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Sample records for activating cell surface

  1. Regulation of tissue factor coagulant activity on cell surfaces

    PubMed Central

    RAO, L.V.M.; PENDURTHI, U.R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Tissue factor (TF) is a transmembrane glycoprotein and an essential component of factor VIIa-TF enzymatic complex that triggers activation of the coagulation cascade. Formation of TF-FVIIa complexes on cell surfaces not only trigger the coagulation cascade but also transduce cell signaling via activation of protease-activated receptors. Tissue factor is expressed constitutively on cell surfaces of a variety of extravascular cell types, including fibroblasts and pericytes in and surrounding blood vessel walls and epithelial cells but generally absent on cells that come in contact with blood directly. However, TF expression could be induced in some blood cells, such as monocytes and endothelial cells, following an injury or pathological stimuli. Tissue factor is essential for hemostasis, but aberrant expression of TF leads to thrombosis. Therefore, a proper regulation of TF activity is critical for the maintenance of hemostatic balance and health in general. TF-FVIIa coagulant activity at the cell surface is influenced not only by TF protein expression levels but also independently by a variety of mechanisms, including alterations in membrane phospholipid composition and cholesterol content, thiol-dependent modifications of TF allosteric disulfide bond, and other post-translational modifications of TF. In this article, we critically review key literature on mechanisms by which TF coagulant activity is regulated at the cell surface in the absence of changes in TF protein levels with specific emphasis on recently published data and provide the authors’ perspective on the subject. PMID:23006890

  2. Surface free energy activated high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinru; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Tao; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin; Zuo, Yi Y

    2014-09-16

    Cell sorting is an important screening process in microbiology, biotechnology, and clinical research. Existing methods are mainly based on single-cell analysis as in flow cytometric and microfluidic cell sorters. Here we report a label-free bulk method for sorting cells by differentiating their characteristic surface free energies (SFEs). We demonstrated the feasibility of this method by sorting model binary cell mixtures of various bacterial species, including Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Escherichia coli DH5α. This method can effectively separate 10(10) bacterial cells within 30 min. Individual bacterial species can be sorted with up to 96% efficiency, and the cell viability ratio can be as high as 99%. In addition to its capacity of sorting evenly mixed bacterial cells, we demonstrated the feasibility of this method in selecting and enriching cells of minor populations in the mixture (presenting at only 1% in quantity) to a purity as high as 99%. This SFE-activated method may be used as a stand-alone method for quickly sorting a large quantity of bacterial cells or as a prescreening tool for microbial discrimination. Given its advantages of label-free, high-throughput, low cost, and simplicity, this SFE-activated cell sorting method has potential in various applications of sorting cells and abiotic particles.

  3. Active screen plasma nitriding enhances cell attachment to polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaklamani, Georgia; Bowen, James; Mehrban, Nazia; Dong, Hanshan; Grover, Liam M.; Stamboulis, Artemis

    2013-05-01

    Active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) is a well-established technique used for the surface modification of materials, the result of which is often a product with enhanced functional performance. Here we report the modification of the chemical and mechanical properties of ultra-high molecular weight poly(ethylene) (UHMWPE) using 80:20 (v/v) N2/H2 ASPN, followed by growth of 3T3 fibroblasts on the treated and untreated polymer surfaces. ASPN-treated UHMWPE showed extensive fibroblast attachment within 3 h of seeding, whereas fibroblasts did not successfully attach to untreated UHMWPE. Fibroblast-coated surfaces were maintained for up to 28 days, monitoring their metabolic activity and morphology throughout. The chemical properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, revealing the presence of Csbnd N, Cdbnd N, and Ctbnd N chemical bonds. The elastic modulus, surface topography, and adhesion properties of the ASPN-treated UHMWPE surface were studied over 28 days during sample storage under ambient conditions and during immersion in two commonly used cell culture media.

  4. Regulation of Cell Surface CB2 Receptor during Human B Cell Activation and Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Julie T; Harui, Airi; Roth, Michael D

    2017-03-31

    Cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2) is the primary receptor pathway mediating the immunologic consequences of cannabinoids. We recently reported that human peripheral blood B cells express CB2 on both the extracellular membrane and at intracellular sites, where-as monocytes and T cells only express intracellular CB2. To better understand the pattern of CB2 expression by human B cells, we examined CD20(+) B cells from three tissue sources. Both surface and intracellular expression were present and uniform in cord blood B cells, where all cells exhibited a naïve mature phenotype (IgD(+)/CD38(Dim)). While naïve mature and quiescent memory B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(-)) from tonsils and peripheral blood exhibited a similar pattern, tonsillar activated B cells (IgD(-)/CD38(+)) expressed little to no surface CB2. We hypothesized that regulation of the surface CB2 receptor may occur during B cell activation. Consistent with this, a B cell lymphoma cell line known to exhibit an activated phenotype (SUDHL-4) was found to lack cell surface CB2 but express intracellular CB2. Furthermore, in vitro activation of human cord blood resulted in a down-regulation of surface CB2 on those B cells acquiring the activated phenotype but not on those retaining IgD expression. Using a CB2 expressing cell line (293 T/CB2-GFP), confocal microscopy confirmed the presence of both cell surface expression and multifocal intracellular expression, the latter of which co-localized with endoplasmic reticulum but not with mitochondria, lysosomes, or nucleus. Our findings suggest a dynamic multi-compartment expression pattern for CB2 in B cells that is specifically modulated during the course of B cell activation.

  5. Role of the Bp35 cell surface polypeptide in human B-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, E A; Shu, G; Ledbetter, J A

    1985-01-01

    A 35-kDa polypeptide, Bp35, expressed on the surface of all B cells, plays a role in B-cell activation. Monoclonal antibodies to Bp35 stimulate human tonsillar B cells to proliferate. The activation induced by anti-Bp35 is similar to anti-Ig-mediated in several ways: the activation does not require T cells but is augmented by T-cell-derived allogeneic factors; monovalent Fab fragments to Bp35 do not trigger proliferation but instead block activation by whole antibody, indicating that cross-linking is required; and induction by anti-Bp35, like the induction by anti-Ig, is inhibited by monoclonal anti-IgM via an Fc domain-dependent mechanism. However, several features of anti-Bp35-mediated proliferation are clearly different from activation by anti-Ig: anti-Bp35 monoclonal antibodies do not require attachment to beads to function, the proliferation induced by anti-Bp35 and anti-Ig is additive, and Fab fragments of anti-Bp35 augment proliferation induced by anti-Ig. Models for the possible function of the Bp35 polypeptide as either a "bridge" or a "second signal" with surface Ig in B-cell activation are discussed. PMID:3872456

  6. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  7. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  8. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Summary We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  9. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  10. Bacterial activation of human natural killer cells: role of cell surface lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, R A

    1988-01-01

    Culture of human peripheral blood lymphocytes with gram-negative bacteria associated with periodontal disease caused a rapid increase in the cytotoxic potential of natural killer (NK) cells. The NK cells were activated to kill NK-resistant targets, the peak cytotoxicity occurring on day 1 of culture. The addition of anti-Tac, anti-CD3, or anti-OKT-11 antibodies to block activation via the interleukin-2 (IL-2), T-cell, or E rosette receptors had a minimal effect on this inductive process. Anti-IL-2 antiserum was effective in blocking a significant amount, but not all, of the cytotoxicity in bacterium-activated cultures. Modest IL-2 production (5 to 6 National Institutes of Health units) was measured in lymphocyte cultures activated by bacteria, but proliferation was not induced during a 1-week period. When polymixin B sulfate was added to bind and block lipopolysaccharides, bacterium-induced cytotoxicity was completely abrogated for all activating bacteria. In addition, when culture supernatants from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans were tested, activation still occurred. However, again, this activation was totally inhibited by polymixin B sulfate. Monocytes were also activated by bacteria to produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF). To exclude the possibility that TNF was responsible for cytotoxicity, an antiserum to TNF was added to cocultures of bacteria and lymphocytes with adherent cells removed. The antiserum had no effect on the inductive process. In addition, exogenous TNF did not kill M14 targets. These results suggest that bacterial cell surface lipopolysaccharides provide a major activation signal for NK cells to enhance cytotoxicity. PMID:2895743

  11. Characterization of fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis: Evidence for a cell surface fucosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F. )

    1989-02-21

    Fucosyltransferase activity was quantified in mouse germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis. Specifically, fucosyltransferase activities of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and cauda epididymal sperm were compared. Fucosyltranferase activity of mixed germ cells displayed an apparent V{sub max} of 17 pmol (mg of protein){sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} and an apparent K{sub m} of approximately 13 {mu}M for GDP-L-({sup 14}C)fucose in the presence of saturating amounts of asialofetuin at 33{degree}C. Under these conditions, cellular fucosyltransferase activity was found to increase during spermatogenesis. In agreement with assays of intact cells, examination of subcellular fractions indicated that a large fraction of fucosyltransferase activity was associated with the cell surface. The fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface progressively increased throughout spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation so that nearly all of the fucosyltransferase in epididymal sperm was on the cell surface. Specifically, by comparison of activities in the presence and absence of the detergent NP-40, the fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface in pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and epididymal sperm was 0.36, 0.5, and 0.85, respectively. These results suggest that a cell surface fucosyltransferase may be important during differentiation of spermatogenic cells in the testis as well as during epididymal maturation and fertilization.

  12. Murine Immunoprotective Activity of Klebsiella pneumoniae Cell Surface Preparations: Comparative Study with Ribosomal Preparations

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Jean-Michel; Jolivet-Reynaud, Colette; Riottot, Marie-Madeleine; Jouin, Hélène

    1981-01-01

    Cell surface preparations and ribosomal preparations were extracted from Klebsiella pneumoniae. Agar gel diffusion with antisera to cell surface preparations or ribosomal preparations indicated common antigenic components among the preparations. Lipopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide were identified in the cell surface preparations. These results and the previous identification of lipopolysaccharide and capsular polysaccharide in ribosomal preparations suggest that these antigens are responsible for the immunochemical cross-reactivity observed among these two bacterial extracts. Active protection could be induced in mice by these two preparations. On a dry-weight basis, cell surface preparations provided better immunoprotective activity than did ribosomal preparations. However, the 50% protective dose of both preparations is practically the same on the basis of their capsular polysaccharide content. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the immunoprotective moiety of ribosomal preparations is the contaminating cell surface antigens. Furthermore, the low level of nucleotidic components detected in purified cell surface preparations led us to infer that the immunoprotective activity of capsular polysaccharide may not be dependent on the adjuvant activity of ribonucleic acid. The involvement of capsular polysaccharide in the immunoprotective capacity of cell surface preparations is demonstrated either by using a degradation of this antigen by K. pneumoniae bacteriophage K2-associated glycanase or by using a preparation extracted from a noncapsulated mutant of K. pneumoniae. Nevertheless, the low protective ability of purified capsular polysaccharides is in contrast to its greater activity when induced in bacterial cell surface preparations. The protective activity of K. pneumoniae capsular polysaccharide may be dependent on its association with other surface antigenic components present in cell surface preparations or may be dependent on its

  13. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  14. Inhibition of cell surface mediated plasminogen activation by a monoclonal antibody against alpha-Enolase.

    PubMed

    López-Alemany, Roser; Longstaff, Colin; Hawley, Stephen; Mirshahi, Massoud; Fábregas, Pere; Jardí, Merce; Merton, Elizabeth; Miles, Lindsey A; Félez, Jordi

    2003-04-01

    Localization of plasmin activity on leukocyte surfaces plays a critical role in fibrinolysis as well as in pathological and physiological processes in which cells must degrade the extracellular matrix in order to migrate. The binding of plasminogen to leukocytic cell lines induces a 30- to 80-fold increase in the rate of plasminogen activation by tissue-type (tPA) and urokinase-type (uPA) plasminogen activators. In the present study we have examined the role of alpha-enolase in plasminogen activation on the cell surface. We produced and characterized a monoclonal antibody (MAb) 11G1 against purified alpha-enolase, which abrogated about 90% of cell-dependent plasminogen activation by either uPA or tPA on leukocytoid cell lines of different lineages: B-lymphocytic, T-lymphocytic, granulocytic, and monocytic cells. In addition, MAb 11G1 also blocked enhancement of plasmin formation by peripheral blood neutrophils and monocytes. In contrast, MAb 11G1 did not affect plasmin generation in the presence of fibrin, indicating that this antibody did not interact with fibrinolytic components in the absence of cells. These data suggest that, although leukocytic cells display several molecules that bind plasminogen, alpha-enolase is responsible for the majority of the promotion of plasminogen activation on the surfaces of leukocytic cells.

  15. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  16. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  17. Association of tissue factor activity with the surface of cultured cells.

    PubMed Central

    Maynard, J R; Heckman, C A; Pitlick, F A; Nemerson, Y

    1975-01-01

    Tissue factor occurs in a dormant state on the surface of cultured normal human fibroblasts and WISH 1 amnion cells. The activity of undisturbed monolayers or cells lifted with brief trypsin treatment (0.125 per cent trypsin for 1 min) increases up to 60-fold upon prolonged digestion with dilute trypsin (0.0025 per cent trypsin for 30 min); activity appears subsequent to cell detachment. Up to 70 per cent of the total cellular tissue factor becomes active under these conditions and is released from the cells. The ruthenium red staining coat of the cells is lost during detachment, but cell viability (more than 90 per cent exclude trypan blue) and cell morphology do not change during the subsequent development of tissue factor activity. Furthermore, less than 10 percent of four intracellular enzymes and less than 20 per cent of two plasma membrane enzymes are released during this period of time. We therefore conclude that cells in culture do have tissue factor activity, that it exists in a latent form, and that total cell disruption is not necessary for this activity to initiate blood coagulation. Images PMID:47334

  18. Osteoinductive activity of insulin-functionalized cell culture surfaces obtained using diazonium chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulska, Anna; Filipowska, Joanna; Osyczka, Anna; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    Polymeric surfaces suitable for cell culture (DR/Pec) were constructed from diazoresin (DR) and pectin (Pec) in a form of ultrathin films using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The surfaces were functionalized with insulin using diazonium chemistry. Such functionalized surfaces were used to culture human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to assess their suitability for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. The activity of insulin immobilized on the surfaces (DR/Pec/Ins) was compared to that of insulin dissolved in the culture medium. Human MSC grown on insulin-immobilized DR/Pec surfaces displayed increased proliferation and higher osteogenic activity. The latter was determined by means of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, which increases at early stages of osteoblasts differentiation. Insulin dissolved in the culture medium did not stimulate cell proliferation and its osteogenic activity was significantly lower. Addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) to the culture medium further increased ALP activity in hMSCs indicating additive osteogenic action of immobilized insulin and rhBMP-2

  19. Cell surface expression of biologically active influenza C virus HEF glycoprotein expressed from cDNA.

    PubMed

    Pekosz, A; Lamb, R A

    1999-10-01

    The hemagglutinin, esterase, and fusion (HEF) glycoprotein of influenza C virus possesses receptor binding, receptor destroying, and membrane fusion activities. The HEF cDNAs from influenza C/Ann Arbor/1/50 (HEF-AA) and influenza C/Taylor/1223/47 (HEF-Tay) viruses were cloned and expressed, and transport of HEF to the cell surface was monitored by susceptibility to cleavage by exogenous trypsin, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and flow cytometry. Previously it has been found in studies with the C/Johannesburg/1/66 strain of influenza C virus (HEF-JHB) that transport of HEF to the cell surface is severely inhibited, and it is thought that the short cytoplasmic tail, Arg-Thr-Lys, is involved in blocking HEF cell surface expression (F. Oeffner, H.-D. Klenk, and G. Herrler, J. Gen. Virol. 80:363-369, 1999). As the cytoplasmic tail amino acid sequences of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay are identical to that of HEF-JHB, the data indicate that cell surface expression of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay is not inhibited by this amino acid sequence. Furthermore, the abundant cell surface transport of HEF-AA and HEF-Tay indicates that their cell surface expression does not require coexpression of another viral protein. The HEF-AA and HEF-Tay HEF glycoproteins bound human erythrocytes, promoted membrane fusion in a low-pH and trypsin-dependent manner, and displayed esterase activity, indicating that the HEF glycoprotein alone mediates all three known functions at the cell surface.

  20. Variable expression of activation-linked surface antigens on human mast cells in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Valent, P; Schernthaner, G H; Sperr, W R; Fritsch, G; Agis, H; Willheim, M; Bühring, H J; Orfao, A; Escribano, L

    2001-02-01

    Mast cells (MC) are multipotent effector cells of the immune system. They contain an array of biologically active mediator substances in their granules. MC also express a number of functionally important cell surface antigens, including stem cell factor receptor (SCFR=kit=CD117), high affinity IgER (FcepsilonRI), or CSaR (CD88). Respective ligands can induce or promote degranulation, migration, or cytokine production. Other integral surface molecules can mediate adhesion or cell aggregation. Recent data suggest that a number of critical molecules are variably expressed on the surface of human MC. In fact, depending on the environment (organ), stage of cell maturation, type of disease, and other factors, MC express variable amounts of activation-linked antigens (CD25, CD63, CD69, CD88), cell recognition molecules (CD2, CD11, CD18, CD50, CD54), or cytokine receptors. At present, however, little is known about the mechanisms and regulation of expression of such antigens. The present article gives an overview of MC phenotypes in health and disease, and attempts to provide explanations for the phenotypic variability of MC.

  1. Atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by CPA47 cells - Evidence for a divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is rapidly cleared and degraded in vivo. Nonguanylate-cyclase receptors (C-ANPR) and a metalloproteinase, neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) (NEP 24.11), are thought to be responsible for its metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms of ANP degradation by an endothelial-derived cell line, CPA47. CPA47 cells degraded 88 percent of 125I-ANP after 1 h at 37 degrees C as determined by HPLC. Medium preconditioned by these cells degraded 41 percent of the 125I-ANP, and this activity was inhibited by a divalent cation chelator, EDTA. Furthermore, a cell-surface proteolytic activity degraded 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA when receptor-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by low temperature (4 degrees C) or by hyperosmolarity at 37 degrees C. The metalloproteinase, NEP 24.11, is unlikely to be the cell-surface peptidase because 125I-ANP is degraded by CPA47 cells at 4 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. These data indicate that CPA47 cells can degrade ANP by a novel divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity.

  2. Display of functionally active PHB depolymerase on Escherichia coli cell surface.

    PubMed

    Hiraishi, Tomohiro; Yamashita, Koichi; Sakono, Masafumi; Nakanishi, Jun; Tan, Liu-Tzea; Sudesh, Kumar; Abe, Hideki; Maeda, Mizuo

    2012-02-01

    The display of PHB depolymerase (PhaZ(RpiT1) ) from R. pickettii T1 on the surface of E. coli JM109 cells is realized using OprI of P. aeruginosa as the anchoring motif. The fusion protein is stably expressed and its surface localization is verified by immunofluorescence microscopy. The displayed PhaZ(RpiT1) retains its cleaving ability for soluble substrates as well as its ability to adsorb to the PHB surface, and also remains catalycically active in the degradation of insoluble polyester materials, in spite of the possible suppression of the enzyme movement on the polymer surface. The results demonstrate that PhaZ(RpiT1) -displaying E. coli shows potential for use as a whole-cell biocatalyst for the production of (R)-3-hydroxybutyrate monomers from insoluble PHB materials.

  3. Bio-active molecules modified surfaces enhanced mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mobasseri, Rezvan; Tian, Lingling; Soleimani, Masoud; Ramakrishna, Seeram; Naderi-Manesh, Hossein

    2017-01-29

    Surface modification of the substrate as a component of in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering, using bio-active molecules including extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins or peptides derived ECM proteins can modulate the surface properties and thereby induce the desired signaling pathways in cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavior of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) on glass substrates modified with fibronectin (Fn), collagen (Coll), RGD peptides (RGD) and designed peptide (R-pept) as bio-active molecules. The glass coverslips were coated with fibronectin, collagen, RGD peptide and R-peptide. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on different substrates and the adhesion behavior in early incubation times was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and confocal microscopy. The MTT assay was performed to evaluate the effect of different bio-active molecules on MSCs proliferation rate during 24 and 72 h. Formation of filopodia and focal adhesion (FA) complexes, two steps of cell adhesion process, were observed in MSCs cultured on bio-active molecules modified coverslips, specifically in Fn coated and R-pept coated groups. SEM image showed well adhesion pattern for MSCs cultured on Fn and R-pept after 2 h incubation, while the shape of cells cultured on Coll and RGD substrates indicated that they might experience stress condition in early hours of culture. Investigation of adhesion behavior, as well as proliferation pattern, suggests R-peptide as a promising bio-active molecule to be used for surface modification of substrate in supporting and inducing cell adhesion and proliferation.

  4. Murine Polyomavirus Cell Surface Receptors Activate Distinct Signaling Pathways Required for Infection

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Samantha D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus binding to the cell surface triggers an array of host responses, including activation of specific signaling pathways that facilitate steps in virus entry. Using mouse polyomavirus (MuPyV), we identified host signaling pathways activated upon virus binding to mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Pathways activated by MuPyV included the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), FAK/SRC, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Gangliosides and α4-integrin are required receptors for MuPyV infection. MuPyV binding to both gangliosides and the α4-integrin receptors was required for activation of the PI3K pathway; however, either receptor interaction alone was sufficient for activation of the MAPK pathway. Using small-molecule inhibitors, we confirmed that the PI3K and FAK/SRC pathways were required for MuPyV infection, while the MAPK pathway was dispensable. Mechanistically, the PI3K pathway was required for MuPyV endocytosis, while the FAK/SRC pathway enabled trafficking of MuPyV along microtubules. Thus, MuPyV interactions with specific cell surface receptors facilitate activation of signaling pathways required for virus entry and trafficking. Understanding how different viruses manipulate cell signaling pathways through interactions with host receptors could lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets for viral infection. PMID:27803182

  5. The effect of CD47 modified polymer surfaces on inflammatory cell attachment and activation

    PubMed Central

    Stachelek, Stanley J.; Finley, Matthew J.; Alferiev, Ivan S.; Wang, Fengxiang; Tsai, Richard; Eckells, Edward C.; Tomczyk, Nancy; Connolly, Jeanne M.; Discher, Dennis E.; Eckmann, David M.; Levy, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    CD47 is a transmembrane protein that is a marker of “self”. CD47 binding to its cognate receptor in leukocytes and macrophages, signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), causes inhibition of inflammatory cell attachment. We hypothesized that immobilization of recombinant CD47 on polymeric surfaces would reduce inflammation. Recombinant CD47 was appended to polyvinyl chloride (PVC) or polyurethane (PU) surfaces via photoactivation chemistry. Cell culture studies showed that CD47 immobilization significantly reduced human neutrophil (HL-60) and human monocyte derived macrophage (MDM) (THP-1) attachment to PVC and PU respectively. A neutralizing antibody, directed against SIRPα, inhibited THP-1 and HL-60 binding to PU and PVC surfaces respectively. This antibody also increased the level of SIRPα tyrosine phosphorylation, thereby indicating a direct role for SIRPα mediated signaling in preventing inflammatory cell attachment. Studies using human blood in an ex vivo flow-loop showed that CD47 modified PVC tubing significantly reduced cell binding and neutrophil activation compared to unmodified tubing or poly-2-methoxy-ethylacrylate (PMEA) coated tubing. In ten-week rat subdermal implants, CD47 functionalized PU films showed a significant reduction in markers of MDM mediated oxidative degradation compared to unmodified PU. In conclusion, CD47 functionalized surfaces can resist inflammatory cell interactions both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21429575

  6. Cell surface localization and release of the candidate tumor suppressor Ecrg4 from polymorphonuclear cells and monocytes activate macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Andrew; Coimbra, Raul; Dang, Xitong; Lopez, Nicole; Lee, Jisook; Krzyzaniak, Michael; Winfield, Robert; Potenza, Bruce; Eliceiri, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    We identified fresh human leukocytes as an abundant source of the candidate epithelial tumor suppressor gene, Ecrg4, an epigenetically regulated gene, which unlike other tumor suppressor genes, encodes an orphan-secreted, ligand-like protein. In human cell lines, Ecrg4 gene expression was low, Ecrg4 protein undetectable, and Ecrg4 promoter hypermethylation high (45–90%) and reversible by the methylation inhibitor 5-AzaC. In contrast, Ecrg4 gene expression in fresh, normal human PBMCs and PMNs was 600–800 times higher than in cultured cell lines, methylation of the Ecrg4 promoter was low (<3%), and protein levels were readily detectable in lysates and on the cell surface. Flow cytometry, immunofluorescent staining, and cell surface biotinylation established that full-length, 14-kDa Ecrg4 was localized on PMN and monocyte cell surfaces, establishing that Ecrg4 is a membrane-anchored protein. LPS treatment induced processing and release of Ecrg4, as detected by flow and immunoblotting, whereas an effect of fMLF treatment on Ecrg4 on the PMN cell surface was detected on the polarized R2 subpopulation of cells. This loss of cell surface Ecrg4 was associated with the detection of intact and processed Ecrg4 in the conditioned media of fresh leukocytes and was shown to be associated with the inflammatory response that follows severe, cutaneous burn injury. Furthermore, incubation of macrophages with a soluble Ecrg4-derived peptide increased the P-p65, suggesting that processing of an intact sentinel Ecrg4 on quiescent circulating leukocytes leads to processing from the cell surface following injury and macrophage activation. PMID:22396620

  7. Phosphatidic acid-mediated activation and translocation to the cell surface of sialidase NEU3, promoting signaling for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kohta; Hosono, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Hata, Keiko; Shiozaki, Momo; Bassi, Rosaria; Prinetti, Alessandro; Sonnino, Sandro; Nitta, Kazuo; Miyagi, Taeko

    2015-05-01

    The plasma membrane-associated sialidase NEU3 plays crucial roles in regulation of transmembrane signaling, and its aberrant up-regulation in various cancers contributes to malignancy. However, it remains uncertain how NEU3 is naturally activated and locates to plasma membranes, because of its Triton X-100 requirement for the sialidase activity in vitro and its often changing subcellular location. Among phospholipids examined, we demonstrate that phosphatidic acid (PA) elevates its sialidase activity 4 to 5 times at 50 μM in vitro at neutral pH and promotes translocation to the cell surface and cell migration through Ras-signaling in HeLa and COS-1 cells. NEU3 was found to interact selectively with PA as assessed by phospholipid array, liposome coprecipitation, and ELISA assays and to colocalize with phospholipase D (PLD) 1 in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) or serum stimulation. Studies using tagged NEU3 fragments with point mutations identified PA- and calmodulin (CaM)-binding sites around the N terminus and confirmed its participation in translocation and catalytic activity. EGF induced PLD1 activation concomitantly with enhanced NEU3 translocation to the cell surface, as assessed by confocal microscopy. These results suggest that interactions of NEU3 with PA produced by PLD1 are important for regulation of transmembrane signaling, this aberrant acceleration probably promoting malignancy in cancers.

  8. Surface expression of Mo3e antigen by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R.F. III; Bury, M.J.; Liu, D.Y.

    1986-03-05

    The surface expression of a protease-sensitive antigen, Mo3e, by activated human monocytes and U-937 cells is a plasma membrane feature of the activated state. Mo3e, which is an 80 kD protein on Western blot analysis, may represent the surface receptor for migration inhibitory factor (MIF), as evidenced by inhibition of MIF responsiveness produced by anti-Mo3e monoclonal antibody. Mo3e is barely detectable (by surface immunofluorescence) on freshly isolated monocytes but becomes expressed in high antigen density during 18-24 hrs culture in medium containing E. coli lipopolysaccharide (> 1 ng/ml), 4..beta..-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) (5-10 nM), or muramyl dipeptide (0.1-1 ..mu..M). In U-937 cells, Mo3e surface expression is detectable after 24 hrs exposure to PMA and other pharmacological activators of protein kinase C: 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 dibutyrate, 4..beta..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate, mezerein, or Sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol. The biologically-inactivate phorbol compounds, 4..cap alpha..-phorbol 12, 13 didecanoate and 4/sub ..beta../-phorbol do not stimulate Mo3e expression. The calcium ionophore, ionomycin, has a synergistic effect on Mo3e expression stimulated by PMA; conversely, calcium antagonists block PMA-induced Mo3e expression. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C activation and intracellular calcium mobilization in the stimulated expression of Mo3e by activated human mononuclear phagocytes.

  9. Surface grafting of a thermoplastic polyurethane with methacrylic acid by previous plasma surface activation and by ultraviolet irradiation to reduce cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Alves, P; Pinto, S; Kaiser, Jean-Pierre; Bruinink, Arie; de Sousa, Hermínio C; Gil, M H

    2011-02-01

    The material performance, in a biological environment, is mainly mediated by its surface properties and by the combination of chemical, physical, biological, and mechanical properties required, for a specific application. In this study, the surface of a thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) material (Elastollan(®)1180A50) was activated either by plasma or by ultra-violet (UV) irradiation. After surface activation, methacrylic acid (MAA) was linked to the surface of TPU in order to improve its reactivity and to reduce cell adhesion. Grafted surfaces were evaluated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and by contact angle measurements. Blood compatibility studies and cell adhesion tests with human bone marrow cells (HBMC) were also performed. If was found that UV grafting method led to better results than the plasma activation method, since cell adhesion was reduced when methacrylic acid was grafted to the TPU surface by UV.

  10. Evaluation of adhesion capacity, cell surface traits and immunomodulatory activity of presumptive probiotic Lactobacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Kotzamanidis, Charalambos; Kourelis, Andreas; Litopoulou-Tzanetaki, Evanthia; Tzanetakis, Nikolaos; Yiangou, Minas

    2010-06-15

    Twelve lactobacilli previously isolated from newborn infants' gastrointestinal tract and Feta cheese were further characterized by pulse field gel eletrophoresis (PFGE). All strains exhibited distinct PFGE genotypic patterns with the exception of DC421 and DC423 strains possessing identical patterns. The strains DC421, 2035 and 2012 were found to posses certain cell surface traits such as hydrophobicity, autoaggregation and/or high adhesive capacity suggesting potential immunomodulatory activity. However, application of the dorsal mouse air pouch system revealed that only the DC421, DC429 and 2035 strains exhibited strong immunostimulatory activity such as increased chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells in association with increased phagocytosis and cytokine production. The same strains also induced immunomodulatory activity in the gut associated lymphoid tissue in mice in the absence of any inflammatory response. All strains induced IgA production while reduced TNFalpha production by small intestine cells. The strains DC421 and DC429 exerted their effect on the intestine through Toll-like receptor TLR2/TLR4/TLR9 mediated signalling events leading to secretion of a certain profile of cytokines in which gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6 and IL-10 are included. The strain 2035 induced similar cytokine profile through the synergy of TLR2/TLR4. This study further supports the eligibility of the air pouch model to discriminate presumptive probiotic Lactobacillus strains exhibiting immunostimulatory activity in the gut. Furthermore, evidence is provided that the cell surface traits examined may not be the only criteria but an alternative and important component of a complex mechanism that enables a microorganism to interact with the host gut to exert its immunoregulatory activity.

  11. Toll-like receptor activation modulates antimicrobial peptide expression by ocular surface cells.

    PubMed

    Redfern, Rachel L; Reins, Rose Y; McDermott, Alison M

    2011-03-01

    The ability of the ocular surface to respond to pathogens is in part attributed to toll-like receptors (TLRs) that recognize conserved motifs on various microbes. This study examines TLR expression on various ocular surface cells, if TLR agonists can modulate the expression of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), human beta defensins (hBD) and cathelicidin (hCAP-18/LL-37) which maybe functionally active against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) and if TLR agonists or AMPs can modulate TLR mRNA expression. TLR1-10 mRNA expression was examined in corneal epithelial, corneal stromal cells and conjunctival epithelial cells by RT-PCR. To confirm protein expression flow cytometry or immunostaining was performed for selected TLRs on some cell cultures. Ocular surface cells were cultured with a range of TLR agonists and then hBD-1, 2, 3, or hCAP-18 mRNA and protein expression was determined by RT-PCR and immunoblotting. In some experiments, cells were cultured with a cocktail of agonists for TLR3, 5 and 6/2 and the antimicrobial activity of the culture media was tested against PA. TLR mRNA expression was also examined in primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) treated with either 3 μg/ml of hBD-2, 5 μg/ml of LL-37 or TLR4, 5 and 9 agonists. Overall, the ocular surface cells expressed mRNA for most of the TLRs but some differences were found. TLR2 was not detected in corneal fibroblasts, TLR4 was not detected in primary cultured or freshly isolated HCEC, TLR5 was not detected in conjunctival epithelial cells (IOBA-NHC) and corneal fibroblasts, TLR7 was not detected in freshly isolated HCEC and TLR10 was not detected in HCEC and IOBA-NHC. TLR8 mRNA was not expressed by any of the samples tested. Immunostaining of cadaver corneas revealed TLR5 and 9 expression throughout the cornea while TLR3 was significantly expressed only in the epithelium. Flow cytometry and immunostaining revealed cultured fibroblasts expressed TLR9 but had no significant TLR3 expression. hBD-2 expression

  12. Cancer cell exosomes depend on cell-surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans for their internalization and functional activity.

    PubMed

    Christianson, Helena C; Svensson, Katrin J; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Li, Jin-Ping; Belting, Mattias

    2013-10-22

    Extracellular vesicle (EV)-mediated intercellular transfer of signaling proteins and nucleic acids has recently been implicated in the development of cancer and other pathological conditions; however, the mechanism of EV uptake and how this may be targeted remain as important questions. Here, we provide evidence that heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans (PGs; HSPGs) function as internalizing receptors of cancer cell-derived EVs with exosome-like characteristics. Internalized exosomes colocalized with cell-surface HSPGs of the syndecan and glypican type, and exosome uptake was specifically inhibited by free HS chains, whereas closely related chondroitin sulfate had no effect. By using several cell mutants, we provide genetic evidence of a receptor function of HSPG in exosome uptake, which was dependent on intact HS, specifically on the 2-O and N-sulfation groups. Further, enzymatic depletion of cell-surface HSPG or pharmacological inhibition of endogenous PG biosynthesis by xyloside significantly attenuated exosome uptake. We provide biochemical evidence that HSPGs are sorted to and associate with exosomes; however, exosome-associated HSPGs appear to have no direct role in exosome internalization. On a functional level, exosome-induced ERK1/2 signaling activation was attenuated in PG-deficient mutant cells as well as in WT cells treated with xyloside. Importantly, exosome-mediated stimulation of cancer cell migration was significantly reduced in PG-deficient mutant cells, or by treatment of WT cells with heparin or xyloside. We conclude that cancer cell-derived exosomes use HSPGs for their internalization and functional activity, which significantly extends the emerging role of HSPGs as key receptors of macromolecular cargo.

  13. Surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol in colloidal dispersions exerts cytostatic effects and apoptotic dismissal of cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kristl, Julijana; Teskac, Karmen; Milek, Miha; Mlinaric-Rascan, Irena

    2008-10-15

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have been praised for their advantageous drug delivery properties such as biocompatibility, controlled release and passive drug targeting. However, the cytotoxicity of SLN and their ingredients, especially over a longer time period, has not been investigated in detail. We examined the critical issues regarding the use of a surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol (Tyl) for the preparation of solid lipid particles (SLP) and their effects on cellular functions and viability. SLP composed of behenate, phospholipids and a stabilizer, Tyloxapol or Lutrol (Lut), were prepared by the lipid melt method, labeled with a fluorescent dye and tested on Jurkat or HEK293 cells. The nano-sized particles were rapidly internalized and exhibited cytoplasmic localization. Incubation of cells with SLP-Tyl resulted in a dose- and time-dependent cytostatic effect, and also caused moderate and delayed cytotoxicity. Tyloxapol solution or SLP-Tyl dispersion caused the detachment of HEK293 cells, a decrease in cell proliferation and alterations in cellular morphology. Cell cycle analysis revealed that, while the unfavourable effects of SLP-Tyl and Tyloxapol solution are similar initially, longer incubation results in partial recovery of cells incubated with the dispersion of SLP-Tyl, whereas the presence of Tyloxapol solution induces apoptotic cell death. These findings indicate that Tyloxapol is an unfavourable stabilizer of SLP used for intracellular delivery and reinforce the role of stabilizers in a design of SLP with minimal cytotoxic properties.

  14. Identification of a novel inducible cell-surface ligand of CD5 on activated lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    CD5 is a 67-kD glycoprotein that is expressed on most T lymphocytes and on a subset of mature B cells. Although its physiologic function is unknown, several lines of evidence suggest that CD5 may play a role in the regulation of T cell activation and in T cell-antigen presenting cell interactions. Using a CD5-immunoglobulin fusion protein (CD5Rg, for receptorglobulin) we have uncovered a new CD5 ligand (CD5L) expressed on the surface of activated splenocytes. Stimulation of murine splenocytes with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies induce transient expression of CD5L on B lymphocytes that lasts for approximately 72 h. Binding of CD5Rg to activated splenocytes is trypsin resistant and independent of divalent cations. However, it is pronase sensitive and dependent on N-linked glycosylation of CD5, since treatment of CD5Rg with PNGaseF on N-glycanase completely abrogates its ability to bind activated splenocytes. It addition to splenocytes, CD5L is expressed on activated murine T cell clones. Immunoprecipitation, antibody, and recombinant protein blocking studies indicate that CD5L is distinct from CD72, which has been proposed to be a CD5 ligand. To determine whether CD5-CD5L interaction might play a role in vivo, we tested the effect of CD5Rg in a murine model of antibody-mediated membranous glomerulonephritis. Injection of CD5Rg was found to abrogate development of the disease. Taken together, our results help identify a novel ligand of CD5 and propose a role for CD5 in the regulation of immune responses. PMID:9064341

  15. The active translation of MHCII mRNA during dendritic cells maturation supplies new molecules to the cell surface pool.

    PubMed

    Malanga, Donatella; Barba, Pasquale; Harris, Paul E; Maffei, Antonella; Del Pozzo, Giovanna

    2007-04-01

    The transition of human dendritic cells (DCs) from the immature to the mature phenotype is characterized by an increased density of MHC class II (MHCII) molecules on the plasma membrane, a key requirement of their competence as professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). MHCII molecules on the cell surface derive from newly synthesized as well as from preexisting proteins. So far, all the studies done on DCs during maturation, to establish the relative contribution of newly synthesized MHCII molecules to the cell surface pool did not produced a clear, unified scenario. We report that, in human DCs stimulated ex vivo with LPS, the changes in the RNA accumulation specific for at least two MHCII genes (HLA-DRA and HLA-DQA1) due to transcriptional upregulation, is associated with the active translation at high rate of these transcripts. Our finding reveals that, across the 24h of the maturation process in human DCs, newly synthesized MHCII proteins are supplied to the APCs cell surface pool.

  16. Active Currents and Stresses on the cell surface: Clustering, Instabilities and Budding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    We study the contractile dynamics of a collection of active polar filaments, such as actin, on a two dimensional substrate, using a continuum hydrodynamic description in the presence of spatiotemporal noise. The steady states, characterized by a variety of phases generically consisting of a transient collection of inward pointing asters. We next study the dynamics of particles advected along these active filaments. This is relevant to the dynamics and organization of a large class of cell surface molecules. We make several predictions regarding the statistics of fluctuations of these passive advective particles which we confirm using fluorescence based experiments. We then show how such active patterning of filaments can give rise to membrane stresses leading to membrane shape deformations. In collaboration with Kripa Gowrishankar and Satyajit Mayor.

  17. Photothermal activation of astrocyte cells using localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Eom, Kyungsik; Hwang, Seoyoung; Yun, Seunghyeon; Byun, Kyung Min; Jun, Sang Beom; Kim, Sung June

    2017-04-01

    Although it has been revealed that astrocytes, generally known as star-shaped glial cells, play critical roles in the functions of central nervous system, there have been few efforts to directly modulate their activities and responses. In this study, an optical stimulation strategy for producing intracellular Ca(2+) transients of astrocytes is demonstrated using near-infrared (NIR) light and localized surface plasmon resonance. It is presented that NIR stimulation of micro-second duration combined with gold nanorods (GNRs) efficiently produces stronger Ca(2+) transients of astrocytes, which seems to be associated with a local heat generation by photothermal effects of GNRs. Since the proposed scheme can directly activate astrocytes with a high reliability, it is expected that GNR-mediated NIR stimulation could be utilized to facilitate minimally invasive physiological studies on the astrocyte functions. Photos of intracellular Ca(2+) transient of astrocytes with membrane-bound GNRs after optical stimulation at 30 s.

  18. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as permeabilization factor. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied in determining the influence of different parameters on permeabilization process. The aim of the study was to find such values of the process parameters that would yield maximum activity of catalase during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The optimum operating conditions for permeabilization process obtained by RSM were as follows: 53% (v/v) of ethanol concentration, temperature of 14.8 °C and treatment time of 40 min. After permeabilization, the activity of catalase increased ca. 40 times and its maximum value equalled to 4711 U/g. PMID:26019618

  19. Predicting Cell Association of Surface-Modified Nanoparticles Using Protein Corona Structure - Activity Relationships (PCSAR).

    PubMed

    Kamath, Padmaja; Fernandez, Alberto; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are likely to interact in real-case application scenarios with mixtures of proteins and biomolecules that will absorb onto their surface forming the so-called protein corona. Information related to the composition of the protein corona and net cell association was collected from literature for a library of surface-modified gold and silver nanoparticles. For each protein in the corona, sequence information was extracted and used to calculate physicochemical properties and statistical descriptors. Data cleaning and preprocessing techniques including statistical analysis and feature selection methods were applied to remove highly correlated, redundant and non-significant features. A weighting technique was applied to construct specific signatures that represent the corona composition for each nanoparticle. Using this basic set of protein descriptors, a new Protein Corona Structure-Activity Relationship (PCSAR) that relates net cell association with the physicochemical descriptors of the proteins that form the corona was developed and validated. The features that resulted from the feature selection were in line with already published literature, and the computational model constructed on these features had a good accuracy (R(2)LOO=0.76 and R(2)LMO(25%)=0.72) and stability, with the advantage that the fingerprints based on physicochemical descriptors were independent of the specific proteins that form the corona.

  20. Fibroblast activation protein-alpha and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (CD26): cell-surface proteases that activate cell signaling and are potential targets for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein-alpha (FAP-alpha) and dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) are serine proteases with post-prolyl peptidase activities that can modify tumor cell behavior. FAP-alpha and DPPIV can form heteromeric complexes with each other and may function coordinately to modulate the growth, differentiation, adhesion, and metastasis of tumor cells. This review is focused on FAP-alpha and summarizes a series of studies showing that elevated expression of FAP-alpha results in profound changes in growth and malignant behavior of tumor cells. Depending on the model system investigated, FAP-alpha expression causes dramatic promotion or suppression of tumor growth. In the case of tumor promotion, FAP-alpha expression can drive tumor growth by increasing angiogenesis and by decreasing the anti-tumor response of the immune system. In the case of tumor suppression, FAP-alpha can decrease tumorigenicity of mouse melanoma cells and restore contact inhibition and growth factor dependence even when it is catalytically inactive, implying that protein-protein interactions mediate these effects. Understanding how FAP-alpha activates cell signaling is critical to determining how FAP-alpha mediates growth promotion versus growth suppression in the different model systems and ultimately in human cancer patients. In particular, the roles of FAP-alpha protease activity and FAP-alpha complex formation with DPPIV and other surface molecules in activating cell signaling need to be elucidated since these represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  1. The Prc and RseP proteases control bacterial cell-surface signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Bastiaansen, Karlijn C; Ibañez, Aurelia; Ramos, Juan L; Bitter, Wilbert; Llamas, María A

    2014-08-01

    Extracytoplasmic function (ECF) sigma factors play a key role in the regulation of vital functions in the bacterial response to the environment. In Gram-negative bacteria, activity of these sigma factors is often controlled by cell-surface signalling (CSS), a regulatory system that also involves an outer membrane receptor and a transmembrane anti-sigma factor. To get more insight into the molecular mechanism behind CSS regulation, we have focused on the unique Iut system of Pseudomonas putida. This system contains a hybrid protein containing both a cytoplasmic ECF sigma domain and a periplasmic anti-sigma domain, apparently leading to a permanent interaction between the sigma and anti-sigma factor. We show that the Iut ECF sigma factor regulates the response to aerobactin under iron deficiency conditions and is activated by a proteolytic pathway that involves the sequential action of two proteases: Prc, which removes the periplasmic anti-sigma domain, and RseP, which subsequently removes the transmembrane domain and thereby generates the ECF active transcriptional form. We furthermore demonstrate the role of these proteases in the regulation of classical CSS systems in which the sigma and anti-sigma factors are two different proteins.

  2. Isolation of two biologically active cell surface proteins from Brucella abortus by chromatofocusing

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabai, L.B.; Deyoe, B.L.

    1983-01-01

    Brucella abortus contains a group of immunogenic cell surface proteins which have potential value as a vaccine or as a diagnostic reagent for the prevention and diagnosis of bovine brucellosis. Under nondenaturing conditions, these proteins range in molecular weight from 10,000-124,000, as determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on TSK 3000sw. By analytical isoelectrofocusing, 6 major protein bands could be distinguished with pI's ranging from 4.0 to 6.0 and 3 additional major proteins with pI's of 7.5, 9.5, and 10. By chromatofocusing on Polybuffer Exchanger 94 with a pH gradient from 6-4, two of the six proteins from pI 4-6 were separated, a pI 4.9 and a pI 4.7 protein; a third fraction contained the high pI proteins. The former two proteins were homogeneous by analytical isoelectrofocusing, and a molecular weight of 54,000 daltons was found for both protein species by HPLC on TSK 3000sw. The pI 4-6 and not the pI 9.5 and 10 proteins, could be radiolabeled when intact cells were radioiodinated with diazotized (/sup 125/I)-iodosulfanilic acid. Biological activity of the proteins as assessed in lemmings indicated that immunization with the pI 4.7 and 4.9 proteins afforded better protection against experimental brucellosis than immunization with the high pI proteins. These results support our view that a single surface protein may be sufficient for the prevention of experimental brucellosis.

  3. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  4. RET(MEN 2B) is active in the endoplasmic reticulum before reaching the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Runeberg-Roos, P; Virtanen, H; Saarma, M

    2007-12-13

    MEN 2B (multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2B) is an autosomal dominant cancer syndrome caused by an oncogenic form of the receptor tyrosine kinase REarranged during transfection (RET). The MEN 2B syndrome is associated with an abnormal autophosphorylation of the mutated receptor even without ligand-stimulation. Here, we characterize the activation of a RET(MEN 2B) variant carrying the point mutation Met918Thr, and show that the 150 kDa precursor of RET(MEN 2B) becomes phosphorylated already during synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). At least three different tyrosine residues (Tyr905, Tyr1062, Tyr1096) of the RET(MEN 2B) precursor are phosphorylated before the oncogenic receptor reaches the cell surface. We also demonstrate that the precursor of RET(MEN 2B) interacts with both growth factor receptor-bound protein and Src homology 2 domain-containing already in the ER, and that this interaction is dependent on the kinase activity of RET. With the aid of two RET mutants (RET(MEN 2B/S32L) and RET(MEN 2B/F393L)), which accumulate in the ER, we show that the oncogenic precursor of the receptor has the capacity to activate AKT, extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 from the ER. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the oncogenic precursor of RET(MEN 2B) is phosphorylated, interacts with adapter proteins and induces downstream signalling from the ER.

  5. Surface oxide net charge of a titanium alloy: modulation of fibronectin-activated attachment and spreading of osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Rapuano, Bruce E; MacDonald, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, we have altered the surface oxide properties of a Ti6Al4V alloy using heat treatment or radiofrequency glow discharge (RFGD) in order to evaluate the relationship between the physico-chemical and biological properties of the alloy's surface oxide. The effects of surface pretreatments on the attachment of cells from two osteogenic cell lines (MG63 and MC3T3) and a mesenchymal stem cell line (C3H10T1/2) to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy were measured. Both heat and RFGD pretreatments produced a several-fold increase in the number of cells that attached to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy at a range of coating concentrations (0.001-10nM FN) for each cell line tested. An antibody (HFN7.1) directed against the central integrin binding domain of fibronectin produced a 65-70% inhibition of cell attachment to fibronectin-coated disks, indicating that cell attachment to the metal discs was dependent on fibronectin binding to cell integrin receptors. Both treatments also accelerated the cell spreading response manifested by extensive flattening and an increase in mean cellular area. The treatment-induced increases in the cell attachment activity of adsorbed fibronectin were correlated with previously demonstrated increases in Ti6Al4V oxide negative net surface charge at physiological pH produced by both heat and RFGD pretreatments. Since neither treatment increased the adsorption mass of fibronectin, these findings suggest that negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in Ti6Al4V can modulate fibronectin's integrin receptor activity by altering the adsorbed protein's conformation. Our results further suggest that negatively charged functional groups in the surface oxide can play a prominent role in the osseointegration of metallic implant materials.

  6. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes.

    PubMed

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A D; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A

    2016-03-30

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin's activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types.

  7. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A.D.; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin’s activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types. PMID:27043625

  8. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    PubMed

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-05-24

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm).

  9. Bioactive proteinase 3 on the cell surface of human neutrophils: quantification, catalytic activity, and susceptibility to inhibition.

    PubMed

    Campbell, E J; Campbell, M A; Owen, C A

    2000-09-15

    Although proteinase 3 (PR3) is known to have the potential to promote inflammation and injure tissues, the biologic forms and function of PR3 in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) from healthy donors have received little attention. In this paper, we show that PMN contain 3.24 +/- SD 0.24 pg of PR3 per cell, and that the mean concentration of PR3 in azurophil granules of PMN is 13.4 mM. Low levels of PR3 are detectable on the cell surface of unstimulated PMN. Exposure of PMN to cytokines or chemoattractants alone induces modest (1.5- to 2.5-fold) increases in cell surface-bound PR3. In contrast, brief priming of PMN with cytokines, followed by activation with a chemoattractant, induces rapid and persistent, 5- to 6-fold increases in cell surface expression of PR3, while causing minimal free release of PR3. Membrane-bound PR3 on PMN is catalytically active against Boc-Alanine-Alanine-Norvaline-thiobenzyl ester and fibronectin, but in marked contrast to soluble PR3, membrane-bound PR3 is resistant to inhibition by physiologic proteinase inhibitors. PR3 appears to bind to the cell surface of PMN via a charge-dependent mechanism because exposure of fixed, activated PMN to solutions having increasing ionic strength results in elution of PR3, HLE, and CG, and there is a direct relationship between their order of elution and their isoelectric points. These data indicate that rapidly inducible PR3 expressed on the cell surface of PMN is an important bioactive form of the proteinase. If PR3 expression on the cell surface of PMN is dysregulated, it is well equipped to amplify tissue injury directly, and also indirectly via the generation of autoantibodies.

  10. Lack of MHC class I surface expression on neoplastic cells and poor activation of the secretory pathway of cytotoxic cells in oral squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, I; Meijer, C J L M; Walboomers, J M M; Snijders, P J F; Waal, I Van der

    1999-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and natural killer (NK) cells use the secretory pathway of perforin/granzymes to kill their target cells. In contrast to NK cells, CTL responses are MHC class I restricted. In this study we analysed the relative activation of CTL and NK cells in relation with MHC class I expression on oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs). MHC class I expression was investigated in 47 OSCCs by immunohistochemistry using HCA2, HC10 and β2-m antibodies. The presence of CTLs, NK cells, and its activation, was investigated in 21 of these OSCCs using respectively, CD8, CD57 and GrB7 antibodies. The Q-Prodit measuring system was used for quantification of cytotoxic cells. All OSCCs showed weak or absent staining of β2-m on the cell surface. The absence of β2-m was significantly associated with absent expression of MHC class I heavy chain as detected by HC10 antibody (P = 0.004). In tumour infiltrates CTLs always outnumbered NK cells, as reflected by the ratio CD57/CD8 being always inferior to one (mean: 0.19; SD: 0.15). The proportion of activated cytotoxic cells as detected by granzyme B expression was generally low (mean: 8.6%; SD 8.9). A clear correlation between MHC class I expression and the relative proportion of NK cells/CTLs was not found. This study shows that the majority of OSCCs show weak or absent expression of MHC class I molecules on the cell surface, possibly due to alterations in the normal β2-m pathway. The low proportion of granzyme B-positive CTLs/NK cells indicates that the secretory pathway of cytotoxicity is poor in these patients. The lack of correlation between MHC class I expression and CTL/NK cell activation as detected by granzyme B expression suggests that, next to poor antigen presentation, also local factors seem to determine the final outcome of the cytotoxic immune response. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10555762

  11. In-situ electrochemically active surface area evaluation of an open-cathode polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torija, Sergio; Prieto-Sanchez, Laura; Ashton, Sean J.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to evaluate the electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) of fuel cell electrodes is crucial toward characterising designs and component suites in-situ, particularly when evaluating component durability in endurance testing, since it is a measure of the electrode area available to take part in the fuel cell reactions. Conventional methods to obtain the ECSA using cyclic voltammetry, however, rely on potentiostats that cannot be easily scaled to simultaneously evaluate all cells in a fuel cell stack of practical size, which is desirable in fuel cell development. In-situ diagnostics of an open-cathode fuel cell stack are furthermore challenging because the cells do not each possess an enclosed cathode compartment; instead, the cathodes are rather open to the environment. Here we report on a diagnostic setup that allows the electrochemically active surface area of each cell anode or cathode in an open-cathode fuel cell stack to be evaluated in-situ and simultaneously, with high resolution and reproducibility, using an easily scalable chronopotentiometry methodology and a gas-tight stack enclosure.

  12. Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area

    DOEpatents

    George, Thomas J.; Meacham, G. B. Kirby

    2002-03-26

    A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

  13. Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area

    SciTech Connect

    George, Thomas J.; Meacham, G.B. Kirby

    1999-11-26

    A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

  14. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  15. A cleavage-resistant urokinase plasminogen activator receptor exhibits dysregulated cell-surface clearance.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Evelyn C; Manchanda, Naveen

    2010-04-23

    Urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR) binds urokinase plasminogen activator (u-PA) and participates in plasminogen activation in addition to modulating several cellular processes such as adhesion, proliferation, and migration. u-PAR is susceptible to proteolysis by its cognate ligand and several other proteases. To elucidate the biological significance of receptor cleavage by u-PA, we engineered and expressed a two-chain urokinase plasminogen activator (tcu-PA) cleavage-resistant u-PAR (cr-u-PAR). This mutated receptor was similar to wild-type u-PAR in binding u-PA and initiating plasminogen activation. However, cr-u-PAR exhibited accelerated internalization and resurfacing due to direct association with the endocytic receptor alpha(2)-macroglobulin receptor/low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in the absence of the enzyme x inhibitor complex of tcu-PA and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (tcu-PA.PAI-1). cr-u-PAR-expressing cells had enhanced migration compared with wild-type u-PAR-expressing cells, and cr-u-PAR was less sensitive to chymotrypsin cleavage as compared with wt u-PAR. Our studies suggest that these mutations in the linker region result in a rearrangement within the cr-u-PAR structure that makes it resemble its ligand-bound form. This constitutively active variant may mimic highly glycosylated cleavage-resistant u-PAR expressed in certain highly malignant cancer-cells.

  16. Embryonal cell surface recognition. Extraction of an active plasma membrane component.

    PubMed

    Merrell, R; Gottlieb, D I; Glaser, L

    1975-07-25

    Plasma membranes obtained from different neural regions of the chicken embryo have previously been shown to specifically bind to homotypic cells and prevent cell aggregation (Merrell, R., and Glaser, L. (1973) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 70, 2794-2798). Proteins responsible for the specific inhibition of cell aggregation have been solubilized from the plasma membrane of neural retina and optic tectum by delipidation with acetone followed by extraction with lithium diiodosalicylate. The extracts show the same regional and temporal specificity as previously shown for plasma membrane recognition by the same cells (Gottlieb, D. I., Merrell, R., and Glaser, L. (1974) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 71, 1800-1802). Two micrograms of the most purified protein fraction inhibits the aggregation of 2.5 times 10(-4) cells under standard assay conditions. This represents a 20-fold increase in specific activity compared to whole membranes.

  17. Extracellular superoxide dismutase in cultured astrocytes: decrease in cell-surface activity and increase in medium activity by lipopolysaccharide-stimulation.

    PubMed

    Iitsuka, Ichiro; Motoyoshi-Yamashiro, Akiko; Moriyama, Mitsuaki; Kannan-Hayashi, Yukiko; Fujimoto, Yuka; Takano, Katsura; Murakami, Koji; Yoneda, Yukio; Nakamura, Yoichi

    2012-10-01

    Under pathological conditions such as ischemia/reperfusion, a large amount of superoxide anion (O(2) (-)) is produced and released in brain. Among three isozymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD), extracellular (EC)-SOD, known to be excreted outside cells and bound to extracellular matrix, should play a role to detoxify O(2) (-) in extracellular space; however, a little is known about EC-SOD in brain. In order to evaluate the SOD activity in extracellular space of CNS as direct as possible, we attempted to measure the cell-surface SOD activity on primary cultured rat brain cells by the inhibition of color development of a water-soluble tetrazolium due to O(2) (-) generation by xanthine oxidase/hypoxanthine added into extracellular medium of intact cells. The cell-surface SOD activity on cultured neuron and microglia was below the detection limit; however, that on cultured astrocyte was high enough to measure. By means of RT-PCR, all mRNA of three isozymes of SOD could be detected in the three types of the cells examined; however, the semi-quantitative analysis revealed that the level of EC-SOD mRNA in astrocytes was significantly higher than that in neurons and microglia. When astrocytes were stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) for 12-24 h, the cell-surface SOD activity decreased to a half, whereas the activity recovered after 36-48 h. The decrease in the activity was dependent on the LPS concentration. On the other hand, the SOD activity in the medium increased by the LPS-stimulation in a dose dependent manner; suggesting that the SOD protein localized on cell-surface, probably EC-SOD, was released into the medium. These results suggest that EC-SOD of astrocyte play a role for detoxification of extracellular O(2) (-) and the regulation of EC-SOD in astrocytes may contribute to the defensive mechanism against oxidative stress in brain.

  18. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  19. Activation of NLRP3 inflammasome by crystalline structures via cell surface contact.

    PubMed

    Hari, Aswin; Zhang, Yifei; Tu, Zhongyuan; Detampel, Pascal; Stenner, Melanie; Ganguly, Anutosh; Shi, Yan

    2014-12-02

    Crystalline structures activate the NLRP3 inflammasome, leading to the production of IL-1β, however, the molecular interactions responsible for NLRP3 activation are not fully understood. Cathepsin B release from the ruptured phagolysosome and potassium ion efflux have been suggested to be critical for this activation. Here, we report that Cathepsin B redistribution was not a crucial event in crystal-induced IL-1β production. Silica and monosodium urate crystal-treated macrophages with undisturbed lysosomes demonstrated strong co-localization of ASC and Caspase-1, indicative of NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Importantly, we provided evidence to suggest that macrophage cell membrane binding to immobilized crystals was sufficient to induce IL-1β release, and this activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome was inhibited by blocking potassium efflux. Therefore, this work reveals additional complexity in crystalline structure-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome regulations.

  20. Optoacoustic tweezers: a programmable, localized cell concentrator based on opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yanhui; Li, Sixing; Rufo, Joseph; Yang, Shikuan; Guo, Feng; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    We present a programmable, biocompatible technique for dynamically concentrating and patterning particles and cells in a microfluidic device. Since our technique utilizes opto-thermally generated, acoustically activated, surface bubbles, we name it “optoacoustic tweezers.” The optoacoustic tweezers are capable of concentrating particles/cells at any prescribed locations in a microfluidic chamber without the use of permanent structures, rendering it particularly useful for the formation of flexible, complex cell patterns. Additionally, this technique has demonstrated excellent biocompatibility and can be conveniently integrated with other microfluidic units. In our experiments, micro-bubbles were generated by focusing a 405 nm diode laser onto a gold-coated glass chamber. By properly tuning the laser, we demonstrate precise control over the position and size of the generated bubbles. Acoustic waves were then applied to activate the surface bubbles, causing them to oscillate at an optimized frequency. The resulting acoustic radiation force allowed us to locally trap particles/cells, including 15 μm polystyrene beads and HeLa cells, around each bubble. Cell-adhesion tests were also conducted after cell concentrating to confirm the biocompatibility of this technique. PMID:23511348

  1. Surface-assembled poly(I:C) on PEGylated PLGA microspheres as vaccine adjuvant: APC activation and bystander cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hafner, Annina M; Corthésy, Blaise; Textor, Marcus; Merkle, Hans P

    2016-11-30

    Biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres are potential vehicles to deliver antigens for vaccination. Because they lack the full capacity to activate professional antigen presenting cells (APCs), combination with an immunostimulatory adjuvant may be considered. A candidate is the synthetic TLR3 ligand polyriboinosinic acid-polyribocytidylic acid, poly(I:C), which drives cell-mediated immunity. However, poly(I:C) has also been linked to the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, as affected by widespread stimulation of non-hematopoietic bystander cells. To address this aspect, we propose to minimize the poly(I:C) dose as well as to control the stimulation of non-immune bystander cells by poly(I:C). To facilitate the maturation of APCs with minimal poly(I:C) doses, we surface-assembled poly(I:C) onto PLGA microspheres. The microspheres' surface was further modified by poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coronas with varying PEG-densities. PLGA microspheres loaded with tetanus toxoid (tt) as model antigen were manufactured by microextrusion-based solvent extraction. The negatively charged PLGA(tt) microspheres were coated with polycationic poly(l-lysine) (PLL) polymers, either PLL itself or PEG-grafted PLL (PLL-g-PEG) with varying grafting ratios (g=2.2 and g=10.1). Stable surface assembly of poly(I:C) was achieved by subsequent incubation of polymer-coated PLGA microspheres with aqueous poly(I:C) solutions. We evaluated the immunostimulatory potential of such PLGA(tt) microsphere formulations on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) as well as human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) as model for non-hematopoietic bystander cells. Formulations with surface-assembled poly(I:C) readily activated MoDCs with respect to the expression of maturation-related surface markers, proinflammatory cytokine secretion and directed migration. When surface-assembled, poly(I:C) enhanced its immunostimulatory activity by more than one order of magnitude as compared to free poly

  2. Detection of Trypanosoma brucei Variant Surface Glycoprotein Switching by Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting and Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Danae; Mugnier, Monica R; Boothroyd, Catherine E; Papavasiliou, F Nina

    2016-10-19

    Trypanosoma brucei, a protozoan parasite that causes both Human and Animal African Trypanosomiasis (known as sleeping sickness and nagana, respectively) cycles between a tsetse vector and a mammalian host. It evades the mammalian host immune system by periodically switching the dense, variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) that covers its surface. The detection of antigenic variation in Trypanosoma brucei can be both cumbersome and labor intensive. Here, we present a method for quantifying the number of parasites that have 'switched' to express a new VSG in a given population. The parasites are first stained with an antibody against the starting VSG, and then stained with a secondary antibody attached to a magnetic bead. Parasites expressing the starting VSG are then separated from the rest of the population by running the parasites over a column attached to a magnet. Parasites expressing the dominant, starting VSG are retained on the column, while the flow-through contains parasites that express a new VSG as well as some contaminants expressing the starting VSG. This flow-through population is stained again with a fluorescently labeled antibody against the starting VSG to label contaminants, and propidium iodide (PI), which labels dead cells. A known number of absolute counting beads that are visible by flow cytometry are added to the flow-through population. The ratio of beads to number of cells collected can then be used to extrapolate the number of cells in the entire sample. Flow cytometry is used to quantify the population of switchers by counting the number of PI negative cells that do not stain positively for the starting, dominant VSG. The proportion of switchers in the population can then be calculated using the flow cytometry data.

  3. The regulated cell surface zymogen activation of the proprotein convertase PC5A directs the processing of its secretory substrates.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Gaétan; Hamelin, Josée; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Pasquato, Antonella; Marcinkiewicz, Edwidge; Tang, Meiyi; Tabibzadeh, Siamak; Seidah, Nabil G

    2008-01-25

    The proprotein convertases are synthesized as zymogens that acquire activity upon autocatalytic removal of their NH(2)-terminal prosegment. Based on the convertase furin, to fold properly and gain activity, the convertases PC5A, PACE4, and PC7 are presumed to undergo two sequential prosegment cleavages in the endoplasmic reticulum and then in the trans-Golgi network. However, biochemical and immunocytochemical experiments revealed that mouse PC5A is complexed to its prosegment at the plasma membrane. This labeling is lost upon treatment with heparin and is increased by overexpressing members of the syndecan family and CD44, suggesting attachment of secreted PC5A-prosegment complex to heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Following stimulation of Y1 cells with adrenocorticotropic hormone or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, the cell surface labeling of the prosegment of PC5A is greatly diminished, whereas the signal for mature PC5A is increased. Moreover, after stimulation, the protease activity of PC5A is enhanced, as evidenced by the cleavage of the PC5A substrates Lefty, ADAMTS-4, endothelial lipase, and PCSK9. Our data suggest a novel mechanism for PC5A activation and substrate cleavage at the cell surface, through a regulated removal of its prosegment. A similar mechanism may also apply to the convertase PACE4, thereby extending our knowledge of the molecular details of the zymogen activation and functions of these heparan sulfate proteoglycan-bound convertases.

  4. Impaired surface expression of PAF receptors on human neutrophils is dependent upon cell activation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, W; Javors, M A; Olson, M S

    1994-02-01

    The capacity of human neutrophils to bind PAF was rapidly diminished upon cell stimulation with both physiological agonists (N-formylmethionylleucylphenylalanine (FMLP), leukotriene B4 (LTB4)) and pharmacologic agonists (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), A23187). As a consequence, PAF responses in neutrophils were blunted, as monitored by an inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Downregulation of the PAF receptor in neutrophils by diverse agonists was temperature-sensitive and required intact cells. Scatchard analysis of binding data revealed that PAF binding sites were lost without an appreciable change in the affinity of the ligand for the receptor. The binding of the PAF receptor antagonist WEB2086 to neutrophils decreased in parallel with PAF binding. PMA-induced PAF receptor downregulation was staurosporine-sensitive while PAF receptor downregulation by A23187, FMLP, or LTB4 was staurosporine-resistant. Both neutrophil aggregation (a form of intercellular adhesion) and PAF receptor downregulation occurred only at high concentrations of agonists while other signaling processes such as the increase in [Ca2+]i, PKC activation, and PAF synthesis were stimulated at low concentrations of agonists. Furthermore, agonist-induced PAF receptor downregulation was observed only under conditions in which the activated neutrophils were stirred (or shaken) and were allowed to aggregate. Additionally, chelation of extracellular Ca2+ with EGTA minimized cell aggregation and also inhibited PAF receptor downregulation. While the nature of the biochemical signal or the physical changes in the plasma membrane associated with aggregation or that follow aggregation remain to be elucidated it is clear that full expression of cell activation (i.e., neutrophil aggregation) is required for PAF receptor downregulation.

  5. Bioelectrochemistry of cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolowy, Krzysztof

    This paper deals with processes and phenomena of cell surface bioelectrochemistry in which charges do not move across the cell membrane. First, electrochemical properties of the cell membrane and the cell medium interface are described, and different electric potentials present in biological systems are defined. Methods of cell electrophoresis are then discussed. It is shown that none of the simple electrochemical models of the cell membrane can explain the dependence of cell electrophoretic mobility upon ionic strength and other electrochemical properties of the cell membrane, such as the difference in cell membrane charge as determined electrochemically and biochemically, or the effect of neuraminidase, pH, or membrane potential change on cell electrophoretic mobility. Thus, it is apparent that conclusions drawn from electrophoretic mobility data on the basis of simple models are false. The more complex multilayer-electrochemical model of the cell membrane is then described and shown to explain most electrochemical properties of the cell membrane. Next, different electrochemical techniques that were applied to study cell surfaces are described. It is shown that colloid titration, isoelectric focusing, and partition of cells between two immiscible phases is dependent not only on electrical properties of the cell membrane, but also on the energy of adsorption at cell surfaces of organic molecules used in these methods. Powder electrodes, cell polarography, conductometric titration, and Donnan potential methods are described and it is shown that these methods also produce results of doubtful value and are also often misinterpreted. The contact potential difference method produces results difficult to interpret and only electro-osmotic measurements and potential sensitive molecules are valuable methods. The colloid particle interaction theory of Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey, and Overbeek (DLVO) as applied to cell interactions is discussed. It is shown that the

  6. Active particles on curved surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fily, Yaouen; Baskaran, Aparna; Hagan, Michael

    Active systems have proved to be very sensitive to the geometry of their environment. This is often achieved by spending significant time at the boundary, probing its shape by gliding along it. I will discuss coarse graining the microscopic dynamics of self-propelled particles on a general curved surface to predict the way the density profile on the surface depends on its geometry. Beyond confined active particles, this formalism is a natural starting point to study objects that cannot leave the boundary at all, such as cells crawling on a curved substrate, animals running on uneven ground, or active colloids trapped at an interface.

  7. Active compounds from Saussurea lappa Clarks that suppress hepatitis B virus surface antigen gene expression in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, H C; Chou, C K; Lee, S D; Wang, J C; Yeh, S F

    1995-05-01

    We have examined the antiviral activity of the crude extract prepared from the root of Saussurea lappa Clarks, a Chinese medicinal herb which is widely used for many illnesses including cancer. Two active components, costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone, were identified which show strong suppressive effect on the expression of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) in human hepatoma Hep3B cells, but have little effect on the viability of the cells. Both costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone suppress the HBsAg production by Hep3B cells in a dose-dependent manner with IC50s of 1.0 and 2.0 microM, respectively. Northern blotting analysis shows that the suppression of HBsAg gene expression by both costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone were mainly at the mRNA level. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone on HBsAg and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), a marker for hepatitis B viral genome replication in human liver cells, was also observed in another human hepatoma cell line HepA2 which was derived from HepG2 cells by transfecting a tandemly repeat hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA. Similarly, the mRNA of HBsAg in HepA2 cells was also suppressed by these two compounds. Our findings suggest that costunolide and dehydrocostus lactone may have potential to develop as specific anti-HBV drugs in the future.

  8. Isolation of cell surface-specific human monoclonal antibodies using phage display and magnetically-activated cell sorting: applications in immunohematology.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D L; Chang, T Y; Russell, S L; Bunya, V Y

    1997-08-07

    A method is described for the isolation of filamentous phage-displayed human monoclonal antibodies directed at unpurifiable cell surface-expressed molecules. To optimize the capture of antigen-specific phage and minimize the binding of irrelevant phage antibodies, a simultaneous positive and negative selection strategy is employed. Cells bearing the antigen of interest are pre-coated with magnetic beads and diluted into an excess of unmodified antigen-negative cells. Following incubation of the cell admixture with a Fab/phage library, the antigen-positive cell population is retrieved using magnetically-activated cell sorting and antigen-specific Fab/phage are eluted and propagated in bacterial culture. Utilizing this protocol with magnetically-labeled Rh(D)-positive and excess unlabeled Rh(D)-negative human red blood cells and a Fab/phage library constructed from human peripheral blood lymphocytes, dozens of unique clinically-useful gamma 1 kappa and gamma 1 lambda anti-Rh(D) antibodies were isolated from a single alloimmunized individual. This cell-surface selection method is readily adaptable for use in other systems, such as for the identification of putative tumor-specific antigens and provides a rapid (< 1 month), high-yield approach for isolating self-replicative antibody reagents directed at novel or conformationally-dependent cell-surface epitopes.

  9. Galectin-3 Protein Modulates Cell Surface Expression and Activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor 2 in Human Endothelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Markowska, Anna I.; Jefferies, Kevin C.; Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is heavily influenced by VEGF-A and its family of receptors, particularly VEGF receptor 2 (VEGF-R2). Like most cell surface proteins, VEGF-R2 is glycosylated, although the function of VEGF-R2 with respect to its glycosylation pattern is poorly characterized. Galectin-3, a glycan binding protein, interacts with the EGF and TGFβ receptors, retaining them on the plasma membrane and altering their signal transduction. Because VEGF-R2 is glycosylated and both galectin-3 and VEGF-R2 are involved with angiogenesis, we hypothesized that galectin-3 binds VEGF-R2 and modulates its signal transduction as well. Employing a Western blot analysis approach, we found that galectin-3 induces phosphorylation of VEGF-R2 in endothelial cells. Knockdown of galectin-3 and Mgat5, an enzyme that synthesizes high-affinity glycan ligands of galectin-3, reduced VEGF-A mediated angiogenesis in vitro. A direct interaction on the plasma membrane was detected between galectin-3 and VEGF-R2, and this interaction was dependent on the expression of Mgat5. Using immunofluorescence and cell surface labeling, we found an increase in the level of internalized VEGF-R2 in both Mgat5 and galectin-3 knockdown cells, suggesting that galectin-3 retains the receptor on the plasma membrane. Finally, we observed reduced suture-induced neovascularization in the corneas of Gal3−/− and Mgat5−/− mice. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that, like its role with the EGF and TGFβ receptors, galectin-3 contributes to the plasma membrane retention and proangiogenic function of VEGF-R2. PMID:21715322

  10. Effect of external sodium on intracellular chloride activity in the surface cells of frog gastric mucosa. Microelectrode studies.

    PubMed

    Curci, S; Schettino, T

    1984-06-01

    The intracellular chloride activity and its dependence on ionic substitutions in the bathing media was studied in individual surface cells of resting gastric mucosa using conventional and Cl- selective microelectrodes. When the tissue was perfused with control NaCl-Ringer the cell membrane p.d.'s, cell-lumen (psi cm) and cell-serosa (psi cs) were -40.9 +/- 0.6 mV and -66.8 +/- 0.5 mV (n = 175) respectively and the p.d. measured by the Cl- selective microelectrodes across the serosal membrane (psi csCl-) averaged -32.4 +/- 0.7 mV (n = 138). From these values an intracellular Cl- activity (acCl-) of 15.3 mmol/l can be estimated. The data indicate that chloride ion is distributed close to equilibrium at the luminal membrane while it is accumulated by an energy requiring step at the serosal membrane. Reduction (2 mmol/l) or absence of chloride from the luminal bath did not result in any detectable change of acCl-; on the other hand, after removal of Cl- from the serosal bath the intracellular Cl- activity fell to 7.1 mmol/l. When the tissue was exposed to serosal Na+-free Ringer (Na+ replaced by choline or TMA), although the acCl- remained unaffected, a marked reduction of the electrochemical gradient for Cl- at the serosal membrane was observed. These data indicate that: chloride is accumulated in the surface cells against its electrochemical potential difference at the serosal membrane; the luminal membrane has a negligible conductance to Cl-, while the serosal membrane represents a conductive pathway to chloride; the uphill entry of chloride at the serosal membrane seems to be, at least partially, Na+-dependent.

  11. Microparticle Surface Modifications Targeting Dendritic Cells for Non-Activating Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jamal S.; Zaveri, Toral D.; Crooks, Charles P.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    Microparticulate systems for delivery of therapeutics to DCs for immunotherapy have gained attention recently. However, reports addressing the optimization of DC-targeting microparticle delivery systems are limited, particularly for cases where the goal is to deliver payload to DCs in a non-activating fashion. Here, we investigate targeting DCs using poly (d lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles (MPs) in a non-stimulatory manner and assess efficacy in vitro and in vivo. We modified MPs by surface immobilizing DC receptor targeting molecules – antibodies (anti-CD11c, anti-DEC-205) or peptides (P-D2, RGD), where anti-CD11c antibody, P-D2 and RGD peptides target integrins and anti-DEC-205 antibody targets the c-type lectin receptor DEC-205. Our results demonstrate the modified MPs are neither toxic nor activating, and DC uptake of MPs in vitro is improved by the anti-DEC-205 antibody, the anti-CD11c antibody and the P-D2 peptide modifications. The P-D2 peptide MP modification significantly improved DC antigen presentation in vitro both at immediate and delayed time points. Notably, MP functionalization with P-D2 peptide and anti-CD11c antibody increased the rate and extent of MP translocation in vivo by DCs and MΦs, with the P-D2 peptide modified MPs demonstrating the highest translocation. This work informs the design of non-activating polymeric microparticulate applications such as vaccines for autoimmune diseases. PMID:22796161

  12. Model of cell activation and desensitization by surface immunoglobin: the case of histamine release from human basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Dembo, M.; Goldstein, B.

    1980-11-01

    We present a model for the control of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated histamine release from human basophils. We suggest that there is a calcium gating factor which interacts with crosslinked IgE to form a short-lived open calcium channel. After formation of the channel the activated gating factor rapidly decays to an inactive form. It is the loss of the active gating factor which causes the basophil to desensitize nonspecifically. We propose that the crosslinked IgE molecules are deactivated by a mechanism, such as endocytosis or shedding, which is independent of the mechanism which inactivates the calcium gating factor. This loss of functional IgE leads to specific desensitization. The mathematical formulation of the model explains the relationship of specific and nonspecific desensitization to the amount of specific IgE on the basophil surface; explains why there are two types of antigen excess inhibition; explains the relationship between antigen excess inhibition and desensitization; explains why, for a fixed antigen concentration, increasing the concentration of cell surface IgE increases histamine release until an optimal concentration is reached, then decreases histamine release; predicts the effects that changing the external calcium will have on the dose response curve; and predicts that increasing the amount of specific IgE on the cell surface will cause the dose response curve to undergo a transition from a curve with a single maximum to a curve with two maxima.

  13. Influence of Cu-Ti thin film surface properties on antimicrobial activity and viability of living cells.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszak, Damian; Kaczmarek, Danuta; Antosiak, Aleksandra; Mazur, Michal; Rybak, Zbigniew; Rusak, Agnieszka; Osekowska, Malgorzata; Poniedzialek, Agata; Gamian, Andrzej; Szponar, Bogumila

    2015-11-01

    The paper describes properties of thin-film coatings based on copper and titanium. Thin films were prepared by co-sputtering of Cu and Ti targets in argon plasma. Deposited coatings consist of 90at.% of Cu and 10at.% of Ti. Characterization of the film was made on the basis of investigations of microstructure and physicochemical properties of the surface. Methods such as scanning electron microscopy, x-ray microanalysis, x-ray diffraction, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, optical profilometry and wettability measurements were used to assess the properties of deposited thin films. An impact of Cu-Ti coating on the growth of selected bacteria and viability of the living cells (line L929, NCTC clone 929) was described in relation to the structure, surface state and wettability of the film. It was found that as-deposited films were amorphous. However, in such surroundings the nanocrystalline grains of 10-15nm and 25-35nm size were present. High surface active area with a roughness of 8.9nm, had an effect on receiving relatively high water contact angle value (74.1°). Such wettability may promote cell adhesion and result in an increase of the probability of copper ion transfer from the film surface into the cell. Thin films revealed bactericidal and fungicidal effects even in short term-contact. High activity of prepared films was directly related to high amount (ca. 51 %) of copper ions at 1+ state as x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results have shown.

  14. Cell surface chondroitin sulfate glycosaminoglycan in melanoma: role in the activation of pro-MMP-2 (pro-gelatinase A).

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Wilhelmson, Krista L; Ng, Janet; Lee, Peter; Morrison, Charlotte; Tam, Eric; Overall, Christopher M; McCarthy, James B

    2007-05-01

    We previously reported that CS (chondroitin sulfate) GAG (glycosaminoglycan), expressed on MCSP (melanoma-specific CS proteoglycan), is important for regulating MT3-MMP [membrane-type 3 MMP (matrix metalloproteinase)]-mediated human melanoma invasion and gelatinolytic activity in vitro. In the present study, we sought to determine if CS can directly enhance MT3-MMP-mediated activation of pro-MMP-2. Co-immunoprecipitation studies suggest that MCSP forms a complex with MT3-MMP and MMP-2 on melanoma cell surface. When melanoma cells were treated with betaDX (p-nitro-beta-D-xylopyranoside) to inhibit coupling of CS on the core protein, both active form and proform of MMP-2 were no longer co-immunoprecipitated with either MCSP or MT3-MMP, suggesting a model in which CS directly binds to MMP-2 and presents the gelatinase to MT3-MMP to be activated. By using recombinant proteins, we determined that MT3-MMP directly activates pro-MMP-2 and that this activation requires the interaction of the C-terminal domain of pro-MMP-2 with MT3-MMP. Activation of pro-MMP-2 by suboptimal concentrations of MT3-MMP is also significantly enhanced in the presence of excess C4S (chondroitin 4-sulfate), whereas C6S (chondroitin 6-sulfate) or low-molecular-mass hyaluronan was ineffective. Affinity chromatography studies using CS isolated from aggrecan indicate that the catalytic domain of MT3-MMP and the C-terminal domain of MMP-2 directly bind to the GAG. Thus the direct binding of pro-MMP-2 with CS through the C-domain would present the catalytic domain of pro-MMP-2 to MT3-MMP, which facilitates the generation of the active form of MMP-2. These results suggest that C4S, which is expressed on tumour cell surface, can function to bind to pro-MMP-2 and facilitate its activation by MT3-MMP-expressing tumour cells to enhance invasion and metastasis.

  15. UV activation of polymeric high aspect ratio microstructures: ramifications in antibody surface loading for circulating tumor cell selection†

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua M.; Witek, Małgorzata A.; Hupert, Mateusz L.; Brady, Charles; Pullagurla, Swathi; Kamande, Joyce; Aufforth, Rachel D.; Tignanelli, Christopher J.; Torphy, Robert J.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2014-01-01

    The need to activate thermoplastic surfaces using robust and efficient methods has been driven by the fact that replication techniques can be used to produce microfluidic devices in a high production mode and at low cost, making polymer microfluidics invaluable for in vitro diagnostics, such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis, where device disposability is critical to mitigate artifacts associated with sample carryover. Modifying the surface chemistry of thermoplastic devices through activation techniques can be used to increase the wettability of the surface or to produce functional scaffolds to allow for the covalent attachment of biologics, such as antibodies for CTC recognition. Extensive surface characterization tools were used to investigate UV activation of various surfaces to produce uniform and high surface coverage of functional groups, such as carboxylic acids in microchannels of different aspect ratios. We found that the efficiency of the UV activation process is highly dependent on the microchannel aspect ratio and the identity of the thermoplastic substrate. Colorimetric assays and fluorescence imaging of UV-activated microchannels following EDC/NHS coupling of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotides indicated that UV-activation of a PMMA microchannel with an aspect ratio of ∼3 was significantly less efficient toward the bottom of the channel compared to the upper sections. This effect was a consequence of the bulk polymer's damping of the modifying UV radiation due to absorption artifacts. In contrast, this effect was less pronounced for COC. Moreover, we observed that after thermal fusion bonding of the device's cover plate to the substrate, many of the generated functional groups buried into the bulk rendering them inaccessible. The propensity of this surface reorganization was found to be higher for PMMA compared to COC. As an example of the effects of material and microchannel aspect ratios on device functionality, thermoplastic devices for the

  16. UV activation of polymeric high aspect ratio microstructures: ramifications in antibody surface loading for circulating tumor cell selection.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Joshua M; Witek, Małgorzata A; Hupert, Mateusz L; Brady, Charles; Pullagurla, Swathi; Kamande, Joyce; Aufforth, Rachel D; Tignanelli, Christopher J; Torphy, Robert J; Yeh, Jen Jen; Soper, Steven A

    2014-01-07

    The need to activate thermoplastic surfaces using robust and efficient methods has been driven by the fact that replication techniques can be used to produce microfluidic devices in a high production mode and at low cost, making polymer microfluidics invaluable for in vitro diagnostics, such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis, where device disposability is critical to mitigate artifacts associated with sample carryover. Modifying the surface chemistry of thermoplastic devices through activation techniques can be used to increase the wettability of the surface or to produce functional scaffolds to allow for the covalent attachment of biologics, such as antibodies for CTC recognition. Extensive surface characterization tools were used to investigate UV activation of various surfaces to produce uniform and high surface coverage of functional groups, such as carboxylic acids in microchannels of different aspect ratios. We found that the efficiency of the UV activation process is highly dependent on the microchannel aspect ratio and the identity of the thermoplastic substrate. Colorimetric assays and fluorescence imaging of UV-activated microchannels following EDC/NHS coupling of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotides indicated that UV-activation of a PMMA microchannel with an aspect ratio of ~3 was significantly less efficient toward the bottom of the channel compared to the upper sections. This effect was a consequence of the bulk polymer's damping of the modifying UV radiation due to absorption artifacts. In contrast, this effect was less pronounced for COC. Moreover, we observed that after thermal fusion bonding of the device's cover plate to the substrate, many of the generated functional groups buried into the bulk rendering them inaccessible. The propensity of this surface reorganization was found to be higher for PMMA compared to COC. As an example of the effects of material and microchannel aspect ratios on device functionality, thermoplastic devices for the

  17. EGF-independent activation of cell-surface EGF receptors harboring mutations found in gefitinib-sensitive lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, S H; Mendrola, J M; Lemmon, M A

    2007-03-08

    Several somatic mutations within the tyrosine kinase domain of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have been identified that predict clinical response of non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients to gefitinib. To test the hypothesis that these mutations cause constitutive EGF receptor signaling, and to investigate its mechanistic basis, we expressed representative examples in a null background and analysed their biochemical properties. Each mutation caused significant EGF-independent tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, and allowed the receptor to promote Ba/F3 cell mitogenesis in the absence of EGF, arguing that these are oncogenic mutations. Active mutated receptors are present at the cell surface and are fully competent to bind EGF. Recent structural studies show that the inactive EGFR tyrosine kinase domain is autoinhibited by intramolecular interactions between its activation loop and alphaC helix. We find that mutations predicted to disrupt this autoinhibitory interaction (including several that have not been described in NSCLC) elevate EGF-independent tyrosine kinase activity, thus providing new insight into how somatic mutations activate EGFR and other ErbB family members.

  18. The human NKG2D ligand ULBP2 can be expressed at the cell surface with or without a GPI anchor and both forms can activate NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Messina, Lola; Ashiru, Omodele; Agüera-González, Sonia; Reyburn, Hugh T.; Valés-Gómez, Mar

    2011-01-01

    The activating immune receptor NKG2D binds to several stress-induced ligands that are structurally different. MHC-class-I-related chain (MIC) A/B molecules have a transmembrane domain, whereas most UL16 binding proteins (ULBPs) are glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked molecules. The significance of this variability in membrane anchors is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that ULBP2, but not ULBP1 or ULBP3, can reach the cell surface without the GPI modification. Several proteins are expressed at the cell surface as both transmembrane and GPI-linked molecules, either via alternative splicing or by the expression of linked genes. However, to our knowledge, ULBP2 is the first single mammalian cDNA that can be expressed as either a transmembrane or a GPI-anchored protein. The rate of maturation and the levels of cell surface expression of the non-GPI-linked form were lower than those of the GPI-linked ULBP2. Nonetheless, non-GPI ULBP2 was recognised by NKG2D and triggered NK cell cytotoxicity. These data show that differences in membrane attachment by NKG2D ligands are more important for regulation of their surface expression than for cytotoxic recognition by NKG2D and emphasise that detailed characterisation of the cell biology of individual NKG2D ligands will be necessary to allow targeted modulation of this system. PMID:21224393

  19. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca(2+)]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca(2+)]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca(2+)]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca(2+)]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca(2+), glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca(2+)]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor.

  20. The effect of surface modification of mesoporous silica micro-rod scaffold on immune cell activation and infiltration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weiwei Aileen; Lu, Beverly Ying; Gu, Luo; Choi, Youngjin; Kim, Jaeyun; Mooney, David J

    2016-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffold based vaccines show significant potential in generating potent antigen-specific immunity. However, the role of the scaffold surface chemistry in initiating and modulating the immune response is not well understood. In this study, a mesoporous silica micro-rod (MSR) scaffold was modified with PEG, PEG-RGD and PEG-RDG groups. PEG modification significantly enhanced BMDC activation marker up-regulation and IL-1β production in vitro, and innate immune cell infiltration in vivo. PEG-RGD MSRs and PEG-RDG MSRs displayed decreased inflammation compared to PEG MSRs, and the effect was not RGD specific. Finally, the Nlrp3 inflammasome was found to be necessary for MSR stimulated IL-1β production in vitro and played a key role in regulating immune cell infiltration in vivo. These findings suggest that simply modulating the surface chemistry of a scaffold can regulate its immune cell infiltration profile and have implications for the design and development of new material based vaccines. PMID:26784009

  1. Endothelial Cell-Surface Gp60 Activates Vesicle Formation and Trafficking via Gi-Coupled Src Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Minshall, Richard D.; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Vogel, Stephen M.; Niles, Walter D.; Gilchrist, Annette; Hamm, Heidi E.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the albumin-docking protein gp60, which is localized in caveolae, couples to the heterotrimeric GTP binding protein Gi, and thereby activates plasmalemmal vesicle formation and the directed migration of vesicles in endothelial cells (ECs). We used the water-soluble styryl pyridinium dye N-(3-triethylaminopropyl)-4-(p-dibutylaminostyryl) pyridinium dibromide (FM 1-43) to quantify vesicle trafficking by confocal and digital fluorescence microscopy. FM 1-43 and fluorescently labeled anti-gp60 antibody (Ab) were colocalized in endocytic vesicles within 5 min of gp60 activation. Vesicles migrated to the basolateral surface where they released FM 1-43, the fluid phase styryl probe. FM 1-43 fluorescence disappeared from the basolateral EC surface without the loss of anti-gp60 Ab fluorescence. Activation of cell-surface gp60 by cross-linking (using anti-gp60 Ab and secondary Ab) in EC grown on microporous filters increased transendothelial 125I-albumin permeability without altering liquid permeability (hydraulic conductivity), thus, indicating the dissociation of hydraulic conductivity from the albumin permeability pathway. The findings that the sterol-binding agent, filipin, prevented gp60-activated vesicle formation and that caveolin-1 and gp60 were colocalized in vesicles suggest the caveolar origin of endocytic vesicles. Pertussis toxin pretreatment and expression of the dominant negative construct encoding an 11–amino acid Gαi carboxyl-terminal peptide inhibited endothelial 125I-albumin endocytosis and vesicle formation induced by gp60 activation. Expression of dominant negative Src (dn-Src) and overexpression of wild-type caveolin-1 also prevented gp60-activated endocytosis. Caveolin-1 overexpression resulted in the sequestration of Gαi with the caveolin-1, whereas dn-Src inhibited Gαi binding to caveolin-1. Thus, vesicle formation induced by gp60 and migration of vesicles to the basolateral membrane requires the interaction of gp60

  2. CCR5 promoter activity correlates with HIV disease progression by regulating CCR5 cell surface expression and CD4 T cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anjali; Punke, Erin B; Sedano, Melina; Beauchamp, Bethany; Patel, Rima; Hossenlopp, Cassady; Alozie, Ogechika K; Gupta, Jayanta; Mukherjee, Debabrata; Garg, Himanshu

    2017-03-22

    CCR5 is the major co-receptor for HIV and polymorphisms in the CCR5 gene as well as promoter region that alter cell surface expression have been associated with disease progression. We determined the relationship between CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CD4 decline and other immunopathological features like immune activation and CD4+ T cell apoptosis in HIV patients. CCR5 promoter haplotype HHC was significantly associated with higher CD4 counts in patients. The relative promoter activity (RPA) of each haplotype was determined in vitro and combined promoter activity based on both alleles (CRPA) was assigned to each patients. Interestingly, CCR5 CRPA correlated inversely with CD4 counts and CD4:CD8 ratio specifically in viremic patients. In normal individuals, the CRPA correlated with the number of CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood suggesting an effect on CCR5 expression. In a subset of high viremic patients harboring R5 tropic HIV, there was a strong correlation between CCR5 CRPA and both CD4 counts and CD4 T cell apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms correlate with CD4 T cell loss possibly by regulating CD4 T cell apoptosis in HIV patients. Furthermore, assigning CRPAs to each patient is a new method of translating genotype to phenotype.

  3. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...

  4. Activation of human naïve Th cells increases surface expression of GD3 and induces neoexpression of GD2 that colocalize with TCR clusters.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Cabello, Tania M; Mollicone, Rosella; Cruz-Muñoz, Mario E; López-Guerrero, Delia V; Martínez-Duncker, Iván

    2015-12-01

    CD4+ T helper lymphocytes (Th) orchestrate the immune response after their activation by antigen-presenting cells. Activation of naïve Th cells is reported to generate the reduction in surface epitopes of sialic acid (Sia) in α2,3 and α2,6 linkages. In this work, we report that in spite of this glycophenotype, anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated purified human naïve Th cells show a significant increase in surface Sia, as assessed by metabolic labeling, compared with resting naïve Th cells, suggesting an increased flux of Sia toward Siaα2,8 glycoconjugates. To understand this increase as a result of ganglioside up-regulation, we observed that very early after activation, human naïve Th cells show an increased expression in surface GD3 and neoexpression of surface GD2 gangliosides, the latter clustering with the T cell receptor (TCR). Also, we report that in contrast to GM2/GD2 synthase null mice, lentiviral vector-mediated silencing of the GM2/GD2 synthase in activated human naïve Th cells reduced efficient TCR clustering and downstream signaling, as assessed by proliferation assays and IL-2 and IL-2R expression, pointing to an important role of this enzyme in activation of human naive Th cells.

  5. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  6. The stromal cell-surface protease fibroblast activation protein-α localizes to lipid rafts and is recruited to invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Julia D; Tholen, Stefan; Koczorowska, Maria M; De Wever, Olivier; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a cell surface protease expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the microenvironment of most solid tumors. As there is increasing evidence for proteases having non-catalytic functions, we determined the FAPα interactome in cancer-associated fibroblasts using the quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK) method. Complex formation with adenosin deaminase, erlin-2, stomatin, prohibitin, Thy-1 membrane glycoprotein, and caveolin-1 was further validated by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of the known stoichiometric FAPα binding partner dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) corroborated the proteomic strategy. Reverse co-IPs validated the FAPα interaction with caveolin-1, erlin-2, and stomatin while co-IP upon RNA-interference mediated knock-down of DPPIV excluded adenosin deaminase as a direct FAPα interaction partner. Many newly identified FAPα interaction partners localize to lipid rafts, including caveolin-1, a widely-used marker for lipid raft localization. We hypothesized that this indicates a recruitment of FAPα to lipid raft structures. In density gradient centrifugation, FAPα co-fractionates with caveolin-1. Immunofluorescence optical sectioning microscopy of FAPα and lipid raft markers further corroborates recruitment of FAPα to lipid rafts and invadopodia. FAPα is therefore an integral component of stromal lipid rafts in solid tumors. In essence, we provide one of the first interactome analyses of a cell surface protease and translate these results into novel biological aspects of a marker protein for cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  7. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase regulates hippocampal neuronal pH by recruiting Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE5 to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Szabó, Elöd Z; Numat, Masayuki; Orlowski, John

    2014-07-25

    Strict regulation of intra- and extracellular pH is an important determinant of nervous system function as many voltage-, ligand-, and H(+)-gated cationic channels are exquisitely sensitive to transient fluctuations in pH elicited by neural activity and pathophysiologic events such as hypoxia-ischemia and seizures. Multiple Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) are implicated in maintenance of neural pH homeostasis. However, aside from the ubiquitous NHE1 isoform, their relative contributions are poorly understood. NHE5 is of particular interest as it is preferentially expressed in brain relative to other tissues. In hippocampal neurons, NHE5 regulates steady-state cytoplasmic pH, but intriguingly the bulk of the transporter is stored in intracellular vesicles. Here, we show that NHE5 is a direct target for phosphorylation by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor and regulator of cellular energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stresses. In NHE5-transfected non-neuronal cells, activation of AMPK by the AMP mimetic AICAR or by antimycin A, which blocks aerobic respiration and causes acidification, increased cell surface accumulation and activity of NHE5, and elevated intracellular pH. These effects were effectively blocked by the AMPK antagonist compound C, the NHE inhibitor HOE694, and mutation of a predicted AMPK recognition motif in the NHE5 C terminus. This regulatory pathway was also functional in primary hippocampal neurons, where AMPK activation of NHE5 protected the cells from sustained antimycin A-induced acidification. These data reveal a unique role for AMPK and NHE5 in regulating the pH homeostasis of hippocampal neurons during metabolic stress.

  8. Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Hippocampal Neuronal pH by Recruiting Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE5 to the Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Szabó, Elöd Z.; Numata, Masayuki; Orlowski, John

    2014-01-01

    Strict regulation of intra- and extracellular pH is an important determinant of nervous system function as many voltage-, ligand-, and H+-gated cationic channels are exquisitely sensitive to transient fluctuations in pH elicited by neural activity and pathophysiologic events such as hypoxia-ischemia and seizures. Multiple Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) are implicated in maintenance of neural pH homeostasis. However, aside from the ubiquitous NHE1 isoform, their relative contributions are poorly understood. NHE5 is of particular interest as it is preferentially expressed in brain relative to other tissues. In hippocampal neurons, NHE5 regulates steady-state cytoplasmic pH, but intriguingly the bulk of the transporter is stored in intracellular vesicles. Here, we show that NHE5 is a direct target for phosphorylation by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor and regulator of cellular energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stresses. In NHE5-transfected non-neuronal cells, activation of AMPK by the AMP mimetic AICAR or by antimycin A, which blocks aerobic respiration and causes acidification, increased cell surface accumulation and activity of NHE5, and elevated intracellular pH. These effects were effectively blocked by the AMPK antagonist compound C, the NHE inhibitor HOE694, and mutation of a predicted AMPK recognition motif in the NHE5 C terminus. This regulatory pathway was also functional in primary hippocampal neurons, where AMPK activation of NHE5 protected the cells from sustained antimycin A-induced acidification. These data reveal a unique role for AMPK and NHE5 in regulating the pH homeostasis of hippocampal neurons during metabolic stress. PMID:24936055

  9. Mitochondrial activation chemicals synergize with surface receptor PD-1 blockade for T cell-dependent antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Chamoto, Kenji; Chowdhury, Partha S.; Kumar, Alok; Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Honjo, Tasuku

    2017-01-01

    Although immunotherapy by PD-1 blockade has dramatically improved the survival rate of cancer patients, further improvement in efficacy is required to reduce the fraction of less sensitive patients. In mouse models of PD-1 blockade therapy, we found that tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in draining lymph nodes (DLNs) carry increased mitochondrial mass and more reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that ROS generation by ROS precursors or indirectly by mitochondrial uncouplers synergized the tumoricidal activity of PD-1 blockade by expansion of effector/memory CTLs in DLNs and within the tumor. These CTLs carry not only the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but also an increment of their downstream transcription factors such as PPAR-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and T-bet. Furthermore, direct activators of mTOR, AMPK, or PGC-1α also synergized the PD-1 blockade therapy whereas none of above-mentioned chemicals alone had any effects on tumor growth. These findings will pave a way to developing novel combinatorial therapies with PD-1 blockade. PMID:28096382

  10. Mitochondrial activation chemicals synergize with surface receptor PD-1 blockade for T cell-dependent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Chamoto, Kenji; Chowdhury, Partha S; Kumar, Alok; Sonomura, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Fagarasan, Sidonia; Honjo, Tasuku

    2017-01-31

    Although immunotherapy by PD-1 blockade has dramatically improved the survival rate of cancer patients, further improvement in efficacy is required to reduce the fraction of less sensitive patients. In mouse models of PD-1 blockade therapy, we found that tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in draining lymph nodes (DLNs) carry increased mitochondrial mass and more reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show that ROS generation by ROS precursors or indirectly by mitochondrial uncouplers synergized the tumoricidal activity of PD-1 blockade by expansion of effector/memory CTLs in DLNs and within the tumor. These CTLs carry not only the activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) but also an increment of their downstream transcription factors such as PPAR-gamma coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and T-bet. Furthermore, direct activators of mTOR, AMPK, or PGC-1α also synergized the PD-1 blockade therapy whereas none of above-mentioned chemicals alone had any effects on tumor growth. These findings will pave a way to developing novel combinatorial therapies with PD-1 blockade.

  11. Polyclonal Activation of the Murine Immune System by an Antibody to IgD. 2. Generation of Polyclonal Antibody Production and Cells with Surface IgG

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-08-01

    TO IGD , II. GENERATION OF POLYCLONAL ANTIBODY PRODUCTION AND CELLS WITH SURFACE IGG. F.DFINKELMANi I.SCHER, J,JoMOND, S.KESSLER, J.T.KUNG, AND E...1982 by The Ameuican Assoclari of irturlogists Prined in U.S.A POLYCLONAL ACTIVATION OF THE MURINE IMMUNE SYSTEM BY AN ANTIBODY TO IgD II. Generation...of the A linking of B cell surface IgD by ligand leads to 1) direct second wave of lymphocyte proliferation suggested that the in * activation of B

  12. The Oncogenic Response to MiR-335 Is Associated with Cell Surface Expression of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) Activity.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Fausto; Hernandez, Maria E; Silva, Milagros; Li, Lihua; Subramanian, Subbaya; Wilson, Michael J; Liu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA miR-335 has been reported to have both tumor suppressor and oncogenic activities. In order to determine possible tissue and cell type differences in response to miR-335, we examined the effect of miR-335 on cell expression of MT1-MMP, a proteinase commonly expressed in tumors and associated with cell proliferation and migration. miR-335 increased cell surface expression of MT1-MMP in fibrosarcoma HT-1080 and benign prostate BPH-1 cells, but not in prostate LNCaP or breast MCF-7 tumor cells. miR-335 stimulated proliferation and cell migration in a wound healing in vitro assay in HT-1080, BPH-1, and U87 glioblastoma cells, cells which demonstrated significant cell surface expression of MT1-MMP. In contrast, miR-335 did not affect proliferation or migration in cells without a prominent plasma membrane associated MT1-MMP activity. Our data suggest that differences in response to miR-335 by tumor cells may lie in part in the mechanism of regulation of MT1-MMP production.

  13. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p < 0.05) between the bacterial cell count estimated by the pour plate method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  14. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  15. Raman activated cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Song, Yizhi; Yin, Huabing; Huang, Wei E

    2016-08-01

    Single cell Raman spectra (SCRS) are intrinsic biochemical profiles and 'chemical images' of single cells which can be used to characterise phenotypic changes, physiological states and functions of cells. On the base of SCRS, Raman activated cell sorting (RACS) provides a label-free cell sorting approach, which can link single cells to their chemical or phenotypic profiles. Overcoming naturally weak Raman signals, establishing Raman biomarker as sorting criteria to RACS and improving specific sorting technology are three challenges of developing RACS. Advances on Raman spectroscopy such as stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and pre-screening helped to increase RACS sorting speed. Entire SCRS can be characterised using pattern recognition methods, and specific Raman bands can be extracted as biomarkers for RACS. Recent advances on cell sorting technologies based on microfluidic device and surface-ejection enable accurate and reliable single cell sorting from complex samples. A high throughput RACS will be achievable in near future by integrating fast Raman detection system such as SRS with microfluidic RACS and Raman activated cell ejection (RACE).

  16. Effect of silica nanoparticles with variable size and surface functionalization on human endothelial cell viability and angiogenic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, Daniela; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Belli, Valentina; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Netti, Paolo

    2014-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles could be promising delivery vehicles for drug targeting or gene therapy. However, few studies have been undertaken to determine the biological behavior effects of silica nanoparticles on primary endothelial cells. Here we investigated uptake, cytotoxicity and angiogenic properties of silica nanoparticle with positive and negative surface charge and sizes ranging from 25 to 115 nm in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Dynamic light scattering measurements and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to estimate the dispersion status of nanoparticles in cell culture media, which was a key aspect to understand the results of the in vitro cellular uptake experiments. Nanoparticles were taken up by primary endothelial cells in a size-dependent manner according to their degree of agglomeration occurring after transfer in cell culture media. Functionalization of the particle surface with positively charged groups enhanced the in vitro cellular uptake, compared to negatively charged nanoparticles. However, this effect was contrasted by the tendency of particles to form agglomerates, leading to lower internalization efficiency. Silica nanoparticle uptake did not affect cell viability and cell membrane integrity. More interestingly, positively and negatively charged 25 nm nanoparticles did not influence capillary-like tube formation and angiogenic sprouting, compared to controls. Considering the increasing interest in nanomaterials for several biomedical applications, a careful study of nanoparticle-endothelial cells interactions is of high relevance to assess possible risks associated to silica nanoparticle exposure and their possible applications in nanomedicine as safe and effective nanocarriers for vascular transport of therapeutic agents.

  17. Efficient gene transfer into human primary blood lymphocytes by surface-engineered lentiviral vectors that display a T cell-activating polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Marielle; Verhoeyen, Els; Salmon, Patrick; Trono, Didier; Russell, Stephen J; Cosset, François-Loïc

    2002-04-01

    In contrast to oncoretroviruses, lentiviruses such as human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) are able to integrate their genetic material into the genome of nonproliferating cells that are metabolically active. Likewise, vectors derived from HIV-1 can transduce many types of nonproliferating cells, with the exception of some particular quiescent cell types such as resting T cells. Completion of reverse transcription, nuclear import, and subsequent integration of the lentivirus genome do not occur in these cells unless they are activated via the T-cell receptor (TCR) or by cytokines or both. However, to preserve the functional properties of these important gene therapy target cells, only minimal activation with cytokines or TCR-specific antibodies should be performed during gene transfer. Here we report the characterization of HIV-1-derived lentiviral vectors whose virion surface was genetically engineered to display a T cell-activating single-chain antibody polypeptide derived from the anti-CD3 OKT3 monoclonal antibody. Interaction of OKT3 IgGs with the TCR can activate resting peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) by promoting the transition from G(0) to G(1) phases of the cell cycle. Compared to unmodified HIV-1-based vectors, OKT3-displaying lentiviral vectors strongly increased gene delivery in freshly isolated PBLs by up to 100-fold. Up to 48% transduction could be obtained without addition of PBL activation stimuli during infection. Taken together, these results show that surface-engineered lentiviral vectors significantly improve transduction of primary lymphocytes by activating the target cells. Moreover these results provide a proof of concept for an approach that may have utility in various gene transfer applications, including in vivo gene delivery.

  18. Activation of plasminogen into plasmin at the surface of endothelial microparticles: a mechanism that modulates angiogenic properties of endothelial progenitor cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lacroix, Romaric; Sabatier, Florence; Mialhe, Agnes; Basire, Agnes; Pannell, Ralph; Borghi, Helene; Robert, Stephane; Lamy, Edouard; Plawinski, Laurent; Camoin-Jau, Laurence; Gurewich, Victor; Angles-Cano, Eduardo; Dignat-George, Francoise

    2007-01-01

    The regulation of plasmin generation on cell surfaces is of critical importance in the control of vascular homeostasis. Cell-derived microparticles participate in the dissemination of biological activities. However their capacity to promote plasmin generation has not been documented. In this study, we show that endothelial microparticles (EMP) from TNFα-stimulated endothelial cells, served as a surface for the generation of plasmin. The generation of plasmin involved expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its receptor (uPAR) at the surface of EMP and was further increased by their ability to bind exogenous uPA on uPAR. Plasminogen was activated at the surface of EMP in a dose-dependent, saturable and specific manner as indicated by the inhibition of plasmin formation by ε-amino-caproic acid (ε-ACA) and carboxypeptidase B. EMP-induced plasmin generation affects tube formation mediated by endothelial progenitor cells. However, low amounts of EMP increased tube formation whereas higher concentrations inhibited it. Prevention of these effects by inhibitors of either uPA or plasmin, underscore the key role of EMP-induced plasmin generation. In conclusion, we demonstrated that EMP act as vectors supporting efficient plasmin generation and dissemination, a new pathway in the regulation of endothelial proteolytic activities with potential involvement in inflammation, angiogenesis and atherosclerosis. PMID:17606760

  19. Mechanical guidance through cell-cell and cell-surface contact during multicellular streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chenlu; Driscoll, Meghan; Gupta, Satyandra K.; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    During collective cell migration, mechanical forces arise from the extracellular matrix (ECM) through cell-surface contact and from other cells through cell-cell contact. These forces regulate the motion of migrating cell groups. To determine how these mechanical interactions balance during cell migration, we measured the shape dynamics of Dictyostelium discoideum cells at the multicellular streaming stage. We found that cells can coordinate their motion by synchronizing protrusion waves that travel along their membranes when they form proper cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion. In addition, our experiments on live actin labeled cells show that intracellular actin polymerization actively responds to the change of cell-cell/surface adhesion and helps to stabilize multicellular migration streams. Our finding suggests that the coordination of motion between neighboring cells in collective migration requires a balance between cell-cell adhesion and cell-surface adhesion, and that the cell cytoskeleton plays an important role in this balance.

  20. Expression of the surface antigen 4F2hc affects system-L-like neutral-amino-acid-transport activity in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, S; Bröer, A; Hamprecht, B

    1997-01-01

    Mammalian cells possess a variety of amino acid-transport systems with overlapping substrate specificity. System L is one of the major amino acid-transport systems of non-epithelial cells. By expression cloning we have recently demonstrated that the surface antigen 4F2hc (CD98) is a necessary component for expression of system-L-like amino acid-transport activity in C6-BU-1 rat glioma cells [Bröer, Bröer and Hamprecht (1995) Biochem. J. 312, 863-870]. 4F2hc mRNA was detected in CHO cells, COS cells, activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse spleen and primary cultures of astrocytes. In all these cell types, Na+-independent isoleucine transport was mediated by system L. No contribution of system y+L to isoleucine or arginine transport was detected in C6-BU-1 cells. In lymphocytes, both system-L-like amino acid-transport activity and 4F2hc mRNA levels increased after treatment with phorbol ester plus ionomycin. Antisense oligonucleotides caused modest inhibition of Na+-independent isoleucine transport in C6-BU-1 cells and primary cultures of astroglial cells, whereas arginine transport was unaffected. Overexpression of 4F2hc cDNA in CHO cells resulted in an increase in Na+-independent isoleucine transport. PMID:9182715

  1. Surfactant-free poly(styrene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) particles with surface-bound antibodies for activation and proliferation of human T cells.

    PubMed

    Thümmler, Katja; Häntzschel, Nadine; Skapenko, Alla; Schulze-Koops, Hendrik; Pich, Andrij

    2010-05-19

    In this article, we present our results on the design of new polymeric carriers for antibodies. Polymer colloids based on poly(styrene-co-glycidyl methacrylate) were synthesized by surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. Obtained polymer particles stabilized by grafted poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains and carrying active epoxy groups were used for the covalent immobilization of activating antibodies against the human surface proteins CD (cluster of differentiation) 3 and CD28. The particle-antibody conjugates were employed for the stimulation of human CD4 memory T cells. This was analyzed by the up-regulation of the activation markers CD69 and CD25 on T cells and T cell proliferation as assessed by the dilution of a fluorescent dye on dividing daughter T cells. The particle-antibody conjugates were able to stimulate T cells at least as efficiently as conventional methods, e.g., surface-immobilized antibodies. Furthermore, an increase of the PEG chain length of the particles decreased the efficiency of the particle-antibody conjugates to activate T cells.

  2. The human alpha 2-macroglobulin receptor: identification of a 420-kD cell surface glycoprotein specific for the activated conformation of alpha 2-macroglobulin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Ligand affinity chromatography was used to purify a cell surface alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) receptor. Detergent extracts of human placenta were applied to an affinity matrix consisting of alpha 2M, previously reacted with methylamine, coupled to Sepharose. Elution with EDTA specifically released polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 420 and 39 kD. In some preparations, small amounts of a 90-kD polypeptide were observed. The 420- and 39-kD polypeptides appear specific for the forms of alpha 2M activated by reaction with proteinases or methylamine and do not bind to an affinity matrix consisting of native alpha 2M coupled to Sepharose. Separation of these two polypeptides was accomplished by anion exchange chromatography, and binding activity was exclusively associated with the 420-kD polypeptide. The purified 420-kD protein binds to the conformationally altered forms of alpha 2M that are known to specifically interact with alpha 2M receptors and does not bind to native alpha 2M. Binding of the 420-kD polypeptide to immobilized wheat germ agglutinin indicates that this polypeptide is a glycoprotein. The cell surface localization of the 420-kD glycoprotein was confirmed by affinity chromatography of extracts from surface radioiodinated fibroblasts. These properties suggest that the 420-kD polypeptide is a cell surface receptor for the activated forms of alpha 2M. PMID:1691187

  3. Functional dynamics of cell surface membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishida, Noritaka; Osawa, Masanori; Takeuchi, Koh; Imai, Shunsuke; Stampoulis, Pavlos; Kofuku, Yutaka; Ueda, Takumi; Shimada, Ichio

    2014-04-01

    Cell surface receptors are integral membrane proteins that receive external stimuli, and transmit signals across plasma membranes. In the conventional view of receptor activation, ligand binding to the extracellular side of the receptor induces conformational changes, which convert the structure of the receptor into an active conformation. However, recent NMR studies of cell surface membrane proteins have revealed that their structures are more dynamic than previously envisioned, and they fluctuate between multiple conformations in an equilibrium on various timescales. In addition, NMR analyses, along with biochemical and cell biological experiments indicated that such dynamical properties are critical for the proper functions of the receptors. In this review, we will describe several NMR studies that revealed direct linkage between the structural dynamics and the functions of the cell surface membrane proteins, such as G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), ion channels, membrane transporters, and cell adhesion molecules.

  4. Photothermal effects of laser-activated surface plasmonic gold nanoparticles on the apoptosis and osteogenesis of osteoblast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Lih-Rou; Huang, Wan-Yu; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Tsai, Shiao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The specific properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them a novel class of photothermal agents that can induce cancer cell damage and even death through the conversion of optical energy to thermal energy. Most relevant studies have focused on increasing the precision of cell targeting, improving the efficacy of energy transfer, and exploring additional functions. Nevertheless, most cells can uptake nanosized particles through nonspecific endocytosis; therefore, before hyperthermia via AuNPs can be applied for clinical use, it is important to understand the adverse optical–thermal effects of AuNPs on nontargeted cells. However, few studies have investigated the thermal effects induced by pulsed laser-activated AuNPs on nearby healthy cells due to nonspecific treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the photothermal effects induced by AuNPs plus a pulsed laser on MG63, an osteoblast-like cell line, specifically examining the effects on cell morphology, viability, death program, and differentiation. The cells were treated with media containing 50 nm AuNPs at a concentration of 5 ppm for 1 hour. Cultured cells were then exposed to irradiation at 60 mW/cm2 and 80 mW/cm2 by a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm wavelength). We observed that the cytoskeletons of MG63 cells treated with bare AuNPs followed by pulsed laser irradiation were damaged, and these cells had few bubbles on the cell membrane compared with those that were not treated (control) or were treated with AuNPs or the laser alone. There were no significant differences between the AuNPs plus laser treatment group and the other groups in terms of cell viability, death program analysis results, or alkaline phosphatase and calcium accumulation during culture for up to 21 days. However, the calcium deposit areas in the cells treated with AuNPs plus laser were larger than those in other groups during the early culture period. PMID:27555768

  5. Proteomic analysis of human U937 cell line activation mediated by Haemophilus influenzae type b P2 porin and its surface-exposed loop 7.

    PubMed

    Severino, Valeria; Chambery, Angela; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Cantisani, Marco; Galdiero, Stefania; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Malorni, Livia; Di Maro, Antimo; Parente, Augusto

    2010-02-05

    The virulence of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) has been attributed to a variety of potential factors associated with its cell surface, including lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and major outer membrane proteins (OMPs). P2 porin, one of the best-characterized porins in terms of its functional characteristics, is the most abundant OMP in Hib and has also been shown to possess proinflammatory activity. To characterize the role played by bacterial surface components in disease onset and development, the proteomic profiling of human U937 cell line activated by H. influenzae type b P2 porin and its most active surface-exposed loop (L7) was performed by means of two-dimensional electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. The study provided a list of candidate proteins with potential relevance in the host immune and inflammatory response. Most of the differentially expressed proteins are involved in metabolic processes, remodelling of cytoskeleton, stress response and signal transduction pathways. The results constitute the basis for dissecting signal transduction cascades activated by P2 stimulation and gain insights into the molecular events involved in the modulation of pathogen-host cell interactions.

  6. Identification of a Bacillus thuringiensis Surface-Layer-Protein with Cytotoxic Activity against MDA-MB-231 Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Viviana P; Bravo, Alejandra; Olmos, Jorge

    2016-10-06

    In this work we isolated a Surface-Layer-Protein (SLP) from a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) strain to evaluate it cytotoxic effects against MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. AP11 was selected from a group of Bt strains using SLP oligonucleotides developed from Bacillus conserved regions. AP11 strain was grown in Luria Bertani (LB) medium until late exponential phase; an 86 kDa protein was extracted using 5 M LiCl and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). It corresponded to a multispecies S-layer protein highly similar to previously described SLP in B. thuringiensis. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells LC₅₀ was obtained using 0.25 µg/ml of the isolated SLP. HaCat non-cancerous cells presented 90% survival using the same protein concentration. Our data suggest that SLP cytotoxicity against MDA-MB-231 could be induced by an interaction with CDH11 cell membrane receptor.

  7. Correlation between cell attachment areas after 2 h of culture and osteogenic differentiation activity of rat mesenchymal stem cells on hydroxyapatite substrates with various surface properties.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Kan; Hirose, Motohiro; Wang, Xiupeng; Sogo, Yu; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Ito, Atsuo

    2013-01-04

    The initial attachment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to substrates and osteogenic differentiation are supported by culture on a hydroxyapatite substrate. Cell attachment areas of rat MSCs after 2 h of culture on hydroxyapatite substrates with various microstructures and the osteogenic differentiation activity thereafter were measured. The perceived outcome was that, after 2 h of culture, rat MSCs with a small attachment area would have a high osteogenic differentiation activity, whereas those with a large attachment area would have a low osteogenic differentiation activity. Furthermore, rat MSCs with a small attachment area had many cytoplasmic processes, while those with a large attachment area revealed clear stress fibers and focal contacts. These results suggest that cell attachment area of rat MSCs after 2 h of culture has a strong effect on the osteogenic differentiation of rat MSCs. Thus, the measurement of cell attachment area after 2 h of culture could become valuable for estimating the osteogenic differentiation activity of rat MSCs thereafter.

  8. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  9. Surface densities of ephrin-B1 determine EphB1-coupled activation of cell attachment through alphavbeta3 and alpha5beta1 integrins.

    PubMed Central

    Huynh-Do, U; Stein, E; Lane, A A; Liu, H; Cerretti, D P; Daniel, T O

    1999-01-01

    Receptors of the Eph family and their ligands (ephrins) mediate developmental vascular assembly and direct axonal guidance. Migrating cell processes identify appropriate targets within migratory fields based on topographically displayed ephrin gradients. Here, EphB1 regulated cell attachment by discriminating the density at which ephrin-B1 was displayed on a reconstituted surface. EphB1-ephrin-B1 engagement did not promote cell attachment through mechanical tethering, but did activate integrin-mediated attachment. In endothelial cells, attachment to RGD peptides or fibrinogen was mediated through alphavbeta3 integrin. EphB1 transfection conferred ephrin-B1-responsive activation of alpha5beta1 integrin-mediated cell attachment in human embryonic kidney cells. Activation-competent but signaling-defective EphB1 point mutants failed to stimulate ephrin-B1 dependent attachment. These findings lead us to propose that EphB1 functions as a 'ligand density sensor' to signal integrin-mediated cell-matrix attachment. PMID:10205170

  10. Persistence of Zinc-Binding Bacterial Superantigens at the Surface of Antigen-Presenting Cells Contributes to the Extreme Potency of These Superantigens as T-Cell Activators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Contributes to the Extreme Potency of These Superantigens as T-Cell Activators Dorothy D. Pless,† Gordon Ruthel, Emily K. Reinke, Robert G. Ulrich, and Sina...immunoglobulin G, and the cells were analyzed with a FACSort flow cytometer (Becton Dickinson , Mountain View, CA). To measure off rates, 1 or 5 g of SE or

  11. GARP (LRRC32) is essential for the surface expression of latent TGF-β on platelets and activated FOXP3+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Dat Q.; Andersson, John; Wang, Rui; Ramsey, Heather; Unutmaz, Derya; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2009-01-01

    TGF-β family members are highly pleiotropic cytokines with diverse regulatory functions. TGF-β is normally found in the latent form associated with latency-associated peptide (LAP). This latent complex can associate with latent TGFβ-binding protein (LTBP) to produce a large latent form. Latent TGF-β is also found on the surface of activated FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), but it is unclear how it is anchored to the cell membrane. We show that GARP or LRRC32, a leucine-rich repeat molecule of unknown function, is critical for tethering TGF-β to the cell surface. We demonstrate that platelets and activated Tregs co-express latent TGF-β and GARP on their membranes. The knockdown of GARP mRNA with siRNA prevented surface latent TGF-β expression on activated Tregs and recombinant latent TGF-β1 is able to bind directly with GARP. Confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation strongly support their interactions. The role of TGF-β on Tregs appears to have dual functions, both for Treg-mediated suppression and infectious tolerance mechanism. PMID:19651619

  12. A light-responsive and periodic NADH oxidase activity of the cell surface of Tetrahymena and of human buffy coat cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter, A. D.; Morre, D. J.; Morre, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidation of external NADH (NADH is an impermeant substrate) by cells of Tetrahymena pyriformis oscillated with a period of 24-26 min. The period length in darkness (25.6 min) appeared to be slightly longer than the period in light (approximately 24 min). When Tetrahymena were placed in darkness for 30-50 min and then returned to light, a new maximum in the rate of NADH oxidation was observed 36-38 min (13 + 24) min after the beginning of the light treatment. The cell-surface NADH oxidase of human buffy coats (a mixture of white cells and platelets) also was periodic and light responsive.

  13. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    PubMed

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity.

  14. Ligands Binding to Cell Surface Ganglioside GD2 Cause Src-Dependent Activation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Signaling and Changes in Cellular Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Martin; Saragovi, H. Uri

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a plasma membrane glycosphinogolipid. In healthy adults it is expressed at low levels, but it is over-expressed in many cancers. For cancer therapy, GD2 is targeted with anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and one adverse side effect is severe visceral pain. Pain is not neuropathic, cannot be blocked with morphine, and stops on discontinuation of mAb therapy. Here, we provide evidence that ligand binding to cell surface GD2 induces rapid and transient activation of Src-family kinases, followed by Src-dependent phosphorylation of NMDA-receptor NR2B subunits selectively, activation of Ca++ fluxes, production of cAMP, and changes in cellular morphology. These GD2-ligand activated signals differ in kinetics and in pharmacology from activation of the same signals in the same cells by BDNF, the growth factor agonist of the TrkB receptor, suggesting biological specificity. Hence, cell surface GD2 regulates pathways that can be associated with neoplasia and with morphine-intractable pain; and this can explain why expression of GD2 correlates with these two pathologies. PMID:26252487

  15. TGF-β1 activation in human hamstring cells through growth factor binding peptides on polycaprolactone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Crispim, J; Fernandes, H A M; Fu, S C; Lee, Y W; Jonkheijm, P; Saris, D B F

    2017-01-26

    The administration of soluble growth factors (GFs) to injured tendons and ligaments (T/L) is known to promote and enhance the healing process. However, the administration of GFs is a complex, expensive and heavily-regulated process and only achieved by employing supraphysiological GF concentrations. In addition, for proper healing, specific and spatial immobilization of the GFs (s) is critical. We hypothesized that biomaterials functionalized with GF-binding peptides can be employed to capture endogenous GFs in a spatially-controlled manner, thus overcoming the need for the exogenous administration of supraphysiological doses of GFs. Here we demonstrate that the modification of films of polycaprolactone (PCL) with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1)-binding peptides allows GFs to be captured and presented to the target cells. Moreover, using a TGF-β reporter cell line and immunocytochemistry, we show that the GFs retained their biological activity. In human primary tendon cells, the immobilized TGF-β1 activated TGF-β target genes ultimately lead to a 2.5-fold increase in total collagen matrix production. In vivo implantation in rats clearly shows an accumulation of TGF-β1 on the polymer films functionalized with the TGF-β1-binding peptide when compared with the native films. This accumulation leads to an increase in the recruitment of inflammatory cells at day 3 and an increase in the fibrogenic response and vascularization around the implant at day 7. The results herein presented will endow current and future medical devices with novel biological properties and by doing so will accelerate T/L healing.

  16. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.

  17. MDMA causes a redistribution of serotonin transporter from the cell surface to the intracellular compartment by a mechanism independent of phospho-p38-mitogen activated protein kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Kivell, B; Day, D; Bosch, P; Schenk, S; Miller, J

    2010-06-16

    3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) causes long-term serotonin depletion and reduced serotonin transporter (SERT) function in humans and in animal models. Using quantitative Western blotting and real-time PCR, we have shown that total SERT protein in the striatum and nucleus accumbens and mRNA levels in the dorsal raphe nucleus were not significantly changed following MDMA exposure in rats (4 x 2 h i.p. injections, 10 mg/kg each). In mouse neuroblastoma (N(2)A) cells transiently expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged human SERT (GFP-hSERT), we have shown redistribution of SERT from the cell surface to intracellular vesicles on exposure to MDMA using cell surface biotinylation, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) and live-cell confocal microscopy. To investigate the mechanism responsible for SERT redistribution, we used specific antibodies to phospho-p38-mitogen activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), a known signalling pathway involved in SERT membrane expression. We found that p38 MAPK activation was not involved in the MDMA-induced redistribution of SERT from the cell-surface to the cell interior. A loss of SERT from the cell surface on acute exposure to MDMA may contribute to the decreased SERT function seen in rats exposed to MDMA.

  18. Bacterial activation of mast cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, David S; Walker, Elaine S; Hossler, Fred E; Krishnaswamy, Guha

    2006-01-01

    Mast cells often are found in a perivascular location but especially in mucosae, where they may response to various stimuli. They typically associate with immediate hypersensitive responses and are likely to play a critical role in host defense. In this chapter, a common airway pathogen, Moraxella catarrhalis, and a commensal bacterium, Neiserria cinerea, are used to illustrate activation of human mast cells. A human mast cell line (HMC-1) derived from a patient with mast cell leukemia was activated with varying concentrations of heat-killed bacteria. Active aggregation of bacteria over mast cell surfaces was detected by scanning electron microscopy. The activation of mast cells was analyzed by nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and cytokine production in culture supernatants. Both M. catarrhalis and N. cinerea induce mast cell activation and the secretion of two key inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-6 and MCP-1. This is accompanied by NF-kappaB activation. Direct bacterial contact with mast cells appears to be essential for this activation because neither cell-free bacterial supernatants nor bacterial lipopolysaccharide induce cytokine secretion.

  19. Furrowing in altered cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, R

    1976-02-01

    Understanding the process which established the cell division mechanism requires analysis of the role of the responding surface as well as that of stimulatory subsurface structures. Cell surface was altered by the expansion which occurs during exovate formation. Exovates appear on the surface of fertilized Arbacia lixula, Paracentrotus lividus and Echinarachnius parma eggs in response to extreme flattening. They result from cytoplasmic outflow initiated in a very restricted portion of the egg surface. Observations of the formation process in pigmented A. lixula eggs revealed that the original surface may be expanded about 100 fold as the exovate swells. When exovates formed 15-30 minutes after fertilization contain the mitotic apparatus, they divide synchronously with flattened controls. If nucleated exovates are established after the beginning of first cleavage, furrows appear in ten minutes. Exovates established after the beginning of second cleavage develop furrows four minutes after the entrance of the the mitsotic apparatus. Cytoplasm beneath damaged exovate surfaces sometimes develops partial constrictions independently of the surface in the plane the furrow would have occupied. These results suggest that normal surface structure is unnecessary for furrow establishment and function.

  20. SUMO modification of cell surface Kv2.1 potassium channels regulates the activity of rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Dowdell, Evan J.; Dementieva, Irina S.; Marks, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv2.1 potassium channels are important in the brain for determining activity-dependent excitability. Small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOs) regulate function through reversible, enzyme-mediated conjugation to target lysine(s). Here, sumoylation of Kv2.1 in hippocampal neurons is shown to regulate firing by shifting the half-maximal activation voltage (V1/2) of channels up to 35 mV. Native SUMO and Kv2.1 are shown to interact within and outside channel clusters at the neuronal surface. Studies of single, heterologously expressed Kv2.1 channels show that only K470 is sumoylated. The channels have four subunits, but no more than two non-adjacent subunits carry SUMO concurrently. SUMO on one site shifts V1/2 by 15 mV, whereas sumoylation of two sites produces a full response. Thus, the SUMO pathway regulates neuronal excitability via Kv2.1 in a direct and graded manner. PMID:21518833

  1. A Surface-Controlled Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1987-01-01

    Open-circuit voltage and cell efficiency increased. Proposed technique for controlling recombination velocity on solar-cell surfaces provides cells of increased efficiency and open-circuit voltage. In present cells, uncontrolled surface recombination velocity degrades opencircuit voltage and efficiency. In cell using proposed technique, transparent conducting layer, insulated from cell contacts, biased to enable variable control of surface recombination velocity.

  2. CD23 surface density on B cells is associated with IgE levels and determines IgE-facilitated allergen uptake, as well as activation of allergen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Selb, Regina; Eckl-Dorna, Julia; Neunkirchner, Alina; Schmetterer, Klaus; Marth, Katharina; Gamper, Jutta; Jahn-Schmid, Beatrice; Pickl, Winfried F.; Valenta, Rudolf; Niederberger, Verena

    2017-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that the low-affinity receptor for IgE, CD23, plays an important role in controlling the activity of allergen-specific T cells through IgE-facilitated allergen presentation. Objective We sought to determine the number of CD23 molecules on immune cells in allergic patients and to investigate whether the number of CD23 molecules on antigen-presenting cells is associated with IgE levels and influences allergen uptake and allergen-specific T-cell activation. Methods Numbers of CD23 molecules on immune cells of allergic patients were quantified by using flow cytometry with QuantiBRITE beads and compared with total and allergen-specific IgE levels, as well as with allergen-induced immediate skin reactivity. Allergen uptake and allergen-specific T-cell activation in relation to CD23 surface density were determined by using flow cytometry in combination with confocal microscopy and T cells transfected with the T-cell receptor specific for the birch pollen allergen Bet v 1, respectively. Defined IgE-allergen immune complexes were formed with human monoclonal allergen-specific IgE and Bet v 1. Results In allergic patients the vast majority of CD23 molecules were expressed on naive IgD+ B cells. The density of CD23 molecules on B cells but not the number of CD23+ cells correlated with total IgE levels (RS = 0.53, P = .03) and allergen-induced skin reactions (RS = 0.63, P = .008). Uptake of allergen-IgE complexes into B cells and activation of allergen-specific T cells depended on IgE binding to CD23 and were associated with CD23 surface density. Addition of monoclonal IgE to cultured PBMCs significantly (P = .04) increased CD23 expression on B cells. Conclusion CD23 surface density on B cells of allergic patients is correlated with allergen-specific IgE levels and determines allergen uptake and subsequent activation of T cells. PMID:27372566

  3. V7, A novel leukocyte surface protein that participates in T cell activation. II. Molecular cloning and characterization of the V7 gene

    SciTech Connect

    Ruegg, C.L.; Rivas, A.; Madani, N.D.

    1995-05-01

    V7 is a cell surface glycoprotein expressed on Ag-activated T cells, monocytes, and granulocytes, as well as subpopulations of T cells and accessory cells present in thymic medulla and tonsil. A mAb directed against V7 inhibits the proliferative response to T cells to allogeneic cells or immobilized anti-CD3 Ab, but no lectin mitogens, suggesting that V7 plays a role in TCR/CD3-mediated T cell activation. We have used the anti-V7 Ab in eukaryotic expression cloning experiments to isolate a cDNA clone containing a 3,340-bp insert that encodes V7 when transiently expressed in simian and murine fibroblastoid cells. DNA sequence analysis revealed a novel 1,021-amino acid open reading frame the structure of which conforms to the category of type I integral membrane proteins. The protein sequence includes a 20-residue putative hydrophobic signal sequence followed by a putative extracellular domain of 934 amino acids, a prototypic hydrophobic transmembrane spanning a domain of 25 residues, and finally a short and highly charged putative cytoplasmic domain of 42 residues. The extracellular domain contains seven pairs of regularly spaced cysteine residues, suggestive of Ig-like domains. On the basis of statistical analysis of the sequences of the putative cysteine loops, all seven of the Ig-like domains belong to the variable, or V-type, category. By using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the V7 gene to human chromosome 1p13. Thus, the V7 glycoprotein represents a novel member of the Ig superfamily that is involved in critical intracellular signals essential for immune function. 44 refs., 8 figs., 21 tabs.

  4. Active and responsive polymer surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2010-02-01

    A central challenge in polymer science today is creating materials that dynamically alter their structures and properties on demand, or in response to changes in their environment. Surfaces represent an attractive area of focus, since they exert disproportionately large effects on properties such as wettability, adhesiveness, optical appearance, and bioactivity, enabling pronounced changes in properties to be accomplished through subtle changes in interfacial structure or chemistry. In this critical review, we review the recent research progress into active and responsive polymer surfaces. The chief purpose of this article is to summarize the advanced preparation techniques and applications in this field from the past decade. This review should be of interest both to new scientists in this field and the interdisciplinary researchers who are working on "intelligent" polymer surfaces (117 references).

  5. Cell surface engineering with edible protein nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Drachuk, Irina; Shchepelina, Olga; Harbaugh, Svetlana; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy; Stone, Morley; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2013-09-23

    Natural protein (silk fibroin) nanoshells are assembled on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells without compromising their viability. The nanoshells facilitate initial protection of the cells and allow them to function in encapsulated state for some time period, afterwards being completely biodegraded and consumed by the cells. In contrast to a traditional methanol treatment, the gentle ionic treatment suggested here stabilizes the shell silk fibroin structure but does not compromise the viability of the cells, as indicated by the fast response of the encapsulated cells, with an immediate activation by the inducer molecules. Extremely high viability rates (up to 97%) and preserved activity of encapsulated cells are facilitated by cytocompatibility of the natural proteins and the formation of highly porous shells in contrast to traditional polyelectrolyte-based materials. Moreover, in a high contrast to traditional synthetic shells, the silk proteins are biodegradable and can be consumed by cells at a later stage of growth, thus releasing the cells from their temporary protective capsules. These on-demand encapsulated cells can be considered a valuable platform for biocompatible and biodegradable cell encapsulation, controlled cell protection in a synthetic environment, transfer to a device environment, and cell implantation followed by biodegradation and consumption of protective protein shells.

  6. Teratogen metabolism: activation of thalidomide and thalidomide analogues to products that inhibit the attachment of cells to concanavalin A coated plastic surfaces. Revised version

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.G.; Weinreb, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    Thalidomide metabolites inhibit the attachment of tumor cells to concanavalin A coated polyethylene surfaces. Thalidomide, itself, is non-inhibitory. Thalidomide activation to inhibitory products requires hepatic microsomes, an NADPH generating system and molecular oxygen. Production of inhibitory metabolites is unaffected by either epoxide hydrolase or TCPO, an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolase endogenous to hepatic S9 fraction. Therefore the attachment inhibitor is probably not an arene oxide. Inhibition is not accompanied by cytotoxicity as judged by trypan blue exclusion. Although uninduced hepatic microsomes from mice, rats and dogs have similar ability to activate thalidomide, microsomes from Aroclor 1254 induced rats are relatively inactive in the system. Inhibitory metabolites can be generated from the thalidomide analogues EM8, EM12, EM16, EM87, EM136, EM255, E350, phthalimide, phthalimido-phthalimide, indan, 1-indanone and 1,3-indandione. Glutarimide, glutamic acid and phthalic acid do not activate to inhibitory products.

  7. UTP Controls Cell Surface Distribution and Vasomotor Activity of the Human P2Y2 Receptor through an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-transregulated Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Norambuena, Andrés; Palma, Francisco; Poblete, M. Inés; Donoso, M. Verónica; Pardo, Evelyn; González, Alfonso; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides transmit signals into the cells through the P2 family of cell surface receptors. These receptors are amply expressed in human blood vessels and participate in vascular tone control; however, their signaling mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show that in smooth muscle cells of isolated human chorionic arteries, the activation of the P2Y2 receptor (P2Y2R) induces not only its partition into membrane rafts but also its rapid internalization. Cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin reduced the association of the agonist-activated receptor into membrane rafts but did not affect either the UTP-mediated vasoconstrictions or the vasomotor responses elicited by both serotonin and KCl. Ex vivo perfusion of human chorionic artery segments with 1–10 μm UTP, a selective P2Y2R agonist, displaced the P2Y2R localization into membrane rafts within 1 min, a process preceded by the activation of both RhoA and Rac1 GTPases. AG1478, a selective and potent inhibitor of the epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase activity, not only blocked the UTP-induced vasomotor activity but also abrogated both RhoA and Rac1 activation, the P2Y2R association with membrane rafts, and its internalization. Altogether, these results show for the first time that the plasma membrane distribution of the P2Y2R is transregulated by the epidermal growth factor receptor, revealing an unsuspected functional interplay that controls both the membrane distribution and the vasomotor activity of the P2Y2R in intact human blood vessels. PMID:19996104

  8. Active Surfaces and Interfaces of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming

    A variety of intriguing surface patterns have been observed on developing natural systems, ranging from corrugated surface of white blood cells at nanometer scales to wrinkled dog skins at millimeter scales. To mimetically harness functionalities of natural morphologies, artificial transformative skin systems by using soft active materials have been rationally designed to generate versatile patterns for a variety of engineering applications. The study of the mechanics and design of these dynamic surface patterns on soft active materials are both physically interesting and technologically important. This dissertation starts with studying abundant surface patterns in Nature by constructing a unified phase diagram of surface instabilities on soft materials with minimum numbers of physical parameters. Guided by this integrated phase diagram, an electroactive system is designed to investigate a variety of electrically-induced surface instabilities of elastomers, including electro-creasing, electro-cratering, electro-wrinkling and electro-cavitation. Combing experimental, theoretical and computational methods, the initiation, evolution and transition of these instabilities are analyzed. To apply these dynamic surface instabilities to serving engineering and biology, new techniques of Dynamic Electrostatic Lithography and electroactive anti-biofouling are demonstrated.

  9. Isoflurane induces a protein kinase C alpha-dependent increase in cell-surface protein level and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2005-05-01

    Glutamate transporters regulate extracellular concentrations of glutamate, an excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. We have shown that the commonly used anesthetic isoflurane increased the activity of glutamate transporter type 3 (excitatory amino acid transporter 3, EAAT3) possibly via a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent pathway. In this study, we showed that isoflurane induced a time- and concentration-dependent redistribution of EAAT3 to the cell membrane in C6 glioma cells. This redistribution was inhibited by staurosporine, a pan PKC inhibitor, or by 12-(2-cyanoethyl)-6,7,12,13-tetrahydro-13-methyl-5-oxo-5H-indolo(2,3-a)pyrrolo(3,4-c)-carbazole (Go6976) at a concentration that selectively inhibits conventional PKC isozymes (PKC alpha, -beta, and -gamma). This isoflurane-induced EAAT3 redistribution was also blocked when the expression of PKC alpha but not PKC beta proteins was down-regulated by the respective antisense oligonucleotides. The isoflurane-induced increase of glutamate uptake by EAAT3 was abolished by the down-regulation of PKC alpha expression. Immunoprecipitation with an anti-EAAT3 antibody pulled down more PKC alpha in cells exposed to isoflurane than in control cells. Isoflurane also increased the phosphorylated EAAT3 and the redistribution of PKC alpha to the particulate fraction of cells. Consistent with the results in C6 cells, isoflurane also increased EAAT3 cell-surface expression and enhanced the association of PKC alpha with EAAT3 in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Our results suggest that the isoflurane-induced increase in EAAT3 activity requires an increased amount of EAAT3 protein in the plasma membrane. These effects are PKC alpha-dependent and may rely on the formation of an EAAT3-PKC alpha complex. Together, these results suggest an important mechanism for the regulation of glutamate transporter functions and expand our understanding of isoflurane pharmacology at cellular and molecular levels.

  10. Detection of estrogenic activity in Flemish surface waters using an in vitro recombinant assay with yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Witters, H E; Vangenechten, C; Berckmans, P

    2001-01-01

    Numerous environmental chemicals possess estrogen-like properties. At elevated doses, natural estrogens and environmental estrogen-like chemicals are known to produce adverse effects on humans and wildlife. Sources of potential exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds have to be identified for risk and hazard assessment. Extracts prepared from 16 selected water samples taken in Flemish rivers, effluents of municipal wastewater treatment plants and reservoirs for drinking water production were analysed for estrogenic activity with a cellular bioassay. Yeast cells, which are stably transfected with the DNA sequence of hER and which contain expression plasmids with the reporter gene lac-Z, encoding the enzyme beta-galactosidase, were used to measure receptor binding. Flemish rivers showed the highest estrogenic potency, compared to effluents of waste water treatment plants and reservoirs which showed low induction factors (beta-galactosidase production) relative to solvent control conditions. By comparison with a standard curve for 17 beta-estradiol (E2), estrogenic potency in water samples was calculated as E2-equivalents and ranged from below detection limit (approximately 2.75 ng E2/l) up to 81.4 ng/l E2-equivalents. About 7 water samples had more than 10 ng/l E2-equivalents. These elevated levels of E2-equivalents are likely to exert significant adverse effects on reproduction success of wildlife, which should be verified with in vivo studies.

  11. Reversibility of cell surface label rearrangement

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Cell surface labeling can cause rearrangements of randomly distributed membrane components. Removal of the label bound to the cell surface allows the membrane components to return to their original random distribution, demonstrating that label is necessary to maintain as well as to induce rearrangements. With scanning electron microscopy, the rearrangement of concanavalin A (con A) and ricin binding sites on LA-9 cells has been followed by means of hemocyanin, a visual label. The removal of con A from its binding sites at the cell surface with alpha- methyl mannoside, and the return of these sites to their original distribution are also followed in this manner. There are labeling differences with con A and ricin. Under some conditions, however, the same rearrangements are seen with both lectins. The disappearance of labeled sites from areas of ruffling activity is a major feature of the rearrangements seen. Both this ruffling activity and the rearrangement of label are sensitive to cytochalasin B, and ruffling activity, perhaps along with other cytochalasin-sensitive structure, may play a role in the rearrangements of labeled sites. PMID:1025154

  12. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-17

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections.

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman imaging of red blood cell membrane with highly uniform active substrates obtained using block copolymers self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Gianluigi; Malafronte, Anna; Dochshanov, Alden; Rusciano, Giulia; Auriemma, Finizia; Pesce, Giuseppe; De Rosa, Claudio; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-05-01

    In this communication, we discuss the application of ordered, ultrahigh-density templates of nano-textured Ag-particles obtained by self-assembling of inorganic-containing polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) copolymer (PS-b-P4VP) micelles, for the spectroscopic surface-enhanced Raman imaging in-vitro of red blood cells (RBCs) and its capability to identify the vibrational fingerprint of the plasma membrane of the cell physisorbed to the SERS substrate. Hexagonal arrays of PS-b-P4VP micelles, with selective inclusion of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in the polar core, prepared by in situ reduction of a suitable precursor, are obtained by polymer self-assembly upon fast solvent evaporation during spin coating on the supporting substrate. UV irradiation and/or plasma oxygen treatment remove the polymer matrix leaving immobilized nano-islands of Ag-NPs. Such a kind of SERS-active substrate consists of a reproducible and uniform twodimensional hexagonal array of silver clusters with a diameter ranging from 25 to 30 nm (single particles having typically diameters of 5 nm) and nano-island gap distances of the order of 5-8 nm on silicon and 15 nm on glass , while giving rise to high enhancement factors and addressing the issue of SERS reproducibility. The basic substrate supporting the plasmonic coating used in this work is either of silicon or glass. This last allows working in back scattering configuration permitting real time monitoring, via microscopy, of the RBCs on which Raman measurements are being carried out. The template is thus applied for surface-enhanced Raman analysis of the red blood cell (RBC) membrane in confocal micro-Raman configuration demonstrating to have SERS imaging potential thanks to the uniformity of the nano-textured substrate. The first experimental evidence of SERS imaging of a red blood cell membrane in-vitro is demonstrated.

  14. The amino acid sequence of Neisseria lactamica PorB surface-exposed loops influences Toll-like receptor 2-dependent cell activation.

    PubMed

    Toussi, Deana N; Carraway, Margaretha; Wetzler, Lee M; Lewis, Lisa A; Liu, Xiuping; Massari, Paola

    2012-10-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a major role in host mucosal and systemic defense mechanisms by recognizing a diverse array of conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). TLR2, with TLR1 and TLR6, recognizes structurally diverse bacterial products such as lipidated factors (lipoproteins and peptidoglycans) and nonlipidated proteins, i.e., bacterial porins. PorB is a pan-neisserial porin expressed regardless of organisms' pathogenicity. However, commensal Neisseria lactamica organisms and purified N. lactamica PorB (published elsewhere as Nlac PorB) induce TLR2-dependent proinflammatory responses of lower magnitude than N. meningitidis organisms and N. meningitidis PorB (published elsewhere as Nme PorB). Both PorB types bind to TLR2 in vitro but with different apparent specificities. The structural and molecular details of PorB-TLR2 interaction are only beginning to be unraveled and may be due to electrostatic attraction. PorB molecules have significant strain-specific sequence variability within surface-exposed regions (loops) putatively involved in TLR2 interaction. By constructing chimeric recombinant PorB loop mutants in which surface-exposed loop residues have been switched between N. lactamica PorB and N. meningitidis PorB, we identified residues in loop 5 and loop 7 that influence TLR2-dependent cell activation using HEK cells and BEAS-2B cells. These loops are not uniquely responsible for PorB interaction with TLR2, but NF-κB and MAP kinases signaling downstream of TLR2 recognition are likely influenced by a hypothetical "TLR2-binding signature" within the sequence of PorB surface-exposed loops. Consistent with the effect of purified PorB in vitro, a chimeric N. meningitidis strain expressing N. lactamica PorB induces lower levels of interleukin 8 (IL-8) secretion than wild-type N. meningitidis, suggesting a role for PorB in induction of host cell activation by whole bacteria.

  15. Cells behaviors and genotoxicity on topological surface.

    PubMed

    Yang, N; Yang, M K; Bi, S X; Chen, L; Zhu, Z Y; Gao, Y T; Du, Z

    2013-08-01

    To investigate different cells behaviors and genotoxicity, which were driven by specific microenvironments, three patterned surfaces (pillars, wide grooves and narrow grooves) and one smooth surface were prepared by template-based technique. Vinculin is a membrane-cytoskeletal protein in focal adhesion plaques and associates with cell-cell and cell-matrix junctions, which can promote cell adhesion and spreading. The immunofluorescence staining of vinculin revealed that the narrow grooves patterned substrate was favorable for L929 cell adhesion. For cell multiplication, the narrow grooves surface was fitted for the proliferation of L929, L02 and MSC cells, the pillars surface was only in favor of L929 cells to proliferate during 7 days of cell cultivation. Cell genetic toxicity was evaluated by cellular micronuclei test (MNT). The results indicated that topological surfaces were more suitable for L929 cells to proliferate and maintain the stability of genome. On the contrary, the narrow grooves surface induced higher micronuclei ratio of L02 and MSC cells than other surfaces. With the comprehensive results of cell multiplication and MNT, it was concluded that the wide grooves surface was best fitted for L02 cells to proliferate and have less DNA damages, and the smooth surface was optimum for the research of MSC cells in vitro.

  16. Apoplastic Venom Allergen-like Proteins of Cyst Nematodes Modulate the Activation of Basal Plant Innate Immunity by Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L.; Wilbers, Ruud H. P.; Warmerdam, Sonja; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Diaz-Granados, Amalia; van Schaik, Casper C.; Helder, Johannes; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Schots, Arjen; Smant, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes most likely utilize

  17. Comparison of alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on different Ti surfaces: modified sandblasted with large grit and acid-etched (MSLA), laser-treated, and laser and acid-treated Ti surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Jie; Kim, So-Nam

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant surface treatment on cell differentiation of osteoblast cells. For this purpose, three surfaces were compared: (1) a modified SLA (MSLA: sand-blasted with large grit, acid-etched, and immersed in 0.9% NaCl), (2) a laser treatment (LT: laser treatment) titanium surface and (3) a laser and acid-treated (LAT: laser treatment, acid-etched) titanium surface. MATERIALS AND METHODS The MSLA surfaces were considered as the control group, and LT and LAT surfaces as test groups. Alkaline phosphatase expression (ALP) was used to quantify osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell. Surface roughness was evaluated by a contact profilometer (URFPAK-SV; Mitutoyo, Kawasaki, Japan) and characterized by two parameters: mean roughness (Ra) and maximum peak-to-valley height (Rt). RESULTS Scanning electron microscope revealed that MSLA (control group) surface was not as rough as LT, LAT surface (test groups). Alkaline phosphatase expression, the measure of osteoblastic differentiation, and total ALP expression by surface-adherent cells were found to be highest at 21 days for all three surfaces tested (P<.05). Furthermore, ALP expression levels of MSLA and LAT surfaces were significantly higher than expression levels of LT surface-adherent cells at 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively (P<.05). However, ALP expression levels between MSLA and LAT surface were equal at 7, 14, and 21 days (P>.05). CONCLUSION This study suggested that MSLA and LAT surfaces exhibited more favorable environment for osteoblast differentiation when compared with LT surface, the results that are important for implant surface modification studies. PMID:27350860

  18. 3D Quantification of Low-Coordinate Surface Atom Density: Bridging Catalytic Activity to Concave Facets of Nanocatalysts in Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ye; Zhong, Xiaoyan; Ke, Xiaoxing; Zhang, Gui-Rong; Cheng, Zhiying; Xu, Bo-Qing

    2016-12-01

    A protocol to quantify the distribution of surface atoms of concave nanocatalysts according to their coordination number is proposed. The 3D surface of an Au@Pd concave nanocube is reconstructed and segmented. The crystallographic coordinates and low-coordinate surface atom densities of the concave facets are determined. The result shows that 32% of the surface atoms are low-coordinated, which may contribute to the high activity.

  19. Cell attachment on microscopically textured silicon surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Stephen W.; Kam, Lance; Isaacson, Michael; Craighead, Harold G.; Szarowski, Donald H.; Turner, James N.; Shain, W.

    1997-03-01

    To assess the effect of surface topography on cell attachment, central nervous system (astroglial cells) cells were grown on surfaces patterned with two different types of texture. Reactive ion etching (RIE) was used to induce nanometer-scale roughness in silicon wafers. In a subsequent wet etch, photo-patterned resist protected selected areas of the surface, resulting in a pattern of modified and unmodified texture. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the RIE-roughened 'primary' surface consists of randomly positioned columnar structures (diameter approximately equals 50 nm, height approximately equals 250 nm). The wet-etched 'secondary' surfaces had shorter and more sparsely distributed projections, controlled to a degree by wet etch duration. Confocal microscopy and SEM demonstrated that transformed astroglial (LRM55) cells preferred secondary surfaces. The morphology of cells on secondary surfaces depended on wet etch duration. with brief wet etch, cells hade stellate or mounded morphology and were not closely adherent to the surface. With long wet etch, cells had an epithelial-like morphology and were closely adherent to substrates. Under all conditions, cells discriminated between primary and secondary surfaces. In contrast to LRM55 cells, astrocytes in primary cell culture preferred primary surfaces. Thus changes in surface topography produce cell-specific selectivity and change cell attachment characteristics.

  20. Single cell profiling of surface carbohydrates on Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Congzhou; Ehrhardt, Christopher J.; Yadavalli, Vamsi K.

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates are important to various bacterial activities and functions. It is well known that different types of Bacillus display heterogeneity of surface carbohydrate compositions, but detection of their presence, quantitation and estimation of variation at the single cell level have not been previously solved. Here, using atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based recognition force mapping coupled with lectin probes, the specific carbohydrate distributions of N-acetylglucosamine and mannose/glucose were detected, mapped and quantified on single B. cereus surfaces at the nanoscale across the entire cell. Further, the changes of the surface carbohydrate compositions from the vegetative cell to spore were shown. These results demonstrate AFM-based ‘recognition force mapping’ as a versatile platform to quantitatively detect and spatially map key bacterial surface biomarkers (such as carbohydrate compositions), and monitor in situ changes in surface biochemical properties during intracellular activities at the single cell level. PMID:25505137

  1. HPLC analysis and cell surface receptor binding activities of the crude aqueous and methanolic extract of Sesamum indicum

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Repon Kumer; Dinar, Md. Abu Monsur; Nabila, Kausain Akther; Roy, Priyanka

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify the possible functional molecules for therapeutic uses by screening the crude aqueous and methanolic extracts derived from sesame seeds (Sesamum indicum) in vitro. Methods High performance liquid chromatography was used to scan the functional molecules present in the extracts. Results The crude aqueous extracts showed the possibilities to present caffeine and cetirizine or its derivatives like molecules. On the other hand, the crude methanolic extract may contain Loratadine or its derivatives like molecules. Both type of extracts showed hemagglutination inhibition activities in all types of human blood samples tested. However, they showed stronger binding with AB+ blood group than those of A+ and B+ blood. Conclusions Sesame seeds may be considered as a functional food. PMID:25183142

  2. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    PubMed

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  3. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis in epithelial sheets: alterations of cell surface properties induced by cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed

    Vasiliev, J M; Gelfand, I M; Domnina, L V; Zacharova, O S; Ljubimov, A V

    1975-02-01

    Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was found to be characteristic for epithelial sheets formed in cultures by several cell types: normal and transformed mouse kidney cells, and differentiated mouse hepatoma cells. In these sheets most central cells surrounded by other cells had very low phagocytic activity. In contrast, marginal cells having a free edge were able to perform an active phagocytosis. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was absent in dense cultures of mouse embryo fibroblasts and in cultures of anaplastic mouse hepatoma 22a. The upper surface of epithelial sheets was nonadhesive for prelabeled epithelial cells and fibroblasts. In contrast, the upper surface of dense cultures of mouse fibroblasts was adhesive for these cells. These and other data strengthen the suggestion that contact inhibition of phagocytosis is a result of different adhesiveness of the upper cell surface and of the surfaces near the free edge. Agents inhibiting cell surface movements at the free edges of marginal epithelial cells (cytochalasin, azide, sorbitol, low temperature) prevented adhesion of particles to these edges. Possibly, the surface of actively moving cytoplasmic processes is the only cell part that has adhesive properties necessary for the formation of attachments with other cellular and noncellular surfaces. In epithelial sheets, in contrast to fibroblast cultures, Colcemid did not activate movements of immobile contacting cell edges. These results indicate that mechanisms of contact immobilization of cell surface may be different in epithelium and fibroblasts. Firm contacts formed between epithelial cells are sufficient for stable immobilization of the surface; additional stabilization of the surface by microtubules is not essential. Fibroblasts do not form firm contacts and the Colcemid-sensitive stabilization process is essential for maintenance of the immobile state of their surfaces. Differences in the stability of cell surface immobilization produced by cell-cell

  4. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  5. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions.

  6. Cell Surface Expression of the Major Amyloid-β Peptide (Aβ)-degrading Enzyme, Neprilysin, Depends on Phosphorylation by Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Kinase (MEK) and Dephosphorylation by Protein Phosphatase 1a*

    PubMed Central

    Kakiya, Naomasa; Saito, Takashi; Nilsson, Per; Matsuba, Yukio; Tsubuki, Satoshi; Takei, Nobuyuki; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Saido, Takaomi C.

    2012-01-01

    Neprilysin is one of the major amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-degrading enzymes, the expression of which declines in the brain during aging. The decrease in neprilysin leads to a metabolic Aβ imbalance, which can induce the amyloidosis underlying Alzheimer disease. Pharmacological activation of neprilysin during aging therefore represents a potential strategy to prevent the development of Alzheimer disease. However, the regulatory mechanisms mediating neprilysin activity in the brain remain unclear. To address this issue, we screened for pharmacological regulators of neprilysin activity and found that the neurotrophic factors brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, and neurotrophins 3 and 4 reduce cell surface neprilysin activity. This decrease was mediated by MEK/ERK signaling, which enhanced phosphorylation at serine 6 in the neprilysin intracellular domain (S6-NEP-ICD). Increased phosphorylation of S6-NEP-ICD in primary neurons reduced the levels of cell surface neprilysin and led to a subsequent increase in extracellular Aβ levels. Furthermore, a specific inhibitor of protein phosphatase-1a, tautomycetin, induced extensive phosphorylation of the S6-NEP-ICD, resulting in reduced cell surface neprilysin activity. In contrast, activation of protein phosphatase-1a increased cell surface neprilysin activity and lowered Aβ levels. Taken together, these results indicate that the phosphorylation status of S6-NEP-ICD influences the localization of neprilysin and affects extracellular Aβ levels. Therefore, maintaining S6-NEP-ICD in a dephosphorylated state, either by inhibition of protein kinases involved in its phosphorylation or by activation of phosphatases catalyzing its dephosphorylation, may represent a new approach to prevent reduction of cell surface neprilysin activity during aging and to maintain physiological levels of Aβ in the brain. PMID:22767595

  7. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  8. Reduced surface expression of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II in mitogen-activated T cells from Sézary patients.

    PubMed Central

    Capocasale, R J; Lamb, R J; Vonderheid, E C; Fox, F E; Rook, A H; Nowell, P C; Moore, J S

    1995-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SzS), the leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, is characterized by clonal proliferation of CD4+ T cells and immune dysfunctions, raising the possibility of cytokine-related abnormalities. We previously described a decreased response to the growth-inhibitory effects of transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) in SzS T cells accompanied by apparent loss of surface type II TGF-beta receptor (TGF beta RII). To specifically determine if defects exist in TGF beta RII protein expression and/or transport in SzS patients, we developed a sensitive flow cytometric method to detect TGF beta RII on the surface and intracellularly in the CD4+ T cells. Our results indicate that unlike normal CD4+ T cells, CD4+ T cells from 9 of 12 SzS patients expressed little, if any, surface TGF beta RII in response to mitogen stimulation. At the intracellular level, however, pools of TGF beta RII were comparable to those in normal CD4+ T cells. This indicates that defective trafficking of this inhibitory cytokine receptor may contribute significantly to the development of this disease. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7777538

  9. Standing surface acoustic wave based cell coculture.

    PubMed

    Li, Sixing; Guo, Feng; Chen, Yuchao; Ding, Xiaoyun; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-10-07

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell-cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell-cell interactions.

  10. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change. PMID:24844289

  11. Cell Surface Measurements in Hydrocarbon and Carbohydrate Fermentations

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, R. J.; Zajic, J. E.; Gerson, D. F.

    1980-01-01

    Acinetobacter calcoaceticus was grown in 11-liter batch fermentations with hexadecane or sodium citrate as the sole source of carbon. Surface and interfacial tension measurements of the microbial broth indicated that surface-active compounds were being produced only during growth on the hydrocarbon substrate. Contact angle measurements of an aqueous drop on a smooth lawn of cells in a hexadecane bath indicated a highly hydrophobic surface of the cells in the initial stages of the hydrocarbon fermentation (120° contact angle). At this stage, the entire cell population was bound to the hydrocarbon-aqueous interface. The contact angle dropped rapidly to approximately 45° after 14 h into the fermentation. This coincided with a shift of the cell population to the aqueous phase. Thus, the cells demonstrated more hydrophilic characteristics in the later stages of the fermentation. Contact angles on cells grown on sodium citrate ranged from 18 to 24° throughout the fermentation. The cells appear to be highly hydrophilic during growth on a soluble substrate. From the contact angle and aqueous-hydrocarbon interfacial tension, the surface free energy of the cells was calculated along with the cell-aqueous and cell-hydrocarbon interfacial tension. The results of these measurements were useful in quantitatively evaluating the hydrophobic nature of the cell surface during growth on hydrocarbons and comparing it with the hydrophilic nature of the cell surface during growth on a soluble substrate. PMID:16345526

  12. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  13. Standing Surface Acoustic Wave Based Cell Coculture

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Precise reconstruction of heterotypic cell–cell interactions in vitro requires the coculture of different cell types in a highly controlled manner. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell coculture platform. In our approach, different types of cells are patterned sequentially in the SSAW field to form an organized cell coculture. To validate our platform, we demonstrate a coculture of epithelial cancer cells and endothelial cells. Real-time monitoring of cell migration dynamics reveals increased cancer cell mobility when cancer cells are cocultured with endothelial cells. Our SSAW-based cell coculture platform has the advantages of contactless cell manipulation, high biocompatibility, high controllability, simplicity, and minimal interference of the cellular microenvironment. The SSAW technique demonstrated here can be a valuable analytical tool for various biological studies involving heterotypic cell–cell interactions. PMID:25232648

  14. Back surface reflectors for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chai, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    Sample solar cells were fabricated to study the effects of various back surface reflectors on the device performance. They are typical 50 micrometers thick, space quality, silicon solar cells except for variations of the back contact configuration. The back surfaces of the sample cells are polished to a mirror like finish, and have either conventional full contacts or grid finger contacts. Measurements and evaluation of various metallic back surface reflectors, as well as cells with total internal reflection, are presented. Results indicate that back surface reflectors formed using a grid finger back contact are more effective reflectors than cells with full back metallization and that Au, Ag, or Cu are better back surface reflector metals than Al.

  15. Cell behavior on surface modified polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS).

    PubMed

    Stanton, Morgan M; Rankenberg, Johanna M; Park, Byung-Wook; McGimpsey, W Grant; Malcuit, Christopher; Lambert, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Designing complex tissue culture systems requires cell alignment and directed extracellular matrix (ECM) and gene expression. Here, a micro-rough, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surface, that also integrates a micro-pattern of 50 µm wide lines of fibronectin (FN) separated by 60 µm wide lines of bovine serum albumin (BSA), is developed. Human fibroblasts cultured on the rough, patterned substrate have aligned growth and a significant change in morphology when compared to cells on a flat, patterned surface. The rough PDMS topography significantly decreases cell area and induces the upregulation of several ECM related genes by two-fold when compared to cells cultured on flat PDMS. This study describes a simple surface engineering procedure for creating surface architecture for scaffolds to design and control the cell-surface interface.

  16. Identification and characterization of a cell surface protein of Prevotella intermedia 17 with broad-spectrum binding activity for extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fan; Iyer, Divya; Anaya, Cecilia; Lewis, Janina P

    2006-11-01

    Prevotella intermedia binds and invades a variety of host cells. This binding is most probably mediated through cell surface proteins termed adhesins. To identify proteins binding to the host extracellular matrix (ECM) component, fibronectin, and study the molecular mechanism underlying bacterial colonization, we applied proteomic approaches to perform a global investigation of P. intermedia strain 17 outer membrane proteins. 2-DE followed by Far Western Blot analysis using fibronectin as a probe revealed a 29-kDa fibronectin-binding protein, designated here AdpB. The molecular identity of the protein was determined using PMF followed by a search of the P. intermedia 17 protein database. Database searches revealed the similarity of AdpB to multiple bacterial outer membrane proteins including the fibronectin-binding protein from Campylobacter jejuni. A recombinant AdpB protein bound fibronectin as well as other host ECM components, including fibrinogen and laminin, in a saturable, dose-dependent manner. Binding of AdpB to immobilized fibronectin was also inhibited by soluble fibronectin, laminin, and fibrinogen, indicating the binding was specific. Finally, immunoelectron microscopy with anti-AdpB demonstrated the cell surface location of the protein. This is the first cell surface protein with a broad-spectrum ECM-binding abilities identified and characterized in P. intermedia 17.

  17. Theoretical analysis of cell separation based on cell surface marker density.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, J J; Zborowski, M; Moore, L; Mandal, S; Fang, B B; Sun, L

    1998-07-05

    A theoretical analysis was performed to determine the number of fractions a multidisperse, immunomagnetically labeled cell population can be separated into based on the surface marker (antigen) density. A number of assumptions were made in this analysis: that there is a proportionality between the number of surface markers on the cell surface and the number of immunomagnetic labels bound; that this surface marker density is independent of the cell diameter; and that there is only the presence of magnetic and drag forces acting on the cell. Due to the normal distribution of cell diameters, a "randomizing" effect enters into the analysis, and an analogy between the "theoretical plate" analysis of distillation, adsorption, and chromatography can be made. Using the experimentally determined, normal distribution of cell diameters for human lymphocytes and a breast cancer cell line, and fluorescent activated cell screening data of specific surface marker distributions, examples of theoretical plate calculations were made and discussed.

  18. Surface-Activated Coupling Reactions Confined on a Surface.

    PubMed

    Dong, Lei; Liu, Pei Nian; Lin, Nian

    2015-10-20

    Chemical reactions may take place in a pure phase of gas or liquid or at the interface of two phases (gas-solid or liquid-solid). Recently, the emerging field of "surface-confined coupling reactions" has attracted intensive attention. In this process, reactants, intermediates, and products of a coupling reaction are adsorbed on a solid-vacuum or a solid-liquid interface. The solid surface restricts all reaction steps on the interface, in other words, the reaction takes place within a lower-dimensional, for example, two-dimensional, space. Surface atoms that are fixed in the surface and adatoms that move on the surface often activate the surface-confined coupling reactions. The synergy of surface morphology and activity allow some reactions that are inefficient or prohibited in the gas or liquid phase to proceed efficiently when the reactions are confined on a surface. Over the past decade, dozens of well-known "textbook" coupling reactions have been shown to proceed as surface-confined coupling reactions. In most cases, the surface-confined coupling reactions were discovered by trial and error, and the reaction pathways are largely unknown. It is thus highly desirable to unravel the mechanisms, mechanisms of surface activation in particular, of the surface-confined coupling reactions. Because the reactions take place on surfaces, advanced surface science techniques can be applied to study the surface-confined coupling reactions. Among them, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are the two most extensively used experimental tools. The former resolves submolecular structures of individual reactants, intermediates, and products in real space, while the latter monitors the chemical states during the reactions in real time. Combination of the two methods provides unprecedented spatial and temporal information on the reaction pathways. The experimental findings are complemented by theoretical modeling. In particular, density

  19. Active Cells for Multifunctional Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    techniques to explore a variety of cell designs.  Designed a simplified active cell using Nitinol as the actuation method and relying on Joule heating...for contraction of the cell.  Developed manufacturing techniques for reliably creating Nitinol spring coils in a variety of diameters and gauges...design of the active cells to maximum the stroked length of the active cells by tuning the stiffness of a passive spring in parallel with the Nitinol

  20. Cu Nanowires with Clean Surfaces: Synthesis and Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinmei; Sui, Yongming; Yang, Xinyi; Wei, Yingjin; Zou, Bo

    2016-10-12

    Low activity and high cost of electrocatalysts are the major challenge for the commercialization of the direct fuel cells (DFCs) and biofuel cells. In this work, we demonstrate the desirable "clean surfaces" effect of Cu nanocrystals in electrocatalysis. By a new reaction route of Cu2O nanospheres (Cu2O NSs), Cu nanowires (Cu NWs) with high purity and "clean surfaces" are first obtained under mild conditions. Benefiting from the path directing effects and abundant (100) facets, the as-prepared Cu NWs exhibit a lower overpotential to achieve the methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) than that of analogous Cu nanoparticles (Cu NPs). Moreover, the "clean surfaces" provide more available active sites for the efficient transfer of electrons, enabling the Cu NWs to show their enhanced electrocatalytic activity. In the MOR, forward peak current density for the surface-cleaned Cu NWs is 2839 μA cm(-2), which is ca. 6.45-fold higher than that of the Cu NWs with residual capping molecules on their surface. The "clean surfaces" effect can also be extended to the glucose electro-oxidation reaction (GOR), and the enhancement in specific surface area activity for the Cu NWs is 11.3-fold. This work enhances the electrocatalytic performance of Cu nanocrystals without the need for additional noble metals, which opens up new avenues for utilizing non-noble metals in the DFC or biofuel cell applications.

  1. Distribution of cell surface saccharides on pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Maylie-Pfenninger, M; Jamieson, JD

    1979-01-01

    We describe here a simple, general procedure for the purification of a variety of lectins, and for the preparation of lectin-ferritin conjugates of defined molar composition and binding properties to be used as probes for cell surface saccharides. The technique uses a “universal” affinity column for lectins and their conjugates, which consists of hog sulfated gastric mucin glycopeptides covalently coupled to agarose. The procedure involes: (a) purification of lectins by chromatography of aqueous extracts of seeds or other lectin-containing fluids over the affinity column, followed by desorption of the desired lectin with its hapten suge; (b) iodination of the lectin to serve as a marker during subsequent steps; (c) conjugation of lectin to ferritin with glutaraldehyde; (d) collection of active lectin-ferritin conjugates by affinity chromatography; and (e) separation of monomeric lectin-ferritin conjugates from larger aggregates and unconjugated lectin by gel chromatography. Based on radioactivity and absorbancy at 310 nm for lectin and ferritin, respectively, the conjugates consist of one to two molecules of lectin per ferrritin molecule. Binding studies of native lectins and their ferritin conjugates to dispersed pancreatic acinar cells showed that the conjugation procedure does not significantly alter either the affinity constant of the lectin for its receptor on the cell surface or the number of sites detected. PMID:422653

  2. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  3. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Imee Su; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10{sup -6} Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  4. Aptamer-guided silver-gold bimetallic nanostructures with highly active surface-enhanced Raman scattering for specific detection and near-infrared photothermal therapy of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ping; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Chenxin

    2012-09-18

    The aptamer (S2.2)-guided Ag-Au nanostructures (aptamer-Ag-Au) have been synthesized by photoreduction and validated by ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. Differential interference contrast (DIC), fluorescence, and TEM images, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra indicated that the aptamer-Ag-Au nanostructures can target the surface of human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) with high affinity and specificity. This targeting is completed via the specific interaction between S2.2 aptamer (a 25-base oligonucleotide) and MUC1 mucin (a large transmembrane glycoprotein, whose expression increased at least 10-fold at MCF-7 cells in primary and metastatic breast cancers). However, the nanostructures cannot target HepG2 (human liver cancer cells) or MCF-10A cells (human normal breast epithelial cells), because these cells are MUC1-negative expressed. Moreover, the synthesized nanostructures exhibited a high SERS activity. Based on these results, a new assay for specifically detecting MCF-7 cells has been proposed. This assay can also discriminate MCF-7 cells from MCF-10A cells and different cancer cell lines, such as HepG2 cells. In addition, the aptamer-Ag-Au nanostructures have a high capability of adsorpting near-infrared (NIR) irradiation and are able to perform photothermal therapy of MCF-7 cells at a very low irradiation power density (0.25 W/cm(2)) without destroying the healthy cells and the surrounding normal tissue. Therefore, the proposed assay is significant for the diagnosis of tumors in their nascent stage. The synthesized nanostructures could offer a protocol to specifically recognize and sensitively detect the cancer cells, and would have great potential for application in the photothermal therapy of the cancers.

  5. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  6. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed.

  7. Receptor Dissociation and B-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianying; Reth, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) is one of the most abundant receptors on the surface of B cells with roughly 100,000-200,000 copies per cell. Signaling through the BCR is crucial for the activation and differentiation of B cells. Unlike other receptors, the BCR can be activated by a large set of structurally different ligands, but the molecular mechanism of BCR activation is still a matter of controversy. Although dominant for a long time, the cross-link model (CLM) of BCR activation is not supported by recent studies of the nanoscale organization of the BCR on the surface of resting B cells. In contrast to the prediction of CLM, the numerous BCR complexes on these cells are not randomly distributed monomers but rather form oligomers which reside within membrane confinements. This finding is more in line with the dissociation activation model (DAM), wherein B-cell activation is accompanied by an opening of the auto-inhibited BCR oligomers instead of a cross-linking of the BCR monomers. In this review, we discuss in detail the new findings and their implications for BCR signaling.

  8. Medium-size droplets of methyl ricinoleate are reduced by cell-surface activity in the gamma-decalactone production by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Waché, Y; Bergmark, K; Courthaudon, J L; Aguedo, M; Nicaud, J M; Belin, J M

    2000-03-01

    Size of methyl ricinoleate droplets during biotransformation into gamma-decalactone by Yarrowia lipolytica was measured in both homogenized and non-homogenized media. In non-homogenized but shaken medium, droplets had an average volume surface diameter d32 of 2.5 microm whereas it was 0.7 microm in homogenized and shaken medium. But as soon as yeast cells were inoculated, both diameters became similar at about 0.7 microm and did not vary significantly until the end of the culture. The growth of Y. lipolytica in both media was very similar except for the lag phase which was lowered in homogenized medium conditions.

  9. Adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on micropatterned polyelectrolyte surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Naoki; Guo, Likun; Wozniak, Michal J; Imaizumi, Yumie; Tateishi, Tetsuya; Zhang, Xingdong; Chen, Guoping

    2009-01-01

    Three kinds of photoreactive polyelectrolytes of polyallylamine (PAAm), poly(acrylic acid) (PAAc), and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were synthesized by the introduction of azidophenyl groups in the respective polymers. The photoreactive PAAm, PAAc, and PVA were micropatterned on polystyrene surfaces by photolithography. Observation with optical microscopy and scanning probe microscopy demonstrated the formation of a striped pattern of polyelectrolytes with a width of 200 microm. The micropatterned polyelectrolytes swelled in water. The micropatterned surfaces were used for cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and their effects on adipogenic differentiation were investigated. The MSCs adhered to and proliferated evenly on the PAAm- and PAAc-patterned surfaces while they formed a cell pattern on the PVA-patterned surface. The PAAm-, PAAc-grafted, and polystyrene surfaces supported cell adhesion while the PVA-grafted surface did not. When cultured in adipogenic differentiation medium, the adipogenic differentiation of MSCs on the polyelectrolyte-patterned surfaces was demonstrated by the formation of lipid vacuoles and gene expression analysis. Oil Red-O-positive cells showed an even distribution on the PAAm- and PAAc-patterned surfaces, while they showed a pattern on the PVA-patterned surface. The fraction of Oil RedO-positive cells increased with culture time. The MSCs cultured on the PAAm-, PAAc-grafted, and polystyrene surfaces in adipogenic differentiation medium expressed the adipogenesis marker genes of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma2 (PPARgamma2), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), and fatty acid binding protein 4 (FABP4). These results indicate that the PAAm-, and PAAc-grafted, and polystyrene surfaces supported the adipogenesis of MSCs while a PVA-grafted surface did not.

  10. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  11. Fluorescence activated cell sorting.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Hulett, H. R.; Sweet, R. G.; Herzenberg, L. A.

    1972-01-01

    An instrument has been developed for sorting biological cells. The cells are rendered differentially fluorescent and incorporated into a small liquid stream illuminated by a laser beam. The cells pass sequentially through the beam, and fluorescent light from the cells gives rise to electrical signals. The stream is broken into a series of uniform size drops downstream of the laser. The cell signals are used to give appropriate electrostatic charges to drops containing the cells. The drops then pass between two charged plates and are deflected to appropriate containers. The system has proved capable of providing fractions containing large numbers of viable cells highly enriched in a particular functional type.

  12. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  13. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  14. Alleviation of Cu and Pb rhizotoxicities in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) as related to ion activities at root-cell plasma membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Kopittke, Peter M; Kinraide, Thomas B; Wang, Peng; Blamey, F Pax C; Reichman, Suzie M; Menzies, Neal W

    2011-06-01

    Cations, such as Ca and Mg, are generally thought to alleviate toxicities of trace metals through site-specific competition (as incorporated in the biotic ligand model, BLM). Short-term experiments were conducted with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) seedlings in simple nutrient solutions to examine the alleviation of Cu and Pb toxicities by Al, Ca, H, Mg, and Na. For Cu, the cations depolarized the plasma membrane (PM) and reduced the negativity of ψ(0)(o) (electrical potential at the outer surface of the PM) and thereby decreased {Cu(2+)}(0)(o) (activity of Cu(2+) at the outer surface of the PM). For Pb, root elongation was generally better correlated to the activity of Pb(2+) in the bulk solution than to {Pb(2+)}(0)(o). However, we propose that the addition of cations resulted in a decrease in {Pb(2+)}(0)(o) but a simultaneous increase in the rate of Pb uptake (due to an increase in the negativity of E(m,surf), the difference in potential between the inner and outer surfaces of the PM) thus offsetting the decrease in {Pb(2+)}(0)(o). In addition, Ca was found to alleviate Pb toxicity through a specific effect. Although our data do not preclude site-specific competition (as incorporated in the BLM), we suggest that electrostatic effects have an important role.

  15. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  16. Functions of red cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Daniels, G

    2007-11-01

    The external membrane of the red cell contains numerous proteins that either cross the lipid bilayer one or more times or are anchored to it through a lipid tail. Many of these proteins express blood group activity. The functions of some of these proteins are known; in others their function can only be surmised from the protein structure or from limited experimental evidence. They are loosely divided into four categories based on their functions: membrane transporters; adhesion molecules and receptors; enzymes; and structural proteins that link the membrane with the membrane skeleton. Some of the proteins carry out more than one of these functions. Some proteins may complete their major functions during erythropoiesis or may only be important under adverse physiological conditions. Furthermore, some might be evolutionary relics and may no longer have significant functions. Polymorphisms or rare changes in red cell surface proteins are often responsible for blood groups. The biological significance of these polymorphisms or the selective pressures responsible for their stability within populations are mostly not known, although exploitation of the proteins by pathogenic micro-organisms has probably played a major role.

  17. Detection of Cell Surface Dopamine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbant assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, cells surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact. PMID:23296774

  18. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  19. Metabolic activity is necessary for activation of T suppressor cells by B cells

    SciTech Connect

    Elkins, K.L.; Stashak, P.W.; Baker, P.J. )

    1990-04-15

    Ag-primed B cells must express cell-surface IgM, but not IgD or Ia Ag, and must remain metabolically active, in order to activate suppressor T cells (Ts) specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide. Ag-primed B cells that were gamma-irradiated with 1000r, or less, retained the ability to activate Ts; however, Ag-primed B cells exposed to UV light were not able to do so. gamma-Irradiated and UV-treated Ag-primed B cells both expressed comparable levels of cell-surface IgM, and both localized to the spleen after in vivo transfer; neither could proliferate in vitro in response to mitogens. By contrast, gamma-irradiated primed B cells were still able to synthesize proteins, whereas UV-treated primed B cells could not. These findings suggest that in order for Ag-primed B cells to activate Ts, they must (a) express cell-associated IgM (sIgM) antibody bearing the idiotypic determinants of antibody specific for type III pneumococcal polysaccharide, and (b) be able to synthesize protein for either the continued expression of sIgM after cell transfer, or for the elaboration of another protein molecule that is also required for the activation of Ts; this molecule does not appear to be Ia Ag.

  20. SLC30A10 Is a Cell Surface-Localized Manganese Efflux Transporter, and Parkinsonism-Causing Mutations Block Its Intracellular Trafficking and Efflux Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; Chen, Pan; Zogzas, Charles E.; Hutchens, Steven; Mercado, Jonathan M.; Swaim, Caleb D.; Morrisett, Richard A.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal, but elevated cellular levels are toxic and may lead to the development of an irreversible parkinsonian-like syndrome that has no treatment. Mn-induced parkinsonism generally occurs as a result of exposure to elevated Mn levels in occupational or environmental settings. Additionally, patients with compromised liver function attributable to diseases, such as cirrhosis, fail to excrete Mn and may develop Mn-induced parkinsonism in the absence of exposure to elevated Mn. Recently, a new form of familial parkinsonism was reported to occur as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. The cellular function of SLC30A10 and the mechanisms by which mutations in this protein cause parkinsonism are unclear. Here, using a combination of mechanistic and functional studies in cell culture, Caenorhabditis elegans, and primary midbrain neurons, we show that SLC30A10 is a cell surface-localized Mn efflux transporter that reduces cellular Mn levels and protects against Mn-induced toxicity. Importantly, mutations in SLC30A10 that cause familial parkinsonism blocked the ability of the transporter to traffic to the cell surface and to mediate Mn efflux. Although expression of disease-causing SLC30A10 mutations were not deleterious by themselves, neurons and worms expressing these mutants exhibited enhanced sensitivity to Mn toxicity. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms involved in the onset of a familial form of parkinsonism and highlight the possibility of using enhanced Mn efflux as a therapeutic strategy for the potential management of Mn-induced parkinsonism, including that occurring as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. PMID:25319704

  1. Technique for surface oxidation of activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sircar, S.; Golden, T.C.

    1987-10-27

    A method of activating a carbon adsorbent is described, which comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mild oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidizing carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent. In a process for the removal of water or carbon dioxide from a gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide of the type wherein the gas stream containing water or carbon dioxide is contacted with a solid phase adsorbent under pressure-swing adsorption or thermal-swing adsorption processing conditions, the improvement is described comprising utilizing an adsorbent produced by the activation of a carbon adsorbent. The activation comprises oxidizing the surface of the carbon adsorbent with a mold oxidizing acid in the presence of a metal oxidation catalyst at an elevated temperature and boiling the mixture of the carbon adsorbent, mild oxidizing acid and metal oxidation catalyst to dryness. Then rinse the surface oxidized carbon adsorbent with water; and dry the rinsed surface oxidized carbon adsorbent.

  2. Optical Activity of Anisotropic Achiral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, T.; Kauranen, M.; Van Rompaey, Y.; Persoons, A. |

    1996-08-01

    Anisotropic achiral surfaces respond differently to left- and right-hand circularly polarized light. This occurs when the orientation of the surface with respect to an otherwise achiral experimental setup makes the total geometry chiral. Such optical activity is demonstrated in second-harmonic generation from an anisotropic thin molecular film. The circular-difference response reverses sign as the handedness of the geometry is reversed and vanishes when the setup possesses a mirror plane. The results are explained within the electric-dipole-allowed second-order surface nonlinearity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Inhibition of isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3 by serine 465 sequence-specific peptides.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Li, Liaoliao; Washington, Jacqueline M; Xu, Xuebing; Sando, Julianne J; Lin, Daowei; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2011-03-25

    Excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT) transport glutamate into cells to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain nontoxic extracellular glutamate levels for neurons. We showed previously that the commonly used volatile anesthetic isoflurane increases the transporting activity of EAAT3, the major neuronal EAAT. This effect requires a protein kinase C (PKC) α-mediated and S465-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. Thus, we hypothesize that specific peptides can be designed to block this effect. We conjugated a 10-amino acid synthetic peptide with a sequence identical to that of EAAT3 around the S465 to a peptide that can facilitate permeation of the plasma membrane. This fusion peptide inhibited the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane in C6 cells and hippocampus. It did not affect the basal EAAT3 activity. This peptide also attenuated isoflurane-induced increase of PKCα in the immunoprecipitates produced by an anti-EAAT3 antibody. A scrambled peptide that has the same amino acid composition as the S465 sequence-specific peptide but has a random sequence did not change the effects of isoflurane on EAAT3. The S465 sequence-specific peptide, but not the scrambled peptide, is a good PKCα substrate in in vitro assay. These peptides did not affect cell viability. These results, along with our previous findings, strongly suggest that PKCα interacts with EAAT3 to regulate its functions. The S465 sequence-specific peptide may interrupt this interaction and is an effective inhibitor for the regulation of EAAT3 activity and trafficking by PKCα and isoflurane.

  4. Roles for E-cadherin cell surface regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Yuliya I.; Schecterson, Leslayann; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    The loss of E-cadherin expression in association with the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs frequently during tumor metastasis. However, metastases often retain E-cadherin expression, an EMT is not required for metastasis, and metastases can arise from clusters of tumor cells. We demonstrate that the regulation of the adhesive activity of E-cadherin present at the cell surface by an inside-out signaling mechanism is important in cancer. First, we find that the metastasis of an E-cadherin–expressing mammary cell line from the mammary gland to the lung depends on reduced E-cadherin adhesive function. An activating monoclonal antibody to E-cadherin that induces a high adhesive state significantly reduced the number of cells metastasized to the lung without affecting the growth in size of the primary tumor in the mammary gland. Second, we find that many cancer-associated germline missense mutations in the E-cadherin gene in patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer selectively affect the mechanism of inside-out cell surface regulation without inhibiting basic E-cadherin adhesion function. This suggests that genetic deficits in E-cadherin cell surface regulation contribute to cancer progression. Analysis of these mutations also provides insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin regulation at the cell surface. PMID:27582386

  5. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  6. Detection of cell surface dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jiping; Bergson, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine receptors are a class of metabotropic G protein-coupled receptors. Plasma membrane expression is a key determinant of receptor signaling, and one that is regulated both by extra and intracellular cues. Abnormal dopamine receptor signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, as well as drug abuse. Here, we describe in detail the application of two complementary applications of protein biotinylation and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) for detecting and quantifying levels of dopamine receptors expressed on the cell surface. In the biotinylation method, cell surface receptors are labeled with Sulfo-NHS-biotin. The charge on the sulfonyl facilitates water solubility of the reactive biotin compound and prevents its diffusion across the plasma membrane. In the ELISA method, surface labeling is achieved with antibodies specific to extracellular epitopes on the receptors, and by fixing the cells without detergent such that the plasma membrane remains intact.

  7. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-01-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  8. Human NK cells: From surface receptors to clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Moretta, Lorenzo; Pietra, Gabriella; Vacca, Paola; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Locatelli, Franco; Moretta, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in innate defenses against pathogens, primarily viruses, and are also thought to be part of the immunosurveillance against tumors. They express an array of surface receptors that mediate NK cell function. The human leukocytes antigen (HLA) class I-specific inhibitory receptors allow NK cells to detect and kill cells that have lost or under-express HLA class I antigens, a typical feature of tumor or virally infected cells. However, NK cell activation and induction of cytolytic activity and cytokine production depends on another important checkpoint, namely the expression on target cells of ligands recognized by activating NK receptors. Despite their potent cytolytic activity, NK cells frequently fail to eliminate tumors. This is due to mechanisms of tumor escape, determined by the tumor cells themselves or by tumor-associated cells (i.e. the tumor microenvironment) via the release of soluble suppressive factors or the induction of inhibitory loops involving induction of regulatory T cells, M2-polarized macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells. The most important clinical application involving NK cells is the cure of high-risk leukemias in the haplo-identical hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) setting. NK cells originated from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) of HLA-haploidentical donors may express Killer Immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) that are mismatched with the HLA class I alleles of the recipient. This allows NK cells to kill leukemia blasts residual after the conditioning regimen, while sparing normal cells (that do not express ligands for activating NK receptors). More recent approaches based on the specific removal of TCR α/β(+) T cells and of CD19(+) B cells, allow the infusion, together with CD34(+) HSC, of mature KIR(+) NK cells and of TCR γ/δ(+) T cells, both characterized by a potent anti-leukemia activity. This greatly reduces the time interval necessary to obtain alloreactive, KIR(+) NK

  9. Dominant negative mutation in cell surface beta 1,4- galactosyltransferase inhibits cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    In addition to its traditional location within the Golgi complex, beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) is also present on the cell surface, where it is thought to function as a cell adhesion molecule by binding to extracellular oligosaccharide ligands. Recent studies suggest that cells contain two forms of GalTase with distinct cytoplasmic domains. The longer form of GalTase contains a 13-amino acid cytoplasmic extension and is preferentially targeted to the plasma membrane, relative to the shorter GalTase protein that is confined primarily to the Golgi compartment. In this study, we created a dominant negative mutation that interferes with the function of cell surface GalTase by transfecting into cells cDNAs encoding truncated versions of the long form of GalTase containing the complete cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains, but devoid of the catalytic domain. In both F9 embryonal carcinoma cells and Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, overexpressing the truncated long GalTase (TLGT) protein displaced the endogenous cell surface GalTase from its association with the cytoskeleton, resulting in a loss of intercellular adhesion and cell spreading specifically on matrices that use GalTase as a cell surface receptor. In contrast, overexpressing the analogous truncated short GalTase (TSGT) protein did not affect cell morphology or GalTase activity. In control assays, inducing the TLGT protein had no effect on cell interactions with fibronectin (which is independent of GalTase), or on the cytoskeleton attachment of another matrix receptor (beta 1 integrin), or on overall glycoprotein synthesis, thus eliminating nonspecific effects of the TLGT protein on cellular adhesion and metabolism. These results represent the first molecular manipulation of cell surface GalTase expression and confirm its function as a cell adhesion molecule. These studies further suggest that the cytoskeleton contains a defined, saturable number of binding sites for GalTase, which enables it to function as

  10. Mechanotransductive surfaces for reversible biocatalysis activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Damien; Vogt, Cédric; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mutterer, Jérôme; Ball, Vincent; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Schaaf, Pierre; Lavalle, Philippe

    2009-09-01

    Fibronectin, like other proteins involved in mechanotransduction, has the ability to exhibit recognition sites under mechanical stretch. Such cryptic sites are buried inside the protein structure in the native fold and become exposed under an applied force, thereby activating specific signalling pathways. Here, we report the design of new active polymeric nanoassembled surfaces that show some similarities to these cryptic sites. These nanoassemblies consist of a first polyelectrolyte multilayer stratum loaded with enzymes and capped with a second polyelectrolyte multilayer acting as a mechanically sensitive nanobarrier. The biocatalytic activity of the film is switched on/off reversibly by mechanical stretching, which exposes enzymes through the capping barrier, similarly to mechanisms involved in proteins during mechanotransduction. This first example of a new class of biologically inspired surfaces should have great potential in the design of various devices aimed to trigger and modulate chemical reactions by mechanical action with applications in the field of microfluidic devices or mechanically controlled biopatches for example.

  11. Porous Collagen Scaffold Reinforced with Surfaced Activated PLLA Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Cancan; Lu, Wei; Bian, Shaoquan; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Zhang, Xingdong

    2012-01-01

    Porous collagen scaffold is integrated with surface activated PLLA nanoparticles fabricated by lyophilizing and crosslinking via EDC treatment. In order to prepare surface-modified PLLA nanoparticles, PLLA was firstly grafted with poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) through surface-initiated polymerization of acrylic acid. Nanoparticles of average diameter 316 nm and zeta potential −39.88 mV were obtained from the such-treated PLLA by dialysis method. Porous collagen scaffold were fabricated by mixing PLLA nanoparticles with collagen solution, freeze drying, and crosslinking with EDC. SEM observation revealed that nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed in collagen matrix, forming interconnected porous structure with pore size ranging from 150 to 200 μm, irrespective of the amount of nanoparticles. The porosity of the scaffolds kept almost unchanged with the increment of the nanoparticles, whereas the mechanical property was obviously improved, and the degradation was effectively retarded. In vitro L929 mouse fibroblast cells seeding and culture studies revealed that cells infiltrated into the scaffolds and were distributed homogeneously. Compared with the pure collagen sponge, the number of cells in hybrid scaffolds greatly increased with the increment of incorporated nanoparticles. These results manifested that the surface-activated PLLA nanoparticles effectively reinforced the porous collagen scaffold and promoted the cells penetrating into the scaffold, and proliferation. PMID:22448137

  12. Calculated activity of Mn2+ at the outer surface of the root cell plasma membrane governs Mn nutrition of cowpea seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Kopittke, Peter M.; Blamey, F. Pax C.; Wang, Peng; Menzies, Neal W.

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential micronutrient for plant growth but is often toxic in acid or waterlogged soils. Using cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) grown with 0.05–1500 μM Mn in solution, two short-term (48 h) solution culture experiments examined if the effects of cations (Ca, Mg, Na, Al, or H) on Mn nutrition are related to the root cells’ plasma membrane (PM) surface potential, ψ00. When grown in solutions containing levels of Mn that were toxic, both relative root elongation rate (RRER) and root tissue Mn concentration were more closely related to the activity of Mn2+ at the outer surface of the PM, {Mn2+}00 (R2=0.812 and 0.871) than to its activity in the bulk solution, {Mn2+}b (R2=0.673 and 0.769). This was also evident at lower levels of Mn (0.05–10 μM) relevant to studies investigating Mn as an essential micronutrient (R2=0.791 versus 0.590). In addition, changes in the electrical driving force for ion transport across the PM influenced both RRER and the Mn concentration in roots. The {Mn2+}b causing a 50% reduction in root growth was found to be c. 500 to >1000 μM (depending upon solution composition), whilst the corresponding value was 3300 μM when related to {Mn2+}00. Although specific effects such as competition are not precluded, the data emphasize the importance of non-specific electrostatic effects in the Mn nutrition of cowpea seedlings over a 1×105-fold range of Mn concentration in solution. PMID:21511910

  13. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stem-Like Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem-like...investigate the hypothesis that cell surface GRP78 drives cancer stem-like behavior by activating an Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling axis in prostate cancer stem...investigate these signaling pathways in year 2. Task 4: Investigate the relative expression of Snail -1, a GSK-3 target, in adherent prostate cancer cells

  14. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  15. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  16. Glycopeptide capture for cell surface proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lee, M C Gilbert; Sun, Bingyun

    2014-05-09

    Cell surface proteins, including extracellular matrix proteins, participate in all major cellular processes and functions, such as growth, differentiation, and proliferation. A comprehensive characterization of these proteins provides rich information for biomarker discovery, cell-type identification, and drug-target selection, as well as helping to advance our understanding of cellular biology and physiology. Surface proteins, however, pose significant analytical challenges, because of their inherently low abundance, high hydrophobicity, and heavy post-translational modifications. Taking advantage of the prevalent glycosylation on surface proteins, we introduce here a high-throughput glycopeptide-capture approach that integrates the advantages of several existing N-glycoproteomics means. Our method can enrich the glycopeptides derived from surface proteins and remove their glycans for facile proteomics using LC-MS. The resolved N-glycoproteome comprises the information of protein identity and quantity as well as their sites of glycosylation. This method has been applied to a series of studies in areas including cancer, stem cells, and drug toxicity. The limitation of the method lies in the low abundance of surface membrane proteins, such that a relatively large quantity of samples is required for this analysis compared to studies centered on cytosolic proteins.

  17. Leukocyte cell surface proteinases: regulation of expression, functions, and mechanisms of surface localization.

    PubMed

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: (1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinases by cells; (2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or (3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: (1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; (2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; (3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; (4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and (5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes.

  18. Living Toroids - Cells on Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Angelini, Thomas; Marquez, Samantha; Kim, Harold; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. Substrate mechanics has been recognized as one of the important physical cues that governs cell behavior at single cell level as well as in collective cell motion. Past research has suggested several contact-guided behaviors to be the result of surface curvature. However, studies on the effect of curvature are relatively scarce likely due to the difficulty in generating substrates with well-defined curvature. Here we describe the generation of toroidal droplets, which unlike spherical droplets, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus. Cells are either encapsulated inside toroidal droplets or located on toroidal hydrogel surfaces. Preliminary studies use B. Subtilis to study the organization of bacteria biofilms. When confined in droplets surrounded by yield-stress fluid, bacteria self-organize into heterogeneous biofilm at fluid- substrate interface. It is found that the surface curvature in the sub-millimeter scale has little effect on biofilm architecture.

  19. Critical role of serine 465 in isoflurane-induced increase of cell-surface redistribution and activity of glutamate transporter type 3.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yueming; Feng, Xiaorong; Sando, Julianne J; Zuo, Zhiyi

    2006-12-15

    Glutamate transporters (also called excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) bind extracellular glutamate and transport it to intracellular space to regulate glutamate neurotransmission and to maintain extracellular glutamate concentrations below neurotoxic levels. We previously showed that isoflurane, a commonly used anesthetic, enhanced the activity of EAAT3, a major neuronal EAAT. This effect required a protein kinase C (PKC) alpha-dependent EAAT3 redistribution to the plasma membrane. In this study, we prepared COS7 cells stably expressing EAAT3 with or without mutations of potential PKC phosphorylation sites in the putative intracellular domains. Here we report that mutation of threonine 5 or threonine 498 to alanine did not affect the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. However, the mutation of serine 465 to alanine abolished isoflurane-induced increase of EAAT3 activity and redistribution to the plasma membrane. The mutation of serine 465 to aspartic acid increased the expression of EAAT3 in the plasma membrane and also abolished the isoflurane effects on EAAT3. These results suggest an essential role of serine 465 in the isoflurane-increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution and a direct effect of PKC on EAAT3. Consistent with these results, isoflurane induced an increase in phosphorylation of wild type, T5A, and T498A EAAT3, and this increase was absent in S465A and S465D. Our current results, together with our previous data that showed the involvement of PKCalpha in the isoflurane effects on EAAT3, suggest that the phosphorylation of serine 465 in EAAT3 by PKCalpha mediates the increased EAAT3 activity and redistribution to plasma membrane after isoflurane exposure.

  20. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-08-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose.

  1. Specialized cell surface structures in cellulolytic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lamed, R; Naimark, J; Morgenstern, E; Bayer, E A

    1987-01-01

    The cell surface topology of various gram-negative and -positive, anaerobic and aerobic, mesophilic and thermophilic, cellulolytic and noncellulolytic bacteria was investigated by scanning electron microscopic visualization using cationized ferritin. Characteristic protuberant structures were observed on cells of all cellulolytic strains. These structures appeared to be directly related to the previously described exocellular cellulase-containing polycellulosomes of Clostridium thermocellum YS (E. A. Bayer and R. Lamed, J. Bacteriol. 167:828-836, 1986). Immunochemical evidence and lectin-binding studies suggested a further correlation on the molecular level among cellulolytic bacteria. The results indicate that such cell surface cellulase-containing structures may be of general consequence to the bacterial interaction with and degradation of cellulose. Images PMID:3301817

  2. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  3. Asphaltenes as a surface active agent

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.; Storm, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Asphaltene represents the heavy-end materials of the crude oil, conventionally defined via solvent solubility (either heptane or pentane). Chemically, it consists of polynuclear aromatics with the H/C ratio close to unity. Additionally, it contains a great deal of heteroatoms, such as sulfur, nitrogen, nickel, vanadium, etc. Several experiments have revealed the surface activity of asphaltenes in some selected solvents through measurements of their rheology or critical micelle concentrations in these solvents. The asphaltene micelles were found thermodynamically reversible. In a two phase asphaltene/water system, asphaltenes appear to vary their surface activities depending upon the polarity of the aqueous phase. Our recent experiment further showed that asphaltene/water/toluene may form, water-in-oil emulsion under certain conditions.

  4. The Exploration of Mars: Crew Surface Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosri, Wisuwat; Cojanis, Philip; Gupta, Madhu; Khopkar, Manasi; Kiely, Aaron; Myers, Michael; Oxnevad, Knut; Sengupta, Anita; Sexton, Adam; Shaw, Don

    1999-01-01

    Surface activities of the first Mars mission crew, as suggested in phase I of the NASA HEDS reference mission, are discussed in this paper. The HEDS reference mission calls for a two phased approach. In phase I, humans supported by robotic systems will explore the Martian surface, collect and analyze geologic, geophysical, and meteorological data, search for potential permanent base sites, and conduct technology verification experiments. In phase II, a Mars base site will be selected, and the building of a permanent human base will be initiated. In this report two complementary architectures are portrayed. First, a permanent base for 3-6 people consisting of an ISRU unit, two nuclear power systems, a green house, and inflatable habitats and laboratories, built inside adobe structures. Second, a reusable, and resupplyable methane propelled very long range type traverse vehicle capable of collecting and analyzing data, and repairing and deploying scientific payloads during its planned 150 days 4800 km traverse. The very long range traverse vehicle will carry smaller rovers, crawlers, blimps, and an air drill capable of quickly reaching depths beyond 100m. The report presents a global vision of human activities on the surface of Mars at a programmatic level. It consists of several vignettes called "concept architectures" We speculate that these activities will facilitate a phase I Mars exploration architecture.

  5. A generic rate law for surface-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Onder; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2013-09-02

    Many biochemical reactions are confined to interfaces, such as membranes or cell walls. Despite their importance, no canonical rate laws describing the kinetics of surface-active enzymes exist. Combining the approach chosen by Michaelis and Menten 100 years ago with concepts from surface chemical physics, we here present an approach to derive generic rate laws of enzymatic processes at surfaces. We illustrate this by a simple reversible conversion on a surface to stress key differences to the classical case in solution. The available area function, a concept from surface physics which enters the rate law, covers different models of adsorption and presents a unifying perspective on saturation effects and competition between enzymes. A remarkable implication is the direct dependence of the rate of a given enzyme on all other enzymatic species able to bind at the surface. The generic approach highlights general principles of the kinetics of surface-active enzymes and allows to build consistent mathematical models of more complex pathways involving reactions at interfaces.

  6. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  7. Selection of resistant acute myeloid leukemia SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells by vincristine-, mitoxantrone- and lenalidomide-induced upregulation of P-glycoprotein activity and downregulation of CD33 cell surface exposure.

    PubMed

    Imrichova, D; Messingerova, L; Seres, M; Kavcova, H; Pavlikova, L; Coculova, M; Breier, A; Sulova, Z

    2015-09-18

    Bone marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients contain upregulated levels of cell surface antigen CD33 compared with healthy controls. This difference enables the use of humanized anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to cytotoxic agents for CD33 targeted immunotherapy. However, the expression of the membrane-bound drug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been shown to be critical for resistance against the cytotoxicity of a humanized anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to maytansine-derivative DM4. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the expression of P-gp in AML cell lines is associated with changes in CD33 expression. For this purpose, we established drug resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 AML cell lines via the selection of parental cells for resistance to vincristine, mitoxantrone and lenalidomide. All three substances induced a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in SKM-1 cells associated with strong upregulation of P-gp and downregulation of CD33. However, in MOLM-13 cells, the upregulation of P-gp and downregulation of CD33 were present only in cells selected for resistance to vincristine and mitoxantrone but not lenalidomide. Inverse expression of P-gp and CD33 were observed in all resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells. The MDR phenotype of resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells was associated with alterations in apoptotic regulatory proteins and downregulation of the multidrug resistance associated protein 1 and breast cancer resistance protein.

  8. Activated Membrane Patches Guide Chemotactic Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Inbal; Skoge, Monica L.; Charest, Pascale G.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Firtel, Richard A.; Loomis, William F.; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2011-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells are able to crawl on surfaces and guide their motility based on environmental cues. These cues are interpreted by signaling systems which couple to cell mechanics; indeed membrane protrusions in crawling cells are often accompanied by activated membrane patches, which are localized areas of increased concentration of one or more signaling components. To determine how these patches are related to cell motion, we examine the spatial localization of RasGTP in chemotaxing Dictyostelium discoideum cells under conditions where the vertical extent of the cell was restricted. Quantitative analyses of the data reveal a high degree of spatial correlation between patches of activated Ras and membrane protrusions. Based on these findings, we formulate a model for amoeboid cell motion that consists of two coupled modules. The first module utilizes a recently developed two-component reaction diffusion model that generates transient and localized areas of elevated concentration of one of the components along the membrane. The activated patches determine the location of membrane protrusions (and overall cell motion) that are computed in the second module, which also takes into account the cortical tension and the availability of protrusion resources. We show that our model is able to produce realistic amoeboid-like motion and that our numerical results are consistent with experimentally observed pseudopod dynamics. Specifically, we show that the commonly observed splitting of pseudopods can result directly from the dynamics of the signaling patches. PMID:21738453

  9. Bacterial cell surface structures in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Białas, Nataniel; Kasperkiewicz, Katarzyna; Radziejewska-Lebrecht, Joanna; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-06-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a widespread member of the family of Enterobacteriaceae that contains both non-virulent and virulent isolates. Pathogenic Y. enterocolitica strains, especially belonging to serotypes O:3, O:5,27, O:8 and O:9 are etiologic agents of yersiniosis in animals and humans. Y. enterocolitica cell surface structures that play a significant role in virulence have been subject to many investigations. These include outer membrane (OM) glycolipids such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) and several cell surface adhesion proteins present only in virulent Y. enterocolitica, i.e., Inv, YadA and Ail. While the yadA gene is located on the Yersinia virulence plasmid the Ail, Inv, LPS and ECA are chromosomally encoded. These structures ensure the correct architecture of the OM, provide adhesive properties as well as resistance to antimicrobial peptides and to host innate immune response mechanisms.

  10. Cell surface alpha 2,6 sialylation affects adhesion of breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shaoqiang; Kemmner, Wolfgang; Grigull, Sabine; Schlag, Peter M

    2002-05-15

    Tumor-associated alterations of cell surface glycosylation play a crucial role in the adhesion and metastasis of carcinoma cells. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of alpha 2,6-sialylation on the adhesion properties of breast carcinoma cells. To this end mammary carcinoma cells, MDA-MB-435, were sense-transfected with sialyltransferase ST6Gal-I cDNA or antisense-transfected with a part of the ST6Gal-I sequence. Sense transfectants showed an enhanced ST6Gal-I mRNA expression and enzyme activity and an increased binding of the lectin Sambucus nigra agglutinin (SNA), specific for alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid. Transfection with ST6Gal-I in the antisense direction resulted in less enzyme activity and SNA reactivity. A sense-transfected clone carrying increased amounts of alpha 2,6-linked sialic acid adhered preferentially to collagen IV and showed reduced cell-cell adhesion and enhanced invasion capacity. In contrast, antisense transfection led to less collagen IV adhesion but enhanced homotypic cell-cell adhesion. In another approach, inhibition of ST6Gal-I enzyme activity by application of soluble antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides was studied. Antisense treatment resulted in reduced ST6 mRNA expression and cell surface 2,6-sialylation and significantly decreased collagen IV adhesion. Our results suggest that cell surface alpha 2,6-sialylation contributes to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion of tumor cells. Inhibition of sialytransferase ST6Gal-I by antisense-oligodeoxynucleotides might be a way to reduce the metastatic capacity of carcinoma cells.

  11. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  12. Immunotherapy and mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Santos, M A; Pedro, E; Santos, S; Lopes-Pregal, A

    1998-10-01

    Tryptase is the more specific markers for mast cell activation and mediators release and can be used as an index of mast cell activation after challenge. Nasal provocation tests have been done in patients allergic to the pollen of Parietaria (pellitory wall) before and after specific systemic immunotherapy and tryptase release evaluated in nasal lavage fluid. After specific immunotherapy the concentration of tryptase in nasal lavage was significantly decreased to all the concentrations used in challenge and the peack of tryptase release was delayed. These results confirm that assays of tryptase in nasal fluid after nasal provocation are a reliable markers of mast cell activation. Immunotherapy with specific allergen decreases mast cell reactivity to the same allergen.

  13. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  14. Motility of active fluid drops on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Diana; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2015-12-01

    Drops of active liquid crystal have recently shown the ability to self-propel, which was associated with topological defects in the orientation of active filaments [Sanchez et al., Nature 491, 431 (2013), 10.1038/nature11591]. Here, we study the onset and different aspects of motility of a three-dimensional drop of active fluid on a planar surface. We analyze theoretically how motility is affected by orientation profiles with defects of various types and locations, by the shape of the drop, and by surface friction at the substrate. In the scope of a thin drop approximation, we derive exact expressions for the flow in the drop that is generated by a given orientation profile. The flow has a natural decomposition into terms that depend entirely on the geometrical properties of the orientation profile, i.e., its bend and splay, and a term coupling the orientation to the shape of the drop. We find that asymmetric splay or bend generates a directed bulk flow and enables the drop to move, with maximal speeds achieved when the splay or bend is induced by a topological defect in the interior of the drop. In motile drops the direction and speed of self-propulsion is controlled by friction at the substrate.

  15. Hair follicle targeting, penetration enhancement and Langerhans cell activation make cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping a promising delivery technique for transcutaneous immunization with large molecules and particle-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Deckert, Iliane; Schmidt, Julia; Stroux, Andrea; Afraz, Zahra; Rancan, Fiorenza; Lademann, Jürgen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) requires targeting of a maximum number of skin antigen-presenting cells as non-invasive as possible on small skin areas. In two clinical trials, we introduced cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) as a safe method for TCI. Here, using ex vivo human skin, we demonstrate that one CSSS procedure removed only 30% of stratum corneum, but significantly increased the penetration of 200 nm polystyrene particles deep into vellus and intermediate hair follicles from where they could not been retrieved by conventional tape stripping. Two subsequent CSSS had no striking additional effect. CSSS increased particle penetration in superficial stratum corneum and induced Langerhans cell activation. Formulation in amphiphilic ointment or massage did not substantially influences the interfollicular penetration profiles. Hair follicle (HF) targeting by CSSS could become a highly effective tool for TCI when combined with carrier-based delivery and is gaining new attention as our understanding on the HF immune system increases.

  16. Identification of a cell-surface antigen selectively expressed on the natural killer cell

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    We have studied the cell-surface phenotype of natural killer (NK) cells of NZB and B6 mice which react to an MuLV+ lymphoid tumor. (a) NK cells do not express Thy1, Ly2, or Ig surface markers. (b) NK cells express an antigen recognized by C3H anti-CE antiserum ('anti-Ly1.2 antiserum'). Inasmuch as NK activity of spleen cells from B6 and B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains were both equally sensitive to C3H anti-CE antiserum, the NK antigen is distinct from Ly1.2. This point was confirmed by the observation that alphaNK activity was removed by absorption of C3H anti-CE antiserum with spleen cells from either B6 or B6/Ly1.1 congenic strains. Absorption of C3H alphaCE serum with BALB/c thymocytes and spleen cells (which are Ly1.2+NK-) removed anti-Ly1.2 activity and left anti-NK activity intact. This absorption step could be circumvented by inserting the BALB/c genotype into the recipient immunized to CE cells (i.e., (C3H X BALB/c)F1 alphaCE spleen cells). This antiserum, provisionally termed 'anti-NK', defines a new subclass of lymphocytes which may play a central role in the immunosurveillance against tumors. PMID:187714

  17. Topical corticosteroids do not revert the activated phenotype of eosinophils in eosinophilic esophagitis but decrease surface levels of CD18 resulting in diminished adherence to ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lingblom, Christine; Bergquist, Henrik; Johnsson, Marianne; Sundström, Patrik; Quiding-Järbrink, Marianne; Bove, Mogens; Wennerås, Christine

    2014-12-01

    Swallowed topical corticosteroids are the standard therapy for eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) in adults. Eosinophils in the blood of untreated EoE patients have an activated phenotype. Our aim was to determine if corticosteroids restore the phenotype of eosinophils to a healthy phenotype and if certain cell-surface molecules on blood eosinophils correlate with eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. Levels of eight surface markers on eosinophils from treated and untreated EoE patients were determined by flow cytometry and analyzed using multivariate methods of pattern recognition. Corticosteroid-treated EoE patients' eosinophils had decreased levels of CD18 compared to both untreated patients and healthy controls, but maintained their activated phenotype. CD18 expression correlated positively with eosinophil numbers in the esophagus and promoted the adherence of eosinophils to ICAM-1, ICAM-2, and to endothelial cells. The diminished expression of CD18 may be one mechanism behind the reduced entry of eosinophils into the esophagus in corticosteroid-treated EoE patients.

  18. Documenting Biophysical Activities on Land Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobron, N.; Pinty, B.; Melin, F.; Taberner, M.; Verstraete, M. M.; Widlowski, J.

    2002-12-01

    The biophysical activities on land surfaces have been documented from spectral measurements made in space for decades. These estimates often were derived from the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, which is simple to compute but very sensitive to perturbations and prone to yield misleading or erroneous results. Advances in the understanding of radiation transfer and availability of higher performance instruments have lead to the development of a new generation of geophysical products poised to provide reliable, accurate information on the state and evolution of terrestrial environments. Specifically, a series of optimized algorithms have been developed to estimate the Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FAPAR) for various instruments. Such an approach allows the synergistic use of FAPAR products derived from different sensors and the construction of global FAPAR time series independent from the life time of these specific sensors. The outline of the methodology will be summarized and the results from an application conducted with SeaWiFS data will be presented.

  19. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces. II: Silica as a chemical stressor influencing cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria grow in complex solutions where the adsorption of aqueous species and nucleation of mineral phases on the cell surface may interfere with membrane-dependent homeostatic functions. While previous investigations have provided evidence that bacteria may alter their surface chemical properties in response to environmental stimuli, to our knowledge no effort has been made to evaluate surface compositional changes resulting from non-nutritional chemical stresses within a quantitative framework applicable to surface complexation modeling. We consider here the influence of exposure to silica on cyanobacterial surface chemistry, particularly in light of the propensity for cyanobacteria to become silicified in geothermal environments. Using data modeled from over 50 potentiometric titrations of the unsheathed cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, we find that both abiotic geochemical and biotic biochemical-assimilatory factors have important and different effects on cell surface chemistry. Changes in functional group distribution that resulted from growth by different nitrogen assimilation pathways were greatest in the absence of dissolved silica and less important in its presence. Furthermore, out of the three nitrogen assimilation pathways investigated, in terms of surface functional group distribution, nitrate-reducing cultures were least sensitive, and ammonium-assimilating cultures were most sensitive, to changes in media silica concentration. When functional group distributions were plotted as a function of silica concentration, it appears that, with higher silica concentrations, basic groups (p Ka > 7) increase in concentration relative to acidic groups (p Ka < 7), and the total ligand densities (on a per-weight basis) decreased. The results imply a decrease in both the magnitude and density of surface charge as the net result of growth at high silica concentrations. Thus, Anabaena sp. appears to actively respond to growth in silicifying solutions by

  20. Surface plasmon resonance imaging of cells and surface-associated fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alexander W; Halter, Michael; Tona, Alessandro; Bhadriraju, Kiran; Plant, Anne L

    2009-01-01

    Background A critical challenge in cell biology is quantifying the interactions of cells with their extracellular matrix (ECM) environment and the active remodeling by cells of their ECM. Fluorescence microscopy is a commonly employed technique for examining cell-matrix interactions. A label-free imaging method would provide an alternative that would eliminate the requirement of transfected cells and modified biological molecules, and if collected nondestructively, would allow long term observation and analysis of live cells. Results Using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI), the deposition of protein by vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) cultured on fibronectin was quantified as a function of cell density and distance from the cell periphery. We observed that as much as 120 ng/cm2 of protein was deposited by cells in 24 h. Conclusion SPRI is a real-time, low-light-level, label-free imaging technique that allows the simultaneous observation and quantification of protein layers and cellular features. This technique is compatible with live cells such that it is possible to monitor cellular modifications to the extracellular matrix in real-time. PMID:19245706

  1. Development of a novel mammalian cell surface antibody display platform.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Jacobsen, Frederick W; Cai, Ling; Chen, Qing; Shen, Weyen David

    2010-01-01

    Antibody display systems have been successfully applied to screen, select and characterize antibody fragments. These systems typically use prokaryotic organisms such as phage and bacteria or lower eukaryotic organisms, such as yeast. These organisms possess either no or different post-translational modification functions from mammalian cells and prefer to display small antibody fragments instead of full-length IgGs. We report here a novel mammalian cell-based antibody display platform that displays full-length functional antibodies on the surface of mammalian cells. Through recombinase-mediated DNA integration, each host cell contains one copy of the gene of interest in the genome. Utilizing a hot-spot integration site, the expression levels of the gene of interest are high and comparable between clones, ensuring a high signal to noise ratio. Coupled with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) technology, our platform is high throughput and can distinguish antibodies with very high antigen binding affinities directly on the cell surface. Single-round FACS can enrich high affinity antibodies by more than 500 fold. Antibodies with significantly improved neutralizing activity have been identified from a randomly mutagenized library, demonstrating the power of this platform in screening and selecting antibody therapeutics.

  2. Hemagglutinating activity in phytopathogenic bacteria surface compounds.

    PubMed

    Serra, M T; Castresana, M C; Tejerina, G

    1987-01-01

    Extracellular components of plant pathogenic bacteria were obtained from their culture medium as well as from the whole cells by using NaCl 1 M, pH 6.0; 20% sucrose dissolved in 0.03 M Tris buffer, pH 8.0; or 0.05 M Na2EDTA. All the extracts from Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora, Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola, Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli, Pseudomonas solanacearum, and Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica, were assayed for hemagglutinating activity on sheep, rabbit and chicken red blood cells (RBCs). The only active extracts were those obtained by NaCl treatment. They agglutinated sheep and rabbit erythrocytes. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica gave rise to the high agglutination titer on rabbit RBCs. These extracts had the lowest polysaccharide/protein ratio. E. carotovora subsp. carotovora extracts showed only a low titer (18.5 units). The agglutinating activity present in NaCl extracts of the bacteria tested was inhibited by different carbohydrates to various extent. Extracts from E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica appeared to be the most sensitive ones while those of E. carotovora subsp. carotovora least sensitive to the presence of sugar. It is suggested that hemagglutinins observed in plant pathogenic bacteria and those in plant host are similar and that both may, in some way, be involved in the plant-parasite relationship.

  3. Expression of cell surface antigens on mast cells: mast cell phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Hauswirth, Alexander W; Florian, Stefan; Schernthaner, Gerit-Holger; Krauth, Maria-Theresa; Sonneck, Karoline; Sperr, Wolfgang R; Valent, Peter

    2006-01-01

    During the past few decades, a number of functionally important cell surface antigens have been detected on human mast cells (MCs). These antigens include the stem cell factor receptor (SCFR/CD117), the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor, adhesion molecules, and activation-linked membrane determinants. Several of these antigens (CD2, CD25, CD35, CD88, CD203c) appear to be upregulated on MCs in patients with systemic mastocytosis and therefore are used as diagnostic markers. Quantitative measurement of these markers on MCs is thus of diagnostic value and is usually performed by multicolor-based flow cytometry techniques utilizing a PE- or APC-labeled antibody against CD117 for MCs detection. This chapter gives an overview about the methods of staining of MC in various tissues with special reference to novel diagnostic markers applied in patients with suspected systemic mastocytosis.

  4. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape ‘A’ to a memorized permanent shape ‘B’ upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology. PMID:27877747

  5. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape ‘A’ to a memorized permanent shape ‘B’ upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology.

  6. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology.

    PubMed

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape 'A' to a memorized permanent shape 'B' upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology.

  7. Epigenomics of T cell activation, differentiation and memory

    PubMed Central

    Cuddapah, Suresh; Barski, Artem; Zhao, Keji

    2010-01-01

    Activation of T cells is an essential step in the immunological response to infection. While activation of naïve T cells results in proliferation and slow differentiation into cytokine-producing effector cells, antigen engagement with memory cells leads to cytokine production immediately. Even though the cell surface signaling events are similar in both the cases, the outcome is different, suggesting that distinct regulatory mechanisms may exist downstream of the activation signals. Recent advances in the understanding of global epigenetic patterns in T cells have resulted in the appreciation of the role of epigenetic mechanisms in processes such as activation and differentiation. In this review we discuss recent data suggesting that naïve T cell activation, differentiation and lineage commitment results in epigenetic changes and a fine balance between different histone modifications is required. On the other hand, memory T cells are poised and do not require epigenetic changes for short-term activation. PMID:20226645

  8. Does Titan have an Active Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.

    2009-12-01

    ammonia, a compound expected in Titan’s interior. This, combined with the previous evidence from VIMS and RADAR images, creates a strong case for Titan having a presently active surface, possibly due to cryovolcanism. Cassini encountered Titan at very close range on 2008-11-19-13:58 and again on 2008-12-05-12:38. These epochs are called T47 and T48. Comparison of earlier lower resolution data (T5) with the recent T47 and T48 data reveal changes of the surface reflectance and morphology in the Hotei region. This is the first evidence from VIMS that confirms the RADAR report that Hotei Reggio has morphology consistent with volcanic terrain. It has not escaped our attention that ammonia, in association with methane and nitrogen, the principal species of Titan’s atmosphere, closely replicates the environment at the time that live first emerged on earth. If Titan is currently active then these results raise the following questions: What is the full extent of current geologic activity? What are the ongoing processes? Are Titan’s chemical processes today supporting a prebiotic chemistry similar to that under which life evolved on Earth? This work done at JPL under contract with NASA. Refs: [1]R. M. Nelson et al., Icarus 199 (2009) 429-441. [2]R. M. Nelson et al., GRL, VOL. 36, L04202, doi:10.1029/2008GL036206, 2009. [3]S. D. Wall GRL, VOL. 36, L04203, doi:10.1029/2008GL036415, 2009

  9. Cell-surface marker analysis of rat thymic dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bañuls, M P; Alvarez, A; Ferrero, I; Zapata, A; Ardavin, C

    1993-01-01

    Rat thymic dendritic cells have been isolated by collagenase digestion, separation of the low-density cell fraction by centrifugation on metrizamide, and differential adherence. The resulting dendritic cell preparation had a purity of > 90%, and has been analysed by flow cytometry (FCM) using a large panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAb). Dendritic cells expressed major histocompatibility (MHC) class I and class II molecules, the leucocyte common antigen CD45, the rat leucocyte antigen OX44, the rat macrophage marker ED1, and the adhesion molecules Mac-1, LFA-1 and ICAM-1. They were negative for the T- and B-cell-specific forms of CD45, CD45R and B220, and the B-cell marker OX12. Concerning T-cell marker expression, they were negative for T-cell receptor (TcR) and OX40, but they expressed CD2, CD4 and CD8, and interestingly, 50% of DC were CD5+, 50% expressed the alpha-chain of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), and 80% were positive for the T-cell activation antigen recognized by the mAb OX48. Moreover, 60% of DC expressed high levels of Thy-1, whereas 40% displayed intermediate levels of this T-cell marker. PMID:8102122

  10. Low-magnitude, high-frequency vibration promotes the adhesion and the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells cultured on a hydroxyapatite-coated surface: The direct role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bailing; Lin, Tao; Yang, Xiaoxi; Li, Yiqiang; Xie, Denghui; Zheng, Wenhui; Cui, Haowen; Deng, Weimin; Tan, Xin

    2016-11-01

    The positive effect of low-magnitude, high‑frequency (LMHF) vibration on implant osseointegration has been demonstrated; however, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of LMHF vibration on the adhesion and the osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) cultured on hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated surfaces in an in vitro model as well as to elucidate the molecular mechanism responsible for the effects of LMHF vibration on osteogenesis. LMHF vibration resulted in the increased expression of fibronectin, which was measured by immunostaining and RT-qPCR. Stimulation of BMSCs by LMHF vibration resulted in the rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton with more prominent F-actin. Moreover, the expression of β1 integrin, vinculin and paxillin was notably increased following LMHF stimulation. Scanning electron microscope observations revealed that there were higher cell numbers and more extracellular matrix attached to the HA-coated surface in the LMHF group. Alkaline phosphatase activity as well as the expression of osteogenic-specific genes, namely Runx2, osterix, collagen I and osteocalcin, were significantly elevated in the LMHF group. In addition, the protein expression of Wnt10B, β-catenin, Runx2 and osterix was increased following exposure to LMHF vibration. Taken together, the findings of this study indicate that LMHF vibration promotes the adhesion and the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs on HA-coated surfaces in vitro, and LMHF vibration may directly induce osteogenesis by activating the Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway. These data suggest that LMHF vibration enhances the osseointegration of bone to a HA-coated implant, and provide a scientific foundation for improving bone-implant osseointegration through the application of LMHF vibration.

  11. The cell surface expressed nucleolin is a glycoprotein that triggers calcium entry into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Losfeld, Marie-Estelle; Khoury, Diala El; Mariot, Pascal; Carpentier, Mathieu; Krust, Bernard; Briand, Jean-Paul; Mazurier, Joel; Hovanessian, Ara G.; Legrand, Dominique

    2009-01-15

    Nucleolin is an ubiquitous nucleolar phosphoprotein involved in fundamental aspects of transcription regulation, cell proliferation and growth. It has also been described as a shuttling molecule between nucleus, cytosol and the cell surface. Several studies have demonstrated that surface nucleolin serves as a receptor for various extracellular ligands implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, mitogenesis and angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that nucleolin in the extranuclear cell compartment is a glycoprotein containing N- and O-glycans. In the present study, we show that glycosylation is an essential requirement for surface nucleolin expression, since it is prevented when cells are cultured in the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation. Accordingly, surface but not nuclear nucleolin is radioactively labeled upon metabolic labeling of cells with [{sup 3}H]glucosamine. Besides its well-demonstrated role in the internalization of specific ligands, here we show that ligand binding to surface nucleolin could also induce Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells. Indeed, by flow cytometry, microscopy and patch-clamp experiments, we show that the HB-19 pseudopeptide, which binds specifically surface nucleolin, triggers rapid and intense membrane Ca{sup 2+} fluxes in various types of cells. The use of several drugs then indicated that Store-Operated Ca{sup 2+} Entry (SOCE)-like channels are involved in the generation of these fluxes. Taken together, our findings suggest that binding of an extracellular ligand to surface nucleolin could be involved in the activation of signaling pathways by promoting Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells.

  12. Expression of the T-cell surface molecule CD2 and an epitope-loss CD2 mutant to define the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, B E; Peterson, A; Barbosa, J; Seed, B; Burakoff, S J

    1988-01-01

    To define the role of the CD2-lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) interaction in T-cell activation, we have expressed a cDNA encoding the human CD2 molecule in a murine antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Expression of the CD2 molecule greatly enhances T-cell responsiveness to antigen; this enhancement is inhibited by anti-CD2 and anti-LFA-3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). CD2+ hybridomas produce interleukin 2 in response to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs 9.6 and 9-1 and, in the presence of mAb 9-1, to sheep erythrocytes or to the LFA-3 antigen. Furthermore, hybridomas expressing a mutant CD2 molecule that has lost mAb 9.6 binding do not exhibit the enhanced response to antigen or the ability to respond to LFA-3 plus mAb 9-1, but these hybridomas retain the ability to respond to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs. The role of the CD2-LFA-3 interaction in T-cell activation and the potential for other physiologic ligands for CD2 are discussed. PMID:2448792

  13. 1D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate dephosphorylation by rat enterocytes involves an intracellular 5-phosphatase and non-specific phosphatase activity at the cell surface.

    PubMed Central

    Rubiera, C; Velasco, G; Michell, R H; Lazo, P S; Shears, S B

    1988-01-01

    We studied the dephosphorylation of Ins(1,4,5)P3 (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) by permeabilized rat intestinal epithelial cells incubated in a medium resembling intracellular ionic strength and pH. Saponin-permeabilized cells rapidly dephosphorylated Ins(1,4,5)P3 to a mixture of three InsP2 (inositol bisphosphate) isomers, namely Ins(1,4)P2, Ins(1,5)P2 and Ins(4,5)P2. These products were identified by h.p.l.c. analysis after dephosphorylation of both 3H- and 32P-labelled Ins(1,4,5)P3. Ins(1,4)P2 accumulated to about half of the concentration attained by Ins(1,5)P2 and Ins(4,5)P2. Ins(1,4,5)P3 dephosphorylation was inhibited, by up to 75%, by 10 mM-glucose 6-phosphate. In these conditions Ins(1,4)P2 became the predominant product, indicating that glucose 6-phosphate inhibited non-specific dephosphorylation of Ins(1,4,5)P3, at least at the 1- and 4-phosphate groups. Ins(1,4)P2 was further dephosphorylated, and the major InsP (inositol monophosphate) product was Ins4P. Most of the glucose 6-phosphate-inhibitable Ins(1,4,5)P3 phosphatase activity was exposed on the cell surface. The glucose 6-phosphate-insensitive Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase activity was not detected until the cells were permeabilized with saponin. This intracellular 5-phosphatase activity was: (i) predominantly associated with the particulate portion of the cell; (ii) strongly inhibited by 10 mM-2,3-bisphosphoglycerate; (iii) insensitive to 50 mM-Li+. Therefore the Ins(1,4,5)P3 5-phosphatase activity in enterocytes appears similar to the 5-phosphatase that has been characterized in a number of cell types. PMID:2848503

  14. Ionic surface active compounds in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    Sukhapan, Jariya; Brimblecombe, Peter

    2002-04-27

    Surfactants in the atmosphere have several potential roles in atmospheric chemistry. They can form films on aqueous surfaces, which lowers the surface tension and possibly delays water evaporation and gaseous transportation across the aqueous interface. They can also increase the solubility of organic compounds in the aqueous phase. Recently, the decrease of surface tension in cloud growing droplets has been suggested as relevant to increases in the number of droplets of smaller size, potentially enhancing cloud albedo. Natural surfactants in the lung aid gas transfer and influence the dissolution rate of aerosol particles, so surfactants in atmospheric aerosols, once inhaled, may interact with pulmonary surfactants. Ambient aerosols were collected from the edge of Norwich, a small city in a largely agricultural region of England, and analysed for surfactants. Methylene blue, a conventional dye for detecting anionic surfactants, has been used as a colorimetric agent. The concentration of surfactants expressed as methylene blue active substances (MBAS) is in the range of 6-170 pmol m(-3)(air). A negative correlation with chloride aerosol indicates that these surfactants are probably not the well-known surfactants derived from marine spray. A more positive correlation with aerosol nitrate and gaseous NOx supports an association with more polluted inland air masses. The surfactants found in aerosols seem to be relatively strong acids, compared with weaker acids such as the long-chain carboxylic acids previously proposed as atmospheric surfactants. Surfactants from the oxidation of organic materials (perhaps vegetation- or soil-derived) seem a likely source of these substances in the atmosphere.

  15. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1μg/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  16. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  17. A Novel Cytoplasmic Tail Motif Regulates Mouse Corin Expression on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Lina; Dong, Ningzheng; Qi, Xiaofei; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are important in many biological processes. Cell surface expression is critical for TTSP activation and function. To date, the mechanism underlying TTSP cell surface expression is poorly understood. Corin is a TTSP and acts as the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide convertase that is essential for sodium homeostasis and normal blood pressure. In this study, we investigated how cytoplasmic tail sequences may regulate corin expression and activation on the cell surface. By site-directed mutagenesis, we made mouse corin proteins with truncations or point-mutations in the cytoplasmic tail. We expressed the mutants in transfected HEK293 cells and analyzed corin cell surface expression and activation by Western blotting and flow cytometry. We found that corin truncation mutants lacking a Lys-Phe-Gln sequence at residues 71–73 had higher levels of cell surface expression and activation compared with that in wild-type corin. When Lys-71, Phe-72 and Gln-73 residues were mutated together, but not individually, in corin with the full-length cytoplasmic tail, increased levels of cell surface expression and zymogen activation were also observed. These results indicate that residues Lys-71, Phe-72 and Gln-73 serve as a novel retention motif in the intracellular pathway to regulate corin cell surface expression and activation. PMID:26241673

  18. Knowledge discovery of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jing

    High-throughput cell culture is an emerging technology that shows promise as a tool for research in tissue engineering, drug discovery, and medical diagnostics. An important, but overlooked, challenge is the integration of experimental methods with information processing suitable for handling large databases of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. In this work the traditional global descriptions of cell behaviors and surface characteristics was shown insufficient for investigating short-distance cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions. Traditional summary metrics cannot distinguish information of cell near neighborhood from the average, global features, thus often is not suitable for studying distance-sensitive cell behaviors. The problem of traditional summary metrics was addressed by introducing individual-cell based local metrics that emphasize cell local environment. An individual-cell based local data analysis method was established. Contact inhibition of cell proliferation was used as a benchmark for the effectiveness of the local metrics and the method. Where global, summary metrics were unsuccessful, the local metrics successfully and quantitatively distinguished the contact inhibition effects of MC3T3-E1 cells on PLGA, PCL, and TCPS surfaces. In order to test the new metrics and analysis method in detail, a model of cell contact inhibition was proposed. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for validating the individual-cell based local data analysis method as well as the cell model itself. The simulation results well matched with the experimental observations. The parameters used in the cell model provided new descriptions of both cell behaviors and surface characteristics. Based on the viewpoint of individual cells, the local metrics and local data analysis method were extended to the investigation of cell-surface interactions, and a new high-throughput screening and knowledge discovery method on combinatorial libraries, local cell

  19. The Mesenchymal Precursor Cell Marker Antibody STRO-1 Binds to Cell Surface Heat Shock Cognate 70.

    PubMed

    Fitter, Stephen; Gronthos, Stan; Ooi, Soo Siang; Zannettino, Andrew C W

    2016-12-27

    Since its discovery more than 25 years ago, the STRO-1 antibody has played a fundamental role in defining the hierarchical nature of mesenchymal precursor cells (MPC) and their progeny. STRO-1 antibody binding remains a hallmark of immature pluripotent MPC. Despite the significance of STRO-1 in the MPC field, the identity of the antigen has remained elusive. Using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, coupled with Western blotting and Tandem mass spectroscopy, we have identified the STRO-1 antigen as heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70;HSPA8). STRO-1 binds to immune-precipitated HSC70 and siRNA-mediated knock down of HSPA8 reduced STRO-1 binding. STRO-1 surface binding does not correlate with HSC70 expression and sequestration of cholesterol reduces STRO-1 surface binding, suggesting that the plasma membrane lipid composition may be an important determinant in the presentation of HSC70 on the cell surface. HSC70 is present on the surface of STRO-1(+) but not STRO-1(-) cell lines as assessed by cell surface biotinylation and recombinant HSC70 blocks STRO-1 binding to the cell surface. The STRO-1 epitope on HSC70 was mapped to the ATPase domain using a series of deletion mutants in combination with peptide arrays. Deletion of the first four amino acids of the consensus epitope negated STRO-1 binding. Notably, in addition to HSC70, STRO-1 cross-reacts with heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), however all the clonogenic cell activity is restricted to the STRO-1(BRIGHT) /HSP70(-) fraction. These results provide important insight into the properties that define multipotent MPC and provide the impetus to explore the role of cell surface HSC70 in MPC biology. Stem Cells 2016.

  20. Functional mapping of cell surface proteins with localized stimulation of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bingyun; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2003-11-01

    This paper describes the development of using individual micro and nano meter-sized vesicles as delivery vessels to functionally map the distribution of cell surface proteins at the level of single cells. The formation of different sizes of vesicles from tens of nanometers to a few micrometers in diameter that contain the desired molecules is addressed. An optical trap is used to manipulate the loaded vesicle to specific cell morphology of interest, and a pulsed UV laser is used to photo-release the stimuli onto the cell membrane. Carbachol activated cellular calcium flux, upon binding to muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, is studied by this method, and the potential of using this method for the functional mapping of localized proteins on the cell surface membrane is discussed.

  1. Surface activity of solid particles with extremely rough surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Yoshimune; Komura, Shigeyuki

    2008-01-15

    The solid particles are adsorbed at liquid-liquid interfaces and form self-assembled structures when the particles have suitable wettability to both liquids. Here, we show theoretically how the extreme roughness on the particle surface affects their adsorption properties. In our previous work, we discussed the adsorption behavior of the solid particles with microstructured surfaces using the so-called Wenzel model [Y. Nonomura et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 110 (2006) 13124]. In the present study, the wettability and the adsorbed position of the particles with extremely rough surfaces are studied based on the Cassie-Baxter model. We predict that the adsorbed position and the interfacial energy depend on the interfacial tensions between the solid and liquid phases, the radius of the particle, and the fraction of the particle surface area that is in contact with the external liquid phase. Interestingly, the initial state of the system governs whether the particle is adsorbed at the interface or not. The shape of the particle is also an important factor which governs the adsorbed position. The disk-shaped particle and the spherical particle which is partially covered with the extremely rough surface, i.e. Janus particle, are adsorbed at the liquid-liquid interface in an oriented state. We should consider not only the interfacial tensions, but also the surface structure and the particle shape to control the adsorption behavior of the particle.

  2. Surface plasmon amplification and active nonreciprocal gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karami Keshmarzi, Elham; Tait, R. Niall; Berini, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we review our recent work on active plasmonic structures composed of optically pumped dye molecules infiltrated in a polymer host as the cladding of long-range surface plasmon polariton (LRSPP) structures. In particular, concepts for distributed Bragg and distributed feedback (DBR/DFB) lasers, and a spatially non-reciprocal Bragg grating (NRBG) are reviewed. The LRSPP Bragg grating is a fundamental element in these devices which is created by stepping the width of a metal stripe to produce modulation of refractive index. The gain medium in all of these active devices is assumed to be a thin film (~1μm) of polymer (poly (methyl methacrylate)) doped with organic laser dye molecules IR- 140. The gain medium is assumed pumped optically through the top of the devices via 10 ns laser pulses at 810 nm with 500 kW/cm2 power intensity to enable stimulated emission at 880 nm. The maximum material gain coefficient of this medium was measured independently as 68 cm-1.

  3. Perspective of surface active agents in baking industry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asif; Arshad, Nazish; Ahmed, Zaheer; Bhatti, Muhammad Shahbaz; Zahoor, Tahir; Anjum, Nomana; Ahmad, Hajra; Afreen, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Different researchers have previously used surfactants for improving bread qualities and revealed that these compounds result in improving the quality of dough and bread by influencing dough strength, tolerance, uniform crumb cell size, and improve slicing characteristics and gas retention. The objective of this review is to highlight the areas where surfactants are most widely used particularly in the bread industries, their role and mechanism of interaction and their contribution to the quality characteristics of the dough and bread. This review reveals some aspects of surface-active agents regarding its role physiochemical properties of dough that in turn affect the bread characteristics by improving its sensory quality and storage stability.

  4. Mapping cellular hierarchy by single cell analysis of the cell surface repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Guoji; Luc, Sidinh; Marco, Eugenio; Lin, Ta-Wei; Peng, Cong; Kerenyi, Marc A.; Beyaz, Semir; Kim, Woojin; Xu, Jian; Das, Partha Pratim; Neff, Tobias; Zou, Keyong; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Orkin, Stuart H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Stem cell differentiation pathways are most often studied at the population level, whereas critical decisions are executed at the level of single cells. We have established a highly multiplexed, quantitative PCR assay to profile in an unbiased manner a panel of all commonly used cell surface markers (280 genes) from individual cells. With this method we analyzed over 1500 single cells throughout the mouse hematopoietic system, and illustrate its utility for revealing important biological insights. The comprehensive single cell dataset permits mapping of the mouse hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation hierarchy by computational lineage progression analysis. Further profiling of 180 intracellular regulators enabled construction of a genetic network to assign the earliest differentiation event during hematopoietic lineage specification. Analysis of acute myeloid leukemia elicited by MLL-AF9 uncovered a distinct cellular hierarchy containing two independent self-renewing lineages with different clonal activities. The strategy has broad applicability in other cellular systems. PMID:24035353

  5. Surface plasmonic effects on organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Ashraf; Yang, Xiaohan

    2014-02-01

    Most high-performance organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices reported in the literature have been fabricated using the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) concept. Typically, the optimum thickness of the active layer for an OPV device is around 100 nm, or possibly less; such a thin layer can lead to low absorption of light. A thicker layer, however, inevitably increases the device resistance, due to the low carrier mobilities and short exciton diffusion lengths in organic materials. This situation imposes a trade-off between light absorption and charge transport efficiencies in OPV devices, motivating the development of a variety of light-trapping techniques. Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) such as Ag, Au, etc. and other metallic nanostructures are potential candidates for improving the light absorption due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). LSPR contributes to the significant enhancement of local electromagnetic fields and improves the optical properties of the nanostructure devices. The excitation of LSPR is achieved when the frequency of the incident light matches its resonance peak, resulting in unique optical properties; selective light extinction as well as local enhancement of electromagnetic fields near the surface of metallic NPs. The resonance peak of LSPR depends strongly on the size, shape, and the dielectric environment of the metallic NPs. In this review article, progress on plasmonic enhanced OPV device performance is examined. The concepts of surface plasmonics for OPV devices, suitable plasmonic materials, location, optimum size and concentration of NP materials within the device are explored.

  6. Monocyte cell surface glycosaminoglycans positively modulate IL-4-induced differentiation toward dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    den Dekker, Els; Grefte, Sander; Huijs, Tonnie; ten Dam, Gerdy B; Versteeg, Elly M M; van den Berk, Lieke C J; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2008-03-15

    IL-4 induces the differentiation of monocytes toward dendritic cells (DCs). The activity of many cytokines is modulated by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In this study, we explored the effect of GAGs on the IL-4-induced differentiation of monocytes toward DCs. IL-4 dose-dependently up-regulated the expression of DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), CD80, CD206, and CD1a. Monocytes stained positive with Abs against heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) B (CSB; dermatan sulfate), but not with Abs that recognize CSA, CSC, and CSE. Inhibition of sulfation of monocyte/DC cell surface GAGs by sodium chlorate reduced the reactivity of sulfate-recognizing single-chain Abs. This correlated with hampered IL-4-induced DC differentiation as evidenced by lower expression of DC-SIGN and CD1a and a decreased DC-induced PBL proliferation, suggesting that sulfated monocyte cell surface GAGs support IL-4 activity. Furthermore, removal of cell surface chondroitin sulfates by chondroitinase ABC strongly impaired IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation, whereas removal of HS by heparinase III had only a weak inhibitory effect. IL-4 bound to heparin and CSB, but not to HS, CSA, CSC, CSD, and CSE. Binding of IL-4 required iduronic acid, an N-sulfate group (heparin) and specific O sulfates (CSB and heparin). Together, these data demonstrate that monocyte cell surface chondroitin sulfates play an important role in the IL-4-driven differentiation of monocytes into DCs.

  7. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-06

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  8. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability.

  9. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications.

  10. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25476450

  11. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy.

  12. Sclerostin Antibody Administration Converts Bone Lining Cells Into Active Osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wan; Lu, Yanhui; Williams, Elizabeth A; Lai, Forest; Lee, Ji Yeon; Enishi, Tetsuya; Balani, Deepak H; Ominsky, Michael S; Ke, Hua Zhu; Kronenberg, Henry M; Wein, Marc N

    2016-11-14

    Sclerostin antibody (Scl-Ab) increases osteoblast activity, in part through increasing modeling-based bone formation on previously quiescent surfaces. Histomorphometric studies have suggested that this might occur through conversion of bone lining cells into active osteoblasts. However, direct data demonstrating Scl-Ab-induced conversion of lining cells into active osteoblasts are lacking. Here, we used in vivo lineage tracing to determine if Scl-Ab promotes the conversion of lining cells into osteoblasts on periosteal and endocortical bone surfaces in mice. Two independent, tamoxifen-inducible lineage-tracing strategies were used to label mature osteoblasts and their progeny using the DMP1 and osteocalcin promoters. After a prolonged "chase" period, the majority of labeled cells on bone surfaces assumed a thin, quiescent morphology. Then, mice were treated with either vehicle or Scl-Ab (25 mg/kg) twice over the course of the subsequent week. After euthanization, marked cells were enumerated, their thickness quantified, and proliferation and apoptosis examined. Scl-Ab led to a significant increase in the average thickness of labeled cells on periosteal and endocortical bone surfaces, consistent with osteoblast activation. Scl-Ab did not induce proliferation of labeled cells, and Scl-Ab did not regulate apoptosis of labeled cells. Therefore, direct reactivation of quiescent bone lining cells contributes to the acute increase in osteoblast numbers after Scl-Ab treatment in mice. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  13. Evidence that cell surface heparan sulfate is involved in the high affinity thrombin binding to cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, K; Ozawa, T

    1985-01-01

    It has been postulated that thrombin binds to endothelial cells through, at least in part, cell surface glycosaminoglycans such as heparan sulfate, which could serve as antithrombin cofactor on the endothelium. In the present study, we have directly evaluated the binding of 125I-labeled bovine thrombin to cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells. The thrombin binding to the cell surface was rapid, reversible, and displaced by enzymatically inactive diisopropylphosphoryl-thrombin. The concentration of thrombin at half-maximal binding was approximately 20 nM. Both specific and nonspecific binding of 125I-thrombin to the endothelial cell surface was partially inhibited in the presence of protamine sulfate, after the removal of cell surface heparan sulfate by the treatment of cells with crude Flavobacterium heparinum enzyme or purified heparitinase. The binding as a function of the concentration of thrombin revealed that the maximal amount of specific binding was reduced by approximately 50% with little alteration in binding affinity by these enzymatic treatments. The reversibility and active-site independence as well as the rate of the binding did not change after heparitinase treatment. Whereas removal of chondroitin sulfates by chondroitin ABC lyase treatment of cells did not affect the binding, identical enzymatic treatments of [35S]sulfate-labeled cells showed that either heparan sulfate or chondroitin sulfate was selectively and completely removed from the cell surface by heparitinase or chondroitin ABC lyase treatment, respectively. Furthermore, proteolysis of cell surface proteins by the purified glycosaminoglycan lyases was excluded by the identical enzymatic treatments of [3H]leucine-labeled or cell surface radioiodinated cells. Our results provide the first direct evidence that heparan sulfate on the cell surface is involved in the high-affinity, active site-independent thrombin binding by endothelial cells, and also suggest the presence of thrombin

  14. Cell surface fluctuations studied with defocusing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agero, U.; Monken, C. H.; Ropert, C.; Gazzinelli, R. T.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2003-05-01

    Phase objects can become visible by slightly defocusing an optical microscope, a technique seldom used as a useful tool. We revisited the theory of defocusing and apply it to our optical microscope with optics corrected at infinity. In our approximation, we obtain that the image contrast is proportional to the two-dimensional (2D) Laplacian of the phase difference introduced by the phase object. If the index of refraction of the phase object is uniform the image obtained from defocusing microscopy is the image of curvature (Laplacian of the local thickness) of the phase object, while standard phase-contrast microscopy gives information about the thickness of the object. We made artificial phase objects and measured image contrasts with defocusing microscopy. Measured contrasts are in excellent agreement with our theoretical model. We use defocusing microscopy to study curvature fluctuations (ruffles) on the surface of macrophages (cell of the innate immune system), and try to correlate mechanical properties of macrophage surface and phagocytosis. We observe large coherent propagating structures: Their shape, speed, density are measured and curvature energy estimated. Inhomogeneities of cytoskeleton refractive index, curvature modulations due to thermal fluctuations and/or periodic changes in cytoskeleton-membrane interactions cause random fluctuations in image contrast. From the temporal and spatial contrast correlation functions, we obtain the decay time and correlation length of such fluctuations that are related to their size and the viscoelastic properties of the cytoskeleton. In order to associate the dynamics of cytoskeleton with the process of phagocytosis, we use an optical tweezers to grab a zymosan particle and put it into contact with the macrophage. We then measure the time for a single phagocytosis event. We add the drug cytochalasin D that depolymerizes the cytoskeleton F-actin network: It inhibits the large propagating coherent fluctuations on the

  15. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  16. Influence of the morphology on the platinum electrode surface activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, Andreas; Steiger, Beat; Scherer, Günther G.; Wokaun, Alexander

    Polycrystalline Pt electrodes with different surface characteristics were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 0.5 M H 2SO 4. Plane electrodes showed a decrease in electrochemically active surface area while cycling in the hydrogen underpotential region (H upd), in contrast, electrodes roughened by intensive pre-cycling exhibited a stable value for the electrochemically active surface.

  17. Islet Cell Surface Antibodies from Insulin-dependent Diabetics Bind Specifically to Pancreatic B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van De Winkel, M.; Smets, G.; Gepts, W.; Pipeleers, D.

    1982-01-01

    Viable rat islet cells were used to detect islet cell surface antibodies (ICSA) in the sera of diabetic and control patients. ICSA were present in almost all recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetics younger than 30 yr (15/16); their incidence in other diabetics (6/22) was also higher than in normal controls (1/18) or in patients with autoimmune thyroiditis (1/12). The varying specificity of the ICSA for the different islet cell types led to the recognition of class I sera, whose ICSA bind exclusively to B cells, class II sera, binding only to A and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) cells and class III sera, reacting with the three islet cell types but not with D cells. Most recent-onset insulin-dependent diabetics younger than 30 contained class I-ICSA, which is consistent with an autoimmune basis of their disease and with an involvement of surface antibodies in the B cell destruction. The presence of class II ICSA in three older diabetics and in one normal control raises the question whether autoimmune reactions against A and PP cells exist and are associated with a distinct entity in islet disease. It is concluded that the autoimmune form of diabetes mellitus represents a heterogeneous group, in which ICSA-positive patients can be distinguished on the basis of their ICSA-binding to one or more islet cell types. Three techniques can be used for the further identification of circulating ICSA, namely binding experiments with purified A or B cells, electron microscopical analysis of ICSA-binding islet cells purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and the immunocytochemical characterization of ICSA-positive cells. Images PMID:6123526

  18. Charged extracellular residues, conserved throughout a G-protein-coupled receptor family, are required for ligand binding, receptor activation, and cell-surface expression.

    PubMed

    Hawtin, Stuart R; Simms, John; Conner, Matthew; Lawson, Zoe; Parslow, Rosemary A; Trim, Julie; Sheppard, Andrew; Wheatley, Mark

    2006-12-15

    For G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in general, the roles of extracellular residues are not well defined compared with residues in transmembrane helices (TMs). Nevertheless, extracellular residues are important for various functions in both peptide-GPCRs and amine-GPCRs. In this study, the V(1a) vasopressin receptor was used to systematically investigate the role of extracellular charged residues that are highly conserved throughout a subfamily of peptide-GPCRs, using a combination of mutagenesis and molecular modeling. Of the 13 conserved charged residues identified in the extracellular loops (ECLs), Arg(116) (ECL1), Arg(125) (top of TMIII), and Asp(204) (ECL2) are important for agonist binding and/or receptor activation. Molecular modeling revealed that Arg(125) (and Lys(125)) stabilizes TMIII by interacting with lipid head groups. Charge reversal (Asp(125)) caused re-ordering of the lipids, altered helical packing, and increased solvent penetration of the TM bundle. Interestingly, a negative charge is excluded at this locus in peptide-GPCRs, whereas a positive charge is excluded in amine-GPCRs. This contrasting conserved charge may reflect differences in GPCR binding modes between peptides and amines, with amines needing to access a binding site crevice within the receptor TM bundle, whereas the binding site of peptide-GPCRs includes more extracellular domains. A conserved negative charge at residue 204 (ECL2), juxtaposed to the highly conserved disulfide bond, was essential for agonist binding and signaling. Asp(204) (and Glu(204)) establishes TMIII contacts required for maintaining the beta-hairpin fold of ECL2, which if broken (Ala(204) or Arg(204)) resulted in ECL2 unfolding and receptor dysfunction. This study provides mechanistic insight into the roles of conserved extracellular residues.

  19. Cell Surface Protein Detection to Assess Receptor Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecka, Magdalena; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2017-01-01

    The migration of membrane receptors upon exposure to different stimulants/inhibitors is of great importance. Among others, the internalization of membrane receptors affects their accessibility to ligands and cell responsiveness to environmental cues. Experimentally, receptor internalization can be used as a measure of their activation. In our studies, we employed this approach to explore cross-talk between a seven transmembrane domain receptor for neuropeptide Y (NPY), Y5R, and a tyrosine kinase receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), TrkB. To this end, we measured the internalization of Y5R upon stimulation with the TrkB ligand, BDNF. Upon treatment with BDNF, the cells were exposed to a membrane impermeable, biotinylation reagent that selectively labels surface proteins. Subsequently, the biotinylated membrane proteins were affinity-purified on columns with avidin resins and analyzed by Western blot. Differences in the fraction of receptors present on the cell surface of control and ligand-treated cells served as a measure of their internalization and response to particular stimuli.

  20. Neutrophil cell surface receptors and their intracellular signal transduction pathways☆

    PubMed Central

    Futosi, Krisztina; Fodor, Szabina; Mócsai, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Neutrophils play a critical role in the host defense against bacterial and fungal infections, but their inappropriate activation also contributes to tissue damage during autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Neutrophils express a large number of cell surface receptors for the recognition of pathogen invasion and the inflammatory environment. Those include G-protein-coupled chemokine and chemoattractant receptors, Fc-receptors, adhesion receptors such as selectins/selectin ligands and integrins, various cytokine receptors, as well as innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors and C-type lectins. The various cell surface receptors trigger very diverse signal transduction pathways including activation of heterotrimeric and monomeric G-proteins, receptor-induced and store-operated Ca2 + signals, protein and lipid kinases, adapter proteins and cytoskeletal rearrangement. Here we provide an overview of the receptors involved in neutrophil activation and the intracellular signal transduction processes they trigger. This knowledge is crucial for understanding how neutrophils participate in antimicrobial host defense and inflammatory tissue damage and may also point to possible future targets of the pharmacological therapy of neutrophil-mediated autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. PMID:23994464

  1. Designed DNA Surfaces for in Vitro Modulation of Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Garrecht, Ruben; Meyer, Rebecca; Duppach, Janine; Reipschläger, Simone; Watzl, Carsten; Niemeyer, Christof M

    2016-03-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells are at the junction of the innate and the adaptive immune response and play a very important role in host defense against viral infections and cancer. They have numerous cell surface receptors that activate or inhibit various intracellular signaling cascades that are then integrated to determine the functional activity of these cells. Here we present a surface-based approach that aims to tackle the largely unknown molecular mechanisms of signal integration. We use DNA microarrays containing capture oligonucleotides for the DNA-directed immobilization (DDI) of oligonucleotide-tagged αCD16 antibodies as ligands for NK cells. We demonstrate that the resulting surfaces can be gradually tuned in terms of ligand density to trigger the activation of living NK cells, as evidenced by degranulation, the release of cytokines, and intracellular Ca(2+) flux, measured at the level of single cells.

  2. Toward Cell Selective Surfaces: Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Breath Figures with Antifouling Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Elzein, Tamara; Bejjani, Alice; García-Granda, Maria Jesús; Santos-Coquillat, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of microporous functional polymer surfaces that have been proven to be selective surfaces toward eukaryotic cells while maintaining antifouling properties against bacteria. The fabrication of functional porous films has been carried out by the breath figures approach that allowed us to create porous interfaces with either poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene (5FS). For this purpose, blends of block copolymers in a polystyrene homopolymer matrix have been employed. In contrast to the case of single functional polymer, using blends enables us to vary the chemical distribution of the functional groups inside and outside the formed pores. In particular, fluorinated groups were positioned at the edges while the hydrophilic PEGMA groups were selectively located inside the pores, as demonstrated by TOF-SIMS. More interestingly, studies of cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on these surfaces confirmed that PEGMA functionalized interfaces are excellent candidates to selectively allow cell growth and proliferation while maintaining antifouling properties.

  3. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  4. Responses of endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and platelets dependent on the surface topography of polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Sujan; Anderson, Jordan A; Remund, Tyler; Sun, Hongli; Larson, Mark K; Kelly, Patrick; Mani, Gopinath

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of different structures (flat, expanded, and electrospun) of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on the interactions of endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and platelets was investigated. In addition, the mechanisms that govern the interactions between ECs, SMCs, and platelets with different structures of PTFE were discussed. The surface characterizations showed that the different structures of PTFE have the same surface chemistry, similar surface wettability and zeta potential, but uniquely different surface topography. The viability, proliferation, morphology, and phenotype of ECs and SMCs interacted with different structures of PTFE were investigated. Expanded PTFE (ePTFE) provided a relatively better surface for the growth of ECs. In case of SMC interactions, although all the different structures of PTFE inhibited SMC growth, a maximum inhibitory effect was observed for ePTFE. In case of platelet interactions, the electrospun PTFE provided a better surface for preventing the adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, this study demonstrated that the responses of ECs, SMCs, and platelets strongly dependent on the surface topography of the PTFE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2291-2304, 2016.

  5. Cell Surface Markers in Colorectal Cancer Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Belov, Larissa; Zhou, Jerry; Christopherson, Richard I.

    2011-01-01

    The classification of colorectal cancers (CRC) is currently based largely on histologically determined tumour characteristics, such as differentiation status and tumour stage, i.e., depth of tumour invasion, involvement of regional lymph nodes and the occurrence of metastatic spread to other organs. These are the conventional prognostic factors for patient survival and often determine the requirement for adjuvant therapy after surgical resection of the primary tumour. However, patients with the same CRC stage can have very different disease-related outcomes. For some, surgical removal of early-stage tumours leads to full recovery, while for others, disease recurrence and metastasis may occur regardless of adjuvant therapy. It is therefore important to understand the molecular processes that lead to disease progression and metastasis and to find more reliable prognostic markers and novel targets for therapy. This review focuses on cell surface proteins that correlate with tumour progression, metastasis and patient outcome, and discusses some of the challenges in finding prognostic protein markers in CRC. PMID:21339979

  6. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  7. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Parikh, P.; Bayliss, A.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize and unstable wave.

  8. Active control of compressible flows on a curved surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, L.; Bayliss, A.; Parikh, P.; Turkel, E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of localized, time periodic surface heating and cooling over a curved surface is studied. This is a mechanism for the active control of unstable disturbances by phase cancellation and reinforcement. It is shown that the pressure gradient induced by the curvature significantly enhances the effectiveness of this form of active control. In particular, by appropriate choice of phase, active surface heating can completely stabilize an unstable wave.

  9. Cell-Surface Phenol Soluble Modulins Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Colony Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Kizaki, Hayato; Omae, Yosuke; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), which are amphipathic small peptides with lytic activity against mammalian cells. We previously reported that PSMα1–4 stimulate S. aureus colony spreading, the phenomenon of S. aureus colony expansion on the surface of soft agar plates, whereas δ-toxin (Hld, PSMγ) inhibits colony-spreading activity. In this study, we revealed the underlying mechanism of the opposing effects of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin in S. aureus colony spreading. PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin are abundant on the S. aureus cell surface, and account for 18% and 8.5% of the total amount of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin, respectively, in S. aureus overnight cultures. Knockout of PSMα1–4 did not affect the amount of cell surface δ-toxin. In contrast, knockout of δ-toxin increased the amount of cell surface PSMα1–4, and decreased the amount of culture supernatant PSMα1–4. The δ-toxin inhibited PSMα3 and PSMα2 binding to the S. aureus cell surface in vitro. A double knockout strain of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin exhibited decreased colony spreading compared with the parent strain. Expression of cell surface PSMα1–4, but not culture supernatant PSMα1–4, restored the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. Expression of δ-toxin on the cell surface or in the culture supernatant did not restore the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. These findings suggest that cell surface PSMα1–4 promote S. aureus colony spreading, whereas δ-toxin suppresses colony-spreading activity by inhibiting PSMα1–4 binding to the S. aureus cell surface. PMID:27723838

  10. Calreticulin: Roles in Cell-Surface Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yue; Dey, Sandeepa; Matsunami, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    In order to perform their designated functions, proteins require precise subcellular localizations. For cell-surface proteins, such as receptors and channels, they are able to transduce signals only when properly targeted to the cell membrane. Calreticulin is a multi-functional chaperone protein involved in protein folding, maturation, and trafficking. However, evidence has been accumulating that calreticulin can also negatively regulate the surface expression of certain receptors and channels. In these instances, depletion of calreticulin enhances cell-surface expression and function. In this review, we discuss the role of calreticulin with a focus on its negative effects on the expression of cell-surface proteins. PMID:25230046

  11. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  12. High cell-surface density of HER2 deforms cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Inhee; Reichelt, Mike; Shao, Lily; Akita, Robert W.; Koeppen, Hartmut; Rangell, Linda; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mellman, Ira; Sliwkowski, Mark X.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancers (BC) with HER2 overexpression (referred to as HER2 positive) progress more aggressively than those with normal expression. Targeted therapies against HER2 can successfully delay the progression of HER2-positive BC, but details of how this overexpression drives the disease are not fully understood. Using single-molecule biophysical approaches, we discovered a new effect of HER2 overexpression on disease-relevant cell biological changes in these BC. We found HER2 overexpression causes deformation of the cell membranes, and this in turn disrupts epithelial features by perturbing cell–substrate and cell–cell contacts. This membrane deformation does not require receptor signalling activities, but results from the high levels of HER2 on the cell surface. Our finding suggests that early-stage morphological alterations of HER2-positive BC cells during cancer progression can occur in a physical and signalling-independent manner. PMID:27599456

  13. Surface modification of carbon fuels for direct carbon fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Zhu, Zhonghua; Chen, Jiuling; De Marco, Roland; Dicks, Andrew; Bradley, John; Lu, Gaoqing

    The direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) is a promising power-generation device that has much higher efficiency (80%) and less emissions than conventional coal-fired power plants. Two commercial carbons (activated carbon and carbon black) pre-treated with HNO 3, HCl or air plasma are tested in a DCFC. The correlation between the surface properties and electrochemical performance of the carbon fuels is explored. The HNO 3-treated carbon fuels have the highest electrochemical reactivity in the DCFC due to the largest degree of surface oxygen functional groups. The overall effect on changing the electrochemical reactivity of carbon fuels is in the order HNO 3 > air plasma ≈ HCl. Product gas analysis indicates that complete oxidation of carbon to CO 2 can be achieved at 600-700 °C.

  14. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  15. ProtEx: a novel technology to display exogenous proteins on the cell surface for immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Narendra P; Yolcu, Esma S; Askenasy, Nadir; Shirwan, Haval

    2005-11-01

    Gene therapy as an immunomodulatory approach has the potential to treat various inherited and acquired immune-based human diseases. However, its clinical application has several challenges, varying from the efficiency of gene transfer, control of gene expression, cell and tissue targeting, and safety concerns associated with the introduction of exogenous DNA into cells/tissues. Gene therapy is also a time- and labor-intensive procedure. As an alternative, we recently developed a novel technology, ProtEx, that allows for rapid, efficient, and durable display of exogenous proteins on the surface of cells, tissues, and organs without detectable toxicity. This technology exploits the strong binding affinity (Kd = 10(-15) M) of streptavidin with biotin and involves generation of chimeric molecules composed of the extracellular portions of immunological proteins of interest and a modified form of streptavidin, biotinylation of biological surfaces, and decoration of the modified surface with chimeric proteins. Biotin persists on the cell surface for weeks both in vitro and in vivo, thereby providing a platform to display exogenous proteins with extended cell surface kinetics. Two chimeric proteins, rat FasL (SA-FasL) and human CD80 (CD80-SA), were generated and tested for cell surface display and immunomodulatory functions. SA-FasL and CD80-SA molecules persisted on the surface of various cell types for extended periods, varying from days to weeks in vitro and in vivo. The cell surface kinetics, however, were protein and cell type dependent. SA-FasL showed potent apoptotic activity against Fas+ cells as a soluble protein or displayed on the cell surface and effectively blocked alloreactive responses. The display of CD80-SA on the surface of tumor cells, however, converted them into antigen-presenting cells for effective stimulation of autologous and allogeneic T-cell responses. ProtEx technology, therefore, represents a practical and effective alternative to DNA

  16. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  17. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells Through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the cell surface GRP78-expressing subpopulation of cells supports nuclear Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. These findings are important because they are...original tasks outlined in the approved statement of work. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16. SECURITY...associated with cell surface GRP78 (Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1) were upregulated in GRP78(+) relative to GRP78(-) prostate cancer cells. Our results in this

  18. Heparanase Facilitates Cell Adhesion and Spreading by Clustering of Cell Surface Heparan Sulfate Proteoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Adam, Flonia; Feld, Sari; Suss-Toby, Edith; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2008-01-01

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate (HS) degrading endoglycosidase participating in extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling. Apart of its well characterized enzymatic activity, heparanase was noted to exert also enzymatic-independent functions. Non-enzymatic activities of heparanase include enhanced adhesion of tumor-derived cells and primary T-cells. Attempting to identify functional domains of heparanase that would serve as targets for drug development, we have identified heparin binding domains of heparanase. A corresponding peptide (residues Lys158-Asp171, termed KKDC) was demonstrated to physically associate with heparin and HS, and to inhibit heparanase enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that the pro-adhesive properties of heparanase are mediated by its interaction with cell surface HS proteoglycans, and utilized the KKDC peptide to examine this possibility. We provide evidence that the KKDC peptide interacts with cell membrane HS, resulting in clustering of syndecan-1 and syndecan-4. We applied classical analysis of cell morphology, fluorescent and time-lapse microscopy and demonstrated that the KKDC peptide efficiently stimulates the adhesion and spreading of various cell types, mediated by PKC, Src, and the small GTPase Rac1. These results support, and further substantiate the notion that heparanase function is not limited to its enzymatic activity. PMID:18545691

  19. Engineering chemical reactivity on cell surfaces through oligosaccharide biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mahal, L.K.; Yareme, K.J.; Bertozzi, C.R.

    1997-05-16

    Cell surface oligosaccharide can be engineered to display unusual functional groups for the selective chemical remodeling of cell surfaces. An unnatural derivative of N-acetyl-mannosamine, which has a ketone group, was converted to the corresponding sialic acid and incorporated into cell surface oligosaccharide metabolically, resulting in the cell surface display of ketone groups. The ketone group on the cell surface can then be covalently ligated under physiological conditions with molecules carrying a complementary reactive functional group such as the hydrazide. Cell surface reactions of this kind should prove useful in the introduction of new recognition epitopes, such as peptides, oligosaccharide, or small organic molecules, onto cell surfaces and in the subsequent modulation of cell-cell or cell-small molecule binding events. The versatility of this technology was demonstrated by an example of selective drug delivery. Cells were decorated with biotin through selective conjugation to ketone groups, and selectively killed in the presence of a ricin A chain-avidin conjugate. 30 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Detection of activity of single microalgae cells in a new microfluidic cell capturing chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junsheng; Meng, Xiongfei; Song, Yongxin; Pan, Xinxiang; Li, Dongqing

    2016-12-01

    The analysis of single microalgae cell plays a very important role in understanding the activity of microalgae cell. In this paper, a new method of capturing and monitoring a microalgae cell is presented. This method uses the surface of an air bubble formed in an aqueous solution in a microchannel to capture a microalgae cell. The aliveness of the captured microalgae cell can be monitored quantitatively by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence intensity of the microalgae cell. To demonstrate the performance of this method, two species of microalgae cells, Dunaliella salina and Tetraselmis Chui, were taken as samples. The effect of pH on the cell capture was studied experimentally. The cells were treated by NaClO or Formaldehyde solutions of different concentrations. The kinetics of the photosynthesis activity of the captured single microalgae cells was investigated under different treatment conditions. The results show that the viability of single microalgae cells can be studied individually and accurately by this method.

  1. Hydrodynamics of Sperm Cells near Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elgeti, Jens; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Gompper, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Sperm are propelled by an actively beating tail, and display a wide variety of swimming patterns. When confined between two parallel walls, sperm swim either in circles or on curvilinear trajectories close to the walls. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations in combination with a mechanical sperm model to study the swimming behavior near walls. The simulations show that sperm become captured at the wall due to the hydrodynamic flow fields which are generated by the flagellar beat. The circular trajectories are determined by the chiral asymmetry of the sperm shape. For strong (weak) chirality, sperm swim in tight (wide) circles, with the beating plane of the flagellum oriented perpendicular (parallel) to the wall. For comparison, we also perform simulations based on a local anisotropic friction of the flagellum. In this resistive force approximation, surface adhesion and circular swimming patterns are obtained as well. However, the adhesion mechanism is now due to steric repulsion, and the orientation of the beating plane is different. Our model provides a theoretical framework that explains several distinct swimming behaviors of sperm near and far from a wall. Moreover, the model suggests a mechanism by which sperm navigate in a chemical gradient via a change of their shape. PMID:20712984

  2. SNX17 Affects T Cell Activation by Regulating T Cell Receptor and Integrin Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Douglas G.; Piotrowski, Joshua T.; Dick, Christopher J.; Zhang, Jin-San; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2015-01-01

    A key component in T cell activation is the endosomal recycling of receptors to the cell surface, thereby allowing continual integration of signaling and antigen recognition. One protein potentially involved in T cell receptor transport is sorting nexin 17 (SNX17). SNX proteins have been found to bind proteins involved in T cell activation, but specifically the role of SNX17 in receptor recycling and T cell activation is unknown. Using immunofluorescence, we find that SNX17 co-localizes with TCR and localizes to the immune synapse in T-APC conjugates. Significantly, knockdown of the SNX17 resulted in fewer T-APC conjugates, lower CD69, TCR, and LFA-1 surface expression, as well as lower overall TCR recycling compared to control T cells. Lastly, we identified the FERM-domain of SNX17 as being responsible in the binding and trafficking of TCR and LFA-1 to the cell surface. These data suggest that SNX17 plays a role in the maintenance of normal surface levels of activating receptors and integrins to permit optimum T cell activation at the immune synapse. PMID:25825439

  3. Cell surface engineering of yeast for applications in white biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Cell surface engineering is a promising strategy for the molecular breeding of whole-cell biocatalysts. By using this strategy, yeasts can be constructed by the cell surface display of functional proteins; these yeasts are referred to as arming yeasts. Because reactions using arming yeasts as whole-cell biocatalysts occur on the cell surface, materials that cannot enter the cell can be used as reaction substrates. Numerous arming yeasts have therefore been constructed for a wide range of uses such as biofuel production, synthesis of valuable chemicals, adsorption or degradation of environmental pollutants, recovery of rare metal ions, and biosensors. Here, we review the science of yeast cell surface modification as well as current applications and future opportunities.

  4. Molecularly engineered surfaces for cell biology: from static to dynamic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gooding, J Justin; Parker, Stephen G; Lu, Yong; Gaus, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Surfaces with a well-defined presentation of ligands for receptors on the cell membrane can serve as models of the extracellular matrix for studying cell adhesion or as model cell surfaces for exploring cell-cell contacts. Because such surfaces can provide exquisite control over, for example, the density of these ligands or when the ligands are presented to the cell, they provide a very precise strategy for understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to external adhesive cues. In the present feature article, we present an overview of the basic biology of cell adhesion before discussing surfaces that have a static presentation of immobile ligands. We outline the biological information that such surfaces have given us, before progressing to recently developed switchable surfaces and surfaces that mimic the lipid bilayer, having adhesive ligands that can move around the membrane and be remodeled by the cell. Finally, the feature article closes with some of the biological information that these new types of surfaces could provide.

  5. Cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase functions during neural crest cell migration and neurulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mesenchymal cell migration and neurite outgrowth are mediated in part by binding of cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) to N-linked oligosaccharides within the E8 domain of laminin. In this study, we determined whether cell surface GalTase functions during neural crest cell migration and neural development in vivo using antibodies raised against affinity-purified chicken serum GalTase. The antibodies specifically recognized two embryonic proteins of 77 and 67 kD, both of which express GalTase activity. The antibodies also immunoprecipitated and inhibited chick embryo GalTase activity, and inhibited neural crest cell migration on laminin matrices in vitro. Anti-GalTase antibodies were microinjected into the head mesenchyme of stage 7-9 chick embryos or cranial to Henson's node of stage 6 embryos. Anti-avian GalTase IgG decreased cranial neural crest cell migration on the injected side but did not cross the embryonic midline and did not affect neural crest cell migration on the uninjected side. Anti-avian GalTase Fab crossed the embryonic midline and perturbed cranial neural crest cell migration throughout the head. Neural fold elevation and neural tube closure were also disrupted by Fab fragments. Cell surface GalTase was localized to migrating neural crest cells and to the basal surfaces of neural epithelia by indirect immunofluorescence, whereas GalTase was undetectable on neural crest cells prior to migration. These results suggest that, during early embryogenesis, cell surface GalTase participates during neural crest cell migration, perhaps by interacting with laminin, a major component of the basal lamina. Cell surface GalTase also appears to play a role in neural tube formation, possibly by mediating neural epithelial adhesion to the underlying basal lamina. PMID:1560031

  6. High-throughput screening of improved protease inhibitors using a yeast cell surface display system and a yeast cell chip.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Wataru; Yoshino, Yuichi; Morisaka, Hironobu; Tsunetomo, Keiji; Koyo, Hirotaka; Kamiya, Shinji; Kawata, Noriyuki; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    Protease-targeted inhibitors have been promising pharmaceuticals. Here, we combined a yeast cell surface display system with a yeast cell chip for the high-throughput screening of protease inhibitors, and succeeded in improving the activity of a protease inhibitor.

  7. Separation and reformation of cell surface dopamine receptor oligomers visualized in cells.

    PubMed

    O'Dowd, Brian F; Ji, Xiaodong; Alijaniaram, Mohammad; Nguyen, Tuan; George, Susan R

    2011-05-11

    We previously showed that dopamine receptors existed as homo- and heterooligomers, in cells and in brain tissue. We developed a method designed to study the formation and regulation of G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) oligomers in cells, using a GPCR into which a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) had been inserted. Unlike wildtype GPCRs, in the presence of agonist/antagonist ligands the GPCR-NLS is retained at the cell surface, and following ligand removal, the GPCR-NLS translocated from the cell surface. The D(1) dopamine receptor expressed with either D(2)-NLS or D(1-)NLS receptors translocated to the nucleus, indicating hetero- or homo-oligomerization with the NLS-containing receptor. Using these tools, we now demonstrate that D(1)-D(2) dopamine heterooligomers can be disrupted and the component receptors separated by dopamine and selective agonists that occupied one or both binding pockets. Subsequent agonist removal allowed the reformation of the heterooligomer. D(1) receptor homooligomers could also be disrupted by agonist, but at higher concentrations than that required for the disruption of the D(1)-D(2) heteromer. Dopamine D(1) or D(2) receptor antagonists had no effect on the integrity of the homo- or heterooligomer. We have also determined that the D(1)-D(2) heterooligomer contains D(1) homooligomers. These studies indicate that the populations of dopamine receptor oligomers at the cell surface are subject to conformational changes following agonist occupancy and are likely dynamically regulated following agonist activation.

  8. Novel interaction between proliferating cell nuclear antigen and HLA I on the surface of tumor cells inhibits NK cell function through NKp44.

    PubMed

    Horton, Nathan C; Mathew, Stephen O; Mathew, Porunelloor A

    2013-01-01

    NK cell function is closely regulated by numerous inhibitory and activating receptors binding corresponding ligands on the surface of target cells, providing vital first line defenses against infections and cancer. NKp44, originally discovered as an activating NK cell receptor, was recently found to elicit inhibitory effects on NK cell effector function through recognition of cell surface PCNA. Other reports have pointed to potential associations between NKp44 and HLA I molecules, as well as HLA I and Damage Associated Molecular Pattern molecules (DAMPs) on the surface of tumor cells. In this report, we have identified novel interaction between HLA I and PCNA on the surface of human tumor cells by confocal microscopy and immunoprecipitation. In addition to previous reports, we show PCNA on the cell surface where novel association with HLA I does not require the presence of NKp44 expressing NK cells and occurs with endogenous PCNA. The association of HLA I and PCNA forms the inhibitory ligand for NKp44, resulting in inhibition of NK cell cytotoxicity. We further postulate NCR ligands are composed of DAMP molecules localized to the cell surface, colocalizing with HLA I, and potentially heparin sulfate proteoglycans.

  9. Requirements for extravehicular activities on the lunar and Martian surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Mariann F.; Schentrup, Susan M.

    1990-01-01

    Basic design reference requirements pertinent to EVA equipment on lunar and martian surfaces are provided. Environmental factors affecting surface EVA are analyzed including gravity, dust, atmospheric conditions, thermal gradients, lightning conditions, and radiation effects, and activities associated with surface EVA are outlined. Environmental and activity effects on EVA equipment are assessed, and emphasis is placed on planetary surface portable life support systems (PLSS), suit development, protection from micrometeoroids, dust, and radiation, food and water supplies, and the extravehicular mobility-unit thermal-control system. Environmental and activity impacts on PLSS design are studied, with focus on base self-sufficiency and reduction in resupply logistics.

  10. Control surface spanwise placement in active flutter suppression systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nissim, E.; Burken, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    All flutter suppression systems require sensors to detect the movement of the lifting surface and to activate a control surface according to a synthesized control law. Most of the work performed to date relates to the development of control laws based on predetermined locations of sensors and control surfaces. These locations of sensors and control surfaces are determined either arbitrarily, or by means of a trial and error procedure. The aerodynamic energy concept indicates that the sensors should be located within the activated strip. Furthermore, the best chordwise location of a sensor activating a T.E. control surface is around the 65 percent chord location. The best chordwise location for a sensor activating a L.E. surface is shown to lie upstream of the wing (around 20 percent upstream of the leading edge), or alternatively, two sensors located along the same chord should be used.

  11. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  12. Immunoadjuvant activity of the nanoparticles’ surface modified with mannan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Azita; Hamdy, Samar; Ghotbi, Zahra; Samuel, John; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2014-09-01

    Mannan (MN) is the natural ligand for mannose receptors, which are widely expressed on dendritic cells (DCs). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of formulation parameters on the immunogenicity of MN-decorated poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in terms of their ability to stimulate DC phenotypic as well as functional maturation. For this purpose, NPs were formulated from either ester-terminated or COOH-terminated PLGA. Incorporation of MN in NPs was achieved through encapsulation, physical adsorption or chemical conjugation. Murine bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) were treated with various NP formulations and assessed for their ability to up-regulate DC cell surface markers, secrete immunostimulatory cytokines and to activate allogenic T cell responses. DCs treated with COOH-terminated PLGA-NPs containing chemically conjugated MN (MN-Cov-COOH) have shown superior performance in improving DC biological functions, compared to the rest of the formulations tested. This may be attributed to the higher level of MN incorporation in the former formulation. Incorporation of MN in PLGA NPs through chemical conjugation can lead to enhanced DC maturation and stimulatory function. This strategy may be used to develop more effective PLGA-based vaccine formulations.

  13. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  14. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo.

  15. Hair cell BK channels interact with RACK1, and PKC increases its expression on the cell surface by indirect phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Surguchev, Alexei; Bai, Jun-Ping; Joshi, Powrnima; Navaratnam, Dhasakumar

    2012-07-15

    Large conductance (BK) calcium activated potassium channels (Slo) are ubiquitous and implicated in a number of human diseases including hypertension and epilepsy. BK channels consist of a pore forming α-subunit (Slo) and a number of accessory subunits. In hair cells of nonmammalian vertebrates these channels play a critical role in electrical resonance, a mechanism of frequency selectivity. Hair cell BK channel clusters on the surface and currents increase along the tonotopic axis and contribute significantly to the responsiveness of these hair cells to sounds of high frequency. In contrast, messenger RNA levels encoding the Slo gene show an opposite decrease in high frequency hair cells. To understand the molecular events underlying this paradox, we used a yeast two-hybrid screen to isolate binding partners of Slo. We identified Rack1 as a Slo binding partner and demonstrate that PKC activation increases Slo surface expression. We also establish that increased Slo recycling of endocytosed Slo is at least partially responsible for the increased surface expression of Slo. Moreover, analysis of several PKC phosphorylation site mutants confirms that the effects of PKC on Slo surface expression are likely indirect. Finally, we show that Slo clusters on the surface of hair cells are also increased by increased PKC activity and may contribute to the increasing amounts of channel clusters on the surface of high-frequency hair cells.

  16. Inhibitors for Androgen Receptor Activation Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    new class of chemical therapeutics for treatment of prostate cancer. 15. SUBJECT TERMS X-ray crystallography, high throughput screening, medicinal... treatments because anti-androgen resis- tance usually develops. We conducted functional and x-ray screens to identify compounds that bind the AR surface and...possibility that such compounds could be used for prostate cancer treatment . It is unlikely that natural T3 or Triac concentrations approach levels required

  17. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-04

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation.

  18. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-03-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level.

  19. Mapping cell surface adhesion by rotation tracking and adhesion footprinting

    PubMed Central

    Li, Isaac T. S.; Ha, Taekjip; Chemla, Yann R.

    2017-01-01

    Rolling adhesion, in which cells passively roll along surfaces under shear flow, is a critical process involved in inflammatory responses and cancer metastasis. Surface adhesion properties regulated by adhesion receptors and membrane tethers are critical in understanding cell rolling behavior. Locally, adhesion molecules are distributed at the tips of membrane tethers. However, how functional adhesion properties are globally distributed on the individual cell’s surface is unknown. Here, we developed a label-free technique to determine the spatial distribution of adhesive properties on rolling cell surfaces. Using dark-field imaging and particle tracking, we extract the rotational motion of individual rolling cells. The rotational information allows us to construct an adhesion map along the contact circumference of a single cell. To complement this approach, we also developed a fluorescent adhesion footprint assay to record the molecular adhesion events from cell rolling. Applying the combination of the two methods on human promyelocytic leukemia cells, our results surprisingly reveal that adhesion is non-uniformly distributed in patches on the cell surfaces. Our label-free adhesion mapping methods are applicable to the variety of cell types that undergo rolling adhesion and provide a quantitative picture of cell surface adhesion at the functional and molecular level. PMID:28290531

  20. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  1. Growth of connective tissue progenitor cells on microtextured polydimethylsiloxane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George; Roy, Shuvo

    2002-12-15

    Growth of human connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs) was characterized on smooth and microtextured polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) surfaces. Human bone-marrow-derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on smooth PDMS surfaces and on PDMS post microtextures that were 6 microm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 microm in diameter, respectively. Glass tissue-culture dishes were used as controls. The number of viable cells was determined, and an alkaline phosphatase stain was used as a marker for osteoblastic phenotype. CTPs attached, proliferated, and differentiated on all surfaces. Cells on the smooth PDMS and control surfaces spread and proliferated as colonies in proximity to other cells and migrated in random directions, with cell process lengths of up to 80 microm. In contrast, cells on the PDMS post microtextures grew as sparsely distributed networks of cells, with processes, occasionally up to 300 microm, that appeared to interact with the posts. Cell counts revealed that there were fewer (50%) CTPs on the smooth PDMS surface than were on the glass control surfaces. However, there were consistently more (>144%) CTPs on the PDMS post textures than on the controls. In particular, the 10-microm-in-diameter posts (268%) exhibited a significantly (p < 0.05) greater cell number than did the smooth PDMS.

  2. Surface plasmon-based infrared spectroscopy for cell biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashunsky, Victor; Lirtsman, Vladislav; Zilbershtein, Alexander; Bein, Amir; Schwartz, Betty; Aroeti, Benjamin; Golosovsky, Michael; Davidov, Dan

    2012-08-01

    Cell morphology is often used as a valuable indicator of the physical condition and general status of living cells. We demonstrate a noninvasive method for morphological characterization of adherent cells. We measure infrared reflectivity spectrum at oblique angle from living cells cultured on thin Au film, and utilize the unique properties of the confined infrared waves (i.e., surface plasmon and guided modes) traveling inside the cell layer. The propagation of these waves strongly depends on cell morphology and connectivity. By tracking the resonant wavelength and attenuation of the surface plasmon and guided modes we measure the kinetics of various cellular processes such as (i) cell attachment and spreading on different substrata, (ii) modulation of the outer cell membrane with chlorpromazine, and (iii) formation of intercellular junctions associated with progressive cell polarization. Our method enables monitoring of submicron variations in cell layer morphology in real-time, and in the label-free manner.

  3. Attachment of human primary osteoblast cells to modified polyethylene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Poulsson, Alexandra H C; Mitchell, Stephen A; Davidson, Marcus R; Johnstone, Alan J; Emmison, Neil; Bradley, Robert H

    2009-04-09

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has a long history of use in medical devices, primarily for articulating surfaces due to its inherent low surface energy which limits tissue integration. To widen the applications of UHMWPE, the surface energy can be increased. The increase in surface energy would improve the adsorption of proteins and attachment of cells to allow tissue integration, thereby allowing UHMWPE to potentially be used for a wider range of implants. The attachment and function of human primary osteoblast-like (HOB) cells to surfaces of UHMWPE with various levels of incorporated surface oxygen have been investigated. The surface modification of the UHMWPE was produced by exposure to a UV/ozone treatment. The resulting surface chemistry was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the topography and surface structure were probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which showed an increase in surface oxygen from 11 to 26 atom % with no significant change to the surface topography. The absolute root mean square roughness of both untreated and UV/ozone-treated surfaces was within 350-450 nm, and the water contact angles decreased with increasing oxygen incorporation, i.e., showing an increase in surface hydrophilicity. Cell attachment and functionality were assessed over a 21 day period for each cell-surface combination studied; these were performed using SEM and the alamarBlue assay to study cell attachment and proliferation and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis to confirm extracellular mineral deposits, and total protein assay to examine the intra- and extracellular protein expressed by the cells. HOB cells cultured for 21 days on the modified UHMWPE surfaces with 19 and 26 atom % oxygen incorporated showed significantly higher cell densities compared to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) from day 3 onward. This indicated that the cells attached and proliferated more

  4. Rhamnolipids elicit the same cytotoxic sensitivity between cancer cell and normal cell by reducing surface tension of culture medium.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lifang; Shen, Chong; Long, Xuwei; Zhang, Guoliang; Meng, Qin

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant rhamnolipids have been claimed to show biological activities of inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxicity of rhamnolipids was examined on four cancer cells (HepG2, Caco-2, Hela, MCF-7 cells) and two normal cells (HK-2 cell, primary hepatocyte). Interestingly, both cancer cells and normal cells exhibited similar sensitivities to the addition of rhamnolipids in culture medium, and the cytotoxicity was largely attenuated by the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in culture medium. In correlation of the mono-/di-rhamnolipid cytotoxicity with the surface tension of culture medium, it was found that rhamnolipids triggered cytotoxicity whenever the surface tension of culture medium decreased below 41 mN/m irrespective of the FBS content in culture medium, cell line, or rhamnolipid congener. Similarly, each chemical surfactant (Tween-80, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) could cause cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells whenever its addition made the surface tension under 41 mN/m in culture medium with or without the presence of FBS. It seems that rhamnolipids, like chemical surfactants, exhibited cytotoxicity by reducing the surface tension of culture medium rather than by changing its specific molecular structure, which had no selection on tumor cells. This study could offer helps to correct the misleading biological activity of rhamnolipids and to avoid the possible large wastes of time and expenses on developing the applications in antitumor drugs.

  5. The Assessment of Fuel Cell Power Plants for Surface Combatants.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-30

    fuel cell technology on the design and effectiveness of future naval surface combatants. The study involved the collection of data to characterize four different fuel cell technologies; proton exchange membrane, molten carbonate, phosphoric acid, and solid oxide fuel cells. This information was used to expand current computer models to develop specific fuel cell plants that met the power requirements for several applications on a nominal 5000 Lton destroyer and a nominal 200 Lton corvette. Each of the fuel cell

  6. Nutrient-deprived cancer cells preferentially use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Badr, Haitham A; AlSadek, Dina M M; Mathew, Mohit P; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B; Yarema, Kevin J; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is characterized by abnormal energy metabolism shaped by nutrient deprivation that malignant cells experience during various stages of tumor development. This study investigated the response of nutrient-deprived cancer cells and their non-malignant counterparts to sialic acid supplementation and found that cells utilize negligible amounts of this sugar for energy. Instead cells use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation through complementary mechanisms. First, levels of key metabolites (e.g., UDP-GlcNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac) required for glycan biosynthesis are maintained or enhanced upon Neu5Ac supplementation. In concert, sialyltransferase expression increased at both the mRNA and protein levels, which facilitated increased sialylation in biochemical assays that measure sialyltransferase activity as well as at the whole cell level. In the course of these experiments, several important differences emerged that differentiated the cancer cells from their normal counterparts including resistant to sialic acid-mediated energy depletion, consistently more robust sialic acid-mediated glycan display, and distinctive cell surface vs. internal vesicle display of newly-produced sialoglycans. Finally, the impact of sialic acid supplementation on specific markers implicated in cancer progression was demonstrated by measuring levels of expression and sialylation of EGFR1 and MUC1 as well as the corresponding function of sialic acid-supplemented cells in migration assays. These findings both provide fundamental insight into the biological basis of sialic acid supplementation of nutrient-deprived cancer cells and open the door to the development of diagnostic and prognostic tools.

  7. Nutrient-deprived cancer cells preferentially use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Badr, Haitham A.; AlSadek, Dina M.M.; Mathew, Mohit P.; Li, Chen-Zhong; Djansugurova, Leyla B.; Yarema, Kevin J.; Ahmed, Hafiz

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by abnormal energy metabolism shaped by nutrient deprivation that malignant cells experience during various stages of tumor development. This study investigated the response of nutrient-deprived cancer cells and their non-malignant counterparts to sialic acid supplementation and found that cells utilize negligible amounts of this sugar for energy. Instead cells use sialic acid to maintain cell surface glycosylation through complementary mechanisms. First, levels of key metabolites (e.g., UDP-GlcNAc and CMP-Neu5Ac) required for glycan biosynthesis are maintained or enhanced upon Neu5Ac supplementation. In concert, sialyltransferase expression increased at both the mRNA and protein levels, which facilitated increased sialylation in biochemical assays that measure sialyltransferase activity as well as at the whole cell level. In the course of these experiments, several important differences emerged that differentiated the cancer cells from their normal counterparts including resistant to sialic acid-mediated energy depletion, consistently more robust sialic acid-mediated glycan display, and distinctive cell surface vs. internal vesicle display of newly-produced sialoglycans. Finally, the impact of sialic acid supplementation on specific markers implicated in cancer progression was demonstrated by measuring levels of expression and sialylation of EGFR1 and MUC1 as well as the corresponding function of sialic acid-supplemented cells in migration assays. These findings both provide fundamental insight into the biological basis of sialic acid supplementation of nutrient-deprived cancer cells and open the door to the development of diagnostic and prognostic tools. PMID:26295436

  8. Biomaterial surface proteomic signature determines interaction with epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Mohamed-Nur; Tran, Simon D; Abughanam, Ghada; Laurenti, Marco; Zuanazzi, David; Mezour, Mohamed A; Xiao, Yizhi; Cerruti, Marta; Siqueira, Walter L; Tamimi, Faleh

    2017-03-01

    Cells interact with biomaterials indirectly through extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins adsorbed onto their surface. Accordingly, it could be hypothesized that the surface proteomic signature of a biomaterial might determine its interaction with cells. Here, we present a surface proteomic approach to test this hypothesis in the specific case of biomaterial-epithelial cell interactions. In particular, we determined the surface proteomic signature of different biomaterials exposed to the ECM of epithelial cells (basal lamina). We revealed that the biomaterial surface chemistry determines the surface proteomic profile, and subsequently the interaction with epithelial cells. In addition, we found that biomaterials with surface chemistries closer to that of percutaneous tissues, such as aminated PMMA and aminated PDLLA, promoted higher selective adsorption of key basal lamina proteins (laminins, nidogen-1) and subsequently improved their interactions with epithelial cells. These findings suggest that mimicking the surface chemistry of natural percutaneous tissues can improve biomaterial-epithelial integration, and thus provide a rationale for the design of improved biomaterial surfaces for skin regeneration and percutaneous medical devices.

  9. Fuel cell technology for lunar surface operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deronck, Henry J.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells have been shown, in several NASA and contractor studies, to be an enabling technology for providing electrical power for lunar bases, outposts, and vehicles. The fuel cell, in conjunction with similar electrolysis cells, comprises a closed regenerative energy storage system, commonly referred to as a regenerative fuel cell (RFC). For stationary applications, energy densities of 1,000 watt-hours per kilograms an order of magnitude over the best rechargeable batteries, have been projected. In this RFC, the coupled fuel cell and electrolyzer act as an ultra-light battery. Electrical energy from solar arrays 'charges' the system by electrolyzing water into hydrogen and oxygen. When an electrical load is applied, the fuel cell reacts the hydrogen and oxygen to 'discharge' usable power. Several concepts for utilizing RFC's, with varying degrees of integration, have been proposed, including both primary and backup roles. For mobile power needs, such as rovers, an effective configuration may be to have only the fuel cell located on the vehicle, and to use a central electrolysis 'gas station'. Two fuel cell technologies are prime candidates for lunar power system concepts: alkaline electrolyte and proton exchange membrane. Alkaline fuel cells have been developed to a mature production power unit in NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter. Recent advances in materials offer to significantly improve durability to the level needed for extended lunar operations. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are receiving considerable support for hydrospace and terrestrial transportation applications. This technology promises durability, simplicity, and flexibility.

  10. Fuel cell technology for lunar surface operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deronck, Henry J.

    1992-02-01

    Hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells have been shown, in several NASA and contractor studies, to be an enabling technology for providing electrical power for lunar bases, outposts, and vehicles. The fuel cell, in conjunction with similar electrolysis cells, comprises a closed regenerative energy storage system, commonly referred to as a regenerative fuel cell (RFC). For stationary applications, energy densities of 1,000 watt-hours per kilograms an order of magnitude over the best rechargeable batteries, have been projected. In this RFC, the coupled fuel cell and electrolyzer act as an ultra-light battery. Electrical energy from solar arrays 'charges' the system by electrolyzing water into hydrogen and oxygen. When an electrical load is applied, the fuel cell reacts the hydrogen and oxygen to 'discharge' usable power. Several concepts for utilizing RFC's, with varying degrees of integration, have been proposed, including both primary and backup roles. For mobile power needs, such as rovers, an effective configuration may be to have only the fuel cell located on the vehicle, and to use a central electrolysis 'gas station'. Two fuel cell technologies are prime candidates for lunar power system concepts: alkaline electrolyte and proton exchange membrane. Alkaline fuel cells have been developed to a mature production power unit in NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter. Recent advances in materials offer to significantly improve durability to the level needed for extended lunar operations. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are receiving considerable support for hydrospace and terrestrial transportation applications. This technology promises durability, simplicity, and flexibility.

  11. Reinforcement of a porous collagen scaffold with surface-activated PLA fibers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xi; Huang, Changbin; Feng, Yujie; Liang, Jie; Fan, Yujiang; Gu, Zhongwei; Zhang, Xingdong

    2010-01-01

    A hybrid porous collagen scaffold mechanically reinforced with surface-activated poly(lactic acid) (PLA) fiber was prepared. PLA fibers, 20 mum in diameter and 1 mm in length, were aminolyzed with hexanediamine to introduce free amino groups on the surfaces. After the amino groups were transferred to aldehyde groups by treatment with glutaraldehyde, different amounts (1.5, 3, 5 and 8 mg) of surface-activated PLA fibers were homogeneously mixed with 2 ml type-I collagen solution (pH 2.8, 0.6 wt%). This mixture solution was then freeze-dried and cross-linked to obtain collagen sponges with surface-activated PLA fiber. Scanning electron microscopy observation indicated that the collagen sponges had a highly interconnected porous structure with an average pore size of 170 mum, irrespective of PLA fiber incorporation. The dispersion of surface-activated PLA fibers was homogeneous in collagen sponge, in contrast to unactivated PLA fibers. The compression modulus test results showed that, compared with unactivated PLA fibers, the surface-activated PLA fibers enhanced the resistance of collagen sponge to compression more significantly. Cytotoxicity assay by MTT test showed no cytotoxicity of these collagen sponges. L929 mouse fibroblast cell-culture studies in vitro revealed that the number of L929 cells attached to the collagen sponge with surface-activated PLA fibers, both 6 h and 24 h after seeding, was higher than that in pure collagen sponge and sponge with unactivated PLA fibers. In addition, a better distribution of cells infiltrated in collagen sponge with surface-activated PLA fibers was observed by histological staining. These results indicated that the collagen sponge reinforced with surface-activated PLA fibers is a promising biocompatible scaffold for tissue engineering.

  12. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Ashford, Michael L J; Calaghan, Sarah C; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J; Fuller, William

    2014-12-09

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼ 120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme-substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump.

  13. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  14. Titanium surface topography affects collagen biosynthesis of adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Mendonça, Daniela B S; Miguez, Patrícia A; Mendonça, Gustavo; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Aragão, Francisco J L; Cooper, Lyndon F

    2011-09-01

    Collagen-dependent microstructure and physicochemical properties of newly formed bone around implant surfaces represent key determinants of implant biomechanics. This study investigated the effects of implant surface topography on collagen biosynthesis of adherent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown for 0 to 42 days on titanium disks (20.0 × 1.0 mm) with smooth or rough surfaces. Cell attachment and spreading were evaluated by incubating cells with Texas-Red-conjugated phalloidin antibody. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA levels of Col1α1 and collagen modifying genes including prolyl hydroxylases (PHs), lysyl oxidases (LOXs) and lysyl hydroxylases (LHs). Osteogenesis was assessed at the level of osteoblast specific gene expression and alizarin red staining for mineralization. Cell layer-associated matrix and collagen content were determined by amino acid analysis. At 4h, 100% cells were flattened on both surfaces, however the cells on smooth surface had a fibroblast-like shape, while cells on rough surface lacked any defined long axis. PH, LH, and most LOX mRNA levels were greater in hMSCs grown on rough surfaces for 3 days. The mineralized area was greater for rough surface at 28 and 42 days. The collagen content (percent total protein) was also greater at rough surface compared to smooth surface at 28 (36% versus 26%) and 42 days (46% versus 29%), respectively (p<.05). In a cell culture model, rough surface topography positively modulates collagen biosynthesis and accumulation and the expression of genes associated with collagen cross-linking in adherent hMSC. The altered biosynthesis of the collagen-rich ECM adjacent to endosseous implants may influence the biomechanical properties of osseointegrated endosseous implants.

  15. Activation of a heat-stable cytolytic protein associated with the surface membrane of Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed Central

    Lowrey, D M; McLaughlin, J

    1985-01-01

    Surface membrane-enriched fractions of Naegleria fowleri obtained after isopycnic centrifugation experiments contain a potent cytolytic activity as determined by hemolysis and 51Cr release assays. This surface membrane cytolysin was unaffected by a treatment at 75 degrees C for 30 min and accounted for 70 to 90% of cytolysis by whole-cell lysates of amoebae. This heat resistance as well as intimate membrane association distinguished the surface membrane cytolytic activity from a second heat-labile cytolytic activity which appears to be latent within lysosomes. The surface membrane cytolysin was found to be specifically activated by diluted samples of lysosomal fractions. The possible role of this surface membrane cytotoxin in the pathogenicity of N. fowleri is discussed. PMID:4055029

  16. Cells under siege: Viral glycoprotein interactions at the cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Bowden, Thomas A.; Jones, E. Yvonne; Stuart, David I.

    2011-01-01

    As obligate parasites, viruses are required to enter and replicate within their host, a process which employs many of their proteins to hijack natural cellular processes. High resolution X-ray crystallographic analysis has proven to be an ideal method to visualize the mechanisms by which such virus-host interactions occur and has revealed the innovative capacity of viruses to adapt efficiently to their hosts. In this review, we draw upon recently elucidated paramyxovirus-, arenavirus-, and poxvirus-host protein complex crystal structures to reveal both the capacity of viruses to appropriate one component of a physiological protein–protein binding event (often modifying it to out-compete the host-protein), and the ability to utilize novel binding sites on host cell surface receptors. The structures discussed shed light on a number of biological processes ranging from viral entry to virulence and host antagonism. Drawn together they reveal the common strategies which viruses have evolved to interact with their natural host. The structures also support molecular level rationales for how viruses can be transmitted to unrelated organisms and thus pose severe health risks. PMID:21440638

  17. Endothelial cell behavior on vascular prosthetic grafts: effect of polymer chemistry, surface structure, and surface treatment.

    PubMed

    Marois, Y; Sigot-Luizard, M F; Guidoin, R

    1999-01-01

    When implanting any vascular prosthetic grafts, one important goal to ensure long-term patency is achieving complete endothelialization of the luminal surface, a process that has rarely been observed clinically in humans. Seeding vascular grafts with endothelial cells has been seen as an attractive approach but has not been clinically convincing. A determining factor may be the type of polymer and surface structure. Using organotypic culture assays, the present investigation studied the effect of different polymers, surface structures, and surface treatments on endothelial cell behavior. The materials tested were polyester (PET), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyesterurethane (PESU), and polyetherurethane (PETU) grafts with different surface structures. The surface treatments on the PET grafts included impregnation with cross-linked albumin, collagen, and gelatin, and treatments with fluoropolymer and electrically conducting polypyrrole polymer. Low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) sheets (smooth surface, plain wall) were used as controls. After incubation for 7 days at 37 degrees C, cell adhesion and migration on the different polymers and structures were as follows: woven and knitted PET (high porosity) > PTFE, PESU, PETU hydrophobic (low porosity) > PETU hydrophilic, LDPE, PDMS (no porosity). Cell density results showed no difference between polymers and porous structures and a higher cell density on smooth nonporous surfaces. Compared with the nonimpregnated PET structures, knitted PET treated with albumin, collagen, or gelatin showed slight decreases of cell adhesion. No differences in cell migration and density were reported between any of the PET grafts, except for one polyester graft with a different chemistry than Dacron, which exhibited greater cell migration and lower cell density. Polyester grafts with a fluoropolymer treatment showed lower cell adhesion and migration and higher cell density than the nontreated PET. Finally

  18. Cell-surface translational dynamics of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Barrantes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Synapse efficacy heavily relies on the number of neurotransmitter receptors available at a given time. In addition to the equilibrium between the biosynthetic production, exocytic delivery and recycling of receptors on the one hand, and the endocytic internalization on the other, lateral diffusion and clustering of receptors at the cell membrane play key roles in determining the amount of active receptors at the synapse. Mobile receptors traffic between reservoir compartments and the synapse by thermally driven Brownian motion, and become immobilized at the peri-synaptic region or the synapse by: (a) clustering mediated by homotropic inter-molecular receptor–receptor associations; (b) heterotropic associations with non-receptor scaffolding proteins or the subjacent cytoskeletal meshwork, leading to diffusional “trapping,” and (c) protein-lipid interactions, particularly with the neutral lipid cholesterol. This review assesses the contribution of some of these mechanisms to the supramolecular organization and dynamics of the paradigm neurotransmitter receptor of muscle and neuronal cells -the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Currently available information stemming from various complementary biophysical techniques commonly used to interrogate the dynamics of cell-surface components is critically discussed. The translational mobility of nAChRs at the cell surface differs between muscle and neuronal receptors in terms of diffusion coefficients and residence intervals at the synapse, which cover an ample range of time regimes. A peculiar feature of brain α7 nAChR is its ability to spend much of its time confined peri-synaptically, vicinal to glutamatergic (excitatory) and GABAergic (inhibitory) synapses. An important function of the α7 nAChR may thus be visiting the territories of other neurotransmitter receptors, differentially regulating the dynamic equilibrium between excitation and inhibition, depending on its residence time in each domain. PMID

  19. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  20. Mast cells enhance T cell activation: Importance of mast cell-derived TNF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Kakurai, Maki; Sedgwick, Jonathon D.; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J.

    2005-05-01

    Mast cells are not only important effector cells in immediate hypersensitivity reactions and immune responses to pathogens but also can contribute to T cell-mediated disorders. However, the mechanisms by which mast cells might influence T cells in such settings are not fully understood. We find that mast cells can enhance proliferation and cytokine production in multiple T cell subsets. Mast cell-dependent enhancement of T cell activation can be promoted by FcRI-dependent mast cell activation, TNF production by both mast cells and T cells, and mast cell-T cell contact. However, at high concentrations of cells, mast cells can promote T cell activation independent of IgE or TNF. Finally, mast cells also can promote T cell activation by means of soluble factors. These findings identify multiple mechanisms by which mast cells can influence T cell proliferation and cytokine production. allergy | asthma | autoimmunity | cytokines | immune response

  1. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  2. Biosilica-loaded poly(ϵ-caprolactone) nanofibers mats provide a morphogenetically active surface scaffold for the growth and mineralization of the osteoclast-related SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Link, Thorben; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-10-01

    Bioprinting/3D cell printing procedures for the preparation of scaffolds/implants have the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. Besides biocompatibility and biodegradability, the hardness of the scaffold material is of critical importance to allow sufficient mechanical protection and, to the same extent, allow migration, cell-cell, and cell-substrate contact formation of the matrix-embedded cells. In the present study, we present a strategy to encase a bioprinted, cell-containing, and soft scaffold with an electrospun mat. The electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers mats, containing tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), were subsequently incubated with silicatein. Silicatein synthesizes polymeric biosilica by polycondensation of ortho-silicate that is formed from prehydrolyzed TEOS. Biosilica provides a morphogenetically active matrix for the growth and mineralization of osteoblast-related SaOS-2 cells in vitro. Analysis of the microstructure of the 300-700 nm thick PCL/TEOS nanofibers, incubated with silicatein and prehydrolyzed TEOS, displayed biosilica deposits on the mats formed by the nanofibers. We conclude and propose that electrospun PCL nanofibers mats, coated with biosilica, may represent a morphogenetically active and protective cover for bioprinted cell/tissue-like units with a suitable mechanical stability, even if the cells are embedded in a softer matrix.

  3. Identification of fungi isolated from banana rachis and characterization of their surface activity.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Castillo, L; Prieto-Correa, E; Jiménez-Junca, C

    2017-03-01

    Filamentous fungi are an unexplored source for the production of biosurfactants, but over a decade one of the most surface active molecules called hydrophobins was discovered. There are few techniques to determine the surface activity of fungi without any kind of manipulation that can affect the final results. In this work, we identified 33 strains of filamentous fungi isolated from banana rachis which may have potential in producing biosurfactants. Further, the production of surface active compounds by the strains was measured by two techniques. First, the surface tension of supernatants was evaluated in liquid cultures of the strains. We found that three strains belonging to the genus Fusarium, Penicillium and Trichoderma showed activity in the reduction of surface tension, which indicate a putative production of biosurfactants. Second, we measured the contact angle between the drop of water and the solid culture of strains to determine the surface activity of cells, classifying the strains as hydrophilic or hydrophobic. These techniques can be used as a quantitative measurement of the surface activity of fungi without cell manipulation.

  4. Usp12 stabilizes the T-cell receptor complex at the cell surface during signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Akhee S.; Lestra, Maxime; Swee, Lee Kim; Fan, Ying; Lamers, Mart M.; Tafesse, Fikadu G.; Theile, Christopher S.; Spooner, Eric; Bruzzone, Roberto; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Sanyal, Sumana

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications are central to the spatial and temporal regulation of protein function. Among others, phosphorylation and ubiquitylation are known to regulate proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Here we used a systematic and unbiased approach to uncover deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that participate during TCR signaling in primary mouse T lymphocytes. Using a C-terminally modified vinyl methyl ester variant of ubiquitin (HA-Ub-VME), we captured DUBs that are differentially recruited to the cytosol on TCR activation. We identified ubiquitin-specific peptidase (Usp) 12 and Usp46, which had not been previously described in this pathway. Stimulation with anti-CD3 resulted in phosphorylation and time-dependent translocation of Usp12 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Usp12−/− Jurkat cells displayed defective NFκB, NFAT, and MAPK activities owing to attenuated surface expression of TCR, which were rescued on reconstitution of wild type Usp12. Proximity-based labeling with BirA-Usp12 revealed several TCR adaptor proteins acting as interactors in stimulated cells, of which LAT and Trat1 displayed reduced expression in Usp12−/− cells. We demonstrate that Usp12 deubiquitylates and prevents lysosomal degradation of LAT and Trat1 to maintain the proximal TCR complex for the duration of signaling. Our approach benefits from the use of activity-based probes in primary cells without any previous genome modification, and underscores the importance of ubiquitin-mediated regulation to refine signaling cascades. PMID:26811477

  5. Effect of surface chemistry on the integrin induced pathway in regulating vascular endothelial cells migration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Gao, Min; Ma, Yunlong; Yu, Hongchi; Cui, Fu-zhai; Gregersen, Hans; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2015-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for reendothelialization after implantation of cardiovascular biomaterials. Reendothelialization is largely determined by surface properties of implants. In this study, surfaces modified with various chemical functional groups (CH3, NH2, COOH, OH) prepared by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as model system. Expressions and distributions of critical proteins in the integrin-induced signaling pathway were examined to explore the mechanisms of surface chemistry regulating EC migration. The results showed that SAMs modulated cell migration were in the order CH3>NH2>OH>COOH, determined by differences in the expressions of focal adhesion components and Rho GTPases. Multiple integrin subunits showed difference in a surface chemistry-dependent manner, which induced a stepwise activation of signaling cascades associated with EC migration. This work provides a broad overview of surface chemistry regulated endothelial cell migration and establishes association among the surface chemistry, cell migration behavior and associated integrin signaling events. Understanding the relationship between these factors will help us to understand the surface/interface behavior between biomaterials and cells, reveal molecular mechanism of cells sensing surface characterization, and guide surface modification of cardiovascular implanted materials.

  6. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  7. Surfaces of Fluorinated Pyridinium Block Copolymers with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan,S.; Ward, R.; Hexemer, A.; Sohn, K.; Lee, K.; Angert, E.; Fischer, D.; Kramer, E.; Ober, C.

    2006-01-01

    Polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) copolymers were quaternized with 1-bromohexane and 6-perfluorooctyl-1-bromohexane. Surfaces prepared from these polymers were characterized by contact angle measurements, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The fluorinated pyridinium surfaces showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to their nonfluorinated counterparts. Even a polymer with a relatively low molecular weight pyridinium block showed high antimicrobial activity. The bactericidal effect was found to be related to the molecular composition and organization in the top 2-3 nm of the surface and increased with increasing hydrophilicity and pyridinium concentration of the surface.

  8. Effect of Stratification on Surface Properties of Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Soto, Bernardo; Leonard, Brian C.; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of mucin expression in an immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line (hTCEpi) on the surface properties of cells, such as wettability, contact angle, and surface heterogeneity. Methods hTCEpi cells were cultured to confluence in serum-free medium. The medium was then replaced by stratification medium to induce mucin biosynthesis. The mucin expression profile was analyzed using quantitative PCR and Western blotting. Contact angles were measured using a two-immiscible liquid method, and contact angle hysteresis was evaluated by tilting the apparatus and recording advancing and receding contact angles. The spatial distribution of mucins was evaluated with fluorescently labeled lectin. Results hTCEpi cells expressed the three main ocular mucins (MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16) with a maximum between days 1 and 3 of the stratification process. Upon stratification, cells caused a very significant increase in contact angle hysteresis, suggesting the development of spatially discrete and heterogeneously distributed surface features, defined by topography and/or chemical functionality. Although atomic force microscopy measurements showed no formation of appreciable topographic features on the surface of the cells, we observed a significant increase in surface chemical heterogeneity. Conclusions The surface chemical heterogeneity of the corneal epithelium may influence the dynamic behavior of tear film by “pinning” the contact line between the cellular surface and aqueous tear film. Engineering the surface properties of corneal epithelium could potentially lead to novel treatments in dry eye disease. PMID:26747762

  9. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  10. BMP2 Transfer to Neighboring Cells and Activation of Signaling.

    PubMed

    Alborzinia, Hamed; Shaikhkarami, Marjan; Hortschansky, Peter; Wölfl, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Morphogen gradients and concentration are critical features during early embryonic development and cellular differentiation. Previously we reported the preparation of biologically active, fluorescently labeled BMP2 and quantitatively analyzed their binding to the cell surface and followed BMP2 endocytosis over time on the level of single endosomes. Here we show that this internalized BMP2 can be transferred to neighboring cells and, moreover, also activates downstream BMP signaling in adjacent cells, indicated by Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation and activation of the downstream target gene id1. Using a 3D matrix to modulate cell-cell contacts in culture we could show that direct cell-cell contact significantly increased BMP2 transfer. Using inhibitors of vesicular transport, transfer was strongly inhibited. Interestingly, cotreatment with the physiological BMP inhibitor Noggin increased BMP2 uptake and transfer, albeit activation of Smad signaling in neighboring cells was completely suppressed. Our findings present a novel and interesting mechanism by which morphogens such as BMP2 can be transferred between cells and how this is modulated by BMP antagonists such as Noggin, and how this influences activation of Smad signaling by BMP2 in neighboring cells.

  11. In vivo invasion of modified chorioallantoic membrane by tumor cells: the role of cell surface-bound urokinase

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) to withstand invasion by tumor cells can be intentionally compromised by altering its morphological integrity. Using a newly developed quantitative assay of invasion we showed that intact CAMs were completely resistant to invasion by tumor cells, wounded CAMs did not pose a barrier to penetration, and CAMs that were wounded and then allowed to reseal displayed partial susceptibility to invasion. The invasion of resealed CAMs required catalytically active plasminogen activator (PA) of the urokinase type (uPA); the invasive efficiency of tumor cells was reduced by 75% when tumor uPA activity or tumor uPA production was inhibited. The invasive ability of human tumor cells, which have surface uPA receptors but which do not produce the enzyme, could be augmented by saturating their receptors with exogenous uPA. The mere stimulation of either uPA or tissue plasminogen activator production, in absence of binding to cell receptors, did not result in an enhancement of invasiveness. These findings suggest that the increased invasive potential of tumor cells is correlated with cell surface-associated proteolytic activity stemming from the interaction between uPA and its surface receptor. PMID:2848851

  12. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  13. Cell surface characteristics enable encrustation-free survival of neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saini, G.; Chan, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial growth in mineralizing environments depends on the cells' ability to evade surface precipitation. Cell-mineral interactions may be required for metabolism, but if unmoderated, cells could become encrusted, which would limit diffusion of nutrients and waste across cell walls. A combination of cell surface charge and hydrophobicity could enable the survival of microbes in such environments by inhibiting mineral attachment. To investigate this mechanism, we characterized the surfaces of two neutrophilic iron-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB): Mariprofundus ferrooxydans, a Zetaproteobacterium from Fe(II)-rich submarine hydrothermal vents and a Betaproteobacterium Gallionellales strain R-1, recently isolated from a ferrous groundwater seep. Both bacteria produce iron oxyhydroxides, yet successfully escape surface encrustation while inhabiting milieu where iron minerals are also produced by abiotic processes. SEM-EDX and TEM-EELS analyses of cultured bacteria revealed no iron on the cell surfaces. Zeta potential measurements showed that these bacteria have very small negative surface charge (0 to -4 mV) over a pH range of 4-9, indicating near-neutrally charged surfaces. Water contact angle measurements and thermodynamic calculations demonstrate that both bacteria and abiotically-formed Fe oxhydroxides are hydrophilic. Extended-DLVO calculations showed that hydrophilic repulsion between cells and minerals dominates over electrostatic and Lifshitz-van der Waals interactions. This leads to overall repulsion between microbes and minerals, thus preventing surface encrustation. Low surface charge and hydrophilicity (determined by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbon assay) were common features for both live and azide-inhibited cells, which shows that surface characteristics do not depend on active metabolism. It is remarkable that these two phylogenetically-distant bacteria from different environments employ similar adaptations to prevent surface mineralization. Our results

  14. Multijunction Solar Cell Technology for Mars Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mardesich, Nick; Ewell, Richard C.; Mueller, Robert L.; Endicter, Scott; Aiken, Daniel; Edmondson, Kenneth; Fetze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells used for Mars surface applications have been commercial space qualified AM0 optimized devices. Due to the Martian atmosphere, these cells are not optimized for the Mars surface and as a result operate at a reduced efficiency. A multi-year program, MOST (Mars Optimized Solar Cell Technology), managed by JPL and funded by NASA Code S, was initiated in 2004, to develop tools to modify commercial AM0 cells for the Mars surface solar spectrum and to fabricate Mars optimized devices for verification. This effort required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and to develop and test commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum. This paper discusses the program, including results for the initial modified cells. Simulated Mars surface measurements of MER cells and Phoenix Lander cells (2007 launch) are provided to characterize the performance loss for those missions. In addition, the performance of the MER rover solar arrays is updated to reflect their more than two (2) year operation.

  15. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry.

  16. Biomechanics of cell rolling: shear flow, cell-surface adhesion, and cell deformability.

    PubMed

    Dong, C; Lei, X X

    2000-01-01

    The mechanics of leukocyte (white blood cell; WBC) deformation and adhesion to endothelial cells (EC) has been investigated using a novel in vitro side-view flow assay. HL-60 cell rolling adhesion to surface-immobilized P-selectin was used to model the WBC-EC adhesion process. Changes in flow shear stress, cell deformability, or substrate ligand strength resulted in significant changes in the characteristic adhesion binding time, cell-surface contact and cell rolling velocity. A 2-D model indicated that cell-substrate contact area under a high wall shear stress (20 dyn/cm2) could be nearly twice of that under a low stress (0.5 dyn/cm2) due to shear flow-induced cell deformation. An increase in contact area resulted in more energy dissipation to both adhesion bonds and viscous cytoplasm, whereas the fluid energy that inputs to a cell decreased due to a flattened cell shape. The model also predicted a plateau of WBC rolling velocity as flow shear stresses further increased. Both experimental and computational studies have described how WBC deformation influences the WBC-EC adhesion process in shear flow.

  17. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  18. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  19. Determination of telomerase activity in stem cells and non-stem cells of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; He, Yanli; Zhang, Jiahua; Zhang, Jinghui; Huang, Tao

    2007-07-01

    Although all normal tissue cells, including stem cells, are genetically homologous, variation in gene expression patterns has already determined the distinct roles for individual cells in the physiological process due to the occurrence of epigenetic modification. This is of special importance for the existence of tissue stem cells because they are exclusively immortal within the body, capable of self-replicating and differentiating by which tissues renew and repair itself and the total tissue cell population maintains a steady-state. Impairment of tissue stem cells is usually accompanied by a reduction in cell number, slows down the repair process and causes hypofunction. For instance, chemotherapy usually leads to depression of bone marrow and hair loss. Cellular aging is closely associated with the continuous erosion of the telomere while activation of telomerase repairs and maintains telomeres, thus slowing the aging process and prolonging cell life. In normal adults, telomerase activation mainly presents in tissue stem cells and progenitor cells giving them unlimited growth potential. Despite the extensive demonstration of telomerase activation in malignancy (> 80%), scientists found that heterogeneity also exists among the tumor cells and only minorities of cells, designated as cancer stem cells, undergo processes analogous to the self-renewal and differentiation of normal stem cells while the rest have limited lifespans. In this study, telomerase activity was measured and compared in breast cancer stem cells and non-stem cells that were phenotypically sorted by examining surface marker expression. The results indicated that cancer stem cells show a higher level of enzyme activity than non-stem cells. In addition, associated with the repair of cancer tissue (or relapse) after chemotherapy, telomerase activity in stem cells was markedly increased.

  20. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  1. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Charles M; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-11-07

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction-diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html.

  2. The endomembrane requirement for cell surface repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Miyake, Katsuya; Vogel, Steven S.

    2003-01-01

    The capacity to reseal a plasma membrane disruption rapidly is required for cell survival in many physiological environments. Intracellular membrane (endomembrane) is thought to play a central role in the rapid resealing response. We here directly compare the resealing response of a cell that lacks endomembrane, the red blood cell, with that of several nucleated cells possessing an abundant endomembrane compartment. RBC membrane disruptions inflicted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser, even those initially smaller than hemoglobin, failed to reseal rapidly. By contrast, much larger laser-induced disruptions made in sea urchin eggs, fibroblasts, and neurons exhibited rapid, Ca(2+)-dependent resealing. We conclude that rapid resealing is not mediated by simple physiochemical mechanisms; endomembrane is required.

  3. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Boyan, B.D.; Cheng, A.; Olivares-Navarrete, R.; Schwartz, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. PMID:26927483

  4. Antibacterial and anticancer PDMS surface for mammalian cell growth using the Chinese herb extract paeonol(4-methoxy-2-hydroxyacetophenone)

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Jiajia; Sun, Lili; Guo, Zaiyu; Hou, Sen; Holyst, Robert; Lu, Yun; Feng, Xizeng

    2016-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is widely used as a cell culture platform to produce micro- and nano-technology based microdevices. However, the native PDMS surface is not suitable for cell adhesion and is always subject to bacterial pollution and cancer cell invasion. Coating the PDMS surface with antibacterial or anticancer materials often causes considerable harm to the non-cancer mammalian cells on it. We have developed a method to fabricate a biocompatible PDMS surface which not only promotes non-cancer mammalian cell growth but also has antibacterial and anticancer activities, by coating the PDMS surface with a Chinese herb extract, paeonol. Coating changes the wettability and the elemental composition of the PDMS surface. Molecular dynamic simulation indicates that the absorption of paeonol onto the PDMS surface is an energy favourable process. The paeonol-coated PDMS surface exhibits good antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover considerable antibacterial activity is maintained after the coated surface is rinsed or incubated in water. The coated PDMS surface inhibits bacterial growth on the contact surface and promotes non-cancer mammalian cell growth with low cell toxicity; meanwhile the growth of cancer cells is significantly inhibited. Our study will potentially guide PDMS surface modification approaches to produce biomedical devices. PMID:27941867

  5. Antibacterial and anticancer PDMS surface for mammalian cell growth using the Chinese herb extract paeonol(4-methoxy-2-hydroxyacetophenone)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Jiajia; Sun, Lili; Guo, Zaiyu; Hou, Sen; Holyst, Robert; Lu, Yun; Feng, Xizeng

    2016-12-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is widely used as a cell culture platform to produce micro- and nano-technology based microdevices. However, the native PDMS surface is not suitable for cell adhesion and is always subject to bacterial pollution and cancer cell invasion. Coating the PDMS surface with antibacterial or anticancer materials often causes considerable harm to the non-cancer mammalian cells on it. We have developed a method to fabricate a biocompatible PDMS surface which not only promotes non-cancer mammalian cell growth but also has antibacterial and anticancer activities, by coating the PDMS surface with a Chinese herb extract, paeonol. Coating changes the wettability and the elemental composition of the PDMS surface. Molecular dynamic simulation indicates that the absorption of paeonol onto the PDMS surface is an energy favourable process. The paeonol-coated PDMS surface exhibits good antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Moreover considerable antibacterial activity is maintained after the coated surface is rinsed or incubated in water. The coated PDMS surface inhibits bacterial growth on the contact surface and promotes non-cancer mammalian cell growth with low cell toxicity; meanwhile the growth of cancer cells is significantly inhibited. Our study will potentially guide PDMS surface modification approaches to produce biomedical devices.

  6. Human Diversity in a Cell Surface Receptor that Inhibits Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Anu; Leite, Mara; Kulasekara, Bridget R; Altura, Melissa A; Ogahara, Cassandra; Weiss, Eli; Fu, Wenqing; Blanc, Marie-Pierre; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox; Akey, Joshua M; Miller, Samuel I

    2016-07-25

    Mutations in genes encoding autophagy proteins have been associated with human autoimmune diseases, suggesting that diversity in autophagy responses could be associated with disease susceptibility or severity. A cellular genome-wide association study (GWAS) screen was performed to explore normal human diversity in responses to rapamycin, a microbial product that induces autophagy. Cells from several human populations demonstrated variability in expression of a cell surface receptor, CD244 (SlamF4, 2B4), that correlated with changes in rapamycin-induced autophagy. High expression of CD244 and receptor activation with its endogenous ligand CD48 inhibited starvation- and rapamycin-induced autophagy by promoting association of CD244 with the autophagy complex proteins Vps34 and Beclin-1. The association of CD244 with this complex reduced Vps34 lipid kinase activity. Lack of CD244 is associated with auto-antibody production in mice, and lower expression of human CD244 has previously been implicated in severity of human rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus, indicating that increased autophagy as a result of low levels of CD244 may alter disease outcomes.

  7. Hyaluronan synthesis induces microvillus-like cell surface protrusions.

    PubMed

    Kultti, Anne; Rilla, Kirsi; Tiihonen, Riikka; Spicer, Andrew P; Tammi, Raija H; Tammi, Markku I

    2006-06-09

    Hyaluronan synthases (HASs) are plasma membrane enzymes that simultaneously elongate, bind, and extrude the growing hyaluronan chain directly into extracellular space. In cells transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Has3, the dorsal surface was decorated by up to 150 slender, 3-20-microm-long microvillus-type plasma membrane protrusions, which also contained filamentous actin, the hyaluronan receptor CD44, and lipid raft microdomains. Enzymatic activity of HAS was required for the growth of the microvilli, which were not present in cells transfected with other GFP proteins or inactive GFP-Has3 mutants or in cells incubated with exogenous soluble hyaluronan. The microvilli induced by HAS3 were gradually withered by introduction of an inhibitor of hyaluronan synthesis and rapidly retracted by hyaluronidase digestion, whereas they were not affected by competition with hyaluronan oligosaccharides and disruption of the CD44 gene, suggesting independence of hyaluronan receptors. The data bring out the novel concept that the glycocalyx created by dense arrays of hyaluronan chains, tethered to HAS during biosynthesis, can induce and maintain prominent microvilli.

  8. Feedback Regulation of Intracellular Hydrostatic Pressure in Surface Cells of the Lens

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; White, Thomas W.; Delamere, Nicholas A.; Mathias, Richard T.

    2015-01-01

    In wild-type lenses from various species, an intracellular hydrostatic pressure gradient goes from ∼340 mmHg in central fiber cells to 0 mmHg in surface cells. This gradient drives a center-to-surface flow of intracellular fluid. In lenses in which gap-junction coupling is increased, the central pressure is lower, whereas if gap-junction coupling is reduced, the central pressure is higher but surface pressure is always zero. Recently, we found that surface cell pressure was elevated in PTEN null lenses. This suggested disruption of a feedback control system that normally maintained zero surface cell pressure. Our purpose in this study was to investigate and characterize this feedback control system. We measured intracellular hydrostatic pressures in mouse lenses using a microelectrode/manometer-based system. We found that all feedback went through transport by the Na/K ATPase, which adjusted surface cell osmolarity such that pressure was maintained at zero. We traced the regulation of Na/K ATPase activity back to either TRPV4, which sensed positive pressure and stimulated activity, or TRPV1, which sensed negative pressure and inhibited activity. The inhibitory effect of TRPV1 on Na/K pumps was shown to signal through activation of the PI3K/AKT axis. The stimulatory effect of TRPV4 was shown in previous studies to go through a different signal transduction path. Thus, there is a local two-legged feedback control system for pressure in lens surface cells. The surface pressure provides a pedestal on which the pressure gradient sits, so surface pressure determines the absolute value of pressure at each radial location. We speculate that the absolute value of intracellular pressure may set the radial gradient in the refractive index, which is essential for visual acuity. PMID:26536260

  9. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  10. Choreography of MAGUKs during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Rincón, Mercedes; Davis, Roger J

    2007-02-01

    T cell receptor activation requires the membrane-associated guanylate kinase CARMA1. A new study finds that a second such kinase, Dlgh1, is also required specifically for activation of the alternative p38 kinase pathway.

  11. Skin stem cells: rising to the surface.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Elaine

    2008-01-28

    The skin epidermis and its appendages provide a protective barrier that is impermeable to harmful microbes and also prevents dehydration. To perform their functions while being confronted with the physicochemical traumas of the environment, these tissues undergo continual rejuvenation through homeostasis, and, in addition, they must be primed to undergo wound repair in response to injury. The skin's elixir for maintaining tissue homeostasis, regenerating hair, and repairing the epidermis after injury is its stem cells, which reside in the adult hair follicle, sebaceous gland, and epidermis. Stem cells have the remarkable capacity to both self-perpetuate and also give rise to the differentiating cells that constitute one or more tissues. In recent years, scientists have begun to uncover the properties of skin stem cells and unravel the mysteries underlying their remarkable capacity to perform these feats. In this paper, I outline the basic lineages of the skin epithelia and review some of the major findings about mammalian skin epithelial stem cells that have emerged in the past five years.

  12. Altered T cell surface glycosylation in HIV-1 infection results in increased susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Lantéri, Marion; Giordanengo, Valérie; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Auberger, Patrick; Fukuda, Minoru; Baum, Linda G; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude

    2003-12-01

    The massive T cell death that occurs in HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection contributes profoundly to the pathophysiology associated with AIDS. The mechanisms controlling cell death of both infected and uninfected T cells ("bystander" death) are not completely understood. We have shown that HIV-1 infection of T cells results in altered glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins; specifically, it decreased sialylation and increased expression of core 2 O-glycans. Galectin-1 is an endogenous human lectin that recognizes these types of glycosylation changes and induces cell death of activated lymphocytes. Therefore we studied the possible contribution of galectin-1 in the pathophysiology of AIDS. O-glycan modifications were investigated on peripheral lymphocytes from AIDS patients. Oligosaccharides from CD43 and CD45 of CEM cells latently infected with HIV-1 were chemically analyzed. Consistent with our previous results, we show that HIV-1 infection results in accumulation of exposed lactosamine residues, oligosaccharides recognized by galectin-1 on cell surface glycoproteins. Both latently HIV-1-infected T cell lines and peripheral CD4 and CD8 T cells from AIDS patients exhibited exposed lactosamine residues and demonstrated marked susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, in contrast to control cultures or cells from uninfected donors. The fraction of cells that died in response to galectin-1 exceeded the fraction of infected cells, indicating that death of uninfected cells occurred. Altered cell surface glycosylation of T cells during HIV-1 infection increases the susceptibility to galectin-1-induced cell death, and this death pathway can contribute to loss of both infected and uninfected T cells in AIDS.

  13. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  14. Surface-active materials from Athabasca oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moschopedis, S. E.; Schulz, K. F.; Speight, J. G.; Morrison, D. N.

    1980-01-01

    Surface-active derivatives can be separated, or chemically-derived, from Athabasca bitumen. These materials have the ability to lower the surface tensions of aqueous solutions as well as substantially reduce the interfacial tensions of aqueous-organic systems. As such, they do appear to have a beneficial effect on bitumen recovery processes.

  15. Characterization of surface active materials derived from farm products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface active materials obtained by chemical modification of plant protein isolates (lupin, barley, oat), corn starches (dextrin, normal, high amylose, and waxy) and soybean oil (soybean oil based polysoaps, SOPS) were investigated for their surface and interfacial properties using axisymmetric dro...

  16. The cell surface environment for pathogen recognition and entry

    PubMed Central

    Stow, Jennifer L; Condon, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The surface of mammalian cells offers an interface between the cell interior and its surrounding milieu. As part of the innate immune system, macrophages have cell surface features optimised for probing and sampling as they patrol our tissues for pathogens, debris or dead cells. Their highly dynamic and constantly moving cell surface has extensions such as lamellipodia, filopodia and dorsal ruffles that help detect pathogens. Dorsal ruffles give rise to macropinosomes for rapid, high volume non-selective fluid sampling, receptor internalisation and plasma membrane turnover. Ruffles can also generate phagocytic cups for the receptor-mediated uptake of pathogens or particles. The membrane lipids, actin cytoskeleton, receptors and signalling proteins that constitute these cell surface domains are discussed. Although the cell surface is designed to counteract pathogens, many bacteria, viruses and other pathogens have evolved to circumvent or hijack these cell structures and their underlying machinery for entry and survival. Nevertheless, these features offer important potential for developing vaccines, drugs and preventative measures to help fight infection. PMID:27195114

  17. Surface activity of Corophium volutator: A role for parasites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damsgaard, Jacob Tørring; Mouritsen, Kim N.; Jensen, K. Thomas

    2005-08-01

    In soft-bottom intertidal habitats, the normally infaunal amphipod Corophium volutator is often found active on the sediment surface during low tide, exposed to desiccation and shorebird predation. Here we examine whether such risky behaviour is related to parasite infections. Surface-active and buried C. volutator were collected during a low tide period in the Danish Wadden Sea, and the infection patterns of the two groups were described in relation to sex and size. Surface-active males and females were more heavily infested by microphallid trematodes (four species) than buried specimens of the same sex and size class. Although the density of surfaced amphipods decreased as a function of exposure time, the mean parasite load of those that remained on the surface increased. A narrow size-specific parasite intensity threshold above which the amphipods were always surface active did not exist: heavily infected individuals were also found buried in the substrate. Although likely to be beneficial to the parasites, this suggests that the behavioural alteration is a side-effect of the infections rather than a consequence of direct parasitic manipulation. Besides the presumed mortality associated with the parasite-related surface activity in a range of size-classes, the intensity-size frequency distribution indicated that larger and hence heavily infected hosts are removed from the population. Together it demonstrates that microphallid trematodes impact the population dynamics of C. volutator.

  18. Elastomers bonded to metal surfaces seal electrochemical cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherfey, J. M.

    1964-01-01

    A leakproof seal secondary cell containing alkaline electrolytes was developed by bonding an alkali-resistant elastomer, such as neoprene, to metal contact surfaces. Test results of several different elastomers strongly indicate the feasibility of this sealing method.

  19. Role of nanostructured gold surfaces on monocyte activation and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Sara; Forsberg, Magnus; Hulander, Mats; Vazirisani, Forugh; Palmquist, Anders; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter; Trobos, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The role of material surface properties in the direct interaction with bacteria and the indirect route via host defense cells is not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested that nanostructured implant surfaces possess antimicrobial properties. In the current study, the adhesion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and human monocyte adhesion and activation were studied separately and in coculture in different in vitro models using smooth gold and well-defined nanostructured gold surfaces. Two polystyrene surfaces were used as controls in the monocyte experiments. Fluorescent viability staining demonstrated a reduction in the viability of S. epidermidis close to the nanostructured gold surface, whereas the smooth gold correlated with more live biofilm. The results were supported by scanning electron microscopy observations, showing higher biofilm tower formations and more mature biofilms on smooth gold compared with nanostructured gold. Unstimulated monocytes on the different substrates demonstrated low activation, reduced gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and low cytokine secretion. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan or opsonized live S. epidermidis for 1 hour significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-10, as well as the secretion of TNF-α, demonstrating the ability of the cells to elicit a response and actively phagocytose prey. In addition, cells cultured on the smooth gold and the nanostructured gold displayed a different adhesion pattern and a more rapid oxidative burst than those cultured on polystyrene upon stimulation. We conclude that S. epidermidis decreased its viability initially when adhering to nanostructured surfaces compared with smooth gold surfaces, especially in the bacterial cell layers closest to the surface. In contrast, material surface properties neither strongly

  20. Cell culture on hydrophilicity-controlled silicon nitride surfaces.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-12-01

    Cell culture on silicon nitride membranes is required for atmospheric scanning electron microscopy, electron beam excitation assisted optical microscopy, and various biological sensors. Cell adhesion to silicon nitride membranes is typically weak, and cell proliferation is limited. We increased the adhesion force and proliferation of cultured HeLa cells by controlling the surface hydrophilicity of silicon nitride membranes. We covalently coupled carboxyl groups on silicon nitride membranes, and measured the contact angles of water droplets on the surfaces to evaluate the hydrophilicity. We cultured HeLa cells on the coated membranes and evaluated stretch of the cell. Cell migration and confluence were observed on the coated silicon nitride films. We also demonstrated preliminary observation result with direct electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

  1. Bone cell expression on titanium surfaces is altered by sterilization treatments.

    PubMed

    Stanford, C M; Keller, J C; Solursh, M

    1994-05-01

    Phenotypic responses of rat calvarial osteoblast-like cells (RCOB) were evaluated on commercially pure titanium (cpTi) surfaces when cultured at high density (5100 cells/mm2). These surfaces were prepared to three different clinically relevant surface preparations (1-micron, 600-grit, and 50-microns-grit sand-blast), followed by sterilization with either ultraviolet light, ethylene oxide, argon plasma-cleaning, or routine clinical autoclaving. Osteocalcin and alkaline phosphatase, but not collagen expression, were significantly affected by surface roughness when these surfaces were altered by argon plasma-cleaning. In general, plasma-cleaned cpTi surfaces demonstrated an inverse relationship between surface roughness and phenotypic markers for a bone-like response. On a per-cell basis, levels of the bone-specific protein, osteocalcin, and the enzymatic activity of alkaline phosphatase were highest on the smooth 1-micron polished surface and lowest on the roughest surfaces for the plasma-cleaned cpTi. Detectable bone cell expression can be altered by clinically relevant surfaces prepared by standard dental implant preparation techniques.

  2. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  3. Differential Surface Expression of ADAM10 and ADAM17 on Human T Lymphocytes and Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kabelitz, Dieter; Janssen, Ottmar

    2013-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) have been implicated in many processes controlling organismic development and integrity. Important substrates of ADAM proteases include growth factors, cytokines and their receptors and adhesion proteins. The inducible but irreversible cleavage of their substrates alters cell-cell communication and signaling. The crucial role of ADAM proteases (e.g. ADAM10 and 17) for mammalian development became evident from respective knockout mice, that displayed pre- or perinatal lethality with severe defects in many organs and tissues. Although many substrates for these two ADAM proteases were identified over the last decade, the regulation of their surface appearance, their enzymatic activity and their substrate specificity are still not well understood. We therefore analyzed the constitutive and inducible surface expression of ADAM10 and ADAM17 on a variety of human T cell and tumor cell lines. We demonstrate that ADAM10 is constitutively present at comparably high levels on the majority of the tested cell types. Stimulation with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore does not significantly alter the amount of surface ADAM10, except for a slight down-regulation from T cell blasts. Using FasL shedding as a readout for ADAM10 activity, we show that PKC activation and calcium mobilization are both prerequisite for activation of ADAM10 resulting in a production of soluble FasL. In contrast to ADAM10, the close relative ADAM17 is detected at only low levels on unstimulated cells. ADAM17 surface expression on T cell blasts is rapidly induced by stimulation. Since this inducible mobilization of ADAM17 is sensitive to inhibitors of actin filament formation, we propose that ADAM17 but not ADAM10 is prestored in a subcellular compartment that is transported to the cell surface in an activation- and actin-dependent manner. PMID:24130797

  4. Microfabricated surface designs for cell culture and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, T; Chung, D J

    1994-01-01

    Grooved and holed surfaces with a well fabricated design may serve as microsubstrates for cell culture and microreactors for diagnosis. In this study, the authors prepared chemically treated, micrometer scale grooved and holed glass surfaces by combined surface modification and ultraviolet (UV) excimer laser ablation techniques, as follows. 1) Microcell-culture substrate: Amino group attached glass surfaces, prepared by the treatment with an aminopropylsilane, were condensed with a carboxylated radical initiator. Subsequently, polyacrylamide was grafted by surface initiated radical polymerization to create a very hydrophilic surface layer. Ultraviolet excimer laser beams (KrF: 248 nm) were irradiated through a microscope onto surfaces to create grooves or holes that were 10 and 50 microns in width or diameter, respectively. The depth, depending on the irradiation light strength, ranged from a few to several tenths of a micrometer. On endothelial cell (EC) seeding, ECs adhered and grew on the bottoms of the grooved or holed surface where glass was exposed on ablation. Little cell adhesion was observed on non ablated, grafted surfaces. Endothelial cells aligned along the groove, resulting in very narrow tube like tissue formation, whereas ECs tended to form a multilayered spherical aggregate in a hole. A single cell resided in a 10 microns square hole. 2) Microreactor for diagnosis: The glass surface, treated with a fluorinated silane, was ablated to create round holes. On addition of a few microliters of water, water could be quantitatively transferred into a hole because of the water repellent characteristics of non ablated, fluorinated glass. As a model of a microreactor, enzyme reactions to affect different levels of glucose were carried out in tiny holed surfaces.

  5. Endothelial cell migration on surfaces modified with immobilized adhesive peptides.

    PubMed

    Kouvroukoglou, S; Dee, K C; Bizios, R; McIntire, L V; Zygourakis, K

    2000-09-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) migration has been studied on aminophase surfaces with covalently bound RGDS and YIGSRG cell adhesion peptides. The fluorescent marker dansyl chloride was used to quantify the spatial distribution of the peptides on the modified surfaces. Peptides appeared to be distributed in uniformly dispersed large clusters separated by areas of lower peptide concentrations. We employed digital time-lapse video microscopy and image analysis to monitor EC migration on the modified surfaces and to reconstruct the cell trajectories. The persistent random walk model was then applied to analyze the cell displacement data and compute the mean root square speed, the persistence time, and the random motility coefficient of EC. We also calculated the time-averaged speed of cell locomotion. No differences in the speed of cell locomotion on the various substrates were noted. Immobilization of the cell adhesion peptides (RGDS and YIGSRG), however, significantly increased the persistence of cell movement and, thus, the random motility coefficient. These results suggest that immobilization of cell adhesion peptides on the surface of implantable biomaterials may lead to enhanced endothelization rates.

  6. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  7. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  8. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration.

  9. Enhancement of Biological Reactions on Cell Surfaces via Macromolecular Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Chapanian, Rafi; Kwan, David H.; Constantinescu, Iren; Shaikh, Fathima A.; Rossi, Nicholas A.A.; Withers, Stephen G.; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of macromolecules such as enzymes and antibodies with cell surfaces is often an inefficient process, requiring large amounts of expensive reagent. Here we report a general method based on macromolecular crowding with a range of neutral polymers to enhance such reactions, using red blood cells (RBCs) as a model system. Rates of conversion of Type A and B red blood cells to universal O type by removal of antigenic carbohydrates with selective glycosidases are increased up to 400-fold in the presence of crowders. Similar enhancements are seen for antibody binding. We further explore the factors underlying these enhancements using confocal microscopy and fluorescent recovery after bleaching (FRAP) techniques with various fluorescent protein fusion partners. Increased cell-surface concentration due to volume exclusion, along with two-dimensionally confined diffusion of enzymes close to the cell surface, appear to be the major contributing factors. PMID:25140641

  10. Hedgehog-regulated ubiquitination controls smoothened trafficking and cell surface expression in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Chen, Yongbin; Shi, Qing; Yue, Tao; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Hedgehog transduces signal by promoting cell surface expression of the seven-transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo) in Drosophila, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that Smo is downregulated by ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degradation, and that Hh increases Smo cell surface expression by inhibiting its ubiquitination. We find that Smo is ubiquitinated at multiple Lysine residues including those in its autoinhibitory domain (SAID), leading to endocytosis and degradation of Smo by both lysosome- and proteasome-dependent mechanisms. Hh inhibits Smo ubiquitination via PKA/CK1-mediated phosphorylation of SAID, leading to Smo cell surface accumulation. Inactivation of the ubiquitin activating enzyme Uba1 or perturbation of multiple components of the endocytic machinery leads to Smo accumulation and Hh pathway activation. In addition, we find that the non-visual β-arrestin Kurtz (Krz) interacts with Smo and acts in parallel with ubiquitination to downregulate Smo. Finally, we show that Smo ubiquitination is counteracted by the deubiquitinating enzyme UBPY/USP8. Gain and loss of UBPY lead to reciprocal changes in Smo cell surface expression. Taken together, our results suggest that ubiquitination plays a key role in the downregulation of Smo to keep Hh pathway activity off in the absence of the ligand, and that Hh-induced phosphorylation promotes Smo cell surface accumulation by inhibiting its ubiquitination, which contributes to Hh pathway activation.

  11. Human Corin Isoforms with Different Cytoplasmic Tails That Alter Cell Surface Targeting*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaofei; Jiang, Jingjing; Zhu, Mingqing; Wu, Qingyu

    2011-01-01

    Corin is a cardiac serine protease that activates natriuretic peptides. It consists of an N-terminal cytoplasmic tail, a transmembrane domain, and an extracellular region with a C-terminal trypsin-like protease domain. The transmembrane domain anchors corin on the surface of cardiomyocytes. To date, the function of the corin cytoplasmic tail remains unknown. By examining the difference between human and mouse corin cytoplasmic tails, analyzing their gene sequences, and verifying mRNA expression in hearts, we show that both human and mouse corin genes have alternative exons encoding different cytoplasmic tails. Human corin isoforms E1 and E1a have 45 and 15 amino acids, respectively, in their cytoplasmic tails. In transfected HEK 293 cells and HL-1 cardiomyocytes, corin isoforms E1 and E1a were expressed at similar levels. Compared with isoform E1a, however, isoform E1 was more active in processing natriuretic peptides. By cell surface labeling, glycosidase digestion, Western blotting, and flow cytometry, we found that corin isoform E1 was activated more readily as a result of more efficient cell surface targeting. By mutagenesis, we identified a DDNN motif in the cytoplasmic tail of isoform E1 (which is absent in isoform E1a) that promotes corin surface targeting in both HEK 293 and HL-1 cells. Our data indicate that the sequence in the cytoplasmic tail plays an important role in corin cell surface targeting and zymogen activation. PMID:21518754

  12. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  13. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  14. Asphaltene surface activity at oil/water interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Sheu, E.Y.; Shields, M.B.

    1995-11-01

    Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) dynamic surface tension (DST), dynamic interfacial tension (DIFT), and zero shear viscosity were used to study the surface activity of Ratawi asphaltenes in organic solvents, in the asphaltene/water/toluene emulsions and at the toluene/aqueous solution interfaces. In organic solvents, the kinetic process of micellization and the micellar structure are characterized. Their dependence on asphaltene concentration was investigated. The emulsion droplet structure and their capability in water uptake was tested. Also, the enhancement of surface activity of asphaltenes and its potential applications are briefly discussed.

  15. Synthetically functionalized retroviruses produced from the bioorthogonally engineered cell surface.

    PubMed

    Wong, Shirley; Kwon, Young Jik

    2011-02-16

    Conjugation of desired molecules onto retroviral surfaces through the ease of the bioorthogonal functionalization method was demonstrated. Oxidation of surface sialic acids using periodate and further p-anisidine-catalyzed conjugation with aminooxy-bearing molecules were used to directly label retroviral envelope with a fluorescent dye. The retroviral particles that were produced from a bioorthogonally functionalized virus producing cell surface and further tethered with magnetic nanoparticles were efficiently purified by simple magnetic column separation and capable of magnet-directed transduction.

  16. TLR3-induced activation of mast cells modulates CD8+ T-cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Orinska, Zane; Bulanova, Elena; Budagian, Vadim; Metz, Martin; Maurer, Marcus; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2005-08-01

    Mast cells play an important role in host defense against various pathogens, but their role in viral infection has not been clarified in detail. dsRNA, synthesized by various types of viruses and mimicked by polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (poly(I:C)) is recognized by Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). In this study, we demonstrate that poly(I:C) injection in vivo potently stimulates peritoneal mast cells to up-regulate a number of different costimulatory molecules. Therefore, we examined the expression and the functional significance of TLR3 activation in mast cells. Mast cells express TLR3 on the cell surface and intracellularly. After stimulation of mast cells with poly(I:C) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV), TLR3 is phosphorylated and the expression of key antiviral response cytokines (interferon beta, ISG15) and chemokines (IP10, RANTES) is upregulated. Interestingly, mast cells activated via TLR3-poly(I:C) potently stimulate CD8+ T-cell recruitment. Indeed, mast-cell-deficient mice (KitW/KitW-v) given an intraperitoneal injection of poly(I:C) show a decreased CD8+ T-cell recruitment, whereas granulocytes normally migrate to the peritoneal cavity. Mast-cell reconstitution of KitW/KitW-v mice normalizes the CD8+ T-cell influx. Thus, mast cells stimulated through engagement of TLR3 are potent regulators of CD8+ T-cell activities in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Roddy S; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W; Kam, Lance C; Milone, Michael C

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young's Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E > 2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (nonsignificant) toward a greater proportion of CD62L(neg), effector-differentiated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Naive CD4(+) T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ-producing Th1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation, and Th differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands.

  18. Substrate rigidity regulates human T cell activation and proliferation1

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Roddy S.; Hao, Xueli; Shen, Keyue; Bashour, Keenan; Akimova, Tatiana; Hancock, Wayne W.; Kam, Lance; Milone, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using cultured T cells holds promise for the treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Ligands immobilized on surfaces fabricated from hard materials such as polystyrene plastic are commonly employed for T cell culture. The mechanical properties of a culture surface can influence the adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation of stem cells and fibroblasts. We therefore explored the impact of culture substrate stiffness on the ex vivo activation and expansion of human T cells. We describe a simple system for the stimulation of the TCR/CD3 complex and the CD28 receptor using substrates with variable rigidity manufactured from poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), a biocompatible silicone elastomer. We show that softer (Young’s Modulus [E] < 100 kPa) substrates stimulate an average 4-fold greater IL-2 production and ex vivo proliferation of human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared with stiffer substrates (E >2 MPa). Mixed peripheral blood T cells cultured on the stiffer substrates also demonstrate a trend (non-significant) towards a greater proportion of CD62Lneg, effector-differentiated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Naïve CD4+ T cells expanded on softer substrates yield an average 3-fold greater proportion of IFN-γ producing TH1-like cells. These results reveal that the rigidity of the substrate used to immobilize T cell stimulatory ligands is an important and previously unrecognized parameter influencing T cell activation, proliferation and TH differentiation. Substrate rigidity should therefore be a consideration in the development of T cell culture systems as well as when interpreting results of T cell activation based upon solid-phase immobilization of TCR/CD3 and CD28 ligands. PMID:22732590

  19. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  20. Chemical surface modification of parylene C for enhanced protein immobilization and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Changhong; Thompson, Mark E; Markland, Frank S; Swenson, Steve

    2011-10-01

    To introduce the adhesion site of proteins and/or cells on parylene C (PC)-coated medical devices that can be used as implantable biosensors or drug delivery capsules, the PC surfaces were initially modified by the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction to generate active chlorines. These chlorines were then employed to initiate the atom transfer radical polymerization of tert-butyl acrylate (TBA) and form a polymer brush layer of polyTBA on PC; the acrylate groups in the polymer brushes were hydrolyzed to carboxylic acid groups and further activated into succinimidyl ester groups via the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide/N-hydroxysuccinimide coupling reaction. The PC surface grafted with polymer brushes and activated by succinimide showed efficient attachment of proteins, including gelatin, contortrostatin (CN) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), all at high density on the PC surface. The CN density on the surface was evaluated for both monolayer and polymer brush-based coatings. Based on fluorescence measurements, the polymer brush gives a 60-fold higher surface protein density than the monolayer-based system. Gelatin was used as a model protein and covalently coated onto the modified PC surface for cell culture study. Substrates with gelatin coating showed a significantly higher cell attachment and proliferation in 7 days cultures as compared to the uncoated substrates. In addition, a conventional photolithography technique was coupled with the surface chemistry to successfully pattern the BSA labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate on the modified PC surfaces.

  1. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-09-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  2. Cell surface differentiation of Mycoplasma mobile visualized by surface protein localization.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Akiko; Seto, Shintaro; Jaffe, Jacob D; Miyata, Makoto

    2004-12-01

    Mycoplasma mobile has a flask-shaped cell morphology and glides toward its tapered end at a rate of 3-7 cell lengths per s (2.0-4.5 microm s(-1)) by an unknown mechanism. Gliding requires that the surface of the cell is in contact with a solid substrate, such as glass or plastic. In order to characterize the nature of the outer surface of M. mobile, monoclonal antibodies were raised against intact cells and screened for their ability to recognize surface proteins. Four antibodies were identified and their protein targets were determined. One antibody recognized the Gli349 protein, which is known to be involved in glass binding and gliding. This antibody was also able to displace attached M. mobile cells from glass, suggesting that Gli349 is the major adhesion protein in M. mobile. The other three antibodies recognized members of the Mvsp family of proteins, which are presumably the major surface antigens of M. mobile. Immunofluorescence studies were performed to localize these proteins on the surface of M. mobile cells. Gli349 localized to the proximal region of the tapered part of the cell (the 'neck'), while the various Mvsp family members showed several distinct patterns of subcellular localization. MvspN and MvspO localized to the distal end of the tapered part of the cell (the 'head'), MvspK localized to the main part of the cell (the 'body'), and MvspI localized to both the head and body but not the neck. This analysis shows that M. mobile surprisingly expresses multiple versions of its major surface antigen at once but differentiates its surface by differential localization of the various paralogues.

  3. Surface activation-based nanobonding and interconnection at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howlader, M. M. R.; Yamauchi, A.; Suga, T.

    2011-02-01

    Flip chip nanobonding and interconnect system (NBIS) equipment with high precision alignment has been developed based on the surface activated bonding method for high-density interconnection and MEMS packaging. The 3σ alignment accuracy in the IR transmission system was approximately ±0.2 µm. The performance of the NBIS has been preliminarily investigated through bonding between relatively rough surfaces of copper through silicon vias (Cu-TSVs) and gold-stud bumps (Au-SBs), and smooth surfaces of silicon wafers. The Cu-TSVs of 55 µm diameter and the Au-SBs of 35 µm diameter with ~6-10 nm surface roughness (RMS) were bonded at room temperature after surface activation using an argon fast atom beam (Ar-FAB) under 0.16 N per bump. Silicon wafers of 50 mm diameter with ~0.2 nm RMS surface roughness were bonded without heating after surface activation. Void-free interfaces both in Cu-TSV/Au-SB and silicon/silicon with bonding strength equivalent to bulk fracture of Au and silicon, respectively, were achieved. A few nm thick amorphous layers were observed across the silicon/silicon interface that was fabricated by the Ar-FAB. This study in the interconnection and bonding facilitates the required three-dimensional integration on the same surface for high-density electronic and biomedical systems.

  4. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  5. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  6. Quantification of macrophage cell surface molecules in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Hessian, P A; Highton, J; Palmer, D G

    1989-01-01

    The response of macrophages to stimulation by interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) in vitro is characterized by an increase in the cell surface expression of MHC class II HLA-DR antigen (HLA-DR) and the high-affinity Fc-receptor for immunoglobulin G (FcRI) while the expression of the C3b-receptor (CR1) is reduced. Based on these observations, we have examined further the possibility that IFN-gamma may modulate the activation of mononuclear phagocytes (Mph) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). As reported by others, we found low levels of IFN-gamma in the synovial fluid of these patients (less than 0.3 IU/ml using radioimmunoassay). As an alternative means of establishing whether Mph are influenced by levels of IFN-gamma too low to measure directly, we have quantified the expression of membrane associated HLA-DR, FcRI and CR1 on cell populations isolated from synovial fluid and peripheral blood. The expression of these molecules by Mph is known to be influenced by IFN-gamma. We found that Mph isolated from the synovial fluid of patients with RA showed a significantly increased HLA-DR expression. Significantly less CR1 was associated with the synovial fluid Mph than with peripheral blood monocytes. However the expression of the FcRI by the synovial fluid Mph and peripheral blood monocyte populations was similar. The quantitative changes in HLA-DR and CR1 expression by synovial fluid Mph (but not those of FcRI) were consistent with those seen following IFN-gamma activation of monocytes in vitro. While these results indicate that IFN-gamma may have a role in activating the Mph present in synovial fluid, the apparent independent regulation of FcRI observed suggests other mediators may also be involved. PMID:2527651

  7. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  8. The Activity of Antimicrobial Surfaces Varies by Testing Protocol Utilized

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Matias D.; Zucchi, Paola C.; Phung, Ann; Leonard, Steven N.; Hirsch, Elizabeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Contaminated hospital surfaces are an important source of nosocomial infections. A major obstacle in marketing antimicrobial surfaces is a lack of efficacy data based on standardized testing protocols. Aim We compared the efficacy of multiple testing protocols against several “antimicrobial” film surfaces. Methods Four clinical isolates were used: one Escherichia coli, one Klebsiella pneumoniae, and two Staphylococcus aureus strains. Two industry methods (modified ISO 22196 and ASTM E2149), a “dried droplet”, and a “transfer” method were tested against two commercially available antimicrobial films, one film in development, an untreated control, and a positive (silver) control film. At 2 (only ISO) and 24 hours following inoculation, bacteria were collected from film surfaces and enumerated. Results Compared to untreated films in all protocols, there were no significant differences in recovery on either commercial brand at 2 or 24 hours after inoculation. The silver surface demonstrated significant microbicidal activity (mean loss 4.9 Log10 CFU/ml) in all methods and time points with the exception of 2 hours in the ISO protocol and the transfer method. Using our novel droplet method, no differences between placebo and active surfaces were detected. The surface in development demonstrated variable activity depending on method, organism, and time point. The ISO demonstrated minimal activity at 2 hours but significant activity at 24 hours (mean 4.5 Log10 CFU/ml difference versus placebo). The ASTEM protocol exhibited significant differences in recovery of staphylococci (mean 5 Log10 CFU/ml) but not Gram-negative isolates (10 fold decrease). Minimal activity was observed with this film in the transfer method. Conclusions Varying results between protocols suggested that efficacy of antimicrobial surfaces cannot be easily and reproducibly compared. Clinical use should be considered and further development of representative methods is needed. PMID

  9. Effect of Different Titanium Surfaces on Maturation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaofei; Zhou, Fengjuan; Gu, Yifei; Duan, Xiaobo; Mo, Anchun

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the host response to implanted biomaterials. Osseointegration of titanium (Ti) implant is an immunological and inflammatory-driven process. However, the role of DCs in this complex process is largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different Ti surfaces on DC maturation, and evaluate its subsequent potential on osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblasts. Murine bone marrow-derived DCs were seeded on Ti disks with different surface treatments, including pretreatment (PT), sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA) and modified SLA (modSLA) surface. Compared with DCs cultured on PT and SLA surfaces, the cells seeded on modSLA surface demonstrated a more round morphology with lower expression of CD86 and MHC-II, the DC maturation markers. Those cells also secreted high levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β. Notably, addition of conditioned medium (CM) from modSLA-induced DCs significantly increased the mRNA expression of Runx2 and ALP as well as ALP activity by murine preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells. Our data demonstrated that Ti disks with different surfaces lead to differential DCs responses. PT and SLA surfaces induce DCs mature, while DCs seeded on modSLA-Ti surface maintain an immature phenotype and exhibit a potential of promoting osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. PMID:28157196

  10. Effect of Different Titanium Surfaces on Maturation of Murine Bone Marrow-Derived Dendritic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaofei; Zhou, Fengjuan; Gu, Yifei; Duan, Xiaobo; Mo, Anchun

    2017-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a pivotal role in the host response to implanted biomaterials. Osseointegration of titanium (Ti) implant is an immunological and inflammatory-driven process. However, the role of DCs in this complex process is largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of different Ti surfaces on DC maturation, and evaluate its subsequent potential on osteogenic differentiation of preosteoblasts. Murine bone marrow-derived DCs were seeded on Ti disks with different surface treatments, including pretreatment (PT), sandblasted/acid-etched (SLA) and modified SLA (modSLA) surface. Compared with DCs cultured on PT and SLA surfaces, the cells seeded on modSLA surface demonstrated a more round morphology with lower expression of CD86 and MHC-II, the DC maturation markers. Those cells also secreted high levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and TGF-β. Notably, addition of conditioned medium (CM) from modSLA-induced DCs significantly increased the mRNA expression of Runx2 and ALP as well as ALP activity by murine preosteoblast MC3T3-E1 cells. Our data demonstrated that Ti disks with different surfaces lead to differential DCs responses. PT and SLA surfaces induce DCs mature, while DCs seeded on modSLA-Ti surface maintain an immature phenotype and exhibit a potential of promoting osteogenic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells.

  11. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  12. CD44 is the principal cell surface receptor for hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Aruffo, A; Stamenkovic, I; Melnick, M; Underhill, C B; Seed, B

    1990-06-29

    CD44 is a broadly distributed cell surface protein thought to mediate cell attachment to extracelular matrix components or specific cell surface ligands. We have created soluble CD44-immunoglobulin fusion proteins and characterized their reactivity with tissue sections and lymph node high endothelial cells in primary culture. The CD44 target on high endothelial cells is sensitive to enzymes that degrade hyaluronate, and binding of soluble CD44 is blocked by low concentrations of hyaluronate or high concentrations of chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfates. A mouse anti-hamster hyaluonate receptor antibody reacts with COS cells expressing hamster CD44 cDNA. In sections of all tissues examined, including lymph nodes and Peyer's patches, predigestion with hyaluronidase eliminated CD44 binding.

  13. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  14. Cell Surface Expression and Function of the Macromolecular C1 Complex on the Surface of Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Ji, Yan; Matkovic, Mara; Pednekar, Lina; Rehage, Nina; Tumma, Nithin; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.; Ghebrehiwet, Berhane

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of the subunits of the C1 complex (C1q, C1s, C1r), and its regulator C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh) by human monocytes has been previously established. However, surface expression of these molecules by monocytes has not been shown. Using flow cytometry and antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we show here for the first time that, in addition to C1q, peripheral blood monocytes, and the monocyte-derived U937 cells express C1s and C1r, as well as Factor B and C1-Inh on their surface. C1s and C1r immunoprecipitated with C1q, suggesting that at least some of the C1q on these cells is part of the C1 complex. Furthermore, the C1 complex on U937 cells was able to trigger complement activation via the classical pathway. The presence of C1-Inh may ensure that an unwarranted autoactivation of the C1 complex does not take place. Since C1-Inh closely monitors the activation of the C1 complex in a sterile or infectious inflammatory environment, further elucidation of the role of C1 complex is crucial to dissect its function in monocyte, dendritic cell, and T cell activities, and its implications in host defense and tolerance. PMID:22566921

  15. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  16. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  17. Active Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on a Functionalized Silicon Surface.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, K; Sam, S; Gouget-Laemmel, A C; Henry de Villeneuve, C; Moraillon, A; Ozanam, F; Yang, J; Kermad, A; Ghellai, N; Gabouze, N

    2015-08-04

    In this work, we studied the attachment of active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme on a silicon substrate as a potential biomarker for the detection of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. A multistep functionalization strategy was developed on a crystalline silicon surface: a carboxylic acid-terminated monolayer was grafted onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface by photochemical hydrosilylation, and then AChE was covalently attached through amide bonds using an activation EDC/NHS process. Each step of the modification was quantitatively characterized by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated-total-reflection geometry (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinetics of enzyme immobilization was investigated using in situ real-time infrared spectroscopy. The enzymatic activity of immobilized acetylcholinesterase enzymes was determined with a colorimetric test. The surface concentration of active AChE was estimated to be Γ = 1.72 × 10(10) cm(-2).

  18. Murein hydrolase activity of surface layer proteins from Lactobacillus acidophilus against Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jun; Gao, Shu-Ming; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Lu, Rong-Rong

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the murein hydrolase activities of the surface layer proteins (SLPs) from two strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus using zymography. The influence of these hydrolase activities on Escherichia coli ATCC 43893 was also evaluated by analysing their growth curve, cell morphology and physiological state. After the incubation of E. coli with SLPs, growth was inhibited, the number of viable cells was significantly reduced, examination by transmission electron microscopy showed that the cell wall was damaged and flow cytometry results indicated that the majority of the cells were sublethally injured. All of these results suggested that the SLPs of both L. acidophilus strains possessed murein hydrolase activities that were sublethal to E. coli cells.

  19. The role of nitric oxide in ocular surface cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Chan; Park, Gun Sic; Kim, Jin Kook; Kim, Young Myeong

    2002-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) in the ocular surface remains unknown. We investigated the conditions leading to an increase of NO generation in tear and the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue. We evaluated the dual action (cell survival or cell death) of NO depending on its amount. We measured the concentration of nitrite plus nitrate in the tears of ocular surface diseases and examined the main source of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). When cultured human corneal fibroblast were treated with NO producing donor with or without serum, the viabilities of cells was studied. We found that the main sources of NO in ocular surface tissue were corneal epithelium, fibroblast, endothelium, and inflammatory cells. Three forms of NOS (eNOS, bNOS, and iNOS) were expressed in experimentally induced inflammation. In the fibroblast culture system, the NO donor (SNAP, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-D, L-penicillamine) prevented the death of corneal fibroblast cells caused by serum deprivation in a dose dependent manner up to 500 micrometer SNAP, but a higher dose decreased cell viability. This study suggested that NO might act as a double-edged sword in ocular surface diseases depending on the degree of inflammation related with NO concentration. PMID:12068145

  20. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  1. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Huang, Xiaohua; An, Yue; Ren, Feng; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta; Xiao, Zhicheng; Ma, Keli; Li, Yali

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  2. Asbestos exposure increases human bronchial epithelial cell fibrinolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Gross, T J; Cobb, S M; Gruenert, D C; Peterson, M W

    1993-03-01

    Chronic exposure to asbestos fibers results in fibrotic lung disease. The distal pulmonary epithelium is an early target of asbestos-mediated injury. Local plasmin activity may be important in modulating endoluminal inflammatory responses in the lung. We studied the effects of asbestos exposure on cell-mediated plasma clot lysis as a marker of pericellular plasminogen activation. Exposing human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells to 100 micrograms/ml of asbestos fibers for 24 h resulted in increased plasma clot lysis. Fibrinolytic activity was augmented in a dose-dependent fashion, was not due to secreted protease, and occurred only when there was direct contact between the plasma clot and the epithelial monolayer. Further analysis showed that asbestos exposure increased HBE cell-associated urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity in a time-dependent manner. The increased cell-associated PA activity could be removed by acid washing. The increase in PA activity following asbestos exposure required new protein synthesis because it was abrogated by treatment with either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. Therefore, asbestos exposure increases epithelial-mediated fibrinolysis by augmenting expression of uPA activity at the cell surface by mechanisms that require new RNA and protein synthesis. These observations suggest a novel mechanism whereby exposure of the distal epithelium to inhaled particulates may result in a chronic inflammatory response that culminates in the development of fibrotic lung disease.

  3. A membrane reservoir at the cell surface: unfolding the plasma membrane to fuel cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2014-01-01

    Cell surface expansion is a necessary part of cell shape change. One long-standing hypothesis proposes that membrane for this expansion comes from the flattening out of cell surface projections such as microvilli and membrane folds. Correlative EM data of cells undergoing phagocytosis, cytokinesis, and morphogenesis has hinted at the existence of such an unfolding mechanism for decades; but unfolding has only recently been confirmed using live-cell imaging and biophysical approaches. Considering the wide range of cells in which plasma membrane unfolding has now been reported, it likely represents a fundamental mechanism of cell shape change.

  4. Using Surface Curvature to Control the Dimerization of a Surface-Active Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurylowicz, Martin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the influence of surface geometry on adsorbed proteins promises new possibilities in biophysics, such as topographical catalysis, molecular recognition of geometric cues, and modulations of oligomerization or ligand binding. We have created nano-textured hydrophobic surfaces that are stable in buffer by spin coating polystyrene (PS) nanoparticles (NPs) to form patchy NP monolayers on a PS substrate, yielding flat and highly curved areas on the same sample. Moreover, we have separated surface chemistry from texture by floating a 10 nm thick film of monodisperse PS onto the NP-functionalized surface. Using Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy we have compared in situ the distribution of detachment lengths for proteins on curved surfaces to that measured on flat surfaces. We have shown that β-Lactoglobulin (β-LG), a surface-active protein which helps to stabilize oil droplets in milk, forms dimers on both flat PS surfaces and surfaces with a radius of curvature of 100 nm, whereas β-LG monomers exist for more highly curved surfaces with radii of curvature of 25 and 40 nm. It is surprising that rather large radii of curvature have such a strong influence on proteins whose radius is only ˜2 nm. Furthermore, the transition from dimer to monomer with changes in surface curvature offers promising applications for proteins whose function can be modified by their oligomerization state.

  5. Iron at the cell surface controls DNA synthesis in CCl 39 cells.

    PubMed

    Alcain, F J; Löw, H; Crane, F L

    1994-08-30

    Treatment of CCl 39 cells with the impermeable iron II chelator bathophenanthroline disulfonate (BPS) inhibits both DNA synthesis and transplasma membrane electron transport. The inhibition persists when the BPS is removed, and the extract from 10(6) cells contains up to 1.28 nmoles iron II chelated to BPS. The BPS iron II chelate itself is not inhibitory. Both DNA synthesis and electron transport are restored by addition of microM iron II or iron III compounds to extracted cells. Other impermeable chelators for iron II give similar inhibition, whereas the iron III-specific Tiron or copper-specific bathocuproine sulfonate do not inhibit. The inhibition differs from the permeable iron III chelator inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase, because inhibition of DNA synthesis by the permeable chelators is reversed when chelator is removed. The response to growth factors also differs, with no impermeable chelator inhibition on 10% fetal calf serum contrasting to inhibition by permeable chelators. DNA synthesis with both activation of tyrosine kinase with EGF plus insulin or by thrombin or ceruloplasmin led to protein kinase C activation as inhibited by the impermeable chelators. It is proposed that an iron available on the cell surface is required for DNA synthesis and plasma membrane electron transport.

  6. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties.

  7. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  8. Active gel model of amoeboid cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Voituriez, R.

    2013-02-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-substrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  9. BHK21 fibroblast aggregation inhibited by glycopeptides from the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Vicker, M G

    1976-06-01

    Glycopeptides were removed by trypsinization from the surface of baby hamster kidney cells (line BHK21-C13), digested by pronase and separated into 2 fractions by exclusion chromatography. The addition of small amounts of either glycopeptide fraction to shaken suspensions of lightly trypsinzied cells inhibited their rapid aggregation, but one fraction was more active than the other and in higher concentrations it was able to inhibit aggregation completely. After this fraction was purified by high-voltage electrophoresis one subfraction also inhibited aggregation. The effect of the glycopeptides increased following their pretreatment with neuraminidase, but preincubation with periodiate or galactose oxidase destroyed all activity. Galactose oxidase also inhibited cell aggregation directly. Similar glycopeptides from virus-transformed BHK21 cells, oligosaccharides and intact and desialysed human urinary glycoproteins had comparatively little or no effect on BHK21 cell aggregation. The results suggest terminal beta-galactosides and possible alpha-galactosides, and to some extent a particular substructure of cell surface heteroglycans are necessary for their inhibitory activity. The parent, plasma membrane of glycoproteins might serve as adhesive binding sites in cell cohesion, but some evidence indicates cell surface sialyl- and galactosyltransferases may not ordinarily act as their complementary binding receptors.

  10. Stochasticity and spatial heterogeneity in T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Burroughs, Nigel J; van der Merwe, P Anton

    2007-04-01

    Stochastic and spatial aspects are becoming increasingly recognized as an important factor in T-cell activation. Activation occurs in an intrinsically noisy environment, requiring only a handful of agonist peptide-major histocompatibility complex molecules, thus making consideration of signal to noise of prime importance in understanding sensitivity and specificity. Furthermore, it is widely established that surface-bound ligands are more effective at activation than soluble forms, while surface patternation has highlighted the role of spatial relocation in activation. Here we consider the results of a number of models of T-cell activation, from a realistic model of kinetic segregation-induced T-cell receptor (TCR) triggering through to simple queuing theory models. These studies highlight the constraints on cell activation by a surface receptor that recruits kinases. Our analysis shows that TCR triggering based on trapping of bound TCRs in regions of close proximity that exclude large ectodomain-containing molecules, such as the phosphatases CD45 and CD148, can effectively reproduce known signaling characteristics and is a viable 'signal transduction' mechanism distinct from oligomerization and conformation-based mechanisms. A queuing theory analysis shows the interrelation between sensitivity and specificity, emphasizing that these are properties of individual cell functions and need not be, nor are likely to be, uniform across different functions. In fact, threshold-based mechanisms of detection are shown to be poor at ligand discrimination because, although they can be highly specific, that specificity is limited to a small range of peptide densities. Time integration mechanisms however are able to control noise effectively, while kinetic proofreading mechanisms endow them with good specificity properties. Thus, threshold mechanisms are likely to be important for rapidly detecting minimal signaling requirements, thus achieving efficient scanning of antigen

  11. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    Harrison, in 1914, first recognized that cells respond to physicochemical cues such as substratum topography when he observed that fibroblasts elongated while cultured on spider silk. Recently, techniques developed in the micro-electronics industry have been used to create molds for producing microscaled topographies with various shapes and spatial arrangements. Although these patterning techniques are well-established, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying cell sensing and response to microtopographies. In this work cellular micro-environments with varying surface topographies and chemistries were evaluated with marine organisms and mammalian cells to investigate cellular sensing and response. Biofouling---the accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on submerged surfaces---is an environmental and economic concern. Engineered topographies, replicated in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) and functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) hydrogels, were evaluated for inhibition of marine fouling organism attachment. Microtopographies replicated in PDMSe inhibited attachment of the marine bacterium, Cobetia marina up to 99% versus smooth. The average normalized attachment densities of cells of C. marina and zoospores of the green algae Ulva on PDMSe topographies scaled inversely with the Engineered Roughness Index (ERIII), a representation of surface energy. Attachment densities of Ulva from four assays and C. marina from two growth phases to PDMSe surfaces scaled inversely with one equation: ERI II multiplied by the Reynolds number of the organism (Re) (R 2 = 0.77). The same microtopographies created in PDMSe reduced the initial attachment density and attachment strength of cells of the diatoms Navicula incerta and Seminavis robusta compared to smooth PDMSe. The average normalized attachment density of Navicula after exposure to shear stress (48 Pa) was correlated with the contact area between the diatom and a

  12. Development of exosome surface display technology in living human cells.

    PubMed

    Stickney, Zachary; Losacco, Joseph; McDevitt, Sophie; Zhang, Zhiwen; Lu, Biao

    2016-03-25

    Surface display technology is an emerging key player in presenting functional proteins for targeted drug delivery and therapy. Although a number of technologies exist, a desirable mammalian surface display system is lacking. Exosomes are extracellular vesicles that facilitate cell-cell communication and can be engineered as nano-shuttles for cell-specific delivery. In this study, we report the development of a novel exosome surface display technology by exploiting mammalian cell secreted nano-vesicles and their trans-membrane protein tetraspanins. By constructing a set of fluorescent reporters for both the inner and outer surface display on exosomes at two selected sites of tetraspanins, we demonstrated the successful exosomal display via gene transfection and monitoring fluorescence in vivo. We subsequently validated our system by demonstrating the expected intracellular partitioning of reporter protein into sub-cellular compartments and secretion of exosomes from human HEK293 cells. Lastly, we established the stable engineered cells to harness the ability of this robust system for continuous production, secretion, and uptake of displayed exosomes with minimal impact on human cell biology. In sum, our work paved the way for potential applications of exosome, including exosome tracking and imaging, targeted drug delivery, as well as exosome-mediated vaccine and therapy.

  13. Targeting Prostate Cancer Stemlike Cells through Cell Surface-Expressed GRP78

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    inhibit sphere growth of GRP78-sorted prostate cancer cells. 15. SUBJECT TERMS prostate cancer, cell surface GRP78, cancer stem cell, Snail -1 16...domains of cell surface GRP78 on Akt/GSK-3/ Snail -1 signaling. RESULTS/DISCUSSION: We are delayed in performing the experiments because of our delay in...addressing Task 6 (originally scheduled for year 1, moved to year 2; see above). Task 7: OBJECTIVE: Using Snail -1 shRNAs, assess the

  14. Cell surface differences of Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis exposed with surface markers.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Arturo; Castañón, Guadalupe; Cristóbal-Ramos, Ana Ruth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the distribution of diverse cell surface coat markers were found between Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis. The presence of carbohydrate-containing components in the cell coat of the two species was detected by selective staining with ruthenium red and alcian blue. Using both markers, N. fowleri presented a thicker deposit than N. lovaniensis. The existence of exposed mannose or glucose residues was revealed by discriminatory agglutination with the plant lectin Concanavalin A. These sugar residues were also visualized at the cell surface of these parasites either by transmission electron microscopy or by fluorescein-tagged Concanavalin A. Using this lectin cap formation was induced only in N. fowleri. The anionic sites on the cell surface detected by means of cationized ferritin were more apparent in N. fowleri. Biotinylation assays confirmed that even though the two amoebae species have some analogous plasma membrane proteins, there is a clear difference in their composition.

  15. New Monoclonal Antibodies to Defined Cell Surface Proteins on Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Carmel M; Chy, Hun S; Zhou, Qi; Blumenfeld, Shiri; Lambshead, Jack W; Liu, Xiaodong; Kie, Joshua; Capaldo, Bianca D; Chung, Tung-Liang; Adams, Timothy E; Phan, Tram; Bentley, John D; McKinstry, William J; Oliva, Karen; McMurrick, Paul J; Wang, Yu-Chieh; Rossello, Fernando J; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Chen, Di; Jarde, Thierry; Clark, Amander T; Abud, Helen E; Visvader, Jane E; Nefzger, Christian M; Polo, Jose M; Loring, Jeanne F; Laslett, Andrew L

    2017-03-01

    The study and application of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) will be enhanced by the availability of well-characterized monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) detecting cell-surface epitopes. Here, we report generation of seven new mAbs that detect cell surface proteins present on live and fixed human ES cells (hESCs) and human iPS cells (hiPSCs), confirming our previous prediction that these proteins were present on the cell surface of hPSCs. The mAbs all show a high correlation with POU5F1 (OCT4) expression and other hPSC surface markers (TRA-160 and SSEA-4) in hPSC cultures and detect rare OCT4 positive cells in differentiated cell cultures. These mAbs are immunoreactive to cell surface protein epitopes on both primed and naive state hPSCs, providing useful research tools to investigate the cellular mechanisms underlying human pluripotency and states of cellular reprogramming. In addition, we report that subsets of the seven new mAbs are also immunoreactive to human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), normal human breast subsets and both normal and tumorigenic colorectal cell populations. The mAbs reported here should accelerate the investigation of the nature of pluripotency, and enable development of robust cell separation and tracing technologies to enrich or deplete for hPSCs and other human stem and somatic cell types. Stem Cells 2017;35:626-640.

  16. Synthesis, Surface Active Properties and Cytotoxicity of Sodium N-Acyl Prolines.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Madhumanchi; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Sujitha, Pombala; Kumar, Chityal Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Sodium N-acyl prolines (NaNAPro) were synthesized using mixture of fatty acids obtained from coconut, palm, karanja, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower oils via Schotten-Baumann reaction in 58-75% yields to study the synergetic effect of mixture of hydrophobic fatty acyl functionalities like saturation, unsaturation and cyclopropene fatty acids with different chain lengths and aliphatic hetero cyclic proline head group on their surface and cytotoxicity activities. The products were characterized by chromatographic and spectral techniques. The synthesized products were evaluated for their surface active properties such as surface tension, wetting power, foaming characteristics, emulsion stability, calcium tolerance, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and thermodynamic properties. The results revealed that all the products exhibited superior surface active properties like CMC, calcium tolerance and emulsion stability as compared to the standard surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). In addition, palm, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower fatty N-acyl prolines exhibited promising cytotoxicity against different tumor cell lines.

  17. Indium phosphide negative electron affinity photocathodes: Surface cleaning and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun

    InP(100) is a very important semi-conductor for many applications. When activated by Cs and oxygen, the InP surface achieves the state of Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) making the Cs+O/InP system a very efficient electron source. Despite many years of study, the chemical cleaning and activation of InP are still not well understood. In our work, we have established an understanding of the basic physics and chemistry for the chemical cleaning and activation of the InP(100) surface. Synchrotron Radiation Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the main technique used in this study because of its high surface sensitivity and ability to identify chemical species present on the surface at each stage of our process. A clean, stoichiometric InP(100) surface is crucial for obtaining high performance of NEA photocathodes. Therefore, the first part of our study focused on the chemical cleaning of InP(100). We found that hydrogen peroxide based solutions alone, originally developed to clean GaAs(100) surfaces and widely used for InP(100), do not result in clean InP(I00) surfaces because oxide is left on the surface. A second cleaning step, which uses acid solutions like HCl or H2SO4, can remove all the oxide and leave a 0.4 ML protective layer of elemental phosphorous on the surface. The elemental phosphorous can be removed by annealing at 330°C and a clean InP(100) surface can be obtained. Cs deposition on InP(100) surface shows clear charge transfer from the Cs ad-atoms to the substrate. When the Cs/InP(100) surface is dosed with oxygen, the charge transfer from the Cs to substrate is reduced and substrate is oxidized. The activation of InP as a NEA photocathode is carried out by an alternating series of steps consisting of Cs deposition and Cs+O co-deposition. Two types of oxygen are found after activation. The first is dissociated oxygen and the other is a di-oxygen species (peroxide or superoxide). The decay of quantum-yield with time and with annealing is studied and changes in

  18. Evidence for B cell activation in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Youinou, P Y; Irving, W L; Shipley, M; Hayes, J; Lydyard, P M

    1984-01-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocytes and in some cases synovial eluate cells from 51 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), were analysed for the percentages of cells bearing surface light chains (total B cells), IgM and IgD. In addition, their capacity to form rosettes with mouse erythrocytes (mRFC)--a property of a B cell subpopulation--was determined. Activity of the disease was assessed by clinical and laboratory criteria and classified as very active, moderately active and inactive. Normal, age and sex matched individuals and a group of patients with a variety of other rheumatological disorders, were used as control populations. Although there was no significant difference in percentages of total B cells in any of the groups compared with normal controls, there was a small but significant increase in the ratio of cells bearing IgM to those bearing IgD in patients with very active disease. This was paralleled by a significant decrease in the mRFC in this disease activity group. Patients with inactive disease showed no change in their proportions of IgM:IgD, but did show a significant increase in mRFC. These results are discussed in terms of the presence of activated B cells in patients with very active RA. PMID:6607144

  19. The role of dynamic surface tension in cloud droplet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petters, Markus D.; Suda, Sarah R.; Christensen, Sara I.

    2013-05-01

    We present new data on the cloud droplet forming abilities of two-component particles that contain the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate and sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate. The experiments were designed to test specific predictions made by Kohler theory that accounts for the reduction of surface tension and the partitioning of the surfactant between the interior and the surface of the droplet. We also introduced a pre-humidification step followed by a six minute time delay to test whether dynamic surface tension may lead to kinetic limitations on the partitioning process. Our results confirm previous studies that show that surfactants do not enhance cloud droplet activation relative to what would be predicted from water activity alone. The data obtained with and without time delay were indistinguishable within measurement uncertainty, suggesting that dynamic surface tension does not need to be considered in Kohler theory.

  20. TLR signaling in human antigen‐presenting cells regulates MR1‐dependent activation of MAIT cells

    PubMed Central

    van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Hannaway, Rachel F.; Ruustal, Kerstin; Phalora, Prabhjeet; Kurioka, Ayako; Hansen, Ted H.; Willberg, Christian B.; Phillips, Rodney E.; Klenerman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Mucosal‐associated invariant T (MAIT) cells are an abundant innate‐like T lymphocyte population that are enriched in liver and mucosal tissues. They are restricted by MR1, which presents antigens derived from a metabolic precursor of riboflavin synthesis, a pathway present in many microbial species, including commensals. Therefore, MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation must be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate activation and immunopathology. Using an in vitro model of MR1‐mediated activation of primary human MAIT cells, we investigated the mechanisms by which it is regulated. Uptake of intact bacteria by antigen presenting cells (APCs) into acidified endolysosomal compartments was required for efficient MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation, while stimulation with soluble ligand was inefficient. Consistent with this, little MR1 was seen at the surface of human monocytic (THP1) and B‐cell lines. Activation with a TLR ligand increased the amount of MR1 at the surface of THP1 but not B‐cell lines, suggesting differential regulation in different cell types. APC activation and NF‐κB signaling were critical for MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation. In primary cells, however, prolonged TLR signaling led to downregulation of MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation. Overall, MR1‐mediated MAIT cell activation is a tightly regulated process, dependent on integration of innate signals by APCs. PMID:27105778

  1. Selective bactericidal activity of nanopatterned superhydrophobic cicada Psaltoda claripennis wing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Jafar; Webb, Hayden K; Truong, Vi Khanh; Pogodin, Sergey; Baulin, Vladimir A; Watson, Gregory S; Watson, Jolanta A; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2013-10-01

    The nanopattern on the surface of Clanger cicada (Psaltoda claripennis) wings represents the first example of a new class of biomaterials that can kill bacteria on contact based solely on its physical surface structure. As such, they provide a model for the development of novel functional surfaces that possess an increased resistance to bacterial contamination and infection. Their effectiveness against a wide spectrum of bacteria, however, is yet to be established. Here, the bactericidal properties of the wings were tested against several bacterial species, possessing a range of combinations of morphology and cell wall type. The tested species were primarily pathogens, and included Bacillus subtilis, Branhamella catarrhalis, Escherichia coli, Planococcus maritimus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Staphylococcus aureus. The wings were found to consistently kill Gram-negative cells (i.e., B. catarrhalis, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. fluorescens), while Gram-positive cells (B. subtilis, P. maritimus, and S. aureus) remained resistant. The morphology of the cells did not appear to play any role in determining cell susceptibility. The bactericidal activity of the wing was also found to be quite efficient; 6.1 ± 1.5 × 10(6) P. aeruginosa cells in suspension were inactivated per square centimeter of wing surface after 30-min incubation. These findings demonstrate the potential for the development of selective bactericidal surfaces incorporating cicada wing nanopatterns into the design.

  2. Studies on cell adhesion and recognition. III. The occurrence of α-mannosidase at the fibroblast cell surface, and its possible role in cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Rauvala, H; Hakomori, S

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of α-mannosidase activity at the surface of hamster embryo (NIL) fibroblasts is indicated by the following findings: (a) When NIL cells were incubated on the glass surfaces on which ovalbumin glycopeptides were covalently linked, a rapid release of free mannose from ovalbumin glycopeptides was observed as evidenced by analysis on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. (b) Cell suspensions as well as intact cell monolayers hydrolyzed rapidly p-nitrophenyl-α-D-mannoside, and the time-course of the hydrolytic cleavage was linear from the moment of mixing of the substrate with the cells. The hydrolysis of the nitrophenyl glycosides of β-D-mannose, α-D-galactose, β-D-galactose, α-L-fucose, β-D-glucose, β-D-N-acetylgalactosamine and β-D-N-acetylglucosamine was negligible or more than ten times lower as compared with the hydolysis of α-D-mannoside. (c) No released or secreted activity of mannosidase could be detected under the conditions used. (d) Studies using known proportions of broken cells in the incubation mixture indicated that more than 90 percent of the mannosidase activity measured was attributable to intact cells and not to broken cells or cell fragments. (e) Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-α-D-mannoside by cell monolayers was inhibited, in the order of decreasing inhibitory activity, by yeast mannan, ovalbumin, α-1,4-L-mannonolactone, α-methylmannoside, and mannose-6-phosphate. High inhibitory activity of the mannan polysaccharide and of ovalbumin favored the presence of the mannosidase activity at the cell surface, as these substrates may not penetrate rapidly into the cells. The following findings indicated that the cell surface mannosidase is mediating the cell adhesion based on the recognition of high-mannose-type glycopeptide: (a) Ovalbumin- coated plastic surfaces strongly promoted attachment and spreading of NIL fibroblasts, whereas the same ovalbumin coat did not promote attachment and spreading of some other cell types (BALB/c 3

  3. Adhesion of platelets to artificial surfaces: effect of red cells.

    PubMed

    Brash, J L; Brophy, J M; Feuerstein, I A

    1976-05-01

    Adhesion of platelets to several polymer- and protein-coated glass surfaces has been studied in vitro. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical probe rotating in a test tube containing the platelet medium and allows close control of fluid shear and mass transport. Suspensions of washed pig platelets constitute the basic platelet medium, and can be modified by adding back red cells and plasma proteins. Adhesion is measured via 51Cr-labeling of platelets. In the absence of red cells, identical low levels of adhesion were seen on all surfaces and saturation was reached within 2 min. In the presence of red cells, adhesion was greater. Saturation on all surfaces except fibrinogen and collagen again occurred within 2 min. The adhesion levels on polymer surfaces and glass were indistinguishable, while those on albumin were lower and those on fibrinogen were higher. Collagen was the most reactive surface. It did not equilibrate within 15 min., and kinetic data indicated a platelet diffusivity strongly dependent on hematocrit. These effects were attributed to rotational and translational motion of the red cells causing increased diffusion and surface-platelet collision energy.

  4. Cell patterning on polylactic acid through surface-tethered oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshiki; Arima, Yusuke; Takemoto, Naohiro; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-02-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a candidate material to prepare scaffolds for 3-D tissue regeneration. However, cells do not adhere or proliferate well on the surface of PLA because it is hydrophobic. We report a simple and rapid method for inducing cell adhesion to PLA through DNA hybridization. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and to a terminal phospholipid (ssDNA-PEG-lipid) was used for cell surface modification. Through DNA hybridization, modified cells were able to attach to PLA surfaces modified with complementary sequence (ssDNA'). Different cell types can be attached to PLA fibers and films in a spatially controlled manner by using ssDNAs with different sequences. In addition, they proliferate well in a culture medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. The coexisting modes of cell adhesion through DNA hybridization and natural cytoskeletal adhesion machinery revealed no serious effects on cell growth. The combination of a 3-D scaffold made of PLA and cell immobilization on the PLA scaffold through DNA hybridization will be useful for the preparation of 3-D tissue and organs.

  5. Single-molecule imaging of cell surfaces using near-field nanoscopy.

    PubMed

    Hinterdorfer, Peter; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2012-03-20

    responses upon cell activation. We anticipate that the next steps in the evolution of single-molecule near-field nanoscopy will involve combining single-molecule imaging with single-molecule force spectroscopy to simultaneously measure the localization, elasticity, and interactions of cell surface molecules. In addition, progress in high-speed AFM should allow researchers to image single cell surface molecules at unprecedented temporal resolution. In parallel, exciting advances in the fields of photonic antennas and plasmonics may soon find applications in cell biology, enabling true nanoimaging and nanospectroscopy of individual molecules in living cells.

  6. Quantum Efficiency Loss after PID Stress: Wavelength Dependence on Cell Surface and Cell Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jaewon; Bowden, Stuart; TamizhMani, GovindaSamy; Hacke, Peter

    2015-06-14

    It is known that the potential induced degradation (PID) stress of conventional p-base solar cells affects power, shunt resistance, junction recombination, and quantum efficiency (QE). One of the primary solutions to address the PID issue is a modification of chemical and physical properties of antireflection coating (ARC) on the cell surface. Depending on the edge isolation method used during cell processing, the ARC layer near the edges may be uniformly or non-uniformly damaged. Therefore, the pathway for sodium migration from glass to the cell junction could be either through all of the ARC surface if surface and edge ARC have low quality or through the cell edge if surface ARC has high quality but edge ARC is defective due to certain edge isolation process. In this study, two PID susceptible cells from two different manufacturers have been investigated. The QE measurements of these cells before and after PID stress were performed at both surface and edge. We observed the wavelength dependent QE loss only in the first manufacturer's cell but not in the second manufacturer's cell. The first manufacturer's cell appeared to have low quality ARC whereas the second manufacturer's cell appeared to have high quality ARC with defective edge. To rapidly screen a large number of cells for PID stress testing, a new but simple test setup that does not require laminated cell coupon has been developed and is used in this investigation.

  7. Surface chemical functionalities affect the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xujie; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in vitro. Plasma polymerized films rich in amine (sbnd NH2), carboxyl (sbnd COOH) and methyl (sbnd CH3), were generated on hydroxyapatite (HAp) substrates. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ability of different substrates to absorb proteins was evaluated. The results showed that substrates modified with hydrophilic functional group (sbnd COOH and sbnd NH2) can absorb more proteins than these modified with more hydrophobic functional group (sbnd CH3). The behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on different substrates was investigated in vitro: cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis was used to characterize cell proliferation, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis was used to characterize cell morphology and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis was used to account for differentiation. The results of this study demonstrated that the sbnd NH2 modified surfaces encourage osteogenic differentiation; the sbnd COOH modified surfaces promote cell adhesion and spreading and the sbnd CH3 modified surfaces have the lowest ability to induce osteogenic differentiation. These findings confirmed that the surface chemical states of biomaterials can affect the behavior of hASCs in vitro.

  8. Signals from the surface modulate differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells through glycosaminoglycans and integrins.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, Paul J; Klim, Joseph R; Hernandez, Brandon A; Koonce, Chad H; Kamp, Timothy J; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-12-23

    The fate decisions of human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells are governed by soluble and insoluble signals from the microenvironment. Many hPS cell differentiation protocols use Matrigel, a complex and undefined substrate that engages multiple adhesion and signaling receptors. Using defined surfaces programmed to engage specific cell-surface ligands (i.e., glycosaminoglycans and integrins), the contribution of specific matrix signals can be dissected. For ectoderm and motor neuron differentiation, peptide-modified surfaces that can engage both glycosaminoglycans and integrins are effective. In contrast, surfaces that interact selectively with glycosaminoglycans are superior to Matrigel in promoting hPS cell differentiation to definitive endoderm and mesoderm. The modular surfaces were used to elucidate the signaling pathways underlying these differences. Matrigel promotes integrin signaling, which in turn inhibits mesendoderm differentiation. The data indicate that integrin-activating surfaces stimulate Akt signaling via integrin-linked kinase (ILK), which is antagonistic to endoderm differentiation. The ability to attribute cellular responses to specific interactions between the cell and the substrate offers new opportunities for revealing and controlling the pathways governing cell fate.

  9. Cells responding to surface structure of calcium phosphate ceramics for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingwei; Sun, Lanying; Luo, Xiaoman; Barbieri, Davide; de Bruijn, Joost D; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; Moroni, Lorenzo; Yuan, Huipin

    2017-02-08

    Surface structure largely affects the inductive bone-forming potential of calcium phosphate (CaP) ceramics in ectopic sites and bone regeneration in critical-sized bone defects. Surface-dependent osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) partially explained the improved bone-forming ability of submicron surface structured CaP ceramics. In this study, we investigated the possible influence of surface structure on different bone-related cells, which may potentially participate in the process of improved bone formation in CaP ceramics. Besides BMSCs, the response of human brain vascular pericytes (HBVP), C2C12 (osteogenic inducible cells), MC3T3-E1 (osteogenic precursors), SV-HFO (pre-osteoblasts), MG63 (osteoblasts) and SAOS-2 (mature osteoblasts) to the surface structure was evaluated in terms of cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and gene expression. The cells were cultured on tricalcium phosphate (TCP) ceramics with either micron-scaled surface structure (TCP-B) or submicron-scaled surface structure (TCP-S) for up to 14 days, followed by DNA, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and quantitative polymerase chain reaction gene assays. HBVP were not sensitive to surface structure with respect to cell proliferation and osteogenic differentiation, but had downregulated angiogenesis-related gene expression (i.e. vascular endothelial growth factor) on TCP-S. Without additional osteogenic inducing factors, submicron-scaled surface structure enhanced ALP activity and osteocalcin gene expression of human (h)BMSCs and C2C12 cells, favoured the proliferation of MC3T3-E1, MG63 and SAOS-2, and increased ALP activity of MC3T3-E1 and SV-HFO. The results herein indicate that cells with osteogenic potency (either osteogenic inducible cells or osteogenic cells) could be sensitive to surface structure and responded to osteoinductive submicron-structured CaP ceramics in cell proliferation, ALP production or osteogenic gene expression, which favour bone

  10. Effects of surface viscoelasticity on cellular responses of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Motahare-Sadat; Katbab, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: One area of nanoscience deals with nanoscopic interactions between nanostructured materials and biological systems. To elucidate the effects of the substrate surface morphology and viscoelasticity on cell proliferation, fractal analysis was performed on endothelial cells cultured on nanocomposite samples based on silicone rubber (SR) and various concentrations of organomodified nanoclay (OC). Methods: The nanoclay/SR ratio was tailored to enhance cell behavior via changes in sample substrate surface roughness and viscoelasticity. Results: Surface roughness of the cured SR filled with negatively-charged nanosilicate layers had a greater effect than elasticity on cell growth. The surface roughness of SR nanocomposite samples increased with increasing the OC content, leading to enhanced cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. This was consistent with the decrease in SR segmental motions and damping factor as the primary viscoelastic parameters by the nanosilicate layers with increasing clay concentrations. Conclusions: The inclusion of clay nanolayers affected the growth and behavior of endothelial cells on microtextured SR. PMID:26989733

  11. Biological surface engineering: a simple system for cell pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S; Yan, L; Altman, M; Lässle, M; Nugent, H; Frankel, F; Lauffenburger, D A; Whitesides, G M; Rich, A

    1999-07-01

    Biological surface engineering using synthetic biological materials has a great potential for advances in our understanding of complex biological phenomena. We developed a simple system to engineer biologically relevant surfaces using a combination of self-assembling oligopeptide monolayers and microcontact printing (muCP). We designed and synthesized two oligopeptides containing a cell adhesion motif (RADS)n (n = 2 and 3) at the N-terminus, followed by an oligo(alanine) linker and a cysteine residue at the C-terminus. The thiol group of cysteine allows the oligopeptides to attach covalently onto a gold-coated surface to form monolayers. We then microfabricated a variety of surface patterns using the cell adhesion peptides in combination with hexa-ethylene glycol thiolate which resist non-specific adsorption of proteins and cells. The resulting patterns consist of areas either supporting or inhibiting cell adhesion, thus they are capable of aligning cells in a well-defined manner, leading to specific cell array and pattern formations.

  12. Monocyte surface-bound IL-15 can function as an activating receptor and participate in reverse signaling.

    PubMed

    Neely, Graham G; Epelman, Slava; Ma, Ling Ling; Colarusso, Pina; Howlett, Christopher J; Amankwah, Ernest K; McIntyre, Amanda C; Robbins, Stephen M; Mody, Christopher H

    2004-04-01

    IL-15 is a short chain, four-alpha helix cytokine that shares some biological function with IL-2. One striking difference between IL-2 and IL-15 is the ability of monocytes to express IL-15 on their cell surface after activation. In the current study we have investigated the ability of human monocyte cell surface IL-15 to participate in reverse signaling. Cross-linking anti-IL-15 Abs were used as a surrogate ligand for surface IL-15 engagement. Ligation of cell surface-expressed IL-15 induced monocyte adhesion that required the activity of small m.w. GTPases. Reverse signals through surface IL-15 activated the Rho-GTPase Rac3. In addition, engagement of cell surface IL-15 was found to activate a number of signaling pathways, including both extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and p38, and resulted in the secretion of IL-8. IL-8 production required mitogen-activated protein kinase activity. Thus, the current study has established that cell surface IL-15 is more than just a ligand; it can function as a receptor and participate in reverse signaling that results in cellular adhesion and production of inflammatory cytokines.

  13. Variation in human cancer cell external phosphatidylserine is regulated by flippase activity and intracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D; Blanco, Víctor M; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K; Vallabhapurapu, Swarajya Lakshmi; Chu, Zhengtao; Franc