shown that pathogenic Mtb can be targeted by selective autophagy through an ESX-1 type VII secretion system. Here, we review the triggers, host factors, and intracellular pathways that regulate host autophagy and its impact on antimicrobial host defenses during mycobacterial infection.

  20. Phenotypic analysis of apoplastic effectors from the phytopathogenic nematode, Globodera rostochiensis demonstrates that an expansin can induce and suppress host defenses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis (Woll.) is an important pest of potato. Like other biotrophic pathogens, plant parasitic nematodes are presumed to employ effector proteins, secreted into the apoplast as well as the host cytoplasm to successfully infect their hosts. We have identifie...

  1. C-type lectin receptors Dectin-3 and Dectin-2 form a heterodimeric pattern-recognition receptor for host defense against fungal infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Le-Le; Zhao, Xue-Qiang; Jiang, Changying; You, Yun; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Jia, Xin-Ming; Lin, Xin

    2013-08-22

    C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) play critical roles as pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) for sensing Candida albicans infection, which can be life-threatening for immunocompromised individuals. Here we have shown that Dectin-3 (also called CLECSF8, MCL, or Clec4d), a previously uncharacterized CLR, recognized α-mannans on the surfaces of C. albicans hyphae and induced NF-κB activation. Mice with either blockade or genetically deleted Dectin-3 were highly susceptible to C. albicans infection. Dectin-3 constantly formed heterodimers with Dectin-2, a well-characterized CLR, for recognizing C. albicans hyphae. Compared to their respective homodimers, Dectin-3 and Dectin-2 heterodimers bound α-mannans more effectively, leading to potent inflammatory responses against fungal infections. Together, our study demonstrates that Dectin-3 forms a heterodimeric PRR with Dectin-2 for sensing fungal infection and suggests that different CLRs may form different hetero- and homodimers, which provide different sensitivity and diversity for host cells to detect various microbial infections.

  2. The Importance of the KR-Rich Region of the Coat Protein of Ourmia melon virus for Host Specificity, Tissue Tropism, and Interference With Antiviral Defense.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marika; Vallino, Marta; Abbà, Simona; Ciuffo, Marina; Balestrini, Raffaella; Genre, Andrea; Turina, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal region of the Ourmia melon virus (OuMV) coat protein (CP) contains a short lysine/arginine-rich (KR) region. By alanine scanning mutagenesis, we showed that the KR region influences pathogenicity and virulence of OuMV without altering viral particle assembly. A mutant, called OuMV6710, with three basic residue substitutions in the KR region, was impaired in the ability to maintain the initial systemic infection in Nicotiana benthamiana and to infect both cucumber and melon plants systemically. The integrity of this protein region was also crucial for encapsidation of viral genomic RNA; in fact, certain mutations within the KR region partially compromised the RNA encapsidation efficiency of the CP. In Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0, OuMV6710 was impaired in particle accumulation; however, this phenotype was abolished in dcl2/dcl4 and dcl2/dcl3/dcl4 Arabidopsis mutants defective for antiviral silencing. Moreover, in contrast to CPwt, in situ immunolocalization experiments indicated that CP6710 accumulates efficiently in the spongy mesophyll tissue of infected N. benthamiana and A. thaliana leaves but only occasionally infects palisade tissues. These results provided strong evidence of a crucial role for OuMV CP during viral infection and highlighted the relevance of the KR region in determining tissue tropism, host range, pathogenicity, and RNA affinity, which may be all correlated with a possible CP silencing-suppression activity.