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Sample records for activating downstream signaling

  1. Alternative Activation Mechanisms of Protein Kinase B Trigger Distinct Downstream Signaling Responses*

    PubMed Central

    Balzano, Deborah; Fawal, Mohamad-Ali; Velázquez, Jose V.; Santiveri, Clara M.; Yang, Joshua; Pastor, Joaquín; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Djouder, Nabil; Lietha, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) is an important mediator of signals that control various cellular processes including cell survival, growth, proliferation, and metabolism. PKB promotes these processes by phosphorylating many cellular targets, which trigger distinct downstream signaling events. However, how PKB is able to selectively target its substrates to induce specific cellular functions remains elusive. Here we perform a systematic study to dissect mechanisms that regulate intrinsic kinase activity versus mechanisms that specifically regulate activity toward specific substrates. We demonstrate that activation loop phosphorylation and the C-terminal hydrophobic motif are essential for high PKB activity in general. On the other hand, we identify membrane targeting, which for decades has been regarded as an essential step in PKB activation, as a mechanism mainly affecting substrate selectivity. Further, we show that PKB activity in cells can be triggered independently of PI3K by initial hydrophobic motif phosphorylation, presumably through a mechanism analogous to other AGC kinases. Importantly, different modes of PKB activation result in phosphorylation of distinct downstream targets. Our data indicate that specific mechanisms have evolved for signaling nodes, like PKB, to select between various downstream events. Targeting such mechanisms selectively could facilitate the development of therapeutics that might limit toxic side effects. PMID:26286748

  2. Activation of the Syk tyrosine kinase is insufficient for downstream signal transduction in B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hsueh, Robert C; Hammill, Adrienne M; Lee, Jamie A; Uhr, Jonathan W; Scheuermann, Richard H

    2002-01-01

    Background Immature B lymphocytes and certain B cell lymphomas undergo apoptotic cell death following activation of the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signal transduction pathway. Several biochemical changes occur in response to BCR engagement, including activation of the Syk tyrosine kinase. Although Syk activation appears to be necessary for some downstream biochemical and cellular responses, the signaling events that precede Syk activation remain ill defined. In addition, the requirements for complete activation of the Syk-dependent signaling step remain to be elucidated. Results A mutant form of Syk carrying a combination of a K395A substitution in the kinase domain and substitutions of three phenylalanines (3F) for the three C-terminal tyrosines was expressed in a murine B cell lymphoma cell line, BCL1.3B3 to interfere with normal Syk regulation as a means to examine the Syk activation step in BCR signaling. Introduction of this kinase-inactive mutant led to the constitutive activation of the endogenous wildtype Syk enzyme in the absence of receptor engagement through a 'dominant-positive' effect. Under these conditions, Syk kinase activation occurred in the absence of phosphorylation on Syk tyrosine residues. Although Syk appears to be required for BCR-induced apoptosis in several systems, no increase in spontaneous cell death was observed in these cells. Surprisingly, although the endogenous Syk kinase was enzymatically active, no enhancement in the phosphorylation of cytoplasmic proteins, including phospholipase Cγ2 (PLCγ2), a direct Syk target, was observed. Conclusion These data indicate that activation of Syk kinase enzymatic activity is insufficient for Syk-dependent signal transduction. This observation suggests that other events are required for efficient signaling. We speculate that localization of the active enzyme to a receptor complex specifically assembled for signal transduction may be the missing event. PMID:12470302

  3. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits an Activated FGFR3 Mutant, and Blocks Downstream Signaling in Multiple Myeloma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, April N.; McAndrew, Christopher W.; Donoghue, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Activating mutations within Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3), a receptor tyrosine kinase, are responsible for human skeletal dysplasias including achondroplasia and the neonatal lethal syndromes, Thanatophoric Dysplasia (TD) type I and II. Several of these same FGFR3 mutations have also been identified somatically in human cancers, including multiple myeloma, bladder carcinoma and cervical cancer. Based on reports that strongly activated mutants of FGFR3 such as the TDII (K650E) mutant signal preferentially from within the secretory pathway, the inhibitory properties of nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), which blocks protein transport through the Golgi, were investigated. NDGA was able to inhibit FGFR3 autophosphorylation both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, signaling molecules downstream of FGFR3 activation such as STAT1, STAT3 and MAPK were inhibited by NDGA treatment. Using HEK293 cells expressing activated FGFR3-TDII, together with several multiple myeloma cell lines expressing activated forms of FGFR3, NDGA generally resulted in a decrease in MAPK activation by 1 hour, and resulted in increased apoptosis over 24 hours. The effects of NDGA on activated FGFR3 derivatives targeted either to the plasma membrane or the cytoplasm were also examined. These results suggest that inhibitory small molecules such as NDGA that target a specific subcellular compartment may be beneficial in the inhibition of activated receptors such as FGFR3 that signal from the same compartment. PMID:18794123

  4. Fn14, a Downstream Target of the TGF-β Signaling Pathway, Regulates Fibroblast Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Lai, Wen; Ye, Litong; Chen, Jing; Hou, Xinghua; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Wenwei; Wu, Yueheng; Liu, Xiaoying; Huang, Shufang; Yu, Xiyong; Xiao, Dingzhang

    2015-01-01

    Fibrosis, the hallmark of human injuries and diseases such as serious burns, is characterized by excessive collagen synthesis and myofibroblast accumulation. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), a potent inducer of collagen synthesis, has been implicated in fibrosis in animals. In addition to TGF-β, fibroblast growth factor-inducible molecule 14 (Fn14) has been reported to play an important role in fibrotic diseases, such as cardiac fibrosis. However, the function and detailed regulatory mechanism of Fn14 in fibrosis are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of Fn14 on the activation of human dermal fibroblasts. In normal dermal fibroblasts, TGF-β signaling increased collagen production and Fn14 expression. Furthermore, Fn14 siRNA blocked extracellular matrix gene expression; even when TGF-β signaling was activated by TGF-β1, fibroblast activation remained blocked in the presence of Fn14 siRNA. Overexpressing Fn14 increased extracellular matrix gene expression. In determining the molecular regulatory mechanism, we discovered that SMAD4, an important TGF-β signaling co-mediator, bound to the Fn14 promoter and activated Fn14 transcription. Taken together, these results indicate that the TGF-β signaling pathway activates Fn14 expression through the transcription factor SMAD4 and that activated Fn14 expression increases extracellular matrix synthesis and fibroblast activation. Therefore, Fn14 may represent a promising approach to preventing the excessive accumulation of collagen or ECM in skin fibrosis. PMID:26625141

  5. H2O2 is required for UVB-induced EGF receptor and downstream signaling pathway activation.

    PubMed

    Peus, D; Meves, A; Vasa, R A; Beyerle, A; O'Brien, T; Pittelkow, M R

    1999-12-01

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced receptor phosphorylation is increasingly recognized as a widely occurring phenomenon. However, the mechanisms, mediators, and sequence of events involved in this process remain ill-defined. We have recently shown that exposure of human keratinocytes to physiologic doses of ultraviolet B radiation (UVB) activates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/extracellular-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and p38 signaling pathways via reactive oxygen species. Here we demonstrate that UVB exposure increased intra- and extracellular H2O2 production rapidly in a time-dependent manner. An EGFR-specific monoclonal antibody abrogated EGFR autophosphorylation and markedly decreased the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 whereas p38 activation was unaffected. Overexpression of catalase strongly inhibited UVB-induced EGFR/ERK1/2 pathway activation. These findings establish the sequence of events after UVB irradiation: (i) H2O2 generation, (ii) EGFR phosphorylation, and (iii) ERK activation. Our results identify UVB-induced H2O2 as a second messenger that is required for EGFR and dependent downstream signaling pathways activation.

  6. T3-induced liver AMP-activated protein kinase signaling: Redox dependency and upregulation of downstream targets

    PubMed Central

    Videla, Luis A; Fernández, Virginia; Cornejo, Pamela; Vargas, Romina; Morales, Paula; Ceballo, Juan; Fischer, Alvaro; Escudero, Nicolás; Escobar, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the redox dependency and promotion of downstream targets in thyroid hormone (T3)-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling as cellular energy sensor to limit metabolic stresses in the liver. METHODS: Fed male Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single ip dose of 0.1 mg T3/kg or T3 vehicle (NaOH 0.1 N; controls) and studied at 8 or 24 h after treatment. Separate groups of animals received 500 mg N-acetylcysteine (NAC)/kg or saline ip 30 min prior T3. Measurements included plasma and liver 8-isoprostane and serum β-hydroxybutyrate levels (ELISA), hepatic levels of mRNAs (qPCR), proteins (Western blot), and phosphorylated AMPK (ELISA). RESULTS: T3 upregulates AMPK signaling, including the upstream kinases Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase-β and transforming growth factor-β-activated kinase-1, with T3-induced reactive oxygen species having a causal role due to its suppression by pretreatment with the antioxidant NAC. Accordingly, AMPK targets acetyl-CoA carboxylase and cyclic AMP response element binding protein are phosphorylated, with the concomitant carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1α (CPT-1α) activation and higher expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activator-1α and that of the fatty acid oxidation (FAO)-related enzymes CPT-1α, acyl-CoA oxidase 1, and acyl-CoA thioesterase 2. Under these conditions, T3 induced a significant increase in the serum levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, a surrogate marker for hepatic FAO. CONCLUSION: T3 administration activates liver AMPK signaling in a redox-dependent manner, leading to FAO enhancement as evidenced by the consequent ketogenic response, which may constitute a key molecular mechanism regulating energy dynamics to support T3 preconditioning against ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:25516653

  7. Thermoperiodic control of hypocotyl elongation depends on auxin-induced ethylene signaling that controls downstream PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 activity.

    PubMed

    Bours, Ralph; Kohlen, Wouter; Bouwmeester, Harro J; van der Krol, Alexander

    2015-02-01

    We show that antiphase light-temperature cycles (negative day-night temperature difference [-DIF]) inhibit hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This is caused by reduced cell elongation during the cold photoperiod. Cell elongation in the basal part of the hypocotyl under -DIF was restored by both 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC; ethylene precursor) and auxin, indicating limited auxin and ethylene signaling under -DIF. Both auxin biosynthesis and auxin signaling were reduced during -DIF. In addition, expression of several ACC Synthase was reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application. In contrast, the reduced hypocotyl elongation of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling mutants could not be complemented by auxin, indicating that auxin functions upstream of ethylene. The PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 were previously shown to be important regulators of hypocotyl elongation. We now show that, in contrast to pif4 and pif5 mutants, the reduced hypocotyl length in pif3 cannot be rescued by either ACC or auxin. In line with this, treatment with ethylene or auxin inhibitors reduced hypocotyl elongation in PIF4 overexpressor (PIF4ox) and PIF5ox but not PIF3ox plants. PIF3 promoter activity was strongly reduced under -DIF but could be restored by auxin application in an ACC Synthase-dependent manner. Combined, these results show that PIF3 regulates hypocotyl length downstream, whereas PIF4 and PIF5 regulate hypocotyl length upstream of an auxin and ethylene cascade. We show that, under -DIF, lower auxin biosynthesis activity limits the signaling in this pathway, resulting in low activity of PIF3 and short hypocotyls.

  8. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase Activating Polypeptide (PACAP) Signalling Exerts Chondrogenesis Promoting and Protecting Effects: Implication of Calcineurin as a Downstream Target

    PubMed Central

    Juhász, Tamás; Matta, Csaba; Katona, Éva; Somogyi, Csilla; Takács, Roland; Gergely, Pál; Csernoch, László; Panyi, Gyorgy; Tóth, Gábor; Reglődi, Dóra; Tamás, Andrea; Zákány, Róza

    2014-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) is an important neurotrophic factor influencing differentiation of neuronal elements and exerting protecting role during traumatic injuries or inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although increasing evidence is available on its presence and protecting function in various peripheral tissues, little is known about the role of PACAP in formation of skeletal components. To this end, we aimed to map elements of PACAP signalling in developing cartilage under physiological conditions and during oxidative stress. mRNAs of PACAP and its receptors (PAC1,VPAC1, VPAC2) were detectable during differentiation of chicken limb bud-derived chondrogenic cells in micromass cell cultures. Expression of PAC1 protein showed a peak on days of final commitment of chondrogenic cells. Administration of either the PAC1 receptor agonist PACAP 1-38, or PACAP 6-38 that is generally used as a PAC1 antagonist, augmented cartilage formation, stimulated cell proliferation and enhanced PAC1 and Sox9 protein expression. Both variants of PACAP elevated the protein expression and activity of the Ca-calmodulin dependent Ser/Thr protein phosphatase calcineurin. Application of PACAPs failed to rescue cartilage formation when the activity of calcineurin was pharmacologically inhibited with cyclosporine A. Moreover, exogenous PACAPs prevented diminishing of cartilage formation and decrease of calcineurin activity during oxidative stress. As an unexpected phenomenon, PACAP 6-38 elicited similar effects to those of PACAP 1-38, although to a different extent. On the basis of the above results, we propose calcineurin as a downstream target of PACAP signalling in differentiating chondrocytes either in normal or pathophysiological conditions. Our observations imply the therapeutical perspective that PACAP can be applied as a natural agent that may have protecting effect during joint inflammation and/or may promote cartilage regeneration

  9. Suramin blocks interaction between human FGF1 and FGFR2 D2 domain and reduces downstream signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zong-Sian; Liu, Che Fu; Fu, Brian; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yu, Chin

    2016-09-01

    The extracellular portion of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor2 D2 domain (FGFR2 D2) interacts with human fibroblast growth factor 1 (hFGF1) to activate a downstream signaling cascade that ultimately affects mitosis and differentiation. Suramin is an antiparasiticdrug and a potent inhibitor of FGF-induced angiogenesis. Suramin has been shown to bind to hFGF1, and might block the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. Here, we titrated hFGF1 with FGFR2 D2 and suramin to elucidate their interactions using the detection of NMR. The docking results of both hFGF1-FGFR2 D2 domain and hFGF1-suramin complex were superimposed. The results indicate that suramin blocks the interaction between hFGF1 and FGFR2 D2. We used the PyMOL software to show the hydrophobic interaction of hFGF1-suramin. In addition, we used a Water-soluble Tetrazolium salts assay (WST1) to assess hFGF1 bioactivity. The results will be useful for the development of new antimitogenic activity drugs.

  10. Examining the critical roles of human CB2 receptor residues Valine 3.32 (113) and Leucine 5.41 (192) in ligand recognition and downstream signaling activities.

    PubMed

    Alqarni, Mohammed; Myint, Kyaw Zeyar; Tong, Qin; Yang, Peng; Bartlow, Patrick; Wang, Lirong; Feng, Rentian; Xie, Xiang-Qun

    2014-09-26

    We performed molecular modeling and docking to predict a putative binding pocket and associated ligand-receptor interactions for human cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2). Our data showed that two hydrophobic residues came in close contact with three structurally distinct CB2 ligands: CP-55,940, SR144528 and XIE95-26. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments and subsequent functional assays implicated the roles of Valine residue at position 3.32 (V113) and Leucine residue at position 5.41 (L192) in the ligand binding function and downstream signaling activities of the CB2 receptor. Four different point mutations were introduced to the wild type CB2 receptor: V113E, V113L, L192S and L192A. Our results showed that mutation of Val113 with a Glutamic acid and Leu192 with a Serine led to the complete loss of CB2 ligand binding as well as downstream signaling activities. Substitution of these residues with those that have similar hydrophobic side chains such as Leucine (V113L) and Alanine (L192A), however, allowed CB2 to retain both its ligand binding and signaling functions. Our modeling results validated by competition binding and site-directed mutagenesis experiments suggest that residues V113 and L192 play important roles in ligand binding and downstream signaling transduction of the CB2 receptor.

  11. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 directly binds to calcineurin A and activates downstream NFAT signaling, leading to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Hisamitsu, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomoe Y; Wakabayashi, Shigeo

    2012-08-01

    The calcineurin A (CaNA) subunit was identified as a novel binding partner of plasma membrane Na(+)/H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1). CaN is a Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase involved in many cellular functions, including cardiac hypertrophy. Direct binding of CaN to the (715)PVITID(720) sequence of NHE1, which resembles the consensus CaN-binding motif (PXIXIT), was observed. Overexpression of NHE1 promoted serum-induced CaN/nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) signaling in fibroblasts, as indicated by enhancement of NFAT promoter activity and nuclear translocation, which was attenuated by NHE1 inhibitor. In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, NHE1 stimulated hypertrophic gene expression and the NFAT pathway, which were inhibited by a CaN inhibitor, FK506. Importantly, CaN activity was strongly enhanced with increasing pH, so NHE1 may promote CaN/NFAT signaling via increased intracellular pH. Indeed, Na(+)/H(+) exchange activity was required for NHE1-dependent NFAT signaling. Moreover, interaction of CaN with NHE1 and clustering of NHE1 to lipid rafts were also required for this response. Based on these results, we propose that NHE1 activity may generate a localized membrane microdomain with higher pH, thereby sensitizing CaN to activation and promoting NFAT signaling. In cardiomyocytes, such signaling can be a pathway of NHE1-dependent hypertrophy.

  12. The roles of Ca2+, downstream protein kinases, and oscillatory signaling in regulating fertilization and the activation of development

    PubMed Central

    Ducibella, Tom; Fissore, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    Reviews in Developmental Biology have covered the pathways that generate the all-important intracellular calcium (Ca2+) signal at fertilization (Miyazaki et al., 1993a; Runft et al., 2002) and the different temporal responses of Ca2+ in many organisms (Stricker, 1999). Those reviews raise the importance of identifying how Ca2+ causes the events of egg activation (EEA) and to what extent these temporal Ca2+ responses encode developmental information. This review covers recent studies that have analyzed how these Ca2+ signals are interpreted by specific proteins, and how these proteins regulate various EEA responsible for the onset of development. Many of these proteins are protein kinases (CaMKII, PKC, MPF, MAPK, MLCK) whose activity is directly or indirectly regulated by Ca2+, and whose amount increases during late oocyte maturation. We cover biochemical progress in defining the signaling pathways between Ca2+ and the EEA, as well as discuss how oscillatory or multiple Ca2+ signals are likely to have specific advantages biochemically and/or developmentally. These emerging concepts are put into historical context, emphasizing that key contributions have come from many organisms. The intricate interdependence of Ca2+, Ca2+-dependent proteins, and the EEA raise many new questions for future investigations that will provide insight into the extent to which fertilization-associated signaling has long-range implications for development. In addition, answers to these questions should be beneficial to establishing parameters of egg quality for human and animal IVF, as well as improving egg activation protocols for somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate stem cells and save endangered species. PMID:18255053

  13. LATERAL ROOT PRIMORDIA 1 of maize acts as a transcriptional activator in auxin signalling downstream of the Aux/IAA gene rootless with undetectable meristem 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxiang; von Behrens, Inga; Zimmermann, Roman; Ludwig, Yvonne; Hey, Stefan; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2015-07-01

    Only little is known about target genes of auxin signalling downstream of the Aux/IAA-ARF module. In the present study, it has been demonstrated that maize lateral root primordia 1 (lrp1) encodes a transcriptional activator that is directly regulated by the Aux/IAA protein ROOTLESS WITH UNDETECTABLE MERISTEM 1 (RUM1). Expression of lrp1 is confined to early root primordia and meristems and is auxin-inducible. Based on its primary protein structure, LRP1 is predicted to be a transcription factor. This notion is supported by exclusive LRP1 localization in the nucleus and its ability to activate downstream gene activity. Based on the observation that lrp1 transcription is completely repressed in the semi-dominant gain of function mutant rum1, it was demonstrated that the lrp1 promoter is a direct target of RUM1 proteins. Subsequently, promoter activation assays indicated that RUM1 represses the expression of a GFP reporter fused to the native promoter of lrp1. Constitutive repression of lrp1 in rum1 mutants is a consequence of the stability of mutated rum1 proteins which cannot be degraded by the proteasome and thus constitutively bind to the lrp1 promoter and repress transcription. Taken together, the repression of the transcriptional activator lrp1 by direct binding of RUM1 to its promoter, together with specific expression of lrp1 in root meristems, suggests a function in maize root development via the RUM1-dependent auxin signalling pathway. PMID:25911745

  14. Comparative analyses of downstream signal transduction targets modulated after activation of the AT1 receptor by two β-arrestin-biased agonists.

    PubMed

    Santos, Geisa A; Duarte, Diego A; Parreiras-E-Silva, Lucas T; Teixeira, Felipe R; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; Oliveira, Eduardo B; Bouvier, Michel; Costa-Neto, Claudio M

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in essentially all physiological processes in mammals. The classical GPCR signal transduction mechanism occurs by coupling to G protein, but it has recently been demonstrated that interaction with β-arrestins leads to activation of pathways that are independent of the G protein pathway. Also, it has been reported that some ligands can preferentially activate one of these signaling pathways; being therefore called biased agonists for G protein or β-arrestin pathways. The angiotensin II (AngII) AT1 receptor is a prototype GPCR in the study of biased agonism due to the existence of well-known β-arrestin-biased agonists, such as [Sar(1), Ile(4), Ile(8)]-AngII (SII), and [Sar(1), D-Ala(8)]-AngII (TRV027). The aim of this study was to comparatively analyze the two above mentioned β-arrestin-biased agonists on downstream phosphorylation events and gene expression profiles. Our data reveal that activation of AT1 receptor by each ligand led to a diversity of activation profiles that is far broader than that expected from a simple dichotomy between "G protein-dependent" and "β-arrestin-dependent" signaling. We observed clusters of activation profiles common to AngII, SII, and TRV027, as well as downstream effector activation that are unique to AngII, SII, or TRV027. Analyses of β-arrestin conformational changes after AT1 receptor stimulation with SII or TRV027 suggests that the observed differences could account, at least partially, for the diversity of modulated targets observed. Our data reveal that, although the categorization "G protein-dependent" vs. "β-arrestin-dependent" signaling can be of pharmacological relevance, broader analyses of signaling pathways and downstream targets are necessary to generate an accurate activation profile for a given ligand. This may bring relevant information for drug development, as it may allow more refined comparison of drugs with similar mechanism of action and effects, but with

  15. GPR30 Promotes Prostate Stromal Cell Activation via Suppression of ERα Expression and Its Downstream Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Jia, Bona; Gao, Yu; Li, Mingming; Shi, Jiandang; Peng, Yanfei; Du, Xiaoling; Klocker, Helmut; Sampson, Natalie; Shen, Yongmei; Liu, Mengyang; Zhang, Ju

    2016-08-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a vital role in malignant transformation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa), and accumulating evidence suggests an enhancing effect of estrogens on PCa. The present study aimed to investigate the possible origin of prostate CAFs and the effects of estrogen receptors, G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) and estrogen receptor (ER)-α, on stromal cell activation. High expression of fibroblast activation protein (FAP), CD44, and nonmuscle myosin heavy chain B (SMemb) accompanied by low expression of smooth muscle differentiation markers was found in the stromal cells of PCa tissues and in cultured human prostate CAFs. Additionally, SMemb expression, which is coupled to cell phenotype switching and proliferation, was coexpressed with FAP, a marker of activated stromal cells, and with the stem cell marker CD44 in the stromal cells of PCa tissue. Prostate CAFs showed high GPR30 and low ERα expression. Moreover, GPR30 was coexpressed with FAP, CD44, and SMemb. Furthermore, the study demonstrated that the overexpression of GPR30 or the knockdown of ERα in prostate stromal cells induced the up-regulation of FAP, CD44, Smemb, and the down-regulation of smooth muscle markers. The conditioned medium from these cells promoted the proliferation and migration of LNCaP and PC3 PCa cells. GPR30 knockdown or ERα overexpression showed opposite effects. Finally, we present a novel mechanism whereby GPR30 limits ERα expression via inhibition of the cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway. These results suggest that stem-like cells within the stroma are a possible source of prostate CAFs and that the negative regulation of ERα expression by GPR30 is centrally involved in prostate stromal cell activation. PMID:27163843

  16. Evaluation of Intracellular Signaling Downstream Chimeric Antigen Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Hannah; Svensson, Emma; Gigg, Camilla; Jarvius, Malin; Olsson-Strömberg, Ulla; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Loskog, Angelica

    2015-01-01

    CD19-targeting CAR T cells have shown potency in clinical trials targeting B cell leukemia. Although mainly second generation (2G) CARs carrying CD28 or 4-1BB have been investigated in patients, preclinical studies suggest that third generation (3G) CARs with both CD28 and 4-1BB have enhanced capacity. However, little is known about the intracellular signaling pathways downstream of CARs. In the present work, we have analyzed the signaling capacity post antigen stimulation in both 2G and 3G CARs. 3G CAR T cells expanded better than 2G CAR T cells upon repeated stimulation with IL-2 and autologous B cells. An antigen-driven accumulation of CAR+ cells was evident post antigen stimulation. The cytotoxicity of both 2G and 3G CAR T cells was maintained by repeated stimulation. The phosphorylation status of intracellular signaling proteins post antigen stimulation showed that 3G CAR T cells had a higher activation status than 2G. Several proteins involved in signaling downstream the TCR were activated, as were proteins involved in the cell cycle, cell adhesion and exocytosis. In conclusion, 3G CAR T cells had a higher degree of intracellular signaling activity than 2G CARs which may explain the increased proliferative capacity seen in 3G CAR T cells. The study also indicates that there may be other signaling pathways to consider when designing or evaluating new generations of CARs. PMID:26700307

  17. Thermoperiodic Control of Hypocotyl Elongation Depends on Auxin-Induced Ethylene Signaling That Controls Downstream PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR3 Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Bours, Ralph; Kohlen, Wouter; Bouwmeester, Harro J.

    2015-01-01

    We show that antiphase light-temperature cycles (negative day-night temperature difference [−DIF]) inhibit hypocotyl growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). This is caused by reduced cell elongation during the cold photoperiod. Cell elongation in the basal part of the hypocotyl under −DIF was restored by both 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC; ethylene precursor) and auxin, indicating limited auxin and ethylene signaling under −DIF. Both auxin biosynthesis and auxin signaling were reduced during −DIF. In addition, expression of several ACC Synthase was reduced under −DIF but could be restored by auxin application. In contrast, the reduced hypocotyl elongation of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling mutants could not be complemented by auxin, indicating that auxin functions upstream of ethylene. The PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTORS (PIFs) PIF3, PIF4, and PIF5 were previously shown to be important regulators of hypocotyl elongation. We now show that, in contrast to pif4 and pif5 mutants, the reduced hypocotyl length in pif3 cannot be rescued by either ACC or auxin. In line with this, treatment with ethylene or auxin inhibitors reduced hypocotyl elongation in PIF4 overexpressor (PIF4ox) and PIF5ox but not PIF3ox plants. PIF3 promoter activity was strongly reduced under −DIF but could be restored by auxin application in an ACC Synthase-dependent manner. Combined, these results show that PIF3 regulates hypocotyl length downstream, whereas PIF4 and PIF5 regulate hypocotyl length upstream of an auxin and ethylene cascade. We show that, under −DIF, lower auxin biosynthesis activity limits the signaling in this pathway, resulting in low activity of PIF3 and short hypocotyls. PMID:25516603

  18. Serine-71 phosphorylation of Rac1 modulates downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Janett; Proff, Julia; Hävemeier, Anika; Ladwein, Markus; Rottner, Klemens; Barlag, Britta; Pich, Andreas; Tatge, Helma; Just, Ingo; Gerhard, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The Rho GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 regulate a variety of cellular functions by signaling to different signal pathways. It is believed that the presence of a specific effector at the location of GTPase activation determines the route of downstream signaling. We previously reported about EGF-induced Ser-71 phosphorylation of Rac1/Cdc42. By using the phosphomimetic S71E-mutants of Rac1 and Cdc42 we investigated the impact of Ser-71 phosphorylation on binding to selected effector proteins. Binding of the constitutively active (Q61L) variants of Rac1 and Cdc42 to their specific interaction partners Sra-1 and N-WASP, respectively, as well as to their common effector protein PAK was abrogated when Ser-71 was exchanged to glutamate as phosphomimetic substitution. Interaction with their common effector proteins IQGAP1/2/3 or MRCK alpha was, however, hardly affected. This ambivalent behaviour was obvious in functional assays. In contrast to Rac1 Q61L, phosphomimetic Rac1 Q61L/S71E was not able to induce increased membrane ruffling. Instead, Rac1 Q61L/S71E allowed filopodia formation, which is in accordance with abrogation of the dominant Sra-1/Wave signalling pathway. In addition, in contrast to Rac1 transfected cells Rac1 S71E failed to activate PAK1/2. On the other hand, Rac1 Q61L/S71E was as effective in activation of NF-kappaB as Rac1 Q61L, illustrating positive signal transduction of phosphorylated Rac1. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of Rac1 and Cdc42 at serine-71 represents a reversible mechanism to shift specificity of GTPase/effector coupling, and to preferentially address selected downstream pathways. PMID:22970203

  19. Constitutive and ligand-induced EGFR signaling triggers distinct and mutually exclusive downstream signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Sharmistha; Li, Li; Puliyappadamba, VineshkumarThidil; Guo, Gao; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Mickey, Bruce; Souza, Rhonda F.; Vo, Peggy; Herz, Joachim; Chen, Mei-Ru; Boothman, David A.; Pandita, Tej K.; Wang, David H.; Sen, Ganes C.; Habib, Amyn A.

    2014-01-01

    EGFR overexpression plays an important oncogenic role in cancer. Regular EGFR protein levels are increased in cancer cells and the receptor then becomes constitutively active. However, downstream signals generated by constitutively activated EGFR are unknown. Here we report that the overexpressed EGFR oscillates between two distinct and mutually exclusive modes of signaling. Constitutive or non-canonical EGFR signaling activates the transcription factor IRF3 leading to expression of IFI27, IFIT1, and TRAIL. Ligand-mediated activation of EGFR switches off IRF3 dependent transcription, activates canonical ERK and Akt signals, and confers sensitivity to chemotherapy and virus-induced cell death. Mechanistically, the distinct downstream signals result from a switch of EGFR associated proteins. EGFR constitutively complexes with IRF3 and TBK1 leading to TBK1 and IRF3 phosphorylation. Addition of EGF dissociates TBK1, IRF3, and EGFR leading to a loss of IRF3 activity, Shc-EGFR association and ERK activation. Finally, we provide evidence for non-canonical EGFR signaling in glioblastoma. PMID:25503978

  20. Feeding by whiteflies suppresses downstream jasmonic acid signaling by eliciting salicylic acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng-Jun; Li, Wei-Di; Huang, Fang; Zhang, Jin-Ming; Xu, Fang-Cheng; Lu, Yao-Bin

    2013-05-01

    Phloem-feeding whiteflies in the species complex Bemisia tabaci cause extensive crop damage worldwide. One of the reasons for their "success" is their ability to suppress the effectual jasmonic acid (JA) defenses of the host plant. However, little is understood about the mechanisms underlying whitefly suppression of JA-regulated defenses. Here, we showed that the expression of salicylic acid (SA)-responsive genes (EDS1 and PR1) in Arabidopsis thaliana was significantly enhanced during feeding by whitefly nymphs. Whereas upstream JA-responsive genes (LOX2 and OPR3) also were induced, the downstream JA-responsive gene (VSP1) was repressed, i.e., whiteflies only suppressed downstream JA signaling. Gene-expression analyses with various Arabidopsis mutants, including NahG, npr-1, ein2-1, and dde2-2, revealed that SA signaling plays a key role in the suppression of downstream JA defenses by whitefly feeding. Assays confirmed that SA activation enhanced whitefly performance by suppressing downstream JA defenses.

  1. Turbulence decay downstream of an active grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Gregory; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-11-01

    A grid in a wind tunnel stirs up turbulence that has a certain large-scale structure. The moving parts in a so-called ``active grid'' can be programmed to produce different structures. We use a special active grid in which each of 129 paddles on the grid has its own position-controlled servomotor that can move independently of the others. We observe among other things that the anisotropy in the amplitude of the velocity fluctuations and in the correlation lengths can be set and varied with an algorithm that oscillates the paddles in a specified way. The variation in the anisotropies that we observe can be explained by our earlier analysis of anisotropic ``soccer ball'' turbulence (Bewley, Chang and Bodenschatz 2012, Phys. Fluids). We define the influence of this variation in structure on the downstream evolution of the turbulence. with Eberhard Bodenschatz and others.

  2. DNA G-quadruplex formation in response to remote downstream transcription activity: long-range sensing and signal transducing in DNA double helix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Liu, Hong-He; Zheng, Ke-Wei; Hao, Yu-Hua; Tan, Zheng

    2013-08-01

    G-quadruplexes, four-stranded structures formed by Guanine-rich nucleic acids, are implicated in many physiological and pathological processes. G-quadruplex-forming sequences are abundant in genomic DNA, and G-quadruplexes have recently been shown to exist in the genome of mammalian cells. However, how G-quadruplexes are formed in the genomes remains largely unclear. Here, we show that G-quadruplex formation can be remotely induced by downstream transcription events that are thousands of base pairs away. The induced G-quadruplexes alter protein recognition and cause transcription termination at the local region. These results suggest that a G-quadruplex-forming sequence can serve as a sensor or receiver to sense remote DNA tracking activity in response to the propagation of mechanical torsion in a DNA double helix. We propose that the G-quadruplex formation may provide a mean for long-range sensing and communication between distal genomic locations to coordinate regulatory transactions in genomic DNA. PMID:23716646

  3. PI3K-C2γ is a Rab5 effector selectively controlling endosomal Akt2 activation downstream of insulin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Braccini, Laura; Ciraolo, Elisa; Campa, Carlo C.; Perino, Alessia; Longo, Dario L.; Tibolla, Gianpaolo; Pregnolato, Marco; Cao, Yanyan; Tassone, Beatrice; Damilano, Federico; Laffargue, Muriel; Calautti, Enzo; Falasca, Marco; Norata, Giuseppe D.; Backer, Jonathan M.; Hirsch, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    In the liver, insulin-mediated activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is at the core of metabolic control. Multiple PI3K and Akt isoenzymes are found in hepatocytes and whether isoform-selective interplays exist is currently unclear. Here we report that insulin signalling triggers the association of the liver-specific class II PI3K isoform γ (PI3K-C2γ) with Rab5-GTP, and its recruitment to Rab5-positive early endosomes. In these vesicles, PI3K-C2γ produces a phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate pool specifically required for delayed and sustained endosomal Akt2 stimulation. Accordingly, loss of PI3K-C2γ does not affect insulin-dependent Akt1 activation as well as S6K and FoxO1-3 phosphorylation, but selectively reduces Akt2 activation, which specifically inhibits glycogen synthase activity. As a consequence, PI3K-C2γ-deficient mice display severely reduced liver accumulation of glycogen and develop hyperlipidemia, adiposity as well as insulin resistance with age or after consumption of a high-fat diet. Our data indicate PI3K-C2γ supports an isoenzyme-specific forking of insulin-mediated signal transduction to an endosomal pool of Akt2, required for glucose homeostasis. PMID:26100075

  4. The effect of CD4 receptor downregulation and its downstream signaling molecules on HIV-1 latency

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Chang; Kim, Hyeon Guk; Roh, Tae-Young; Park, Jihwan; Jung, Kyung-Min; Lee, Joo-Shil; Choi, Sang-Yun; Kim, Sung Soon; Choi, Byeong-Sun

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CD4 receptors were downregulated on the surface of HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} CD4 downstream signaling molecules were suppressed in HIV-1 latently infected cells. {yields} HIV-1 progeny can be reactivated by induction of T-cell activation signal molecules. {yields} H3K4me3 and H3K9ac were highly enriched in CD4 downstream signaling molecules. {yields} HIV-1 latency can be maintained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules. -- Abstract: HIV-1 can establish a latent infection in memory CD4 + T cells to evade the host immune response. CD4 molecules can act not only as the HIV-1 receptor for entry but also as the trigger in an intracellular signaling cascade for T-cell activation and proliferation via protein tyrosine kinases. Novel chronic HIV-1-infected A3.01-derived (NCHA) cells were used to examine the involvement of CD4 downstream signaling in HIV-1 latency. CD4 receptors in NCHA cells were dramatically downregulated on its surface but were slightly decreased in whole-cell lysates. The expression levels of CD4 downstream signaling molecules, including P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, LAT, and c-Jun, were sharply decreased in NCHA cells. The lowered histone modifications of H3K4me3 and H3K9ac correlated with the downregulation of P56{sup Lck}, ZAP-70, and LAT in NCHA cells. AP-1 binding activity was also reduced in NCHA cells. LAT and c-Jun suppressed in NCHA cells were highly induced after PMA treatment. In epigenetic analysis, other signal transduction molecules which are associated with active and/or latent HIV-1 infection showed normal states in HIV-1 latently infected cells compared to A3.01 cells. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the HIV-1 latent state is sustained by the reduction of downstream signaling molecules via the downregulation of CD4 and the attenuated activity of transcription factor as AP-1. The HIV-1 latency model via T-cell deactivation may provide some clues for the development of the new

  5. EGF-receptor phosphorylation and downstream signaling are activated by benzo[a]pyrene 3,6-quinone and benzo[a]pyrene 1,6-quinone in human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Fragoso, Lourdes; Melendez, Karla; Hudson, Laurie G.; Lauer, Fredine T.; Burchiel, Scott W.

    2009-03-15

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is activated by xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes to highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolites. Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that benzo[a]pyrene quinones (BPQs), 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ, are able to induce epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) cell signaling through the production of reactive oxygen species. Recently, we have reported that BPQs have the potential to induce the expression of genes involved in numerous pathways associated with cell proliferation and survival in human mammary epithelial cells. In the present study we demonstrated that BPQs not only induced EGFR tyrosine autophosphorylation, but also induced EGFR-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C-{gamma}1 and several signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs). The effects of BPQs were evaluated in a model of EGF withdrawal in MCF10-A cells. We found that BPQs (1 {mu}M), induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation at positions Y845, Y992, Y1068, and Y1086. PLC-{gamma}1 phosphorylation correlated with the phosphorylation of tyrosine-Y992, a proposed docking site for PLC-{gamma}1 on the EGFR. Additionally, we found that BPQs induced the activation of STAT-1, STAT-3, STAT-5a and STAT-5b. STAT5 was shown to translocate to the nucleus following 3,6-BPQ and 1,6-BPQ exposures. Although the patterns of phosphorylation at EGFR, PLC-{gamma}1 and STATs were quite similar to those induced by EGF, an important difference between BPQ-mediated signaling of the EGFR was observed. Signaling produced by EGF ligand produced a rapid disappearance of EGFR from the cell surface, whereas BPQ signaling maintained EGFR receptors on the cell membrane. Thus, the results of these studies show that 1,6-BPQ and 3,6-BPQ can produce early events as evidenced by EGFR expression, and a prolonged transactivation of EGFR leading to downstream cell signaling pathways.

  6. Arabidopsis NAC1 transduces auxin signal downstream of TIR1 to promote lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Xie, Q; Frugis, G; Colgan, D; Chua, N H

    2000-12-01

    Auxin plays a key role in lateral root formation, but the signaling pathway for this process is poorly understood. We show here that NAC1, a new member of the NAC family, is induced by auxin and mediates auxin signaling to promote lateral root development. NAC1 is a transcription activator consisting of an N-terminal conserved NAC-domain that binds to DNA and a C-terminal activation domain. This factor activates the expression of two downstream auxin-responsive genes, DBP and AIR3. Transgenic plants expressing sense or antisense NAC1 cDNA show an increase or reduction of lateral roots, respectively. Finally, TIR1-induced lateral root development is blocked by expression of antisense NAC1 cDNA, and NAC1 overexpression can restore lateral root formation in the auxin-response mutant tir1, indicating that NAC1 acts downstream of TIR1.

  7. Oxidative stress and its downstream signaling in aging eyes

    PubMed Central

    Pinazo-Durán, María Dolores; Gallego-Pinazo, Roberto; García-Medina, Jose Javier; Zanón-Moreno, Vicente; Nucci, Carlo; Dolz-Marco, Rosa; Martínez-Castillo, Sebastián; Galbis-Estrada, Carmen; Marco-Ramírez, Carla; López-Gálvez, Maria Isabel; Galarreta, David J; Díaz-Llópis, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress (OS) and its biomarkers are the biochemical end point of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the ability of the antioxidant (AOX) biological systems to fight against oxidative injury. Objective We reviewed the role of OS and its downstream signaling in aging eyes. Methods A search of the literature and current knowledge on the physiological and pathological mechanisms of OS were revisited in relation to the eyes and the aging process. Most prevalent ocular diseases have been analyzed herein in relation to OS and nutraceutic supplements, such as dry-eye disorders, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy. Results Clinical, biochemical, and molecular data from anterior and posterior eye segment diseases point to OS as the common pathogenic mechanism in the majority of these ocular disorders, many of which are pathologies causing visual impairment, blindness, and subsequent loss of life quality. Studies with nutraceutic supplements in aging eye-related pathologies have also been reviewed. Conclusion OS, nutritional status, and nutraceutic supplements have to be considered within the standards of care of older ophthalmologic patients. OS biomarkers and surrogate end points may help in managing the aging population with ocular diseases. PMID:24748782

  8. Leader cells regulate collective cell migration via Rac activation in the downstream signaling of integrin β1 and PI3K.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naoya; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2015-01-07

    Collective cell migration plays a crucial role in several biological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. Here, we focused on collectively migrating Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells that follow a leader cell on a collagen gel to clarify the mechanism of collective cell migration. First, we removed a leader cell from the migrating collective with a micromanipulator. This then caused disruption of the cohesive migration of cells that followed in movement, called "follower" cells, which showed the importance of leader cells. Next, we observed localization of active Rac, integrin β1, and PI3K. These molecules were clearly localized in the leading edge of leader cells, but not in follower cells. Live cell imaging using active Rac and active PI3K indicators was performed to elucidate the relationship between Rac, integrin β1, and PI3K. Finally, we demonstrated that the inhibition of these molecules resulted in the disruption of collective migration. Our findings not only demonstrated the significance of a leader cell in collective cell migration, but also showed that Rac, integrin β1, and PI3K are upregulated in leader cells and drive collective cell migration.

  9. Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1) plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer through inhibition of AP-1 and

  10. EVALUATING THE EFFECT OF UPSTREAM WATERSHED ACTIVITIES TO DOWNSTREAM STREAMFLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Linking the impacts of upstream activities such as urban development to changes in downstream streamflow is critical to achieving a balance between economic development and environmental protection as a basis for sustainable watershed development. This paper presents a modeling a...

  11. Distinct G protein-coupled receptor recycling pathways allow spatial control of downstream G protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Shanna Lynn; Shiwarski, Daniel John; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2016-09-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recycled via a sequence-dependent pathway that is spatially and biochemically distinct from bulk recycling. Why there are two distinct recycling pathways from the endosome is a fundamental question in cell biology. In this study, we show that the separation of these two pathways is essential for normal spatial encoding of GPCR signaling. The prototypical β-2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR) activates Gα stimulatory protein (Gαs) on the endosome exclusively in sequence-dependent recycling tubules marked by actin/sorting nexin/retromer tubular (ASRT) microdomains. B2AR was detected in an active conformation in bulk recycling tubules, but was unable to activate Gαs. Protein kinase A phosphorylation of B2AR increases the fraction of receptors localized to ASRT domains and biases the downstream transcriptional effects of B2AR to genes controlled by endosomal signals. Our results identify the physiological relevance of separating GPCR recycling from bulk recycling and suggest a mechanism to tune downstream responses of GPCR signaling by manipulating the spatial origin of G protein signaling. PMID:27646272

  12. Distinct G protein-coupled receptor recycling pathways allow spatial control of downstream G protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Shanna Lynn; Shiwarski, Daniel John; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2016-09-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recycled via a sequence-dependent pathway that is spatially and biochemically distinct from bulk recycling. Why there are two distinct recycling pathways from the endosome is a fundamental question in cell biology. In this study, we show that the separation of these two pathways is essential for normal spatial encoding of GPCR signaling. The prototypical β-2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR) activates Gα stimulatory protein (Gαs) on the endosome exclusively in sequence-dependent recycling tubules marked by actin/sorting nexin/retromer tubular (ASRT) microdomains. B2AR was detected in an active conformation in bulk recycling tubules, but was unable to activate Gαs. Protein kinase A phosphorylation of B2AR increases the fraction of receptors localized to ASRT domains and biases the downstream transcriptional effects of B2AR to genes controlled by endosomal signals. Our results identify the physiological relevance of separating GPCR recycling from bulk recycling and suggest a mechanism to tune downstream responses of GPCR signaling by manipulating the spatial origin of G protein signaling.

  13. ECM compliance regulates osteogenesis by influencing MAPK signaling downstream of RhoA and ROCK.

    PubMed

    Khatiwala, Chirag B; Kim, Peter D; Peyton, Shelly R; Putnam, Andrew J

    2009-05-01

    The compliance of the extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates osteogenic differentiation by modulating extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity. However, the molecular mechanism linking ECM compliance to the ERK-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway remains unclear. Furthermore, RhoA has been widely implicated in integrin-mediated signaling and mechanotransduction. We studied the relationship between RhoA and ERK-MAPK signaling to determine their roles in the regulation of osteogenesis by ECM compliance. Inhibition of RhoA and ROCK in MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts cultured on substrates of varying compliance reduced ERK activity, whereas constitutively active RhoA enhanced it. The expression of RUNX2, a potent osteogenic transcription factor, was increased on stiffer matrices and correlated with elevated ERK activity. Inhibition of RhoA, ROCK, or the MAPK pathway diminished RUNX2 activity and delayed the onset of osteogenesis as shown by altered osteocalcin (OCN) and bone sialoprotein (BSP) gene expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and matrix mineralization. These data establish that one possible mechanism by which ECM rigidity regulates osteogenic differentiation involves MAPK activation downstream of the RhoA-ROCK signaling pathway.

  14. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  15. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ray, Poulomi; Chapman, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK)-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis. PMID:26237312

  16. Transduction of Functionally Contrasting Signals by Two Mycobacterial PPE Proteins Downstream of TLR2 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Udgata, Atul; Qureshi, Rahila; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita

    2016-09-01

    As pathogen-associated molecular pattern sensors, the TLRs can detect diverse ligands to elicit either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses, but the mechanism that dictates such contrasting immune responses is not well understood. In this work, we demonstrate that proline-proline-glutamic acid (PPE)17 protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces TLR1/2 heterodimerization to elicit proinflammatory-type response, whereas PPE18-induced homodimerization of TLR2 triggers anti-inflammatory type responses. Ligation of TLR1/2 caused an increased recruitment of IL-1R-associated kinase (IRAK)1, MyD88, and protein kinase C (PKC)ε to the downstream TLR-signaling complex that translocated PKCε into the nucleus in an IRAK1-dependent manner. PKCε-mediated phosphorylation allowed the nuclear IRAK3 to be exported to the cytoplasm, leading to increased activation of ERK1/2, stabilization of MAPK phosphatase 1 (MKP-1), and induction of TNF-α with concomitant downregulation of p38MAPK. Silencing of TLR1 inhibited PPE17-triggered cytoplasmic export of IRAK3 as well as TNF-α induction, suggesting an important role of TLR1/2 heterodimer in regulating proinflammatory responses via the IRAK3-signaling pathway. In contrast, PPE18-mediated homodimerization of TLR2 caused poorer cytoplasmic export of nuclear IRAK3 and MKP-1 stabilization, resulting in increased p38MAPK activation. Our study hints to a novel mechanism that implicates PKCε-IRAK3-MKP-1 signaling in the regulation of MAPK activity and inflammatory cascades downstream of TLR2 in tuberculosis. PMID:27481848

  17. Targeting the cis-dimerization of LINGO-1 with low MW compounds affects its downstream signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cobret, L; De Tauzia, M L; Ferent, J; Traiffort, E; Hénaoui, I; Godin, F; Kellenberger, E; Rognan, D; Pantel, J; Bénédetti, H; Morisset-Lopez, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The transmembrane protein LINGO-1 is a negative regulator in the nervous system mainly affecting axonal regeneration, neuronal survival, oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating its functions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the formation and the role of LINGO-1 cis-dimers in the regulation of its biological activity. Experimental Approach LINGO-1 homodimers were identified in both HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cells using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and BRET saturation analysis. We performed a hypothesis-driven screen for identification of small-molecule protein–protein interaction modulators of LINGO-1 using a BRET-based assay, adapted for screening. The compound identified was further assessed for effects on LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways using Western blotting analysis and AlphaScreen technology. Key Results LINGO-1 was present as homodimers in primary neuronal cultures. LINGO-1 interacted homotypically in cis-orientation and LINGO-1 cis-dimers were formed early during LINGO-1 biosynthesis. A BRET-based assay allowed us to identify phenoxybenzamine as the first conformational modulator of LINGO-1 dimers. In HEK-293 cells, phenoxybenzamine was a positive modulator of LINGO-1 function, increasing the LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of EGF receptor signalling and Erk phosphorylation. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that LINGO-1 forms constitutive cis-dimers at the plasma membrane and that low MW compounds affecting the conformational state of these dimers can regulate LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways. We propose that targeting the LINGO-1 dimerization interface opens a new pharmacological approach to the modulation of its function and provides a new strategy for drug discovery. PMID:25257685

  18. An electrostatic selection mechanism controls sequential kinase signaling downstream of the T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neel H; Wang, Qi; Yan, Qingrong; Karandur, Deepti; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Fallahee, Ian R; Russ, William P; Ranganathan, Rama; Weiss, Arthur; Kuriyan, John

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of events that initiates T cell signaling is dictated by the specificities and order of activation of the tyrosine kinases that signal downstream of the T cell receptor. Using a platform that combines exhaustive point-mutagenesis of peptide substrates, bacterial surface-display, cell sorting, and deep sequencing, we have defined the specificities of the first two kinases in this pathway, Lck and ZAP-70, for the T cell receptor ζ chain and the scaffold proteins LAT and SLP-76. We find that ZAP-70 selects its substrates by utilizing an electrostatic mechanism that excludes substrates with positively-charged residues and favors LAT and SLP-76 phosphosites that are surrounded by negatively-charged residues. This mechanism prevents ZAP-70 from phosphorylating its own activation loop, thereby enforcing its strict dependence on Lck for activation. The sequence features in ZAP-70, LAT, and SLP-76 that underlie electrostatic selectivity likely contribute to the specific response of T cells to foreign antigens. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20105.001 PMID:27700984

  19. mafba is a downstream transcriptional effector of Vegfc signaling essential for embryonic lymphangiogenesis in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Koltowska, Katarzyna; Paterson, Scott; Bower, Neil I.; Baillie, Gregory J.; Lagendijk, Anne K.; Astin, Jonathan W.; Chen, Huijun; Francois, Mathias; Crosier, Philip S.; Taft, Ryan J.; Simons, Cas; Smith, Kelly A.; Hogan, Benjamin M.

    2015-01-01

    The lymphatic vasculature plays roles in tissue fluid balance, immune cell trafficking, fatty acid absorption, cancer metastasis, and cardiovascular disease. Lymphatic vessels form by lymphangiogenesis, the sprouting of new lymphatics from pre-existing vessels, in both development and disease contexts. The apical signaling pathway in lymphangiogenesis is the VEGFC/VEGFR3 pathway, yet how signaling controls cellular transcriptional output remains unknown. We used a forward genetic screen in zebrafish to identify the transcription factor mafba as essential for lymphatic vessel development. We found that mafba is required for the migration of lymphatic precursors after their initial sprouting from the posterior cardinal vein. mafba expression is enriched in sprouts emerging from veins, and we show that mafba functions cell-autonomously during lymphatic vessel development. Mechanistically, Vegfc signaling increases mafba expression to control downstream transcription, and this regulatory relationship is dependent on the activity of SoxF transcription factors, which are essential for mafba expression in venous endothelium. Here we identify an indispensable Vegfc–SoxF–Mafba pathway in lymphatic development. PMID:26253536

  20. Re-modulated technology of WDM-PON employing different DQPSK downstream signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Chao; Xin, Xiang-jun; Yu, Chong-xiu

    2012-11-01

    This paper proposes a kind of modulation architecture for wavelength-division-multiplexing passive optical network (WDMPON) employing optical differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK) downstream signals and two different modulation formats of re-modulated upstream signals. At the optical line terminal (OLT), 10 Gbit/s signal is modulated with DQPSK. At the optical network unit (ONU), part of the downstream signal is re-modulated with on-off keying (OOK) or inverse-return-to-zero (IRZ). Simulation results show the impact on the system employing NRZ, RZ and carrier-suppressed return-to-zero (CSRZ). The analyses also reflect that the architecture can restrain chromatic dispersion and channel crosstalk, which makes it the best architecture of access network in the future.

  1. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dose-dependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  2. Misoprostol Reverse Hippocampal Neuron Cyclooxygenase-2 Downstream Signaling Imbalance in Aluminum-Overload Rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanxin; Lei, Wenjuan; Wang, Jianfeng; Hu, Xinyue; Wei, Yuling; Ji, Chaonan; Yang, Junqing

    2016-01-01

    Although COX-2 inhibition in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases has shown neuroprotection, recent studies have revealed some serious side effects (ulcers, bleeding, fatal cerebrovascular diseases etc.) and the limited benefits of COX-2 inhibitors. A more focused approach is necessary to explore the therapeutic effect of the COX downstream signaling pathway in neurological research. The aim of this study was to explore the alterations of the PGES-PGE2-EP signal pathway and the effect of misoprostol on neurodegeneration by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Adult rats were treated by intragastric administration of aluminum gluconate. The PGE2 content and expression of PGES and EPs in the hippocampi of rats were detected using ELISA, q-PCR and Western blot analysis, respectively. The content of malondialdehyde (MDA) and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the rat hippocampi were also detected. The misoprostol treatment dose-dependently improved spatial learning and memory function as well as healing after hippocampal neuron damage induced by chronic aluminum-overload in rats. Meanwhile, the administration of misoprostol resulted in a decrease in the PGE2 level and down-regulation of the mPGES-1, EP2 and EP4 expression levels, while there was a dosedependent up-regulation of EP3 expression. These results suggest that misoprostol possesses a neuroprotective property, and the mechanism involves affecting the EP3 level and reducing the endogenous production of PGE2 through a negative feedback mechanism, increasing the EP3 expression level, decreasing the EP2 and EP4 expression levels, and rebuilding the mPGES-1-PGE2-EP1-4 signal pathway balance. In this way, misoprostol has a counteractive effect on oxidant stress and inflammation in the central nervous system. The PGES-PGE2-EPs signaling pathway is a potential therapeutic strategy for treating neurodegeneration in patients. PMID:27033056

  3. MicroRNA-145 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting IRS1 and its downstream Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yelin; Hu, Chen; Cheng, Jun; Chen, Binquan; Ke, Qinghong; Lv, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Yanfeng

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • MiR-145 expression is down-regulated in HCC tissues and inversely related with IRS1 levels. • MiR-145 directly targets IRS1 in HCC cells. • Restored expression of miR-145 suppressed HCC cell proliferation and growth. • MiR-145 induced IRS1 under-expression potentially reduced downstream AKT signaling. - Abstract: Accumulating evidences have proved that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we showed that miRNA-145 level was significantly decreased in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) tissues and cell lines, and its low expression was inversely associated with the abundance of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a key mediator in oncogenic insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. We verified IRS1 as a direct target of miR-145 using Western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. Further, the restoration of miR-145 in HCC cell lines suppressed cancer cell growth, owing to down-regulated IRS1 expression and its downstream Akt/FOXO1 signaling. Our results demonstrated that miR-145 could inhibit HCC through targeting IRS1 and its downstream signaling, implicating the loss of miR-145 regulation may be a potential molecular mechanism causing aberrant oncogenic signaling in HCC.

  4. Aquaporin-3 mediates hydrogen peroxide uptake to regulate downstream intracellular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Evan W.; Dickinson, Bryan C.; Chang, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by cell-surface NADPH Oxidase (Nox) enzymes is emerging as an important signaling molecule for growth, differentiation, and migration processes. However, how cells spatially regulate H2O2 to achieve physiological redox signaling over nonspecific oxidative stress pathways is insufficiently understood. Here we report that the water channel Aquaporin-3 (AQP3) can facilitate the uptake of H2O2 into mammalian cells and mediate downstream intracellular signaling. Molecular imaging with Peroxy Yellow 1 Methyl-Ester (PY1-ME), a new chemoselective fluorescent indicator for H2O2, directly demonstrates that aquaporin isoforms AQP3 and AQP8, but not AQP1, can promote uptake of H2O2 specifically through membranes in mammalian cells. Moreover, we show that intracellular H2O2 accumulation can be modulated up or down based on endogenous AQP3 expression, which in turn can influence downstream cell signaling cascades. Finally, we establish that AQP3 is required for Nox-derived H2O2 signaling upon growth factor stimulation. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the downstream intracellular effects of H2O2 can be regulated across biological barriers, a discovery that has broad implications for the controlled use of this potentially toxic small molecule for beneficial physiological functions. PMID:20724658

  5. Downstream signaling pathways in mouse adipose tissues following acute in vivo administration of fibroblast growth factor 21.

    PubMed

    Muise, Eric S; Souza, Sandra; Chi, An; Tan, Yejun; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-Yang, Qing; Wu, Margaret; Sarr, Tim; Zhu, Lan; Guo, Hongbo; Li, Zhihua; Li, Wenyu; Hu, Weiwen; Jiang, Guoqiang; Paweletz, Cloud P; Hendrickson, Ronald C; Thompson, John R; Mu, James; Berger, Joel P; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    FGF21 is a novel secreted protein with robust anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, and anti-atherogenic activities in preclinical species. In the current study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways downstream of FGF21 following acute administration of the growth factor to mice. Focusing on adipose tissues, we identified FGF21-mediated downstream signaling events and target engagement biomarkers. Specifically, RNA profiling of adipose tissues and phosphoproteomic profiling of adipocytes, following FGF21 treatment revealed several specific changes in gene expression and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation, in several relevant proteins. Affymetrix microarray analysis of white adipose tissues isolated from both C57BL/6 (fed either regular chow or HFD) and db/db mice identified over 150 robust potential RNA transcripts and over 50 potential secreted proteins that were changed greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 acutely. Phosphoprofiling analysis identified over 130 phosphoproteins that were modulated greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the combined gene and phosphoprotein profiling data identified a number of known metabolic pathways such as glucose uptake, insulin receptor signaling, Erk/Mapk signaling cascades, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, a number of novel events with hitherto unknown links to FGF21 signaling were observed at both the transcription and protein phosphorylation levels following treatment. We conclude that such a combined "omics" approach can be used not only to identify robust biomarkers for novel therapeutics but can also enhance our understanding of downstream signaling pathways; in the example presented here, novel FGF21-mediated signaling events in adipose tissue have been revealed that warrant further investigation.

  6. Downstream Signaling Pathways in Mouse Adipose Tissues Following Acute In Vivo Administration of Fibroblast Growth Factor 21

    PubMed Central

    Chi, An; Tan, Yejun; Zhao, Xuemei; Liu, Franklin; Dallas-yang, Qing; Wu, Margaret; Sarr, Tim; Zhu, Lan; Guo, Hongbo; Li, Zhihua; Li, Wenyu; Hu, Weiwen; Jiang, Guoqiang; Paweletz, Cloud P.; Hendrickson, Ronald C.; Thompson, John R.; Mu, James; Berger, Joel P.; Mehmet, Huseyin

    2013-01-01

    FGF21 is a novel secreted protein with robust anti-diabetic, anti-obesity, and anti-atherogenic activities in preclinical species. In the current study, we investigated the signal transduction pathways downstream of FGF21 following acute administration of the growth factor to mice. Focusing on adipose tissues, we identified FGF21-mediated downstream signaling events and target engagement biomarkers. Specifically, RNA profiling of adipose tissues and phosphoproteomic profiling of adipocytes, following FGF21 treatment revealed several specific changes in gene expression and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation, in several relevant proteins. Affymetrix microarray analysis of white adipose tissues isolated from both C57BL/6 (fed either regular chow or HFD) and db/db mice identified over 150 robust potential RNA transcripts and over 50 potential secreted proteins that were changed greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 acutely. Phosphoprofiling analysis identified over 130 phosphoproteins that were modulated greater than 1.5 fold by FGF21 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Bioinformatic analysis of the combined gene and phosphoprotein profiling data identified a number of known metabolic pathways such as glucose uptake, insulin receptor signaling, Erk/Mapk signaling cascades, and lipid metabolism. Moreover, a number of novel events with hitherto unknown links to FGF21 signaling were observed at both the transcription and protein phosphorylation levels following treatment. We conclude that such a combined "omics" approach can be used not only to identify robust biomarkers for novel therapeutics but can also enhance our understanding of downstream signaling pathways; in the example presented here, novel FGF21-mediated signaling events in adipose tissue have been revealed that warrant further investigation. PMID:24039848

  7. Linking ligand perception by PEPR pattern recognition receptors to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and downstream immune signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robin K.; Zhao, Yichen; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about molecular steps linking perception of pathogen invasion by cell surface sentry proteins acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to downstream cytosolic Ca2+ elevation, a critical step in plant immune signaling cascades. Some PRRs recognize molecules (such as flagellin) associated with microbial pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), whereas others bind endogenous plant compounds (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) such as peptides released from cells upon attack. This work focuses on the Arabidopsis DAMPs plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2. Pep application causes in vivo cGMP generation and downstream signaling that is lost when the predicted PEPR receptor guanylyl cyclase (GC) active site is mutated. Pep-induced Ca2+ elevation is attributable to cGMP activation of a Ca2+ channel. Some differences were identified between Pep/PEPR signaling and the Ca2+-dependent immune signaling initiated by the flagellin peptide flg22 and its cognate receptor Flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). FLS2 signaling may have a greater requirement for intracellular Ca2+ stores and inositol phosphate signaling, whereas Pep/PEPR signaling requires extracellular Ca2+. Maximal FLS2 signaling requires a functional Pep/PEPR system. This dependence was evidenced as a requirement for functional PEPR receptors for maximal flg22-dependent Ca2+ elevation, H2O2 generation, defense gene [WRKY33 and Plant Defensin 1.2 (PDF1.2)] expression, and flg22/FLS2-dependent impairment of pathogen growth. In a corresponding fashion, FLS2 loss of function impaired Pep signaling. In addition, a role for PAMP and DAMP perception in bolstering effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is reported; loss of function of either FLS2 or PEPR receptors impaired the hypersensitive response (HR) to an avirulent pathogen. PMID:23150556

  8. Linking ligand perception by PEPR pattern recognition receptors to cytosolic Ca2+ elevation and downstream immune signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Walker, Robin K; Zhao, Yichen; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2012-11-27

    Little is known about molecular steps linking perception of pathogen invasion by cell surface sentry proteins acting as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) to downstream cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, a critical step in plant immune signaling cascades. Some PRRs recognize molecules (such as flagellin) associated with microbial pathogens (pathogen-associated molecular patterns, PAMPs), whereas others bind endogenous plant compounds (damage-associated molecular patterns, DAMPs) such as peptides released from cells upon attack. This work focuses on the Arabidopsis DAMPs plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors, PEPR1 and PEPR2. Pep application causes in vivo cGMP generation and downstream signaling that is lost when the predicted PEPR receptor guanylyl cyclase (GC) active site is mutated. Pep-induced Ca(2+) elevation is attributable to cGMP activation of a Ca(2+) channel. Some differences were identified between Pep/PEPR signaling and the Ca(2+)-dependent immune signaling initiated by the flagellin peptide flg22 and its cognate receptor Flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). FLS2 signaling may have a greater requirement for intracellular Ca(2+) stores and inositol phosphate signaling, whereas Pep/PEPR signaling requires extracellular Ca(2+). Maximal FLS2 signaling requires a functional Pep/PEPR system. This dependence was evidenced as a requirement for functional PEPR receptors for maximal flg22-dependent Ca(2+) elevation, H(2)O(2) generation, defense gene [WRKY33 and Plant Defensin 1.2 (PDF1.2)] expression, and flg22/FLS2-dependent impairment of pathogen growth. In a corresponding fashion, FLS2 loss of function impaired Pep signaling. In addition, a role for PAMP and DAMP perception in bolstering effector-triggered immunity (ETI) is reported; loss of function of either FLS2 or PEPR receptors impaired the hypersensitive response (HR) to an avirulent pathogen.

  9. Ape1/Ref-1 Stimulates GDNF/GFRalpha1-mediated Downstream Signaling and Neuroblastoma Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Mi-Young; Kim, Kweon Young; Yoon, Young; Kang, Yoonsung; Kim, Hong Beum; Youn, Cha Kyung; Kim, Dong-Hui; Kim, Mi-Hwa

    2009-10-01

    We previously reported that glial cell line-derived neurotropic factor (GDNF) receptor alpha1 (GFRalpha1) is a direct target of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (Ape1/Ref-1). In the present study, we further analyzed the physiological roles of Ape1/Ref-1-induced GFRalpha1 expression in Neuro2a mouse neuroblastoma cells. Ape1/Ref-1 expression caused the clustering of GFRalpha1 immunoreactivity in lipid rafts in response to GDNF. We also found that Ret, a downstream target of GFRalpha1, was functionally activated by GDNF in Ape1/Ref-1-expressing cells. Moreover, GDNF promoted the proliferation of Ape1/Ref-1-expressing Neuro2a cells. Furthermore, GFRalpha1-specific RNA experiments demonstrated that the downregulation of GFRalpha1 by siRNA in Ape1/Ref-1-expressing cells impaired the ability of GDNF to phosphorylate Akt and PLCgamma-1 and to stimulate cellular proliferation. These results show an association between Ape1/Ref-1 and GDNF/GFRalpha signaling, and suggest a potential molecular mechanism for the involvement of Ape1/Ref-1 in neuronal proliferation.

  10. Activation of the transcription factor FosB/activating protein-1 (AP-1) is a prominent downstream signal of the extracellular nucleotide receptor P2RX7 in monocytic and osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Gavala, Monica L; Hill, Lindsay M; Lenertz, Lisa Y; Karta, Maya R; Bertics, Paul J

    2010-10-29

    Activation of the ionotropic P2RX7 nucleotide receptor by extracellular ATP has been implicated in modulating inflammatory disease progression. Continuous exposure of P2RX7 to ligand can result in apoptosis in many cell types, including monocytic cells, whereas transient activation of P2RX7 is linked to inflammatory mediator production and the promotion of cell growth. Given the rapid hydrolysis of ATP in the circulation and interstitial space, transient activation of P2RX7 appears critically important for its action, yet its effects on gene expression are unclear. The present study demonstrates that short-term stimulation of human and mouse monocytic cells as well as mouse osteoblasts with P2RX7 agonists substantially induces the expression of several activating protein-1 (AP-1) members, particularly FosB. The potent activation of FosB after P2RX7 stimulation is especially noteworthy considering that little is known concerning the role of FosB in immunological regulation. Interestingly, the magnitude of FosB activation induced by P2RX7 stimulation appears greater than that observed with other known inducers of FosB expression. In addition, we have identified a previously unrecognized role for FosB in osteoblasts with respect to nucleotide-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), which is the rate-limiting enzyme in prostaglandin biosynthesis from arachidonic acid and is critical for osteoblastic differentiation and immune behavior. The present studies are the first to link P2RX7 action to FosB/AP-1 regulation in multiple cell types, including a role in nucleotide-induced COX-2 expression, and support a role for FosB in the control of immune and osteogenic function by P2RX7. PMID:20813842

  11. Electrical Motor Current Signal Analysis using a Modulation Signal Bispectrum for the Fault Diagnosis of a Gearbox Downstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haram, M.; Wang, T.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2012-05-01

    Motor current signal analysis has been an effective way for many years of monitoring electrical machines themselves. However, little work has been carried out in using this technique for monitoring their downstream equipment because of difficulties in extracting small fault components in the measured current signals. This paper investigates the characteristics of electrical current signals for monitoring the faults from a downstream gearbox using a modulation signal bispectrum (MSB), including phase effects in extracting small modulating components in a noisy measurement. An analytical study is firstly performed to understand amplitude, frequency and phase characteristics of current signals due to faults. It then explores the performance of MSB analysis in detecting weak modulating components in current signals. Experimental study based on a 10kw two stage gearbox, driven by a three phase induction motor, shows that MSB peaks at different rotational frequencies can be based to quantify the severity of gear tooth breakage and the degrees of shaft misalignment. In addition, the type and location of a fault can be recognized based on the frequency at which the change of MSB peak is the highest among different frequencies.

  12. mTOR Signaling Feedback Modulates Mammary Epithelial Differentiation and Restrains Invasion Downstream of PTEN Loss

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Susmita; Varela, Lidenys; Sood, Akshay; Park, Ben Ho; Lotan, Tamara L.

    2013-01-01

    Oncogenic signaling pathways are tightly regulated by negative feedback circuits and relief of these circuits represents a common mechanism of tumor drug resistance. Although the significance of these feedback pathways for signal transduction is evident, their relevance for cellular differentiation and morphogenesis in a genetically-defined context is unclear. In this study, we used isogenic benign mammary organotypic cultures to interrogate the role of mTOR-mediated negative feedback in the specific setting of PTEN inactivation. We found that mTOR signaling promoted basal-like differentiation and repressed nuclear hormone receptor expression after short-term PTEN loss in murine cell cultures analyzed ex vivo. Unexpectedly, we found that PTEN inactivation inhibited growth factor-induced epithelial invasion, and that downstream mTOR-mediated signaling feedback was both necessary and sufficient for this effect. Mechanistically, using isogenic MCF10A cells with and without somaticPTEN deletion, we showed that mTOR inhibition promoted EGF-mediated epithelial invasion by de-repressing upstream EGFR, SRC and PI3K signaling. In addition to offering new signal transduction insights, these results bring to light a number of important and potentially clinically relevant cellular consequences of mTOR inhibition in the specific context of PTEN loss, including modulation of hormone and growth factor responsiveness and promotion of epithelial invasion. Our findings prompt future investigations of the possibility that mTOR inhibitor therapy may not only be ineffective but even deleterious in tumors with PTEN loss. PMID:23774212

  13. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Gary S.; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K.; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV’s C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV’s GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions. PMID:25926659

  14. Evolutionary divergence of the plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors: interfamily incompatibility of perception but compatibility of downstream signalling

    PubMed Central

    Lori, Martina; van Verk, Marcel C.; Hander, Tim; Schatowitz, Hendrik; Klauser, Dominik; Flury, Pascale; Gehring, Christoph A.; Boller, Thomas; Bartels, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Plant elicitor peptides (Peps) are potent inducers of pattern-triggered immunity and amplify the immune response against diverse pathogens. Peps have been discovered and studied extensively in Arabidopsis and only recently orthologues in maize were also identified and characterized in more detail. Here, the presence of PROPEPs, the Pep precursors, and PEPRs, the Pep receptors, was investigated within the plant kingdom. PROPEPs and PEPRs were identified in most sequenced species of the angiosperms. The conservation and compatibility of the Pep-PEPR-system was analysed by using plants of two distantly related dicot families, Brassicaceae and Solanaceae, and a representative family of monocot plants, the Poaceae. All three plant families contain important crop plants, including maize, rice, tomato, potato, and canola. Peps were not recognized by species outside of their plant family of origin, apparently because of a divergence of the Pep sequences. Three family-specific Pep motifs were defined and the integration of such a motif into the Pep sequence of an unrelated Pep enabled its perception. Transient transformation of Nicotiana benthamiana with the coding sequences of the AtPEPR1 and ZmPEPR1a led to the recognition of Pep peptides of Brassicaceae or Poaceae origin, respectively, and to the proper activation of downstream signalling. It was concluded that signalling machinery downstream of the PEPRs is highly conserved whereas the leucine-rich repeat domains of the PEPRs co-evolved with the Peps, leading to distinct motifs and, with it, interfamily incompatibility. PMID:26002971

  15. Evolutionary divergence of the plant elicitor peptides (Peps) and their receptors: interfamily incompatibility of perception but compatibility of downstream signalling.

    PubMed

    Lori, Martina; van Verk, Marcel C; Hander, Tim; Schatowitz, Hendrik; Klauser, Dominik; Flury, Pascale; Gehring, Christoph A; Boller, Thomas; Bartels, Sebastian

    2015-08-01

    Plant elicitor peptides (Peps) are potent inducers of pattern-triggered immunity and amplify the immune response against diverse pathogens. Peps have been discovered and studied extensively in Arabidopsis and only recently orthologues in maize were also identified and characterized in more detail.Here, the presence of PROPEPs, the Pep precursors, and PEPRs, the Pep receptors, was investigated within the plant kingdom. PROPEPs and PEPRs were identified in most sequenced species of the angiosperms. The conservation and compatibility of the Pep-PEPR-system was analysed by using plants of two distantly related dicot families, Brassicaceae and Solanaceae, and a representative family of monocot plants, the Poaceae. All three plant families contain important crop plants, including maize, rice, tomato, potato, and canola. Peps were not recognized by species outside of their plant family of origin, apparently because of a divergence of the Pep sequences. Three family-specific Pep motifs were defined and the integration of such a motif into the Pep sequence of an unrelated Pep enabled its perception. Transient transformation of Nicotiana benthamiana with the coding sequences of the AtPEPR1 and ZmPEPR1a led to the recognition of Pep peptides of Brassicaceae or Poaceae origin, respectively, and to the proper activation of downstream signalling. It was concluded that signalling machinery downstream of the PEPRs is highly conserved whereas the leucine-rich repeat domains of the PEPRs co-evolved with the Peps, leading to distinct motifs and, with it, interfamily incompatibility. PMID:26002971

  16. Tumor-related alternatively spliced Rac1b is not regulated by Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitors and exhibits selective downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Matos, Paulo; Collard, John G; Jordan, Peter

    2003-12-12

    Rac1 is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, which control signaling pathways that regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics and gene transcription. Rac1 is activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and inactivated by GTPase-activating proteins. In addition, Rho-GDP dissociation inhibitors (Rho-GDIs) can inhibit Rac1 by sequestering it in the cytoplasm. We have found previously that colorectal tumors express an alternatively spliced variant, Rac1b, containing 19 additional amino acids following the switch II region. Here we characterized the regulation and downstream signaling of Rac1b. Although little Rac1b protein is expressed in cells, the amount of activated Rac1b protein often exceeds that of activated Rac1, suggesting that Rac1b contributes significantly to the downstream signaling of Rac in cells. The regulation of both Rac1 and Rac1b activities is dependent on guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, but the difference in their activation is mainly determined by the inability of Rac1b to interact with Rho-GDI. As a consequence, most Rac1b remains bound to the plasma membrane and is not sequestered by Rho-GDI in the cytoplasm. Unlike Rac1, activated Rac1b is unable to induce lamellipodia formation and is unable to bind and activate p21-activated protein kinase nor activate the downstream protein kinase JNK. However, both Rac1 and Rac1b are able to activate NFkappaB to the same extent. These data suggest that alternative splicing of Rac1 leads to a highly active Rac variant that differs in regulation and downstream signaling.

  17. Downstream activation of NF-κB in the EDA-A1/EDAR signalling in Sjögren's syndrome and its regulation by the ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20.

    PubMed

    Sisto, M; Barca, A; Lofrumento, D D; Lisi, S

    2016-05-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease and the second most common chronic systemic rheumatic disorder. Prevalence of primary SS in the general population has been estimated to be approximately 1-3%, whereas secondary SS has been observed in 10-20% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and scleroderma. Despite this, its exact aetiology and pathogenesis are largely unexplored. Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signalling mechanisms provide central controls in SS, but how these pathways intersect the pathological features of this disease is unclear. The ubiquitin-editing enzyme A20 (tumour necrosis factor-α-induced protein 3, TNFAIP3) serves as a critical inhibitor on NF-κB signalling. In humans, polymorphisms in the A20 gene or a deregulated expression of A20 are often associated with several inflammatory disorders, including SS. Because A20 controls the ectodysplasin-A1 (EDA-A1)/ectodysplasin receptor (EDAR) signalling negatively, and the deletion of A20 results in excessive EDA1-induced NF-κB signalling, this work investigates the expression levels of EDA-A1 and EDAR in SS human salivary glands epithelial cells (SGEC) and evaluates the hypothesis that SS SGEC-specific deregulation of A20 results in excessive EDA1-induced NF-κB signalling in SS. Our approach, which combines the use of siRNA-mediated gene silencing and quantitative pathway analysis, was used to elucidate the role of the A20 target gene in intracellular EDA-A1/EDAR/NF-κB pathway in SS SGEC, holding significant promise for compound selection in drug discovery. PMID:26724675

  18. Subthalamic, not striatal, activity correlates with basal ganglia downstream activity in normal and parkinsonian monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Deffains, Marc; Iskhakova, Liliya; Katabi, Shiran; Haber, Suzanne N; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai

    2016-01-01

    The striatum and the subthalamic nucleus (STN) constitute the input stage of the basal ganglia (BG) network and together innervate BG downstream structures using GABA and glutamate, respectively. Comparison of the neuronal activity in BG input and downstream structures reveals that subthalamic, not striatal, activity fluctuations correlate with modulations in the increase/decrease discharge balance of BG downstream neurons during temporal discounting classical condition task. After induction of parkinsonism with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), abnormal low beta (8-15 Hz) spiking and local field potential (LFP) oscillations resonate across the BG network. Nevertheless, LFP beta oscillations entrain spiking activity of STN, striatal cholinergic interneurons and BG downstream structures, but do not entrain spiking activity of striatal projection neurons. Our results highlight the pivotal role of STN divergent projections in BG physiology and pathophysiology and may explain why STN is such an effective site for invasive treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease and other BG-related disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16443.001 PMID:27552049

  19. Activation of HuR downstream of p38 MAPK promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Slone, Samuel; Anthony, Sarah R; Wu, Xiaoqing; Benoit, Joshua B; Aube, Jeffrey; Xu, Liang; Tranter, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The RNA binding protein Human antigen R (HuR) interacts with specific AU-rich domains in target mRNAs and is highly expressed in many cell types, including cardiomyocytes. However, the role of HuR in cardiac physiology is largely unknown. Our results show that HuR undergoes cytoplasmic translocation, indicative of its activation, in hypertrophic cardiac myocytes. Specifically, HuR cytoplasmic translocation is significantly increased in NRVMs (neonatal rat ventricular myocytes) following treatment with phenylephrine or angiotensin II, agonists of two independent Gαq-coupled GPCRs known to induce hypertrophy. This Gq-mediated HuR activation is dependent on p38 MAP kinase, but not canonical Gq-PKC signaling. Furthermore, we show that HuR activation is necessary for Gq-mediated hypertrophic growth of NRVMs as siRNA-mediated knockdown of HuR inhibits hypertrophy as measured by cell size and expression of ANF (atrial natriuretic factor). Additionally, HuR overexpression is sufficient to induce hypertrophic cell growth. To decipher the downstream mechanisms by which HuR translocation promotes cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, we assessed the role of HuR in the transcriptional activity of NFAT (nuclear factor of activated T cells), the activation of which is a hallmark of cardiac hypertrophy. Using an NFAT-luciferase reporter assay, we show an acute inhibition of NFAT transcriptional activity following pharmacological inhibition of HuR. In conclusion, our results identify HuR as a novel mediator of cardiac hypertrophy downstream of the Gq-p38 MAPK pathway, and suggest modulation of NFAT activity as a potential mechanism.

  20. Effect of Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-2 (WISP-2/CCN5), a downstream protein of Wnt signaling, on adipocyte differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Inadera, Hidekuni Shimomura, Akiko; Tachibana, Shinjiro

    2009-02-20

    Wnt signaling negatively regulates adipocyte differentiation, and ectopic expression of Wnt-1 in 3T3-L1 cells induces several downstream molecules of Wnt signaling, including Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein (WISP)-2. In this study, we examined the role of WISP-2 in the process of adipocyte differentiation using an in vitro cell culture system. In the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, WISP-2 expression was observed in growing cells and declined thereafter. In the mitotic clonal expansion phase of adipocyte differentiation, WISP-2 expression was transiently down-regulated concurrently with up-regulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein {delta} expression. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells in the differentiation medium with lithium, an activator of Wnt signaling, inhibited the differentiation process with concomitant induction of WISP-2. Treatment of differentiated cells with lithium induced de-differentiation as evidenced by profound reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor {gamma} expression and concomitant induction of WISP-2. However, de-differentiation of differentiated cells induced by tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} did not induce WISP-2 expression. To directly examine the effect of WISP-2 on adipocyte differentiation, 3T3-L1 cells were infected with a retrovirus carrying WISP-2. Although forced expression of WISP-2 inhibited preadipocyte proliferation, it had no effect on adipocyte differentiation. Thus, although WISP-2 is a downstream protein of Wnt signaling, the role of WISP-2 on adipocyte differentiation may be marginal, at least in this in vitro culture model.

  1. Effect of Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein-2 (WISP-2/CCN5), a downstream protein of Wnt signaling, on adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Inadera, Hidekuni; Shimomura, Akiko; Tachibana, Shinjiro

    2009-02-20

    Wnt signaling negatively regulates adipocyte differentiation, and ectopic expression of Wnt-1 in 3T3-L1 cells induces several downstream molecules of Wnt signaling, including Wnt-1 inducible signaling pathway protein (WISP)-2. In this study, we examined the role of WISP-2 in the process of adipocyte differentiation using an in vitro cell culture system. In the differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells, WISP-2 expression was observed in growing cells and declined thereafter. In the mitotic clonal expansion phase of adipocyte differentiation, WISP-2 expression was transiently down-regulated concurrently with up-regulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta expression. Treatment of 3T3-L1 cells in the differentiation medium with lithium, an activator of Wnt signaling, inhibited the differentiation process with concomitant induction of WISP-2. Treatment of differentiated cells with lithium induced de-differentiation as evidenced by profound reduction of peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor gamma expression and concomitant induction of WISP-2. However, de-differentiation of differentiated cells induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha did not induce WISP-2 expression. To directly examine the effect of WISP-2 on adipocyte differentiation, 3T3-L1 cells were infected with a retrovirus carrying WISP-2. Although forced expression of WISP-2 inhibited preadipocyte proliferation, it had no effect on adipocyte differentiation. Thus, although WISP-2 is a downstream protein of Wnt signaling, the role of WISP-2 on adipocyte differentiation may be marginal, at least in this in vitro culture model.

  2. PREX1 Protein Function Is Negatively Regulated Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation by p21-activated Kinases (PAKs).

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; He, John Z; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-09-16

    Downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) stimulation, the phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchange factor (PREX) family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activates Rho GTPases, leading to important roles for PREX proteins in numerous cellular processes and diseases, including cancer. PREX1 and PREX2 GEF activity is activated by the second messengers PIP3 and Gβγ, and further regulation of PREX GEF activity occurs by phosphorylation. Stimulation of receptor tyrosine kinases by neuregulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) leads to the phosphorylation of PREX1; however, the kinases that phosphorylate PREX1 downstream of these ligands are not known. We recently reported that the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), which are activated by GTP-bound Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), mediate the phosphorylation of PREX2 after insulin receptor activation. Here we show that certain phosphorylation events on PREX1 after insulin, neuregulin, and IGF1 treatment are PAK-dependent and lead to a reduction in PREX1 binding to PIP3 Like PREX2, PAK-mediated phosphorylation also negatively regulates PREX1 GEF activity. Furthermore, the onset of PREX1 phosphorylation was delayed compared with the phosphorylation of AKT, supporting a model of negative feedback downstream of PREX1 activation. We also found that the phosphorylation of PREX1 after isoproterenol and prostaglandin E2-mediated GPCR activation is partially PAK-dependent and likely also involves protein kinase A, which is known to reduce PREX1 function. Our data point to multiple mechanisms of PREX1 negative regulation by PAKs within receptor tyrosine kinase and GPCR-stimulated signaling pathways that have important roles in diseases such as diabetes and cancer. PMID:27481946

  3. The protein kinase homologue Ste20p is required to link the yeast pheromone response G-protein beta gamma subunits to downstream signalling components.

    PubMed Central

    Leberer, E; Dignard, D; Harcus, D; Thomas, D Y; Whiteway, M

    1992-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the G-protein beta gamma subunits have been shown to trigger downstream events of the pheromone response pathway. We have identified a new gene, designated STE20, which encodes a protein kinase homologue with sequence similarity to protein kinase C, which is required to transmit the pheromone signal from G beta gamma to downstream components of the signalling pathway. Overproduction of the kinase suppresses the mating defect of dominant-negative G beta mutations providing genetic evidence for an interaction with G beta, and epistasis experiments show that this kinase functions after or at the same point as G beta gamma, but before any of the other currently identified components of the signalling pathway. This points to a potentially new mechanism of G-protein mediated signal transduction, the activation of a protein kinase through G beta gamma. Images PMID:1464311

  4. PKN3 is required for malignant prostate cell growth downstream of activated PI 3-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Leenders, Frauke; Möpert, Kristin; Schmiedeknecht, Anett; Santel, Ansgar; Czauderna, Frank; Aleku, Manuela; Penschuck, Silke; Dames, Sibylle; Sternberger, Maria; Röhl, Thomas; Wellmann, Axel; Arnold, Wolfgang; Giese, Klaus; Kaufmann, Jörg; Klippel, Anke

    2004-01-01

    Chronic activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PTEN signal transduction pathway contributes to metastatic cell growth, but up to now effectors mediating this response are poorly defined. By simulating chronic activation of PI3K signaling experimentally, combined with three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions and gene expression profiling, we aimed to identify novel effectors that contribute to malignant cell growth. Using this approach we identified and validated PKN3, a barely characterized protein kinase C-related molecule, as a novel effector mediating malignant cell growth downstream of activated PI3K. PKN3 is required for invasive prostate cell growth as assessed by 3D cell culture assays and in an orthotopic mouse tumor model by inducible expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA). We demonstrate that PKN3 is regulated by PI3K at both the expression level and the catalytic activity level. Therefore, PKN3 might represent a preferred target for therapeutic intervention in cancers that lack tumor suppressor PTEN function or depend on chronic activation of PI3K. PMID:15282551

  5. PTHrP promotes malignancy of human oral cancer cell downstream of the EGFR signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, Tamaki; Tsuda, Masumi; Ohba, Yusuke Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Totsuka, Yasunori; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2008-04-11

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is detected in many aggressive tumors and involved in malignant conversion; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. Here, we identified PTHrP as a mediator of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling to promote the malignancies of oral cancers. PTHrP mRNA was abundantly expressed in most of the quiescent oral cancer cells, and was significantly upregulated by EGF stimulation via ERK and p38 MAPK. PTHrP silencing by RNA interference, as well as EGFR inhibitor AG1478 treatment, significantly suppressed cell proliferation, migration, and invasiveness. Furthermore, combined treatment of AG1478 and PTHrP knockdown achieved synergistic inhibition of malignant phenotypes. Recombinant PTHrP substantially promoted cell motility, and rescued the inhibition by PTHrP knockdown, suggesting the paracrine/autocrine function of PTHrP. These data indicate that PTHrP contributes to the malignancy of oral cancers downstream of EGFR signaling, and may thus provide a therapeutic target for oral cancer.

  6. Mechanisms of Biased β-Arrestin-Mediated Signaling Downstream from the Cannabinoid 1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Peraza, Francheska; Ahn, Kwang H.; Nogueras-Ortiz, Carlos; Mungrue, Imran N.; Mackie, Ken; Kendall, Debra A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of G protein-coupled receptors results in multiple waves of signaling that are mediated by heterotrimeric G proteins and the scaffolding proteins β-arrestin 1/2. Ligands can elicit full or subsets of cellular responses, a concept defined as ligand bias or functional selectivity. However, our current understanding of β-arrestin-mediated signaling is still very limited. Here we provide a comprehensive view of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1R). By using a signaling biased receptor, we define the cascades, specific receptor kinases, and molecular mechanism underlying β-arrestin-mediated signaling: We identify the interaction kinetics of CB1R and β-arrestin 1 during their endocytic trafficking as directly proportional to its efficacy. Finally, we demonstrate that signaling results in the control of genes clustered around prosurvival and proapoptotic functions among others. Together, these studies constitute a comprehensive description of β-arrestin-mediated signaling from CB1Rs and suggest modulation of receptor endocytic trafficking as a therapeutic approach to control β-arrestin-mediated signaling. PMID:27009233

  7. Nek7 is an essential mediator of NLRP3 activation downstream of potassium efflux

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuan; Zeng, Melody Y.; Yang, Dahai; Motro, Benny; Núñez, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are intracellular protein complexes that drive the activation of inflammatory caspases1. To date, four inflammasomes involving NLRP1, NLRP3, NLRC4 and AIM2 have been described that recruit the common adaptor ASC to activate caspase-1, leading to the secretion of mature IL-1β and IL-182,3. The NLRP3 inflammasome has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several acquired inflammatory diseases4,5 as well as Cryopyrin-associated periodic fever syndromes (CAPS) caused by inherited NLRP3 mutations6,7. Potassium efflux is a common step that is essential for NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by multiple stimuli8,9. Despite extensive investigation, the molecular mechanism leading to NLRP3 activation in response to potassium efflux remains unknown. We report here the identification of Nek7, a member of the family of mammalian NIMA-related kinases (Neks)10, as an NLRP3-binding protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to regulate NLRP3 oligomerization and activation. In the absence of Nek7, caspase-1 activation and IL-1β release were abrogated in response to signals that activate NLRP3, but not NLRC4 or AIM2 inflammasome. NLRP3-activating stimuli promoted the NLRP3-Nek7 interaction in a process dependent on potassium efflux. NLRP3 associated with the catalytic domain of Nek7, but the catalytic activity of Nek7 was dispensable for activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. Activated macrophages formed a high-molecular-mass NLRP3-Nek7 complex, which along with ASC oligomerization and ASC speck formation were abrogated in the absence of Nek7. Nek7 was required for macrophages harboring the CAPS-associated NLRP3R258W activating mutation to activate caspase-1. Mouse chimeras reconstituted with wild-type, Nek7−/− or Nlrp3−/− hematopoietic cells revealed that Nek7 was required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation in vivo. These studies demonstrate that Nek7 is an essential protein that acts downstream of potassium efflux to mediate NLRP3 inflammasome

  8. beta-Arrestin mediates beta1-adrenergic receptor-epidermal growth factor receptor interaction and downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Tilley, Douglas G; Kim, Il-Man; Patel, Priyesh A; Violin, Jonathan D; Rockman, Howard A

    2009-07-24

    beta1-Adrenergic receptor (beta1AR) stimulation confers cardioprotection via beta-arrestin-de pend ent transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs), however, the precise mechanism for this salutary process is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that the beta1AR and EGFR form a complex that differentially directs intracellular signaling pathways. beta1AR stimulation and EGF ligand can each induce equivalent EGFR phosphorylation, internalization, and downstream activation of ERK1/2, but only EGF ligand causes translocation of activated ERK to the nucleus, whereas beta1AR-stimulated/EGFR-transactivated ERK is restricted to the cytoplasm. beta1AR and EGFR are shown to interact as a receptor complex both in cell culture and endogenously in human heart, an interaction that is selective and undergoes dynamic regulation by ligand stimulation. Although catecholamine stimulation mediates the retention of beta1AR-EGFR interaction throughout receptor internalization, direct EGF ligand stimulation initiates the internalization of EGFR alone. Continued interaction of beta1AR with EGFR following activation is dependent upon C-terminal tail GRK phosphorylation sites of the beta1AR and recruitment of beta-arrestin. These data reveal a new signaling paradigm in which beta-arrestin is required for the maintenance of a beta1AR-EGFR interaction that can direct cytosolic targeting of ERK in response to catecholamine stimulation.

  9. Phosphodiesterase 4D acts downstream of Neuropilin to control Hedgehog signal transduction and the growth of medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xuecai; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Suyama, Kaye; Hartl, Tom; Purzner, Teresa; Winans, Amy; Meyer, Tobias; Scott, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling lead to birth defects and cancers including medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor. Although inhibitors targeting the membrane protein Smoothened suppress Hh signaling, acquired drug resistance and tumor relapse call for additional therapeutic targets. Here we show that phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) acts downstream of Neuropilins to control Hh transduction and medulloblastoma growth. PDE4D interacts directly with Neuropilins, positive regulators of Hh pathway. The Neuropilin ligand Semaphorin3 enhances this interaction, promoting PDE4D translocation to the plasma membrane and cAMP degradation. The consequent inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) enhances Hh transduction. In the developing cerebellum, genetic removal of Neuropilins reduces Hh signaling activity and suppresses proliferation of granule neuron precursors. In mouse medulloblastoma allografts, PDE4D inhibitors suppress Hh transduction and inhibit tumor growth. Our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of Hh transduction, and highlight PDE4D as a promising target to treat Hh-related tumors. PMID:26371509

  10. Phosphodiesterase 4D acts downstream of Neuropilin to control Hedgehog signal transduction and the growth of medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Xuecai; Milenkovic, Ljiljana; Suyama, Kaye; Hartl, Tom; Purzner, Teresa; Winans, Amy; Meyer, Tobias; Scott, Matthew P

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in Hedgehog (Hh) signaling lead to birth defects and cancers including medulloblastoma, the most common pediatric brain tumor. Although inhibitors targeting the membrane protein Smoothened suppress Hh signaling, acquired drug resistance and tumor relapse call for additional therapeutic targets. Here we show that phosphodiesterase 4D (PDE4D) acts downstream of Neuropilins to control Hh transduction and medulloblastoma growth. PDE4D interacts directly with Neuropilins, positive regulators of Hh pathway. The Neuropilin ligand Semaphorin3 enhances this interaction, promoting PDE4D translocation to the plasma membrane and cAMP degradation. The consequent inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) enhances Hh transduction. In the developing cerebellum, genetic removal of Neuropilins reduces Hh signaling activity and suppresses proliferation of granule neuron precursors. In mouse medulloblastoma allografts, PDE4D inhibitors suppress Hh transduction and inhibit tumor growth. Our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of Hh transduction, and highlight PDE4D as a promising target to treat Hh-related tumors. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07068.001 PMID:26371509

  11. An experimental demonstration for carrier reused bidirectional PON system with adaptive modulation DDO-OFDM downstream and QPSK upstream signals.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jhih-Heng; Chen, You-Wei; Shen, Kuan-Heng; Feng, Kai-Ming

    2013-11-18

    A light source centralized bidirectional passive optical network (PON) system based on multiband direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) downstream and quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) upstream is experimentally demonstrated. By introducing a simple optical single-side band (SSB) filter at the optical network unit (ONU), all the desired signal bands will be immune from the deleterious signal-signal beating interference (SSBI) noise with only single-end direct-detection scheme. An adaptive modulation configuration is employed to enhance the entire downstream throughput which results in a 150-Gbps downstream data rate with a single optical carrier. In the upstream direction, by recycling the clean downstream optical carrier, a 12.5 Gb/s QPSK format with coherent receiving mechanism in central office is adopted for better receiving sensitivity and dispersion tolerance. With the power enhancement by the long-reach PON architecture, the downstream splitting ratio can achieve as high as 1:1024.

  12. Drosophila Fascin is a novel downstream target of prostaglandin signaling during actin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Groen, Christopher M; Spracklen, Andrew J; Fagan, Tiffany N; Tootle, Tina L

    2012-12-01

    Although prostaglandins (PGs)-lipid signals produced downstream of cyclooxygenase (COX) enzymes-regulate actin cytoskeletal dynamics, their mechanisms of action are unknown. We previously established Drosophila oogenesis, in particular nurse cell dumping, as a new model to determine how PGs regulate actin remodeling. PGs, and thus the Drosophila COX-like enzyme Pxt, are required for both the parallel actin filament bundle formation and the cortical actin strengthening required for dumping. Here we provide the first link between Fascin (Drosophila Singed, Sn), an actin-bundling protein, and PGs. Loss of either pxt or fascin results in similar actin defects. Fascin interacts, both pharmacologically and genetically, with PGs, as reduced Fascin levels enhance the effects of COX inhibition and synergize with reduced Pxt levels to cause both parallel bundle and cortical actin defects. Conversely, overexpression of Fascin in the germline suppresses the effects of COX inhibition and genetic loss of Pxt. These data lead to the conclusion that PGs regulate Fascin to control actin remodeling. This novel interaction has implications beyond Drosophila, as both PGs and Fascin-1, in mammalian systems, contribute to cancer cell migration and invasion.

  13. miR-326 is downstream of Sonic hedgehog signaling and regulates the expression of Gli2 and smoothened.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhihua; Cushing, Leah; Ai, Xingbin; Lü, Jining

    2014-08-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is expressed and secreted from the embryonic lung epithelium and acts on the adjacent mesenchymal cells via its receptor Patched (Ptch)/Smoothened (Smo) and transcriptional effectors Gli proteins. Genetic studies showed that the Shh pathway plays critical roles in mouse lung development. However, little is known about microRNAs (miRNAs) downstream of Shh in embryonic lungs. Here we profiled miRNAs in embryonic lung cultures treated with cyclopamine, a specific Smo antagonist or with Smo agonist by next-generation of sequencing. We then performed functional screening to examine whether some of these miRNAs can modulate the induction of Gli-responsive luciferase by Shh treatment. These analyses revealed that expression of miR-326 and its host gene, Arrestin β1, is selectively enriched in embryonic lung mesenchymal cells and is specifically influenced by Shh activity. Furthermore, functional analyses showed that miR-326 acts as a negative modulator for Shh signaling by directly targeting Smo and Gli2. Together, these findings suggest a novel miR-326-negative feedback loop in regulating the activity of Shh signaling.

  14. An essential role for Grk2 in Hedgehog signalling downstream of Smoothened.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhonghua; Lee, Raymond Teck Ho; Pusapati, Ganesh V; Iyu, Audrey; Rohatgi, Rajat; Ingham, Philip W

    2016-05-01

    The G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (adrbk2/GRK2) has been implicated in vertebrate Hedgehog (Hh) signalling based on the effects of its transient knock-down in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. Here, we show that the response to Hh signalling is effectively abolished in the absence of Grk2 activity. Zebrafish embryos lacking all Grk2 activity are refractory to both Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and oncogenic Smoothened (Smo) activity, but remain responsive to inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. Mutation of the kinase domain abrogates the rescuing activity of grk2 mRNA, suggesting that Grk2 acts in a kinase-dependent manner to regulate the response to Hh. Previous studies have suggested that Grk2 potentiates Smo activity by phosphorylating its C-terminal tail (CTT). In the zebrafish embryo, however, phosphomimetic Smo does not display constitutive activity, whereas phospho-null mutants retain activity, implying phosphorylation is neither sufficient nor necessary for Smo function. Since Grk2 rescuing activity requires the integrity of domains essential for its interaction with GPCRs, we speculate that Grk2 may regulate Hh pathway activity by downregulation of a GPCR. PMID:27113758

  15. Peroxisome proliferation in Arabidopsis: The challenging identification of ligand perception and downstream signaling is closer.

    PubMed

    León, José

    2008-09-01

    Peroxisomes are subcellular organelles with multiple functions mediated by their plasticity and dynamic behavior in plants. Changes in their shape, size, number and enzyme content occur in response to developmental and metabolic cues as well as environmental conditions. The number of peroxisomes per cell is thus mainly determined by its capacity to proliferate. In mammals, peroxisome proliferators such as the hypolipidemic drug clofibrate are perceived by the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptors (PPARs) nuclear receptors. Therein, activated transcription of the peroxisome biogenesis PEX11 genes and the recruitment of dynamin-related proteins lead to peroxisome proliferation. We recently reported that Arabidopsis thaliana, despite of lacking a PPAR homolog protein, activated the proliferation of peroxisomes in response to clofibrate. Concomitantly, clofibrate activated the expression of wound-responsive genes through the jasmonic acid signaling master regulator COI1 F-box protein. Besides, wounding activated the expression of the peroxisome biogenesis-related PEX1 and PEX14 genes, but not of PEX11 or DRP3A, which analogously to mammals, code for the main regulators of peroxisome proliferation in Arabidopsis. Thus, wounding did not activate peroxisome proliferation. Noteworthy, jasmonic acid-treated plants contained fewer but larger peroxisomes. Despite of the cross-talk between clofibrate- and wound-induced signaling, the proliferation of peroxisomes and the wound-activated defense remained uncoupled.

  16. Frequency of alcohol consumption in humans; the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors and downstream signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Meyers, J L; Salling, M C; Almli, L M; Ratanatharathorn, A; Uddin, M; Galea, S; Wildman, D E; Aiello, A E; Bradley, B; Ressler, K; Koenen, K C

    2015-01-01

    Rodent models implicate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and downstream signaling pathways in addictive behaviors through metaplasticity. One way mGluRs can influence synaptic plasticity is by regulating the local translation of AMPA receptor trafficking proteins via eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). However, genetic variation in this pathway has not been examined with human alcohol use phenotypes. Among a sample of adults living in Detroit, Michigan (Detroit Neighborhood Health Study; n = 788; 83% African American), 206 genetic variants across the mGluR-eEF2-AMPAR pathway (including GRM1, GRM5, HOMER1, HOMER2, EEF2K, MTOR, EIF4E, EEF2, CAMK2A, ARC, GRIA1 and GRIA4) were found to predict number of drinking days per month (corrected P-value < 0.01) when considered as a set (set-based linear regression conducted in PLINK). In addition, a CpG site located in the 3'-untranslated region on the north shore of EEF2 (cg12255298) was hypermethylated in those who drank more frequently (P < 0.05). Importantly, the association between several genetic variants within the mGluR-eEF2-AMPAR pathway and alcohol use behavior (i.e., consumption and alcohol-related problems) replicated in the Grady Trauma Project (GTP), an independent sample of adults living in Atlanta, Georgia (n = 1034; 95% African American), including individual variants in GRM1, GRM5, EEF2, MTOR, GRIA1, GRIA4 and HOMER2 (P < 0.05). Gene-based analyses conducted in the GTP indicated that GRM1 (empirical P < 0.05) and EEF2 (empirical P < 0.01) withstood multiple test corrections and predicted increased alcohol consumption and related problems. In conclusion, insights from rodent studies enabled the identification of novel human alcohol candidate genes within the mGluR-eEF2-AMPAR pathway. PMID:26101849

  17. Frequency of alcohol consumption in humans; the role of metabotropic glutamate receptors and downstream signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, J L; Salling, M C; Almli, L M; Ratanatharathorn, A; Uddin, M; Galea, S; Wildman, D E; Aiello, A E; Bradley, B; Ressler, K; Koenen, K C

    2015-01-01

    Rodent models implicate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and downstream signaling pathways in addictive behaviors through metaplasticity. One way mGluRs can influence synaptic plasticity is by regulating the local translation of AMPA receptor trafficking proteins via eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2). However, genetic variation in this pathway has not been examined with human alcohol use phenotypes. Among a sample of adults living in Detroit, Michigan (Detroit Neighborhood Health Study; n=788; 83% African American), 206 genetic variants across the mGluR–eEF2–AMPAR pathway (including GRM1, GRM5, HOMER1, HOMER2, EEF2K, MTOR, EIF4E, EEF2, CAMK2A, ARC, GRIA1 and GRIA4) were found to predict number of drinking days per month (corrected P-value <0.01) when considered as a set (set-based linear regression conducted in PLINK). In addition, a CpG site located in the 3′-untranslated region on the north shore of EEF2 (cg12255298) was hypermethylated in those who drank more frequently (P<0.05). Importantly, the association between several genetic variants within the mGluR–eEF2–AMPAR pathway and alcohol use behavior (i.e., consumption and alcohol-related problems) replicated in the Grady Trauma Project (GTP), an independent sample of adults living in Atlanta, Georgia (n=1034; 95% African American), including individual variants in GRM1, GRM5, EEF2, MTOR, GRIA1, GRIA4 and HOMER2 (P<0.05). Gene-based analyses conducted in the GTP indicated that GRM1 (empirical P<0.05) and EEF2 (empirical P<0.01) withstood multiple test corrections and predicted increased alcohol consumption and related problems. In conclusion, insights from rodent studies enabled the identification of novel human alcohol candidate genes within the mGluR–eEF2–AMPAR pathway. PMID:26101849

  18. Differential subcellular membrane recruitment of Src may specify its downstream signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Diesbach, Philippe de; Medts, Thierry; Carpentier, Sarah; D'Auria, Ludovic; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Platek, Anna; Mettlen, Marcel; Caplanusi, Adrian; Hove, Marie-France van den; Tyteca, Donatienne; Courtoy, Pierre J.

    2008-04-15

    Most Src family members are diacylated and constitutively associate with membrane 'lipid rafts' that coordinate signalling. Whether the monoacylated Src, frequently hyperactive in carcinomas, also localizes at 'rafts' remains controversial. Using polarized MDCK cells expressing the thermosensitive v-Src/tsLA31 variant, we here addressed how Src tyrosine-kinase activation may impact on its (i) membrane recruitment, in particular to 'lipid rafts'; (ii) subcellular localization; and (iii) signalling. The kinetics of Src-kinase thermoactivation correlated with its recruitment from the cytosol to sedimentable membranes where Src largely resisted solubilisation by non-ionic detergents at 4 deg. C and floated into sucrose density gradients like caveolin-1 and flotillin-2, i.e. 'lipid rafts'. By immunofluorescence, activated Src showed a dual localization, at apical endosomes/macropinosomes and at the apical plasma membrane. The plasma membrane Src pool did not colocalize with caveolin-1 and flotillin-2, but extensively overlapped GM1 labelling by cholera toxin. Severe ({approx} 70%) cholesterol extraction with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}CD) did not abolish 'rafts' floatation, but strongly decreased Src association with floating 'rafts' and abolished its localization at the apical plasma membrane. Src activation independently activated first the MAP-kinase - ERK1/2 pathway, then the PI3-kinase - Akt pathway. MAP-kinase - ERK1/2 activation was insensitive to M{beta}CD, which suppressed Akt phosphorylation and apical endocytosis induced by Src, both depending on the PI3-kinase pathway. We therefore suggest that activated Src is recruited at two membrane compartments, allowing differential signalling, first via ERK1/2 at 'non-raft' domains on endosomes, then via PI3-kinase-Akt on a distinct set of 'rafts' at the apical plasma membrane. Whether this model is applicable to c-Src remains to be examined.

  19. Mixtures of xenoestrogens disrupt estradiol-induced non-genomic signaling and downstream functions in pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Our study examines the effects of xenoestrogen mixtures on estradiol-induced non-genomic signaling and associated functional responses. Bisphenol-A, used to manufacture plastic consumer products, and nonylphenol, a surfactant, are estrogenic by a variety of assays, including altering many intracellular signaling pathways; bisphenol-S is now used as a bisphenol-A substitute. All three compounds contaminate the environment globally. We previously showed that bisphenol-S, bisphenol-A, and nonylphenol alone rapidly activated several kinases at very low concentrations in the GH3/B6/F10 rat pituitary cell line. Methods For each assay we compared the response of individual xenoestrogens at environmentally relevant concentrations (10-15 -10-7 M), to their mixture effects on 10-9 M estradiol-induced responses. We used a medium-throughput plate immunoassay to quantify phosphorylations of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and c-Jun-N-terminal kinases (JNKs). Cell numbers were assessed by crystal violet assay to compare the proliferative effects. Apoptosis was assessed by measuring caspase 8 and 9 activities via the release of the fluorescent product 7-amino-4-trifluoromethylcoumarin. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay after a 1 min exposure to all individual and combinations of estrogens. Results Individual xenoestrogens elicited phospho-activation of ERK in a non-monotonic dose- (fM-nM) and mostly oscillating time-dependent (2.5-60 min) manner. When multiple xenoestrogens were combined with nM estradiol, the physiologic estrogen’s response was attenuated. Individual bisphenol compounds did not activate JNK, while nonylphenol did; however, the combination of two or three xenoestrogens with estradiol generated an enhanced non-monotonic JNK dose–response. Estradiol and all xenoestrogen compounds induced cell proliferation individually, while the mixtures of these compounds with estradiol suppressed proliferation below that of the

  20. The Metastasis Suppressor, N-MYC Downstream-regulated Gene-1 (NDRG1), Down-regulates the ErbB Family of Receptors to Inhibit Downstream Oncogenic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Menezes, Sharleen V; Sahni, Sumit; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Bae, Dong-Hun; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2016-01-15

    N-MYC downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent growth and metastasis suppressor that acts through its inhibitory effects on a wide variety of cellular signaling pathways, including the TGF-β pathway, protein kinase B (AKT)/PI3K pathway, RAS, etc. To investigate the hypothesis that its multiple effects could be regulated by a common upstream effector, the role of NDRG1 on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other members of the ErbB family, namely human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), was examined. We demonstrate that NDRG1 markedly decreased the expression and activation of EGFR, HER2, and HER3 in response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand, while also inhibiting formation of the EGFR/HER2 and HER2/HER3 heterodimers. In addition, NDRG1 also decreased activation of the downstream MAPKK in response to EGF. Moreover, novel anti-tumor agents of the di-2-pyridylketone class of thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, which markedly up-regulate NDRG1, were found to inhibit EGFR, HER2, and HER3 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells. However, the mechanism involved appeared dependent on NDRG1 for di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, but was independent of this metastasis suppressor for di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone. This observation demonstrates that small structural changes in thiosemicarbazones result in marked alterations in molecular targeting. Collectively, these results reveal a mechanism for the extensive downstream effects on cellular signaling attributed to NDRG1. Furthermore, this study identifies a novel approach for the treatment of tumors resistant to traditional EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26534963

  1. A simple feature construction method for predicting upstream/downstream signal flow in human protein-protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Suyu; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Signaling pathways play important roles in understanding the underlying mechanism of cell growth, cell apoptosis, organismal development and pathways-aberrant diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are commonly-used infrastructure to infer signaling pathways. However, PPI networks generally carry no information of upstream/downstream relationship between interacting proteins, which retards our inferring the signal flow of signaling pathways. In this work, we propose a simple feature construction method to train a SVM (support vector machine) classifier to predict PPI upstream/downstream relations. The domain based asymmetric feature representation naturally embodies domain-domain upstream/downstream relations, providing an unconventional avenue to predict the directionality between two objects. Moreover, we propose a semantically interpretable decision function and a macro bag-level performance metric to satisfy the need of two-instance depiction of an interacting protein pair. Experimental results show that the proposed method achieves satisfactory cross validation performance and independent test performance. Lastly, we use the trained model to predict the PPIs in HPRD, Reactome and IntAct. Some predictions have been validated against recent literature. PMID:26648121

  2. HAESA and HAESA-LIKE2 activate organ abscission downstream of NEVERSHED and EVERSHED in Arabidopsis flowers

    PubMed Central

    Gubert, Catherine M; Liljegren, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    A ligand-receptor module comprised of the peptide INFLORESCENCE DEFICIENT IN ABSCISSION (IDA) and the receptor-like kinases HAESA (HAE) and HAESA-LIKE2 (HSL2) activates organ abscission in Arabidopsis flowers. Another set of receptor-like kinases, including EVERSHED (EVR), restricts the extent of cell separation in abscission zones by potentially altering HAE/HSL2 localization or activity. The NEVERSHED (NEV) ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein facilitates the intracellular movement of molecules required for organ abscission and fruit growth. Here we report further analysis of the relationship between NEV-mediated intracellular traffic, EVR activity and IDA-HAE/HSL2 signaling during flower development. Our results support a model in which cell separation is mediated by HAE/HSL2 signaling downstream of NEV and EVR. We discuss the possibility that conserved circuits control organ abscission and modulate fruit growth. PMID:25763490

  3. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase SHPTP2 is a required positive effector for insulin downstream signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, K; Milarski, K L; Saltiel, A R; Pessin, J E

    1995-01-01

    SHPTP2 is a ubiquitously expressed tyrosine-specific protein phosphatase that contains two amino-terminal Src homology 2 (SH2) domains responsible for its association with tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. In this study, expression of dominant interfering mutants of SHPTP2 was found to inhibit insulin stimulation of c-fos reporter gene expression and activation of the 42-kDa (Erk2) and 44-kDa (Erk1) mitogen-activated protein kinases. Cotransfection of dominant interfering SHPTP2 mutants with v-Ras or Grb2 indicated that SHPTP2 regulated insulin signaling either upstream of or in parallel to Ras function. Furthermore, phosphotyrosine blotting and immunoprecipitation identified the 125-kDa focal adhesion kinase (pp125FAK) as a substrate for insulin-dependent tyrosine dephosphorylation. These data demonstrate that SHPTP2 functions as a positive regulator of insulin action and that insulin signaling results in the dephosphorylation of tyrosine-phosphorylated pp125FAK. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7531337

  4. Twist induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell motility in breast cancer via ITGB1-FAK/ILK signaling axis and its associated downstream network.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jiajia; Hou, Yixuan; Zhou, Mingli; Wen, Siyang; Zhou, Jian; Xu, Liyun; Tang, Xi; Du, Yan-e; Hu, Ping; Liu, Manran

    2016-02-01

    Twist, a highly conserved basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factor, functions as a major regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and tumor metastasis. In different cell models, signaling pathways such as TGF-β, MAPK/ERK, WNT, AKT, JAK/STAT, Notch, and P53 have also been shown to play key roles in the EMT process, yet little is known about the signaling pathways regulated by Twist in tumor cells. Using iTRAQ-labeling combined with 2D LC-MS/MS analysis, we identified 194 proteins with significant changes of expression in MCF10A-Twist cells. These proteins reportedly play roles in EMT, cell junction organization, cell adhesion, and cell migration and invasion. ECM-receptor interaction, MAPK, PI3K/AKT, P53 and WNT signaling were found to be aberrantly activated in MCF10A-Twist cells. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis showed that integrin β1 (ITGB1) acts as a core regulator in linking integrin-linked kinase (ILK), Focal-adhesion kinase (FAK), MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and WNT signaling. Increased Twist and ITGB1 are associated with breast tumor progression. Twist transcriptionally regulates ITGB1 expression. Over-expression of ITGB1 or Twist in MCF10A led to EMT, activation of FAK/ILK, MAPK/ERK, PI3K/AKT, and WNT signaling. Knockdown of Twist or ITGB1 in BT549 and Hs578T cells decreased activity of FAK, ILK, and their downstream signaling, thus specifically impeding EMT and cell invasion. Knocking down ILK or inhibiting FAK, MAPK/ERK, or PI3K/AKT signaling also suppressed Twist-driven EMT and cell invasion. Thus, the Twist-ITGB1-FAK/ILK pathway and their downstream signaling network dictate the Twist-induced EMT process in human mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells. PMID:26693891

  5. pangolin encodes a Lef-1 homologue that acts downstream of Armadillo to transduce the Wingless signal in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Brunner, E; Peter, O; Schweizer, L; Basler, K

    1997-02-27

    Members of the Wnt/Wingless (Wg) family of signalling proteins organize many aspects of animal development by regulating the expression of particular target genes in responding cells. Recent biochemical studies indicate that the vertebrate HMG-domain proteins Lef-1 and XTcf-3 can physically interact with beta-catenin, a homologue of Drosophila Armadillo (Arm), the most downstream component known in the Wnt signal transduction pathway. However, these studies do not address whether the endogenous Lef/Tcf family members are required in vivo to transduce Wnt signals. Using genetic methods in Drosophila, we define a new segment polarity gene, pangolin (pan), and show that its product is required in vivo for Wg signal transduction in embryos and in developing adult tissues. In addition, we show that pan encodes a Lef/Tcf homologue and provide evidence that its protein product binds to the beta-catenin homologue Armadillo in vivo. Finally, we demonstrate that Pan functions downstream of Arm to transduce the Wg signal. Thus, our results indicate that Pan is an essential component of the Wg transduction pathway and suggest that it acts directly to regulate gene transcription in response to Wg signalling.

  6. Dystroglycan is involved in skin morphogenesis downstream of the Notch signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sirour, Cathy; Hidalgo, Magdalena; Bello, Valérie; Buisson, Nicolas; Darribère, Thierry; Moreau, Nicole

    2011-08-15

    Dystroglycan (Dg) is a transmembrane protein involved both in the assembly and maintenance of basement membrane structures essential for tissue morphogenesis, and the transmission of signals across the plasma membrane. We used a morpholino knockdown approach to investigate the function of Dg during Xenopus laevis skin morphogenesis. The loss of Dg disrupts epidermal differentiation by affecting the intercalation of multiciliated cells, deposition of laminin, and organization of fibronectin in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Depletion of Dg also affects cell-cell adhesion, as shown by the reduction of E-cadherin expression at the intercellular contacts, without affecting the distribution of β(1) integrins. This was associated with a decrease of cell proliferation, a disruption of multiciliated-cell intercalation, and the down-regulation of the transcription factor P63, a marker of differentiated epidermis. In addition, we demonstrated that inhibition or activation of the Notch pathway prevents and promotes transcription of X-dg. Our study showed for the first time in vivo that Dg, in addition to organizing laminin in the ECM, also acts as a key signaling component in the Notch pathway. PMID:21680717

  7. The β-catenin Axis Integrates Multiple Signals Downstream From RET/PTC and Leads to Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Castellone, Maria Domenica; De Falco, Valentina; Rao, Deva Magendra; Bellelli, Roberto; Muthu, Magesh; Basolo, Fulvio; Fusco, Alfredo; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Santoro, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    RET/PTC (RET/papillary thyroid carcinoma) oncoproteins result from the in-frame fusion of the RET receptor tyrosine kinase domain with protein dimerization motifs encoded by heterologous genes. Here we show that RET/PTC stimulates the β-catenin pathway. By stimulating PI3K/AKT and Ras/ERK, RET/PTC promotes GSK3β phosphorylation, thereby reducing GSK3β-mediated N-terminal β-catenin (Ser33/Ser37/Thr41) phosphorylation. In addition, RET/PTC physically interacts with β-catenin, and increases its phosphotyrosine content. The increased free pool of S/T(nonphospho)/Y(phospho)β-catenin is stabilized as a result of the reduced binding affinity for the Axin/GSK3β complex and activates the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factor. Moreover, through the ERK pathway, RET/PTC stimulates cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and promotes the formation of a β-catenin-CREB-CBP/p300 transcriptional complex. Transcriptional complexes containing β-catenin are recruited to the cyclin D1 promoter and a cyclin D1 gene promoter reporter is active in RET/PTC expressing cells. Silencing of β-catenin by siRNA inhibits proliferation of RET/PTC transformed PC thyrocytes, whereas a constitutively active form of β-catenin stimulates autonomous proliferation of thyroid cells. Thus, multiple signaling events downstream from RET/PTC converge on β-catenin to stimulate cell proliferation. PMID:19223551

  8. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  9. Downstream effect of ramping neural activity through synapses with short-term plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-01-01

    Ramping neuronal activity has been observed in multiple cortical areas correlated with evidence accumulation processes or timing. In this work we investigate the downstream effect of ramping neuronal activity through synapses that display short-term facilitation (STF) or depression (STD). We obtain an analytical result for a synapse driven by deterministic linear ramping input that exhibits pure STF or STD, and investigate the general case when both STF and STD exist numerically. In neural circuits, the ramping inputs usually have strong fluctuation and each downstream neuron receives converging inputs from many presynaptic neurons. We show that the analytical deterministic solution gives an accurate description of the averaging synaptic activation that a postsynaptic neuron receives in a neural circuit, even when the fluctuation in ramping input is strong. Therefore our work provides insights on the impact of ramping neuronal activity on downstream neurons through synapses displaying short-term plasticity. Specifically, activation of a synapse with STF shows a sublinear increase with time and is insensitive to the slopes of ramping inputs during the initial period, followed by a linear ramping similar to a synapse without STF. Activation of a synapse with STD, on the other hand, develops a local maximum before reaching a steady state, which is independent of the slope of ramping input. For a synapse displaying both STF and STD, increase of the depression time constant from a value much smaller than the facilitation time constant τF to a value much larger than τF leads to a transition from facilitation domination to depression domination. By utilizing STD in the corticostriatal synapses, our work provides an understanding of the saturation of striatal activity as observed for monkeys performing evidence accumulation. Our work also predicts that in the fixed duration version of motion discrimination tasks the stationary state of neuronal activity downstream to the

  10. PAK proteins and YAP-1 signalling downstream of integrin beta-1 in myofibroblasts promote liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katherine; Pritchett, James; Llewellyn, Jessica; Mullan, Aoibheann F.; Athwal, Varinder S.; Dobie, Ross; Harvey, Emma; Zeef, Leo; Farrow, Stuart; Streuli, Charles; Henderson, Neil C.; Friedman, Scott L.; Hanley, Neil A.; Piper Hanley, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis due to extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion from myofibroblasts complicates many chronic liver diseases causing scarring and organ failure. Integrin-dependent interaction with scar ECM promotes pro-fibrotic features. However, the pathological intracellular mechanism in liver myofibroblasts is not completely understood, and further insight could enable therapeutic efforts to reverse fibrosis. Here, we show that integrin beta-1, capable of binding integrin alpha-11, regulates the pro-fibrotic phenotype of myofibroblasts. Integrin beta-1 expression is upregulated in pro-fibrotic myofibroblasts in vivo and is required in vitro for production of fibrotic ECM components, myofibroblast proliferation, migration and contraction. Serine/threonine-protein kinase proteins, also known as P21-activated kinase (PAK), and the mechanosensitive factor, Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP-1) are core mediators of pro-fibrotic integrin beta-1 signalling, with YAP-1 capable of perpetuating integrin beta-1 expression. Pharmacological inhibition of either pathway in vivo attenuates liver fibrosis. PAK protein inhibition, in particular, markedly inactivates the pro-fibrotic myofibroblast phenotype, limits scarring from different hepatic insults and represents a new tractable therapeutic target for treating liver fibrosis. PMID:27535340

  11. Regulation of mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal by a Yes-YAP-TEAD2 signaling pathway downstream of LIF.

    PubMed

    Tamm, Christoffer; Böwer, Nathalie; Annerén, Cecilia

    2011-04-01

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase Yes has previously been shown to have an important role in maintaining mouse and human embryonic stem (ES) self-renewal through an unknown pathway downstream of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and one or more factors in serum. Here, we show that TEAD2 and its transcriptional co-activator, the Yes-associated protein YAP, co-operate in a signaling pathway downstream of Yes. We show that YAP, TEAD2 and Yes are highly expressed in self-renewing ES cells, are activated by LIF and serum, and are downregulated when cells are induced to differentiate. We also demonstrate that kinase-active Yes binds and phosphorylates YAP, and activates YAP-TEAD2-dependent transcription. We found that TEAD2 associates directly with the Oct-3/4 promoter. Moreover, activation of the Yes pathway induced activity of the Oct-3/4 and Nanog promoters, whereas suppression of this pathway inhibited promoter activity. Nanog, in turn, suppressed TEAD2-dependent promoter activity, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Nanog induced it, suggesting a negative regulatory feedback loop. Episomal supertransfection of cells with inhibitory TEAD2-EnR induced endodermal differentiation, which suggests that this pathway is necessary for ES cell maintenance.

  12. Nicotine enhances invasion and metastasis of human colorectal cancer cells through the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor downstream p38 MAPK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Tao; Fei, Rushan; Wang, Zhe; Shen, Zhonglei; Qian, Jing; Chen, Wenbin

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine as a cigarette component is an established risk factor for colorectal cancer tumorigenesis. The downstream signaling pathways of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAchRs) are believed to be responsible for the cellular effects. In the present study, we evaluated the effects and novel mechanisms for nicotine on the capacity for colorectal cancer cell invasion and metastasis. LOVO and SW620 colorectal cancer cells were stimulated with nicotine in vitro. A Transwell chamber model was applied to detect the capacity for tumor cell invasion. Assays for gelatin zymography and western blotting were applied to detect the activity and expression of metastasis-related matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), respectively. Signal transduction was assessed by immunoblotting for the phosphorylation of relevant signal molecules and the application of pharmaceutical inhibitors. We showed that nicotine increased LOVO and SW620 colorectal cancer cell invasion along with enhanced activity and expression of MMP-1, -2 and -9. Nicotine increased phosphorylation of p38, ERK, Akt and PI3K p85 but had no effect on phosphorylation of JNK, or NF-κB. Of the pharmaceutical inhibitors of U0126 (ERK1/2 inhibitor), LY294002 (Akt activation inhibitor), SB239063 (p38 MAPK activation inhibitor) and hexamethonium (Hex) (nAchRs inhibitor), the cellular and molecular effects were reduced by the applications of SB239063 and Hex. We concluded that nicotine stimulates the invasion and metastasis of colon cancer cells in vitro via activation of the nAchRs and the p38 MAPK downstream signaling pathway. Therefore, p38 MAPK may have potential as a therapeutic target for smoking-related human colorectal cancer metastasis.

  13. PI3K-AKT signaling is a downstream effector of retinoid prevention of murine basal cell carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    So, Po-Lin; Wang, Grace Y.; Wang, Kevin; Chuang, Mindy; Calinisan Chiueh, Venice; Kenny, Paraic A.; Epstein, Ervin H.

    2014-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. We have demonstrated previously that topical application of the retinoid prodrug tazarotene profoundly inhibits murine BCC carcinogenesis via RARγ-mediated regulation of tumor cell transcription. Since topical retinoids can cause adverse cutaneous effects and since tumors can develop resistance to retinoids, we have investigated mechanisms downstream of tazarotene’s anti-tumor effect in this model. Specifically we have used (i) global expression profiling to identify and (ii) functional cell-based assays to validate the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway as a downstream target pathway of tazarotene’s action. Crucially, we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of this downstream pathway profoundly reduces murine BCC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These data identify PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling as a highly attractive target for BCC chemoprevention and indicate more generally that this pathway may be, in some contexts, an important mediator of retinoid anti-cancer effects. PMID:24449057

  14. PI3K-AKT signaling is a downstream effector of retinoid prevention of murine basal cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    So, Po-Lin; Wang, Grace Y; Wang, Kevin; Chuang, Mindy; Chiueh, Venice Calinisan; Kenny, Paraic A; Epstein, Ervin H

    2014-04-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common human cancer. We have demonstrated previously that topical application of the retinoid prodrug tazarotene profoundly inhibits murine BCC carcinogenesis via retinoic acid receptor γ-mediated regulation of tumor cell transcription. Because topical retinoids can cause adverse cutaneous effects and because tumors can develop resistance to retinoids, we have investigated mechanisms downstream of tazarotene's antitumor effect in this model. Specifically we have used (i) global expression profiling to identify and (ii) functional cell-based assays to validate the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway as a downstream target pathway of tazarotene's action. Crucially, we have demonstrated that pharmacologic inhibition of this downstream pathway profoundly reduces murine BCC cell proliferation and tumorigenesis both in vitro and in vivo. These data identify PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling as a highly attractive target for BCC chemoprevention and indicate more generally that this pathway may be, in some contexts, an important mediator of retinoid anticancer effects.

  15. Amphiregulin Is a Critical Downstream Effector of Estrogen Signaling in ERα-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Esther A; Jenkins, Edmund C; Lofgren, Kristopher A; Chandiramani, Natasha; Liu, Hui; Aranda, Evelyn; Barnett, Maryia; Kenny, Paraic A

    2015-11-15

    Estrogen stimulation promotes epithelial cell proliferation in estrogen receptor (ERα)-positive breast cancer. Many ERα target genes have been enumerated, but the identities of the key effectors mediating the estrogen signal remain obscure. During mouse mammary gland development, the estrogen growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand amphiregulin acts as an important stage-specific effector of estrogen signaling. In this study, we investigated the role of amphiregulin in breast cancer cell proliferation using human tissue samples and tumor xenografts in mice. Amphiregulin was enriched in ERα-positive human breast tumor cells and required for estrogen-dependent growth of MCF7 tumor xenografts. Furthermore, amphiregulin levels were suppressed in patients treated with endocrine therapy. Suppression of EGF receptor signaling appeared necessary for the therapeutic response in this setting. Our findings implicate amphiregulin as a critical mediator of the estrogen response in ERα-positive breast cancer, emphasizing the importance of EGF receptor signaling in breast tumor pathogenesis and therapeutic response. PMID:26527289

  16. Functional Consequences of Differential O-glycosylation of MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16 (Downstream Effects on Signaling)

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Ryan L.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications that occur within the cell. Under normal physiological conditions, O-linked glycosylation of extracellular proteins is critical for both structure and function. During the progression of cancer, however, the expression of aberrant and truncated glycans is commonly observed. Mucins are high molecular weight glycoproteins that contain numerous sites of O-glycosylation within their extracellular domains. Transmembrane mucins also play a functional role in monitoring the surrounding microenvironment and transducing these signals into the cell. In cancer, these mucins often take on an oncogenic role and promote a number of pro-tumorigenic effects, including pro-survival, migratory, and invasive behaviors. Within this review, we highlight both the processes involved in the expression of aberrant glycan structures on mucins, as well as the potential downstream impacts on cellular signaling. PMID:27483328

  17. Downstream Effect of Ramping Neuronal Activity through Synapses with Short-Term Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Wang, Xiao-Jing

    2016-04-01

    Ramping neuronal activity refers to spiking activity with a rate that increases quasi-linearly over time. It has been observed in multiple cortical areas and is correlated with evidence accumulation processes or timing. In this work, we investigated the downstream effect of ramping neuronal activity through synapses that display short-term facilitation (STF) or depression (STD). We obtained an analytical result for a synapse driven by deterministic linear ramping input that exhibits pure STF or STD and numerically investigated the general case when a synapse displays both STF and STD. We show that the analytical deterministic solution gives an accurate description of the averaging synaptic activation of many inputs converging onto a postsynaptic neuron, even when fluctuations in the ramping input are strong. Activation of a synapse with STF shows an initial cubical increase with time, followed by a linear ramping similar to a synapse without STF. Activation of a synapse with STD grows in time to a maximum before falling and reaching a plateau, and this steady state is independent of the slope of the ramping input. For a synapse displaying both STF and STD, an increase in the depression time constant from a value much smaller than the facilitation time constant τ(F) to a value much larger than τ(F) leads to a transition from facilitation dominance to depression dominance. Therefore, our work provides insights into the impact of ramping neuronal activity on downstream neurons through synapses that display short-term plasticity. In a perceptual decision-making process, ramping activity has been observed in the parietal and prefrontal cortices, with a slope that decreases with task difficulty. Our work predicts that neurons downstream from such a decision circuit could instead display a firing plateau independent of the task difficulty, provided that the synaptic connection is endowed with short-term depression. PMID:26890350

  18. Fyn is a downstream target of the pleiotrophin/receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta/zeta-signaling pathway: regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of Fyn by pleiotrophin.

    PubMed

    Pariser, Harold; Ezquerra, Laura; Herradon, Gonzalo; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Deuel, Thomas F

    2005-07-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN the protein, Ptn the gene) signals downstream targets through inactivation of its receptor, the transmembrane receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase (RPTP)beta/zeta, disrupting the balanced activity of RPTPbeta/zeta and the activity of a constitutively active tyrosine kinase. As a consequence of the inactivation of RPTPbeta/zeta, PTN stimulates a sharp increase in the levels of tyrosine phosphorylation of the substrates of RPTPbeta/zeta in PTN-stimulated cells. We now report that the Src family member Fyn interacts with the intracellular domain of RPTPbeta/zeta in a yeast two-hybrid system. We further demonstrate that Fyn is a substrate of RPTPbeta/zeta, and that tyrosine phosphorylation of Fyn is sharply increased in PTN-stimulated cells. In previous studies, we demonstrated that beta-catenin and beta-adducin are targets of the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta-signaling pathway and defined the mechanisms through which tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin and beta-adducin disrupts cytoskeletal protein complexes. We conclude that Fyn is a downstream target of the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta-signaling pathway and suggest that PTN coordinately regulates tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, beta-adducin, and Fyn through the PTN/RPTPbeta/zeta-signaling pathway and that together Fyn, beta-adducin, and beta-catenin may be effectors of the previously described PTN-stimulated disruption of cytoskeletal stability, increased cell plasticity, and loss of cell-cell adhesion that are characteristic of PTN-stimulated cells and a feature of many human malignant cells in which mutations have established constitutive expression of the Ptn gene.

  19. Bitter, sweet and umami taste receptors and downstream signaling effectors: Expression in embryonic and growing chicken gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Cheled-Shoval, Shira L; Druyan, Shelly; Uni, Zehava

    2015-08-01

    Taste perception is a crucial biological mechanism affecting food and water choices and consumption in the animal kingdom. Bitter taste perception is mediated by a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family-the taste 2 receptors (T2R)-and their downstream proteins, whereas sweet and umami tastes are mediated by the GPCR family -taste 1 receptors (T1R) and their downstream proteins. Taste receptors and their downstream proteins have been identified in extra-gustatory tissues in mammals, such as the lungs and gastrointestinal tract (GIT), and their GIT activation has been linked with different metabolic and endocrinic pathways in the GIT. The chicken genome contains three bitter taste receptors termed ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, and ggTas2r7, and the sweet/umami receptors ggTas1r1 and ggTas1r3, but it lacks the sweet receptor ggTas1r2. The aim of this study was to identify and determine the expression of genes related to taste perception in the chicken GIT, both at the embryonic stage and in growing chickens. The results of this study demonstrate for the first time, using real-time PCR, expression of the chicken taste receptor genes ggTas2r1, ggTas2r2, ggTas2r7, ggTas1r1, and ggTas1r3 and of their downstream protein-encoding genes TRPM5, α-gustducin, and PLCβ2 in both gustatory tissues-the palate and tongue, and extra-gustatory tissues-the proventriculus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, cecum, and colon of embryonic day 19 (E19) and growing (21 d old) chickens. Expression of these genes suggests the involvement of taste pathways for sensing carbohydrates, amino acids and bitter compounds in the chicken GIT.

  20. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is a critical downstream target of p53 in the induction of replicative senescence.

    PubMed

    Kortlever, Roderik M; Higgins, Paul J; Bernards, René

    2006-08-01

    p53 limits the proliferation of primary diploid fibroblasts by inducing a state of growth arrest named replicative senescence - a process which protects against oncogenic transformation and requires integrity of the p53 tumour suppressor pathway. However, little is known about the downstream target genes of p53 in this growth-limiting response. Here, we report that suppression of the p53 target gene encoding plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) by RNA interference (RNAi) leads to escape from replicative senescence both in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts and primary human BJ fibroblasts. PAI-1 knockdown results in sustained activation of the PI(3)K-PKB-GSK3beta pathway and nuclear retention of cyclin D1, consistent with a role for PAI-1 in regulating growth factor signalling. In agreement with this, we find that the PI(3)K-PKB-GSK3beta-cyclin D1 pathway is also causally involved in cellular senescence. Conversely, ectopic expression of PAI-1 in proliferating p53-deficient murine or human fibroblasts induces a phenotype displaying all the hallmarks of replicative senescence. Our data indicate that PAI-1 is not merely a marker of senescence, but is both necessary and sufficient for the induction of replicative senescence downstream of p53.

  1. Polycomb repressive complex PRC2 regulates Xenopus retina development downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aldiri, Issam; Moore, Kathryn B.; Hutcheson, David A.; Zhang, Jianmin; Vetter, Monica L.

    2013-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase complex PRC2 controls key steps in developmental transitions and cell fate choices; however, its roles in vertebrate eye development remain unknown. Here, we report that in Xenopus, PRC2 regulates the progression of retinal progenitors from proliferation to differentiation. We show that the PRC2 core components are enriched in retinal progenitors and downregulated in differentiated cells. Knockdown of the PRC2 core component Ezh2 leads to reduced retinal progenitor proliferation, in part due to upregulation of the Cdk inhibitor p15Ink4b. In addition, although PRC2 knockdown does not alter eye patterning, retinal progenitor gene expression or expression of the neural competence factor Sox2, it does cause suppression of proneural bHLH gene expression, indicating that PRC2 is crucial for the initiation of neural differentiation in the retina. Consistent with this, knocking down or blocking PRC2 function constrains the generation of most retinal neural cell types and promotes a Müller glial cell fate decision. We also show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling acting through the receptor Frizzled 5, but independent of Sox2, regulates expression of key PRC2 subunits in the developing retina. This is consistent with a role for this pathway in coordinating proliferation and the transition to neurogenesis in the Xenopus retina. Our data establish PRC2 as a regulator of proliferation and differentiation during eye development. PMID:23739135

  2. Signal focusing through active transport.

    PubMed

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing-faster and more precise signaling-are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  3. Symmetric 10 Gb/s wavelength reused bidirectional RSOA based WDM-PON with DPSK modulated downstream and OFDM modulated upstream signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Pallab K.; Khan, Tanvir Zaman

    2016-08-01

    A 10 Gb/s bidirectional wavelength division multiplexing passive optical network (WDM-PON) with reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) based colorless optical network unit (ONU) is proposed and analyzed for next generation gigabit class optical access network. Differential phase shift keying (DPSK) modulated signal is used in downstream and further reused as a seeding wavelength for upstream data modulation. By exploiting the constant envelope property of DPSK seed signal, the re-modulation noise in upstream receiver is effectively minimized without employing any constraint on extinction ratio of downstream signal. Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) signal is used in upstream transmission to overcome the limited bandwidth (∼1 GHz) response of RSOA remodulation. The results show that the proposed 10 Gb/s symmetric WDM-PON can achieve good performance over 25 km fiber transmission with error free operation in downstream and bit error rate (BER) lower than forward error correction (FEC) limit in upstream.

  4. Identification of Candidate Downstream Targets of TGFβ Signaling During Palate Development by Genome-Wide Transcript Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Chai, Yang; Hacia, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Nonsyndromic orofacial clefts are common birth defects whose etiology is influenced by complex genetic and environmental factors and gene–environment interactions. Although these risk factors are not yet fully elucidated, it is known that alterations in transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling can cause craniofacial abnormalities, including cleft palate, in mammals. To elucidate the downstream targets of TGFβ signaling in palatogenesis, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of Tgfbr2fl/fl;Wnt1-Cre mouse embryos with cleft palate and other craniofacial deformities resulting from the targeted inactivation of the Tgfbr2 gene in their cranial neural crest (CNC) cells. Relative to controls, palatal tissues obtained from Tgfbr2fl/fl;Wnt1-Cre mouse embryos at embryonic day 14.5 (E14.5) of gestation have a robust gene expression signature reflective of known defects in CNC-derived mesenchymal cell proliferation. Groups of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were involved in diverse cellular processes and components associated with orofacial clefting, including the extracellular matrix, cholesterol metabolism, ciliogenesis, and multiple signaling pathways. A subset of the DEGs are known or suspected to be associated with an increased risk of orofacial clefting in humans and/or genetically engineered mice. Based on bioinformatics analyses, we highlight the functional relationships among differentially expressed transcriptional regulators of palatogenesis as well as transcriptional factors not previously associated with this process. We suggest that gene expression profiling studies of mice with TGFβ signaling defects provide a valuable approach for identifying candidate mechanisms by which this pathway controls cell fate during palatogenesis and its role in the etiology of human craniofacial abnormalities. PMID:23060211

  5. Src-Like adaptor protein (SLAP) binds to the receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 and modulates receptor stability and downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Julhash U; Rönnstrand, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3) is an important growth factor receptor in hematopoiesis. Gain-of-function mutations of the receptor contribute to the transformation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) is an interaction partner of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl that can regulate receptor tyrosine kinases-mediated signal transduction. In this study, we analyzed the role of SLAP in signal transduction downstream of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3. The results show that upon ligand stimulation SLAP stably associates with Flt3 through multiple phosphotyrosine residues in Flt3. SLAP constitutively interacts with oncogenic Flt3-ITD and co-localizes with Flt3 near the cell membrane. This association initiates Cbl-dependent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Depletion of SLAP expression by shRNA in Flt3-transfected Ba/F3 cells resulted in a weaker activation of FL-induced PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling. Meta-analysis of microarray data from patient samples suggests that SLAP mRNA is differentially expressed in different cancers and its expression was significantly increased in patients carrying the Flt3-ITD mutation. Thus, our data suggest a novel role of SLAP in different cancers and in modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling apart from its conventional role in regulation of receptor stability.

  6. The Osr1 and Osr2 genes act in the pronephric anlage downstream of retinoic acid signaling and upstream of Wnt2b to maintain pectoral fin development.

    PubMed

    Neto, Ana; Mercader, Nadia; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Vertebrate odd-skipped related genes (Osr) have an essential function during the formation of the intermediate mesoderm (IM) and the kidney structures derived from it. Here, we show that these genes are also crucial for limb bud formation in the adjacent lateral plate mesoderm (LPM). Reduction of zebrafish Osr function impairs fin development by the failure of tbx5a maintenance in the developing pectoral fin bud. Osr morphant embryos show reduced wnt2b expression, and increasing Wnt signaling in Osr morphant embryos partially rescues tbx5a expression. Thus, Osr genes control limb bud development in a non-cell-autonomous manner, probably through the activation of Wnt2b. Finally, we demonstrate that Osr genes are downstream targets of retinoic acid (RA) signaling. Therefore, Osr genes act as a relay within the genetic cascade of fin bud formation: by controlling the expression of the signaling molecule Wnt2ba in the IM they play an essential function transmitting the RA signaling originated in the somites to the LPM.

  7. Signal focusing through active transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godec, Aljaž; Metzler, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The accuracy of molecular signaling in biological cells and novel diagnostic devices is ultimately limited by the counting noise floor imposed by the thermal diffusion. Motivated by the fact that messenger RNA and vesicle-engulfed signaling molecules transiently bind to molecular motors and are actively transported in biological cells, we show here that the random active delivery of signaling particles to within a typical diffusion distance to the receptor generically reduces the correlation time of the counting noise. Considering a variety of signaling particle sizes from mRNA to vesicles and cell sizes from prokaryotic to eukaryotic cells, we show that the conditions for active focusing—faster and more precise signaling—are indeed compatible with observations in living cells. Our results improve the understanding of molecular cellular signaling and novel diagnostic devices.

  8. Molecular steps in the immune signaling pathway evoked by plant elicitor peptides: Ca2+-dependent protein kinases, nitric oxide, and reactive oxygen species are downstream from the early Ca2+ signal.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Zhao, Yichen; Walker, Robin K; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2013-11-01

    Endogenous plant elicitor peptides (Peps) can act to facilitate immune signaling and pathogen defense responses. Binding of these peptides to the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plasma membrane-localized Pep receptors (PEPRs) leads to cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation, an early event in a signaling cascade that activates immune responses. This immune response includes the amplification of signaling evoked by direct perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by plant cells under assault. Work included in this report further characterizes the Pep immune response and identifies new molecular steps in the signal transduction cascade. The PEPR coreceptor BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 contributes to generation of the Pep-activated Ca(2+) signal and leads to increased defense gene expression and resistance to a virulent bacterial pathogen. Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases (CPKs) decode the Ca(2+) signal, also facilitating defense gene expression and enhanced resistance to the pathogen. Nitric oxide and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species generation (due to the function of Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog proteins D and F) are also involved downstream from the Ca(2+) signal in the Pep immune defense signal transduction cascade, as is the case with BRASSINOSTEROID-INSENSITIVE1 Associated Kinase1 and CPK5, CPK6, and CPK11. These steps of the pathogen defense response are required for maximal Pep immune activation that limits growth of a virulent bacterial pathogen in the plant. We find a synergism between function of the PEPR and Flagellin Sensing2 receptors in terms of both nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species generation. Presented results are also consistent with the involvement of the secondary messenger cyclic GMP and a cyclic GMP-activated Ca(2+)-conducting channel in the Pep immune signaling pathway.

  9. A Triple Helix-Loop-Helix/Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Cascade Controls Cell Elongation Downstream of Multiple Hormonal and Environmental Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Ming-Yi; Fan, Min; Oh, Eunkyoo; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2012-01-01

    Environmental and endogenous signals, including light, temperature, brassinosteroid (BR), and gibberellin (GA), regulate cell elongation largely by influencing the expression of the paclobutrazol-resistant (PRE) family helix-loop-helix (HLH) factors, which promote cell elongation by interacting antagonistically with another HLH factor, IBH1. However, the molecular mechanism by which PREs and IBH1 regulate gene expression has remained unknown. Here, we show that IBH1 interacts with and inhibits a DNA binding basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein, HBI1, in Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of HBI1 increased hypocotyl and petiole elongation, whereas dominant inactivation of HBI1 and its homologs caused a dwarf phenotype, indicating that HBI1 is a positive regulator of cell elongation. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that HBI1 directly bound to the promoters and activated two EXPANSIN genes encoding cell wall–loosening enzymes; HBI1’s DNA binding and transcriptional activities were inhibited by IBH1, but the inhibitory effects of IBH1 were abolished by PRE1. The results indicate that PREs activate the DNA binding bHLH factor HBI1 by sequestering its inhibitor IBH1. Altering each of the three factors affected plant sensitivities to BR, GA, temperature, and light. Our study demonstrates that PREs, IBH1, and HBI1 form a chain of antagonistic switches that regulates cell elongation downstream of multiple external and endogenous signals. PMID:23221598

  10. NRG1 and KITL signal downstream of retinoic acid in the germline to support soma-free syncytial growth of differentiating spermatogonia

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, KM; Medrano, GA; Chaudhary, J; Hamra, FK

    2015-01-01

    Defined culture systems supporting spermatogonial differentiation will provide experimental platforms to study spermatogenesis. However, germline-intrinsic signaling mechanisms sufficient to support spermatogonial differentiation without somatic cells remain largely undefined. Here we analyzed EGF superfamily receptor and ligand diversity in rat testis cells and delineated germline-intrinsic signaling via an ERBB3 co-transducer, ERBB2, as essential for retinoic acid-induced syncytial growth by differentiating spermatogonia. Similar to the ERBB2/3 agonist NRG1, we found that KIT Ligand (KITL) robustly supported spermatogonial differentiation without serum or somatic cells. ERBB2 inhibitors failed to disrupt KITL-dependent spermatogonial development, and KITL prevented ERBB3-deficient spermatogonial degeneration upon differentiation. Thus we report that NRG1 and KITL activate alternative pathways downstream of retinoic acid signaling in the germline that are essential for stem cells to undergo premeiotic steps of spermatogenesis in culture. Robust serum/soma-free spermatogonial differentiation opens new doors to study mammalian germ cell biology in culture and to discover factors that can drive meiotic progression in vitro. PMID:26500786

  11. Salicylic Acid Suppresses Jasmonic Acid Signaling Downstream of SCFCOI1-JAZ by Targeting GCC Promoter Motifs via Transcription Factor ORA59[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Leon-Reyes, Antonio; Koornneef, Annemart; Van Verk, Marcel C.; Rodenburg, Nicole; Pauwels, Laurens; Goossens, Alain; Körbes, Ana P.; Memelink, Johan; Ritsema, Tita; Van Wees, Saskia C.M.; Pieterse, Corné M.J.

    2013-01-01

    Antagonism between the defense hormones salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) plays a central role in the modulation of the plant immune signaling network, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that suppression of the JA pathway by SA functions downstream of the E3 ubiquitin-ligase Skip-Cullin-F-box complex SCFCOI1, which targets JASMONATE ZIM-domain transcriptional repressor proteins (JAZs) for proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, neither the stability nor the JA-induced degradation of JAZs was affected by SA. In silico promoter analysis of the SA/JA crosstalk transcriptome revealed that the 1-kb promoter regions of JA-responsive genes that are suppressed by SA are significantly enriched in the JA-responsive GCC-box motifs. Using GCC:GUS lines carrying four copies of the GCC-box fused to the β-glucuronidase reporter gene, we showed that the GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Using plants overexpressing the GCC-box binding APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (AP2/ERF) transcription factors ERF1 or ORA59, we found that SA strongly reduces the accumulation of ORA59 but not that of ERF1. Collectively, these data indicate that the SA pathway inhibits JA signaling downstream of the SCFCOI1-JAZ complex by targeting GCC-box motifs in JA-responsive promoters via a negative effect on the transcriptional activator ORA59. PMID:23435661

  12. Four Arabidopsis AREB/ABF transcription factors function predominantly in gene expression downstream of SnRK2 kinases in abscisic acid signalling in response to osmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    YOSHIDA, TAKUYA; FUJITA, YASUNARI; MARUYAMA, KYONOSHIN; MOGAMI, JUNRO; TODAKA, DAISUKE; SHINOZAKI, KAZUO; YAMAGUCHI-SHINOZAKI, KAZUKO

    2015-01-01

    Under osmotic stress conditions such as drought and high salinity, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in stress-responsive gene expression mainly through three bZIP transcription factors, AREB1/ABF2, AREB2/ABF4 and ABF3, which are activated by SNF1-related kinase 2s (SnRK2s) such as SRK2D/SnRK2.2, SRK2E/SnRK2.6 and SRK2I/SnRK2.3 (SRK2D/E/I). However, since the three AREB/ABFs are crucial, but not exclusive, for the SnRK2-mediated gene expression, transcriptional pathways governed by SRK2D/E/I are not fully understood. Here, we show that a bZIP transcription factor, ABF1, is a functional homolog of AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 in ABA-dependent gene expression in Arabidopsis. Despite lower expression levels of ABF1 than those of the three AREB/ABFs, the areb1 areb2 abf3 abf1 mutant plants displayed increased sensitivity to drought and decreased sensitivity to ABA in primary root growth compared with the areb1 areb2 abf3 mutant. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that expression of downstream genes of SRK2D/E/I, which include many genes functioning in osmotic stress responses and tolerance such as transcription factors and LEA proteins, was mostly impaired in the quadruple mutant. Thus, these results indicate that the four AREB/ABFs are the predominant transcription factors downstream of SRK2D/E/I in ABA signalling in response to osmotic stress during vegetative growth. Abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in osmotic stress-responsive gene expression mainly through three bZIP transcription factors, AREB1, AREB2, and ABF3, which are activated by SnRK2s such as SRK2D, SRK2E, and SRK2I (SRK2D/E/I). However, transcription factors other than the three AREB/ABFs that function downstream of SRK2D/E/I remain obscure. Here, we report that ABF1 is a functional homolog of AREB1, AREB2, and ABF3 in ABA-dependent gene expression from a comparative analysis between the areb1 areb2 abf3 abf1 and areb1 areb2 abf3 mutants. Moreover, genome

  13. Human sperm liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) acts as a downstream target of the estrogen signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Montanaro, Daniela; Santoro, Marta; Carpino, Amalia; Perrotta, Ida; De Amicis, Francesca; Sirianni, Rosa; Rago, Vittoria; Gervasi, Serena; Aquila, Saveria

    2015-10-01

    In the last decade, the study of human sperm anatomy, at molecular level, has revealed the presence of several nuclear protein receptors. In this work, we examined the expression profile and the ultrastructural localization of liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) in human spermatozoa. We evidenced the presence of the receptor by Western blotting and real time-RT-PCR. Furthermore, we used immunogold electron microscopy to investigate the sperm anatomical regions containing LRH-1. The receptor was mainly located in the sperm head, whereas its expression was reduced in the neck and across the tail. Interestingly, we observed the presence of LRH-1 in different stages of testicular germ cell development by immunohistochemistry. In somatic cells, it has been suggested that the LRH-1 pathway is tightly linked with estrogen signaling and the important role of estradiol has been widely studied in sperm cells. To assess the significance of LRH-1 in male gametes and to deepen understanding of the role of estrogens in these cells, we investigated important sperm features such as motility, survival and capacitation. Spermatozoa were treated with 10 nm estradiol and the inhibition of LRH-1 reversed the estradiol stimulatory action. From our data, we discovered that human spermatozoa can be considered a new site of expression for LRH-1, evidencing its role in sperm motility, survival and cholesterol efflux. Furthermore, we may presume that in spermatozoa the LRH-1 effects are closely integrated with the estrogen signaling, supporting LRH-1 as a downstream effector of the estradiol pathway on some sperm functions.

  14. Two Redundant Receptor-Like Cytoplasmic Kinases Function Downstream of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Regulate Activation of SA Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Qing; Sun, Tongjun; Qu, Na; Ma, Junling; Li, Meng; Cheng, Yu-Ti; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-06-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) serves as a critical signaling molecule in plant defense. Two transcription factors, SARD1 and CBP60g, control SA biosynthesis through regulating pathogen-induced expression of Isochorismate Synthase1, which encodes a key enzyme for SA biosynthesis. Here, we report that Pattern-Triggered Immunity Compromised Receptor-like Cytoplasmic Kinase1 (PCRK1) and PCRK2 function as key regulators of SA biosynthesis. In the pcrk1 pcrk2 double mutant, pathogen-induced expression of SARD1, CBP60g, and ICS1 is greatly reduced. The pcrk1 pcrk2 double mutant, but neither of the single mutants, exhibits reduced accumulation of SA and enhanced disease susceptibility to bacterial pathogens. Both PCRK1 and PCRK2 interact with the pattern recognition receptor FLS2, and treatment with pathogen-associated molecular patterns leads to rapid phosphorylation of PCRK2. Our data suggest that PCRK1 and PCRK2 function downstream of pattern recognition receptor in a signal relay leading to the activation of SA biosynthesis. PMID:27208222

  15. AKT-STAT3 Pathway as a Downstream Target of EGFR Signaling to Regulate PD-L1 Expression on NSCLC cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdelhamed, Sherif; Ogura, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Satoru; Saiki, Ikuo; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    While cancer development and progression can be controlled by cytotoxic T cells, it is also known that tumor-specific CD8+T cells become functionally impaired by acquiring a group of inhibitory receptors known as immune checkpoints. Amongst those, programmed death-1 (PD-1) is one of the most recognized negative regulators of T cell function. In non-small lung cancers (NSCLCs), the aberrant activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to induce PD-L1 expression and further the treatment with gefitinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) for EGFR, decrease the expression of PD-L1 on NSCLC. Given the acquired resistance to gefitinib treatment frequently observed by developing secondary-site mutations limiting its efficacy, it is important to understand the downstream mechanism of activated-EGFR signaling for regulating PD-L1 in NSCLC. In this study, we demonstrated that AKT-STAT3 pathway could be a potential target for regulating the surface expression of PD-L1 on NSCLCs with aberrant EGFR activity and, further, the inhibition of AKT or STAT3 activity could down-regulate the expression of PD-L1 even in gefitinib-resistant NSCLCs. These results highlight an importance of AKT-STAT3 pathway as a promising target for potentiating anti-tumor immune responses by regulating PD-L1 expression on cancer cells with aberrant EGFR activity.

  16. Effect of Redox Balance Alterations on Cellular Localization of LAT and Downstream T-Cell Receptor Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gringhuis, Sonja I.; Papendrecht-van der Voort, Ellen A. M.; Leow, Angela; Levarht, E. W. Nivine; Breedveld, Ferdinand C.; Verweij, Cornelis L.

    2002-01-01

    The integral membrane protein linker for activation of T cells (LAT) is a central adapter protein in the T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling pathways. The cellular localization of LAT is extremely sensitive to intracellular redox balance alterations. Reduced intracellular levels of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH), a hallmark of chronic oxidative stress, resulted in the membrane displacement of LAT, abrogated TCR-mediated signaling and consequently hyporesponsiveness of T lymphocytes. The membrane displacement of LAT is accompanied by a considerable difference in the mobility of LAT upon native and nonreducing denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis, a finding indicative of a conformational change. Targeted mutation of redox-sensitive cysteine residues within LAT created LAT mutants which remain membrane anchored under conditions of chronic oxidative stress. The expression of redox-insensitive LAT mutants allows for restoration of TCR-mediated signal transduction, whereas CD28-mediated signaling pathways remained impaired. These results are indicative that the membrane displacement of LAT as a result of redox balance alterations is a consequence of a conformational change interfering with the insertion of LAT into the plasma membrane. Conclusively, the data suggest a role for LAT as a crucial intermediate in the sensitivity of TCR signaling and hence T lymphocytes toward chronic oxidative stress. PMID:11756537

  17. Ganglioside GM2 mediates migration of tumor cells by interacting with integrin and modulating the downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Manjari; Mahata, Barun; Banerjee, Avisek; Chakraborty, Sohini; Debnath, Shibjyoti; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Ghosh, Zhumur; Biswas, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    The definitive role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor-induced growth and progression is still unknown. Here we report a novel role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor cell migration and uncovered its mechanism. Data shows differential expression levels of GM2-synthase as well as GM2 in different human cancer cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of GM2-synthase in CCF52, A549 and SK-RC-26B cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration as well as invasion in vitro without affecting cellular proliferation. Over-expression of GM2-synthase in low-GM2 expressing SK-RC-45 cells resulted in a consequent increase in migration thus confirming the potential role GM2 and its downstream partners play in tumor cell migration and motility. Further, treatment of SK-RC-45 cells with exogenous GM2 resulted in a dramatic increase in migratory and invasive capacity with no change in proliferative capacity, thereby confirming the role of GM2 in tumorigenesis specifically by mediating tumor migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling of GM2-synthase silenced cells revealed altered expression of several genes involved in cell migration primarily those controlling the integrin mediated signaling. GM2-synthase knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK, Src as well as Erk, while over-expression and/or exogenous GM2 treatment caused increased FAK and Erk phosphorylation respectively. Again, GM2 mediated invasion and Erk phosphorylation is blocked in integrin knockdown SK-RC-45 cells, thus confirming that GM2 mediated migration and phosphorylation of Erk is integrin dependent. Finally, confocal microscopy suggested co-localization while co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirmed direct interaction of membrane bound ganglioside, GM2 with the integrin receptor. PMID:27066976

  18. Ganglioside GM2 mediates migration of tumor cells by interacting with integrin and modulating the downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Manjari; Mahata, Barun; Banerjee, Avisek; Chakraborty, Sohini; Debnath, Shibjyoti; Ray, Sougata Sinha; Ghosh, Zhumur; Biswas, Kaushik

    2016-07-01

    The definitive role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor-induced growth and progression is still unknown. Here we report a novel role of ganglioside GM2 in mediating tumor cell migration and uncovered its mechanism. Data shows differential expression levels of GM2-synthase as well as GM2 in different human cancer cells. siRNA mediated knockdown of GM2-synthase in CCF52, A549 and SK-RC-26B cells resulted in significant inhibition of tumor cell migration as well as invasion in vitro without affecting cellular proliferation. Over-expression of GM2-synthase in low-GM2 expressing SK-RC-45 cells resulted in a consequent increase in migration thus confirming the potential role GM2 and its downstream partners play in tumor cell migration and motility. Further, treatment of SK-RC-45 cells with exogenous GM2 resulted in a dramatic increase in migratory and invasive capacity with no change in proliferative capacity, thereby confirming the role of GM2 in tumorigenesis specifically by mediating tumor migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling of GM2-synthase silenced cells revealed altered expression of several genes involved in cell migration primarily those controlling the integrin mediated signaling. GM2-synthase knockdown resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK, Src as well as Erk, while over-expression and/or exogenous GM2 treatment caused increased FAK and Erk phosphorylation respectively. Again, GM2 mediated invasion and Erk phosphorylation is blocked in integrin knockdown SK-RC-45 cells, thus confirming that GM2 mediated migration and phosphorylation of Erk is integrin dependent. Finally, confocal microscopy suggested co-localization while co-immunoprecipitation and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) confirmed direct interaction of membrane bound ganglioside, GM2 with the integrin receptor.

  19. Inhibition of Rac GTPase signaling and downstream prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins as combination targeted therapy in MLL-AF9 leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mizukawa, Benjamin; Wei, Junping; Shrestha, Mahesh; Wunderlich, Mark; Chou, Fu-Sheng; Griesinger, Andrea; Harris, Chad E; Kumar, Ashish R; Zheng, Yi; Williams, David A; Mulloy, James C

    2011-11-10

    The Rac family of small Rho GTPases coordinates diverse cellular functions in hematopoietic cells including adhesion, migration, cytoskeleton rearrangements, gene transcription, proliferation, and survival. The integrity of Rac signaling has also been found to critically regulate cellular functions in the initiation and maintenance of hematopoietic malignancies. Using an in vivo gene targeting approach, we demonstrate that Rac2, but not Rac1, is critical to the initiation of acute myeloid leukemia in a retroviral expression model of MLL-AF9 leukemogenesis. However, loss of either Rac1 or Rac2 is sufficient to impair survival and growth of the transformed MLL-AF9 leukemia. Rac2 is known to positively regulate expression of Bcl-2 family proteins toward a prosurvival balance. We demonstrate that disruption of downstream survival signaling through antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins is implicated in mediating the effects of Rac2 deficiency in MLL-AF9 leukemia. Indeed, overexpression of Bcl-xL is able to rescue the effects of Rac2 deficiency and MLL-AF9 cells are exquisitely sensitive to direct inhibition of Bcl-2 family proteins by the BH3-mimetic, ABT-737. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to NSC23766, a small-molecule inhibitor of Rac activation, increases the apoptotic effect of ABT-737, indicating the Rac/Bcl-2 survival pathway may be targeted synergistically.

  20. Four Arabidopsis AREB/ABF transcription factors function predominantly in gene expression downstream of SnRK2 kinases in abscisic acid signalling in response to osmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Takuya; Fujita, Yasunari; Maruyama, Kyonoshin; Mogami, Junro; Todaka, Daisuke; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Under osmotic stress conditions such as drought and high salinity, the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays important roles in stress-responsive gene expression mainly through three bZIP transcription factors, AREB1/ABF2, AREB2/ABF4 and ABF3, which are activated by SNF1-related kinase 2s (SnRK2s) such as SRK2D/SnRK2.2, SRK2E/SnRK2.6 and SRK2I/SnRK2.3 (SRK2D/E/I). However, since the three AREB/ABFs are crucial, but not exclusive, for the SnRK2-mediated gene expression, transcriptional pathways governed by SRK2D/E/I are not fully understood. Here, we show that a bZIP transcription factor, ABF1, is a functional homolog of AREB1, AREB2 and ABF3 in ABA-dependent gene expression in Arabidopsis. Despite lower expression levels of ABF1 than those of the three AREB/ABFs, the areb1 areb2 abf3 abf1 mutant plants displayed increased sensitivity to drought and decreased sensitivity to ABA in primary root growth compared with the areb1 areb2 abf3 mutant. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses revealed that expression of downstream genes of SRK2D/E/I, which include many genes functioning in osmotic stress responses and tolerance such as transcription factors and LEA proteins, was mostly impaired in the quadruple mutant. Thus, these results indicate that the four AREB/ABFs are the predominant transcription factors downstream of SRK2D/E/I in ABA signalling in response to osmotic stress during vegetative growth.

  1. NLRP3 inflammasome activation downstream of cytoplasmic LPS recognition by both caspase-4 and caspase-5.

    PubMed

    Baker, Paul J; Boucher, Dave; Bierschenk, Damien; Tebartz, Christina; Whitney, Paul G; D'Silva, Damian B; Tanzer, Maria C; Monteleone, Mercedes; Robertson, Avril A B; Cooper, Matthew A; Alvarez-Diaz, Silvia; Herold, Marco J; Bedoui, Sammy; Schroder, Kate; Masters, Seth L

    2015-10-01

    Humans encode two inflammatory caspases that detect cytoplasmic LPS, caspase-4 and caspase-5. When activated, these trigger pyroptotic cell death and caspase-1-dependent IL-1β production; however the mechanism underlying this process is not yet confirmed. We now show that a specific NLRP3 inhibitor, MCC950, prevents caspase-4/5-dependent IL-1β production elicited by transfected LPS. Given that both caspase-4 and caspase-5 can detect cytoplasmic LPS, it is possible that these proteins exhibit some degree of redundancy. Therefore, we generated human monocytic cell lines in which caspase-4 and caspase-5 were genetically deleted either individually or together. We found that the deletion of caspase-4 suppressed cell death and IL-1β production following transfection of LPS into the cytoplasm, or in response to infection with Salmonella typhimurium. Although deletion of caspase-5 did not confer protection against transfected LPS, cell death and IL-1β production were reduced after infection with Salmonella. Furthermore, double deletion of caspase-4 and caspase-5 had a synergistic effect in the context of Salmonella infection. Our results identify the NLRP3 inflammasome as the specific platform for IL-1β maturation, downstream of cytoplasmic LPS detection by caspase-4/5. We also show that both caspase-4 and caspase-5 are functionally important for appropriate responses to intracellular Gram-negative bacteria.

  2. Thorium induced cytoproliferative effect in human liver cell HepG2: role of insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor and downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Ali, Manjoor; Kumar, Amit; Pandey, Badri N

    2014-03-25

    Thorium-232 ((232)Th), a naturally-occurring actinide has gained significant attention due to its immense potential as a nuclear fuel for advanced reactors. Understanding the biological effects of (232)Th would significantly impact its efficient utilization with adequate health protection. Humans administered with (232)Th (thorotrast patients) or experimental animal models showed that liver is one of the major sites of (232)Th accumulation. Present study reports cellular effects of (232)Th-nitrate in a human-derived liver cell (HepG2). Results showed that the low concentration of (232)Th (0.1-10 μM) induced proliferation of HepG2 cells which was inhibited by the pre-treatment of cells with neutralizing antibody against insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R). Consistently, (232)Th treatment was found to increase the phosphorylated level of IGF-1R-associated molecule, IRS1 which serves to activate PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways. Pre-treatment with specific inhibitors of PI3K (LY294002) or JNK-MAPK (SP600125) significantly abrogated the cytoproliferative effect of (232)Th. Immunofluorescence analysis showed increased levels of phospho-Akt and phospho-JNK, downstream kinases of IGF-1R, in (232)Th-treated HepG2 cells suggesting the role of IGF-1R-mediated signaling in (232)Th-stimulated cell proliferation. The cell cycle analysis showed that (232)Th increased S and G2-M cell fractions concomitant to the increase of cyclin-E level. Thus, the present investigation highlights the role of IGF-1R-mediated signaling in the cytoproliferative effect of (232)Th in human liver cells at low concentration. PMID:24462957

  3. Signal processing by its coil zipper domain activates IKKγ

    PubMed Central

    Bloor, Stuart; Ryzhakov, Grigor; Wagner, Sebastian; Butler, P. Jonathan G.; Smith, David L.; Krumbach, Rebekka; Dikic, Ivan; Randow, Felix

    2008-01-01

    NF-κB activation occurs upon degradation of its inhibitor I-κB and requires prior phosphorylation of the inhibitor by I-κB kinase (IKK). Activity of IKK is governed by its noncatalytic subunit IKKγ. Signaling defects due to missense mutations in IKKγ have been correlated to its inability to either become ubiquitylated or bind ubiquitin noncovalently. Because the relative contribution of these events to signaling had remained unknown, we have studied mutations in the coil-zipper (CoZi) domain of IKKγ that either impair signaling or cause constitutive NF-κB activity. Certain signaling-deficient alleles neither bound ubiquitin nor were they ubiquitylated by TRAF6. Introducing an activating mutation into those signaling-impaired alleles restored their ubiquitylation and created mutants constitutively activating NF-κB without repairing the ubiquitin-binding defect. Constitutive activity therefore arises downstream of ubiquitin binding but upstream of ubiquitylation. Such constitutive activity reveals a signal-processing function for IKKγ beyond that of a mere ubiquitin-binding adaptor. We propose that this signal processing may involve homophilic CoZi interactions as suggested by the enhanced affinity of CoZi domains from constitutively active IKKγ. PMID:18216269

  4. Calmodulin binds to K-Ras, but not to H- or N-Ras, and modulates its downstream signaling.

    PubMed

    Villalonga, P; López-Alcalá, C; Bosch, M; Chiloeches, A; Rocamora, N; Gil, J; Marais, R; Marshall, C J; Bachs, O; Agell, N

    2001-11-01

    Activation of Ras induces a variety of cellular responses depending on the specific effector activated and the intensity and amplitude of this activation. We have previously shown that calmodulin is an essential molecule in the down-regulation of the Ras/Raf/MEK/extracellularly regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in cultured fibroblasts and that this is due at least in part to an inhibitory effect of calmodulin on Ras activation. Here we show that inhibition of calmodulin synergizes with diverse stimuli (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, bombesin, or fetal bovine serum) to induce ERK activation. Moreover, even in the absence of any added stimuli, activation of Ras by calmodulin inhibition was observed. To identify the calmodulin-binding protein involved in this process, calmodulin affinity chromatography was performed. We show that Ras and Raf from cellular lysates were able to bind to calmodulin. Furthermore, Ras binding to calmodulin was favored in lysates with large amounts of GTP-bound Ras, and it was Raf independent. Interestingly, only one of the Ras isoforms, K-RasB, was able to bind to calmodulin. Furthermore, calmodulin inhibition preferentially activated K-Ras. Interaction between calmodulin and K-RasB is direct and is inhibited by the calmodulin kinase II calmodulin-binding domain. Thus, GTP-bound K-RasB is a calmodulin-binding protein, and we suggest that this binding may be a key element in the modulation of Ras signaling.

  5. Human Cytomegalovirus Immediate-Early 1 Protein Rewires Upstream STAT3 to Downstream STAT1 Signaling Switching an IL6-Type to an IFNγ-Like Response

    PubMed Central

    Lukas, Simone; Zenger, Marion; Reitberger, Tobias; Danzer, Daniela; Übner, Theresa; Munday, Diane C.; Paulus, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (hCMV) major immediate-early 1 protein (IE1) is best known for activating transcription to facilitate viral replication. Here we present transcriptome data indicating that IE1 is as significant a repressor as it is an activator of host gene expression. Human cells induced to express IE1 exhibit global repression of IL6- and oncostatin M-responsive STAT3 target genes. This repression is followed by STAT1 phosphorylation and activation of STAT1 target genes normally induced by IFNγ. The observed repression and subsequent activation are both mediated through the same region (amino acids 410 to 445) in the C-terminal domain of IE1, and this region serves as a binding site for STAT3. Depletion of STAT3 phenocopies the STAT1-dependent IFNγ-like response to IE1. In contrast, depletion of the IL6 receptor (IL6ST) or the STAT kinase JAK1 prevents this response. Accordingly, treatment with IL6 leads to prolonged STAT1 instead of STAT3 activation in wild-type IE1 expressing cells, but not in cells expressing a mutant protein (IE1dl410-420) deficient for STAT3 binding. A very similar STAT1-directed response to IL6 is also present in cells infected with a wild-type or revertant hCMV, but not an IE1dl410-420 mutant virus, and this response results in restricted viral replication. We conclude that IE1 is sufficient and necessary to rewire upstream IL6-type to downstream IFNγ-like signaling, two pathways linked to opposing actions, resulting in repressed STAT3- and activated STAT1-responsive genes. These findings relate transcriptional repressor and activator functions of IE1 and suggest unexpected outcomes relevant to viral pathogenesis in response to cytokines or growth factors that signal through the IL6ST-JAK1-STAT3 axis in hCMV-infected cells. Our results also reveal that IE1, a protein considered to be a key activator of the hCMV productive cycle, has an unanticipated role in tempering viral replication. PMID:27387064

  6. Effects of angiotensin II on leptin and downstream leptin signaling in the carotid body during acute intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Moreau, J M; Messenger, S A; Ciriello, J

    2015-12-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) is known to promote leptin production and secretion. Although ANG II type 1 receptors (AT1Rs) and leptin are expressed within the carotid body, it is not known whether AT1R and leptin are co-expressed in the same glomus cells nor if these peptides are affected within the carotid body by intermittent hypoxia (IH). This study was done to investigate whether ANG II modulated leptin signaling in the carotid body during IH. Rats were treated with captopril (Capt) or the AT1R blocker losartan (Los) in the drinking water for 3days prior to being exposed to IH (8h) or normoxia (8h). IH induced increases in plasma ANG II and leptin compared to normoxic controls. Capt treatment abolished the plasma leptin changes to IH, whereas Los treatment had no effect on the IH induced increase in plasma leptin. Additionally, carotid body glomus cells containing both leptin and the long form of the leptin receptor (OB-Rb) were found to co-express AT1R protein, and IH increased the expression of only AT1R protein within the carotid body in both Capt- and non-Capt-treated animals. On the other hand, Los treatment did not modify AT1R protein expression to IH. Additionally, Capt and Los treatment eliminated the elevated carotid body leptin protein expression, and the changes in phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription three protein, the short form of the leptin receptor (OB-R100), suppressor of cytokine signaling 3, and phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression induced by IH. However, Capt elevated the expression of OB-Rb protein, whereas Los abolished the changes in OB-Rb protein to IH. These findings, taken together with the previous observation that ANG II modifies carotid body chemosensitivity, suggest that the increased circulating levels of ANG II and leptin induced by IH act at the carotid body to alter leptin signaling within the carotid body which in turn may influence chemoreceptor function.

  7. FOXM1 is a downstream target of LPA and YAP oncogenic signaling pathways in high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qipeng; Cai, Qingchun; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-29

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a prototypical ligand for G protein coupled receptors, and Forkhead box protein M1 (FOXM1), a transcription factor that regulates expression of a wide array of genes involved in cancer initiation and progression, are two important oncogenic signaling molecules in human epithelial ovarian cancers (EOC). We conducted in vitro mechanistic studies using pharmacological inhibitors, genetic forms of the signaling molecules, and RNAi-mediated gene knock-down to uncover the molecular mechanisms of how these two molecules interact in EOC cells. Additionally, in vivo mouse studies were performed to confirm the functional involvement of FOXM1 in EOC tumor formation and progression. We show for the first time that LPA up-regulates expression of active FOXM1 splice variants in a time- and dose-dependent manner in the human EOC cell lines OVCA433, CAOV3, and OVCAR5. Gi-PI3K-AKT and G12/13-Rho-YAP signaling pathways were both involved in the LPA receptor (LPA1-3) mediated up-regulation of FOXM1 at the transcriptional level. In addition, down-regulation of FOXM1 in CAOV3 xenografts significantly reduced tumor and ascites formation, metastasis, and expression of FOXM1 target genes involved in cell proliferation, migration, or invasion. Collectively, our data link the oncolipid LPA, the oncogene YAP, and the central regulator of cell proliferation/mutagenesis FOXM1 in EOC cells. Moreover, these results provide further support for the importance of these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in EOC. PMID:26299613

  8. Unique Effects of Acute Aripiprazole Treatment on the Dopamine D2 Receptor Downstream cAMP-PKA and Akt-GSK3β Signalling Pathways in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Bo; Chen, Jiezhong; Lian, Jiamei; Huang, Xu-Feng; Deng, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Aripiprazole is a wide-used antipsychotic drug with therapeutic effects on both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia, and reduced side-effects. Although aripiprazole was developed as a dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) partial agonist, all other D2R partial agonists that aimed to mimic aripiprazole failed to exert therapeutic effects in clinic. The present in vivo study aimed to investigate the effects of aripiprazole on the D2R downstream cAMP-PKA and Akt-GSK3β signalling pathways in comparison with a D2R antagonist--haloperidol and a D2R partial agonist--bifeprunox. Rats were injected once with aripiprazole (0.75 mg/kg, i.p.), bifeprunox (0.8 mg/kg, i.p.), haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle. Five brain regions--the prefrontal cortex (PFC), nucleus accumbens (NAc), caudate putamen (CPu), ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra (SN) were collected. The protein levels of PKA, Akt and GSK3β were measured by Western Blotting; the cAMP levels were examined by ELISA tests. The results showed that aripiprazole presented similar acute effects on PKA expression to haloperidol, but not bifeprunox, in the CPU and VTA. Additionally, aripiprazole was able to increase the phosphorylation of GSK3β in the PFC, NAc, CPu and SN, respectively, which cannot be achieved by bifeprunox and haloperidol. These results suggested that acute treatment of aripiprazole had differential effects on the cAMP-PKA and Akt-GSK3β signalling pathways from haloperidol and bifeprunox in these brain areas. This study further indicated that, by comparison with bifeprunox, the unique pharmacological profile of aripiprazole may be attributed to the relatively lower intrinsic activity at D2R.

  9. Geniposide plays an anti-inflammatory role via regulating TLR4 and downstream signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojing; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Tiancheng; Jiang, Haichao; Zhang, Zecai; Fu, Yunhe; Yang, Zhengtao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Geniposide is a medicine isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, which is a traditional Chinese herb that is widely used in Asia for the treatment of inflammation, brain diseases, and hepatic disorders. Mastitis is a highly prevalent and important infectious disease. In this study, we used a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse mastitis model and LPS-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMECs) to explore the anti-inflammatory effect and the mechanism of action of geniposide. Using intraductal injection of LPS as a mouse model of mastitis, we found that geniposide significantly reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). To further investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism, we used LPS-stimulated mMECs as an in vitro mastitis model. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that geniposide inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that geniposide could suppress the phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Geniposide also inhibited the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the LPS-stimulated mMECs. In conclusion, geniposide exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by regulating TLR4 expression, which affected the downstream NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thus, geniposide may be a potential drug for mastitis therapy.

  10. Geniposide plays an anti-inflammatory role via regulating TLR4 and downstream signaling pathways in lipopolysaccharide-induced mastitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaojing; Zhang, Wen; Wang, Tiancheng; Jiang, Haichao; Zhang, Zecai; Fu, Yunhe; Yang, Zhengtao; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2014-10-01

    Geniposide is a medicine isolated from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis, which is a traditional Chinese herb that is widely used in Asia for the treatment of inflammation, brain diseases, and hepatic disorders. Mastitis is a highly prevalent and important infectious disease. In this study, we used a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced mouse mastitis model and LPS-stimulated primary mouse mammary epithelial cells (mMECs) to explore the anti-inflammatory effect and the mechanism of action of geniposide. Using intraductal injection of LPS as a mouse model of mastitis, we found that geniposide significantly reduced the infiltration of inflammatory cells and downregulated the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). To further investigate the anti-inflammatory mechanism, we used LPS-stimulated mMECs as an in vitro mastitis model. The results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) showed that geniposide inhibited the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in a dose-dependent manner. Western blot analysis demonstrated that geniposide could suppress the phosphorylation of inhibitory kappa B (IκBα), nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Geniposide also inhibited the expression of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the LPS-stimulated mMECs. In conclusion, geniposide exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by regulating TLR4 expression, which affected the downstream NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thus, geniposide may be a potential drug for mastitis therapy. PMID:24771071

  11. Autophagy fosters myofibroblast differentiation through MTORC2 activation and downstream upregulation of CTGF

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Monique; Dieudé, Mélanie; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Underwood, Katy; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that autophagy may favor fibrosis through enhanced differentiation of fibroblasts in myofibroblasts. Here, we sought to characterize the mediators and signaling pathways implicated in autophagy-induced myofibroblast differentiation. Fibroblasts, serum starved for up to 4 d, showed increased LC3-II/-I ratios and decreased SQSTM1/p62 levels. Autophagy was associated with acquisition of markers of myofibroblast differentiation including increased protein levels of ACTA2/αSMA (actin, α 2, smooth muscle, aorta), enhanced gene and protein levels of COL1A1 (collagen, type I, α 1) and COL3A1, and the formation of stress fibers. Inhibiting autophagy with 3 different class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) inhibitors or through ATG7 silencing prevented myofibroblast differentiation. Autophagic fibroblasts showed increased expression and secretion of CTGF (connective tissue growth factor), and CTGF silencing prevented myofibroblast differentiation. Phosphorylation of the MTORC1 target RPS6KB1/p70S6K kinase was abolished in starved fibroblasts. Phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, a MTORC2 target, was reduced after initiation of starvation but was followed by spontaneous rephosphorylation after 2 d of starvation, suggesting the reactivation of MTORC2 with sustained autophagy. Inhibiting MTORC2 activation with long-term exposure to rapamycin or by silencing RICTOR, a central component of the MTORC2 complex abolished AKT rephosphorylation. Both RICTOR silencing and rapamycin treatment prevented CTGF and ACTA2 upregulation, demonstrating the central role of MTORC2 activation in CTGF induction and myofibroblast differentiation. Finally, inhibition of autophagy with PtdIns3K inhibitors or ATG7 silencing blocked AKT rephosphorylation. Collectively, these results identify autophagy as a novel activator of MTORC2 signaling leading to CTGF induction and myofibroblast differentiation. PMID:25495560

  12. Autophagy fosters myofibroblast differentiation through MTORC2 activation and downstream upregulation of CTGF.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Monique; Dieudé, Mélanie; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Underwood, Katy; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that autophagy may favor fibrosis through enhanced differentiation of fibroblasts in myofibroblasts. Here, we sought to characterize the mediators and signaling pathways implicated in autophagy-induced myofibroblast differentiation. Fibroblasts, serum starved for up to 4 d, showed increased LC3-II/-I ratios and decreased SQSTM1/p62 levels. Autophagy was associated with acquisition of markers of myofibroblast differentiation including increased protein levels of ACTA2/αSMA (actin, α 2, smooth muscle, aorta), enhanced gene and protein levels of COL1A1 (collagen, type I, α 1) and COL3A1, and the formation of stress fibers. Inhibiting autophagy with 3 different class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) inhibitors or through ATG7 silencing prevented myofibroblast differentiation. Autophagic fibroblasts showed increased expression and secretion of CTGF (connective tissue growth factor), and CTGF silencing prevented myofibroblast differentiation. Phosphorylation of the MTORC1 target RPS6KB1/p70S6K kinase was abolished in starved fibroblasts. Phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, a MTORC2 target, was reduced after initiation of starvation but was followed by spontaneous rephosphorylation after 2 d of starvation, suggesting the reactivation of MTORC2 with sustained autophagy. Inhibiting MTORC2 activation with long-term exposure to rapamycin or by silencing RICTOR, a central component of the MTORC2 complex abolished AKT rephosphorylation. Both RICTOR silencing and rapamycin treatment prevented CTGF and ACTA2 upregulation, demonstrating the central role of MTORC2 activation in CTGF induction and myofibroblast differentiation. Finally, inhibition of autophagy with PtdIns3K inhibitors or ATG7 silencing blocked AKT rephosphorylation. Collectively, these results identify autophagy as a novel activator of MTORC2 signaling leading to CTGF induction and myofibroblast differentiation. PMID:25495560

  13. Autophagy fosters myofibroblast differentiation through MTORC2 activation and downstream upregulation of CTGF.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Monique; Dieudé, Mélanie; Yang, Bing; Hamelin, Katia; Underwood, Katy; Hébert, Marie-Josée

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that autophagy may favor fibrosis through enhanced differentiation of fibroblasts in myofibroblasts. Here, we sought to characterize the mediators and signaling pathways implicated in autophagy-induced myofibroblast differentiation. Fibroblasts, serum starved for up to 4 d, showed increased LC3-II/-I ratios and decreased SQSTM1/p62 levels. Autophagy was associated with acquisition of markers of myofibroblast differentiation including increased protein levels of ACTA2/αSMA (actin, α 2, smooth muscle, aorta), enhanced gene and protein levels of COL1A1 (collagen, type I, α 1) and COL3A1, and the formation of stress fibers. Inhibiting autophagy with 3 different class I phosphoinositide 3-kinase and class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PtdIns3K) inhibitors or through ATG7 silencing prevented myofibroblast differentiation. Autophagic fibroblasts showed increased expression and secretion of CTGF (connective tissue growth factor), and CTGF silencing prevented myofibroblast differentiation. Phosphorylation of the MTORC1 target RPS6KB1/p70S6K kinase was abolished in starved fibroblasts. Phosphorylation of AKT at Ser473, a MTORC2 target, was reduced after initiation of starvation but was followed by spontaneous rephosphorylation after 2 d of starvation, suggesting the reactivation of MTORC2 with sustained autophagy. Inhibiting MTORC2 activation with long-term exposure to rapamycin or by silencing RICTOR, a central component of the MTORC2 complex abolished AKT rephosphorylation. Both RICTOR silencing and rapamycin treatment prevented CTGF and ACTA2 upregulation, demonstrating the central role of MTORC2 activation in CTGF induction and myofibroblast differentiation. Finally, inhibition of autophagy with PtdIns3K inhibitors or ATG7 silencing blocked AKT rephosphorylation. Collectively, these results identify autophagy as a novel activator of MTORC2 signaling leading to CTGF induction and myofibroblast differentiation.

  14. Aquaporin-3 Controls Breast Cancer Cell Migration by Regulating Hydrogen Peroxide Transport and Its Downstream Cell Signaling.

    PubMed

    Satooka, Hiroki; Hara-Chikuma, Mariko

    2016-04-01

    Most breast cancer mortality is due to clinical relapse associated with metastasis. CXCL12/CXCR4-dependent cell migration is a critical process in breast cancer progression; however, its underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that the water/glycerol channel protein aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is required for CXCL12/CXCR4-dependent breast cancer cell migration through a mechanism involving its hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) transport function. Extracellular H2O2, produced by CXCL12-activated membrane NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2), was transported into breast cancer cells via AQP3. Transient H2O2 accumulation was observed around the membrane during CXCL12-induced migration, which may be facilitated by the association of AQP3 with Nox2. Intracellular H2O2 then oxidized PTEN and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) followed by activation of the Akt pathway. This contributed to directional cell migration. The expression level of AQP3 in breast cancer cells was related to their migration ability both in vitro and in vivo through CXCL12/CXCR4- or H2O2-dependent pathways. Coincidentally, spontaneous metastasis of orthotopic xenografts to the lung was reduced upon AQP3 knockdown. These findings underscore the importance of AQP3-transported H2O2 in CXCL12/CXCR4-dependent signaling and migration in breast cancer cells and suggest that AQP3 has potential as a therapeutic target for breast cancer.

  15. Hydrogen sulfide acts as a downstream signal molecule in salicylic acid-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Xie, Lin-Run; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2015-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, is a small phenolic compound with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development, and the acquisition of stress tolerance. In recent years, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been found to have similar functions, but cross talk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. In this study, pretreatment of maize seedlings with SA improved the survival percentage of seedlings under heat stress, indicating that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings. In addition, treatment with SA enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, which in turn induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. Interestingly, SA-induced heat tolerance was enhanced by addition of NaHS, a H2S donor, but weakened by specific inhibitors of H2S biosynthesis DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and its scavenger hydroxylamine (HT). Furthermore, pretreatment with paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), inhibitors of SA biosynthesis, had no significant effect on NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings. Similarly, significant change in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H), the key enzymes in SA biosynthesis, and the content of endogenous SA, was not observed in maize seedlings by NaHS treatment. All of the above-mentioned results suggest that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings, and H2S might be a novel downstream signal molecule in SA-induced heat tolerance.

  16. Receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase MARIS functions downstream of CrRLK1L-dependent signaling during tip growth

    PubMed Central

    Boisson-Dernier, Aurélien; Franck, Christina Maria; Lituiev, Dmytro S.; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2015-01-01

    Growing plant cells need to rigorously coordinate external signals with internal processes. For instance, the maintenance of cell wall (CW) integrity requires the coordination of CW sensing with CW remodeling and biosynthesis to avoid growth arrest or integrity loss. Despite the involvement of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) of the Catharanthus roseus RLK1-like (CrRLK1L) subfamily and the reactive oxygen species-producing NADPH oxidases, it remains largely unknown how this coordination is achieved. ANXUR1 (ANX1) and ANX2, two redundant members of the CrRLK1L subfamily, are required for tip growth of the pollen tube (PT), and their closest homolog, FERONIA, controls root-hair tip growth. Previously, we showed that ANX1 overexpression mildly inhibits PT growth by oversecretion of CW material, whereas pollen tubes of anx1 anx2 double mutants burst spontaneously after germination. Here, we report the identification of suppressor mutants with improved fertility caused by the rescue of anx1 anx2 pollen tube bursting. Mapping of one these mutants revealed an R240C nonsynonymous substitution in the activation loop of a receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase (RLCK), which we named MARIS (MRI). We show that MRI is a plasma membrane-localized member of the RLCK-VIII subfamily and is preferentially expressed in both PTs and root hairs. Interestingly, mri-knockout mutants display spontaneous PT and root-hair bursting. Moreover, expression of the MRIR240C mutant, but not its wild-type form, partially rescues the bursting phenotypes of anx1 anx2 PTs and fer root hairs but strongly inhibits wild-type tip growth. Thus, our findings identify a novel positive component of the CrRLK1L-dependent signaling cascade that coordinates CW integrity and tip growth. PMID:26378127

  17. Power Budget Analysis of Colorless Hybrid WDM/TDM-PON Scheme Using Downstream DPSK and Re-modulated Upstream OOK Data Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Yousaf; Afridi, Muhammad Idrees; Khan, Ahmed Mudassir; Rehman, Waheed Ur; Khan, Jahanzeb

    2014-09-01

    Hybrid wavelength-division multiplexed/time-division multiplexed passive optical access networks (WDM/TDM-PONs) combine the advance features of both WDM and TDM PONs to provide a cost-effective access network solution. We demonstrate and analyze the transmission performances and power budget issues of a colorless hybrid WDM/TDM-PON scheme. A 10-Gb/s downstream differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and remodulated upstream on/off keying (OOK) data signals are transmitted over 25 km standard single mode fiber. Simulation results show error free transmission having adequate power margins in both downstream and upstream transmission, which prove the applicability of the proposed scheme to future passive optical access networks. The power budget confines both the PON splitting ratio and the distance between the Optical Line Terminal (OLT) and Optical Network Unit (ONU).

  18. Tie2 and Eph Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Activation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barton, William A.; Dalton, Annamarie C.; Seegar, Tom C.M.; Himanen, Juha P.

    2014-01-01

    The Eph and Tie cell surface receptors mediate a variety of signaling events during development and in the adult organism. As other receptor tyrosine kinases, they are activated on binding of extracellular ligands and their catalytic activity is tightly regulated on multiple levels. The Eph and Tie receptors display some unique characteristics, including the requirement of ligand-induced receptor clustering for efficient signaling. Interestingly, both Ephs and Ties can mediate different, even opposite, biological effects depending on the specific ligand eliciting the response and on the cellular context. Here we discuss the structural features of these receptors, their interactions with various ligands, as well as functional implications for downstream signaling initiation. The Eph/ephrin structures are already well reviewed and we only provide a brief overview on the initial binding events. We go into more detail discussing the Tie-angiopoietin structures and recognition. PMID:24478383

  19. Trastuzumab as a preoperative monotherapy does not inhibit HER2 downstream signaling in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Maëva; Harlé, Alexandre; Salleron, Julia; Ramacci, Carole; Campone, Mario; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 15–20% of breast carcinomas. The overexpression of HER2 was previously associated with a poor prognosis until the development of the first anti-HER2 therapy, trastuzumab, which drastically improves the prognosis of HER2-overexpressing breast cancers. However, its mechanism of action remains not fully understood. Several studies have proposed that the behavior and mechanism of action of trastuzumab may be drastically altered in vitro and in vivo. The present study assesses the ability of trastuzumab to inhibit the phosphorylation of the key-proteins of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mechanistic target of rapamycin and Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in vitro, in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor biopsies obtained from patients treated with trastuzumab preoperative monotherapy as part of the Unicancer GEP04 RADHER phase II clinical trial. HER2-positive SKBR3 and HER2-negative MCF-7 cell lines were exposed to trastuzumab for 72 h. In total, 41 patients received trastuzumab alone for 6 weeks of preoperative treatment. Biopsies were collected at the baseline and at surgery. A total of 19 pairs of associated baseline and surgery tumor specimens were eligible for protein extraction and comparative phosphoprotein expression analysis, prior to and subsequent to treatment. The expression of phosphoproteins was quantitatively assessed using a multiplex immunoassay. In the SKBR3 cell line, a statistically significant decrease of the expression level of phosphorylated (p-)AKT, p-ribosomal protein S6 kinase B1, p-extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and p-mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 was observed after exposure to trastuzumab. In contrast, no statistically significant variations for levels expression of these phosphoproteins were observed in patients following treatment. The lack of downregulation of PI3K and MAPK pathways could probably

  20. Trastuzumab as a preoperative monotherapy does not inhibit HER2 downstream signaling in HER2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Maëva; Harlé, Alexandre; Salleron, Julia; Ramacci, Carole; Campone, Mario; Merlin, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) is overexpressed in 15–20% of breast carcinomas. The overexpression of HER2 was previously associated with a poor prognosis until the development of the first anti-HER2 therapy, trastuzumab, which drastically improves the prognosis of HER2-overexpressing breast cancers. However, its mechanism of action remains not fully understood. Several studies have proposed that the behavior and mechanism of action of trastuzumab may be drastically altered in vitro and in vivo. The present study assesses the ability of trastuzumab to inhibit the phosphorylation of the key-proteins of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT)/mechanistic target of rapamycin and Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in vitro, in breast cancer cell lines and in tumor biopsies obtained from patients treated with trastuzumab preoperative monotherapy as part of the Unicancer GEP04 RADHER phase II clinical trial. HER2-positive SKBR3 and HER2-negative MCF-7 cell lines were exposed to trastuzumab for 72 h. In total, 41 patients received trastuzumab alone for 6 weeks of preoperative treatment. Biopsies were collected at the baseline and at surgery. A total of 19 pairs of associated baseline and surgery tumor specimens were eligible for protein extraction and comparative phosphoprotein expression analysis, prior to and subsequent to treatment. The expression of phosphoproteins was quantitatively assessed using a multiplex immunoassay. In the SKBR3 cell line, a statistically significant decrease of the expression level of phosphorylated (p-)AKT, p-ribosomal protein S6 kinase B1, p-extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and p-mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 was observed after exposure to trastuzumab. In contrast, no statistically significant variations for levels expression of these phosphoproteins were observed in patients following treatment. The lack of downregulation of PI3K and MAPK pathways could probably

  1. Calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for sperm activation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyu; Wang, Bin; He, Ruijun; Zhao, Yanmei; Miao, Long

    2014-02-01

    In nematode, sperm activation (or spermiogenesis), a process in which the symmetric and non-motile spermatids transform into polarized and crawling spermatozoa, is critical for sperm cells to acquire fertilizing competence. SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent pathways function redundantly during sperm activation in both males and hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the downstream signaling for both pathways remains unclear. Here we show that calcium signaling and the MAPK cascade are required for both SPE-8 dependent and SPE-8 independent sperm activation, implying that both pathways share common downstream signaling components during sperm activation. We demonstrate that activation of the MAPK cascade is sufficient to activate spermatids derived from either wild-type or spe-8 group mutant males and that activation of the MAPK cascade bypasses the requirement of calcium signal to induce sperm activation, indicating that the MAPK cascade functions downstream of or parallel with the calcium signaling during sperm activation. Interestingly, the persistent activation of MAPK in activated spermatozoa inhibits Major Sperm Protein (MSP)-based cytoskeleton dynamics. We demonstrate that MAPK plays dual roles in promoting pseudopod extension during sperm activation but also blocking the MSP-based, amoeboid motility of the spermatozoa. Thus, though nematode sperm are crawling cells, morphologically distinct from flagellated sperm, and the molecular machinery for motility of amoeboid and flagellated sperm is different, both types of sperm might utilize conserved signaling pathways to modulate sperm maturation.

  2. Common and Diverging Integrin Signals Downstream of Adhesion and Mechanical Stimuli and Their Interplay with Reactive Oxygen Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Kathrin Stephanie; Johansson, Staffan

    The integrin family of adhesion receptors regulates basic functions of cells, and the signals they induce are altered in tumor cells. In this review we discuss how different integrindependent signals are generated during cell adhesion and by physical forces acting on cells. We also describe how reactive oxygen species are integral parts of integrin signaling and highlight a few important questions in the field. Answers to those may improve our understanding of integrins and their role in the development of cancer.

  3. Gbx2 is required for the morphogenesis of the mouse inner ear: a downstream candidate of hindbrain signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhengshi; Cantos, Raquel; Patente, Maria; Wu, Doris K

    2005-05-01

    Gbx2 is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that is related to unplugged in Drosophila. In mice, Gbx2 and Otx2 negatively regulate each other to establish the mid-hindbrain boundary in the neural tube. Here, we show that Gbx2 is required for the development of the mouse inner ear. Absence of the endolymphatic duct and swelling of the membranous labyrinth are common features in Gbx2-/- inner ears. More severe mutant phenotypes include absence of the anterior and posterior semicircular canals, and a malformed saccule and cochlear duct. However, formation of the lateral semicircular canal and its ampulla is usually unaffected. These inner ear phenotypes are remarkably similar to those reported in kreisler mice, which have inner ear defects attributed to defects in the hindbrain. Based on gene expression analyses, we propose that activation of Gbx2 expression within the inner ear is an important pathway whereby signals from the hindbrain regulate inner ear development. In addition, our results suggest that Gbx2 normally promotes dorsal fates such as the endolymphatic duct and semicircular canals by positively regulating genes such as Wnt2b and Dlx5. However, Gbx2 promotes ventral fates such as the saccule and cochlear duct, possibly by restricting Otx2 expression. PMID:15829521

  4. Gbx2 is required for the morphogenesis of the mouse inner ear: a downstream candidate of hindbrain signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhengshi; Cantos, Raquel; Patente, Maria; Wu, Doris K

    2005-05-01

    Gbx2 is a homeobox-containing transcription factor that is related to unplugged in Drosophila. In mice, Gbx2 and Otx2 negatively regulate each other to establish the mid-hindbrain boundary in the neural tube. Here, we show that Gbx2 is required for the development of the mouse inner ear. Absence of the endolymphatic duct and swelling of the membranous labyrinth are common features in Gbx2-/- inner ears. More severe mutant phenotypes include absence of the anterior and posterior semicircular canals, and a malformed saccule and cochlear duct. However, formation of the lateral semicircular canal and its ampulla is usually unaffected. These inner ear phenotypes are remarkably similar to those reported in kreisler mice, which have inner ear defects attributed to defects in the hindbrain. Based on gene expression analyses, we propose that activation of Gbx2 expression within the inner ear is an important pathway whereby signals from the hindbrain regulate inner ear development. In addition, our results suggest that Gbx2 normally promotes dorsal fates such as the endolymphatic duct and semicircular canals by positively regulating genes such as Wnt2b and Dlx5. However, Gbx2 promotes ventral fates such as the saccule and cochlear duct, possibly by restricting Otx2 expression.

  5. Isolation of Fully Human Antagonistic RON Antibodies Showing Efficient Block of Downstream Signaling and Cell Migration1

    PubMed Central

    Gunes, Zeynep; Zucconi, Adriana; Cioce, Mario; Meola, Annalisa; Pezzanera, Monica; Acali, Stefano; Zampaglione, Immacolata; De Pratti, Valeria; Bova, Luca; Talamo, Fabio; Demartis, Anna; Monaci, Paolo; La Monica, Nicola; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Vitelli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    RON belongs to the c-MET family of receptor tyrosine kinases. As its well-known family member MET, RON and its ligand macrophage-stimulating protein have been implicated in the progression and metastasis of tumors and have been shown to be overexpressed in cancer. We generated and tested a large number of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human RON. Our screening yielded three high-affinity antibodies that efficiently block ligand-dependent intracellular AKT and MAPK signaling. This effect correlates with the strong reduction of ligand-activated migration of T47D breast cancer cell line. By cross-competition experiments, we showed that the antagonistic antibodies fall into three distinct epitope regions of the RON extracellular Sema domain. Notably, no inhibition of tumor growth was observed in different epithelial tumor xenografts in nude mice with any of the antibodies. These results suggest that distinct properties beside ligand antagonism are required for anti-RON mAbs to exert antitumor effects in vivo. PMID:21286376

  6. Assembly-driven activation of the AIM2 foreign-dsDNA sensor provides a polymerization template for downstream ASC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrone, Seamus R.; Matyszewski, Mariusz; Yu, Xiong; Delannoy, Michael; Egelman, Edward H.; Sohn, Jungsan

    2015-07-01

    AIM2 recognizes foreign dsDNA and assembles into the inflammasome, a filamentous supramolecular signalling platform required to launch innate immune responses. We show here that the pyrin domain of AIM2 (AIM2PYD) drives both filament formation and dsDNA binding. In addition, the dsDNA-binding domain of AIM2 also oligomerizes and assists in filament formation. The ability to oligomerize is critical for binding dsDNA, and in turn permits the size of dsDNA to regulate the assembly of the AIM2 polymers. The AIM2PYD oligomers define the filamentous structure, and the helical symmetry of the AIM2PYD filament is consistent with the filament assembled by the PYD of the downstream adaptor ASC. Our results suggest that the role of AIM2PYD is not autoinhibitory, but generating a structural template by coupling ligand binding and oligomerization is a key signal transduction mechanism in the AIM2 inflammasome.

  7. Wogonin inhibits the proliferation and invasion, and induces the apoptosis of HepG2 and Bel7402 HCC cells through NF‑κB/Bcl-2, EGFR and EGFR downstream ERK/AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodong; Tian, Shuo; Liu, Mei; Jian, Lingyan; Zhao, Limei

    2016-10-01

    The anticancer effects of the natural flavonoid, wogonin, have been reported. However, its molecular mechanisms of action have not yet been fully explored. In the present study, we aimed to examine the molecular mechanisms of action of wogonin and its effects on the biological behavior of the HepG2 and Bel7402 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines. We also examined the effects of wogonin on nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/Bcl-2 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling, as well as on downstream pathways of EGFR, namely extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/AKT signaling. We found that treatment with wogonin inhibited the proliferation and invasion, and induced the apoptosis of the HepG2 and Bel7402 cells. In addition, treatment with wogonin decreased cyclin D1, cyclin E, CDK4/6, Bcl-2 and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) expression, and promoted the cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-9 in a concentration-dependent manner. Further experiments revealed that wogonin inhibited NF-κB/Bcl-2 signaling by decreasing the IκB and p65 phosphorylation levels. Wogonin also inhibited the activation of the EGFR (Tyr845) signaling pathway, and that of downstream pathways of EGFR, namely ERK/AKT/MMP2 signaling. The depletion of EGFR by siRNA partly abolished the inhibitory effects of wogonin on cyclin D1, MMP2 expression. On the whole, our our findings demonstrate that wogonin effectively suppresses the proliferation, invasion and survival of HCC cells through the modulation of the NF-κB and EGFR signaling pathways.

  8. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri Race 1 Induced Redox State Alterations Are Coupled to Downstream Defense Signaling in Root Tissues of Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Moniya; Das, Sampa

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are known to play pivotal roles in pathogen perception, recognition and downstream defense signaling. But, how these redox alarms coordinate in planta into a defensive network is still intangible. Present study illustrates the role of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp ciceri Race1 (Foc1) induced redox responsive transcripts in regulating downstream defense signaling in chickpea. Confocal microscopic studies highlighted pathogen invasion and colonization accompanied by tissue damage and deposition of callose degraded products at the xylem vessels of infected roots of chickpea plants. Such depositions led to the clogging of xylem vessels in compatible hosts while the resistant plants were devoid of such obstructions. Lipid peroxidation assays also indicated fungal induced membrane injury. Cell shrinkage and gradual nuclear adpression appeared as interesting features marking fungal ingress. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction exhibited differential expression patterns of redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors during Foc1 progression. Network analysis showed redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors to coordinate into a well orchestrated defensive network with sugars acting as internal signal modulators. Respiratory burst oxidase homologue, cationic peroxidase, vacuolar sorting receptor, polyol transporter, sucrose synthase, and zinc finger domain containing transcription factor appeared as key molecular candidates controlling important hubs of the defense network. Functional characterization of these hub controllers may prove to be promising in understanding chickpea–Foc1 interaction and developing the case study as a model for looking into the complexities of wilt diseases of other important crop legumes. PMID:24058463

  9. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. ciceri race 1 induced redox state alterations are coupled to downstream defense signaling in root tissues of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumanti; Bhar, Anirban; Chatterjee, Moniya; Das, Sampa

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are known to play pivotal roles in pathogen perception, recognition and downstream defense signaling. But, how these redox alarms coordinate in planta into a defensive network is still intangible. Present study illustrates the role of Fusarium oxysporum f.sp ciceri Race1 (Foc1) induced redox responsive transcripts in regulating downstream defense signaling in chickpea. Confocal microscopic studies highlighted pathogen invasion and colonization accompanied by tissue damage and deposition of callose degraded products at the xylem vessels of infected roots of chickpea plants. Such depositions led to the clogging of xylem vessels in compatible hosts while the resistant plants were devoid of such obstructions. Lipid peroxidation assays also indicated fungal induced membrane injury. Cell shrinkage and gradual nuclear adpression appeared as interesting features marking fungal ingress. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction exhibited differential expression patterns of redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors during Foc1 progression. Network analysis showed redox regulators, cellular transporters and transcription factors to coordinate into a well orchestrated defensive network with sugars acting as internal signal modulators. Respiratory burst oxidase homologue, cationic peroxidase, vacuolar sorting receptor, polyol transporter, sucrose synthase, and zinc finger domain containing transcription factor appeared as key molecular candidates controlling important hubs of the defense network. Functional characterization of these hub controllers may prove to be promising in understanding chickpea-Foc1 interaction and developing the case study as a model for looking into the complexities of wilt diseases of other important crop legumes.

  10. Analysis of signal transduction pathways during anoxia exposure in a marine snail: a role for p38 MAP kinase and downstream signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Larade, Kevin; Storey, Kenneth B

    2006-01-01

    The responses of members of the three main MAPK families (ERK, JNK/SAPK, p38 MAPK), as well as selected peripheral pathways, were examined in hepatopancreas of the marine periwinkle, Littorina littorea, to determine if anoxia exposure influenced the total protein content or the phosphorylation status of any key components. The content of active phospho-p38 MAPK was 2-fold higher in hepatopancreas from anoxic snails relative to controls. A 1.7-fold increase in the amount of phospho-Hsp27 and a 1.3-fold increase in phospho-CREB correlated well with the changes in p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Activation of these factors via p38 MAPK may be vital to the reorganization of metabolic responses to anoxia in hepatopancreas. No changes in components of the JNK/SAPK and ERK pathways occurred and transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism did not appear to be affected by anoxia. The present analysis of a variety of signaling pathways has implicated the p38 MAPK pathway as a key anoxia-responsive signal transduction pathway in L. littorea. PMID:16326124

  11. Reg-2, A Downstream Signaling Protein in the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Survival Pathway, Alleviates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Tian, Ke-Wei; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Beibei; Han, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), originally described as a neurocytokine that could support the survival of neurons, has been recently found to alleviate demyelination, prevent axon loss, and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, poor penetration into the brain parenchyma and unfavorable side effects limit the utility of CNTF. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a protein downstream of CNTF, regeneration gene protein 2 (Reg-2). Using multiple morphological, molecular biology, and electrophysiological methods to assess neuroinflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and functional impairment, we observed that Reg-2 and CNTF exert similar effects in the acute phase of EAE. Both treatments attenuated axonal loss and demyelination, improved neuronal survival, and produced functional improvement. With a smaller molecular weight and improved penetration into the brain parenchyma, Reg-2 may be a useful substitute for CNTF therapy in EAE and multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:27242448

  12. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C.; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation. PMID:27068814

  13. Phosphorylation of Sox9 is required for neural crest delamination and is regulated downstream of BMP and canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jessica A J; Wu, Ming-Hoi; Yan, Carol H; Chau, Bolton K H; So, Henry; Ng, Alvis; Chan, Alan; Cheah, Kathryn S E; Briscoe, James; Cheung, Martin

    2013-02-19

    Coordination of neural crest cell (NCC) induction and delamination is orchestrated by several transcription factors. Among these, Sry-related HMG box-9 (Sox9) and Snail2 have been implicated in both the induction of NCC identity and, together with phoshorylation, NCC delamination. How phosphorylation effects this function has not been clear. Here we show, in the developing chick neural tube, that phosphorylation of Sox9 on S64 and S181 facilitates its SUMOylation, and the phosphorylated forms of Sox9 are essential for trunk neural crest delamination. Both phosphorylation and to a lesser extent SUMOylation, of Sox9 are required to cooperate with Snail2 to promote delamination. Moreover, bone morphogenetic protein and canonical Wnt signaling induce phosphorylation of Sox9, thereby connecting extracellular signals with the delamination of NCCs. Together the data suggest a model in which extracellular signals initiate phosphorylation of Sox9 and its cooperation with Snail2 to induce NCC delamination. PMID:23382206

  14. Phosphorylation of Sox9 is required for neural crest delamination and is regulated downstream of BMP and canonical Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jessica A. J.; Wu, Ming-Hoi; Yan, Carol H.; Chau, Bolton K. H.; So, Henry; Chan, Alan; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Briscoe, James; Cheung, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Coordination of neural crest cell (NCC) induction and delamination is orchestrated by several transcription factors. Among these, Sry-related HMG box-9 (Sox9) and Snail2 have been implicated in both the induction of NCC identity and, together with phoshorylation, NCC delamination. How phosphorylation effects this function has not been clear. Here we show, in the developing chick neural tube, that phosphorylation of Sox9 on S64 and S181 facilitates its SUMOylation, and the phosphorylated forms of Sox9 are essential for trunk neural crest delamination. Both phosphorylation and to a lesser extent SUMOylation, of Sox9 are required to cooperate with Snail2 to promote delamination. Moreover, bone morphogenetic protein and canonical Wnt signaling induce phosphorylation of Sox9, thereby connecting extracellular signals with the delamination of NCCs. Together the data suggest a model in which extracellular signals initiate phosphorylation of Sox9 and its cooperation with Snail2 to induce NCC delamination. PMID:23382206

  15. LLM-Domain B-GATA Transcription Factors Promote Stomatal Development Downstream of Light Signaling Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana Hypocotyls.

    PubMed

    Klermund, Carina; Ranftl, Quirin L; Diener, Julia; Bastakis, Emmanouil; Richter, René; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2016-03-01

    Stomata are pores that regulate the gas and water exchange between the environment and aboveground plant tissues, including hypocotyls, leaves, and stems. Here, we show that mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana LLM-domain B-GATA genes are defective in stomata formation in hypocotyls. Conversely, stomata formation is strongly promoted by overexpression of various LLM-domain B-class GATA genes, most strikingly in hypocotyls but also in cotyledons. Genetic analyses indicate that these B-GATAs act upstream of the stomata formation regulators SPEECHLESS(SPCH), MUTE, and SCREAM/SCREAM2 and downstream or independent of the patterning regulators TOO MANY MOUTHS and STOMATAL DENSITY AND DISTRIBUTION1 The effects of the GATAs on stomata formation are light dependent but can be induced in dark-grown seedlings by red, far-red, or blue light treatments. PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR(PIF) mutants form stomata in the dark, and in this genetic background, GATA expression is sufficient to induce stomata formation in the dark. Since the expression of the LLM-domain B-GATAs GNC(GATA, NITRATE-INDUCIBLE, CARBON METABOLISM-INVOLVED) and GNC-LIKE/CYTOKININ-RESPONSIVE GATA FACTOR1 as well as that of SPCH is red light induced but the induction of SPCH is compromised in a GATA gene mutant background, we hypothesize that PIF- and light-regulated stomata formation in hypocotyls is critically dependent on LLM-domain B-GATA genes. PMID:26917680

  16. EGF stimulates the activation of EGF receptors and the selective activation of major signaling pathways during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Wee, Ping; Shi, Huaiping; Jiang, Jennifer; Wang, Yuluan; Wang, Zhixiang

    2015-03-01

    Mitosis and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) are both targets for cancer therapy. The role of EGFR signaling in mitosis has been rarely studied and poorly understood. The limited studies indicate that the activation of EGFR and downstream signaling pathways is mostly inhibited during mitosis. However, we recently showed that EGFR is phosphorylated in response to EGF stimulation in mitosis. Here we studied EGF-induced EGFR activation and the activation of major signaling pathways downstream of EGFR during mitosis. We showed that EGFR was strongly activated by EGF during mitosis as all the five major tyrosine residues including Y992, Y1045, Y1068, Y1086, and Y1173 were phosphorylated to a level similar to that in the interphase. We further showed that the activated EGFR is able to selectively activate some downstream signaling pathways while avoiding others. Activated EGFR is able to activate PI3K and AKT2, but not AKT1, which may be responsible for the observed effects of EGF against nocodazole-induced cell death. Activated EGFR is also able to activate c-Src, c-Cbl and PLC-γ1 during mitosis. However, activated EGFR is unable to activate ERK1/2 and their downstream substrates RSK and Elk-1. While it activated Ras, EGFR failed to fully activate Raf-1 in mitosis due to the lack of phosphorylation at Y341 and the lack of dephosphorylation at pS259. We conclude that contrary to the dogma, EGFR is activated by EGF during mitosis. Moreover, EGFR-mediated cell signaling is regulated differently from the interphase to specifically serve the needs of the cell in mitosis.

  17. Signaling pathways activated by a protease allergen in basophils

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Rachel K.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Yu, Shuang; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a significant burden in industrialized countries, but why and how the immune system responds to allergens remain largely unknown. Because many clinically significant allergens have proteolytic activity, and many helminths express proteases that are necessary for their life cycles, host mechanisms likely have evolved to detect the proteolytic activity of helminth proteases, which may be incidentally activated by protease allergens. A cysteine protease, papain, is a prototypic protease allergen that can directly activate basophils and mast cells, leading to the production of cytokines, including IL-4, characteristic of the type 2 immune response. The mechanism of papain’s immunogenic activity remains unknown. Here we have characterized the cellular response activated by papain in basophils. We find that papain-induced IL-4 production requires calcium flux and activation of PI3K and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Interestingly, papain-induced IL-4 production was dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) adaptor protein Fc receptor γ-chain, even though the canonical ITAM signaling was not activated by papain. Collectively, these data characterize the downstream signaling pathway activated by a protease allergen in basophils. PMID:25369937

  18. The transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 acts downstream of BMP signaling to generate primordial germ cells in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Taro; Extavour, Cassandra G

    2016-01-15

    Segregation of the germ line from the soma is an essential event for transmission of genetic information across generations in all sexually reproducing animals. Although some well-studied systems such as Drosophila and Xenopus use maternally inherited germ determinants to specify germ cells, most animals, including mice, appear to utilize zygotic inductive cell signals to specify germ cells during later embryogenesis. Such inductive germ cell specification is thought to be an ancestral trait of Bilateria, but major questions remain as to the nature of an ancestral mechanism to induce germ cells, and how that mechanism evolved. We previously reported that BMP signaling-based germ cell induction is conserved in both the mouse Mus musculus and the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, which is an emerging model organism for functional studies of induction-based germ cell formation. In order to gain further insight into the functional evolution of germ cell specification, here we examined the Gryllus ortholog of the transcription factor Blimp-1 (also known as Prdm1), which is a widely conserved bilaterian gene known to play a crucial role in the specification of germ cells in mice. Our functional analyses of the Gryllus Blimp-1 ortholog revealed that it is essential for Gryllus primordial germ cell development, and is regulated by upstream input from the BMP signaling pathway. This functional conservation of the epistatic relationship between BMP signaling and Blimp-1 in inductive germ cell specification between mouse and cricket supports the hypothesis that this molecular mechanism regulated primordial germ cell specification in a last common bilaterian ancestor.

  19. Spargel/dPGC-1 is a new downstream effector in the insulin-TOR signaling pathway in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Subhas; Duttaroy, Atanu

    2013-10-01

    Insulin and target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathways converge to maintain growth so a proportionate body form is attained. Insufficiency in either insulin or TOR results in developmental growth defects due to low ATP level. Spargel is the Drosophila homolog of PGC-1, which is an omnipotent transcriptional coactivator in mammals. Like its mammalian counterpart, Spargel/dPGC-1 is recognized for its role in energy metabolism through mitochondrial biogenesis. An earlier study demonstrated that Spargel/dPGC-1 is involved in the insulin-TOR signaling, but a comprehensive analysis is needed to understand exactly which step of this pathway Spargel/PGC-1 is essential. Using genetic epistasis analysis, we demonstrated that a Spargel gain of function can overcome the TOR and S6K mediated cell size and cell growth defects in a cell autonomous manner. Moreover, the tissue-restricted phenotypes of TOR and S6k mutants are rescued by Spargel overexpression. We have further elucidated that Spargel gain of function sets back the mitochondrial numbers in growth-limited TOR mutant cell clones, which suggests a possible mechanism for Spargel action on cells and tissue to attain normal size. Finally, excess Spargel can ameliorate the negative effect of FoxO overexpression only to a limited extent, which suggests that Spargel does not share all of the FoxO functions and consequently cannot significantly rescue the FoxO phenotypes. Together, our observation established that Spargel/dPGC-1 is indeed a terminal effector in the insulin-TOR pathway operating below TOR, S6K, Tsc, and FoxO. This led us to conclude that Spargel should be incorporated as a new member of this growth-signaling pathway.

  20. The mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway can mediate growth inhibition and proliferation in smooth muscle cells. Dependence on the availability of downstream targets.

    PubMed Central

    Bornfeldt, K E; Campbell, J S; Koyama, H; Argast, G M; Leslie, C C; Raines, E W; Krebs, E G; Ross, R

    1997-01-01

    Activation of the classical mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway leads to proliferation of many cell types. Accordingly, an inhibitor of MAPK kinase, PD 098059, inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation of human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) that do not secrete growth-inhibitory PGs such as PGE2. In striking contrast, in SMCs that express the inducible form of cyclooxygenase (COX-2), activation of MAPK serves as a negative regulator of proliferation. In these cells, PDGF-induced MAPK activation leads to cytosolic phospholipase A2 activation, PGE2 release, and subsequent activation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which acts as a strong inhibitor of SMC proliferation. Inhibition of either MAPK kinase signaling or of COX-2 in these cells releases them from the influence of the growth-inhibitory PGs and results in the subsequent cell cycle traverse and proliferation. Thus, the MAPK pathway mediates either proliferation or growth inhibition in human arterial SMCs depending on the availability of specific downstream enzyme targets. PMID:9259587

  1. SIRT1, AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and downstream kinases in response to a single bout of sprint exercise: influence of glucose ingestion.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Borja; Guadalupe-Grau, Amelia; Fuentes, Teresa; Ponce-González, Jesús Gustavo; Morales-Alamo, David; Olmedillas, Hugo; Guillén-Salgado, José; Santana, Alfredo; Calbet, José A L

    2010-07-01

    This study was designed to examine potential in vivo mechanisms of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation inhibition and its downstream signaling consequences during the recovery period after a single bout of sprint exercise. Sprint exercise induces Thr(172)-AMPK phosphorylation and increased PGC-1alpha mRNA, by an unknown mechanism. Muscle biopsies were obtained in 15 young healthy men in response to a 30-s sprint exercise (Wingate test) randomly distributed into two groups: the fasting (n = 7, C) and the glucose group (n = 8, G), who ingested 75 g of glucose 1 h before exercising to inhibit AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Exercise elicited different patterns of Ser(221)-ACCbeta, Ser(473)-Akt and Thr(642)-AS160 phosphorylation, during the recovery period after glucose ingestion. Thirty minutes after the control sprint, Ser(485)-AMPKalpha1/Ser(491)-AMPKalpha2 phosphorylation was reduced by 33% coinciding with increased Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation (both, P < 0.05). Glucose abolished the 30-min Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation. Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation was elevated immediately following and 30 min after exercise in C and G, implying a dissociation between Thr(172)-AMPKalpha and Ser(221)-ACCbeta phosphorylation. Two hours after the sprint, PGC-1alpha protein expression remained unchanged while SIRT1 (its upstream deacetylase) was increased. Glucose ingestion abolished the SIRT1 response without any significant effect on PGC-1alpha protein expression. In conclusion, glucose ingestion prior to a sprint exercise profoundly affects Thr(172)-AMPKalpha phosphorylation and its downstream signaling during the recovery period.

  2. Raf-1 Activation Prevents Caspase 9 Processing Downstream of Apoptosome Formation

    PubMed Central

    Cagnol, Sébastien; Mansour, Anna; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen; Chambard, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    In many cell types, growth factor removal induces the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria that leads to activation of caspase-9 in the apoptosome complex. Here, we show that sustained stimulation of the Raf-1/MAPK1,3 pathway prevents caspase-9 activation induced by serum depletion in CCL39/ΔRaf-1:ER fibroblasts. The protective effect mediated by Raf-1 is sensitive to MEK inhibition that is sufficient to induce caspase-9 cleavage in exponentially growing cells. Raf-1 activation does not inhibit the release of cytochrome-c from mitochondria while preventing caspase-9 activation. Gel filtration chromatography analysis of apoptosome formation in cells shows that Raf-1/MAPK1,3 activation does not interfere with APAF-1 oligomerization and recruitment of caspase 9. Raf-1-mediated caspase-9 inhibition is sensitive to emetine, indicating that the protective mechanism requires protein synthesis. However, the Raf/MAPK1,3 pathway does not regulate XIAP. Taken together, these results indicate that the Raf-1/MAPK1,3 pathway controls an apoptosis regulator that prevents caspase-9 activation in the apoptosome complex. PMID:21637382

  3. Proper processing of dengue virus nonstructural glycoprotein NS1 requires the N-terminal hydrophobic signal sequence and the downstream nonstructural protein NS2a.

    PubMed

    Falgout, B; Chanock, R; Lai, C J

    1989-05-01

    Expression of dengue virus gene products involves specific proteolytic cleavages of a precursor polyprotein. To study the flanking sequences required for expression of the dengue virus nonstructural glycoprotein NS1, we constructed a series of recombinant vaccinia viruses that contain the coding sequence for NS1 in combination with various lengths of upstream and downstream sequences. The NS1 products expressed by these viruses in infected CV-1 cells were immune precipitated and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The data show that the 24-residue hydrophobic sequence preceding NS1 was necessary and sufficient for the production of glycosylated NS1 and that this sequence was cleaved from NS1 in the absence of most dengue virus proteins. This finding is consistent with previous proposals that this hydrophobic sequence serves as an N-terminal signal sequence that is cleaved by signal peptidase. The cleavage between the C terminus of NS1 and the downstream protein NS2a occurred when the complete NS2a was present. Recombinant viruses containing NS1 plus 15 or 49% of NS2a produced proteins larger than authentic NS1, indicating that the cleavage between NS1 and NS2a had not occurred. Failure of cleavage was not corrected by coinfection with a recombinant virus capable of cleavage. These results suggest that NS2a may be a cis-acting protease that cleaves itself from NS1, or NS2a may provide sequences for recognition by a specific cellular protease that cleaves at the NS1-NS2a junction.

  4. Id4 functions downstream of Bmp signaling to restrict TCF function in endocardial cells during atrioventricular valve development.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Suchit; Dogra, Deepika; Stainier, Didier Y R; Reischauer, Sven

    2016-04-01

    The atrioventricular canal (AVC) connects the atrial and ventricular chambers of the heart and its formation is critical for the development of the cardiac valves, chamber septation and formation of the cardiac conduction system. Consequently, problems in AVC formation can lead to congenital defects ranging from cardiac arrhythmia to incomplete cardiac septation. While our knowledge about early heart tube formation is relatively comprehensive, much remains to be investigated about the genes that regulate AVC formation. Here we identify a new role for the basic helix-loop-helix factor Id4 in zebrafish AVC valve development and function. id4 is first expressed in the AVC endocardium and later becomes more highly expressed in the atrial chamber. TALEN induced inactivation of id4 causes retrograde blood flow at the AV canal under heat induced stress conditions, indicating defects in AV valve function. At the molecular level, we found that id4 inactivation causes misexpression of several genes important for AVC and AV valve formation including bmp4 and spp1. We further show that id4 appears to control the number of endocardial cells that contribute to the AV valves by regulating Wnt signaling in the developing AVC endocardium. PMID:26892463

  5. MiT/TFE transcription factors are activated during mitophagy downstream of Parkin and Atg5

    PubMed Central

    Nezich, Catherine L.; Wang, Chunxin; Fogel, Adam I.

    2015-01-01

    The kinase PINK1 and ubiquitin ligase Parkin can regulate the selective elimination of damaged mitochondria through autophagy (mitophagy). Because of the demand on lysosomal function by mitophagy, we investigated a role for the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis, in this process. We show that during mitophagy TFEB translocates to the nucleus and displays transcriptional activity in a PINK1- and Parkin-dependent manner. MITF and TFE3, homologues of TFEB belonging to the same microphthalmia/transcription factor E (MiT/TFE) family, are similarly regulated during mitophagy. Unlike TFEB translocation after starvation-induced mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibition, Parkin-mediated TFEB relocalization required Atg9A and Atg5 activity. However, constitutively active Rag guanosine triphosphatases prevented TFEB translocation during mitophagy, suggesting cross talk between these two MiT/TFE activation pathways. Analysis of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–generated TFEB/MITF/TFE3/TFEC single, double, and triple knockout cell lines revealed that these proteins partly facilitate Parkin-mediated mitochondrial clearance. These results illuminate a pathway leading to MiT/TFE transcription factor activation, distinct from starvation-induced autophagy, which occurs during mitophagy. PMID:26240184

  6. Activation of signalling by the activin receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Montalvo, E; Massagué, J

    1996-01-01

    Activin exerts its effects by simultaneously binding to two types of p rotein serine/threonine kinase receptors, each type existing in various isoforms. Using the ActR-IB and ActR-IIB receptor isoforms, we have investigated the mechanism of activin receptor activation. ActR-IIB are phosphoproteins with demonstrable affinity for each other. However, activin addition strongly promotes an interaction between these two proteins. Activin binds directly to ActR-IIB, and this complex associates with ActR-IB, which does not bind ligand on its own. In the resulting complex, ActR-IB becomes hyperphosphorylated, and this requires the kinase activity of ActR-IIB. Mutation of conserved serines and threonines in the GS domain, a region just upstream of the kinase domain in ActR-IB, abrogates both phosphorylation and signal propagation, suggesting that this domain contains phosphorylation sites required for signalling. ActR-IB activation can be mimicked by mutation of Thr-206 to aspartic acid, which yields a construct, ActR-IB(T206D), that signals in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the signalling activity of this mutant construct is undisturbed by overexpression of a dominant negative kinase-defective ActR-IIB construct, indicating that ActR-IB(T206D) can signal independently of ActR-IIB. The evidence suggests that ActR-IIB acts as a primary activin receptor and ActR-IB acts as a downstream transducer of activin signals. PMID:8622651

  7. Bcl-2 overexpression blocks caspase activation and downstream apoptotic events instigated by photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Granville, D J; Jiang, H; An, M T; Levy, J G; McManus, B M; Hunt, D W C

    1999-01-01

    Treatment with the photosensitizer benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA, verteporfin) followed by irradiation with visible light induces apoptosis in human acute myelogenous leukaemia HL-60 cells. Photoactivation of BPD-MA induces procaspase 3 (CPP32/Yama/apopain) and procaspase 6 (Mch2) cleavage into their proteolytically active subunits in these cells. The Bcl-2 proto-oncogene product has been shown to protect cells from a number of proapoptotic stimuli. In the present study, the influence of Bcl-2 overexpression on cellular resistance to photoactivation of BPD-MA was studied. Overexpression of Bcl-2 in HL-60 cells prevented apoptosis-related events including caspase 3 and 6 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and the formation of hypodiploid DNA produced by BPD-MA (0–200 ng ml−1) and light. However, Bcl-2 overexpression was less effective at preventing cell death that occurred after photoactivation at high levels (50–100 ng ml−1) compared with lower doses (10–25 ng ml−1) of BPD-MA. These results indicate that caspase 3 and 6 activation and their regulation by Bcl-2 may play important roles in photodynamic therapy (PDT)-induced cell killing. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408699

  8. Novel angiogenesis inhibitory activity in cinnamon extract blocks VEGFR2 kinase and downstream signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    VEGF is one of the most critical factors that induce angiogenesis, and has thus become an attractive target for anti-angiogenesis treatment. However, most of the current anti-VEGF agents that often cause side effects cannot be recommended for long term use. Identification of natural VEGF inhibitors...

  9. Cherry Valley Ducks Mitochondrial Antiviral-Signaling Protein-Mediated Signaling Pathway and Antiviral Activity Research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Hong, Tianqi; Li, Rong; Wang, Yao; Guo, Mengjiao; Cao, Zongxi; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS), an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-like receptors (RLRs)-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS) was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline-rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly upregulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV). Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon (IFN)-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8) in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What is more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (DTMUV, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus) at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks. PMID:27708647

  10. NF-kB activation and its downstream target genes expression after heavy ions exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chishti, Arif Ali; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Schmitz, Claudia; Koch, Kristina; Feles, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    To enable long-term human space flight cellular radiation response to densely ionizing radiation needs to be better understood for developing appropriate countermeasures to mitigate acute effects and late radiation risks for the astronaut. The biological effectiveness of accelerated heavy ions (which constitute the most important radiation type in space) with high linear energy transfer (LET) for effecting DNA damage response pathways as a gateway to cell death or survival is of major concern not only for space missions but also for new regimes of tumor radiotherapy. In the current research study, the contribution of NF-κB in response to space-relevant radiation qualities was determined by a NF-κB reporter cell line (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo L2). The NF-κB dependent reporter gene expression (d2EGFP) after ionizing radiation (X-rays and heavy ions) exposure was evaluated by flow cytometry. Because of differences in the extent of NF-κB activation after X-irradiation and heavy ions exposure, it was expected that radiation quality (LET) might play an important role in the cellular radiation response. In addition, the biological effectiveness (RBE) of NF-κB activation and reduction of cellular survival was examined for heavy ions having a broad range of LET (˜0.3 - 9674 keV/µm). Furthermore, the effect of LET on NF-κB target gene expression was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). In this study it was proven that NF-κB activation and NF-κB dependent gene expression comprises an early step in cellular radiation response. Taken together, this study clearly demonstrates that NF-κB activation and NF-κB-dependent gene expression by heavy ions are highest in the LET range of ˜50-200 keV/μupm. The up-regulated chemokines and cytokines (CXCL1, CXCL2, CXCL10, IL-8 and TNF) might be important for cell-cell communication among hit as well as unhit cells (bystander effect). The results obtained suggest the NF-κB pathway to be a

  11. Krüppel-like factor 6 is a co-activator of NF-κB that mediates p65-dependent transcription of selected downstream genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Lei, Cao-Qi; Hu, Yun-Hong; Xia, Tian; Li, Mi; Zhong, Bo; Shu, Hong-Bing

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor NF-κB plays a pivotal role in a broad range of physiological and pathological processes, including development, inflammation, and immunity. How NF-κB integrates activating signals to expression of specific sets of target genes is of great interest. Here, we identified Krüppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) as a co-activator of NF-κB after TNFα and IL-1β stimulation. Overexpression of KLF6 enhanced TNFα- and IL-1β-induced activation of NF-κB and transcription of a subset of downstream genes, whereas knockdown of KLF6 had opposite effects. KLF6 interacted with p65 in the nucleus and bound to the promoters of target genes. Upon IL-1β stimulation, KLF6 was recruited to promoters of a subset of NF-κB target genes in a p65-dependent manner, which was in turn required for the optimal binding of p65 to the target gene promoters. Our findings thus identified KLF6 as a previously unknown but essential co-activator of NF-κB and provided new insight into the molecular regulation of p65-dependent gene expression.

  12. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Ricky D; Labib, Karim

    2015-10-15

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the 'alternative clamp loader' known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved 'Pol ϵ binding module' in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. PMID:26250113

  13. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J.; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Labib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the ‘alternative clamp loader’ known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved ‘Pol ϵ binding module’ in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. PMID:26250113

  14. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Ricky D; Labib, Karim

    2015-10-15

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the 'alternative clamp loader' known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved 'Pol ϵ binding module' in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint.

  15. Eriocalyxin B-induced apoptosis in pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells through thiol-containing antioxidant systems and downstream signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Yue, G G L; Pu, J X; Sun, H D; Fung, K P; Leung, P C; Han, Q B; Lau, C B S; Leung, P S

    2014-01-01

    Thiol-containing antioxidant systems play an important role in regulating cellular redox homeostasis. Several anti-cancer agents act by targeting these systems by inducing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our earlier studies have shown that Eriocalyxin B (EriB), a diterpenoid isolated from Isodon eriocalyx, possesses anti-pancreatic tumour activities in vitro and in vivo. The present study further demonstrated that only thiol-containing antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) or dithiothreitol (DTT), inhibited EriB-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. EriB suppressed the glutathione and thioredoxin antioxidant systems, thus increasing the intracellular ROS levels and regulating the MAPK, NFκB pathways. Treatment with EriB depleted the intracellular thiol-containing proteins in CAPAN-2 cells. In vivo studies also showed that EriB treatment (2.5 mg/kg) reduced the pancreatic tumour weights significantly in nude mice with increased superoxide levels. Taken together, our results shed important new light on the molecular mechanisms of EriB acting as an apoptogenic agent and its therapeutic potential for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24894173

  16. Activity Dependent Signal Transduction in Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Susan L.

    1999-01-01

    The overall goals of this project are: 1) to define the initial signal transduction events whereby the removal of gravitational load from antigravity muscles, such as the soleus, triggers muscle atrophy, and 2) to develop countermeasures to prevent this from happening. Our rationale for this approach is that, if countermeasures can be developed to regulate these early events, we could avoid having to deal with the multiple cascades of events that occur downstream from the initial event. One of our major findings is that hind limb suspension causes an early and sustained increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca (2+)](sub i)). In most cells the consequences of changes in ([Ca (2+)](sub i))depend on the amplitude, frequency and duration of the Ca(2+) signal and on other factors in the intracellular environment. We propose that muscle remodeling in microgravity represents a change in the balance among several CA(2+) regulated signal transduction pathways, in particular those involving the transcription factors NFAT and NFkB and the pro-apoptotic protein BAD. Other Ca(2+) sensitive pathways involving PKC, ras, rac, and CaM kinase II may also contribute to muscle remodeling.

  17. Autocrine CSF1R signaling mediates switching between invasion and proliferation downstream of TGFβ in claudin-low breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Patsialou, A; Wang, Y; Pignatelli, J; Chen, X; Entenberg, D; Oktay, M; Condeelis, J S

    2015-05-21

    Patient data suggest that colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) and its receptor (CSF1R) have critical roles during breast cancer progression. We have previously shown that in human breast tumors expressing both CSF1 and CSF1R, invasion in vivo is dependent both on a paracrine interaction with tumor-associated macrophages and an autocrine regulation of CSF1R in the tumor cells themselves. Although the role of the paracrine interaction between tumor cells and macrophages has been extensively studied, very little is known about the mechanism by which the autocrine CSF1R signaling contributes to tumor progression. We show here that breast cancer patients of the claudin-low subtype have significantly increased expression of CSF1R. Using a panel of breast cancer cell lines, we confirm that CSF1R expression is elevated and regulated by TGFβ specifically in claudin-low cell lines. Abrogation of autocrine CSF1R signaling in MDA-MB-231 xenografts (a claudin-low cell line) leads to increased tumor size by enhanced proliferation, but significantly reduced invasion, dissemination and metastasis. Indeed, we show that proliferation and invasion are oppositely regulated by CSF1R downstream of TGFβ only in claudin-low cell lines. Intravital multiphoton imaging revealed that inhibition of CSF1R in the tumor cells leads to decreased in vivo motility and a more cohesive morphology. We show that, both in vitro and in vivo, CSF1R inhibition results in a reversal of claudin-low marker expression by significant upregulation of luminal keratins and tight-junction proteins such as claudins. Finally, we show that artificial overexpression of claudins in MDA-MB-231 cells is sufficient to tip the cells from an invasive state to a proliferative state. Our results suggest that autocrine CSF1R signaling is essential in maintaining low claudin expression and that it mediates a switch between the proliferative and the invasive state in claudin-low tumor cells downstream of TGFβ.

  18. Comparison of the Gene Expression Profiles from Normal and Fgfrl1 Deficient Mouse Kidneys Reveals Downstream Targets of Fgfrl1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Simon D.; Amann, Ruth; Wyder, Stefan; Trueb, Beat

    2012-01-01

    Fgfrl1 (fibroblast growth factor receptor-like 1) is a transmembrane receptor that is essential for the development of the metanephric kidney. It is expressed in all nascent nephrogenic structures and in the ureteric bud. Fgfrl1 null mice fail to develop the metanephric kidneys. Mutant kidney rudiments show a dramatic reduction of ureteric branching and a lack of mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition. Here, we compared the expression profiles of wildtype and Fgfrl1 mutant kidneys to identify genes that act downstream of Fgfrl1 signaling during the early steps of nephron formation. We detected 56 differentially expressed transcripts with 2-fold or greater reduction, among them many genes involved in Fgf, Wnt, Bmp, Notch, and Six/Eya/Dach signaling. We validated the microarray data by qPCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization and showed the expression pattern of candidate genes in normal kidneys. Some of these genes might play an important role during early nephron formation. Our study should help to define the minimal set of genes that is required to form a functional nephron. PMID:22432025

  19. APASdb: a database describing alternative poly(A) sites and selection of heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals.

    PubMed

    You, Leiming; Wu, Jiexin; Feng, Yuchao; Fu, Yonggui; Guo, Yanan; Long, Liyuan; Zhang, Hui; Luan, Yijie; Tian, Peng; Chen, Liangfu; Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Li, Yuxin; Li, Jie; Chen, Chengyong; Zhang, Yaqing; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing amounts of genes have been shown to utilize alternative polyadenylation (APA) 3'-processing sites depending on the cell and tissue type and/or physiological and pathological conditions at the time of processing, and the construction of genome-wide database regarding APA is urgently needed for better understanding poly(A) site selection and APA-directed gene expression regulation for a given biology. Here we present a web-accessible database, named APASdb (http://mosas.sysu.edu.cn/utr), which can visualize the precise map and usage quantification of different APA isoforms for all genes. The datasets are deeply profiled by the sequencing alternative polyadenylation sites (SAPAS) method capable of high-throughput sequencing 3'-ends of polyadenylated transcripts. Thus, APASdb details all the heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals, and maintains near complete coverage for APA sites, much better than the previous databases using conventional methods. Furthermore, APASdb provides the quantification of a given APA variant among transcripts with different APA sites by computing their corresponding normalized-reads, making our database more useful. In addition, APASdb supports URL-based retrieval, browsing and display of exon-intron structure, poly(A) signals, poly(A) sites location and usage reads, and 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs). Currently, APASdb involves APA in various biological processes and diseases in human, mouse and zebrafish.

  20. APASdb: a database describing alternative poly(A) sites and selection of heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals

    PubMed Central

    You, Leiming; Wu, Jiexin; Feng, Yuchao; Fu, Yonggui; Guo, Yanan; Long, Liyuan; Zhang, Hui; Luan, Yijie; Tian, Peng; Chen, Liangfu; Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Li, Yuxin; Li, Jie; Chen, Chengyong; Zhang, Yaqing; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing amounts of genes have been shown to utilize alternative polyadenylation (APA) 3′-processing sites depending on the cell and tissue type and/or physiological and pathological conditions at the time of processing, and the construction of genome-wide database regarding APA is urgently needed for better understanding poly(A) site selection and APA-directed gene expression regulation for a given biology. Here we present a web-accessible database, named APASdb (http://mosas.sysu.edu.cn/utr), which can visualize the precise map and usage quantification of different APA isoforms for all genes. The datasets are deeply profiled by the sequencing alternative polyadenylation sites (SAPAS) method capable of high-throughput sequencing 3′-ends of polyadenylated transcripts. Thus, APASdb details all the heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals, and maintains near complete coverage for APA sites, much better than the previous databases using conventional methods. Furthermore, APASdb provides the quantification of a given APA variant among transcripts with different APA sites by computing their corresponding normalized-reads, making our database more useful. In addition, APASdb supports URL-based retrieval, browsing and display of exon-intron structure, poly(A) signals, poly(A) sites location and usage reads, and 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs). Currently, APASdb involves APA in various biological processes and diseases in human, mouse and zebrafish. PMID:25378337

  1. Mechanism of IRSp53 inhibition and combinatorial activation by Cdc42 and downstream effectors

    PubMed Central

    Kast, David J; Yang, Changsong; Disanza, Andrea; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Madasu, Yadaiah; Scita, Giorgio; Svitkina, Tatyana; Dominguez, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The Rho family GTPase effector IRSp53 has essential roles in filopodia formation and neuronal development, but its regulatory mechanism is poorly understood. IRSp53 contains a membrane-binding BAR domain followed by an unconventional CRIB motif that overlaps with a proline-rich region (CRIB–PR) and an SH3 domain that recruits actin cytoskeleton effectors. Using a fluorescence reporter assay, we show that human IRSp53 adopts a closed inactive conformation that opens synergistically with the binding of human Cdc42 to the CRIB–PR and effector proteins, such as the tumor-promoting factor Eps8, to the SH3 domain. The crystal structure of Cdc42 bound to the CRIB–PR reveals a new mode of effector binding to Rho family GTPases. Structure-inspired mutations disrupt autoinhibition and Cdc42 binding in vitro and decouple Cdc42- and IRSp53-dependent filopodia formation in cells. The data support a combinatorial mechanism of IRSp53 activation. PMID:24584464

  2. Two Redundant Receptor-Like Cytoplasmic Kinases Function Downstream of Pattern Recognition Receptors to Regulate Activation of SA Biosynthesis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qing; Qu, Na; Ma, Junling; Li, Meng; Cheng, Yu-ti; Zhang, Qian; Wu, Di; Zhang, Zhibin; Zhang, Yuelin

    2016-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) serves as a critical signaling molecule in plant defense. Two transcription factors, SARD1 and CBP60g, control SA biosynthesis through regulating pathogen-induced expression of Isochorismate Synthase1, which encodes a key enzyme for SA biosynthesis. Here, we report that Pattern-Triggered Immunity Compromised Receptor-like Cytoplasmic Kinase1 (PCRK1) and PCRK2 function as key regulators of SA biosynthesis. In the pcrk1 pcrk2 double mutant, pathogen-induced expression of SARD1, CBP60g, and ICS1 is greatly reduced. The pcrk1 pcrk2 double mutant, but neither of the single mutants, exhibits reduced accumulation of SA and enhanced disease susceptibility to bacterial pathogens. Both PCRK1 and PCRK2 interact with the pattern recognition receptor FLS2, and treatment with pathogen-associated molecular patterns leads to rapid phosphorylation of PCRK2. Our data suggest that PCRK1 and PCRK2 function downstream of pattern recognition receptor in a signal relay leading to the activation of SA biosynthesis. PMID:27208222

  3. De novo whole transcriptome analysis of the fish louse, Argulus siamensis: first molecular insights into characterization of Toll downstream signalling molecules of crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Pramoda Kumar; Kar, Banya; Mohapatra, Amruta; Mohanty, Jyotirmaya

    2013-11-01

    Argulus siamensis is a major ectoparasitic pathogen of freshwater fish capable of causing substantial economic loss. None of the available control measures have been able to address the problem of argulosis resourcefully. To combat this pathogen effectively, it is necessary to have a comprehensive understanding of its life processes with information on various genes involved. The transcriptome studies can generate introductory information about genes participating in physiological processes of the parasite which could be targeted for their control. In this study, the transcriptome sequencing of A. siamensis was performed on Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform which generated 75,126,957 high quality reads. A total of 46,352 transcript contigs were assembled with average length of 1211bp and N50 length of 2302bp. In total, 19,290 CDS including 184 novel CDS and 59,019 open reading frames (ORFs) were identified from the assembled contigs. Gene ontology and Kyoto Encylopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis were performed to classify contigs into their functional categories and regulation pathways. Additionally, 1171 simple sequence repeats were identified from the assembled contigs. Further, twelve contigs with high similarity with downstream molecules of the mammalian toll like receptor (TLR) pathway were validated by their inductive expressions in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli and Gram positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. The transcriptome of an ectoparasite A. siamensis was sequenced, assembled, annotated, and the downstream signalling molecules of Toll pathway characterized. The transcriptome data generated will facilitate studies on functional genomics that will subsequently be applied for vaccine development and other control strategies against the parasite.

  4. Cypermethrin Stimulates GSK3β-Dependent Aβ and p-tau Proteins and Cognitive Loss in Young Rats: Reduced HB-EGF Signaling and Downstream Neuroinflammation as Critical Regulators.

    PubMed

    Maurya, Shailendra Kumar; Mishra, Juhi; Abbas, Sabiya; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2016-03-01

    Pesticide exposure is recognized as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated early signs of AD-like pathology upon exposure to a pyrethroid pesticide, cypermethrin, reported to impair neurodevelopment. We treated weanling rats with cypermethrin (10 and 25 mg/kg) and detected dose-dependent increase in the key proteins of AD, amyloid beta (Aβ), and phospho-tau, in frontal cortex and hippocampus as early as postnatal day 45. Upregulation of Aβ pathway involved an increase in amyloid precursor protein (APP) and its pro-amyloidogenic processing through beta-secretase (BACE) and gamma-secretase. Tau pathway entailed elevation in tau and glycogen-synthase kinase-3-beta (GSK3β)-dependent, phospho-tau. GSK3β emerged as a molecular link between the two pathways, evident from reduction in phospho-tau as well as BACE upon treating GSK3β inhibitor, lithium chloride. Exploring the mechanism revealed an attenuated heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF) signaling and downstream astrogliosis-mediated neuroinflammation to be responsible for inducing Aβ and phospho-tau. Cypermethrin caused a proximal reduction in HB-EGF, which promoted astrocytic nuclear factor kappa B signaling and astroglial activation close to Aβ and phospho-tau. Glial activation stimulated generation of interleukin-1 (IL-1), which upregulated GSK3β, and APP and tau as well, resulting in co-localization of Aβ and phospho-tau with IL-1 receptor. Intracerebral insertion of exogenous HB-EGF restored its own signaling and suppressed neuroinflammation and thereby Aβ and phospho-tau in cypermethrin-exposed rats, proving a central role of reduced HB-EGF signaling in cypermethrin-mediated neurodegeneration. Furthermore, cypermethrin stimulated cognitive impairments, which could be prevented by exogenous HB-EGF. Our data demonstrate that cypermethrin induces premature upregulation of GSK3β-dependent Aβ and tau pathways, where HB-EGF signaling and neuroinflammation serve as

  5. Androgen activates β-catenin signaling in bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zheng, Yichun; Izumi, Koji; Ishiguro, Hitoshi; Ye, Bo; Li, Faqian; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2013-06-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signals have been implicated in bladder carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling has also been reported to correlate with bladder cancer progression and poor patients' outcomes. However, cross talk between AR and β-catenin pathways in bladder cancer remains uncharacterized. In radical cystectomy specimens, we immunohistochemically confirmed aberrant expression of β-catenin especially in aggressive tumors. There was a strong association between nuclear expressions of AR and β-catenin in bladder tumors (P=0.0215). Kaplan-Meier and log-rank tests further revealed that reduced membranous β-catenin expression (P=0.0276), nuclear β-catenin expression (P=0.0802), and co-expression of nuclear AR and β-catenin (P=0.0043) correlated with tumor progression after cystectomy. We then assessed the effects of androgen on β-catenin in AR-positive and AR-negative bladder cancer cell lines. A synthetic androgen R1881 increased the expression of an active form of β-catenin and its downstream target c-myc only in AR-positive lines. R1881 also enhanced the activity of β-catenin-mediated transcription, which was abolished by an AR antagonist hydroxyflutamide. Using western blotting and immunofluorescence, R1881 was found to induce nuclear translocation of β-catenin when co-localized with AR. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation revealed androgen-induced associations of AR with β-catenin or T-cell factor (TCF) in bladder cancer cells. Thus, it was likely that androgen was able to activate β-catenin signaling through the AR pathway in bladder cancer cells. Our results also suggest that activation of β-catenin signaling possibly via formation of AR/β-catenin/TCF complex contributes to the progression of bladder cancer, which may enhance the feasibility of androgen deprivation as a potential therapeutic approach. PMID:23447569

  6. Biased Signaling of Protease-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peishen; Metcalf, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their role in protein degradation and digestion, proteases can also function as hormone-like signaling molecules that regulate vital patho-physiological processes, including inflammation, hemostasis, pain, and repair mechanisms. Certain proteases can signal to cells by cleaving protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of four G protein-coupled receptors. PARs are expressed by almost all cell types, control important physiological and disease-relevant processes, and are an emerging therapeutic target for major diseases. Most information about PAR activation and function derives from studies of a few proteases, for example thrombin in the case of PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4, and trypsin in the case of PAR2 and PAR4. These proteases cleave PARs at established sites with the extracellular N-terminal domains, and expose tethered ligands that stabilize conformations of the cleaved receptors that activate the canonical pathways of G protein- and/or β-arrestin-dependent signaling. However, a growing number of proteases have been identified that cleave PARs at divergent sites to activate distinct patterns of receptor signaling and trafficking. The capacity of these proteases to trigger distinct signaling pathways is referred to as biased signaling, and can lead to unique patho-physiological outcomes. Given that a different repertoire of proteases are activated in various patho-physiological conditions that may activate PARs by different mechanisms, signaling bias may account for the divergent actions of proteases and PARs. Moreover, therapies that target disease-relevant biased signaling pathways may be more effective and selective approaches for the treatment of protease- and PAR-driven diseases. Thus, rather than mediating the actions of a few proteases, PARs may integrate the biological actions of a wide spectrum of proteases in different patho-physiological conditions. PMID:24860547

  7. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. PMID:27329811

  8. Calcium-Oxidant Signaling Network Regulates AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) Activation upon Matrix Deprivation*

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, Ananthalakshmy; Amirtham, Usha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2016-01-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has recently been implicated in anoikis resistance. However, the molecular mechanisms that activate AMPK upon matrix detachment remain unexplored. In this study, we show that AMPK activation is a rapid and sustained phenomenon upon matrix deprivation, whereas re-attachment to the matrix leads to its dephosphorylation and inactivation. Because matrix detachment leads to loss of integrin signaling, we investigated whether integrin signaling negatively regulates AMPK activation. However, modulation of focal adhesion kinase or Src, the major downstream components of integrin signaling, failed to cause a corresponding change in AMPK signaling. Further investigations revealed that the upstream AMPK kinases liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) contribute to AMPK activation upon detachment. In LKB1-deficient cells, we found AMPK activation to be predominantly dependent on CaMKKβ. We observed no change in ATP levels under detached conditions at early time points suggesting that rapid AMPK activation upon detachment was not triggered by energy stress. We demonstrate that matrix deprivation leads to a spike in intracellular calcium as well as oxidant signaling, and both these intracellular messengers contribute to rapid AMPK activation upon detachment. We further show that endoplasmic reticulum calcium release-induced store-operated calcium entry contributes to intracellular calcium increase, leading to reactive oxygen species production, and AMPK activation. We additionally show that the LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK axis and intracellular calcium levels play a critical role in anchorage-independent cancer sphere formation. Thus, the Ca2+/reactive oxygen species-triggered LKB1/CaMKK-AMPK signaling cascade may provide a quick, adaptable switch to promote survival of metastasizing cancer cells. PMID:27226623

  9. The VSV Polymerase can initiate at mRNA start sites located either up or downstream of a transcription termination signal but size of the intervening intergenic region affects efficiency of initiation

    PubMed Central

    Barr, J.N.; Tang, Xiaoling; Hinzman, Edward; Shen, Ruizhong; Wertz, Gail W.

    2008-01-01

    Transcription by the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) polymerase has been characterized as obligatorily sequential with transcription of each downstream gene dependant on termination of the gene immediately upstream. In studies described here we investigated the ability of the VSV RNA-dependant RNA polymerase (RdRp) to access mRNA initiation sites located at increasing distances either downstream or upstream of a transcription termination signal. Bicistronic subgenomic replicons were constructed containing progressively extended intergenic regions preceding the initiation site of a downstream gene. The ability of the RdRp to access the downstream sites was progressively reduced as the length of the intergenic region increased. Alternatively, bicistronic replicons were constructed containing a mRNA start signal located at increasing distances upstream of a termination site. Analysis of transcription of these "overlapped" genes showed that for an upstream mRNA start site to be recognized it had to contain not only the canonical 3'-UUGUCnnUAG-5' gene start signal, but that signal needed also to be preceded by a U7 tract. Access of these upstream mRNA initiation sites by the VSV RdRp was proportionately reduced with increasing distance between the termination site and the overlapped initiation signal. Possible mechanisms for how the RdRp accesses these upstream start sites are discussed. PMID:18241907

  10. Effects of mutant human Ki-ras{sup G12C} gene dosage on murine lung tumorigenesis and signaling to its downstream effectors

    SciTech Connect

    Dance-Barnes, Stephanie T.; Kock, Nancy D.; Floyd, Heather S.; Moore, Joseph E.; Mosley, Libyadda J.; D'Agostino, Ralph B.; Pettenati, Mark J.; Miller, Mark Steven

    2008-08-15

    Studies in cell culture have suggested that the level of RAS expression can influence the transformation of cells and the signaling pathways stimulated by mutant RAS expression. However, the levels of RAS expression in vivo appear to be subject to feedback regulation, limiting the total amount of RAS protein that can be expressed. We utilized a bitransgenic mouse lung tumor model that expressed the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in a tetracycline-inducible, lung-specific manner. Treatment for 12 months with 500 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (DOX) allowed for maximal expression of the human Ki-ras{sup G12C} allele in the lung, and resulted in the development of focal hyperplasia and adenomas. We determined if different levels of mutant RAS expression would influence the phenotype of the lung lesions. Treatment with 25, 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml of DOX resulted in dose-dependent increases in transgene expression and tumor multiplicity. Microscopic analysis of the lungs of mice treated with the 25 {mu}g/ml dose of DOX revealed infrequent foci of hyperplasia, whereas mice treated with the 100 and 500 {mu}g/ml doses exhibited numerous hyperplastic foci and also adenomas. Immunohistochemical and RNA analysis of the downstream effector pathways demonstrated that different levels of mutant RAS transgene expression resulted in differences in the expression and/or phosphorylation of specific signaling molecules. Our results suggest that the molecular alterations driving tumorigenesis may differ at different levels of mutant Ki-ras{sup G12C} expression, and this should be taken into consideration when inducible transgene systems are utilized to promote tumorigenesis in mouse models.

  11. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Jung; Jang, In-Cheol; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15 However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. PMID:27246098

  12. Diversity of Stability, Localization, Interaction and Control of Downstream Gene Activity in the Maize Aux/IAA Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Yvonne; Berendzen, Kenneth W.; Xu, Changzheng; Piepho, Hans-Peter; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2014-01-01

    AUXIN/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID (Aux/IAA) proteins are central regulators of auxin signal transduction. They control many aspects of plant development, share a conserved domain structure and are localized in the nucleus. In the present study, five maize Aux/IAA proteins (ZmIAA2, ZmIAA11, ZmIAA15, ZmIAA20 and ZmIAA33) representing the evolutionary, phylogenetic and expression diversity of this gene family were characterized. Subcellular localization studies revealed that ZmIAA2, ZmIAA11 and ZmIAA15 are confined to the nucleus while ZmIAA20 and ZmIAA33 are localized in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Introduction of specific point mutations in the degron sequence (VGWPPV) of domain II by substituting the first proline by serine or the second proline by leucine stabilized the Aux/IAA proteins. While protein half-life times between ∼11 min (ZmIAA2) to ∼120 min (ZmIAA15) were observed in wild-type proteins, the mutated forms of all five proteins were almost as stable as GFP control proteins. Moreover, all five maize Aux/IAA proteins repressed downstream gene expression in luciferase assays to different degrees. In addition, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) analyses demonstrated interaction of all five Aux/IAA proteins with RUM1 (ROOTLESS WITH UNDETECTABLE MERISTEM 1, ZmIAA10) while only ZmIAA15 and ZmIAA33 interacted with the RUM1 paralog RUL1 (RUM-LIKE 1, ZmIAA29). Moreover, ZmIAA11, ZmIAA15 ZmIAA33 displayed homotypic interaction. Hence, despite their conserved domain structure, maize Aux/IAA proteins display a significant variability in their molecular characteristics which is likely associated with the wide spectrum of their developmental functions. PMID:25203637

  13. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  14. A Negative Regulatory Mechanism Involving 14-3-3ζ Limits Signaling Downstream of ROCK to Regulate Tissue Stiffness in Epidermal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kular, Jasreen; Scheer, Kaitlin G; Pyne, Natasha T; Allam, Amr H; Pollard, Anthony N; Magenau, Astrid; Wright, Rebecca L; Kolesnikoff, Natasha; Moretti, Paul A; Wullkopf, Lena; Stomski, Frank C; Cowin, Allison J; Woodcock, Joanna M; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Pitson, Stuart M; Timpson, Paul; Ramshaw, Hayley S; Lopez, Angel F; Samuel, Michael S

    2015-12-21

    ROCK signaling causes epidermal hyper-proliferation by increasing ECM production, elevating dermal stiffness, and enhancing Fak-mediated mechano-transduction signaling. Elevated dermal stiffness in turn causes ROCK activation, establishing mechano-reciprocity, a positive feedback loop that can promote tumors. We have identified a negative feedback mechanism that limits excessive ROCK signaling during wound healing and is lost in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Signal flux through ROCK was selectively tuned down by increased levels of 14-3-3ζ, which interacted with Mypt1, a ROCK signaling antagonist. In 14-3-3ζ(-/-) mice, unrestrained ROCK signaling at wound margins elevated ECM production and reduced ECM remodeling, increasing dermal stiffness and causing rapid wound healing. Conversely, 14-3-3ζ deficiency enhanced cutaneous SCC size. Significantly, inhibiting 14-3-3ζ with a novel pharmacological agent accelerated wound healing 2-fold. Patient samples of chronic non-healing wounds overexpressed 14-3-3ζ, while cutaneous SCCs had reduced 14-3-3ζ. These results reveal a novel 14-3-3ζ-dependent mechanism that negatively regulates mechano-reciprocity, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities.

  15. A Negative Regulatory Mechanism Involving 14-3-3ζ Limits Signaling Downstream of ROCK to Regulate Tissue Stiffness in Epidermal Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kular, Jasreen; Scheer, Kaitlin G; Pyne, Natasha T; Allam, Amr H; Pollard, Anthony N; Magenau, Astrid; Wright, Rebecca L; Kolesnikoff, Natasha; Moretti, Paul A; Wullkopf, Lena; Stomski, Frank C; Cowin, Allison J; Woodcock, Joanna M; Grimbaldeston, Michele A; Pitson, Stuart M; Timpson, Paul; Ramshaw, Hayley S; Lopez, Angel F; Samuel, Michael S

    2015-12-21

    ROCK signaling causes epidermal hyper-proliferation by increasing ECM production, elevating dermal stiffness, and enhancing Fak-mediated mechano-transduction signaling. Elevated dermal stiffness in turn causes ROCK activation, establishing mechano-reciprocity, a positive feedback loop that can promote tumors. We have identified a negative feedback mechanism that limits excessive ROCK signaling during wound healing and is lost in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Signal flux through ROCK was selectively tuned down by increased levels of 14-3-3ζ, which interacted with Mypt1, a ROCK signaling antagonist. In 14-3-3ζ(-/-) mice, unrestrained ROCK signaling at wound margins elevated ECM production and reduced ECM remodeling, increasing dermal stiffness and causing rapid wound healing. Conversely, 14-3-3ζ deficiency enhanced cutaneous SCC size. Significantly, inhibiting 14-3-3ζ with a novel pharmacological agent accelerated wound healing 2-fold. Patient samples of chronic non-healing wounds overexpressed 14-3-3ζ, while cutaneous SCCs had reduced 14-3-3ζ. These results reveal a novel 14-3-3ζ-dependent mechanism that negatively regulates mechano-reciprocity, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:26702834

  16. Membrane Bound GSK-3 Activates Wnt Signaling through Disheveled and Arrow

    PubMed Central

    Mannava, Anirudh G.; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.

    2015-01-01

    Wnt ligands and their downstream pathway components coordinate many developmental and cellular processes. In adults, they regulate tissue homeostasis through regulation of stem cells. Mechanistically, signal transduction through this pathway is complicated by pathway components having both positive and negative roles in signal propagation. Here we examine the positive role of GSK-3/Zw3 in promoting signal transduction at the plasma membrane. We find that targeting GSK-3 to the plasma membrane activates signaling in Drosophila embryos. This activation requires the presence of the co-receptor Arrow-LRP5/6 and the pathway activating protein Disheveled. Our results provide genetic evidence for evolutionarily conserved, separable roles for GSK-3 at the membrane and in the cytosol, and are consistent with a model where the complex cycles from cytosol to membrane in order to promote signaling at the membrane and to prevent it in the cytosol. PMID:25848770

  17. Curcumin exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP(+))-stimulated mesencephalic astrocytes by interference with TLR4 and downstream signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Song; Wang, Xu; He, Xingliang; Wang, Yue; Gao, Sujie; Ren, Lu; Shi, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Neuroinflammation is closely associated with the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent evidence indicates that astrocytes also play pro-inflammatory roles in the central nervous system (CNS) by activation with toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Therefore, targeting anti-inflammation may provide a promising therapeutic strategy for PD. Curcumin, a polyphenolic compound isolated from Curcuma longa root, has been commonly used for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the details of how curcumin exerts neuroprotection remain uncertain. Here, we investigated the protective effect of curcumin on 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion-(MPP(+)-) stimulated primary astrocytes. Our results showed that MPP(+) stimulation resulted in significant production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL-6), and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in primary mesencephalic astrocytes. Curcumin pretreatment decreased the levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines while increased IL-10 expression in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. In addition, curcumin increased the levels of antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and reduced ROS production. Our results further showed that curcumin decreased the levels of TLR4 and its downstream effectors including NF-κB, IRF3, MyD88, and TIRF that are induced by MPP(+) as well as inhibited the immunoreactivity of TLR4 and morphological activation in MPP(+)-stimulated astrocytes. Together, data suggest that curcumin might exert a beneficial effect on neuroinflammation in the pathophysiology of PD. PMID:27164829

  18. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus viral interferon regulatory factor 4 (vIRF4/K10) is a novel interaction partner of CSL/CBF1, the major downstream effector of Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Katharina; Scholz, Barbara A; Nowak, Agnes; Fossum, Even; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Haas, Juergen; Frank, Ronald; Kempkes, Bettina

    2010-12-01

    In cells infected with the Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), CSL/CBF1 signaling is essential for viral replication and promotes the survival of KSHV-infected cells. CSL/CBF1 is a DNA adaptor molecule which recruits coactivator and corepressor complexes to regulate viral and cellular gene transcription and which is a major downstream effector molecule of activated Notch. The interaction of KSHV RTA and LANA with CSL/CBF1 has been shown to balance the lytic and latent viral life cycle. Here we report that a third KSHV protein, viral interferon regulatory factor 4 (vIRF4/K10), but none of the three other KSHV-encoded vIRFs, interacts with CSL/CBF1. Two regions of vIRF4 with dissimilar affinities contribute to CSL/CBF1 binding. Similar to Notch, vIRF4 targets the hydrophobic pocket in the beta trefoil domain of CSL/CBF1 through a short peptide motif which closely resembles a motif found in Notch but does not strictly follow the ΦWΦP consensus conserved in human and mouse Notch proteins. Our results suggest that vIRF4 might compete with Notch for CSL/CBF1 binding and signaling. PMID:20861242

  19. A novel AKT inhibitor, AZD5363, inhibits phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activates phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1 dependent on the liver cancer cell type

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, YUNCHENG; ZHENG, YUANWEN; FAHEEM, ALI; SUN, TIANTONG; LI, CHUNYOU; LI, ZHE; ZHAO, DIANTANG; WU, CHAO; LIU, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Due to frequent phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway dysregulation, AKT is typically accepted as a promising anticancer therapeutic target. mTOR, in particular, represents a suitable therapeutic target for hepatocellular carcinoma, whilst suppressor with morphogenetic effect on genitalia family member-1 (SMG-1) is believed to serve a potential tumor suppressor role in human cancer. Despite SMG-1 and mTOR belonging to the same PI3K-related kinase family, the interactions between them are not yet fully understood. In the present study, a novel pyrrolopyrimidine-derived compound, AZD5363, was observed to suppress proliferation in liver cancer Hep-G2 and Huh-7 cells by inhibiting the phosphorylation of downstream molecules in the AKT signal pathway, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. AZD5363 activated the phosphorylation of mTOR, dependent on the liver cancer cell type, as it may have differing effects in various liver cancer cell lines. Additionally, AZD5363 also activated SMG-1 within the same liver cancer cells types, which subsequently activated the phosphorylation of mTOR. In conclusion, the present study indicates that AZD5363 inhibited phosphorylation of AKT downstream molecules, and activated phosphorylation of mTOR and SMG-1, dependent on the liver cancer type. PMID:26998062

  20. Occurrence, bioaccumulation and risk assessment of lipophilic pharmaceutically active compounds in the downstream rivers of sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianchao; Lu, Guanghua; Xie, Zhengxin; Zhang, Zhenghua; Li, Sheng; Yan, Zhenhua

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence, bioaccumulation and risk assessment of lipophilic pharmaceutically active compounds (LPhACs), such as antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin and ketoconazole), anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen and diclofenac), β-blockers (propranolol), antiepileptics (carbamazepine) and steroid hormones (17α-ethinylestradiol), were investigated in the downstream rivers of sewage treatment plants in Nanjing, China. The results indicate that these LPhACs were widely detected in the surface water and fish samples, with the mean concentrations of the total LPhACs (ΣLPhACs) being in the range of 15.4 and 384.5 ng/L and 3.0 and 128.4 ng/g (wet weight), respectively. The bioaccumulation of the ΣLPhACs in wild fish tissues was generally in the order the liver>brain>gill>muscle. Among the target LPhACs, however, an interspecies difference in tissue distribution was evident for erythromycin. The bioaccumulation factors of LPhACs in the liver and brain, the two major targeted storage sites for toxicants, exhibited an obvious negative correlation with the aquatic concentrations (P<0.05). Finally, risk quotients posed by pharmaceuticals were assessed by comprehensive and comparative methods for different aquatic organisms (algae, daphnids and fish). The overall relative order of susceptibility was estimated to be algae>daphnids>fish. However, the results indicate that diclofenac, ibuprofen and 17α-ethinylestradiol each posed chronic risks for high trophic level organisms (fish). In all of the risk assessments, erythromycin was found to be the most harmful for the most sensitive algae group. In this work, however, the total BAF and toxicological interactions of pharmaceuticals were not performed due to the lack of metabolite information and combined toxicity data, which represents a major hindrance to the effective risk assessment of pharmaceuticals. PMID:25531589

  1. Occurrence, bioaccumulation and risk assessment of lipophilic pharmaceutically active compounds in the downstream rivers of sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianchao; Lu, Guanghua; Xie, Zhengxin; Zhang, Zhenghua; Li, Sheng; Yan, Zhenhua

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence, bioaccumulation and risk assessment of lipophilic pharmaceutically active compounds (LPhACs), such as antibiotics (roxithromycin, erythromycin and ketoconazole), anti-inflammatories (ibuprofen and diclofenac), β-blockers (propranolol), antiepileptics (carbamazepine) and steroid hormones (17α-ethinylestradiol), were investigated in the downstream rivers of sewage treatment plants in Nanjing, China. The results indicate that these LPhACs were widely detected in the surface water and fish samples, with the mean concentrations of the total LPhACs (ΣLPhACs) being in the range of 15.4 and 384.5 ng/L and 3.0 and 128.4 ng/g (wet weight), respectively. The bioaccumulation of the ΣLPhACs in wild fish tissues was generally in the order the liver>brain>gill>muscle. Among the target LPhACs, however, an interspecies difference in tissue distribution was evident for erythromycin. The bioaccumulation factors of LPhACs in the liver and brain, the two major targeted storage sites for toxicants, exhibited an obvious negative correlation with the aquatic concentrations (P<0.05). Finally, risk quotients posed by pharmaceuticals were assessed by comprehensive and comparative methods for different aquatic organisms (algae, daphnids and fish). The overall relative order of susceptibility was estimated to be algae>daphnids>fish. However, the results indicate that diclofenac, ibuprofen and 17α-ethinylestradiol each posed chronic risks for high trophic level organisms (fish). In all of the risk assessments, erythromycin was found to be the most harmful for the most sensitive algae group. In this work, however, the total BAF and toxicological interactions of pharmaceuticals were not performed due to the lack of metabolite information and combined toxicity data, which represents a major hindrance to the effective risk assessment of pharmaceuticals.

  2. Chronic ethanol ingestion in rats decreases granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor expression and downstream signaling in the alveolar macrophage.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pratibha C; Applewhite, Lisa; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D; Roman, Jesse; Fernandez, Alberto L; Eaton, Douglas C; Brown, Lou Ann S; Guidot, David M

    2005-11-15

    Although it is well recognized that alcohol abuse impairs alveolar macrophage immune function and renders patients susceptible to pneumonia, the mechanisms are incompletely understood. Alveolar macrophage maturation and function requires priming by GM-CSF, which is produced and secreted into the alveolar space by the alveolar epithelium. In this study, we determined that although chronic ethanol ingestion (6 wk) in rats had no effect on GM-CSF expression within the alveolar space, it significantly decreased membrane expression of the GM-CSF receptor in alveolar macrophages. In parallel, ethanol ingestion decreased cellular expression and nuclear binding of PU.1, the master transcription factor that activates GM-CSF-dependent macrophage functions. Furthermore, treatment of ethanol-fed rats in vivo with rGM-CSF via the upper airway restored GM-CSF receptor membrane expression as well as PU.1 protein expression and nuclear binding in alveolar macrophages. Importantly, GM-CSF treatment also restored alveolar macrophage function in ethanol-fed rats, as reflected by endotoxin-stimulated release of TNF-alpha and bacterial phagocytosis. We conclude that ethanol ingestion dampens alveolar macrophage immune function by decreasing GM-CSF receptor expression and downstream PU.1 nuclear binding and that these chronic defects can be reversed relatively quickly with rGM-CSF treatment in vivo.

  3. A hub for ABA signaling to the nucleus: significance of a cytosolic and nuclear dual-localized PPR protein SOAR1 acting downstream of Mg-chelatase H subunit.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shang-Chuan; Mei, Chao; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2014-01-01

    SOAR1 is a cytosol-nucleus dual-localized pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) protein, which we indentified recently as a crucial regulator in the CHLH/ABAR (Mg-chelatase H subunit /putative ABA receptor)-mediated signaling pathway, acting downstream of CHLH/ABAR and upstream of a nuclear ABA-responsive bZIP transcription factor ABI5. Downregulation and upregulation of SOAR1 expression alter dramatically both ABA sensitivity and expression of a subset of key, nuclear ABA-responsive genes, suggesting that SOAR1 is a hub for ABA signaling to the nucleus, and CHLH/ABAR mediates a central signaling pathway to regulate downstream gene expression through SOAR1.

  4. Enhanced multistatic active sonar signal processing.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kexin; Liang, Junli; Karlsson, Johan; Li, Jian

    2013-07-01

    Multistatic active sonar systems involve the transmission and reception of multiple probing sequences and can achieve significantly enhanced performance of target detection and localization through exploiting spatial diversity. This paper mainly focuses on two signal processing aspects of such systems, namely, enhanced range-Doppler imaging and improved target parameter estimation. The main contributions of this paper are (1) a hybrid dense-sparse method is proposed to generate range-Doppler images with both low sidelobe levels and high accuracy; (2) a generalized K-Means clustering (GKC) method for target association is developed to associate the range measurements from different transmitter-receiver pairs, which is actually a range fitting procedure; (3) the extended invariance principle-based weighted least-squares method is developed for accurate target position and velocity estimation. The effectiveness of the proposed multistatic active sonar signal processing techniques is verified using numerical examples.

  5. Activation of Smurf E3 Ligase Promoted by Smoothened Regulates Hedgehog Signaling through Targeting Patched Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiudeng; Chen, Zhenping; Sun, Liwei; Wang, Hailong; Zhu, Yuanxiang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Shuyan; Lu, Yi; Sun, Qinmiao; Tao, Yi; Liu, Feng; Zhao, Yun; Chen, Dahua

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog signaling plays conserved roles in controlling embryonic development; its dysregulation has been implicated in many human diseases including cancers. Hedgehog signaling has an unusual reception system consisting of two transmembrane proteins, Patched receptor and Smoothened signal transducer. Although activation of Smoothened and its downstream signal transduction have been intensively studied, less is known about how Patched receptor is regulated, and particularly how this regulation contributes to appropriate Hedgehog signal transduction. Here we identified a novel role of Smurf E3 ligase in regulating Hedgehog signaling by controlling Patched ubiquitination and turnover. Moreover, we showed that Smurf-mediated Patched ubiquitination depends on Smo activity in wing discs. Mechanistically, we found that Smo interacts with Smurf and promotes it to mediate Patched ubiquitination by targeting the K1261 site in Ptc. The further mathematic modeling analysis reveals that a bidirectional control of activation of Smo involving Smurf and Patched is important for signal-receiving cells to precisely interpret external signals, thereby maintaining Hedgehog signaling reliability. Finally, our data revealed an evolutionarily conserved role of Smurf proteins in controlling Hh signaling by targeting Ptc during development. PMID:24302888

  6. Transcript Expression Data from Human Islets Links Regulatory Signals from Genome-Wide Association Studies for Type 2 Diabetes and Glycemic Traits to Their Downstream Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaoqing; Barrett, Amy; Grey, Caleb; Li, Lei; Bennett, Amanda J.; Johnson, Paul R.; Rajotte, Raymond V.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; MacDonald, Patrick E.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    The intersection of genome-wide association analyses with physiological and functional data indicates that variants regulating islet gene transcription influence type 2 diabetes (T2D) predisposition and glucose homeostasis. However, the specific genes through which these regulatory variants act remain poorly characterized. We generated expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data in 118 human islet samples using RNA-sequencing and high-density genotyping. We identified fourteen loci at which cis-exon-eQTL signals overlapped active islet chromatin signatures and were coincident with established T2D and/or glycemic trait associations. ‎At some, these data provide an experimental link between GWAS signals and biological candidates, such as DGKB and ADCY5. At others, the cis-signals implicate genes with no prior connection to islet biology, including WARS and ZMIZ1. At the ZMIZ1 locus, we show that perturbation of ZMIZ1 expression in human islets and beta-cells influences exocytosis and insulin secretion, highlighting a novel role for ZMIZ1 in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Together, these findings provide a significant advance in the mechanistic insights of T2D and glycemic trait association loci. PMID:26624892

  7. Transcript Expression Data from Human Islets Links Regulatory Signals from Genome-Wide Association Studies for Type 2 Diabetes and Glycemic Traits to Their Downstream Effectors.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, Martijn; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Dai, Xiaoqing; Barrett, Amy; Grey, Caleb; Li, Lei; Bennett, Amanda J; Johnson, Paul R; Rajotte, Raymond V; Gaulton, Kyle J; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; MacDonald, Patrick E; McCarthy, Mark I; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-12-01

    The intersection of genome-wide association analyses with physiological and functional data indicates that variants regulating islet gene transcription influence type 2 diabetes (T2D) predisposition and glucose homeostasis. However, the specific genes through which these regulatory variants act remain poorly characterized. We generated expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data in 118 human islet samples using RNA-sequencing and high-density genotyping. We identified fourteen loci at which cis-exon-eQTL signals overlapped active islet chromatin signatures and were coincident with established T2D and/or glycemic trait associations. ‎At some, these data provide an experimental link between GWAS signals and biological candidates, such as DGKB and ADCY5. At others, the cis-signals implicate genes with no prior connection to islet biology, including WARS and ZMIZ1. At the ZMIZ1 locus, we show that perturbation of ZMIZ1 expression in human islets and beta-cells influences exocytosis and insulin secretion, highlighting a novel role for ZMIZ1 in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Together, these findings provide a significant advance in the mechanistic insights of T2D and glycemic trait association loci. PMID:26624892

  8. Transcript Expression Data from Human Islets Links Regulatory Signals from Genome-Wide Association Studies for Type 2 Diabetes and Glycemic Traits to Their Downstream Effectors.

    PubMed

    van de Bunt, Martijn; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; Dai, Xiaoqing; Barrett, Amy; Grey, Caleb; Li, Lei; Bennett, Amanda J; Johnson, Paul R; Rajotte, Raymond V; Gaulton, Kyle J; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; MacDonald, Patrick E; McCarthy, Mark I; Gloyn, Anna L

    2015-12-01

    The intersection of genome-wide association analyses with physiological and functional data indicates that variants regulating islet gene transcription influence type 2 diabetes (T2D) predisposition and glucose homeostasis. However, the specific genes through which these regulatory variants act remain poorly characterized. We generated expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) data in 118 human islet samples using RNA-sequencing and high-density genotyping. We identified fourteen loci at which cis-exon-eQTL signals overlapped active islet chromatin signatures and were coincident with established T2D and/or glycemic trait associations. ‎At some, these data provide an experimental link between GWAS signals and biological candidates, such as DGKB and ADCY5. At others, the cis-signals implicate genes with no prior connection to islet biology, including WARS and ZMIZ1. At the ZMIZ1 locus, we show that perturbation of ZMIZ1 expression in human islets and beta-cells influences exocytosis and insulin secretion, highlighting a novel role for ZMIZ1 in the maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Together, these findings provide a significant advance in the mechanistic insights of T2D and glycemic trait association loci.

  9. Up-stream and Down-stream Events in the NF-kB Activation Cascade in Response to Sparsely and Densely Ionizing Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langen, Britta; Hellweg, Christine; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Ruscher, Roland; Schmitz, Claudia; Arenz, Andrea; Lau, Patrick; Meier, Matthias M.; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    Radiation is a potentially limiting factor for long term orbital and interplanetary missions. Long-term exposure to galactic cosmic rays may shorten the healthy life-span after return to Earth due to cancer induction. During the mission, a solar flare can be life threatening. For better risk estimation and development of appropriate countermeasures, the study of the cellular radiation response is necessary. As an antiapoptotic factor, if activated in human cells by exposure to components of cosmic rays, the transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF- κB) could influence the cancer risk of astronauts exposed to cosmic radiation and improve cellular survival after exposure to high radiation doses. In previous studies using a screening assay for the detection of NF-κB-dependent gene induction (HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells), the activation of this transcription factor by heavy ions was shown (Radiat. Res. 164: 527- 530, 2005). In this work, the events upstream of NF-κB attachment to its promoter and enhancer binding sites, and downstream expression of target genes were analysed. It is supposed that the ATM kinase mediates the signal from damaged DNA in the nucleus to kinases in the cytoplasm, such as NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO). For liberation of NF-κB and its nuclear translocation, the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) has to be degraded in the proteasom. In order to evaluate a role of NEMO in the radiation response, the survival of murine embryonic fibroblasts expressing wildtype NEMO and lacking NEMO in response to ionizing radiation was analyzed. Lack of NEMO impairs survival after X-ray exposure. The inhibition of ATM by KU-55933 suppresses the X-ray and heavy ion (13C, 35 MeV/u, LET 70 keV/µm) induced activation of NF-κB dependent gene expression, indicating the central position of ATM in radiation induced NF-κB activation. Short-term incubation with the proteasome inhibitor MG-132 also blocks NF-κB activation by radiation. These results suggest a role of

  10. Characterising low molecular weight dissolved organic carbon compounds in subglacial systems; implications for subglacial metabolic activity and potential downstream export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, Emily; Wadham, Jemma; Lis, Grzegorz; Telling, Jon

    2010-05-01

    Glaciers and ice sheets represent ~10% of the contemporary global surface coverage, yet remain one of the least explored sectors of the Earth's biosphere. The basal regions of these ice masses, known as subglacial environments, are capable of harbouring a diverse range of microorganisms that are often metabolically active despite the lack of sunlight, the cold temperatures and nutrient scarcity. Here, we consider the potential for such environments to be active components of the Earth's biogeochemical cycles. Subglacial environments have traditionally been excluded from global carbon budgets because they were assumed to be predominantly abiotic. Organic carbon (OC) reservoirs and transformations were also believed to be limited. However, significant stores of bioavailable carbon are thought to be present in glacially-overridden material, providing a potential substrate for in situ microbial metabolism. We examine the molecular characteristics of dissolved OC in basal ice and subglacial runoff from two glacier/ice-sheet systems with contrasting organic carbon substrates; Russell/Leverett Glacier, Greenland ice sheet, and Engabreen, Norway, to determine the range of dissolved low molecular weight OC (LMWOC) compounds and their relative bioavailability. Overridden material beneath the Greenland ice sheet is relatively young and organic-rich, contrasting with the older crystalline bedrock/continental shield that was overridden during glaciation at Engabreen. We first utilise a combination of fluorescence spectroscopy and ion chromatography to identify and quantify volatile fatty acids, carbohydrates and amino acids in basal ice. Volatile fatty acids are key metabolic substrates and their provision is thought to be a primary control on subglacial metabolic activity. We then provide a temporal record of amino acids and carbohydrates in subglacial runoff from Leverett Glacier (June 23rd - August 18th 2009), and compare this with subglacial runoff from Engabreen (2008 melt

  11. Disentangling between stellar activity and planetary signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Bonfils, X.; Santos, N.; Vauclair, S.

    2011-04-01

    Photospheric stellar activity (i.e. dark spots or bright plages) might be an important source of noise and confusion in stellar radial-velocity (RV) measurements. Radial-velocimetry planet search surveys as well as follow-up of photometric transit surveys require a deeper understanding and characterization of the effects of stellar activities to differentiate them from planetary signals. We simulate dark spots on a rotating stellar photosphere. The variations in the photometry, RV, and spectral line shapes are characterized and analyzed according to the stellar inclination, the latitude, and the number of spots. We show that the anti-correlation between RV and bisector span, known to be a signature of activity, requires a good sampling to be resolved when there are several spots on the photosphere. The Lomb-Scargle periodograms of the RV variations induced by activity present power at the rotational period Prot of the star and its two first harmonics Prot/2 and Prot/3. Three adjusted sinusoids fixed at the fundamental period and its two-first harmonics allow us to remove about 90% of the RV jitter amplitude. We apply and validate our approach on four known active planet-host stars: HD 189733, GJ 674, CoRoT-7, and ι Hor. We succeed in fitting simultaneously activity and planetary signals on GJ674 and CoRoT-7. This simultaneous modeling of the activity and planetary parameters leads to slightly higher masses of CoRoT-7b and c of respectively, 5.7 ± 2.5 MEarth and 13.2 ± 4.1 MEarth. The larger uncertainties properly take into account the stellar active jitter. We exclude short-period low-mass exoplanets around ι Hor. For data with realistic time-sampling and white Gaussian noise, we use simulations to show that our approach is effective in distinguishing reflex-motion due to a planetary companion and stellar-activity-induced RV variations provided that 1) the planetary orbital period is not close to that of the stellar rotation or one of its two first harmonics; 2

  12. The Activation of Nrf2 and Its Downstream Regulated Genes Mediates the Antioxidative Activities of Xueshuan Xinmaining Tablet in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Lingxin; Xie, Jingshu; Song, Chenxue; Liu, Jinping; Zheng, Jingtong; Liu, Chuangui; Zhang, Xiaotian; Li, Pingya; Wang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have verified the critical role that antioxidative stress plays in protecting vascular endothelial cells. The aims of the present study were to investigate the antioxidative activities and differential regulation of nuclear erythroid-related factor 2- (Nrf2-) mediated gene expression by Xueshuan Xinmaining Tablet (XXT), a traditional Chinese medicine with the effect of treating cardiovascular diseases. The antioxidative activities of XXT were investigated using quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), a PCR array, and western blotting. Our results indicated that XXT exhibited potent antioxidative activities by suppressing the levels of hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). We were also conscious of strong Nrf2-mediated antioxidant induction. XXT enhanced the expressions of Keap1, Nrf2, and Nrf2-mediated genes, such as glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM), NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in HUVECs. In summary, XXT strongly activated Nrf2 and its downstream regulated genes, which may contribute to the antioxidative and vascular endothelial cell protective activities of XXT. PMID:26681964

  13. An Upstream By-product from Ester Activation via NHC-Catalysis Catalyzes Downstream Sulfonyl Migration Reaction.

    PubMed

    Han, Runfeng; He, Liwenze; Liu, Lin; Xie, Xingang; She, Xuegong

    2016-01-01

    A sequential reaction combining N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI) catalysis allowed for the upstream by-product NHPI, which was generated in the NHC-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction, to act as the catalyst for a downstream nitrogen-to-carbon sulfonyl migration reaction. Enantiomeric excess of the major product in the cycloaddition reaction remained intact in the follow-up sulfonyl migration reaction.

  14. Integration of telencephalic Wnt and hedgehog signaling center activities by Foxg1.

    PubMed

    Danesin, Catherine; Peres, João N; Johansson, Marie; Snowden, Victoria; Cording, Amy; Papalopulu, Nancy; Houart, Corinne

    2009-04-01

    The forebrain is patterned along the dorsoventral (DV) axis by Sonic Hedgehog (Shh). However, previous studies have suggested the presence of an Shh-independent mechanism. Our study identifies Wnt/beta-catenin-activated from the telencephalic roof-as an Shh-independent pathway that is essential for telencephalic pallial (dorsal) specification during neurulation. We demonstrate that the transcription factor Foxg1 coordinates the activity of two signaling centers: Foxg1 is a key downstream effector of the Shh pathway during induction of subpallial (ventral) identity, and it inhibits Wnt/beta-catenin signaling through direct transcriptional repression of Wnt ligands. This inhibition restricts the dorsal Wnt signaling center to the roof plate and consequently limits pallial identities. Concomitantly to these roles, Foxg1 controls the formation of the compartment boundary between telencephalon and basal diencephalon. Altogether, these findings identify a key direct target of Foxg1, and uncover a simple molecular mechanism by which Foxg1 integrates two opposing signaling centers.

  15. A negative element in the downstream region of the Rice tungro bacilliform virus promoter is orientation- and position-independent and is active with heterologous promoters.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Arunima; Sharma, Shweta; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2010-10-01

    The promoter of an Indian isolate of the pararetrovirus Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV-WB) contains a negative element downstream of the transcription start site (TSS), between nucleotide residues +58 and +195 (Mathur and Dasgupta, 2007). To further characterize the element, we show, by using transient gus reporter gene assays in the cells of onion peel, rice calli and Arabidopsis leaves, that it down-regulates heterologous promoters CaMV35S and Maize ubiquitin. Quantitative measurements of transient GUS activity indicated more than 90% inhibition of reporter gene expression by the negative element. We also show, by reversing the orientation of the element downstream and by placing it in a position upstream to a constitutively expressing RTBV promoter, that the negative element is orientation- and position-independent, pointing towards its activity at the transcriptional and not post-transcriptional level. PMID:20621135

  16. Retinoic acid suppresses the canonical Wnt signaling pathway in embryonic stem cells and activates the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have both the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into various cell lineages. Retinoic acid (RA), a metabolite of Vitamin A, has a critical function in initiating lineage differentiation of ESCs through binding to the retinoic acid receptors (RARs). Additionally, the Wnt signaling pathway plays a role in pluripotency and differentiation, depending on the activation status of the canonical and noncanonical pathways. The activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which requires the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and its interaction with Tcf1/Lef at Wnt response elements, is involved in ESC stemness maintenance. The noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway, through actions of Tcf3, can antagonize the canonical pathway. We show that RA activates the noncanonical Wnt signaling pathway, while concomitantly inhibiting the canonical pathway. RA increases the expression of ligands and receptors of the noncanonical Wnt pathway (Wnt 5a, 7a, Fzd2 and Fzd6), downstream signaling, and Tcf3 expression. RA reduces the phosphorylated β-catenin level by 4-fold, though total β-catenin levels don't change. We show that RA signaling increases the dissociation of Tcf1 and the association of Tcf3 at promoters of genes that regulate stemness (e.g. NR5A2,Lrh-1) or differentiation (eg. Cyr61, Zic5). Knockdown of Tcf3 increases Lrh-1 transcript levels in mESCs and prevents the RA-associated, ∼4-fold increase in Zic5, indicating that RA requires Tcf3 to effect changes in Zic5 levels. We demonstrate a novel role for RA in altering the activation of these two Wnt signaling pathways and show that Tcf3 mediates some actions of RA during differentiation. PMID:24648413

  17. Disentangling between stellar activity and planetary signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, Isabelle; Bouchy, François; Hébrard, Guillaume; Bonfils, Xavier; Santos, Nuno; Vauclair, Sylvie

    2011-08-01

    Photospheric stellar activity (i.e. dark spots or bright plages) might be an important source of noise and confusion in the radial-velocity (RV) measurements. Radial-velocimetry planet search surveys as well as follow-up of photometric transit surveys require a deeper understanding and characterization of the effects of stellar activities to disentangle it from planetary signals. We simulate dark spots on a rotating stellar photosphere. The variations of the RV are characterized and analyzed according to the stellar inclination, the latitude and the number of spots. The Lomb-Scargle periodograms of the RV variations induced by activity present power at the rotational period Prot of the star and its two-first harmonics Prot/2 and Prot/3. Three adjusted sinusoids fixed at the fundamental period and its two-first harmonics allow to remove about 90% of the RV jitter amplitude. We apply and validate our approach on four known active planet-host stars: HD 189733, GJ 674, CoRoT-7 and ι Hor. We succeed in fitting simultaneously activity and planetary signals on GJ674 and CoRoT-7. We excluded short-period low-mass exoplanets around ι Hor. Our approach is efficient to disentangle reflex-motion due to a planetary companion and stellar-activity induced-RV variations provided that 1) the planetary orbital period is not close to that of the stellar rotation or one of its two-first harmonics, 2) the rotational period of the star is accurately known, 3) the data cover more than one stellar rotational period.

  18. Transcriptional activation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 UL38 promoter conferred by the cis-acting downstream activation sequence is mediated by a cellular transcription factor.

    PubMed Central

    Guzowski, J F; Singh, J; Wagner, E K

    1994-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 strict late (gamma) UL38 promoter contains three cis-acting transcriptional elements: a TATA box, a specific initiator element, and the downstream activation sequence (DAS). DAS is located between positions +20 and +33 within the 5' untranslated leader region and strongly influences transcript levels during productive infection. In this communication, we further characterize DAS and investigate its mechanism of action. DAS function has a strict spacing requirement, and DAS contains an essential 6-bp core element. A similarly positioned element from the gamma gC gene (UL44) has partial DAS function within the UL38 promoter context, and the promoter controlling expression of the gamma US11 transcript contains an identically located element with functional and sequence similarity to UL38 DAS. These data suggest that downstream elements are a common feature of many HSV gamma promoters. Results with recombinant viruses containing modifications of the TATA box or initiator element of the UL38 promoter suggest that DAS functions to increase transcription initiation and not the efficiency of transcription elongation. In vitro transcription assays using uninfected HeLa nuclear extracts show that, as in productive infection with recombinant viruses, the deletion of DAS from the UL38 promoter dramatically decreases RNA expression. Finally, electrophoretic mobility shift assays and UV cross-linking experiments show that DAS DNA forms a specific, stable complex with a cellular protein (the DAS-binding factor) of approximately 35 kDa. These data strongly suggest that the interaction of cellular DAS-binding factor with DAS is required for efficient expression of UL38 and other HSV late genes. Images PMID:7966567

  19. NMDA receptor activation regulates sociability by its effect on mTOR signaling activity.

    PubMed

    Burket, Jessica A; Benson, Andrew D; Tang, Amy H; Deutsch, Stephen I

    2015-07-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex is one example of a syndromic form of autism spectrum disorder associated with disinhibited activity of mTORC1 in neurons (e.g., cerebellar Purkinje cells). mTORC1 is a complex protein possessing serine/threonine kinase activity and a key downstream molecule in a signaling cascade beginning at the cell surface with the transduction of neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate and acetylcholine) and nerve growth factors (e.g., Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor). Interestingly, the severity of the intellectual disability in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex may relate more to this metabolic disturbance (i.e., overactivity of mTOR signaling) than the density of cortical tubers. Several recent reports showed that rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, improved sociability and other symptoms in mouse models of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and autism spectrum disorder, consistent with mTORC1 overactivity playing an important pathogenic role. NMDA receptor activation may also dampen mTORC1 activity by at least two possible mechanisms: regulating intraneuronal accumulation of arginine and the phosphorylation status of a specific extracellular signal regulating kinase (i.e., ERK1/2), both of which are "drivers" of mTORC1 activity. Conceivably, the prosocial effects of targeting the NMDA receptor with agonists in mouse models of autism spectrum disorders result from their ability to dampen mTORC1 activity in neurons. Strategies for dampening mTORC1 overactivity by NMDA receptor activation may be preferred to its direct inhibition in chronic neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders.

  20. GM1 ganglioside activates ERK1/2 and Akt downstream of Trk tyrosine kinase and protects PC12 cells against hydrogen peroxide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zakharova, Irina O; Sokolova, Tatyana V; Vlasova, Yulia A; Furaev, Victor V; Rychkova, Maria P; Avrova, Natalia F

    2014-11-01

    Ganglioside GM1 at micro- and nanomolar concentrations was shown to increase the viability of pheochromocytoma PC12 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide and diminish the accumulation of reactive oxygen species and oxidative inactivation of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase, the effects of micromolar GM1 being more pronounced than those of nanomolar GM1. These effects of GM1 were abolished by Trk receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and diminished by MEK1/2, phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase C inhibitors. Hydrogen peroxide activates Trk tyrosine kinase; Akt and ERK1/2 are activated downstream of this protein kinase. GM1 was found to activate Trk receptor tyrosine kinase in PC12 cells. GM1 (100 nM and 10 µM) increased the basal activity of Akt, but did not change Akt activity in cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Basal ERK1/2 activity in PC12 cells was increased by GM1 at a concentration of 10 µM, but not at nanomolar concentrations. Activation of ERK1/2 by hydrogen peroxide was enhanced by GM1 at a concentration of 10 µM and to a lesser extent at a concentration of 100 nM. Thus, the protective and metabolic effects of GM1 ganglioside on PC12 cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide appear to depend on the activation of Trk receptor tyrosine kinase and downstream activation of Akt and ERK1/2.

  1. Aurora A drives early signalling and vesicle dynamics during T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Blas-Rus, Noelia; Bustos-Morán, Eugenio; Pérez de Castro, Ignacio; de Cárcer, Guillermo; Borroto, Aldo; Camafeita, Emilio; Jorge, Inmaculada; Vázquez, Jesús; Alarcón, Balbino; Malumbres, Marcos; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B.; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Aurora A is a serine/threonine kinase that contributes to the progression of mitosis by inducing microtubule nucleation. Here we have identified an unexpected role for Aurora A kinase in antigen-driven T-cell activation. We find that Aurora A is phosphorylated at the immunological synapse (IS) during TCR-driven cell contact. Inhibition of Aurora A with pharmacological agents or genetic deletion in human or mouse T cells severely disrupts the dynamics of microtubules and CD3ζ-bearing vesicles at the IS. The absence of Aurora A activity also impairs the activation of early signalling molecules downstream of the TCR and the expression of IL-2, CD25 and CD69. Aurora A inhibition causes delocalized clustering of Lck at the IS and decreases phosphorylation levels of tyrosine kinase Lck, thus indicating Aurora A is required for maintaining Lck active. These findings implicate Aurora A in the propagation of the TCR activation signal. PMID:27091106

  2. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 as a key signaling pathway in normal mammary gland developmental biology and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Furth, Priscilla A; Nakles, Rebecca E; Millman, Sarah; Diaz-Cruz, Edgar S; Cabrera, M Carla

    2011-10-12

    STAT5 consists of two proteins, STAT5A/B, that impact mammary cell differentiation, proliferation, and survival. In normal development, STAT5 expression and activity are regulated by prolactin signaling with JAK2/ELF5, EGF signaling networks that include c-Src, and growth hormone, insulin growth factor, estrogen, and progesterone signaling pathways. In cancer, erythropoietin signaling can also regulate STAT5. Activation levels are influenced by AKT, caveolin, PIKE-A, Pak1, c-Myb, Brk, beta-integrin, dystroglycan, other STATs, and STAT pathway molecules JAK1, Shp2, and SOCS. TGF-β and PTPN9 can downregulate prolactin- and EGF-mediated STAT5 activation, respectively. IGF, AKT, RANKL, cyclin D1, BCL6, and HSP90A lie downstream of STAT5.

  3. Disentangling stellar activity and planetary signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Bouchy, F.; Hébrard, G.; Bonfils, X.; Santos, N. C.; Vauclair, S.

    2011-02-01

    Photospheric stellar activity (i.e. dark spots or bright plages) might be an important source of noise and confusion in the radial-velocity (RV) measurements. Radial-velocimetry planet search surveys as well as follow-up of photometric transit surveys require a deep understanding and precise characterization of the effects of stellar activity, in order to disentangle it from planetary signals. We simulate dark spots on a rotating stellar photosphere. The variations of the RV are characterized and analyzed according to the stellar inclination, the latitude and the number of spots. The Lomb-Scargle periodograms of the RV variations induced by activity present power at the rotational period Prot of the star and its two-first harmonics Prot/2 and Prot/3. Three adjusted sinusoids fixed at the fundamental period and its two-first harmonics allow to remove about 90% of the RV jitter amplitude. We apply and validate our approach on four known active planet-host stars: HD 189733, GJ 674, CoRoT-7 and ι Hor.

  4. Phosphorylation of Glutathione S-Transferase P1 (GSTP1) by Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Promotes Formation of the GSTP1-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) Complex and Suppresses JNK Downstream Signaling and Apoptosis in Brain Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Tatsunori; Antoun, Gamil; Keir, Stephen T; Friedman, Henry; Bigner, Darell D; Ali-Osman, Francis

    2015-12-25

    Under normal physiologic conditions, the glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) protein exists intracellularly as a dimer in reversible equilibrium with its monomeric subunits. In the latter form, GSTP1 binds to the mitogen-activated protein kinase, JNK, and inhibits JNK downstream signaling. In tumor cells, which frequently are characterized by constitutively high GSTP1 expression, GSTP1 undergoes phosphorylation by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at tyrosine residues 3, 7, and 198. Here we report on the effect of this EGFR-dependent GSTP1 tyrosine phosphorylation on the interaction of GSTP1 with JNK, on the regulation of JNK downstream signaling by GSTP1, and on tumor cell survival. Using in vitro and in vivo growing human brain tumors, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation shifts the GSTP1 dimer-monomer equilibrium to the monomeric state and facilitates the formation of the GSTP1-JNK complex, in which JNK is functionally inhibited. Targeted mutagenesis and functional analysis demonstrated that the increased GSTP1 binding to JNK results from phosphorylation of the GSTP1 C-terminal Tyr-198 by EGFR and is associated with a >2.5-fold decrease in JNK downstream signaling and a significant suppression of both spontaneous and drug-induced apoptosis in the tumor cells. The findings define a novel mechanism of regulatory control of JNK signaling that is mediated by the EGFR/GSTP1 cross-talk and provides a survival advantage for tumors with activated EGFR and high GSTP1 expression. The results lay the foundation for a novel strategy of dual EGFR/GSTP1 for treating EGFR+ve, GSTP1 expressing GBMs.

  5. Regulation of MDA5-MAVS Antiviral Signaling Axis by TRIM25 through TRAF6-Mediated NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Na-Rae; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Yi, Chae-Min; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Tripartite motif protein 25 (TRIM25), mediates K63-linked polyubiquitination of Retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I) that is crucial for downstream antiviral interferon signaling. Here, we demonstrate that TRIM25 is required for melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and MAVS mediated activation of NF-κB and interferon production. TRIM25 is required for the full activation of NF-κB at the downstream of MAVS, while it is not involved in IRF3 nuclear translocation. Mechanical studies showed that TRIM25 is involved in TRAF6-mediated NF-κB activation. These collectively indicate that TRIM25 plays an additional role in RIG-I/MDA5 signaling other than RIG-I ubiquitination via activation of NF-κB. PMID:26299329

  6. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Inflammatory Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Wang, Minge; Ribeiro, Denise; Cho, Hyong Jin; Olmstead, Richard; Breen, Elizabeth Crabb; Martinez-Maza, Otoniel; Cole, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests that sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. This study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on activation of nuclear factor (NF) -κB, a transcription factor that serves a critical role in the inflammatory signaling cascade. Methods In 14 healthy adults (7 females; 7 males), peripheral blood mononuclear cell NF-κB was repeatedly assessed, along with enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations, in the morning after baseline sleep, partial sleep deprivation (awake from 23:00 h to 03:00 h), and recovery sleep. Results In the morning after a night of sleep loss, mononuclear cell NF-κB activation was significantly greater compared with morning levels following uninterrupted baseline or recovery sleep, in which the response was found in females but not in males. Conclusions These results identify NF-κB activation as a molecular pathway by which sleep disturbance may influence leukocyte inflammatory gene expression and the risk of inflammation-related disease. PMID:18561896

  7. Heat dissipation guides activation in signaling proteins

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-01-01

    Life is fundamentally a nonequilibrium phenomenon. At the expense of dissipated energy, living things perform irreversible processes that allow them to propagate and reproduce. Within cells, evolution has designed nanoscale machines to do meaningful work with energy harnessed from a continuous flux of heat and particles. As dictated by the Second Law of Thermodynamics and its fluctuation theorem corollaries, irreversibility in nonequilibrium processes can be quantified in terms of how much entropy such dynamics produce. In this work, we seek to address a fundamental question linking biology and nonequilibrium physics: can the evolved dissipative pathways that facilitate biomolecular function be identified by their extent of entropy production in general relaxation processes? We here synthesize massive molecular dynamics simulations, Markov state models (MSMs), and nonequilibrium statistical mechanical theory to probe dissipation in two key classes of signaling proteins: kinases and G-protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs). Applying machinery from large deviation theory, we use MSMs constructed from protein simulations to generate dynamics conforming to positive levels of entropy production. We note the emergence of an array of peaks in the dynamical response (transient analogs of phase transitions) that draw the proteins between distinct levels of dissipation, and we see that the binding of ATP and agonist molecules modifies the observed dissipative landscapes. Overall, we find that dissipation is tightly coupled to activation in these signaling systems: dominant entropy-producing trajectories become localized near important barriers along known biological activation pathways. We go on to classify an array of equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular switches that harmonize to promote functional dynamics. PMID:26240354

  8. Uric acid induces oxidative stress and growth inhibition by activating adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signal pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongneng; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Hisatome, Ichiro; Li, Youfeng; Cheng, Weijie; Sun, Ning; Cai, Bozhi; Huang, Tianliang; Zhu, Yuzhang; Li, Zhi; Jing, Xubin; Zhou, Rui; Cheng, Jidong

    2013-08-15

    Hyperuricaemia is a disorder of purine metabolism, and is strongly associated with insulin resistance and abnormal glucose metabolism. As the producer of insulin, pancreatic β cells might be affected by elevated serum uric acid levels and contribute to the disregulated glucose metabolism. In this study, we investigated the effect of high uric acid on rat pancreatic β cell function. Under high uric acid condition, proliferation of pancreatic β cells was inhibited, production of reactive oxygen species increased, and glucose stimulated insulin secretion was also compromised. Further examination on signal transduction pathways revealed that uric acid-induced ROS is involved in the activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Pharmacological inhibition of ERK activation rescued β cells from growth inhibition. More importantly, activation of ERK induced by uric acid is significantly diminished by AMPK inhibitor, indicating ERK as a downstream target of AMPK in response to high uric acid condition. We also investigated the transportation channel for uric acid into pancreatic β cells. While major urate transporter URAT1 is not expressed in β cells, organic anion transporter (OAT) inhibitor successfully blocked the activation of ERK by uric acid. Our data indicate that high uric acid levels induce oxidative damage and inhibit growth of rat pancreatic β cells by activating the AMPK and ERK signal pathways. Hyperuricemia may contribute to abnormal glucose metabolism by causing oxidative damage and function inhibition of pancreatic β cells.

  9. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in signaling plant growth and development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Zhang, Shuqun

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are ubiquitous signaling modules in eukaryotes. Early research of plant MAPKs has been focused on their functions in immunity and stress responses. Recent studies reveal that they also play essential roles in plant growth and development downstream of receptor-like protein kinases (RLKs). With only a limited number of MAPK components, multiple functional pathways initiated from different receptors often share the same MAPK components or even a complete MAPK cascade. In this review, we discuss how MAPK cascades function as molecular switches in response to spatiotemporal-specific ligand-receptor interactions and the availability of downstream substrates. In addition, we discuss other possible mechanisms governing the functional specificity of plant MAPK cascades, a question central to our understanding of MAPK functions.

  10. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can detect, recognize, and

  11. Carbon nanotube-assisted optical activation of TGF-β signalling by near-infrared light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Ling; Zhao, Bing; Xie, Ran; Lin, Wei; Li, He; Li, Yaya; Shi, Minlong; Chen, Ye-Guang; Springer, Timothy A.; Chen, Xing

    2015-05-01

    Receptor-mediated signal transduction modulates complex cellular behaviours such as cell growth, migration and differentiation. Although photoactivatable proteins have emerged as a powerful tool for controlling molecular interactions and signalling cascades at precise times and spaces using light, many of these light-sensitive proteins are activated by ultraviolent or visible light, which has limited tissue penetration. Here, we report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-assisted approach that enables near-infrared light-triggered activation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signal transduction, an important signalling pathway in embryonic development and cancer progression. The protein complex of TGF-β and its latency-associated peptide is conjugated onto SWCNTs, where TGF-β is inactive. Upon near-infrared irradiation, TGF-β is released through the photothermal effect of SWCNTs and becomes active. The released TGF-β activates downstream signal transduction in live cells and modulates cellular behaviours. Furthermore, preliminary studies show that the method can be used to mediate TGF-β signalling in living mice.

  12. The PAK system links Rho GTPase signaling to thrombin-mediated platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Sandra M.; Loren, Cassandra P.; Haley, Kristina M.; Itakura, Asako; Pang, Jiaqing; Greenberg, Daniel L.; David, Larry L.; Manser, Ed; Chernoff, Jonathan; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of the platelet actin cytoskeleton by the Rho family of small GTPases is essential for the proper maintenance of hemostasis. However, little is known about how intracellular platelet activation from Rho GTPase family members, including Rac, Cdc42, and Rho, translate into changes in platelet actin structures. To better understand how Rho family GTPases coordinate platelet activation, we identified platelet proteins associated with Rac1, a Rho GTPase family member, and actin regulatory protein essential for platelet hemostatic function. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that upon platelet activation with thrombin, Rac1 associates with a set of effectors of the p21-activated kinases (PAKs), including GIT1, βPIX, and guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEFH1. Platelet activation by thrombin triggered the PAK-dependent phosphorylation of GIT1, GEFH1, and other PAK effectors, including LIMK1 and Merlin. PAK was also required for the thrombin-mediated activation of the MEK/ERK pathway, Akt, calcium signaling, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure. Inhibition of PAK signaling prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation and blocked platelet focal adhesion and lamellipodia formation in response to thrombin. Together, these results demonstrate that the PAK signaling system is a key orchestrator of platelet actin dynamics, linking Rho GTPase activation downstream of thrombin stimulation to PAK effector function, MAP kinase activation, calcium signaling, and PS exposure in platelets. PMID:23784547

  13. cis-acting sequences located downstream of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 promoter affect its chromatin structure and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    el Kharroubi, A; Martin, M A

    1996-06-01

    We have examined the roles of AP-1, AP-3-like, DBF1, and Sp1 binding sites, which are located downstream of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) promoter, in regulating basal transcriptional activity directed by the integrated viral long terminal repeat (LTR). Point mutations affecting all four of these elements functionally inactivated the HIV-1 LTR when it was constrained in a chromatin configuration. Analyses of the chromatin structures of the transcriptionally active wild-type and inactive mutated HIV-1 promoters revealed several differences. In the active promoter, the 3' half of the U3 region, including the basal promoter, the enhancer, and the putative upstream regulatory sequences are situated within a nuclease-hypersensitive region. However, the far upstream U3 region appears to be packaged into a nuclease-resistant nucleosomal structure, whereas the R, U5, and gag leader sequences are associated with a region of altered chromatin that is sensitive to restriction endonucleases. In the inactive template, only the basal promoter and enhancer element remain sensitive to nucleases, and the adjacent upstream and downstream regions are incorporated into nuclease-resistant nucleosomal structures. Taken together, these results indicate that the chromatin structure of the integrated HIV-1 LTR plays a critical role in modulating basal transcriptional activity. PMID:8649407

  14. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signaling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Emma; Salery, Marine; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA) concentration within the striatum. The main DA Guanine nucleotide binding protein couple receptors (GPCRs) expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behavior induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signaling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodeling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioral changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signaling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signaling, plasticity, and behavior. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signaling for the actions of drugs of abuse. PMID:24409148

  15. Notch Activity Modulates the Responsiveness of Neural Progenitors to Sonic Hedgehog Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jennifer H.; Yang, Linlin; Dessaud, Eric; Chuang, Katherine; Moore, Destaye M.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Briscoe, James; Novitch, Bennett G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Throughout the developing nervous system, neural stem and progenitor cells give rise to diverse classes of neurons and glia in a spatially and temporally coordinated manner. In the ventral spinal cord, much of this diversity emerges through the morphogen actions of Sonic hedgehog (Shh). Interpretation of the Shh gradient depends on both the amount of ligand and duration of exposure, but the mechanisms permitting prolonged responses to Shh are not well understood. We demonstrate that Notch signaling plays an essential role in this process, enabling neural progenitors to attain sufficiently high levels of Shh pathway activity needed to direct the ventral-most cell fates. Notch activity regulates subcellular localization of the Shh receptor Patched1, gating the translocation of the key effector Smoothened to primary cilia and its downstream signaling activities. These data reveal an unexpected role for Notch shaping the interpretation of the Shh morphogen gradient and influencing cell fate determination. PMID:25936505

  16. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  17. New Constitutively Active Phytochromes Exhibit Light-Independent Signaling Activity.

    PubMed

    Jeong, A-Reum; Lee, Si-Seok; Han, Yun-Jeong; Shin, Ah-Young; Baek, Ayoung; Ahn, Taeho; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Young Soon; Lee, Keun Woo; Nagatani, Akira; Kim, Jeong-Il

    2016-08-01

    Plant phytochromes are photoreceptors that mediate a variety of photomorphogenic responses. There are two spectral photoisomers, the red light-absorbing Pr and far-red light-absorbing Pfr forms, and the photoreversible transformation between the two forms is important for the functioning of phytochromes. In this study, we isolated a Tyr-268-to-Val mutant of Avena sativa phytochrome A (AsYVA) that displayed little photoconversion. Interestingly, transgenic plants of AsYVA showed light-independent phytochrome signaling with a constitutive photomorphogenic (cop) phenotype that is characterized by shortened hypocotyls and open cotyledons in the dark. In addition, the corresponding Tyr-303-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phytochrome B (AtYVB) exhibited nuclear localization and interaction with phytochrome-interacting factor 3 (PIF3) independently of light, conferring a constitutive photomorphogenic development to its transgenic plants, which is comparable to the first constitutively active version of phytochrome B (YHB; Tyr-276-to-His mutant). We also found that chromophore ligation was required for the light-independent interaction of AtYVB with PIF3. Moreover, we demonstrated that AtYVB did not exhibit phytochrome B activity when it was localized in the cytosol by fusion with the nuclear export signal and that AsYVA exhibited the full activity of phytochrome A when localized in the nucleus by fusion with the nuclear localization signal. Furthermore, the corresponding Tyr-269-to-Val mutant of Arabidopsis phytochrome A (AtYVA) exhibited similar cop phenotypes in transgenic plants to AsYVA. Collectively, these results suggest that the conserved Tyr residues in the chromophore-binding pocket play an important role during the Pr-to-Pfr photoconversion of phytochromes, providing new constitutively active alleles of phytochromes by the Tyr-to-Val mutation. PMID:27325667

  18. MLL1, a H3K4 methyltransferase, regulates the TNFα-stimulated activation of genes downstream of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiang; Zhu, Kun; Li, Shangze; Liao, Yifang; Du, Runlei; Zhang, Xiaodong; Shu, Hong-Bing; Guo, An-Yuan; Li, Lianyun; Wu, Min

    2012-09-01

    Genes of the mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) family regulate transcription by methylating histone H3K4. Six members of the MLL family exist in humans, including SETD1A, SETD1B and MLL1-MLL4. Each of them plays non-redundant roles in development and disease genesis. MLL1 regulates the cell cycle and the oscillation of circadian gene expression. Its fusion proteins are involved in leukemogenesis. Here, we studied the role of MLL1 in innate immunity and found it selectively regulates the activation of genes downstream of NF-κB mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Real-time PCR and genome-wide gene expression profile analysis proved that the deficiency of MLL1 reduced the expression of a group of genes downstream of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). However, the activation of NF-κB itself was not affected. The MLL1 complex is found both in the nucleus and cytoplasm and is associated with NF-κB. CHIP assays proved that the translocation of MLL1 to chromatin was dependent on NF-κB. Our results suggest that MLL1 is recruited to its target genes by activated NF-κB and regulates their transcription. PMID:22623725

  19. Potential Function of Exogenous Vimentin on the Activation of Wnt Signaling Pathway in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Hu, Jiemiao; Xia, Xueqing; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell signaling, growth, morphology, proliferation and tumorigenic potential are largely depending on the signaling molecules present naturally in the tumor microenvironment and the identification of key molecules that drive the tumor progression is critical for the development of new modalities for the prevention of tumor progression. High concentrations of vimentin in the blood of cancer patients have been reported, however the function of blood circulating vimentin remains unknown. Here, we investigated the functional role of exogenously supplemented vimentin on colon cancer cells and examined the Wnt Signaling activation and cancer cell invasion. Vimentin when supplemented to the cancer cells remained bound to the surface of the cancer cells. Furthermore, bound vimentin activates Wnt signaling pathway as detectable by increased β-catenin accumulation in the nucleus with concomitant activation of β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt signaling downstream targets. Functionally, there was an increase in the rate of cellular invasion in these cancer cells upon binding with vimentin. Our results thus suggest that free vimentin in the tumor microenvironment acts as a positive regulator of the β-catenin signaling pathway, thus providing a basis for cancer invasive properties.

  20. Potential Function of Exogenous Vimentin on the Activation of Wnt Signaling Pathway in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Satelli, Arun; Hu, Jiemiao; Xia, Xueqing; Li, Shulin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell signaling, growth, morphology, proliferation and tumorigenic potential are largely depending on the signaling molecules present naturally in the tumor microenvironment and the identification of key molecules that drive the tumor progression is critical for the development of new modalities for the prevention of tumor progression. High concentrations of vimentin in the blood of cancer patients have been reported, however the function of blood circulating vimentin remains unknown. Here, we investigated the functional role of exogenously supplemented vimentin on colon cancer cells and examined the Wnt Signaling activation and cancer cell invasion. Vimentin when supplemented to the cancer cells remained bound to the surface of the cancer cells. Furthermore, bound vimentin activates Wnt signaling pathway as detectable by increased β-catenin accumulation in the nucleus with concomitant activation of β-catenin-dependent transcription of Wnt signaling downstream targets. Functionally, there was an increase in the rate of cellular invasion in these cancer cells upon binding with vimentin. Our results thus suggest that free vimentin in the tumor microenvironment acts as a positive regulator of the β-catenin signaling pathway, thus providing a basis for cancer invasive properties. PMID:27698922

  1. Ras-activated Dsor1 promotes Wnt signaling in Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric T; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-12-15

    Wnt/Wingless (Wg) and Ras-MAPK signaling both play fundamental roles in growth and cell fate determination, and when dysregulated, can lead to tumorigenesis. Several conflicting modes of interaction between Ras-MAPK and Wnt signaling have been identified in specific cellular contexts, causing synergistic or antagonistic effects on target genes. We find novel evidence that the Drosophila homolog of the dual specificity kinases MEK1/2 (also known as MAP2K1/2), Downstream of Raf1 (Dsor1), is required for Wnt signaling. Knockdown of Dsor1 results in loss of Wg target gene expression, as well as reductions in stabilized Armadillo (Arm; Drosophila β-catenin). We identify a close physical interaction between Dsor1 and Arm, and find that catalytically inactive Dsor1 causes a reduction in active Arm. These results suggest that Dsor1 normally counteracts the Axin-mediated destruction of Arm. We find that Ras-Dsor1 activity is independent of upstream activation by EGFR, and instead it appears to be activated by the insulin-like growth factor receptor to promote Wg signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a new crosstalk pathway between insulin and Wg signaling that is mediated by Dsor1. PMID:26542023

  2. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-01-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes. PMID:26096612

  3. Voltage-gated Na+ Channel Activity Increases Colon Cancer Transcriptional Activity and Invasion Via Persistent MAPK Signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, Carrie D.; Wang, Bi-Dar; Ceniccola, Kristin; Williams, Russell; Simaan, May; Olender, Jacqueline; Patel, Vyomesh; Baptista-Hon, Daniel T.; Annunziata, Christina M.; Silvio Gutkind, J.; Hales, Tim G.; Lee, Norman H.

    2015-06-01

    Functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) has been demonstrated in multiple cancer cell types where channel activity induces invasive activity. The signaling mechanisms by which VGSCs promote oncogenesis remain poorly understood. We explored the signal transduction process critical to VGSC-mediated invasion on the basis of reports linking channel activity to gene expression changes in excitable cells. Coincidentally, many genes transcriptionally regulated by the SCN5A isoform in colon cancer have an over-representation of cis-acting sites for transcription factors phosphorylated by ERK1/2 MAPK. We hypothesized that VGSC activity promotes MAPK activation to induce transcriptional changes in invasion-related genes. Using pharmacological inhibitors/activators and siRNA-mediated gene knockdowns, we correlated channel activity with Rap1-dependent persistent MAPK activation in the SW620 human colon cancer cell line. We further demonstrated that VGSC activity induces downstream changes in invasion-related gene expression via a PKA/ERK/c-JUN/ELK-1/ETS-1 transcriptional pathway. This is the first study illustrating a molecular mechanism linking functional activity of VGSCs to transcriptional activation of invasion-related genes.

  4. CXC Chemokine Receptor 3 Alternative Splice Variants Selectively Activate Different Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Berchiche, Yamina A; Sakmar, Thomas P

    2016-10-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) C-X-C chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a potential drug target that mediates signaling involved in cancer metastasis and inflammatory diseases. The CXCR3 primary transcript has three potential alternative splice variants and cell-type specific expression results in receptor variants that are believed to have different functional characteristics. However, the molecular pharmacology of ligand binding to CXCR3 alternative splice variants and their downstream signaling pathways remain poorly explored. To better understand the role of the functional consequences of alternative splicing of CXCR3, we measured signaling in response to four different chemokine ligands (CXCL4, CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11) with agonist activity at CXCR3. Both CXCL10 and CXCL11 activated splice variant CXCR3A. Whereas CXCL10 displayed full agonistic activity for Gαi activation and extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 phosphorylation and partial agonist activity for β-arrestin recruitment, CXCL9 triggered only modest ERK1/2 phosphorylation. CXCL11 induced CXCR3B-mediated β-arrestin recruitment and little ERK phosphorylation. CXCR3Alt signaling was limited to modest ligand-induced receptor internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in response to chemokines CXCL11, CXCL10, and CXCL9. These results show that CXCR3 splice variants activate different signaling pathways and that CXCR3 variant function is not redundant, suggesting a mechanism for tissue specific biased agonism. Our data show an additional layer of complexity for chemokine receptor signaling that might be exploited to target specific CXCR3 splice variants. PMID:27512119

  5. A Phosphatase Activity of Sts-1 Contributes to the Suppression of TCR Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailik,A.; Ford, B.; Keller, J.; Chen, Y.; Nassar, N.; Carpino, N.

    2007-01-01

    Precise signaling by the T cell receptor (TCR) is crucial for a proper immune response. To ensure that T cells respond appropriately to antigenic stimuli, TCR signaling pathways are subject to multiple levels of regulation. Sts-1 negatively regulates signaling pathways downstream of the TCR by an unknown mechanism(s). Here, we demonstrate that Sts-1 is a phosphatase that can target the tyrosine kinase Zap-70 among other proteins. The X-ray structure of the Sts-1 C terminus reveals that it has homology to members of the phosphoglycerate mutase/acid phosphatase (PGM/AcP) family of enzymes, with residues known to be important for PGM/AcP catalytic activity conserved in nature and position in Sts-1. Point mutations that impair Sts-1 phosphatase activity in vitro also impair the ability of Sts-1 to regulate TCR signaling in T cells. These observations reveal a PGM/AcP-like enzyme activity involved in the control of antigen receptor signaling.

  6. Kinase active Misshapen regulates Notch signaling in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Abhinava K; Sachan, Nalani; Mutsuddi, Mousumi; Mukherjee, Ashim

    2015-11-15

    Notch signaling pathway represents a principal cellular communication system that plays a pivotal role during development of metazoans. Drosophila misshapen (msn) encodes a protein kinase, which is related to the budding yeast Ste20p (sterile 20 protein) kinase. In a genetic screen, using candidate gene approach to identify novel kinases involved in Notch signaling, we identified msn as a novel regulator of Notch signaling. Data presented here suggest that overexpression of kinase active form of Msn exhibits phenotypes similar to Notch loss-of-function condition and msn genetically interacts with components of Notch signaling pathway. Kinase active form of Msn associates with Notch receptor and regulate its signaling activity. We further show that kinase active Misshapen leads to accumulation of membrane-tethered form of Notch. Moreover, activated Msn also depletes Armadillo and DE-Cadherin from adherens junctions. Thus, this study provides a yet unknown mode of regulation of Notch signaling by Misshapen. PMID:26431585

  7. Microgravity and Signaling Molecules in Rat Osteoblasts: Downstream of Receptor Tyrosine Kinase, G-Protein-Coupled Receptor, and Small GTP-Binding Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumel, Yasuhiro; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Morita, Sadao; Katano, Hisako; Akiyama, Hideo; Hirano, Masahiko; Ohya, Keiichi; Sams, Clarence F.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2005-01-01

    Rat osteoblasts were cultured for 4 and 5 days aboard Space Shuttle and solubilized on board. The mRNA levels of the post-receptor signaling molecules were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR. The G-protein alpha subunit G(alpha)q mRNA levels were elevated 3-fold by microgravity. G(alpha)q stimulates PLC(beta), and then PKC. PKC(delta) and PKC(theta) mRNA levels were increased 2- to 5-fold by microgravity The mRNA levels of SOS and Ras GRF were increased 4 to 5-fold by microgravity, while Ras GAP was not altered. Spaceflight-induced bone loss might be attributed to microgravity modulation of the signaling pathway in osteoblasts.

  8. Phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase α activation critically contributes to CD28-dependent signaling responses.

    PubMed

    Muscolini, Michela; Camperio, Cristina; Capuano, Cristina; Caristi, Silvana; Piccolella, Enza; Galandrini, Ricciarda; Tuosto, Loretta

    2013-05-15

    CD28 is one of the most relevant costimulatory receptors that deliver both TCR-dependent and TCR-independent signals regulating a wide range of signaling pathways crucial for cytokine and chemokine gene expressions, T cell survival, and proliferation. Most of the CD28-dependent signaling functions are initiated by the recruitment and activation of class IA PI3Ks, which catalyze the conversion of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) into phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate, thus generating the docking sites for key signaling proteins. Hence, PIP2 is a crucial substrate in driving the PI3K downstream signaling pathways, and PIP2 turnover may be an essential regulatory step to ensure the activation of PI3K following CD28 engagement. Despite some data evidence that CD28 augments TCR-induced turnover of PIP2, its direct role in regulating PIP2 metabolism has never been assessed. In this study, we show that CD28 regulates PIP2 turnover by recruiting and activating phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinases α (PIP5Kα) in human primary CD4(+) T lymphocytes. This event leads to the neosynthesis of PIP2 and to its consumption by CD28-activated PI3K. We also evidenced that PIP5Kα activation is required for both CD28 unique signals regulating IL-8 gene expression as well as for CD28/TCR-induced Ca(2+) mobilization, NF-AT nuclear translocation, and IL-2 gene transcription. Our findings elucidate a novel mechanism that involves PIP5Kα as a key modulator of CD28 costimulatory signals.

  9. S-glutathionylation impairs signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation and signaling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yi; Kole, Sutapa; Precht, Patricia; Pazin, Michael J; Bernier, Michel

    2009-03-01

    S-glutathionylation is a physiological, reversible protein modification of cysteine residues with glutathione in response to mild oxidative stress. Because the key cell growth regulator signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is particularly susceptible to redox regulation, we hypothesized that oxidative modification of cysteine residues of STAT3 by S-glutathionylation may occur. Herein, we show that the cysteine residues of STAT3 are modified by a thiol-alkylating agent and are the targets of S-glutathionylation. STAT3 protein thiol reactivity was reversibly attenuated with concomitant increase in the S-glutathionylation of STAT3 upon treatment of human HepG2 hepatoma cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, glutathione disulfide, or diamide. Under these conditions there was a marked reduction in IL-6-dependent STAT3 signaling, including decreased STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, loss in nuclear accumulation of STAT3, and impaired expression of target genes, such as fibrinogen-gamma. In a cell-free system, diamide induced glutathionylation of STAT3, which was decreased upon addition of glutaredoxin (GRX)-1, a deglutathionylation enzyme, or the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Glutathionylated STAT3 was a poor Janus protein tyrosine kinase 2 substrate in vitro, and it exhibited low DNA-binding activity. Cellular GRX-1 activity was inhibited by diamide and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate treatment; however, ectopic expression of GRX-1 was accompanied by a modest increase in phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding ability of STAT3 in response to IL-6. These results are the first to show S-glutathionylation of STAT3, a modification that may exert regulatory function in STAT3 signaling.

  10. S-Glutathionylation Impairs Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Activation and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yi; Kole, Sutapa; Precht, Patricia; Pazin, Michael J.; Bernier, Michel

    2009-01-01

    S-glutathionylation is a physiological, reversible protein modification of cysteine residues with glutathione in response to mild oxidative stress. Because the key cell growth regulator signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is particularly susceptible to redox regulation, we hypothesized that oxidative modification of cysteine residues of STAT3 by S-glutathionylation may occur. Herein, we show that the cysteine residues of STAT3 are modified by a thiol-alkylating agent and are the targets of S-glutathionylation. STAT3 protein thiol reactivity was reversibly attenuated with concomitant increase in the S-glutathionylation of STAT3 upon treatment of human HepG2 hepatoma cells with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, glutathione disulfide, or diamide. Under these conditions there was a marked reduction in IL-6-dependent STAT3 signaling, including decreased STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation, loss in nuclear accumulation of STAT3, and impaired expression of target genes, such as fibrinogen-γ. In a cell-free system, diamide induced glutathionylation of STAT3, which was decreased upon addition of glutaredoxin (GRX)-1, a deglutathionylation enzyme, or the reducing agent, dithiothreitol. Glutathionylated STAT3 was a poor Janus protein tyrosine kinase 2 substrate in vitro, and it exhibited low DNA-binding activity. Cellular GRX-1 activity was inhibited by diamide and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate treatment; however, ectopic expression of GRX-1 was accompanied by a modest increase in phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and DNA-binding ability of STAT3 in response to IL-6. These results are the first to show S-glutathionylation of STAT3, a modification that may exert regulatory function in STAT3 signaling. PMID:18988672

  11. Mathematical modeling of light-mediated HPA axis activity and downstream implications on the entrainment of peripheral clock genes.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Panteleimon D; Corbett, Siobhan A; Calvano, Steven E; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-10-15

    In this work we propose a semimechanistic model that describes the photic signal transduction to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that ultimately regulates the synchronization of peripheral clock genes (PCGs). Our HPA axis model predicts that photic stimulation induces a type-1 phase response curve to cortisol's profile with increased cortisol sensitivity to light exposure in its rising phase, as well as the shortening of cortisol's period as constant light increases (Aschoff's first rule). Furthermore, our model provides insight into cortisol's phase and amplitude dependence on photoperiods and reveals that cortisol maintains highest amplitude variability when it is entrained by a balanced schedule of light and dark periods. Importantly, by incorporating the links between HPA axis and PCGs we were able to investigate how cortisol secretion impacts the entrainment of a population of peripheral cells and show that disrupted light schedules, leading to blunted cortisol secretion, fail to synchronize a population of PCGs which further signifies the loss of circadian rhythmicity in the periphery of the body.

  12. Neuropeptide FF activates ERK and NF kappa B signal pathways in differentiated SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu-long; Zhang, Xiao-yuan; He, Ning; Sun, Tao; Zhuang, Yan; Fang, Quan; Wang, Kai-rong; Wang, Rui

    2012-11-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) has been reported to play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes. However, little attention has been focused on the downstream signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Here, we used the differentiated neuroblastoma cell line, dSH-SY5Y, which endogenously expresses hNPFF2 receptor, to investigate the signal transduction downstream of NPFF. In particular we investigated the regulation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) and the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) pathways by NPFF in these cells. NPFF rapidly and transiently stimulated ERK. H89, a selective inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), inhibited the NPFF-activated ERK pathway, indicating the involvement of PKA in the NPFF-induced ERK activation. Down-regulation of nitric oxide synthases also attenuated NPFF-induced ERK activation, suggesting that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent pathway is involved. Moreover, the core upstream components of the NF-κB pathway were also significantly activated in response to NPFF, suggesting that the NF-κB pathway is involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF. Collectively, these data demonstrate that nitric oxide synthases are involved in the signal transduction pathway of NPFF, and provide the first evidence for the interaction between NPFF and the NF-κB pathway. These advances in our interpretation of the NPFF pathway mechanism will aid the comprehensive understanding of its function and provide novel molecular insight for further study of the NPFF system.

  13. Epigenetic regulator Lid maintains germline stem cells through regulating JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity

    PubMed Central

    Tarayrah, Lama; Li, Yuping; Gan, Qiang; Chen, Xin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms have both been shown to play essential roles in regulating stem cell activity. While the role of either mechanism in this regulation is well established in multiple stem cell lineages, how the two mechanisms interact to regulate stem cell activity is not as well understood. Here we report that in the Drosophila testis, an H3K4me3-specific histone demethylase encoded by little imaginal discs (lid) maintains germline stem cell (GSC) mitotic index and prevents GSC premature differentiation. Lid is required in germ cells for proper expression of the Stat92E transcription factor, the downstream effector of the Janus kinase signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway. Our findings support a germ cell autonomous role for the JAK-STAT pathway in maintaining GSCs and place Lid as an upstream regulator of this pathway. Our study provides new insights into the biological functions of a histone demethylase in vivo and sheds light on the interaction between epigenetic mechanisms and signaling pathways in regulating stem cell activities. PMID:26490676

  14. Ethylene-Induced Vinblastine Accumulation Is Related to Activated Expression of Downstream TIA Pathway Genes in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Pan, Ya-Jie; Chang, Bo-Wen; Hu, Yan-Bo; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    We selected different concentrations of ethephon, to stress C. roseus. We used qRT-PCR and HPLC followed by PCA to obtain comprehensive profiling of the vinblastine biosynthesis in response to ethephon. Based on our findings, the results showed that the high concentration of ethephon had a positive effect at both transcriptional and metabolite level. Meanwhile, there was a remarkable decrease of hydrogen peroxide content and a promoted peroxidase activity in leaves. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis suggested that CrPrx1 could be regarded as a positive regulator and interacts with ethylene response factor (ERF) to play a key role in vinblastine content and peroxidase (POD) activity. This study provides the foundation for a better understanding of the regulation and accumulation of vinblastine in response to ethephon. PMID:27314017

  15. Cooperative signaling through the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and nuclear factor-κB pathways in subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Lloyd T.; Wright, George; Davis, R. Eric; Lenz, Georg; Farinha, Pedro; Dang, Lenny; Chan, John W.; Rosenwald, Andreas; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2008-01-01

    The activated B cell–like (ABC) subgroup of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is characterized by constitutive activation of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. In this study, we showed that the NF-κB pathway induced the expression of the cytokines interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10 in ABC DLBCL cell lines, which also have high levels of total and phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 protein, suggesting autocrine signaling. Using RNA interference for STAT3, we defined a gene expression signature of IL-6 and IL-10 signaling through STAT3. Based on this signature, we constructed a molecular predictor of STAT3 signaling that defined a subset of ABC DLBCL tumors with high expression of STAT3, IL-6, and/or IL-10 and their downstream targets. Although the STAT3-high and STAT3-low subsets had equivalent expression of genes that distinguish ABC DLBCL from germinal center B cell–like DLBCL, STAT3-high ABC DLBCLs had higher expression of signatures that reflected NF-κB activity, proliferation, and glycolysis. A small-molecule inhibitor of Janus kinase signaling, which blocked STAT3 signature expression, was toxic only for ABC DLBCL lines and synergized with an inhibitor of NF-κB signaling. These findings suggest that the biological interplay between the STAT3 and NF-κB pathways may be exploited for the treatments of a subset of ABC DLBCLs. PMID:18160665

  16. Activation of RAF/MEK/ERK and PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways in pituitary adenomas and their effects on downstream effectors.

    PubMed

    Dworakowska, D; Wlodek, E; Leontiou, C A; Igreja, S; Cakir, M; Teng, M; Prodromou, N; Góth, M I; Grozinsky-Glasberg, S; Gueorguiev, M; Kola, B; Korbonits, M; Grossman, A B

    2009-12-01

    Raf/MEK/ERK and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) cascades are key signalling pathways interacting with each other to regulate cell growth and tumourigenesis. We have previously shown B-Raf and Akt overexpression and/or overactivation in pituitary adenomas. The aim of this study is to assess the expression of their downstream components (MEK1/2, ERK1/2, mTOR, TSC2, p70S6K) and effectors (c-MYC and CYCLIN D1). We studied tissue from 16 non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), six GH-omas, six prolactinomas and six ACTH-omas, all collected at transsphenoidal surgery; 16 normal autopsy pituitaries were used as controls. The expression of phospho and total protein was assessed with western immunoblotting, and the mRNA expression with quantitative RT-PCR. The expression of pSer217/221 MEK1/2 and pThr183 ERK1/2 (but not total MEK1/2 or ERK1/2) was significantly higher in all tumour subtypes in comparison to normal pituitaries. There was no difference in the expression of phosphorylated/total mTOR, TSC2 or p70S6K between pituitary adenomas and controls. Neither c-MYC phosphorylation at Ser 62 nor total c-MYC was changed in the tumours. However, c-MYC phosphorylation at Thr58/Ser62 (a response target for Akt) was decreased in all tumour types. CYCLIN D1 expression was higher only in NFPAs. The mRNA expression of MEK1, MEK2, ERK1, ERK2, c-MYC and CCND1 was similar in all groups. Our data indicate that in pituitary adenomas both the Raf/MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathways are upregulated in their initial cascade, implicating a pro-proliferative signal derangement upstream to their point of convergence. However, we speculate that other processes, such as senescence, attenuate the changes downstream in these benign tumours. PMID:19620247

  17. Chemical downstream etching of tungsten

    SciTech Connect

    Blain, M.G.; Jarecki, R.L.; Simonson, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The downstream etching of tungsten and tungsten oxide has been investigated. Etching of chemical vapor deposited tungsten and e-beam deposited tungsten oxide samples was performed using atomic fluorine generated by a microwave discharge of argon and NF{sub 3}. Etching was found to be highly activated with activation energies approximated to be 6.0{plus_minus}0.5thinspkcal/mol and 5.4{plus_minus}0.4thinspkcal/mol for W and WO{sub 3}, respectively. In the case of F etching of tungsten, the addition of undischarged nitric oxide (NO) directly into the reaction chamber results in the competing effects of catalytic etch rate enhancement and the formation of a nearly stoichiometric WO{sub 3} passivating tungsten oxide film, which ultimately stops the etching process. For F etching of tungsten oxide, the introduction of downstream NO reduces the etch rate. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  18. Nucleotide Sequences and Modifications That Determine RIG-I/RNA Binding and Signaling Activities

    PubMed Central

    Uzri, Dina; Gehrke, Lee

    2009-01-01

    Cytoplasmic viral RNAs with 5′ triphosphates (5′ppp) are detected by the RNA helicase RIG-I, initiating downstream signaling and alpha/beta interferon (IFN-α/β) expression that establish an antiviral state. We demonstrate here that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) 3′ untranslated region (UTR) RNA has greater activity as an immune stimulator than several flavivirus UTR RNAs. We confirmed that the HCV 3′-UTR poly(U/UC) region is the determinant for robust activation of RIG-I-mediated innate immune signaling and that its antisense sequence, poly(AG/A), is an equivalent RIG-I activator. The poly(U/UC) region of the fulminant HCV JFH-1 strain was a relatively weak activator, while the antisense JFH-1 strain poly(AG/A) RNA was very potent. Poly(U/UC) activity does not require primary nucleotide sequence adjacency to the 5′ppp, suggesting that RIG-I recognizes two independent RNA domains. Whereas poly(U) 50-nt or poly(A) 50-nt sequences were minimally active, inserting a single C or G nucleotide, respectively, into these RNAs increased IFN-β expression. Poly(U/UC) RNAs transcribed in vitro using modified uridine 2′ fluoro or pseudouridine ribonucleotides lacked signaling activity while functioning as competitive inhibitors of RIG-I binding and IFN-β expression. Nucleotide base and ribose modifications that convert activator RNAs into competitive inhibitors of RIG-I signaling may be useful as modulators of RIG-I-mediated innate immune responses and as tools to dissect the RNA binding and conformational events associated with signaling. PMID:19224987

  19. Dact2 represses PITX2 transcriptional activation and cell proliferation through Wnt/beta-catenin signaling during odontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Florez, Sergio; Wang, Jianbo; Cao, Huojun; Amendt, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Dact proteins belong to the Dapper/Frodo protein family and function as cytoplasmic attenuators in Wnt and TGFβ signaling. Previous studies show that Dact1 is a potent Wnt signaling inhibitor by promoting degradation of β-catenin. We report a new mechanism for Dact2 function as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway by interacting with PITX2. PITX2 is a downstream transcription factor in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, and PITX2 synergizes with Lef-1 to activate downstream genes. Immunohistochemistry verified the expression of Dact2 in the tooth epithelium, which correlated with Pitx2 epithelial expression. Dact2 loss of function and PITX2 gain of function studies reveal a feedback mechanism for controlling Dact2 expression. Pitx2 endogenously activates Dact2 expression and Dact2 feeds back to repress Pitx2 transcriptional activity. A Topflash reporter system was employed showing PITX2 activation of Wnt signaling, which is attenuated by Dact2. Transient transfections demonstrate the inhibitory effect of Dact2 on critical dental epithelial differentiation factors during tooth development. Dact2 significantly inhibits PITX2 activation of the Dlx2 and amelogenin promoters. Multiple lines of evidence conclude the inhibition is achieved by the physical interaction between Dact2 and Pitx2 proteins. The loss of function of Dact2 also reveals increased cell proliferation due to up-regulated Wnt downstream genes, cyclinD1 and cyclinD2. In summary, we have identified a novel role for Dact2 as an inhibitor of the canonical Wnt pathway in embryonic tooth development through its regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation.

  20. Vangl1 protein acts as a downstream effector of intestinal trefoil factor (ITF)/TFF3 signaling and regulates wound healing of intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kalabis, Jiri; Rosenberg, Ian; Podolsky, Daniel K

    2006-03-10

    The intestinal trefoil factor (ITF/TFF3) protects intestinal epithelia from a range of insults and contributes to mucosal repair. However, the signaling events that mediate healing responses are only partially understood. To identify ITF signaling pathways, proteins that were Ser/Thr phosphorylated in response to ITF stimulation were immunoprecipitated from human colon carcinoma cell lines and identified by mass spectrometry. We demonstrated that Van Gogh-like protein 1 (also designated Vang-like 1 or Vangl1), a protein with four transmembrane domains, was Ser/Thr phosphorylated in response to ITF stimulation. Vangl1 was present in normal human colon and all intestinal epithelial cell lines (IEC) tested. In transfected IEC, FLAG-Vangl1 was mostly present in the Nonidet P-40 soluble fraction as detected by Western blotting, corresponding to the localization of endogenous protein in cytoplasmic vesicular structures by confocal microscopy with rabbit polyclonal anti-human Vangl1 antibody (alpha-Vangl1). Vangl1 cell membrane association increased with differentiation, as demonstrated by co-localization with E-cadherin in differentiated IEC. Increased Vangl1 phosphorylation after stimulation with ITF corresponded to decreased cell membrane association with E-cadherin. Functionally, Vangl1 overexpression enhanced ITF unstimulated and stimulated wound closure of IEC, whereas siRNA directed against Vangl1 inhibited the migratory response to ITF. Vangl1 protein may serve as an effector mediating the ITF healing response of the intestinal mucosa.

  1. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  2. CD200R/Foxp3-mediated signalling regulates microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Min-Hee; Zhang, Enji; Kim, Jwa-Jin; Baek, Hyunjung; Shin, Nara; Kim, Sena; Kim, Sang Ryong; Kim, Hang-Rae; Lee, Sung Joong; Park, Jin Bong; Kim, Yonghyun; Kwon, O-Yu; Lee, Young Ho; Oh, Sang-Ha; Kim, Dong Woon

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneity of microglial functions have either beneficial or detrimental roles in specific physiological or pathological environments. However, the details of what transcriptional mechanisms induce microglia to take beneficial phenotypes remain unknown. Here, we report that Foxp3 is essential for beneficial outcome of the microglial response and depends upon signalling by the immunoglobulin CD200 through its receptor (CD200R). Foxp3 expression was up-regulated in microglia activated by excitotoxicity-induced hippocampal neuroinflammation. Suppression of CD200R prevented anti-inflammatory phenotype of microglia, but over-expression of Foxp3 enhanced it. Phosphorylation of STAT6, a downstream effector of CD200R, modulated transcription of Foxp3. Finally, CD200R/Foxp3-mediated signalling enhanced hippocampal neuronal viability and conferred a degree of neuroprotection, presumably by counteracting inducible nitric oxide synthase. We conclude that enhancement of Foxp3 through CD200R could be neuroprotective by targeting the microglia. PMID:27731341

  3. Oxidative Stress–Induced JNK1/2 Activation Triggers Proapoptotic Signaling and Apoptosis That Leads to Diabetic Embryopathy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezheng; Weng, Hongbo; Xu, Cheng; Reece, E. Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress and apoptosis are implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic embryopathy. The proapoptotic c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK)1/2 activation is associated with diabetic embryopathy. We sought to determine whether 1) hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress is responsible for the activation of JNK1/2 signaling, 2) JNK1 contributes to the teratogenicity of hyperglycemia, and 3) both JNK1 and JNK2 activation cause activation of downstream transcription factors, caspase activation, and apoptosis, resulting in neural tube defects (NTDs). Wild-type (WT) embryos from nondiabetic WT dams and WT, superoxide dismutase (SOD)1–overexpressing, jnk1+/−, jnk1−/−, and jnk2−/− embryos exposed to maternal hyperglycemia were used to assess JNK1/2 activation, NTDs, activation of transcription factors downstream of JNK1/2, caspase cascade, and apoptosis. SOD1 overexpression abolished diabetes-induced activation of JNK1/2 and their downstream effectors: phosphorylation of c-Jun, activating transcription factor 2, and E twenty-six–like transcription factor 1 and dephosphorylation of forkhead box class O3a. jnk1−/− embryos had significantly lower incidences of NTDs than those of WT or jnk1+/− embryos. Either jnk1 or jnk2 gene deletion blocked diabetes-induced activation of JNK1/2 signaling, caspases 3 and 8, and apoptosis in Sox1+ neural progenitors of the developing neural tube. Our results show that JNK1 and JNK2 are equally involved in diabetic embryopathy and that the oxidative stress–JNK1/2–caspase pathway mediates the proapoptotic signals and the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes. PMID:22688338

  4. Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway activation is required for proliferation of chicken primordial germ cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyung Chul; Lim, Sumi; Han, Jae Yong

    2016-01-01

    Here, we investigated the role of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) in vitro. We confirmed the expression of Wnt signaling pathway-related genes and the localization of β-catenin in the nucleus, revealing that this pathway is potentially activated in chicken PGCs. Then, using the single-cell pick-up assay, we examined the proliferative capacity of cultured PGCs in response to Wnt ligands, a β-catenin-mediated Wnt signaling activator (6-bromoindirubin-3′-oxime [BIO]) or inhibitor (JW74), in the presence or absence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). WNT1, WNT3A, and BIO promoted the proliferation of chicken PGCs similarly to bFGF, whereas JW74 inhibited this proliferation. Meanwhile, such treatments in combination with bFGF did not show a synergistic effect. bFGF treatment could not rescue PGC proliferation in the presence of JW74. In addition, we confirmed the translocation of β-catenin into the nucleus by the addition of bFGF after JW74 treatment. These results indicate that there is signaling crosstalk between FGF and Wnt, and that β-catenin acts on PGC proliferation downstream of bFGF. In conclusion, our study suggests that Wnt signaling enhances the proliferation of chicken PGCs via the stabilization of β-catenin and activation of its downstream genes. PMID:27687983

  5. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction.

  6. Human Macrophage SCN5A Activates an Innate Immune Signaling Pathway for Antiviral Host Defense*

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Alexis; Kainz, Danielle; Khan, Faatima; Lee, Cara; Carrithers, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors contain a binding domain for pathogen-associated molecular patterns coupled to a signaling domain that regulates transcription of host immune response genes. Here, a novel mechanism that links pathogen recognition to channel activation and downstream signaling is proposed. We demonstrate that an intracellular sodium channel variant, human macrophage SCN5A, initiates signaling and transcription through a calcium-dependent isoform of adenylate cyclase, ADCY8, and the transcription factor, ATF2. Pharmacological stimulation with a channel agonist or treatment with cytoplasmic poly(I:C), a mimic of viral dsRNA, activates this pathway to regulate expression of SP100-related genes and interferon β. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that the SCN5A variant mediates nonselective outward currents and a small, but detectable, inward current. Intracellular poly(I:C) markedly augments an inward voltage-sensitive sodium current and inhibits the outward nonselective current. These results suggest human macrophage SCN5A initiates signaling in an innate immune pathway relevant to antiviral host defense. It is postulated that SCN5A is a novel pathogen sensor and that this pathway represents a channel activation-dependent mechanism of transcriptional regulation. PMID:25368329

  7. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  8. Identification of Small Molecules That Suppress Ricin-Induced Stress-Activated Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wahome, Paul G.; Ahlawat, Sarita; Mantis, Nicholas J.

    2012-01-01

    Ricin is a member of the ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) family of plant and bacterial toxins. In this study we used a high-throughput, cell-based assay to screen more than 118,000 compounds from diverse chemical libraries for molecules that reduced ricin-induced cell death. We describe three compounds, PW66, PW69, and PW72 that at micromolar concentrations significantly delayed ricin-induced cell death. None of the compounds had any demonstrable effect on ricin's ability to arrest protein synthesis in cells or on ricin's enzymatic activity as assessed in vitro. Instead, all three compounds appear to function by blocking downstream stress-induced signaling pathways associated with the toxin-mediated apoptosis. PW66 virtually eliminated ricin-induced TNF-α secretion by J774A.1 macrophages and concomitantly blocked activation of the p38 MAPK and JNK signaling pathways. PW72 suppressed ricin-induced TNF-α secretion, but not p38 MAPK and JNK signaling. PW69 suppressed activity of the executioner caspases 3/7 in ricin toxin- and Shiga toxin 2-treated cells. While the actual molecular targets of the three compounds have yet to be identified, these data nevertheless underscore the potential of small molecules to down-regulate inflammatory signaling pathways associated with exposure to the RIP family of toxins. PMID:23133670

  9. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  10. Adiponectin, a downstream target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma}, controls hepatitis B virus replication

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Sarah; Jung, Jaesung; Kim, Taeyeung; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2011-01-20

    In this study, HepG2-hepatitis B virus (HBV)-stable cells that did not overexpress HBx and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells were analyzed for their expression of HBV-induced, upregulated adipogenic and lipogenic genes. The mRNAs of CCAAT enhancer binding protein {alpha} (C/EBP{alpha}), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), adiponectin, liver X receptor {alpha} (LXR{alpha}), sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), and fatty acid synthase (FAS) were expressed at higher levels in HepG2-HBV and lamivudine-treated stable cells and HBx-deficient mutant-transfected cells than in the HepG2 cells. Lamivudine treatment reduced the mRNA levels of PPAR{gamma} and C/EBP{alpha}. Conversely, HBV replication was upregulated by adiponectin and PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone treatments and was downregulated by adiponectin siRNAs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that HBV replication and/or protein expression, even in the absence of HBx, upregulated adipogenic or lipogenic genes, and that the control of adiponectin might prove useful as a therapeutic modality for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B.

  11. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide induces increased expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and downstream TLR signaling molecules in bovine mammary epithelial cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine mammary epithelial cells contribute to the innate immune response to intramammary infections by recognizing pathogens through specialized pattern recognition receptors. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) is one such receptor that binds and is activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of the...

  12. Kresoxim-methyl primes Medicago truncatula plants against abiotic stress factors via altered reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling leading to downstream transcriptional and metabolic readjustment.

    PubMed

    Filippou, Panagiota; Antoniou, Chrystalla; Obata, Toshihiro; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Kanetis, Loukas; Aidinis, Vassilis; Van Breusegem, Frank; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-03-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses, such as fungal infection and drought, cause major yield losses in modern agriculture. Kresoxim-methyl (KM) belongs to the strobilurins, one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides displaying a direct effect on several plant physiological and developmental processes. However, the impact of KM treatment on salt and drought stress tolerance is unknown. In this study we demonstrate that KM pre-treatment of Medicago truncatula plants results in increased protection to drought and salt stress. Foliar application with KM prior to stress imposition resulted in improvement of physiological parameters compared with stressed-only plants. This protective effect was further supported by increased proline biosynthesis, modified reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling, and attenuation of cellular damage. In addition, comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a number of transcripts that are differentially accumulating in drought- and salinity-stressed plants (646 and 57, respectively) after KM pre-treatment compared with stressed plants with no KM pre-treatment. Metabolomic analysis suggests that the priming role of KM in drought- and to a lesser extent in salinity-stressed plants can be attributed to the regulation of key metabolites (including sugars and amino acids) resulting in protection against abiotic stress factors. Overall, the present study highlights the potential use of this commonly used fungicide as a priming agent against key abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26712823

  13. Kresoxim-methyl primes Medicago truncatula plants against abiotic stress factors via altered reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling leading to downstream transcriptional and metabolic readjustment

    PubMed Central

    Filippou, Panagiota; Antoniou, Chrystalla; Obata, Toshihiro; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Kanetis, Loukas; Aidinis, Vassilis; Van Breusegem, Frank; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses, such as fungal infection and drought, cause major yield losses in modern agriculture. Kresoxim-methyl (KM) belongs to the strobilurins, one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides displaying a direct effect on several plant physiological and developmental processes. However, the impact of KM treatment on salt and drought stress tolerance is unknown. In this study we demonstrate that KM pre-treatment of Medicago truncatula plants results in increased protection to drought and salt stress. Foliar application with KM prior to stress imposition resulted in improvement of physiological parameters compared with stressed-only plants. This protective effect was further supported by increased proline biosynthesis, modified reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling, and attenuation of cellular damage. In addition, comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a number of transcripts that are differentially accumulating in drought- and salinity-stressed plants (646 and 57, respectively) after KM pre-treatment compared with stressed plants with no KM pre-treatment. Metabolomic analysis suggests that the priming role of KM in drought- and to a lesser extent in salinity-stressed plants can be attributed to the regulation of key metabolites (including sugars and amino acids) resulting in protection against abiotic stress factors. Overall, the present study highlights the potential use of this commonly used fungicide as a priming agent against key abiotic stress conditions. PMID:26712823

  14. Rhamnazin, a novel inhibitor of VEGFR2 signaling with potent antiangiogenic activity and antitumor efficacy

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Yao; Cai, Wei; Pei, Chong-gang; Shao, Yi

    2015-03-20

    Anti-angiogenesis targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) has emerged as an important tool for cancer therapy. The identification of new drugs from natural products has a long and successful history. In this study, we described a novel VEGFR2 inhibitor, rhamnazin, which inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth. Rhamnazin significantly inhibited proliferation, migration and tube formation of human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro as well as inhibited sprouts formation of rat aorta ring. In addition, it inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 and its downstream signaling regulator in HUVECs. Moreover, rhamnazin could directly inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 in vitro and in vivo. Oral administration of rhamnazin at a dose of 200 mg/kg/day could markedly inhibited human tumor xenograft growth and decreased microvessel densities (MVD) in tumor sections. Taken together, these preclinical evaluations suggest that rhamnazin inhibits angiogenesis and may be a promising anticancer drug candidate. - Highlights: • Rhamnazin inhibits the response of HUVECs to VEGF in vitro. • Rhamnazin inhibits VEGFR2 kinase activity and its downstream signaling. • Rhamnazin prevents the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor and reduces micro-vessel density in vivo.

  15. TLN-4601, a novel anticancer agent, inhibits Ras signaling post Ras prenylation and before MEK activation.

    PubMed

    Boufaied, Nadia; Wioland, My-Anh; Falardeau, Pierre; Gourdeau, Henriette

    2010-06-01

    TLN-4601 is a structurally novel farnesylated dibenzodiazepinone discovered through DECIPHER, Thallion's proprietary drug discovery platform. The compound was shown to have a broad cytotoxic activity (low micromol/l) when tested in the NCI 60 tumor cell line panel and has shown in-vivo antitumor activity in several xenograft models. Related to its farnesylated moiety, the effect of TLN-4601 on Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling was assessed. Downstream Ras signaling events, Raf-1, MEK, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation in MCF7 cells were evaluated by western blot analysis. TLN-4601 prevented epidermal growth factor-induced phosphorylation of Raf-1, MEK, and ERK1/2. This effect was time-dependent and dose-dependent with complete inhibition of protein phosphorylation within 4-6 h at 10 micromol/l. The inhibition of Ras signaling was not mediated by the inhibition of protein prenylation, documented by the lack of effect TLN-4601 on the prenylation of HDJ2 (specific substrate of farnesyltransferase), RAP1A (specific substrate of geranylgeranyl transferase-1), or Ras. As TLN-4601 did not inhibit EGFR, Raf-1, MEK or ERK1/2 kinase activities, the inhibitory effect of TLN-4601 on Ras signaling is not mediated by direct kinase inhibition. Using an Elk-1 trans-activation reporter assay, we found that TLN-4601 inhibits the MEK/ERK pathway at the level of Raf-1. Interestingly, TLN-4601 induces Raf-1 proteasomal-dependent degradation. These data indicate that TLN-4601 may inhibit the Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase-signaling pathway by depleting the Raf-1 protein.

  16. Dynamic assembly of a membrane signaling complex enables selective activation of NFAT by Orai1.

    PubMed

    Kar, Pulak; Samanta, Krishna; Kramer, Holger; Morris, Otto; Bakowski, Daniel; Parekh, Anant B

    2014-06-16

    NFAT-dependent gene expression is essential for the development and function of the nervous, immune, and cardiovascular systems and kidney, bone, and skeletal muscle. Most NFAT protein resides in the cytoplasm because of extensive phosphorylation, which masks a nuclear localization sequence. Dephosphorylation by the Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated protein phosphatase calcineurin triggers NFAT migration into the nucleus. In some cell types, NFAT can be activated by Ca(2+) nanodomains near open store-operated Orai1 and voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels in the plasma membrane. How local Ca(2+) near Orai1 is detected and whether other Orai channels utilize a similar mechanism remain unclear. Here, we report that the paralog Orai3 fails to activate NFAT. Orai1 is effective in activating gene expression via Ca(2+) nanodomains because it participates in a membrane-delimited signaling complex that forms after store depletion and brings calcineurin, via the scaffolding protein AKAP79, to calmodulin tethered to Orai1. By contrast, Orai3 interacts less well with AKAP79 after store depletion, rendering it ineffective in activating NFAT. A channel chimera of Orai3 with the N terminus of Orai1 was able to couple local Ca(2+) entry to NFAT activation, identifying the N-terminal domain of Orai1 as central to Ca(2+) nanodomain-transcription coupling. The formation of a store-dependent signaling complex at the plasma membrane provides for selective activation of a fundamental downstream response by Orai1.

  17. Phosphatidic acid mediates activation of mTORC1 through the ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Jeremiah N.; Fox, Todd E.; Kester, Mark; Jefferson, Leonard S.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) assembles into two distinct multiprotein complexes known as mTORC1 and mTORC2. Of the two complexes, mTORC1 acts to integrate a variety of positive and negative signals to downstream targets that regulate cell growth. The lipid second messenger, phosphatidic acid (PA), represents one positive input to mTORC1, and it is thought to act by binding directly to mTOR, thereby enhancing the protein kinase activity of mTORC1. Support for this model includes findings that PA binds directly to mTOR and addition of PA to the medium of cells in culture results in activation of mTORC1. In contrast, the results of the present study do not support a model in which PA activates mTORC1 through direct interaction with the protein kinase but, instead, show that the lipid promotes mTORC1 signaling through activation of the ERK pathway. Moreover, rather than acting directly on mTORC1, the results suggest that exogenous PA must be metabolized to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which subsequently activates the LPA receptor endothelial differentiation gene (EDG-2). Finally, in contrast to previous studies, the results of the present study demonstrate that leucine does not act through phospholipase D and PA to activate mTORC1 and, instead, show that the two mediators act through parallel upstream signaling pathways to activate mTORC1. Overall, the results demonstrate that leucine and PA signal through parallel pathways to activate mTORC1 and that PA mediates its effect through the ERK pathway, rather than through direct binding to mTOR. PMID:20427710

  18. Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) Family Members in Helminth Infections

    PubMed Central

    Becerra-Díaz, Mireya; Valderrama-Carvajal, Héctor; Terrazas, Luis I.

    2011-01-01

    Helminth parasites are a diverse group of multicellular organisms. Despite their heterogeneity, helminths share many common characteristics, such as the modulation of the immune system of their hosts towards a permissive state that favors their development. They induce strong Th2-like responses with high levels of IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 cytokines, and decreased production of proinflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ. IL-4, IFN-γ and other cytokines bind with their specific cytokine receptors to trigger an immediate signaling pathway in which different tyrosine kinases (e.g. Janus kinases) are involved. Furthermore, a seven-member family of transcription factors named Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT) that initiate the transcriptional activation of different genes are also involved and regulate downstream the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. However, how helminths avoid and modulate immune responses remains unclear; moreover, information concerning STAT-mediated immune regulation during helminth infections is scarce. Here, we review the research on mice deficient in STAT molecules, highlighting the importance of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in regulating susceptibility and/or resistance in these infections. PMID:22110388

  19. Dual-level regulation of ACC synthase activity by MPK3/MPK6 cascade and its downstream WRKY transcription factor during ethylene induction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojing; Meng, Xiangzong; Wang, Ruigang; Mao, Guohong; Han, Ling; Liu, Yidong; Zhang, Shuqun

    2012-06-01

    Plants under pathogen attack produce high levels of ethylene, which plays important roles in plant immunity. Previously, we reported the involvement of ACS2 and ACS6, two Type I ACS isoforms, in Botrytis cinerea-induced ethylene biosynthesis and their regulation at the protein stability level by MPK3 and MPK6, two Arabidopsis pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The residual ethylene induction in the acs2/acs6 double mutant suggests the involvement of additional ACS isoforms. It is also known that a subset of ACS genes, including ACS6, is transcriptionally induced in plants under stress or pathogen attack. However, the importance of ACS gene activation and the regulatory mechanism(s) are not clear. In this report, we demonstrate using genetic analysis that ACS7 and ACS11, two Type III ACS isoforms, and ACS8, a Type II ACS isoform, also contribute to the B. cinerea-induced ethylene production. In addition to post-translational regulation, transcriptional activation of the ACS genes also plays a critical role in sustaining high levels of ethylene induction. Interestingly, MPK3 and MPK6 not only control the stability of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins via direct protein phosphorylation but also regulate the expression of ACS2 and ACS6 genes. WRKY33, another MPK3/MPK6 substrate, is involved in the MPK3/MPK6-induced ACS2/ACS6 gene expression based on genetic analyses. Furthermore, chromatin-immunoprecipitation assay reveals the direct binding of WRKY33 to the W-boxes in the promoters of ACS2 and ACS6 genes in vivo, suggesting that WRKY33 is directly involved in the activation of ACS2 and ACS6 expression downstream of MPK3/MPK6 cascade in response to pathogen invasion. Regulation of ACS activity by MPK3/MPK6 at both transcriptional and protein stability levels plays a key role in determining the kinetics and magnitude of ethylene induction.

  20. Cadmium Activates Multiple Signaling Pathways That Coordinately Stimulate Akt Activity to Enhance c-Myc mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jia-Shiuan; Chao, Cheng-Han; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a known environmental carcinogen. Exposure of Cd leads to the activation of several proto-oncogenes in cells. We investigated here the mechanism of c-Myc expression in hepatic cells under Cd treatment. The c-Myc protein and mRNA levels increased in dose- and time-dependent manners in HepG2 cells with Cd treatment. This increase was due to an increase in c-Myc mRNA stability. To explore the mechanism involved in enhancing the mRNA stability, several cellular signaling factors that evoked by Cd treatment were analyzed. PI3K, p38, ERK and JNK were activated by Cd. However, ERK did not participate in the Cd-induced c-Myc expression. Further analysis revealed that mTORC2 was a downstream factor of p38. PI3K, JNK and mTORC2 coordinately activated Akt. Akt was phosphorylated at Thr450 in the untreated cells. Cd treatment led to additional phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473. Blocking any of the three signaling factors resulted in the reduction of phosphorylation level at all three Akt sites. The activated Akt phosphorylated Foxo1 and allowed the modified protein to translocate into the cytoplasm. We conclude that Cd-induced accumulation of c-Myc requires the activation of several signaling pathways. The signals act coordinately for Akt activation and drive the Foxo1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Reduction of Foxo1 in the nucleus reduces the transcription of its target genes that may affect c-Myc mRNA stability, resulting in a higher accumulation of the c-Myc proteins. PMID:26751215

  1. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-25

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol. PMID:27545348

  2. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P; Adams, Ralf H; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  3. Activation of endothelial β-catenin signaling induces heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Akito; Naito, Atsuhiko T.; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Shibamoto, Masato; Higo, Tomoaki; Okada, Katsuki; Sakai, Taku; Hashimoto, Akihito; Kuramoto, Yuki; Oka, Toru; Lee, Jong-Kook; Harada, Mutsuo; Ueda, Kazutaka; Shiojima, Ichiro; Limbourg, Florian P.; Adams, Ralf H.; Noda, Tetsuo; Sakata, Yasushi; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Activation of β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt signaling in endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis during development and ischemic diseases, however, other roles of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that sustained activation of β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells causes cardiac dysfunction through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB pathway in the heart. Conditional gain-of-function mutation of β-catenin, which activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling in Bmx-positive arterial endothelial cells (Bmx/CA mice) led to progressive cardiac dysfunction and 100% mortality at 40 weeks after tamoxifen treatment. Electron microscopic analysis revealed dilatation of T-tubules and degeneration of mitochondria in cardiomyocytes of Bmx/CA mice, which are similar to the changes observed in mice with decreased neuregulin-ErbB signaling. Endothelial expression of Nrg1 and cardiac ErbB signaling were suppressed in Bmx/CA mice. The cardiac dysfunction of Bmx/CA mice was ameliorated by administration of recombinant neuregulin protein. These results collectively suggest that sustained activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in endothelial cells might be a cause of heart failure through suppressing neuregulin-ErbB signaling, and that the Wnt/β-catenin/NRG axis in cardiac endothelial cells might become a therapeutic target for heart failure. PMID:27146149

  4. Vascular endothelial growth factor signaling regulates the segregation of artery and vein via ERK activity during vascular development

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hee; Schmitt, Christopher E.; Woolls, Melissa J.; Holland, Melinda B.; Kim, Jun-Dae; Jin, Suk-Won

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► VEGF-A signaling regulates the segregation of axial vessels. ► VEGF-A signaling is mediated by PKC and ERK in this process. ► Ectopic activation of ERK is sufficient to rescue defects in vessel segregation. -- Abstract: Segregation of two axial vessels, the dorsal aorta and caudal vein, is one of the earliest patterning events occur during development of vasculature. Despite the importance of this process and recent advances in our understanding on vascular patterning during development, molecular mechanisms that coordinate the segregation of axial vessels remain largely elusive. In this report, we find that vascular endothelial growth factor-A (Vegf-A) signaling regulates the segregation of dorsal aorta and axial vein during development. Inhibition of Vegf-A pathway components including ligand Vegf-A and its cognate receptor Kdrl, caused failure in segregation of axial vessels in zebrafish embryos. Similarly, chemical inhibition of Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (Map2k1)/Extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (Erk) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3 K), which are downstream effectors of Vegf-A signaling pathway, led to the fusion of two axial vessels. Moreover, we find that restoring Erk activity by over-expression of constitutively active MEK in embryos with a reduced level of Vegf-A signaling can rescue the defects in axial vessel segregation. Taken together, our data show that segregation of axial vessels requires the function of Vegf-A signaling, and Erk may function as the major downstream effector in this process.

  5. Rgnef (p190RhoGEF) Knockout Inhibits RhoA Activity, Focal Adhesion Establishment, and Cell Motility Downstream of Integrins

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Nichol L. G.; Lawson, Christine; Chen, Xiao Lei; Lim, Ssang-Taek; Schlaepfer, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell migration is a highly regulated process that involves the formation and turnover of cell-matrix contact sites termed focal adhesions. Rho-family GTPases are molecular switches that regulate actin and focal adhesion dynamics in cells. Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) activate Rho-family GTPases. Rgnef (p190RhoGEF) is a ubiquitous 190 kDa GEF implicated in the control of colon carcinoma and fibroblast cell motility. Principal Findings Rgnef exon 24 floxed mice (Rgnefflox) were created and crossed with cytomegalovirus (CMV)-driven Cre recombinase transgenic mice to inactivate Rgnef expression in all tissues during early development. Heterozygous RgnefWT/flox (Cre+) crosses yielded normal Mendelian ratios at embryonic day 13.5, but Rgnefflox/flox (Cre+) mice numbers at 3 weeks of age were significantly less than expected. Rgnefflox/flox (Cre+) (Rgnef−/−) embryos and primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) were isolated and verified to lack Rgnef protein expression. When compared to wildtype (WT) littermate MEFs, loss of Rgnef significantly inhibited haptotaxis migration, wound closure motility, focal adhesion number, and RhoA GTPase activation after fibronectin-integrin stimulation. In WT MEFs, Rgnef activation occurs within 60 minutes upon fibronectin plating of cells associated with RhoA activation. Rgnef−/− MEF phenotypes were rescued by epitope-tagged Rgnef re-expression. Conclusions Rgnef−/− MEF phenotypes were due to Rgnef loss and support an essential role for Rgnef in RhoA regulation downstream of integrins in control of cell migration. PMID:22649559

  6. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi Jung

    2016-01-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15. However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. PMID:27246098

  7. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs.

  8. A novel c-Jun-dependent signal transduction pathway necessary for the transcriptional activation of interferon gamma response genes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Daniel J; Sabapathy, Kanaga; Ko, Enoch Yi-No; Arthur, Helen A; Schreiber, Robert D; Trapani, Joseph A; Clarke, Christopher J P; Johnstone, Ricky W

    2007-01-12

    The biological effects of interferon gamma (IFNgamma) are mediated by interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), many of which are activated downstream of Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) signaling. Herein we have shown that IFNgamma rapidly activated AP-1 DNA binding that required c-Jun but was independent of JAK1 and STAT1. IFNgamma-induced c-Jun phosphorylation and AP-1 DNA binding required the MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 signaling pathways, whereas the JNK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways were dispensable. The induction of several ISGs, including ifi-205 and iNOS, was impaired in IFNgamma-treated c-Jun-/- cells, but others, such as IP-10 and SOCS3, were unaffected, and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that c-Jun binds to the iNOS promoter following treatment with IFNgamma. Thus, IFNgamma induced JAK1- and STAT1-independent activation of the ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway, phosphorylation of c-Jun, and activation of AP-1 DNA binding, which are important for the induction of a subset of ISGs. This represents a novel signal transduction pathway induced by IFNgamma that proceeds in parallel with conventional JAK/STAT signaling to activate ISGs. PMID:17105733

  9. Activity-dependent survival of developing neocortical neurons depends on PI3K signalling.

    PubMed

    Wagner-Golbs, Antje; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2012-02-01

    Spontaneous electrical network activity plays a major role in the control of cell survival in the developing brain. Several intracellular pathways are implicated in transducing electrical activity into gene expression dependent and independent survival signals. These include activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream effector Akt, activation of Ras and subsequently MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase and signalling via calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK). In the present study, we analyzed the role of these pathways for the control of neuronal survival in different extracellular potassium concentrations ([K(+) ](ex) ). Organotypic neocortical slice cultures prepared from newborn mice were kept in 5.3, 8.0 and 25.0mM [K(+) ](ex) and treated with specific inhibitors of PI3K, MEK1, CaMKK and a broad spectrum CaMK inhibitor. After 6h of incubation, slices were immunostained for activated caspase 3 (a-caspase 3) and the number of apoptotic cells was quantified by computer based analysis. We found that in 5.3 and 8.0mM [K(+) ](ex) only PI3K was important for neuronal survival. When [K(+) ](ex) was raised to 25.0mM, a concentration above the depolarization block, we found no influence of PI3K on neuronal survival. Our data demonstrate that only the PI3K pathway, and not the MEK1, CaMKK or CaMKs pathway, plays a central role in the regulation of activity-dependent neuronal survival in the developing cerebral cortex.

  10. CTNNB1 Signaling in Sertoli Cells Downregulates Spermatogonial Stem Cell Activity via WNT4

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Alexandre; Yeh, Jonathan R.; Zhang, Xiangfan; Paquet, Marilène; Gaudin, Aurore; Nagano, Makoto C.; Boerboom, Derek

    2012-01-01

    Constitutive activation of the WNT signaling effector CTNNB1 (β-catenin) in the Sertoli cells of the Ctnnb1tm1Mmt/+;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ mouse model results in progressive germ cell loss and sterility. In this study, we sought to determine if this phenotype could be due to a loss of spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) activity. Reciprocal SSC transplants between Ctnnb1tm1Mmt/+;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ and wild-type mice showed that SSC activity is lost in Ctnnb1tm1Mmt/+;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ testes over time, whereas the mutant testes could not support colonization by wild-type SSCs. Microarray analyses performed on cultured Sertoli cells showed that CTNNB1 induces the expression of genes associated with the female sex determination pathway, which was also found to occur in Ctnnb1tm1Mmt/+;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ testes. One CTNNB1 target gene encoded the secreted signaling molecule WNT4. We therefore tested the effects of WNT4 on SSC-enriched germ cell cultures, and found that WNT4 induced cell death and reduced SSC activity without affecting cell cycle. Conversely, conditional inactivation of Wnt4 in the Ctnnb1tm1Mmt/+;Amhr2tm3(cre)Bhr/+ model rescued spermatogenesis and male fertility, indicating that WNT4 is the major effector downstream of CTNNB1 responsible for germ cell loss. Furthermore, WNT4 was found to signal via the CTNNB1 pathway in Sertoli cells, suggesting a self-reinforcing positive feedback loop. Collectively, these data indicate for the first time that ectopic activation of a signaling cascade in the stem cell niche depletes SSC activity through a paracrine factor. These findings may provide insight into the pathogenesis of male infertility, as well as embryonic gonadal development. PMID:22253774

  11. Autocrine activity of BDNF induced by the STAT3 signaling pathway causes prolonged TrkB activation and promotes human non-small-cell lung cancer proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Liang, Yan; He, Zheng; An, Yunhe; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin superfamily, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of the nervous system. Recently, several studies have suggested that BDNF and/or its receptor, tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB), are involved in tumor growth and metastasis in several cancers, including prostate cancer, neuroblastoma, pancreatic ductal carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and lung cancer. Despite the increasing emphasis on BDNF/TrkB signaling in human tumors, how it participates in primary tumors has not yet been determined. Additionally, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that elicit signaling downstream of TrkB in the progression of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we report the significant expression of BDNF in NSCLC samples and show that BDNF stimulation increases the synthesis of BDNF itself through activation of STAT3 in lung cancer cells. The release of BDNF can in turn activate TrkB signaling. The activation of both TrkB and STAT3 contribute to downstream signaling and promote human non-small-cell lung cancer proliferation. PMID:27456333

  12. Insulin receptor signaling activated by penta-O-galloyl-α-D: -glucopyranose induces p53 and apoptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanyan; Evans, Susan C; Soans, Eroica; Malki, Ahmed; Liu, Yi; Liu, Yan; Chen, Xiaozhuo

    2011-09-01

    p53 is essential for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction while insulin receptor (IR) signaling is important for cell metabolism and proliferation and found upregulated in cancers. While IR has recently been found to be involved in apoptosis, p53 induction or apoptosis mediated through IR signaling activation has never been documented. Here, we report that the IR signaling pathway, particularly the IR-MEK pathway, mediates biological and biochemical changes in p53 and apoptosis in tumor cells. Specifically, natural compound penta-O-galloyl-α-D: -glucopyranose (α-PGG), a previously characterized IR signaling activator, induced apoptosis in RKO cells without significantly affecting its normal counterpart FHC cells. α-PGG induced apoptosis in RKO cells through p53, Bax and caspase 3. Importantly, α-PGG's ability to elevate p53 was diminished by IR inhibitor and IR-siRNA, suggesting a non-conventional role of IR as being involved in p53 induction. Further studies revealed that α-PGG activated MEK, a downstream signaling factor of IR. Blocking MEK significantly suppressed α-PGG-induced p53 and Bax elevation. All these results suggested that α-PGG induced p53, Bax, and apoptosis through the IR-MEK signaling pathway. The unique activity of α-PGG, a novel IR phosphorylation and apoptosis inducer, may offer a new therapeutic strategy for eliciting apoptotic signal and inhibiting cancer growth.

  13. Tracheal activity recognition based on acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Olubanjo, Temiloluwa; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal activity recognition can play an important role in continuous health monitoring for wearable systems and facilitate the advancement of personalized healthcare. Neck-worn systems provide access to a unique set of health-related data that other wearable devices simply cannot obtain. Activities including breathing, chewing, clearing the throat, coughing, swallowing, speech and even heartbeat can be recorded from around the neck. In this paper, we explore tracheal activity recognition using a combination of promising acoustic features from related work and apply simplistic classifiers including K-NN and Naive Bayes. For wearable systems in which low power consumption is of primary concern, we show that with a sub-optimal sampling rate of 16 kHz, we have achieved average classification results in the range of 86.6% to 87.4% using 1-NN, 3-NN, 5-NN and Naive Bayes. All classifiers obtained the highest recognition rate in the range of 97.2% to 99.4% for speech classification. This is promising to mitigate privacy concerns associated with wearable systems interfering with the user's conversations.

  14. Overexpressed galectin-3 in pancreatic cancer induces cell proliferation and invasion by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Shumei; Ji, Baoan; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Wang, Huamin; Hafley, Margarete; Logsdon, Craig; Bresalier, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PDAC) is a lethal disease with a five-year survival of 3-5%. Mutations in K-Ras are found in nearly all cases, but K-Ras mutations alone are not sufficient for the development of PDAC. Additional factors contribute to activation of Ras signaling and lead to tumor formation. Galectin-3 (Gal-3), a multifunctional β-galactoside-binding protein, is highly expressed in PDAC. We therefore investigated the functional role of Gal-3 in pancreatic cancer progression and its relationship to Ras signaling. Expression of Gal-3 was determined by immunohistochemistry, Q-PCR and immunoblot. Functional studies were performed using pancreatic cell lines genetically engineered to express high or low levels of Gal-3. Ras activity was examined by Raf pull-down assays. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence were used to assess protein-protein interactions. In this study, we demonstrate that Gal-3 was highly up-regulated in human tumors and in a mutant K-Ras mouse model of PDAC. Down-regulation of Gal-3 by lentivirus shRNA decreased PDAC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and reduced tumor volume and size in an orthotopic mouse model. Gal-3 bound Ras and maintained Ras activity; down-regulation of Gal-3 decreased Ras activity as well as Ras down-stream signaling including phosphorylation of ERK and AKT and Ral A activity. Transfection of Gal-3 cDNA into PDAC cells with low-level Gal-3 augmented Ras activity and its down-stream signaling. These results suggest that Gal-3 contributes to pancreatic cancer progression, in part, by binding Ras and activating Ras signaling. Gal-3 may therefore be a potential novel target for this deadly disease. PMID:22900040

  15. Signal peptides are allosteric activators of the protein translocase

    PubMed Central

    Gouridis, Giorgos; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Gelis, Ioannis; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.; Economou, Anastassios

    2010-01-01

    Extra-cytoplasmic polypeptides are usually synthesized as “preproteins” carrying aminoterminal, cleavable signal peptides1 and secreted across membranes by translocases. The main bacterial translocase comprises the SecYEG protein-conducting channel and the peripheral ATPase motor SecA2,3. Most proteins destined for the periplasm and beyond are exported post-translationally by SecA2,3. Preprotein targeting to SecA is thought to involve signal peptides4 and chaperones like SecB5,6. Here we reveal that signal peptides have a novel role beyond targeting: they are essential allosteric activators of the translocase. Upon docking on their binding groove on SecA, signal peptides act in trans to drive three successive states: first, “triggering” that drives the translocase to a lower activation energy state; then “trapping” that engages non-native preprotein mature domains docked with high affinity on the secretion apparatus and, finally, “secretion” during which trapped mature domains undergo multiple turnovers of translocation in segments7. A significant contribution by mature domains renders signal peptides less critical in bacterial secretory protein targeting than currently assumed. Rather, it is their function as allosteric activators of the translocase that renders signal peptides essential for protein secretion. A role for signal peptides and targeting sequences as allosteric activators may be universal in protein translocases. PMID:19924216

  16. Ectodysplasin regulates activator-inhibitor balance in murine tooth development through Fgf20 signaling.

    PubMed

    Häärä, Otso; Harjunmaa, Enni; Lindfors, Päivi H; Huh, Sung-Ho; Fliniaux, Ingrid; Åberg, Thomas; Jernvall, Jukka; Ornitz, David M; Mikkola, Marja L; Thesleff, Irma

    2012-09-01

    Uncovering the origin and nature of phenotypic variation within species is the first step in understanding variation between species. Mouse models with altered activities of crucial signal pathways have highlighted many important genes and signal networks regulating the morphogenesis of complex structures, such as teeth. The detailed analyses of these models have indicated that the balanced actions of a few pathways regulating cell behavior modulate the shape and number of teeth. Currently, however, most mouse models studied have had gross alteration of morphology, whereas analyses of more subtle modification of morphology are required to link developmental studies to evolutionary change. Here, we have analyzed a signaling network involving ectodysplasin (Eda) and fibroblast growth factor 20 (Fgf20) that subtly affects tooth morphogenesis. We found that Fgf20 is a major downstream effector of Eda and affects Eda-regulated characteristics of tooth morphogenesis, including the number, size and shape of teeth. Fgf20 function is compensated for by other Fgfs, in particular Fgf9 and Fgf4, and is part of an Fgf signaling loop between epithelium and mesenchyme. We showed that removal of Fgf20 in an Eda gain-of-function mouse model results in an Eda loss-of-function phenotype in terms of reduced tooth complexity and third molar appearance. However, the extra anterior molar, a structure lost during rodent evolution 50 million years ago, was stabilized in these mice.

  17. Activation of the Notch signaling pathway in response to pulp capping of rat molars.

    PubMed

    Løvschall, H; Tummers, M; Thesleff, I; Füchtbauer, E-M; Poulsen, K

    2005-08-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway that controls the developmental choices made by individual cells. Cells communicate via Notch receptors and their ligands, which direct decisions on the fate of stem cells according to the states of their neighbors. In this study we explored Notch signaling after the pulp capping of adult first upper rat molars. The wound was capped with calcium hydroxide. In situ hybridization revealed an increased expression of Notch signaling genes on day 1, which showed a tendency to decrease on day 3. Notch1 increased in the subodontoblast zone and close to the lesion limited to a few cells. Notch2 increased in pulp stroma surrounded by coronal odontoblasts. Notch1 and, especially, Notch3 expression increased, corresponding to perivascular cell groups. A low increase of ligand expression was observed near the injury with Delta1 expression along the dentin wall and Jagged1 in the stroma. Expression of the downstream target, Hes1, was observed along the lesion and adjacent dentin walls. Hes5 expression was not observed. The results indicate that Notch signaling is activated in response to injury and associated with the differentiation of pulp cells into perivascular cells and odontoblasts. The findings are consistent with the concept that the Notch pathway controls stem cell fate during pulp regeneration. PMID:16048523

  18. FOXO1 activates glutamine synthetase gene in mouse skeletal muscles through a region downstream of 3'-UTR: possible contribution to ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yasutomi; Hattori, Maki; Hatazawa, Yukino; Kasahara, Tomomi; Kanou, Masanobu; Kanai, Sayaka; Yuan, Xunmei; Suganami, Takayoshi; Lamers, Wouter H; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Skeletal muscle is a reservoir of energy in the form of protein, which is degraded under catabolic conditions, resulting in the formation of amino acids and ammonia as a byproduct. The expression of FOXO1, a forkhead-type transcription factor, increases during starvation and exercise. In agreement, transgenic FOXO1-Tg mice that overexpress FOXO1 in skeletal muscle exhibit muscle atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FOXO1 in amino acid metabolism. The mRNA and protein expressions of glutamine synthetase (GS) were increased in skeletal muscle of FOXO1-Tg mice. Fasting induced FOXO1 and GS expression in wild-type mice but hardly increased GS expression in muscle-specific FOXO1 knockout (FOXO1-KO) mice. Activation of FOXO1 also increased GS mRNA and protein expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Using a transient transfection reporter assay, we observed that FOXO1 activated the GS reporter construct. Mutation of a putative FOXO1-binding consensus sequence in the downstream genomic region of GS decreased basal and FOXO1-dependent reporter activity significantly. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that FOXO1 was recruited to the 3' region of GS in C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that FOXO1 directly upregulates GS expression. GS is considered to mediate ammonia clearance in skeletal muscle. In agreement, an intravenous ammonia challenge increased blood ammonia concentrations to a twofold higher level in FOXO1-KO than in wild-type mice, demonstrating that the capacity for ammonia disposal correlated inversely with the expression of GS in muscle. These data indicate that FOXO1 plays a role in amino acid metabolism during protein degradation in skeletal muscle. PMID:25074987

  19. FOXO1 activates glutamine synthetase gene in mouse skeletal muscles through a region downstream of 3'-UTR: possible contribution to ammonia detoxification.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Yasutomi; Hattori, Maki; Hatazawa, Yukino; Kasahara, Tomomi; Kanou, Masanobu; Kanai, Sayaka; Yuan, Xunmei; Suganami, Takayoshi; Lamers, Wouter H; Kitamura, Tadahiro; Ogawa, Yoshihiro

    2014-09-15

    Skeletal muscle is a reservoir of energy in the form of protein, which is degraded under catabolic conditions, resulting in the formation of amino acids and ammonia as a byproduct. The expression of FOXO1, a forkhead-type transcription factor, increases during starvation and exercise. In agreement, transgenic FOXO1-Tg mice that overexpress FOXO1 in skeletal muscle exhibit muscle atrophy. The aim of this study was to examine the role of FOXO1 in amino acid metabolism. The mRNA and protein expressions of glutamine synthetase (GS) were increased in skeletal muscle of FOXO1-Tg mice. Fasting induced FOXO1 and GS expression in wild-type mice but hardly increased GS expression in muscle-specific FOXO1 knockout (FOXO1-KO) mice. Activation of FOXO1 also increased GS mRNA and protein expression in C2C12 myoblasts. Using a transient transfection reporter assay, we observed that FOXO1 activated the GS reporter construct. Mutation of a putative FOXO1-binding consensus sequence in the downstream genomic region of GS decreased basal and FOXO1-dependent reporter activity significantly. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that FOXO1 was recruited to the 3' region of GS in C2C12 myoblasts. These results suggest that FOXO1 directly upregulates GS expression. GS is considered to mediate ammonia clearance in skeletal muscle. In agreement, an intravenous ammonia challenge increased blood ammonia concentrations to a twofold higher level in FOXO1-KO than in wild-type mice, demonstrating that the capacity for ammonia disposal correlated inversely with the expression of GS in muscle. These data indicate that FOXO1 plays a role in amino acid metabolism during protein degradation in skeletal muscle.

  20. Effects of fucoidan on proliferation, AMP-activated protein kinase, and downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-associated molecules in poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cells.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Hayakawa, Masako; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-05-01

    Survival rates are low in patients with poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown seaweed, has anticancer activity; however, the effects of fucoidan on poorly differentiated HCC remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoidan on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a proliferation regulator, and its downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-related molecules in a poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cell line. HLF cells were treated with fucoidan (10, 50, or 100 µg/ml; n=4) or phosphate buffered saline (control; n=4) for 96 h. Proliferation was evaluated by counting cells every 24 h. AMPK, TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP-citrate lyase, p53, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, and CDK6 expression and/or phosphorylation were examined by immunoblotting 24 h after treatment with 100 µg/ml fucoidan. Cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter 48 h after treatment. Treatment with 50 or 100 µg/ml fucoidan significantly and dose- and time-dependently suppressed HLF cell proliferation (P<0.0001). Fucoidan induced AMPK phosphorylation on Ser172 24 h after treatment. Although no differences were seen in expression and phosphorylation levels of TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, ATP-citrate lyase, and p53 between the control and fucoidan-treated HLF cells, fucoidan induced ACC phosphorylation on Ser79. Moreover, fucoidan decreased cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression 24 h after treatment. Furthermore, HLF cells were arrested in the G1/S phase 48 h after fucoidan treatment. We demonstrated that fucoidan suppressed HLF cell proliferation with AMPK phosphorylation. We showed that fucoidan phosphorylated ACC and downregulated cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression. Our findings suggest that fucoidan inhibits proliferation through AMPK-associated suppression of fatty acid synthesis and G1/S transition in HLF cells.

  1. Magnetic Nanoparticles as Mediators of Ligand-Free Activation of EGFR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Cornelia; Klaver, Arjen; Kanger, Johannes S.; Jovin, Thomas M.; Arndt-Jovin, Donna J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are of particular interest in biomedical research, and have been exploited for molecular separation, gene/drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperthermic cancer therapy. In the case of cultured cells, magnetic manipulation of NPs provides the means for studying processes induced by mechanotransduction or by local clustering of targeted macromolecules, e.g. cell surface receptors. The latter are normally activated by binding of their natural ligands mediating key signaling pathways such as those associated with the epidermal growth factor (EGFR). However, it has been reported that EGFR may be dimerized and activated even in the absence of ligands. The present study assessed whether receptor clustering induced by physical means alone suffices for activating EGFR in quiescent cells. Methodology/Principal Findings The EGFR on A431 cells was specifically targeted by superparamagnetic iron oxide NPs (SPIONs) carrying either a ligand-blocking monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody or a streptavidin molecule for targeting a chimeric EGFR incorporating a biotinylated amino-terminal acyl carrier peptide moiety. Application of a magnetic field led to SPION magnetization and clustering, resulting in activation of the EGFR, a process manifested by auto and transphosphorylation and downstream signaling. The magnetically-induced early signaling events were similar to those inherent to the ligand dependent EGFR pathways. Magnetization studies indicated that the NPs exerted magnetic dipolar forces in the sub-piconewton range with clustering dependent on Brownian motion of the receptor-SPION complex and magnetic field strength. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrate that EGFR on the cell surface that have their ligand binding-pocket blocked by an antibody are still capable of transphosphorylation and initiation of signaling cascades if they are clustered by SPIONs either attached locally or targeted to another site of the receptor

  2. Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signalling and T-cell lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Tracey J; John, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Interaction of cytokines with their cognate receptors leads to the activation of latent transcription factors – the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins – whose biological activities ultimately regulate many critical aspects of cell growth, survival and differentiation. Dysregulation of the JAK-STAT pathway is frequently observed in many primary human tumours, reflecting the importance of this pathway in the maintenance of cellular integrity. Here we review the current progress in STAT structure and function, and the contribution of STAT signalling to the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas. PMID:15720432

  3. Non-Canonical Notch Signaling Drives Activation and Differentiation of Peripheral CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dongre, Anushka; Surampudi, Lalitha; Lawlor, Rebecca G.; Fauq, Abdul H.; Miele, Lucio; Golde, Todd E.; Minter, Lisa M.; Osborne, Barbara A.

    2014-01-01

    Cleavage of the Notch receptor via a γ-secretase, results in the release of the active intra-cellular domain of Notch that migrates to the nucleus and interacts with RBP-Jκ, resulting in the activation of downstream target genes. This canonical Notch signaling pathway has been documented to influence T cell development and function. However, the mechanistic details underlying this process remain obscure. In addition to RBP-Jκ, the intra-cellular domain of Notch also interacts with other proteins in the cytoplasm and nucleus, giving rise to the possibility of an alternate, RBP-Jκ independent Notch pathway. However, the contribution of such RBP-Jκ independent, “non-canonical” Notch signaling in regulating peripheral T cell responses is unknown. In this report, we specifically demonstrate the requirement of Notch1 for regulating signal strength and signaling events distal to the T cell receptor in peripheral CD4+ T cells. By using mice with a conditional deletion in Notch1 or RBP-Jκ, we show that Notch1 regulates activation and proliferation of CD4+ T cells independently of RBP-Jκ. Furthermore, differentiation to TH1 and iTreg lineages although Notch dependent, is RBP-Jκ independent. Our striking observations demonstrate that many of the cell-intrinsic functions of Notch occur independently of RBP-Jκ. Such non-canonical regulation of these processes likely occurs through NF-κ B. This reveals a previously unknown, novel role of non-canonical Notch signaling in regulating peripheral T cell responses. PMID:24611064

  4. A-TWinnipeg: Pathogenesis of rare ATM missense mutation c.6200C>A with decreased protein expression and downstream signaling, early-onset dystonia, cancer, and life-threatening radiotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kotoka; Fike, Francesca; Haghayegh, Sara; Saunders-Pullman, Rachel; Dawson, Angelika J; Dörk, Thilo; Gatti, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    We studied 10 Mennonite patients who carry the c.6200C>A missense mutation (p.A2067D) in the ATM gene, all of whom exhibited a phenotypic variant of ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) that is characterized by early-onset dystonia and late-onset mild ataxia, as previously described. This report provides the pathogenetic evidence for this mutation on cellular functions. Several patients have developed cancer and subsequently experienced life-threatening adverse reactions to radiation (radiotoxicity) and/or chemotherapy. As the c.6200C>A mutation is, thus far, unique to the Mennonite population and is always associated with the same haplotype or haplovariant, it was important to rule out any possible confounding DNA variant on the same haplotype. Lymphoblastoid cells derived from Mennonite patients expressed small amounts of ATM protein, which had no autophosphorylation activity at ATM Ser1981, and trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets. A-T lymphoblastoid cells stably transfected with ATM cDNA which had been mutated for c.6200C>A did not show a detectable amount of ATM protein. The same stable cell line with mutated ATM cDNA also showed a trace-to-absent transphosphorylation of downstream ATM targets SMC1pSer966 and KAP1pSer824. From these results, we conclude that c.6200A is the disease-causing ATM mutation on this haplotype. The presence of at least trace amounts of ATM kinase activity on some immunoblots may account for the late-onset, mild ataxia of these patients. The cause of the dystonia remains unclear. Because this dystonia-ataxia phenotype is often encountered in the Mennonite population in association with cancer and adverse reactions to chemotherapy, an early diagnosis is important. PMID:25077176

  5. Activation of the Canonical Wnt Signaling Pathway Induces Cementum Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Han, Pingping; Ivanovski, Saso; Crawford, Ross; Xiao, Yin

    2015-07-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling is important in tooth development but it is unclear whether it can induce cementogenesis and promote the regeneration of periodontal tissues lost because of disease. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the influence of canonical Wnt signaling enhancers on human periodontal ligament cell (hPDLCs) cementogenic differentiation in vitro and cementum repair in a rat periodontal defect model. Canonical Wnt signaling was induced by (1) local injection of lithium chloride; (2) local injection of sclerostin antibody; and (3) local injection of a lentiviral construct overexpressing β-catenin. The results showed that the local activation of canonical Wnt signaling resulted in significant new cellular cementum deposition and the formation of well-organized periodontal ligament fibers, which was absent in the control group. In vitro experiments using hPDLCs showed that the Wnt signaling pathway activators significantly increased mineralization, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and gene and protein expression of the bone and cementum markers osteocalcin (OCN), osteopontin (OPN), cementum protein 1 (CEMP1), and cementum attachment protein (CAP). Our results show that the activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway can induce in vivo cementum regeneration and in vitro cementogenic differentiation of hPDLCs.

  6. Involvement of the neuronal phosphotyrosine signal adaptor N-Shc in kainic acid-induced epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Shiro; Onga, Kazuko; Kakizawa, Sho; Ohyama, Kyoji; Yasuda, Kunihiko; Otsubo, Hiroshi; Scott, Brian W.; Burnham, W. McIntyre; Matsuo, Takayuki; Nagata, Izumi; Mori, Nozomu

    2016-01-01

    BDNF-TrkB signaling is implicated in experimental seizures and epilepsy. However, the downstream signaling involved in the epileptiform activity caused by TrkB receptor activation is still unknown. The aim of the present study was to determine whether TrkB-mediated N-Shc signal transduction was involved in kainic acid (KA)-induced epileptiform activity. We investigated KA-induced behavioral seizures, epileptiform activities and neuronal cell loss in hippocampus between N-Shc deficient and control mice. There was a significant reduction in seizure severity and the frequency of epileptiform discharges in N-Shc deficient mice, as compared with wild-type and C57BL/6 mice. KA-induced neuronal cell loss in the CA3 of hippocampus was also inhibited in N-Shc deficient mice. This study demonstrates that the activation of N-Shc signaling pathway contributes to an acute KA-induced epileptiform activity and neuronal cell loss in the hippocampus. We propose that the N-Shc-mediated signaling pathway could provide a potential target for the novel therapeutic approaches of epilepsy. PMID:27273072

  7. Cholinergic signals in mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing.

    PubMed

    Eggermann, Emmanuel; Kremer, Yves; Crochet, Sylvain; Petersen, Carl C H

    2014-12-11

    Internal brain states affect sensory perception, cognition, and learning. Many neocortical areas exhibit changes in the pattern and synchrony of neuronal activity during quiet versus active behaviors. Active behaviors are typically associated with desynchronized cortical dynamics. Increased thalamic firing contributes importantly to desynchronize mouse barrel cortex during active whisker sensing. However, a whisking-related cortical state change persists after thalamic inactivation, which is mediated at least in part by acetylcholine, as we show here by using whole-cell recordings, local pharmacology, axonal calcium imaging, and optogenetic stimulation. During whisking, we find prominent cholinergic signals in the barrel cortex, which suppress spontaneous cortical activity. The desynchronized state of barrel cortex during whisking is therefore driven by at least two distinct signals with opposing functions: increased thalamic activity driving glutamatergic excitation of the cortex and increased cholinergic input suppressing spontaneous cortical activity.

  8. Coco is a dual activity modulator of TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Haremaki, Tomomi; Warmflash, Aryeh; Sorre, Benoit; Brivanlou, Ali H.

    2015-01-01

    The TGFβ signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of developmental processes and disease. The activity of TGFβ ligands is modulated by various families of soluble inhibitors that interfere with the interactions between ligands and receptors. In an unbiased, genome-wide RNAi screen to identify genes involved in ligand-dependent signaling, we unexpectedly identified the BMP/Activin/Nodal inhibitor Coco as an enhancer of TGFβ1 signaling. Coco synergizes with TGFβ1 in both cell culture and Xenopus explants. Molecularly, Coco binds to TGFβ1 and enhances TGFβ1 binding to its receptor Alk5. Thus, Coco acts as both an inhibitor and an enhancer of signaling depending on the ligand it binds. This finding raises the need for a global reconsideration of the molecular mechanisms regulating TGFβ signaling. PMID:26116664

  9. Mechanistic and Signaling Analysis of Muc4-ErbB2 Signaling Module: New Insights into the Mechanism of Ligand-Independent ErbB2 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kozloski, Goldi A.; Carothers Carraway, Coralie A.; Carraway, Kermit L.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY The membrane mucin Muc4 is aberrantly expressed in numerous epithelial carcinomas and is currently used as a cancer diagnostic and prognostic tool. Muc4 can also potentiate signal transduction by modulating differential ErbB2 phosphorylation in the absence and in the presence of the ErbB3 soluble ligand heregulin (HRG-β1). These features of Muc4 suggest that Muc4 is not merely a cancer marker, but an oncogenic factor with a unique binding/activation relationship with the receptor ErbB2. In the present study, we examined the signaling mechanisms that are associated with the Muc4-ErbB2 module by analyzing ErbB2 differential signaling in response to Muc4 expression. Our study was carried out in the A375 human melanoma and BT-474 breast cancer cell lines as our model systems. Quantitative and comparative signaling modulations were evaluated by immunoblot using phospho-specific antibodies, and densitometry analysis. Signaling complex components were identified by chemical cross-linking, fractionation by gel filtration, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Activated downstream signaling pathways were analyzed by an antibody microarray screen and immunoblot analyses. Our results indicate that Muc4 modulates ErbB2 signaling potential significantly by stabilizing and directly interacting with the ErbB2-ErbB3 heterodimer. Further analyses indicate that Muc4 promotes ErbB2 autocatalysis, but it has no effect on ErbB3 phosphorylation, although the chemical cross linking data indicated that the signaling module is composed of Muc4, ErbB2 and ErbB3. Our microarray analysis indicates that Muc4 expression promotes cell migration by increasing the phosphorylation of the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and also through an increase in the levels of β-catenin. PMID:20432461

  10. X-ray irradiation activates K+ channels via H2O2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Gibhardt, Christine S; Roth, Bastian; Schroeder, Indra; Fuck, Sebastian; Becker, Patrick; Jakob, Burkhard; Fournier, Claudia; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a universal tool in tumor therapy but may also cause secondary cancers or cell invasiveness. These negative side effects could be causally related to the human-intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated-K+-channel (hIK), which is activated by X-ray irradiation and affects cell proliferation and migration. To analyze the signaling cascade downstream of ionizing radiation we use genetically encoded reporters for H2O2 (HyPer) and for the dominant redox-buffer glutathione (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor with high spatial and temporal resolution, radiation-triggered excursions of H2O2 in A549 and HEK293 cells. The data show that challenging cells with ≥1 Gy X-rays or with UV-A laser micro-irradiation causes a rapid rise of H2O2 in the nucleus and in the cytosol. This rise, which is determined by the rate of H2O2 production and glutathione-buffering, is sufficient for triggering a signaling cascade that involves an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ and eventually an activation of hIK channels. PMID:26350345

  11. X-ray irradiation activates K+ channels via H2O2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Gibhardt, Christine S.; Roth, Bastian; Schroeder, Indra; Fuck, Sebastian; Becker, Patrick; Jakob, Burkhard; Fournier, Claudia; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is a universal tool in tumor therapy but may also cause secondary cancers or cell invasiveness. These negative side effects could be causally related to the human-intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated-K+-channel (hIK), which is activated by X-ray irradiation and affects cell proliferation and migration. To analyze the signaling cascade downstream of ionizing radiation we use genetically encoded reporters for H2O2 (HyPer) and for the dominant redox-buffer glutathione (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor with high spatial and temporal resolution, radiation-triggered excursions of H2O2 in A549 and HEK293 cells. The data show that challenging cells with ≥1 Gy X-rays or with UV-A laser micro-irradiation causes a rapid rise of H2O2 in the nucleus and in the cytosol. This rise, which is determined by the rate of H2O2 production and glutathione-buffering, is sufficient for triggering a signaling cascade that involves an elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ and eventually an activation of hIK channels. PMID:26350345

  12. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  13. Thailand's downstream projects proliferate

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-03

    Thailand continues to press expansion and modernization of its downstream sector. Among recent developments: Construction of an olefins unit at Thailand's second major petrochemical complex and a worldscale aromatics unit in Thailand is threatened by rising costs. Thailand's National Petrochemical Corp (NPC) let a 9 billion yen contract to Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co. and C. Itoh and Co. for a dual fuel cogeneration power plant at its Mab Ta Phud, Rayong province, petrochemical complex. Financing is in place to flash a green light for a $530 million Belgian-Thai joint venture sponsoring a worldscale polyvinyl chloride/vinyl chloride monomer plant in Thailand. Work is more than 50% complete on the $345 million second phase expansion of Thai Oil's Sri Racha refinery in Chon Buri province. Petroleum Authority of Thailand (PTT) endorsed a plan to install two more natural gas processing plants in Thailand to meet rapidly growing domestic demand for petroleum gas.

  14. Src Tyrosine Kinase Activation by 4-Hydroxynonenal Upregulates p38, ERK/AP-1 Signaling and COX-2 Expression in YPEN-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Eun Ji; Jeong, Hyoung Oh; Park, Daeui; Kim, Dae Hyun; Choi, Yeon Ja; Chung, Ki Wung; Park, Min Hi; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2015-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a major end product of lipid peroxidation, is highly reactive and involved in various cellular processes, such as inflammatory signaling. However, to date, the mechanistic roles of 4-HNE in inflammatory signaling related to protein tyrosine kinases have not been elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the interaction between 4-HNE and Src (a non-receptor tyrosine kinase) for its involvement in the molecular modulation of the inflammatory signaling pathway utilizing the YPEN-1 cell system. Immunoprecipitation experiments showed that 4-HNE phosphorylates (activates) Src at Tyr416 via adduct formation. In addition, LC-MS/MS and a docking simulation model revealed an addiction site at the Cys248 residue of Src, resulting in the stimulation of downstream p38, ERK/AP-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) signaling in YPEN-1 cells. The role of 4-HNE-activated Src in downstream inflammatory signaling was further investigated using dasatinib (a Src inhibitor) and by siRNA knockdown of Src. p38 and ERK were directly regulated by Src, as revealed by immunoblotting of the phosphorylated forms of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), which are key elements in the signaling transduction pathway initiated by Src. The study also shows that Src modulates the HNE-enhanced activation of AP-1 and the expression of COX-2 (a target gene of AP-1). Together, the results of this study show that 4-HNE stimulates Src tyrosine kinase in activation of the inflammation process. PMID:26466383

  15. Correlation of nighttime MF signal strength with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohata, Hiroki; Kimura, Iwane; Wakai, Noboru; Ogawa, Tadahiko

    Observations of the signal strength of MF broadcasting signals (774/770 kHz) transmitted from Akita, Japan, on board the Japanese Antarctic ice breaker Fuji, bound from Japan to Syowa station, Antarctica, have revealed an interesting positive correlation between strengths of long distance signals propagating at night and solar activity. It is already known that MF propagation characteristics in North America show a negative correlation with solar activity. The present paper, interprets the results by using the multihop method with full-wave analysis. The difference in correlation with solar activity between the results of Fuji and those in North America can be elucidated if it is assumed that there is a ledge in the electron-density profile around an altitude range of 85 to 90 km and that the density of the ledge is smaller in the North American region than in the equatorial region.

  16. Astragaloside IV inhibits microglia activation via glucocorticoid receptor mediated signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hong-Shuai; Shi, Hai-Lian; Huang, Fei; Peterson, Karin E.; Wu, Hui; Lan, Yun-Yi; Zhang, Bei-Bei; He, Yi-Xin; Woods, Tyson; Du, Min; Wu, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of microglia activation may provide therapeutic treatment for many neurodegenerative diseases. Astragaloside IV (ASI) with anti-inflammatory properties has been tested as a therapeutic drug in clinical trials of China. However, the mechanism of ASI inhibiting neuroinflammation is unknown. In this study, we showed that ASI inhibited microglia activation both in vivo and in vitro. It could enhance glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-luciferase activity and facilitate GR nuclear translocation in microglial cells. Molecular docking and TR-FRET GR competitive binding experiments demonstrated that ASI could bind to GR in spite of relative low affinity. Meanwhile, ASI modulated GR-mediated signaling pathway, including dephosphorylation of PI3K, Akt, I κB and NF κB, therefore, decreased downstream production of proinflammatory mediators. Suppression of microglial BV-2 activation by ASI was abrogated by GR inhibitor, RU486 or GR siRNA. Similarly, RU486 counteracted the alleviative effect of ASI on microgliosis and neuronal injury in vivo. Our findings demonstrated that ASI inhibited microglia activation at least partially by activating the glucocorticoid pathway, suggesting its possible therapeutic potential for neuroinflammation in neurological diseases. PMID:26750705

  17. Guidance of Signaling Activations by Cadherins and Integrins in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roggiani, Francesca; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Rea, Katia; Tomassetti, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest tumor among gynecological cancer in the industrialized countries. The EOC incidence and mortality have remained unchanged over the last 30 years, despite the progress in diagnosis and treatment. In order to develop novel and more effective therapeutic approaches, the molecular mechanisms involved in EOC progression have been thoroughly investigated in the last few decades. At the late stage, peritoneal metastases originate from the attachment of small clusters of cancer cells that shed from the primary site and carried by the ascites adhere to the abdominal peritoneum or omentum. This behavior suggests that cell–cell or cell–matrix adhesion mechanisms regulate EOC growth and dissemination. Complex downstream signalings, which might be influenced by functional cross-talk between adhesion molecules and co-expressed and activated signaling proteins, can affect the proliferation/survival and the migration/invasion of EOC cells. This review aimed to define the impact of the mechanisms of cell–cell, through cadherins, and cell–extracellular matrix adhesion, through integrins, on the signaling cascades induced by membrane receptors and cytoplasmic proteins known to have a role in the proliferation, migration and invasion of EOC cells. Finally, some novel approaches using peptidomimetic ligands to cadherin and integrins are summarized. PMID:27563880

  18. Activation of GABA(B) receptors inhibits protein kinase B/glycogen synthase kinase 3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Frances Fangjia; Su, Ping; Liu, Fang; Daskalakis, Zafiris J

    2012-11-28

    Accumulated evidence has suggested that potentiation of cortical GABAergic inhibitory neurotransmission may be a key mechanism in the treatment of schizophrenia. However, the downstream molecular mechanisms related to GABA potentiation remain unexplored. Recent studies have suggested that dopamine D2 receptor antagonists, which are used in the clinical treatment of schizophrenia, modulate protein kinase B (Akt)/glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3 signaling. Here we report that activation of GABA(B) receptors significantly inhibits Akt/GSK-3 signaling in a β-arrestin-dependent pathway. Agonist stimulation of GABA(B) receptors enhances the phosphorylation of Akt (Thr-308) and enhances the phosphorylation of GSK-3α (Ser-21)/β (Ser-9) in both HEK-293T cells expressing GABA(B) receptors and rat hippocampal slices. Furthermore, knocking down the expression of β-arrestin2 using siRNA abolishes the GABA(B) receptor-mediated modulation of GSK-3 signaling. Our data may help to identify potentially novel targets through which GABA(B) receptor agents may exert therapeutic effects in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  19. Dynasore enhances the formation of mitochondrial antiviral signalling aggregates and endocytosis-independent NF-ĸB activation

    PubMed Central

    Ailenberg, M; Di Ciano-Oliveira, C; Szaszi, K; Dan, Q; Rozycki, M; Kapus, A; Rotstein, O D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dynasore has been used extensively as an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. While studying the role of endocytosis in LPS-induced signalling events, we discovered that dynasore itself induced activation of NF-κB, independently of its effects on endocytosis and without involving the Toll-like receptor 4 signalling pathways. The purpose of this study was to characterize this novel effect and to explore the underlying mechanism of action. Experimental Approach We utilized gel electrophoresis, microscopy, gene knockdown and luciferase-based promoter activity to evaluate the effect of dynasore on cell signalling pathways and to delineate the mechanisms involved in its effects, Key Results Dynasore activated the NF-κB and IFN-β pathways by activating mitochondrial antiviral signalling protein (MAVS). We showed that MAVS is activated by NOX/Rac and forms high molecular weight aggregates, similar to that observed in response to viral infection. We also demonstrated that dynasore-induced activation of JNK occurs downstream of MAVS and is required for activation of NF-κB and IFN-β. Conclusion and Implications These findings demonstrate a novel effect of dynasore on cell signalling. We describe a novel Rac1-, ROS- and MAVS-mediated signalling cascade through which dynasore dramatically activates NF-κB, mimicking the viral induction of this key inflammatory signalling pathway. Our results call attention to the need for a broader interpretation of results when dynasore is used in its traditional fashion as an inhibitor of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These results suggest the intriguing possibility that dynasore or one of its analogues might be of value as an antiviral therapeutic strategy or vaccine adjuvant. PMID:25850711

  20. Notch signaling promotes osteoclast maturation and resorptive activity.

    PubMed

    Ashley, Jason W; Ahn, Jaimo; Hankenson, Kurt D

    2015-11-01

    The role of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation is controversial with conflicting experimental evidence indicating both stimulatory and inhibitory roles. Differences in experimental protocols and in vivo versus in vitro models may explain the discrepancies between studies. In this study, we investigated cell autonomous roles of Notch signaling in osteoclast differentiation and function by altering Notch signaling during osteoclast differentiation using stimulation with immobilized ligands Jagged1 or Delta-like1 or by suppression with γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT or transcriptional inhibitor SAHM1. Stimulation of Notch signaling in committed osteoclast precursors resulted in larger osteoclasts with a greater number of nuclei and resorptive activity whereas suppression resulted in smaller osteoclasts with fewer nuclei and suppressed resorptive activity. Conversely, stimulation of Notch signaling in osteoclast precursors prior to induction of osteoclastogenesis resulted in fewer osteoclasts. Our data support a mechanism of context-specific Notch signaling effects wherein Notch stimulation inhibits commitment to osteoclast differentiation, but enhances the maturation and function of committed precursors.

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Testerink, C; Wang, M

    2000-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), calcium, potassium, pH and a transient activation of MAP kinase. The ABA signal transduction cascades have been shown to be tissue-specific, the transient activation of MAP kinase has until now only been found in barley aleurone cells. However, type 2C phosphatases are involved in the induction of most ABA responses, as shown by the PP2C-deficient abi-mutants. These phosphatases show high homology with phosphatases that regulate MAP kinase activity in yeast. In addition, the role of farnesyl transferase as a negative regulator of ABA responses also indicates towards involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction. Farnesyl transferase is known to regulate Ras proteins, Ras proteins in turn are known to regulate MAP kinase activation. Interestingly, Ras-like proteins were detected in barley aleurone cells. Further establishment of the involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction and its role therein, still awaits more study.

  2. Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway play important roles in activating liver cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ronghua; Sun, Qian; Wang, Peng; Liu, Man; Xiong, Si; Luo, Jing; Huang, Hai; Du, Qiang; Geller, David A.; Cheng, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is driven and maintained by liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs) that display stem cell properties. These LCSCs are promoted by the intersecting of Notch and Wnt/β-Catenin signaling pathways. In this study, we demonstrate that LCSCs with markers CD90, CD24, CD13, and CD133 possess stem properties of self-renewal and tumorigenicity in NOD/SCID mice. The increased expression of these markers was correlated with advanced disease stage, larger tumors, and worse overall survival in 61 HCC cases. We also found that both Notch and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathways played important roles in increasing the stem-ness characteristics of LCSCs. Our data suggested that Notch1 was downstream of Wnt/β-catenin. The active form of Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) expression depended on Wnt/β-catenin pathway activation. Moreover, Notch1 negatively contributed to Wnt/β-catenin signaling modulation. Knock down of Notch1 with lentivirus N1ShRNA up-regulated the active form of β-catenin. Ectopic expression of NICD with LV-Notch1 in LCSCs attenuated β-catenin/TCF dependent luciferase activity significantly. In addition, there was a non-proteasome mediated feedback loop between Notch1 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling in LCSCs. The central role of Notch and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in LCSCs may provide an attractive therapeutic strategy against HCC. PMID:26735577

  3. Small Molecule APY606 Displays Extensive Antitumor Activity in Pancreatic Cancer via Impairing Ras-MAPK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Na; Liu, Zuojia; Zhao, Wenjing; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has been found with abnormal expression or mutation in Ras proteins. Oncogenic Ras activation exploits their extensive signaling reach to affect multiple cellular processes, in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling exerts important roles in tumorigenesis. Therapies targeted Ras are thus of major benefit for pancreatic cancer. Although small molecule APY606 has been successfully picked out by virtual drug screening based on Ras target receptor, its in-depth mechanism remains to be elucidated. We herein assessed the antitumor activity of APY606 against human pancreatic cancer Capan-1 and SW1990 cell lines and explored the effect of Ras-MAPK and apoptosis-related signaling pathway on the activity of APY606. APY606 treatment resulted in a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cancer cell viability. Additionally, APY606 exhibited strong antitumor activity, as evidenced not only by reduction in tumor cell invasion, migration and mitochondrial membrane potential but also by alteration in several apoptotic indexes. Furthermore, APY606 treatment directly inhibited Ras-GTP and the downstream activation of MAPK, which resulted in the down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2, leading to the up-regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway-related proteins (Bax, cytosolic Cytochrome c and Caspase 3) and of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and Cyclin A, E. These data suggest that impairing Ras-MAPK signaling is a novel mechanism of action for APY606 during therapeutic intervention in pancreatic cancer. PMID:27223122

  4. Human evoked cortical activity to signal-to-noise ratio and absolute signal level.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Tremblay, Kelly L; Stecker, G Christopher; Tolin, Wendy M

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of signal level and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on the latency and amplitude of evoked cortical activity to further our understanding of how the human central auditory system encodes signals in noise. Cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) were recorded from 15 young normal-hearing adults in response to a 1000 Hz tone presented at two tone levels in quiet and while continuous background noise levels were varied in five equivalent SNR steps. These 12 conditions were used to determine the effects of signal level and SNR level on CAEP components P1, N1, P2, and N2. Based on prior signal-in-noise experiments conducted in animals, we hypothesized that SNR, would be a key contributor to human CAEP characteristics. As hypothesized, amplitude increased and latency decreased with increasing SNR; in addition, there was no main effect of tone level across the two signal levels tested (60 and 75 dB SPL). Morphology of the P1-N1-P2 complex was driven primarily by SNR, highlighting the importance of noise when recording CAEPs. Results are discussed in terms of the current interest in recording CAEPs in hearing aid users.

  5. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation.

    PubMed

    Phong, Binh L; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L; Gorman, Jacob V; Watkins, Simon C; Colgan, John D; Kane, Lawrence P

    2015-12-14

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation.

  6. Tim-3 enhances FcεRI-proximal signaling to modulate mast cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Binh L.; Avery, Lyndsay; Sumpter, Tina L.; Gorman, Jacob V.; Watkins, Simon C.; Colgan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    T cell (or transmembrane) immunoglobulin and mucin domain protein 3 (Tim-3) has attracted significant attention as a novel immune checkpoint receptor (ICR) on chronically stimulated, often dysfunctional, T cells. Antibodies to Tim-3 can enhance antiviral and antitumor immune responses. Tim-3 is also constitutively expressed by mast cells, NK cells and specific subsets of macrophages and dendritic cells. There is ample evidence for a positive role for Tim-3 in these latter cell types, which is at odds with the model of Tim-3 as an inhibitory molecule on T cells. At this point, little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which Tim-3 regulates the function of T cells or other cell types. We have focused on defining the effects of Tim-3 ligation on mast cell activation, as these cells constitutively express Tim-3 and are activated through an ITAM-containing receptor for IgE (FcεRI), using signaling pathways analogous to those in T cells. Using a variety of gain- and loss-of-function approaches, we find that Tim-3 acts at a receptor-proximal point to enhance Lyn kinase-dependent signaling pathways that modulate both immediate-phase degranulation and late-phase cytokine production downstream of FcεRI ligation. PMID:26598760

  7. CXCL12/CXCR4 Axis Activation Mediates Prostate Myofibroblast Phenoconversion through Non-Canonical EGFR/MEK/ERK Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Nieves, José A.; Patalano, Susan C.; Almanza, Diego; Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Macoska, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), an enlargement of the prostate common in aging in men, is associated with urinary voiding dysfunction manifest as Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS). Although inflammation and abnormal smooth muscle contractions are known to play key roles in the development of LUTS, tissue fibrosis may also be an important and previously unrecognized contributing factor. Tissue fibrosis arises from the unregulated differentiation of fibroblasts or other precursor cell types into myofibroblasts, which is usually accomplished by activation of the TGFβ/TGFβR axis. Previously we reported that the CXC-type chemokines, CXCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL12, which are up-regulated in the aging in the prostate, can drive this differentiation process as well in the absence of TGFβ. Based on this data we sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms employed by CXCL12, and its receptor CXCR4, during prostate myofibroblast phenoconversion. The results of these studies suggest that CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated signaling events in prostate myofibroblast phenoconversion may proceed through non-canonical pathways that do not depend on TGFβ/TGFβR axis activation or Smad signaling. Here we report that CXCL12/CXCR4 axis activation promotes signaling through the EGFR and downstream MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways during myofibroblast phenoconversion, but not through TGFβ/TGFβR and downstream Smad signaling, in prostate fibroblasts undergoing myofibroblast phenoconversion. We document that EGFR transactivation is required for CXCL12-mediated signaling and expression of genes associate with myofibroblast phenoconversion (α-SMA, COL1a1). Our study successfully identified TGFβ/TGFβR-independent molecular mechanisms that promote CXCL12/CXCR4-induced myofibroblast phenoconversion. This information may be crucial for the development of novel therapies and potential biomarkers for prostatic fibrosis. PMID:27434301

  8. CXCL12/CXCR4 Axis Activation Mediates Prostate Myofibroblast Phenoconversion through Non-Canonical EGFR/MEK/ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Nieves, José A; Patalano, Susan C; Almanza, Diego; Gharaee-Kermani, Mehrnaz; Macoska, Jill A

    2016-01-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), an enlargement of the prostate common in aging in men, is associated with urinary voiding dysfunction manifest as Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS). Although inflammation and abnormal smooth muscle contractions are known to play key roles in the development of LUTS, tissue fibrosis may also be an important and previously unrecognized contributing factor. Tissue fibrosis arises from the unregulated differentiation of fibroblasts or other precursor cell types into myofibroblasts, which is usually accomplished by activation of the TGFβ/TGFβR axis. Previously we reported that the CXC-type chemokines, CXCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL12, which are up-regulated in the aging in the prostate, can drive this differentiation process as well in the absence of TGFβ. Based on this data we sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms employed by CXCL12, and its receptor CXCR4, during prostate myofibroblast phenoconversion. The results of these studies suggest that CXCL12/CXCR4-mediated signaling events in prostate myofibroblast phenoconversion may proceed through non-canonical pathways that do not depend on TGFβ/TGFβR axis activation or Smad signaling. Here we report that CXCL12/CXCR4 axis activation promotes signaling through the EGFR and downstream MEK/ERK and PI3K/Akt pathways during myofibroblast phenoconversion, but not through TGFβ/TGFβR and downstream Smad signaling, in prostate fibroblasts undergoing myofibroblast phenoconversion. We document that EGFR transactivation is required for CXCL12-mediated signaling and expression of genes associate with myofibroblast phenoconversion (α-SMA, COL1a1). Our study successfully identified TGFβ/TGFβR-independent molecular mechanisms that promote CXCL12/CXCR4-induced myofibroblast phenoconversion. This information may be crucial for the development of novel therapies and potential biomarkers for prostatic fibrosis. PMID:27434301

  9. Active Finger Recognition from Surface EMG Signal Using Bayesian Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Nozomu; Hoashi, Yuki; Konishi, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Kunihiko; Ishigaki, Hiroyuki

    This paper proposed an active finger recognition method using Bayesian filter in order to control a myoelectric hand. We have previously proposed a finger joint angle estimation method based on measured surface electromyography (EMG) signals and a linear model. However, when we estimate 2 or more finger angles by this estimation method, the estimation angle of the inactive finger is not accurate. This is caused by interference of surface EMG signal. To solve this interference problem, we proposed active finger recognition method from the amplitude spectrum of surface EMG signal using Bayesian filter. To confirm the effectiveness of this recognition method, we developed a myoelectric hand simulator that implements proposed recognition algorithm and carried out real-time recognition experiment.

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  11. Metabolic signals and innate immune activation in obesity and exercise.

    PubMed

    Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus; Mooren, Frank C; Krüger, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    The combination of a sedentary lifestyle and excess energy intake has led to an increased prevalence of obesity which constitutes a major risk factor for several co-morbidities including type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Intensive research during the last two decades has revealed that a characteristic feature of obesity linking it to insulin resistance is the presence of chronic low-grade inflammation being indicative of activation of the innate immune system. Recent evidence suggests that activation of the innate immune system in the course of obesity is mediated by metabolic signals, such as free fatty acids (FFAs), being elevated in many obese subjects, through activation of pattern recognition receptors thereby leading to stimulation of critical inflammatory signaling cascades, like IκBα kinase/nuclear factor-κB (IKK/NF- κB), endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) and NOD-like receptor P3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway, that interfere with insulin signaling. Exercise is one of the main prescribed interventions in obesity management improving insulin sensitivity and reducing obesity- induced chronic inflammation. This review summarizes current knowledge of the cellular recognition mechanisms for FFAs, the inflammatory signaling pathways triggered by excess FFAs in obesity and the counteractive effects of both acute and chronic exercise on obesity-induced activation of inflammatory signaling pathways. A deeper understanding of the effects of exercise on inflammatory signaling pathways in obesity is useful to optimize preventive and therapeutic strategies to combat the increasing incidence of obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:25825956

  12. TRPC3 amplifies B-cell receptor-induced ERK signalling via protein kinase D-dependent Rap1 activation.

    PubMed

    Numaga-Tomita, Takuro; Nishida, Motohiro; Putney, James W; Mori, Yasuo

    2016-01-15

    Sustained activation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) has an important role in the decision regarding the cell fate of B-lymphocytes. Recently, we demonstrated that the diacylglycerol-activated non-selective cation channel canonical transient receptor potential 3 (TRPC3) is required for the sustained ERK activation induced by the B-cell receptor. However, the signalling mechanism underlying TRPC3-mediated ERK activation remains elusive. In the present study, we have shown that TRPC3 mediates Ca(2+) influx to sustain activation of protein kinase D (PKD) in a protein kinase C-dependent manner in DT40 B-lymphocytes. The later phase of ERK activation depends on the small G-protein Rap1, known as a downstream target of PKD, whereas the earlier phase of ERK activation depends on the Ras protein. It is of interest that sustained ERK phosphorylation is required for the full induction of the immediate early gene Egr-1 (early growth response 1). These results suggest that TRPC3 reorganizes the BCR signalling complex by switching the subtype of small G-proteins to sustain ERK activation in B-lymphocytes.

  13. Spectrin regulates Hippo signaling by modulating cortical actomyosin activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hua; Wang, Wei; Yu, Jianzhong; Zheng, Yonggang; Qing, Yun; Pan, Duojia

    2015-01-01

    The Hippo pathway controls tissue growth through a core kinase cascade that impinges on the transcription of growth-regulatory genes. Understanding how this pathway is regulated in development remains a major challenge. Recent studies suggested that Hippo signaling can be modulated by cytoskeletal tension through a Rok-myosin II pathway. How cytoskeletal tension is regulated or its relationship to the other known upstream regulators of the Hippo pathway remains poorly defined. In this study, we identify spectrin, a contractile protein at the cytoskeleton-membrane interface, as an upstream regulator of the Hippo signaling pathway. We show that, in contrast to canonical upstream regulators such as Crumbs, Kibra, Expanded, and Merlin, spectrin regulates Hippo signaling in a distinct way by modulating cortical actomyosin activity through non-muscle myosin II. These results uncover an essential mediator of Hippo signaling by cytoskeleton tension, providing a new entry point to dissecting how mechanical signals regulate Hippo signaling in living tissues. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06567.001 PMID:25826608

  14. Protein kinase A activity and Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kotani, Tomoya

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a well-known kinase that plays fundamental roles in a variety of biological processes. In Hedgehog-responsive cells, PKA plays key roles in proliferation and fate specification by modulating the transduction of Hedgehog signaling. In the absence of Hedgehog, a basal level of PKA activity represses the transcription of Hedgehog target genes. The main substrates of PKA in this process are the Ci/Gli family of bipotential transcription factors, which activate and repress Hedgehog target gene expression. PKA phosphorylates Ci/Gli, promoting the production of the repressor forms of Ci/Gli and thus repressing Hedgehog target gene expression. In contrast, the activation of Hedgehog signaling in response to Hedgehog increases the active forms of Ci/Gli, resulting in Hedgehog target gene expression. Because both decreased and increased levels of PKA activity cause abnormal cell proliferation and alter cell fate specification, the basal level of PKA activity in Hedgehog-responsive cells should be precisely regulated. However, the mechanism by which PKA activity is regulated remains obscure and appears to vary between cell types, tissues, and organisms. To date, two mechanisms have been proposed. One is a classical mechanism in which PKA activity is regulated by a small second messenger, cAMP; the other is a novel mechanism in which PKA activity is regulated by a protein, Misty somites. PMID:22391308

  15. Anti-Tumor Activity of Yuanhuacine by Regulating AMPK/mTOR Signaling Pathway and Actin Cytoskeleton Organization in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji In; Hong, Ji-Young; Lee, Hye-Jung; Bae, Song Yi; Jung, Cholomi; Park, Hyen Joo; Lee, Sang Kook

    2015-01-01

    Yuanhuacine (YC), a daphnane diterpenoid from the flowers of Daphne genkwa, exhibited a potential growth inhibitory activity against human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. YC also suppressed the invasion and migration of lung cancer cells. However, the precise molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. In the present study, we report that YC significantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway and suppressed mTORC2-mediated downstream signaling pathway in H1993 human NSCLC cells. AMPK plays an important role in energy metabolism and cancer biology. Therefore, activators of AMPK signaling pathways can be applicable to the treatment of cancer. YC enhanced the expression of p-AMPKα. The co-treatment of YC and compound C (an AMPK inhibitor) or metformin (an AMPK activator) also confirmed that YC increases p-AMPKα. YC also suppressed the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) expression, a downstream target of AMPK. Further study revealed that YC modulates mTORC2-associated downstream signaling pathways with a decreased expressions of p-Akt, p-protein kinase C alpha (PKCα), p-ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and filamentous actin (F-actin) that are known to activate cell growth and organize actin cytoskeleton. In addition, YC inhibited the tumor growth in H1993 cell-implanted xenograft nude mouse model. These data suggest the YC could be a potential candidate for cancer chemotherapeutic agents derived from natural products by regulating AMPK/mTORC2 signaling pathway and actin cytoskeleton organization. PMID:26656173

  16. Activation of ERK and JNK signaling pathways by mycotoxin citrinin in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.-H.; Yu, F.-Y.; Wang, L.-T.; Lin, Y.-S.; Liu, B.-H.

    2009-06-15

    Mycotoxin citrinin (CTN) is commonly found in foods and feeds that are contaminated/inoculated with Penicillium, Aspergillus and Monascus species. The exposure of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and HeLa cells to CTN resulted in a dose-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of two major mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), ERK1/2 and JNK. In HEK293 cultures, the administering of CTN increased both the mRNA and protein levels of egr-1, c-fos and c-jun genes; additionally, the ERK1/2 pathway contributed to the upregulation of Egr-1 and c-Fos protein expression. CTN treatment also induced the transcription activity of Egr-1 and AP-1 proteins, as evidenced by luciferase reporter assays. Bioinformatic analyses indicated two genes Gadd45{beta} and MMP3 have Egr-1 and AP-1 response elements in their promoters, respectively. Furthermore, co-exposure of HEK293 cells to CTN and MAPK pathway inhibitors demonstrated that CTN increased the levels of Gadd45{beta} mRNA through ERK1/2 signaling pathway and up-regulated the MMP3 transcripts majorly via JNK pathway. Finally, CTN-triggered caspase 3 activity was significantly reduced in the presence of MAPK inhibitors. Our results suggest that CTN positively regulates ERK1/2 and JNK pathways as well as their downstream effectors in human cells; activated MAPK pathways are also involved in CTN-induced apoptosis.

  17. MAF1 suppresses AKT‐mTOR signaling and liver cancer through activation of PTEN transcription

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Tsang, Chi Kwan; Wang, Suihai; Li, Xiao‐Xing; Yang, Yang; Fu, Liwu; Huang, Wenlin; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3‐kinase/phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5‐trisphosphate 3‐phosphatase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K‐PTEN‐AKT‐mTOR) pathway is a central controller of cell growth and a key driver for human cancer. MAF1 is an mTOR downstream effector and transcriptional repressor of ribosomal and transfer RNA genes. MAF1 expression is markedly reduced in hepatocellular carcinomas, which is correlated with disease progression and poor prognosis. Consistently, MAF1 displays tumor‐suppressor activity toward in vitro and in vivo cancer models. Surprisingly, blocking the synthesis of ribosomal and transfer RNAs is insufficient to account for MAF1's tumor‐suppressor function. Instead, MAF1 down‐regulation paradoxically leads to activation of AKT‐mTOR signaling, which is mediated by decreased PTEN expression. MAF1 binds to the PTEN promoter, enhancing PTEN promoter acetylation and activity. Conclusion: In contrast to its canonical function as a transcriptional repressor, MAF1 can also act as a transcriptional activator for PTEN, which is important for MAF1's tumor‐suppressor function. These results have implications in disease staging, prognostic prediction, and AKT‐mTOR‐targeted therapy in liver cancer. (Hepatology 2016;63:1928‐1942) PMID:26910647

  18. Inductive expression of toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) and associated downstream signaling molecules following ligand exposure and bacterial infection in the Indian major carp, mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala).

    PubMed

    Basu, M; Swain, B; Maiti, N K; Routray, P; Samanta, M

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are one of the key components of innate immunity. Among various types of TLRs, TLR5 is involved in recognizing bacterial flagellin and after binding, it triggers myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling pathway to induce pro-inflammatory cytokines. In this report, we analyzed the expression profile of TLR5 and its associated downstream signaling molecules like MyD88 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 6 in the Indian major carp (IMC), mrigal (Cirrhinus mrigala) which is highly commercially important fish species in the Indian subcontinent. Ontogeny analysis of TLR5, MyD88 and TRAF6 revealed constitutive expression of these genes in all embryonic developmental stages, and highlighted the importance of embryonic innate immune defense system in fish. Tissue specific expression analysis of these genes by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed their wide distribution in various organs and tissues; highest expression of TLR5 and MyD88 was in liver and TRAF6 was in kidney. Modulation of TLR5, MyD88 and TRAF6 gene expression, and the induction of interleukin (IL)-8 and TNF-α were analyzed in various organs by qRT-PCR following flagellin stimulation, and Aeromonas hydrophila and Edwardsiella tarda infection. In the treated fish, majority of the tested tissues exhibited significant induction of these genes, although with varied intensity among the tissues and with the types of treatments. Among the examined tissues, a significant relationship of TLR5 induction, MyD88 and TRAF6 up-regulation, and enhanced expression of IL-8 and TNF-α gene transcripts was observed in the blood and intestine of both flagellin stimulated and bacteria infected fish. These findings may indicate the involvement of TLR5 in inducing IL-8 and TNF-α, and suggest the important role of TLR5 in augmenting innate immunity in fish in response to pathogenic invasion. This study will enrich the information

  19. Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 integrates activating and inhibitory signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Gegenbauer, Kristina; Elia, Giuliano; Blanco-Fernandez, Alfonso; Smolenski, Albert

    2012-04-19

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18) is a GTPase-activating protein for the G-α-q and G-α-i subunits of heterotrimeric G-proteins that turns off signaling by G-protein coupled receptors. RGS18 is highly expressed in platelets. In the present study, we show that the 14-3-3γ protein binds to phosphorylated serines 49 and 218 of RGS18. Platelet activation by thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP stimulates the association of 14-3-3 and RGS18, probably by increasing the phosphorylation of serine 49. In contrast, treatment of platelets with prostacyclin and nitric oxide, which trigger inhibitory cyclic nucleotide signaling involving cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase I (PKGI), induces the phosphorylation of serine 216 of RGS18 and the detachment of 14-3-3. Serine 216 phosphorylation is able to block 14-3-3 binding to RGS18 even in the presence of thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP. 14-3-3-deficient RGS18 is more active compared with 14-3-3-bound RGS18, leading to a more pronounced inhibition of thrombin-induced release of calcium ions from intracellular stores. Therefore, PKA- and PKGI-mediated detachment of 14-3-3 activates RGS18 to block Gq-dependent calcium signaling. These findings indicate cross-talk between platelet activation and inhibition pathways at the level of RGS18 and Gq. PMID:22234696

  20. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  1. Molecular hydrogen suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yingni; Ohkawara, Bisei; Ito, Mikako; Misawa, Nobuaki; Miyamoto, Kentaro; Takegami, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Akio; Toyokuni, Shinya; Ohno, Kinji

    2016-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2) is effective for many diseases. However, molecular bases of H2 have not been fully elucidated. Cumulative evidence indicates that H2 acts as a gaseous signal modulator. We found that H2 suppresses activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling by promoting phosphorylation and degradation οf β-catenin. Either complete inhibition of GSK3 or mutations at CK1- and GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin abolished the suppressive effect of H2. H2 did not increase GSK3-mediated phosphorylation of glycogen synthase, indicating that H2 has no direct effect on GSK3 itself. Knock-down of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) or Axin1, which form the β-catenin degradation complex, minimized the suppressive effect of H2 on β-catenin accumulation. Accordingly, the effect of H2 requires CK1/GSK3-phosphorylation sites of β-catenin, as well as the β-catenin degradation complex comprised of CK1, GSK3, APC, and Axin1. We additionally found that H2 reduces the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in human osteoarthritis chondrocytes. Oral intake of H2 water tended to ameliorate cartilage degradation in a surgery-induced rat osteoarthritis model through attenuating β-catenin accumulation. We first demonstrate that H2 suppresses abnormally activated Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which accounts for the protective roles of H2 in a fraction of diseases. PMID:27558955

  2. Hepatitis B virus HBx protein activates Ras-GTP complex formation and establishes a Ras, Raf, MAP kinase signaling cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Benn, J; Schneider, R J

    1994-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus produces a small (154-amino acid) transcriptional transactivating protein, HBx, which is required for viral infection and has been implicated in virus-mediated liver oncogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism for HBx activity and its possible influence on cell proliferation have remained obscure. A number of studies suggest that HBx may stimulate transcription by indirectly activating transcription factors, possibly by influencing cell signaling pathways. We now present biochemical evidence that HBx activates Ras and rapidly induces a cytoplasmic signaling cascade linking Ras, Raf, and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase), leading to transcriptional transactivation. HBx strongly elevates levels of GTP-bound Ras, activated and phosphorylated Raf, and tyrosine-phosphorylated and activated MAP kinase. Transactivation of transcription factor AP-1 by HBx is blocked by inhibition of Ras or Raf activities but not by inhibition of Ca(2+)- and diacylglycerol-dependent protein kinase C. HBx was also found to stimulate DNA synthesis in serum-starved cells. The hepatitis B virus HBx protein therefore stimulates Ras-GTP complex formation and promotes downstream signaling through Raf and MAP kinases, and may influence cell proliferation. Images PMID:7937954

  3. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  4. View of downstream debris field at the Merry Generator House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of downstream debris field at the Merry Generator House, showing possible concrete generator seats, looking south - Arthur Holmes Merry Generator House, Signal Lake North of Range Road, Fort Gordon, Richmond County, GA

  5. Calcineurin signaling mediates activity-dependent relocation of the axon initial segment.

    PubMed

    Evans, Mark D; Sammons, Rosanna P; Lebron, Sabrina; Dumitrescu, Adna S; Watkins, Thomas B K; Uebele, Victor N; Renger, John J; Grubb, Matthew S

    2013-04-17

    The axon initial segment (AIS) is a specialized neuronal subcompartment located at the beginning of the axon that is crucially involved in both the generation of action potentials and the regulation of neuronal polarity. We recently showed that prolonged neuronal depolarization produces a distal shift of the entire AIS structure away from the cell body, a change associated with a decrease in neuronal excitability. Here, we used dissociated rat hippocampal cultures, with a major focus on the dentate granule cell (DGC) population, to explore the signaling pathways underlying activity-dependent relocation of the AIS. First, a pharmacological screen of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) showed that AIS relocation is triggered by activation of L-type Cav1 VGCCs with negligible contribution from any other VGCC subtypes. Additional pharmacological analysis revealed that downstream signaling events are mediated by the calcium-sensitive phosphatase calcineurin; inhibition of calcineurin with either FK506 or cyclosporin A totally abolished both depolarization- and optogenetically-induced activity-dependent AIS relocation. Furthermore, calcineurin activation is sufficient for AIS plasticity, because expression of a constitutively active form of the phosphatase resulted in relocation of the AIS of DGCs without a depolarizing stimulus. Finally, we assessed the role of calcineurin in other forms of depolarization-induced plasticity. Neither membrane resistance changes nor spine density changes were affected by FK506 treatment, suggesting that calcineurin acts via a separate pathway to modulate AIS plasticity. Together, these results emphasize calcineurin as a vital player in the regulation of intrinsic plasticity as governed by the AIS. PMID:23595753

  6. Fc epsilon RI-mediated association of 6-micron beads with RBL-2H3 mast cells results in exclusion of signaling proteins from the forming phagosome and abrogation of normal downstream signaling

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Cells of the mucosal mast cell line, RBL-2H3, are normally stimulated to degranulate after aggregation of high affinity receptors for IgE (Fc epsilon RI) by soluble cross-linking ligands. This cellular degranulation process requires sustained elevation of cytoplasmic Ca2+. In this study, we investigated the response of RBL-2H3 cells to 6- micron beads coated with IgE-specific ligands. These ligand-coated beads cause only small, transient Ca2+ responses, even though the same ligands added in soluble form cause larger, more sustained Ca2+ responses. The ligand-coated 6-micron beads also fail to stimulate significant degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells, whereas much larger ligand- coated Sepharose beads stimulate ample degranulation. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows that the 6-micron beads (but not the Sepharose beads) are phagocytosed by RBL-2H3 cells and that, beginning with the initial stages of bead engulfment, there is exclusion of many plasma membrane components from the 6-micron bead/cell interface, including p53/56lyn and several other markers for detergent-resistant membrane domains, as well as an integrin and unliganded IgE-Fc epsilon RI. The fluorescent lipid probe DiIC16 is a marker for the membrane domains that is excluded from the cell/bead interface, whereas a structural analogue, fast DiI, which differs from DiIC16 by the presence of unsaturated acyl chains, is not substantially excluded from the interface. None of these components are excluded from the interface of RBL-2H3 cells and the large Sepharose beads. Additional confocal microscopy analysis indicates that microfilaments are involved in the exclusion of plasma membrane components from the cell/bead interface. These results suggest that initiation of phagocytosis diverts normal signaling pathways in a cytoskeleton-driven membrane clearance process that alters the physiological response of the cells. PMID:8830772

  7. Heat shock protein 60 activates cytokine-associated negative regulator suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 in T cells: effects on signaling, chemotaxis, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Tal, Guy; Shivtiel, Shoham; Cohen, Michal; Lapidot, Tsvee; Nussbaum, Gabriel; Margalit, Raanan; Cohen, Irun R; Lider, Ofer

    2005-07-01

    Previously, we reported that treatment of T cells with the 60-kDa heat shock protein (HSP60) inhibits chemotaxis. We now report that treatment of purified human T cells with recombinant human HSP60 or its biologically active peptide p277 up-regulates suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS)3 expression via TLR2 and STAT3 activation. SOCS3, in turn, inhibits the downstream effects of stromal cell-derived-1alpha (CXCL12)-CXCR4 interaction in: 1) phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Pyk2, AKT, and myosin L chain, required for cell adhesion and migration; 2) formation of rear-front T cell polarity; and 3) migration into the bone marrow of NOD/SCID mice. HSP60 also activates SOCS3 in mouse lymphocytes and inhibits their chemotaxis toward stromal cell-derived factor-1alpha and their ability to adoptively transfer delayed-type hypersensitivity. These effects of HSP60 could not be attributed to LPS or LPS-associated lipoprotein contamination. Thus, HSP60 can regulate T cell-mediated inflammation via specific signal transduction and SOCS3 activation. PMID:15972659

  8. Chemical activation of a food deprivation signal extends lifespan.

    PubMed

    Lucanic, Mark; Garrett, Theo; Yu, Ivan; Calahorro, Fernando; Asadi Shahmirzadi, Azar; Miller, Aaron; Gill, Matthew S; Hughes, Robert E; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Lithgow, Gordon J

    2016-10-01

    Model organisms subject to dietary restriction (DR) generally live longer. Accompanying this lifespan extension are improvements in overall health, based on multiple metrics. This indicates that pharmacological treatments that mimic the effects of DR could improve health in humans. To find new chemical structures that extend lifespan, we screened 30 000 synthetic, diverse drug-like chemicals in Caenorhabditis elegans and identified several structurally related compounds that acted through DR mechanisms. The most potent of these NP1 impinges upon a food perception pathway by promoting glutamate signaling in the pharynx. This results in the overriding of a GPCR pathway involved in the perception of food and which normally acts to decrease glutamate signals. Our results describe the activation of a dietary restriction response through the pharmacological masking of a novel sensory pathway that signals the presence of food. This suggests that primary sensory pathways may represent novel targets for human pharmacology. PMID:27220516

  9. Convergence of multiple signaling pathways is required to coordinately up-regulate mtDNA and mitochondrial biogenesis during T cell activation.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Anthony D; Parikh, Neal; Kaech, Susan M; Shadel, Gerald S

    2007-12-01

    The quantity and activity of mitochondria vary dramatically in tissues and are modulated in response to changing cellular energy demands and environmental factors. The amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), which encodes essential subunits of the oxidative phosphorylation complexes required for cellular ATP production, is also tightly regulated, but by largely unknown mechanisms. Using murine T cells as a model system, we have addressed how specific signaling pathways influence mitochondrial biogenesis and mtDNA copy number. T cell receptor (TCR) activation results in a large increase in mitochondrial mass and membrane potential and a corresponding amplification of mtDNA, consistent with a vital role for mitochondrial function for growth and proliferation of these cells. Independent activation of protein kinase C (via PMA) or calcium-related pathways (via ionomycin) had differential and sub-maximal effects on these mitochondrial parameters, as did activation of naïve T cells with proliferative cytokines. Thus, the robust mitochondrial biogenesis response observed upon TCR activation requires synergy of multiple downstream signaling pathways. One such pathway involves AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which we show has an unprecedented role in negatively regulating mitochondrial biogenesis that is mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent. That is, inhibition of AMPK after TCR signaling commences results in excessive, but uncoordinated mitochondrial proliferation. Thus mitochondrial biogenesis is not under control of a single master regulatory circuit, but rather requires the convergence of multiple signaling pathways with distinct downstream consequences on the organelle's structure, composition, and function.

  10. Downstream in Mawrth Valles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the Martian surface using five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from using multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    This false color image is from further downstream in Mawrth Valles than yesterday's image. The channel here is at the end of the vallis. This image was collected during the Northern Spring season.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 26.7, Longitude 340.2 East (19.8 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages

  11. TEIF associated centrosome activity is regulated by EGF/PI3K/Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zou, Yongxin; Liu, Haijing; Wang, Huali; Zhang, Hong; Hou, Wei; Li, Xin; Jia, Xinying; Zhang, Jing; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2014-09-01

    Centrosome amplification, which is a characteristic of cancer cells, has been understood as a driving force of genetic instability in the development of cancer. In previous work, we demonstrated that TEIF (transcriptional element-interacting factor) distributes in the centrosomes and regulates centrosome status under both physiologic and pathologic conditions. Here we identify TEIF as a downstream effector in EGF/PI3K/Akt signaling. The addition of EGF or transfection of active Akt stimulates centrosome TEIF distribution, resulting in an increase of centrosome splitting and amplification, while inhibitors of either PI3K or Akt attenuate these changes in TEIF and the associated centrosome status. A consensus motif for Akt phosphorylation (RHRVLT) proved to be involved in centrosomal TEIF localization, and the 469-threonine of this motif may be phosphorylated by Akt both in vitro and in vivo. Elimination of this phosphorylated site on TEIF caused reduced centrosome distribution and centrosome splitting or amplification. Moreover, TEIF closely co-localized with C-NAP1 at the proximal ends of centrioles, and centriolar loading of TEIF stimulated by EGF/Akt could displace C-NAP1, resulting in centrosome splitting. These findings reveal linkage of the EGF/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway to regulation of centrosome status which may act as an oncogenic pathway and induce genetic instability in carcinogenesis. PMID:24769208

  12. Band-pass processing in a GPCR signaling pathway selects for NFAT transcription factor activation.

    PubMed

    Sumit, M; Neubig, R R; Takayama, S; Linderman, J J

    2015-11-01

    Many biological processes are rhythmic and proper timing is increasingly appreciated as being critical for development and maintenance of physiological functions. To understand how temporal modulation of an input signal influences downstream responses, we employ microfluidic pulsatile stimulation of a G-protein coupled receptor, the muscarinic M3 receptor, in single cells with simultaneous real-time imaging of both intracellular calcium and NFAT nuclear localization. Interestingly, we find that reduced stimulation with pulses of ligand can give more efficient transcription factor activation, if stimuli are timed appropriately. Our experiments and computational analyses show that M3 receptor-induced calcium oscillations form a low pass filter while calcium-induced NFAT translocation forms a high pass filter. The combination acts as a band-pass filter optimized for intermediate frequencies of stimulation. We demonstrate that receptor desensitization and NFAT translocation rates determine critical features of the band-pass filter and that the band-pass may be shifted for different receptors or NFAT dynamics. As an example, we show that the two NFAT isoforms (NFAT4 and NFAT1) have shifted band-pass windows for the same receptor. While we focus specifically on the M3 muscarinic receptor and NFAT translocation, band-pass processing is expected to be a general theme that applies to multiple signaling pathways.

  13. Activation of NFAT signaling in podocytes causes glomerulosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinqiu; Jarad, George; Tripathi, Piyush; Pan, Minggui; Cunningham, Jeanette; Martin, Daniel R; Liapis, Helen; Miner, Jeffrey H; Chen, Feng

    2010-10-01

    Mutant forms of TRPC6 can activate NFAT-dependent transcription in vitro via calcium influx and activation of calcineurin. The same TRPC6 mutants can cause FSGS, but whether this involves an NFAT-dependent mechanism is unknown. Here, we generated mice that allow conditional induction of NFATc1. Mice with NFAT activation in nascent podocytes in utero developed proteinuria and glomerulosclerosis postnatally, resembling FSGS. NFAT activation in adult mice also caused progressive proteinuria and FSGS. Ultrastructural studies revealed podocyte foot process effacement and deposition of extracellular matrix. NFAT activation did not initially affect expression of podocin, synaptopodin, and nephrin but reduced their expression as glomerular injury progressed. In contrast, we observed upregulation of Wnt6 and Fzd9 in the mutant glomeruli before the onset of significant proteinuria, suggesting a potential role for Wnt signaling in the pathogenesis of NFAT-induced podocyte injury and FSGS. These results provide in vivo evidence for the involvement of NFAT signaling in podocytes, proteinuria, and glomerulosclerosis. Furthermore, this study suggests that NFAT activation may be a key intermediate step in the pathogenesis of mutant TRPC6-mediated FSGS and that suppression of NFAT activity may contribute to the antiproteinuric effects of calcineurin inhibitors.

  14. Protein kinase A activation inhibits oncogenic Sonic hedgehog signalling and suppresses basal cell carcinoma of the skin.

    PubMed

    Makinodan, Eri; Marneros, Alexander G

    2012-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma of the skin (BCC) is caused by constitutive activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway, mainly through mutations either in the Shh receptor Patched (PTCH) or in its co-receptor Smoothened (Smo). Inhibitors of this pathway that are currently in clinical trials inhibit Smo. However, mutations in Smo can result in resistance to these inhibitors. To target most BCCs and avoid acquired resistance because of Smo mutations, inhibiting the Shh-pathway downstream of Smo is critical. Attractive downstream targets would be at the level of Gli proteins, the transcriptional activators of this pathway in BCCs. Previously it has been shown that Gli1 and Gli2, when phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA), are targeted for proteosomal degradation. Here we show that PKA activation via the cAMP agonist forskolin is sufficient to completely abolish oncogenic Smo activity in vitro. In an inducible BCC mouse model due to a Smo mutation that confers resistance to current Smo inhibitors, topical forskolin treatment significantly reduced Gli1 mRNA levels and resulted in strongly suppressed BCC tumor growth. Our data show that forskolin inhibits the growth of even those BCCs that are resistant to Smo inhibitors and provide a proof-of-principle framework for the development of topically applied human skin-permeable novel pharmacologic inhibitors of oncogenic Shh-signaling through PKA activation. PMID:23163650

  15. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  16. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  17. Steroid signaling activation and intracellular localization of sex steroid receptors.

    PubMed

    Giraldi, Tiziana; Giovannelli, Pia; Di Donato, Marzia; Castoria, Gabriella; Migliaccio, Antimo; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2010-12-01

    In addition to stimulating gene transcription, sex steroids trigger rapid, non-genomic responses in the extra-nuclear compartment of target cells. These events take place within seconds or minutes after hormone administration and do not require transcriptional activity of sex steroid receptors. Depending on cell systems, activation of extra-nuclear signaling pathways by sex steroids fosters cell cycle progression, prevents apoptosis, leads to epigenetic modifications and increases cell migration through cytoskeleton changes. These findings have raised the question of intracellular localization of sex steroid receptors mediating these responses. During the past years, increasing evidence has shown that classical sex steroid receptors localized in the extra-nuclear compartment or close to membranes of target cells induce these events. The emerging picture is that a process of bidirectional control between signaling activation and sex steroid receptor localization regulates the outcome of hormonal responses in target cells. This mechanism ensures cell cycle progression in estradiol-treated breast cancer cells, and its derangement might occur in progression of human proliferative diseases. These findings will be reviewed here together with unexpected examples of the relationship between sex steroid receptor localization, signaling activation and biological responses in target cells. We apologize to scientists whose reports are not mentioned or extensively discussed owing to space limitations.

  18. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  19. Gnb isoforms control a signaling pathway comprising Rac1, Plcβ2, and Plcβ3 leading to LFA-1 activation and neutrophil arrest in vivo.

    PubMed

    Block, Helena; Stadtmann, Anika; Riad, Daniel; Rossaint, Jan; Sohlbach, Charlotte; Germena, Giulia; Wu, Dianqing; Simon, Scott I; Ley, Klaus; Zarbock, Alexander

    2016-01-21

    Chemokines are required for leukocyte recruitment and appropriate host defense and act through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which induce downstream signaling leading to integrin activation. Although the α and β subunits of the GPCRs are the first intracellular molecules that transduce signals after ligand binding and are therefore indispensable for downstream signaling, relatively little is known about their contribution to lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) activation and leukocyte recruitment. We used knockout mice and short hairpin RNA to knock down guanine nucleotide binding protein (GNB) isoforms (GNB1, GNB2, GNB4, and GNB5) in HL60 cells and primary murine hematopoietic cells. Neutrophil function was assessed by using intravital microscopy, flow chamber assays, and chemotaxis and biochemistry studies. We unexpectedly discovered that all expressed GNB isoforms are required for LFA-1 activation. Their downregulation led to a significant impairment of LFA-1 activation, which was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that GPCR activation leads to Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)-dependent activation of both phospholipase C β2 (Plcβ2) and Plcβ3. They act nonredundantly to produce inositol triphosphate-mediated intracellular Ca(2+) flux and LFA-1 activation that support chemokine-induced arrest in vivo. In a complex inflammatory disease model, Plcβ2-, Plcβ3-, or Rac1-deficient mice were protected from lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury. Taken together, we demonstrated that all Gnb isoforms are required for chemokine-induced downstream signaling, and Rac1, Plcβ2, and Plcβ3 are critically involved in integrin activation and leukocyte arrest. PMID:26468229

  20. The EEG signal: a window on the cortical brain activity.

    PubMed

    Constant, Isabelle; Sabourdin, Nada

    2012-06-01

    The accurate assessment of the depth of anesthesia, allowing a more accurate adaptation of the doses of hypnotics, is an important end point for the anesthesiologist. It is a particularly crucial issue in pediatric anesthesia, in the context of the recent controversies about the potential neurological consequences of the main anesthetic drugs on the developing brain. The electroencephalogram signal reflects the electrical activity of the neurons in the cerebral cortex. It is thus the key to assessment of the level of hypnosis. Beyond visual analysis, several monitoring devices allow an automated treatment of the electroencephalographic (EEG) signal, combining time and frequency domain analysis. Each of these monitors focuses on a specific combination of characteristics of the signal and provides the clinician with useful information that remains, however, partial. For a comprehensive approach of the EEG-derived indices, the main features of the normal EEG, in adults and children, will be presented in the awake state and during sleep. Age-related modifications accompanying cerebral maturation during infancy and childhood will be detailed. Then, this review will provide an update on how anesthetic drugs, particularly hypnotics, influence the EEG signal, and how the main available monitors analyze these drug-induced modifications. The relationships between pain, memory, and the EEG will be discussed. Finally, this review will focus on some specific EEG features such as the electrical epileptoid activity observed under sevoflurane anesthesia. The EEG signal is the best window we have on cortical brain activity and provides a fair pharmacodynamic feedback of the effects of hypnotics. However, the cortex is only one of several targets of anesthesia. Hypnotics and opiates, have also subcortical primary targets, and the EEG performances in the evaluation or prediction of nociception are poor. Monitoring subcortical structures in combination with the EEG might in the future

  1. Common γ-chain cytokine signaling is required for macroautophagy induction during CD4+ T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Botbol, Yair; Patel, Bindi; Macian, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a cellular process that mediates degradation in the lysosome of cytoplasmic components including proteins and organelles. Previous studies have shown that macroautophagy is induced in activated T cells to regulate organelle homeostasis and the cell's energy metabolism. However, the signaling pathways that initiate and regulate activation-induced macroautophagy in T cells have not been identified. Here, we show that activation-induced macroautophagy in T cells depends on signaling from common γ-chain cytokines. Consequently, inhibition of signaling through JAK3, induced downstream of cytokine receptors containing the common γ-chain, prevents full induction of macroautophagy in activated T cells. Moreover, we found that common γ-chain cytokines are not only required for macroautophagy upregulation during T cell activation but can themselves induce macroautophagy. Our data also show that macroautophagy induction in T cells is associated with an increase of LC3 expression that is mediated by a post-transcriptional mechanism. Overall, our findings unveiled a new role for common γ-chain cytokines as a molecular link between autophagy induction and T-cell activation. PMID:26391567

  2. Extracellular PKM2 induces cancer proliferation by activating the EGFR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Hung, Wen-Chun; Yamaguchi, Hirohito; Lim, Seung-Oe; Liao, Hsin-Wei; Tsai, Chia-Hua; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase is a key enzyme in the glycolytic pathway that converts phosphoenolpyruvate to pyruvate, and the M2 isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2) is associated with cancer. PKM2 has been reported to function independently of its pyruvate kinase activity, which is crucial for cancer cell proliferation. Moreover, there is growing evidence indicating that dimeric PKM2 is released from tumor cells into the circulation of cancer patients. However, the role of secreted PKM2 in cancer is not well understood. Here, we found that the phosphorylation level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) significantly increased upon the exposure of cells to the recombinant PKM2 protein. In addition, secreted PKM2 induces EGFR phosphorylation and activates the EGFR downstream signaling in triple-negative breast cancer cells. In contrast, knocking down PKM2 decreased EGFR phosphorylation. Moreover, expression of R399E mutant PKM2, which has been reported to preferentially form a dimer, enhanced EGFR phosphorylation, cellular transformation, and cell proliferation more strongly than the wild-type PKM2. Thus, our study revealed a novel function of extracellular PKM2 in the promoting cancer cell proliferation through EGFR activation. PMID:27152240

  3. Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  4. A WRKY gene from creosote bush encodes an activator of the abscisic acid signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaolu; Seemann, Jeffrey R; Neuman, Dawn; Shen, Qingxi J

    2004-12-31

    The creosote bush (Larrea tridentata) is a xerophytic evergreen C3 shrub thriving in vast arid areas of North America. As the first step toward understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling the drought tolerance of this desert plant, we have isolated a dozen genes encoding transcription factors, including LtWRKY21 that encodes a protein of 314 amino acid residues. Transient expression studies with the GFP-LtWRKY21 fusion construct indicate that the LtWRKY21 protein is localized in the nucleus and is able to activate the promoter of an abscisic acid (ABA)-inducible gene, HVA22, in a dosage-dependent manner. The transactivating activity of LtWRKY21 relies on the C-terminal sequence containing the WRKY domain and a N-terminal motif that is essential for the repression activity of some regulators in ethylene signaling. LtWRKY21 interacts synergistically with ABA and transcriptional activators VP1 and ABI5 to control the expression of the HVA22 promoter. Co-expression of VP1, ABI5, and LtWRKY21 leads to a much higher expression of the HVA22 promoter than does the ABA treatment alone. In contrast, the Lt-WRKY21-mediated transactivation is inhibited by two known negative regulators of ABA signaling: 1-butanol, an inhibitor of phospholipase D, and abi1-1, a dominant negative mutant protein phosphatase. Interestingly, abi1-1 does not block the synergistic effect of LtWRKY21, VP1, and ABI5 co-expression, indicating that LtWRKY21, VP1, and ABI5 may form a complex that functions downstream of ABI1 to control ABA-regulated expression of genes.

  5. Dentin phosphophoryn in the matrix activates AKT and mTOR signaling pathway to promote preodontoblast survival and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Eapen, Asha; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin phosphophoryn (DPP) is an extracellular matrix protein synthesized by odontoblasts. It is highly acidic and the phosphorylated protein possesses a strong affinity for calcium ions. Therefore, DPP in the extracellular matrix can promote hydroxyapatite nucleation and can regulate the size of the growing crystal. Besides its calcium binding property, DPP can initiate signaling functions from the ECM (Extracellular matrix). The signals that promote the cytodifferentiation of preodontoblasts to fully functional odontoblasts are not known. In this study, we demonstrate that preodontoblasts on a DPP matrix, generates mechanical and biochemical signals. This is initiated by the ligation of the integrins with the RGD containing DPP. The downstream biochemical response observed is the activation of the AKT(protein kinase B) and mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling pathways leading to the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB (Nuclear factor κB). Terminal differentiation of the preodontoblasts was assessed by identifying phosphate and calcium deposits in the matrix using von Kossa and Alizarin red staining respectively. Identifying the signaling pathways initiated by DPP in the dentin matrix would help in devising strategies for dentin tissue engineering. PMID:26300786

  6. TCR Signal Strength Alters T–DC Activation and Interaction Times and Directs the Outcome of Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    van Panhuys, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The ability of CD4+ T cells to differentiate into effector subsets underpins their ability to shape the immune response and mediate host protection. During T cell receptor-induced activation of CD4+ T cells, both the quality and quantity of specific activatory peptide/MHC ligands have been shown to control the polarization of naive CD4+ T cells in addition to co-stimulatory and cytokine-based signals. Recently, advances in two-­photon microscopy and tetramer-based cell tracking methods have allowed investigators to greatly extend the study of the role of TCR signaling in effector differentiation under in vivo conditions. In this review, we consider data from recent in vivo studies analyzing the role of TCR signal strength in controlling the outcome of CD4+ T cell differentiation and discuss the role of TCR in controlling the critical nature of CD4+ T cell interactions with dendritic cells during activation. We further propose a model whereby TCR signal strength controls the temporal aspects of T–DC interactions and the implications for this in mediating the downstream signaling events, which influence the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of effector differentiation. PMID:26834747

  7. Regulation of Sufu activity by p66β and Mycbp provides new insight into vertebrate Hedgehog signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chuwen; Yao, Erica; Wang, Kevin; Nozawa, Yoko; Shimizu, Hirohito; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Chen, Jau-Nian; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    Control of Gli function by Suppressor of Fused (Sufu), a major negative regulator, is a key step in mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, but how this is achieved in the nucleus is unknown. We found that Hh signaling results in reduced Sufu protein levels and Sufu dissociation from Gli proteins in the nucleus, highlighting critical functions of Sufu in the nucleus. Through a proteomic approach, we identified several Sufu-interacting proteins, including p66β (a member of the NuRD [nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase] repressor complex) and Mycbp (a Myc-binding protein). p66β negatively and Mycbp positively regulate Hh signaling in cell-based assays and zebrafish. They function downstream from the membrane receptors, Patched and Smoothened, and the primary cilium. Sufu, p66β, Mycbp, and Gli are also detected on the promoters of Hh targets in a dynamic manner. Our results support a new model of Hh signaling in the nucleus. Sufu recruits p66β to block Gli-mediated Hh target gene expression. Meanwhile, Mycbp forms a complex with Gli and Sufu without Hh stimulation but remains inactive. Hh pathway activation leads to dissociation of Sufu/p66β from Gli, enabling Mycbp to promote Gli protein activity and Hh target gene expression. These studies provide novel insight into how Sufu controls Hh signaling in the nucleus. PMID:25403183

  8. The regulation of oncogenic Ras/ERK signalling by dual-specificity mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatases (MKPs).

    PubMed

    Kidger, Andrew M; Keyse, Stephen M

    2016-02-01

    Dual-specificity MAP kinase (MAPK) phosphatases (MKPs or DUSPs) are well-established negative regulators of MAPK signalling in mammalian cells and tissues. By virtue of their differential subcellular localisation and ability to specifically recognise, dephosphorylate and inactivate different MAPK isoforms, they are key spatiotemporal regulators of pathway activity. Furthermore, as they are transcriptionally regulated as downstream targets of MAPK signalling they can either act as classical negative feedback regulators or mediate cross talk between distinct MAPK pathways. Because MAPKs and particularly Ras/ERK signalling are implicated in cancer initiation and development, the observation that MKPs are abnormally regulated in human tumours has been interpreted as evidence that these enzymes can either suppress or promote carcinogenesis. However, definitive evidence of such roles has been lacking. Here we review recent work based on the use of mouse models, biochemical studies and clinical data that demonstrate key roles for MKPs in modulating the oncogenic potential of Ras/ERK signalling and also indicate that these enzymes may play a role in the response of tumours to certain anticancer drugs. Overall, this work reinforces the importance of negative regulatory mechanisms in modulating the activity of oncogenic MAPK signalling and indicates that MKPs may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in cancer. PMID:26791049

  9. Expression of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) and downstream muscle-specific proteins in ground squirrel skeletal and heart muscle during hibernation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yichi; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-01-01

    The thirteen-lined ground squirrel (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) undergoes remarkable adaptive changes during hibernation. Interestingly, skeletal muscle remodelling occurs during the torpor-arousal cycle of hibernation to prevent net muscle loss despite inactivity. Reversible cardiomyocyte hypertrophy occurs in cardiac muscle, allowing the heart to preserve cardiac output during hibernation, while avoiding chronic maladaptive hypertrophy post-hibernation. We propose that calcium signalling proteins [calcineurin (Cn), calmodulin (CaM), and calpain], the nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) family of transcription factors, and the NFAT targets myoferlin and myomaker contribute significantly to adaptations taking place in skeletal and cardiac muscle during hibernation. Protein-level analyses were performed over several conditions: euthermic room temperature (ER), euthermic cold room (EC), entrance into (EN), early (ET), and late torpor (LT) time points, in addition to early (EA), interbout (IA), and late arousal (LA) time points using immunoblotting and DNA-protein interaction (DPI) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISAs). In skeletal and cardiac muscle, NFATc2 protein levels were elevated during torpor. NFATc4 increased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle in both tissues, and NFATc1 showed this trend in cardiac muscle only. NFATc3 showed an elevation in DNA-binding activity but not expression during torpor. Myoferlin protein levels dramatically increased during torpor in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Myomaker levels also increased significantly in cardiac muscle during torpor. Cardiac Cn levels remained stable, whereas CaM and calpain decreased throughout the torpor-arousal cycle. Activation and/or upregulation of NFATc2, c3, myoferlin, and myomaker at torpor could be part of a stress-response mechanism to preserve skeletal muscle mass, whereas CaM and calpain appear to initiate the rapid reversal of cardiac hypertrophy during arousal through

  10. A specific CD4 epitope bound by tregalizumab mediates activation of regulatory T cells by a unique signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Helling, Bianca; König, Martin; Dälken, Benjamin; Engling, Andre; Krömer, Wolfgang; Heim, Katharina; Wallmeier, Holger; Haas, Jürgen; Wildemann, Brigitte; Fritz, Brigitte; Jonuleit, Helmut; Kubach, Jan; Dingermann, Theodor; Radeke, Heinfried H; Osterroth, Frank; Uherek, Christoph; Czeloth, Niklas; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2015-04-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a specialized subpopulation of T cells, which are essential for maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. The immunomodulatory effects of Tregs depend on their activation status. Here we show that, in contrast to conventional anti-CD4 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), the humanized CD4-specific monoclonal antibody tregalizumab (BT-061) is able to selectively activate the suppressive properties of Tregs in vitro. BT-061 activates Tregs by binding to CD4 and activation of signaling downstream pathways. The specific functionality of BT-061 may be explained by the recognition of a unique, conformational epitope on domain 2 of the CD4 molecule that is not recognized by other anti-CD4 mAbs. We found that, due to this special epitope binding, BT-061 induces a unique phosphorylation of T-cell receptor complex-associated signaling molecules. This is sufficient to activate the function of Tregs without activating effector T cells. Furthermore, BT-061 does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results demonstrate that BT-061 stimulation via the CD4 receptor is able to induce T-cell receptor-independent activation of Tregs. Selective activation of Tregs via CD4 is a promising approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases where insufficient Treg activity has been described. Clinical investigation of this new approach is currently ongoing. PMID:25512343

  11. Chemical Signaling and Functional Activation in Colloidosome-Based Protocells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shiyong; Li, Mei; Dong, Faqin; Wang, Shengjie; Tian, Liangfei; Mann, Stephen

    2016-04-13

    An aqueous-based microcompartmentalized model involving the integration of partially hydrophobic Fe(III)-rich montmorillonite (FeM) clay particles as structural and catalytic building blocks for colloidosome membrane assembly, self-directed membrane remodeling, and signal-induced protocell communication is described. The clay colloidosomes exhibit size- and charge-selective permeability, and show dual catalytic functions involving spatially confined enzyme-mediated dephosphorylation and peroxidase-like membrane activity. The latter is used for the colloidosome-mediated synthesis and assembly of a temperature-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM)/clay-integrated hybrid membrane. In situ PNIPAM elaboration of the membrane is coupled to a glucose oxidase (GOx)-mediated signaling pathway to establish a primitive model of chemical communication and functional activation within a synthetic "protocell community" comprising a mixed population of GOx-containing silica colloidosomes and alkaline phosphatase (ALP)-containing FeM-clay colloidosomes. Triggering the enzyme reaction in the silica colloidosomes gives a hydrogen peroxide signal that induces polymer wall formation in a coexistent population of the FeM-clay colloidosomes, which in turn generates self-regulated membrane-gated ALP-activity within the clay microcompartments. The emergence of new functionalities in inorganic colloidosomes via chemical communication between different protocell populations provides a first step toward the realization of interacting communities of synthetic functional microcompartments. PMID:26923794

  12. Interleukin 2 activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 2

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) stimulated activation of the 42-kD extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (Erk2) in murine IL-3-dependent cells, expressing either high or intermediate affinity IL-2 receptors. Activation was both rapid, occurring within 5 min of IL-2 addition, and prolonged, remaining elevated for 30 min. Activation of Erk2 appeared to be necessary for IL-2 stimulation of proliferation, as deletion of a region of the cytoplasmic domain of the IL-2 receptor beta chain, essential for IL-2 stimulation of proliferation, abolished Erk2 activation by IL-2. Furthermore, cells that had been deprived of cytokine for 24 h were then refractory to IL-2 stimulation of both Erk2 activity and proliferation. However, elevation of Erk2 activity was not sufficient to stimulate proliferation, as protein kinase C activation stimulated Erk2 activity but not DNA synthesis. Also, cells exposed to IL-2 in the presence of rapamycin showed full Erk2 activation but not DNA synthesis. These data suggest that IL-2 must stimulate both Erk2 activity and a further pathway(s) to trigger cell proliferation. PMID:8376945

  13. Wnt Signaling Activates Shh Signaling in Early Postnatal Intervertebral Discs, and Re-Activates Shh Signaling in Old Discs in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Debora; Wylie, Christopher C.; Dahia, Chitra Lekha

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are strong fibrocartilaginous joints that connect adjacent vertebrae of the spine. As discs age they become prone to failure, with neurological consequences that are often severe. Surgical repair of discs treats the result of the disease, which affects as many as one in seven people, rather than its cause. An ideal solution would be to repair degenerating discs using the mechanisms of their normal differentiation. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Using the mouse as a model, we previously showed that Shh signaling produced by nucleus pulposus cells activates the expression of differentiation markers, and cell proliferation, in the postnatal IVD. In the present study, we show that canonical Wnt signaling is required for the expression of Shh signaling targets in the IVD. We also show that Shh and canonical Wnt signaling pathways are down-regulated in adult IVDs. Furthermore, this down-regulation is reversible, since re-activation of the Wnt or Shh pathways in older discs can re-activate molecular markers of the IVD that are lost with age. These data suggest that biological treatments targeting Wnt and Shh signaling pathways may be feasible as a therapeutic for degenerative disc disease. PMID:24892825

  14. RalA, a GTPase targeted by miR-181a, promotes transformation and progression by activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaochuang; Yang, Juhua; Li, Yumin; Li, Tianfu; Wang, Ruirui; Fei, Jia

    2016-01-01

    BCR/ABL is a well-known activator of multiple signaling pathways. RalA, a Ras downstream signaling molecule and a small GTPase, plays an important role in Bcr-Abl-induced leukemogenesis but the exact mechanism remains elusive. Here, we show that RalA GTPase activity is commonly high in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) cell lines and patient samples. Overexpression of RalA results in malignant transformation and progression, and induces resistance to imatinib (IM) in BaF3 and K562 cell lines. RalA reduced survival and led to IM resistance in a xenografted mouse model. Ablation of RalA by either siRNA or miR-181a, a RalA targeting microRNA, attenuated the malignant phenotypes in K562 cells. RBC8, a selective Ral inhibitor, enhanced the inhibitory effects of IM in K562, KCL22 and BaF3-P210 cells. Interestingly, the phospho-specific protein microarray assay revealed that multiple phosphorylation signal proteins were decreased by RalA inhibition, including SAPK, JNK, SRC, VEGFR2, P38 MAPK, c-Kit, JunB, and Keratin18. Among them, P38 MAPK and SAPK/JNK are Ras downstream signaling kinases. Taken together, RalA GTPase might be an important oncogene activating the Ras-related signaling pathway in CML. PMID:26967392

  15. Novel crosstalk to BMP signalling: cGMP-dependent kinase I modulates BMP receptor and Smad activity

    PubMed Central

    Schwappacher, Raphaela; Weiske, Jörg; Heining, Eva; Ezerski, Verena; Marom, Barak; Henis, Yoav I; Huber, Otmar; Knaus, Petra

    2009-01-01

    Integration of multiple signals into the canonical BMP/Smad pathway poses a big challenge during the course of embryogenesis and tissue homeostasis. Here, we show that cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent kinase I (cGKI) modulates BMP receptors and Smads, providing a novel mechanism enhancing BMP signalling. cGKI, a key mediator of vasodilation and hypertension diseases, interacts with and phosphorylates the BMP type II receptor (BMPRII). In response to BMP-2, cGKI then dissociates from the receptors, associates with activated Smads, and undergoes nuclear translocation. In the nucleus, cGKI binds with Smad1 and the general transcription factor TFII-I to promoters of BMP target genes such as Id1 to enhance transcriptional activation. Accordingly, cGKI has a dual function in BMP signalling: (1) it modulates BMP receptor/Smad activity at the plasma membrane and (2) after redistribution to the nucleus, it further regulates transcription as a nuclear co-factor for Smads. Consequently, cellular defects caused by mutations in BMPRII, found in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients, were compensated through cGKI, supporting the positive action of cGKI on BMP-induced Smad signalling downstream of the receptors. PMID:19424179

  16. Signal transduction in the activation of spermatozoa compared to other signalling pathways: a biological networks study.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, Nicola; Mattioli, Mauro; Barboni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we represented Spermatozoa Activation (SA) the process that leads male gametes to reach their fertilising ability of sea urchin, Caenorhabditis elegans and human as biological networks, i.e. as networks of nodes (molecules) linked by edges (their interactions). Then, we compared them with networks representing ten pathways of relevant physio-pathological importance and with a computer-generated network. We have found that the number of nodes and edges composing each network is not related with the amount of published papers on each specific topic and that all the topological parameters examined are similar in all the networks, thus conferring them a scale free topology and small world behaviour. In conclusion, SA topology, independently from the reproductive biology of considered organism, as others signalling networks is characterised by robustness against random failure, controllability and efficiency in signal transmission. PMID:26489142

  17. Differences in cell death induction by Phytophthora Elicitins are determined by signal components downstream of MAP kinase kinase in different species of Nicotiana and cultivars of Brassica rapa and Raphanus sativus.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Daigo; Hardham, Adrienne R; Jones, David A

    2005-07-01

    Elicitins are small, secreted proteins produced by species of the plant-pathogenic oomycete Phytophthora. They induce hypersensitive cell death in most Nicotiana species and in some cultivars of Brassica rapa and Raphanus sativus. In this study, two true-breeding Fast Cycling B. rapa lines were established that showed severe necrosis (line 7-R) or no visible response (line 18-NR) after treatment with elicitin. Unexpectedly, microscopic examination revealed localized cell death in line 18-NR plants, and expression levels of various defense-marker genes were comparable in both lines. These results suggested that both "responsive" and "nonresponsive" plants responded to elicitin but differed in the extent of the cell death response. Expression of a constitutively active form of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MAP kinase kinase 4 (AtMEK4(DD)) also induced rapid development of confluent cell death in line 7-R, whereas line 18-NR showed no visible cell death. Similarly, elicitin-responsive Nicotiana species and R. sativus cultivars showed significantly stronger cell death responses following expression of AtMEK4(DD) compared with nonresponsive species/cultivars. Line 7-R also showed higher sensitivity to toxin-containing culture filtrates produced by Alternaria brassicicola, and toxin sensitivity cosegregated with elicitin responsiveness, suggesting that the downstream responses induced by elicitin and Alternaria toxin share factors that control the extent of cell death. Interestingly, elicitin responsiveness was shown to correlate with greater susceptibility to A. brassicicola (a necrotroph) in B. rapa but less susceptibility to Phytophthora nicotianae (a hemibiotroph) in Nicotiana, suggesting a more extensive cell death response could cause opposite effects on the outcomes of biotrophic versus necrotrophic plant-pathogen interactions.

  18. Plasmonic activation of gold nanorods for remote stimulation of calcium signaling and protein expression in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P; Sauer, Jeremy P; Stanley, Sarah A; Qian, Xi; Gottesdiener, Andrew; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2016-10-01

    Remote activation of specific cells of a heterogeneous population can provide a useful research tool for clinical and therapeutic applications. Here, we demonstrate that photostimulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) using a tunable near-infrared (NIR) laser at specific longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelengths can induce the selective and temporal internalization of calcium in HEK 293T cells. Biotin-PEG-Au nanorods coated with streptavidin Alexa Fluor-633 and biotinylated anti-His antibodies were used to decorate cells genetically modified with His-tagged TRPV1 temperature-sensitive ion channel and AuNRs conjugated to biotinylated RGD peptide were used to decorate integrins in unmodified cells. Plasmonic activation can be stimulated at weak laser power (0.7-4.0 W/cm(2) ) without causing cell damage. Selective activation of TRPV1 channels could be controlled by laser power between 1.0 and 1.5 W/cm(2) . Integrin targeting robustly stimulated calcium signaling due to a dense cellular distribution of nanoparticles. Such an approach represents a functional tool for combinatorial activation of cell signaling in heterogeneous cell populations. Our results suggest that it is possible to induce cell activation via NIR-induced gold nanorod heating through the selective targeting of membrane proteins in unmodified cells to produce calcium signaling and downstream expression of specific genes with significant relevance for both in vitro and therapeutic applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2228-2240. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27563853

  19. Plasmonic activation of gold nanorods for remote stimulation of calcium signaling and protein expression in HEK 293T cells.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, Sandra P; Sauer, Jeremy P; Stanley, Sarah A; Qian, Xi; Gottesdiener, Andrew; Friedman, Jeffrey M; Dordick, Jonathan S

    2016-10-01

    Remote activation of specific cells of a heterogeneous population can provide a useful research tool for clinical and therapeutic applications. Here, we demonstrate that photostimulation of gold nanorods (AuNRs) using a tunable near-infrared (NIR) laser at specific longitudinal surface plasmon resonance wavelengths can induce the selective and temporal internalization of calcium in HEK 293T cells. Biotin-PEG-Au nanorods coated with streptavidin Alexa Fluor-633 and biotinylated anti-His antibodies were used to decorate cells genetically modified with His-tagged TRPV1 temperature-sensitive ion channel and AuNRs conjugated to biotinylated RGD peptide were used to decorate integrins in unmodified cells. Plasmonic activation can be stimulated at weak laser power (0.7-4.0 W/cm(2) ) without causing cell damage. Selective activation of TRPV1 channels could be controlled by laser power between 1.0 and 1.5 W/cm(2) . Integrin targeting robustly stimulated calcium signaling due to a dense cellular distribution of nanoparticles. Such an approach represents a functional tool for combinatorial activation of cell signaling in heterogeneous cell populations. Our results suggest that it is possible to induce cell activation via NIR-induced gold nanorod heating through the selective targeting of membrane proteins in unmodified cells to produce calcium signaling and downstream expression of specific genes with significant relevance for both in vitro and therapeutic applications. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2228-2240. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Altered LKB1/CREB-regulated transcription co-activator (CRTC) signaling axis promotes esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Gu, Y; Lin, S; Li, J-L; Nakagawa, H; Chen, Z; Jin, B; Tian, L; Ucar, D A; Shen, H; Lu, J; Hochwald, S N; Kaye, F J; Wu, L

    2012-01-26

    LKB1 is a tumor susceptibility gene for the Peutz-Jeghers cancer syndrome and is a target for mutational inactivation in sporadic human malignancies. LKB1 encodes a serine/threonine kinase that has critical roles in cell growth, polarity and metabolism. A novel and important function of LKB1 is its ability to regulate the phosphorylation of CREB-regulated transcription co-activators (CRTCs) whose aberrant activation is linked with oncogenic activities. However, the roles and mechanisms of LKB1 and CRTC in the pathogenesis of esophageal cancer have not been previously investigated. In this study, we observed altered LKB1-CRTC signaling in a subset of human esophageal cancer cell lines and patient samples. LKB1 negatively regulates esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion in vitro. Mechanistically, we determined that CRTC signaling becomes activated because of LKB1 loss, which results in the transcriptional activation of specific downstream targets including LYPD3, a critical mediator for LKB1 loss-of-function. Our data indicate that de-regulated LKB1-CRTC signaling might represent a crucial mechanism for esophageal cancer progression.

  1. Miltefosine Suppresses Hepatic Steatosis by Activating AMPK Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yaqin; Tong, Xing; Li, Kexue; Bai, Hui; Li, Xiaoyu; Ben, Jingjing; Zhang, Hanwen; Yang, Qing; Chen, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose It has been accepted that AMPK (Adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase) activation exhibits many beneficial effects on glucolipid metabolism. Lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) is an important lysophospholipid which can improve blood glucose levels in diabetic mice and attenuate inflammation by activating AMPK signal pathway in macrophages. Synthetic alkylphospholipids (ALPs), such as miltefosine, is used as an alternate of LPC for the clinical application. Here, we investigated whether miltefosine could have an impact on hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. Experimental Approach Mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks to generate an obese model. Next, the obese mice were randomly divided into three groups: saline-treated and miltefosine-treated (2.5 or 5 mg/kg/d) groups. Miltefosine was intraperitoneally administrated into mice for additional 4 weeks plus HFD treatment. Key Results It was shown that miltefosine treatment could substantially improve glucose metabolism, prevented hepatic lipid accumulation, and inhibited liver inflammation in HFD-fed mice by activating AMPK signal pathway. In vitro, miltefosine stimulated AMPKα phosphorylation both in time and dose dependent manner and decreased lipid accumulation in liver cells. When a specific AMPK inhibitor compound C was used to treat mice, the antagonistic effects of miltefosine on HFD-induced mouse hyperlipidaemia and liver steatosis were abolished. Treatment with miltefosine also dramatically inhibited the HFD-induced liver inflammation in mice. Conclusions and Implications Here we demonstrated that miltefosine might be a new activator of AMPK signal pathway in vivo and in vitro and be useful for treatment of hepatic steatosis and related metabolic disorders. PMID:27681040

  2. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    SciTech Connect

    Berndt, Alexander; Büttner, Robert; Gühne, Stefanie; Gleinig, Anna; Richter, Petra; Chen, Yuan; Franz, Marcus; Liebmann, Claus

    2014-04-01

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCM{sub TGF}, FCM{sub PDGF}) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCM{sub B}). FCM{sub TGF} stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCM{sub TGF}≫FCM{sub PDGF} induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCM{sub TGF}>FCM{sub PDGF}) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin

  3. Activation of PI3K/Akt signaling has a dominant negative effect on IL-12 production by macrophages infected with Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Ruhland, Aaron; Kima, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    Infection of macrophages with Leishmania parasites does not result in the production of IL-12. In addition, infection with Leishmania suppresses IL-12 production elicited by otherwise potent activators of IL-12. We provide evidence that engagement of phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling during Leishmania amazonensis infection leads to the prevention of IL-12 p70 production at the level of transcription of its p40 subunit in bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMϕ). Inhibition of PI3K signaling with specific inhibitors of PI3K or the downstream kinase Akt, reverses the IL-12 blockade. Although the MAP kinase ERK (p44 and p42) was transiently activated by infection with L. amazonensis, inhibition of MEK, the kinase upstream of ERK, with PD98059, did not reverse the blockade of IL-12. Furthermore, inhibition of the other MAP kinases JNK and p38 as well as treatment of cells with pertussis toxin that blocks G protein mediated signaling, did not reverse the prevention of IL-12 production by Leishmania infection. Interestingly, activation of PI3K/Akt signaling had differential effects on ERK and p38 activation. Taken together we propose that infection of BMDMϕ with Leishmania promastigotes activates both positive and negative signaling pathways that control IL-12 production. PI3K signaling activated by the infection is the negative signaling pathway that prevents IL-12 production. PMID:19186178

  4. Activation of PI3K/Akt signaling has a dominant negative effect on IL-12 production by macrophages infected with Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Ruhland, Aaron; Kima, Peter E

    2009-05-01

    Infection of macrophages with Leishmania parasites does not result in the production of IL-12. In addition, infection with Leishmania suppresses IL-12 production elicited by otherwise potent activators of IL-12. We provide evidence that engagement of phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K) signaling during Leishmania amazonensis infection leads to the prevention of IL-12 p70 production at the level of transcription of its p40 subunit in bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDMPhi). Inhibition of PI3K signaling with specific inhibitors of PI3K or the downstream kinase Akt, reverses the IL-12 blockade. Although the MAP kinase ERK (p44 and p42) was transiently activated by infection with L. amazonensis, inhibition of MEK, the kinase upstream of ERK, with PD98059, did not reverse the blockade of IL-12. Furthermore, inhibition of the other MAP kinases JNK and p38 as well as treatment of cells with pertussis toxin that blocks G protein mediated signaling, did not reverse the prevention of IL-12 production by Leishmania infection. Interestingly, activation of PI3K/Akt signaling had differential effects on ERK and p38 activation. Taken together we propose that infection of BMDMPhi with Leishmania promastigotes activates both positive and negative signaling pathways that control IL-12 production. PI3K signaling activated by the infection is the negative signaling pathway that prevents IL-12 production.

  5. Robust Indoor Human Activity Recognition Using Wireless Signals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi; Jiang, Xinli; Cao, Rongyu; Wang, Xiyang

    2015-01-01

    Wireless signals–based activity detection and recognition technology may be complementary to the existing vision-based methods, especially under the circumstance of occlusions, viewpoint change, complex background, lighting condition change, and so on. This paper explores the properties of the channel state information (CSI) of Wi-Fi signals, and presents a robust indoor daily human activity recognition framework with only one pair of transmission points (TP) and access points (AP). First of all, some indoor human actions are selected as primitive actions forming a training set. Then, an online filtering method is designed to make actions’ CSI curves smooth and allow them to contain enough pattern information. Each primitive action pattern can be segmented from the outliers of its multi-input multi-output (MIMO) signals by a proposed segmentation method. Lastly, in online activities recognition, by selecting proper features and Support Vector Machine (SVM) based multi-classification, activities constituted by primitive actions can be recognized insensitive to the locations, orientations, and speeds. PMID:26184231

  6. Signal integration by Ca2+ regulates intestinal stem cell activity

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Hansong; Gerencser, Akos A.; Jasper, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic stem cells (SCs) maintain tissue homeostasis by dynamically adjusting proliferation and differentiation in response to stress and metabolic cues. Here, we identify Ca2+ signaling as a central regulator of intestinal SC (ISC) activity in Drosophila. We find that dietary L-glutamate stimulates ISC division and gut growth. The metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) is required in ISCs for this response and for an associated modulation of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations that results in sustained high cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. High cytosolic Ca2+ induces ISC proliferation by regulating Calcineurin and CREB - regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC). In response to a wide range of dietary and stress stimuli, ISCs reversibly transition between Ca2+ oscillation states that represent poised or activated modes of proliferation, respectively. We propose that the dynamic regulation of intracellular Ca2+ levels allows effective integration of diverse mitogenic signals in ISCs to tailor their proliferative activity to the needs of the tissue. PMID:26633624

  7. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 Activates Canonical Notch Signaling To Downregulate TLR2/4 Expression and Promote Intracellular Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lina, Taslima T.; Dunphy, Paige S.; Luo, Tian

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ehrlichia chaffeensis preferentially targets mononuclear phagocytes and survives through a strategy of subverting innate immune defenses, but the mechanisms are unknown. We have shown E. chaffeensis type 1 secreted tandem repeat protein (TRP) effectors are involved in diverse molecular pathogen-host interactions, such as the TRP120 interaction with the Notch receptor-cleaving metalloprotease ADAM17. In the present study, we demonstrate E. chaffeensis, via the TRP120 effector, activates the canonical Notch signaling pathway to promote intracellular survival. We found that nuclear translocation of the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain (NICD) occurs in response to E. chaffeensis or recombinant TRP120, resulting in upregulation of Notch signaling pathway components and target genes notch1, adam17, hes, and hey. Significant differences in canonical Notch signaling gene expression levels (>40%) were observed during early and late stages of infection, indicating activation of the Notch pathway. We linked Notch pathway activation specifically to the TRP120 effector, which directly interacts with the Notch metalloprotease ADAM17. Using pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against γ-secretase enzyme, Notch transcription factor complex, Notch1, and ADAM17, we demonstrated that Notch signaling is required for ehrlichial survival. We studied the downstream effects and found that E. chaffeensis TRP120-mediated activation of the Notch pathway causes inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways required for PU.1 and subsequent Toll-like receptor 2/4 (TLR2/4) expression. This investigation reveals a novel mechanism whereby E. chaffeensis exploits the Notch pathway to evade the host innate immune response for intracellular survival. PMID:27381289

  8. Notum deacylates Wnt proteins to suppress signalling activity.

    PubMed

    Kakugawa, Satoshi; Langton, Paul F; Zebisch, Matthias; Howell, Steven A; Chang, Tao-Hsin; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Bineva, Ganka; O'Reilly, Nicola; Snijders, Ambrosius P; Jones, E Yvonne; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2015-03-12

    Signalling by Wnt proteins is finely balanced to ensure normal development and tissue homeostasis while avoiding diseases such as cancer. This is achieved in part by Notum, a highly conserved secreted feedback antagonist. Notum has been thought to act as a phospholipase, shedding glypicans and associated Wnt proteins from the cell surface. However, this view fails to explain specificity, as glypicans bind many extracellular ligands. Here we provide genetic evidence in Drosophila that Notum requires glypicans to suppress Wnt signalling, but does not cleave their glycophosphatidylinositol anchor. Structural analyses reveal glycosaminoglycan binding sites on Notum, which probably help Notum to co-localize with Wnt proteins. They also identify, at the active site of human and Drosophila Notum, a large hydrophobic pocket that accommodates palmitoleate. Kinetic and mass spectrometric analyses of human proteins show that Notum is a carboxylesterase that removes an essential palmitoleate moiety from Wnt proteins and thus constitutes the first known extracellular protein deacylase. PMID:25731175

  9. SNIP1: a new activator of HSE signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; An, Jian; Liu, Xianghua; Zhang, Mingjun; Ling, Yichen; Wang, Chenji; Zhao, Jing; Yu, Long

    2012-03-01

    In the last 10 years, more and more attention has been focused on SNIP1 (Smad nuclear interacting protein 1), which functions as a transcriptional coactivator. We report here that through quantitative real-time PCR analysis in 18 different human tissues, SNIP1 was found to be expressed ubiquitously. When overexpressed in HeLa cells, SNIP1-EGFP fused protein exhibited a nuclear localization with a characteristic subnuclear distribution in speckles or formed larger discrete nuclear bodies in some cells. Reporter gene assay showed that overexpression of SNIP1 in HEK 293 cells or H1299 cells strongly activated the HSE signaling pathway. Moreover, SNIP1 could selectively regulate the transcription of HSP70A1A and HSP27. Taken together, our findings suggest that SNIP1 might also be a positive regulator of HSE signaling pathway.

  10. Pathway connectivity and signaling coordination in the yeast stress-activated signaling network

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Deborah; Ho, Yi-Hsuan; Berry, David B; Nemec, Corey M; MacGilvray, Matthew E; Hose, James; Merrill, Anna E; Lee, M Violet; Will, Jessica L; Coon, Joshua J; Ansari, Aseem Z; Craven, Mark; Gasch, Audrey P

    2014-01-01

    Stressed cells coordinate a multi-faceted response spanning many levels of physiology. Yet knowledge of the complete stress-activated regulatory network as well as design principles for signal integration remains incomplete. We developed an experimental and computational approach to integrate available protein interaction data with gene fitness contributions, mutant transcriptome profiles, and phospho-proteome changes in cells responding to salt stress, to infer the salt-responsive signaling network in yeast. The inferred subnetwork presented many novel predictions by implicating new regulators, uncovering unrecognized crosstalk between known pathways, and pointing to previously unknown ‘hubs’ of signal integration. We exploited these predictions to show that Cdc14 phosphatase is a central hub in the network and that modification of RNA polymerase II coordinates induction of stress-defense genes with reduction of growth-related transcripts. We find that the orthologous human network is enriched for cancer-causing genes, underscoring the importance of the subnetwork's predictions in understanding stress biology. PMID:25411400

  11. Testicular hyperthermia induces Unfolded Protein Response signaling activation in spermatocyte.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Hak; Park, Sun-Ji; Kim, Tae-Shin; Park, Hyo-Jin; Park, Junghyung; Kim, Bo Kyung; Kim, Gyeong-Ryul; Kim, Jin-Man; Huang, Song Mei; Chae, Jung-Il; Park, Choon-Keun; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2013-05-17

    The testes of most mammals are sensitive to temperature. To survive and adapt under conditions that promote endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress such as heat shock, cells have a self-protective mechanism against ER stress that has been termed the "Unfolded Protein Response" (UPR). However, the cellular and molecular events underlying spermatogenesis with testicular hyperthermia involved in the UPR signaling pathway under ER stress remain poorly understood. In the present study, we verified that UPR signaling via phospho-eIF2α/ATF4/GADD34, p90ATF6, and phospho-IRE1α/XBP-1 is activated with testicular hyperthermia (43 °C, 15 min/day) and induced ER stress-mediated apoptosis associated with CHOP, phospho-JNK, and caspase-3 after repetitive periods of hyperthermia. Levels of phospho-eIF2α protein of mouse spermatocytes in the testis were rapidly increased by one cycle of testicular hyperthermia. ATF4/GADD34 and p90ATF6 expression gradually increased and decreased, respectively, with repetitive cycles of hyperthermia. Spliced XBP1 mRNA as a marker of IRE1 activity was increased after one, three cycles of hyperthermia and decreased by five cycles of hyperthermia. Although the levels of anti-apoptotic phospho-JNK (p54) were gradually decreased after three cycles of hyperthermia, CHOP expression was rapidly increased. After five cycles of testicular hyperthermia, the levels of cleaved caspase-3 and TUNEL-positive apoptotic spermatocytes cells were significantly increased. Our data demonstrated that testicular hyperthermia induces UPR signaling and repetitive cycles of hyperthermia lead to apoptosis of spermatocytes in mouse testis. These results suggest a link between the UPR signaling pathway and testicular hyperthermia.

  12. Biochemical Analysis of Initiator Caspase-Activating Complexes: The Apoptosome and the Death-Inducing Signaling Complex.

    PubMed

    Langlais, Claudia; Hughes, Michelle A; Cain, Kelvin; MacFarlane, Marion

    2015-12-02

    Apoptosis is a highly regulated process that can be initiated by activation of death receptors or perturbation of mitochondria causing the release of apoptogenic proteins. This results in the activation of caspases, which are responsible for many of the biochemical and morphological changes associated with apoptosis. Caspases are normally inactive and require activation in a cascade emanating from an "initiator" or activating caspase, which in turn activates a downstream or "effector" caspase. Activation of initiator caspases is tightly regulated and requires the assembly of caspase-9 (via mitochondrial perturbation) or caspase-8/10 (via death receptor ligation) activating complexes, which are termed the apoptosome and the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), respectively. These large multiprotein complexes can initially be separated according to size by gel filtration chromatography and subsequently analyzed by affinity purification or immunoprecipitation. The advantage of combining these techniques is one can first assess the assembly of individual components into a multiprotein complex, and then assess the size and composition of the native functional signaling platform within a particular cell type alongside a biochemical analysis of the enriched/purified complex. Here, we describe various methods currently used for characterization of the apoptosome and DISC.

  13. Zinc deficiency impairs the renewal of hippocampal neural stem cells in adult rats: involvement of FoxO3a activation and downstream p27(kip1) expression.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingling; Zhao, Jianya; Jiang, Junkang; Ma, Xia; Liu, Xinhang; Wang, Cheng; Jiang, Shengyang; Wan, Chunhua

    2015-09-01

    Zinc plays an important role in the development and maintenance of central neural system. Zinc deficiency has been known to alter normal brain function, whose molecular mechanism remains largely elusive. In the present study, we established a zinc deficiency-exposed rat model, and, using western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, found that the expression of FoxO3a and p27(kip1) was remarkably up-regulated in the rat brain hippocampus. Immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO3a and p27(kip1) were significantly co-localized with nestin, the marker of neural stem cells (NSCs). Furthermore, we identified that the proportion of proliferating NSCs was markedly decreased in zinc-deficient rat hippocampaus. Using C17.2 neural stem cells, it was revealed that exposure to zinc chelator N,N,N',N'-tetrakis-(2-pyridylmethy) ethylenediamine induced the expression of FoxO3a and p27(kip1) , which coincided with reduced NSC proliferation. Furthermore, depletion of FoxO3a inhibited p27(kip1) expression and restored the growth of NSCs. On the basis of these data, we concluded that FoxO3a/p27(kip1) signaling might play a significant role in zinc deficiency-induced growth impairment of NSCs and consequent neurological disorders. We describe here that zinc deficiency induces the proliferative impairment of hippocampal neural stem cells partially through the activation of FOXO3a-p27 axis in rats. Neural progenitor cells exhibited significantly up-regulated expression of FOXO3a and p27 after zinc deficiency in vivo and in vitro. Depletion of FOXO3a ameliorates zinc deficiency-induced expression of p27 and growth impairment of neural stem cells. We provide novel insight into the mechanisms underlying zinc deficiency-induced neurological deficits.

  14. Over-expression of CKS1B activates both MEK/ERK and JAK/STAT3 signaling pathways and promotes myeloma cell drug-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Zangari, Maurizio; Xu, Hongwei; Cao, Thai M.; Xu, Chunjiao; Wu, Yong; Xiao, Fang; Liu, Yinghong; Yang, Ye; Salama, Mohamed; Li, Guiyuan; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2010-01-01

    Here we demonstrate the crucial role of CKS1B in multiple myeloma (MM) progression and define CKS1B-mediated SKP2/p27Kip1-independent down-stream signaling pathways. Forced-expression of CKS1B in MM cells increased cell multidrug-resistance. CKS1B activates STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. In contrast, SKP2 knockdown or p27Kip1 over-expression resulted in activation of the STAT3 and MEK/ERK pathways. Further investigations showed that BCL2 is a downstream target of MEK/ERK signaling. Stimulation of STAT3 and MEK/ERK signaling pathways partially abrogated CKS1B knockdown induced MM cell death and growth inhibition. Targeting STAT3 and MEK/ ERK signaling pathways by specific inhibitors induced significant MM cell death and growth inhibition in CKS1B-overexpressing MM cells and their combinations resulted in synergy. Thus, our findings provide a rationale for targeting STAT3 and MEK/ERK/ BCL2 signaling in aggressive CKS1B-overexpressing MM. PMID:20930946

  15. Ca2+ signaling by plant Arabidopsis thaliana Pep peptides depends on AtPepR1, a receptor with guanylyl cyclase activity, and cGMP-activated Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhi; Verma, Rajeev; Gehring, Chris; Yamaguchi, Yube; Zhao, Yichen; Ryan, Clarence A; Berkowitz, Gerald A

    2010-12-01

    A family of peptide signaling molecules (AtPeps) and their plasma membrane receptor AtPepR1 are known to act in pathogen-defense signaling cascades in plants. Little is currently known about the molecular mechanisms that link these signaling peptides and their receptor, a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase, to downstream pathogen-defense responses. We identify some cellular activities of these molecules that provide the context for a model for their action in signaling cascades. AtPeps activate plasma membrane inwardly conducting Ca(2+) permeable channels in mesophyll cells, resulting in cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. This activity is dependent on their receptor as well as a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel (CNGC2). We also show that the leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase receptor AtPepR1 has guanylyl cyclase activity, generating cGMP from GTP, and that cGMP can activate CNGC2-dependent cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. AtPep-dependent expression of pathogen-defense genes (PDF1.2, MPK3, and WRKY33) is mediated by the Ca(2+) signaling pathway associated with AtPep peptides and their receptor. The work presented here indicates that extracellular AtPeps, which can act as danger-associated molecular patterns, signal by interaction with their receptor, AtPepR1, a plasma membrane protein that can generate cGMP. Downstream from AtPep and AtPepR1 in a signaling cascade, the cGMP-activated channel CNGC2 is involved in AtPep- and AtPepR1-dependent inward Ca(2+) conductance and resulting cytosolic Ca(2+) elevation. The signaling cascade initiated by AtPeps leads to expression of pathogen-defense genes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner.

  16. Digital signaling decouples activation probability and population heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Ryan A; Tian, Chengzhe; Lipniacki, Tomasz; Quake, Stephen R; Tay, Savaş

    2015-01-01

    Digital signaling enhances robustness of cellular decisions in noisy environments, but it is unclear how digital systems transmit temporal information about a stimulus. To understand how temporal input information is encoded and decoded by the NF-κB system, we studied transcription factor dynamics and gene regulation under dose- and duration-modulated inflammatory inputs. Mathematical modeling predicted and microfluidic single-cell experiments confirmed that integral of the stimulus (or area, concentration × duration) controls the fraction of cells that activate NF-κB in the population. However, stimulus temporal profile determined NF-κB dynamics, cell-to-cell variability, and gene expression phenotype. A sustained, weak stimulation lead to heterogeneous activation and delayed timing that is transmitted to gene expression. In contrast, a transient, strong stimulus with the same area caused rapid and uniform dynamics. These results show that digital NF-κB signaling enables multidimensional control of cellular phenotype via input profile, allowing parallel and independent control of single-cell activation probability and population heterogeneity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08931.001 PMID:26488364

  17. RASA1 functions in EPHB4 signaling pathway to suppress endothelial mTORC1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Jun; Aegerter, Sandrine; Fevurly, R. Dawn; Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Sahin, Mustafa; Mably, John D.; Fishman, Steven J.; Chan, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Vascular malformations are linked to mutations in RAS p21 protein activator 1 (RASA1, also known as p120RasGAP); however, due to the global expression of this gene, it is unclear how these mutations specifically affect the vasculature. Here, we tested the hypothesis that RASA1 performs a critical effector function downstream of the endothelial receptor EPHB4. In zebrafish models, we found that either RASA1 or EPHB4 deficiency induced strikingly similar abnormalities in blood vessel formation and function. Expression of WT EPHB4 receptor or engineered receptors with altered RASA1 binding revealed that the ability of EPHB4 to recruit RASA1 is required to restore blood flow in EPHB4-deficient animals. Analysis of EPHB4-deficient zebrafish tissue lysates revealed that mTORC1 is robustly overactivated, and pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 in these animals rescued both vessel structure and function. Furthermore, overexpression of mTORC1 in endothelial cells exacerbated vascular phenotypes in animals with reduced EPHB4 or RASA1, suggesting a functional EPHB4/RASA1/mTORC1 signaling axis in endothelial cells. Tissue samples from patients with arteriovenous malformations displayed strong endothelial phospho-S6 staining, indicating increased mTORC1 activity. These results indicate that deregulation of EPHB4/RASA1/mTORC1 signaling in endothelial cells promotes vascular malformation and suggest that mTORC1 inhibitors, many of which are approved for the treatment of certain cancers, should be further explored as a potential strategy to treat patients with vascular malformations. PMID:24837431

  18. Explosive activity at Mt. Yasur volcano: characterization of acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, L.; Taddeucci, J.; Scarlato, P.; Freda, C.; Gresta, S.

    2012-04-01

    Mt. Yasur (Vanuatu Islands) is an active volcano characterized by persistent Strombolian to mild Vulcanian explosive activity, well known to generate a broad variety of air pressure waves. Between 9 and 12 July 2011, we recorded explosive activity from the three active vents of Mt. Yasur by means of a multiparametric station, comprising thermal and visual high-speed cameras and two ECM microphones recording both infrasonic and sonic signals at 10 kHz sampling frequency. A total of 106 major acoustic events, lasting on average 5 seconds (up to 20 in some ash-rich explosion), correspond to visually recorded explosions at the vents and exhibit a surprisingly broad waveform variability. Major events intervene between minor transients with strongly repetitive waveforms typical of puffing activity. Spectral analyses have been computed on both major events and whole traces. Analysis of major events, carried out using a 5.12 s long window, reveals peak frequencies mostly beneath 5 Hz, only a few events displaying a notable energy content in the sonic band (up to 100 Hz ca). Peak-to-peak amplitude as well as RMS values (evaluated from event start to end) were computed on both raw and filtered (above and below 20 Hz) signals. Spectrograms of the whole traces, carried out using 1.28, 2.56, and 5.12 seconds long windows with 50% overlap, outline clearly the frequency content of major events and the occurrence of puffing ones. We also evaluated the peak frequency of each spectrum of the spectrogram, in order to detect spectral variation of the puffing signal. Considering their great variability, we classified the major events on the base of their spectral content rather than on waveform, grouping together all events having similar spectra by cross-correlating them. Three spectral families cover most of the dataset, as follows: 1) variable and irregular shaped spectra, with energy mainly below 4 Hz; 2) monochromatic events, with simple spectra corresponding in the time domain to

  19. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  20. Thrombin-Mediated Direct Activation of Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2: Another Target for Thrombin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Hansen, Kristina K; Renaux, Bernard; Polley, Danny; Gibson, Stacy; Vanderboor, Christina; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2016-05-01

    Thrombin is known to signal to cells by cleaving/activating a G-protein-coupled family of proteinase-activated receptors (PARs). The signaling mechanism involves the proteolytic unmasking of an N-terminal receptor sequence that acts as a tethered receptor-activating ligand. To date, the recognized targets of thrombin cleavage and activation for signaling are PAR1 and PAR4, in which thrombin cleaves at a conserved target arginine to reveal a tethered ligand. PAR2, which like PAR1 is also cleaved at an N-terminal arginine to unmask its tethered ligand, is generally regarded as a target for trypsin but not for thrombin signaling. We now show that thrombin, at concentrations that can be achieved at sites of acute injury or in a tumor microenvironment, can directly activate PAR2 vasorelaxation and signaling, stimulating calcium and mitogen-activated protein kinase responses along with triggeringβ-arrestin recruitment. Thus, PAR2 can be added alongside PAR1 and PAR4 to the targets, whereby thrombin can affect tissue function.

  1. Monocyte Signal Transduction Receptors in Active and Latent Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Druszczynska, Magdalena; Wlodarczyk, Marcin; Janiszewska-Drobinska, Beata; Kielnierowski, Grzegorz; Zawadzka, Joanna; Kowalewicz-Kulbat, Magdalena; Fol, Marek; Szpakowski, Piotr; Rudnicka, Karolina; Chmiela, Magdalena; Rudnicka, Wieslawa

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms that promote either resistance or susceptibility to TB disease remain insufficiently understood. Our aim was to compare the expression of cell signaling transduction receptors, CD14, TLR2, CD206, and β2 integrin LFA-1 on monocytes from patients with active TB or nonmycobacterial lung disease and healthy individuals with M.tb latency and uninfected controls to explain the background of the differences between clinical and subclinical forms of M.tb infection. A simultaneous increase in the expression of the membrane bound mCD14 receptor and LFA-1 integrin in patients with active TB may be considered a prodrome of breaking immune control by M.tb bacilli in subjects with the latent TB and absence of clinical symptoms. PMID:23401703

  2. Extracellular ATP activates MAPK and ROS signaling during injury response in the fungus Trichoderma atroviride

    PubMed Central

    Medina-Castellanos, Elizabeth; Esquivel-Naranjo, Edgardo U.; Heil, Martin; Herrera-Estrella, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The response to mechanical damage is crucial for the survival of multicellular organisms, enabling their adaptation to hostile environments. Trichoderma atroviride, a filamentous fungus of great importance in the biological control of plant diseases, responds to mechanical damage by activating regenerative processes and asexual reproduction (conidiation). During this response, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by the NADPH oxidase complex. To understand the underlying early signaling events, we evaluated molecules such as extracellular ATP (eATP) and Ca2+ that are known to trigger wound-induced responses in plants and animals. Concretely, we investigated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways by eATP, Ca2+, and ROS. Indeed, application of exogenous ATP and Ca2+ triggered conidiation. Furthermore, eATP promoted the Nox1-dependent production of ROS and activated a MAPK pathway. Mutants in the MAPK-encoding genes tmk1 and tmk3 were affected in wound-induced conidiation, and phosphorylation of both Tmk1 and Tmk3 was triggered by eATP. We conclude that in this fungus, eATP acts as a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP). Our data indicate the existence of an eATP receptor and suggest that in fungi, eATP triggers pathways that converge to regulate asexual reproduction genes that are required for injury-induced conidiation. By contrast, Ca2+ is more likely to act as a downstream second messenger. The early steps of mechanical damage response in T. atroviride share conserved elements with those known from plants and animals. PMID:25484887

  3. Stromal Hedgehog signalling is downregulated in colon cancer and its restoration restrains tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Gerling, Marco; Büller, Nikè V. J. A.; Kirn, Leonard M.; Joost, Simon; Frings, Oliver; Englert, Benjamin; Bergström, Åsa; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Blaas, Leander; Wielenga, Mattheus C. B.; Almer, Sven; Kühl, Anja A.; Fredlund, Erik; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Toftgård, Rune

    2016-01-01

    A role for Hedgehog (Hh) signalling in the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) has been proposed. In CRC and other solid tumours, Hh ligands are upregulated; however, a specific Hh antagonist provided no benefit in a clinical trial. Here we use Hh reporter mice to show that downstream Hh activity is unexpectedly diminished in a mouse model of colitis-associated colon cancer, and that downstream Hh signalling is restricted to the stroma. Functionally, stroma-specific Hh activation in mice markedly reduces the tumour load and blocks progression of advanced neoplasms, partly via the modulation of BMP signalling and restriction of the colonic stem cell signature. By contrast, attenuated Hh signalling accelerates colonic tumourigenesis. In human CRC, downstream Hh activity is similarly reduced and canonical Hh signalling remains predominantly paracrine. Our results suggest that diminished downstream Hh signalling enhances CRC development, and that stromal Hh activation can act as a colonic tumour suppressor. PMID:27492255

  4. Zinc promotes proliferation and activation of myogenic cells via the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Kazuya; Nagata, Yosuke; Wada, Eiji; Zammit, Peter S.; Shiozuka, Masataka; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2015-05-01

    Skeletal muscle stem cells named muscle satellite cells are normally quiescent but are activated in response to various stimuli, such as injury and overload. Activated satellite cells enter the cell cycle and proliferate to produce a large number of myogenic progenitor cells, and these cells then differentiate and fuse to form myofibers. Zinc is one of the essential elements in the human body, and has multiple roles, including cell growth and DNA synthesis. However, the role of zinc in myogenic cells is not well understood, and is the focus of this study. We first examined the effects of zinc on differentiation of murine C2C12 myoblasts and found that zinc promoted proliferation, with an increased number of cells incorporating EdU, but inhibited differentiation with reduced myogenin expression and myotube formation. Furthermore, we used the C2C12 reserve cell model of myogenic quiescence to investigate the role of zinc on activation of myogenic cells. The number of reserve cells incorporating BrdU was increased by zinc in a dose dependent manner, with the number dramatically further increased using a combination of zinc and insulin. Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) are downstream of insulin signaling, and both were phosphorylated after zinc treatment. The zinc/insulin combination-induced activation involved the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and ERK cascade. We conclude that zinc promotes activation and proliferation of myogenic cells, and this activation requires phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt and ERK as part of the signaling cascade. - Highlights: • Zinc has roles for promoting proliferation and inhibition differentiation of C2C12. • Zinc promotes activation of reserve cells. • Insulin and zinc synergize activation of reserve cells. • PI3K/Akt and ERK cascade affect zinc/insulin-mediated activation of reserve cells.

  5. A novel Lyn-protein kinase Cδ/ε-protein kinase D axis is activated in B cells by signalosome-independent alternate pathway BCR signaling.

    PubMed

    Guo, Benchang; Rothstein, Thomas L

    2013-06-01

    BCR signaling initiates multiple activities critical for B-cell function. Recently, we identified an alternate BCR signaling pathway, induced by IL-4, that is signalosome-independent, unlike the classical signalosome-dependent pathway, and that leads to activation of the MAP kinase, ERK. Here we questioned whether alternate pathway signaling extends to other key downstream events, especially protein kinase D (PKD) activation. We found that in murine spleen-derived B cells the IL-4-induced alternate pathway for BCR signaling results in PKD and PKD substrate phosphorylation, and that alternate pathway phosphorylation of HDAC5/7 and other key substrates requires PKD. Furthermore, we found that tyrosine phosphorylation of PKCδ/ε occurs as a result of alternate but not classical pathway signaling and is required for phosphorylation of PKD and PKD substrates. This result identifies PKCδ/ε tyrosine phosphorylation as a unique outcome of the alternate pathway. The alternate pathway is mediated by Lyn that is not required for classical pathway signaling and we found that Lyn associates directly with PKCδ/ε and is required for phosphorylation of PKCδ/ε and of PKD. These findings indicate that IL-4 influences B-cell activation by inducing a novel signaling pathway from BCR to Lyn to PKCδ/ε to PKD.

  6. Prolactin-Stimulated Activation of ERK1/2 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases is Controlled by PI3-Kinase/Rac/PAK Signaling Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aksamitiene, Edita; Achanta, Sirisha; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Hoek, Jan B.; Kiyatkin, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    There is strong evidence that deregulation of prolactin (PRL) signaling contributes to pathogenesis and chemoresistance of breast cancer. Therefore, understanding cross-talk between distinct signal transduction pathways triggered by activation of the prolactin receptor (PRL-R), is essential for elucidating the pathogenesis of metastatic breast cancer. In this study, we applied a sequential inhibitory analysis of various signaling intermediates to examine the hierarchy of protein interactions within the PRL signaling network and to evaluate the relative contributions of multiple signaling branches downstream of PRL-R to the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases ERK1 and ERK2 in T47D and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Quantitative measurements of the phosphorylation/activation patterns of proteins showed that PRL simultaneously activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and the JAK/STAT, phosphoinositide-3 (PI3)-kinase/Akt and MAPK signaling pathways. The specific blockade or siRNA-mediated suppression of SFK/FAK, JAK2/STAT5, PI3-kinase/PDK1/Akt, Rac/PAK or Ras regulatory circuits revealed that (1) the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway is required for activation of the MAPK/ERK signaling cascade upon PRL stimulation; (2) PI3-kinase-mediated activation of the c-Raf-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 cascade occurs independent of signaling dowstream of STATs, Akt and PKC, but requires JAK2, SFKs and FAK activities; (3) activated PRL-R mainly utilizes the PI3-kinase-dependent Rac/PAK pathway rather than the canonical Shc/Grb2/SOS/Ras route to initiate and sustain ERK1/2 signaling. By interconnecting diverse signaling pathways PLR may enhance proliferation, survival, migration and invasiveness of breast cancer cells. PMID:21726627

  7. Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3, Inflammation, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Bharat B.; Kunnumakkara, Ajaikumar B.; Harikumar, Kuzhuvelil B.; Gupta, Shan R.; Tharakan, Sheeja T.; Koca, Cemile; Dey, Sanjit; Sung, Bokyung

    2011-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT-3) is one of six members of a family of transcription factors. It was discovered almost 15 years ago as an acute-phase response factor. This factor has now been associated with inflammation, cellular transformation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis of cancer. Various types of carcinogens, radiation, viruses, growth factors, oncogenes, and inflammatory cytokines have been found to activate STAT-3. STAT-3 is constitutively active in most tumor cells but not in normal cells. Phosphorylation of STAT-3 at tyrosine 705 leads to its dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and gene transcription. The phosphorylation of STAT-3 at serine 727 may regulate its activity negatively or positively. STAT-3 regulates the expression of genes that mediate survival (survivin, bcl-xl, mcl-1, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein), proliferation (c-fos, c-myc, cyclin D1), invasion (matrix metalloproteinase-2), and angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor). STAT-3 activation has also been associated with both chemoresistance and radioresistance. STAT-3 mediates these effects through its collaboration with various other transcription factors, including nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia-inducible factor-1, and peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ. Because of its critical role in tumorigenesis, inhibitors of this factor’s activation are being sought for both prevention and therapy of cancer. This has led to identification of small peptides, oligonucleotides, and small molecules as potential STAT-3 inhibitors. Several of these small molecules are chemo-preventive agents derived from plants. This review discusses the intimate relationship between STAT-3, inflammation, and cancer in more detail. PMID:19723038

  8. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-08-01

    Active coping underlies a healthy stress response, but neural processes supporting such resilient coping are not well-known. Using a brief, sustained exposure paradigm contrasting highly stressful, threatening, and violent stimuli versus nonaversive neutral visual stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we show significant subjective, physiologic, and endocrine increases and temporally related dynamically distinct patterns of neural activation in brain circuits underlying the stress response. First, stress-specific sustained increases in the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, midbrain, right insula, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions supported the stress processing and reactivity circuit. Second, dynamic neural activation during stress versus neutral runs, showing early increases followed by later reduced activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), left DLPFC, hippocampus, and left insula, suggested a stress adaptation response network. Finally, dynamic stress-specific mobilization of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC), marked by initial hypoactivity followed by increased VmPFC activation, pointed to the VmPFC as a key locus of the emotional and behavioral control network. Consistent with this finding, greater neural flexibility signals in the VmPFC during stress correlated with active coping ratings whereas lower dynamic activity in the VmPFC also predicted a higher level of maladaptive coping behaviors in real life, including binge alcohol intake, emotional eating, and frequency of arguments and fights. These findings demonstrate acute functional neuroplasticity during stress, with distinct and separable brain networks that underlie critical components of the stress response, and a specific role for VmPFC neuroflexibility in stress-resilient coping. PMID:27432990

  9. You've found a safety signal--now what?: regulatory implications of industry signal detection activities.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Sidney N

    2007-01-01

    Signals detected by measuring disproportionality of drug-event combinations are only statistical indicators of possible real safety issues, and are not per se necessarily medically important. Nevertheless, once a signal is observed, sponsors are obligated by regulations and ethical considerations to determine whether it represents a new product-associated risk by additional analysis, validation and evaluation of its clinical relevance. Signal strength does not necessarily correlate with medical significance. Strong signals most often represent known, expected and/or medically trivial adverse reactions or confounding by treatment indication, common co-morbidities or other common concomitant treatments. Conversely, any product with reasonably extensive clinical use and reporting of suspected adverse reactions is likely to manifest many weak but clinically unimportant signals, creating significant background 'noise'. Since relatively rare, medically important adverse drug reactions are often likely to manifest as weak signals, sponsors face a potentially onerous burden of evaluating multiple signals in order to distinguish true, clinically important events of concern from spurious signals. This paper discusses the regulatory, clinical and potential legal liability issues that confront industry as a consequence of signal identification activities, including: current and anticipated regulatory requirements for detection, assessment and reporting; the reliability of the data used for signal generation; assessment of clinical relevance; organisational approaches and responses to observed signals; targeted clinical and scientific responses to observed signals; and potential regulatory, legal and commercial impact.

  10. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Heejin; Lee, Kyunghee; Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  11. Aurora A kinase activity influences calcium signaling in kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Plotnikova, Olga V; Pugacheva, Elena N; Golemis, Erica A

    2011-06-13

    Most studies of Aurora A (AurA) describe it as a mitotic centrosomal kinase. However, we and others have recently identified AurA functions as diverse as control of ciliary resorption, cell differentiation, and cell polarity control in interphase cells. In these activities, AurA is transiently activated by noncanonical signals, including Ca(2+)-dependent calmodulin binding. These and other observations suggested that AurA might be involved in pathological conditions, such as polycystic kidney disease (PKD). In this paper, we show that AurA is abundant in normal kidney tissue but is also abnormally expressed and activated in cells lining PKD-associated renal cysts. PKD arises from mutations in the PKD1 or PKD2 genes, encoding polycystins 1 and 2 (PC1 and PC2). AurA binds, phosphorylates, and reduces the activity of PC2, a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel and, thus, limits the amplitude of Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum. These and other findings suggest AurA may be a relevant new biomarker or target in the therapy of PKD.

  12. Signal-to-noise ratio in neuro activation PET studies

    SciTech Connect

    Votaw, J.R.

    1996-04-01

    It has become commonplace to compare scanner sensitivity characteristics by comparing noise equivalent count rate curves. However, because a 20-cm diameter uniform phantom is drastically difference from a human brain, these curves give misleading information when planning a neuro activation PET experiment. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) calculations have been performed using measured data (Siemens 921 scanner) from the three-dimensional (3-D) Hoffman brain phantom for the purpose of determining the optimal injection and scanning protocol for [{sup 15}O] labeled activation experiments. Region of interest (ROI) values along with the variance due to prompt (trues plus randoms) and random events were determined for various regions and radioactivity concentrations. Calculated attenuation correction was used throughout. Scatter correction was not used when calculating the SNR in activation studies because the number of scattered events is almost identical in each data acquisition and hence cancels. The results indicate that randoms correction should not be performed and that rather than being limited by the scanner capabilities, neuro activation experiments are limited by the amount of radioactivity that can be injected and the length of time the patient can stay in the scanner.

  13. Accelerated Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity Potentiates Osteoclastogenesis via NFATc1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Man; Kwon, So Hyun; Lee, Seoung Hoon; Lee, Soo Young; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-01-01

    Osteoclasts seem to be metabolic active during their differentiation and bone-resorptive activation. However, the functional role of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a tetrameric enzyme consisting of an A and/or B subunit that catalyzes interconversion of pyruvate to lactate, in RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is not known. In this study, RANKL treatment induced gradual gene expression and activation of the LDH A2B2 isotype during osteoclast differentiation as well as the LDH A1B3 and B4 isotypes during osteoclast maturation after pre-osteoclast formation. Glucose consumption and lactate production in growth media were accelerated during osteoclast differentiation, together with enhanced expression of H+-lactate co-transporter and increased extracellular acidification, demonstrating that glycolytic metabolism was stimulated during differentiation. Further, oxygen consumption via mitochondria was stimulated during osteoclast differentiation. On the contrary, depletion of LDH-A or LDH-B subunit suppressed both glycolytic and mitochondrial metabolism, resulting in reduced mature osteoclast formation via decreased osteoclast precursor fusion and down-regulation of the osteoclastogenic critical transcription factor NFATc1 and its target genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that RANKL-induced LDH activation stimulates glycolytic and mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, facilitating mature osteoclast formation via osteoclast precursor fusion and NFATc1 signaling. PMID:27077737

  14. Transfer Function between EEG and BOLD Signals of Epileptic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Marco; Leal, Alberto; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2013-01-01

    Simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) recordings have seen growing application in the evaluation of epilepsy, namely in the characterization of brain networks related to epileptic activity. In EEG-correlated fMRI studies, epileptic events are usually described as boxcar signals based on the timing information retrieved from the EEG, and subsequently convolved with a hemodynamic response function to model the associated Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) changes. Although more flexible approaches may allow a higher degree of complexity for the hemodynamics, the issue of how to model these dynamics based on the EEG remains an open question. In this work, a new methodology for the integration of simultaneous EEG-fMRI data in epilepsy is proposed, which incorporates a transfer function from the EEG to the BOLD signal. Independent component analysis of the EEG is performed, and a number of metrics expressing different models of the EEG-BOLD transfer function are extracted from the resulting time courses. These metrics are then used to predict the fMRI data and to identify brain areas associated with the EEG epileptic activity. The methodology was tested on both ictal and interictal EEG-fMRI recordings from one patient with a hypothalamic hamartoma. When compared to the conventional analysis approach, plausible, consistent, and more significant activations were obtained. Importantly, frequency-weighted EEG metrics yielded superior results than those weighted solely on the EEG power, which comes in agreement with previous literature. Reproducibility, specificity, and sensitivity should be addressed in an extended group of patients in order to further validate the proposed methodology and generalize the presented proof of concept. PMID:23355832

  15. FGF signaling activates a Sox9-Sox10 pathway for the formation and branching morphogenesis of mouse ocular glands.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ziyan; Huang, Jie; Liu, Ying; Dattilo, Lisa K; Huh, Sung-Ho; Ornitz, David; Beebe, David C

    2014-07-01

    Murine lacrimal, harderian and meibomian glands develop from the prospective conjunctival and eyelid epithelia and produce secretions that lubricate and protect the ocular surface. Sox9 expression localizes to the presumptive conjunctival epithelium as early as E11.5 and is detected in the lacrimal and harderian glands as they form. Conditional deletion showed that Sox9 is required for the development of the lacrimal and harderian glands and contributes to the formation of the meibomian glands. Sox9 regulates the expression of Sox10 to promote the formation of secretory acinar lobes in the lacrimal gland. Sox9 and FGF signaling were required for the expression of cartilage-associated extracellular matrix components during early stage lacrimal gland development. Fgfr2 deletion in the ocular surface epithelium reduced Sox9 and eliminated Sox10 expression. Sox9 deletion from the ectoderm did not affect Fgf10 expression in the adjacent mesenchyme or Fgfr2 expression in the epithelium, but appeared to reduce FGF signaling. Sox9 heterozygotes showed a haploinsufficient phenotype, in which the exorbital branch of the lacrimal gland was absent in most cases. However, enhancement of epithelial FGF signaling by expression of a constitutively active FGF receptor only partially rescued the lacrimal gland defects in Sox9 heterozygotes, suggesting a crucial role of Sox9, downstream of FGF signaling, in regulating lacrimal gland branching and differentiation.

  16. Nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway activated by M1-type muscarinic acetylcholine receptor cascade inhibits Na+-activated K+ currents in Kenyon cells.

    PubMed

    Hasebe, Masaharu; Yoshino, Masami

    2016-06-01

    The interneurons of the mushroom body, known as Kenyon cells, are essential for the long-term memory of olfactory associative learning in some insects. Some studies have reported that nitric oxide (NO) is strongly related to this long-term memory in Kenyon cells. However, the target molecules and upstream and downstream NO signaling cascades are not completely understood. Here we analyzed the effect of the NO signaling cascade on Na(+)-activated K(+) (KNa) channel activity in Kenyon cells of crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). We found that two different NO donors, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), strongly suppressed KNa channel currents. Additionally, this inhibitory effect of GSNO on KNa channel activity was diminished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), and KT5823, an inhibitor of protein kinase G (PKG). Next, we analyzed the role of ACh in the NO signaling cascade. ACh strongly suppressed KNa channel currents, similar to NO donors. Furthermore, this inhibitory effect of ACh was blocked by pirenzepine, an M1 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist, but not by 1,1-dimethyl-4-diphenylacetoxypiperidinium iodide (4-DAMP) and mecamylamine, an M3 muscarinic ACh receptor antagonist and a nicotinic ACh receptor antagonist, respectively. The ACh-induced inhibition of KNa channel currents was also diminished by the PLC inhibitor U73122 and the calmodulin antagonist W-7. Finally, we found that ACh inhibition was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). These results suggested that the ACh signaling cascade promotes NO production by activating NOS and NO inhibits KNa channel currents via the sGC/cGMP/PKG signaling cascade in Kenyon cells. PMID:26984419

  17. Canine adenovirus downstream processing protocol.

    PubMed

    Puig, Meritxell; Piedra, Jose; Miravet, Susana; Segura, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are efficient gene delivery tools. A major caveat with vectors derived from common human adenovirus serotypes is that most adults are likely to have been exposed to the wild-type virus and exhibit active immunity against the vectors. This preexisting immunity limits their clinical success. Strategies to circumvent this problem include the use of nonhuman adenovirus vectors. Vectors derived from canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) are among the best-studied representatives. CAV-2 vectors are particularly attractive for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, CAV-2 vectors have shown great promise as oncolytic agents in virotherapy approaches and as vectors for recombinant vaccines. The rising interest in CAV-2 vectors calls for the development of scalable GMP compliant production and purification strategies. A detailed protocol describing a complete scalable downstream processing strategy for CAV-2 vectors is reported here. Clarification of CAV-2 particles is achieved by microfiltration. CAV-2 particles are subsequently concentrated and partially purified by ultrafiltration-diafiltration. A Benzonase(®) digestion step is carried out between ultrafiltration and diafiltration operations to eliminate contaminating nucleic acids. Chromatography purification is accomplished in two consecutive steps. CAV-2 particles are first captured and concentrated on a propyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography column followed by a polishing step using DEAE anion exchange monoliths. Using this protocol, high-quality CAV-2 vector preparations containing low levels of contamination with empty viral capsids and other inactive vector forms are typically obtained. The complete process yield was estimated to be 38-45 %. PMID:24132487

  18. Bisphenol A (BPA) stimulates the interferon signaling and activates the inflammasome activity in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Panchanathan, Ravichandran; Liu, Hongzhu; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Ho, Shuk-mei; Choubey, Divaker

    2015-11-01

    Environmental factors contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), which exhibits a strong female bias (female-to-male ratio 9:1). However, the molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because a feedforward loop between the female sex hormone estrogen (E2) and type I interferon (IFN-α/β)-signaling induces the expression of certain p200-family proteins (such as murine p202 and human IFI16) that regulate innate immune responses and modify lupus susceptibility, we investigated whether treatment of myeloid cells with bisphenol A (BPA), an environmental estrogen, could regulate the p200-family proteins and activate innate immune responses. We found that treatment of murine bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with BPA induced the expression of ERα and IFN-β, activated the IFN-signaling, and stimulated the expression of the p202 and IFI16 proteins. Further, the treatment increased levels of the NLRP3 inflammasome and stimulated its activity. Accordingly, BPA-treatment of BMCs from non lupus-prone C57BL/6 and the lupus-prone (NZB×NZW)F1 mice activated the type I IFN-signaling, induced the expression of p202, and activated an inflammasome activity. Our study demonstrates that BPA-induced signaling in the murine and human myeloid cells stimulates the type I IFN-signaling that results in an induction of the p202 and IFI16 innate immune sensors for the cytosolic DNA and activates an inflammasome activity. These observations provide novel molecular insights into the role of environmental BPA exposures in potentiating the development of certain autoimmune diseases such as SLE.

  19. Signal-amplifying genetic circuit enables in vivo observation of weak promoter activation in the Rhl quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Karig, David; Weiss, Ron

    2005-03-20

    Small changes in transcriptional activity often significantly affect phenotype but are not detectable in vivo by conventional means. To address this problem, we present a technique for detecting weak transcriptional responses using signal-amplifying genetic circuits. We apply this technique to reveal previously undetectable log phase responses of several Rhl quorum sensing controlled (qsc) promoters from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Genetic circuits with Rhl promoters and transcriptional amplification components were built and tested in Escherichia coli. This enabled us to isolate the behavior of the promoters under study from Las and quinolone interactions. To amplify qsc promoter responses to acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL), the highly efficient lambda repressor gene was placed downstream of several Rhl promoters and coupled to a fluorescent reporter under the control of the lambda P(R) promoter. With amplification, up to approximately 100-fold differences in fluorescence levels between AHL induced and noninduced cultures were observed for promoters whose responses were otherwise not detectable. In addition, the combination of using signal amplification and performing experiments in E. coli simplified the analysis of AHL signal crosstalk. For example, we discovered that while a C4HSL/RhlR complex activates both qscrhlA and qscphzA1, a 3OC12HSL/RhlR complex activates qscphzA1 but not qscrhlA in our system. This crosstalk information is particularly important since one of the potential uses of amplification constructs is for the detection of specific quorum sensing signals in environmental and clinical isolates. Furthermore, the process of decomposing networks into basic parts, isolating these components in a well-defined background, and using amplification to characterize both crosstalk and cognate signal responses embodies an important approach to understanding complex genetic networks.

  20. Lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol Reduces Experimental Atherosclerosis through Activation of Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhekang; Chen, Minjie; Xie, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Desikan, Rajagopal; Mihai, Georgeta; Burns, Patrick; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and Nrf2 is the transcriptional factor central in cellular antioxidant responses. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a dihydrolipoic acid derivative lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol (LMDP) on the progression of atherosclerosis and test whether its effect on atherosclerosis is mediated by Nrf2. Methods and Results Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and en face analysis reveal that 14 weeks of treatment with LMDP markedly reduced atherosclerotic burden in a rabbit balloon vascular injury model. Myograph analyses show decreased aortic contractile response to phenylephrine and increased aortic response to acetylcholine and insulin in LMDP-treated animals, suggesting that LMDP inhibits atherosclerosis through improving vascular function. A role of Nrf2 signaling in mediating the amelioration of vascular function by LMDP was supported by increased Nrf2 translocation into nuclear and increased expression of Nrf2 target genes. Furthermore, chemotaxis analysis with Boydem chamber shows that leukocytes isolated from LMDP-treated rabbits had reduced chemotaxis, and knock-down of Nrf2 significantly reduced the effect of LMDP on the chemotaxis of mouse macrophages. Conclusion Our results support that LMDP has an anti-atherosclerotic effect likely through activation of Nrf2 signaling and subsequent inhibition of macrophage chemotaxis. PMID:26859892

  1. Nucleoporin 62-Like Protein Activates Canonical Wnt Signaling through Facilitating the Nuclear Import of β-Catenin in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaojie; Gu, Qilin; Lin, Li; Li, Shaoyang; Zhong, Shan

    2015-01-01

    Nucleoporin p62 (Nup62) localizes in the central channel of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) and regulates nuclear pore permeability and nucleocytoplasmic transport. However, the developmental roles of Nup62 in vertebrates remain largely unclear. Zebrafish Nup62-like protein (Nup62l) is a homolog of mammalian Nup62. The nup62l gene is maternally expressed, but its transcripts are ubiquitously distributed during early embryogenesis and enriched in the head, pharynx, and intestine of developing embryos. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway positively modulates nup62l transcription, while Bmp signaling acts downstream of Wnt/β-catenin signaling to negatively regulate nup62l expression. Overexpression of nup62l dorsalized embryos and enhanced gastrula convergence and extension (CE) movements. In contrast, knockdown of Nup62l led to ventralized embryos, an impediment to CE movements, and defects in specification of midline organ progenitors. Mechanistically, Nup62l acts as an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling through interaction with and facilitation of nuclear import of β-catenin-1/2 in zebrafish. Thus, Nup62l regulates dorsoventral patterning, gastrula CE movements, and proper specification of midline organ precursors through mediating the nuclear import of β-catenins in zebrafish. PMID:25605329

  2. Remodeling of global transcription patterns of Cryptococcus neoformans genes mediated by the stress-activated HOG signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young-Joon; Yu, Yeong Man; Kim, Gyu-Bum; Lee, Gir-Won; Maeng, Pil Jae; Kim, Sangsoo; Floyd, Anna; Heitman, Joseph; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2009-08-01

    The ability to sense and adapt to a hostile host environment is a crucial element for virulence of pathogenic fungi, including Cryptococcus neoformans. These cellular responses are evoked by diverse signaling cascades, including the stress-activated HOG pathway. Despite previous analysis of central components of the HOG pathway, its downstream signaling network is poorly characterized in C. neoformans. Here we performed comparative transcriptome analysis with HOG signaling mutants to explore stress-regulated genes and their correlation with the HOG pathway in C. neoformans. In this study, we not only provide important insights into remodeling patterns of global gene expression for counteracting external stresses but also elucidate novel characteristics of the HOG pathway in C. neoformans. First, inhibition of the HOG pathway increases expression of ergosterol biosynthesis genes and cellular ergosterol content, conferring a striking synergistic antifungal activity with amphotericin B and providing an excellent opportunity to develop a novel therapeutic method for treatment of cryptococcosis. Second, a number of cadmium-sensitive genes are differentially regulated by the HOG pathway, and their mutation causes resistance to cadmium. Finally, we have discovered novel stress defense and HOG-dependent genes, which encode a sodium/potassium efflux pump, protein kinase, multidrug transporter system, and elements of the ubiquitin-dependent system.

  3. CELL SIGNALLING DYNAMICS IN TIME AND SPACE

    PubMed Central

    Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2006-01-01

    PREFACE The specificity of cellular responses to receptor stimulation is encoded by the spatial and temporal dynamics of downstream signalling networks. Computational models provide insights into the intricate relationships between stimuli and responses and reveal mechanisms that enable networks to amplify signals, reduce noise and generate discontinuous bistable dynamics or oscillations. These temporal dynamics are coupled to precipitous spatial gradients of signalling activities, which guide pivotal intracellular processes, but also necessitate mechanisms to facilitate signal propagation across a cell. PMID:16482094

  4. The apelin receptor: physiology, pathology, cell signalling, and ligand modulation of a peptide-activated class A GPCR.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Nigel A; Dupré, Denis J; Rainey, Jan K

    2014-12-01

    The apelin receptor (AR or APJ) is a class A (rhodopsin-like) G-protein-coupled receptor with wide distribution throughout the human body. Activation of the AR by its cognate peptide ligand, apelin, induces diverse physiological effects including vasoconstriction and dilation, strengthening of heart muscle contractility, angiogenesis, and regulation of energy metabolism and fluid homeostasis. Recently, another endogenous peptidic activator of the AR, Toddler/ELABELA, was identified as having a crucial role in zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryonic development. The AR is also implicated in pathologies including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and cancer, making it a promising therapeutic target. Despite its established importance, the precise roles of AR signalling remain poorly understood. Moreover, little is known about the mechanisms of peptide-AR activation. Additional complexity arises from modulation of the AR by 2 endogenous peptide ligands, both with multiple bioactive isoforms of variable length and distribution. The various apelin and Toddler/ELABELA isoforms may also produce distinct cellular effects. Further complexity arises through formation of functionally distinct heterodimers between the AR and other G-protein-coupled receptors. This minireview outlines key (patho)physiological actions of the AR, addresses what is known about signal transduction downstream of AR activation, and concludes by discussing unique properties of the endogenous peptidic ligands of the AR. PMID:25275559

  5. Phospholipase C-η1 is activated by intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization and enhances GPCRs/PLC/Ca(2+) signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Choi, Jung Woong; Lim, Seyoung; Kwon, Ohman; Seo, Jeong Kon; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2011-06-01

    Phospholipase C-η1 (PLC-η1) is the most recently identified PLC isotype and is primarily expressed in nerve tissue. However, its functional role is unclear. In the present study, we report for the first time that PLC-η1 acts as a signal amplifier in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated PLC and Ca(2+) signaling. Short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of endogenous PLC-η1 reduced lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-, bradykinin (BK)-, and PACAP-induced PLC activity in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro2A (N2A) cells, indicating that PLC-η1 participates in GPCR-mediated PLC activation. Interestingly, ionomycin-induced PLC activity was significantly decreased by PLC-η1, but not PLC-η2, knockdown. In addition, we found that intracellular Ca(2+) source is enough for PLC-η1 activation. Furthermore, the IP(3) receptor inhibitor, 2-APB, inhibited LPA-induced PLC activity in control N2A cells, whereas this effect was not observed in PLC-η1 knockdown N2A cells, suggesting a pivotal role of intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization in PLC-η1 activation. Finally, we found that LPA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and expression of the downstream target gene, krox-24, were significantly decreased by PLC-η1 knockdown, and these knockdown effects were abolished by 2-APB. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that PLC-η1 is activated via intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization from the ER, and therefore amplifies GPCR-mediated signaling.

  6. Activation of the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling Is Critical for Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cell Osteogenic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chen-Shuang; Zheng, Zhong; Su, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Fei; Ling, Michelle; Zou, Min; Zhou, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs) are recognized as candidate progenitor cells for bone regeneration. However, the mechanism of hUCMSC osteogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling is involved in hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation in vitro. Particularly, the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) and p38 signaling pathways maintained a consistent level in hUCMSCs through the entire 21-day osteogenic differentiation period. At the same time, the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) signaling significantly increased from day 5, peaked at day 9, and declined thereafter. Moreover, gene profiling of osteogenic markers, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity measurement, and alizarin red staining demonstrated that the application of U0126, a specific inhibitor for ERK activation, completely prohibited hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation. However, when U0126 was removed from the culture at day 9, ERK activation and osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs were partially recovered. Together, these findings demonstrate that the activation of ERK signaling is essential for hUCMSC osteogenic differentiation, which points out the significance of ERK signaling pathway to regulate the osteogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs as an alternative cell source for bone tissue engineering. PMID:26989682

  7. Cyclic AMP signaling reduces sirtuin 6 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells by promoting ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation via inhibition of the Raf-MEK-ERK (Raf/mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase) pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Jun; Juhnn, Yong-Sung

    2015-04-10

    The cAMP signaling system regulates various cellular functions, including metabolism, gene expression, and death. Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) removes acetyl groups from histones and regulates genomic stability and cell viability. We hypothesized that cAMP modulates SIRT6 activity to regulate apoptosis. Therefore, we examined the effects of cAMP signaling on SIRT6 expression and radiation-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells. cAMP signaling in H1299 and A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells was activated via the expression of constitutively active Gαs plus treatment with prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), isoproterenol, or forskolin. The expression of sirtuins and signaling molecules were analyzed by Western blotting. Activation of cAMP signaling reduced SIRT6 protein expression in lung cancer cells. cAMP signaling increased the ubiquitination of SIRT6 protein and promoted its degradation. Treatment with MG132 and inhibiting PKA with H89 or with a dominant-negative PKA abolished the cAMP-mediated reduction in SIRT6 levels. Treatment with PGE2 inhibited c-Raf activation by increasing inhibitory phosphorylation at Ser-259 in a PKA-dependent manner, thereby inhibiting downstream MEK-ERK signaling. Inhibiting ERK with inhibitors or with dominant-negative ERKs reduced SIRT6 expression, whereas activation of ERK by constitutively active MEK abolished the SIRT6-depleting effects of PGE2. cAMP signaling also augmented radiation-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells. This effect was abolished by exogenous expression of SIRT6. It is concluded that cAMP signaling reduces SIRT6 expression by promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation, a process mediated by the PKA-dependent inhibition of the Raf-MEK-ERK pathway. Reduced SIRT6 expression mediates the augmentation of radiation-induced apoptosis by cAMP signaling in lung cancer cells.

  8. Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) signalling desensitization is counteracted via PAR4 signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fälker, Knut; Haglund, Linda; Gunnarsson, Peter; Nylander, Martina; Lindahl, Tomas L; Grenegård, Magnus

    2011-06-01

    PARs (protease-activated receptors) 1 and 4 belong to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors which induce both G(α12/13) and G(αq) signalling. By applying the specific PAR1- and PAR4-activating hexapeptides, SFLLRN and AYPGKF respectively, we found that aggregation of isolated human platelets mediated via PAR1, but not via PAR4, is abolished upon homologous receptor activation in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. This effect was not due to receptor internalization, but to a decrease in Ca²⁺ mobilization, PKC (protein kinase C) signalling and α-granule secretion, as well as to a complete lack of dense granule secretion. Interestingly, subthreshold PAR4 activation rapidly abrogated PAR1 signalling desensitization by differentially reconstituting these affected signalling events and functional responses, which was sufficient to re-establish aggregation. The lack of ADP release and P2Y₁₂ receptor-induced G(αi) signalling accounted for the loss of the aggregation response, as mimicking G(αi/z) signalling with 2-MeS-ADP (2-methylthioadenosine-5'-O-diphosphate) or epinephrine (adrenaline) could substitute for intermediate PAR4 activation. Finally, we found that the re-sensitization of PAR1 signalling-induced aggregation via PAR4 relied on PKC-mediated release of both ADP from dense granules and fibrinogen from α-granules. The present study elucidates further differences in human platelet PAR signalling regulation and provides evidence for a cross-talk in which PAR4 signalling counteracts mechanisms involved in PAR1 signalling down-regulation. PMID:21391917

  9. JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway promotes cell proliferation through activation of Pituitary Tumor Transforming Gene 1 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Xu-Liang; Wei, Wu; Xu, Hong-Liang; Zhang, Mei-Xiang; Qin, Xiao-Qi; Shi, Wen-Zhi; Jiang, Zhi-Ping; Chen, Yi-Jian; Chen, Fang-Ping

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} AG490, a member of tyrosine kinase inhibitors, could inhibit the JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway in HEL cell which harbor JAK2V617F mutation. {yields} Inhibition of the JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway inhibited the growth of HEL cells. {yields} JAK2V617F mutation promotes cell proliferation through activation of PTTG1 expression. {yields} JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway regulate PTTG1 expression at transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Gain-of-function mutations of JAK2 play crucial roles in the development of myeloproliferative neoplasms; however, the underlying downstream events of this activated signaling pathway are not fully understood. Our experiment was designed and performed to address one aspect of this issue. Here we report that AG490, a potent JAK2V617F kinase inhibitor, effectively inhibits the proliferation of HEL cells. Interestingly, AG490 also decreases the expression of PTTG1, a possible target gene of the aberrant signaling pathway, in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the promoter activity analyses reveal that the inhibition of the PTTG1 expression is affected at the transcriptional level. Thus, our results suggest that the JAK2V617F/STAT5 signaling pathway promotes cell proliferation through the transcriptional activation of PTTG1.

  10. BLM promotes the activation of Fanconi Anemia signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Panneerselvam, Jayabal; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Jun; Che, Raymond; Yu, Herbert; Fei, Peiwen

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the human RecQ helicase, BLM, causes Bloom Syndrome, which is a rare autosomal recessive disorder and characterized by genomic instability and an increased risk of cancer. Fanconi Anemia (FA), resulting from mutations in any of the 19 known FA genes and those yet to be known, is also characterized by chromosomal instability and a high incidence of cancer. BLM helicase and FA proteins, therefore, may work in a common tumor-suppressor signaling pathway. To date, it remains largely unclear as to how BLM and FA proteins work concurrently in the maintenance of genome stability. Here we report that BLM is involved in the early activation of FA group D2 protein (FANCD2). We found that FANCD2 activation is substantially delayed and attenuated in crosslinking agent-treated cells harboring deficient Blm compared to similarly treated control cells with sufficient BLM. We also identified that the domain VI of BLM plays an essential role in promoting FANCD2 activation in cells treated with DNA crosslinking agents, especially ultraviolet B. The similar biological effects performed by ΔVI-BLM and inactivated FANCD2 further confirm the relationship between BLM and FANCD2. Mutations within the domain VI of BLM detected in human cancer samples demonstrate the functional importance of this domain, suggesting human tumorigenicity resulting from mtBLM may be at least partly attributed to mitigated FANCD2 activation. Collectively, our data show a previously unknown regulatory liaison in advancing our understanding of how the cancer susceptibility gene products act in concert to maintain genome stability. PMID:27083049

  11. The chemokine CCL5 regulates glucose uptake and AMP kinase signaling in activated T cells to facilitate chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Chan, Olivia; Burke, J Daniel; Gao, Darrin F; Fish, Eleanor N

    2012-08-24

    Recruitment of effector T cells to sites of infection or inflammation is essential for an effective adaptive immune response. The chemokine CCL5 (RANTES) activates its cognate receptor, CCR5, to initiate cellular functions, including chemotaxis. In earlier studies, we reported that CCL5-induced CCR5 signaling activates the mTOR/4E-BP1 pathway to directly modulate mRNA translation. Specifically, CCL5-mediated mTOR activation contributes to T cell chemotaxis by initiating the synthesis of chemotaxis-related proteins. Up-regulation of chemotaxis-related proteins may prime T cells for efficient migration. It is now clear that mTOR is also a central regulator of nutrient sensing and glycolysis. Herein we describe a role for CCL5-mediated glucose uptake and ATP accumulation to meet the energy demands of chemotaxis in activated T cells. We provide evidence that CCL5 is able to induce glucose uptake in an mTOR-dependent manner. CCL5 treatment of ex vivo activated human CD3(+) T cells also induced the activation of the nutrient-sensing kinase AMPK and downstream substrates ACC-1, PFKFB-2, and GSK-3β. Using 2-deoxy-d-glucose, an inhibitor of glucose uptake, and compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, experimental data are presented that demonstrate that CCL5-mediated T cell chemotaxis is dependent on glucose, as these inhibitors inhibit CCL5-mediated chemotaxis in a dose-dependent manner. Altogether, these findings suggest that both glycolysis and AMPK signaling are required for efficient T cell migration in response to CCL5. These studies extend the role of CCL5 mediated CCR5 signaling beyond lymphocyte chemotaxis and demonstrate a role for chemokines in promoting glucose uptake and ATP production to match energy demands of migration.

  12. Activation of Beta-Catenin Signaling in Androgen Receptor–Negative Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xinhai; Liu, Jie; Lu, Jing-Fang; Tzelepi, Vassiliki; Yang, Jun; Starbuck, Michael W.; Diao, Lixia; Wang, Jing; Efstathiou, Eleni; Vazquez, Elba S.; Troncoso, Patricia; Maity, Sankar N.; Navone, Nora M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To study Wnt/beta-catenin in castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and understand its function independently of the beta-catenin–androgen receptor (AR) interaction. Experimental Design We performed beta-catenin immunocytochemical analysis, evaluated TOP-flash reporter activity (a reporter of beta-catenin–mediated transcription), and sequenced the beta-catenin gene in MDA PCa 118a, MDA PCa 118b, MDA PCa 2b, and PC-3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells. We knocked down beta-catenin in AR-negative MDA PCa 118b cells and performed comparative gene-array analysis. We also immunohistochemically analyzed beta-catenin and AR in 27 bone metastases of human CRPCs. Results Beta-catenin nuclear accumulation and TOP-flash reporter activity were high in MDA PCa 118b but not in MDA PCa 2b or PC-3 cells. MDA PCa 118a and 118b cells carry a mutated beta-catenin at codon 32 (D32G). Ten genes were expressed differently (false discovery rate, 0.05) in MDA PCa 118b cells with downregulated beta-catenin. One such gene, hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), synthesizes hyaluronan, a core component of the extracellular matrix. We confirmed HAS2 upregulation in PC-3 cells transfected with D32G-mutant beta-catenin. Finally, we found nuclear localization of beta-catenin in 10 of 27 human tissue specimens; this localization was inversely associated with AR expression (P = 0.056, Fisher’s exact test), suggesting that reduced AR expression enables Wnt/beta-catenin signaling. Conclusion We identified a previously unknown downstream target of beta-catenin, HAS2, in PCa, and found that high beta-catenin nuclear localization and low or no AR expression may define a subpopulation of men with bone-metastatic PCa. These findings may guide physicians in managing these patients. PMID:22298898

  13. Differential signal pathway activation and 5-HT function: the role of gut enterochromaffin cells as oxygen sensors

    PubMed Central

    Haugen, Martin; Dammen, Rikard; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Pfragner, Roswitha; Modlin, Irvin

    2012-01-01

    The chemomechanosensory function of the gut enterochromaffin (EC) cell enables it to respond to dietary agents and mechanical stretch. We hypothesized that the EC cell, which also sensed alterations in luminal or mucosal oxygen level, was physiologically sensitive to fluctuations in O2. Given that low oxygen levels induce 5-HT production and secretion through a hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α)-dependent pathway, we also hypothesized that increasing O2 would reduce 5-HT production and secretion. Isolated normal EC cells as well as the well-characterized EC cell model KRJ-I were used to examine HIF signaling (luciferase-assays), hypoxia transcriptional response element (HRE)-mediated transcription (PCR), signaling pathways (Western blot), and 5-HT release (ELISA) during exposure to different oxygen levels. Normal EC cells and KRJ-I cells express HIF-1α, and transient transfection with Renilla luciferase under HRE control identified a hypoxia-mediated pathway in these cells. PCR confirmed activation of HIF-downstream targets, GLUT1, IGF2, and VEGF under reduced O2 levels (0.5%). Reducing O2 also elevated 5-HT secretion (2–3.2-fold) as well as protein levels of HIF-1α (1.7–3-fold). Increasing O2 to 100% inhibited HRE-mediated signaling, transcription, reduced 5-HT secretion, and significantly lowered HIF-1α levels (∼75% of control). NF-κB signaling was also elevated during hypoxia (1.2–1.6-fold), but no significant changes were noted in PKA/cAMP. We concluded that gut EC cells are oxygen responsive, and alterations in O2 levels differentially activate HIF-1α and tryptophan hydroxylase 1, as well as NF-κB signaling. This results in alterations in 5-HT production and secretion and identifies that the chemomechanosensory role of EC cells extends to oxygen sensing. PMID:22936271

  14. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC(50)=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca(2+) current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPgamma channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPgamma channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  15. The Satiety Signaling Neuropeptide Perisulfakinin Inhibits the Activity of Central Neurons Promoting General Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  16. Simvastatin impairs growth hormone-activated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling pathway in UMR-106 osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Usme, María Claudia; Umaña-Pérez, Adriana; Guerra, Borja; Hernández-Perera, Octavio; Hernández-Perera, Orlando; García-Castellano, José Manuel; Fernández-