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Sample records for activating cell surface

  1. Surface free energy activated high-throughput cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinru; Zhang, Qian; Yan, Tao; Jiang, Zeyi; Zhang, Xinxin; Zuo, Yi Y

    2014-09-16

    Cell sorting is an important screening process in microbiology, biotechnology, and clinical research. Existing methods are mainly based on single-cell analysis as in flow cytometric and microfluidic cell sorters. Here we report a label-free bulk method for sorting cells by differentiating their characteristic surface free energies (SFEs). We demonstrated the feasibility of this method by sorting model binary cell mixtures of various bacterial species, including Pseudomonas putida KT2440, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028, and Escherichia coli DH5α. This method can effectively separate 10(10) bacterial cells within 30 min. Individual bacterial species can be sorted with up to 96% efficiency, and the cell viability ratio can be as high as 99%. In addition to its capacity of sorting evenly mixed bacterial cells, we demonstrated the feasibility of this method in selecting and enriching cells of minor populations in the mixture (presenting at only 1% in quantity) to a purity as high as 99%. This SFE-activated method may be used as a stand-alone method for quickly sorting a large quantity of bacterial cells or as a prescreening tool for microbial discrimination. Given its advantages of label-free, high-throughput, low cost, and simplicity, this SFE-activated cell sorting method has potential in various applications of sorting cells and abiotic particles. PMID:25184988

  2. Differentiation Between Intracellular and Cell Surface Glycosyl Transferases: Galactosyl Transferase Activity in Intact Cells and in Cell Homogenate

    PubMed Central

    Deppert, Wolfgang; Werchau, Hermann; Walter, Gernot

    1974-01-01

    Intact BHK (baby hamster kidney) cells catalyze the hydrolysis of UDP-galactose to free galactose. The generation of galactose from UDP-galactose and its intracellular utilization impede the detection of possible galactosyl transferases on the cell surface of intact cells. Several independent procedures have been used to distinguish between intracellular and cell surface glycosyl transferases. With these procedures, no evidence was obtained for the presence of detectable amounts of galactosyl transferase activity on the surface of BHK cells. The data suggest that galactosyl transferases do not play a general role in the phenomena of cell adhesion and contact inhibition. PMID:4528509

  3. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  4. A yeast surface display system for the discovery of ligands that trigger cell activation.

    PubMed

    Cho, B K; Kieke, M C; Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D; Kranz, D M

    1998-11-01

    Opposing cells often communicate signalling events using multivalent interactions between receptors present on their cell surface. For example, T cells are typically activated when the T cell receptor (TCR) and its associated costimulatory molecules are multivalently engaged by the appropriate ligands present on an antigen presenting cell. In this report, yeast expressing high cell-surface levels of a TCR ligand (a recombinant antibody to the TCR Vbeta domain) were shown to act as 'pseudo' antigen presenting cells and induce T cell activation as monitored by increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and by downregulation of cell surface TCR. Similar levels of T cell activation could occur even when a 30-fold excess of irrelevant yeast was present, suggesting that such a yeast display system, by virtue of its ability to present ligands multivalently, may be used in highly sensitive procedures to identify novel polypeptides that interact multivalently with cell surface receptors and thereby trigger specific cellular responses.

  5. Equilibrium of sortase A dimerization on Staphylococcus aureus cell surface mediates its cell wall sorting activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jie; Xiang, Liang; Jiang, Faqin

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus sortase A (SrtA) transpeptidase is a therapeutically important membrane-bound enzyme in Gram-positive bacteria, which organizes the covalently attached cell surface proteins on the peptidoglycan cell wall of the organism. Here, we report the direct observation of the highly selective homo-dimerization of SrtA on the cell membrane. To address the biological significance of the dimerization towards enzyme function, site-directed mutagenesis was performed to generate a SrtA mutant, which exists as monomer on the cell membrane. We observed that the cell surface display of adhesive proteins in S. aureus cells expressing monomeric SrtA mutant is more prominent than the cells expressing the wild-type enzyme. A cell-based invasion assay was also performed to evaluate the activities of wild-type SrtA and its monomeric mutant as well. Our data demonstrated that S. aureus cells expressing SrtA in monomeric form invade host mammalian cells more efficiently than those expressing wild-type SrtA in dimer-monomer equilibrium. The results suggested that the monomeric form of SrtA is more active than the dimeric form of the enzyme in terms of cell surface display of virulence factors for infection. This is the first study to present the oligomerization of SrtA and its related biological function on the cell membrane. Study of SrtA dimerization has implications for understanding its catalytic mechanism at the cellular level as well as the development of novel anti-infective agents. PMID:26129884

  6. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Regulates the Cell Surface Proteome and Integrin Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Thanusi; Medvedev, Sergei; Bowden, Peter; Marshall, John G.; Antonescu, Costin N.

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface proteome controls numerous cellular functions including cell migration and adhesion, intercellular communication and nutrient uptake. Cell surface proteins are controlled by acute changes in protein abundance at the plasma membrane through regulation of endocytosis and recycling (endomembrane traffic). Many cellular signals regulate endomembrane traffic, including metabolic signaling; however, the extent to which the cell surface proteome is controlled by acute regulation of endomembrane traffic under various conditions remains incompletely understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key metabolic sensor that is activated upon reduced cellular energy availability. AMPK activation alters the endomembrane traffic of a few specific proteins, as part of an adaptive response to increase energy intake and reduce energy expenditure. How increased AMPK activity during energy stress may globally regulate the cell surface proteome is not well understood. To study how AMPK may regulate the cell surface proteome, we used cell-impermeable biotinylation to selectively purify cell surface proteins under various conditions. Using ESI-MS/MS, we found that acute (90 min) treatment with the AMPK activator A-769662 elicits broad control of the cell surface abundance of diverse proteins. In particular, A-769662 treatment depleted from the cell surface proteins with functions in cell migration and adhesion. To complement our mass spectrometry results, we used other methods to show that A-769662 treatment results in impaired cell migration. Further, A-769662 treatment reduced the cell surface abundance of β1-integrin, a key cell migration protein, and AMPK gene silencing prevented this effect. While the control of the cell surface abundance of various proteins by A-769662 treatment was broad, it was also selective, as this treatment did not change the cell surface abundance of the transferrin receptor. Hence, the cell surface proteome is subject to acute

  7. The role of cell surface receptors in the activation of human B cells by phosphorothioate oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Reich, C F; Pisetsky, D S; Lipsky, P E

    2000-08-01

    Phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (sODN) containing the CpG motif or TCG repeats induce T cell-independent polyclonal activation of human B cells. To elucidate the mechanism of this response, the role of cell surface receptors was investigated. Sepharose beads coated with stimulatory but not nonstimulatory sODNs induced B cell proliferation comparably with soluble sODNs. The B cell stimulatory activity of Sepharose-bound sODN did not result from free sODN released from the beads since media incubated with coated beads were inactive. Using FITC-labeled sODNs as probes, binding to human B cells could be detected by flow cytometry. Binding was rapid, saturable, initially temperature independent, but with a rapid off-rate. Competition studies indicated that both stimulatory sODNs and minimally stimulatory sODNs bound to the same receptor. By contrast, phosphodiester oligonucleotides with the same nucleotide sequence as sODNs and bacterial DNA inhibited the binding of sODNs to B cells minimally. Charge appeared to contribute to the binding of sODNs to B cells since binding of sODNs was competitively inhibited by negatively charged molecules, including fucoidan, poly I, and polyvinyl sulfate. These data indicate that human B cells bind sODNs by a receptor-mediated mechanism that is necessary but not sufficient for polyclonal activation.

  8. Minor Role of Plasminogen in Complement Activation on Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Hyvärinen, Satu; Jokiranta, T. Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a rare, but severe thrombotic microangiopathy. In roughly two thirds of the patients, mutations in complement genes lead to uncontrolled activation of the complement system against self cells. Recently, aHUS patients were described with deficiency of the fibrinolytic protein plasminogen. This zymogen and its protease form plasmin have both been shown to interact with complement proteins in the fluid phase. In this work we studied the potential of plasminogen to restrict complement propagation. In hemolytic assays, plasminogen inhibited complement activation, but only when it had been exogenously activated to plasmin and when it was used at disproportionately high concentrations compared to serum. Addition of only the zymogen plasminogen into serum did not hinder complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes. Plasminogen could not restrict deposition of complement activation products on endothelial cells either, as was shown with flow cytometry. With platelets, a very weak inhibitory effect on deposition of C3 fragments was observed, but it was considered too weak to be significant for disease pathogenesis. Thus it was concluded that plasminogen is not an important regulator of complement on self cells. Instead, addition of plasminogen was shown to clearly hinder platelet aggregation in serum. This was attributed to plasmin causing disintegration of formed platelet aggregates. We propose that reduced proteolytic activity of plasmin on structures of growing thrombi, rather than on complement activation fragments, explains the association of plasminogen deficiency with aHUS. This adds to the emerging view that factors unrelated to the complement system can also be central to aHUS pathogenesis and suggests that future research on the mechanism of the disease should expand beyond complement dysregulation. PMID:26637181

  9. Surface plasmon enhanced cell microscopy with blocked random spatial activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Taehwang; Oh, Youngjin; Lee, Wonju; Yang, Heejin; Kim, Donghyun

    2016-03-01

    We present surface plasmon enhanced fluorescence microscopy with random spatial sampling using patterned block of silver nanoislands. Rigorous coupled wave analysis was performed to confirm near-field localization on nanoislands. Random nanoislands were fabricated in silver by temperature annealing. By analyzing random near-field distribution, average size of localized fields was found to be on the order of 135 nm. Randomly localized near-fields were used to spatially sample F-actin of J774 cells (mouse macrophage cell-line). Image deconvolution algorithm based on linear imaging theory was established for stochastic estimation of fluorescent molecular distribution. The alignment between near-field distribution and raw image was performed by the patterned block. The achieved resolution is dependent upon factors including the size of localized fields and estimated to be 100-150 nm.

  10. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  11. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting.

  12. Characterization of fucosyltransferase activity during mouse spermatogenesis: Evidence for a cell surface fucosyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Cardullo, R.A.; Armant, D.R.; Millette, C.F. )

    1989-02-21

    Fucosyltransferase activity was quantified in mouse germ cells at different stages of spermatogenesis. Specifically, fucosyltransferase activities of pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and cauda epididymal sperm were compared. Fucosyltranferase activity of mixed germ cells displayed an apparent V{sub max} of 17 pmol (mg of protein){sup {minus}1} min{sup {minus}1} and an apparent K{sub m} of approximately 13 {mu}M for GDP-L-({sup 14}C)fucose in the presence of saturating amounts of asialofetuin at 33{degree}C. Under these conditions, cellular fucosyltransferase activity was found to increase during spermatogenesis. In agreement with assays of intact cells, examination of subcellular fractions indicated that a large fraction of fucosyltransferase activity was associated with the cell surface. The fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface progressively increased throughout spermatogenesis and epididymal maturation so that nearly all of the fucosyltransferase in epididymal sperm was on the cell surface. Specifically, by comparison of activities in the presence and absence of the detergent NP-40, the fraction of fucosyltransferase activity that was associated with the cell surface in pachytene spermatocytes, round spermatids, and epididymal sperm was 0.36, 0.5, and 0.85, respectively. These results suggest that a cell surface fucosyltransferase may be important during differentiation of spermatogenic cells in the testis as well as during epididymal maturation and fertilization.

  13. Activation of Cell Surface Bound 20S Proteasome Inhibits Vascular Cell Growth and Arteriogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Wulf D.; Lund, Natalie; Zhang, Ziyang; Buck, Friedrich; Lellek, Heinrich; Horst, Andrea; Machens, Hans-Günther; Schunkert, Heribert; Schaper, Wolfgang; Meinertz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Arteriogenesis is an inflammatory process associated with rapid cellular changes involving vascular resident endothelial progenitor cells (VR-EPCs). Extracellular cell surface bound 20S proteasome has been implicated to play an important role in inflammatory processes. In our search for antigens initially regulated during collateral growth mAb CTA 157-2 was generated against membrane fractions of growing collateral vessels. CTA 157-2 stained endothelium of growing collateral vessels and the cell surface of VR-EPCs. CTA 157-2 bound a protein complex (760 kDa) that was identified as 26 kDa α7 and 21 kDa β3 subunit of 20S proteasome in mass spectrometry. Furthermore we demonstrated specific staining of 20S proteasome after immunoprecipitation of VR-EPC membrane extract with CTA 157-2 sepharose beads. Functionally, CTA 157-2 enhanced concentration dependently AMC (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin) cleavage from LLVY (N-Succinyl-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr) by recombinant 20S proteasome as well as proteasomal activity in VR-EPC extracts. Proliferation of VR-EPCs (BrdU incorporation) was reduced by CTA 157-2. Infusion of the antibody into the collateral circulation reduced number of collateral arteries, collateral proliferation, and collateral conductance in vivo. In conclusion our results indicate that extracellular cell surface bound 20S proteasome influences VR-EPC function in vitro and collateral growth in vivo. PMID:26146628

  14. Simultaneous interaction of bacteria and tissue cells with photocatalytically activated, anodized titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Yue, Chongxia; Kuijer, Roel; Kaper, Hans J; van der Mei, Henny C; Busscher, Henk J

    2014-03-01

    Photocatalytic-activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces has been demonstrated to yield antibacterial and tissue integrating effects, but effects on simultaneous growth of tissue cells and bacteria in co-culture have never been studied. Moreover, it is unknown how human-bone-marrow-mesenchymal-stem (hBMMS) cells, laying the groundwork for integration of titanium implants in bone, respond to photocatalytic activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces. Photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium and titanium-alloy surfaces achieved 99.99% killing of adhering Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, an effect that lasted for 30 days of storage in air. Surface coverage by osteoblasts was not affected by photocatalytic activation of anodized TiO2-surfaces. Co-cultures of osteoblasts with contaminating S. epidermidis however, enhanced surface coverage on photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium-alloy surfaces. hBMMS cells grew less on photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium surfaces, while not at all on photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium-alloy surfaces and did not survive the presence of contaminating staphylococci. This reduced surface coverage by hBMMS cells disappeared when photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium-alloy surfaces were exposed to buffer for 60 min, both in absence or presence of contaminating S. aureus. Consequently, it is concluded that photocatalytically-activated, anodized titanium and titanium-alloy surfaces will effectively kill peri-operatively introduced staphylococci contaminating an implant surface and constitute an effective means for antibiotic prophylaxis in cementless fixation of orthopaedic hardware.

  15. NREL Team Creates High-Activity, Durable Platinum Extended Surface Catalyst for Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    Researchers with NREL's Fuel Cell team showed that platinum can replace copper nanowires in such a way that high-surface-area and high-specific-activity catalysts are produced, potentially allowing for lower-cost catalysts.

  16. Activity-dependent mobilization of the adhesion molecule polysialic NCAM to the cell surface of neurons and endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, J Z; Wang, C; Olive, S; Rougon, G; Lang, J; Baetens, D; Harry, D; Pralong, W F

    1994-01-01

    The alpha-2,8-linked sialic acid polymer (PSA) on the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is an important regulator of cell surface interactions. We have examined the translocation of PSA-NCAM to the surface of cultured cortical neurons and insulin secreting beta cells under different conditions of cell activity. Endoneuraminidase N, an enzyme that specifically cleaves PSA chains, was used to remove pre-existing PSA from the plasma membrane and the re-expression of the molecule was monitored by immunocytochemistry. Punctate PSA immunostaining was restored on the surface of 68% of neurons within 1 h. This recovery was almost completely prevented by tetrodotoxin, suggesting that spontaneous electrical activity is required. K+ depolarization (50 mM) allowed recovery of PSA surface staining in the presence of tetrodotoxin and this effect required the presence of extracellular Ca2+. Rapid redistribution of PSA-NCAM to the surface of beta cells was observed under conditions that stimulate insulin secretion. Ca2+ channel inhibition decreased both PSA-NCAM expression and insulin secretion to control, non-stimulated levels. Finally, subcellular fractionation of an insulin-secreting cell line showed that the secretory vesicle fraction is highly enriched in PSA-NCAM. These results suggest that PSA-NCAM can be translocated to the cell surface via regulated exocytosis. Taken together, our results provide unprecedented evidence linking cell activity and PSA-NCAM expression, and suggest a mechanism for rapid modulation of cell surface interactions. Images PMID:7957094

  17. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21{sup cip1} and p27{sup kip1} and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  18. Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibition reverses low cell activity on hydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu Shun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Kim, Hyun-Man

    2009-08-28

    Hydrophobic polymers do not offer an adequate scaffold surface for cells to attach, migrate, proliferate, and differentiate. Thus, hydrophobic scaffolds for tissue engineering have traditionally been physicochemically modified to enhance cellular activity. However, modifying the surface by chemical or physical treatment requires supplementary engineering procedures. In the present study, regulation of a cell signal transduction pathway reversed the low cellular activity on a hydrophobic surface without surface modification. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) by Y-27632 markedly enhanced adhesion, migration, and proliferation of osteoblastic cells cultured on a hydrophobic polystyrene surface. ROCK inhibition regulated cell-cycle-related molecules on the hydrophobic surface. This inhibition also decreased expression of the inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases such as p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) and increased expression of cyclin A and D. These results indicate that defective cellular activity on the hydrophobic surface can be reversed by the control of a cell signal transduction pathway without physicochemical surface modification.

  19. Surface aminopeptidase activity of rat natural killer cells. I. Biochemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Amoscato, A A; Spiess, R R; Brumfield, A M; Herberman, R B; Chambers, W H

    1994-04-28

    Aminopeptidase (AP) activity on rat natural killer (NK) cells was found to have the following characteristics: (1) the activity was surface associated and not secreted, as determined by extracellular location of product and by the cessation of hydrolysis of substrate upon removal of the cells from the medium. (2) The activity was linear with respect to time and cell number. (3) The enzymatic activity on splenocytes and on the NK leukemia cell line CRNK-16, but not on IL-2 activated NK (A-NK) cells, was sensitive to trypsin treatment. (4) The AP activity on intact cells had a broad pH dependency with optimal activity at slightly alkaline pH but lower activity at acidic pH. (5) There was a preference for neutral substrates and essentially no activity towards acidic substrates. (6) Enzymatic activity was inhibited in the presence of the AP inhibitors bestatin and amastatin, and in the presence of the chelator, 1,10 phenanthroline, indicating the involvement of a metalloprotease. (7) Culture of A-NK cells with bestatin resulted in a decrease in cytotoxicity against YAC-1 and P815 targets. Amastatin treatment caused only a slight decrease in cytotoxicity against YAC-1 targets, but a significant decrease in cytotoxicity against P815 targets. (8) Treatment of A-NK cultures with specific inhibitors of APases caused an increase in expression of CD2 (an increase from 20-80% with bestatin and an increase from 25-35% in the presence of amastatin). These results provide the first evidence for the existence of APases on the surface of NK cells and suggest a role for these enzymes in the regulation of cytotoxic activity and of CD2 surface expression.

  20. Cell surface activation of the erythropoietin receptor by Friend spleen focus-forming virus gp55.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J P; Hu, H O; Niu, Q T; Fang, C

    1995-01-01

    The leukemogenic membrane glycoprotein gp55, encoded by Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV), induces erythroid cell proliferation through its interaction with the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R). There are two forms of gp55 in SFFV-infected cells: an intracellular form (more than 95% of the total protein), which is localized within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, and a cell surface form (about 3 to 5%). Because both forms of the viral proteins bind to EPO-R, it is not clear whether the viral protein induces mitogenesis intracellularly or at the cell surface. To address this question, we constructed an EPO-R mutant that contained a 6-amino-acid (DEKKMP) C-terminus ER retention signal. Biochemical and functional analyses with this mutant indicated that it was completely retained in the ER and not expressed at the cell surface. Further analysis showed that the mutant, like the wild-type EPO-R, interacted with SFFV gp55. However, this apparent intracellular interaction between the two proteins failed to induce growth factor-independent proliferation of Ba/F3 cells. Furthermore, spontaneous variants of the ER-retained EPO-R selected on the basis of their ability to induce cell proliferation when coexpressed with gp55 were exclusively expressed at the cell surface. Thus, our results support the hypothesis that the mitogenic activation of the EPO-R by gp55 requires the interaction of the two proteins at the cell surface. PMID:7853508

  1. Spatiotemporal regulation of chemical reaction kinetics of cell surface molecules by active remodeling of cortical actin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Bhaswati; Chaudhuri, Abhishek; Gowrishankar, Kripa; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan

    2010-03-01

    Cell surface proteins such as lipid tethered GPI-anchored proteins and Ras-proteins are distributed as monomers and nanoclusters on the surface of living cells. Recent work from our laboratory suggests that the spatial distribution and dynamics of formation and breakup of these nanoclusters is controlled by the active remodeling dynamics of the underlying cortical actin. To explain these observations, we propose a novel mechanism of nanoclustering, involving the transient binding to and advection along constitutively occuring ``asters'' of cortical actin. Here we study the consequences of such active actin based clustering, in the context of chemical reactions involving conformational changes of cell surface proteins. We find that active remodeling of cortical actin, can give rise to a dramatic increase in the reaction efficiency and output levels. In general, such actin driven clustering of membrane proteins could be a cellular mechanism to spatiotemporally regulate and amplify local chemical reaction rates, in the context of signalling and endocytosis.

  2. Cell Surface Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Increase Src and c-Cbl Activity and Receptor Ubiquitylation*

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Eileen E.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an established role for the endocytic pathway in regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to downstream effectors. However, because ligand-mediated EGFR endocytosis utilizes multiple “moving parts,” dissecting the spatial versus temporal contributions has been challenging. Blocking all endocytic trafficking can have unintended effects on other receptors as well as give rise to compensatory mechanisms, both of which impact interpretation of EGFR signaling. To overcome these limitations, we used epidermal growth factor (EGF) conjugated to polystyrene beads (EGF beads). EGF beads simultaneously activate the EGFR while blocking its endocytosis and allow analysis of EGFR signaling from the plasma membrane. Human telomerase immortalized corneal epithelial (hTCEpi) cells were used to model normal epithelial cell biology. In hTCEpi cells, both cell surface and intracellular EGFRs exhibited dose-dependent increases in effector activity after 15 min of ligand stimulation, but only the serine phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) was statistically significant when accounting for receptor phosphorylation. However, over time with physiological levels of receptor phosphorylation, cell surface receptors produced either enhanced or sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (c-Cbl), and the pro-oncogene Src activity. These increases in effector communication by cell surface receptors resulted in an increase in EGFR ubiquitylation with sustained ligand incubation. Together, these data indicate that spatial regulation of EGFR signaling may be an important regulatory mechanism in receptor down-regulation. PMID:25074934

  3. Increased cell surface hydrophobicity of a Serratia marcescens NS 38 mutant lacking wetting activity.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ness, R; Avrahamy, N; Matsuyama, T; Rosenberg, M

    1988-09-01

    The cell surface hydrophobicity of Serratia marcescens appears to be an important factor in its adhesion to and colonization of various interfaces. The cell surface components responsible for mediating the hydrophobicity of S. marcescens have not been completely elucidated, but may include prodigiosin and other factors. In the present report we have investigated the potential role of serratamolide, an amphipathic aminolipid present on the surfaces of certain S. marcescens strains, in modulating cell surface hydrophobicity. The hydrophobic properties of a serratamolide-producing strain (NS 38) were compared with those of a serratamolide-deficient mutant (NS 38-9) by monitoring the kinetics of adhesion to hexadecane. Serratamolide production was monitored by thin-layer chromatography and the wetting activity of washed-cell suspensions on polystyrene. Wild-type NS 38 cells were far less hydrophobic than the serratamolide-deficient mutant cells were; the removal coefficients were 48 min-1 for the mutant, as compared with only 18 min-1 for the wild type. The data suggest that the presence of serratamolide on S. marcescens cells results in a reduction in hydrophobicity, presumably by blocking hydrophobic sites on the cell surface.

  4. Osteoinductive activity of insulin-functionalized cell culture surfaces obtained using diazonium chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikulska, Anna; Filipowska, Joanna; Osyczka, Anna; Nowakowska, Maria; Szczubiałka, Krzysztof

    2014-12-01

    Polymeric surfaces suitable for cell culture (DR/Pec) were constructed from diazoresin (DR) and pectin (Pec) in a form of ultrathin films using the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique. The surfaces were functionalized with insulin using diazonium chemistry. Such functionalized surfaces were used to culture human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to assess their suitability for bone tissue engineering and regeneration. The activity of insulin immobilized on the surfaces (DR/Pec/Ins) was compared to that of insulin dissolved in the culture medium. Human MSC grown on insulin-immobilized DR/Pec surfaces displayed increased proliferation and higher osteogenic activity. The latter was determined by means of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, which increases at early stages of osteoblasts differentiation. Insulin dissolved in the culture medium did not stimulate cell proliferation and its osteogenic activity was significantly lower. Addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2) to the culture medium further increased ALP activity in hMSCs indicating additive osteogenic action of immobilized insulin and rhBMP-2

  5. Receptor-independent, direct membrane binding leads to cell surface lipid sorting and Syk kinase activation in dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Gilbert; Sharma, Karan; Ward, Sandra M.; Desrosiers, Melanie D.; Stephens, Leslie A.; Schoel, W. Michael; Li, Tonglei; Lowell, Clifford A.; Ling, Chang-Chun; Amrein, Matthias W.; Shi, Yan

    2008-01-01

    Summary Binding of particulate antigens by antigen presenting cells (APC) is a critical step in immune activation. Previously, we demonstrated that uric acid crystals are potent adjuvants, initiating a robust adaptive immune response. However, the mechanisms of activation are unknown. Using atomic force microscopy as a tool for real time single cell activation analysis, we report that uric acid crystals can directly engage cellular membranes, particularly the cholesterol components, with a force substantially stronger than protein based cellular contacts. Binding of particulate substances activates Syk kinase-dependent signaling in dendritic cells (DCs). These observations suggest a mechanism whereby immune cell activation can be triggered by solid structures via membrane lipid alteration without the requirement for specific cell surface receptors, and a testable hypothesis for crystal-associated arthropathies, inflammation and adjuvanticity. PMID:18993083

  6. Atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by CPA47 cells - Evidence for a divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is rapidly cleared and degraded in vivo. Nonguanylate-cyclase receptors (C-ANPR) and a metalloproteinase, neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) (NEP 24.11), are thought to be responsible for its metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms of ANP degradation by an endothelial-derived cell line, CPA47. CPA47 cells degraded 88 percent of 125I-ANP after 1 h at 37 degrees C as determined by HPLC. Medium preconditioned by these cells degraded 41 percent of the 125I-ANP, and this activity was inhibited by a divalent cation chelator, EDTA. Furthermore, a cell-surface proteolytic activity degraded 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA when receptor-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by low temperature (4 degrees C) or by hyperosmolarity at 37 degrees C. The metalloproteinase, NEP 24.11, is unlikely to be the cell-surface peptidase because 125I-ANP is degraded by CPA47 cells at 4 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. These data indicate that CPA47 cells can degrade ANP by a novel divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity.

  7. Annexin A8 controls leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells via cell surface delivery of CD63

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poeter, Michaela; Brandherm, Ines; Rossaint, Jan; Rosso, Gonzalo; Shahin, Victor; Skryabin, Boris V.; Zarbock, Alexander; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2014-04-01

    To enable leukocyte adhesion to activated endothelium, the leukocyte receptor P-selectin is released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB) to the endothelial cell surface where it is stabilized by CD63. Here we report that loss of annexin A8 (anxA8) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) strongly decreases cell surface presentation of CD63 and P-selectin, with a concomitant reduction in leukocyte rolling and adhesion. We confirm the compromised leukocyte adhesiveness in inflammatory-activated endothelial venules of anxA8-deficient mice. We find that WPB of anxA8-deficient HUVEC contain less CD63, and that this is caused by improper transport of CD63 from late multivesicular endosomes to WPB, with CD63 being retained in intraluminal vesicles. Consequently, reduced CD63 cell surface levels are seen following WPB exocytosis, resulting in enhanced P-selectin re-internalization. Our data support a model in which anxA8 affects leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells by supplying WPB with sufficient amounts of the P-selectin regulator CD63.

  8. Annexin A8 controls leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells via cell surface delivery of CD63.

    PubMed

    Poeter, Michaela; Brandherm, Ines; Rossaint, Jan; Rosso, Gonzalo; Shahin, Victor; Skryabin, Boris V; Zarbock, Alexander; Gerke, Volker; Rescher, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    To enable leukocyte adhesion to activated endothelium, the leukocyte receptor P-selectin is released from Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB) to the endothelial cell surface where it is stabilized by CD63. Here we report that loss of annexin A8 (anxA8) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) strongly decreases cell surface presentation of CD63 and P-selectin, with a concomitant reduction in leukocyte rolling and adhesion. We confirm the compromised leukocyte adhesiveness in inflammatory-activated endothelial venules of anxA8-deficient mice. We find that WPB of anxA8-deficient HUVEC contain less CD63, and that this is caused by improper transport of CD63 from late multivesicular endosomes to WPB, with CD63 being retained in intraluminal vesicles. Consequently, reduced CD63 cell surface levels are seen following WPB exocytosis, resulting in enhanced P-selectin re-internalization. Our data support a model in which anxA8 affects leukocyte recruitment to activated endothelial cells by supplying WPB with sufficient amounts of the P-selectin regulator CD63. PMID:24769558

  9. Optimization of the whole-cell catalytic activity of recombinant Escherichia coli cells with surface-immobilized organophosphorus hydrolase.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxing; Li, Qianqian; Ye, Ting; Zhang, Zhen; Li, Lin

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have verified the feasibility of using Escherichia coli systems that display organophosphorous hydrolase (OPH) on the cell surface as whole-cell catalysts. However, the inefficient display of the enzyme on cell surfaces remains unaddressed. In the present study, multiple optimization experiments on full-length and truncated ice nucleation protein anchors, E. coli host cells, culture media, and culture conditions were performed to optimize whole-cell OPH enzymatic activity. The results show that apart from the dramatic effect of isopropyl-beta-D-thiogalactoside concentration and culture temperature, the coordination between the anchor protein, culture media, and host cells is essential for highly efficient OPH display. Under optimal conditions, namely, culturing in M9 medium, 20 degrees C induction temperature, 0.1 mmol l(-1) IPTG, and 100 micromol I(-1) Co2+, the engineered E. coli strain MB109-406 that expresses the fusion enzyme lnaK-N-OPH exhibited a whole-cell OPH activity of 0.62 U mg(-1) x cell d.wt. This result is much higher than that of several currently available OPH-displaying systems, which shows the potential of the current system for further large-scale industrial or environmental applications. PMID:24620599

  10. Surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol in colloidal dispersions exerts cytostatic effects and apoptotic dismissal of cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kristl, Julijana; Teskac, Karmen; Milek, Miha; Mlinaric-Rascan, Irena

    2008-10-15

    Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) have been praised for their advantageous drug delivery properties such as biocompatibility, controlled release and passive drug targeting. However, the cytotoxicity of SLN and their ingredients, especially over a longer time period, has not been investigated in detail. We examined the critical issues regarding the use of a surface active stabilizer Tyloxapol (Tyl) for the preparation of solid lipid particles (SLP) and their effects on cellular functions and viability. SLP composed of behenate, phospholipids and a stabilizer, Tyloxapol or Lutrol (Lut), were prepared by the lipid melt method, labeled with a fluorescent dye and tested on Jurkat or HEK293 cells. The nano-sized particles were rapidly internalized and exhibited cytoplasmic localization. Incubation of cells with SLP-Tyl resulted in a dose- and time-dependent cytostatic effect, and also caused moderate and delayed cytotoxicity. Tyloxapol solution or SLP-Tyl dispersion caused the detachment of HEK293 cells, a decrease in cell proliferation and alterations in cellular morphology. Cell cycle analysis revealed that, while the unfavourable effects of SLP-Tyl and Tyloxapol solution are similar initially, longer incubation results in partial recovery of cells incubated with the dispersion of SLP-Tyl, whereas the presence of Tyloxapol solution induces apoptotic cell death. These findings indicate that Tyloxapol is an unfavourable stabilizer of SLP used for intracellular delivery and reinforce the role of stabilizers in a design of SLP with minimal cytotoxic properties.

  11. Active Currents and Stresses on the cell surface: Clustering, Instabilities and Budding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    We study the contractile dynamics of a collection of active polar filaments, such as actin, on a two dimensional substrate, using a continuum hydrodynamic description in the presence of spatiotemporal noise. The steady states, characterized by a variety of phases generically consisting of a transient collection of inward pointing asters. We next study the dynamics of particles advected along these active filaments. This is relevant to the dynamics and organization of a large class of cell surface molecules. We make several predictions regarding the statistics of fluctuations of these passive advective particles which we confirm using fluorescence based experiments. We then show how such active patterning of filaments can give rise to membrane stresses leading to membrane shape deformations. In collaboration with Kripa Gowrishankar and Satyajit Mayor.

  12. A Combined Omics Approach to Generate the Surface Atlas of Human Naive CD4+ T Cells during Early T-Cell Receptor Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Graessel, Anke; Hauck, Stefanie M.; von Toerne, Christine; Kloppmann, Edda; Goldberg, Tatyana; Koppensteiner, Herwig; Schindler, Michael; Knapp, Bettina; Krause, Linda; Dietz, Katharina; Schmidt-Weber, Carsten B.; Suttner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Naive CD4+ T cells are the common precursors of multiple effector and memory T-cell subsets and possess a high plasticity in terms of differentiation potential. This stem-cell-like character is important for cell therapies aiming at regeneration of specific immunity. Cell surface proteins are crucial for recognition and response to signals mediated by other cells or environmental changes. Knowledge of cell surface proteins of human naive CD4+ T cells and their changes during the early phase of T-cell activation is urgently needed for a guided differentiation of naive T cells and may support the selection of pluripotent cells for cell therapy. Periodate oxidation and aniline-catalyzed oxime ligation technology was applied with subsequent quantitative liquid chromatography-tandem MS to generate a data set describing the surface proteome of primary human naive CD4+ T cells and to monitor dynamic changes during the early phase of activation. This led to the identification of 173 N-glycosylated surface proteins. To independently confirm the proteomic data set and to analyze the cell surface by an alternative technique a systematic phenotypic expression analysis of surface antigens via flow cytometry was performed. This screening expanded the previous data set, resulting in 229 surface proteins, which were expressed on naive unstimulated and activated CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, we generated a surface expression atlas based on transcriptome data, experimental annotation, and predicted subcellular localization, and correlated the proteomics result with this transcriptional data set. This extensive surface atlas provides an overall naive CD4+ T cell surface resource and will enable future studies aiming at a deeper understanding of mechanisms of T-cell biology allowing the identification of novel immune targets usable for the development of therapeutic treatments. PMID:25991687

  13. Optimization of permeabilization process of yeast cells for catalase activity using response surface methodology

    PubMed Central

    Trawczyńska, Ilona; Wójcik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Biotransformation processes accompanied by whole yeast cells as biocatalyst are a promising area of food industry. Among the chemical sanitizers currently used in food technology, hydrogen peroxide is a very effective microbicidal and bleaching agent. In this paper, permeabilization has been applied to Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells aiming at increased intracellular catalase activity for decomposed H2O2. Ethanol, which is non-toxic, biodegradable and easily available, has been used as permeabilization factor. Response surface methodology (RSM) has been applied in determining the influence of different parameters on permeabilization process. The aim of the study was to find such values of the process parameters that would yield maximum activity of catalase during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The optimum operating conditions for permeabilization process obtained by RSM were as follows: 53% (v/v) of ethanol concentration, temperature of 14.8 °C and treatment time of 40 min. After permeabilization, the activity of catalase increased ca. 40 times and its maximum value equalled to 4711 U/g. PMID:26019618

  14. CD26 surface molecule involvement in T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis in rheumatoid and other inflammatory synovitis.

    PubMed

    Gerli, R; Muscat, C; Bertotto, A; Bistoni, O; Agea, E; Tognellini, R; Fiorucci, G; Cesarotti, M; Bombardieri, S

    1996-07-01

    T cell surface expression and the functional role of CD26 antigen (Ag), a surface ectoenzyme involved in T cell activation and migration across the extracellular matrix, were analyzed in the peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) from patients with inflammatory arthritides. CD26 membrane expression on T cells was detected by cytofluorometry using two different monoclonal antibodies, anti-Ta1 and anti-1F7, while cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma production were evaluated in anti-CD3- or anti-CD2-stimulated cell cultures after Ag surface modulation with anti-1F7. The results showed that Ta1 and 1F7 Ag expression were increased on T cells from PB of patients with active, but not inactive, rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Most SF T cells from RA or other inflammatory arthritides displayed the memory marker CD45R0 and the Ta1 Ag, but lacked the 1F7 molecule. In addition, in vitro 1F7 modulation, which enhanced RA PB T cell proliferation and both IL-2 and IFN-gamma synthesis, did not synergize with anti-CD3 or anti-CD2 in inducing IL-2-dependent activation of SF T cells, but reduced IFN-gamma production. A spontaneous reappearance of 1F7 Ag on the SF T cell surface was seen after 2-5 days in culture. Phorbol myristate acetate, able to accelerate its reexpression, also restored a normal response of SF T cells to anti-1F7 comitogenic effects. These data confirm a role of the CD26 surface molecule in regulating T cell activation and lymphokine synthesis. This observation may have important implications in the regulation of T cell activity at the joint level during chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:8674237

  15. Predicting Cell Association of Surface-Modified Nanoparticles Using Protein Corona Structure - Activity Relationships (PCSAR).

    PubMed

    Kamath, Padmaja; Fernandez, Alberto; Giralt, Francesc; Rallo, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles are likely to interact in real-case application scenarios with mixtures of proteins and biomolecules that will absorb onto their surface forming the so-called protein corona. Information related to the composition of the protein corona and net cell association was collected from literature for a library of surface-modified gold and silver nanoparticles. For each protein in the corona, sequence information was extracted and used to calculate physicochemical properties and statistical descriptors. Data cleaning and preprocessing techniques including statistical analysis and feature selection methods were applied to remove highly correlated, redundant and non-significant features. A weighting technique was applied to construct specific signatures that represent the corona composition for each nanoparticle. Using this basic set of protein descriptors, a new Protein Corona Structure-Activity Relationship (PCSAR) that relates net cell association with the physicochemical descriptors of the proteins that form the corona was developed and validated. The features that resulted from the feature selection were in line with already published literature, and the computational model constructed on these features had a good accuracy (R(2)LOO=0.76 and R(2)LMO(25%)=0.72) and stability, with the advantage that the fingerprints based on physicochemical descriptors were independent of the specific proteins that form the corona.

  16. Global suppression of mitogen-activated ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells by surface protein activity from Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Shahzad, W; Ajuwape, Adebowale Titilayo Phillip; Rosenbusch, Ricardo Francisco

    2010-07-01

    Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae is associated with chronic non-progressive pneumonia of sheep and goats. As with many other mycoplasmas involved in animal diseases, protective immune responses have not been achieved with vaccines, even though antibody responses can be obtained. This study focuses on characterizing the interaction of M. ovipneumoniae with ovine PBMC using carboxy-fluorescein-succinimidyl-ester (CFSE) loading and flow cytometry to measure lymphoid cell division. M. ovipneumoniae induced a strong in vitro polyclonal suppression of CD4(+), CD8(+), and B blood lymphocyte subsets. The suppressive activity could be destroyed by heating to 60 degrees C, and partially impaired by formalin and binary ethyleneimine treatment that abolished its viability. The activity resided on the surface-exposed membrane protein fraction of the mycoplasma, since mild trypsin treatment not affecting viability was shown to reduce suppressive activity. Trypsin-treated mycoplasma regained suppressive activity once the mycoplasma was allowed to re-synthesize its surface proteins. Implications for the design of vaccines against M. ovipneumoniae are discussed.

  17. Correlation between spontaneous metastatic potential, platelet-aggregating activity of cell surface extracts, and cell surface sialylation in 10 metastatic-variant derivatives of a rat renal sarcoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Pearlstein, E; Salk, P L; Yogeeswaran, G; Karpatkin, S

    1980-01-01

    Several properties of 10 cell lines derived from the polyoma-induced PW20 Wistar-Furth rat renal sarcoma have been examined, including the ability of the tumor cells to metastasize spontaneously from subcutaneous sites in syngeneic hosts, the platelet-aggregating activity of material extracted by urea from the surface of cultured cells, the sialic acid content of the platelet-aggregating material, and the degree of sialylation of cell surface glycoconjugates in cultured cells. A correlation has been observed among all of these parameters. The results suggest a possible link between the degree of cell surface sialylation of tumor cells, their ability to aggregate platelets, and their ability to metastasize. PMID:6933486

  18. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  19. Signaling activities of the Drosophila wingless gene are separately mutable and appear to be transduced at the cell surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bejsovec, A.; Wieschaus, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila segment polarity gene wingless encodes an intercellular signaling molecule that transmits positional information during development of the embryonic epidermis. We have explored the mechanism of wg signal transduction by perturbing cellular processes genetically and by performing structure/function analysis of the Wg protein. We present evidence that Wingless protein may transduce signal at the cell surface and that Wg may bind to its cell surface receptor without necessarily activating it. We demonstrate that two specific signaling activities of the Wg molecule can be disrupted independently by mutation. Sequence analysis indicates that these different signaling activities are not promoted by discrete functional domains, but rather that the overall conformation of the molecule may control distinct signaling functions. We conclude that wg signaling may involve complex interactions between the Wg ligand and its cell surface receptor molecule(s) and that some of this complexity resides within the Wg ligand itself. 48 refs., 6 figs.

  20. Signaling Activities of the Drosophila Wingless Gene Are Separately Mutable and Appear to Be Transduced at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Bejsovec, A.; Wieschaus, E.

    1995-01-01

    The Drosophila segment polarity gene wingless encodes an intercellular signaling molecule that transmits positional information during development of the embryonic epidermis. We have explored the mechanism of wg signal transduction by perturbing cellular processes genetically and by performing structure/function analysis of the Wg protein. We present evidence that Wingless protein may transduce signal at the cell surface and that Wg may bind to its cell surface receptor without necessarily activating it. We demonstrate that two specific signaling activities of the Wg molecule can be disrupted independently by mutation. Sequence analysis indicates that these different signaling activities are not promoted by discrete functional domains, but rather that the overall conformation of the molecule may control distinct signaling functions. We conclude that wg signaling may involve complex interactions between the Wg ligand and its cell surface receptor molecule(s) and that some of this complexity resides within the Wg ligand itself. PMID:7705631

  1. Identification of a novel surface protein on activated CD4+ T cells that induces contact-dependent B cell differentiation (help)

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes provide contact-dependent stimuli to B cells that are critical for the generation of specific antibody responses in a process termed T helper function. The surface structures on activated CD4+ T cells that mediate this function are not fully known. We previously reported the isolation of a functionally unique subclone of the Jurkat leukemic T cell line (D1.1) that constitutively expressed contact-dependent helper effector function. To identify T cell surface molecules that mediate contact-dependent T helper function, a monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated 5c8, was generated that inhibits D1.1-mediated B cell activation and immunoprecipitates a novel 30-kD protein structure from surface-iodinated D1.1 cells. Normal CD4+ T cells express 5c8 antigen (Ag) transiently 5-6 h after activation by phorbol myristate acetate and phytohemagglutinin with maximal expression 5-6 h after activation and absence of expression by 24 h. In contrast, neither resting nor activated CD8+ T cells express 5c8 Ag. In functional studies, mAb 5c8 inhibits the ability of fixed, activated CD4+ T cells to induce B cell surface CD23 expression. In addition, mAb 5c8 inhibits the ability of CD4+ T cells to direct terminal B cell differentiation driven by pokeweed mitogen. Taken together, these data suggest that 5c8 Ag is a novel, activation-induced surface T cell protein that is involved in mediating a contact-dependent element of the helper effector function of CD4+ T lymphocytes. PMID:1348081

  2. Hepatic stellate cells inhibit T cells through active TGFβ1 from a cell-surface-bound latent TGFβ1/GARP complex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Kim, Byung-Gyu; Qian, Shiguang; Letterio, John J.; Fung, John J.; Lu, Lina; Lin, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) inhibit T cells, a process that could help the liver to maintain its immunoprivileged status. HSCs secrete latent TGFβ1, but the detailed mechanisms by which latent TGFβ1 is activated and whether it plays any role in HSC-mediated T-cell suppression remain unclear. Glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP) is a surface marker of activated regulatory T cells (Tregs). GARP binds latent TGFβ1 for its activation, which is critical for Tregs to suppress effector T cells; however, it is still unclear whether GARP is present on HSCs and whether it has any impact on HSC function. In this study, we found that TGFβ1+/− HSCs, which produce reduced levels of TGFβ1, showed decreased potency in inhibiting T cells. We also found that pharmaceutical or genetic inhibition of the TGFβ1 signaling pathway reduced the T-cell-inhibiting activity of HSCs. In addition, using isolated primary HSCs, we demonstrated that GARP was constitutively expressed on HSCs. Blocking GARP function or knocking down GARP expression significantly impaired the potency of HSCs to suppress the proliferation of and IFNγ production from activated T cells, suggesting that GARP is important for HSCs to inhibit T cells. These results demonstrate the unexpected presence of GARP on HSCs and its significance in regard to the ability of HSCs to activate latent TGFβ1 and thereby inhibit T cells. Our study reveals a new mechanism for HSC-mediated immune regulation and potentially for other conditions, such as liver fibrosis, that involve HSC-secreted TGFβ1. PMID:26246140

  3. Linkage of extracellular plasminogen activator to the fibroblast cytoskeleton: colocalization of cell surface urokinase with vinculin

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Several cell types display binding sites for [125I]urokinase (Vassalli, J.-D., D. Baccino, D. Belin. 1985. J. Cell Biol. 100:86-92) which in certain cases are occupied with endogenous urokinase. These sites appear to focus urokinase at cell surfaces and hence may participate in tissue matrix destruction and cell invasion. Recently Pollanen et al. (1987) demonstrated that the cell surface urokinase of human fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells is deposited underneath the cells in strands, apparently at sites of cell-to-substratum contact. Here, using immunofluorescence double labeling, we show that the urokinase strands present on human foreskin fibroblasts are colocalized with strands of vinculin, an intracellular actin-binding protein that is deposited at cell-to-substratum focal adhesion sites. Thus, this indicates linkage of the plasminogen/plasmin system both to sites of cell adhesion and to the cytoskeleton. The urokinase strands on HT 1080 fibrosarcoma cells are more numerous and have shapes that are more tortuous than those on normal fibroblasts. In intact HT 1080 cells, colocalized vinculin strands are obscured by an intense background of soluble vinculin but are apparent on isolated ventral plasma membranes. Certain properties of the urokinase strands suggest that they are related to the [125I]urokinase-binding sites that have been described by several groups: (a) incubating fibroblasts with dexamethasone for 48 h or at pH 3 at 5 degrees C for 10 min greatly decreases the number and intensity of the urokinase strands; (b) strands reappear when glucocorticoid- treated cells are incubated with exogenous 54-kD (but not 35-kD) urokinase, and this process is inhibited by a previously described 16- amino acid peptide that blocks [125I]urokinase binding to the cells. PMID:3129438

  4. Winter-to-summer changes in the composition and single-cell activity of near-surface Arctic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Sánchez, Olga; Gasol, Josep M; Balagué, Vanessa; Pedrós-Alio, Carlos

    2008-09-01

    We collected surface samples in Franklin Bay (Western Arctic) from ice-covered to ice-free conditions, to determine seasonal changes in the identity and in situ activity of the prokaryotic assemblages. Catalysed reported fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to quantify the abundance of different groups, and combined with microautoradiography to determine the fraction of active cells taking up three substrates: glucose, amino acids and ATP. In surface waters, Archaea accounted for 16% of the total cell count in winter, but decreased to almost undetectable levels in summer, when Bacteria made up 97% of the total cell count. Alphaproteobacteria were the most abundant group followed by Bacteroidetes (average of 34% and 14% of total cell counts respectively). Some bacterial groups appearing in low abundances (< 10% of total cell counts), such as Betaproteobacteria, Roseobacter and Gammaproteobacteria, showed a high percentage of active cells. By contrast, more abundant groups, such as SAR11 or Bacteroidetes, had a lower percentage of active cells in the uptake of the substrates tested. Archaea showed low heterotrophic activity throughout the year. In comparison with temperate oceans, the percentage of active Bacteria in the uptake of the substrates was relatively high, even during the winter season.

  5. ADAM10 Cell Surface Expression but Not Activity Is Critical for Staphylococcus aureus α-Hemolysin-Mediated Activation of the NLRP3 Inflammasome in Human Monocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ezekwe, Ejiofor A.D.; Weng, Chengyu; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus toxin, α-hemolysin, is an important and well-studied virulence factor in staphylococcal infection. It is a soluble monomeric protein that, once secreted by the bacterium, forms a heptameric pore in the membrane of a broad range of host cell types. Hemolysin was recently discovered to bind and activate a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). In epithelial and endothelial cells, ADAM10 activation is required for the toxin’s activity against these cells. In host monocytic cells, α-hemolysin activates the nucleotide-binding domain and leucine-rich repeat containing gene family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome leading to production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cell death. We now show that ADAM10 is critical for α-hemolysin-mediated activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human monocytes as siRNA knockdown or chemical blockade of ADAM10-α-hemolysin interaction leads to diminished inflammasome activation and cell death by reducing the available ADAM10 on the cell surface. Unlike epithelial cell and endothelial cell damage, which requires α-hemolysin induced ADAM10 activation, ADAM10 protease activity was not required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation. This work confirms the importance of ADAM10 in immune activation by α-hemolysin, but indicates that host cell signal induction by the toxin is different between host cell types. PMID:27043625

  6. Additive manufactured polymeric 3D scaffolds with tailored surface topography influence mesenchymal stromal cells activity.

    PubMed

    Neves, Sara C; Mota, Carlos; Longoni, Alessia; Barrias, Cristina C; Granja, Pedro L; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Additive manufactured three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds with tailored surface topography constitute a clear advantage in tissue regeneration strategies to steer cell behavior. 3D fibrous scaffolds of poly(ethylene oxide terephthalate)/poly(butylene terephthalate) block copolymer presenting different fiber surface features were successfully fabricated by additive manufacturing combined with wet-spinning, in a single step, without any post-processing. The optimization of the processing parameters, mainly driven by different solvent/non-solvent combinations, led to four distinct scaffold types, with average surface roughness values ranging from 0.071 ± 0.012 μm to 1.950 ± 0.553 μm, average pore sizes in the x- and y-axis between 351.1 ± 33.6 μm and 396.1 ± 32.3 μm, in the z-axis between 36.5 ± 5.3 μm and 70.7 ± 8.8 μm, average fiber diameters between 69.4 ± 6.1 μm and 99.0 ± 9.4 μm, and porosity values ranging from 60.2 ± 0.8% to 71.7 ± 2.6%. Human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) cultured on these scaffolds adhered, proliferated, and produced endogenous extracellular matrix. The effect of surface roughness and topography on hMSCs differentiation was more evident for cells seeded at lower density, where the percentage of cells in direct contact with the surface was higher compared to more densely seeded scaffolds. Under osteogenic conditions, lower surface roughness values (0.227 ± 0.035 μm) had a synergistic effect on hMSCs behavior, while chondrogenesis was favored on rougher surfaces (1.950 ± 0.553 μm). PMID:27219645

  7. Ionizing radiations increase the activity of the cell surface glycohydrolases and the plasma membrane ceramide content.

    PubMed

    Aureli, Massimo; Bassi, Rosaria; Prinetti, Alessandro; Chiricozzi, Elena; Pappalardi, Brigida; Chigorno, Vanna; Di Muzio, Nadia; Loberto, Nicoletta; Sonnino, Sandro

    2012-12-01

    We detected significant levels of β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase, sialidase Neu3 and sphingomyelinase activities associated with the plasma membrane of fibroblasts from normal and Niemann-Pick subjects and of cells from breast, ovary, colon and neuroblastoma tumors in culture. All of the cells subjected to ionizing radiations showed an increase of the activity of plasma membrane β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase and sialidase Neu3, in addition of the well known increase of activity of plasma membrane sphingomyelinase, under similar conditions. Human breast cancer cell line T47D was studied in detail. In these cells the increase of activity of β-glucosidase and β-galactosidase was parallel to the increase of irradiation dose up to 60 Gy and continued with time, at least up to 72 h from irradiation. β-glucosidase increased up to 17 times and β-galactosidase up to 40 times with respect to control. Sialidase Neu3 and sphingomyelinase increased about 2 times at a dose of 20 Gy but no further significant differences were observed with increase of radiation dose and time. After irradiation, we observed a reduction of cell proliferation, an increase of apoptotic cell death and an increase of plasma membrane ceramide up to 3 times, with respect to control cells. Tritiated GM3 ganglioside has been administered to T47D cells under conditions that prevented the lysosomal catabolism. GM3 became component of the plasma membranes and was transformed into LacCer, GlcCer and ceramide. The quantity of ceramide produced in irradiated cells was about two times that of control cells.

  8. In-situ electrochemically active surface area evaluation of an open-cathode polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torija, Sergio; Prieto-Sanchez, Laura; Ashton, Sean J.

    2016-09-01

    The ability to evaluate the electrochemically active surface area (ECSA) of fuel cell electrodes is crucial toward characterising designs and component suites in-situ, particularly when evaluating component durability in endurance testing, since it is a measure of the electrode area available to take part in the fuel cell reactions. Conventional methods to obtain the ECSA using cyclic voltammetry, however, rely on potentiostats that cannot be easily scaled to simultaneously evaluate all cells in a fuel cell stack of practical size, which is desirable in fuel cell development. In-situ diagnostics of an open-cathode fuel cell stack are furthermore challenging because the cells do not each possess an enclosed cathode compartment; instead, the cathodes are rather open to the environment. Here we report on a diagnostic setup that allows the electrochemically active surface area of each cell anode or cathode in an open-cathode fuel cell stack to be evaluated in-situ and simultaneously, with high resolution and reproducibility, using an easily scalable chronopotentiometry methodology and a gas-tight stack enclosure.

  9. Interaction of an annexin V homodimer (Diannexin) with phosphatidylserine on cell surfaces and consequent antithrombotic activity.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, Frans A; Larkin, Sandra K; Emeis, Jef J; Allison, Anthony C

    2007-03-01

    Annexin V (AV), a protein with anticoagulant activity, exerts antithrombotic activity by binding to phosphatidylserine (PS), inhibiting activation of serine proteases important in blood coagulation. The potential use of this protein as an anticoagulant is limited as it rapidly passes from the blood into the kidneys due to its relatively small size (36 kDa). We used recombinant DNA technology to produce a homodimer of human AV (DAV, 73 kDa), which exceeds the renal filtration threshold, and has a 6.5-hour half-life in the rat circulation. Human red blood cells with externalized PS were used to show that DAV had a higher affinity for PS-exposing cells than AV. DAV labeling sensitively identifies PS-exposing cells, was found to be a potent inhibitor of the activity of the prothombinase complexes and inhibits the ability of secretory phospholipaseA(2) to hydrolyze phospholipids of PS-exposing cells, reducing the formation of mediators of blood coagulation and reperfusion injury. DAV exerts dose-dependent antithrombotic activity in rat veins. This combination of activities suggests that DAV is a valuable probe to measure PS exposure and may be efficacious as a novel drug in a wide range of clinical situations.

  10. Research Resource: Androgen Receptor Activity Is Regulated Through the Mobilization of Cell Surface Receptor Networks.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Jordy J; Ng, Brandon H; Smits, Melinda M; Martinez, Harryl D; Jasavala, Rohini J; Hinkson, Izumi V; Fermin, Damian; Eng, Jimmy K; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Wright, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    The aberrant expression of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcriptional programs is a defining pathology of the development and progression of prostate cancers. Transcriptional cofactors that bind AR are critical determinants of prostate tumorigenesis. To gain a deeper understanding of the proteins linked to AR-dependent gene transcription, we performed a DNA-affinity chromatography-based proteomic screen designed to identify proteins involved in AR-mediated gene transcription in prostate tumor cells. Functional experiments validated the coregulator roles of known AR-binding proteins in AR-mediated transcription in prostate tumor cells. More importantly, novel coregulatory functions were detected in components of well-established cell surface receptor-dependent signal transduction pathways. Further experimentation demonstrated that components of the TNF, TGF-β, IL receptor, and epidermal growth factor signaling pathways modulated AR-dependent gene transcription and androgen-dependent proliferation in prostate tumor cells. Collectively, our proteomic dataset demonstrates that the cell surface receptor- and AR-dependent pathways are highly integrated, and provides a molecular framework for understanding how disparate signal-transduction pathways can influence AR-dependent transcriptional programs linked to the development and progression of human prostate cancers.

  11. Research Resource: Androgen Receptor Activity Is Regulated Through the Mobilization of Cell Surface Receptor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Jordy J.; Ng, Brandon H.; Smits, Melinda M.; Martinez, Harryl D.; Jasavala, Rohini J.; Hinkson, Izumi V.; Fermin, Damian; Eng, Jimmy K.; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2015-01-01

    The aberrant expression of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent transcriptional programs is a defining pathology of the development and progression of prostate cancers. Transcriptional cofactors that bind AR are critical determinants of prostate tumorigenesis. To gain a deeper understanding of the proteins linked to AR-dependent gene transcription, we performed a DNA-affinity chromatography-based proteomic screen designed to identify proteins involved in AR-mediated gene transcription in prostate tumor cells. Functional experiments validated the coregulator roles of known AR-binding proteins in AR-mediated transcription in prostate tumor cells. More importantly, novel coregulatory functions were detected in components of well-established cell surface receptor-dependent signal transduction pathways. Further experimentation demonstrated that components of the TNF, TGF-β, IL receptor, and epidermal growth factor signaling pathways modulated AR-dependent gene transcription and androgen-dependent proliferation in prostate tumor cells. Collectively, our proteomic dataset demonstrates that the cell surface receptor- and AR-dependent pathways are highly integrated, and provides a molecular framework for understanding how disparate signal-transduction pathways can influence AR-dependent transcriptional programs linked to the development and progression of human prostate cancers. PMID:26181434

  12. Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area

    DOEpatents

    George, Thomas J.; Meacham, G. B. Kirby

    2002-03-26

    A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

  13. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell model for aging predictions: Simulated equivalent active surface area loss and comparisons with durability tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robin, C.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; d'Arbigny, J.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) lifetime is one of the major challenges to optimize both material properties and dynamic control of the fuel cell system. In this study, by a multiscale modeling approach, a mechanistic catalyst dissolution model is coupled to a dynamic PEMFC cell model to predict the performance loss of the PEMFC. Results are compared to two 2000-h experimental aging tests. More precisely, an original approach is introduced to estimate the loss of an equivalent active surface area during an aging test. Indeed, when the computed Electrochemical Catalyst Surface Area profile is fitted on the experimental measures from Cyclic Voltammetry, the computed performance loss of the PEMFC is underestimated. To be able to predict the performance loss measured by polarization curves during the aging test, an equivalent active surface area is obtained by a model inversion. This methodology enables to successfully find back the experimental cell voltage decay during time. The model parameters are fitted from the polarization curves so that they include the global degradation. Moreover, the model captures the aging heterogeneities along the surface of the cell observed experimentally. Finally, a second 2000-h durability test in dynamic operating conditions validates the approach.

  14. Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin: Binding Studies and Characterization of Cell Surface Receptor by Fluorescence-Activated Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Hale, Martha L.; Marvaud, Jean-Christophe; Popoff, Michel R.

    2000-01-01

    The binding characteristics of iota toxin, a binary enterotoxin produced by Clostridium perfringens type E, were studied by fluorescence-activated cytometry. The proteolytically activated binding component of iota toxin, iota b (Ib), bound to various cell types when incubated at 4, 25, or 37°C for 10 min. The binding of Ib was inhibited by antisera against C. perfringens type E or Clostridium spiroforme culture supernatants, but not C. perfringens types C or D. Pretreatment of Vero cells with glycosidases or lectins did not affect Ib interactions, while pronase effectively prevented Ib binding to the cell surface. The Ib protomer (Ibp) bound to the cell surface, but trypsinization of Ibp was necessary for docking of the ADP-ribosylating component, iota a (Ia). Ia attached to cell-bound Ib within 10 min at 37°C, but surface levels of Ia decreased 90% after 30 min and were undetectable by 60 min. Detectable surface levels of Ib also diminished over time, and Western blot analysis suggested internalization or embedment of Ib into the membrane. PMID:10816501

  15. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-01-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection. PMID:2789190

  17. Engineering interface and surface of noble metal nanoparticle nanotubes toward enhanced catalytic activity for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun-Hua; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-07-16

    In order for fuel cells to have commercial viability as alternative fuel sources, researchers need to develop highly active and robust fuel cell electrocatalysts. In recent years, the focus has been on the design and synthesis of novel catalytic materials with controlled interface and surface structures. Another goal is to uncover potential catalytic activity and selectivity, as well as understand their fundamental catalytic mechanisms. Scientists have achieved great progress in the experimental and theoretical investigation due to the urgent demand for broad commercialization of fuel cells in automotive applications. However, there are still three main problems: cost, performance, and stability. To meet these targets, the catalyst needs to have multisynergic functions. In addition, the composition and structure changes of the catalysts during the reactions still need to be explored. Activity in catalytic nanomaterials is generally controlled by the size, shape, composition, and interface and surface engineering. As such, one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes are of special interest. However, these structures tend to lose the nanoparticle morphology and inhibit the use of catalysts in both fuel cell anodes and cathodes. In 2003, Rubinstein and co-workers proposed the idea of nanoparticle nanotubes (NNs), which combine the geometry of nanotubes and the morphology of nanoparticles. This concept gives both the high surface-to-volume ratio and the size effect, which are both appealing in electrocatalyst design. In this Account, we describe our developments in the construction of highly active NNs with unique surface and heterogeneous interface structures. We try to clarify enhanced activity and stability in catalytic systems by taking into account the activity impact factors. We briefly introduce material structural effects on the electrocatalytic reactivity including metal oxide/metal and metal/metal interfaces, dealloyed pure Pt, and mixed Pt

  18. Engineering interface and surface of noble metal nanoparticle nanotubes toward enhanced catalytic activity for fuel cell applications.

    PubMed

    Cui, Chun-Hua; Yu, Shu-Hong

    2013-07-16

    In order for fuel cells to have commercial viability as alternative fuel sources, researchers need to develop highly active and robust fuel cell electrocatalysts. In recent years, the focus has been on the design and synthesis of novel catalytic materials with controlled interface and surface structures. Another goal is to uncover potential catalytic activity and selectivity, as well as understand their fundamental catalytic mechanisms. Scientists have achieved great progress in the experimental and theoretical investigation due to the urgent demand for broad commercialization of fuel cells in automotive applications. However, there are still three main problems: cost, performance, and stability. To meet these targets, the catalyst needs to have multisynergic functions. In addition, the composition and structure changes of the catalysts during the reactions still need to be explored. Activity in catalytic nanomaterials is generally controlled by the size, shape, composition, and interface and surface engineering. As such, one-dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires and nanotubes are of special interest. However, these structures tend to lose the nanoparticle morphology and inhibit the use of catalysts in both fuel cell anodes and cathodes. In 2003, Rubinstein and co-workers proposed the idea of nanoparticle nanotubes (NNs), which combine the geometry of nanotubes and the morphology of nanoparticles. This concept gives both the high surface-to-volume ratio and the size effect, which are both appealing in electrocatalyst design. In this Account, we describe our developments in the construction of highly active NNs with unique surface and heterogeneous interface structures. We try to clarify enhanced activity and stability in catalytic systems by taking into account the activity impact factors. We briefly introduce material structural effects on the electrocatalytic reactivity including metal oxide/metal and metal/metal interfaces, dealloyed pure Pt, and mixed Pt

  19. A conserved hydrophobic surface of the LARG pleckstrin homology domain is critical for RhoA activation in cells

    PubMed Central

    Aittaleb, Mohamed; Gao, Guang; Evelyn, Chris R.; Neubig, Richard R.; Tesmer, John J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Leukemia associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG) activates RhoA in response to signals received by specific classes of cell surface receptors. The catalytic core of LARG is a Dbl homology (DH) domain whose activity is modulated by an adjacent pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. In this study, we used a transcriptional assay and confocal microscopy to examine the roles of several novel structural features of the LARG DH/PH domains, including a conserved and exposed hydrophobic patch on the PH domain that mediates protein-protein interactions in crystal structures of LARG and its close homolog PDZ-RhoGEF. Mutation of the hydrophobic patch has no effect on nucleotide exchange activity in vitro, but abolished the ability of LARG to activate RhoA and to induce stress fiber formation in cultured cells. The activity of these mutants could be rescued by fusion with exogenous membrane targeting domains. However, because membrane recruitment by activated Gα13 subunits was not sufficient to rescue activity of a hydrophobic patch mutant, the LARG PH domain cannot solely contribute to membrane targeting. Instead, it seems likely the domain is involved in regulatory interactions with other proteins near the membrane surface. We also show that the hydrophobic patch of the PH domain is likely important for the activity of all Lbc family RhoGEFs. PMID:19560536

  20. Development of an autofluorescent whole-cell biocatalyst by displaying dual functional moieties on Escherichia coli cell surfaces and construction of a coculture with organophosphate-mineralizing activity .

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Zhu, Yaran; Yang, Jijian; Liu, Zheng; Qiao, Chuanling; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-12-01

    Surface display of the active proteins on living cells has enormous potential in the degradation of numerous toxic compounds. Here, we report the codisplay of organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) on the cell surface of Escherichia coli by use of the truncated ice nucleation protein (INPNC) and Lpp-OmpA fusion systems. The surface localization of both INPNC-OPH and Lpp-OmpA-GFP was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, immunofluorescence microscopy, and a protease accessibility experiment. Anchorage of GFP and OPH on the outer membrane neither inhibits cell growth nor affects cell viability, as shown by growth kinetics of cells and stability of resting cultures. The engineered E. coli can be applied in the form of a whole-cell biocatalyst and can be tracked by fluorescence during bioremediation. This strategy of codisplay should open a new dimension for the display of multiple functional moieties on the surface of a bacterial cell. Furthermore, a coculture comprised of the engineered E. coli and a natural p-nitrophenol (PNP) degrader, Ochrobactrum sp. strain LL-1, was assembled for complete mineralization of organophosphates (OPs) with a PNP substitution. The coculture degraded OPs as well as PNP rapidly. Therefore, the coculture with autofluorescent and mineralizing activities can potentially be applied for bioremediation of OP-contaminated sites. PMID:18952884

  1. Studies of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. I. Evidence using novel monoclonal antibodies that most human LAK precursor cells share a common surface marker

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Separation of LAK precursor (LAKp) cells (as defined by LAK effector generation after incubation with IL-2 for 7 d) from cells with NK activity/LGL morphology was achieved on Percoll gradients using a longer, slower centrifugation than that used for optimal NK enrichment. mAb were generated using the various Percoll fractions as the immunizing cells and used for separation and depletion studies. Two mAbs DM-1 (IgM,k) and DM-2 (IgM,k) recognizing 2-15% and 15-30% of PBL, respectively, abrogated a large proportion of LAK generative potential after complement depletion, but had little effect on NK or LAK effector activity. Cell sorting experiments indicated that the majority of LAKp cells are found within the DM-1+ population and that DM-1+ cells are not simply an accessory cell required for LAKp generation. Further, these two mAbs do not recognize cells that are responsible for generating cytotoxicity during MLC or co-culture with the PR-1 EBV lymphoblastoid cell line. Western blot analysis indicated that DM-1 and DM-2 recognize a 38,000 and 44,000 dalton moiety, respectively. The frequency of cells bearing these antigens and the intensity of cell surface staining decreased during the 7-d culture period, suggesting that these antibodies recognize determinants found only at the precursor level. These findings indicate that cells other than NK effectors or mature T cells are capable of generating a LAK cell response. These LAK precursor cells share a common differentiation surface antigen and are different from AK or antigen-specific CTL precursors. The possibility exists that these cells are identical to, or include, the NK precursor cell. PMID:2784480

  2. Microparticle Surface Modifications Targeting Dendritic Cells for Non-Activating Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Jamal S.; Zaveri, Toral D.; Crooks, Charles P.; Keselowsky, Benjamin G.

    2012-01-01

    Microparticulate systems for delivery of therapeutics to DCs for immunotherapy have gained attention recently. However, reports addressing the optimization of DC-targeting microparticle delivery systems are limited, particularly for cases where the goal is to deliver payload to DCs in a non-activating fashion. Here, we investigate targeting DCs using poly (d lactide-co-glycolide) microparticles (MPs) in a non-stimulatory manner and assess efficacy in vitro and in vivo. We modified MPs by surface immobilizing DC receptor targeting molecules – antibodies (anti-CD11c, anti-DEC-205) or peptides (P-D2, RGD), where anti-CD11c antibody, P-D2 and RGD peptides target integrins and anti-DEC-205 antibody targets the c-type lectin receptor DEC-205. Our results demonstrate the modified MPs are neither toxic nor activating, and DC uptake of MPs in vitro is improved by the anti-DEC-205 antibody, the anti-CD11c antibody and the P-D2 peptide modifications. The P-D2 peptide MP modification significantly improved DC antigen presentation in vitro both at immediate and delayed time points. Notably, MP functionalization with P-D2 peptide and anti-CD11c antibody increased the rate and extent of MP translocation in vivo by DCs and MΦs, with the P-D2 peptide modified MPs demonstrating the highest translocation. This work informs the design of non-activating polymeric microparticulate applications such as vaccines for autoimmune diseases. PMID:22796161

  3. Effects of DO levels on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ma, Si-Jia; Ding, Li-Li; Huang, Hui; Geng, Jin-Ju; Xu, Ke; Zhang, Yan; Ren, Hong-Qiang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we employ atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique, phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and MiSeq analysis to study the effects of traditional dissolved oxygen (DO) levels (0.71-1.32mg/L, 2.13-3.02mg/L and 4.31-5.16mg/L) on surface force, cell membrane properties and microbial community dynamics of activated sludge. Results showed that low DO level enhanced the surface force and roughness of activated sludge; the medium DO level decreased cell membrane fluidity by reducing the synthesis of branched fatty acids in the cell membrane; high DO level resulted in the highest protein content in the effluent by EEM scanning. Abundance of Micropruina, Zoogloea and Nakamurella increased and Paracoccus and Rudaea decreased with the increase of DO levels. RDA analysis suggested that saturated fatty acids (SFA), anteiso-fatty acids (AFA) and iso-fatty acids (IFA) were closely related to effluent quality as well as some genera. PMID:27187569

  4. UV activation of polymeric high aspect ratio microstructures: ramifications in antibody surface loading for circulating tumor cell selection†

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Joshua M.; Witek, Małgorzata A.; Hupert, Mateusz L.; Brady, Charles; Pullagurla, Swathi; Kamande, Joyce; Aufforth, Rachel D.; Tignanelli, Christopher J.; Torphy, Robert J.; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2014-01-01

    The need to activate thermoplastic surfaces using robust and efficient methods has been driven by the fact that replication techniques can be used to produce microfluidic devices in a high production mode and at low cost, making polymer microfluidics invaluable for in vitro diagnostics, such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis, where device disposability is critical to mitigate artifacts associated with sample carryover. Modifying the surface chemistry of thermoplastic devices through activation techniques can be used to increase the wettability of the surface or to produce functional scaffolds to allow for the covalent attachment of biologics, such as antibodies for CTC recognition. Extensive surface characterization tools were used to investigate UV activation of various surfaces to produce uniform and high surface coverage of functional groups, such as carboxylic acids in microchannels of different aspect ratios. We found that the efficiency of the UV activation process is highly dependent on the microchannel aspect ratio and the identity of the thermoplastic substrate. Colorimetric assays and fluorescence imaging of UV-activated microchannels following EDC/NHS coupling of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotides indicated that UV-activation of a PMMA microchannel with an aspect ratio of ∼3 was significantly less efficient toward the bottom of the channel compared to the upper sections. This effect was a consequence of the bulk polymer's damping of the modifying UV radiation due to absorption artifacts. In contrast, this effect was less pronounced for COC. Moreover, we observed that after thermal fusion bonding of the device's cover plate to the substrate, many of the generated functional groups buried into the bulk rendering them inaccessible. The propensity of this surface reorganization was found to be higher for PMMA compared to COC. As an example of the effects of material and microchannel aspect ratios on device functionality, thermoplastic devices for the

  5. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca2+]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca2+]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca2+]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca2+]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca2+, glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca2+]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor. PMID:26630567

  6. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca(2+)]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca(2+)]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca(2+)]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca(2+)]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca(2+), glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca(2+)]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor.

  7. Use of stable isotope-labelled cells to identify active grazers of picocyanobacteria in ocean surface waters

    PubMed Central

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Thompson, Anne; Waldbauer, Jacob; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-01-01

    Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria. They represent a significant fraction of the total primary production of the world oceans and comprise a major fraction of the prey biomass available to phagotrophic protists. Despite relatively rapid growth rates, picocyanobacterial cell densities in open-ocean surface waters remain fairly constant, implying steady mortality due to viral infection and consumption by predators. There have been several studies on grazing by specific protists on Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in culture, and of cell loss rates due to overall grazing in the field. However, the specific sources of mortality of these primary producers in the wild remain unknown. Here, we use a modification of the RNA stable isotope probing technique (RNA-SIP), which involves adding labelled cells to natural seawater, to identify active predators that are specifically consuming Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean. Four major groups were identified as having their 18S rRNA highly labelled: Prymnesiophyceae (Haptophyta), Dictyochophyceae (Stramenopiles), Bolidomonas (Stramenopiles) and Dinoflagellata (Alveolata). For the first three of these, the closest relative of the sequences identified was a photosynthetic organism, indicating the presence of mixotrophs among picocyanobacterial predators. We conclude that the use of RNA-SIP is a useful method to identity specific predators for picocyanobacteria in situ, and that the method could possibly be used to identify other bacterial predators important in the microbial food-web. PMID:19196281

  8. Use of stable isotope-labelled cells to identify active grazers of picocyanobacteria in ocean surface waters.

    PubMed

    Frias-Lopez, Jorge; Thompson, Anne; Waldbauer, Jacob; Chisholm, Sallie W

    2009-02-01

    Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus are the two most abundant marine cyanobacteria. They represent a significant fraction of the total primary production of the world oceans and comprise a major fraction of the prey biomass available to phagotrophic protists. Despite relatively rapid growth rates, picocyanobacterial cell densities in open-ocean surface waters remain fairly constant, implying steady mortality due to viral infection and consumption by predators. There have been several studies on grazing by specific protists on Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in culture, and of cell loss rates due to overall grazing in the field. However, the specific sources of mortality of these primary producers in the wild remain unknown. Here, we use a modification of the RNA stable isotope probing technique (RNA-SIP), which involves adding labelled cells to natural seawater, to identify active predators that are specifically consuming Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus in the surface waters of the Pacific Ocean. Four major groups were identified as having their 18S rRNA highly labelled: Prymnesiophyceae (Haptophyta), Dictyochophyceae (Stramenopiles), Bolidomonas (Stramenopiles) and Dinoflagellata (Alveolata). For the first three of these, the closest relative of the sequences identified was a photosynthetic organism, indicating the presence of mixotrophs among picocyanobacterial predators. We conclude that the use of RNA-SIP is a useful method to identity specific predators for picocyanobacteria in situ, and that the method could possibly be used to identify other bacterial predators important in the microbial food-web.

  9. Active frequency selective surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchwald, Walter R.; Hendrickson, Joshua; Cleary, Justin W.; Guo, Junpeng

    2013-05-01

    Split ring resonator arrays are investigated for use as active elements for the realization of voltage controllable frequency selective surfaces. Finite difference time domain simulations suggest the absorptive and reflective properties of such surfaces can be externally controlled through modifications of the split ring resonator gap impedance. In this work, such voltage-controlled resonance tuning is obtained through the addition of an appropriately designed high electron mobility transistor positioned across the split ring resonator gap. It is shown that a 0.5μm gate length high electron mobility transistor allows voltage controllable switching between the two resonant conditions associated with a split ring resonator and that of a closed loop geometry when the surface is illuminated with THz radiation. Partial switching between these two resonant conditions is observed at larger gate lengths. Such active frequency selective surfaces are proposed, for example, for use as modulators in THz detection schemes and as RF filters in radar applications when scaled to operate at GHz frequencies.

  10. Endothelial Cell-Surface Gp60 Activates Vesicle Formation and Trafficking via Gi-Coupled Src Kinase Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Minshall, Richard D.; Tiruppathi, Chinnaswamy; Vogel, Stephen M.; Niles, Walter D.; Gilchrist, Annette; Hamm, Heidi E.; Malik, Asrar B.

    2000-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the albumin-docking protein gp60, which is localized in caveolae, couples to the heterotrimeric GTP binding protein Gi, and thereby activates plasmalemmal vesicle formation and the directed migration of vesicles in endothelial cells (ECs). We used the water-soluble styryl pyridinium dye N-(3-triethylaminopropyl)-4-(p-dibutylaminostyryl) pyridinium dibromide (FM 1-43) to quantify vesicle trafficking by confocal and digital fluorescence microscopy. FM 1-43 and fluorescently labeled anti-gp60 antibody (Ab) were colocalized in endocytic vesicles within 5 min of gp60 activation. Vesicles migrated to the basolateral surface where they released FM 1-43, the fluid phase styryl probe. FM 1-43 fluorescence disappeared from the basolateral EC surface without the loss of anti-gp60 Ab fluorescence. Activation of cell-surface gp60 by cross-linking (using anti-gp60 Ab and secondary Ab) in EC grown on microporous filters increased transendothelial 125I-albumin permeability without altering liquid permeability (hydraulic conductivity), thus, indicating the dissociation of hydraulic conductivity from the albumin permeability pathway. The findings that the sterol-binding agent, filipin, prevented gp60-activated vesicle formation and that caveolin-1 and gp60 were colocalized in vesicles suggest the caveolar origin of endocytic vesicles. Pertussis toxin pretreatment and expression of the dominant negative construct encoding an 11–amino acid Gαi carboxyl-terminal peptide inhibited endothelial 125I-albumin endocytosis and vesicle formation induced by gp60 activation. Expression of dominant negative Src (dn-Src) and overexpression of wild-type caveolin-1 also prevented gp60-activated endocytosis. Caveolin-1 overexpression resulted in the sequestration of Gαi with the caveolin-1, whereas dn-Src inhibited Gαi binding to caveolin-1. Thus, vesicle formation induced by gp60 and migration of vesicles to the basolateral membrane requires the interaction of gp60

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Active Plasmonic Nanoparticles with Ultrasmall Interior Nanogap for Multiplex Quantitative Detection and Cancer Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiuxing; Zhu, Zhi; Zhu, Bingqing; Ma, Yanli; Lin, Bingqian; Liu, Rudi; Song, Yanling; Lin, Hui; Tu, Song; Yang, Chaoyong

    2016-08-01

    Due to its large enhancement effect, nanostructure-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technology had been widely applied for bioanalysis and cell imaging. However, most SERS nanostructures suffer from poor signal reproducibility, which hinders the application of SERS nanostructures in quantitative detection. We report an etching-assisted approach to synthesize SERS-active plasmonic nanoparticles with 1 nm interior nanogap for multiplex quantitative detection and cancer cell imaging. Raman dyes and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) thiol (mPEG-SH) were attached to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to prepare gold cores. Next, Ag atoms were deposited on gold cores in the presence of Pluronic F127 to form a Ag shell. HAuCl4 was used to etch the Ag shell and form an interior nanogap in Au@AgAuNPs, leading to increased Raman intensity of dyes. SERS intensity distribution of Au@AgAuNPs was found to be more uniform than that of aggregated AuNPs. Finally, Au@AgAuNPs were used for multiplex quantitative detection and cancer cell imaging. With the advantages of simple and rapid preparation of Au@AgAuNPs with highly uniform, stable, and reproducible Raman intensity, the method reported here will widen the applications of SERS-active nanoparticles in diagnostics and imaging. PMID:27385563

  12. THE SIZE AND SURFACE COATING OF NANOSILVER DIFFERENTIALLY AFFECTS BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY IN BLOOD BRAIN BARRIER (RBEC4) CELLS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking the physical properties of nanoparticles with differences in their biological activity is critical for understanding their potential toxicity and mode of action. The influence of aggregate size, surface coating, and surface charge on nanosilver's (nanoAg) movement through...

  13. The stromal cell-surface protease fibroblast activation protein-α localizes to lipid rafts and is recruited to invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Julia D; Tholen, Stefan; Koczorowska, Maria M; De Wever, Olivier; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a cell surface protease expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the microenvironment of most solid tumors. As there is increasing evidence for proteases having non-catalytic functions, we determined the FAPα interactome in cancer-associated fibroblasts using the quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK) method. Complex formation with adenosin deaminase, erlin-2, stomatin, prohibitin, Thy-1 membrane glycoprotein, and caveolin-1 was further validated by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of the known stoichiometric FAPα binding partner dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) corroborated the proteomic strategy. Reverse co-IPs validated the FAPα interaction with caveolin-1, erlin-2, and stomatin while co-IP upon RNA-interference mediated knock-down of DPPIV excluded adenosin deaminase as a direct FAPα interaction partner. Many newly identified FAPα interaction partners localize to lipid rafts, including caveolin-1, a widely-used marker for lipid raft localization. We hypothesized that this indicates a recruitment of FAPα to lipid raft structures. In density gradient centrifugation, FAPα co-fractionates with caveolin-1. Immunofluorescence optical sectioning microscopy of FAPα and lipid raft markers further corroborates recruitment of FAPα to lipid rafts and invadopodia. FAPα is therefore an integral component of stromal lipid rafts in solid tumors. In essence, we provide one of the first interactome analyses of a cell surface protease and translate these results into novel biological aspects of a marker protein for cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  14. N-terminal cleavage of proTGFα occurs at the cell surface by a TACE-independent activity

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    ProTGFα (transforming growth factor α precursor) maturation and conversion into soluble TGFα is a complex process that involves three proteolytic steps. One, that occurs co-translationally, eliminates the signal sequence. Another, occurring at the juxtamembrane domain, solubilizes TGFα. A third cleavage removes the N-terminal extension of proTGFα. This latter step has been poorly studied, mainly because of the rapid kinetics of this cleavage. In the present study, we have designed a strategy to analyse several aspects regarding this N-terminal cleavage. In vivo treatment with the hydroxamate-based metalloprotease inhibitors BB3103 or TAPI-2 (tumour necrosis factor-α protease inhibitor 2) reversibly induced accumulation of forms of proTGFα that included the N-terminal extension. N-terminal shedding was rapid, and occurred at the cell surface. However, the machinery responsible for the N-terminal cleavage was inactive in other cellular sites, such as the endoplasmic reticulum. Experiments of proTGFα expression and maturation in cells deficient in TACE (tumour-necrosis-factor-α-converting enzyme) activity indicated that this protease was dispensable for N-terminal processing of proTGFα in vivo, but was required for regulated cleavage at the C-terminus. These findings indicate that TACE is not involved in N-terminal processing of proTGFα, and suggest differences in the machineries that control the cleavage at both ends of TGFα within its precursor. PMID:15777285

  15. Activation of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Regulates Hippocampal Neuronal pH by Recruiting Na+/H+ Exchanger NHE5 to the Cell Surface*

    PubMed Central

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Szabó, Elöd Z.; Numata, Masayuki; Orlowski, John

    2014-01-01

    Strict regulation of intra- and extracellular pH is an important determinant of nervous system function as many voltage-, ligand-, and H+-gated cationic channels are exquisitely sensitive to transient fluctuations in pH elicited by neural activity and pathophysiologic events such as hypoxia-ischemia and seizures. Multiple Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) are implicated in maintenance of neural pH homeostasis. However, aside from the ubiquitous NHE1 isoform, their relative contributions are poorly understood. NHE5 is of particular interest as it is preferentially expressed in brain relative to other tissues. In hippocampal neurons, NHE5 regulates steady-state cytoplasmic pH, but intriguingly the bulk of the transporter is stored in intracellular vesicles. Here, we show that NHE5 is a direct target for phosphorylation by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor and regulator of cellular energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stresses. In NHE5-transfected non-neuronal cells, activation of AMPK by the AMP mimetic AICAR or by antimycin A, which blocks aerobic respiration and causes acidification, increased cell surface accumulation and activity of NHE5, and elevated intracellular pH. These effects were effectively blocked by the AMPK antagonist compound C, the NHE inhibitor HOE694, and mutation of a predicted AMPK recognition motif in the NHE5 C terminus. This regulatory pathway was also functional in primary hippocampal neurons, where AMPK activation of NHE5 protected the cells from sustained antimycin A-induced acidification. These data reveal a unique role for AMPK and NHE5 in regulating the pH homeostasis of hippocampal neurons during metabolic stress. PMID:24936055

  16. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p < 0.05) between the bacterial cell count estimated by the pour plate method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells. PMID:27406324

  17. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    PubMed

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p < 0.05) between the bacterial cell count estimated by the pour plate method and flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  18. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  19. Ligation of cancer cell surface GRP78 with antibodies directed against its COOH-terminal domain up-regulates p53 activity and promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Uma Kant; Mowery, Yvonne; Kaczowka, Steven; Pizzo, Salvatore Vincent

    2009-05-01

    Binding of activated α(2)-macroglobulin to GRP78 on the surface of human prostate cancer cells promotes proliferation by activating signaling cascades. Autoantibodies directed against the activated α(2)-macroglobulin binding site in the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78 are receptor agonists, and their presence in the sera of cancer patients is a poor prognostic indicator. We now show that antibodies directed against the GRP78 COOH-terminal domain inhibit [(3)H]thymidine uptake and cellular proliferation while promoting apoptosis as measured by DNA fragmentation, Annexin V assay, and clonogenic assay. These antibodies are receptor antagonists blocking autophosphorylation and activation of GRP78. Using 1-LN and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines and A375 melanoma cells, which express GRP78 on their cell surface, we show that antibodies directed against the COOH-terminal domain of GRP78 up-regulate the tumor suppressor protein p53. By contrast, antibody directed against the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78 shows negligible effects on p53 expression. PC-3 prostate cancer cells, which do not express GRP78 on their cell surface, are refractory to the effects of anti-GRP78 antibodies directed against either the COOH- or NH(2)-terminal domains. However, overexpression of GRP78 in PC-3 cells causes translocation of GRP78 to the cell surface and promotes apoptosis when these cells are treated with antibody directed against its COOH-terminal domain. Silencing GRP78 or p53 expression by RNA interference significantly blocked the increase in p53 induced by antibodies. Antibodies directed against the COOH-terminal domain may play a therapeutic role in cancer patients whose tumors trigger the production of autoantibodies directed against the NH(2)-terminal domain of GRP78.

  20. Display of active enzymes on the cell surface of Escherichia coli using PgsA anchor protein and their application to bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Narita, Junya; Okano, Kenji; Tateno, Toshihiro; Tanino, Takanori; Sewaki, Tomomitsu; Sung, Moon-Hee; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2006-05-01

    We have developed a novel Escherichia coli cell surface display system by employing PgsA as an anchoring motif. In our display system, C-terminal fusion to PgsA anchor protein from Bacillus subtilis was used. The enzymes selected for display were alpha-amylase (AmyA) from Streptococcus bovis 148 and lipase B (CALB) from Candida antarctica. The molecular mass values of AmyA and CALB are approximately 77 and 34 kDa, respectively. The enzymes were displayed on the surface as a fusion protein with a FLAG peptide tag at the C terminus. Both the PgsA-AmyA-FLAG and PgsA-CALB-FLAG fusion proteins were shown to be displayed by immunofluorescence labeling using anti-FLAG antibody. The displayed enzymes were active forms, and AmyA and CALB activities reached 990 U/g (dry cell weight) and 4.6 U/g (dry cell weight), respectively. AmyA-displaying E. coli cells grew utilizing cornstarch as the sole carbon source, while CALB-displaying E. coli cells catalyzed enantioselective transesterification, indicating that they are effective whole-cell biocatalysts. Since a target enzyme with a size of 77 kDa and an industrially useful lipase have been successfully displayed on the cell surface of E. coli for the first time, PgsA protein is probably a useful anchoring motif to display various enzymes.

  1. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-09-27

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. PMID:7524079

  2. Temporal differences in the activation of three classes of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases following B-cell antigen receptor surface engagement.

    PubMed Central

    Saouaf, S J; Mahajan, S; Rowley, R B; Kut, S A; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Tsukada, S; Witte, O N; Bolen, J B

    1994-01-01

    We evaluated in WEHI 231 B cells the time-dependent responses of Lyn, Blk, Btk, Syk, and three members of the Jak family of protein tyrosine kinases following antibody-mediated surface engagement of the B-cell antigen receptor. Our results show that the enzyme activities of Lyn and Blk were stimulated within seconds of antigen receptor engagement and correlated with the initial tyrosine phosphorylation of the Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the B-cell antigen receptor. Btk enzyme activity was also transiently stimulated and was maximal at approximately 5 min after B-cell receptor surface binding. Syk activity gradually increased to a maximum at 10-30 min following receptor ligation and was found to parallel the association of Syk with the tyrosine phosphorylated Ig alpha and Ig beta subunits of the receptor. While the specific activities of the Jak1, Jak2, and Tyk2 protein tyrosine kinases were unaltered following B-cell receptor ligation, the abundance of Jak1 and Jak2 were increased 3- to 4-fold within 10 min of receptor engagement. These results demonstrate that multiple families of non-transmembrane protein tyrosine kinases are temporally regulated during the process of B-cell antigen receptor-initiated intracellular signal transduction. Images PMID:7524079

  3. M-COPA, a Golgi Disruptor, Inhibits Cell Surface Expression of MET Protein and Exhibits Antitumor Activity against MET-Addicted Gastric Cancers.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Yoshimi; Okamura, Mutsumi; Hirosawa, Asaka; Tamaki, Naomi; Akatsuka, Akinobu; Wu, Kuo-Ming; Choi, Hyeong-Wook; Yoshimatsu, Kentaro; Shiina, Isamu; Yamori, Takao; Dan, Shingo

    2016-07-01

    The Golgi apparatus is responsible for transporting, processing, and sorting numerous proteins in the cell, including cell surface-expressed receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK). The small-molecule compound M-COPA [2-methylcoprophilinamide (AMF-26)] disrupts the Golgi apparatus by inhibiting the activation of Arf1, resulting in suppression of tumor growth. Here, we report an evaluation of M-COPA activity against RTK-addicted cancers, focusing specifically on human gastric cancer (GC) cells with or without MET amplification. As expected, the MET-addicted cell line MKN45 exhibited a better response to M-COPA than cell lines without MET amplification. Upon M-COPA treatment, cell surface expression of MET was downregulated with a concurrent accumulation of its precursor form. M-COPA also reduced levels of the phosphorylated form of MET along with the downstream signaling molecules Akt and S6. Similar results were obtained in additional GC cell lines with amplification of MET or the FGF receptor FGFR2 MKN45 murine xenograft experiments demonstrated the antitumor activity of M-COPA in vivo Taken together, our results offer an initial preclinical proof of concept for the use of M-COPA as a candidate treatment option for MET-addicted GC, with broader implications for targeting the Golgi apparatus as a novel cancer therapeutic approach. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3895-903. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197184

  4. Photothermal effects of laser-activated surface plasmonic gold nanoparticles on the apoptosis and osteogenesis of osteoblast-like cells.

    PubMed

    Rau, Lih-Rou; Huang, Wan-Yu; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Tsai, Shiao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The specific properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them a novel class of photothermal agents that can induce cancer cell damage and even death through the conversion of optical energy to thermal energy. Most relevant studies have focused on increasing the precision of cell targeting, improving the efficacy of energy transfer, and exploring additional functions. Nevertheless, most cells can uptake nanosized particles through nonspecific endocytosis; therefore, before hyperthermia via AuNPs can be applied for clinical use, it is important to understand the adverse optical-thermal effects of AuNPs on nontargeted cells. However, few studies have investigated the thermal effects induced by pulsed laser-activated AuNPs on nearby healthy cells due to nonspecific treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the photothermal effects induced by AuNPs plus a pulsed laser on MG63, an osteoblast-like cell line, specifically examining the effects on cell morphology, viability, death program, and differentiation. The cells were treated with media containing 50 nm AuNPs at a concentration of 5 ppm for 1 hour. Cultured cells were then exposed to irradiation at 60 mW/cm(2) and 80 mW/cm(2) by a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm wavelength). We observed that the cytoskeletons of MG63 cells treated with bare AuNPs followed by pulsed laser irradiation were damaged, and these cells had few bubbles on the cell membrane compared with those that were not treated (control) or were treated with AuNPs or the laser alone. There were no significant differences between the AuNPs plus laser treatment group and the other groups in terms of cell viability, death program analysis results, or alkaline phosphatase and calcium accumulation during culture for up to 21 days. However, the calcium deposit areas in the cells treated with AuNPs plus laser were larger than those in other groups during the early culture period. PMID:27555768

  5. Photothermal effects of laser-activated surface plasmonic gold nanoparticles on the apoptosis and osteogenesis of osteoblast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Lih-Rou; Huang, Wan-Yu; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Tsai, Shiao-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The specific properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them a novel class of photothermal agents that can induce cancer cell damage and even death through the conversion of optical energy to thermal energy. Most relevant studies have focused on increasing the precision of cell targeting, improving the efficacy of energy transfer, and exploring additional functions. Nevertheless, most cells can uptake nanosized particles through nonspecific endocytosis; therefore, before hyperthermia via AuNPs can be applied for clinical use, it is important to understand the adverse optical–thermal effects of AuNPs on nontargeted cells. However, few studies have investigated the thermal effects induced by pulsed laser-activated AuNPs on nearby healthy cells due to nonspecific treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the photothermal effects induced by AuNPs plus a pulsed laser on MG63, an osteoblast-like cell line, specifically examining the effects on cell morphology, viability, death program, and differentiation. The cells were treated with media containing 50 nm AuNPs at a concentration of 5 ppm for 1 hour. Cultured cells were then exposed to irradiation at 60 mW/cm2 and 80 mW/cm2 by a Nd:YAG laser (532 nm wavelength). We observed that the cytoskeletons of MG63 cells treated with bare AuNPs followed by pulsed laser irradiation were damaged, and these cells had few bubbles on the cell membrane compared with those that were not treated (control) or were treated with AuNPs or the laser alone. There were no significant differences between the AuNPs plus laser treatment group and the other groups in terms of cell viability, death program analysis results, or alkaline phosphatase and calcium accumulation during culture for up to 21 days. However, the calcium deposit areas in the cells treated with AuNPs plus laser were larger than those in other groups during the early culture period. PMID:27555768

  6. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polystyrene. This technique together with various oxidation techniques that render surfaces suitable for cell culture generated high surface densities of hydroxyl groups. The importance of surface hydroxyl groups for the adhesion of baby hamster kidney cells or leukocytes was demonstrated by the inhibition of adhesion when these groups were blocked: blocking of carboxyl groups did not inhibit adhesion and may raise the adhesion of a surface. These results applied to cell adhesion in the presence and absence of serum. The relative unimportance of fibronectin for the adhesion and spreading of baby hamster kidney cells to hydroxyl-rich surfaces was concluded when cells spread on such surfaces after protein synthesis was inhibited with cycloheximide, fibronectin was removed by trypsinization, and trypsin activity was stopped with leupeptin. PMID:6355120

  7. Europa's Active Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    A newly discovered impact crater can be seen just right of the center of this image of Jupiter's moon Europa returned by NASA's Galileo spacecraft camera. The crater is about 30 kilometers (18.5 miles) in diameter. The impact excavated into Europa's icy crust, throwing debris (seen as whitish material) across the surrounding terrain. Also visible is a dark band, named Belus Linea, extending east-west across the image. This type of feature, which scientists call a 'triple band,' is characterized by a bright stripe down the middle. The outer margins of this and other triple bands are diffuse, suggesting that the dark material was put there as a result of possible geyser-like activity which shot gas and rocky debris from Europa's interior. The curving 'X' pattern seen in the lower left corner of the image appears to represent fracturing of the icy crust and infilling by slush which froze in place. The crater is centered at about 2 degrees north latitude by 239 degrees west longitude. The image was taken from a distance of 156,000 kilometers (about 96,300 miles) on June 27, 1996, during Galileo's first orbit around Jupiter. The area shown is 860 by 700 kilometers (530 by 430 miles), or about the size of Oregon and Washington combined. The Galileo mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  8. Titanium surface hydrophilicity enhances platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Alfarsi, Mohammed A; Hamlet, Stephen M; Ivanovski, Saso

    2014-01-01

    Titanium implant surface modification is a key strategy used to enhance osseointegration. Platelets are the first cells that interact with the implant surface whereupon they release a wide array of proteins that influence the subsequent healing process. This study therefore investigated the effect of titanium surface modification on the attachment and activation of human platelets. The surface characteristics of three titanium surfaces: smooth (SMO), micro-rough (SLA) and hydrophilic micro-rough (SLActive) and the subsequent attachment and activation of platelets following exposure to these surfaces were determined. The SLActive surface showed the presence of significant nanoscale topographical features. While attached platelets appeared to be morphologically similar, significantly fewer platelets attached to the SLActive surface compared to both the SMO and SLA surfaces. The SLActive surface however induced the release of the higher levels of chemokines β-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4 from platelets. This study shows that titanium surface topography and chemistry have a significant effect on platelet activation and chemokine release.

  9. Solid-state capture and real-time analysis of individual T cell activation via self-assembly of binding multimeric proteins on functionalized materials surfaces.

    PubMed

    Diener, Kerrilyn R; Christo, Susan N; Griesser, Stefani S; Sarvestani, Ghafar T; Vasilev, Krasimir; Griesser, Hans J; Hayball, John D

    2012-01-01

    Polyfunctional T cell responses are increasingly underpinning new and improved vaccination regimens. Studies of the nature and extent of these T cell responses may be facilitated if specific T cell populations can be assessed from mixed populations by ligand-mediated capture in a solid-state assay format. Accordingly, we report here the development of a novel strategy for the solid-state capture and real-time activation analyses of individual cognate T cells which utilizes a spontaneous self-assembly process for generating multimers of biotinylated class I major histocompatibility-peptide complex (MHCp) directly on the solid-state assay surface while also ensuring stability by covalent interfacial binding. The capture surface was constructed by the fabrication of multilayer coatings onto standard slides. The first layer was a thin polymer coating with surface aldehyde groups, onto which streptavidin was covalently immobilized, followed by the docking of multimers of biotinylated MHCp or biotinylated anti-CD45.1 monoclonal antibody. The high binding strength at each step of this immobilization sequence aims to ensure that artefacts such as (partial) detachment, or displacement by proteins from solution, would not interfere with the intended biological assays. The multilayer coating steps were monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy; data indicated that the MHCp proteins self-assembled in a multimeric form onto the streptavidin surface. Immobilized multimeric MHCp demonstrated the capacity to bind and retain antigen-specific T cells from mixed populations of cells onto the solid carrier. Furthermore, real-time confocal microscopic detection and quantification of subsequent calcium flux using paired fluorescent ratiometric probes facilitated the analysis of individual T cell response profiles, as well as population analyses using a combination of individual T cell events. PMID:21945827

  10. SGLT1 activity in lung alveolar cells of diabetic rats modulates airway surface liquid glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tales Lyra; Candeia-Medeiros, Návylla; Cavalcante-Araújo, Polliane M.; Melo, Igor Santana; Fávaro-Pípi, Elaine; Fátima, Luciana Alves; Rocha, Antônio Augusto; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Machado, Ubiratan Fabres; Campos, Ruy R.; Sabino-Silva, Robinson

    2016-01-01

    High glucose concentration in the airway surface liquid (ASL) is an important feature of diabetes that predisposes to respiratory infections. We investigated the role of alveolar epithelial SGLT1 activity on ASL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation. Non-diabetic and diabetic rats were intranasally treated with saline, isoproterenol (to increase SGLT1 activity) or phlorizin (to decrease SGLT1 activity); 2 hours later, glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation (methicillin-resistant Sthaphylococcus aureus, MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, P. aeruginosa) were analyzed in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL); and alveolar SGLT1 was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. BAL glucose concentration and bacterial proliferation increased in diabetic animals: isoproterenol stimulated SGLT1 migration to luminal membrane, and reduced (50%) the BAL glucose concentration; whereas phlorizin increased the BAL glucose concentration (100%). These regulations were accompanied by parallel changes of in vitro MRSA and P. aeruginosa proliferation in BAL (r = 0.9651 and r = 0.9613, respectively, Pearson correlation). The same regulations were observed in in vivo P. aeruginosa proliferation. In summary, the results indicate a relationship among SGLT1 activity, ASL glucose concentration and pulmonary bacterial proliferation. Besides, the study highlights that, in situations of pulmonary infection risk, such as in diabetic subjects, increased SGLT1 activity may prevent bacterial proliferation whereas decreased SGLT1 activity can exacerbate it. PMID:26902517

  11. A light-responsive and periodic NADH oxidase activity of the cell surface of Tetrahymena and of human buffy coat cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peter, A. D.; Morre, D. J.; Morre, D. M.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidation of external NADH (NADH is an impermeant substrate) by cells of Tetrahymena pyriformis oscillated with a period of 24-26 min. The period length in darkness (25.6 min) appeared to be slightly longer than the period in light (approximately 24 min). When Tetrahymena were placed in darkness for 30-50 min and then returned to light, a new maximum in the rate of NADH oxidation was observed 36-38 min (13 + 24) min after the beginning of the light treatment. The cell-surface NADH oxidase of human buffy coats (a mixture of white cells and platelets) also was periodic and light responsive.

  12. Cell sedimentation with gravity activation.

    PubMed

    Czerlinski, G; Goldman-Leikin, R; Reid, D

    1988-12-01

    Murine monoclonal antibody T101 has been coupled to thinly polymer-coated heavy alloy particles (LaMn2Ge2). These conjugates are coupled to cultured cells of the human T-cell leukemia line RPMI 8402 (T8402). The sedimentation velocities of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached are measured. After determining the mean radii of cells, of particles, and of cells with particles attached, one may compute a mean number of 33 particles attached to a cell. Independently one may compute a mean number of 144 particles/cell for surface saturation. The Appendix handles the underlying theory in three parts: number of particles/cell, saturation number of particles/cell, and resolution for gravity activation. Regarding the latter, cell radii from 4 to 10 microns and particle radii from 0.01 to 1 micron are considered.

  13. Enhancement of Platinum Mass Activity on the Surface of Polymer-wrapped Carbon Nanotube-Based Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Hafez, Inas H.; Berber, Mohamed R.; Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2014-01-01

    Cost reduction and improved durability are the two major targets for accelerating the commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEFCs). To achieve these goals, the development of a novel method to fabricate platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts with a high mass activity, deposited on durable conductive support materials, is necessary. In this study, we describe a facile approach to grow homogeneously dispersed Pt nanoparticles (Pt) with a narrow diameter distribution in a highly controllable fashion on polymer-wrapped carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A PEFC cell employing a composite with the smallest Pt nanoparticle size (2.3 nm diameter) exhibited a ~8 times higher mass activity compared to a cell containing Pt with a 3.7 nm diameter. This is the first example of the diamter control of Pt on polymer-wrapped carbon supporting materials, and the study opens the door for the development of a future-generation of PEFCs using a minimal amount of Pt. PMID:25221915

  14. Structure of the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Singer, S J

    1982-01-01

    The cell surface is the locus for many important biochemical functions of cells and for the interactions of cells with one another and with their environment. The structure of the cell surface may be thought of as three-layered, with a central plasma membrane to which certain macromolecular components are attached on the outer face (the exoskeleton) and other components on the inner face (the membrane cytoskeleton). In the last decade, the basic molecular structure of the plasma membrane has been elucidated and can be represented by the fluid mosaic model as a first approximation. The binding of specific integral proteins of the membrane to individual peripheral proteins outside or inside the cell is most likely the basis for the three-layered structure of the cell surface. Studies of the last several years on the molecular structures of these three-layered cell surfaces of cultured normal fibroblasts and of fibroblasts transformed by oncogenic viruses are beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanisms responsible for changes in cell shape, adhesiveness, and in contact inhibition of motility associated with neoplastic transformation.

  15. Ligands Binding to Cell Surface Ganglioside GD2 Cause Src-Dependent Activation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Signaling and Changes in Cellular Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Martin; Saragovi, H. Uri

    2015-01-01

    Ganglioside GD2 is a plasma membrane glycosphinogolipid. In healthy adults it is expressed at low levels, but it is over-expressed in many cancers. For cancer therapy, GD2 is targeted with anti-GD2 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and one adverse side effect is severe visceral pain. Pain is not neuropathic, cannot be blocked with morphine, and stops on discontinuation of mAb therapy. Here, we provide evidence that ligand binding to cell surface GD2 induces rapid and transient activation of Src-family kinases, followed by Src-dependent phosphorylation of NMDA-receptor NR2B subunits selectively, activation of Ca++ fluxes, production of cAMP, and changes in cellular morphology. These GD2-ligand activated signals differ in kinetics and in pharmacology from activation of the same signals in the same cells by BDNF, the growth factor agonist of the TrkB receptor, suggesting biological specificity. Hence, cell surface GD2 regulates pathways that can be associated with neoplasia and with morphine-intractable pain; and this can explain why expression of GD2 correlates with these two pathologies. PMID:26252487

  16. Optimization of amino group density on surfaces of titanium dioxide nanoparticles covalently bonded to a silicone substrate for antibacterial and cell adhesion activities.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Yasuda, Shoji; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Iwasaki, Mitsunobu; Ito, Seishiro; Kishida, Akio; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2006-01-01

    A composite consisting of titanium dioxide (TiO2) particle, the surface of which was modified with amino groups, and a silicone substrate through covalent bonding at their interface was developed, and antibacterial and cell adhesion activities of the composite were evaluated. The density of the amino groups on the TiO2 particle surface was controlled by the reaction time of the modification reaction. The degradation rate of CH3CHO in the presence of the TiO2 particles under UV irradiation decreased with an increase in the amino group density on the TiO2 surface. On the other hand, the number of L929 cells adhering on the TiO2/silicone composite increased with an increase in the amino group density. From the above two results, the optimum density of amino groups for both photoreactivity and cell adhesiveness was estimated to be 2.0-4.0 molecules/nm2. The optimum amino group-modified TiO2/silicone composite sheet (amino group density, 3.0 molecules/nm2) showed an effective antibacterial activity for Escherichia coli bacteria under UV irradiation.

  17. A subset of CD4+ memory T cells contains preformed CD40 ligand that is rapidly but transiently expressed on their surface after activation through the T cell receptor complex

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Signaling through surface CD40 is essential for selecting B cells that have mutated their immunoglobulin variable region genes in germinal centers and is an important signal in the early stages of antibody responses to T cell-dependent antigens. It is shown that a subset of CD45RO+, CD4+ T cells isolated from human tonsil contains preformed 30- 35-kD ligand for CD40. This is expressed on their surfaces within 5 min of their antigen-receptor complexes interacting with CD3 epsilon antibodies bound to ox erythrocytes. This surface expression does not require de novo protein synthesis and lasts for only 1-2 h. Preformed CD40 ligand (CD40L) was not detected in any CD4+ CD45RA+ T cells, but > 90% of all CD4+ T cells from the tonsil can be induced to express large amounts of CD40L on culture with phorbol myristate acetate and the calcium ionophore ionomycin. This expression of CD40L starts between 1 and 2 h, peaks at 6 h, and remains at a high level for > 20 h. It is totally prevented by adding a concentration of cycloheximide that inhibits CD25 synthesis by these activated cells. While CD3 epsilon antibody bound to ox red cells is a good inducer of surface expression of CD40L, it is a much less potent inducer of CD40L synthesis than phorbol myristate acetate with ionomycin. Immunohistological analysis of tonsil sections shows that cells containing CD40L are located mainly in the outer zone of germinal centers and the margins of the T zones that are rich in dendritic cells (interdigitating cells). The distribution of these cells is consistent with: (a) their interaction in T zones with B cells that have taken up and processed antigen and (b) their involvement in B cell selection in germinal centers. PMID:7699321

  18. Cell surface markers for T and B lymphocytes activation and adhesion as putative prognostic biomarkers for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Mariléia Chaves; Ferreira, Shirlene Barbosa Pimentel; Gonçalves, Luciana C; De-Paula, Alfredo Maurício Batista; de Faria, Elaine Speziali; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2013-12-01

    The study population comprised HNSCC patients, risk-positive controls (tabagism and alcoholism habits), and risk-negative controls (without risk factors). Significant increases in the activation status of CD4(+)and CD8(+) T-cells, and higher migration potentials of lymphocytes were observed in HNSCC patients compared with control groups. Although decreased frequency of CD19(+)-B lymphocytes was observed in HSNCC patients, a higher percentage of HLA-DR(+)CD19(+)-B lymphocytes was detected in these individuals as compared with other evaluated groups. Metastasis and tumor grading were the major pathological parameters associated with significant alterations in the expression of activation molecules on circulating CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cells. A reduced frequency of CD38-expressing CD8(+) T-cells was the most relevant biomarker associated with HNSCC aggressiveness. Performance analysis suggested a cut-off point for the CD8(+)CD38(+)/CD8(+) T-cell ratio of 7.0 for segregating patients according to tumor grading. In contrast, a higher proportion of CD8(+)CD54(+)/CD8(+) T-cells could represent a relevant biomarker associated with metastasis in HNSCC patients, and performance analysis suggested a cut-off point for the CD8(+)CD54(+)/CD8(+) T-cell ratio of 30 for segregating patients according to absence or presence of metastasis. The results obtained can increment immunological aspects of HNSCC and provide tools for the determination of cut-off scores of clinically relevant immunophenotypic prognostic biomarkers. PMID:23994583

  19. SUMO modification of cell surface Kv2.1 potassium channels regulates the activity of rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Dowdell, Evan J.; Dementieva, Irina S.; Marks, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv2.1 potassium channels are important in the brain for determining activity-dependent excitability. Small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOs) regulate function through reversible, enzyme-mediated conjugation to target lysine(s). Here, sumoylation of Kv2.1 in hippocampal neurons is shown to regulate firing by shifting the half-maximal activation voltage (V1/2) of channels up to 35 mV. Native SUMO and Kv2.1 are shown to interact within and outside channel clusters at the neuronal surface. Studies of single, heterologously expressed Kv2.1 channels show that only K470 is sumoylated. The channels have four subunits, but no more than two non-adjacent subunits carry SUMO concurrently. SUMO on one site shifts V1/2 by 15 mV, whereas sumoylation of two sites produces a full response. Thus, the SUMO pathway regulates neuronal excitability via Kv2.1 in a direct and graded manner. PMID:21518833

  20. Teratogen metabolism: activation of thalidomide and thalidomide analogues to products that inhibit the attachment of cells to concanavalin A coated plastic surfaces. Revised version

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, A.G.; Weinreb, S.L.

    1982-01-01

    Thalidomide metabolites inhibit the attachment of tumor cells to concanavalin A coated polyethylene surfaces. Thalidomide, itself, is non-inhibitory. Thalidomide activation to inhibitory products requires hepatic microsomes, an NADPH generating system and molecular oxygen. Production of inhibitory metabolites is unaffected by either epoxide hydrolase or TCPO, an inhibitor of epoxide hydrolase endogenous to hepatic S9 fraction. Therefore the attachment inhibitor is probably not an arene oxide. Inhibition is not accompanied by cytotoxicity as judged by trypan blue exclusion. Although uninduced hepatic microsomes from mice, rats and dogs have similar ability to activate thalidomide, microsomes from Aroclor 1254 induced rats are relatively inactive in the system. Inhibitory metabolites can be generated from the thalidomide analogues EM8, EM12, EM16, EM87, EM136, EM255, E350, phthalimide, phthalimido-phthalimide, indan, 1-indanone and 1,3-indandione. Glutarimide, glutamic acid and phthalic acid do not activate to inhibitory products.

  1. Active Surfaces and Interfaces of Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiming

    A variety of intriguing surface patterns have been observed on developing natural systems, ranging from corrugated surface of white blood cells at nanometer scales to wrinkled dog skins at millimeter scales. To mimetically harness functionalities of natural morphologies, artificial transformative skin systems by using soft active materials have been rationally designed to generate versatile patterns for a variety of engineering applications. The study of the mechanics and design of these dynamic surface patterns on soft active materials are both physically interesting and technologically important. This dissertation starts with studying abundant surface patterns in Nature by constructing a unified phase diagram of surface instabilities on soft materials with minimum numbers of physical parameters. Guided by this integrated phase diagram, an electroactive system is designed to investigate a variety of electrically-induced surface instabilities of elastomers, including electro-creasing, electro-cratering, electro-wrinkling and electro-cavitation. Combing experimental, theoretical and computational methods, the initiation, evolution and transition of these instabilities are analyzed. To apply these dynamic surface instabilities to serving engineering and biology, new techniques of Dynamic Electrostatic Lithography and electroactive anti-biofouling are demonstrated.

  2. The influence of galvanic currents and voltage on the proliferation activity of lymphocytes and expression of cell surface molecules.

    PubMed

    Podzimek, S; Hána, K; Miksovský, M; Pousek, L; Matucha, P; Meloun, M; Procházková, J

    2008-01-01

    Release of metal ions from dental metal fillings supported by galvanism can cause local or general pathological problems in sensitive and genetically susceptible individuals. We aimed to investigate in vitro lymphocyte responses and expression of surface molecules influenced by galvanic currents and voltage. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes were influenced by galvanic currents and voltages and lymphocyte proliferation was measured. Control samples were not exposed to the influence of galvanism. We also studied the expression of surface molecules by the FACS analysis. A 15-h and shorter influence of almost all tested currents and voltages caused a significant decrease in lymphocyte proliferation and the 15-h influence of 20 microA currents significantly increased expression of surface molecules CD 19, 11a/18, 19/69 and 19/95. An influence of 10 and 3 microA currents led to a significant decrease in the expression of surface molecules CD 3, 11a/18, 3/69 and 3/95 and to a significant increase in CD 19 expression. An 80 mV voltage influence led to a significant decrease in the expression of surface molecules CD 3, 11a/18, 3/69, 3/95, 19/69 and 19/95, and 200 and 300 mV voltages significantly decreased the expression of surface molecules CD 3, 19, 11a/18, 3/95 and 19/95 and significantly increased CD 19/69 expression. A long-lasting influence of galvanism can, in sensitive and genetically susceptible individuals, influence lymphocyte proliferation and surface molecule expression. The threshold for pathological values of 5 microA for galvanic currents and 100 mV for galvanic voltage was confirmed.

  3. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-17

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections.

  4. Bactericidal activity of biomimetic diamond nanocone surfaces.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Leanne E; Yang, Yang; Yuen, Muk-Fung; Zhang, Wenjun; Nobbs, Angela H; Su, Bo

    2016-03-01

    The formation of biofilms on implant surfaces and the subsequent development of medical device-associated infections are difficult to resolve and can cause considerable morbidity to the patient. Over the past decade, there has been growing recognition that physical cues, such as surface topography, can regulate biological responses and possess bactericidal activity. In this study, diamond nanocone-patterned surfaces, representing biomimetic analogs of the naturally bactericidal cicada fly wing, were fabricated using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition, followed by bias-assisted reactive ion etching. Two structurally distinct nanocone surfaces were produced, characterized, and the bactericidal ability examined. The sharp diamond nanocone features were found to have bactericidal capabilities with the surface possessing the more varying cone dimension, nonuniform array, and decreased density, showing enhanced bactericidal ability over the more uniform, highly dense nanocone surface. Future research will focus on using the fabrication process to tailor surface nanotopographies on clinically relevant materials that promote both effective killing of a broader range of microorganisms and the desired mammalian cell response. This study serves to introduce a technology that may launch a new and innovative direction in the design of biomaterials with capacity to reduce the risk of medical device-associated infections. PMID:26992656

  5. Acoustofluidic Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorter.

    PubMed

    Nawaz, Ahmad Ahsan; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Nissly, Ruth Helmus; Ren, Liqiang; Ozcelik, Adem; Wang, Lin; McCoy, J Philip; Levine, Stewart J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-12-15

    Selective isolation of cell subpopulations with defined biological characteristics is crucial for many biological studies and clinical applications. In this work, we present the development of an acoustofluidic fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) device that simultaneously performs on-demand, high-throughput, high-resolution cell detection and sorting, integrated onto a single chip. Our acoustofluidic FACS device uses the "microfluidic drifting" technique to precisely focus cells/particles three dimensionally and achieves a flow of single-file particles/cells as they pass through a laser interrogation region. We then utilize short bursts (150 μs) of standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW) triggered by an electronic feedback system to sort fluorescently labeled particles/cells with desired biological properties. We have demonstrated continuous isolation of fluorescently labeled HeLa cells from unlabeled cells at a throughput of ∼1200 events/s with a purity reaching 92.3 ± 3.39%. Furthermore, 99.18% postsort cell viability indicates that our acoustofluidic sorting technique maintains a high integrity of cells. Therefore, our integrated acoustofluidic FACS device is demonstrated to achieve two-way cell sorting with high purity, biocompatibility, and biosafety. We believe that our device has significant potential for use as a low-cost, high-performance, portable, and user-friendly FACS instrument.

  6. A Friend virus mutant that overcomes Fv-2rr host resistance encodes a small glycoprotein that dimerizes, is processed to cell surfaces, and specifically activates erythropoietin receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, S L; Hoatlin, M E; Ferro, F E; Majumdar, M K; Geib, R W; Fox, M T; Kabat, D

    1993-01-01

    The env gene of Friend spleen focus-forming virus (SFFV) encodes a membrane glycoprotein (gp55) that is inefficiently (3 to 5%) processed from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to form a larger dimeric plasma membrane derivative (gp55p). Moreover, the SFFV env glycoprotein associates with erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) to cause proliferation of infected erythroblasts [J.-P. Li, A. D. D'Andrea, H. F. Lodish, and D. Baltimore, Nature (London) 343:762-764, 1990]. Interestingly, the mitogenic effect of SFFV is blocked in mice homozygous for the Fv-2r resistance gene, but mutant SFFVs can overcome this resistance. Recent evidence suggested that these mutants contain partial env deletions that truncate the membrane-proximal extracellular domain of the encoded glycoproteins (M. H. Majumdar, C.-L. Cho, M. T. Fox, K. L. Eckner, S. Kozak, D. Kabat, and R. W. Geib, J. Virol. 66:3652-3660, 1992). Mutant BB6, which encodes a gp42 glycoprotein that has a large deletion in this domain, causes erythroblastosis in DBA/2 (Fv-2s) as well as in congenic D2.R (Fv-2r) mice. Analogous to gp55, gp42 is processed inefficiently as a disulfide-bonded dimer to form cell surface gp42p. Retroviral vectors with SFFV and BB6 env genes have no effect on interleukin 3-dependent BaF3 hematopoietic cells, but they cause growth factor independency of BaF3/EpoR cells, a derivative that contains recombinant EpoR. After binding 125I-Epo to surface EpoR on these factor-independent cells and adding the covalent cross-linking reagent disuccinimidyl suberate, complexes that had immunological properties and sizes demonstrating that they consisted of 125I-Epo-gp55p and 125I-Epo-gp42p were isolated from cell lysates. Contrary to a previous report, SFFV or BB6 env glycoproteins did not promiscuously activate other members of the EpoR superfamily. Although the related env glycoproteins encoded by dualtropic murine leukemia viruses formed detectable complexes with EpoR, strong mitogenic signalling did not ensue

  7. Effect of surfactant-induced cell surface modifications on electron transport system and catechol 1,2-dioxygenase activities and phenanthrene biodegradation by Citrobacter sp. SA01.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Zhu, Lizhong

    2012-11-01

    In order to better understand how surfactants affect biodegradation of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs), Tween 80 and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), were selected to investigate effects on cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH), electron transport system (ETS) activities and phenanthrene biodegradation by Citrobacter sp. SA01. Tween 80 and SDBS increased CSH by 19.8-25.2%, ETS activities by 352.1-376.0μmol/gmin, catechol 1,2-dioxygenase (C12) activities by 50.8-52.7U/L, and phenanthrene biodegradation by 8.9-17.2% separately in the presence of 50mg/L of surfactants as compared to in their absence. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) release was 334.7μg/mg in the presence of both surfactants whereas in their absence only 8.6-44.4μg/mg of LPS was released. Thus, enhanced LPS release probably increased ETS and C12 activities as well as phenanthrene biodegradation by increasing CSH. The results demonstrate that surfactant-enhanced CSH provides a simple, yet effective strategy for field applications of surfactant-enhanced bioremediation of HOCs.

  8. The binding of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides to cell-surface and its immunostimulatory activity are modulated by extracellular acidic pH.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhenlin; Sun, Shuhan; Zhou, Fengjuan

    2003-01-17

    Both the binding of CpG-oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODNs) to cell-surface and its immunostimulatory activity were modulated by extracellular pH in present study. At neutral pH (pH 7.4), the binding of CpG-ODN to splenocyte-surface, as well as that of non-CpG-ODN, was competitively inhibited by non-specific DNA-Herring sperm DNA in a dose dependent manner, indicating their binding sites have no specificity for CpG-motif. When the extracellular pH shifted to acidic (pH 6.4), however, their binding to cell-surface markedly increased, and only the binding of non-CpG-ODN instead of CpG-ODN was inhibited by Herring sperm DNA, implying such pH change enabled CpG-ODN bind to its specific binding-site. Consistently, lymphocytes appeared more sensitive to the stimulation of CpG-ODN at acidic pH, and Herring sperm DNA inhibited the CpG-ODN-induced TNF production from splenocytes at pH 7.4, but not at pH 6.4. These results suggest the existence of membrane receptor that specifically engages CpG-ODN with high affinity only at acidic pH, and support the hypothesis that the binding CpG-ODN to its specific membrane receptor and subsequently triggering of CpG-related signaling occurred within acidified endosomes.

  9. Apoplastic venom allergen-like proteins of cyst nematodes modulate the activation of basal plant innate immunity by cell surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L; Wilbers, Ruud H P; Warmerdam, Sonja; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Diaz-Granados, Amalia; van Schaik, Casper C; Helder, Johannes; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Schots, Arjen; Smant, Geert

    2014-12-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes most likely utilize

  10. Apoplastic Venom Allergen-like Proteins of Cyst Nematodes Modulate the Activation of Basal Plant Innate Immunity by Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Torres, Jose L.; Wilbers, Ruud H. P.; Warmerdam, Sonja; Finkers-Tomczak, Anna; Diaz-Granados, Amalia; van Schaik, Casper C.; Helder, Johannes; Bakker, Jaap; Goverse, Aska; Schots, Arjen; Smant, Geert

    2014-01-01

    Despite causing considerable damage to host tissue during the onset of parasitism, nematodes establish remarkably persistent infections in both animals and plants. It is thought that an elaborate repertoire of effector proteins in nematode secretions suppresses damage-triggered immune responses of the host. However, the nature and mode of action of most immunomodulatory compounds in nematode secretions are not well understood. Here, we show that venom allergen-like proteins of plant-parasitic nematodes selectively suppress host immunity mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Venom allergen-like proteins are uniquely conserved in secretions of all animal- and plant-parasitic nematodes studied to date, but their role during the onset of parasitism has thus far remained elusive. Knocking-down the expression of the venom allergen-like protein Gr-VAP1 severely hampered the infectivity of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis. By contrast, heterologous expression of Gr-VAP1 and two other venom allergen-like proteins from the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in plants resulted in the loss of basal immunity to multiple unrelated pathogens. The modulation of basal immunity by ectopic venom allergen-like proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana involved extracellular protease-based host defenses and non-photochemical quenching in chloroplasts. Non-photochemical quenching regulates the initiation of the defense-related programmed cell death, the onset of which was commonly suppressed by venom allergen-like proteins from G. rostochiensis, H. schachtii, and the root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita. Surprisingly, these venom allergen-like proteins only affected the programmed cell death mediated by surface-localized immune receptors. Furthermore, the delivery of venom allergen-like proteins into host tissue coincides with the enzymatic breakdown of plant cell walls by migratory nematodes. We, therefore, conclude that parasitic nematodes most likely utilize

  11. Comparison of alkaline phosphatase activity of MC3T3-E1 cells cultured on different Ti surfaces: modified sandblasted with large grit and acid-etched (MSLA), laser-treated, and laser and acid-treated Ti surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin-Jie; Kim, So-Nam

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE In this study, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of implant surface treatment on cell differentiation of osteoblast cells. For this purpose, three surfaces were compared: (1) a modified SLA (MSLA: sand-blasted with large grit, acid-etched, and immersed in 0.9% NaCl), (2) a laser treatment (LT: laser treatment) titanium surface and (3) a laser and acid-treated (LAT: laser treatment, acid-etched) titanium surface. MATERIALS AND METHODS The MSLA surfaces were considered as the control group, and LT and LAT surfaces as test groups. Alkaline phosphatase expression (ALP) was used to quantify osteoblastic differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cell. Surface roughness was evaluated by a contact profilometer (URFPAK-SV; Mitutoyo, Kawasaki, Japan) and characterized by two parameters: mean roughness (Ra) and maximum peak-to-valley height (Rt). RESULTS Scanning electron microscope revealed that MSLA (control group) surface was not as rough as LT, LAT surface (test groups). Alkaline phosphatase expression, the measure of osteoblastic differentiation, and total ALP expression by surface-adherent cells were found to be highest at 21 days for all three surfaces tested (P<.05). Furthermore, ALP expression levels of MSLA and LAT surfaces were significantly higher than expression levels of LT surface-adherent cells at 7, 14, and 21 days, respectively (P<.05). However, ALP expression levels between MSLA and LAT surface were equal at 7, 14, and 21 days (P>.05). CONCLUSION This study suggested that MSLA and LAT surfaces exhibited more favorable environment for osteoblast differentiation when compared with LT surface, the results that are important for implant surface modification studies. PMID:27350860

  12. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis in epithelial sheets: alterations of cell surface properties induced by cell-cell contacts.

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliev, J M; Gelfand, I M; Domnina, L V; Zacharova, O S; Ljubimov, A V

    1975-01-01

    Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was found to be characteristic for epithelial sheets formed in cultures by several cell types: normal and transformed mouse kidney cells, and differentiated mouse hepatoma cells. In these sheets most central cells surrounded by other cells had very low phagocytic activity. In contrast, marginal cells having a free edge were able to perform an active phagocytosis. Contact inhibition of phagocytosis was absent in dense cultures of mouse embryo fibroblasts and in cultures of anaplastic mouse hepatoma 22a. The upper surface of epithelial sheets was nonadhesive for prelabeled epithelial cells and fibroblasts. In contrast, the upper surface of dense cultures of mouse fibroblasts was adhesive for these cells. These and other data strengthen the suggestion that contact inhibition of phagocytosis is a result of different adhesiveness of the upper cell surface and of the surfaces near the free edge. Agents inhibiting cell surface movements at the free edges of marginal epithelial cells (cytochalasin, azide, sorbitol, low temperature) prevented adhesion of particles to these edges. Possibly, the surface of actively moving cytoplasmic processes is the only cell part that has adhesive properties necessary for the formation of attachments with other cellular and noncellular surfaces. In epithelial sheets, in contrast to fibroblast cultures, Colcemid did not activate movements of immobile contacting cell edges. These results indicate that mechanisms of contact immobilization of cell surface may be different in epithelium and fibroblasts. Firm contacts formed between epithelial cells are sufficient for stable immobilization of the surface; additional stabilization of the surface by microtubules is not essential. Fibroblasts do not form firm contacts and the Colcemid-sensitive stabilization process is essential for maintenance of the immobile state of their surfaces. Differences in the stability of cell surface immobilization produced by cell-cell

  13. Intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM).

    PubMed

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) regulates differentiation and functioning of neurons by accumulating at the cell surface where it mediates the interactions of neurons with the extracellular environment. NCAM also induces a number of intracellular signaling cascades, which coordinate interactions at the cell surface with intracellular processes including changes in gene expression, transport and cytoskeleton remodeling. Since NCAM functions at the cell surface, its transport and delivery to the cell surface play a critical role. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM. We also discuss the data suggesting a possibility of cross talk between activation of NCAM at the cell surface and the intracellular transport and cell surface delivery of NCAM.

  14. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J.; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C.; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  15. Targeting Negative Surface Charges of Cancer Cells by Multifunctional Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bingdi; Le, Wenjun; Wang, Yilong; Li, Zhuoquan; Wang, Dong; Ren, Lei; Lin, Ling; Cui, Shaobin; Hu, Jennifer J; Hu, Yihui; Yang, Pengyuan; Ewing, Rodney C; Shi, Donglu; Cui, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    A set of electrostatically charged, fluorescent, and superparamagnetic nanoprobes was developed for targeting cancer cells without using any molecular biomarkers. The surface electrostatic properties of the established cancer cell lines and primary normal cells were characterized by using these nanoprobes with various electrostatic signs and amplitudes. All twenty two randomly selected cancer cell lines of different organs, but not normal control cells, bound specifically to the positively charged nanoprobes. The relative surface charges of cancer cells could be quantified by the percentage of cells captured magnetically. The activities of glucose metabolism had a profound impact on the surface charge level of cancer cells. The data indicate that an elevated glycolysis in the cancer cells led to a higher level secretion of lactate. The secreted lactate anions are known to remove the positive ions, leaving behind the negative changes on the cell surfaces. This unique metabolic behavior is responsible for generating negative cancer surface charges in a perpetuating fashion. The metabolically active cancer cells are shown to a unique surface electrostatic pattern that can be used for recovering cancer cells from the circulating blood and other solutions. PMID:27570558

  16. Cell surface receptors for CCN proteins.

    PubMed

    Lau, Lester F

    2016-06-01

    The CCN family (CYR61; CTGF; NOV; CCN1-6; WISP1-3) of matricellular proteins in mammals is comprised of six homologous members that play important roles in development, inflammation, tissue repair, and a broad range of pathological processes including fibrosis and cancer. Despite considerable effort to search for a high affinity CCN-specific receptor akin to growth factor receptors, no such receptor has been found. Rather, CCNs bind several groups of multi-ligand receptors as characteristic of other matricellular proteins. The most extensively documented among CCN-binding receptors are integrins, including αvβ3, αvβ5, α5β1, α6β1, αIIbβ3, αMβ2, and αDβ2, which mediate diverse CCN functions in various cell types. CCNs also bind cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), low density liproprotein receptor-related proteins (LRPs), and the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, which are endocytic receptors that may also serve as co-receptors in cooperation with other cell surface receptors. CCNs have also been reported to bind FGFR-2, Notch, RANK, and TrkA, potentially altering the affinities of these receptors for their ligands. The ability of CCNs to bind a multitude of receptors in various cell types may account for the remarkable versatility of their functions, and underscore the diverse signaling pathways that mediate their activities.

  17. Neurite outgrowth of neuroblastoma cells: dependence on adhesion surface--cell surface interactions

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth of C 1300 neuroblastoma cells, which were dispersed from adherent cultures or grown in suspension, was studied on different protein-coated surfaces. Of 29 different surface structures studied, including surfaces treated with various fibronectins, lectins, glycosidases, or glycosyltransferases capable of stimulating fibroblast spreading, only the surfaces coated with plasma fibronectin or with a protein mixture secreted by C6 glioma cells displayed an extensive activity in the sprouting assay. Neurite outgrowth was inhibited by brain gangliosides and by colominic acid (a sialic acid polymer). A 50% inhibition of neurite outgrowth of N18 neuroblasts induced by the glioma cell proteins was observed at the following approximate concentration: 100 microM (0.2 mg/ml) GD1A ganglioside, 20 microM (0.04 mg/ml) GT1B ganglioside, and 5 mg/ml colominic acid. Specificity of inhibition was suggested by the finding that a few polyanionic substances tested were not inhibitory in the sprouting assay, and that the type of gangliosides inhibiting sprouting were found to be major sialoglycolipids of the neuroblasts. A hypothesis is discussed, according to which neurite outgrowth of neuroblasts is stimulated by adhesion involving interactions of the adhesion-mediating protein with cell surface carbohydrates characteristic of brain gangliosides. PMID:6699078

  18. Surface Markers for the Murine Oval Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Dorrell, Craig; Erker, Laura; Lanxon-Cookson, Kelsea M.; Abraham, Stephanie L.; Victoroff, Tristan; Ro, Simon; Canaday, Pamela S.; Streeter, Philip R.; Grompe, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The biology of progenitor activation in the liver is of considerable medical and scientific interest. The powerful genetic tools available for the mouse make it an ideal model system to study this complex process involving many different cell types. However, reagents for the isolation and study of distinct hepatic subpopulations have been quite limited compared to those available for hematopoietic cells. To produce cell surface reactive reagents more specific for the oval cell response, we generated a new collection of monoclonal antibodies by immunization of Fischer rats with enzymatically dispersed nonparenchymal cells from the livers of adult mice treated with 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine. Each of the resulting antibodies recognized a surface antigen present on a liver cell subset and permitted the viable isolation of the associated subpopulation by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Differential activity was observed on normal liver cells and at different stages of oval cell activation, indicating potential utility for progenitor cell identification. The subdivision of liver cells using these tools should facilitate the study of the biology of ductal and periductal hepatic cell types, including progenitors. Conclusion A new panel of surface reactive monoclonal antibodies to support investigation of the murine oval cell response has been developed. PMID:18726953

  19. Programming Surface Chemistry with Engineered Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Heyde, Keith C; Scott, Felicia Y; Paek, Sung-Ho; Ruder, Warren C

    2016-09-16

    We have developed synthetic gene networks that enable engineered cells to selectively program surface chemistry. E. coli were engineered to upregulate biotin synthase, and therefore biotin synthesis, upon biochemical induction. Additionally, two different functionalized surfaces were developed that utilized binding between biotin and streptavidin to regulate enzyme assembly on programmable surfaces. When combined, the interactions between engineered cells and surfaces demonstrated that synthetic biology can be used to engineer cells that selectively control and modify molecular assembly by exploiting surface chemistry. Our system is highly modular and has the potential to influence fields ranging from tissue engineering to drug development and delivery. PMID:27203116

  20. Programming Surface Chemistry with Engineered Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruihua; Heyde, Keith C; Scott, Felicia Y; Paek, Sung-Ho; Ruder, Warren C

    2016-09-16

    We have developed synthetic gene networks that enable engineered cells to selectively program surface chemistry. E. coli were engineered to upregulate biotin synthase, and therefore biotin synthesis, upon biochemical induction. Additionally, two different functionalized surfaces were developed that utilized binding between biotin and streptavidin to regulate enzyme assembly on programmable surfaces. When combined, the interactions between engineered cells and surfaces demonstrated that synthetic biology can be used to engineer cells that selectively control and modify molecular assembly by exploiting surface chemistry. Our system is highly modular and has the potential to influence fields ranging from tissue engineering to drug development and delivery.

  1. Creation of a Cellooligosaccharide-Assimilating Escherichia coli Strain by Displaying Active Beta-Glucosidase on the Cell Surface via a Novel Anchor Protein ▿

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kawabata, Hitomi; Ogino, Chiaki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrated direct assimilation of cellooligosaccharide using Escherichia coli displaying beta-glucosidase (BGL). BGL from Thermobifida fusca YX (Tfu0937) was displayed on the E. coli cell surface using a novel anchor protein named Blc. This strain was grown successfully on 0.2% cellobiose, and the optical density at 600 nm (OD600) was 1.05 after 20 h. PMID:21742905

  2. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties. PMID:27117575

  3. Diffusing colloidal probes of cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Gregg A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Bevan, Michael A

    2016-05-25

    Measurements and analyses are reported to quantify dynamic and equilibrium interactions between colloidal particles and live cell surfaces using dark field video microscopy. Two-dimensional trajectories of micron-sized polyethylene glycol (PEG)-coated silica colloids relative to adherent epithelial breast cancer cell perimeters are determined allowing measurement of position dependent diffusivities and interaction potentials. PEG was chosen as the material system of interest to assess non-specific interactions with cell surfaces and establishes a basis for investigation of specific interactions in future studies. Analysis of measured potential energies on cell surfaces reveals the spatial dependence in cell topography. With the measured cell topography and models for particle-cell surface hydrodynamic interactions, excellent agreement is obtained between theoretical and measured colloidal transport on cell surfaces. Quantitative analyses of association lifetimes showed that PEG coatings act to stabilize colloids above the cell surface through net repulsive, steric interactions. Our results demonstrate a self-consistent analysis of diffusing colloidal probe interactions due to conservative and non-conservative forces to characterize biophysical cell surface properties.

  4. Controlled surface chemistries and quantitative cell response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plant, Anne L.

    2002-03-01

    Living cells experience a large number of signaling cues from their extracellular matrix. As a result of these inputs, a variety of intracellular signaling pathways are apparently initiated simultaneously. The vast array of alternative responses that result from the integration of these inputs suggests that it may be reasonable to look for cellular response not as an 'on' or 'off' condition but as a distribution of responses. A difficult challenge is to determine whether variations in responses from individual cells arise from the complexity of intracellular signals or are due to variations in the cell culture environment. By controlling surface chemistry so that every cell 'sees' the same chemical and physical environment, we can begin to assess how the distribution of cell response is affected strictly by changes in the chemistry of the cell culture surface. Using the gene for green fluorescent protein linked to the gene for the promoter of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin, we can easily probe the end product in a signaling pathway that is purported to be linked to surface protein chemistry and to cell shape. Cell response to well-controlled, well-characterized, and highly reproducible surfaces prepared using soft lithography techniques are compared with more conventional ways of preparing extracellular matrix proteins for cell culture. Using fluorescence microscopy and image analysis of populations of cells on these surfaces, we probe quantitatively the relationship between surface chemistry, cell shape and variations in gene expression endpoint.

  5. Analysis of cell surface antigens by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Schasfoort, Richard B M; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2014-02-15

    Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) is most commonly used to measure bio-molecular interactions. SPR is used significantly less frequent for measuring whole cell interactions. Here we introduce a method to measure whole cells label free using the specific binding of cell surface antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and specific ligands deposited on sensor chips using an IBIS MX96 SPR imager (SPRi). As a model system, cells from the breast cancer cell line HS578T, SKBR3 and MCF7 were used. SPRi responses to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM) antibody and other ligands coated on the sensor chips were measured. SPR curves show a response attributable to the sedimentation of the cells and a specific binding response on top of the initial response, the magnitude of which is dependent on the ligand density and the cell type used. Comparison of SPRi with flow cytometry showed similar EpCAM expression on MCF7, SKBR3 and HS578T cells.

  6. A requirement for trypsin-sensitive cell-surface components for cell-cell interactions of embryonic neural retina cells

    PubMed Central

    McClay, DR; Godding, LR; Fransen, ME

    1977-01-01

    A quantitative assay was used to measure the rate of collection of a population of embryonic neural retina cells to the surface of cell aggregates. The rate of collection of freshly trysinized cells was limited in the initial stages by the rate of replacement of trypsin-sensitive cell- surface components. When cells were preincubated, or "recovered," and then added to cell aggregates, collection occurred at a linear rate and was independent of protein and glycoprotein synthesis. The adhesion of recovered cells was temperature and energy dependent, and was reversibly inhibited by cytochalasin B. Colchicine had little effect on collection of recovered cells. Antiserum directed against recovered cell membranes was shown to bind to recovered cells by indirect immunofluorescence. The antiserum also was shown to inhibit collection of recovered cells to aggregates, suggesting that at least some of the antigens identified might be involved in the adhesion process. The inhibitory effect of the antiserum was dose dependent . Freshly trypsinized cells absorbed neither the immunofluorescence activity nor the adhesion-inhibiting activity. Recovered cells absorbed away both activities. In specificity studies, dorsal neural retina cells adhered to aggregates of ventral optic tectum in preference to aggregates of dorsal optic tectum. The adhesive specificity of the dorsal retina cells was less sensitive to trypsin than the adhesive specificity of ventral retina cells which adhered preferentially to dorsal tectal aggregates only after a period of recovery. PMID:562349

  7. Stem cell tracking with optically active nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Cui, Yan; Chan, Jerry KY; Xu, Chenjie

    2013-01-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies hold promise and potential to address many unmet clinical needs. Cell tracking with modern imaging modalities offers insight into the underlying biological process of the stem-cell-based therapies, with the goal to reveal cell survival, migration, homing, engraftment, differentiation, and functions. Adaptability, sensitivity, resolution, and non-invasiveness have contributed to the longstanding use of optical imaging for stem cell tracking and analysis. To identify transplanted stem cells from the host tissue, optically active probes are usually used to label stem cells before the administration. In comparison to the traditional fluorescent probes like fluorescent proteins and dyes, nanoparticle-based probes are advantageous in terms of the photo-stabilities and minimal changes to the cell phenotype. The main focus here is to overview the recent development of optically active nanoparticles for stem cells tracking. The related optical imaging modalities include fluorescence imaging, photoacoustic imaging, Raman and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy imaging. PMID:23638335

  8. Cell-surface remodelling during mammalian erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Wraith, D C; Chesterton, C J

    1982-10-15

    Current evidence suggests that the major cell-surface modification occurring during mammalian erythropoiesis could be generated by two separate mechanisms: either selective loss of membrane proteins during enucleation or endocytosis at the subsequent reticulocyte and erythrocyte stages. The former idea was tested by collecting developing rabbit erythroid cells before and after the enucleation step and comparing their cell-surface protein composition via radiolabelling and electrophoresis. Few changes were observed. Our data thus lend support to the endocytosis mechanism.

  9. Profiling of the cell surface proteome.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Hanash, Samir

    2003-10-01

    The in depth-mining of the proteome necessitates the comprehensive analysis of proteins in individual subcellular compartments to uncover interesting patterns of protein expression that include assessment of protein location, trafficking and of post-translational modifications that are location specific. One of the compartments of substantial interest from a diagnostic and therapeutic point of view is the plasma membrane which contains intrinsic membrane proteins and other proteins expressed on the cell surface. Technologies are currently available for the comprehensive profiling of the cell surface proteome that rely on protein tagging of intact cells. Studies are emerging that point to unexpected patterns of expression of specific proteins on the cell surface, with a common occurrence of proteins previously considered to occur predominantly in other compartments, notably the endoplasmic reticulum. The profiling of the cell surface and plasma membrane proteomes will likely provide novel insights and uncover disease related alterations. PMID:14625857

  10. Microplicae--Specialized Surface Structure of Epithelial Cells of Wet-Surfaced Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Asikainen, P; Sirviö, E; Mikkonen, J J W; Singh, S P; Schulten, E A J M; ten Bruggenkate, C M; Koistinen, A P; Kullaa, A M

    2015-01-01

    The surface structure of the superficial cells of the oral mucosa is decorated with numerous membrane ridges, termed microplicae (MPLs). The MPL structure is typical of the epithelial surfaces that are covered with protective mucus. Cell membrane MPLs are no longer seen as passive consequences of cellular activity. The interaction between MPLs and the mucins has been demonstrated, however the role of MPL structure seen on the upper surface of the oral epithelial cells is speculative. The cell surface is of potentially great significance, as it harbors many markers for refined prognosis and targets for oral mucosal diseases and cancer therapy. With these aspects in mind, we conducted the present review of the MPL structure and function in order to form the basis for further studies of MPLs of the oral epithelial cells.

  11. High vacuum cells for classical surface techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Imee Su; Baldelli, Steven

    2010-04-15

    Novel glass cells were designed and built to be able to perform surface potential and surface tension measurements in a contained environment. The cells can withstand pressures of approximately 1x10{sup -6} Torr, providing a reasonable level of control in terms of the amounts of volatile contaminants during experimentation. The measurements can take several hours; thus the cells help maintain the integrity of the sample in the course of the experiment. To test for the feasibility of the cell design, calibration measurements were performed. For the surface potential cell, the modified TREK 6000B-7C probe exhibited performance comparable to its unmodified counterpart. The correlation measurements between applied potential on the test surface and the measured potential showed R-values very close to 1 as well as standard deviation values of less than 1. Results also demonstrate improved measurement values for experiments performed in vacuum. The surface tension cell, on the other hand, which was used to perform the pendant drop method, was tested on common liquids and showed percentage errors of 0.5% when compared to literature values. The fabricated cells redefine measurements using classical surface techniques, providing unique and novel methods of sample preparation, premeasurement preparation, and sample analysis at highly beneficial expenditure cost.

  12. Increased Na+/H+ exchanger activity on the apical surface of a cilium-deficient cortical collecting duct principal cell model of polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Olteanu, Dragos; Liu, Xiaofen; Liu, Wen; Roper, Venus C.; Sharma, Neeraj; Yoder, Bradley K.; Satlin, Lisa M.; Schwiebert, Erik M.

    2012-01-01

    Pathophysiological anomalies in autosomal dominant and recessive forms of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) may derive from impaired function/formation of the apical central monocilium of ductal epithelia such as that seen in the Oak Ridge polycystic kidney or orpk (Ift88Tg737Rpw) mouse and its immortalized cell models for the renal collecting duct. According to a previous study, Na/H exchanger (NHE) activity may contribute to hyperabsorptive Na+ movement in cilium-deficient (“mutant”) cortical collecting duct principal cell monolayers derived from the orpk mice compared with cilium-competent (“rescued”) monolayers. To examine NHE activity, we measured intracellular pH (pHi) by fluorescence imaging with the pH-sensitive dye BCECF, and used a custom-designed perfusion chamber to control the apical and basolateral solutions independently. Both mutant and rescued monolayers exhibited basolateral Na+-dependent acid-base transporter activity in the nominal absence of CO2/HCO3−. However, only the mutant cells displayed appreciable apical Na+-induced pHi recoveries from NH4+ prepulse-induced acid loads. Similar results were obtained with isolated, perfused collecting ducts from orpk vs. wild-type mice. The pHi dependence of basolateral cariporide/HOE-694-sensitive NHE activity under our experimental conditions was similar in both mutant and rescued cells, and 3.5- to 4.5-fold greater than apical HOE-sensitive NHE activity in the mutant cells (pHi 6.23–6.68). Increased apical NHE activity correlated with increased apical NHE1 expression in the mutant cells, and increased apical localization in collecting ducts of kidney sections from orpk vs. control mice. A kidney-specific conditional cilium-knockout mouse produced a more acidic urine compared with wild-type littermates and became alkalotic by 28 days of age. This study provides the first description of altered NHE activity, and an associated acid-base anomaly in any form of PKD. PMID:22301060

  13. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  14. Immobilization of Active Bacteriophages on Polyhydroxyalkanoate Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chanchan; Sauvageau, Dominic; Elias, Anastasia

    2016-01-20

    A rapid, efficient technique for the attachment of bacteriophages (phages) onto polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) surfaces has been developed and compared to three reported methods for phage immobilization. Polymer surfaces were modified to facilitate phage attachment using (1) plasma treatment alone, (2) plasma treatment followed by activation by 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (sulfo-NHS), (3) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting, or (4) plasma-initiated acrylic acid grafting with activation by EDC and sulfo-NHS. The impact of each method on the surface chemistry of PHA was investigated using contact angle analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Each of the four treatments was shown to result in both increased hydrophilicity and in the modification of the surface functional groups. Modified surfaces were immersed in suspensions of phage T4 for immobilization. The highest level of phage binding was observed for the surfaces modified by plasma treatment alone. The change in chemical bond states observed for surfaces that underwent plasma treatment is suspected to be the cause of the increased binding of active phages. Plasma-treated surfaces were further analyzed through phage-staining and fluorescence microscopy to assess the surface density of immobilized phages and their capacity to capture hosts. The infective capability of attached phages was confirmed by exposing the phage-immobilized surfaces to the host bacteria Escherichia coli in both plaque and infection dynamic assays. Plasma-treated surfaces with immobilized phages displayed higher infectivity than surfaces treated with other methods; in fact, the equivalent initial multiplicity of infection was 2 orders of magnitude greater than with other methods. Control samples - prepared by immersing polymer surfaces in phage suspensions (without prior plasma treatment) - did not show any bacterial growth inhibition, suggesting they did not bind

  15. Low-Reflectance Surfaces For Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Fatemi, Navid; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1994-01-01

    Improved method for increasing solar cell efficiency has potential application for space-based and terrestrial solar power systems and optoelectronic devices. Etched low-angle grooves help recover reflected light. Light reflected from v-grooved surface trapped in cover glass and adhesive by total internal reflection. Reflected light redirected onto surface, and greater fraction of incident light absorbed, producing more electrical energy in InP solar photovoltaic cell.

  16. Enzyme Evolution by Yeast Cell Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Miura, Natsuko; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Artificial evolution of proteins with the aim of acquiring novel or improved functionality is important for practical applications of the proteins. We have developed yeast cell surface engineering methods (or arming technology) for evolving enzymes. Here, we have described yeast cell surface engineering coupled with in vivo homologous recombination and library screening as a method for the artificial evolution of enzymes such as firefly luciferases. Using this method, novel luciferases with improved substrate specificity and substrate reactivity were engineered. PMID:26060078

  17. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R. F.

    2011-09-26

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H{sup -} ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by plasma electrode 'activation', without supplying additional Cs, by heating the collar to high temperature for several hours using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, optimum cesiation was produced (without additional Cs) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces. Such activation by accumulation of impurities on electrode surfaces can be a reason for H{sup -} emission enhancement in other so-called 'volume' negative ion sources.

  18. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed.

  19. Cell surface engineering of industrial microorganisms for biorefining applications.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsutomu; Kondo, Akihiko

    2015-11-15

    In order to decrease carbon emissions and negative environmental impacts of various pollutants, biofuel/biochemical production should be promoted for replacing fossil-based industrial processes. Utilization of abundant lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock has recently become an attractive option. In this review, we focus on recent efforts of cell surface display using industrial microorganisms such as Escherichia coli and yeast. Cell surface display is used primarily for endowing cellulolytic activity on the host cells, and enables direct fermentation to generate useful fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Cell surface display systems are systematically summarized, and the drawbacks/perspectives as well as successful application of surface display for industrial biotechnology are discussed. PMID:26070720

  20. Standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based cell washing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sixing; Ding, Xiaoyun; Mao, Zhangming; Chen, Yuchao; Nama, Nitesh; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Wang, Lin; Cameron, Craig E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cell/bead washing is an indispensable sample preparation procedure used in various cell studies and analytical processes. In this article, we report a standing surface acoustic wave (SSAW)-based microfluidic device for cell and bead washing in a continuous flow. In our approach, the acoustic radiation force generated in a SSAW field is utilized to actively extract cells or beads from their original medium. A unique configuration of tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) is employed in our device, enabling us to wash beads with >98% recovery rate and >97% washing efficiency. We also demonstrate the functionality of our device by preparing high-purity (>97%) white blood cells from lysed blood samples through cell washing. Our SSAW-based cell/bead washing device has the advantages of label-free manipulation, simplicity, high biocompatibility, high recovery rate, and high washing efficiency. It can be useful for many lab-on-a-chip applications. PMID:25372273

  1. Reactivation of cell surface transport in Reticulomyxa.

    PubMed

    Orokos, D D; Bowser, S S; Travis, J L

    1997-01-01

    Granuloreticulosean protists transport particles (e.g., bacteria, algae, and sand grains) along the outer surfaces of their pseudopodia. This cell surface transport plays a vital role in feeding, reproduction, shell construction, and locomotion and can be visualized by the movements of extracellularly adherent polystyrene microspheres (i.e., latex beads). Our videomicroscopic analyses of transport associated with the pseudopodia of Reticulomyxa filosa revealed two distinct types of both intracellular and cell surface transport: (1) saltatory, bidirectional transport of individual or clustered organelles and/or surface-attached particles, and (2) continuous, unidirectional bulk or "resolute" motion of aggregated organelles and/or surface-bound particles. Organelles and surface-attached polystyrene microspheres remained firmly attached to the microtubule cytoskeletons of detergent-extracted pseudopodia. Both saltatory and resolute organelle and surface transport reactivated upon the addition of 0.01-1.0 mM ATP. At 1 mM ATP, the velocities of reactivated saltatory transport were indistinguishable from those observed in vivo. The reactivated transport was microtubule-dependent and was not inhibited by incubation with Ca(2+)-gelsolin under conditions that abolish rhodamine-phalloidin detection of actin filaments. These findings provide further support that both intracellular organelle and membrane surface transport are mediated by a common mechanism, and establish Reticulomyxa as a unique model system to further study the mechanochemistry of cell surface transport in vitro.

  2. Surface modification of active material structures in battery electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, Michael; Tikhonov, Konstantin

    2016-02-02

    Provided herein are methods of processing electrode active material structures for use in electrochemical cells or, more specifically, methods of forming surface layers on these structures. The structures are combined with a liquid to form a mixture. The mixture includes a surface reagent that chemically reacts and forms a surface layer covalently bound to the structures. The surface reagent may be a part of the initial liquid or added to the mixture after the liquid is combined with the structures. In some embodiments, the mixture may be processed to form a powder containing the structures with the surface layer thereon. Alternatively, the mixture may be deposited onto a current collecting substrate and dried to form an electrode layer. Furthermore, the liquid may be an electrolyte containing the surface reagent and a salt. The liquid soaks the previously arranged electrodes in order to contact the structures with the surface reagent.

  3. Structure and functions of fungal cell surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nozawa, Y.

    1984-01-01

    A review with 24 references on the biochemistry, molecular structure, and function of cell surfaces of fungi, especially dermatophytes: the chemistry and structure of the cell wall, the effect of polyene antibiotics on the morphology and function of cytoplasmic membranes, and the chemical structure and function of pigments produced by various fungi are discussed.

  4. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  5. Oxidation of cell surface thiol groups by contact sensitizers triggers the maturation of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Kagatani, Saori; Sasaki, Yoshinori; Hirota, Morihiko; Mizuashi, Masato; Suzuki, Mie; Ohtani, Tomoyuki; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2010-01-01

    p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) has a crucial role in the maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) by sensitizers. Recently, it has been reported that the oxidation of cell surface thiols by an exogenous impermeant thiol oxidizer can phosphorylate p38 MAPK. In this study, we examined whether sensitizers oxidize cell surface thiols of monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs). When cell surface thiols were quantified by flow cytometry using Alexa fluor maleimide, all the sensitizers that we examined decreased cell surface thiols on MoDCs. To examine the effects of decreased cell surface thiols by sensitizers on DC maturation, we analyzed the effects of an impermeant thiol oxidizer, o-phenanthroline copper complex (CuPhen). The treatment of MoDCs with CuPhen decreased cell surface thiols, phosphorylated p38 MAPK, and induced MoDC maturation, that is, the augmentation of CD83, CD86, HLA-DR, and IL-8 mRNA, as well as the downregulation of aquaporin-3 mRNA. The augmentation of CD86 was significantly suppressed when MoDCs were pretreated with N-acetyl-L-cystein or treated with SB203580. Finally, we showed that epicutaneous application of 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene on mouse skin significantly decreased cell surface thiols of Langerhans cells in vivo. These data suggest that the oxidation of cell surface thiols has some role in triggering DC maturation by sensitizers. PMID:19641517

  6. Alleviation of Cu and Pb rhizotoxicities in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) as related to ion activities at root-cell plasma membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Kopittke, Peter M; Kinraide, Thomas B; Wang, Peng; Blamey, F Pax C; Reichman, Suzie M; Menzies, Neal W

    2011-06-01

    Cations, such as Ca and Mg, are generally thought to alleviate toxicities of trace metals through site-specific competition (as incorporated in the biotic ligand model, BLM). Short-term experiments were conducted with cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) seedlings in simple nutrient solutions to examine the alleviation of Cu and Pb toxicities by Al, Ca, H, Mg, and Na. For Cu, the cations depolarized the plasma membrane (PM) and reduced the negativity of ψ(0)(o) (electrical potential at the outer surface of the PM) and thereby decreased {Cu(2+)}(0)(o) (activity of Cu(2+) at the outer surface of the PM). For Pb, root elongation was generally better correlated to the activity of Pb(2+) in the bulk solution than to {Pb(2+)}(0)(o). However, we propose that the addition of cations resulted in a decrease in {Pb(2+)}(0)(o) but a simultaneous increase in the rate of Pb uptake (due to an increase in the negativity of E(m,surf), the difference in potential between the inner and outer surfaces of the PM) thus offsetting the decrease in {Pb(2+)}(0)(o). In addition, Ca was found to alleviate Pb toxicity through a specific effect. Although our data do not preclude site-specific competition (as incorporated in the BLM), we suggest that electrostatic effects have an important role.

  7. Cell-surface carbohydrates of Entamoeba invadens.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, S; Soares, R M; Alviano, C S; Da Silva, E F; De Souza, W; Angluster, J

    1997-01-01

    Cell-surface carbohydrates of Entamoeba invadens trophozoites were analyzed using (a) a panel of highly purified lectins specific for molecules containing N-acetylglucosamine or sialic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine, galactose, mannose-like residues, and fucose; (b) Escherichia coli K-12 with mannose-sensitive fimbria; (c) enzymatic digestion; and (d) scanning electron microscopy. The presence of galactose (D-Gal) and N-acetylgalactosamine (D-GalNAc) was detected in the amoeba. Previous trypsinization induced the appearance of Glycine max (SBA, specific for D-GalNAc residues)-binding sites, whereas such treatment completely abolished the ability of Ricinus communis (RCAI) and Axinalla polypoides (APP, specific for D-Gal) lectins and partially abolished that of Euonymus europaeus (EEL, specific for D-Gal) lectins to agglutinate the trophozoites. The agglutinating activity of E. coli K-12 adheans with the amoeba was markedly increased after trypsin digestion, indicating that mannose units become exposed after enzyme treatment. These findings were essentially confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. After neuraminidase treatment the parasites became strongly agglutinated with SBA and Arachis hypogaea (PNA, specific for D-Gal) and the cell interaction with Wisteria floribunda (WFH, specific for D-GalNAc) was markedly increased. These results suggest that in E. invadens trophozoites, sialic acid residues are linked to D-Gal and D-GalNAc. PMID:9342747

  8. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    PubMed

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  9. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Han, Baoxi; Johnson, Rolland P.; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H- ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by long time plasma electrode activation, without adding Cs from Cs supply, by heating the collar to high temperature using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, perfect cesiation was produced (without additional Cs supply) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces.

  10. Active micromixer using surface acoustic wave streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Branch; Darren W. , Meyer; Grant D. , Craighead; Harold G.

    2011-05-17

    An active micromixer uses a surface acoustic wave, preferably a Rayleigh wave, propagating on a piezoelectric substrate to induce acoustic streaming in a fluid in a microfluidic channel. The surface acoustic wave can be generated by applying an RF excitation signal to at least one interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric substrate. The active micromixer can rapidly mix quiescent fluids or laminar streams in low Reynolds number flows. The active micromixer has no moving parts (other than the SAW transducer) and is, therefore, more reliable, less damaging to sensitive fluids, and less susceptible to fouling and channel clogging than other types of active and passive micromixers. The active micromixer is adaptable to a wide range of geometries, can be easily fabricated, and can be integrated in a microfluidic system, reducing dead volume. Finally, the active micromixer has on-demand on/off mixing capability and can be operated at low power.

  11. Expression of heat shock protein 90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Cristina; Regidor, Ignacio; Poveda, Pedro D.

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the activity of heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90/HSPC) as a chaperone, some recent studies have reported expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in certain types of cancer and nervous system cells. We study the expression of Hsp90 at the cell surface in human neuroblastoma (NB69) cells. Immunofluorescence experiments labeling with anti-Hsp90 antibodies on both nonpermeabilized cells and live cells detected Hsp90 at the cell surface. Hsp90 was also identified in a membrane fraction from subcellular fractionation. Cell-surface Hsp90 was significantly more expressed in undifferentiated proliferative spherical neuroblastoma cells than in differentiated flattened cells. In addition, spherical cells were significantly more sensitive to Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin compared to flattened cells. This paper describes the first evidence of cell-surface Hsp90 expression in a cancer cell line from nervous tissue and may indicate a novel target for anti-tumoral agents. PMID:18800240

  12. Role of T-helper type 2 cytokines in down-modulation of fas mRNA and receptor on the surface of activated CD4(+) T cells: molecular basis for the persistence of the allergic immune response.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Agea, E; Fizzotti, M; Bassotti, G; Russano, A; Droetto, S; Bistoni, O; Grignani, F; Bertotto, A

    1998-12-01

    The mechanisms responsible for persistence of T lymphocytes at the sites of allergic inflammation are not completely understood. Activated T cells, usually expressing Fas on their surface, undergo activation-induced apoptotic death, thus limiting the dangerous consequences of a persistent immune reaction. We have previously shown that pulmonary T lymphocytes from untreated asthmatic subjects do not express surface Fas receptors nor do they contain Fas mRNA, yet they display normal levels of Fas ligand. This is not an inherited defect and is confined to mucosal T cells. To gain insights into the mechanism responsible for these findings, we performed a set of experiments with both purified Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus allergen and recombinant human cytokines: interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-5, transforming growth factor beta1, interferon gamma, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In vitro exposure of purified CD4(+) lymphocytes to allergen yielded only transient up-regulation of surface Fas but did not influence susceptibility to Fas-mediated cell death. T-helper type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and GM-CSF) had a dose-dependent and specific inhibitory effect on Fas mRNA, suggesting a new fundamental biological role in the survival of inflammatory cells during allergen exposure. PMID:9837865

  13. Evaluation of Clinical Biomaterial Surface Effects on T Lymphocyte Activation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Analiz; Anderson, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Previous in vitro studies in our laboratory have shown that lymphocytes can influence macrophage adhesion and fusion on biomaterial surfaces. However, few studies have evaluated how material adherent macrophages can influence lymphocyte behavior, specifically T cells. In this study, we cultured human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors on three synthetic non-biodegradable biomedical polymers: Elasthane 80A (PEU), Silicone rubber (SR), or polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). Upregulation of T cell surface activation markers (CD69 and CD25), lymphocyte proliferation, and interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFNγ) concentrations were evaluated by flow cytometry, carboxy-fluorescein diacetate, succinimydyl ester (CFSE) incorporation, and multiplex cytokine immunoassay, respectively, to assess T cell activation. Following 3 and 7 days of culture, CD4+ helper T cells from cultures of any of the material groups did not express the activation markers CD69 and CD25 and lymphocyte proliferation was not present. IL-2 and IFNγ levels were produced, but dependent on donor. These data indicate that T cells are not activated in response to clinically relevant synthetic biomaterials. The data also suggest that lymphocyte subsets exclusive of T cells are the source of the lymphokines, IL-2 and IFN-γ, in certain donors. PMID:19172618

  14. SLC30A10 Is a Cell Surface-Localized Manganese Efflux Transporter, and Parkinsonism-Causing Mutations Block Its Intracellular Trafficking and Efflux Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leyva-Illades, Dinorah; Chen, Pan; Zogzas, Charles E.; Hutchens, Steven; Mercado, Jonathan M.; Swaim, Caleb D.; Morrisett, Richard A.; Bowman, Aaron B.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential metal, but elevated cellular levels are toxic and may lead to the development of an irreversible parkinsonian-like syndrome that has no treatment. Mn-induced parkinsonism generally occurs as a result of exposure to elevated Mn levels in occupational or environmental settings. Additionally, patients with compromised liver function attributable to diseases, such as cirrhosis, fail to excrete Mn and may develop Mn-induced parkinsonism in the absence of exposure to elevated Mn. Recently, a new form of familial parkinsonism was reported to occur as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. The cellular function of SLC30A10 and the mechanisms by which mutations in this protein cause parkinsonism are unclear. Here, using a combination of mechanistic and functional studies in cell culture, Caenorhabditis elegans, and primary midbrain neurons, we show that SLC30A10 is a cell surface-localized Mn efflux transporter that reduces cellular Mn levels and protects against Mn-induced toxicity. Importantly, mutations in SLC30A10 that cause familial parkinsonism blocked the ability of the transporter to traffic to the cell surface and to mediate Mn efflux. Although expression of disease-causing SLC30A10 mutations were not deleterious by themselves, neurons and worms expressing these mutants exhibited enhanced sensitivity to Mn toxicity. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms involved in the onset of a familial form of parkinsonism and highlight the possibility of using enhanced Mn efflux as a therapeutic strategy for the potential management of Mn-induced parkinsonism, including that occurring as a result of mutations in SLC30A10. PMID:25319704

  15. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inducers and estrogen receptor (ER) activities in surface sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China evaluated with in vitro cell bioassays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Bovee, Toine F H; Bi, Yonghong; Bernhöft, Silke; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-02-01

    Two types of biological tests were employed for monitoring the toxicological profile of sediment cores in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. In the present study, sediments collected in June 2010 from TGR were analyzed for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activities. The estrogenic activity was assessed using a rapid yeast estrogen bioassay, based on the expression of a green fluorescent reporter protein. Weak anti-estrogenic activity was detected in sediments from an area close to the dam of the reservoir, and weak estrogenic activities ranging from 0.3 to 1 ng 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalents (EQ) g(-1) dry weight sediment (dw) were detected in sediments from the Wanzhou to Guojiaba areas. In the upstream areas Wanzhou and Wushan, sediments demonstrated additive effects in co-administration of 1 nM E2 in the yeast test system, while sediments from the downstream Badong and Guojiaba areas showed estrogenic activities which seemed to be more than additive (synergistic activity). There was an increasing tendency in estrogenic activity from upstream of TGR to downstream, while this tendency terminated and converted into anti-estrogenic activity in the area close to the dam. The AhR activity was detected employing rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). EROD activities were found homogenously distributed in sediments in TGR ranging from 200 to 311 pg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) EQ g(-1) dw for total AhR agonists and from 45 to 76 pg TCDD EQ g(-1) dw for more persistent AhR agonists. The known AhR agonists polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, polychlorinated biphenyl, and PCDD/F only explained up to 8 % of the more persistent AhR agonist activity in the samples, which suggests that unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a great proportion of the TCDD EQ in sediments from TGR. These findings of estrogenic potential and dioxin-like activity in TGR sediments provide possible weight-of-evidence of potential

  16. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) inducers and estrogen receptor (ER) activities in surface sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China evaluated with in vitro cell bioassays.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingxian; Bovee, Toine F H; Bi, Yonghong; Bernhöft, Silke; Schramm, Karl-Werner

    2014-02-01

    Two types of biological tests were employed for monitoring the toxicological profile of sediment cores in the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. In the present study, sediments collected in June 2010 from TGR were analyzed for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activities. The estrogenic activity was assessed using a rapid yeast estrogen bioassay, based on the expression of a green fluorescent reporter protein. Weak anti-estrogenic activity was detected in sediments from an area close to the dam of the reservoir, and weak estrogenic activities ranging from 0.3 to 1 ng 17β-estradiol (E2) equivalents (EQ) g(-1) dry weight sediment (dw) were detected in sediments from the Wanzhou to Guojiaba areas. In the upstream areas Wanzhou and Wushan, sediments demonstrated additive effects in co-administration of 1 nM E2 in the yeast test system, while sediments from the downstream Badong and Guojiaba areas showed estrogenic activities which seemed to be more than additive (synergistic activity). There was an increasing tendency in estrogenic activity from upstream of TGR to downstream, while this tendency terminated and converted into anti-estrogenic activity in the area close to the dam. The AhR activity was detected employing rat hepatoma cell line (H4IIE). EROD activities were found homogenously distributed in sediments in TGR ranging from 200 to 311 pg 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) EQ g(-1) dw for total AhR agonists and from 45 to 76 pg TCDD EQ g(-1) dw for more persistent AhR agonists. The known AhR agonists polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon, polychlorinated biphenyl, and PCDD/F only explained up to 8 % of the more persistent AhR agonist activity in the samples, which suggests that unidentified AhR-active compounds represented a great proportion of the TCDD EQ in sediments from TGR. These findings of estrogenic potential and dioxin-like activity in TGR sediments provide possible weight-of-evidence of potential

  17. Boltzmann active walkers and rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochy, R. D.; Kayser, D. R.; Aberle, L. K.; Lam, L.

    1993-06-01

    An active walker model (AWM) was recently proposed by Freimuth and Lam for the generation of various filamentary patterns. In an AWM, the walker changes the landscape as it walks, and its steps are in turn influenced by the changing landscape. The landscape so obtained is a rough surface. In this paper, the properties of such a rough surface (with average height conserved) generated by a Boltzmann active walker in 1 + 1 dimensions is investigated in detail. The scaling properties of the surface thickness σ T is found to belong to a new class quite different from other types of fractal surfaces. For example, σ T is independent of the system size L, but is a function of the “temperature” T. Soliton propagation is found when T = 0.

  18. Synergistic fungicidal activity of Cu(2+) and allicin, an allyl sulfur compound from garlic, and its relation to the role of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase 1 as a cell surface defense in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ogita, Akira; Hirooka, Kiyoo; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Tsutsui, Nobuo; Fujita, Ken-Ichi; Taniguchi, Makoto; Tanaka, Toshio

    2005-11-15

    Cu(2+) showed a dose-dependent fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, and its lethal effect was extremely enhanced in the presence of allicin, an allyl sulfur compound from garlic. The fungicidal activity of Cu(2+) was unaffected or rather attenuated by other sulfur-containing compounds such as N-acetyl-cysteine, l-cysteine or dithiothreitol. Ca(2+) could absolutely protect against the lethal effect of Cu(2+) itself, but showed no protection against the fungicidal activity of Cu(2+) newly generated in combination with allicin. Cu(2+) accelerated an endogenous generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in S. cerevisiae cells at a lethal concentration, but such intracellular oxidative stress induction was not observed during cell death progression upon treatment with Cu(2+) and allicin. A surfactant, sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate (SLS), enhanced the solubilization of a few proteins including alkyl hydroperoxide reductase 1 (AHP1) in intact cells, accounting for the absence of this protein in the extract from allicin-treated cells. Allicin-treated cells were rendered extremely sensitive to the subsequent Cu(2+) treatment as in the case of SLS-treated cells. Allicin-treated cells and SLS-treated cells similarly showed an increased sensitivity to exogenously added tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BOOH), an organic peroxide that is detoxified by the action of AHP1. Our study suggests that allicin influences the mode of cell surface localization or the related function of AHP1 as a defense against phospholipid peroxidation by the external action of Cu(2+). PMID:16102883

  19. Progenitor cells for ocular surface regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Nieto-Nicolau, Nuria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are essential for maintaining the cornea's transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio-replacement, such as cultured limbal epithelial transplantation and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation, present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiencies. Another emerging therapeutic strategy consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins using tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal stromal cells, represents a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases and also offers a more rational, less invasive and more physiological approach to ocular surface regeneration. PMID:23257987

  20. Progenitor cells for ocular surface regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Nieto-Nicolau, Nuria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are essential for maintaining the cornea's transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio-replacement, such as cultured limbal epithelial transplantation and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation, present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiencies. Another emerging therapeutic strategy consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins using tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal stromal cells, represents a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases and also offers a more rational, less invasive and more physiological approach to ocular surface regeneration.

  1. Biosensing based on surface plasmon resonance and living cells.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Vincent; Cuerrier, Charles M; Escher, Emanuel; Aimez, Vincent; Grandbois, Michel; Charette, Paul G

    2009-02-15

    We propose the combination of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) with living cells as a biosensing method. Our detection scheme is based on the premise that cellular activity induced by external agents is often associated with changes in cellular morphology, which in turn should lead to a variation of the effective refractive index at the interface between the cell membrane and the metal layer. We monitored surface plasmon resonance signals originating from a gold surface coated with cells on a custom apparatus after injection of various agents known to influence cellular activity and morphology. Specifically, we evaluated three types of stimulation: response to an endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides), a chemical toxin (sodium azide) and a physiological agonist (thrombin). A comparison with phase contrast microscopy reveals that SPR signal variations are associated with the induction of cell death for lipopolysaccharides treatment and a contraction of the cell body for sodium azide. Thrombin-induced cellular response shows a rapid decrease of the measured laser reflectance over 5min followed by a return to the original value. For this treatment, phase contrast micrographs relate the first phase of the SPR variation to cell contraction and increase of the intercellular gaps, whereas the recovery phase can be associated with a spreading of the cell on the sensing surface. Hence, the SPR signal is very consistent with the cellular response normally observed for these treatments. This confirms the validity of the biosensing method, which could be applied to a large variety of cellular responses involving shape remodeling induced by external agents. PMID:18845432

  2. Surface cell immobilization within perfluoroalkoxy microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojkovič, Gorazd; Krivec, Matic; Vesel, Alenka; Marinšek, Marjan; Žnidaršič-Plazl, Polona

    2014-11-01

    Perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) is one of the most promising materials for the fabrication of cheap, solvent resistant and reusable microfluidic chips, which have been recently recognized as effective tools for biocatalytic process development. The application of biocatalysts significantly depends on efficient immobilization of enzymes or cells within the reactor enabling long-term biocatalyst use. Functionalization of PFA microchannels by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (ATPES) and glutaraldehyde was used for rapid preparation of microbioreactors with surface-immobilized cells. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used to accurately monitor individual treatment steps and to select conditions for cell immobilization. The optimized protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization on PFA microchannel walls comprised ethanol surface pretreatment, 4 h contacting with 10% APTES aqueous solution, 10 min treatment with 1% glutaraldehyde and 20 min contacting with cells in deionized water. The same protocol enabled also immobilization of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus subtilis cells on PFA surface in high densities. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been proved to be very efficient also for surface immobilization of tested cells on other materials that are used for microreactor fabrication, including glass, polystyrene, poly (methyl methacrylate), polycarbonate, and two olefin-based polymers, namely Zeonor® and Topas®.

  3. Active Flow Control Stator With Coanda Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guendogdu; Vorreiter; Seume

    2010-01-01

    Active Flow Control increases the permissible aerodynamic loading. Curved surface near the trailing edge ("Coanda surface"): a) increases turning -> higher pressure ratio. b) controls boundary layer separation -> increased surge margin. Objective: Reduce the number of vanes or compressor stages. Constraints: 1. In a real compressor, the vane must still function entirely without blowing. 2. Maintain the flow exit angle of the reference stator despite the resulting increase in stator loading.

  4. Optical Activity of Anisotropic Achiral Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Verbiest, T.; Kauranen, M.; Van Rompaey, Y.; Persoons, A. |

    1996-08-01

    Anisotropic achiral surfaces respond differently to left- and right-hand circularly polarized light. This occurs when the orientation of the surface with respect to an otherwise achiral experimental setup makes the total geometry chiral. Such optical activity is demonstrated in second-harmonic generation from an anisotropic thin molecular film. The circular-difference response reverses sign as the handedness of the geometry is reversed and vanishes when the setup possesses a mirror plane. The results are explained within the electric-dipole-allowed second-order surface nonlinearity. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  5. The Cell Surface Proteome of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pursche, Theresia; Bornhäuser, Martin; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Background Multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) are considered as promising biological tools for regenerative medicine. Their antibody-based isolation relies on the identification of reliable cell surface markers. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain a comprehensive view of the cell surface proteome of bone marrow-derived hMSCs, we have developed an analytical pipeline relying on cell surface biotinylation of intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin to enrich the plasma membrane proteins and mass spectrometry for identification with extremely high confidence. Among the 888 proteins identified, we found ≈200 bona fide plasma membrane proteins including 33 cell adhesion molecules and 26 signaling receptors. In total 41 CD markers including 5 novel ones (CD97, CD112, CD239, CD276, and CD316) were identified. The CD markers are distributed homogenously within plastic-adherent hMSC populations and their expression is modulated during the process of adipogenesis or osteogenesis. Moreover, our in silico analysis revealed a significant difference between the cell surface proteome of hMSCs and that of human embryonic stem cells reported previously. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, our analytical methods not only provide a basis for further studies of mechanisms maintaining the multipotency of hMSCs within their niches and triggering their differentiation after signaling, but also a toolbox for a refined antibody-based identification of hMSC populations from different tissues and their isolation for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21637820

  6. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  7. Vesicle trafficking and cell surface membrane patchiness.

    PubMed

    Tang, Q; Edidin, M

    2001-07-01

    Membrane proteins and lipids often appear to be distributed in patches on the cell surface. These patches are often assumed to be membrane domains, arising from specific molecular associations. However, a computer simulation (Gheber and Edidin, 1999) shows that membrane patchiness may result from a combination of vesicle trafficking and dynamic barriers to lateral mobility. The simulation predicts that the steady-state patches of proteins and lipids seen on the cell surface will decay if vesicle trafficking is inhibited. To test this prediction, we compared the apparent sizes and intensities of patches of class I HLA molecules, integral membrane proteins, before and after inhibiting endocytic vesicle traffic from the cell surface, either by incubation in hypertonic medium or by expression of a dominant-negative mutant dynamin. As predicted by the simulation, the apparent sizes of HLA patches increased, whereas their intensities decreased after endocytosis and vesicle trafficking were inhibited. PMID:11423406

  8. Cell surface recycling in yeast: mechanisms and machineries.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Chris; Piper, Robert C

    2016-04-15

    Sorting internalized proteins and lipids back to the cell surface controls the supply of molecules throughout the cell and regulates integral membrane protein activity at the surface. One central process in mammalian cells is the transit of cargo from endosomes back to the plasma membrane (PM) directly, along a route that bypasses retrograde movement to the Golgi. Despite recognition of this pathway for decades we are only beginning to understand the machinery controlling this overall process. The budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, a stalwart genetic system, has been routinely used to identify fundamental proteins and their modes of action in conserved trafficking pathways. However, the study of cell surface recycling from endosomes in yeast is hampered by difficulties that obscure visualization of the pathway. Here we briefly discuss how recycling is likely a more prevalent process in yeast than is widely appreciated and how tools might be built to better study the pathway.

  9. Surface texturing and patterning in solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1993-11-01

    Surface texture can perform a number of functions in modern solar cell design. The most obvious function is in control of reflection from surfaces on which sunlight is incident. However, texture can also be used to influence the fate of light that is refracted into the cell. Light steering by surface texture can ensure this refracted light is absorbed in regions of the cell which are most responsive. When used with rear reflectors, surface texture can help trap weakly absorbed light into the cell, increasing the effective path length or optical thickness of the cell by factors of 30--60. Two general types of texture are considered. One involves macroscopic features of controlled shape designed to control the direction of interacting light. The other is based on the use of irregular features of size comparable to wavelength of the light. These can be very effective in scattering light into a wide range of directions. Non-optical uses of texture are also briefly described. 62 refs., 22 figs.

  10. Green Bank Telescope active surface system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasse, Richard J.

    1998-05-01

    During the design phase of the Green Bank Telescope (GBT), various means of providing an accurate surface on a large aperture paraboloid, were considered. Automated jacks supporting the primary reflector were selected as the appropriate technology since they promised greater performance and potentially lower costs than a homologous or carbon fiber design, and had certain advantages over an active secondary. The design of the active surface has presented many challenges. Since the actuators are mounted on a tipping structure, it was required that they support a significant side-load. Such devices were not readily available commercially so they had to be developed. Additional actuator requirements include low backlash, repeatable positioning, and an operational life of at least 230 years. Similarly, no control system capable of controlling the 2209 actuators was commercially available. Again a prime requirement was reliability. Maintaining was also a very important consideration. The system architecture is tree-like. An active surface 'master-computer' controls interaction with the telescope control system, and controls ancillary equipment such as power supplies and temperature monitors. Two slave computers interface with the master- computer, and each closes approximately 1100 position loops. For simplicity, the servo is an 'on/off' type, yet achieves a positioning resolution of 25 microns. Each slave computer interfaces with 4 VME I/O cards, which in turn communicate with 140 control modules. The control modules read out the positions of the actuators every 0.1 sec and control the actuators' DC motors. Initial control of the active surface will be based on an elevation dependant structural model. Later, the model will be improved by holographic observations.Surface accuracy will be improved further by using laser ranging system which will actively measure the surface figure. Several tests have been conducted to assure that the system will perform as desired when

  11. Osteoblastic cell behaviour on different titanium implant surfaces.

    PubMed

    Le Guehennec, Laurent; Lopez-Heredia, Marco-Antonio; Enkel, Benedicte; Weiss, Pierre; Amouriq, Yves; Layrolle, Pierre

    2008-05-01

    The osseointegration of oral implants is related to the early interactions between osteoblastic cells and titanium surfaces. The behaviour of osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells was compared on four different titanium surfaces: mirror-polished (Smooth-Ti), alumina grit-blasted (Alumina-Ti) or biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic grit-blasted (BCP-Ti) and a commercially available implant surface (SLA). Scanning electron microscopy and profilometry showed distinct microtopographies. The BCP-Ti group had higher average surface roughness (Ra=2.5 microm) than the other grit-blasted groups. Hydrophilicity and surfaces energies were determined on the different substrates by dynamic contact angle measurements. The most hydrophilic surface was the Alumina-Ti discs, while SLA was the most hydrophobic. The titanium surfaces were all oxidized as TiO2 and polluted by carbon contaminants, as determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Alumina-Ti samples also exhibited aluminium peaks as a result of the blasting. The BCP-Ti discs contained traces of calcium and phosphorus. MC3T3-E1 cells attached, spread and proliferated on the substrates. For both the SLA and BCP-Ti groups, the entire surface was covered with a layer of osteoblastic cells after 2 days. At high magnification, the cells exhibited cytoplasmic extensions and filopodia. Compared with plastic, cell viability was similar with the Smooth-Ti, slightly lower with the Alumina-Ti and superior with the SLA and BCP-Ti groups. Alkaline phosphatase activity increased with the culture time whatever the substrate. This study shows that BCP-blasting produces rough titanium implants without surface contaminants. PMID:18226985

  12. Production of cell surface and secreted glycoproteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Seiradake, Elena; Zhao, Yuguang; Lu, Weixian; Aricescu, A Radu; Jones, E Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian protein expression systems are becoming increasingly popular for the production of eukaryotic secreted and cell surface proteins. Here we describe methods to produce recombinant proteins in adherent or suspension human embryonic kidney cell cultures, using transient transfection or stable cell lines. The protocols are easy to scale up and cost-efficient, making them suitable for protein crystallization projects and other applications that require high protein yields. PMID:25502196

  13. Surface-active organics in atmospheric aerosols.

    PubMed

    McNeill, V Faye; Sareen, Neha; Schwier, Allison N

    2014-01-01

    Surface-active organic material is a key component of atmospheric aerosols. The presence of surfactants can influence aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, cloud formation, and ice nucleation. We review the current state of the science on the sources, properties, and impacts of surfactants in atmospheric aerosols. PMID:23408277

  14. A Generalizable Platform for the Photoactivation of Cell Surface Receptors.

    PubMed

    Duc, Thinh Nguyen; Huse, Morgan

    2015-11-20

    Polarized signal transduction from cell surface receptors plays a central role in the development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms, and it also contributes to cellular dysfunction in many disease states. Understanding the molecular and cellular bases of polarized signaling requires experimental methods that provide precise spatiotemporal control of receptor activation. However, we currently lack strategies for inducing both sustained and spatially constrained signal transduction. In the present study, we combined synthetic and cell biological tools to develop a generalizable photoactivation approach for the stimulation of cell surface receptors. Our system, which is based upon the local decaging of a "universal" peptide ligand, is particularly well suited for the live imaging of single cells. We anticipate that it will greatly facilitate future mechanistic analyses of polarized signal transduction in a variety of cell types. PMID:26295186

  15. Activated mast cells promote differentiation of B cells into effector cells

    PubMed Central

    Palm, Anna-Karin E.; Garcia-Faroldi, Gianni; Lundberg, Marcus; Pejler, Gunnar; Kleinau, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Based on the known accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in B cell-dependent inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, we hypothesized that MCs directly modulate B cells. We show here that degranulated, and to a lesser extent naïve or IgE-sensitized, MCs activate both naïve and B cell receptor-activated B cells. This was shown by increased proliferation, blast formation, and expression of CD19, MHC class II and CD86 in the B cells. Further, MCs stimulated the secretion of IgM and IgG in IgM+ B cells, indicating that MCs can induce class-switch recombination in B cells. We also show that coculture of MCs with B cells promotes surface expression of L-selectin, a homing receptor, on the B cells. The effects of MCs on B cells were partly dependent on cell-cell contact and both follicular and marginal zone B cells could be activated by MCs. Our findings suggest that degranulated MCs support optimal activation of B cells, a finding that is in line with in vivo studies showing that MCs frequently degranulate in the context of B-cell driven pathologies such as arthritis. Together, our findings show that MCs have the capacity to differentiate B cells to effector cells. PMID:26847186

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant displaying beta-glucans on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yumiko; Azuma, Masayuki; Takada, Yuki; Umeyama, Takashi; Kaneko, Aki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Koichi; Ooshima, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The deletion of MCD4 leads to an increase in beta-1,6-glucan level and a decrease in glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein and mannan levels in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that mcd4 deletion mutant (mcd4Delta) displays beta-glucans on the cell surface without a mannan cover. An observation of the cell surface of mcd4Delta cells and an examination of the effect of contact between mcd4Delta cells and mouse macrophages indicated that macrophages were activated by contact with mcd4Delta cells displaying beta-glucans on the cell surface. We further examined the effect of intraperitoneal ethanol-fixed mcd4Delta cells on the survival period of mice infected with Candida albicans. mcd4Delta cells prolonged the survival period, implying that mcd4Delta cells may enhance the immune function of mice via macrophage activation. Moreover, we examined the structures of beta-glucans (i.e., alkali- and acetic acid-insoluble beta-glucans) extracted from mcd4Delta with (13)C-NMR and the effect of extracted beta-glucans on TNF-alpha secretion from macrophages. The structures of the beta-glucans from mcd4Delta differed from those of wild type (WT); however, there was no difference in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion level between beta-glucans from mcd4Delta and those from WT. The yield of purified beta-glucans obtained from dry cells of mcd4Delta was higher than that obtained from dry cells of WT. mcd4Delta may be a superior strain for the preparation of beta-glucans. PMID:17368399

  17. Kinetic discrimination in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, J D; Beeson, C; Lyons, D S; Davis, M M; McConnell, H M

    1996-01-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model. PMID:8643643

  18. Kinetic Discrimination in T-Cell Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Beeson, Craig; Lyons, Daniel S.; Davis, Mark M.; McConnell, Harden M.

    1996-02-01

    We propose a quantitative model for T-cell activation in which the rate of dissociation of ligand from T-cell receptors determines the agonist and antagonist properties of the ligand. The ligands are molecular complexes between antigenic peptides and proteins of the major histocompatibility complex on the surfaces of antigen-presenting cells. Binding of ligand to receptor triggers a series of biochemical reactions in the T cell. If the ligand dissociates after these reactions are complete, the T cell receives a positive activation signal. However, dissociation of ligand after completion of the first reaction but prior to generation of the final products results in partial T-cell activation, which acts to suppress a positive response. Such a negative signal is brought about by T-cell ligands containing the variants of antigenic peptides referred to as T-cell receptor antagonists. Results of recent experiments with altered peptide ligands compare favorably with T-cell responses predicted by this model.

  19. Femtosecond fabricated surfaces for cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Daniel; Gu, Min

    2010-08-01

    Microfabrication using femtosecond pulse lasers is enabling access to a range of structures, surfaces and materials that was not previously available for scientific and engineering applications. The ability to produce micrometre sized features directly in polymer and metal substrates is demonstrated with applications in cell biology. The size, shape and aspect ratio of the etched features can be precisely controlled through the manipulation of the fluence of the laser etching process with respect to the properties of the target material. Femtosecond laser etching of poly(methyl methacrylate) and aluminium substrates has enabled the production of micrometre resolution moulds that can be accurately replicated using soft lithography. The moulded surfaces are used in the imaging of T cells and demonstrate the improved ability to observe biological events over time periods greater than 10 h. These results indicate the great potential femtosecond pulse lasers may have in the future manufacturing of microstructured surfaces and devices.

  20. Living Toroids - Cells on Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Angelini, Thomas; Marquez, Samantha; Kim, Harold; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. Substrate mechanics has been recognized as one of the important physical cues that governs cell behavior at single cell level as well as in collective cell motion. Past research has suggested several contact-guided behaviors to be the result of surface curvature. However, studies on the effect of curvature are relatively scarce likely due to the difficulty in generating substrates with well-defined curvature. Here we describe the generation of toroidal droplets, which unlike spherical droplets, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus. Cells are either encapsulated inside toroidal droplets or located on toroidal hydrogel surfaces. Preliminary studies use B. Subtilis to study the organization of bacteria biofilms. When confined in droplets surrounded by yield-stress fluid, bacteria self-organize into heterogeneous biofilm at fluid- substrate interface. It is found that the surface curvature in the sub-millimeter scale has little effect on biofilm architecture.

  1. Solar cell having improved front surface metallization

    SciTech Connect

    Lillington, D.R.; Mardesich, N.; Dill, H.G.; Garlick, G.F.J.

    1987-09-15

    This patent describes a solar cell comprising: a first layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N+ conductivity; a second layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of an N conductivity overlying the first layer; a third layer of gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a P conductivity overlying the N conductivity layer and forming a P-N junction therebetween. A layer of aluminium gallium arsenide semiconductor material of a p conductivity overlying the front major surface of the P conductivity third layer and having an exposed surface essentially parallel to the front major surface and at least one edge; a plurality of metallic contact lines made of a first metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a first predetermined distance traversing the exposed surface and extending through the aluminium gallium arsenide layer to the front major surface and making electrical contact to the third layer; a plurality of longitudinally disposed metallic grid lines made of a second metal alloy composition and being spaced apart by a second predetermined distance located on the exposed surface of the aluminium gallium arsenide layer and which cross the metallic contact lines and make electrical contact to the metallic lines; a flat metallic strip disposed on the aluminium gallium arsenide layer exposed surface near the edge, the strip electrically coupling the metallic grid lines to one another; and a back contact located on the back major surface.

  2. Dual Active Surface Heat Flux Gage Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-01-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  3. Melittin interaction with sulfated cell surface sugars.

    PubMed

    Klocek, Gabriela; Seelig, Joachim

    2008-03-01

    Melittin is a 26-residue cationic peptide with cytolytic and antimicrobial properties. Studies on the action mechanism of melittin have focused almost exclusively on the membrane-perturbing properties of this peptide, investigating in detail the melittin-lipid interaction. Here, we report physical-chemical studies on an alternative mechanism by which melittin could interact with the cell membrane. As the outer surface of many cells is decorated with anionic (sulfated) glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a strong Coulombic interaction between the two oppositely charged molecules can be envisaged. Indeed, the present study using isothermal titration calorimetry reveals a high affinity of melittin for several GAGs, that is, heparan sulfate (HS), dermatan sulfate, and heparin. The microscopic binding constant of melittin for HS is 2.4 x 10 (5) M (-1), the reaction enthalpy is Delta H melittin (0) = -1.50 kcal/mol, and the peptide-to-HS stoichiometry is approximately 11 at 10 mM Tris, 100 mM NaCl at pH 7.4 and 28 degrees C. Delta H melittin (0) is characterized by a molar heat capacity of Delta C P (0) = -227 cal mol (-1) K (-1). The large negative heat capacity change indicates that hydrophobic interactions must also be involved in the binding of melittin to HS. Circular dichroism spectroscopy demonstrates that the binding of the peptide to HS induces a conformational change to a predominantly alpha-helical structure. A model for the melittin-HS complex is presented. Melittin binding was compared with that of magainin 2 and nisin Z to HS. Magainin 2 is known for its antimicrobial properties, but it does not cause lysis of the eukaryotic cells. Nisin Z shows activity against various Gram-positive bacteria. Isothermal titration calorimetry demonstrates that magainin 2 and nisin Z do not bind to HS (5-50 degrees C, 10 mM Tris, and 100 mM NaCl at pH 7.4). PMID:18220363

  4. A Rapid Method for Refolding Cell Surface Receptors and Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Lu; Wu, Ling; Li, Feng; Burnham, Robert S.; Pizarro, Juan C.; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Production of membrane-associated cell surface receptors and their ligands is often a cumbersome, expensive, and time-consuming process that limits detailed structural and functional characterization of this important class of proteins. Here we report a rapid method for refolding inclusion-body-based, recombinant cell surface receptors and ligands in one day, a speed equivalent to that of soluble protein production. This method efficiently couples modular on-column immobilized metal ion affinity purification and solid-phase protein refolding. We demonstrated the general utility of this method for producing multiple functionally active immunoreceptors, ligands, and viral decoys, including challenging cell surface proteins that cannot be produced using typical dialysis- or dilution-based refolding approaches. PMID:27215173

  5. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, C.R. |

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  6. Selection of resistant acute myeloid leukemia SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells by vincristine-, mitoxantrone- and lenalidomide-induced upregulation of P-glycoprotein activity and downregulation of CD33 cell surface exposure.

    PubMed

    Imrichova, D; Messingerova, L; Seres, M; Kavcova, H; Pavlikova, L; Coculova, M; Breier, A; Sulova, Z

    2015-09-18

    Bone marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from both acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients contain upregulated levels of cell surface antigen CD33 compared with healthy controls. This difference enables the use of humanized anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to cytotoxic agents for CD33 targeted immunotherapy. However, the expression of the membrane-bound drug transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp) has been shown to be critical for resistance against the cytotoxicity of a humanized anti-CD33 antibody conjugated to maytansine-derivative DM4. The aim of the present study was to examine whether the expression of P-gp in AML cell lines is associated with changes in CD33 expression. For this purpose, we established drug resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 AML cell lines via the selection of parental cells for resistance to vincristine, mitoxantrone and lenalidomide. All three substances induced a multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype in SKM-1 cells associated with strong upregulation of P-gp and downregulation of CD33. However, in MOLM-13 cells, the upregulation of P-gp and downregulation of CD33 were present only in cells selected for resistance to vincristine and mitoxantrone but not lenalidomide. Inverse expression of P-gp and CD33 were observed in all resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells. The MDR phenotype of resistant variants of SKM-1 and MOLM-13 cells was associated with alterations in apoptotic regulatory proteins and downregulation of the multidrug resistance associated protein 1 and breast cancer resistance protein.

  7. Antiviral activity of alcohol for surface disinfection.

    PubMed

    Moorer, W R

    2003-08-01

    Bacteria and viruses from the patient's mouth travel with dental splatter and spills. A surface disinfectant should possess antiviral activity as well as antibacterial action. Because of frequent and 'open' application in the dental office, such a disinfectant should be non-toxic, non-allergenic and safe for the hygienist. It now appears that high-concentration alcohol mixtures (i.e. 80% ethanol + 5% isopropanol) are not only excellent antibacterials, but quickly inactivate HIV as well as hepatitis B and hepatitis C viruses. Compared to alternative surface disinfectants, use of high-concentration alcohol for the spray-wipe-spray method of surface disinfection in dentistry appears safe and efficient. However, dried matter should be wiped and hydrated first.

  8. Active surfaces: Ferrofluid-impregnated surfaces for active manipulation of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Karim; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Abu-Dheir, Numan; Varanasi, Kripa

    2014-11-01

    Droplet manipulation and mobility on non-wetting surfaces is of practical importance for diverse applications ranging from micro-fluidic devices, anti-icing, dropwise condensation, and biomedical devices. The use of active external fields has been explored via electric, acoustic, and vibrational, yet moving highly conductive and viscous fluids remains a challenge. Magnetic fields have been used for droplet manipulation; however, usually, the fluid is functionalized to be magnetic, and requires enormous fields of superconducting magnets when transitioning to diamagnetic materials such as water. Here we present a class of active surfaces by stably impregnating active fluids such as ferrofluids into a textured surface. Droplets on such ferrofluid-impregnated surfaces have extremely low hysteresis and high mobility such that they can be propelled by applying relatively low magnetic fields. Our surface is able to manipulate a variety of materials including diamagnetic, conductive and highly viscous fluids, and additionally solid particles.

  9. Active surfaces: Ferrofluid-impregnated surfaces for active manipulation of droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Karim S.; Mahmoudi, Seyed Reza; Abu-dheir, Numan; Varanasi, Kripa K.

    2014-07-01

    Droplet manipulation and mobility on non-wetting surfaces is of practical importance for diverse applications ranging from micro-fluidic devices, anti-icing, dropwise condensation, and biomedical devices. The use of active external fields has been explored via electric, acoustic, and vibrational, yet moving highly conductive and viscous fluids remains a challenge. Magnetic fields have been used for droplet manipulation; however, usually, the fluid is functionalized to be magnetic, and requires enormous fields of superconducting magnets when transitioning to diamagnetic materials such as water. Here we present a class of active surfaces by stably impregnating active fluids such as ferrofluids into a textured surface. Droplets on such ferrofluid-impregnated surfaces have extremely low hysteresis and high mobility such that they can be propelled by applying relatively low magnetic fields. Our surface is able to manipulate a variety of materials including diamagnetic, conductive and highly viscous fluids, and additionally solid particles.

  10. Upregulation of bcl-2 by the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein LMP1: a B-cell-specific response that is delayed relative to NF-kappa B activation and to induction of cell surface markers.

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, M; Peng-Pilon, M; Huen, D S; Hardy, R; Croom-Carter, D; Lundgren, E; Rickinson, A B

    1994-01-01

    An ability of the Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein LMP1 to enhance the survival of infected B cells through upregulation of the bcl-2 oncogene was first suggested by experiments involving gene transfection and the selection of stable LMP1+ clones (S. Henderson, M. Rowe, C. Gregory, F. Wang, E. Kieff, and A. Rickinson, Cell 65:1107-1115, 1991). However, it was not possible to ascertain whether Bcl-2 upregulation was a specific consequence of LMP1 expression or an artifact of the selection procedure whereby rare Bcl-2+ cells already present in the starting population might best be able to tolerate the potentially toxic effects of LMP1. We therefore reexamined this issue by using two different experimental approaches that allowed LMP1-induced effects to be monitored immediately following expression of the viral protein and in the absence of selective pressures; activation of the NF-kappa B transcription factor and upregulation of the cell adhesion molecule ICAM-1 were used as early indices of LMP1 function. In the first approach, stable clones of two B-cell lines carrying an LMP1 gene under the control of an inducible metallothionein promoter were induced to express LMP1 in all cells. Activation of NK-kappa B and upregulation of ICAM-1 occurred within 24 h and were followed at 48 to 72 h by upregulation of Bcl-2. In the second approach, we tested the generality of this phenomenon by transiently expressing LMP1 from a strong constitutively active promoter in a range of different cell types. All six B-cell lines tested showed NF-kappa B activation in response to LMP1 expression, and this was followed in five of six lines by expression of ICAM-1 and Bcl-2. In the same experiments, all three non-B-cell lines showed NF-kappa B activation and ICAM-1 upregulation but never any effect upon Bcl-2. We therefore conclude that Bcl-2 upregulation is part of the panoply of cellular changes induced by LMP1 but that the effect is cell type specific. Our data also suggest

  11. Cell surface proteoglycan associates with the cytoskeleton at the basolateral cell surface of mouse mammary epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The cell surface proteoglycan on normal murine mammary gland mouse mammary epithelial cells consists of an ectodomain bearing heparan and chondroitin sulfate chains and a lipophilic domain that is presumed to be intercalated into the plasma membrane. Because the ectodomain binds to matrix components produced by stromal cells with specificity and high affinity, we have proposed that the cell surface proteoglycan is a matrix receptor that binds epithelial cells to their underlying basement membrane. We now show that the proteoglycan surrounds cells grown in subconfluent or newly confluent monolayers, but becomes restricted to the basolateral surface of cells that have been confluent for a week or more; Triton X-100 extraction distinguishes three fractions of cell surface proteoglycan: a fraction released by detergent and presumed to be free in the membrane, a fraction bound via a salt-labile linkage, and a nonextractable fraction; the latter two fractions co-localize with actin filament bundles at the basal cell surface; and when proteoglycans at the apical cell surface are cross- linked by antibodies, they initially assimilate into detergent- resistant, immobile clusters that are subsequently aggregated by the cytoskeleton. These findings suggest that the proteoglycan, initially present on the entire surface and free in the plane of the membrane, becomes sequestered at the basolateral cell surface and bound to the actin-rich cytoskeleton as the cells become polarized in vitro. Binding of matrix components may cross-link proteoglycans at the basal cell surface and cause them to associate with the actin cytoskeleton, providing a mechanism by which the cell surface proteoglycan acts as a matrix receptor to stabilize the morphology of epithelial sheets. PMID:3025223

  12. Cell-surface arylsulfatase A and B on sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes, and Kupffer cells in mammalian livers.

    PubMed

    Mitsunaga-Nakatsubo, Keiko; Kusunoki, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Hayato; Akasaka, Koji; Akimoto, Yoshihiro

    2009-06-01

    Arylsulfatase A (ARSA) and B (ARSB) have been regarded as lysosomal enzymes because of their hydrolytic activity on synthetic aromatic substrates and the lysosomal localization of their enzymatic activity. Using sea urchin embryos, we previously demonstrated that the bulk of ARS is located on the cell surface of the epithelium, colocalizing with sulfated polysaccharides, and that it does not exhibit enzymatic activity. To examine whether ARSA and ARSB exist on the cell surface in mammalian tissues, we raised antibodies against ARSA and ARSB and examined immunohistochemically their localization in the liver using light and electron microscopy. Here we show that mammalian ARSA and ARSB exist on the cell surface of sinusoidal endothelial cells, hepatocytes, and sinusoidal macrophages (Kupffer cells), as well as in the lysosome. They are also colocalized with heparan sulfate proteoglycan. These results suggest that ARSA and ARSB also may function in the cell surface of mammals. This is the first report to show cell-surface localization of ARS in mammalian somatic cells. The extracellular localization of ARS will provide new insight for human ARS deficiency disorders, such as metachromatic leukodystrophy and mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

  13. Ab initio investigation of the oxygen reduction reaction activity on noble metal (Pt, Au, Pd), Pt3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) and Pd3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) alloy surfaces, for Lisbnd O2 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankarasubramanian, Shrihari; Singh, Nikhilendra; Mizuno, Fuminori; Prakash, Jai

    2016-07-01

    First principles, density functional theory (DFT) modelling of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on noble metal (Pt, Au, Pd), Pt3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) and Pd3M (M = Fe, Co, Ni, Cu) alloy surfaces, was carried out. Periodic models of close-packed (111) surfaces were constructed, their geometry was optimized and the most stable geometric surface configuration was identified. The correlation between the intermediate species binding energy and the favored reaction pathway from amongst 1e-, 2e-, and 4e- mechanisms were studied by calculating the binding energies of a 1/4 monolayer of O, O2, LiO, LiO2, Li2O2, and Li2O on various sites and orientations. The reaction free energies (ΔGrxn) were calculated and used to compute the catalytic activity of the surfaces using molecular kinetics theory. Plots of the catalytic activity vs. Oxygen binding energy (EBinding (O)) showed a typical "volcano" profile. The insights gained from this study can be used to guide the choice of cathode catalysts in Lisbnd O2 cells.

  14. The Exploration of Mars: Crew Surface Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhosri, Wisuwat; Cojanis, Philip; Gupta, Madhu; Khopkar, Manasi; Kiely, Aaron; Myers, Michael; Oxnevad, Knut; Sengupta, Anita; Sexton, Adam; Shaw, Don

    1999-01-01

    Surface activities of the first Mars mission crew, as suggested in phase I of the NASA HEDS reference mission, are discussed in this paper. The HEDS reference mission calls for a two phased approach. In phase I, humans supported by robotic systems will explore the Martian surface, collect and analyze geologic, geophysical, and meteorological data, search for potential permanent base sites, and conduct technology verification experiments. In phase II, a Mars base site will be selected, and the building of a permanent human base will be initiated. In this report two complementary architectures are portrayed. First, a permanent base for 3-6 people consisting of an ISRU unit, two nuclear power systems, a green house, and inflatable habitats and laboratories, built inside adobe structures. Second, a reusable, and resupplyable methane propelled very long range type traverse vehicle capable of collecting and analyzing data, and repairing and deploying scientific payloads during its planned 150 days 4800 km traverse. The very long range traverse vehicle will carry smaller rovers, crawlers, blimps, and an air drill capable of quickly reaching depths beyond 100m. The report presents a global vision of human activities on the surface of Mars at a programmatic level. It consists of several vignettes called "concept architectures" We speculate that these activities will facilitate a phase I Mars exploration architecture.

  15. Surface cell density effects on Escherichia coli gene expression during cell attachment.

    PubMed

    Mauter, Meagan S; Mauter, Meagan; Fait, Aaron; Elimelech, Menachem; Herzberg, Moshe

    2013-06-18

    Escherichia coli attachment to a surface initiates a complex series of interconnected signaling and regulation pathways that promote biofilm formation and maturation. The present work investigates the effect of deposited cell density on E. coli cell physiology, metabolic activity, and gene expression in the initial stages of biofilm development. Deposited cell density is controlled by exploiting the relationship between ionic strength and bacterial attachment efficiency in a packed bed column. Distinct differences in cell transcriptome are analyzed by comparing sessile cultures at two different cell surface densities and differentiating ionic strength effects by analyzing planktonic cultures in parallel. Our results indicate that operons regulating trypotophan production and the galactitol phosphotransferase system (including dihydroxyacetone phosphate synthesis) are strongly affected by cell density on the surface. Additional transcriptome and metabolomic impacts of cell density on succinate, proline, and pyroglutamic acid systems are also reported. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that surface cell density plays a major role in sessile cell physiology, commencing with the first stage of biofilm formation. These findings improve our understanding of biofilm formation in natural and engineered environmental systems and will contribute to future work ranging from pathogen migration in the environment to control of biofouling on engineered surfaces.

  16. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  17. Surface visualization of electromagnetic brain activity.

    PubMed

    Badea, Alexandra; Kostopoulos, George K; Ioannides, Andreas A

    2003-08-15

    Advances in hardware and software have made possible the reconstruction of brain activity from non-invasive electrophysiological measurements over a large part of the brain. The appreciation of the information content in the data is enhanced when relevant anatomical detail is also available for visualization. Different neuroscientific questions give rise to different requirements for optimal superposition of structure and function. Most available software deal with scalar measures of activity, especially hemodynamic changes. In contrast, the electrophysiological observables are generated by electrical activity, which depends on the synchrony of neuronal assemblies and the geometry of the local cortical surface. We describe methods for segmentation and visualization of spatio-temporal brain activity, which allow the interplay of geometry and scalar as well as vector properties of the current density directly in the representations. The utility of these methods is demonstrated through displays of tomographic reconstructions of early sensory processing in the somatosensory and visual modality extracted from magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. The activation course characteristic to a specific area could be observed as current density or statistical maps independently and/or contrasted to the activity in other areas or the whole brain. MEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activations were simultaneously visualized. Integrating and visualizing complementary functional data into a single environment helps evaluating analysis and understanding structure/function relationships in normal and diseased brain.

  18. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles as Optical Labels for Imaging Cell Surface Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaughlin, Christina M.

    Assaying the expression of cell surface proteins has widespread application for characterizing cell type, developmental stage, and monitoring disease transformation. Immunophenotyping is conducted by treating cells with labelled targeting moieties that have high affinity for relevant surface protein(s). The sensitivity and specificity of immunophenotyping is defined by the choice of contrast agent and therefore, the number of resolvable signals that can be used to simultaneously label cells. Narrow band width surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles are proposed as optical labels for multiplexed immunophenotying. Two types of surface coatings were investigated to passivate the gold nanoparticles, incorporate SERS functionality, and to facilitate attachment of targeting antibodies. Thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) forms dative bonds with the gold surface and is compatible with multiple physisorbed Raman-active reporter molecules. Ternary lipid bilayers are used to encapsulate the gold nanoparticles particles, and incorporate three different classes of Raman reporters. TEM, UV-Visible absorbance spectroscopy, DLS, and electrophoretic light scattering were used characterize the particle coating. Colourimetric protein assay, and secondary antibody labelling were used to quantify the antibody conjugation. Three different in vitromodels were used to investigate the binding efficacy and specificity of SERS labels for their biomarker targets. Primary human CLL cells, LY10 B lymphoma, and A549 adenocarcinoma lines were targeted. Dark field imaging was used to visualize the colocalization of SERS labels with cells, and evidence of receptor clustering was obtained based on colour shifts of the particles' Rayleigh scattering. Widefield, and spatially-resolved Raman spectra were used to detect labels singly, and in combination from labelled cells. Fluorescence flow cytometry was used to test the particles' binding specificity, and SERS from labelled cells was also

  19. Hair follicle targeting, penetration enhancement and Langerhans cell activation make cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping a promising delivery technique for transcutaneous immunization with large molecules and particle-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Deckert, Iliane; Schmidt, Julia; Stroux, Andrea; Afraz, Zahra; Rancan, Fiorenza; Lademann, Jürgen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) requires targeting of a maximum number of skin antigen-presenting cells as non-invasive as possible on small skin areas. In two clinical trials, we introduced cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) as a safe method for TCI. Here, using ex vivo human skin, we demonstrate that one CSSS procedure removed only 30% of stratum corneum, but significantly increased the penetration of 200 nm polystyrene particles deep into vellus and intermediate hair follicles from where they could not been retrieved by conventional tape stripping. Two subsequent CSSS had no striking additional effect. CSSS increased particle penetration in superficial stratum corneum and induced Langerhans cell activation. Formulation in amphiphilic ointment or massage did not substantially influences the interfollicular penetration profiles. Hair follicle (HF) targeting by CSSS could become a highly effective tool for TCI when combined with carrier-based delivery and is gaining new attention as our understanding on the HF immune system increases. PMID:25382068

  20. Hair follicle targeting, penetration enhancement and Langerhans cell activation make cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping a promising delivery technique for transcutaneous immunization with large molecules and particle-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Annika; Hadam, Sabrina; Deckert, Iliane; Schmidt, Julia; Stroux, Andrea; Afraz, Zahra; Rancan, Fiorenza; Lademann, Jürgen; Combadiere, Behazine; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) requires targeting of a maximum number of skin antigen-presenting cells as non-invasive as possible on small skin areas. In two clinical trials, we introduced cyanoacrylate skin surface stripping (CSSS) as a safe method for TCI. Here, using ex vivo human skin, we demonstrate that one CSSS procedure removed only 30% of stratum corneum, but significantly increased the penetration of 200 nm polystyrene particles deep into vellus and intermediate hair follicles from where they could not been retrieved by conventional tape stripping. Two subsequent CSSS had no striking additional effect. CSSS increased particle penetration in superficial stratum corneum and induced Langerhans cell activation. Formulation in amphiphilic ointment or massage did not substantially influences the interfollicular penetration profiles. Hair follicle (HF) targeting by CSSS could become a highly effective tool for TCI when combined with carrier-based delivery and is gaining new attention as our understanding on the HF immune system increases.

  1. Nanoparticle energy transfer on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Bene, László; Szentesi, Gergely; Mátyus, László; Gáspár, Rezso; Damjanovich, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    Membrane topology of receptors plays an important role in shaping transmembrane signalling of cells. Among the methods used for characterizing receptor clusters, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a donor and acceptor fluorophore plays a unique role based on its capability of detecting molecular level (2-10 nm) proximities of receptors in physiological conditions. Recent development of biotechnology has made possible the usage of colloidal gold particles in a large size range for specific labelling of cells for the purposes of electron microscopy. However, by combining metal and fluorophore labelling of cells, the versatility of metal-fluorophore interactions opens the way for new applications by detecting the presence of the metal particles by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy. An outstanding feature of the metal nanoparticle-fluorophore interaction is that the metal particle can enhance spontaneous emission of the fluorophore in a distance-dependent fashion, in an interaction range essentially determined by the size of the nanoparticle. In our work enhanced fluorescence of rhodamine and cyanine dyes was observed in the vicinity of immunogold nanoparticles on the surface of JY cells in a flow cytometer. The dyes and the immunogold were targetted to the cell surface receptors MHCI, MHCII, transferrin receptor and CD45 by monoclonal antibodies. The fluorescence enhancement was sensitive to the wavelength of the exciting light, the size and amount of surface bound gold beads, as well as the fluorophore-nanoparticle distance. The intensity of 90 degrees scattering of the incident light beam was enhanced by the immunogold in a concentration and size-dependent fashion. The 90 degrees light scattering varied with the wavelength of the incident light in a manner characteristic to gold nanoparticles of the applied sizes. A reduction in photobleaching time constant of the cyanine dye was observed in the vicinity of gold particles in a digital imaging

  2. Actin polymerization and intracellular solvent flow in cell surface blebbing

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The cortical actin gel of eukaryotic cells is postulated to control cell surface activity. One type of protrusion that may offer clues to this regulation are the spherical aneurysms of the surface membrane known as blebs. Blebs occur normally in cells during spreading and alternate with other protrusions, such as ruffles, suggesting similar protrusive machinery is involved. We recently reported that human melanoma cell lines deficient in the actin filament cross-linking protein, ABP-280, show prolonged blebbing, thus allowing close study of blebs and their dynamics. Blebs expand at different rates of volume increase that directly predict the final size achieved by each bleb. These rates decrease as the F-actin concentration of the cells increase over time after plating on a surface, but do so at lower concentrations in ABP-280 expressing cells. Fluorescently labeled actin and phalloidin injections of blebbing cells indicate that a polymerized actin structure is not present initially, but appears later and is responsible for stopping further bleb expansion. Therefore, it is postulated that blebs occur when the fluid-driven expansion of the cell membrane is sufficiently rapid to initially outpace the local rate of actin polymerization. In this model, the rate of intracellular solvent flow driving this expansion decreases as cortical gelation is achieved, whether by factors such as ABP-280, or by concentrated actin polymers alone, thereby leading to decreased size and occurrence of blebs. Since the forces driving bleb extension would always be present in a cell, this process may influence other cell protrusions as well. PMID:7790356

  3. Surface plasmon resonance imaging of cells and surface-associated fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Alexander W; Halter, Michael; Tona, Alessandro; Bhadriraju, Kiran; Plant, Anne L

    2009-01-01

    Background A critical challenge in cell biology is quantifying the interactions of cells with their extracellular matrix (ECM) environment and the active remodeling by cells of their ECM. Fluorescence microscopy is a commonly employed technique for examining cell-matrix interactions. A label-free imaging method would provide an alternative that would eliminate the requirement of transfected cells and modified biological molecules, and if collected nondestructively, would allow long term observation and analysis of live cells. Results Using surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRI), the deposition of protein by vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMC) cultured on fibronectin was quantified as a function of cell density and distance from the cell periphery. We observed that as much as 120 ng/cm2 of protein was deposited by cells in 24 h. Conclusion SPRI is a real-time, low-light-level, label-free imaging technique that allows the simultaneous observation and quantification of protein layers and cellular features. This technique is compatible with live cells such that it is possible to monitor cellular modifications to the extracellular matrix in real-time. PMID:19245706

  4. Brown spider venom toxins interact with cell surface and are endocytosed by rabbit endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nowatzki, Jenifer; de Sene, Reginaldo Vieira; Paludo, Katia Sabrina; Veiga, Silvio Sanches; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Trindade, Edvaldo S; Franco, Célia Regina C

    2010-09-15

    Bites from the Loxosceles genus (brown spiders) cause severe clinical symptoms, including dermonecrotic injury, hemorrhage, hemolysis, platelet aggregation and renal failure. Histological findings of dermonecrotic lesions in animals exposed to Loxosceles intermedia venom show numerous vascular alterations. Study of the hemorrhagic consequences of the venom in endothelial cells has demonstrated that the degeneration of blood vessels results not only from degradation of the extracellular matrix molecule or massive leukocyte infiltration, but also from a direct and primary activity of the venom on endothelial cells. Exposure of an endothelial cell line in vitro to L. intermedia venom induce morphological alterations, such as cell retraction and disadhesion to the extracellular matrix. The aim of the present study was to investigate the interaction between the venom toxins and the endothelial cell surface and their possible internalization, in order to illuminate the information about the deleterious effect triggered by venom. After treating endothelial cells with venom toxins, we observed that the venom interacts with cell surface. Venom treatment also can cause a reduction of cell surface glycoconjugates. When cells were permeabilized, it was possible to verify that some venom toxins were internalized by the endothelial cells. The venom internalization involves endocytic vesicles and the venom was detected in the lysosomes. However, no damage to lysosomal integrity was observed, suggesting that the cytotoxic effect evoked by L. intermedia venom on endothelial cells is not mediated by venom internalization.

  5. [The presence of an endogenous peroxidase activity in hairy cell leukemia cells].

    PubMed

    Reyes, F; Gourdin, M F; Farcet, J P; Dreyfus, B; Breton-Gorius, J

    1977-02-01

    Mononuclear cells from hairy cell leukemia have been studied in three cases by ultrastructural immunocytochemistry. Cells have fairly detectable surface immunoglobulins, without monoclonal distribution however. In addition these cells have a peroxidatic activity which is revealed in the perinuclear space and strands of endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:404081

  6. Acid base properties of cyanobacterial surfaces. II: Silica as a chemical stressor influencing cell surface reactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lalonde, S. V.; Smith, D. S.; Owttrim, G. W.; Konhauser, K. O.

    2008-03-01

    Bacteria grow in complex solutions where the adsorption of aqueous species and nucleation of mineral phases on the cell surface may interfere with membrane-dependent homeostatic functions. While previous investigations have provided evidence that bacteria may alter their surface chemical properties in response to environmental stimuli, to our knowledge no effort has been made to evaluate surface compositional changes resulting from non-nutritional chemical stresses within a quantitative framework applicable to surface complexation modeling. We consider here the influence of exposure to silica on cyanobacterial surface chemistry, particularly in light of the propensity for cyanobacteria to become silicified in geothermal environments. Using data modeled from over 50 potentiometric titrations of the unsheathed cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, we find that both abiotic geochemical and biotic biochemical-assimilatory factors have important and different effects on cell surface chemistry. Changes in functional group distribution that resulted from growth by different nitrogen assimilation pathways were greatest in the absence of dissolved silica and less important in its presence. Furthermore, out of the three nitrogen assimilation pathways investigated, in terms of surface functional group distribution, nitrate-reducing cultures were least sensitive, and ammonium-assimilating cultures were most sensitive, to changes in media silica concentration. When functional group distributions were plotted as a function of silica concentration, it appears that, with higher silica concentrations, basic groups (p Ka > 7) increase in concentration relative to acidic groups (p Ka < 7), and the total ligand densities (on a per-weight basis) decreased. The results imply a decrease in both the magnitude and density of surface charge as the net result of growth at high silica concentrations. Thus, Anabaena sp. appears to actively respond to growth in silicifying solutions by

  7. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  8. Shape-memory surfaces for cell mechanobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebara, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) are a new class of smart materials, which have the capability to change from a temporary shape ‘A’ to a memorized permanent shape ‘B’ upon application of an external stimulus. In recent years, SMPs have attracted much attention from basic and fundamental research to industrial and practical applications due to the cheap and efficient alternative to well-known metallic shape-memory alloys. Since the shape-memory effect in SMPs is not related to a specific material property of single polymers, the control of nanoarchitecture of polymer networks is particularly important for the smart functions of SMPs. Such nanoarchitectonic approaches have enabled us to further create shape-memory surfaces (SMSs) with tunable surface topography at nano scale. The present review aims to bring together the exciting design of SMSs and the ever-expanding range of their uses as tools to control cell functions. The goal for these endeavors is to mimic the surrounding mechanical cues of extracellular environments which have been considered as critical parameters in cell fate determination. The untapped potential of SMSs makes them one of the most exciting interfaces of materials science and cell mechanobiology.

  9. Unleashing Cancer Cells on Surfaces Exposing Motogenic IGDQ Peptides.

    PubMed

    Corvaglia, Valentina; Marega, Riccardo; De Leo, Federica; Michiels, Carine; Bonifazi, Davide

    2016-01-20

    Thiolated peptides bearing the Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD) motif, a highly conserved sequence of fibronectin, are used for the preparation of anisotropic self-assembled monolayers (SAM gradients) to study the whole-population migratory behavior of metastatic breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 cells). Ile-Gly-Asp-Gln-(IGDQ)-exposing SAMs sustain the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 cells by triggering focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation, similarly to the analogous Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-(GRGD)-terminating surfaces. However, the biological responses of different cell lines interfaced with the SAM gradients show that only those exposing the IGDQ sequence induce significant migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. In particular, the observed migratory behavior suggests the presence of cell subpopulations associated with a "stationary" or a "migratory" phenotype, the latter determining a considerable cell migration at the sub-cm length scale. These findings are of great importance as they suggest for the first time an active role of biological surfaces exposing the IGD motif in the multicomponent orchestration of cellular signaling involved in the metastatic progression.

  10. The cell surface expressed nucleolin is a glycoprotein that triggers calcium entry into mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Losfeld, Marie-Estelle; Khoury, Diala El; Mariot, Pascal; Carpentier, Mathieu; Krust, Bernard; Briand, Jean-Paul; Mazurier, Joel; Hovanessian, Ara G.; Legrand, Dominique

    2009-01-15

    Nucleolin is an ubiquitous nucleolar phosphoprotein involved in fundamental aspects of transcription regulation, cell proliferation and growth. It has also been described as a shuttling molecule between nucleus, cytosol and the cell surface. Several studies have demonstrated that surface nucleolin serves as a receptor for various extracellular ligands implicated in cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, mitogenesis and angiogenesis. Previously, we reported that nucleolin in the extranuclear cell compartment is a glycoprotein containing N- and O-glycans. In the present study, we show that glycosylation is an essential requirement for surface nucleolin expression, since it is prevented when cells are cultured in the presence of tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-glycosylation. Accordingly, surface but not nuclear nucleolin is radioactively labeled upon metabolic labeling of cells with [{sup 3}H]glucosamine. Besides its well-demonstrated role in the internalization of specific ligands, here we show that ligand binding to surface nucleolin could also induce Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells. Indeed, by flow cytometry, microscopy and patch-clamp experiments, we show that the HB-19 pseudopeptide, which binds specifically surface nucleolin, triggers rapid and intense membrane Ca{sup 2+} fluxes in various types of cells. The use of several drugs then indicated that Store-Operated Ca{sup 2+} Entry (SOCE)-like channels are involved in the generation of these fluxes. Taken together, our findings suggest that binding of an extracellular ligand to surface nucleolin could be involved in the activation of signaling pathways by promoting Ca{sup 2+} entry into cells.

  11. Expression of the T-cell surface molecule CD2 and an epitope-loss CD2 mutant to define the role of lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) in T-cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Bierer, B E; Peterson, A; Barbosa, J; Seed, B; Burakoff, S J

    1988-01-01

    To define the role of the CD2-lymphocyte function-associated antigen 3 (LFA-3) interaction in T-cell activation, we have expressed a cDNA encoding the human CD2 molecule in a murine antigen-specific T-cell hybridoma. Expression of the CD2 molecule greatly enhances T-cell responsiveness to antigen; this enhancement is inhibited by anti-CD2 and anti-LFA-3 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). CD2+ hybridomas produce interleukin 2 in response to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs 9.6 and 9-1 and, in the presence of mAb 9-1, to sheep erythrocytes or to the LFA-3 antigen. Furthermore, hybridomas expressing a mutant CD2 molecule that has lost mAb 9.6 binding do not exhibit the enhanced response to antigen or the ability to respond to LFA-3 plus mAb 9-1, but these hybridomas retain the ability to respond to combinations of anti-CD2 mAbs. The role of the CD2-LFA-3 interaction in T-cell activation and the potential for other physiologic ligands for CD2 are discussed. PMID:2448792

  12. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  13. Estrogen inhibits cell cycle progression and retinoblastoma phosphorylation in rhesus ovarian surface epithelial cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Jay W.; Stouffer, Richard L.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2003-10-31

    Estrogen promotes the growth of some ovarian cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, but has been shown to inhibit growth of normal ovarian surface epithelial (OSE) cells at micromolar concentrations (1μg/ml). OSE cells express the estrogen receptor (ER)-α, and are the source of 90% of various cancers. The potential sensitivity of OSE cells to estrogen stresses the importance of understanding the estrogen-dependent mechanisms at play in OSE proliferation and transformation, as well as in anticancer treatment. We investigated the effects of estradiol on cell proliferation in vitro, and demonstrate an intracellular locus of action of estradiol in cultured rhesus ovarian surface epithelial (RhOSE) cells. We show that ovarian and breast cells are growth-inhibited by micromolar concentration of estradiol and that this inhibition correlates with estrogen receptor expression. We further show that normal rhesus OSE cells do not activate ERK or Akt in response to estradiol nor does estradiol block the ability of serum to stimulate ERK or induce cyclin D expression. Contrarily, estradiol inhibits serum-dependent retinoblastoma protein (Rb) phosphorylation and blocks DNA synthesis. This inhibition does not formally arrest cells and is reversible within hours of estrogen withdrawal. Our data are consistent with growth inhibition by activation of Rb and indicate that sensitivity to hormone therapy in anticancer treatment can be modulated by cell cycle regulators downstream of the estrogen receptor.

  14. Does Titan have an Active Surface?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, R.

    2009-12-01

    ammonia, a compound expected in Titan’s interior. This, combined with the previous evidence from VIMS and RADAR images, creates a strong case for Titan having a presently active surface, possibly due to cryovolcanism. Cassini encountered Titan at very close range on 2008-11-19-13:58 and again on 2008-12-05-12:38. These epochs are called T47 and T48. Comparison of earlier lower resolution data (T5) with the recent T47 and T48 data reveal changes of the surface reflectance and morphology in the Hotei region. This is the first evidence from VIMS that confirms the RADAR report that Hotei Reggio has morphology consistent with volcanic terrain. It has not escaped our attention that ammonia, in association with methane and nitrogen, the principal species of Titan’s atmosphere, closely replicates the environment at the time that live first emerged on earth. If Titan is currently active then these results raise the following questions: What is the full extent of current geologic activity? What are the ongoing processes? Are Titan’s chemical processes today supporting a prebiotic chemistry similar to that under which life evolved on Earth? This work done at JPL under contract with NASA. Refs: [1]R. M. Nelson et al., Icarus 199 (2009) 429-441. [2]R. M. Nelson et al., GRL, VOL. 36, L04202, doi:10.1029/2008GL036206, 2009. [3]S. D. Wall GRL, VOL. 36, L04203, doi:10.1029/2008GL036415, 2009

  15. Knowledge discovery of cell-cell and cell-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jing

    High-throughput cell culture is an emerging technology that shows promise as a tool for research in tissue engineering, drug discovery, and medical diagnostics. An important, but overlooked, challenge is the integration of experimental methods with information processing suitable for handling large databases of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. In this work the traditional global descriptions of cell behaviors and surface characteristics was shown insufficient for investigating short-distance cell-to-cell and cell-to-surface interactions. Traditional summary metrics cannot distinguish information of cell near neighborhood from the average, global features, thus often is not suitable for studying distance-sensitive cell behaviors. The problem of traditional summary metrics was addressed by introducing individual-cell based local metrics that emphasize cell local environment. An individual-cell based local data analysis method was established. Contact inhibition of cell proliferation was used as a benchmark for the effectiveness of the local metrics and the method. Where global, summary metrics were unsuccessful, the local metrics successfully and quantitatively distinguished the contact inhibition effects of MC3T3-E1 cells on PLGA, PCL, and TCPS surfaces. In order to test the new metrics and analysis method in detail, a model of cell contact inhibition was proposed. Monte Carlo simulation was performed for validating the individual-cell based local data analysis method as well as the cell model itself. The simulation results well matched with the experimental observations. The parameters used in the cell model provided new descriptions of both cell behaviors and surface characteristics. Based on the viewpoint of individual cells, the local metrics and local data analysis method were extended to the investigation of cell-surface interactions, and a new high-throughput screening and knowledge discovery method on combinatorial libraries, local cell

  16. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  17. Elasticity of adherent active cells on a compliant substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Mertz, Aaron F.; Dufresne, Eric R.; Marchetti, M. Cristina

    2012-02-01

    We present a continuum mechanical model of rigidity sensing by livings cells adhering to a compliant substrate. The cell or cell colony is modeled as an elastic active gel, adapting recently developed continuum theories of active viscoelastic fluids. The coupling to the substrate enters as a boundary condition that relates the cell's deformation field to local stress gradients. In the presence of activity, the substrate induces spatially inhomogeneous contractile stresses and deformations, with a power law dependence of the total traction forces on cell or colony size. This is in agreement with recent experiments on keratinocyte colonies adhered to fibronectin coated surfaces. In the presence of acto-myosin activity, the substrate also enhances the cell polarization, breaking the cell's front-rear symmetry. Maximal polarization is observed when the substrate stiffness matches that of the cell, in agreement with experiments on stem cells.

  18. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    steric hindrance. The adhesive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3 phosphate kinase (PI3K) and actin cytoskeleton, and the invasive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by PI3K, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Rho and actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, galectin-1-induced cell death in H-ALCL cells was accompanied by inhibition of CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. In conclusion, cell adhesion and invasion to galectin-1 appeared to be regulated by cell surface sialylation and N-glycosylation, and galectin-1 regulates cell death through inhibition of CD45 PTP activity of H-ALCL. PMID:24589677

  19. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: regulatory roles of cell surface glycans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-05-01

    steric hindrance. The adhesive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by phosphatidylinositol 3 phosphate kinase (PI3K) and actin cytoskeleton, and the invasive capacity of H-ALCL cells is regulated by PI3K, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Rho and actin cytoskeleton. Furthermore, galectin-1-induced cell death in H-ALCL cells was accompanied by inhibition of CD45 protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity. In conclusion, cell adhesion and invasion to galectin-1 appeared to be regulated by cell surface sialylation and N-glycosylation, and galectin-1 regulates cell death through inhibition of CD45 PTP activity of H-ALCL.

  20. Immunization of Mice with a TolA-Like Surface Protein of Trypanosoma cruzi Generates CD4+ T-Cell-Dependent Parasiticidal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Quanquin, Natalie M.; Galaviz, Charles; Fouts, David L.; Wrightsman, Ruth A.; Manning, Jerry E.

    1999-01-01

    The gene family encoding a trypomastigote-specific protein restricted to the part of the flagellum in contact with the cell body of the trypomastigote form of Trypanosoma cruzi has been isolated, characterized, and expressed in a baculovirus expression system. The gene family contains three tandemly repeated members that have 97 to 100% sequence identity. The predicted protein encoded by the gene family has both significant amino acid sequence identity and other physical and biological features in common with the TolA proteins of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Based on these similarities, we have designated this gene family tolT. Immunization of mice with recombinant TolT generates a population of CD4+ T lymphocytes that recognize T. cruzi-infected macrophages, resulting in the production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), which leads to NO production and a 50 to 60% reduction in parasite numbers compared to that seen with infected macrophages incubated with naive T cells. This population of T cells also produces both IFN-γ and interleukin 2 (IL-2) but not IL-4 or IL-5 when incubated with spleen cells stimulated with TolT antigen, indicating that they are of the T-helper 1 type. T cells from mice chronically infected with T. cruzi also produce significant levels of IFN-γ when cocultured with macrophages and either TolT protein or paraflagellar rod protein, indicating that both of these flagellar proteins produce positive T-cell responses in mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. PMID:10456906

  1. Surface activation of Concorde by Be-7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truscott, P. R.; Dyer, C. S.; Flatman, J. C.

    1992-01-01

    Activation analysis of two airframe components from the Concorde aircraft has identified the presence of Be-7, a nuclide found by other investigators that was deposited on the forward edge of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) structure. The results of the Concorde analysis indicate that this phenomenon is very much a surface effect, and that the areal densities of the Be-7 are comparable to those found for LDEF. The collection of Be-7 by the aircraft must be greater than in the case of LDEF (since duration for which Concorde is accumulating the nuclide is shorter) and is of the order of 1.2 to 41 nuclei/sq cm(-)s(exp -1) depending upon assumptions made regarding the altitude at which collection becomes appreciable, and the efficiency of the process which removes the radionuclide.

  2. High cell-surface density of HER2 deforms cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Chung, Inhee; Reichelt, Mike; Shao, Lily; Akita, Robert W; Koeppen, Hartmut; Rangell, Linda; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mellman, Ira; Sliwkowski, Mark X

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancers (BC) with HER2 overexpression (referred to as HER2 positive) progress more aggressively than those with normal expression. Targeted therapies against HER2 can successfully delay the progression of HER2-positive BC, but details of how this overexpression drives the disease are not fully understood. Using single-molecule biophysical approaches, we discovered a new effect of HER2 overexpression on disease-relevant cell biological changes in these BC. We found HER2 overexpression causes deformation of the cell membranes, and this in turn disrupts epithelial features by perturbing cell-substrate and cell-cell contacts. This membrane deformation does not require receptor signalling activities, but results from the high levels of HER2 on the cell surface. Our finding suggests that early-stage morphological alterations of HER2-positive BC cells during cancer progression can occur in a physical and signalling-independent manner. PMID:27599456

  3. Calculation of cell volumes and surface areas in MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    MCNP is a general Monte Carlo neutron-photon particle transport code which treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces, and some special fourth-degree surfaces. It is necessary to calculate cell volumes and surface areas so that cell masses, fluxes, and other important information can be determined. The volume/area calculation in MCNP computes cell volumes and surface areas for cells and surfaces rotationally symmetric about any arbitrary axis. 5 figures, 1 table.

  4. Surface active properties of chitosan and its derivatives.

    PubMed

    Elsabee, Maher Z; Morsi, Rania Elsayed; Al-Sabagh, A M

    2009-11-01

    This review discusses the definition of surface active agents and specifically natural polymeric surface active agents. Chitosan by itself was found to have weak surface activity since it has no hydrophobic segments. Chemical modifications of chitosan could improve such surface activity. This is achieved by introducing hydrophobic substituents in its glucosidic group. Several examples of chitosan derivatives with surfactant activity have been surveyed. The surface active polymers form micelles and aggregates which have enormous importance in the entrapment of water-insoluble drugs and consequently applications in the controlled drug delivery and many biomedical fields. Chitosan also interacts with several substrates by electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with considerable biomedical applications.

  5. Monocyte cell surface glycosaminoglycans positively modulate IL-4-induced differentiation toward dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    den Dekker, Els; Grefte, Sander; Huijs, Tonnie; ten Dam, Gerdy B; Versteeg, Elly M M; van den Berk, Lieke C J; Bladergroen, Bellinda A; van Kuppevelt, Toin H; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2008-03-15

    IL-4 induces the differentiation of monocytes toward dendritic cells (DCs). The activity of many cytokines is modulated by glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). In this study, we explored the effect of GAGs on the IL-4-induced differentiation of monocytes toward DCs. IL-4 dose-dependently up-regulated the expression of DC-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), CD80, CD206, and CD1a. Monocytes stained positive with Abs against heparan sulfate (HS) and chondroitin sulfate (CS) B (CSB; dermatan sulfate), but not with Abs that recognize CSA, CSC, and CSE. Inhibition of sulfation of monocyte/DC cell surface GAGs by sodium chlorate reduced the reactivity of sulfate-recognizing single-chain Abs. This correlated with hampered IL-4-induced DC differentiation as evidenced by lower expression of DC-SIGN and CD1a and a decreased DC-induced PBL proliferation, suggesting that sulfated monocyte cell surface GAGs support IL-4 activity. Furthermore, removal of cell surface chondroitin sulfates by chondroitinase ABC strongly impaired IL-4-induced STAT6 phosphorylation, whereas removal of HS by heparinase III had only a weak inhibitory effect. IL-4 bound to heparin and CSB, but not to HS, CSA, CSC, CSD, and CSE. Binding of IL-4 required iduronic acid, an N-sulfate group (heparin) and specific O sulfates (CSB and heparin). Together, these data demonstrate that monocyte cell surface chondroitin sulfates play an important role in the IL-4-driven differentiation of monocytes into DCs.

  6. Controlling cell-cell interactions using surface acoustic waves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; French, Jarrod B; Mao, Zhangming; Zhao, Hong; Li, Sixing; Nama, Nitesh; Fick, James R; Benkovic, Stephen J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between pairs of cells and within multicellular assemblies are critical to many biological processes such as intercellular communication, tissue and organ formation, immunological reactions, and cancer metastasis. The ability to precisely control the position of cells relative to one another and within larger cellular assemblies will enable the investigation and characterization of phenomena not currently accessible by conventional in vitro methods. We present a versatile surface acoustic wave technique that is capable of controlling the intercellular distance and spatial arrangement of cells with micrometer level resolution. This technique is, to our knowledge, among the first of its kind to marry high precision and high throughput into a single extremely versatile and wholly biocompatible technology. We demonstrated the capabilities of the system to precisely control intercellular distance, assemble cells with defined geometries, maintain cellular assemblies in suspension, and translate these suspended assemblies to adherent states, all in a contactless, biocompatible manner. As an example of the power of this system, this technology was used to quantitatively investigate the gap junctional intercellular communication in several homotypic and heterotypic populations by visualizing the transfer of fluorescent dye between cells.

  7. Surface plasmonic effects on organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Ashraf; Yang, Xiaohan

    2014-02-01

    Most high-performance organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices reported in the literature have been fabricated using the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) concept. Typically, the optimum thickness of the active layer for an OPV device is around 100 nm, or possibly less; such a thin layer can lead to low absorption of light. A thicker layer, however, inevitably increases the device resistance, due to the low carrier mobilities and short exciton diffusion lengths in organic materials. This situation imposes a trade-off between light absorption and charge transport efficiencies in OPV devices, motivating the development of a variety of light-trapping techniques. Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) such as Ag, Au, etc. and other metallic nanostructures are potential candidates for improving the light absorption due to the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR). LSPR contributes to the significant enhancement of local electromagnetic fields and improves the optical properties of the nanostructure devices. The excitation of LSPR is achieved when the frequency of the incident light matches its resonance peak, resulting in unique optical properties; selective light extinction as well as local enhancement of electromagnetic fields near the surface of metallic NPs. The resonance peak of LSPR depends strongly on the size, shape, and the dielectric environment of the metallic NPs. In this review article, progress on plasmonic enhanced OPV device performance is examined. The concepts of surface plasmonics for OPV devices, suitable plasmonic materials, location, optimum size and concentration of NP materials within the device are explored.

  8. Comparison of actin and cell surface dynamics in motile fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamic behavior of actin in fibroblast lamellipodia using photoactivation of fluorescence. Activated regions of caged resorufin (CR)-labeled actin in lamellipodia of IMR 90 and MC7 3T3 fibroblasts were observed to move centripetally over time. Thus in these cells, actin filaments move centripetally relative to the substrate. Rates were characteristic for each cell type; 0.66 +/- 0.27 microns/min in IMR 90 and 0.36 +/- 0.16 microns/min in MC7 3T3 cells. In neither case was there any correlation between the rate of actin movement and the rate of lamellipodial protrusion. The half-life of the activated CR-actin filaments was approximately 1 min in IMR 90 lamellipodia, and approximately 3 min in MC7 3T3 lamellipodia. Thus continuous filament turnover accompanies centripetal movement. In both cell types, the length of time required for a section of the actin meshwork to traverse the lamellipodium was several times longer than the filament half-life. The dynamic behavior of the dorsal surface of the cell was also observed by tracking lectin-coated beads on the surface and phase-dense features within lamellipodia of MC7 3T3 cells. The movement of these dorsal features occurred at rates approximately three times faster than the rate of movement of the underlying bulk actin cytoskeleton, even when measured in the same individual cells. Thus the transport of these dorsal features must occur by some mechanism other than simple attachment to the moving bulk actin cytoskeleton. PMID:1400580

  9. Perspective of surface active agents in baking industry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Asif; Arshad, Nazish; Ahmed, Zaheer; Bhatti, Muhammad Shahbaz; Zahoor, Tahir; Anjum, Nomana; Ahmad, Hajra; Afreen, Asma

    2014-01-01

    Different researchers have previously used surfactants for improving bread qualities and revealed that these compounds result in improving the quality of dough and bread by influencing dough strength, tolerance, uniform crumb cell size, and improve slicing characteristics and gas retention. The objective of this review is to highlight the areas where surfactants are most widely used particularly in the bread industries, their role and mechanism of interaction and their contribution to the quality characteristics of the dough and bread. This review reveals some aspects of surface-active agents regarding its role physiochemical properties of dough that in turn affect the bread characteristics by improving its sensory quality and storage stability.

  10. Synthetic surfaces as artificial antigen presenting cells in the study of T cell receptor triggering and immunological synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Irvine, Darrell J; Doh, Junsang

    2007-08-01

    T cell activation occurs when T cell receptors engage peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules displayed on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs). Clustering of TCRs and other receptors in physical patterns at the T-APC interface forms a structure known as an immunological synapse (IS). Studies of the IS are challenging due to the cell-cell contact context of the governing interactions. Model surfaces as synthetic APCs have thus been developed, where the type, quantity, and physical arrangement of ligands displayed to T cells are precisely controlled. These model systems have provided important insights into the structure and function of the IS. PMID:17398113

  11. Short-chain ceramides depress integrin cell surface expression and function in colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Morad, Samy A F; Bridges, Lance C; Almeida Larrea, Alex D; Mayen, Anthony L; MacDougall, Matthew R; Davis, Traci S; Kester, Mark; Cabot, Myles C

    2016-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly metastatic, significantly so to liver, a characteristic that embodies one of the most challenging aspects of treatment. The integrin family of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion receptors plays a central role in migration and invasion, functions that underlie metastatic potential. In the present work we sought to determine the impact of ceramide, which plays a key modulatory role in cancer suppression, on integrin cell surface expression and function in CRC cells in order to reveal possible ceramide-centric effects on tumor cell motility. Human CRC cells LoVo, HT-29, and HCT-116 were employed, which represent lines established from primary and metastatic sites. A cell-permeable, short-chain analog, C6-ceramide, was used as ceramide mimic. Exposure of cells to C6-ceramide (24 h) promoted a dose-dependent (2.5-10 µM) decrease in the expression of cell surface β1 and β4 integrin subunits in all cell lines; at 10 µM C6-ceramide, the decreases ranged from 30 to 50% of the control. Expression of cell surface αVβ6 integrin, which is associated with advanced invasion in CRC, was also suppressed by C6-ceramide. Decreases in integrin expression translated to diminished cellular adhesion, 50% of the control at 5 µM C6-ceramide, and markedly reduced cellular migration, approximately 30-40% of the control in all cell lines. Physicochemical examination revealed potent efficacy of nano-formulated C6-ceramide, but inferior activity of dihydro-C6-ceramide and L-C6-ceramide, compared to the unsaturated counterpart and the natural d-enantiomer, respectively. These studies demonstrate novel actions of ceramides that may have application in suppression of tumor metastasis, in addition to their known tumor suppressor effects. PMID:27045476

  12. Effect of Surface-Active Pseudomonas spp. on Leaf Wettability

    PubMed Central

    Bunster, Lillian; Fokkema, Nyckle J.; Schippers, Bob

    1989-01-01

    Different strains of Pseudomonas putida and P. fluorescens isolated from the rhizosphere and phyllosphere were tested for surface activity in droplet cultures on polystyrene. Droplets of 6 of the 12 wild types tested spread over the surface during incubation, and these strains were considered surface active; strains not showing this reaction were considered non-surface active. Similar reactions were observed on pieces of wheat leaves. Supernatants from centrifuged broth cultures behaved like droplets of suspensions in broth; exposure to 100°C destroyed the activity. Average contact angles of the supernatants of surface-active and non-surface-active strains on polystyrene were 24° and 72°, respectively. The minimal surface tension of supernatants of the surface-active strains was about 46 mN/m, whereas that of the non-surface-active strains was 64 mN/m (estimations from Zisman plots). After 6 days of incubation, wheat flag leaves sprayed with a dilute suspension of a surface-active strain of P. putida (WCS 358RR) showed a significant increase in leaf wettability, which was determined by contact angle measurements. Increasing the initial concentration of bacteria and the amount of nutrients in the inoculum sprayed on leaves reduced the contact angles from 138° on leaves treated with antibiotics (control) to 43° on leaves treated with surface-active bacteria. A closely related strain with no surface activity on polystyrene did not affect leaf wettability, although it was present in densities similar to those of the surface-active strain. Nutrients alone could occasionally also increase leaf wettability, apparently by stimulating naturally occurring surface-active bacteria. When estimating densities of Pseudomonas spp. underneath droplets with low contact angles, it appeared that populations on leaves treated with a surface-active strain could vary from about 104 to 106 CFU cm−2, suggesting that the surface effect may be prolonged after a decline of the

  13. Selection of Antibodies Interfering with Cell Surface Receptor Signaling Using Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Melidoni, Anna N; Dyson, Michael R; McCafferty, John

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies able to bind and modify the function of cell surface signaling components in vivo are increasingly being used as therapeutic drugs. The identification of such "functional" antibodies from within large antibody pools is, therefore, the subject of intense research. Here we describe a novel cell-based expression and reporting system for the identification of functional antibodies from antigen-binding populations preselected with phage display. The system involves inducible expression of the antibody gene population from the Rosa-26 locus of embryonic stem (ES) cells, followed by secretion of the antibodies during ES cell differentiation. Target antigens are cell-surface signaling components (receptors or ligands) with a known effect on the direction of cell differentiation (FGFR1 mediating ES cell exit from self renewal in this particular protocol). Therefore, inhibition or activation of these components by functional antibodies in a few elite clones causes a shift in the differentiation outcomes of these clones, leading to their phenotypic selection. Functional antibody genes are then recovered from positive clones and used to produce the purified antibodies, which can be tested for their ability to affect cell fates exogenously. Identified functional antibody genes can be further introduced in different stem cell types. Inducible expression of functional antibodies has a temporally controlled protein-knockdown capability, which can be used to study the unknown role of the signaling pathway in different developmental contexts. Moreover, it provides a means for control of stem cell differentiation with potential in vivo applications.

  14. The MDCK epithelial cell line expresses a cell surface antigen of the kidney distal tubule

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell line to identify epithelial cell surface macromolecules involved in renal function. Lymphocyte hybrids were generated by fusing P3U-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a C3H mouse immunized with MDCK cells. Hybridomas secreting anti-MDCK antibodies were obtained and clonal lines isolated in soft agarose. We are reporting on one hybridoma line that secretes a monoclonal antibody that binds to MDCK cells at levels 20-fold greater than background binding. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy was utilized to study the distribution of antibody binding on MDCK cells and on frozen sections of dog kidney and several nonrenal tissues. In the kidney the fluorescence staining pattern demonstrates that the antibody recognizes an antigenic determinant that is expressed only on the epithelial cells of the thick ascending limb of Henle's loops and the distal convoluted tubule and appears to be localized on the basolateral plasma membrane. This antigen also has a unique distribution in non-renal tissues and can only be detected on cells known to be active in transepithelial ion movements. These results indicate the probable distal tubule origin of MDCK and suggest that the monoclonal antibody recognizes a cell surface antigen involved in physiological functions unique to the kidney distal tubule and transporting epithelia of nonrenal tissues. PMID:6178742

  15. Summary of activities. [Mars surface sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Four space projects' activities are summarized. Design work on the Mars Penetrator Project, in cooperation with the NASA Ames Research Center, is being continued. Efforts are focused on the drilling mechanism which must penetrate the martian subsurface soil to collect and retrieve an uncontaminated sample. The new design consists of a rotary-percussive drill mechanism. This mechanism is optimum for dry drilling, necessary to avoid contamination of the soil sample, in many different soil types. The need for a small, relatively inexpensive device to study the chemical structure of this martian soil was also established. The egg design was chosen for its low cost compared to other systems and potential for a large number of eggs to be deployed on the martian surface. The design process included analysis of the dynamics of reentry, dissipation of heat during reentry, impact with the surface, access to undisturbed soil samples, and ability to gather samples from the soil at three depths. The egg consists of the reentry systems, soil probe lifting system, soil probe package, gas chromatograph, transmitter, and battery power supply. The egg must function only once, but is designed to withstand one martian year. The Mars Mole is designed as a rover-based device which penetrates the martian soil to a depth of up to 10 m, obtains a sample of soil, and returns it to the surface for analysis. The mole was designed to meet the following specifications: (1) weight less than 10 kg; (2) size less than 20 x 20 x 30 cm; (3) power less than 100 W; (4) ability to obtain a sample of at least 5 cc; (5) ability to penetrate fine, loose sand; and (6) need to obtain at least one sample. The space station umbilical connector project is a device which provides the translational motion of the connectors on the Space Station Freedom to allow engagement for power and data transfer. The design is capable of delivering a 20 lb force within the necessary tolerances and will operate reliably in the

  16. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25476450

  17. Quantitative comparison of a human cancer cell surface proteome between interphase and mitosis.

    PubMed

    Özlü, Nurhan; Qureshi, Mohammad H; Toyoda, Yusuke; Renard, Bernhard Y; Mollaoglu, Gürkan; Özkan, Nazlı E; Bulbul, Selda; Poser, Ina; Timm, Wiebke; Hyman, Anthony A; Mitchison, Timothy J; Steen, Judith A

    2015-01-13

    The cell surface is the cellular compartment responsible for communication with the environment. The interior of mammalian cells undergoes dramatic reorganization when cells enter mitosis. These changes are triggered by activation of the CDK1 kinase and have been studied extensively. In contrast, very little is known of the cell surface changes during cell division. We undertook a quantitative proteomic comparison of cell surface-exposed proteins in human cancer cells that were tightly synchronized in mitosis or interphase. Six hundred and twenty-eight surface and surface-associated proteins in HeLa cells were identified; of these, 27 were significantly enriched at the cell surface in mitosis and 37 in interphase. Using imaging techniques, we confirmed the mitosis-selective cell surface localization of protocadherin PCDH7, a member of a family with anti-adhesive roles in embryos. We show that PCDH7 is required for development of full mitotic rounding pressure at the onset of mitosis. Our analysis provided basic information on how cell cycle progression affects the cell surface. It also provides potential pharmacodynamic biomarkers for anti-mitotic cancer chemotherapy.

  18. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression. PMID:26601950

  19. Fibronectin on the Surface of Myeloma Cell-derived Exosomes Mediates Exosome-Cell Interactions.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Anurag; Bandari, Shyam Kumar; Liu, Jian; Mobley, James A; Brown, Elizabeth E; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-22

    Exosomes regulate cell behavior by binding to and delivering their cargo to target cells; however, the mechanisms mediating exosome-cell interactions are poorly understood. Heparan sulfates on target cell surfaces can act as receptors for exosome uptake, but the ligand for heparan sulfate on exosomes has not been identified. Using exosomes isolated from myeloma cell lines and from myeloma patients, we identify exosomal fibronectin as a key heparan sulfate-binding ligand and mediator of exosome-cell interactions. We discovered that heparan sulfate plays a dual role in exosome-cell interaction; heparan sulfate on exosomes captures fibronectin, and on target cells it acts as a receptor for fibronectin. Removal of heparan sulfate from the exosome surface releases fibronectin and dramatically inhibits exosome-target cell interaction. Antibody specific for the Hep-II heparin-binding domain of fibronectin blocks exosome interaction with tumor cells or with marrow stromal cells. Regarding exosome function, fibronectin-mediated binding of exosomes to myeloma cells activated p38 and pERK signaling and expression of downstream target genes DKK1 and MMP-9, two molecules that promote myeloma progression. Antibody against fibronectin inhibited the ability of myeloma-derived exosomes to stimulate endothelial cell invasion. Heparin or heparin mimetics including Roneparstat, a modified heparin in phase I trials in myeloma patients, significantly inhibited exosome-cell interactions. These studies provide the first evidence that fibronectin binding to heparan sulfate mediates exosome-cell interactions, revealing a fundamental mechanism important for exosome-mediated cross-talk within tumor microenvironments. Moreover, these results imply that therapeutic disruption of fibronectin-heparan sulfate interactions will negatively impact myeloma tumor growth and progression.

  20. Cell surface fluctuations studied with defocusing microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agero, U.; Monken, C. H.; Ropert, C.; Gazzinelli, R. T.; Mesquita, O. N.

    2003-05-01

    Phase objects can become visible by slightly defocusing an optical microscope, a technique seldom used as a useful tool. We revisited the theory of defocusing and apply it to our optical microscope with optics corrected at infinity. In our approximation, we obtain that the image contrast is proportional to the two-dimensional (2D) Laplacian of the phase difference introduced by the phase object. If the index of refraction of the phase object is uniform the image obtained from defocusing microscopy is the image of curvature (Laplacian of the local thickness) of the phase object, while standard phase-contrast microscopy gives information about the thickness of the object. We made artificial phase objects and measured image contrasts with defocusing microscopy. Measured contrasts are in excellent agreement with our theoretical model. We use defocusing microscopy to study curvature fluctuations (ruffles) on the surface of macrophages (cell of the innate immune system), and try to correlate mechanical properties of macrophage surface and phagocytosis. We observe large coherent propagating structures: Their shape, speed, density are measured and curvature energy estimated. Inhomogeneities of cytoskeleton refractive index, curvature modulations due to thermal fluctuations and/or periodic changes in cytoskeleton-membrane interactions cause random fluctuations in image contrast. From the temporal and spatial contrast correlation functions, we obtain the decay time and correlation length of such fluctuations that are related to their size and the viscoelastic properties of the cytoskeleton. In order to associate the dynamics of cytoskeleton with the process of phagocytosis, we use an optical tweezers to grab a zymosan particle and put it into contact with the macrophage. We then measure the time for a single phagocytosis event. We add the drug cytochalasin D that depolymerizes the cytoskeleton F-actin network: It inhibits the large propagating coherent fluctuations on the

  1. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability.

  2. Effects of surface active agents on DNAPL migration and distribution in saturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhou; Gao, Bin; Xu, Hongxia; Sun, Yuanyuan; Shi, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jichun

    2016-11-15

    Dissolved surface active agents such as surfactant and natural organic matter can affect the distribution and fate of dense nonaqueous liquids (DNAPLs) in soil and groundwater systems. This work investigated how two common groundwater surface active agents, humic acid (HA) and Tween 80, affected tetrachloroethylene (PCE) migration and source zone architecture in saturated porous media under environmentally relevant conditions. Batch experiments were first conducted to measure the contact angles and interfacial tensions (IFT) between PCE and quartz surface in water containing different amount of surface active agents. Results showed that the contact angle increased and IFT decreased with concentration of surface active agent increasing, and Tween 80 was much more effective than HA. Five 2-D flow cell experiments were then conducted. Correspondingly, Tween 80 showed strong effects on the migration and distribution of PCE in the porous media due to its ability to change the medium wettability from water-wet into intermediate/NAPL-wet. The downward migration velocities of the PCE in three Tween 80 cells were slower than those in the other two cells. In addition, the final saturation of the PCE in the cells containing surface active agents was higher than that in the water-only cell. Results from this work indicate that the presence of surface active agents in groundwater may strongly affect the fate and distribution of DNAPL through altering porous medium wettability. PMID:27450259

  3. Shape memory polymers for active cell culture.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kevin A; Luo, Xiaofan; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2011-07-04

    have generally been passive and could not be programmed to change significantly during culture. This physical stasis has limited the potential of topographic substrates to control cells in culture. Here, active cell culture (ACC) SMP substrates are introduced that employ surface shape memory to provide programmed control of substrate topography and deformation. These substrates demonstrate the ability to transition from a temporary grooved topography to a second, nearly flat memorized topography. This change in topography can be used to control cell behavior under standard cell culture conditions.

  4. Phospholipid polymer-based antibody immobilization for cell rolling surfaces in stem cell purification system.

    PubMed

    Mahara, Atsushi; Chen, Hao; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yamaoka, Tetsuji

    2014-01-01

    We previously developed an antibody-conjugated cell rolling column that successfully separates stem cell subpopulations depending on the cell surface marker density, but a large amount of the injected cells were retained in the column because of non-specific interactions. In this study, an amphiphilic copolymer, poly[2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC)-co-n-butyl methacrylate (nBMA)-co-N-vinyl formamide (NVf)], with phospholipid polar side groups was designed as a novel antibody-immobilizing modifier. The formamide groups in NVf units were converted to active maleimide groups. A plastic flow microfluidic chamber was coated with the copolymers, and a reduced anti-CD90 antibody was immobilized. The adipose tissue-derived stem cells isolated from the rat were injected into the flow chamber, and their rolling behavior was observed under a microscope with a high-speed camera. Non-specific cell adhesion was reduced strongly by means of this immobilization method because of the MPC unit, resulting in a high percentage of rolling cells. These results demonstrate that a surface coated with phospholipid polar groups can be used in an effective stem cell separation system based on the cell rolling process.

  5. Facile cell patterning on an albumin-coated surface.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Hironori; Uemura, Toshimasa; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2008-08-19

    Fabrication of micropatterned surfaces to organize and control cell adhesion and proliferation is an indispensable technique for cell-based technologies. Although several successful strategies for creating cellular micropatterns on substrates have been demonstrated, a complex multistep process and requirements for special and expensive equipment or materials limit their prevalence as a general experimental tool. To circumvent these problems, we describe here a novel facile fabrication method for a micropatterned surface for cell patterning by utilizing the UV-induced conversion of the cell adhesive property of albumin, which is the most abundant protein in blood plasma. An albumin-coated surface was prepared by cross-linking albumin with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether and subsequent casting of the cross-linked albumin solution on the cell culture dish. While cells did not attach to the albumin surface prepared in this way, UV exposure renders the surface cell-adhesive. Thus, surface micropatterning was achieved simply by exposing the albumin-coated surface to UV light through a mask with the desired pattern. Mouse fibroblast L929 cells were inoculated on the patterned albumin substrates, and cells attached and spread in a highly selective manner according to the UV-irradiated pattern. Although detailed investigation of the molecular-level mechanism concerning the change in cell adhesiveness of the albumin-coated surface is required, the present results would give a novel facile method for the fabrication of cell micropatterned surfaces. PMID:18627191

  6. Heat-activated liposome targeting to streptavidin-coated surfaces.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yujia; Trefná, Hana Dobšíček; Persson, Mikael; Svedhem, Sofia

    2015-06-01

    There is a great need of improved anticancer drugs and corresponding drug carriers. In particular, liposomal drug carriers with heat-activated release and targeting functions are being developed for combined hyperthermia and chemotherapy treatments of tumors. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the heat-activation of liposome targeting to biotinylated surfaces, in model experiments where streptavidin is used as a pretargeting protein. The design of the heat-activated liposomes is based on liposomes assembled in an asymmetric structure and with a defined phase transition temperature. Asymmetry between the inside and the outside of the liposome membrane was generated through the enzymatic action of phospholipase D, where lipid head groups in the outer membrane leaflet, i.e. exposed to the enzyme, were hydrolyzed. The enzymatically treated and purified liposomes did not bind to streptavidin-modified surfaces. When activation heat was applied, starting from 22°C, binding of the liposomes occurred once the temperature approached 33±0.5°C. Moreover, it was observed that the asymmetric structure remained stable for at least 2 weeks. These results show the potential of asymmetric liposomes for the targeted binding to cell membranes in response to (external) temperature stimulus. By using pretargeting proteins, this approach can be further developed for personalized medicine, where tumor-specific antibodies can be selected for the conjugation of pretargeting agents.

  7. Chemical modification of the surfaces of bacterial cell walls.

    PubMed

    Neihof, R A; Echols, W H

    1978-01-01

    The surfaces of the isolated cell walls of four bacterial species were studied by microelectrophoresis following chemical treatments intended to remove specific charged groups. Acid-base titrations of the walls were used to assess specificity and extent of the modifications. Carboxyl groups were specifically and completely modified by activation with a water-soluble carbodiimide and subsequent reaction with a nucleophile, such as glycinamide, to give an uncharged pH-stable product. Aqueous media and mild reaction conditions make the method suitable for modifying carboxyl groups on cell surfaces too labile to withstand the harsh conditions required for conventional esterification reactions. Use of the carbodiimide-mediated reaction for discharging carboxyl groups, along with fluorodinitrobenzene for discharging amino groups and extraction procedures for removing constituents carrying phosphoester groups (teichoic acids), made it possible to obtain information about the spatial arrangement of charged groups on the wall surfaces. Removal of the exterior negative charge dominating wall surfaces allowed underlying amino groups to become electrokinetically effective and, in the case of E. coli, also revealed a lipophilic region with an affinity for a cationic surfactant.

  8. Mouse Paneth Cell Secretory Responses to Cell Surface Glycolipids of Virulent and Attenuated Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hiroki; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Bainbridge, Brian; Guina, Tina; Ernst, Robert K.; Darveau, Richard P.; Miller, Samuel I.; Ouellette, Andre J.

    2005-01-01

    Mouse Paneth cells respond to bacteria and bacterial cell surface antigens by discharging secretory granules into the lumen of small intestinal crypts (T. Ayabe et al., Nat. Immunol. 1:113-118, 2000). To investigate mechanisms regulating these responses, purified surface glycolipid molecules with known acyl chain modifications and attenuated properties were tested for the ability to stimulate Paneth cell secretion. The antigens included lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from wild-type and msbB-null Escherichia coli and phoP-null and phoP-constitutive Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strains, as well as LPS, lipid A, and lipoteichoic acid from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Listeria monocytogenes grown in Mg2+-limited media. Measurements of total secreted protein, secreted lysozyme, and the bactericidal peptide activities of collected secretions showed that the purified antigens elicited similar secretory responses from Paneth cells in mouse crypts ex vivo, regardless of glycolipid acyl chain modification. Despite their impaired Tlr4 pathway, Paneth cells in ex vivo C3H/HeJ mouse crypts released equivalent amounts of bactericidal peptide activity in response to purified bacterial antigens, including lipid A. Thus, mouse Paneth cells respond equivalently to purified bacterial cell envelope glycolipids, regardless of functional Tlr4, the structural properties of glycolipid acyl chains, or their association with virulence in humans. PMID:15784576

  9. Activation of Complement by Cells Infected with Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas F.; Mcintosh, Kenneth; Fishaut, Mark; Henson, Peter M.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-infected HEp-2 cells in culture to activate complement was investigated. After incubation of cells with various complement sources and buffer, binding of C3b to surfaces of infected cells was demonstrated by immunofluorescence with a double-staining technique. Nonsyncytial and syncytial (i.e., fused, multinucleated) cells were separately enumerated. Also, lysis of RSV-infected cells was assessed by lactic dehydrogenase release. In this system only RSV-infected cells stained for C3b, and they did so only after incubation with functionally active complement. Blocking of classical pathway activation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid diminished the number of infected nonsyncytial cells positively stained for C3b, but had no effect on staining of syncytial cells. Blocking of alternative pathway activation with either zymosan incubation or heat treatment decreased the number of both syncytial and nonsyncytial cells stained for C3b. Decreasing immunoglobulin concentration of the serum used as the complement source also decreased numbers of both cell types stained for C3b. Eliminating specific anti-RSV antibody diminished numbers of both cell types stained for C3b, but staining was not eliminated. Lastly, incubation with functionally active complement markedly increased lactic dehydrogenase release from infected cells. This study demonstrated that RSV-infected nonsyncytial and syncytial cells are able to activate complement by both classical and alternative pathways. Activation of complement by syncytial cells appears to be less dependent on the classical pathway than is activation by nonsyncytial cells, and activation by syncytial cells may require immunoglobulin but not specific antibody. These experiments suggest the possibility of complement activation during respiratory tract infection by RSV. Implications of this are discussed. Images PMID:7263071

  10. Dendritic cell exosomes directly kill tumor cells and activate natural killer cells via TNF superfamily ligands

    PubMed Central

    Munich, Stephan; Sobo-Vujanovic, Andrea; Buchser, William J.; Beer-Stolz, Donna; Vujanovic, Nikola L.

    2012-01-01

    Autocrine and paracrine cell communication can be conveyed by multiple mediators, including membrane-associate proteins, secreted proteins and exosomes. Exosomes are 30–100 nm endosome-derived vesicles consisting in cytosolic material surrounded by a lipid bilayer containing transmembrane proteins. We have previously shown that dendritic cells (DCs) express on their surface multiple TNF superfamily ligands (TNFSFLs), by which they can induce the apoptotic demise of tumor cells as well as the activation of natural killer (NK) cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that, similar to DCs, DC-derived exosomes (DCex) express on their surface TNF, FasL and TRAIL, by which they can trigger caspase activation and apoptosis in tumor cells. We also show that DCex activate NK cells and stimulate them to secrete interferonγ (IFNγ) upon the interaction of DCex TNF with NK-cell TNF receptors. These data demonstrate that DCex can mediate essential innate immune functions that were previously ascribed to DCs. PMID:23170255

  11. Tracking and treating activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, N.H.; Nadithe, V.; Elsayed, M.; Merkel, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    Upon activation, T cells of various subsets are the most important mediators in cell-mediated immune responses. Activated T cells play an important role in immune system related diseases such as chronic inflammatory diseases, viral infections, autoimmune disease, transplant rejection, Crohn disease, diabetes, and many more. Therefore, efforts have been made to both visualize and treat activated T cells specifically. This review summarizes imaging approaches and selective therapeutics for activated T cells and gives an outlook on how tracking and treating can be combined into theragnositc agents for activated T cells. PMID:24660025

  12. The surface of articular cartilage contains a progenitor cell population.

    PubMed

    Dowthwaite, Gary P; Bishop, Joanna C; Redman, Samantha N; Khan, Ilyas M; Rooney, Paul; Evans, Darrell J R; Haughton, Laura; Bayram, Zubeyde; Boyer, Sam; Thomson, Brian; Wolfe, Michael S; Archer, Charles W

    2004-02-29

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that articular cartilage growth is achieved by apposition from the articular surface. For such a mechanism to occur, a population of stem/progenitor cells must reside within the articular cartilage to provide transit amplifying progeny for growth. Here, we report on the isolation of an articular cartilage progenitor cell from the surface zone of articular cartilage using differential adhesion to fibronectin. This population of cells exhibits high affinity for fibronectin, possesses a high colony-forming efficiency and expresses the cell fate selector gene Notch 1. Inhibition of Notch signalling abolishes colony forming ability whilst activated Notch rescues this inhibition. The progenitor population also exhibits phenotypic plasticity in its differentiation pathway in an embryonic chick tracking system, such that chondroprogenitors can engraft into a variety of connective tissue types including bone, tendon and perimysium. The identification of a chondrocyte subpopulation with progenitor-like characteristics will allow for advances in our understanding of both cartilage growth and maintenance as well as provide novel solutions to articular cartilage repair. PMID:14762107

  13. Substrate elasticity affects bovine satellite cell activation kinetics in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lapin, M R; Gonzalez, J M; Johnson, S E

    2013-05-01

    Satellite cells support efficient postnatal skeletal muscle hypertrophy through fusion into the adjacent muscle fiber. Nuclear contribution allows for maintenance of the fiber myonuclear domain and proficient transcription of myogenic genes. Niche growth factors affect satellite cell biology; however, the interplay between fiber elasticity and microenvironment proteins remains largely unknown. The objective of the experiment was to examine the effects of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and surface elasticity on bovine satellite cell (BSC) activation kinetics in vitro. Young's elastic modulus was calculated for the semimembranosus (SM) and LM muscles of young bulls (5 d; n = 8) and adult cows (27 mo; n = 4) cattle. Results indicate that LM elasticity decreased (P < 0.05) with age; no difference in Young's modulus for the SM was noted. Bovine satellite cells were seeded atop polyacrylamide bioscaffolds with surface elasticities that mimic young bull and adult cow LM or traditional cultureware. Cells were maintained in low-serum media supplemented with 5 ng/mL HGF or vehicle only for 24 or 48 h. Activation was evaluated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) immunocytochemistry. Results indicate that BSC maintained on rigid surfaces were activated at 24 h and refractive to HGF supplementation. By contrast, fewer (P < 0.05) BSC had exited quiescence after 24 h of culture on surfaces reflective of either young bull (8.1 ± 1.7 kPa) or adult cow (14.6 ± 1.6 kPa) LM. Supplementation with HGF promoted activation of BSC cultured on bioscaffolds as measured by an increase (P < 0.05) in PCNA immunopositive cells. Culture on pliant surfaces affected neither activation kinetics nor numbers of Paired box 7 (Pax7) immunopositive muscle stem cells (P > 0.05). However, with increasing surface elasticity, an increase (P < 0.05) in the numbers of muscle progenitors was observed. These results confirm that biophysical and biochemical signals regulate BSC activation.

  14. Toward Cell Selective Surfaces: Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Breath Figures with Antifouling Surface Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Campos, Enrique; Elzein, Tamara; Bejjani, Alice; García-Granda, Maria Jesús; Santos-Coquillat, Ana; Ramos, Viviana; Muñoz-Bonilla, Alexandra; Rodríguez-Hernández, Juan

    2016-03-01

    We report the preparation of microporous functional polymer surfaces that have been proven to be selective surfaces toward eukaryotic cells while maintaining antifouling properties against bacteria. The fabrication of functional porous films has been carried out by the breath figures approach that allowed us to create porous interfaces with either poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) or 2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorostyrene (5FS). For this purpose, blends of block copolymers in a polystyrene homopolymer matrix have been employed. In contrast to the case of single functional polymer, using blends enables us to vary the chemical distribution of the functional groups inside and outside the formed pores. In particular, fluorinated groups were positioned at the edges while the hydrophilic PEGMA groups were selectively located inside the pores, as demonstrated by TOF-SIMS. More interestingly, studies of cell adhesion, growth, and proliferation on these surfaces confirmed that PEGMA functionalized interfaces are excellent candidates to selectively allow cell growth and proliferation while maintaining antifouling properties. PMID:26909529

  15. Neisseria lactamica selectively induces mitogenic proliferation of the naive B cell pool via cell surface Ig.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Brackenbury, Louise S; Massari, Paola; Davenport, Victoria; Gorringe, Andrew; Heyderman, Robert S; Williams, Neil A

    2010-09-15

    Neisseria lactamica is a commensal bacteria that colonizes the human upper respiratory tract mucosa during early childhood. In contrast to the closely related opportunistic pathogen Neisseria meningitidis, there is an absence of adaptive cell-mediated immunity to N. lactamica during the peak age of carriage. Instead, outer membrane vesicles derived from N. lactamica mediate a B cell-dependent proliferative response in mucosal mononuclear cells that is associated with the production of polyclonal IgM. We demonstrate in this study that this is a mitogenic human B cell response that occurs independently of T cell help and any other accessory cell population. The ability to drive B cell proliferation is a highly conserved property and is present in N. lactamica strains derived from diverse clonal complexes. CFSE staining of purified human tonsillar B cells demonstrated that naive IgD(+) and CD27(-) B cells are selectively induced to proliferate by outer membrane vesicles, including the innate CD5(+) subset. Neither purified lipooligosaccharide nor PorB from N. lactamica is likely to be responsible for this activity. Prior treatment of B cells with pronase to remove cell-surface Ig or treatment with BCR-specific Abs abrogated the proliferative response to N. lactamica outer membrane vesicles, suggesting that this mitogenic response is dependent upon the BCR.

  16. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections. PMID:27077876

  17. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  18. Enzymatic activity induced by interactions with a nanofabricated hydrophobic Si surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2013-07-01

    The binding of peptides of 2-10 glycine residues (2-10Gly) to papain on nanofabricated hydrophobic Si surfaces was investigated by molecular dynamics and docking simulations. 5Gly, 7Gly, 9Gly, and 10Gly were distributed on sites near the active center of papain on the Si surface, while 6-10Gly were distributed on sites near the active center of free papain. The Si surface changed the substrate specificity of papain, and modification of this surface should allow full control of substrate specificity. Molecular surgery of proteins in cells may be realized using papain on specially designed surfaces.

  19. Cell surface lectin-binding glycoconjugates on marine planktonic protists.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Emily C; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Martin-Cereceda, Mercedes; Novarino, Gianfranco; Wootton, Emma C

    2006-12-01

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions appear to play an important role in the phagocytosis of microbial prey by free-living protozoa. The present study utilizes FITC-labelled plant lectins to investigate the presence and localization of cell surface glycoconjugates on live and fixed planktonic protists (Dunaliella primolecta, Oxyrrhis marina, Goniomonas amphinema, Paraphysomonas vestita and Euplotes vannus). With live flagellate preparations, lectins primarily bound to external cell surfaces, with minimal internal staining observed. In contrast, cell fixation permeabilized cell membranes, allowing lectins to bind to internal structures, such as nuclear membranes and food vacuoles, interfering with the characterization of cell surface glycoconjugates. The method developed to label cell surface sugar moieties of live planktonic protists successfully overcomes the problems associated with fixation, and thus provides a useful protocol for future studies on protistan cell surface carbohydrate characterization.

  20. Biocompatible functionalization of polymersome surfaces: a new approach to surface immobilization and cell targeting using polymersomes.

    PubMed

    Egli, Stefan; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Chami, Mohamed; Bruns, Nico; Palivan, Cornelia; Meier, Wolfgang

    2011-03-30

    Vesicles assembled from amphiphilic block copolymers represent promising nanomaterials for applications that include drug delivery and surface functionalization. One essential requirement to guide such polymersomes to a desired site in vivo is conjugation of active, targeting ligands to the surface of preformed self-assemblies. Such conjugation chemistry must fulfill criteria of efficiency and selectivity, stability of the resulting bond, and biocompatibility. We have here developed a new system that achieves these criteria by simple conjugation of 4-formylbenzoate (4FB) functionalized polymersomes with 6-hydrazinonicotinate acetone hydrazone (HyNic) functionalized antibodies in aqueous buffer. The number of available amino groups on the surface of polymersomes composed of poly(dimethylsiloxane)-block-poly(2-methyloxazoline) diblock copolymers was investigated by reacting hydrophilic succinimidyl-activated fluorescent dye with polymersomes and evaluating the resulting emission intensity. To prove attachment of biomolecules to polymersomes, HyNic functionalized enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (eYFP) was attached to 4FB functionalized polymersomes, resulting in an average number of 5 eYFP molecules per polymersome. Two different polymersome-antibody conjugates were produced using either antibiotin IgG or trastuzumab. They showed specific targeting toward biotin-patterned surfaces and breast cancer cells. Overall, the polymersome-ligand platform appears promising for therapeutic and diagnostic use.

  1. Surface modification for interaction study with bacteria and preosteoblast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Qing

    Surface modification plays a pivotal role in bioengineering. Polymer coatings can provide biocompatibility and biofunctionalities to biomaterials through surface modification. In this dissertation, initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was utilized to coat two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) substrates with differently charged polyelectrolytes in order to generate antimicrobial and osteocompatible biomaterials. ICVD is a modified CVD technique that enables surface modification in an all-dry condition without substrate damage and solvent contamination. The free-radical polymerization allows the vinyl polymers to conformally coat on various micro- and nano-structured substrates and maintains the delicate structure of the functional groups. The vapor deposition of polycations provided antimicrobial activity to planar and porous substrates through destroying the negatively charged bacterial membrane and brought about high contact-killing efficiency (99.99%) against Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Additionally, the polyampholytes synthesized by iCVD exhibited excellent antifouling performance against the adhesion of Gram-positive Listeria innocua and Gram-negative E. coli in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Their antifouling activities were attributed to the electrostatic interaction and hydration layers that served as physical and energetic barriers to prevent bacterial adhesion. The contact-killing and antifouling polymers synthesized by iCVD can be applied to surface modification of food processing equipment and medical devices with the aim of reducing foodborne diseases and medical infections. Moreover, the charged polyelectrolyte modified 2D polystyrene surfaces displayed good osteocompatibility and enhanced osteogenesis of preosteoblast cells than the un-modified polystyrene surface. In order to promote osteoinduction of hydroxyapatite (HA) scaffolds, bioinspired polymer-controlled mineralization was conducted

  2. High cell-surface density of HER2 deforms cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Inhee; Reichelt, Mike; Shao, Lily; Akita, Robert W.; Koeppen, Hartmut; Rangell, Linda; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mellman, Ira; Sliwkowski, Mark X.

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancers (BC) with HER2 overexpression (referred to as HER2 positive) progress more aggressively than those with normal expression. Targeted therapies against HER2 can successfully delay the progression of HER2-positive BC, but details of how this overexpression drives the disease are not fully understood. Using single-molecule biophysical approaches, we discovered a new effect of HER2 overexpression on disease-relevant cell biological changes in these BC. We found HER2 overexpression causes deformation of the cell membranes, and this in turn disrupts epithelial features by perturbing cell–substrate and cell–cell contacts. This membrane deformation does not require receptor signalling activities, but results from the high levels of HER2 on the cell surface. Our finding suggests that early-stage morphological alterations of HER2-positive BC cells during cancer progression can occur in a physical and signalling-independent manner. PMID:27599456

  3. Cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer cells on U251 glioma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Guo, Meng; Wu, Tingting; Wan, Lixin

    2016-07-01

    The present study aimed to observe the cytotoxic activity of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells on U251 glioma cells and to investigate their mechanism of action to establish an effective treatment strategy for neuroglioma. Cell survival curves, colony formation assays and karyotype analysis were performed to investigate the characteristics of U251 glioma cells. The present study demonstrated that natural killer group 2, member D (NKG2D)‑major histocompatibility complex class I‑related chain A/B (MICA/B) interactions contributed to the cytotoxic effect of NK cells on K562 and U251 cells. In antibody‑blocking assays to inhibit NKG2D ligands, the cytotoxic activity was not completely attenuated, which suggested that other signaling pathways contribute to the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on tumor cells in addition to the NKG2D‑mediated activity. The present study identified that the expression levels of NKG2D ligands on the surface of target cells influenced the strength of the NK cell immune response. Furthermore, allogeneic NK cells were observed to kill glioma cells in vitro, and this anticancer activity is associated with the rate of NKG2D expression on the surface of glioma cells.

  4. Responses of endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and platelets dependent on the surface topography of polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Sujan; Anderson, Jordan A; Remund, Tyler; Sun, Hongli; Larson, Mark K; Kelly, Patrick; Mani, Gopinath

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of different structures (flat, expanded, and electrospun) of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on the interactions of endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and platelets was investigated. In addition, the mechanisms that govern the interactions between ECs, SMCs, and platelets with different structures of PTFE were discussed. The surface characterizations showed that the different structures of PTFE have the same surface chemistry, similar surface wettability and zeta potential, but uniquely different surface topography. The viability, proliferation, morphology, and phenotype of ECs and SMCs interacted with different structures of PTFE were investigated. Expanded PTFE (ePTFE) provided a relatively better surface for the growth of ECs. In case of SMC interactions, although all the different structures of PTFE inhibited SMC growth, a maximum inhibitory effect was observed for ePTFE. In case of platelet interactions, the electrospun PTFE provided a better surface for preventing the adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, this study demonstrated that the responses of ECs, SMCs, and platelets strongly dependent on the surface topography of the PTFE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2291-2304, 2016. PMID:27119260

  5. Responses of endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and platelets dependent on the surface topography of polytetrafluoroethylene.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Sujan; Anderson, Jordan A; Remund, Tyler; Sun, Hongli; Larson, Mark K; Kelly, Patrick; Mani, Gopinath

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the effect of different structures (flat, expanded, and electrospun) of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) on the interactions of endothelial cells (ECs), smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and platelets was investigated. In addition, the mechanisms that govern the interactions between ECs, SMCs, and platelets with different structures of PTFE were discussed. The surface characterizations showed that the different structures of PTFE have the same surface chemistry, similar surface wettability and zeta potential, but uniquely different surface topography. The viability, proliferation, morphology, and phenotype of ECs and SMCs interacted with different structures of PTFE were investigated. Expanded PTFE (ePTFE) provided a relatively better surface for the growth of ECs. In case of SMC interactions, although all the different structures of PTFE inhibited SMC growth, a maximum inhibitory effect was observed for ePTFE. In case of platelet interactions, the electrospun PTFE provided a better surface for preventing the adhesion and activation of platelets. Thus, this study demonstrated that the responses of ECs, SMCs, and platelets strongly dependent on the surface topography of the PTFE. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2291-2304, 2016.

  6. Cell-Surface Phenol Soluble Modulins Regulate Staphylococcus aureus Colony Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Kizaki, Hayato; Omae, Yosuke; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Saito, Yuki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), which are amphipathic small peptides with lytic activity against mammalian cells. We previously reported that PSMα1–4 stimulate S. aureus colony spreading, the phenomenon of S. aureus colony expansion on the surface of soft agar plates, whereas δ-toxin (Hld, PSMγ) inhibits colony-spreading activity. In this study, we revealed the underlying mechanism of the opposing effects of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin in S. aureus colony spreading. PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin are abundant on the S. aureus cell surface, and account for 18% and 8.5% of the total amount of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin, respectively, in S. aureus overnight cultures. Knockout of PSMα1–4 did not affect the amount of cell surface δ-toxin. In contrast, knockout of δ-toxin increased the amount of cell surface PSMα1–4, and decreased the amount of culture supernatant PSMα1–4. The δ-toxin inhibited PSMα3 and PSMα2 binding to the S. aureus cell surface in vitro. A double knockout strain of PSMα1–4 and δ-toxin exhibited decreased colony spreading compared with the parent strain. Expression of cell surface PSMα1–4, but not culture supernatant PSMα1–4, restored the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. Expression of δ-toxin on the cell surface or in the culture supernatant did not restore the colony-spreading activity of the PSMα1-4/δ-toxin double knockout strain. These findings suggest that cell surface PSMα1–4 promote S. aureus colony spreading, whereas δ-toxin suppresses colony-spreading activity by inhibiting PSMα1–4 binding to the S. aureus cell surface. PMID:27723838

  7. A Mass Spectrometric-Derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P.; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L.; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R.; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  8. A mass spectrometric-derived cell surface protein atlas.

    PubMed

    Bausch-Fluck, Damaris; Hofmann, Andreas; Bock, Thomas; Frei, Andreas P; Cerciello, Ferdinando; Jacobs, Andrea; Moest, Hansjoerg; Omasits, Ulrich; Gundry, Rebekah L; Yoon, Charles; Schiess, Ralph; Schmidt, Alexander; Mirkowska, Paulina; Härtlová, Anetta; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Aebersold, Ruedi; Boheler, Kenneth R; Zandstra, Peter; Wollscheid, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Cell surface proteins are major targets of biomedical research due to their utility as cellular markers and their extracellular accessibility for pharmacological intervention. However, information about the cell surface protein repertoire (the surfaceome) of individual cells is only sparsely available. Here, we applied the Cell Surface Capture (CSC) technology to 41 human and 31 mouse cell types to generate a mass-spectrometry derived Cell Surface Protein Atlas (CSPA) providing cellular surfaceome snapshots at high resolution. The CSPA is presented in form of an easy-to-navigate interactive database, a downloadable data matrix and with tools for targeted surfaceome rediscovery (http://wlab.ethz.ch/cspa). The cellular surfaceome snapshots of different cell types, including cancer cells, resulted in a combined dataset of 1492 human and 1296 mouse cell surface glycoproteins, providing experimental evidence for their cell surface expression on different cell types, including 136 G-protein coupled receptors and 75 membrane receptor tyrosine-protein kinases. Integrated analysis of the CSPA reveals that the concerted biological function of individual cell types is mainly guided by quantitative rather than qualitative surfaceome differences. The CSPA will be useful for the evaluation of drug targets, for the improved classification of cell types and for a better understanding of the surfaceome and its concerted biological functions in complex signaling microenvironments. PMID:25894527

  9. Theory of back-surface-field solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonroos, O.

    1979-01-01

    Report describes simple concise theory of back-surface-field (BSF) solar cells (npp + junctions) based on Shockley's depletion-layer approximation and cites superiority of two-junction devices over conventional unijunction cells.

  10. Surface Modification of Si3N4-Coated Silicon Plate for Investigation of Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Isao; Iwata, Hiroo; Ismail, Abu Bakar Md.; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Yukimasa, Tetsuo; Sugihara, Hirokazu

    2000-11-01

    We report a simple new method to improve the cell adhesion ability on the Si3N4 surface. Light-addressable potentiometric sensors (LAPS) have become a powerful tool for studying the biological action of cells. The Si3N4 surface of a LAPS structure was coated with poly-L-ornithine and laminin to improve its cell adhesion ability. The thickness of the coated layer was very thin, about 4 nm, as determined by atomic force microscopy measurement and thus this treatment surface is suitable for biological sensing applications such as the detection of cell activities.

  11. Signaling pathways engaged by NK cell receptors: double concerto for activating receptors, inhibitory receptors and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, E; Bléry, M; Vély, F; Vivier, E

    2000-04-01

    Despite the absence of antigen-specific receptors at their surface, NK cells can selectively eliminate virus-infected cells, tumor cells and allogenic cells. A dynamic and precisely coordinated balance between activating and inhibitory receptors governs NK cell activation programs. Multiple activating and inhibitory NK cell surface molecules have been described, a group of them acting as receptors for MHC class I molecules. In spite of their heterogeneity, activating NK cell receptors present remarkable structural and functional homologies with T cell- and B cell-antigen receptors. Inhibitory NK cell receptors operate at early stages of activating cascades by recruiting protein tyrosine phosphatases via intra- cytoplasmic motifs (ITIM), a strategy which is widely conserved in hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells.

  12. Quantitative immunoferritin localization of [Na+,K+]ATPase on canine hepatocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Distribution of [Na+,K+]ATPase on the cell surface of canine hepatocytes was investigated quantitatively by incubating prefixed and dissociated liver cells with ferritin antibody conjugates against canine kidney holo[Na+,K+]ATPase. We found that [Na+,K+]-ATPase exists bilaterally both on the bile canalicular and sinusoid-lateral surfaces. The particle density on the bile canalicular surface was much higher (approximately 2.5 times) than that on the sinusoid-lateral surface. In the latter region, the enzyme was detected almost equally both on the sinusoidal and lateral surfaces. On all the surfaces, the distribution of the enzyme was homogeneous and no clustering of the enzyme was detected. Total number of the enzyme on the sinusoid-lateral surface was, however, approximately three times higher than that on the bile canalicular region, because the sinusoid-lateral surface represents approximately 87% of the total cell surface of a hepatocyte. We suggest that the [Na+, K+]ATPase on the bile canalicular surface is responsible for the bile acid-independent bile flow and the other transport processes on the bile canalicular cell surface, while that on the sinusoid-lateral surface is responsible not only for the active transport of Na+ but also for the secondary active transport of various substances in this region. PMID:6090472

  13. Surface Functionalized Graphene Biosensor on Sapphire for Cancer Cell Detection.

    PubMed

    Joe, Daniel J; Hwang, Jeonghyun; Johnson, Christelle; Cha, Ho-Young; Lee, Jo-Won; Shen, Xiling; Spencer, Michael G; Tiwari, Sandip; Kim, Moonkyung

    2016-01-01

    Graphene has several unique physical, optical and electrical properties such as a two-dimensional (2D) planar structure, high optical transparency and high carrier mobility at room temperature. These make graphene interesting for electrical biosensing. Using a catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, graphene film is grown on a sapphire substrate. There is a single or a few sheets as confirmed by Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Electrical graphene biosensors are fabricated to detect large-sized biological analytes such as cancer cells. Human colorectal carcinoma cells are sensed by the resistance change of an active bio-functionalized graphene device as the cells are captured by the immobilized antibody surface. The functionalized sensors show an increase in resistance as large as ~20% of the baseline with a small number of adhered cells. This study suggests that the bio-functionalized electrical graphene sensors on sapphire, which is a highly transparent material, can potentially detect circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and monitor cellular electrical behavior while being compatible with fluorescence-based optical-detection bioassays. PMID:27398439

  14. Hydrodynamics of Sperm Cells near Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Elgeti, Jens; Kaupp, U. Benjamin; Gompper, Gerhard

    2010-01-01

    Sperm are propelled by an actively beating tail, and display a wide variety of swimming patterns. When confined between two parallel walls, sperm swim either in circles or on curvilinear trajectories close to the walls. We employ mesoscale hydrodynamics simulations in combination with a mechanical sperm model to study the swimming behavior near walls. The simulations show that sperm become captured at the wall due to the hydrodynamic flow fields which are generated by the flagellar beat. The circular trajectories are determined by the chiral asymmetry of the sperm shape. For strong (weak) chirality, sperm swim in tight (wide) circles, with the beating plane of the flagellum oriented perpendicular (parallel) to the wall. For comparison, we also perform simulations based on a local anisotropic friction of the flagellum. In this resistive force approximation, surface adhesion and circular swimming patterns are obtained as well. However, the adhesion mechanism is now due to steric repulsion, and the orientation of the beating plane is different. Our model provides a theoretical framework that explains several distinct swimming behaviors of sperm near and far from a wall. Moreover, the model suggests a mechanism by which sperm navigate in a chemical gradient via a change of their shape. PMID:20712984

  15. Labile disulfide bonds are common at the leucocyte cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Metcalfe, Clive; Cresswell, Peter; Ciaccia, Laura; Thomas, Benjamin; Barclay, A. Neil

    2011-01-01

    Redox conditions change in events such as immune and platelet activation, and during viral infection, but the biochemical consequences are not well characterized. There is evidence that some disulfide bonds in membrane proteins are labile while others that are probably structurally important are not exposed at the protein surface. We have developed a proteomic/mass spectrometry method to screen for and identify non-structural, redox-labile disulfide bonds in leucocyte cell-surface proteins. These labile disulfide bonds are common, with several classes of proteins being identified and around 30 membrane proteins regularly identified under different reducing conditions including using enzymes such as thioredoxin. The proteins identified include integrins, receptors, transporters and cell–cell recognition proteins. In many cases, at least one cysteine residue was identified by mass spectrometry as being modified by the reduction process. In some cases, functional changes are predicted (e.g. in integrins and cytokine receptors) but the scale of molecular changes in membrane proteins observed suggests that widespread effects are likely on many different types of proteins including enzymes, adhesion proteins and transporters. The results imply that membrane protein activity is being modulated by a ‘redox regulator’ mechanism. PMID:22645650

  16. Clonal evolution of myeloma cells leads to quantitative changes in immunoglobulin secretion and surface antigen expression.

    PubMed Central

    Leibson, P J; Loken, M R; Panem, S; Schreiber, H

    1979-01-01

    We report that a cloned population of tumor cells can rapidly produce variants that differ in their quantitative expression of surface proteins and in their rate of immunoglobulin secretion. A fresh clonal isolate of S107 myeloma cells possessing large amounts of surface IgA was continuously passaged in vitro for 2 years. During this period, fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis indicated the development of subpopulations possessing decreased amounts of surface IgA. Cells from these variant subpopulations were isolated by first using the cell sorter to enrich for cells with decreased amounts of surface IgA and then cloning the selected population in soft agar. The 50 sublines that were isolated showed heritable differences in their levels of surface IgA and H-2 antigens and in their rates of myeloma protein secretion. Sublines having either large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of surface IgA also had corresponding large amounts, intermediate amounts, or absence of myeloma protein secretion. In contrast, a decrease or loss of surface Ig did not correlate with a decrease or loss of viral envelope glycoprotein gp71 and H-2 antigens. The variants did not resemble the phenotypes of less-differentiated normal lymphocyte populations of the B-cell lineage. The isolation and characterization of these variants allows us to explore the mechanisms and pathways of tumor cell differentiation as well as to study the regulation and function of cell surface proteins. PMID:288078

  17. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide activates CD57-negative human NK cells.

    PubMed

    Kanevskiy, L M; Erokhina, S A; Streltsova, M A; Telford, W G; Sapozhnikov, A M; Kovalenko, E I

    2014-12-01

    NK cells play an important regulatory role in sepsis by induction and augmentation of proinflammatory reactions in early stages of the septic process and by suppression of immune response in later stages of inflammation. The present work was aimed at the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the main pathogenic factor of sepsis development, on human NK cells ex vivo. We show that LPS activates immature CD57-negative NK cells, which typically constitute less than half of the normal NK cell population in human peripheral blood. Under conditions of NK cell stimulation with IL-2, addition of LPS provokes an increase in IFN-γ production. However, LPS both increased and inhibited NK cell cytotoxic activity. It is important to note that the activation of NK cells on LPS addition was observed in the absence of TLR4 on the NK cell surface. These results confirm our previous data arguing for a direct interaction of LPS with NK cells and evidence an atypical mechanism of LPS-induced NK cell activation without the involvement of surface TLR4.

  18. Dormancy activation mechanism of tracheal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Xu, Jing-xian; Jia, Xin-Shan; Li, Wen-ya; Han, Yi-chen; Wang, En-hua; Li, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate markers and molecular mechanisms of stem cell dormancy and activation are poorly understood. In this study, the anti-cancer drug, 5-fluorouracil, was used to selectively kill proliferating cells of human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cell line. This method can enrich and purify stem cell population. The dormant versus active status of stem cells was determined by phosphorylation of RNAp II Ser2. The surviving stem cells were cultured to form stem cell spheres expressing stem cell markers and transplanted into nude mice to form a teratoma. The results demonstrated the properties of stem cells and potential for multi-directional differentiation. Bisulfite sequencing polymerase chain reaction showed that demethylation of the Sox2 promoter by 5-FU resulted in Sox2 expression in the dormant stem cells. This study shows that the dormancy and activation of HBE stem cells is closely related to epigenetic modification. PMID:27009861

  19. T cell-activating protein on murine lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeh, E T; Reiser, H; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1986-12-01

    A functional T cell surface molecule, T cell-activating protein (TAP), has been identified on murine lymphocytes. TAP is a protein with an apparent molecular mass of 10-12 kilodaltons (kDa) nonreduced, 16-17 kDa reduced. Cross-linking of TAP can result in profound activation of T lymphocytes to produce lymphokines and to enter the cell cycle. Furthermore, antibody binding to TAP can modulate antigen-driven T cell stimulation. Current data suggest that TAP is physically distinct from the T cell receptor complex. On unstimulated lymphocytes, TAP is expressed on T cells and defines heterogeneity within the major T cell subsets. Its profile of expression is rapidly altered on cell activation. Ontologically, it is first detected in the thymus, where it is found on both the most immature and the most mature cell subsets, and it is functional on both. Together, these TAP+ cells constitute a small fraction of thymocytes. TAP expression, however, defines the immunocompetent compartment of the thymus, and thus could be involved in functional maturation. Finally, the gene controlling TAP expression has been mapped, and is tightly linked to a locus of hematopoietic antigens (Ly-6). TAP is molecularly distinct from these antigens. Furthermore, all of these proteins show a markedly distinct developmental regulation in their cell surface expression.

  20. Molecularly engineered surfaces for cell biology: from static to dynamic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gooding, J Justin; Parker, Stephen G; Lu, Yong; Gaus, Katharina

    2014-04-01

    Surfaces with a well-defined presentation of ligands for receptors on the cell membrane can serve as models of the extracellular matrix for studying cell adhesion or as model cell surfaces for exploring cell-cell contacts. Because such surfaces can provide exquisite control over, for example, the density of these ligands or when the ligands are presented to the cell, they provide a very precise strategy for understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to external adhesive cues. In the present feature article, we present an overview of the basic biology of cell adhesion before discussing surfaces that have a static presentation of immobile ligands. We outline the biological information that such surfaces have given us, before progressing to recently developed switchable surfaces and surfaces that mimic the lipid bilayer, having adhesive ligands that can move around the membrane and be remodeled by the cell. Finally, the feature article closes with some of the biological information that these new types of surfaces could provide.

  1. CARbodies: Human Antibodies Against Cell Surface Tumor Antigens Selected From Repertoires Displayed on T Cell Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Sánchez-Martín, David; Compte, Marta; Nuñez-Prado, Natalia; Diaz, Rosa M; Vile, Richard; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2013-01-01

    A human single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody library was expressed on the surface of human T cells after transduction with lentiviral vectors (LVs). The repertoire was fused to a first-generation T cell receptor ζ (TCRζ)-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). We used this library to isolate antibodies termed CARbodies that recognize antigens expressed on the tumor cell surface in a proof-of-principle system. After three rounds of activation-selection there was a clear repertoire restriction, with the emergence dominant clones. The CARbodies were purified from bacterial cultures as soluble and active proteins. Furthermore, to validate its potential application for adoptive cell therapy, human T cells were transduced with a LV encoding a second-generation costimulatory CAR (CARv2) bearing the selected CARbodies. Transduced human primary T cells expressed significant levels of the CARbodies-based CARv2 fusion protein on the cell surface, and importantly could be specifically activated, after stimulation with tumor cells. This approach is a promising tool for the generation of antibodies fully adapted to the display format (CAR) and the selection context (cell synapse), which could extend the scope of current adoptive cell therapy strategies with CAR-redirected T cells. PMID:23695536

  2. Surface topography of granulosa cells accompanied by fragmented oocytes.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, H; Noda, M; Kima, M; Matsuda, T

    1983-07-15

    Scanning electron microscopy of granulosa cells (GC) and granulosa cell-like structures (GCLS) revealed that both had lacy foldings, or plicae, on the surface and were identical. The plicae did not always cover the entire surface of GC or GCLS. Both structures were interconnected by multivalent processes.

  3. Cell Surface-based Sensing with Metallic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ziwen; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles provide versatile scaffolds for biosensing applications. In this review, we focus on the use of metallic nanoparticles for cell surface sensings. Examples of the use of both specific recognition and array-based “chemical nose” approaches to cell surface sensing will be discussed. PMID:25853985

  4. Interaction of Biofunctionalized Nanoparticles with Receptors on Cell Surfaces: MC Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dormidontova, Elena; Wang, Shihu

    2015-03-01

    One of the areas of active development of modern nanomedicine is drug/gene delivery and imaging application of nanoparticles functionalized by ligands, aptamers or antibodies capable of specific interactions with cell surface receptors. Being a complex multifunctional system different structural aspects of nanoparticles affect their interactions with cell surfaces and the surface properties of cells can be different (e.g. density, distribution and mobility of receptors). Computer simulations allow a systematic investigation of the influence of multiple factors and provide a unified platform for the comparison. Using Monte Carlo simulations we investigate the influence of the nanoparticle properties (nanoparticle size, polymer tether length, polydispersity, density, ligand energy, valence and density) on nanoparticle-cell surface interactions and make predictions regarding favorable nanoparticle design for achieving multiple ligand-receptor binding. We will also discuss the implications of nanoparticle design on the selectivity of attachment to cells with high receptor density while ``ignoring'' cells with a low density of receptors.

  5. Investigation of back surface fields effect on bifacial solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepeai, Suhaila; Sulaiman, M. Y.; Sopian, Kamaruzzaman; Zaidi, Saleem H.

    2012-11-01

    A bifacial solar cell, in contrast with a conventional monofacial solar cell, produces photo-generated current from both front and back sides. Bifacial solar cell is an attractive candidate for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) market competitiveness as well as supporting the current efforts to increase efficiency and lower material costs. This paper reports on the fabrication of bifacial solar cells using phosphorus-oxytrichloride (POCl3) emitter formation on p-type, nanotextured silicon (Si) wafer. Backside surface field was formed through Al-diffusion using conventional screen-printing process. Bifacial solar cells with a structure of n+pp+ with and without back surface field (BSF) were fabricated in which silicon nitride (SiN) anti reflection and passivation films were coated on both sides, followed by screen printing of Argentum (Ag) and Argentum/Aluminum (Ag/Al) on front and back contacts, respectively. Bifacial solar cells without BSF exhibited open circuit voltage (VOC) of 535 mV for front and 480 mV for back surface. With Al-alloyed BSF bifacial solar cells, the VOC improved to 580 mV for the front surface and 560 mV for the back surface. Simulation of bifacial solar cells using PC1D and AFORS software demonstrated good agreement with experimental results. Simulations showed that best bifacial solar cells are achieved through a combination of high lifetime wafer, low recombination back surface field, reduced contact resistance, and superior surface passivation.

  6. Modulation of cell-surface antigens of a murine neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Akeson, R; Herschman, H R

    1974-01-01

    Antisera were produced in rabbits to morphologically differentiated cells from the C1300 murine neuroblastoma (i.e., cells in which process formation was induced by maintenance on serum-free medium for 5 days). These antisera reacted more strongly in the complement fixation reaction with such "differentiated" cells than with "undifferentiated" (nonprocess-bearing) neuroblastoma cells. Adsorption of the antisera with undifferentiated cells removed the reactivity to cells without processes, while the reactivity with serum-free cells which possess processes was retained. Indirect immunofluorescence studies confirmed the results obtained by complement fixation and demonstrated that antibodies to the surface antigens of process-bearing cells could be adsorbed by particulate preparations from brain but not liver, spleen, or kidney. This is the first description of neural-associated cell-surface changes that correlate with the morphological differentiation in culture of neuroblastoma cells.

  7. Stem cell behavior on tailored porous oxide surface coatings.

    PubMed

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Poxson, David J; Ogievetsky, Nika; Dordick, Jonathan S; Siegel, Richard W

    2015-07-01

    Nanoscale surface topographies are known to have a profound influence on cell behavior, including cell guidance, migration, morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. In this study, we have observed the behavior of human mesenchymal stem cells cultured on a range of tailored porous SiO2 and TiO2 nanostructured surface coatings fabricated via glancing angle electron-beam deposition. By controlling the physical vapor deposition angle during fabrication, we could control systematically the deposited coating porosity, along with associated topographic features. Immunocytochemistry and image analysis quantitatively revealed the number of adherent cells, as well as their basic cellular morphology, on these surfaces. Signaling pathway studies showed that even with subtle changes in nanoscale surface structures, the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells was strongly influenced by the precise surface structures of these porous coatings.

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi Spirochetes Induce Mast Cell Activation and Cytokine Release

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, Jeffrey; Nickell, Steven P.

    1999-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, is introduced into human hosts via tick bites. Among the cell types present in the skin which may initially contact spirochetes are mast cells. Since spirochetes are known to activate a variety of cell types in vitro, we tested whether B. burgdorferi spirochetes could activate mast cells. We report here that freshly isolated rat peritoneal mast cells or mouse MC/9 mast cells cultured in vitro with live or freeze-thawed B. burgdorferi spirochetes undergo low but detectable degranulation, as measured by [5-3H] hydroxytryptamine release, and they synthesize and secrete the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). In contrast to findings in previous studies, where B. burgdorferi-associated activity was shown to be dependent upon protein lipidation, mast cell TNF-α release was not induced by either lipidated or unlipidated recombinant OspA. This activity was additionally shown to be protease sensitive and surface expressed. Finally, comparisons of TNF-α-inducing activity in known low-, intermediate-, and high-passage B. burgdorferi B31 isolates demonstrated passage-dependent loss of activity, indicating that the activity is probably plasmid encoded. These findings document the presence in low-passage B. burgdorferi spirochetes of a novel lipidation-independent activity capable of inducing cytokine release from host cells. PMID:10024550

  9. Advances in cell surface glycoengineering reveal biological function.

    PubMed

    Nischan, Nicole; Kohler, Jennifer J

    2016-08-01

    Cell surface glycans are critical mediators of cell-cell, cell-ligand, and cell-pathogen interactions. By controlling the set of glycans displayed on the surface of a cell, it is possible to gain insight into the biological functions of glycans. Moreover, control of glycan expression can be used to direct cellular behavior. While genetic approaches to manipulate glycosyltransferase gene expression are available, their utility in glycan engineering has limitations due to the combinatorial nature of glycan biosynthesis and the functional redundancy of glycosyltransferase genes. Biochemical and chemical strategies offer valuable complements to these genetic approaches, notably by enabling introduction of unnatural functionalities, such as fluorophores, into cell surface glycans. Here, we describe some of the most recent developments in glycoengineering of cell surfaces, with an emphasis on strategies that employ novel chemical reagents. We highlight key examples of how these advances in cell surface glycan engineering enable study of cell surface glycans and their function. Exciting new technologies include synthetic lipid-glycans, new chemical reporters for metabolic oligosaccharide engineering to allow tandem and in vivo labeling of glycans, improved chemical and enzymatic methods for glycoproteomics, and metabolic glycosyltransferase inhibitors. Many chemical and biochemical reagents for glycan engineering are commercially available, facilitating their adoption by the biological community.

  10. Immunoadjuvant activity of the nanoparticles’ surface modified with mannan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, Azita; Hamdy, Samar; Ghotbi, Zahra; Samuel, John; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2014-09-01

    Mannan (MN) is the natural ligand for mannose receptors, which are widely expressed on dendritic cells (DCs). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of formulation parameters on the immunogenicity of MN-decorated poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in terms of their ability to stimulate DC phenotypic as well as functional maturation. For this purpose, NPs were formulated from either ester-terminated or COOH-terminated PLGA. Incorporation of MN in NPs was achieved through encapsulation, physical adsorption or chemical conjugation. Murine bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) were treated with various NP formulations and assessed for their ability to up-regulate DC cell surface markers, secrete immunostimulatory cytokines and to activate allogenic T cell responses. DCs treated with COOH-terminated PLGA-NPs containing chemically conjugated MN (MN-Cov-COOH) have shown superior performance in improving DC biological functions, compared to the rest of the formulations tested. This may be attributed to the higher level of MN incorporation in the former formulation. Incorporation of MN in PLGA NPs through chemical conjugation can lead to enhanced DC maturation and stimulatory function. This strategy may be used to develop more effective PLGA-based vaccine formulations.

  11. Immunoadjuvant activity of the nanoparticles' surface modified with mannan.

    PubMed

    Haddadi, Azita; Hamdy, Samar; Ghotbi, Zahra; Samuel, John; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh

    2014-09-01

    Mannan (MN) is the natural ligand for mannose receptors, which are widely expressed on dendritic cells (DCs). The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of formulation parameters on the immunogenicity of MN-decorated poly (D, L-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in terms of their ability to stimulate DC phenotypic as well as functional maturation. For this purpose, NPs were formulated from either ester-terminated or COOH-terminated PLGA. Incorporation of MN in NPs was achieved through encapsulation, physical adsorption or chemical conjugation. Murine bone marrow derived DCs (BMDCs) were treated with various NP formulations and assessed for their ability to up-regulate DC cell surface markers, secrete immunostimulatory cytokines and to activate allogenic T cell responses. DCs treated with COOH-terminated PLGA-NPs containing chemically conjugated MN (MN-Cov-COOH) have shown superior performance in improving DC biological functions, compared to the rest of the formulations tested. This may be attributed to the higher level of MN incorporation in the former formulation. Incorporation of MN in PLGA NPs through chemical conjugation can lead to enhanced DC maturation and stimulatory function. This strategy may be used to develop more effective PLGA-based vaccine formulations.

  12. Rhamnolipids elicit the same cytotoxic sensitivity between cancer cell and normal cell by reducing surface tension of culture medium.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lifang; Shen, Chong; Long, Xuwei; Zhang, Guoliang; Meng, Qin

    2014-12-01

    Biosurfactant rhamnolipids have been claimed to show biological activities of inhibiting the proliferation of cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxicity of rhamnolipids was examined on four cancer cells (HepG2, Caco-2, Hela, MCF-7 cells) and two normal cells (HK-2 cell, primary hepatocyte). Interestingly, both cancer cells and normal cells exhibited similar sensitivities to the addition of rhamnolipids in culture medium, and the cytotoxicity was largely attenuated by the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS) in culture medium. In correlation of the mono-/di-rhamnolipid cytotoxicity with the surface tension of culture medium, it was found that rhamnolipids triggered cytotoxicity whenever the surface tension of culture medium decreased below 41 mN/m irrespective of the FBS content in culture medium, cell line, or rhamnolipid congener. Similarly, each chemical surfactant (Tween-80, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate) could cause cytotoxicity on HepG2 cells whenever its addition made the surface tension under 41 mN/m in culture medium with or without the presence of FBS. It seems that rhamnolipids, like chemical surfactants, exhibited cytotoxicity by reducing the surface tension of culture medium rather than by changing its specific molecular structure, which had no selection on tumor cells. This study could offer helps to correct the misleading biological activity of rhamnolipids and to avoid the possible large wastes of time and expenses on developing the applications in antitumor drugs.

  13. The Use of Yeast Surface Display in Biofuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Szczupak, Alon; Alfonta, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Biofuel cells are electrochemical devices which convert chemical energy to electricity using biochemical pathways and redox enzymes. In enzymatic fuel cells purified redox enzymes catalyze the reactions in the anode and cathode compartments whereas in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) the entire metabolism of the microorganisms is exploited. Here, a hybrid biofuel cell concept is presented, which is based on yeast surface display (YSD) of redox enzymes to catalyze the different cell reactions. PMID:26060081

  14. Attachment of human primary osteoblast cells to modified polyethylene surfaces.

    PubMed

    Poulsson, Alexandra H C; Mitchell, Stephen A; Davidson, Marcus R; Johnstone, Alan J; Emmison, Neil; Bradley, Robert H

    2009-04-01

    Ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has a long history of use in medical devices, primarily for articulating surfaces due to its inherent low surface energy which limits tissue integration. To widen the applications of UHMWPE, the surface energy can be increased. The increase in surface energy would improve the adsorption of proteins and attachment of cells to allow tissue integration, thereby allowing UHMWPE to potentially be used for a wider range of implants. The attachment and function of human primary osteoblast-like (HOB) cells to surfaces of UHMWPE with various levels of incorporated surface oxygen have been investigated. The surface modification of the UHMWPE was produced by exposure to a UV/ozone treatment. The resulting surface chemistry was studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the topography and surface structure were probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), which showed an increase in surface oxygen from 11 to 26 atom % with no significant change to the surface topography. The absolute root mean square roughness of both untreated and UV/ozone-treated surfaces was within 350-450 nm, and the water contact angles decreased with increasing oxygen incorporation, i.e., showing an increase in surface hydrophilicity. Cell attachment and functionality were assessed over a 21 day period for each cell-surface combination studied; these were performed using SEM and the alamarBlue assay to study cell attachment and proliferation and energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis to confirm extracellular mineral deposits, and total protein assay to examine the intra- and extracellular protein expressed by the cells. HOB cells cultured for 21 days on the modified UHMWPE surfaces with 19 and 26 atom % oxygen incorporated showed significantly higher cell densities compared to cells cultured on tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) from day 3 onward. This indicated that the cells attached and proliferated more

  15. Flocculence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells is induced by nutrient limitation, with cell surface hydrophobicity as a major determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, G; Straver, M H; Lugtenberg, B J; Kijne, J W

    1992-01-01

    Initiation of flocculation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPY1 cells was observed at the moment the cells stop dividing because of nitrogen limitation. A shift in concentration of the limiting nutrient resulted in a corresponding shift in cell division and initiation of flocculence. Other limitations also led to initiation of flocculence, with magnesium limitation as the exception. Magnesium-limited S. cerevisiae cells did not flocculate at any stage of growth. Cell surface hydrophobicity was found to be strongly correlated with the ability of the yeast cells to flocculate. Hydrophobicity sharply increased at the end of the logarithmic growth phase, shortly before initiation of flocculation ability. Treatments of cells which resulted in a decrease in hydrophobicity also yielded a decrease in flocculation ability. Similarly, the presence of polycations increased both hydrophobicity and the ability to flocculate. Magnesium-limited cells were found to be strongly affected in cell surface hydrophobicity. A proteinaceous cell surface factor(s) was identified as a flocculin. This heat-stable component had a strong emulsifying activity, and appears to be involved in both cell surface hydrophobicity and in flocculation ability of the yeast cells. PMID:1482191

  16. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis. PMID:24908305

  17. Analysis of the cell surface expression of cytokine receptors using the surface protein biotinylation method.

    PubMed

    Pavel, Mahmud Arif; Lam, Clarissa; Kashyap, Parul; Salehi-Najafabadi, Zahra; Singh, Gurpreet; Yu, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are pleiotropic, low-molecular-weight proteins that regulate the immune responses to infection and inflammation. They stimulate the immune responses by binding to cytokine receptors on the cell plasma membrane. Thus, knowledge of the expression level of particular cytokine receptors on cell surface is crucial for understanding the cytokine function and regulation. One of the techniques to explore the membrane embedded cytokine receptors is cell surface biotinylation. Biotinylated surface proteins can be rapidly purified through the strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. Here, we describe the procedure for surface biotinylation and purification of biotinylated cytokine receptors for further downstream analysis.

  18. Requirements for extravehicular activities on the lunar and Martian surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Mariann F.; Schentrup, Susan M.

    1990-01-01

    Basic design reference requirements pertinent to EVA equipment on lunar and martian surfaces are provided. Environmental factors affecting surface EVA are analyzed including gravity, dust, atmospheric conditions, thermal gradients, lightning conditions, and radiation effects, and activities associated with surface EVA are outlined. Environmental and activity effects on EVA equipment are assessed, and emphasis is placed on planetary surface portable life support systems (PLSS), suit development, protection from micrometeoroids, dust, and radiation, food and water supplies, and the extravehicular mobility-unit thermal-control system. Environmental and activity impacts on PLSS design are studied, with focus on base self-sufficiency and reduction in resupply logistics.

  19. Antibacterial activity of human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro effects of human NK cells on viability of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was investigated. PBLs depleted of glass- adherent cells showed a significant antibacterial activity that was increased as the concentration of NK cells became higher. Leu-11- enriched cells exhibited the most efficient bactericidal activity. Stimulation of NK cells with staphylococcal enterotoxin B for 16 h produced a significant increase in the antibacterial activity of all NK cells tested. The antibacterial activity of monocyte-depleted cells and Leu-11-enriched cells was also enhanced after culturing in vitro for 16- 24 h without exogenous cytokines. Dependence of the antibacterial activity on the presence of serum in the culture medium was not found. Ultrastructural studies revealed close contact between NK cell membranes and bacteria, no evidence of phagocytosis, and extracellular bacterial ghosts, after incubation at 37 degrees C. Supernatants from purified NK cells exhibited potent bactericidal activity with kinetics and target specificity similar to that of effector cells. These results document the potent antibacterial activity of purified NK cells and suggest an extracellular mechanism of killing. PMID:2642532

  20. Beyond the cell surface: new mechanisms of receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2010-05-21

    The text book view of cell surface receptors depicts them at the top of a vertical chain of command that starts with ligand binding and proceeds in a lineal fashion towards the cell nucleus. Although pedagogically useful, this view is incomplete and recent findings suggest that the extracellular domain of cell surface receptors can be a transmitter as much as a receiver in intercellular communication. GFRalpha1 is a GPI-anchored receptor for GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor), a neuronal growth factor with widespread functions in the developing and adult nervous system. GFRalpha1 partners with transmembrane proteins, such as the receptor tyrosine kinase RET or the cell adhesion molecule NCAM, for intracellular transmission of the GDNF signal. In addition to this canonical role, GFRalpha1 can also engage in horizontal interactions and thereby modify the function of other cell surface components. GFRalpha1 can also function as a ligand-induced adhesion cell molecule, mediating homophilic cell-cell interactions in response to GDNF. Finally, GFRalpha1 can also be released from the cell surface and act at a distance as a soluble factor together with its ligand. This plethora of unconventional mechanisms is likely to be a feature common to several other receptors and considerably expands our view of cell surface receptor function. PMID:20494105

  1. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-01

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation.

  2. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    PubMed

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-01

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation. PMID:27052834

  3. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J.; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M.; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J.; Ashford, Michael L. J.; Calaghan, Sarah C.; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J.; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J.; Fuller, William

    2014-01-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme–substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump. PMID:25422474

  4. Substrate recognition by the cell surface palmitoyl transferase DHHC5.

    PubMed

    Howie, Jacqueline; Reilly, Louise; Fraser, Niall J; Vlachaki Walker, Julia M; Wypijewski, Krzysztof J; Ashford, Michael L J; Calaghan, Sarah C; McClafferty, Heather; Tian, Lijun; Shipston, Michael J; Boguslavskyi, Andrii; Shattock, Michael J; Fuller, William

    2014-12-01

    The cardiac phosphoprotein phospholemman (PLM) regulates the cardiac sodium pump, activating the pump when phosphorylated and inhibiting it when palmitoylated. Protein palmitoylation, the reversible attachment of a 16 carbon fatty acid to a cysteine thiol, is catalyzed by the Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif-containing palmitoyl acyltransferases. The cell surface palmitoyl acyltransferase DHHC5 regulates a growing number of cellular processes, but relatively few DHHC5 substrates have been identified to date. We examined the expression of DHHC isoforms in ventricular muscle and report that DHHC5 is among the most abundantly expressed DHHCs in the heart and localizes to caveolin-enriched cell surface microdomains. DHHC5 coimmunoprecipitates with PLM in ventricular myocytes and transiently transfected cells. Overexpression and silencing experiments indicate that DHHC5 palmitoylates PLM at two juxtamembrane cysteines, C40 and C42, although C40 is the principal palmitoylation site. PLM interaction with and palmitoylation by DHHC5 is independent of the DHHC5 PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) binding motif, but requires a ∼ 120 amino acid region of the DHHC5 intracellular C-tail immediately after the fourth transmembrane domain. PLM C42A but not PLM C40A inhibits the Na pump, indicating PLM palmitoylation at C40 but not C42 is required for PLM-mediated inhibition of pump activity. In conclusion, we demonstrate an enzyme-substrate relationship for DHHC5 and PLM and describe a means of substrate recruitment not hitherto described for this acyltransferase. We propose that PLM palmitoylation by DHHC5 promotes phospholipid interactions that inhibit the Na pump.

  5. The effect of plasma-nitrided titanium surfaces on osteoblastic cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Emanuela P; Sa, Juliana C; de Oliveira, Paulo T; Alves, Clodomiro; Beloti, Marcio M; Rosa, Adalberto L

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect of new plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces on the progression of osteoblast cultures, including cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation. Ti surfaces were treated using two plasma-nitriding protocols, hollow cathode for 3 h (HC 3 h) and 1 h (HC 1 h) and planar for 1 h. Untreated Ti surfaces were used as control. Cells derived from human alveolar and rat calvarial bones were cultured on Ti surfaces for periods of up to 14 days and the following parameters were evaluated: cell morphology, adhesion, spreading and proliferation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, extracellular matrix mineralization, and gene expression of key osteoblast markers. Plasma-nitriding treatments resulted in Ti surfaces with distinct physicochemical characteristics. The cell adhesion and ALP activity were higher on plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces compared with untreated one, whereas cell proliferation and extracellular matrix mineralization were not affected by the treatments. In addition, the plasma-nitrided Ti surfaces increased the ALP, reduced the osteocalcin and did not affect the Runx2 gene expression. We have shown that HC 3 h and planar Ti surfaces slightly favored the osteoblast differentiation process, and then these surfaces should be considered for further investigation using preclinical models.

  6. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  7. Cell Surface Proteome of Dental Pulp Stem Cells Identified by Label-Free Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niehage, Christian; Karbanová, Jana; Steenblock, Charlotte; Corbeil, Denis; Hoflack, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are promising tools for regenerative medicine. They can be isolated from different sources based on their plastic-adherence property. The identification of reliable cell surface markers thus becomes the Holy Grail for their prospective isolation. Here, we determine the cell surface proteomes of human dental pulp-derived MSCs isolated from single donors after culture expansion in low (2%) or high (10%) serum-containing media. Cell surface proteins were tagged on intact cells using cell impermeable, cleavable sulfo-NHS-SS-biotin, which allows their enrichment by streptavidin pull-down. For the proteomic analyses, we first compared label-free methods to analyze cell surface proteomes i.e. composition, enrichment and proteomic differences, and we developed a new mathematical model to determine cell surface protein enrichment using a combinatorial gene ontology query. Using this workflow, we identified 101 cluster of differentiation (CD) markers and 286 non-CD cell surface proteins. Based on this proteome profiling, we identified 14 cell surface proteins, which varied consistently in abundance when cells were cultured under low or high serum conditions. Collectively, our analytical methods provide a basis for identifying the cell surface proteome of dental pulp stem cells isolated from single donors and its evolution during culture or differentiation. Our data provide a comprehensive cell surface proteome for the precise identification of dental pulp-derived MSC populations and their isolation for potential therapeutic intervention. PMID:27490675

  8. Guided Cell Patterning On Gold-Silicon Dioxide Substrates by Surface Molecular Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Veiseh, Mandana; Wickes, Bronwyn; Castner, David G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2004-07-01

    We report an effective approach to patterning cells on a gold-silicon substrate with high precision, selectivity, stability, and reproducibility. This technique is based on photolithography and surface molecular engineering and does not involve a cell positioning or delivery device, thus reducing potential damage to cells. Cell patterning is achieved by activating the gold regions with functionalized thiols that covalently bind proteins to guide the subsequent cell adhesion and passivating the silicon regions with polyethylene glycol (PEG) to resist cell adhesion. Time-of-light secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), a powerful surface chemical state imaging technique that allows simultaneous chemical and spatial characterization, was used to characterize the chemistry of the cell-adhesive and cell-resistant regions of the surface at key stages in the device fabrication. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) reflectance spectroscopy was used to verify the immobilization of proteins on model surfaces. Proteins were tagged with Rhodamine fluorescent probes to characterize patterned surfaces by fluorescence microscopy. Finally, the ability of the engineered surfaces to guide cell adhesion was illustrated by differential interference contrast (DIC) reflectance microscopy. The cell patterning technique introduced in this study is compatible with micro- and photo- electronics, and may have numerous medical, environmental, and defense applications.

  9. Cell multiplication following partial enzymatic removal of surface coat.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1978-08-01

    Treatment of Paramecium aurelia with trypsin or pronase (1 mg per 10(5) cells, at 0 to 4 degrees C) partially removes the surface coat and modifies significantly multiplication of cells. The division rate after 24 hours of cultivation is diminished approximately twice in the case of pronase-treated cells and 1.5 for tyrpsin-digested ciliates as compared with the control. On the second day the division rate increases rapidly and number of cell divisions exceeds the values observed in the control. After 72 hours of cultivation the division rate in both untreated and enzyme-treated cells is almost the same. It is concluded that the observed inhibition of cell fission results from the enzymatic removal of the surface coat--the integrity of this surface coat seems to be necessary in the process of cell division. The influence of environmental factors on the rate of growth is presented.

  10. Cell Surface Changes Associated with Cellular Immune Reactions in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nappi, Anthony J.; Silvers, Michael

    1984-09-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster a temperature-induced change in immune competence accompanies cell surface alterations that cause its blood cells to adhere and to encapsulate a parasite. At 29 degrees C the blood cells of the tumorous-lethal (Tuml) mutant show a high degree of immune competence and encapsulate the eggs of the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. At 21 degrees C the blood cells are essentially immune incompetent. High percentages of lectin binding cells were found under conditions which potentiated cellular encapsulation responses. Some immune reactive blood cells did not bind lectin. The low percentages of lectin binding cells in susceptible hosts suggest that developing parasites alter the cell surface of the blood cells of immune reactive hosts.

  11. Cell surface changes associated with cellular immune reactions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nappi, A J; Silvers, M

    1984-09-14

    In Drosophila melanogaster a temperature-induced change in immune competence accompanies cell surface alterations that cause its blood cells to adhere and to encapsulate a parasite. At 29 degrees C the blood cells of the tumorous-lethal (Tuml) mutant show a high degree of immune competence and encapsulate the eggs of the parasitic wasp Leptopilina heterotoma. At 21 degrees C the blood cells are essentially immune incompetent. High percentages of lectin binding cells were found under conditions which potentiated cellular encapsulation responses. Some immune reactive blood cells did not bind lectin. The low percentages of lectin binding cells in susceptible hosts suggest that developing parasites alter the cell surface of the blood cells of immune reactive hosts. PMID:6433482

  12. Characterization of foamy epithelial surface cells in the canine endometrium.

    PubMed

    Bartel, C; Tichy, A; Walter, I

    2014-06-01

    In mature bitches, endometrial epithelial surface cells modify function and corresponding morphology during the oestrous cycle. During late metoestrous, endometrial epithelial surface cells frequently accumulate fat and thereby adopt a foamy morphology. This cyclic appearance of foamy endometrial epithelial cells (fEECs) seems to be physiological in the dog, whereas in other species, it indicates pathological changes. Function of these fEECs has not been identified until now. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize the fEECs by means of transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry. Different manifestations of fEECs were observed and analysed with regard to proliferative activity and presence of different epithelial adhesion molecules including PLEKHA7, β-catenin and E-cadherin. PLEKHA7 was restricted to the apical regions of the fEECs, whereas E-cadherin and β-catenin were demonstrated basolateral. The immunohistochemical detection of steroid hormone receptors demonstrated the responsiveness of the fEECs to steroid hormones. Intense progesterone receptor expression was observed in the fEECs indicating a high responsiveness to this hormone. Considering a potential function of the fEECs, we hypothesized that leptin, a hormone produced by other lipid-accumulating cells and described to be involved in reproduction, in particular during implantation, might also originate from the fEECs which was confirmed by immunohistochemical methods. Moreover, leptin receptor was found in fEECs indicating the fEECs as both, source and target for leptin. Therefore, we conclude that fEECs in the canine uterus have a potential role in early pregnancy events and that the different observed manifestations might simply reflect the variations of signs of pseudopregnancy among bitches.

  13. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  14. Biosilica-loaded poly(ϵ-caprolactone) nanofibers mats provide a morphogenetically active surface scaffold for the growth and mineralization of the osteoclast-related SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Werner E G; Tolba, Emad; Schröder, Heinz C; Diehl-Seifert, Bärbel; Link, Thorben; Wang, Xiaohong

    2014-10-01

    Bioprinting/3D cell printing procedures for the preparation of scaffolds/implants have the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. Besides biocompatibility and biodegradability, the hardness of the scaffold material is of critical importance to allow sufficient mechanical protection and, to the same extent, allow migration, cell-cell, and cell-substrate contact formation of the matrix-embedded cells. In the present study, we present a strategy to encase a bioprinted, cell-containing, and soft scaffold with an electrospun mat. The electrospun poly(ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofibers mats, containing tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), were subsequently incubated with silicatein. Silicatein synthesizes polymeric biosilica by polycondensation of ortho-silicate that is formed from prehydrolyzed TEOS. Biosilica provides a morphogenetically active matrix for the growth and mineralization of osteoblast-related SaOS-2 cells in vitro. Analysis of the microstructure of the 300-700 nm thick PCL/TEOS nanofibers, incubated with silicatein and prehydrolyzed TEOS, displayed biosilica deposits on the mats formed by the nanofibers. We conclude and propose that electrospun PCL nanofibers mats, coated with biosilica, may represent a morphogenetically active and protective cover for bioprinted cell/tissue-like units with a suitable mechanical stability, even if the cells are embedded in a softer matrix.

  15. Usp12 stabilizes the T-cell receptor complex at the cell surface during signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jahan, Akhee S.; Lestra, Maxime; Swee, Lee Kim; Fan, Ying; Lamers, Mart M.; Tafesse, Fikadu G.; Theile, Christopher S.; Spooner, Eric; Bruzzone, Roberto; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Sanyal, Sumana

    2016-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications are central to the spatial and temporal regulation of protein function. Among others, phosphorylation and ubiquitylation are known to regulate proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling. Here we used a systematic and unbiased approach to uncover deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs) that participate during TCR signaling in primary mouse T lymphocytes. Using a C-terminally modified vinyl methyl ester variant of ubiquitin (HA-Ub-VME), we captured DUBs that are differentially recruited to the cytosol on TCR activation. We identified ubiquitin-specific peptidase (Usp) 12 and Usp46, which had not been previously described in this pathway. Stimulation with anti-CD3 resulted in phosphorylation and time-dependent translocation of Usp12 from the nucleus to the cytosol. Usp12−/− Jurkat cells displayed defective NFκB, NFAT, and MAPK activities owing to attenuated surface expression of TCR, which were rescued on reconstitution of wild type Usp12. Proximity-based labeling with BirA-Usp12 revealed several TCR adaptor proteins acting as interactors in stimulated cells, of which LAT and Trat1 displayed reduced expression in Usp12−/− cells. We demonstrate that Usp12 deubiquitylates and prevents lysosomal degradation of LAT and Trat1 to maintain the proximal TCR complex for the duration of signaling. Our approach benefits from the use of activity-based probes in primary cells without any previous genome modification, and underscores the importance of ubiquitin-mediated regulation to refine signaling cascades. PMID:26811477

  16. APOLLO 10: Training for Lunar Surface Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Astronauts train on a mock-up lunar surface, practicing the procedures they will follow on the real thing, and adjusting to the demands of the workload. From the film documentary 'APOLLO 10: 'Green Light for a Lunar Landing''. Part of a documentary series made in the early 70's on the APOLLO missions, and narrated by Burgess Meredith. (Actual date created is not known at this time) APOLLO 10: Manned lunar orbital flight with Thomas P Stafford, John W. Young, and Eugene A. Cernan to test all aspects of an actual manned lunar landing except the landing. Mission Duration 192hrs 3mins 23 sec

  17. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  18. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chii J.; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J.; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-01-01

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells. PMID:25902426

  19. Myosin II Activity Softens Cells in Suspension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chii J; Ekpenyong, Andrew E; Golfier, Stefan; Li, Wenhong; Chalut, Kevin J; Otto, Oliver; Elgeti, Jens; Guck, Jochen; Lautenschläger, Franziska

    2015-04-21

    The cellular cytoskeleton is crucial for many cellular functions such as cell motility and wound healing, as well as other processes that require shape change or force generation. Actin is one cytoskeleton component that regulates cell mechanics. Important properties driving this regulation include the amount of actin, its level of cross-linking, and its coordination with the activity of specific molecular motors like myosin. While studies investigating the contribution of myosin activity to cell mechanics have been performed on cells attached to a substrate, we investigated mechanical properties of cells in suspension. To do this, we used multiple probes for cell mechanics including a microfluidic optical stretcher, a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic, and real-time deformability cytometry. We found that nonadherent blood cells, cells arrested in mitosis, and naturally adherent cells brought into suspension, stiffen and become more solidlike upon myosin inhibition across multiple timescales (milliseconds to minutes). Our results hold across several pharmacological and genetic perturbations targeting myosin. Our findings suggest that myosin II activity contributes to increased whole-cell compliance and fluidity. This finding is contrary to what has been reported for cells attached to a substrate, which stiffen via active myosin driven prestress. Our results establish the importance of myosin II as an active component in modulating suspended cell mechanics, with a functional role distinctly different from that for substrate-adhered cells.

  20. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  1. Effect of Stratification on Surface Properties of Corneal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yáñez-Soto, Bernardo; Leonard, Brian C.; Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Abbott, Nicholas L.; Murphy, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the influence of mucin expression in an immortalized human corneal epithelial cell line (hTCEpi) on the surface properties of cells, such as wettability, contact angle, and surface heterogeneity. Methods hTCEpi cells were cultured to confluence in serum-free medium. The medium was then replaced by stratification medium to induce mucin biosynthesis. The mucin expression profile was analyzed using quantitative PCR and Western blotting. Contact angles were measured using a two-immiscible liquid method, and contact angle hysteresis was evaluated by tilting the apparatus and recording advancing and receding contact angles. The spatial distribution of mucins was evaluated with fluorescently labeled lectin. Results hTCEpi cells expressed the three main ocular mucins (MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16) with a maximum between days 1 and 3 of the stratification process. Upon stratification, cells caused a very significant increase in contact angle hysteresis, suggesting the development of spatially discrete and heterogeneously distributed surface features, defined by topography and/or chemical functionality. Although atomic force microscopy measurements showed no formation of appreciable topographic features on the surface of the cells, we observed a significant increase in surface chemical heterogeneity. Conclusions The surface chemical heterogeneity of the corneal epithelium may influence the dynamic behavior of tear film by “pinning” the contact line between the cellular surface and aqueous tear film. Engineering the surface properties of corneal epithelium could potentially lead to novel treatments in dry eye disease. PMID:26747762

  2. Effect of surface chemistry on the integrin induced pathway in regulating vascular endothelial cells migration.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yang; Gao, Min; Ma, Yunlong; Yu, Hongchi; Cui, Fu-zhai; Gregersen, Hans; Yu, Qingsong; Wang, Guixue; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2015-02-01

    The migration of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) is essential for reendothelialization after implantation of cardiovascular biomaterials. Reendothelialization is largely determined by surface properties of implants. In this study, surfaces modified with various chemical functional groups (CH3, NH2, COOH, OH) prepared by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) were used as model system. Expressions and distributions of critical proteins in the integrin-induced signaling pathway were examined to explore the mechanisms of surface chemistry regulating EC migration. The results showed that SAMs modulated cell migration were in the order CH3>NH2>OH>COOH, determined by differences in the expressions of focal adhesion components and Rho GTPases. Multiple integrin subunits showed difference in a surface chemistry-dependent manner, which induced a stepwise activation of signaling cascades associated with EC migration. This work provides a broad overview of surface chemistry regulated endothelial cell migration and establishes association among the surface chemistry, cell migration behavior and associated integrin signaling events. Understanding the relationship between these factors will help us to understand the surface/interface behavior between biomaterials and cells, reveal molecular mechanism of cells sensing surface characterization, and guide surface modification of cardiovascular implanted materials. PMID:25575348

  3. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  4. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:27459246

  5. Multijunction Solar Cell Technology for Mars Surface Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mardesich, Nick; Ewell, Richard C.; Mueller, Robert L.; Endicter, Scott; Aiken, Daniel; Edmondson, Kenneth; Fetze, Chris

    2006-01-01

    Solar cells used for Mars surface applications have been commercial space qualified AM0 optimized devices. Due to the Martian atmosphere, these cells are not optimized for the Mars surface and as a result operate at a reduced efficiency. A multi-year program, MOST (Mars Optimized Solar Cell Technology), managed by JPL and funded by NASA Code S, was initiated in 2004, to develop tools to modify commercial AM0 cells for the Mars surface solar spectrum and to fabricate Mars optimized devices for verification. This effort required defining the surface incident spectrum, developing an appropriate laboratory solar simulator measurement capability, and to develop and test commercial cells modified for the Mars surface spectrum. This paper discusses the program, including results for the initial modified cells. Simulated Mars surface measurements of MER cells and Phoenix Lander cells (2007 launch) are provided to characterize the performance loss for those missions. In addition, the performance of the MER rover solar arrays is updated to reflect their more than two (2) year operation.

  6. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  7. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  8. Active cell mechanics: Measurement and theory.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Wylie W; Fodor, Étienne; Betz, Timo

    2015-11-01

    Living cells are active mechanical systems that are able to generate forces. Their structure and shape are primarily determined by biopolymer filaments and molecular motors that form the cytoskeleton. Active force generation requires constant consumption of energy to maintain the nonequilibrium activity to drive organization and transport processes necessary for their function. To understand this activity it is necessary to develop new approaches to probe the underlying physical processes. Active cell mechanics incorporates active molecular-scale force generation into the traditional framework of mechanics of materials. This review highlights recent experimental and theoretical developments towards understanding active cell mechanics. We focus primarily on intracellular mechanical measurements and theoretical advances utilizing the Langevin framework. These developing approaches allow a quantitative understanding of nonequilibrium mechanical activity in living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mechanobiology.

  9. The endomembrane requirement for cell surface repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Miyake, Katsuya; Vogel, Steven S.

    2003-01-01

    The capacity to reseal a plasma membrane disruption rapidly is required for cell survival in many physiological environments. Intracellular membrane (endomembrane) is thought to play a central role in the rapid resealing response. We here directly compare the resealing response of a cell that lacks endomembrane, the red blood cell, with that of several nucleated cells possessing an abundant endomembrane compartment. RBC membrane disruptions inflicted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser, even those initially smaller than hemoglobin, failed to reseal rapidly. By contrast, much larger laser-induced disruptions made in sea urchin eggs, fibroblasts, and neurons exhibited rapid, Ca(2+)-dependent resealing. We conclude that rapid resealing is not mediated by simple physiochemical mechanisms; endomembrane is required.

  10. Improvement of early cell adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface by low energy plasma.

    PubMed

    Amornsudthiwat, Phakdee; Mongkolnavin, Rattachat; Kanokpanont, Sorada; Panpranot, Joongjai; Wong, Chiow San; Damrongsakkul, Siriporn

    2013-11-01

    Low energy plasma has been introduced to treat the surface of Thai silk fibroin which should be enhanced for cell adhesion due to its native hydrophobic surface. Plasma surface treatment could introduce desirable hydrophilic functionalities on the surface without using any chemicals. In this work, nitrogen glow discharge plasma was generated by a low energy AC50Hz power supply system. The plasma operating conditions were optimized to reach the highest nitrogen active species by using optical emission spectroscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that amine, hydroxyl, ether, and carboxyl groups were induced on Thai silk fibroin surface after plasma treatment. The results on Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy confirmed that the plasma treated effects were only on the outermost layer since there was no change in the bulk chemistry. The surface topography was insignificantly changed from the detection with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The plasma-treated effects were the improved surface wettability and cell adhesion. After a 90-s treatment, the water contact angle was at 20°, while the untreated surface was at 70°. The early cell adhesion of L929 mouse fibroblast was accelerated. L929 cells only took 3h to reach 100% cell adhesion on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface, while there was less than 50% cell adhesion on the untreated Thai silk fibroin surface after 6h of culture. The cell adhesion results were in agreement with the cytoskeleton development. L929 F-actin was more evident on 90 s N2 plasma-treated surface than others. It could be concluded that a lower energy AC50Hz plasma system enhanced early L929 mouse fibroblast adhesion on Thai silk fibroin surface without any significant change in surface topography and bulk chemistry. PMID:23893032

  11. Modelling cell motility and chemotaxis with evolving surface finite elements

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Charles M.; Stinner, Björn; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar

    2012-01-01

    We present a mathematical and a computational framework for the modelling of cell motility. The cell membrane is represented by an evolving surface, with the movement of the cell determined by the interaction of various forces that act normal to the surface. We consider external forces such as those that may arise owing to inhomogeneities in the medium and a pressure that constrains the enclosed volume, as well as internal forces that arise from the reaction of the cells' surface to stretching and bending. We also consider a protrusive force associated with a reaction–diffusion system (RDS) posed on the cell membrane, with cell polarization modelled by this surface RDS. The computational method is based on an evolving surface finite-element method. The general method can account for the large deformations that arise in cell motility and allows the simulation of cell migration in three dimensions. We illustrate applications of the proposed modelling framework and numerical method by reporting on numerical simulations of a model for eukaryotic chemotaxis and a model for the persistent movement of keratocytes in two and three space dimensions. Movies of the simulated cells can be obtained from http://homepages.warwick.ac.uk/∼maskae/CV_Warwick/Chemotaxis.html. PMID:22675164

  12. Surfaces of Fluorinated Pyridinium Block Copolymers with Enhanced Antibacterial Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan,S.; Ward, R.; Hexemer, A.; Sohn, K.; Lee, K.; Angert, E.; Fischer, D.; Kramer, E.; Ober, C.

    2006-01-01

    Polystyrene-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) copolymers were quaternized with 1-bromohexane and 6-perfluorooctyl-1-bromohexane. Surfaces prepared from these polymers were characterized by contact angle measurements, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The fluorinated pyridinium surfaces showed enhanced antibacterial activity compared to their nonfluorinated counterparts. Even a polymer with a relatively low molecular weight pyridinium block showed high antimicrobial activity. The bactericidal effect was found to be related to the molecular composition and organization in the top 2-3 nm of the surface and increased with increasing hydrophilicity and pyridinium concentration of the surface.

  13. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  14. Novel eukaryotic enzymes modifying cell-surface biopolymers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic extracellular matrices such as proteoglycans, sclerotinized structures, mucus, external tests, capsules, cell walls and waxes contain highly modified proteins, glycans and other composite biopolymers. Using comparative genomics and sequence profile analysis we identify several novel enzymes that could be potentially involved in the modification of cell-surface glycans or glycoproteins. Results Using sequence analysis and conservation we define the acyltransferase domain prototyped by the fungal Cas1p proteins, identify its active site residues and unify them to the superfamily of classical 10TM acyltransferases (e.g. oatA). We also identify a novel family of esterases (prototyped by the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain of Cas1p) that have a similar fold as the SGNH/GDSL esterases but differ from them in their conservation pattern. Conclusions We posit that the combined action of the acyltransferase and esterase domain plays an important role in controlling the acylation levels of glycans and thereby regulates their physico-chemical properties such as hygroscopicity, resistance to enzymatic hydrolysis and physical strength. We present evidence that the action of these novel enzymes on glycans might play an important role in host-pathogen interaction of plants, fungi and metazoans. We present evidence that in plants (e.g. PMR5 and ESK1) the regulation of carbohydrate acylation by these acylesterases might also play an important role in regulation of transpiration and stress resistance. We also identify a subfamily of these esterases in metazoans (e.g. C7orf58), which are fused to an ATP-grasp amino acid ligase domain that is predicted to catalyze, in certain animals, modification of cell surface polymers by amino acid or peptides. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Gaspar Jekely and Frank Eisenhaber PMID:20056006

  15. Modulated surface nanostructures for enhanced light trapping and reduced surface reflection of crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Hirai, Yuji; Matsuo, Yasutaka; Usami, Noritaka

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrated the fabrication of modulated surface nanostructures as a new surface texture design for thin wafer solar cells. Using a combination of conventional alkali etching and colloidal lithography, we fabricated surface textures with micrometer and nanometre scales on a Si substrate. These modulated surface nanostructures exhibit reduced surface reflection in a broad spectral range, compared with conventional micrometer textures. We investigated optical absorption using a rigorous coupled wave analysis simulation, which revealed a significant reduction in surface reflection over a broad spectral range and efficient light trapping (comparable to that of conventional micrometer-scale textures) for the modulated nanostructures. We found that the modulated surface nanostructures have a high potential of improving the performance of thin wafer crystalline Si solar cells.

  16. Emergence of an Apical Epithelial Cell Surface In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sedzinski, Jakub; Hannezo, Edouard; Tu, Fan; Biro, Maté; Wallingford, John B

    2016-01-11

    Epithelial sheets are crucial components of all metazoan animals, enclosing organs and protecting the animal from its environment. Epithelial homeostasis poses unique challenges, as addition of new cells and loss of old cells must be achieved without disrupting the fluid-tight barrier and apicobasal polarity of the epithelium. Several studies have identified cell biological mechanisms underlying extrusion of cells from epithelia, but far less is known of the converse mechanism by which new cells are added. Here, we combine molecular, pharmacological, and laser-dissection experiments with theoretical modeling to characterize forces driving emergence of an apical surface as single nascent cells are added to a vertebrate epithelium in vivo. We find that this process involves the interplay between cell-autonomous actin-generated pushing forces in the emerging cell and mechanical properties of neighboring cells. Our findings define the forces driving this cell behavior, contributing to a more comprehensive understanding of epithelial homeostasis.

  17. The cell surface environment for pathogen recognition and entry

    PubMed Central

    Stow, Jennifer L; Condon, Nicholas D

    2016-01-01

    The surface of mammalian cells offers an interface between the cell interior and its surrounding milieu. As part of the innate immune system, macrophages have cell surface features optimised for probing and sampling as they patrol our tissues for pathogens, debris or dead cells. Their highly dynamic and constantly moving cell surface has extensions such as lamellipodia, filopodia and dorsal ruffles that help detect pathogens. Dorsal ruffles give rise to macropinosomes for rapid, high volume non-selective fluid sampling, receptor internalisation and plasma membrane turnover. Ruffles can also generate phagocytic cups for the receptor-mediated uptake of pathogens or particles. The membrane lipids, actin cytoskeleton, receptors and signalling proteins that constitute these cell surface domains are discussed. Although the cell surface is designed to counteract pathogens, many bacteria, viruses and other pathogens have evolved to circumvent or hijack these cell structures and their underlying machinery for entry and survival. Nevertheless, these features offer important potential for developing vaccines, drugs and preventative measures to help fight infection. PMID:27195114

  18. Saline Snow Surfaces and Arctic Bromine Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, K. A.; Custard, K. D.; Shepson, P.; Douglas, T. A.; Pöhler, D.; General, S.; Zielcke, J.; Platt, U.; Carlsen, M. S.; Tanner, D.; Huey, L. G.; Stirm, B.

    2012-12-01

    Following polar sunrise, tropospheric ozone levels often decrease rapidly to near zero, concurrent with mercury depletion and deposition. Despite our increasing understanding of the spatial variability of BrO and possible mechanisms based on laboratory studies, important questions remain regarding the most efficient sources of and mechanisms for Arctic halogen activation, leading to tropospheric ozone depletion. Rapid sea ice decline in the Arctic is expected to influence halogen activation and corresponding ozone and mercury depletion events. Therefore, an improved understanding of halogen activation is necessary to predict future changes in atmospheric chemical composition. During the March-April 2012 BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) in Barrow, Alaska, outdoor chamber experiments with snow and ice samples were conducted. Ozone was added as the precursor oxidant, and the samples were investigated with and without ambient sunlight. Samples included first-year sea ice, brine icicles, several layers of snow above first-year sea ice, and seasonal snow above the tundra. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry was utilized to monitor Br2 production, and ion chromatography was utilized to measure the bromide, chloride, nitrate, and sulfate content of the melted snow/ice samples. Surprisingly, tundra snow and drifting snow above sea ice produced the most Br2, with no production resulting from sea ice and basal snow directly above sea ice, suggesting more efficient production from samples characterized by greater acidity and lower chloride/bromide ratios. In addition, Br2 was only observed in the presence of sunlight, indicating the role of snowpack photolysis and the hydroxyl radical in its production. The observed trends in Br2 production may also help explain observations of inland hotspots in measured BrO by aircraft-based nadir MAX-DOAS (Multi Axis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements, conducted during the same field campaign. The

  19. Covalent surface modification of titanium oxide with different adhesive peptides: surface characterization and osteoblast-like cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dettin, Monica; Bagno, Andrea; Gambaretto, Roberta; Iucci, Giovanna; Conconi, Maria Teresa; Tuccitto, Nunzio; Menti, Anna Michela; Grandi, Claudio; Di Bello, Carlo; Licciardello, Antonino; Polzonetti, Giovanni

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental goal in the field of implantology is the design of innovative devices suitable for promoting implant-to-tissue integration. This result can be achieved by means of surface modifications aimed at optimizing tissue regeneration. In the framework of oral and orthopedic implantology, surface modifications concern both the optimization of titanium/titanium alloy surface roughness and the attachment of biochemical factors able to guide cellular adhesion and/or growth. This article focuses on the covalent attachment of two different adhesive peptides to rough titanium disks. The capability of biomimetic surfaces to increase osteoblast adhesion and the specificity of their biological activity due to the presence of cell adhesion signal-motif have also been investigated. In addition, surface analyses by profilometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry have been carried out to investigate the effects and modifications induced by grafting procedures.

  20. Measurement of myeloid cell immune suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Dolcetti, Luigi; Peranzoni, Elisa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-11-01

    This unit presents simple methods to assess the immunosuppressive properties of immunoregulatory cells of myeloid origin, such as myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), both in vitro and in vivo. These methods are general and could be adapted to test the impact of different suppressive populations on T cell activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic activity; moreover they could be useful to assess the influence exerted on immune suppressive pathways by genetic modifications, chemical inhibitors, and drugs.

  1. Angiogenic Role of MMP-2/9 Expressed on the Cell Surface of Early Endothelial Progenitor Cells/Myeloid Angiogenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kanayasu-Toyoda, Toshie; Tanaka, Takeshi; Ishii-Watabe, Akiko; Kitagawa, Hiroko; Matsuyama, Akifumi; Uchida, Eriko; Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2015-11-01

    Since the introduction of angiogenic cell therapy using early endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), myeloid angiogenic cells (MACs) have been expected to be useful in treating ischemic diseases. In order to elucidate the angiogenic properties of MACs/EPCs, we clarified the characteristics of MACs as compared to M2 macrophages (Mϕs). Comparison of the gene expression profiles of MACs and late EPCs revealed that MACs expressed greater amounts of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9. It should be noted that the profile of MMP-2/9 expression on the cell surface of MACs was similar to that of M2 Mϕs, and that cell surface MMP-2/9 might be an active form based on molecular size. In addition, the invasion of MACs was prohibited not only by MMP-2/9 inhibitor, but also by the hyaluronidase treatment that caused the down-regulation of MMP-9 on the cell surface of MACs and inhibited their invasion activity. These results indicate that cell surface MMP-2/9 plays an important role in the high invasion ability of MACs. The conditioned medium of both MACs and M2 Mϕs stimulated tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro. MACs caused an increase in vessel formation in in vivo models through the production of IL-8. We propose that the role of MACs with cell surfaces expressing MMP-2/9 is rapidly invading ischemic tissue. PMID:25820539

  2. Enhancement of Biological Reactions on Cell Surfaces via Macromolecular Crowding

    PubMed Central

    Chapanian, Rafi; Kwan, David H.; Constantinescu, Iren; Shaikh, Fathima A.; Rossi, Nicholas A.A.; Withers, Stephen G.; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2016-01-01

    The reaction of macromolecules such as enzymes and antibodies with cell surfaces is often an inefficient process, requiring large amounts of expensive reagent. Here we report a general method based on macromolecular crowding with a range of neutral polymers to enhance such reactions, using red blood cells (RBCs) as a model system. Rates of conversion of Type A and B red blood cells to universal O type by removal of antigenic carbohydrates with selective glycosidases are increased up to 400-fold in the presence of crowders. Similar enhancements are seen for antibody binding. We further explore the factors underlying these enhancements using confocal microscopy and fluorescent recovery after bleaching (FRAP) techniques with various fluorescent protein fusion partners. Increased cell-surface concentration due to volume exclusion, along with two-dimensionally confined diffusion of enzymes close to the cell surface, appear to be the major contributing factors. PMID:25140641

  3. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  4. Recent Insights into Cell Surface Heparan Sulphate Proteoglycans and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couchman, John R; Multhaupt, Hinke; Sanderson, Ralph D.

    2016-01-01

    A small group of cell surface receptors are proteoglycans, possessing a core protein with one or more covalently attached glycosaminoglycan chains. They are virtually ubiquitous and their chains are major sites at which protein ligands of many types interact. These proteoglycans can signal and regulate important cell processes, such as adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Since many protein ligands, such as growth factors, morphogens, and cytokines, are also implicated in tumour progression, it is increasingly apparent that cell surface proteoglycans impact tumour cell behaviour. Here, we review some recent advances, emphasising that many tumour-related functions of proteoglycans are revealed only after their modification in processes subsequent to synthesis and export to the cell surface. These include enzymes that modify heparan sulphate structure, recycling of whole or fragmented proteoglycans into exosomes that can be paracrine effectors or biomarkers, and lateral interactions between some proteoglycans and calcium channels that impact the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27408707

  5. Analysis of cell surface properties using derivatized agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Salbilla, B A; Vaghefi, H; Chhabra, P; Hall, G; Brown, D; Sadoughi, F; Francisco, E; Attas, L; Walker, S L; Nguyen, B N; Oppenheimer, S B

    1999-07-01

    An assay has been developed to analyse cell surface properties using agarose beads derivatized with amino acids, sugars, proteins, and other molecules. The assay is simple and rapid and is useful to identify new cell surface markers. Various species and strains of yeast, paramecium, and Euglena were tested for their ability to bind to over 100 types of derivatized beads. A variety of specificity studies were performed in order to understand the nature of cell-bead binding. Our results indicate that cell-bead binding is often specific enough to distinguish between configurational isomers and spacer sizes and can be blocked by addition of specific molecules to the incubation medium. In some cases, different species or strains differed only by their binding to a single bead type. This simple and rapid assay may help to uncover new cell surface receptors and may lead to the development of clinically useful compounds for therapeutic applications.

  6. Multi-scale cell/surface interaction on modified titanium aluminum vanadium surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbo

    This dissertation presents a series of experimental studies of the effects of multi-scale cell/surface interactions on modified Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. These include laser-grooved surfaces; porous structures and RGD-coated laser-grooved surfaces. A nano-second DPSS UV lasers with a Gaussian pulse energy profile was used to introduce the desired micro-groove geometries onto Ti-6Al-4V surfaces. This was done without inducing micro-cracks or significant changes in surface chemistry within the heat affected zones. The desired 8-12 mum groove depths and widths were achieved by the control of pulse frequency, scan speed, and the lens focal length that controls spot size. The interactions between human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells and laser-grooved Ti-6Al-4V surfaces were investigated after 48 hours of cell culture. The cell behavior, including cell spreading, alignment and adhesion, was elucidated using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), immuno-fluorescence staining and enzymatic detachment. Contact guidance was shown to increase as grooved spacing decreased. For the range of micro-groove geometries studied, micro-grooves with groove spacings of 20 mum provided the best combination of cell orientation and adhesion. Short-term adhesion experiments (15 mins to 1 day) also revealed that there is a positive correlation between cell orientation and cell adhesion. Contact guidance on the micro-grooved surfaces is shown to be enhanced by nano- and micro-scale asperities that provide sites for the attachment of lamellopodia during cell locomotion and spreading. Contact guidance is also promoted by the geometrical confinement provided by laser grooves. An experimental study of initial cell spreading and ingrowth into Ti-6Al-4V porous structures was also carried out on porous structures with different pore sizes and geometries. A combination of SEM, the tetrazolium salt (MTT) colorimetric assay and enzymatic detachment were used to study cell spreading and adhesion. The extent of cell

  7. Janus particles as artificial antigen-presenting cells for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Jia, Yilong; Gao, Yuan; Sanchez, Lucero; Anthony, Stephen M; Yu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Here we show that the multifunctionality of Janus particles can be exploited for in vitro T cell activation. We engineer bifunctional Janus particles on which the spatial distribution of two ligands, anti-CD3 and fibronectin, mimics the "bull's eye" protein pattern formed in the membrane junction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell. Different levels of T cell activation can be achieved by simply switching the spatial distribution of the two ligands on the surfaces of the "bull's eye" particles. We find that the ligand pattern also affects clustering of intracellular proteins. This study demonstrates that anisotropic particles, such as Janus particles, can be developed as artificial antigen-presenting cells for modulating T cell activation. PMID:25343426

  8. Aptamer-based polyvalent ligands for regulated cell attachment on the hydrogel surface.

    PubMed

    Gaddes, Erin R; Gydush, Gregory; Li, Shihui; Chen, Niancao; Dong, Cheng; Wang, Yong

    2015-04-13

    Natural biomolecules are often used to functionalize materials to achieve desired cell-material interactions. However, their applications can be limited owing to denaturation during the material functionalization process. Therefore, efforts have been made to develop synthetic ligands with polyvalence as alternatives to natural affinity biomolecules for the synthesis of functional materials and the control of cell-material interactions. This work was aimed at investigating the capability of a hydrogel functionalized with a novel polyvalent aptamer in inducing cell attachment in dynamic flow and releasing the attached cells in physiological conditions through a hybridization reaction. The results show that the polyvalent aptamer could induce cell attachment on the hydrogel in dynamic flow. Moreover, cell attachment on the hydrogel surface was significantly influenced by the value of shear stress. The cell density on the hydrogel was increased from 40 cells/mm(2) to nearly 700 cells/mm(2) when the shear stress was decreased from 0.05 to 0.005 Pa. After the attachment onto the hydrogel surface, approximately 95% of the cells could be triggered to detach within 20 min by using an oligonucleotide complementary sequence that displaced polyvalent aptamer strands from the hydrogel surface. While it was found that the cell activity was reduced, the live/dead staining results show that ≥98% of the detached cells were viable. Therefore, this work has suggested that the polyvalent aptamer is a promising synthetic ligand for the functionalization of materials for regulated cell attachment.

  9. Patterns of plasminogen activator production in cultured normal embryonic cells

    PubMed Central

    1977-01-01

    Cultured normal low-passage embryo fibroblasts, from a number of species, and two untransformed clones of a Balb/3T3 line elaborate increasing amounts of plasminogen activator (PA) as they approach confluence; the low-passage cells then lose this PA activity after reaching confluence, while the 3T3 cells retain it indefinitely. Even at their peaks, however, the PA activities of the low-passage cells remain well below those of the corresponding virally or spontaneously transformed cells. The PA increases in normal cells are probably a result of PA production rather than of adsorption of secreted PA to the cell surface, or of changes in cell-associated protease inhibitors. The elaboration of PA by normal cells is dependent upon their metabolic activity, such that the level of serum supplementation and the growth phase of the culture directly influence the level of cell-associated PA observed. In addition, there may be a component of serum which exerts a negative control on PA production and which is not an acid-labile protease inhibitor. PMID:21193

  10. Streptomycin favors biofilm formation by altering cell surface properties.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Ting, Yen-Peng

    2016-10-01

    Studies have shown that external stress induces biofilm formation, but the underlying details are not clearly understood. This study investigates the changes in cell surface properties leading to increase in biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of streptomycin. Bacterial attachment in the presence and absence of streptomycin was quantified by fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, cell surface charge and contact angle were measured and the free energy barrier for attachment was modeled using extended Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (xDLVO) theory. Peptides from bacterial cell surface were shaved by protease treatment and identified with ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC)-QTOF and a homology search program SPIDER. Biofilm formation increased significantly in the presence of streptomycin (10 mg/L) in the culture. Bacterial cell surface charge reduced, and hydrophobicity increased leading to a net decrease in the free energy barrier for attachment. Extracellular matrix-binding protein was positively regulated in S. aureus under stress, indicating stronger interaction between bacterial cells and solid surface. In addition, several other proteins including biofilm regulatory proteins, multidrug efflux pumps, transporters, signaling proteins, and virulence factors were differentially expressed on bacterial cell surface, which is indicative of a strong stress response by bacteria to streptomycin treatment. PMID:27568380

  11. A Method of Targeted Cell Isolation via Glass Surface Functionalization.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Ali; Patel, Reema; Schultheis, Kinsey; Naumovski, Vesna; Imoukhuede, P I

    2016-01-01

    One of the limiting factors to the adoption and advancement of personalized medicine is the inability to develop diagnostic tools to probe individual nuances in expression from patient to patient. Current methodologies that try to separate cells to fill this niche result in disruption of physiological expression, making the separation technique useless as a diagnostic tool. In this protocol, we describe the functionalization and optimization of a surface for the cellular capture and release. This functionalized surface integrates biotinylated antibodies with a glass surface functionalized with an aminosilane (APTES), desthiobiotin and streptavidin. Cell release is facilitated through the introduction of biotin, allowing the recollection and purification of cells captured by the surface. This release is done through the targeting of the secondary moiety desthiobiotin, which results in a much more gentle release paradigm. This reduction in harsh reagents and shear forces reduces changes in cellular expression. The functionalized surface captures up to 80% of cells in a single cell mixture and has demonstrated 50% capture in a dual-cell mixture. Applications of this technology to xenografts and cancer separation studies are investigated. Quantification techniques for surface verification such as plate reader and ImageJ analyses are described as well. PMID:27684992

  12. Characterization of surface active materials derived from farm products

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface active materials obtained by chemical modification of plant protein isolates (lupin, barley, oat), corn starches (dextrin, normal, high amylose, and waxy) and soybean oil (soybean oil based polysoaps, SOPS) were investigated for their surface and interfacial properties using axisymmetric dro...

  13. Surface-active properties of humic and sulfochlorohumic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Ryabova, I.N.; Mustafina, G.A.; Akkulova, Z.G.; Satymbaeva, A.S.

    2009-10-15

    The surface tension of alkaline solutions of humic acids and their sulfochloroderivatives, which are synthesized by sulfonation of chlorohumic acids isolated from coal chlorinated by the electrochemical method, is investigated. It is established that humic compounds possess weak surface activity. Basic adsorption parameters are calculated.

  14. Oxide modified air electrode surface for high temperature electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Singh, Prabhakar; Ruka, Roswell J.

    1992-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous cermet electrode (16) and a porous lanthanum manganite electrode (14), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) between them, where the lanthanum manganite surface next to the electrolyte contains a thin discontinuous layer of high surface area cerium oxide and/or praseodymium oxide, preferably as discrete particles (30) in contact with the air electrode and electrolyte.

  15. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (<5 mm) synthetic vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  16. Role of nanostructured gold surfaces on monocyte activation and Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Sara; Forsberg, Magnus; Hulander, Mats; Vazirisani, Forugh; Palmquist, Anders; Lausmaa, Jukka; Thomsen, Peter; Trobos, Margarita

    2014-01-01

    The role of material surface properties in the direct interaction with bacteria and the indirect route via host defense cells is not fully understood. Recently, it was suggested that nanostructured implant surfaces possess antimicrobial properties. In the current study, the adhesion and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus epidermidis and human monocyte adhesion and activation were studied separately and in coculture in different in vitro models using smooth gold and well-defined nanostructured gold surfaces. Two polystyrene surfaces were used as controls in the monocyte experiments. Fluorescent viability staining demonstrated a reduction in the viability of S. epidermidis close to the nanostructured gold surface, whereas the smooth gold correlated with more live biofilm. The results were supported by scanning electron microscopy observations, showing higher biofilm tower formations and more mature biofilms on smooth gold compared with nanostructured gold. Unstimulated monocytes on the different substrates demonstrated low activation, reduced gene expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines, and low cytokine secretion. In contrast, stimulation with opsonized zymosan or opsonized live S. epidermidis for 1 hour significantly increased the production of reactive oxygen species, the gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-6, and IL-10, as well as the secretion of TNF-α, demonstrating the ability of the cells to elicit a response and actively phagocytose prey. In addition, cells cultured on the smooth gold and the nanostructured gold displayed a different adhesion pattern and a more rapid oxidative burst than those cultured on polystyrene upon stimulation. We conclude that S. epidermidis decreased its viability initially when adhering to nanostructured surfaces compared with smooth gold surfaces, especially in the bacterial cell layers closest to the surface. In contrast, material surface properties neither strongly

  17. Morphology, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells cultured on titanium, tantalum, and chromium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Stiehler, Maik; Lind, Martin; Mygind, Tina; Baatrup, Anette; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Li, Haisheng; Foss, Morten; Besenbacher, Flemming; Kassem, Moustapha; Bünger, Cody

    2008-08-01

    Metallic implants are widely used in orthopedic surgery and dentistry. Durable osseous fixation of an implant requires that osteoprogenitor cells attach and adhere to the implant, proliferate, differentiate into osteoblasts, and produce mineralized matrix. In the present study, we investigated the interactions between human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and smooth surfaces of titanium (Ti), tantalum (Ta), and chromium (Cr). Mean cellular area was quantified using fluorescence microscopy (4 h). Cellular proliferation was assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation and methylene blue cell counting assays (4 days). Osteogenic differentiation response was quantified by cell-specific alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP) assay (4 days), expression analysis of bone-related genes (4 days), and mineralization assay (21 days). Undifferentiated and osteogenically stimulated MSCs cultured on the different surfaces showed the same tendencies for proliferation and differentiation. MSCs exposed to Ti surfaces demonstrated enhanced proliferation compared with Ta and Cr surfaces. Cultivation of MSCs on Ta surfaces resulted in significantly increased mean cellular area and cell-specific ALP activity compared with the other surfaces tested. Cells cultured on Cr demonstrated reduced spreading and proliferation. In conclusion, Ta metal, as an alternative for Ti, can be considered as a promising biocompatible material, whereas further studies are needed to fully understand the role of Cr and its alloys in bone implants.

  18. Cell Surface Human Airway Trypsin-Like Protease Is Lost During Squamous Cell Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Duhaime, Michael J; Page, Khaliph O; Varela, Fausto A; Murray, Andrew S; Silverman, Michael E; Zoratti, Gina L; List, Karin

    2016-07-01

    Cancer progression is accompanied by increased levels of extracellular proteases that are capable of remodeling the extracellular matrix, as well as cleaving and activating growth factors and receptors that are involved in pro-cancerous signaling pathways. Several members of the type II transmembrane serine protease (TTSP) family have been shown to play critical roles in cancer progression, however, the expression or function of the TTSP Human Airway Trypsin-like protease (HAT) in carcinogenesis has not been examined. In the present study we aimed to determine the expression of HAT during squamous cell carcinogenesis. HAT transcript is present in several tissues containing stratified squamous epithelium and decreased expression is observed in carcinomas. We determined that HAT protein is consistently expressed on the cell surface in suprabasal/apical layers of squamous cells in healthy cervical and esophageal epithelia. To assess whether HAT protein is differentially expressed in normal tissue versus tissue in different stages of carcinogenesis, we performed a comprehensive immunohistochemical analysis of HAT protein expression levels and localization in arrays of paraffin embedded human cervical and esophageal carcinomas compared to the corresponding normal tissue. We found that HAT protein is expressed in the non-proliferating, differentiated cellular strata and is lost during the dedifferentiation of epithelial cells, a hallmark of squamous cell carcinogenesis. Thus, HAT expression may potentially be useful as a marker for clinical grading and assessment of patient prognosis in squamous cell carcinomas.

  19. Expanding the diversity of unnatural cell surface sialic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Luchansky, Sarah J.; Goon, Scarlett; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2003-10-30

    Novel chemical reactivity can be introduced onto cell surfaces through metabolic oligosaccharide engineering. This technique exploits the substrate promiscuity of cellular biosynthetic enzymes to deliver unnatural monosaccharides bearing bioorthogonal functional groups into cellular glycans. For example, derivatives of N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) are converted by the cellular biosynthetic machinery into the corresponding sialic acids and subsequently delivered to the cell surface in the form of sialoglycoconjugates. Analogs of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) are also metabolized and incorporated into cell surface glycans, likely through the sialic acid and GalNAc salvage pathways, respectively. Furthermore, GlcNAc analogs can be incorporated into nucleocytoplasmic proteins in place of {beta}-O-GlcNAc residues. These pathways have been exploited to integrate unique electrophiles such as ketones and azides into the target glycoconjugate class. These functional groups can be further elaborated in a chemoselective fashion by condensation with hydrazides and by Staudinger ligation, respectively, thereby introducing detectable probes onto the cell. In conclusion, sialic acid derivatives are efficient vehicles for delivery of bulky functional groups to cell surfaces and masking of their hydroxyl groups improves their cellular uptake and utilization. Furthermore, the successful introduction of photoactivatable aryl azides into cell surface glycans opens up new avenues for studying sialic acid-binding proteins and elucidating the role of sialic acid in essential processes such as signaling and cell adhesion.

  20. Laser activated nanothermolysis of leukemia cells monitored by photothermal microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapotko, Dmitri; Lukianova, Ekaterina; Shnip, Alexander; Zheltov, George; Potapnev, Michail; Savitsky, Valeriy; Klimovich, Olga; Oraevsky, Alexander

    2005-04-01

    We are developing new diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for leukemia based on selective targeting of leukemia cells with gold nanoparticles and thermomechanical destruction of the tumor cells with laser-induced microbubbles. Clusters of spherical gold nanoparticles that have strong optical absorption of laser pulses at 532 nm served as nucleation sites of vapor microbubbles. The nanoparticles were targeted selectively to leukemia cells using leukemia-specific surface receptors and a set of two monoclonal antibodies. Application of a primary myeloid-specific antibody to tumor cells followed by targeting the cells with 30-nm nanoparticles conjugated with a secondary antibody (IgG) resulted in formation of nanoparticulate clusters due to aggregation of IgGs. Formation of clusters resulted in substantial decrease of the damage threshold for target cells. The results encourage development of Laser Activated Nanothermolysis as a Cell Elimination Therapy (LANCET) for leukemia. The proposed technology can be applied separately or in combination with chemotherapy for killing leukemia cells without damage to other blood cells. Potential applications include initial reduction of concentration of leukemia cells in blood prior to chemotherapy and treatment of residual tumor cells after the chemotherapy. Laser-induced bubbles in individual cells and cell damage were monitored by analyzing profile of photothermal response signals over the entire cell after irradiation with a single 10-ns long laser pulse. Photothermal microscopy was utilized for imaging formation of microbubbles around nanoparticulate clusters.

  1. Remote control of tissue interactions via engineered photo-switchable cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2014-01-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies. PMID:25204325

  2. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-09-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies.

  3. Remote Control of Tissue Interactions via Engineered Photo-switchable Cell Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei; Pulsipher, Abigail; Dutta, Debjit; Lamb, Brian M.; Yousaf, Muhammad N.

    2014-01-01

    We report a general cell surface molecular engineering strategy via liposome fusion delivery to create a dual photo-active and bio-orthogonal cell surface for remote controlled spatial and temporal manipulation of microtissue assembly and disassembly. Cell surface tailoring of chemoselective functional groups was achieved by a liposome fusion delivery method and quantified by flow cytometry and characterized by a new cell surface lipid pull down mass spectrometry strategy. Dynamic co-culture spheroid tissue assembly in solution and co-culture tissue multilayer assembly on materials was demonstrated by an intercellular photo-oxime ligation that could be remotely cleaved and disassembled on demand. Spatial and temporal control of microtissue structures containing multiple cell types was demonstrated by the generation of patterned multilayers for controlling stem cell differentiation. Remote control of cell interactions via cell surface engineering that allows for real-time manipulation of tissue dynamics may provide tools with the scope to answer fundamental questions of cell communication and initiate new biotechnologies ranging from imaging probes to drug delivery vehicles to regenerative medicine, inexpensive bioreactor technology and tissue engineering therapies. PMID:25204325

  4. Switching between self-renewal and lineage commitment of human induced pluripotent stem cells via cell-substrate and cell-cell interactions on a dendrimer-immobilized surface.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mee-Hae; Kino-oka, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    Understanding mechanisms that govern cell fate determination of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) could assist in maintenance of the undifferentiated state during cell expansion. We used polyamidoamine dendrimer surfaces with first-generation (G1), third-generation (G3) and fifth-generation (G5) of dendron structure in cultures of hiPSCs with SNL feeder cells. Cells on the G1 surface formed tightly packed colony with close cell-cell contacts during division and migration; those on the G3 surface exhibited loose or dispersed colony pattern by enhanced migration. On the G5 surface, formation of aggregated colony with ring-like structures occurred spontaneously. We found that the substrate-adsorbed fibronectin and feeder cell-secreted fibronectin appeared elevated levels with the varied generation numbers of dendrimer surfaces. This subsequently resulted in cell migration and in activation of paxillin of hiPSCs. Location-dependent expression of Rac1 induced rearrangement of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions on dendrimer surfaces, and was associated with alterations in the cell and colony morphology, and migratory behavior. Furthermore, caspase-3 occurred in apoptotic cells on dendrimer surfaces, concomitant with the loss of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions. Cells on the G1 surface were maintained in an undifferentiated state, while those on the G5 surface exhibited the early commitment to differentiation toward endodermal fates. We conclude that morphological changes associated with altered migration on the dendrimer surfaces were responsible for the coordinated regulation of balance between cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions, thereby switching their transition from self-renewal state to early endoderm differentiation in hiPSCs. PMID:24746960

  5. Probe for the measurement of cell surface pH in vivo and ex vivo.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael; Moshnikova, Anna; Engelman, Donald M; Reshetnyak, Yana K; Andreev, Oleg A

    2016-07-19

    We have developed a way to measure cell surface pH by positioning a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye, seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), conjugated to the pH low insertion peptide (pHLIP). It has been observed that many diseased tissues are acidic and that tumors are especially so. A combination of effects acidifies tumor cell interiors, and cells pump out lactic acid and protons to maintain intracellular pH, acidifying the extracellular space. Overexpression of carbonic anhydrases on cell surfaces further contributes to acidification. Thus, the pH near tumor cell surfaces is expected to be low and to increase with distance from the membrane, so bulk pH measurements will not report surface acidity. Our new surface pH-measurement tool was validated in cancer cells grown in spheroids, in mouse tumor models in vivo, and in excised tumors. We found that the surface pH is sensitive to cell glycolytic activity: the pH decreases in high glucose and increases if glucose is replaced with nonmetabolized deoxyglucose. For highly metastatic cancer cells, the pH measured at the surface was 6.7-6.8, when the surrounding external pH was 7.4. The approach is sensitive enough to detect 0.2-0.3 pH unit changes in vivo in tumors induced by i.p. injection of glucose. The pH at the surfaces of highly metastatic cells within tumors was found to be about 6.1-6.4, whereas in nonmetastatic tumors, it was 6.7-6.9, possibly creating a way to distinguish more aggressive from less aggressive tumors. Other biological roles of surface acidity may be found, now that targeted measurements are possible.

  6. Probe for the measurement of cell surface pH in vivo and ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Michael; Moshnikova, Anna; Engelman, Donald M.; Reshetnyak, Yana K.; Andreev, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a way to measure cell surface pH by positioning a pH-sensitive fluorescent dye, seminaphtharhodafluor (SNARF), conjugated to the pH low insertion peptide (pHLIP). It has been observed that many diseased tissues are acidic and that tumors are especially so. A combination of effects acidifies tumor cell interiors, and cells pump out lactic acid and protons to maintain intracellular pH, acidifying the extracellular space. Overexpression of carbonic anhydrases on cell surfaces further contributes to acidification. Thus, the pH near tumor cell surfaces is expected to be low and to increase with distance from the membrane, so bulk pH measurements will not report surface acidity. Our new surface pH-measurement tool was validated in cancer cells grown in spheroids, in mouse tumor models in vivo, and in excised tumors. We found that the surface pH is sensitive to cell glycolytic activity: the pH decreases in high glucose and increases if glucose is replaced with nonmetabolized deoxyglucose. For highly metastatic cancer cells, the pH measured at the surface was 6.7–6.8, when the surrounding external pH was 7.4. The approach is sensitive enough to detect 0.2–0.3 pH unit changes in vivo in tumors induced by i.p. injection of glucose. The pH at the surfaces of highly metastatic cells within tumors was found to be about 6.1–6.4, whereas in nonmetastatic tumors, it was 6.7–6.9, possibly creating a way to distinguish more aggressive from less aggressive tumors. Other biological roles of surface acidity may be found, now that targeted measurements are possible. PMID:27382181

  7. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-08-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration.

  8. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  9. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants to enhance osteogenic activity and in vivo osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guifang; Li, Jinhua; Lv, Kaige; Zhang, Wenjie; Ding, Xun; Yang, Guangzheng; Liu, Xuanyong; Jiang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Thermal oxidation, which serves as a low-cost, effective and relatively simple/facile method, was used to modify a micro-structured titanium surface in ambient atmosphere at 450 °C for different time periods to improve in vitro and in vivo bioactivity. The surface morphology, crystallinity of the surface layers, chemical composition and chemical states were evaluated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Cell behaviours including cell adhesion, attachment, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation were observed in vitro study. The ability of the titanium surface to promote osseointegration was evaluated in an in vivo animal model. Surface thermal oxidation on titanium implants maintained the microstructure and, thus, both slightly changed the nanoscale structure of titanium and enhanced the crystallinity of the titanium surface layer. Cells cultured on the three oxidized titanium surfaces grew well and exhibited better osteogenic activity than did the control samples. The in vivo bone-implant contact also showed enhanced osseointegration after several hours of oxidization. This heat-treated titanium enhanced the osteogenic differentiation activity of rBMMSCs and improved osseointegration in vivo, suggesting that surface thermal oxidation could potentially be used in clinical applications to improve bone-implant integration. PMID:27546196

  10. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  11. Mutagenic and genotoxic activity of chosen dyes and surface active compounds used in the textile industry.

    PubMed

    Przybojewska, B; Barański, B; Spiechowicz, E; Szymczak, W

    1989-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the mutagenic and genotoxic properties of ten dyes and four surface active compounds using Salmonella/microsome assay and the micronucleus test. Five of the investigated dyes (Acid Blue 7, Acid Green 16, Direct Black 19:1, Basic Red 22, Basic Orange 28) possessed mutagenic activity with regard to test strains of Salmonella. In addition, all of them increased the frequency of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice. Three other compounds (Acid Blue 62, Direct Yellow 12, Direct Red 81), which were not mutagenic in the Salmonella/microsome assay, were genotoxic in the micronucleus test. The other two dyes (Reactive Blue 13, Acid Red 213), as well as tested surface active compounds, did not exert mutagenic and genotoxic effects, and therefore, it is most probable that they do not have carcinogenic properties. Besides, it was noted that Acid Blue 62, Direct Black 19:1, Direct Red 81 and Basic Orange 28 cause a significant decrease in the ratio polychromatic to normochromatic erythrocytes in the bone marrow of mice, which means that, at the doses used in the experiment, they are toxic to the erythrocyte series cells of bone marrow. The other compounds under consideration have no such effect.

  12. SURFACE SPECIALIZATIONS OF FUNDULUS CELLS AND THEIR RELATION TO CELL MOVEMENTS DURING GASTRULATION

    PubMed Central

    Trinkaus, J. P.; Lentz, Thomas L.

    1967-01-01

    Cell movements in Fundulus blastoderms during gastrulation were studied utilizing time-lapse cinemicrography and electron microscopy. Time-lapse films reveal that cells of the enveloping layer undulate and sometimes separate briefly but remain together in a cohesive layer. During epiboly, the marginal enveloping layer cells move over the periblast as it expands over the yolk sphere. Movement occurs as a result of ruffled membrane activity of the free borders of the marginal cells. Deep blastomeres become increasingly active during blastula and gastrula stages. Lobopodia project from the blastomeres in blastulae and adhere to other cells in gastrulae, giving the cells traction for movement. Contact specializations are formed by the lateral adjacent plasma membranes of enveloping layer cells. An apical junction is characterized by an intercellular gap of 60–75 A. Below this contact, the plasma membranes are separated by 120 A or more. In mid-gastrulae, cytoplasmic fibrils occur adjacent to some apical junctions, and small desmosomes appear below the apical junction. Septate desmosomes also appear at this time. A junction with an intercellular gap of 60 A occurs between marginal enveloping layer cells and periblast. Contacts between deep blastomeres become numerous in gastrulae and consist of contacts at the crests of surface undulations, short areas of contact in which the plasma membranes are 60 or 120 A apart, and long regions characterized by a 200-A intercellular gap. Lobopodia contact other blastomeres only in gastrulae. These junctions contain a 200-A intercellular space. Some deep blastomeres are in contact with the tips of periblast microvilli. The mechanism of epiboly in Fundulus is discussed and reevaluated in terms of these observations. The enveloping layer is adherent to the margin of the periblast and moves over it as a coherent cellular sheet. Periblast epiboly involves a controlled flow of cytoplasm from the thicker periblast into the thinner yolk

  13. Growth factor and matrix molecules preserve cell function on thermally responsive culture surfaces.

    PubMed

    von Recum, H; Kikuchi, A; Yamato, M; Sakurai, Y; Okano, T; Kim, S W

    1999-06-01

    Thermally-responsive culture surfaces were designed using copolymers of N-isopropylacrylamide, 4-(aminomethyl)styrene, and acrylic acid. These surfaces contained functional amine and carboxyl groups, which allowed biomolecules to be grafted by amide formation. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), and extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules (collagen type IV, and chondroitin sulfate) were investigated, as surface-grafted biomolecules, for their ability to stimulate cell attachment, proliferation, and function by signaling only from the basal side of cultured cells. Surface analysis of biomolecule-grafted porous inserts showed covalent binding of biomolecules to either amine or carboxyl groups. Multiple attachment to amine and/or carboxyl groups served as cross-linking points that made the polymer hydrogel permanently adherent to the culture surface. Immunofluorescence microscopy techniques gave positive identification of grafted biomolecules. Grafting of EGF improved cell proliferation versus that on nongrafted controls, or controls grafted only with ECM molecules. ECM grafting induced cell attachment on attachment-resistant surfaces. Analysis of trans-epithelial resistance, fluid transport, and polarized g-glutamyl transpeptidase activity indicated that simultaneous grafting of both EGF and ECM produced better polarized cell function than nongrafted controls, or controls grafted with only one type of biomolecule. Covalent grafting of biomolecules did not interfere with cells ability to detach from thermally responsive surfaces upon temperature decrease. PMID:10434072

  14. Cytolytic activity of Naegleria fowleri cell-free extract.

    PubMed

    Fulford, D E; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1986-11-01

    The cytotoxic activity of a cell-free extract of Naegleria fowleri amebae on B103 rat nerve cells in culture was investigated. The cell-free extract was prepared by subjecting lysed amebae to centrifugation at 100,000 g for 1 h, precipitation of the supernatant fluid with 30-60% saturated ammonium sulfate, and desalting by group exclusion chromatography utilizing Sephadex G-25. The supernatant fluid recovered from this procedure was termed the soluble fraction. The Naegleria cytotoxic activity present in the soluble fraction was assayed by 51Cr released from labeled B103 cells. The Naegleria soluble fraction, when added to nerve cells, elicited blebs on the B103 target cell surface within 5 min after exposure to the fraction. Later, holes were observed in the B103 cell plasma membrane. These alterations were never observed on untreated B103 cells. Phospholipase A, phospholipase C, and protease activities were associated with the desalted ammonium sulfate-precipitable cytotoxic activity of N. fowleri cell-free lysate. The cytotoxic activity was impaired by ethylenediamine-tetraacetate (EDTA), phospholipase A inhibitor (Rosenthal's reagent), heating at 50 degrees C for 15 min, or incubation at pH 10 for 60 min. Repeated freeze-thawing and inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes had no effect on the cytotoxic activity. Small amounts of ethanol (5% v/v) enhanced cytotoxic activity of the fraction. Phospholipases A and C, as well as other as yet unidentified cytolytic factors may be responsible for producing 51Cr release from target cells by the soluble fraction of N. fowleri extracts.

  15. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  16. Cell recognition molecule L1 promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation through the regulation of cell surface glycosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ying; Huang, Xiaohua; An, Yue; Ren, Feng; Yang, Zara Zhuyun; Zhu, Hongmei; Zhou, Lei; He, Xiaowen; Schachner, Melitta; Xiao, Zhicheng; Ma, Keli; Li, Yali

    2013-10-25

    Highlights: •Down-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression blocks L1-induced neuronal differentiation of ESCs. •Up-regulating FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression in L1-ESCs depends on the activation of PLCγ. •L1 promotes ESCs to differentiate into neuron through regulating cell surface glycosylation. -- Abstract: Cell recognition molecule L1 (CD171) plays an important role in neuronal survival, migration, differentiation, neurite outgrowth, myelination, synaptic plasticity and regeneration after injury. Our previous study has demonstrated that overexpressing L1 enhances cell survival and proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) through promoting the expression of FUT9 and ST3Gal4, which upregulates cell surface sialylation and fucosylation. In the present study, we examined whether sialylation and fucosylation are involved in ESC differentiation through L1 signaling. RNA interference analysis showed that L1 enhanced differentiation of ESCs into neurons through the upregulation of FUT9 and ST3Gal4. Furthermore, blocking the phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ) signaling pathway with either a specific PLCγ inhibitor or knockdown PLCγ reduced the expression levels of both FUT9 and ST3Gal4 mRNAs and inhibited L1-mediated neuronal differentiation. These results demonstrate that L1 promotes neuronal differentiation from ESCs through the L1-mediated enhancement of FUT9 and ST3Gal4 expression.

  17. Cell Surfaces in Plant-Microorganism Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Esquerré-Tugayé, Marie-Thérèse; Lamport, Derek T. A.

    1979-01-01

    Infection of muskmelon Cucumis melo seedlings by the fungus Colletotrichum lagenarium causes a 10-fold increase in the amount of cell wall hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein. Evidence for this increase was provided by studying two specific markers of this glycoprotein, namely hydroxyproline and glycosylated serine. The lability of the O-glycosidic linkage of wall-bound glycosylated serine in the presence of hydrazine, was used to determine the amount of serine which is glycosylated. A large increase in the hydroxyproline content of infected plants is shown, but the ratios of glycosylated serine to hydroxyproline are similar in healthy and infected plants. As far as these markers are concerned, the hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins secreted into the wall as a result of the disease are similar to those of healthy plants. In addition, the extent of glycosylation of the wall serine, in both healthy and infected plants, decreases as the plant ages. Serine- and hydroxyproline-rich (glyco)peptides were also isolated after trypsinolysis of the wall. These (glyco)peptides include the galactosyl-containing pentapeptide, serine-hydroxyproline4. This pentapeptide is characteristic of cell wall protein. PMID:16660956

  18. Antifouling property of highly oleophobic substrates for solar cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukada, Kenta; Nishizawa, Shingo; Shiratori, Seimei

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of solar cell conversion efficiency by bird spoor or oil smoke is a common issue. Maintaining the surface of solar cells clean to retain the incident light is of utmost importance. In this respect, there has been growing interest in the area of superhydrophobicity for developing water repelling and self-cleaning surfaces. This effect is inspired by lotus leaves that have micro papillae covered with hydrophobic wax nanostructures. Superhydrophobic surfaces on transparent substrates have been developed for removing contaminants from solar cell surfaces. However, oil cannot be removed by superhydrophobic effect. In contrast, to prevent bird spoor, a highly oleophobic surface is required. In a previous study, we reported transparent-type fabrics comprising nanoparticles with a nano/micro hierarchical structure that ensured both oleophobicity and transparency. In the current study, we developed new highly oleophobic stripes that were constructed into semi-transparent oleophobic surfaces for solar cells. Solar cell performance was successfully maintained; the total transmittance was a key factor for determining conversion efficiency.

  19. Electroporation chip for adherent cells on photochemically modified polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbrich, Michael; Rebollar, Esther; Heitz, Johannes; Frischauf, Irene; Romanin, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    We present a polytetrafluoroethylene electroporation microchip with integrated electrodes for transfection of adherent biological cells. For fabrication, UV-surface modification was employed in combination with metal deposition. UV irradiation in reactive atmosphere resulted in introduction of polar chemical groups into the polytetrafluoroethylene surface for significant adhesion enhancement of both biological cells as well as metal electrodes thereon. Electroporation was demonstrated by transfection of human embryonic kidney cells with the enhanced green fluorescent protein. Transparent, working at low voltages, and easy to handle, this chip yields the potential to reduce the amount of sequential working steps necessary for transfection.

  20. Angiopoietin-3 is tethered on the cell surface via heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin; Liu, Yao-Juan; Yu, Qin

    2004-09-24

    Angiopoietins are a family of factors that play important roles in angiogenesis, and their receptor, Tie-2 receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed primarily by endothelial cells. Three angiopoietins have been identified so far, angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), angiopietin-2 (Ang-2), and angiopoietin-3 (Ang-3). It has been established that Ang-1 and Tie-2 play essential roles in embryonic angiogenesis. We have demonstrated recently that, unlike Ang-2, Ang-1 binds to the extracellular matrix, which regulates the availability and activity of Ang-1 (Xu, Y., and Yu, Q. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 34990-34998). However, the role and biochemical characteristics of Ang-3 are unknown. In our current study, we demonstrated that, unlike Ang-1 and Ang-2, Ang-3 is tethered on cell surface via heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs), especially perlecan. The cell surface-bound Ang-3 is capable of binding to its receptor, Tie-2; suggesting HSPGs concentrate Ang-3 on the cell surface and present Ang-3 to its receptor to elicit specific local reaction. Mutagenesis experiment revealed that the coiled-coil domain of Ang-3 is responsible for its binding to the cell surface. In addition, we demonstrated that the cell surface-bound Ang-3 but not soluble Ang-3 induces retraction and loss of integrity of endothelial monolayer, indicating the binding of Ang-3 to the cell surface via HSPGs is required for this bioactivity of Ang-3. PMID:15280392

  1. Influence of engineered surface on cell directionality and motility.

    PubMed

    Tang, Qing Yuan; Tong, Wing Yin; Shi, Jue; Shi, Peng; Lam, Yun Wah; Pang, Stella W

    2014-03-01

    Control of cell migration is important in numerous key biological processes, and is implicated in pathological conditions such as cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. Many previous studies indicated that cell migration could be guided by micropatterns fabricated on cell culture surfaces. In this study, we designed a polydimethylsiloxane cell culture substrate with gratings punctuated by corners and ends, and studied its effects on the behavior of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. MC3T3-E1 cells elongated and aligned with the gratings, and the migration paths of the cells appeared to be guided by the grating pattern. Interestingly, more than 88% of the cells cultured on these patterns were observed to reverse their migration directions at least once during the 16 h examination period. Most of the reversal events occurred at the corners and the ends of the pattern, suggesting these localized topographical features induce an abrupt loss in directional persistence. Moreover, the cell speed was observed to increase temporarily right after each directional reversal. Focal adhesion complexes were more well-established in cells on the angular gratings than on flat surfaces, but the formation of filipodia appeared to be imbalanced at the corners and the ends, possibly leading to the loss of directional persistence. This study describes the first engineered cell culture surface that consistently induces changes in the directional persistence of adherent cells. This will provide an experimental model for the study of this phenomenon and a valuable platform to control the cell motility and directionality, which can be used for cell screening and selection. PMID:24589941

  2. Effects of plasma etching solar cell front surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, W.E.; Bunyan, S.M.; Olson, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    A front surface plasma etch with Freon 14+8% O/sub 2/ or sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) was found to improve terrestrial solar cell output. SEM studies of these samples revealed surface pitting on Freon 14 etched samples. About 50% of the improvement from Freon etched samples can be attributed to the light capturing effects of surface pits. Output increases from SF/sub 6/ plasma etched cells were found to be comparable with Freon etched cells after subtraction of the light trapping effects. The excess output improvement might be attributed to reduced junction depth or removal of near surface lattice damage. Investigations attempting to identify the cause are described. 1 ref.

  3. Activities affecting surface water resources: A general overview

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    In November 1987, P.E.I. signed a federal/provincial work-sharing arrangement on water resource management focusing on groundwater pollution, surface water degradation and estuarine eutrophication. The surface water program was designed to identify current surface water uses and users within 12 major watersheds across the Island containing 26 individual rivers, as well as problems arising due to practices that degrade the quality of surface water and restricts its value to other user groups. This report presents a general overview of the program, covering the general characteristics of the Island; operations in agriculture, fish and wildlife, forestry, recreation, fisheries, and industry; alterations of natural features of waterways; wetlands; additional watershed activities such as hydrometric stations and subdivision development; and activities affecting surface water resources such as sedimentation sources, pollution point sources and instream obstructions.

  4. Surface modified stainless steels for PEM fuel cell bipolar plates

    DOEpatents

    Brady, Michael P [Oak Ridge, TN; Wang, Heli [Littleton, CO; Turner, John A [Littleton, CO

    2007-07-24

    A nitridation treated stainless steel article (such as a bipolar plate for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell) having lower interfacial contact electrical resistance and better corrosion resistance than an untreated stainless steel article is disclosed. The treated stainless steel article has a surface layer including nitrogen-modified chromium-base oxide and precipitates of chromium nitride formed during nitridation wherein oxygen is present in the surface layer at a greater concentration than nitrogen. The surface layer may further include precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide. The surface layer in the treated article is chemically heterogeneous surface rather than a uniform or semi-uniform surface layer exclusively rich in chromium, titanium or aluminum. The precipitates of titanium nitride and/or aluminum oxide are formed by the nitriding treatment wherein titanium and/or aluminum in the stainless steel are segregated to the surface layer in forms that exhibit a low contact resistance and good corrosion resistance.

  5. Micropatterned surfaces for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under flow.

    PubMed

    Nalayanda, Divya D; Kalukanimuttam, Mahendran; Schmidtke, David W

    2007-04-01

    Cell adhesion and rolling on the vascular wall is critical to both inflammation and thrombosis. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of using microfluidic patterning for controlling cell adhesion and rolling under physiological flow conditions. By controlling the width of the lines (50-1000 microm) and the spacing between them (50-100 microm) we were able to fabricate surfaces with well-defined patterns of adhesion molecules. We demonstrate the versatility of this technique by patterning surfaces with 3 different adhesion molecules (P-selectin, E-selectin, and von Willebrand Factor) and controlling the adhesion and rolling of three different cell types (neutrophils, Chinese Hamster Ovary cells, and platelets). By varying the concentration of the incubating solution we could control the surface ligand density and hence the cell rolling velocity. Finally by patterning surfaces with both P-selectin and von Willebrand Factor we could control the rolling of both leukocytes and platelets simultaneously. The technique described in this paper provides and effective and inexpensive way to fabricate patterned surfaces for use in cell rolling assays under physiologic flow conditions. PMID:17160704

  6. Cell surface localization of importin α1/KPNA2 affects cancer cell proliferation by regulating FGF1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kohji; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Tsujii, Akira; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Ikuno, Yudai; Shiromizu, Takashi; Serada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Importin α1 is involved in nuclear import as a receptor for proteins with a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS). Here, we report that importin α1 is localized to the cell surface in several cancer cell lines and detected in their cultured medium. We also found that exogenously added importin α1 is associated with the cell membrane via interaction with heparan sulfate. Furthermore, we revealed that the cell surface importin α1 recognizes cNLS-containing substrates. More particularly, importin α1 bound directly to FGF1 and FGF2, secreted cNLS-containing growth factors, and addition of exogenous importin α1 enhanced the activation of ERK1/2, downstream targets of FGF1 signalling, in FGF1-stimulated cancer cells. Additionally, anti-importin α1 antibody treatment suppressed the importin α1−FGF1 complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, resulting in decreased cell growth. This study provides novel evidence that functional importin α1 is located at the cell surface, where it accelerates the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26887791

  7. MHC Class II Association with Lipid Rafts on the Antigen Presenting Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Howard A.; Roche, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules function by binding peptides derived from either self-or foreign proteins and expressing these peptides on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs) for recognition by CD4 T cells. MHC-II is known to exist on clusters on the surface of APCs, and a variety of biochemical and functional studies have suggested that these clusters represent lipid raft microdomain-associated MHC-II. This review will summarize data exploring the biosynthesis of raft-associated MHC-II and the role that lipid raft association plays in regulating T cell activation by APCs. PMID:25261705

  8. Surface localization of the nuclear receptor CAR in influenza A virus-infected cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Moriyama, Yusuke; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko; Suzuki, Takashi; Miwa, Masao

    2008-04-11

    Constitutive active/androstane receptor CAR is a member of the nuclear receptors which regulate transcription of xenobiotic metabolism enzymes. CAR is usually localized in the cytosol and nucleus. Here, we found that CAR was localized at the cell surface of influenza A virus (IAV)-infected cells. Additionally, we demonstrated that expression of a viral envelope glycoprotein, either hemagglutinin (HA) or neuraminidase (NA), but not viral nucleoprotein (NP), was responsible for this localization. This report is the first demonstration of CAR at the surface of tissue culture cells, and suggests that CAR may exert the IAV infection mechanism.

  9. Cell surface GRP78 as a biomarker and target for suppressing glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Bo Ram; Yang, Seung-Hoon; Chung, Bo-Ryehn; Kim, Woong; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-01-01

    High-grade glioma is a highly malignant and metastatic brain cancer, resistant to many existing anticancer treatments. In such glioma cancer cells, the glucose-regulated protein 78 kDa (GRP78) is particularly highly up-regulated. Former studies have thus targeted mutation-free GRP78 not only to detect glioma cancer cells specifically but also to enhance cytotoxic effect. We focus on cell surface-expressed GRP78 as a target for suppressing high-grade glioma cell lines. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell line, highly malignant glioma cells, was first injected into 5-week-old athymic mice to confirm and compare GRP78 expression in vivo in xenografted and normal brain tissue. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting were utilized to detect surface-localized GRP78 in diverse high-grade glioma cell lines. By treating glioma cell lines with the polyclonal N-20 antibody against surface-localized GRP78, we subsequently studied the significance of surface GRP78 to the survival and growth of the glioma cell lines. We found that inhibiting the function of surface GRP78 suppressed cancer cell survival and growth proving that the surface-expressed GRP78 is a vital receptor involved in the proliferation of high-grade glioma. Our findings provide opportunities to target surface GRP78 as a biomarker for high-grade glioma and to develop effective cell-specific anticancer therapy. PMID:27713511

  10. Surface modification of closed plastic bags for adherent cell cultivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachmann, K.; Dohse, A.; Thomas, M.; Pohl, S.; Meyring, W.; Dittmar, K. E. J.; Lindenmeier, W.; Klages, C.-P.

    2011-07-01

    In modern medicine human mesenchymal stem cells are becoming increasingly important. However, a successful cultivation of this type of cells is only possible under very specific conditions. Of great importance, for instance, are the absence of contaminants such as foreign microbiological organisms, i.e., sterility, and the chemical functionalization of the ground on which the cells are grown. As cultivation of these cells makes high demands, a new procedure for cell cultivation has been developed in which closed plastic bags are used. For adherent cell growth chemical functional groups have to be introduced on the inner surface of the plastic bag. This can be achieved by a new, atmospheric-pressure plasma-based method presented in this paper. The method which was developed jointly by the Fraunhofer IST and the Helmholtz HZI can be implemented in automated equipment as is also shown in this contribution. Plasma process gases used include helium or helium-based gas mixtures (He + N2 + H2) and vapors of suitable film-forming agents or precursors such as APTMS, DACH, and TMOS in helium. The effect of plasma treatment is investigated by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy as well as surface tension determination based on contact angle measurements and XPS. Plasma treatment in nominally pure helium increases the surface tension of the polymer foil due to the presence of oxygen traces in the gas and oxygen diffusing through the gas-permeable foil, respectively, reacting with surface radical centers formed during contact with the discharge. Primary amino groups are obtained on the inner surface by treatment in mixtures with nitrogen and hydrogen albeit their amount is comparably small due to diffusion of oxygen through the gas-permeable bag, interfering with the plasma-amination process. Surface modifications introducing amino groups on the inner surface turned out to be most efficient in the promotion of cell growth.

  11. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties. PMID:27612825

  12. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties.

  13. Biological Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes Using Cell Surface Mucin Mimics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xing; Lee, Goo Soo; Zettl, Alex; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    2004-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) are molecular wires with remarkable structural, electrical, and mechanical properties. Their potential applications in biology include sensing, imaging, and scaffolding for cell growth, but are presently limited by chemical incompatibility of the CNT surface with biological components and their aqueous milieu. Here we describe a biomimetic surface modification of CNTs using glycosylated polymers designed to mimic natural cell surface mucins. The polymers were end-functionalized with lipid tails for self-assembly on the CNT surface through hydrophobic interactions. Mucin mimic-coated CNTs were soluble in water, resisted non-specific protein binding and bound specifically to biomolecules via receptor-ligand interactions. This strategy for biomimetic surface engineering provides a means to bridge nanomaterials and biological systems.

  14. The Activity of Antimicrobial Surfaces Varies by Testing Protocol Utilized

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Matias D.; Zucchi, Paola C.; Phung, Ann; Leonard, Steven N.; Hirsch, Elizabeth B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Contaminated hospital surfaces are an important source of nosocomial infections. A major obstacle in marketing antimicrobial surfaces is a lack of efficacy data based on standardized testing protocols. Aim We compared the efficacy of multiple testing protocols against several “antimicrobial” film surfaces. Methods Four clinical isolates were used: one Escherichia coli, one Klebsiella pneumoniae, and two Staphylococcus aureus strains. Two industry methods (modified ISO 22196 and ASTM E2149), a “dried droplet”, and a “transfer” method were tested against two commercially available antimicrobial films, one film in development, an untreated control, and a positive (silver) control film. At 2 (only ISO) and 24 hours following inoculation, bacteria were collected from film surfaces and enumerated. Results Compared to untreated films in all protocols, there were no significant differences in recovery on either commercial brand at 2 or 24 hours after inoculation. The silver surface demonstrated significant microbicidal activity (mean loss 4.9 Log10 CFU/ml) in all methods and time points with the exception of 2 hours in the ISO protocol and the transfer method. Using our novel droplet method, no differences between placebo and active surfaces were detected. The surface in development demonstrated variable activity depending on method, organism, and time point. The ISO demonstrated minimal activity at 2 hours but significant activity at 24 hours (mean 4.5 Log10 CFU/ml difference versus placebo). The ASTEM protocol exhibited significant differences in recovery of staphylococci (mean 5 Log10 CFU/ml) but not Gram-negative isolates (10 fold decrease). Minimal activity was observed with this film in the transfer method. Conclusions Varying results between protocols suggested that efficacy of antimicrobial surfaces cannot be easily and reproducibly compared. Clinical use should be considered and further development of representative methods is needed. PMID

  15. How cells tiptoe on adhesive surfaces before sticking.

    PubMed

    Pierres, Anne; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Touchard, Dominique; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-05-15

    Cell membranes are studded with protrusions that were thoroughly analyzed with electron microscopy. However, the nanometer-scale three-dimensional motions generated by cell membranes to fit the topography of foreign surfaces and initiate adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the dynamics of surface deformations displayed by monocytic cells bumping against fibronectin-coated surfaces. We observed membrane undulations with typically 5 nm amplitude and 5-10 s lifetime. Cell membranes behaved as independent units of micrometer size. Cells detected the presence of foreign surfaces at 50 nm separation, resulting in time-dependent amplification of membrane undulations. Molecular contact then ensued with apparent cell-membrane separation of 30-40 nm, and this distance steadily decreased during the following tens of seconds. Contact maturation was associated with in-plane egress of bulky molecules and robust membrane fluctuations. Thus, membrane undulations may be the major determinant of cell sensitivity to substrate topography, outcome of interaction, and initial kinetics of contact extension. PMID:18234815

  16. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    Harrison, in 1914, first recognized that cells respond to physicochemical cues such as substratum topography when he observed that fibroblasts elongated while cultured on spider silk. Recently, techniques developed in the micro-electronics industry have been used to create molds for producing microscaled topographies with various shapes and spatial arrangements. Although these patterning techniques are well-established, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying cell sensing and response to microtopographies. In this work cellular micro-environments with varying surface topographies and chemistries were evaluated with marine organisms and mammalian cells to investigate cellular sensing and response. Biofouling---the accumulation of micro-organisms, plants, and animals on submerged surfaces---is an environmental and economic concern. Engineered topographies, replicated in polydimethylsiloxane elastomer (PDMSe) and functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-dimethacrylate (PEGDMA) hydrogels, were evaluated for inhibition of marine fouling organism attachment. Microtopographies replicated in PDMSe inhibited attachment of the marine bacterium, Cobetia marina up to 99% versus smooth. The average normalized attachment densities of cells of C. marina and zoospores of the green algae Ulva on PDMSe topographies scaled inversely with the Engineered Roughness Index (ERIII), a representation of surface energy. Attachment densities of Ulva from four assays and C. marina from two growth phases to PDMSe surfaces scaled inversely with one equation: ERI II multiplied by the Reynolds number of the organism (Re) (R 2 = 0.77). The same microtopographies created in PDMSe reduced the initial attachment density and attachment strength of cells of the diatoms Navicula incerta and Seminavis robusta compared to smooth PDMSe. The average normalized attachment density of Navicula after exposure to shear stress (48 Pa) was correlated with the contact area between the diatom and a

  17. Activity-driven fluctuations in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, É.; Guo, M.; Gov, N. S.; Visco, P.; Weitz, D. A.; van Wijland, F.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a model for the dynamics of a probe embedded in a living cell, where both thermal fluctuations and nonequilibrium activity coexist. The model is based on a confining harmonic potential describing the elastic cytoskeletal matrix, which undergoes random active hops as a result of the nonequilibrium rearrangements within the cell. We describe the probe's statistics and we bring forth quantities affected by the nonequilibrium activity. We find an excellent agreement between the predictions of our model and experimental results for tracers inside living cells. Finally, we exploit our model to arrive at quantitative predictions for the parameters characterizing nonequilibrium activity, such as the typical time scale of the activity and the amplitude of the active fluctuations.

  18. Dissociation of two signals required for activation of resting B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Julius, M H; von Boehmer, H; Sidman, C L

    1982-01-01

    Cellular interactions involved in the T cell-dependent activation of B cells were analyzed by using lines and clones of helper T cells specific for determinants expressed on the B cell surface. Activation of male antigen-, M locus-, and H-2-specific T cells was shown to support polyclonal Ig production by a population of B cells that did not require T-cell-B-cell interaction for induction/amplification. However, these T cells alone did not activate gradient-purified small (resting) B cells. The activation of small B cells was shown to require not only a signal derived through an antigen-specific T-helper cell-B cell interaction but in addition a second signal that could be provided by anti-Ig antibodies. PMID:6979046

  19. Enhanced cell attachment using a novel cell culture surface presenting functional domains from extracellular matrix proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, M. J.; Phillips, S. R.; Shah, D. S.H.; Athey, D.; Lakey, J. H.

    2008-01-01

    Many factors contribute to the creation and maintenance of a realistic environment for cell growth in vitro, e.g. the consistency of the growth medium, the addition of supplements, and the surface on which the cells grow. The nature of the surface on which cells are cultured plays an important role in their ability to attach, proliferate, migrate and function. Components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) are often used to coat glass or plastic surfaces to enhance cell attachment in vitro. Fragments of ECM molecules can be immobilised on surfaces in order to mimic the effects seen by whole molecules. In this study we evaluate the application of a novel technology for the immobilisation of functional domains of known ECM proteins in a controlled manner on a surface. By examining the adherence of cultured PC12 cells to alternative growth surfaces, we show that surfaces coated with motifs from collagen I, collagen IV, fibronectin and laminin can mimic surfaces coated with the corresponding whole molecules. Furthermore, we show that the adherence of cells can be controlled by modifying the hydropathic properties of the surface to either enhance or inhibit cell attachment. Collectively, these data demonstrate the application of a new technology to enable optimisation of cell growth in the tissue culture laboratory. PMID:19002844

  20. Influence of anode surface chemistry on microbial fuel cell operation.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Cornejo, Jose A; Ista, Linnea; Bretschger, Orianna; Marsili, Enrico; Atanassov, Plamen; Schuler, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified gold anodes are used in single chamber microbial fuel cells for organic removal and electricity generation. Hydrophilic (N(CH3)3(+), OH, COOH) and hydrophobic (CH3) SAMs are examined for their effect on bacterial attachment, current and power output. The different substratum chemistry affects the community composition of the electrochemically active biofilm formed and thus the current and power output. Of the four SAM-modified anodes tested, N(CH3)3(+) results in the shortest start up time (15 days), highest current achieved (225 μA cm(-2)) and highest MFC power density (40 μW cm(-2)), followed by COOH (150 μA cm(-2) and 37 μW cm(-2)) and OH (83 μA cm(-2) and 27 μW cm(-2)) SAMs. Hydrophobic SAM decreases electrochemically active bacteria attachment and anode performance in comparison to hydrophilic SAMs (CH3 modified anodes 7 μA cm(-2) anodic current and 1.2 μW cm(-2) MFC's power density). A consortium of Clostridia and δ-Proteobacteria is found on all the anode surfaces, suggesting a synergistic cooperation under anodic conditions.

  1. Active Acetylcholinesterase Immobilization on a Functionalized Silicon Surface.

    PubMed

    Khaldi, K; Sam, S; Gouget-Laemmel, A C; Henry de Villeneuve, C; Moraillon, A; Ozanam, F; Yang, J; Kermad, A; Ghellai, N; Gabouze, N

    2015-08-01

    In this work, we studied the attachment of active acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme on a silicon substrate as a potential biomarker for the detection of organophosphorous (OP) pesticides. A multistep functionalization strategy was developed on a crystalline silicon surface: a carboxylic acid-terminated monolayer was grafted onto a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface by photochemical hydrosilylation, and then AChE was covalently attached through amide bonds using an activation EDC/NHS process. Each step of the modification was quantitatively characterized by ex-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in attenuated-total-reflection geometry (ATR-FTIR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The kinetics of enzyme immobilization was investigated using in situ real-time infrared spectroscopy. The enzymatic activity of immobilized acetylcholinesterase enzymes was determined with a colorimetric test. The surface concentration of active AChE was estimated to be Γ = 1.72 × 10(10) cm(-2).

  2. Potential Biosignificant Interest and Surface Activity of Efficient Heterocyclic Derivatives.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Refat; Althagafi, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Some functionalized pyridine and fused system derivatives were synthesized using enaminonitrile derivative 5 as a starting material for the reaction, with various reagents under different conditions. Propoxylation of these compounds using different moles of propylene oxide (3, 5 and 7 moles) leads to a novel group of surface active agents. The antimicrobial and surface activities of the synthesized compounds were investigated. Most of the evaluated compounds proved to be active as antibacterial and antifungal agents and showed good surface activity, which makes them suitable for diverse applications such as the manufacturing of emulsifiers, cosmetics, drugs, pesticides, etc. Additionally, biodegradation testing exhibits significant breakdown within six to seven days, and hence, lowers the toxicity to human beings and becomes environmentally friendly.

  3. Studies on cell adhesion and recognition. III. The occurrence of α-mannosidase at the fibroblast cell surface, and its possible role in cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Rauvala, H; Hakomori, S

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of α-mannosidase activity at the surface of hamster embryo (NIL) fibroblasts is indicated by the following findings: (a) When NIL cells were incubated on the glass surfaces on which ovalbumin glycopeptides were covalently linked, a rapid release of free mannose from ovalbumin glycopeptides was observed as evidenced by analysis on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. (b) Cell suspensions as well as intact cell monolayers hydrolyzed rapidly p-nitrophenyl-α-D-mannoside, and the time-course of the hydrolytic cleavage was linear from the moment of mixing of the substrate with the cells. The hydrolysis of the nitrophenyl glycosides of β-D-mannose, α-D-galactose, β-D-galactose, α-L-fucose, β-D-glucose, β-D-N-acetylgalactosamine and β-D-N-acetylglucosamine was negligible or more than ten times lower as compared with the hydolysis of α-D-mannoside. (c) No released or secreted activity of mannosidase could be detected under the conditions used. (d) Studies using known proportions of broken cells in the incubation mixture indicated that more than 90 percent of the mannosidase activity measured was attributable to intact cells and not to broken cells or cell fragments. (e) Hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl-α-D-mannoside by cell monolayers was inhibited, in the order of decreasing inhibitory activity, by yeast mannan, ovalbumin, α-1,4-L-mannonolactone, α-methylmannoside, and mannose-6-phosphate. High inhibitory activity of the mannan polysaccharide and of ovalbumin favored the presence of the mannosidase activity at the cell surface, as these substrates may not penetrate rapidly into the cells. The following findings indicated that the cell surface mannosidase is mediating the cell adhesion based on the recognition of high-mannose-type glycopeptide: (a) Ovalbumin- coated plastic surfaces strongly promoted attachment and spreading of NIL fibroblasts, whereas the same ovalbumin coat did not promote attachment and spreading of some other cell types (BALB/c 3

  4. Molecular analysis of cell surface beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase function during cell migration.

    PubMed Central

    Appeddu, P A; Shur, B D

    1994-01-01

    Despite the identification and characterization of cell surface receptors for the extracellular matrix, it is unknown how their relative expression and cytoskeletal association regulate cell migration. Previous studies have identified beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase; EC 2.4.1.38) on the surface of migrating cells, where it mediates cell migration on basal lamina matrices by associating with the cytoskeleton and binding to N-linked oligosaccharides in the E8 domain of laminin. In this study, the function of GalTase during cell migration was examined directly by analyzing the migration rate of stably transfected cell lines in which the relative level of surface GalTase and its ability to associate with the cytoskeleton were altered. We show here that the cytoskeleton contains a limiting, saturable, number of binding sites for surface GalTase. Furthermore, the rate of cell migration was inversely related to the ability of surface GalTase to associate with the cytoskeleton. Elevating surface GalTase in excess of the number of cytoskeleton-binding sites reduced the rate of cell migration, whereas decreasing the amount of surface GalTase available to bind the cytoskeleton increased migration rates. These results show that the rate of cell migration on basal lamina is directly dependent upon the expression of surface GalTase and the ability of this protein to associate with a limiting number of cytoskeleton-binding sites. Images PMID:8134355

  5. Cell surface differences of Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis exposed with surface markers.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Arturo; Castañón, Guadalupe; Cristóbal-Ramos, Ana Ruth; Hernández-Ramírez, Verónica Ivonne; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2007-12-01

    Differences in the distribution of diverse cell surface coat markers were found between Naegleria fowleri and Naegleria lovaniensis. The presence of carbohydrate-containing components in the cell coat of the two species was detected by selective staining with ruthenium red and alcian blue. Using both markers, N. fowleri presented a thicker deposit than N. lovaniensis. The existence of exposed mannose or glucose residues was revealed by discriminatory agglutination with the plant lectin Concanavalin A. These sugar residues were also visualized at the cell surface of these parasites either by transmission electron microscopy or by fluorescein-tagged Concanavalin A. Using this lectin cap formation was induced only in N. fowleri. The anionic sites on the cell surface detected by means of cationized ferritin were more apparent in N. fowleri. Biotinylation assays confirmed that even though the two amoebae species have some analogous plasma membrane proteins, there is a clear difference in their composition.

  6. Cell and tissue behavior on micro-grooved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2001-11-01

    In this review, we discuss substrates and implant surfaces provided with micrometer-sized groove and ridge patterns. Such "microgrooves" influence cell behavior: the cells align themselves, and migrate guided by the surface grooves. This phenomenon is known as "contact guidance". First, cell structure and cell attachment behavior are described. Then techniques for the production of microgrooves are addressed, and a summary is given of a number of previous in-vitro and in-vivo experiments on this subject. Based on the knowledge of cell movement, we suggest a theory involving the dynamics of fibrous cellular components in the filopodium. Finally, future directions for this type of research, and implications for medical and dental implantology, are addressed.

  7. Cell patterning on polylactic acid through surface-tethered oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toshiki; Arima, Yusuke; Takemoto, Naohiro; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-02-01

    Polylactic acid (PLA) is a candidate material to prepare scaffolds for 3-D tissue regeneration. However, cells do not adhere or proliferate well on the surface of PLA because it is hydrophobic. We report a simple and rapid method for inducing cell adhesion to PLA through DNA hybridization. Single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and to a terminal phospholipid (ssDNA-PEG-lipid) was used for cell surface modification. Through DNA hybridization, modified cells were able to attach to PLA surfaces modified with complementary sequence (ssDNA'). Different cell types can be attached to PLA fibers and films in a spatially controlled manner by using ssDNAs with different sequences. In addition, they proliferate well in a culture medium supplemented with fetal bovine serum. The coexisting modes of cell adhesion through DNA hybridization and natural cytoskeletal adhesion machinery revealed no serious effects on cell growth. The combination of a 3-D scaffold made of PLA and cell immobilization on the PLA scaffold through DNA hybridization will be useful for the preparation of 3-D tissue and organs.

  8. Endocytosis of cell surface material mediates cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Dhonukshe, Pankaj; Baluska, Frantisek; Schlicht, Markus; Hlavacka, Andrej; Samaj, Jozef; Friml, Jirí; Gadella, Theodorus W J

    2006-01-01

    Dividing plant cells perform a remarkable task of building a new cell wall within the cytoplasm in a few minutes. A long-standing paradigm claims that this primordial cell wall, known as the cell plate, is generated by delivery of newly synthesized material from Golgi apparatus-originated secretory vesicles. Here, we show that, in diverse plant species, cell surface material, including plasma membrane proteins, cell wall components, and exogenously applied endocytic tracers, is rapidly delivered to the forming cell plate. Importantly, this occurs even when de novo protein synthesis is blocked. In addition, cytokinesis-specific syntaxin KNOLLE as well as plasma membrane (PM) resident proteins localize to endosomes that fuse to initiate the cell plate. The rate of endocytosis is strongly enhanced during cell plate formation, and its genetic or pharmacological inhibition leads to cytokinesis defects. Our results reveal that endocytic delivery of cell surface material significantly contributes to cell plate formation during plant cytokinesis.

  9. Single Cell Analysis of Transcriptional Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Joo, Lucy M.; LeRoy, Gary; Janicki, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene activation is thought to occur through a series of temporally defined regulatory steps. However, this process has not been completely evaluated in single living mammalian cells. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the timing and coordination of gene activation events, we tracked the recruitment of GCN5 (histone acetyltransferase), RNA polymerase II, Brd2 and Brd4 (acetyl-lysine binding proteins), in relation to a VP16-transcriptional activator, to a transcription site that can be visualized in single living cells. All accumulated rapidly with the VP16 activator as did the transcribed RNA. RNA was also detected at significantly more transcription sites in cells expressing the VP16-activator compared to a p53-activator. After α-amanitin pre-treatment, the VP16-activator, GCN5, and Brd2 are still recruited to the transcription site but the chromatin does not decondense. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that a strong activator can rapidly overcome the condensed chromatin structure of an inactive transcription site and supercede the expected requirement for regulatory events to proceed in a temporally defined order. Additionally, activator strength determines the number of cells in which transcription is induced as well as the extent of chromatin decondensation. As chromatin decondensation is significantly reduced after α-amanitin pre-treatment, despite the recruitment of transcriptional activation factors, this provides further evidence that transcription drives large-scale chromatin decondensation. PMID:20422051

  10. Construction and characterization of a thermostable whole-cell chitinolytic enzyme using yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobo; Jin, Xiaobao; Lu, Xuemei; Chu, Fujiang; Shen, Juan; Ma, Yan; Liu, Manyu; Zhu, Jiayong

    2014-10-01

    To develop a novel yeast whole-cell biocatalyst by yeast surface display technology that can hydrolyze chitin, the chitinaseC gene from Serratia marcescens AS1.1652 strain was cloned and subcloned into the yeast surface display plasmid pYD1, and the recombinant plasmid pYD1/SmchiC was electroporated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae EBY100 cell. Aga2p-SmChiC fusion protein was expressed and anchored on the yeast cell surface by induction with galactose, which was verified by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blotting. The chitinolytic activity of the yeast whole-cell biocatalyst or partially purified enzyme was detected by agar plate clear zone test, SDS-PAGE zymography and dinitrosalicylic acid method. The results showed that the chitinaseC gene from S. marcescens AS1.1652 strain was successfully cloned and expressed on the yeast cell surface, Aga2p-SmChiC fusion protein with molecular weight (67 kDa) was determined. Tests on the effect of temperature and pH on enzyme activity and stability revealed that the yeast whole-cell biocatalyst and partially purified enzyme possessed both thermal stability and activity, and even maintained some activity under acidic and weakly alkaline conditions. The optimum reaction temperature and pH value were set at 52 °C and 5.0, respectively. Yeast surface display technology succeeded in preparing a yeast whole-cell biocatalyst with chitinolytic activity, and the utilization of chitin could benefit from this process of enzyme preparation.

  11. Reversed cell imprinting, AFM imaging and adhesion analyses of cells on patterned surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiongtu; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Li, Xin; Wang, Li; Ma, Xueming; Chen, Yong

    2010-05-01

    Cell adhesion and motility depend strongly on the interactions between cells and cell culture substratum. To observe the cell morphology at the interface between cells and artificial substratum or patterned surfaces, we have developed a technique named reversed cell imprinting. After culture and chemical fixation of the cells on a patterned hole array, a liquid polymer was poured on and UV cured, allowing taking off the cell-polymer assembly for a direct observation of the underside cell surface using atomic force microscopy. As expected, we observed local deformation of the cell membrane in the hole area with a penetration depth strongly dependent on the size and depth of the hole as well as the culture time. Quantitative analyses of Hela cells on patterned surfaces of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) revealed that the penetration was also position dependent over the cell attachment area due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the membrane stress. With the increase of the culture time, the penetration depth was reduced, in a close correlation with the increase of the cell spreading area. Nevertheless, both cell seeding and adhesion efficiency on high density hole arrays could be significantly increased comparing to that on a smooth surface. Patterned substrates are increasingly required to produce and interrogate new biomaterials for therapeutic benefit. Overall, this work suggests a strategy to endow conventional imaging methods with added functionality to enable easy observation of the underside cell morphology on topographic patterns. PMID:20390138

  12. Quantum Efficiency Loss after PID Stress: Wavelength Dependence on Cell Surface and Cell Edge

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Jaewon; Bowden, Stuart; TamizhMani, GovindaSamy; Hacke, Peter

    2015-06-14

    It is known that the potential induced degradation (PID) stress of conventional p-base solar cells affects power, shunt resistance, junction recombination, and quantum efficiency (QE). One of the primary solutions to address the PID issue is a modification of chemical and physical properties of antireflection coating (ARC) on the cell surface. Depending on the edge isolation method used during cell processing, the ARC layer near the edges may be uniformly or non-uniformly damaged. Therefore, the pathway for sodium migration from glass to the cell junction could be either through all of the ARC surface if surface and edge ARC have low quality or through the cell edge if surface ARC has high quality but edge ARC is defective due to certain edge isolation process. In this study, two PID susceptible cells from two different manufacturers have been investigated. The QE measurements of these cells before and after PID stress were performed at both surface and edge. We observed the wavelength dependent QE loss only in the first manufacturer's cell but not in the second manufacturer's cell. The first manufacturer's cell appeared to have low quality ARC whereas the second manufacturer's cell appeared to have high quality ARC with defective edge. To rapidly screen a large number of cells for PID stress testing, a new but simple test setup that does not require laminated cell coupon has been developed and is used in this investigation.

  13. Micropatterned Azopolymer Surfaces Modulate Cell Mechanics and Cytoskeleton Structure.

    PubMed

    Rianna, Carmela; Ventre, Maurizio; Cavalli, Silvia; Radmacher, Manfred; Netti, Paolo A

    2015-09-30

    Physical and chemical characteristics of materials are important regulators of cell behavior. In particular, cell elasticity is a fundamental parameter that reflects the state of a cell. Surface topography finely modulates cell fate and function via adhesion mediated signaling and cytoskeleton generated forces. However, how topographies alter cell mechanics is still unclear. In this work we have analyzed the mechanical properties of peripheral and nuclear regions of NIH-3T3 cells on azopolymer substrates with different topographic patterns. Micrometer scale patterns in the form of parallel ridges or square lattices of surface elevations were encoded on light responsive azopolymer films by means of contactless optical methods. Cell mechanics was investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Cells and consequently the cell cytoskeleton were oriented along the linear patterns affecting cytoskeletal structures, e.g., formation of actin stress fibers. Our data demonstrate that topographic substrate patterns are recognized by cells and mechanical information is transferred by the cytoskeleton. Furthermore, cytoskeleton generated forces deform the nucleus, changing its morphology that appears to be related to different mechanical properties in the nuclear region.

  14. Variation in human cancer cell external phosphatidylserine is regulated by flippase activity and intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Vallabhapurapu, Subrahmanya D.; Blanco, Víctor M.; Sulaiman, Mahaboob K.; Vallabhapurapu, Swarajya Lakshmi; Chu, Zhengtao; Franco, Robert S.; Qi, Xiaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Viable cancer cells expose elevated levels of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the exoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. However, the mechanisms leading to elevated PS exposure in viable cancer cells have not been defined. We previously showed that externalized PS may be used to monitor, target and kill tumor cells. In addition, PS on tumor cells is recognized by macrophages and has implications in antitumor immunity. Therefore, it is important to understand the molecular details of PS exposure on cancer cells in order to improve therapeutic targeting. Here we explored the mechanisms regulating the surface PS exposure in human cancer cells and found that differential flippase activity and intracellular calcium are the major regulators of surface PS exposure in viable human cancer cells. In general, cancer cell lines with high surface PS exhibited low flippase activity and high intracellular calcium, whereas cancer cells with low surface PS exhibited high flippase activity and low intracellular calcium. High surface PS cancer cells also had higher total cellular PS than low surface PS cells. Together, our results indicate that the amount of external PS in cancer cells is regulated by calcium dependent flippase activity and may also be influenced by total cellular PS. PMID:26462157

  15. Efficient Killing of High Risk Neuroblastoma Using Natural Killer Cells Activated by Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cordeau, Martine; Belounis, Assila; Lelaidier, Martin; Cordeiro, Paulo; Sartelet, Hervé; Duval, Michel

    2016-01-01

    High-risk neuroblastoma (NB) remains a major therapeutic challenge despite the recent advent of disialoganglioside (GD2)-antibody treatment combined with interleukin (IL)-2 and granulocyte monocyte-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Indeed, more than one third of the patients still die from this disease. Here, we developed a novel approach to improve the current anti-GD2 immunotherapy based on NK cell stimulation using toll-like receptor (TLR)-activated plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). We demonstrated that this strategy led to the efficient killing of NB cells. When the expression of GD2 was heterogeneous on NB cells, the combination of pDC-mediated NK-cell activation and anti-GD2 treatment significantly increased the cytotoxicity of NK cells against NB cells. Activation by pDCs led to a unique NK-cell phenotype characterized by increased surface expression of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), with increased expression of CD69 on CD56dim cytotoxic cells, and strong interferon-γ production. Additionally, NB-cell killing was mediated by the TRAIL death-receptor pathway, as well as by the release of cytolytic granules via the DNAX accessory molecule 1 pathway. NK-cell activation and lytic activity against NB was independent of cell contact, depended upon type I IFN produced by TLR-9-activated pDCs, but was not reproduced by IFN-α stimulation alone. Collectively, these results highlighted the therapeutic potential of activated pDCs for patients with high-risk NB. PMID:27716850

  16. Effects of surface viscoelasticity on cellular responses of endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Motahare-Sadat; Katbab, Ali Asghar

    2014-01-01

    Background: One area of nanoscience deals with nanoscopic interactions between nanostructured materials and biological systems. To elucidate the effects of the substrate surface morphology and viscoelasticity on cell proliferation, fractal analysis was performed on endothelial cells cultured on nanocomposite samples based on silicone rubber (SR) and various concentrations of organomodified nanoclay (OC). Methods: The nanoclay/SR ratio was tailored to enhance cell behavior via changes in sample substrate surface roughness and viscoelasticity. Results: Surface roughness of the cured SR filled with negatively-charged nanosilicate layers had a greater effect than elasticity on cell growth. The surface roughness of SR nanocomposite samples increased with increasing the OC content, leading to enhanced cell growth and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. This was consistent with the decrease in SR segmental motions and damping factor as the primary viscoelastic parameters by the nanosilicate layers with increasing clay concentrations. Conclusions: The inclusion of clay nanolayers affected the growth and behavior of endothelial cells on microtextured SR. PMID:26989733

  17. Synthesis, Surface Active Properties and Cytotoxicity of Sodium N-Acyl Prolines.

    PubMed

    Sreenu, Madhumanchi; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari; Sujitha, Pombala; Kumar, Chityal Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    Sodium N-acyl prolines (NaNAPro) were synthesized using mixture of fatty acids obtained from coconut, palm, karanja, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower oils via Schotten-Baumann reaction in 58-75% yields to study the synergetic effect of mixture of hydrophobic fatty acyl functionalities like saturation, unsaturation and cyclopropene fatty acids with different chain lengths and aliphatic hetero cyclic proline head group on their surface and cytotoxicity activities. The products were characterized by chromatographic and spectral techniques. The synthesized products were evaluated for their surface active properties such as surface tension, wetting power, foaming characteristics, emulsion stability, calcium tolerance, critical micelle concentration (CMC) and thermodynamic properties. The results revealed that all the products exhibited superior surface active properties like CMC, calcium tolerance and emulsion stability as compared to the standard surfactant, sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS). In addition, palm, Sterculia foetida and high oleic sunflower fatty N-acyl prolines exhibited promising cytotoxicity against different tumor cell lines.

  18. Selective bactericidal activity of nanopatterned superhydrophobic cicada Psaltoda claripennis wing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Jafar; Webb, Hayden K; Truong, Vi Khanh; Pogodin, Sergey; Baulin, Vladimir A; Watson, Gregory S; Watson, Jolanta A; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2013-10-01

    The nanopattern on the surface of Clanger cicada (Psaltoda claripennis) wings represents the first example of a new class of biomaterials that can kill bacteria on contact based solely on its physical surface structure. As such, they provide a model for the development of novel functional surfaces that possess an increased resistance to bacterial contamination and infection. Their effectiveness against a wide spectrum of bacteria, however, is yet to be established. Here, the bactericidal properties of the wings were tested against several bacterial species, possessing a range of combinations of morphology and cell wall type. The tested species were primarily pathogens, and included Bacillus subtilis, Branhamella catarrhalis, Escherichia coli, Planococcus maritimus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Staphylococcus aureus. The wings were found to consistently kill Gram-negative cells (i.e., B. catarrhalis, E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and P. fluorescens), while Gram-positive cells (B. subtilis, P. maritimus, and S. aureus) remained resistant. The morphology of the cells did not appear to play any role in determining cell susceptibility. The bactericidal activity of the wing was also found to be quite efficient; 6.1 ± 1.5 × 10(6) P. aeruginosa cells in suspension were inactivated per square centimeter of wing surface after 30-min incubation. These findings demonstrate the potential for the development of selective bactericidal surfaces incorporating cicada wing nanopatterns into the design.

  19. Signals from the surface modulate differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells through glycosaminoglycans and integrins.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, Paul J; Klim, Joseph R; Hernandez, Brandon A; Koonce, Chad H; Kamp, Timothy J; Kiessling, Laura L

    2014-12-23

    The fate decisions of human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells are governed by soluble and insoluble signals from the microenvironment. Many hPS cell differentiation protocols use Matrigel, a complex and undefined substrate that engages multiple adhesion and signaling receptors. Using defined surfaces programmed to engage specific cell-surface ligands (i.e., glycosaminoglycans and integrins), the contribution of specific matrix signals can be dissected. For ectoderm and motor neuron differentiation, peptide-modified surfaces that can engage both glycosaminoglycans and integrins are effective. In contrast, surfaces that interact selectively with glycosaminoglycans are superior to Matrigel in promoting hPS cell differentiation to definitive endoderm and mesoderm. The modular surfaces were used to elucidate the signaling pathways underlying these differences. Matrigel promotes integrin signaling, which in turn inhibits mesendoderm differentiation. The data indicate that integrin-activating surfaces stimulate Akt signaling via integrin-linked kinase (ILK), which is antagonistic to endoderm differentiation. The ability to attribute cellular responses to specific interactions between the cell and the substrate offers new opportunities for revealing and controlling the pathways governing cell fate.

  20. Surface chemical functionalities affect the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xujie; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in vitro. Plasma polymerized films rich in amine (sbnd NH2), carboxyl (sbnd COOH) and methyl (sbnd CH3), were generated on hydroxyapatite (HAp) substrates. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ability of different substrates to absorb proteins was evaluated. The results showed that substrates modified with hydrophilic functional group (sbnd COOH and sbnd NH2) can absorb more proteins than these modified with more hydrophobic functional group (sbnd CH3). The behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on different substrates was investigated in vitro: cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis was used to characterize cell proliferation, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis was used to characterize cell morphology and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis was used to account for differentiation. The results of this study demonstrated that the sbnd NH2 modified surfaces encourage osteogenic differentiation; the sbnd COOH modified surfaces promote cell adhesion and spreading and the sbnd CH3 modified surfaces have the lowest ability to induce osteogenic differentiation. These findings confirmed that the surface chemical states of biomaterials can affect the behavior of hASCs in vitro.

  1. Photodynamic induction of a bacterial cell surface polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Hoober, J K

    1977-01-01

    The photodynamic action of several dyes on cells of a bacterium, tentatively identified as a species of Arthrobacter, resulted in remarkable stimulation of synthesis of a polypeptide 21,000 daltons in mass. This polypeptide resides on the cell surface and can be solubilized by sodium dodecyl sulfate without lysis of the cells. Chlorophyllin and rose bengal are effective in inducing synthesis of the polypeptide in proportion to their ability to sensitize the photooxidation of histidine. Etiolated cells of the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii y-1 excrete a substance into the medium that also sensitized the photoinduction of the polypeptide. Images PMID:885841

  2. Indium phosphide negative electron affinity photocathodes: Surface cleaning and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yun

    InP(100) is a very important semi-conductor for many applications. When activated by Cs and oxygen, the InP surface achieves the state of Negative Electron Affinity (NEA) making the Cs+O/InP system a very efficient electron source. Despite many years of study, the chemical cleaning and activation of InP are still not well understood. In our work, we have established an understanding of the basic physics and chemistry for the chemical cleaning and activation of the InP(100) surface. Synchrotron Radiation Photoelectron Spectroscopy is the main technique used in this study because of its high surface sensitivity and ability to identify chemical species present on the surface at each stage of our process. A clean, stoichiometric InP(100) surface is crucial for obtaining high performance of NEA photocathodes. Therefore, the first part of our study focused on the chemical cleaning of InP(100). We found that hydrogen peroxide based solutions alone, originally developed to clean GaAs(100) surfaces and widely used for InP(100), do not result in clean InP(I00) surfaces because oxide is left on the surface. A second cleaning step, which uses acid solutions like HCl or H2SO4, can remove all the oxide and leave a 0.4 ML protective layer of elemental phosphorous on the surface. The elemental phosphorous can be removed by annealing at 330°C and a clean InP(100) surface can be obtained. Cs deposition on InP(100) surface shows clear charge transfer from the Cs ad-atoms to the substrate. When the Cs/InP(100) surface is dosed with oxygen, the charge transfer from the Cs to substrate is reduced and substrate is oxidized. The activation of InP as a NEA photocathode is carried out by an alternating series of steps consisting of Cs deposition and Cs+O co-deposition. Two types of oxygen are found after activation. The first is dissociated oxygen and the other is a di-oxygen species (peroxide or superoxide). The decay of quantum-yield with time and with annealing is studied and changes in

  3. Surface properties and early murine pre-osteoblastic cell responses of phosphoric acid modified titanium surface

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Sawangmake, Chenphop; Ruangchainicom, Nanticha; Wutikornwipak, Pavitra; Kantukiti, Panisa; Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Pavasant, Prasit

    2015-01-01

    Aims The present study investigated the surface properties and murine pre-osteoblast cell (MC3T3-E1) responses of phosphoric acid (H3PO4) treated commercially pure titanium. Methods Titanium discs were treated with various concentration of H3PO4 (5%, 10%, and 20%; v/v) at 90 °C for 30 min. Surface properties were evaluated by profilometer, contact angle meter, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-rays. MC3T3-E1 attachment and spreading were evaluated by SEM and phalloidin immunohistochemistry staining. Results Surface roughness and wettability were not statistically difference among all experimental and control groups. Phosphate and oxygen were detected on H3PO4 treated surfaces. At 20 min, cell attachment was significantly higher in 10% and 20% H3PO4 treated groups compared to the control. Cells exhibited orientated-cytoskeleton fibers on 20% H3PO4 modified titanium surface. Though, there was no difference in cell spreading stage among all treatment groups. Conclusion H3PO4 treatment on titanium may influence early cell response, particularly on attachment and spreading. PMID:26937362

  4. Bacterial Cell Surface Display of a Multifunctional Cellulolytic Enzyme Screened from a Bovine Rumen Metagenomic Resource.

    PubMed

    Ko, Kyong-Cheol; Lee, Binna; Cheong, Dae-Eun; Han, Yunjon; Choi, Jong Hyun; Song, Jae Jun

    2015-11-01

    A cell surface display system for heterologous expression of the multifunctional cellulase, CelEx-BR12, in Escherichia coli was developed using truncated E. coli outer membrane protein C (OmpC) as an anchor motif. Cell surface expression of CelEx-BR12 cellulase in E. coli harboring OmpC-fused CelEx-BR12, designated MC4100 (pTOCBR12), was confirmed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and analysis of outer membrane fractions by western blotting, which verified the expected molecular mass of OmpC-fused CelEx-BR12 (~72 kDa). Functional evidence for exocellulase activity was provided by enzymatic assays of whole cells and outer membrane protein fractions from E. coli MC4100 (pTOCBR12). The stability of E. coli MC4100 (pTOCBR12) cellulase activity was tested by carrying out repeated reaction cycles, which demonstrated the reusability of recombinant cells. Finally, we showed that recombinant E. coli cells displaying the CelEx-BR12 enzyme on the cell surface were capable of growth using carboxymethyl cellulose as the sole carbon source.

  5. Physical Features of Intracellular Proteins that Moonlight on the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Amblee, Vaishak; Jeffery, Constance J.

    2015-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins comprise a subset of multifunctional proteins that perform two or more biochemical functions that are not due to gene fusions, multiple splice variants, proteolytic fragments, or promiscuous enzyme activities. The project described herein focuses on a sub-set of moonlighting proteins that have a canonical biochemical function inside the cell and perform a second biochemical function on the cell surface in at least one species. The goal of this project is to consider the biophysical features of these moonlighting proteins to determine whether they have shared characteristics or defining features that might suggest why these particular proteins were adopted for a second function on the cell surface, or if these proteins resemble typical intracellular proteins. The latter might suggest that many other normally intracellular proteins found on the cell surface might also be moonlighting in this fashion. We have identified 30 types of proteins that have different functions inside the cell and on the cell surface. Some of these proteins are found to moonlight on the surface of multiple species, sometimes with different extracellular functions in different species, so there are a total of 98 proteins in the study set. Although a variety of intracellular proteins (enzymes, chaperones, etc.) are observed to be re-used on the cell surface, for the most part, these proteins were found to have physical characteristics typical of intracellular proteins. Many other intracellular proteins have also been found on the surface of bacterial pathogens and other organisms in proteomics experiments. It is quite possible that many of those proteins also have a moonlighting function on the cell surface. The increasing number and variety of known moonlighting proteins suggest that there may be more moonlighting proteins than previously thought, and moonlighting might be a common feature of many more proteins. PMID:26110848

  6. Enhanced cell colonization of collagen scaffold by ultraviolet/ozone surface processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaozong; McKenna, Fiona-Mairead; Liang, He; Johnstone, Alan; Abel, Eric W

    2010-12-01

    Both physical and chemical crosslinking methods have been shown to be effective in improving the biological stability and mechanical properties of porous collagen scaffolds. However, the wetting of the collagen fibril surface by a culture medium is reduced and it is difficult for the medium to diffuse into the 3D structure of a porous collagen scaffold. This article reports a strategy for the surface processing of crosslinked collagen scaffolds by an integrated ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing technique. Ultraviolet/ozone perfuse processing improved surface wettability for both the exterior and interior surfaces of the porous 3D collagen scaffold. This leads to a significant improvement in the scaffolds ability to take up water without compromising the bulk biological stability and mechanical properties. In vitro evaluation using mesenchymal stem cell demonstrated that surface processing enhanced cell colonization of the scaffolds, cells could migrate deep into the structure of the scaffolds, and significantly higher levels of cell proliferation were achieved. In contrast, the cells were unable to migrate deep into the scaffolds, and most of the cells that survived were observed only in the top seeding layer resulting in a low level of cell activity in the unprocessed scaffolds.

  7. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Marino, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein “spots” were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  8. Investigation of the Cell Surface Proteome of Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jimin; Menicanin, Danijela; Zilm, Peter S; Marino, Victor; Bartold, P Mark; Gronthos, Stan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the cell surface proteome of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSC) compared to human fibroblasts. Cell surface proteins were prelabelled with CyDye before processing to extract the membrane lysates, which were separated using 2D electrophoresis. Selected differentially expressed protein "spots" were identified using Mass spectrometry. Four proteins were selected for validation: CD73, CD90, Annexin A2, and sphingosine kinase 1 previously associated with mesenchymal stem cells. Flow cytometric analysis found that CD73 and CD90 were highly expressed by human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts but not by keratinocytes, indicating that these antigens could be used as potential markers for distinguishing between mesenchymal cells and epithelial cell populations. Annexin A2 was also found to be expressed at low copy number on the cell surface of human PDLSC and gingival fibroblasts, while human keratinocytes lacked any cell surface expression of Annexin A2. In contrast, sphingosine kinase 1 expression was detected in all the cell types examined using immunocytochemical analysis. These proteomic studies form the foundation to further define the cell surface protein expression profile of PDLSC in order to better characterise this cell population and help develop novel strategies for the purification of this stem cell population. PMID:27579043

  9. Pyocyanin facilitates extracellular DNA binding to Pseudomonas aeruginosa influencing cell surface properties and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Das, Theerthankar; Kutty, Samuel K; Kumar, Naresh; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    Pyocyanin is an electrochemically active metabolite produced by the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It is a recognized virulence factor and is involved in a variety of significant biological activities including gene expression, maintaining fitness of bacterial cells and biofilm formation. It is also recognized as an electron shuttle for bacterial respiration and as an antibacterial and antifungal agent. eDNA has also been demonstrated to be a major component in establishing P. aeruginosa biofilms. In this study we discovered that production of pyocyanin influences the binding of eDNA to P. aeruginosa PA14 cells, mediated through intercalation of pyocyanin with eDNA. P. aeruginosa cell surface properties including cell size (hydrodynamic diameter), hydrophobicity and attractive surface energies were influenced by eDNA in the presence of pyocyanin, affecting physico-chemical interactions and promoting aggregation. A ΔphzA-G PA14 mutant, deficient in pyocynain production, could not bind with eDNA resulting in a reduction in hydrodynamic diameter, a decrease in hydrophobicity, repulsive physico-chemical interactions and reduction in aggregation in comparison to the wildtype strain. Removal of eDNA by DNase I treatment on the PA14 wildtype strain resulted in significant reduction in aggregation, cell surface hydrophobicity and size and an increase in repulsive physico-chemical interactions, similar to the level of the ΔphzA-G mutant. The cell surface properties of the ΔphzA-G mutant were not affected by DNase I treatment. Based on these findings we propose that pyocyanin intercalation with eDNA promotes cell-to-cell interactions in P. aeruginosa cells by influencing their cell surface properties and physico-chemical interactions. PMID:23505483

  10. Cell surface engineering of microorganisms towards adsorption of heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Li, Peng-Song; Tao, Hu-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Heavy metal contamination has become a worldwide environmental concern due to its toxicity, non-degradability and food-chain bioaccumulation. Conventional physical and chemical treatment methods for heavy metal removal have disadvantages such as cost-intensiveness, incomplete removal, secondary pollution and the lack of metal specificity. Microbial biomass-based biosorption is one of the approaches gaining increasing attention because it is effective, cheap, and environmental friendly and can work well at low concentrations. To enhance the adsorption properties of microbial cells to heavy metal ions, the cell surface display of various metal-binding proteins/peptides have been performed using a cell surface engineering approach. The surface engineering of Gram-negative bacteria, Gram-positive bacteria and yeast towards the adsorption of heavy metals are reviewed in this article. The problems and future perspectives of this technology are discussed.

  11. Surface complexation of aluminum on isolated fish gill cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, K.J. Campbell, G.C.; Bertsch, P.M.; Jagoe, C.H.

    1993-06-01

    Cells from the gills of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were isolated and exposed to dilute solutions of Al, Al in the presence of fluoride, or Al plus dissolved organic matter (DOM) to determine the cells` metal binding potential in an acidic medium. Microelectrophoresis was employed to monitor the extent of aluminum sorption to cells in the presence of added ligand. In the absence of Al, the gill cells exhibit an appreciable negative charge; Al binding to the cell surface increases the electric potential at the shear plane and leads to a reduction in the cell`s (negative) electrophoretic mobility. In the presence of both Al and F, aluminum complexation at the gill surface is only marginally reduced; the formation of a mixed ligand complex, [F-Al-L-cell], is proposed to account for the observed results. The presence of such ternary complexes was subsequently verified by {sup 19}F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by potentiometry. Addition of DOM increased the negative electrophoretic mobility of the isolated gill cells both in the presence and absence of aluminum (7.4 {mu}M). 45 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. CELL SURFACE ANTIGENS OF A MOUSE TESTICULAR TERATOMA

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Linda R.; Edidin, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Rabbit antisera to a mouse testicular teratoma, absorbed with normal mouse tissues, react by immunofluorescence with plasma membrane antigens of a variety of transplantable mouse tumor cells and transformed fibroblast cell lines including Clone 1D, SV-40-3T3, and 3T12. Trypsin treatment of cells of "normal" lines, 3T3 and FR-SV-3T3, uncovers reactivity on these as well. Early passage mouse embryo fibroblast cell cultures do not react even after trypsinization. By cross-absorbtion studies, the anti-teratoma serum appears to react with an antigen common to most tumor cells investigated thus far. When this antigen on Clone 1D cells is "capped," H-2 antigens collect with the teratoma antigens in the cap indicating a physical association between the molecules. Molecules specified by both the H-2D and H-2K regions are bound to the teratoma antigens in the Clone 1D plasma membrane. This antigen is also found in soluble tumor cell fractions where it is believed to be free of H-2. A second cell surface antigen defined by anti-teratoma serum is expressed only by hepatoma and teratoma itself. This second antigen is apparently a secretory product of teratoma cells. A third surface antigen defined by anti-teratoma serum appears to be specific for the teratoma. PMID:4365513

  13. Active oxygen and cell death in cereal aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Fath, Angelika; Bethke, Paul; Beligni, Veronica; Jones, Russell

    2002-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue whose function is regulated by gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA). Aleurone cells lack functional chloroplasts, thus excluding photosynthesis as a source of active oxygen species (AOS) in cell death. Incubation of barley aleurone layers or protoplasts in GA initiated the cell death programme, but incubation in ABA delays programmed cell death (PCD). Light, especially blue and UV-A light, and H(2)O(2) accelerate PCD of GA-treated aleurone cells, but ABA-treated aleurone cells are refractory to light and H(2)O(2) and are not killed. It was shown that light elevated intracellular H(2)O(2), and that the rise in H(2)O(2) was greater in GA-treated cells compared to cells in ABA. Experiments with antioxidants show that PCD in aleurone is probably regulated by AOS. The sensitivity of GA-treated aleurone to light and H(2)O(2) is a result of lowered amounts of enzymes that metabolize AOS. mRNAs encoding catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase are all reduced during 6-18 h of incubation in GA, but these mRNAs were present in higher amounts in cells incubated in ABA. The amounts of protein and enzyme activities encoded by these mRNAs were also dramatically reduced in GA-treated cells. Aleurone cells store and metabolize neutral lipids via the glyoxylate cycle in response to GA, and glyoxysomes are one potential source of AOS in the GA-treated cells. Mitochondria are another potential source of AOS in GA-treated cells. AOS generated by these organelles bring about membrane rupture and cell death.

  14. Precise manipulation of cell behaviors on surfaces for construction of tissue/organs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2014-12-01

    The use of micro/nanotechnology has become an indispensable strategy to manipulating cell microenvironments. By employing key elements of soft lithographical technologies including self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), microcontact printing (μCP), and microfluidic pattering (μFP) and a number of switchable surfaces such as electrochemical active, photosensitive, and thermosensitive surfaces, scientists can control the adhesion, proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. By combining essential in vivo conditions, various physical or pathological processes such as cell-cell interaction in wound healing and tumor metastasis could be studied on well-defined surfaces and interfaces. By integrating key elements in live tissues, in vitro models mimicking basic structure and function of vital organs such as lung, heart, blood vessel, liver, kidney, and brain have been developed and greatly increased our knowledge of these important life processes. In this review, we will focus on the recent development of these interfacial methods and their application in fundamental biology research.

  15. Enhanced surface exchange activity and electrode performance of (La2-2xSr2x)(Ni1-xMnx)O4+δ cathode for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyuan; Guan, Bo; Yan, Jianhua; Zhang, Nan; Zhang, Xinxin; Liu, Xingbo

    2016-06-01

    Surface exchange kinetics of Ruddlesden-Popper (R-P) phase lanthanum nickelates upon Mn doping as an intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs) cathode is investigated for the first time in this communication. To promote the exchange rate in oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on nickelates, Mn is partially substituted for Ni. The oxygen exchange resistance is accurately measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with dense thin layer cathode. It is found that Mn substantially promotes the surface kinetics; a surface exchange coefficient (k) of 1.57 × 10-6 cm/s is obtained at 700 °C for La1.8Sr0.2Ni0.9Mn0.1O4+δ (Sr20Mn10), ∼80% higher than that of the undoped La2NiO4+δ (LNO). To our best knowledge, such coefficient is the highest values among the currently available R-P phase IT-SOFC cathodes. The corresponding polarization resistances (Rp) are evaluated on porous electrodes. Rp for LNO is 0.74 Ωcm2 at 750 °C, but decreases significantly to 0.42 Ωcm2 for Sr20Mn10 which is remarkably improved compared to the reported values in the literature for La2MO4+δ materials (M = transition metal). Those promising results demonstrate that Mn-doped LNO is a new excellent cathode material for IT-SOFC.

  16. Apoptotic epithelial cells control the abundance of Treg cells at barrier surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi-Oda, Chigusa; Udayanga, Kankanam Gamage Sanath; Nakamura, Yoshiyuki; Nakazawa, Yuta; Totsuka, Naoya; Miki, Haruka; Iino, Shuichi; Tahara-Hanaoka, Satoko; Honda, Shin-ichiro; Shibuya, Kazuko; Shibuya, Akira

    2016-04-01

    Epithelial tissues continually undergo apoptosis. Commensal organisms that inhabit the epithelium influence tissue homeostasis, in which regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have a central role. However, the physiological importance of epithelial cell apoptosis and how the number of Treg cells is regulated are both incompletely understood. Here we found that apoptotic epithelial cells negatively regulated the commensal-stimulated proliferation of Treg cells. Gut commensals stimulated CX3CR1(+)CD103(-)CD11b(+) dendritic cells (DCs) to produce interferon-β (IFN-β), which augmented the proliferation of Treg cells in the intestine. Conversely, phosphatidylserine exposed on apoptotic epithelial cells suppressed IFN-β production by the DCs via inhibitory signaling mediated by the cell-surface glycoprotein CD300a and thus suppressed Treg cell proliferation. Our findings reveal a regulatory role for apoptotic epithelial cells in maintaining the number of Treg cell and tissue homeostasis. PMID:26855029

  17. Endothelial cells grown on thin polyelectrolyte mutlilayered films: an evaluation of a new versatile surface modification.

    PubMed

    Boura, C; Menu, P; Payan, E; Picart, C; Voegel, J C; Muller, S; Stoltz, J F

    2003-09-01

    Endothelial cell seeding constitutes an appreciated method to improve blood compatibility of small-diameter vascular grafts. In this study, we report the development of a simple innovative technique based on multilayered polyelectrolyte films as cell adhesive substrates. Polyelectrolyte multilayered films ending by poly(sodium-4-styrenesulfonate)/poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PSS/PAH) or poly(L-glutamic acid)/poly(D-lysine) (PGA/PDL) could enhance cell adhesion by modification of the physico-chemical properties of the surface. The biological responses of human umbilical vein endothelial cells seeded on the polyelectrolyte multilayer films, on PDL or PAH monolayers, and on control surfaces, were evaluated in terms of initial attachment, growth, cellular metabolic activity, endothelial phenotype, and adhesion. The results showed that polyelectrolyte multilayers neither induce cytotoxic effects nor alter the phenotype of the endothelial cells. The polyelectrolyte multilayered films enhanced initial cell attachment as compared to the polyelectrolyte monolayer. Cell growth observed on the films was similar to that on TCPS. Among the different coating tested, the film ending by PSS/PAH exhibited an excellent cellular biocompatibility and appeared to be the most interesting surface in terms of cellular adhesion and growth. Such films could be used to cover hydrophobic (cell resistant) substrates in order to promote cell colonization, thereby constituting an excellent material for endothelial cell seeding.

  18. Effects of postdeposition treatments on surfaces of CdTe/CdS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pookpanratana, S.; Liu, X.; Paudel, N. R.; Weinhardt, L.; Bär, M.; Zhang, Y.; Ranasinghe, A.; Khan, F.; Blum, M.; Yang, W.; Compaan, A. D.; Heske, C.

    2010-10-01

    Soft x-ray spectroscopy has been used to follow the effects of postdeposition steps (CdCl2 activation and back contact treatment) on surfaces and interfaces in CdTe-based superstrate solar cells. We find that the CdCl2 activation drives sulfur atoms from the CdS layer toward the back contact but not to its surface. Using atomic force microscopy, we find that both treatments strongly influence the morphology of the Au/Cu back contact. The spectroscopic results, in contrast, suggest that CdCl2 activation exhibits a larger impact on the surface composition and chemical structure of the interfaces involved in CdTe solar cells.

  19. Cell-Surface Marker Signatures for the Isolation of Neural Stem Cells, Glia and Neurons Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Shauna H.; Martin, Jody; Elia, Jeanne; Flippin, Jessica; Paramban, Rosanto I.; Hefferan, Mike P.; Vidal, Jason G.; Mu, Yangling; Killian, Rhiannon L.; Israel, Mason A.; Emre, Nil; Marsala, Silvia; Marsala, Martin; Gage, Fred H.; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.; Carson, Christian T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Neural induction of human pluripotent stem cells often yields heterogeneous cell populations that can hamper quantitative and comparative analyses. There is a need for improved differentiation and enrichment procedures that generate highly pure populations of neural stem cells (NSC), glia and neurons. One way to address this problem is to identify cell-surface signatures that enable the isolation of these cell types from heterogeneous cell populations by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Methodology/Principal Findings We performed an unbiased FACS- and image-based immunophenotyping analysis using 190 antibodies to cell surface markers on naïve human embryonic stem cells (hESC) and cell derivatives from neural differentiation cultures. From this analysis we identified prospective cell surface signatures for the isolation of NSC, glia and neurons. We isolated a population of NSC that was CD184+/CD271−/CD44−/CD24+ from neural induction cultures of hESC and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC). Sorted NSC could be propagated for many passages and could differentiate to mixed cultures of neurons and glia in vitro and in vivo. A population of neurons that was CD184−/CD44−/CD15LOW/CD24+ and a population of glia that was CD184+/CD44+ were subsequently purified from cultures of differentiating NSC. Purified neurons were viable, expressed mature and subtype-specific neuronal markers, and could fire action potentials. Purified glia were mitotic and could mature to GFAP-expressing astrocytes in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions/Significance These findings illustrate the utility of immunophenotyping screens for the identification of cell surface signatures of neural cells derived from human pluripotent stem cells. These signatures can be used for isolating highly pure populations of viable NSC, glia and neurons by FACS. The methods described here will enable downstream studies that require consistent and defined neural cell populations. PMID

  20. Polymeric surfaces exhibiting photocatalytic activity and controlled anisotropic wettability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anastasiadis, Spiros H.; Frysali, Melani A.; Papoutsakis, Lampros; Kenanakis, George; Stratakis, Emmanuel; Vamvakaki, Maria; Mountrichas, Grigoris; Pispas, Stergios

    2015-03-01

    In this work we focus on surfaces, which exhibit controlled, switchable wettability in response to one or more external stimuli as well as photocatalytic activity. For this we are inspired from nature to produce surfaces with a dual-scale hierarchical roughness and combine them with the appropriate inorganic and/or polymer coating. The combination of the hierarchical surface with a ZnO coating and a pH- or temperature-responsive polymer results in efficient photo-active properties as well as reversible superhydrophobic / superhydrophilic surfaces. Furthermore, we fabricate surfaces with unidirectional wettability variation. Overall, such complex surfaces require advanced design, combining hierarchically structured surfaces with suitable polymeric materials. Acknowledgment: This research was partially supported by the European Union (European Social Fund, ESF) and Greek national funds through the ``ARISTEIA II'' Action (SMART-SURF) of the Operational Programme ``Education and Lifelong Learning,'' NSRF 2007-2013, via the General Secretariat for Research & Technology, Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, Greece.

  1. Surface-directed assembly of cell-laden microgels.

    PubMed

    Du, Yanan; Ghodousi, Majid; Lo, Edward; Vidula, Mahesh K; Emiroglu, Onur; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-02-15

    Cell-laden microscale hydrogels (microgels) can be used as tissue building blocks and assembled to create 3D tissue constructs with well-defined microarchitecture. In this article, we present a bottom-up approach to achieve microgel assembly on a patterned surface. Driven by surface tension, the hydrophilic microgels can be assembled into well-defined shapes on a glass surface patterned with hydrophobic and hydrophilic regions. We found that the cuboidic microgels ( approximately 100-200 microm in width) could self-assemble into defined shapes with high fidelity to the surface patterns. The microgel assembly process was improved by increasing the hydrophilicity of the microgels and reducing the surface tension of the surrounding solution. The assembled microgels were stabilized by a secondary crosslinking step. Assembled microgels containing cells stained with different dyes were fabricated to demonstrate the application of this approach for engineering microscale tissue constructs containing multiple cell types. This bottom-up approach enables rapid fabrication of cell-laden microgel assemblies with pre-defined geometrical and biological features, which is easily scalable and can be potentially used in microscale tissue engineering applications.

  2. Cell surface proteome of the marine planctomycete Rhodopirellula baltica.

    PubMed

    Voigt, Birgit; Hieu, Cao Xuan; Hempel, Kristina; Becher, Dörte; Schlüter, Rabea; Teeling, Hanno; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Amann, Rudolf; Hecker, Michael; Schweder, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    The surface proteome (surfaceome) of the marine planctomycete Rhodopirellula baltica SH1(T) was studied using a biotinylation and a proteinase K approach combined with SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry. 52 of the proteins identified in both approaches could be assigned to the group of potential surface proteins. Among them are some high molecular weight proteins, potentially involved in cell-cell attachment, that contain domains shown before to be typical for surface proteins like cadherin/dockerin domains, a bacterial adhesion domain or the fasciclin domain. The identification of proteins with enzymatic functions in the R. baltica surfaceome provides further clues for the suggestion that some degradative enzymes may be anchored onto the cell surface. YTV proteins, which have been earlier supposed to be components of the proteinaceous cell wall of R. baltica, were detected in the surface proteome. Additionally, 8 proteins with a novel protein structure combining a conserved type IV pilin/N-methylation domain and a planctomycete-typical DUF1559 domain were identified. PMID:22623273

  3. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N

    2016-06-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5-CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion.

  4. CCL5 activation of CCR5 regulates cell metabolism to enhance proliferation of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Darrin; Rahbar, Ramtin; Fish, Eleanor N.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that CCL5 enhances proliferation and survival of MCF-7 breast cancer cells in an mTOR-dependent manner and we provided evidence that, for T cells, CCL5 activation of CCR5 results in increased glycolysis and enhanced ATP production. Increases in metabolic activity of cancer cells, specifically increased glycolytic activity and increased expression of glucose transporters, are associated with tumour progression. In this report, we provide evidence that CCL5 enhances the proliferation of human breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, MCF-7) and mouse mammary tumour cells (MMTV-PyMT), mediated by CCR5 activation. Concomitant with enhanced proliferation we show that CCL5 increases cell surface expression of the glucose transporter GLUT1, and increases glucose uptake and ATP production by these cells. Blocking CCL5-inducible glucose uptake abrogates the enhanced proliferation induced by CCL5. We provide evidence that increased glucose uptake is associated with enhanced glycolysis, as measured by extracellular acidification. Moreover, CCL5 enhances the invasive capacity of these breast cancer cells. Using metabolomics, we demonstrate that the metabolic signature of CCL5-treated primary mouse mammary tumour cells reflects increased anabolic metabolism. The implications are that CCL5–CCR5 interactions in the tumour microenvironment regulate metabolic events, specifically glycolysis, to promote tumour proliferation and invasion. PMID:27335323

  5. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4+CD25− T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  6. Doxorubicin resistant cancer cells activate myeloid-derived suppressor cells by releasing PGE2.

    PubMed

    Rong, Yuan; Yuan, Chun-Hui; Qu, Zhen; Zhou, Hu; Guan, Qing; Yang, Na; Leng, Xiao-Hua; Bu, Lang; Wu, Ke; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies often induce drug-resistance in cancer cells and simultaneously stimulate proliferation and activation of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells (MDSCs) to inhibit anti-tumor T cells, thus result in poor prognosis of patients with breast cancers. To date, the mechanism underlying the expansion of MDSCs in response to chemotherapies is poorly understood. In the present study, we used in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal studies to demonstrate that doxorubicin-resistant breast cancer cells secret significantly more prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) than their parental doxorubicin-sensitive cells. The secreted PGE2 can stimulate expansion and polymerization of MDSCs by directly target to its receptors, EP2/EP4, on the surface of MDSCs, which consequently triggers production of miR-10a through activating PKA signaling. More importantly, activated MDSCs can inhibit CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells as evidenced by reduced proliferation and IFN-γ release. In order to determine the molecular pathway that involves miR-10a mediated activation of MDSCs, biochemical and pharmacological studies were carried out. We found that miR-10a can activate AMPK signaling to promote expansion and activation of MDSCs. Thus, these results reveal, for the first time, a novel role of PGE2/miR-10a/AMPK signaling axis in chemotherapy-induced immune resistance, which might be targeted for treatment of chemotherapy resistant tumors. PMID:27032536

  7. In vitro evaluation of H2O2 hydrothermal treatment of aged titanium surface to enhance biofunctional activity.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Yuya; Matsuno, Tomonori; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Satoh, Tazuko

    2013-01-01

    Surface modification of titanium has been extensively investigated in implant science and technology in an effort to improve its osteoconductivity. The rate of protein adsorption on titanium surfaces is known to vary depending on the chemistry, structure, morphology, and titanium-specific biological aging of the surface. It is thus desirable to modify smooth titanium surfaces of miniimplants used as orthodontic anchors immediately prior to use. In this study, we have developed a simple surface modification of titanium alloy that improves its biofunctional activity. The surface of a Ti-6Al-4V disk was modified by applying 3% H(2)O(2) hydrothermal treatment using an autoclave. A nanostructured porous network TiO(2) was observed on the treated surface. Treated surfaces exhibited higher hydrophilicity, protein adsorption, and cell proliferation than untreated surfaces. 3% H(2)O(2) hydrothermal treatment is thought to provide biofunctional activity for aged titanium surface.

  8. An Assessment of Cell Culture Plate Surface Chemistry for in Vitro Studies of Tissue Engineering Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Röder, Alexander; García-Gareta, Elena; Theodoropoulos, Christina; Ristovski, Nikola; Blackwood, Keith A; Woodruff, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    The use of biopolymers as a three dimensional (3D) support structure for cell growth is a leading tissue engineering approach in regenerative medicine. Achieving consistent cell seeding and uniform cell distribution throughout 3D scaffold culture in vitro is an ongoing challenge. Traditionally, 3D scaffolds are cultured within tissue culture plates to enable reproducible cell seeding and ease of culture media change. In this study, we compared two different well-plates with different surface properties to assess whether seeding efficiencies and cell growth on 3D scaffolds were affected. Cell attachment and growth of murine calvarial osteoblast (MC3T3-E1) cells within a melt-electrospun poly-ε-caprolactone scaffold were assessed when cultured in either "low-adhesive" non-treated or corona discharged-treated well-plates. Increased cell adhesion was observed on the scaffold placed in the surface treated culture plates compared to the scaffold in the non-treated plates 24 h after seeding, although it was not significant. However, higher cell metabolic activity was observed on the bases of all well-plates than on the scaffold, except for day 21, well metabolic activity was higher in the scaffold contained in non-treated plate than the base. These results indicate that there is no advantage in using non-treated plates to improve initial cell seeding in 3D polymeric tissue engineering scaffolds, however non-treated plates may provide an improved metabolic environment for long-term studies. PMID:26703748

  9. Autonomous molecular cascades for evaluation of cell surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudchenko, Maria; Taylor, Steven; Pallavi, Payal; Dechkovskaia, Alesia; Khan, Safana; Butler, Vincent P., Jr.; Rudchenko, Sergei; Stojanovic, Milan N.

    2013-08-01

    Molecular automata are mixtures of molecules that undergo precisely defined structural changes in response to sequential interactions with inputs. Previously studied nucleic acid-based automata include game-playing molecular devices (MAYA automata) and finite-state automata for the analysis of nucleic acids, with the latter inspiring circuits for the analysis of RNA species inside cells. Here, we describe automata based on strand-displacement cascades directed by antibodies that can analyse cells by using their surface markers as inputs. The final output of a mole