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Sample records for activating flux plasma

  1. [Spectra and thermal analysis of the arc in activating flux plasma arc welding].

    PubMed

    Chai, Guo-Ming; Zhu, Yi-Feng

    2010-04-01

    In activating flux plasma arc welding the welding arc was analyzed by spectra analysis technique, and the welding arc temperature field was measured by the infrared sensing and computer image technique. The distribution models of welding arc heat flow density of activating flux PAW welding were developed. The composition of welding arc affected by activated flux was studied, and the welding arc temperature field was studied. The results show that the spectral lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are the main spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The spectra lines of weld metal are inappreciable in the spectra lines of the conventional plasma welding arc. The gas particle is the main in the conventional plasma welding arc. The conventional plasma welding arc is gas welding arc. The spectra lines of argon atom and ionized argon atom of primary ionization are intensified in the activating flux plasma welding arc, and the spectra lines of Ti, Cr and Fe elements are found in the activating flux plasma welding arc. The welding arc temperature distribution in activating flux plasma arc welding is compact, the outline of the welding arc temperature field is narrow, the range of the welding arc temperature distribution is concentrated, the welding arc radial temperature gradient is large, and the welding arc radial temperature gradient shows normal Gauss distribution. PMID:20545181

  2. High Active Nitrogen Flux Growth of (Indium) Gallium Nitride by Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McSkimming, Brian Matthew

    Plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) has evolved over the past two decades due to progress in growth science and in the active nitrogen plasma source hardware. The transition from electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma sources to radio frequency (RF) plasma sources has enabled higher growth rates, reduced ion damage and improved operation at higher growth chamber pressures. Even with further improvements in RF plasma sources, PAMBE has remained primarily a research tool partially due to limitations in material growth rates. This dissertation presents results based upon two modifications of a commercially available nitrogen plasma source. These modifications have resulted in record active nitrogen fluxes, and therefore record growth rates of more than 7.6 mum/h. For optimized growth conditions in the standard metal-rich growth regime, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 mumx3 mum) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) impurity analysis demonstrates unintentional oxygen incorporation of ˜1x1016, comparable to the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown template layer. Additionally, a revised universal growth diagram is proposed allowing the rapid determination of the metal flux needed to grow in a specific growth regime for any and all active nitrogen fluxes available. High temperature nitrogen rich PAMBE growth of GaN has been previously demonstrated as a viable alternative to the challenges presented in maintaining the Ga bilayer required by metal rich growth of GaN. This dissertation also present results demonstrating PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ˜100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. Finally, a revised growth diagram is proposed highlighting a large growth window available at high temperatures.

  3. High active nitrogen flux growth of GaN by plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    McSkimming, Brian M. Speck, James S.; Chaix, Catherine

    2015-09-15

    In the present study, the authors report on a modified Riber radio frequency (RF) nitrogen plasma source that provides active nitrogen fluxes more than 30 times higher than those commonly used for plasma assisted molecular beam epitaxy (PAMBE) growth of gallium nitride (GaN) and thus a significantly higher growth rate than has been previously reported. GaN films were grown using N{sub 2} gas flow rates between 5 and 25 sccm while varying the plasma source's RF forward power from 200 to 600 W. The highest growth rate, and therefore the highest active nitrogen flux, achieved was ∼7.6 μm/h. For optimized growth conditions, the surfaces displayed a clear step-terrace structure with an average RMS roughness (3 × 3 μm) on the order of 1 nm. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy impurity analysis demonstrates oxygen and hydrogen incorporation of 1 × 10{sup 16} and ∼5 × 10{sup 17}, respectively. In addition, the authors have achieved PAMBE growth of GaN at a substrate temperature more than 150 °C greater than our standard Ga rich GaN growth regime and ∼100 °C greater than any previously reported PAMBE growth of GaN. This growth temperature corresponds to GaN decomposition in vacuum of more than 20 nm/min; a regime previously unattainable with conventional nitrogen plasma sources. Arrhenius analysis of the decomposition rate shows that samples with a flux ratio below stoichiometry have an activation energy greater than decomposition of GaN in vacuum while samples grown at or above stoichiometry have decreased activation energy. The activation energy of decomposition for GaN in vacuum was previously determined to be ∼3.1 eV. For a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼1.5, this activation energy was found to be ∼2.8 eV, while for a Ga/N flux ratio of ∼0.5, it was found to be ∼7.9 eV.

  4. Characterization and damaging law of CFC for high heat flux actively cooled plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevet, G.; Martin, E.; Boscary, J.; Camus, G.; Herb, V.; Schlosser, J.; Escourbiac, F.; Missirlian, M.

    2011-10-01

    The carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite (CFC) Sepcarb N11 has been used in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak (Cadarache, France) as armour material for the plasma facing components. For the fabrication of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) divertor (Greifswald, Germany), the NB31 material was chosen. For the fabrication of the ITER divertor, two potential CFC candidates are the NB31 and NB41 materials. In the case of Tore Supra, defects such as microcracks or debonding were found at the interface between CFC tile and copper heat sink. A mechanical characterization of the behaviour of N11 and NB31 was undertaken, allowing the identification of a damage model and finite element calculations both for flat tiles (TS and W7-X) and monoblock (ITER) armours. The mechanical responses of these CFC materials were found almost linear under on-axis tensile tests but highly nonlinear under shear tests or off-axis tensile tests. As a consequence, damage develops within the high shear-stress zones.

  5. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-15

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a “heat flux viscosity,” is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  6. Heat flux viscosity in collisional magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.; Fox, W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2015-05-01

    Momentum transport in collisional magnetized plasmas due to gradients in the heat flux, a "heat flux viscosity," is demonstrated. Even though no net particle flux is associated with a heat flux, in a plasma there can still be momentum transport owing to the velocity dependence of the Coulomb collision frequency, analogous to the thermal force. This heat-flux viscosity may play an important role in numerous plasma environments, in particular, in strongly driven high-energy-density plasma, where strong heat flux can dominate over ordinary plasma flows. The heat flux viscosity can influence the dynamics of the magnetic field in plasmas through the generalized Ohm's law and may therefore play an important role as a dissipation mechanism allowing magnetic field line reconnection. The heat flux viscosity is calculated directly using the finite-difference method of Epperlein and Haines [Phys. Fluids 29, 1029 (1986)], which is shown to be more accurate than Braginskii's method [S. I. Braginskii, Rev. Plasma Phys. 1, 205 (1965)], and confirmed with one-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. The resulting transport coefficients are tabulated for ease of application.

  7. [Mutagenic effects of ionized plasma light flux].

    PubMed

    Stupin, I V; Dombrovskiĭ, A M; Novokshonov, A I; Belova, L L; Belous, G G

    1990-10-01

    The effect of ion plasma light flux on the genomes of auxotrophic Escherichia coli strain and Drosophilla melanogaster has been examined. Essentially no mutagenic effect was found in doses close to therapeutic ones. PMID:2126213

  8. Plasma flux-dependent lipid A deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hung-Wen; Hsu, Cheng-Che; Ahmed, Musahid; Liu, Suet Yi; Fang, Yigang; Seog, Joonil; Oehrlein, Gottlieb S.; Graves, David B.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the influence of gas plasma flux on endotoxin lipid A film deactivation. To study the effect of the flux magnitude of reactive species, a modified low-pressure inductively coupled plasma (ICP) with O radical flux ˜1016 cm-2 s-1 was used. After ICP exposures, it was observed that while the Fourier transform infrared absorbance of fatty chains responsible for the toxicity drops by 80% through the film, no obvious film endotoxin deactivation is seen. This is in contrast to that previously observed under low flux exposure conducted in a vacuum beam system: near-surface only loss of fatty chains led to significant film deactivation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry characterization of changes at the film surface did not appear to correlate with the degree of deactivation. Lipid A films need to be nearly completely removed in order to detect significant deactivation under high flux conditions. Additional high reactive species flux experiments were conducted using an atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet and a UV/ozone device. Exposure of lipid A films to reactive species with these devices showed similar deactivation behaviour. The causes for the difference between low and high flux exposures may be due to the nature of near-surface structural modifications as a function of the rate of film removal.

  9. Magnetic Flux Compression Experiments Using Plasma Armatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, M. W.; Hawk, C. W.; Litchford, R. J.

    2003-01-01

    Magnetic flux compression reaction chambers offer considerable promise for controlling the plasma flow associated with various micronuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power schemes, primarily because they avoid thermalization with wall structures and permit multicycle operation modes. The major physical effects of concern are the diffusion of magnetic flux into the rapidly expanding plasma cloud and the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the plasma surface, both of which can severely degrade reactor efficiency and lead to plasma-wall impact. A physical parameter of critical importance to these underlying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) processes is the magnetic Reynolds number (R(sub m), the value of which depends upon the product of plasma electrical conductivity and velocity. Efficient flux compression requires R(sub m) less than 1, and a thorough understanding of MHD phenomena at high magnetic Reynolds numbers is essential to the reliable design and operation of practical reactors. As a means of improving this understanding, a simplified laboratory experiment has been constructed in which the plasma jet ejected from an ablative pulse plasma gun is used to investigate plasma armature interaction with magnetic fields. As a prelude to intensive study, exploratory experiments were carried out to quantify the magnetic Reynolds number characteristics of the plasma jet source. Jet velocity was deduced from time-of-flight measurements using optical probes, and electrical conductivity was measured using an inductive probing technique. Using air at 27-inHg vacuum, measured velocities approached 4.5 km/s and measured conductivities were in the range of 30 to 40 kS/m.

  10. Vorticity flux from active dimples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeon, Beverley; Sherwin, Spencer; Morrison, Jonathan

    2004-11-01

    The effect of surface depressions, or dimples, in reducing drag on golf balls is well-known. Here this concept is extended to using ``active" dimples to manipulate vorticity flux at the wall. Surface vorticity flux is governed by surface accelerations, pressure and shear stress gradients, and surface curvature. ``Active" (or vibrating) dimples may generate vorticity flux by each of these terms, making them an excellent candidate for a basic study of flux manipulation, by which flow control may be achieved. Flow over an active dimple in fully-developed laminar channel flow is simulated with velocity boundary conditions developed from a linearized perturbation method imposed at the wall. This simple model cannot capture flow separation, but gives insight into the most straightforward means of flux generation from the concave surface. Vorticity flux due to dimple geometry and motion is quantified, and enhancements of two to three orders of magnitude in peak vorticity over the static dimple case are observed.

  11. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, Fulvio; Cohen, Samuel A.; Bennett, Timothy; Timberlake, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  12. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOEpatents

    Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1993-08-24

    An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

  13. Explosive Flux Compression: 50 Years of Los Alamos Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, C.M.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

    1998-10-18

    Los Alamos flux compression activities are surveyed, mainly through references in view of space limitations. However, two plasma physics programs done with Sandia National Laboratory are discussed in more detail.

  14. Plasma-depleted Flux Tubes in the Saturnian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H.; Jia, Y. D.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    Similar to Io's mass loading in the jovian magnetosphere, Saturn's moon, Enceladus, provides 100s of kilograms of water group neutrals and plasma to the planet's magnetosphere every second. The newly added plasma, being accelerated and convecting outward due to the centrifugal force, is then lost through magnetic reconnection in the tail. To conserve the total magnetic flux established by the internal dynamo, the 'empty' reconnected magnetic flux must return from the tail back to the inner magnetosphere. At both Jupiter and Saturn, flux tubes with enhanced field strength relative to their surroundings have been detected and are believed to be taking the role of returning the magnetic flux. However, at Saturn, flux tubes with depressed field strength are also reported. To reveal the relationship between the two kinds of flux tubes, we have systematically surveyed all the available 1-sec magnetic field data measured by Cassini and studied their statistical properties. The spatial distributions show that enhanced-field flux tubes are concentrated near the equator and closer to the planet while depressed-field flux tubes are distributed in a larger latitudinal region and can be detected at larger distances. In addition, we find that for both types of flux tubes, their occurrence rates vary with the local time in the same pattern and their magnetic flux is in the same magnitude. Therefore, the two types of flux tubes are just different manifestations of the same phenomenon: near the equator with high ambient plasma density, the flux tubes convecting in from the tail are compressed, resulting in increased field strength; off the equator, these flux tubes expand slightly, resulting in decreased field strength. Here we also present the lifecycle of the enhanced-field flux tubes: they gradually break into smaller ones when convecting inward and become indistinguishable from the background inside an L-value of about 4.

  15. Effect of Energetic Plasma Flux on Flowing Liquid Lithium Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalathiparambil, Kishor; Jung, Soonwook; Christenson, Michael; Fiflis, Peter; Xu, Wenyu; Szott, Mathew; Ruzic, David

    2014-10-01

    An operational liquid lithium system with steady state flow driven by thermo-electric magneto-hydrodynamic force and capable of constantly refreshing the plasma exposed surface have been demonstrated at U of I. To evaluate the system performance in reactor relevant conditions, specifically to understand the effect of disruptive plasma events on the performance of the liquid metal PFCs, the setup was integrated to a pulsed plasma generator. A coaxial plasma generator drives the plasma towards a theta pinch which preferentially heats the ions, simulating ELM like flux, and the plasma is further guided towards the target chamber which houses the flowing lithium system. The effect of the incident flux is examined using diagnostic tools including triple Langmuir probe, calorimeter, rogowski coils, Ion energy analyzers, and fast frame spectral image acquisition with specific optical filters. The plasma have been well characterized and a density of ~1021 m-3, with electron temperature ~10 - 20 eV is measured, and final plasma velocities of 34 - 74 kms-1 have been observed. Calorimetric measurements using planar molybdenum targets indicate a maximum plasma energy (with 6 kV plasma gun and 20 kV theta pinch) of 0.08 MJm-2 with plasma divergence effects resulting in marginal reduction of 40 +/- 23 J in plasma energy. Further results from the other diagnostic tools, using the flowing lithium targets and the planar targets coated with lithium will be presented. DOE DE-SC0008587.

  16. Aerospatiale industrial thermal plasma activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrot, Maxime

    Details of nontransferred arc torches, plasma systems in industrial use and operational plasma applications are listed. A plasma application on a foundry cupola is detailed. The setting up of a plasma system is described. Research and development activities are summarized.

  17. Topology of magnetic flux ropes and formation of fossil flux transfer events and boundary layer plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, L. C.; Ma, Z. W.; Fu, Z. F.; Otto, A.

    1993-01-01

    A mechanism for the formation of fossil flux transfer events and the low-level boundary layer within the framework of multiple X-line reconnection is proposed. Attention is given to conditions for which the bulk of magnetic flux in a flux rope of finite extent has a simple magnetic topology, where the four possible connections of magnetic field lines are: IMF to MSP, MSP to IMF, IMF to IMF, and MSP to MSP. For a sufficient relative shift of the X lines, magnetic flux may enter a flux rope from the magnetosphere and exit into the magnetosphere. This process leads to the formation of magnetic flux ropes which contain a considerable amount of magnetosheath plasma on closed magnetospheric field lines. This process is discussed as a possible explanation for the formation of fossil flux transfer events in the magnetosphere and the formation of the low-latitude boundary layer.

  18. Visualising Plasma Flow in Current-carrying Magnetic Flux Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Setthivoine; Bellan, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    Laboratory experiments at Caltech [1], designed to study the formation and dynamics of spheromaks, solar prominences [2] and astrophysical jets, have motivated a theory for plasma flow within current-carrying magnetic flux tubes [3]. The spheromak and jet plasmas studied are formed by the merging of several plasma-filled magnetic flux tubes. These flux tubes ingest gas puffed in by pulsed gas valves and have current driven along a bias field. The apparatus is now being modified to permit injection of two different gas species into the same flux tube from different ports, corresponding to opposite footpoints of the flux tube. The new gas delivery system allows for simultaneous injection of various combinations of gas species (H, D, He, N, Ne, Ar, Kr) through various gas nozzle locations (inner or outer gun electrodes, left hand side or right hand side series). During the discharge, the multi-species plasmas are to be imaged with high speed, single- and multiple-frame, intensified CCD cameras and will be differentiated by narrow band optical filters. Other diagnostics include a magnetic probe array, soft x-ray diodes and an optical multichannel analyser to monitor the magnetic field evolution, particle velocities and energies. [1] S. C. Hsu and P. M. Bellan, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 334, 257-261 (2000). [2] J. F. Hansen and P. M. Bellan, Astrophys. J., 563, L183-L186, (2001). [3] P. M. Bellan, Phys. Plasmas, 10, 1999-2008 (2003).

  19. Emerging flux in active regions. [of sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liggett, M.; Zirin, H.

    1985-01-01

    The rates at which flux emerges in active and quiet solar regions within the sunspot belts are compared. The emerging flux regions (EFRs) were identified by the appearance of arch filament structures in H-alpha. All EFRs in high resolution films of active regions made at Big Bear in 1978 were counted. The comparable rate of flux emergence in quiet regions was obtained from SGD data and independently from EFRs detected outside the active region perimeter on the same films. The rate of flux emergence is 10 times higher in active regions than in quiet regions. A sample of all active regions in 31 days of 1983 gave a ratio of 7.5. Possible mechanisms which might funnel new magnetic flux to regions of strong magnetic field are discussed.

  20. Neoclassical transport in toroidal plasmas with nonaxisymmetric flux surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2015-05-01

    The capability to treat nonaxisymmetric flux surface geometry has been added to the drift-kinetic code NEO (Belli and Candy 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 095010). Geometric quantities (i.e. metric elements) are supplied by a recently-developed local 3D equilibrium solver, allowing neoclassical transport coefficients to be systematically computed while varying the 3D plasma shape in a simple and intuitive manner. Code verification is accomplished via detailed comparison with 3D Pfirsch-Schlüter theory. A discussion of the various collisionality regimes associated with 3D transport is given, with an emphasis on non-ambipolar particle flux, neoclassical toroidal viscosity, energy flux and bootstrap current. Finally, we compute the transport in the presence of ripple-type perturbations in a DIII-D-like H-mode edge plasma.

  1. Explosive instability and erupting flux tubes in a magnetized plasma

    PubMed Central

    Cowley, S. C.; Cowley, B.; Henneberg, S. A.; Wilson, H. R.

    2015-01-01

    The eruption of multiple flux tubes in a magnetized plasma is proposed as a mechanism for explosive release of energy in plasmas. A significant fraction of the linearly stable isolated flux tubes are shown to be metastable in a box model magnetized atmosphere in which ends of the field lines are embedded in conducting walls. The energy released by destabilizing such field lines can be a large proportion of the gravitational energy stored in the system. This energy can be released in a fast dynamical time. PMID:26339193

  2. Correlation of Alfvén wave Poynting flux in the plasma sheet at 4-7 RE with ionospheric electron energy flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiling, A.; Wygant, J. R.; Cattell, C.; Peria, W.; Parks, G.; Temerin, M.; Mozer, F. S.; Russell, C. T.; Kletzing, C. A.

    2002-07-01

    A comparison of Poynting flux in the plasma sheet at geocentric distances of 4-7 RE to the energy flux of magnetically conjugate precipitating electrons at 100-km altitude is presented. We have investigated 40 plasma sheet crossings by the Polar satellite, including both cases with large in situ values of Poynting flux (~1 ergs cm-2 s-1) and cases with low values (<=0.1 ergs cm-2 s-1). The values correspond to ~125 and ~12 ergs cm-2 s-1, respectively, when mapped along converging magnetic field lines to 100 km. The north-south component of the electric field and the east-west component of the magnetic field were the primary source of the Poynting flux. On the basis of the phase relationship and ratio of E and B, the majority of Poynting flux events were identified as Alfvén waves. The Poynting flux measured at high altitudes by Polar was correlated with the intensity of the conjugate auroral emission in the ultraviolet frequency range, which can be used to estimate energy deposition due to precipitating electron beams. The electron energy flux during times of intense Poynting flux in the plasma sheet exceeded 20 ergs cm-2 s-1. In the absence of strong Poynting flux in the plasma sheet, electron precipitation was small (<=5 ergs cm-2 s-1). The mapped Poynting flux was in almost all events larger by a factor of 1-10 than the ionospheric electron energy flux. These results show that Alfvénic Poynting flux in the midtail region is associated with and capable of powering localized regions of magnetically conjugate auroral emissions. Furthermore, the large Poynting flux events observed at the outer edge of the plasma sheet were conjugate to the poleward border of the active auroral regions, giving further evidence that at least some of the discrete aurora connects to the plasma sheet boundary layer.

  3. Dual active surface heat flux gage probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Curt H.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1995-02-01

    A unique plug-type heat flux gage probe was tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 2x9 turbulent flow duct facility. The probe was fabricated by welding a miniature dual active surface heat flux gage body to the end of a hollow metal cylindrical bolt containing a metal inner tube. Cooling air flows through the inner tube, impinges onto the back of the gage body and then flows out through the annulus formed between the inner tube and the hollow bolt wall. Heat flux was generated in the duct facility with a Huels arc heater. The duct had a rectangular cross section and one wall was fabricated from 2.54 centimeter thick thermal insulation rigid surface material mounted onto an aluminum plate. To measure heat flux, the probe was inserted through the plate and insulating materials with the from of the gage located flush with the hot gas-side insulation surface. Absorbed heat fluxes measured with the probe were compared with absorbed heat fluxes measured with six water-cooled reference calorimeters. These calorimeters were located in a water-cooled metal duct wall which was located across from the probe position. Correspondence of transient and steady heat fluxes measured with the reference calorimeters and heat flux gage probe was generally within a satisfactory plus or minus 10 percent. This good correspondence was achieved even though the much cooler probe caused a large surface temperature disruption of 1000K between the metal gage and the insulation. However, this temperature disruption did not seriously effect the accuracy of the heat flux measurement. A current application for dual active surface heat flux gages is for transient and steady absorbed heat flux, surface temperature and heat transfer coefficient measurements on the surface of an oxidizer turbine inlet deflector operating in a space shuttle test bed engine.

  4. Quiet time particle fluxes and active phenomena on the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishkov, Vitaly; Zeldovich, Mariya; Logachev, Yurii; Kecskemety, Karoly

    Using ACE, SOHO and STEREO data the connection of quiet time particle fluxes with active processes on the Sun is examined in the 23rd SC. Investigation of the intervals selected in the conditions of low solar activity supports our assumption that the active structures on the Sun arising during minimum solar activity are mostly responsible for background particle fluxes. Sources on the Sun of charged particles with energies 0.3-8 MeV/nucleon have been determined during quiet time periods over all solar cycle by comparison with solar wind fluxes. It is shown that at the solar maximum a part of background fluxes with abundances of C and Fe corresponding to mean values in solar corona resulted from equatorial coronal holes. Bipolar structures arising in the hole area (bright X-ray points) were accompanied in most cases by the ejection of solar plasma according to HINOTORI satellite. The speed of a part of such emissions and open magnetic field lines above coronal holes can allow energetic particles to escape into the interplanetary space. During solar minimum abundances of C and Fe in majority of quiet time fluxes corresponded to solar wind values possibly indicating the common origin of energetic particle and solar wind fluxes.

  5. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O.

    2011-12-01

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Γp1023 m-3 s-1, and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of ˜10 MW/m2. An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to ˜0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3×1019 m-3 in He and 2.5×1019 m-3 in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

  6. Geodesic acoustic mode in anisotropic plasma with heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-10-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in an anisotropic tokamak plasma is investigated in fluid approximation. The collisionless anisotropic plasma is described within the 16-momentum magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid closure model, which takes into account not only the pressure anisotropy but also the anisotropic heat flux. It is shown that the GAM frequency agrees better with the kinetic result than the standard Chew-Goldberger-Low (CGL) MHD model. When zeroing the anisotropy, the 16-momentum result is identical with the kinetic one to the order of 1/q{sup 2}, while the CGL result agrees with the kinetic result only on the leading order. The discrepancies between the results of the CGL fluid model and the kinetic theory are well removed by considering the heat flux effect in the fluid approximation.

  7. Solar Wind Driven Plasma Fluxes from the Venus Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez De Tejada, H. A.; Lundin, R. N.; Zhang, T.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Reyes-Ruiz, M.

    2012-12-01

    SOLAR WIND DRIVEN PLASMA FLUXES FROM THE VENUS IONOSPHERE H. Pérez-de-Tejada (1), R. Lundin (2), H. Durand-Manterola (1), S. Barabash (2), T. L. Zhang (3), J. A., Sauvaud (4), and M. Reyes-Ruiz (5) 1 - Institute of Geophysics, UNAM, México, D. F. 2 - Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna, Sweden 3 - Space Research Institute, Graz, Austria 4 - CESR, Toulouse, France 5 - Institute of Astronomy, UNAM, Ensenada, México Measurements conducted with the ASPERA-4 instrument and the magnetometer of the Venus Express spacecraft show that the kinetic pressure of planetary O+ ion fluxes measured in the Venus wake can be significantly larger than the local magnetic pressure and, as a result, those ions are not being driven by magnetic forces but by the kinetic energy of the solar wind. Beams of planetary O+ ions with those properties have been detected in several orbits of the Venus Express through the wake as the spacecraft traverses by the noon-midnight plane along its near polar trajectory. The momentum flux of the O+ ions leads to superalfvenic flow conditions. It is suggested that such O+ ion beams are produced in the vicinity of the magnetic polar regions of the Venus ionosphere where the solar wind erodes the local plasma leading to plasma channels that extend downstream from those regions.

  8. High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Tamura, S.; Tokunaga, K.; Yoshida, N.; Noda, N.; Yang, L.; Xu, Z.

    2004-08-01

    High heat flux properties of pure tungsten and plasma sprayed tungsten coatings on carbon substrates have been studied by annealing and cyclic heat loading. The recrystallization temperature and an activation energy QR=126 kJ/mol for grain growth of tungsten coating by vacuum plasma spray (VPS) were estimated, and the microstructural changes of multi-layer tungsten and rhenium interface pre-deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) with anneal temperature were investigated. Cyclic load tests indicated that pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating could withstand 1000 cycles at 33-35 MW/m 2 heat flux and 3 s pulse duration, and inert gas plasma spray (IPS)-tungsten coating showed local cracks by 300 cycles but did not induce failure by further cycles. However, the failure of pure tungsten and VPS-tungsten coating by fatigue cracking was observed under higher heat load (55-60 MW/m 2) for 420 and 230 cycles, respectively.

  9. Systemic exchangeability of enteral leucine: relationship to plasma flux

    SciTech Connect

    Istfan, N.W.; Ling, P.R.; Bistrian, B.R.; Blackburn, G.L.

    1988-04-01

    The exchangeability of enterally infused leucine within the systemic compartment was estimated in fasted and fed rats using L-(1-/sup 14/C)leucine as a tracer. The experimental design consisted of enteral and parenteral feedings with intravenous or intragastric tracer infusions. During continuous intragastric feeding, only 73 +/- 6% (SE) of the intragastric leucine tracer infusion was accounted for in the systemic circulation. When comparing intravenous vs. intragastric tracer, the estimate of the contribution of protein breakdown to plasma leucine flux was 6 +/- 1 (SE) mumol.h-1.100 g-1 and 18 +/- 3 (SE) mumol.h-1.100 g-1 (P less than 0.01), respectively, for the two routes of administration. Correction of enteral input (either isotope or total leucine), by a factor of 27% for first-pass extraction, eliminated all significant differences in plasma leucine kinetics. Of the 27% of enterally infused tracer not appearing systemically, only 3% could be accounted for in newly synthesized protein in the liver. The remainder is hypothesized to represent first-pass utilization of leucine in intestinal protein synthesis and other metabolic pathways in the splanchnic bed. In contrast, systemic appearance of enteral leucine was essentially complete in the fasted rats, indicating less splanchnic metabolism of leucine in this state. These data indicate that significant error can result in estimating the contribution of endogenous protein breakdown to plasma leucine flux during feeding if the systemic exchangeability of dietary leucine is not considered.

  10. Models for the probability densities of the turbulent plasma flux in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergsaker, A. S.; Fredriksen, Å; Pécseli, H. L.; Trulsen, J. K.

    2015-10-01

    Observations of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas indicate that plasma losses can be due to coherent structures or bursts of plasma rather than a classical random walk or diffusion process. A model for synthetic data based on coherent plasma flux events is proposed, where all basic properties can be obtained analytically in terms of a few control parameters. One basic parameter in the present case is the density of burst events in a long time-record, together with parameters in a model of the individual pulse shapes and the statistical distribution of these parameters. The model and its extensions give the probability density of the plasma flux. An interesting property of the model is a prediction of a near-parabolic relation between skewness and kurtosis of the statistical flux distribution for a wide range of parameters. The model is generalized by allowing for an additive random noise component. When this noise dominates the signal we can find a transition to standard results for Gaussian random noise. Applications of the model are illustrated by data from the toroidal Blaamann plasma.

  11. Plasma observations and magnetic flux conservation in the heliosheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardson, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    Voyager 2 has observed the plasma in the heliosheath from 84 to 101 AU. This paper presents recent observations which show that the speed of the solar wind has been constant across the heliosheath but the flow direction is changing. The flow is now about 60 degrees from radial, mostly in the azimuthal direction. The density decreased in 2008 by a factor of two, but recovered in 2011; this change may be a solar cycle effect. The magnetic flux is conserved at V2 as expected, but at V1 it decreases significantly as the flow slows approaching the stagnation region. The decrease could be due to reconnection in this region removing magnetic flux.

  12. Production of H, D, and He Plasmas in the ORNL High Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O.

    2011-10-01

    The ORNL high particle flux helicon source is has been operated with various light ions at power levels up to 30 kW. It is being studied as an electrodeless source for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Γp >1023m-3s-1 , and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high heat fluxes ~ 10 MW /m2 . The maximum magnetic field strength | B | in the plasma production region for which high density operation is possible at the present power level has been found to increase with increasing ion mass. Operation with | B | ~ 0 . 5 T has been achieved with He as the working gas. The radial density profile is found to be strongly dependent on the axial magnetic field geometry, and both strongly centrally peaked and flat profiles have been obtained. Maximum plasma densities > 4 ×1019m-3 have been achieved with He, and > 2 . 5 ×1019m-3 with H. The device has been modeled using the EMS2D (G. Chen et al., Phys Plasmas 13 (2006) 123507) and SOLPS (R. Schneider, X. Bonnin et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 46 (2006) 3) codes. The latest results will be presented. ORNL is managed by UT-Batelle, LLC, for the U.S. Dept of Energy under contract DE-AC-05-00OR22725.

  13. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5mN with a resolution of 15μN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  14. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    West, Michael D.; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.

    2009-05-15

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 {mu}N. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments.

  15. A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument for plasma thruster exhausts and diffusive plasmas.

    PubMed

    West, Michael D; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2009-05-01

    A high sensitivity momentum flux measuring instrument based on a compound pendulum has been developed for use with electric propulsion devices and radio frequency driven plasmas. A laser displacement system, which builds upon techniques used by the materials science community for surface stress measurements, is used to measure with high sensitivity the displacement of a target plate placed in a plasma thruster exhaust. The instrument has been installed inside a vacuum chamber and calibrated via two different methods and is able to measure forces in the range of 0.02-0.5 mN with a resolution of 15 microN. Measurements have been made of the force produced from the cold gas flow and with a discharge ignited using argon propellant. The plasma is generated using a Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype. The instrument target is placed about 1 mean free path for ion-neutral charge exchange collisions downstream of the thruster exit. At this position, the plasma consists of a low density ion beam (10%) and a much larger downstream component (90%). The results are in good agreement with those determined from the plasma parameters measured with diagnostic probes. Measurements at various flow rates show that variations in ion beam velocity and plasma density and the resulting momentum flux can be measured with this instrument. The instrument target is a simple, low cost device, and since the laser displacement system used is located outside the vacuum chamber, the measurement technique is free from radio frequency interference and thermal effects. It could be used to measure the thrust in the exhaust of other electric propulsion devices and the momentum flux of ion beams formed by expanding plasmas or fusion experiments. PMID:19485509

  16. Linear multispecies gyrokinetic flux tube benchmarks in shaped tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlo, G.; Sauter, O.; Brunner, S.; Burckel, A.; Camenen, Y.; Casson, F. J.; Dorland, W.; Fable, E.; Görler, T.; Jenko, F.; Peeters, A. G.; Told, D.; Villard, L.

    2016-03-01

    Verification is the fundamental step that any turbulence simulation code has to be submitted in order to assess the proper implementation of the underlying equations. We have carried out a cross comparison of three flux tube gyrokinetic codes, GENE [F. Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)], GKW [A. G. Peeters et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 180, 2650 (2009)], and GS2 [W. Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)], focusing our attention on the effect of realistic geometries described by a series of MHD equilibria with increasing shaping complexity. To simplify the effort, the benchmark has been limited to the electrostatic collisionless linear behaviour of the system. A fully gyrokinetic model has been used to describe the dynamics of both ions and electrons. Several tests have been carried out looking at linear stability at ion and electron scales, where for the assumed profiles Ion Temperature Gradient (ITG)/Trapped Electron Modes and Electron Temperature Gradient modes are unstable. The capability of the codes to handle a non-zero ballooning angle has been successfully benchmarked in the ITG regime. Finally, the standard Rosenbluth-Hinton test has been successfully carried out looking at the effect of shaping on Zonal Flows (ZFs) and Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAMs). Inter-code comparison as well as validation of simulation results against analytical estimates has been accomplished. All the performed tests confirm that plasma elongation strongly stabilizes plasma instabilities as well as leads to a strong increase in ZF residual and GAM damping.

  17. Nonlinear evolution of magnetic flux ropes. 2: Finite beta plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Farrugia, C. J.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1995-01-01

    In this second paper on the evolution of magnetic flux ropes we study the effects of gas pressure. We assume that the energy transport is described by a polytropic relationship and reduce the set of ideal MHD equations to a single, second-order, nonlinear, ordinary differential equation for the evolution function. For this conservative system we obtain a first integral of motion. To analyze the possible motions, we use a mechanical analogue -- a one-dimensional, nonlinear oscillator. We find that the effective potential for such an oscillator depends on two parameters: the polytropic index gamma and a dimensionless quantity kappa the latter being a function of the plasma beta, the strength of the azimuthal magnetic field relative to the axial field of the flux rope, and gamma. Through a study of this effective potential we classify all possible modes of evolution of the system. In the main body of the paper, we focus on magnetic flux ropes whose field and gas pressure increase steadily towards the symmetry axis. In this case, for gamma greater than 1 and all values of kappa, only oscillations are possible. For gamma less than 1, however, both oscillations and expansion are allowed. For gamma less than 1 and kappa below a critical value, the energy of the nonlinear oscillator determines whether the flux rope will oscillate or expand to infinity. For gamma less than 1 and kappa above critical, however, only expansion occurs. Thus by increasing kappa while keeping gamma fixed (less than 1), a phase transition occurs at kappa = kappa(sub critical) and the oscillatory mode disappears. We illustrate the above theoretical considerations by the example of a flux rope of constant field line twist evolving self-similarly. For this example, we present the full numerical MHD solution. In an appendix to the paper we catalogue all possible evolutions when (1) either the magnetic field or (2) the gas pressure decreases monotonically toward the axis. We find that in these cases

  18. Numerical simulation of filling a magnetic flux tube with a cold plasma: Anomalous plasma effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Leung, W. C.

    1995-01-01

    Large-scale models of plasmaspheric refilling have revealed that during the early stage of the refilling counterstreaming ion beams are a common feature. However, the instability of such ion beams and its effect on refilling remain unexplored. In order to learn the basic effects of ion beam instabilities on refilling, we have performed numerical simulations of the refilling of an artificial magnetic flux tube. (The shape and size of the tube are assumed so that the essential features of the refilling problem are kept in the simulation and at the same time the small scale processes driven by the ion beams are sufficiently resolved.) We have also studied the effect of commonly found equatorially trapped warm and/or hot plasma on the filling of a flux tube with a cold plasma. Three types of simulation runs have been performed.

  19. Blistering on tungsten surface exposed to high flux deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. Y.; Liu, W.; Luo, G. N.; Yuan, Y.; Jia, Y. Z.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2016-04-01

    The blistering behaviour of tungsten surfaces exposed to very high fluxes (1-2 × 1024/m2/s) of low energy (38 eV) deuterium plasmas was investigated as a function of ion fluence (0.2-7 × 1026 D/m2) and surface temperature (423-873 K). Blisters were observed under all conditions, especially up to temperatures of 873 K. The blister parameters are evaluated with blister size, blister density and surface coverage. The blister size always peaked at less than 0.5 μm and no blister larger than 10 μm is observed even at high fluence. The blister densities are found in high magnitude of 106 blisters/m2, with the surface coverages lower than 2%. The formation of cracks in the sub-surface region was observed by cross-section imaging. Changes in blister size and shape with fluence and temperature suggest processes of predominantly nucleation and subsequent growth of blisters. The smaller blister size is considered to be caused by a combination of flux-related effects such as enhanced defect formation in the near surface region, reduced deuterium diffusivity and relatively short exposure times.

  20. Outreach Activities for Plasma Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; Bannan, K.; Delooper, J.; Eastman, T.; Sweet, P.; Smith, T.

    1997-11-01

    The need for communication beyond experts from subfields of scientific inquiry has been long identified. In response to this need, new outreach activities for plasma science have begun to take shape and grow. One example of this increase in activity is the formation of the Coalition for Plasma Science. The focus of the Coalition's efforts is to enhance the understanding and support for plasma science in the scientific community, the education community, business and the general public. One of the Coalition's first activities was to coordinate the assembly of an eight panel exhibit entitled "Plasmas: Science and Technology for the 21st Century". The formation of the Coalition and the display will be described and some possible future activities will be outlined.

  1. Non-Gaussian properties of global momentum and particle fluxes in a cylindrical laboratory plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Yamada, Takuma; Itoh, Sanae-I.; Inagaki, Shigeru; Fujisawa, Akihide; Yagi, Masatoshi; Arakawa, Hiroyuki; Kasuya, Naohiro; Itoh, Kimitaka; Kamataki, Kunihiro; Shinohara, Shunjiro; Oldenbuerger, Stella; Takase, Yuichi; Diamond, Patrick H.

    2011-07-15

    Non-Gaussian statistical properties of the azimuthally averaged momentum and particle fluxes driven by turbulence have been simultaneously observed in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas for the first time. We identified the stretched Gaussian distribution of the both fluxes and the transition from the point-wise distribution to averaged ones was confirmed. The change of the particle flux precedes that of the momentum flux, demonstrating that the momentum flux is induced by the relaxation of density gradient.

  2. Report on the joint meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K.L.

    1985-10-01

    This report of the Joint Meeting of the Division of Development and Technology Plasma/Wall Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Task Groups contains contributing papers in the following areas: Plasma/Materials Interaction Program and Technical Assessment, High Heat Flux Materials and Components Program and Technical Assessment, Pumped Limiters, Ignition Devices, Program Planning Activities, Compact High Power Density Reactor Requirements, Steady State Tokamaks, and Tritium Plasma Experiments. All these areas involve the consideration of High Heat Flux on Materials and the Interaction of the Plasma with the First Wall. Many of the Test Facilities are described as well. (LSP)

  3. Average energetic ion flux variations associated with geomagnetic activity from EPIC/STICS on Geotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.; Gloeckler, G.; Eastman, T. E.; McEntire, R. W.; Roelef, E. C.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Williams, D. J.; Frank, L. A.; Paterson, W. R.; Kokubun, S.; Matsumoto, H.; Kojima, H.; Mukai, T.; Saito, Y.; Yamamoto, T.

    1996-01-01

    The magnetotail ion flux measurements from the Geotail spacecraft are analyzed both with and without the application of selection criteria that identify the plasma regime in which an observation is obtained. The different results are compared with each other. The initial results on the changes of energetic ion flux and composition correlated to average substorm activity in different magnetotail plasma regimes are discussed. The energetic ions are measured using the energetic particles and ion composition (EPIC) experiment and the suprathermal ion composition spectrometer (STICS). The plasma, wave and field instruments of the Geotail satellite were used to identify the principle magnetotail plasma regimes of plasma sheet, lobe, and magnetospheric boundary layer, as well as the magnetosheath and solar wind. Energetic O and H ions were observed in all the plasma regimes.

  4. Ion species control in high flux deuterium plasma beams produced by a linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, G.-N.; Shu, W.M.; Nakamura, H.; O'Hira, S.; Nishi, M.

    2004-11-01

    The ion species ratios in low energy high flux deuterium plasma beams formed in a linear plasma generator were measured by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. And the species control in the plasma generator was evaluated by changing the operational parameters like neutral pressure, arc current, and axial magnetic confinement to the plasma column. The measurements reveal that the lower pressures prefer to form more D{sup +} ions, and the medium magnetic confinement at the higher pressures results in production of more D{sub 2}{sup +}, while the stronger confinement and/or larger arc current are helpful to D{sub 2}{sup +} conversion into D{sub 3}{sup +}. Therefore, the ion species can be controlled by adjusting the operational parameters of the plasma generator. With suitable adjustment, we can achieve plasma beams highly enriched with a single species of D{sup +}, D{sub 2}{sup +}, or D{sub 3}{sup +}, to a ratio over 80%. It has been found that the axial magnetic configuration played a significant role in the formation of D{sub 3}{sup +} within the experimental pressure range.

  5. Ion flux and ion distribution function measurements in synchronously pulsed inductively coupled plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Brihoum, Melisa; Cunge, Gilles; Darnon, Maxime; Joubert, Olivier; Gahan, David; Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J.

    2013-03-15

    Changes in the ion flux and the time-averaged ion distribution functions are reported for pulsed, inductively coupled RF plasmas (ICPs) operated over a range of duty cycles. For helium and argon plasmas, the ion flux increases rapidly after the start of the RF pulse and after about 50 {mu}s reaches the same steady state value as that in continuous ICPs. Therefore, when the plasma is pulsed at 1 kHz, the ion flux during the pulse has a value that is almost independent of the duty cycle. By contrast, in molecular electronegative chlorine/chlorosilane plasmas, the ion flux during the pulse reaches a steady state value that depends strongly on the duty cycle. This is because both the plasma chemistry and the electronegativity depend on the duty cycle. As a result, the ion flux is 15 times smaller in a pulsed 10% duty cycle plasma than in the continuous wave (CW) plasma. The consequence is that for a given synchronous RF biasing of a wafer-chuck, the ion energy is much higher in the pulsed plasma than it is in the CW plasma of chlorine/chlorosilane. Under these conditions, the wafer is bombarded by a low flux of very energetic ions, very much as it would in a low density, capacitively coupled plasma. Therefore, one can extend the operating range of ICPs through synchronous pulsing of the inductive excitation and capacitive chuck-bias, offering new means by which to control plasma etching.

  6. Role of plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition reactor wall conditions on radical and ion substrate fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Sowa, Mark J.

    2014-01-15

    Chamber wall conditions, such as wall temperature and film deposits, have long been known to influence plasma source performance on thin film processing equipment. Plasma physical characteristics depend on conductive/insulating properties of chamber walls. Radical fluxes depend on plasma characteristics as well as wall recombination rates, which can be wall material and temperature dependent. Variations in substrate delivery of plasma generated species (radicals, ions, etc.) impact the resulting etch or deposition process resulting in process drift. Plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition is known to depend strongly on substrate radical flux, but film properties can be influenced by other plasma generated phenomena, such as ion bombardment. In this paper, the chamber wall conditions on a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition process are investigated. The downstream oxygen radical and ion fluxes from an inductively coupled plasma source are indirectly monitored in temperature controlled (25–190 °C) stainless steel and quartz reactors over a range of oxygen flow rates. Etch rates of a photoresist coated quartz crystal microbalance are used to study the oxygen radical flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Plasma density estimates from Langmuir probe ion saturation current measurements are used to study the ion flux dependence on reactor characteristics. Reactor temperature was not found to impact radical and ion fluxes substantially. Radical and ion fluxes were higher for quartz walls compared to stainless steel walls over all oxygen flow rates considered. The radical flux to ion flux ratio is likely to be a critical parameter for the deposition of consistent film properties. Reactor wall material, gas flow rate/pressure, and distance from the plasma source all impact the radical to ion flux ratio. These results indicate maintaining chamber wall conditions will be important for delivering consistent results from plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition

  7. Plasma β Scaling of Anisotropic Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Flux Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2014-03-01

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of "spaghetti"-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  8. Plasma β scaling of anisotropic magnetic field fluctuations in the solar wind flux tube

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, Aveek; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Ebrahimi, Fatima E-mail: amitava@princeton.edu

    2014-03-10

    Based on various observations, it has been suggested that at 1 AU, solar wind consists of 'spaghetti'-like magnetic field structures that have the magnetic topology of flux tubes. It is also observed that the plasma fluctuation spectra at 1 AU show a plasma β dependence. Reconciling these two sets of observations and using the Invariance Principle, Bhattacharjee et al. suggested that the plasma inside every flux tube may become unstable with respect to pressure-driven instabilities and gives rise to fluctuation spectra that depend on the local plasma β. The present work is the first direct numerical simulation of such a flux tube. We solve the full magnetohydrodynamic equations using the DEBS code and show that if the plasma inside the flux tube is driven unstable by spatial inhomogeneities in the background plasma pressure, the observed nature of the fluctuating power spectra agrees reasonably well with observations, as well as the analytical prediction of Bhattacharjee et al.

  9. Formation of compact toroidal plasmas by magnetized coaxial plasma gun injection into an oblate flux conserver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, W. C.; Goldenbaum, G. C.; Granneman, E. H. A.; Hartman, C. W.; Prono, D. S.; Taska, J.; Smith, A. C., Jr.

    1980-11-01

    Initial results are reported on the formation of compact toroidal plasmas in an oblate shaped metallic flux conserver. A schematic of the experimental apparatus is shown. The plasma injector is a coaxial plasma gun with solenoid coils wound on the inner and outer electrodes. The electrode length is 100 cm, the diameter of the inner (outer) electrode is 19.3 cm (32.4 cm). Deuterium gas is puffed into the region between electrodes by eight pulsed valves located on the outer electrode 50 cm from the end of the gun. The gun injects into a cylindrically symmetrical copper shell (wall thickness = 1.6 mm) which acts as a flux conserver for the time scale of experiments reported here. The copper shell consists of a transition cylinder, a cylindrical oblate pill box, and a downstream cylinder. The gap between the gun and transition cylinder is 6 cm. An axial array of coils outside the vacuum chamber can be used to establish an initial uniform bias field.

  10. Formation of compact toroidal plasmas by magnetized coaxial plasma gun injection into an oblate flux conserver

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, W.C.; Goldenbaum, G.C.; Granneman, E.H.A.; Hartman, C.W.; Prono, D.S.; Taska, J.; Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1980-11-04

    Initial results are reported on the formation of compact toroidal plasmas in an oblate shaped metallic flux conserver. A schematic of the experimental apparatus is shown. The plasma injector is a coaxial plasma gun with solenoid coils wound on the inner and outer electrodes. The electrode length is 100 cm, the diameter of the inner (outer) electrode is 19.3 cm (32.4 cm). Deuterium gas is puffed into the region between electrodes by eight pulsed valves located on the outer electrode 50 cm from the end of the gun. The gun injects into a cylindrically symmetrical copper shell (wall thickness = 1.6 mm) which acts as a flux conserver for the time scale of experiments reported here. The copper shell consists of a transition cylinder 30 cm long, 34 cm in diameter, a cylindrical oblate pill box 40 cm long, 75 cm in diameter and a downstream cylinder 30 cm long, 30 cm in diameter. The gap between the gun and transition cylinder is 6 cm. An axial array of coils outside the vacuum chamber can be used to establish an initial uniform bias field.

  11. Controlling Ion and UV/VUV Photon Fluxes in Pulsed Low Pressure Plasmas for Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2012-10-01

    UV/VUV photon fluxes in plasma materials processing have a variety of effects ranging from damaging to synergistic. To optimize these processes, it is desirable to have separate control over the fluxes of ions and photons, or at least be able to control their relative fluxes or overlap in time. Pulsed plasmas may provide such control as the rates at which ion and photon fluxes respond to the pulse power deposition are different. Results from a computational investigation of pulsed plasmas will be discussed to determine methods to control the ratio of ion to photon fluxes. Simulations were performed using a 2-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics model which addresses radiation transport using a Monte Carlo Simulation. Radiation transport is frequency resolved using partial-frequency-redistribution algorithms. Results for low pressure (10s of mTorr) inductively and capacitively coupled plasmas in Ar/Cl2 mixtures will be discussed while varying duty cycle, reactor geometry, gas mixture and pressure. We found that the time averaged ratio of VUV photon-to-ion fluxes in ICPs can be controlled with duty cycle of the pulsed power. Even with radiation trapping, photon fluxes tend to follow the power pulse whereas due to their finite response times, fluxes of ions tend to average the power pulse. Due to the overshoot in electron temperature that occurs at the start of low-duty-cycle pulses, disproportionately large photon fluxes (compared to ion fluxes) can be generated.

  12. Magnetic flux conversion and relaxation toward a minimum-energy state in S-1 spheromak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Janos, A.

    1985-09-01

    S-1 Spheromak currents and magnetic fluxes have been measured with Rogowski coils and flux loops external to the plasma. Toroidal plasma currents up to 350 kA and spheromak configuration lifetimes over 1.0 msec have been achieved at moderate power levels. The plasma formation in the S-1 Spheromak device is based on an inductive transfer of poloidal and toroidal magnetic flux from a toroidal ''flux core'' to the plasma. Formation is programmed to guide the configuration into a force-free, minimum-energy Taylor state. Properly detailed programming of the formation process is found not to be essential since plasmas adjust themselves during formation to a final equilibrium near the Taylor state. After formation, if the plasma evolves away from the stable state, then distinct relaxation oscillation events occur which restore the configuration to that stable state. The relaxation process involves reconnection of magnetic field lines, and conversion of poloidal to toroidal magnetic flux (and vice versa) has been observed and documented. The scaling of toroidal plasma current and toroidal magnetic flux in the plasma with externally applied currents is consistent with the establishment of a Taylor state after formation. In addition, the magnetic helicity is proportional to that injected from the flux core, independent of how that helicity is generated.

  13. Statistical study of plasma sheet dynamics using ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle flux data

    SciTech Connect

    Dandouras, J.; Re-grave-accentme, H.; Saint-Marc, A.; Sauvaud, J.A.; Parks, G.K.; Anderson, K.A.; Lin, R.P.

    1986-06-01

    During magnetospheric substorms, satellites embedded in the plasma sheet often detect transient dropouts of plasma and energetic particle fluxes, a phenomemon generally interpreted as indicating the exit of the satellite into the magnetospheric lobe due to a plasma sheet thinning. In order to determine the large-scale dynamics of the near-earth plasma sheet during substorms, three satellite years of ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle flux data (1.5 and 6 keV), corresponding to 461 particle flux dropouts, have been analyzed. The principal results show that flux dropouts can be observed anywhere in the nightside plasma sheet, independent of the satellite's geocentric distance (for R>12R/sub E/), magnetic local time (except near the magnetospheric flanks) and estimated distance to the neutral sheet. Furthermore, flux dropouts can be observed for any combination of the AE index value and the satellite's distance to the neutral sheet, which shows that the plasma sheet is dynamic even during weak magnetospheric disturbances. Substorms during which the satellites, though situated in the plasma sheet, did not detect any flux dropout, have also been examined, and it is found that the plasma sheet thickness can locally remain unaffected by substorm development for AE index values up to at least 1000 nT. The predictions of the two major plasma sheet thinning models, i.e., the near-tail X-type magnetic neutral line formation model and the MHD rarefaction wave propagation model, are compared to the experimental results, and it is concluded that neither model can account for all of the observations; plasma sheet dynamics are more complex. Phenomenologically, this study suggests that multiple pinching of the plasma sheet and/or large-amplitude three-dimensional plasma sheet oscillations are important in plasma sheet dynamics.

  14. Magnetic Flux Transport and Pressure Variations at Magnetotail Plasma Flow Bursts during Geomagnetically Quiet Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowada, M.; Fu, S.-Y.; Parks, G. K.; Pu, Z.-Y.; Angelopoulos, V.; Carlson, C. W.; Auster, H.-U.

    2012-04-01

    The fast plasma flows in the geomagnetotail are observed during both geomagnetically active and quiet times. However, it has been unclear about the fundamental difference in the plasma fast flows between at two different geomagnetic conditions, that is, the generation mechanism of, and pictures of the energy transport and balance at the fast plasma flows. Magnetic reconnection in the magnetotail has been believed as one of the most possible mechanisms to generate the fast plasma flows regardless of the geomagnetic conditions. Recently, Nowada et al. [2012], however, demonstrated that the magnetotail magnetic reconnection does not always contribute to the generation of the fast plasma flows at geomagnetically quiet times based on the THEMIS measurements. It is very important to reveal how the energy transport and balance in the magnetotail in association with these plasma fast flows are on obtaining a clue to elucidate an essential difference in the plasma fast flows between during active and quiet geomagnetic conditions. Based on three events of the magnetotail plasma flow bursts, which are transient fast plasma flows with the durations between 1 and 2 minutes, during geomagnetically quiet times, observed by THEMIS, we examined detailed variations of the electric field as a proxy of the flux transport aspect, and associated pressure. The main characteristics of these events are shown as follows; 1) the GSM-X component of the plasma velocity (Vx) was higher than 300 km/s 2) associated parallel (V//) and perpendicular (V⊥) velocities to the local magnetic field line were higher than 200 km/s 3) the flow bursts were observed during which AL and AU indices were lower than 40 nT, and simultaneous Kp index range was between -1 and 1. For almost events, the parallel (E//) and perpendicular (E⊥) components of the electric field to the local magnetic field line were much stronger than the dawn-dusk electric field component (Ey). This result implies that a larger amount

  15. Early capillary flux homogenization in response to neural activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwan; Wu, Weicheng; Boas, David A

    2016-02-01

    This Brief Communication reports early homogenization of capillary network flow during somatosensory activation in the rat cerebral cortex. We used optical coherence tomography and statistical intensity variation analysis for tracing changes in the red blood cell flux over hundreds of capillaries nearly at the same time with 1-s resolution. We observed that while the mean capillary flux exhibited a typical increase during activation, the standard deviation of the capillary flux exhibited an early decrease that happened before the mean flux increase. This network-level data is consistent with the theoretical hypothesis that capillary flow homogenizes during activation to improve oxygen delivery. PMID:26661145

  16. Statistical Study of Plasma-depleted Flux Tubes in Saturnian Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. R.; Russell, C. T.; Wei, H. Y.; Dougherty, M. K.; Jia, Y. D.

    2015-10-01

    We have surveyed the occurrence of flux tubes with both enhanced and depressed field strength relative to their surroundings as observed in Cassini magnetometer data. Consistent with earlier studies, enhanced field flux tubes are concentrated near the equator while depressed field flux tubes are distributed in a larger latitudinal region. For both types of flux tubes, their occurrence rates vary with the local time in the same pattern and they contain the same magnetic flux. Therefore, we suggest that those two types of tubes are just different manifestations of the same phenomenon. Near the equator with high ambient plasma density, the flux tubes convecting in from the tail are compressed, resulting in increased field strength. Off the equator,these flux tubes expand slightly, resulting in decreased field strength. The enhanced flux tubes gradually break into smaller ones as they convect inward. Inside an L value of about 5, they become indistinguishable from the background.

  17. Numerical simulation of heat fluxes in a two-temperature plasma at shock tube walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, E. A.; Poniaev, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation of a two-temperature three-component Xenon plasma flow is presented. A solver based on the OpenFOAM CFD software package is developed. The heat flux at the shock tube end wall is calculated and compared with experimental data. It is shown that the heat flux due to electrons can be as high as 14% of the total heat flux.

  18. Controlling VUV photon fluxes in low-pressure inductively coupled plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Peng; Kushner, Mark J.

    2015-06-01

    Low-pressure (a few to hundreds of millitorrs) inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs), as typically used in microelectronics fabrication, often produce vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photon fluxes onto surfaces comparable to or exceeding the magnitude of ion fluxes. These VUV photon fluxes are desirable in applications such as sterilization of medical equipment but are unwanted in many materials fabrication processes due to damage to the devices by the high-energy photons. Under specific conditions, VUV fluxes may stimulate etching or synergistically combine with ion fluxes to modify polymeric materials. In this regard, it is desirable to control the magnitude of VUV fluxes or the ratio of VUV fluxes to those of other reactive species, such as ions, or to discretely control the VUV spectrum. In this paper, we discuss results from a computational investigation of VUV fluxes from low-pressure ICPs sustained in rare gas mixtures. The control of VUV fluxes through the use of pressure, pulsed power, and gas mixture is discussed. We found that the ratio, β, of VUV photon to ion fluxes onto surfaces generally increases with increasing pressure. When using pulsed plasmas, the instantaneous value of β can vary by a factor of 4 or more during the pulse cycle due to the VUV flux more closely following the pulsed power.

  19. Waves In Space Plasmas (WISP): A space plasma lab active experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredricks, R. W.

    1983-01-01

    The Waves in Space Plasmas (WISP) series of Spacelab Space Plasma Labs devoted to active experimentation, are introduced. Space Plasma Lab-1 is keyed to active probing of the ionosphere and magnetosphere using controlled wave injections by the WISP VLF and HF transmitters, supported by a free-flying plasma diagnostics package instrumented with wave receivers and particle probe diagnostics, designed to measure radiation and propagation of plasma waves, precipitated particle fluxes due to wave/particle interactions, and similar phenomena resulting from wave injectons. The VLF transmitter delivers up to 1 kW of RF power into the antenna terminals over the range from 0.3 to 30 kHz. The HF transmitter delivers up to 500 W to the antenna over the range from 1 to 30 MHz. A dipole antenna commandable to any extension up to 300 m tip-to-tip is available.

  20. Numerical analysis of TDS spectra under high and low flux plasma exposure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigorev, P.; Buzi, L.; Bakaeva, A.; Terentyev, D.; De Temmerman, G.; Van Oost, G.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2016-02-01

    A recently developed numerical model, based on the dislocation-driven nucleation of gas bubbles, is used to analyse experimental results on deuterium retention in tungsten under ITER relevant plasma exposure conditions. Focus is placed on understanding the relation between exposure temperature and flux on primary features of thermal desorption spectra: peak positions and intensities of the desorption flux. The model allows one to relate the peak positions with the size of plasma induced deuterium bubbles and envisage exposure conditions (temperature and flux) for their formation. Based on the performed analysis, dedicated experimental conditions to validate the model are proposed.

  1. The ISEE-3 ULEWAT: Flux tape description and heavy ion fluxes 1978-1984. [plasma diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, G. M.; Klecker, B.

    1985-01-01

    The ISEE ULEWAT FLUX tapes contain ULEWAT and ISEE pool tape data summarized over relatively long time intervals (1hr) in order to compact the data set into an easily usable size. (Roughly 3 years of data fit onto one 1600 BPI 9-track magnetic tape). In making the tapes, corrections were made to the ULEWAT basic data tapes in order to, remove rate spikes and account for changes in instrument response so that to a large extent instrument fluxes can be calculated easily from the FLUX tapes without further consideration of instrument performance.

  2. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding.

    PubMed

    van Eden, G G; Morgan, T W; Aussems, D U B; van den Berg, M A; Bystrov, K; van de Sanden, M C M

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants. PMID:27081983

  3. Self-Regulated Plasma Heat Flux Mitigation Due to Liquid Sn Vapor Shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Eden, G. G.; Morgan, T. W.; Aussems, D. U. B.; van den Berg, M. A.; Bystrov, K.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state high-flux H or He plasma beam was balanced against the pressure of a Sn vapor cloud for the first time, resulting in a self-regulated heat flux intensity near the liquid surface. A temperature response of the liquid surface characterized by a decoupling from the received heating power and significant cooling of the plasma in the neutral Sn cloud were observed. The plasma heat flux impinging on the target was found to be mitigated, as heat was partially dissipated by volumetric processes in the vapor cloud rather than wholly by surface effects. These results motivate further exploration of liquid metal solutions to the critical challenge of heat and particle flux handling in fusion power plants.

  4. Enhanced ion particle flux and momentum outward of a plasma ball

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrinich, Gennady; Fruchtman, Amnon

    2013-09-01

    A plasma ball has been produced near the anode in a configuration that, when magnetized, operates as a radial plasma source (RPS). Plasma balls have been studied recently in different configurations. We find that the plasma particle flux outward of the plasma ball is larger than that expected by the Langmuir relation in double layers. The frequency of oscillations of a pendulum is larger than due to gravity only, reflecting the force by the plasma ball. The force by the plasma ball is larger than expected by the model. We address these two questions: the increased ion flux and the increased force relative to the model. We suggest that the Langmuir relation underestimates the ratio of ion to electron flux. We also suggest that the ions gain most of the momentum in the quasi-neutral plasma rather than in the double layer; the impulse enhancement is suggested to result from ion-neutral collisions in the plasma. Partially supported by the Israel Science Foundation, Grant 765/11.

  5. A direct measurement of the energy flux density in plasma surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussart, Remi; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Semmar, Nadjib; Pichon, Laurianne; Bedra, Larbi; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; Lefaucheux, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The energy flux transferred from a plasma to a surface is a key issue for materials processing (sputtering, etching). We present direct measurements made with a Heat Flux Microsensor (HFM) in an Ar plasma interacting with the surface of the sensor. The HFM is a thermopile of about one thousand metal couples mounted in parallel. An Inductively Coupled Plasma in Argon was used to make the experiments. Langmuir probe and tuneable laser diode absorption measurements were carried out to estimate the contribution of ions, neutrals (conduction) and metastables. In order to evaluate the ability of the HFM to measure the part due to chemical reactions, a Si surface in contact with the HFM was submitted to an SF6 plasma. The direct measurements are in good agreement with the estimation we made knowing the etch rate and the enthalpy of the reaction. Finally, tests were performed on a sputtering reactor. Additional energy flux provided by condensing atoms (Pt) was also measured.

  6. Flux tube train model for local turbulence simulation of toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, T.-H.; Sugama, H.; Ishizawa, A.; Nunami, M.

    2015-02-15

    A new simulation method for local turbulence in toroidal plasmas is developed by extending the conventional idea of the flux tube model. In the new approach, a train of flux tubes is employed, where flux tube simulation boxes are serially connected at each end along a field line so as to preserve a symmetry of the local gyrokinetic equations for image modes in an axisymmetric torus. Validity of the flux tube train model is confirmed against the toroidal ion temperature gradient turbulence for a case with a long parallel correlation of fluctuations, demonstrating numerical advantages over the conventional method in the time step size and the symmetry-preserving property.

  7. US-Japan workshop Q-181 on high heat flux components and plasma-surface interactions for next devices: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, R.T.; Yamashina, T.

    1994-04-01

    This report contain viewgraphs of papers from the following sessions: plasma facing components issues for future machines; recent PMI results from several tokamaks; high heat flux technology; plasma facing components design and applications; plasma facing component materials and irradiation damage; boundary layer plasma; plasma disruptions; conditioning and tritium; and erosion/redeposition.

  8. MAGNETIC FLUX PARADIGM FOR RADIO LOUDNESS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Marek; Begelman, Mitchell C. E-mail: mitch@jila.colorado.edu

    2013-02-20

    We argue that the magnetic flux threading the black hole (BH), rather than BH spin or Eddington ratio, is the dominant factor in launching powerful jets and thus determining the radio loudness of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Most AGNs are radio quiet because the thin accretion disks that feed them are inefficient in depositing magnetic flux close to the BH. Flux accumulation is more likely to occur during a hot accretion (or thick disk) phase, and we argue that radio-loud quasars and strong emission-line radio galaxies occur only when a massive, cold accretion event follows an episode of hot accretion. Such an event might be triggered by the merger of a giant elliptical galaxy with a disk galaxy. This picture supports the idea that flux accumulation can lead to the formation of a so-called magnetically choked accretion flow. The large observed range in radio loudness reflects not only the magnitude of the flux pressed against the BH, but also the decrease in UV flux from the disk, due to its disruption by the ''magnetosphere'' associated with the accumulated flux. While the strongest jets result from the secular accumulation of flux, moderate jet activity can also be triggered by fluctuations in the magnetic flux deposited by turbulent, hot inner regions of otherwise thin accretion disks, or by the dissipation of turbulent fields in accretion disk coronae. These processes could be responsible for jet production in Seyferts and low-luminosity AGNs, as well as jets associated with X-ray binaries.

  9. Plasma Flows Observed in Magnetic Flux Concentrations and Sunspot Fine Structure Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimmele, Thomas R.

    2004-04-01

    We present diffraction-limited observations of magnetic flux concentrations and penumbral and umbral fine structure within an active region observed at disk center. We recorded G-band images, magnetograms, Dopplergrams, and narrowband filtergrams, using the Universal Birefringent Filter (UBF) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). The National Solar Observatory (NSO) adaptive optics system at the DST was used to achieve diffraction-limited long-exposure imaging with a high signal-to-noise ratio. The main results can be summarized as follows: Strong and spatially narrow downflows are observed at the edge of magnetic structures, such as small flux concentrations (sometimes also referred to as flux tubes), pores, a light bridge, and the sunspot umbrae. For the particular sunspot observed, we find strong evidence for what appear to be vigorous, small-scale convection patterns in a light bridge. We observe extremely narrow (<0.2") channels or sheets of downflowing plasma. Flux concentrations as seen in intensity expand from a height close to where the continuum is formed to the height of formation for the G band. These observations indicate that the G band forms in the mid-photosphere. We are able to identify individual penumbral fibrils in our data and find a bright (hot) upflow and a more vertical field structure at the filament footpoint near the umbral boundary. The observations are consistent with a filament geometry in which the field and flow turn to a nearly horizontal, dark structure over a distance of about 0.2". In the deep photosphere we observe strong upflows of the order of 1 km s-1 in umbral dots. We compare our results with theoretical model predictions.

  10. Interaction of high flux deuterium/nitrogen plasmas with beryllium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittmar, T.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Nishijima, D.; Oberkofler, M.; Schwarz-Selinger, T.; Tabarés, F.

    2011-12-01

    Before nitrogen can be used as a radiator for edge plasma temperature control in experiments with beryllium as the wall material, the compatibility of nitrogen-containing plasma with beryllium has to be tested. Therefore beryllium samples were exposed to a variety of mixed N2/D2 plasmas in PISCES-B and codeposits from the sputtered material were collected. It was found that introducing N2 to a D2 plasma reduces Be erosion significantly but recovery to the pre-N2 levels is possible in pure D2 plasma. Berylliated vessel walls can be a reservoir for N2 and chemical processes probably play a significant role during nitriding and N2 removal. Nitrided target samples remain conductive and do not lead to additional arcing, but codeposits are insulating. Thermal desorption measurements of nitrided and un-nitrided target samples are comparable, while codeposits show a slightly reduced D retention. However, D release for both target and codeposits is shifted ≈100 K to higher temperatures, above 510 K.

  11. Multi-machine scaling of the main SOL parallel heat flux width in tokamak limiter plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horacek, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Adamek, J.; Arnoux, G.; Bak, J.-G.; Brezinsek, S.; Dimitrova, M.; Goldston, R. J.; Gunn, J. P.; Havlicek, J.; Hong, S.-H.; Janky, F.; LaBombard, B.; Marsen, S.; Maddaluno, G.; Nie, L.; Pericoli, V.; Popov, Tsv; Panek, R.; Rudakov, D.; Seidl, J.; Seo, D. S.; Shimada, M.; Silva, C.; Stangeby, P. C.; Viola, B.; Vondracek, P.; Wang, H.; Xu, G. S.; Xu, Y.; Contributors, JET

    2016-07-01

    As in many of today’s tokamaks, plasma start-up in ITER will be performed in limiter configuration on either the inner or outer midplane first wall (FW). The massive, beryllium armored ITER FW panels are toroidally shaped to protect panel-to-panel misalignments, increasing the deposited power flux density compared with a purely cylindrical surface. The chosen shaping should thus be optimized for a given radial profile of parallel heat flux, {{q}||} in the scrape-off layer (SOL) to ensure optimal power spreading. For plasmas limited on the outer wall in tokamaks, this profile is commonly observed to decay exponentially as {{q}||}={{q}0}\\text{exp} ~≤ft(-r/λ q\\text{omp}\\right) , or, for inner wall limiter plasmas with the double exponential decay comprising a sharp near-SOL feature and a broader main SOL width, λ q\\text{omp} . The initial choice of λ q\\text{omp} , which is critical in ensuring that current ramp-up or down will be possible as planned in the ITER scenario design, was made on the basis of an extremely restricted L-mode divertor dataset, using infra-red thermography measurements on the outer divertor target to extrapolate to a heat flux width at the main plasma midplane. This unsatisfactory situation has now been significantly improved by a dedicated multi-machine ohmic and L-mode limiter plasma study, conducted under the auspices of the International Tokamak Physics Activity, involving 11 tokamaks covering a wide parameter range with R=\\text{0}\\text{.4--2}\\text{.8} \\text{m}, {{B}0}=\\text{1}\\text{.2--7}\\text{.5} \\text{T}, {{I}\\text{p}}=\\text{9--2500} \\text{kA}. Measurements of λ q\\text{omp} in the database are made exclusively on all devices using a variety of fast reciprocating Langmuir probes entering the plasma at a variety of poloidal locations, but with the majority being on the low field side. Statistical analysis of the database reveals nine reasonable engineering and dimensionless scalings. All yield, however, similar

  12. Average patterns of precipitation and plasma flow in the plasma sheet flux tubes during steady magnetospheric convection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Lennartsson, W.; Pellinen, R.; Vallinkoski, M.; Fedorova, N. I.

    1990-01-01

    Average patterns of plasma drifts and auroral precipitation in the nightside auroral zone were constructed during a steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) event on February 19, 1978. By comparing these patterns with the measurements in the midtail plasma sheet made by ISEE-1, and using the corresponding magnetic field model, the following features are inferred: (1) the concentration of the earthward convection in the midnight portion of the plasma sheet (convection jet); (2) the depleted plasma energy content of the flux tubes in the convection jet region; and (3) the Region-1 field-aligned currents generated in the midtail plasma sheet. It is argued that these three elements are mutually consistent features appearing in the process of ionosphere-magnetosphere interaction during SMC periods. These configurational characteristics resemble the corresponding features of substorm expansions (enhanced convection and 'dipolarized' magnetic field within the substorm current wedge) and appear to play the same role in regulating the plasma flow in the flux tubes connected to the plasma sheet.

  13. Estimates of magnetic flux, and energy balance in the plasma sheet during substorm expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Birn, Joachim; Pulkkinen, Tuija

    1996-01-01

    The energy and magnetic flux budgets of the magnetotail plasma sheet during substorm expansion are investigated. The possible mechanisms that change the energy content of the closed field line region which contains all the major dissipation mechanisms of relevance during substorms, are considered. The compression of the plasma sheet mechanism and the diffusion mechanism are considered and excluded. It is concluded that the magnetic reconnection mechanism can accomplish the required transport. Data-based empirical magnetic field models are used to investigate the magnetic flux transport required to account for the observed magnetic field dipolarizations in the inner magnetosphere. It is found that the magnetic flux permeating the current sheet is typically insufficient to supply the required magnetic flux. It is concluded that no major substorm-type magnetospheric reconfiguration is possible in the absence of magnetic reconnection.

  14. Recombinant prolylcarboxypeptidase activates plasma prekallikrein.

    PubMed

    Shariat-Madar, Zia; Mahdi, Fakhri; Schmaier, Alvin H

    2004-06-15

    The serine protease prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP), isolated from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), is a plasma prekallikrein (PK) activator. PRCP cDNA was cloned in pMT/BIP/V5-HIS-C, transfected into Schneider insect (S2) cells, and purified from serum-free media. Full-length recombinant PRCP (rPRCP) activates PK when bound to high-molecular-weight kininogen (HK). Recombinant PRCP is inhibited by leupeptin, angiotensin II, bradykinin, anti-PRCP, diisopropyl-fluorophosphonate (DFP), phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), and Z-Pro-Proaldehyde-dimethyl acetate, but not by 1 mM EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), bradykinin 1-5, or angiotensin 1-7. Corn trypsin inhibitor binds to prekallikrein to prevent rPRCP activation, but it does not directly inhibit the active site of either enzyme. Unlike factor XIIa, the ability of rPRCP to activate PK is blocked by angiotensin II, not by neutralizing antibody to factor XIIa. PRCP antigen is detected on HUVEC membranes using flow cytometry and laser scanning confocal microscopy. PRCP antigen does not colocalize with LAMP1 on nonpermeabilized HUVECs, but it partially colocalizes in permeabilized cells. PRCP colocalizes with all the HK receptors, gC1qR, uPAR, and cytokeratin 1 antigen, on nonpermeabilized HUVECs. PRCP activity and antigen expression on cultured HUVECs are blocked by a morpholino antisense oligonucleotide. These investigations indicate that rPRCP is functionally identical to isolated HUVEC PRCP and is a major HUVEC membrane-expressed, PK-activating enzyme detected in the intravascular compartment. PMID:14996700

  15. Combined Flux Compression and Plasma Opening Switch on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Felber, Franklin S.; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Mazarakis, Michael G.

    2010-05-07

    A wire-array flux-compression cartridge installed on Sandia's Saturn pulsed power generator doubled the current into a 3-nH load to 6 MA and halved its rise time to 100 ns. The current into the load, however, was unexpectedly delayed by almost 1 {mu}s. Estimates of a plasma flow switch acting as a long-conduction-time opening switch are consistent with key features of the power compression. The results suggest that microsecond-conduction-time plasma flow switches can be combined with flux compression both to amplify currents and to sharpen pulse rise times in pulsed power drivers.

  16. Energetic electron fluxes stimulated with pulsed injection of plasma in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, V.A.; Babaev, A.P.; Gaidukov, V.Iu.; Loevskii, A.S.; Popov, G.A.; Romanovskii, Iu.A.

    1981-01-01

    Two plasma blob injection experiments, performed from the MR-12 rocket launched from Volgograd in 1977, are presented. The blobs were injected along and transverse to the magnetic field lines. An energetic electron flux increase was observed in both cases, the increase being 2-3 times greater than the background flux prior to injection in the longitudinal-injection experiment, and 10-40 times greater in the transverse-injection experiment. Plasma blob parameters presented include injection frequency, propulsive mass, and direction of the injection. Spectrum changes of the energetic electron pulsations were also observed.

  17. Relationship between neutron yield rate of tokamak plasmas and spectrometer measured flux for different sight lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gorini, G.; Kaellne, J.; Ognissanto, F.; Tardocchi, M.

    2011-03-15

    A parametric relationship between total neutron yield rate and collimated fluxes related to the brightness (B) of plasma chords ({lambda}) is developed for different emissivity distributions of tokamak plasmas. Specifically, the brightness was expressed as a function of chord coordinates of radial position using a simple model for the emissivity profiles of width parameter w. The functional brightness dependence B({lambda},w) was calculated to examine the relationship between measured flux and deduced yield rate, and its plasma profile dependence. The results were used to determine the chord range of minimum profile sensitivity in order to identify the preferred collimator sight for the determination of yield rate from neutron emission spectroscopy (YNES) measurements. The YNES method is discussed in comparison to conventional methods to determine the total neutron yield rates and related plasma fusion power relying on uncollimated flux measurements and a different calibration base for the flux-yield relationship. The results have a special bearing for tokamaks operating with both deuterium and deuterium-tritium plasmas and future high power machines such as for ITER, DEMO, and IGNITOR.

  18. Disentangling fluxes of energy and matter in plasma-surface interactions: Effect of process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Wolter, M.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.; Kersten, H.; Kumar, S.

    2010-09-15

    The possibility to discriminate between the relative importance of the fluxes of energy and matter in plasma-surface interaction is demonstrated by the energy flux measurements in low-temperature plasmas ignited by the radio frequency discharge (power and pressure ranges 50-250 W and 8-11.5 Pa) in Ar, Ar+H{sub 2}, and Ar+H{sub 2}+CH{sub 4} gas mixtures typically used in nanoscale synthesis and processing of silicon- and carbon-based nanostructures. It is shown that by varying the gas composition and pressure, the discharge power, and the surface bias one can effectively control the surface temperature and the matter supply rates. The experimental findings are explained in terms of the plasma-specific reactions in the plasma bulk and on the surface.

  19. A two satellite study of nightside flux transfer events in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Elphic, R. C.; Mozer, F. S.; Saint-Marc, A.; Sauvaud, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The short-term (about 1 min) events during two consecutive substorms on March 23 1979 have been studied using high time resolution measurements of magnetic and electric fields and of the kiloelectronvolt electron flux at X about -21 R(e). Data obtained make it possible to describe the localized magnetic structures transported or propagated within the plasma sheet and to identify these events as plasma sheet nightside magnetic flux transfer events (NFTEs). The best examples of the NFTEs found so far are all observed in a thin portion of plasma sheet where the contraction of the reconnected field lines dominates over the oppositely directed pressure gradient force. Systematic differences in the magnetic variations observed at ISEE-1 and 2 indicate current concentration at the outer plasma sheet boundary during the passage of a NFTE.

  20. Surface hardening induced by high flux plasma in tungsten revealed by nano-indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terentyev, D.; Bakaeva, A.; Pardoen, T.; Favache, A.; Zhurkin, E. E.

    2016-08-01

    Surface hardness of tungsten after high flux deuterium plasma exposure has been characterized by nanoindentation. The effect of plasma exposure was rationalized on the basis of available theoretical models. Resistance to plastic penetration is enhanced within the 100 nm sub-surface region, attributed to the pinning of geometrically necessary dislocations on nanometric deuterium cavities - signature of plasma-induced defects and deuterium retention. Sub-surface extension of thereby registered plasma-induced damage is in excellent agreement with the results of alternative measurements. The study demonstrates suitability of nano-indentation to probe the impact of deposition of plasma-induced defects in tungsten on near surface plasticity under ITER-relevant plasma exposure conditions.

  1. Beta electron fluxes inside a magnetic plasma cavern: Calculation and comparison with experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupitskii, E. L.; Smirnov, E. V.; Kulikova, N. A.

    2010-12-01

    We study the possibility of electrostatic blanking of beta electrons in the expanding spherical blob of a radioactive plasma in a rarefied ionosphere. From numerical studies on the dynamics of beta electrons departing a cavern, we obtain the form of a function that determines the portion of departing electrons and calculate the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern in relation to the Starfish Prime nuclear blast. We show that the flux density of electrons in geomagnetic flux tubes and inside the cavern depend on a correct allowance for the quantity of beta electrons returning to the cavern. On the basis of a physical analysis, we determine the approximate criterion for the return of electrons from a geomagnetic flux tube to the cavern. We compare calculation results in terms of the flux density of beta electrons inside the cavern with the recently published experimental results from operation Starfish Prime.

  2. Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux tubes in almost helical plasma flows

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L.C.

    2006-02-15

    Riemannian geometry of curves applied recently by Ricca [Fluid Dyn. Res 36, 319 (2005)] in the case of inflectional disequilibrium of twisted magnetic flux tubes is used here to compute the magnetic helicity force-free field case. Here the application of Lorentz force-free to the magnetic flux tube in tokamaks allows one to obtain an equation that generalizes the cylindrical tokamak equation by a term that contains the curvature of the magnetic flux tube. Another example of the use of the magnetic flux tube is done by taking the electron magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) fluid model (EMHD) of plasma physics that allows one to compute the velocity of the fluid in helical and almost helical flows in terms of the Frenet torsion of thin magnetic flux tubes. The cases of straight and curved twisted tubes are examined. Second-order effects on the Frenet torsion arise on the poloidal component of the magnetic field, while curvature effects appear in the toroidal component. The magnetic fields are computed in terms of the penetration depth used in superconductors. The ratio between poloidal and toroidal components of the magnetic field depends on the torsion and curvature of the magnetic flux tube. It is shown that the rotation of the almost helical plasma flow contributes to the twist of the magnetic flux tube through the total Frenet torsion along the tube.

  3. Formation of plasma and ion flux on a target, irradiated by an intense electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Engelko, Vladimir; Mueller, Georg

    2005-07-01

    Theoretical consideration shows that under the influence of an intense electron beam, first, an ion flux and then plasma are formed on the surface of a target. The target plasma is created when the density of the ion flux achieves a certain limiting value. The time necessary for the plasma formation depends on the beam current density and the efficiency of gas desorption and ionization. This time is few microseconds under typical vacuum conditions of about 5.0x10{sup -5} mbar, electron-beam current density in the range of 10 A/cm{sup 2}, and kinetic energy of electrons in the range of 100 keV. When the density of the ion flux reaches a limiting value the beam potential decreases to a level, which is half of the initial one. A transient layer is formed between the plasma boundary and the electron beam. For conditions mentioned above its length are few centimeters. The target plasma expands into the beam drift region, with a velocity increasing in time. The expansion of the target plasma is the main reason for neutralization of the electron-beam space charge.

  4. Cluster electric current density measurements within a magnetic flux rope in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slavin, J. A.; Lepping, R. P.; Gjerloev, J.; Goldstein, M. L.; Fairfield, D. H.; Acuna, M. H.; Balogh, A.; Dunlop, M.; Kivelson, M. G.; Khurana, K.

    2003-01-01

    On August 22, 2001 all 4 Cluster spacecraft nearly simultaneously penetrated a magnetic flux rope in the tail. The flux rope encounter took place in the central plasma sheet, Beta(sub i) approx. 1-2, near the leading edge of a bursty bulk flow. The "time-of-flight" of the flux rope across the 4 spacecraft yielded V(sub x) approx. 700 km/s and a diameter of approx.1 R(sub e). The speed at which the flux rope moved over the spacecraft is in close agreement with the Cluster plasma measurements. The magnetic field profiles measured at each spacecraft were first modeled separately using the Lepping-Burlaga force-free flux rope model. The results indicated that the center of the flux rope passed northward (above) s/c 3, but southward (below) of s/c 1, 2 and 4. The peak electric currents along the central axis of the flux rope predicted by these single-s/c models were approx.15-19 nA/sq m. The 4-spacecraft Cluster magnetic field measurements provide a second means to determine the electric current density without any assumption regarding flux rope structure. The current profile determined using the curlometer technique was qualitatively similar to those determined by modeling the individual spacecraft magnetic field observations and yielded a peak current density of 17 nA/m2 near the central axis of the rope. However, the curlometer results also showed that the flux rope was not force-free with the component of the current density perpendicular to the magnetic field exceeding the parallel component over the forward half of the rope, perhaps due to the pressure gradients generated by the collision of the BBF with the inner magnetosphere. Hence, while the single-spacecraft models are very successful in fitting flux rope magnetic field and current variations, they do not provide a stringent test of the force-free condition.

  5. Morphological changes of tungsten surfaces by low-flux helium plasma treatment and helium incorporation via magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Iyyakkunnel, Santhosh; Marot, Laurent; Eren, Baran; Steiner, Roland; Moser, Lucas; Mathys, Daniel; Düggelin, Marcel; Chapon, Patrick; Meyer, Ernst

    2014-07-23

    The effect of helium on the tungsten microstructure was investigated first by exposure to a radio frequency driven helium plasma with fluxes of the order of 1 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) and second by helium incorporation via magnetron sputtering. Roughening of the surface and the creation of pinholes were observed when exposing poly- and nanocrystalline tungsten samples to low-flux plasma. A coating process using an excess of helium besides argon in the process gas mixture leads to a porous thin film and a granular surface structure whereas gas mixture ratios of up to 50% He/Ar (in terms of their partial pressures) lead to a dense structure. The presence of helium in the deposited film was confirmed with glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy and thermal desorption measurements. Latter revealed that the highest fraction of the embedded helium atoms desorb at approximately 1500 K. Identical plasma treatments at various temperatures showed strongest modifications of the surface at 1500 K, which is attributed to the massive activation of helium singly bond to a single vacancy inside the film. Thus, an efficient way of preparing nanostructured tungsten surfaces and porous tungsten films at low fluxes was found. PMID:24960311

  6. Plasma anisotropy and the radial particle flux in a rippled tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2016-06-01

    We show that an often used relation between the radial particle flux and the divergence of the gyrotropic stress is an algebraic identity, unrelated to momentum conservation. Our calculation is completely general with regard to toroidal geometry and plasma collisionality. The result bears on the role of anisotropy in momentum relaxation and also clarifies certain methodological issues.

  7. Observation of heat flux and plasma flow in scrape off layer in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, T.; Mahira, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Mishra, K.; Idei, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hasegawa, M.; Matsuoka, K.; Kuzmin, A.; Watanabe, O.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.

    2015-08-01

    Thermal probe with double function of thermocouples and Langmuir probe has been developed, and the initial data observed in far-SOL in QUEST is obtained. Heat flux of megawatt per square meters related to energetic electrons and sonic plasma flow in far-SOL have been observed in the current rump-up phase although no high power inductive force like ohmic winding is applied. The heat flux and the flow are suppressed after the current is built up. In the quasi-steady state, plasma current starts and keeps sawtooth-like oscillation with 20 Hz frequency. The heat flux and the flow in far-SOL have clear responses to the oscillation.

  8. Characterization of radial turbulent fluxes in the Santander linear plasma machine

    SciTech Connect

    Mier, J. A. Anabitarte, E.; Sentíes, J. M.; Sánchez, R.; Newman, D. E.; Castellanos, O. F.; Milligen, B. Ph. van

    2014-05-15

    It is shown that the statistical and correlation properties of the local turbulent flux measured at different radial locations of the cold, weakly ionized plasmas inside the Santander Linear Plasma Machine [Castellanos et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 47, 2067 (2005)] are consistent with diffusive-like transport dynamics. This is in contrast to the dynamical behavior inferred from similar measurements taken in hotter, fully ionized tokamak and stellarator edge plasmas, in which long-term correlations and other features characteristic of complex, non-diffusive transport dynamics have been reported in the past. These results may shed some light on a recent controversy regarding the possible universality of the dynamics of turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas.

  9. Thermal shock behaviour of tungsten after high flux H-plasma loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; De Temmerman, G.; Wright, G. M.

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that transient thermal shock loads induce crack networks on tungsten samples especially at low base temperatures. To achieve test conditions which are more relevant for the performance of tungsten-armoured plasma facing components in next step thermonuclear fusion devices tungsten tiles were exposed to high flux hydrogen-plasma in the linear plasma generator Pilot-PSI and the high heat flux ion beam test facility MARION. Subsequently, the cyclic transient heat load tests were done in the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. The induced damages after these combined tests were examined by microscopically means, profilometry and metallography. The comparison of the obtained results and damage characteristics with those obtained after thermal shock loading show that the preloading of tungsten targets with high flux hydrogen-plasma has significant influence on the thermal shock behaviour of tungsten in terms of crack distance, width, and depth as well as cracked area. Furthermore the plasma parameters, in particular pulse duration and sample temperature during loading, have strong impact on the damage pattern after thermal shock loading.

  10. Core Fueling and Edge Particle Flux Analysis in Ohmically and Auxiliary Heated NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    V.A. Soukhanovskii; R. Maingi; R. Raman; H.W. Kugel; B.P. LeBlanc; L. Roquemore; C.H. Skinner; NSTX Research Team

    2002-06-12

    The Boundary Physics program of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is focusing on optimization of the edge power and particle flows in b * 25% L- and H-mode plasmas of t {approx} 0.8 s duration heated by up to 6 MW of high harmonic fast wave and up to 5 MW of neutral beam injection. Particle balance and core fueling efficiencies of low and high field side gas fueling of L-mode homic and NBI heated plasmas have been compared using an analytical zero dimensional particle balance model and measured ion and neutral fluxes. Gas fueling efficiencies are in the range of 0.05-0.20 and do not depend on discharge magnetic configuration, density or poloidal location of the injector. The particle balance modeling indicates that the addition of HFS fueling results in a reversal of the wall loading rate and higher wall inventories. Initial particle source estimates obtained from neutral pressure and spectroscopic measurements indicate that ion flux into the divertor greatly exceeds midplane ion flux from the main plasma, suggesting that the scrape-off cross-field transport plays a minor role in diverted plasmas. Present analysis provides the basis for detailed fluid modeling of core and edge particle flows and particle confinement properties of NSTX plasmas. This research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contracts No. DE-AC02-76CH03073, DE-AC05-00OR22725, and W-7405-ENG-36.

  11. Magnetorotational instability in a collisionless plasma with heat flux vector and an isotropic plasma with self-gravitational effect

    SciTech Connect

    Ren Haijun; Wu Zhengwei; Cao Jintao; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-09-15

    The linear stability of a differential rotating magnetized plasma is analyzed in the collisionless approximation along with heat flux vector. The dispersion relation is derived and simplified cases are discussed with instability criteria presented. Anisotropic pressures are shown to not only alter the classical instability criterion but also induce new unstable regions. The shear rotating instability in a collisional magnetized plasma with a scalar kinetic pressure in the presence of self-gravitational effect is then considered. Three cases are discussed specifically according to the general dispersion relation. The effects of Jeans term and compressibility on the local shear instability induced by differential rotation are examined and the analytic instability criteria are presented.

  12. Magnetorotational instability in a collisionless plasma with heat flux vector and an isotropic plasma with self-gravitational effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haijun; Cao, Jintao; Wu, Zhengwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2011-09-01

    The linear stability of a differential rotating magnetized plasma is analyzed in the collisionless approximation along with heat flux vector. The dispersion relation is derived and simplified cases are discussed with instability criteria presented. Anisotropic pressures are shown to not only alter the classical instability criterion but also induce new unstable regions. The shear rotating instability in a collisional magnetized plasma with a scalar kinetic pressure in the presence of self-gravitational effect is then considered. Three cases are discussed specifically according to the general dispersion relation. The effects of Jeans term and compressibility on the local shear instability induced by differential rotation are examined and the analytic instability criteria are presented.

  13. Deuterium-induced nanostructure formation on tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, H. Y.; De Temmerman, G.; Luo, G.-N.; Jia, Y. Z.; Yuan, Y.; Fu, B. Q.; Godfrey, A.; Liu, W.

    2015-08-01

    Surface topography of polycrystalline tungsten (W) have been examined after exposure to a low-energy (38 eV/D), high-flux (∼1.1-1.5 × 1024 m-2 s-1) deuterium plasma in the Pilot-PSI linear plasma device. The methods used were scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), positron annihilation Doppler broadening (PADB) and grazing incident X-ray diffraction (GI-XRD). After exposure to high flux D plasma, blisters and nanostructures are formed on the W surface. Generation of defects was evidenced by PADB, while high stress and mixture of phases were detected in depth of 50 nm by GI-XRD. TEM observation revealed fluctuations and disordered microstructure on the outmost surface layer. Based on these results, surface reconstruction is considered as a possible mechanism for the formation of defects and nanostructures.

  14. SNS Sample Activation Calculator Flux Recommendations and Validation

    SciTech Connect

    McClanahan, Tucker C.; Gallmeier, Franz X.; Iverson, Erik B.; Lu, Wei

    2015-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses the Sample Activation Calculator (SAC) to calculate the activation of a sample after the sample has been exposed to the neutron beam in one of the SNS beamlines. The SAC webpage takes user inputs (choice of beamline, the mass, composition and area of the sample, irradiation time, decay time, etc.) and calculates the activation for the sample. In recent years, the SAC has been incorporated into the user proposal and sample handling process, and instrument teams and users have noticed discrepancies in the predicted activation of their samples. The Neutronics Analysis Team validated SAC by performing measurements on select beamlines and confirmed the discrepancies seen by the instrument teams and users. The conclusions were that the discrepancies were a result of a combination of faulty neutron flux spectra for the instruments, improper inputs supplied by SAC (1.12), and a mishandling of cross section data in the Sample Activation Program for Easy Use (SAPEU) (1.1.2). This report focuses on the conclusion that the SAPEU (1.1.2) beamline neutron flux spectra have errors and are a significant contributor to the activation discrepancies. The results of the analysis of the SAPEU (1.1.2) flux spectra for all beamlines will be discussed in detail. The recommendations for the implementation of improved neutron flux spectra in SAPEU (1.1.3) are also discussed.

  15. Simulation of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manchester, W.; van der Holst, B.

    2015-12-01

    Shear flows long observed in solar active regions are now understood to be a consequence of the Lorentz force that develops from a complex interaction between magnetic fields and the thermal pressure of the Sun's gravitationally stratified atmosphere. The shearing motions transport magnetic flux and energy from the submerged portion of the field to the corona providing the necessary energy for flares, filament eruptions and CMEs. To further examine this shearing process, we simulate flux emergence on the scale of active regions with a large-scale model of the near surface convection zone constructed on an adaptive spherical grid. This model is designed to simulate flux emerging on the scale of active regions from a depth of 30 Mm. Here, we show results of a twisted flux rope emerging through the hierarchy of granular convection, and examine the flow patterns that arise as the flux approaches the photosphere. We show how these organized flows driven by the Lorentz force cause the coronal field evolve to a highly non-potential configuration capable of driving solar eruptions such as CMEs and flares.

  16. Plasma signatures in large Martian magnetic flux ropes: MARSIS/ASPERA-3 observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diéval, Catherine; Morgan, David; Duru, Firdevs; Gurnett, Donald

    2014-05-01

    Cylindrical structures of highly twisted magnetic field (flux ropes) have been observed at Mars, using measurements by the MAG-ER magnetometer-electron reflectometer onboard Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) and by the MARSIS radar sounder onboard Mars Express (MEX). Signatures of flux ropes are spikes of magnetic field strength and magnetic field rotations. Both small scale flux ropes (diameters of a few tens of km) and large scale flux ropes (diameters of around 100 km) have been found at Mars. We look at times of presumed flux ropes on the dayside of Mars, detected in the local magnetic field strength given by MARSIS. The signatures in MARSIS are magnetic field strength increases (peak strength reaches several tens to hundred nT) for several minutes (size of hundreds of km along the spacecraft track), found outside but near crustal magnetic field regions. Although we cannot determine the presence of a magnetic field rotation because of the lack of a magnetometer onboard MEX, we assume that these magnetic field increases are large flux ropes. There are indeed large flux ropes with similar characteristics which were established by the magnetometer data from MGS, and thought to form by stretching and reconnection of crustal magnetic field by the solar wind. On the other hand, MEX possesses in situ ion measurements, unlike MGS. We will use the ion and electron data from the ASPERA-3 particle instrument onboard MEX in order to characterize the plasma (ionospheric only or mixing with shocked plasma?) inside the flux ropes, which will give hints on their origin.

  17. ASYMMETRY OF HELICITY INJECTION FLUX IN EMERGING ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Lirong; Alexander, David

    2009-04-20

    Observational and modeling results indicate that typically the leading magnetic field of bipolar active regions (ARs) is often spatially more compact, while more dispersed and fragmented in following polarity. In this paper, we address the origin of this morphological asymmetry, which is not well understood. Although it may be assumed that, in an emerging {omega}-shaped flux tube, those portions of the flux tube in which the magnetic field has a higher twist may maintain its coherence more readily, this has not been tested observationally. To assess this possibility, it is important to characterize the nature of the fragmentation and asymmetry in solar ARs and this provides the motivation for this paper. We separately calculate the distribution of the helicity flux injected in the leading and following polarities of 15 emerging bipolar ARs, using the Michelson Doppler Image 96 minute line-of-sight magnetograms and a local correlation tracking technique. We find from this statistical study that the leading (compact) polarity injects several times more helicity flux than the following (fragmented) one (typically 3-10 times). This result suggests that the leading polarity of the {omega}-shaped flux tube possesses a much larger amount of twist than the following field prior to emergence. We argue that the helicity asymmetry between the leading and following magnetic field for the ARs studied here results in the observed magnetic field asymmetry of the two polarities due to an imbalance in the magnetic tension of the emerging flux tube. We suggest that the observed imbalance in the helicity distribution results from a difference in the speed of emergence between the leading and following legs of an inclined {omega}-shaped flux tube. In addition, there is also the effect of magnetic flux imbalance between the two polarities with the fragmented following polarity displaying spatial fluctuation in both the magnitude and sign of helicity measured.

  18. Simulation of plasma current ramp-up with reduced magnetic flux consumption in JT-60SA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakatsuki, T.; Suzuki, T.; Hayashi, N.; Shiraishi, J.; Ide, S.; Takase, Y.

    2015-06-01

    Current ramp-up with reduced central solenoid (CS) flux consumption in JT-60SA has been investigated using an integrated modeling code suite (TOPICS) with a turbulent model (CDBM). The plasma current can be ramped-up from 0.6 MA to 2.1 MA with no additional CS flux consumption if the plasma current is overdriven by neutral-beam-driven and bootstrap current. A time duration required for the current ramp-up without CS flux consumption becomes as long as 150 s in the scenario we have examined. In order to achieve a current overdrive condition from 0.6 MA, the current drive by a lower energy neutral beam (85 keV) is effective. A higher energy neutral beam (500 keV) cannot be used in this early phase with a low central electron density (~2 × 1019 m-3) due to large shine through loss, while it can be effectively used in the later phase. Therefore, the main current driver should be switched from the lower energy neutral beam to the higher energy neutral beam during the current ramp-up phase. As a result of an intensive auxiliary heating, plasma beta (the ratio of the plasma pressure to the magnetic pressure) becomes high. Ideal MHD instabilities of such high beta plasmas have been investigated using a linear ideal MHD stability analysis code (MARG2D). External kink modes which might affect the core plasma can be stabilized during the current ramp-up if there is a perfectly conducting wall at the location of the stabilizing plate and the vacuum vessel of JT-60SA and the plasma has a broader pressure profile with the H-mode pedestal and the internal transport barrier.

  19. Simulation study of solar plasma eruptions caused by interactions between emerging flux and coronal arcade fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Takafumi; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2014-11-20

    We investigate the triggering mechanisms of plasma eruptions in the solar atmosphere due to interactions between emerging flux and coronal arcade fields by using two-dimensional MHD simulations. We perform parameter surveys with respect to arcade field height, magnetic field strength, and emerging flux location. Our results show that two possible mechanisms exist, and which mechanism is dominant depends mostly on emerging flux location. One mechanism appears when the location of emerging flux is close to the polarity inversion line (PIL) of an arcade field. This mechanism requires reconnection between the emerging flux and the arcade field, as pointed out by previous studies. The other mechanism appears when the location of emerging flux is around the edge of an arcade field. This mechanism does not require reconnection between the emerging flux and the arcade field but does demand reconnection in the arcade field above the PIL. Furthermore, we found that the eruptive condition for this mechanism can be represented by a simple formula.

  20. The distribution of ion orbit loss fluxes of ions and energy from the plasma edge across the last closed flux surface into the scrape-off layer

    SciTech Connect

    Stacey, Weston M.; Schumann, Matthew T.

    2015-04-15

    A more detailed calculation strategy for the evaluation of ion orbit loss of thermalized plasma ions in the edge of tokamaks is presented. In both this and previous papers, the direct loss of particles from internal flux surfaces is calculated from the conservation of canonical angular momentum, energy, and magnetic moment. The previous result that almost all of the ion energy and particle fluxes crossing the last closed flux surface are in the form of ion orbit fluxes is confirmed, and the new result that the distributions of these fluxes crossing the last closed flux surface into the scrape-off layer are very strongly peaked about the outboard midplane is demonstrated. Previous results of a preferential loss of counter current particles leading to a co-current intrinsic rotation peaking just inside of the last closed flux surface are confirmed. Various physical details are discussed.

  1. Plasma dynamics on current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. II - Low potential simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Daniel W.

    1992-01-01

    The evolution of plasma in a current-carrying magnetic flux tube of variable cross section is investigated using a one-dimensional numerical simulation. The flux tube is narrow at the two ends and broad in the middle. The middle part of the flux tube is loaded with a hot, magnetically trapped population, and the two ends have a more dense, gravitationally bound population. A potential difference larger than the gravitational potential but less than the energy of the hot population is applied across the domain. The general result is that the potential change becomes distributed along the anode half of the domain, with negligible potential change on the cathode half. The potential is supported by the mirror force of magnetically trapped particles. The simulations show a steady depletion of plasma on the anode side of the flux tube. The current steadily decreases on a time scale of an ion transit time. The results may provide an explanation for the observed plasma depletions on auroral field lines carrying upward currents.

  2. Ion Flows Associated with Two Flux Ropes in a Background Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaas, Timothy; Gekelman, Walter; van Compernolle, Bart

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic flux ropes are ubiquitous as they are located on and near the sun, presumably other stars, and near the earth and other planets. They consist of helical field lines which vary in pitch due to the electric current flowing along a background magnetic field. Multiple braided flux ropes have been observed in the solar corona, and their unraveling is theorized to be the signature of magnetic reconnection. Two flux ropes (L = 10 m, A = 7 cm2, J = 10 amp/cm2) were created in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA (Bo = 330 G, no = 1012 cm-3, T e = 4eV, Ar). These kink unstable ropes violently twist and oscillate about a central axis. A quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) forms as the ropes collide and the magnetic field lines reconnect. Through the use of a six-faced Mach probe, volumetric data was taken to determine the three-dimensional plasma flow. Volumetric magnetic fields were obtained through use of a three-axis magnetic probe. The three-dimensional data is conditionally averaged to construct the average flux rope dynamic. In this experiment, the ropes are shown to twist, interact, then merge; while the plasma flows are shown to spiral around the two flux ropes in a singular O-point. As they collide and a QSL is formed and an induced electric field is generated, slowing parallel ion flows. This work is supported by LANL-UC research grant and done at the Basic Plasma Science Facility, which is funded by DOE and NSF.

  3. Dynamics of multiple flux tubes in sawtoothing KSTAR plasmas heated by electron cyclotron waves: II. Theoretical and numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierwage, Andreas; Yun, Gunsu S.; Hyuen Choe, Gyueng; Nam, Yoonbum; Lee, Woochang; Park, Hyeon K.; Bae, Youngsoon

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of multiple closed flux tubes in the core of a sawtoothing tokamak plasma are studied using nonlinear simulations. This is motivated by recent observations of long-lived hot spots in the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) images of KSTAR plasmas with electron cyclotron heating (ECH) (Yun et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 145003). Using an empirical source term in a reduced set of MHD equations, it is shown that flux tubes with helicity h = 1 are easily produced and survive for the observed time intervals only if the safety factor is close to unity (|q - 1| ≪ 0.5%) and the magnetic shear is small (|s| ≪ 1). This suggests that sawteeth in KSTAR leave behind wide regions where q ≈ 1. On the basis of the relevant time scales, we discuss how this magnetic geometry and the spatial localization of the EC resonance may allow ECH to actively induce the formation of flux tubes. Using simulations with q profiles that possess a wide q = 1 region inside the sawtooth inversion radius, we examine how the flux tubes merge and annihilate, and how their dynamics depend on the strength of the drive. The phenomena seen in the simulations and experiments lead us to conclude that, during the sawtooth ramp phase, there is a dynamic competition between sources and sinks of thermal and magnetic energy, where the flux tubes may play an important role; both as carriers of and channels for energy. The development of self-consistent simulation models is motivated and directions for future experiments are given.

  4. Integrated framework for the flux calculation of neutral species inside trenches and holes during plasma etching

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkoris, George; Boudouvis, Andreas G.; Gogolides, Evangelos

    2006-11-15

    An integrated framework for the neutral flux calculation inside trenches and holes during plasma etching is described, and a comparison between the two types of structure in a number of applications is presented. First, a detailed and functional set of equations for the neutral and ion flux calculations inside long trenches and holes with cylindrical symmetry is explicitly formulated. This set is based on early works [T. S. Cale and G. B. Raupp, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 8, 1242 (1990); V. K. Singh et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 10, 1091 (1992)], and includes new equations for the case of holes with cylindrical symmetry. Second, a method for the solution of the respective numerical task, i.e., one or a set of linear or nonlinear integral equations, is described. This method includes a coupling algorithm with a surface chemistry model and resolves the singularity problem of the integral equations. Third, the fluxes inside trenches and holes are compared. The flux from reemission is the major portion of the local flux at the bottom of both types of structure. The framework is applied in SiO{sub 2} etching by fluorocarbon plasmas to predict the increased intensity of reactive ion etching lag in SiO{sub 2} holes compared to trenches. It is also applied in deep Si etching: By calculating the flux of F atoms at the bottom of very high aspect ratio (up to 150) Si trenches and holes during the gas chopping process, the aspect ratio at which the flux of F atoms is eliminated and etching practically stops is estimated.

  5. Study of inward particle flux in a multi-instability plasma system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Lang

    We report the observation of a net inward, up-gradient turbulent particle flux which occurs when a collisional drift waves generate a sufficiently strong radially sheared azimuthal zonal flow in a cylindrical magnetized plasma. At low magnetic fields (B≤1.0 kG), particle transport is outward at all radii. As the magnetic field is further increased to 1200G, an up-gradient inward particle flux develops between the peak of the velocity shear and the maximum density gradient. The mean density gradient is also observed to steepen in response to this inward flux. Time-domain and bispectral Fourier domain analysis shows that at the peak of the velocity shear, where the particle flux is outward, the turbulent Reynolds stress acts to reinforce the shear flow. In contrast, in the region of the inward particle flux, the zonal flow drives the fluctuations, and a transient increase in the shearing rate is occurs prior to an increase in the magnitude of the inward flux. The results suggest a hypothesis in which the shear flow is responsible for the up-gradient particle flux and the corresponding steepening in the mean density gradient. However, a linear instability analyses using experimentally measured density and ExB flow profiles in a linear, modified Hasegawa-Wakatani theory model with the coupled potential and density fluctuations failed to reproduce the essential elements of our experimental observations, suggesting some other mechanism is responsible for the inward flux. We summarize recent new experimental results which point towards the possible role of finite ion temperature gradient effects, possibly combined with parallel flow shear, in driving up-gradient particle flux.

  6. Erosion and re-deposition of lithium and boron coatings under high-flux plasma bombardment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, Tyler Wayne

    Lithium and boron coatings are applied to the walls of many tokamaks to enhance performance and protect the underlying substrates. Li and B-coated high-Z substrates are planned for use in NSTX-U and are a candidate plasma-facing component (PFC) for DEMO. However, previous measurements of Li evaporation and thermal sputtering on low-flux devices indicate that the Li temperature permitted on such devices may be unacceptably low. Thus it is crucial to characterize gross and net Li erosion rates under high-flux plasma bombardment. Additionally, no quantitative measurements have been performed of the erosion rate of a boron-coated PFC during plasma bombardment. A realistic model for the compositional evolution of a Li layer under D bombardment was developed that incorporates adsorption, implantation, and diffusion. A model was developed for temperature-dependent mixed-material Li-D erosion that includes evaporation, physical sputtering, chemical sputtering, preferential sputtering, and thermal sputtering. The re-deposition fraction of a Li coating intersecting a linear plasma column was predicted using atomic physics information and by solving the Li continuity equation. These models were tested in the Magnum-PSI linear plasma device at ion fluxes of 1023-1024 m-2 s-1 and Li surface temperatures less than 800 degrees C. Li erosion was measured during bombardment with a neon plasma that will not chemically react with Li and the results agreed well with the erosion model. Next the ratio of the total D fluence to the areal density of the Li coating was varied to quantify differences in Li erosion under D plasma bombardment as a function of the D concentration. The ratio of D/Li atoms was calculated using the results of MD simulations and good agreement is observed between measurements and the predictions of the mixed-material erosion model. Li coatings are observed to disappear from graphite much faster than from TZM Mo, indicating that fast Li diffusion into the bulk

  7. Surface morphology and deuterium retention in tungsten exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. Z.; De Temmerman, G.; Luo, G.-N.; Xu, H. Y.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; Liu, W.

    2015-02-01

    Surface modifications and deuterium retention induced in tungsten by high fluxes (1024 m-2 s-1) low energy (38 eV) deuterium ions were studied as a function of surface temperature. Blister formation was studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction, while deuterium retention was measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy. Blisters are observed on the surface exposed at different temperatures, ranging from 493 K to 1273 K. The blister density and D retention decrease with the increasing exposure temperature. The formation of blisters at high temperatures is attributed to the high flux of D plasma. At 943 K, with the increasing fluence, there is trend to the saturation of D retention and blister density. The defects caused by plasma exposure have an important effect on the D trapping and blistering behavior. The formation of blisters has a strong relationship with slipping system of tungsten.

  8. Banana fluxes in the plateau regime for a nonaxisymmetrically confined plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R.; Fantechi, S. )

    1990-09-01

    The banana (or banana-plateau) fluxes, related to the generalized stresses {l angle}{bold B}{center dot}{del}{center dot}{pi}{sup {alpha}({ital n})}{r angle}, {l angle}{bold B}{sub {ital T}}{center dot}{del}{center dot}{pi}{sup {alpha}({ital n})}{r angle} have been determined in the plateau regime, for a plasma confined by a toroidal magnetic field of arbitrary geometry. The complete set of transport coefficients for both the parallel'' (ambipolar) and toroidal'' (nonambipolar) banana fluxes was obtained in the 13-moment (13M) approximation, going beyond the previously known expressions in the nonaxisymmetric case. The main emphasis is laid on the structure of the transport matrix and of its coefficients. It is shown that the Onsager symmetry of this matrix partly breaks down (for the mixed electron--ion coefficients) in a nonaxisymmetrically confined plasma.

  9. Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R. H.; Chen, G.; Meitner, S.; Baity, F. W.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Owen, L.

    2009-11-26

    Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n{sub e}{>=}10{sup 19} m{sup -3}, T{sub e} = 4-10 eV, particle flux {gamma}{sub p}>10{sup 23}m{sup -3} s{sup -1}, and magnetic field strength |B| up to 1 T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10-26 MHz, and power levels up to {approx}100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

  10. Design of a high particle flux hydrogen helicon plasma source for used in plasma materials interaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, Richard Howell; Chen, Guangye; Meitner, Steven J; Baity Jr, F Wallace; Caughman, John B; Owen, Larry W

    2009-01-01

    Existing linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) facilities all use plasma sources with internal electrodes. An rf-based helicon source is of interest because high plasma densities can be generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. Work has begun at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to develop a large (15 cm) diameter helicon source producing hydrogen plasmas with parameters suitable for use in a linear PMI device: n(e) >= 10(19)m(-3), T(e) = 4-10 eV, particle flux Gamma(p) > 10(23) m(-3) s(-1), and magnetic field strength |B| up to I T in the source region. The device, whose design is based on a previous hydrogen helicon source operated at ORNL[1], will operate at rf frequencies in the range 10 - 26 MHz, and power levels up to similar to 100 kW. Limitations in cooling will prevent operation for pulses longer than several seconds, but a major goal will be the measurement of power deposition on device structures so that a later steady state version can be designed. The device design, the diagnostics to be used, and results of rf modeling of the device will be discussed. These include calculations of plasma loading, resulting currents and voltages in antenna structures and the matching network, power deposition profiles, and the effect of high |B| operation on power absorption.

  11. Breakdown of the Brillouin limit and classical fluxes in rotating collisional plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Rax, J. M.; Fruchtman, A.; Gueroult, R.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-09-15

    The classical collisionless analysis displaying the occurrence of slow and fast rigid body rotation modes in magnetized plasmas is extended to collisional discharges. Collisions speed up the fast mode, slow down the slow one, and break down the classical Brillouin limit. Rigid body rotation has a strong impact on transport, and a collisional radial transport regime, different from the classical Braginskii collisional flux, is identified and analyzed.

  12. Simultaneous plasma wave and electron flux observations upstream of the Martian bow shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skalsky, A.; Grard, R.; Kiraly, P.; Klimov, S.; Kopanyi, V.; Schwingenschuh, K.; Trotignon, J. G.

    1993-03-01

    Flux enhancements of electrons with energies between 100 and 530 eV are observed simultaneously with electron plasma waves in the upstream region of the Martian bow shock. The electron flux appears to reach its maximum when the pitch angle is close to 0 deg, which corresponds to particles reflected from the shock region and backstreaming in the solar wind along the magnetic field. The correlation between high-frequency waves and enhanced electron fluxes is reminiscent of several studies on the electron foreshock of the Earth. Such a similarity indicates that, in spite of major differences between the global shock structures, the microscopic processes operating in the foreshocks of Earth and Mars are probably identical.

  13. Heat flux in a non-Maxwellian plasma. [in realistic solar coronal loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ljepojevic, N. N.; Macneice, P.

    1989-01-01

    A hybrid numerical scheme is applied to solve the Landau equation for the electron distribution function over all velocity space. Evidence is presented for the first time of the degree and character of the failure of the classical Spitzer-Haerm heat flux approximation in a realistic solar coronal loop structure. In the loop model used, the failure is so severe at some points that the role of the heat flux in the plasma's energy balance is completely misinterpreted. In the lower corona the Spitzer-Haerm approximation predicts that the heat flux should act as an energy source, whereas the more accurate distribution functions calculated here show this to be an energy sink.

  14. On the instability and energy flux of lower hybrid waves in the Venus plasma mantle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strangeway, R. J.; Crawford, G. K.

    1993-01-01

    Waves generated near the lower hybrid resonance frequency by the modified two stream instability have been invoked as a possible source of energy flux into the topside ionosphere of Venus. These waves are observed above the ionopause in a region known as the plasma mantle. The plasma within the mantle appears to be a mixture of magnetosheath and ionospheric plasmas. Since the magnetosheath electrons and ions have temperatures of several tens of eV, any instability analysis of the modified two stream instability requires the inclusion of finite electron and ion temperatures. Finite temperature effects are likely to reduce the growth rate of the instability. Furthermore, the lower hybrid waves are only quasi-electrostatic, and the energy flux of the waves is mainly carried by parallel Poynting flux. The magnetic field in the mantle is draped over the ionopause. Lower hybrid waves therefore cannot transport any significant wave energy to lower altitudes, and so do not act as a source of additional heat to the topside ionosphere.

  15. The Transport of Plasma and Magnetic Flux in Giant Planet Magnetospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, C. T.

    2013-05-01

    Both Jupiter and Saturn have moons that add significant quantities of neutrals and/or dust beyond geosynchronous orbit. This material becomes charged and interacts with the planetary plasma that is "orbiting" the planets at near corotational speeds, driven by the planetary ionospheres. Since this speed is greater than the keplerian orbital speed at these distances, the net force on the newly added charged mass is outward. The charged material is held in place by the magnetic field which stretches to the amount needed to balance centripetal and centrifugal forces. The currents involved in this process close in the ionosphere which is an imperfect conductor and the feet of the field lines hence slip poleward and the material near the equator moves outward. This motion allows the magnetosphere to divest itself of the added mass by transferring it to the magnetotail. The magnetotail in turn can rid itself of the newly added mass by the process of reconnection, interior to the region of added mass, freeing an island of magnetized plasma which then moves down the magnetotail no longer connected to the magnetosphere. This maintains a quasi-stationary conservation of mass in the magnetosphere with roughly constant mass and "periodic" disturbances. However, there is one other steady state the magnetosphere needs to maintain. It needs to replace the mass loaded flux tubes with emptied flux tubes. Thus the "emptied" flux tubes in the tail must move inward against the outgoing mass-loaded flux tubes. That they are buoyant is a help in this regard but it appears also to be helpful if the returning flux separates into thin flux tubes, just like air bubbles rising in a container with a leak in the bottom. In this way the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn maintain their dynamic, steady-state convection patterns.

  16. The properties of MHD waves and instabilities in solar plasmas with anisotropic temperature and thermal fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Dzhalilov, Namig

    As confirmed by observations, the temperature anisotropy relative to the magnetic field and the thermal fluxes are typical characteristics of the collisionless and magnetized plasma of the solar corona and solar wind. The properties of such plasma are described in terms of the anisotropic magnetohydrodynamics based on the kinetic equation under the 16-moment approximation. MHD waves and instabilities in the collisionless solar plasma have been analyzed under the aforementioned approximation taking into account the anisotropy of the plasma pressure along and across the magnetic field and the thermal flux along the field. It is established that the thermal flux results in the asymmetry of phase velocities of the compressible wave modes with respect to the outer magnetic field, in a strong interaction between the modes (particularly, between the retrograde modes propagating against the magnetic field), and in oscillatory in-stability of these modes. The thresholds of the mirror and fire-hose instabilities coincide with their kinetic expressions; the increments coincide qualitatively. At a certain propagation angle, the resonance interaction of three retrograde modes (fast sound, slow magnetosound, and slow sound ones) under the occurrence conditions of the classical aperiodic fire-hose instability gives rise to the oscillatory "fire-hose" instability of compressible modes, whose maximum increment may exceed the maximum increment of the classical fire-hose instability. A good agreement of the results obtained in terms of anisotropic MHD with the low-frequency limit of the kinetic description allows us to consider the applied approximation adequate for the description of large-scale dynamics of collisionless anisotropic solar plasma and to use it in the study of waves and instabilities in magnetic tubes and other magnetic features in the solar corona, magnetic reconnection, etc.

  17. Hybrid helicity and magneto-vorticity flux conservation in superdense npe-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, G.

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, it is shown that the magnetic helicity dissipation per unit volume, coupled with the longitudinal conductivity, causes enhancement of the kinematic rotation of the electric (and magnetic) lines if the npe-plasma vorticity vector aligns with the electric (or the magnetic) field. In the case of a rigidly rotating npe-plasma under the influence of a strong magnetic field, the electric lines are rotating faster than the magnetic lines. It is deduced that the orthogonality of the electric and magnetic fields is an essential condition for the conduction current to remain finite in the limit of infinite electric conductivity of the npe-plasma. In this case, the magnetic field is not frozen into the npe-plasma, but the magnetic flux in the magnetic tube is conserved. The hybrid helicity is conserved if the "magneto-vorticity" vector is tangent to the level surfaces of constant entropy per baryon. The "magneto-vorticity" lines are rotating on the level surfaces of constant entropy per baryon due to the electromagnetic energy flow in the direction of the npe-plasma vorticity and the chemical potential variation locked with the kinematic rotation of the npe-plasma flow lines. In the case of an isentropic npe-plasma flow, there exists a family of timelike 2-surfaces spanned by the "magneto-vorticity" lines and the npe-plasma flow lines. In this case, the electric field is normal to such a family of timelike 2-surfaces. Maxwell like equations satisfied by "magneto-vorticity" bivector field are solved in axially symmetric stationary case. It is shown that the npe-plasma is in differential rotation in such a way that its each plasma shell (i.e., plasma surface spanned by "magneto-vorticity" lines) is rotating differentially without continually winding up "magneto-vorticity" lines frozen into the npe-plasma. It is also found that gravitational isorotation and Ferraro's law of isorotation are intimately connected to each other because of coexistence of both the

  18. In situ measurements of the plasma bulk velocity near the Io flux tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, A.

    1985-01-01

    The flow around the Io flux tube was studied by analyzing the eleven spectra taken by the Voyager 1 Plasma Science (PLS) experiment in its vicinity. The bulk plasma parameters were determined using a procedure that uses the full response function of the instrument and the data in all four PLS sensors. The mass density of the plasma in the vicinity of Io is found to be 22,500 + or - 2,500 amu/cu cm and its electron density is found to be 1500 + or - 200/cu cm. The Alfven speed was determined using three independent methods; the values obtained are consistent and taken together yield V sub A = 300 + or - 50 km/sec, corresponding to an Alfven Mach number of 0.19 + or - 0.02. For the flow pattern, good agreement was found with the model of Neubauer (1980), and it was concluded that the plasma flows around the flux tube with a pattern similar to the flow of an incompressible fluid around a long cylinder obstacle of radius 1.26 + or - 0.1 R sub Io.

  19. Magnetic Flux Compression Using Detonation Plasma Armatures and Superconductor Stators: Integrated Propulsion and Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litchford, Ron; Robertson, Tony; Hawk, Clark; Turner, Matt; Koelfgen, Syri

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses the use of magnetic flux compression for space flight applications as a propulsion and other power applications. The qualities of this technology that make it suitable for spaceflight propulsion and power, are that it has high power density, it can give multimegawatt energy bursts, and terawatt power bursts, it can produce the pulse power for low impedance dense plasma devices (e.g., pulse fusion drivers), and it can produce direct thrust. The issues of a metal vs plasma armature are discussed, and the requirements for high energy output, and fast pulse rise time requires a high speed armature. The plasma armature enables repetitive firing capabilities. The issues concerning the high temperature superconductor stator are also discussed. The concept of the radial mode pulse power generator is described. The proposed research strategy combines the use of computational modeling (i.e., magnetohydrodynamic computations, and finite element modeling) and laboratory experiments to create a demonstration device.

  20. Deuterium retention and surface modifications of nanocrystalline tungsten films exposed to high-flux plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    `t Hoen, M. H. J.; Dellasega, D.; Pezzoli, A.; Passoni, M.; Kleyn, A. W.; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.

    2015-08-01

    Deuterium retention studies are presented for nanostructured tungsten films exposed to high-flux deuterium plasmas. Thin tungsten films of ∼1 μm thickness were deposited with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) on bulk tungsten. Surface modifications were studied with scanning electron microscopy and deuterium retention with thermal desorption spectroscopy. Three types of PLD films with different densities and crystallinity were studied after exposure to deuterium plasmas. The surface temperature ranged from about 460 K at the periphery to about 520 K in the centre of the targets. The films withstand the intense plasma exposure well and maintain their overall integrity. An increase of deuterium retention is observed with decreasing tungsten density and crystallite size. We found that the filling of these thin films with deuterium is significantly faster than for pre-damaged polycrystalline tungsten. We observed formation of micrometer-sized blisters as well as structures on the nanometer scale, both depending on the layer type.

  1. Structure of a Magnetic Flux Annihilation Layer Formed by the Collision of Supersonic, Magnetized Plasma Flows.

    PubMed

    Suttle, L G; Hare, J D; Lebedev, S V; Swadling, G F; Burdiak, G C; Ciardi, A; Chittenden, J P; Loureiro, N F; Niasse, N; Suzuki-Vidal, F; Wu, J; Yang, Q; Clayson, T; Frank, A; Robinson, T S; Smith, R A; Stuart, N

    2016-06-01

    We present experiments characterizing the detailed structure of a current layer, generated by the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic and magnetized aluminum plasma flows. The antiparallel magnetic fields advected by the flows are found to be mutually annihilated inside the layer, giving rise to a bifurcated current structure-two narrow current sheets running along the outside surfaces of the layer. Measurements with Thomson scattering show a fast outflow of plasma along the layer and a high ion temperature (T_{i}∼Z[over ¯]T_{e}, with average ionization Z[over ¯]=7). Analysis of the spatially resolved plasma parameters indicates that the advection and subsequent annihilation of the inflowing magnetic flux determines the structure of the layer, while the ion heating could be due to the development of kinetic, current-driven instabilities. PMID:27314720

  2. Structure of a Magnetic Flux Annihilation Layer Formed by the Collision of Supersonic, Magnetized Plasma Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suttle, L. G.; Hare, J. D.; Lebedev, S. V.; Swadling, G. F.; Burdiak, G. C.; Ciardi, A.; Chittenden, J. P.; Loureiro, N. F.; Niasse, N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; Wu, J.; Yang, Q.; Clayson, T.; Frank, A.; Robinson, T. S.; Smith, R. A.; Stuart, N.

    2016-06-01

    We present experiments characterizing the detailed structure of a current layer, generated by the collision of two counterstreaming, supersonic and magnetized aluminum plasma flows. The antiparallel magnetic fields advected by the flows are found to be mutually annihilated inside the layer, giving rise to a bifurcated current structure—two narrow current sheets running along the outside surfaces of the layer. Measurements with Thomson scattering show a fast outflow of plasma along the layer and a high ion temperature (Ti˜Z ¯ Te , with average ionization Z ¯=7 ). Analysis of the spatially resolved plasma parameters indicates that the advection and subsequent annihilation of the inflowing magnetic flux determines the structure of the layer, while the ion heating could be due to the development of kinetic, current-driven instabilities.

  3. Secondary electron emission and the bifurcation of the heat flux to the targets in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wonjae; Krasheninnikov, Sergei I.

    2013-12-15

    The presence of secondary electron emission (SEE) from plasma facing components in fusion devices can result in a strong localization of the heat flux from plasma to the wall and subsequent wall erosion. Usually, the impact of the SEE is considered assuming the Maxwellian distribution of the electrons coming to the surface. As a result, the SEE coefficient only depends on the temperature of primary electrons. However, the tail of primary electron distribution function in the scrape off layer (SOL) of fusion devices can be far from Maxwellian due to preferential loss of fast electrons. Consequently, it is shown that the SEE coefficient will depend on the wall potential and multiple solutions can be possible corresponding to different regimes of plasma flow to the wall: with and without SEE effects. This effect can cause two-slope electron temperature profiles in the SOL, which are often seen in experiments.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Physics of Space Plasma Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, N. F.

    2007-11-01

    This book provides a timely review of our present understanding of plasma phenomena in magnetized terrestrial and solar space plasmas. The author's emphasis is on the fluid and particle modeling and interpretation of observed active processes in space plasmas, i.e. `the physical background of large plasma eruptions in space'. It is somewhat alarming for a plasma physicist to read that an emphasis on processes in spatially inhomogeneous plasmas means that the work `... excludes a considerable fraction of the available methods in space plasma physics, such as the theory of waves, instabilities and wave particle interactions on a homogeneous background', particularly in light of the fact that much of our knowledge of these plasmas is derived from observations of such waves. However, it is clear on reading the book that such a restriction is not a disadvantage, but allows the author to concentrate on the main theme of the book, namely the use of fluid and particle pictures to model the equilibrium and active states of space plasmas. There are many other books which cover the wave aspects of space plasmas, and would complement this book. The book's coverage is based on the extensive and profound research of the author and his colleagues in the area of fluid and particle modeling of space plasma structures. After an introduction to the physical setting of active plasmas, and a necessarily concise, but effective, discussion of the fluid and particle models to be used, the steady states of the magnetized plasmas of interest are treated, including the magnetosphere, solar plasmas and current sheets. Next the dynamics of unstable states is covered, including MHD and tearing instabilities, and nonlinear aspects, with a detailed discussion of magnetic reconnection. Finally, the models are applied to magnetospheric and solar observations. The book is attractively written and produced, and this reviewer managed to find a minimum number of errors. A particularly attractive

  5. Magnetic Flux Concentrations in Stratified Turbulent Plasma Due to Negative Effective Magnetic Pressure Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, S.; Brandenburg, A.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies have suggested a new mechanism that can be used to explain the formation of magnetic spots or bipolar regions in highly stratified turbulent plasmas. According to this model, a large-scale magnetic field suppresses the turbulent pressure, which leads to a negative contribution of turbulence to the effective magnetic pressure. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) have confirmed that the negative contribution is large enough so that the effective magnetic pressure becomes negative and leads to a large-scale instability, which we refer to as negative effective magnetic pressure Instability (NEMPI). NEMPI was used to explain the formation of active regions and sunspots on the solar surface. One step toward improving this model was to combine dynamo in- stability with NEMPI. The dynamo is known to be responsible for the solar large-scale magnetic field and to play a role in solar activity. In this context, we studied stratified turbulent plasmas in spherical geometry, where the background field was generated by alpha squared dynamo. For NEMPI to be excited, the initial magnetic field should be in a proper range, so we used quenching function for alpha. Using the Pencil Code and mean field simulations (MFS), we showed that in the presence of dynamo-generated magnetic fields, we deal with a coupled system, where both instabilities, dynamo and NEMPI, work together and lead to the formation of magnetic structures (Jabbari et al. 2013). We also studied a similar system in plane geometry in the presence of rotation and confirmed that for slow rotation NEMPI works, but as the Coriolis number increases, the rotation suppresses NEMPI. By increasing the Coriolis number even further, the combination of fast rotation and high stratification excites a dynamo, which leads again to a coupled system of dynamo and NEMPI (Jabbari et al. 2014). Another important finding concerning NEMPI is the case where the instability is excited by a vertical magnetic field (Brandenburg et

  6. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golas, Avantika

    Surface engineering of biomaterials with improved hemocompatibility is an imperative, given the widespread global need for cardiovascular devices. Research summarized in this dissertation focuses on contact activation of FXII in buffer and blood plasma frequently referred to as autoactivation. The extant theory of contact activation imparts FXII autoactivation ability to negatively charged, hydrophilic surfaces. According to this theory, contact activation of plasma involves assembly of proteins comprising an "activation complex" on activating surfaces mediated by specific chemical interactions between complex proteins and the surface. This work has made key discoveries that significantly improve our core understanding of contact activation and unravel the existing paradigm of plasma coagulation. It is shown herein that contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension t°a=g° Iv costheta in dyne/cm, where g°Iv is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and theta is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties --36 < t°a < 72 dyne/cm (O° ≤ theta < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20 < t°a < 40 dyne/cm (55° < theta < 75°). Furthermore, contact activation of FXII in buffer solution produces an ensemble of protein fragments exhibiting either procoagulant properties in plasma (proteolysis of blood factor XI or prekallikrein), amidolytic properties (cleavage of s-2302 chromogen), or the ability to suppress autoactivation through currently unknown biochemistry. The relative proportions of these fragments depend on activator surface chemistry/energy. We have also discovered that contact activation is moderated by adsorption of plasma proteins unrelated to coagulation through an

  7. High-flux plasma exposure of ultra-fine grain tungsten

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Doerner, R. P.; Fang, Z. Z.; Ren, C.; Oya, Y.; Michibayashi, K.; Friddle, R. W.; Mills, B. E.

    2016-05-12

    Here we examine the response of an ultra-fine grained (UFG) tungsten material to high-flux deuterium plasma exposure. UFG tungsten has received considerable interest as a possible plasma-facing material in magnetic confinement fusion devices, in large part because of its improved resistance to neutron damage. However, optimization of the material in this manner may lead to trade-offs in other properties. Moreover, we address two aspects of the problem in this work: (a) how high-flux plasmas modify the structure of the exposed surface, and (b) how hydrogen isotopes become trapped within the material. The specific UFG tungsten considered here contains 100 nm-widthmore » Ti dispersoids (1 wt%) that limit the growth of the W grains to a median size of 960 nm. Metal impurities (Fe, Cr) as well as O were identified within the dispersoids; these species were absent from the W matrix. To simulate relevant particle bombardment conditions, we exposed specimens of the W-Ti material to low energy (100 eV), high-flux (> 1022 m-2 s-1) deuterium plasmas in the PISCES-A facility at the University of California, San Diego. To explore different temperature-dependent trapping mechanisms, we considered a range of exposure temperatures between 200 °C and 500 °C. For comparison, we also exposed reference specimens of conventional powder metallurgy warm-rolled and ITER-grade tungsten at 300 °C. Post-mortem focused ion beam profiling and atomic force microscopy of the UFG tungsten revealed no evidence of near-surface bubbles containing high pressure D2 gas, a common surface degradation mechanism associated with plasma exposure. Thermal desorption spectrometry indicated moderately higher trapping of D in the material compared with the reference specimens, though still within the spread of values for different tungsten grades found in the literature database. Finally, for the criteria considered here, these results do not indicate any significant obstacles to the potential use of UFG

  8. Prediction of PFC Plasma Fluxes by Improved Edge/Scrape-off-layer Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T

    2009-02-26

    Large, localized plasma heat exhaust, subsequent inward transport of eroded impurities, and distribution of tritium to walls comprise one of the most critical class of problems for the development of tokamak fusion reactors. The magnitude and temporal duration of the heat fluxes is controlled by two factors: (1) the plasma power coming into the edge from the core, and (2), the physics processes in the edge/scrape-off-layer (SOL) that distribute the power to Plasma Facing Components (PFCs), both in space and in time. Given that the plasma power is largely determined by the fusion power desired, here I address model development needs for item (2), the distribution of power to PFCs, which naturally carries with it the capability for transport of impurities and tritium. Another key issue not addressed here is the impact of edge plasma transport on the plasma pedestal parameters. The nature of plasma transport in the edge/SOL region has long be differentiated from that in the bulk core, initially because of the larger fluctuation amplitudes that are observed, with density fluctuations relative to the time-average sometimes approaching as high as unity in the SOL. More recent measurements have shown addition effects such as strong intermittency, filamentation, toroidal asymmetry, and large flows [1]. These characteristics have a direct impact on plasma energy and particle fluxes to PFCs and on the flow of impurities in the edge. The theory of the edge/SOL is complicated by the steep gradients, multi-dimensional nature of plasma/neutral variations, and as mentioned above, the strong relative fluctuation levels compared to the core region. Furthermore, the strong interaction of the plasma with neutrals and the associated radiative effects for partially ionized plasma are important, Consequently, theoretical models typically need to be, or should be, more complicated, which may be one reason model development has lagged that in the core (funding being another reason

  9. Plasma Composition in a Sigmoidal Anemone Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Steed, K.; Carlyle, J.

    2013-11-01

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  10. Plasma composition in a sigmoidal anemone active region

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, D.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Green, L. M.; Carlyle, J.; Brooks, D. H.; Démoulin, P.; Steed, K.

    2013-11-20

    Using spectra obtained by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) instrument onboard Hinode, we present a detailed spatially resolved abundance map of an active region (AR)-coronal hole (CH) complex that covers an area of 359'' × 485''. The abundance map provides first ionization potential (FIP) bias levels in various coronal structures within the large EIS field of view. Overall, FIP bias in the small, relatively young AR is 2-3. This modest FIP bias is a consequence of the age of the AR, its weak heating, and its partial reconnection with the surrounding CH. Plasma with a coronal composition is concentrated at AR loop footpoints, close to where fractionation is believed to take place in the chromosphere. In the AR, we found a moderate positive correlation of FIP bias with nonthermal velocity and magnetic flux density, both of which are also strongest at the AR loop footpoints. Pathways of slightly enhanced FIP bias are traced along some of the loops connecting opposite polarities within the AR. We interpret the traces of enhanced FIP bias along these loops to be the beginning of fractionated plasma mixing in the loops. Low FIP bias in a sigmoidal channel above the AR's main polarity inversion line, where ongoing flux cancellation is taking place, provides new evidence of a bald patch magnetic topology of a sigmoid/flux rope configuration.

  11. A theoretical understanding of the scrape-off layer main heat-flux widths multi-tokamak database for limited plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, Federico; Horacek, Jan; Pitts, Richard; Ricci, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    The Scrape-off Layer and Divertor topical group of the International Tokamak Physics Activity(ITPA) has amassed a database comprising hundreds of measurements of the main scrape-off layer (SOL) heat-flux widthsin inner-wall limited discharges. We have carried out an analysis of the dependence of the heat-flux widthswith respect to the plasma dimensionless parameters, derived fromturbulent transport theory. Restricting our analysis to circular plasmas, we find that a model based on non-linearly saturated turbulence can reproduce the heat-flux width values found in the database with very good agreement. This work has been carried out within the framework of the EUROfusion Consortium and has received funding from the Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018 under grant agreement No 633053.

  12. Low flux and low energy helium ion implantation into tungsten using a dedicated plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pentecoste, Lucile; Thomann, Anne-Lise; Melhem, Amer; Caillard, Amael; Cuynet, Stéphane; Lecas, Thomas; Brault, Pascal; Desgardin, Pierre; Barthe, Marie-France

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the first stages of defect formation in tungsten (W) due to the accumulation of helium (He) atoms inside the crystal lattice. To reach the required implantation conditions, i.e. low He ion fluxes (1011-1014 ions.cm2.s-1) and kinetic energies below the W atom displacement threshold (about 500 eV for He+), an ICP source has been designed and connected to a diffusion chamber. Implantation conditions have been characterized by means of complementary diagnostics modified for measurements in this very low density helium plasma. It was shown that lowest ion fluxes could only be reached for the discharge working in capacitive mode either in α or γ regime. Special attention was paid to control the energy gained by the ions by acceleration through the sheath at the direct current biased substrate. At very low helium pressure, in α regime, a broad ion energy distribution function was evidenced, whereas a peak centered on the potential difference between the plasma and the biased substrate was found at higher pressures in the γ mode. Polycrystalline tungsten samples were exposed to the helium plasma in both regimes of the discharge and characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy in order to detect the formed vacancy defects. It was found that W vacancies are able to be formed just by helium accumulation and that the same final implanted state is reached, whatever the operating mode of the capacitive discharge.

  13. Controlled Fluxes of Silicon Nanoparticles By Extraction from a Pulsed RF Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girshick, Steven; Larriba-Andaluz, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Deposition of silicon nanoparticles onto substrates may be a means of growing monocrystalline silicon films at low substrate temperature if the nanoparticles' impact energy and size can be controlled to provide melting or amorphization of the nanoparticle without damaging the underlying film. In order to explore conditions that could produce such controlled fluxes of nanoparticles we numerically model a pulsed RF argon-silane plasma, with a positive DC bias applied during the afterglow phase of each pulse so as to extract and accelerate negatively charged silicon particles. Operating parameters studied include pulse on time, pulse off time, DC bias voltage, RF voltage and pressure. This set of parameters is tested to find conditions under which one can achieve a periodic steady state with repeatable pulse-to-pulse conditions that maximize silicon film growth rates while maintaining nanoparticle impact energies in the range 0.5-2.0 eV/atom. We utilize a previously developed 1-D dusty plasma numerical model, modified to consider pulsing and applied substrate bias. This model self-consistently solves for the coupled behavior of plasma, chemistry, and aerosol. Results show that it is possible by this method to produce nanoparticle fluxes that are tailored with respect to their distribution of impact energies and mass deposition rates. Partially supported by US Dept. of Energy Office of Fusion Energy Science (DE-SC0001939), US National Science Foundation (CHE-124752), and Minnesota Supercomputing Institute.

  14. The effect of magnetic flux expansion on plasma sheath/presheath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z. H.; Tang, X. Z.; Berk, H.

    2010-11-01

    Significant magnetic flux expansion can help spread the plasma heat load over a greater area of tokamak divertor plate. It also appears in the expander of an axisymmetric magnetic mirror, which for its favorable magnetic curvature, helps stabilize the global interchange modes in the central cell. For a weakly collisional plasma, the flux expansion introduces a mirror force accelerating the electron and ion flows downstream, which likely induces an ambipolar parallel electric field. This is in addition to the conventional presheath electric field which accelerates the ion to satisfy the Bohm criteria near the wall. We perform kinetic simulations in two spatial and three velocity dimensions to understand (1) the role of mirror force in the parallel and perpendicular thermal energy transfer, and (2) the combined role of mirror-acceleration and parallel electric field on the parallel flow acceleration in the presheath and sheath. The detailed sheath/presheath plasma profiles and the ambipolar electric field will be investigated. Worked supported by OFES.

  15. Control of particle flux and energy on substrate in an inverted cylindrical magnetron for plasma PVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, A.; Mantel, M.; Bés, A.; Vachey, C.; Lacoste, A.

    2014-12-01

    Inverted cylindrical magnetrons (ICMs) are often used in dc, pulsed dc or mid-frequency ac mode for coating complex objects with thin films deposited by plasma PVD. Since in such a configuration the substrate is inherently surrounded by the target and hence by the plasma, the energy flux of the impinging particles represents the main contribution to the substrate heating. This can readily constitute a limiting factor in the deposition process, especially when it is not possible to cool and bias the substrate. This work concerns a dc-driven ICM configuration subjected to several constraints: not only is the substrate surface area small by comparison to the cathode surface area, but its imposed potential is the ground one, thus itself constituting the anode surface of the considered setup. Several important substrate heating factors are highlighted and, in order to reduce the most prominent of them, a means to raise the plasma potential is proposed. This is achieved by positively polarizing two additional electrodes with respect to the ground. This additional surface generates a redistribution of the current and consequently regulates the electron flux on the substrate. The results are shown as a function of bias applied on the auxiliary electrodes and discussed in terms of the impact on the substrate heating.

  16. Roughening and reflection performance of molybdenum coatings exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eren, B.; Marot, L.; Ryzhkov, I. V.; Lindig, S.; Houben, A.; Wisse, M.; Skoryk, O. O.; Oberkofler, M.; Voitsenya, V. S.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Meyer, E.

    2013-11-01

    Optical diagnostic systems of ITER are foreseen to include metallic, plasma-facing, electromagnetic radiation reflecting components called first mirrors (FMs). Molybdenum coatings are important candidates for these components. Depending on the local plasma parameters of the reactor, the mirrors may be under net erosion or deposition conditions. In this work, we exposed molybdenum coatings to a high-flux deuterium plasma in order to test their roughening limits under erosion conditions. The high energy of deuterium ions (500 eV on average) results in more vigorous roughening of the surface compared with lower energy ions (200 eV). Longer exposure (3 × 1020 ions cm-2) of the 200 eV ions results in only a slightly increased roughness compared with shorter exposure (6.8 × 1019 ions cm-2). Both phenomena match to the theory regarding roughening dynamics of physical sputtering. A comparison of results in this work with previous studies gives support to the hypothesis that roughening is flux and temperature dependent. Partial delamination of the coatings is observed upon exposure at room temperature, but not at an elevated temperature (200 °C). In summary, Mo coatings will remain functional in the ITER environment under the expected conditions. However, changes in the expected conditions such as 500 eV mean energy of impinging charge exchange neutrals or <100 °C surface temperature of the mirrors can lead to gradual or sudden failure of the coatings.

  17. Prediction of critical heat flux in water-cooled plasma facing components using computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, James H.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where boiling instabilities begin

  18. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ε ~ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ε ~ 0.1–0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  19. 2D surface temperature measurement of plasma facing components with modulated active pyrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amiel, S.; Loarer, T.; Pocheau, C.; Roche, H.; Gauthier, E.; Aumeunier, M.-H.; Le Niliot, C.; Rigollet, F.; Courtois, X.; Jouve, M.; Balorin, C.; Moncada, V.

    2014-10-01

    In nuclear fusion devices, such as Tore Supra, the plasma facing components (PFC) are in carbon. Such components are exposed to very high heat flux and the surface temperature measurement is mandatory for the safety of the device and also for efficient plasma scenario development. Besides this measurement is essential to evaluate these heat fluxes for a better knowledge of the physics of plasma-wall interaction, it is also required to monitor the fatigue of PFCs. Infrared system (IR) is used to manage to measure surface temperature in real time. For carbon PFCs, the emissivity is high and known (ɛ ˜ 0.8), therefore the contribution of the reflected flux from environment and collected by the IR cameras can be neglected. However, the future tokamaks such as WEST and ITER will be equipped with PFCs in metal (W and Be/W, respectively) with low and variable emissivities (ɛ ˜ 0.1-0.4). Consequently, the reflected flux will contribute significantly in the collected flux by IR camera. The modulated active pyrometry, using a bicolor camera, proposed in this paper allows a 2D surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected fluxes and the emissivity. Experimental results with Tungsten sample are reported and compared with simultaneous measurement performed with classical pyrometry (monochromatic and bichromatic) with and without reflective flux demonstrating the efficiency of this method for surface temperature measurement independently of the reflected flux and the emissivity.

  20. Fundamental aspects of deuterium retention in tungsten at high flux plasma exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Ogorodnikova, O. V.

    2015-08-21

    An effect of enhanced trapping of deuterium in tungsten at high flux was discovered. It was shown analytically and confirmed experimentally that the deuterium trapping in a presence of high density of defects in tungsten (W) depends on the ion energy and ion flux. Newly developed analytical model explains experimentally observed discrepancy of deuterium trapping at radiation-induced defects in tungsten at different ion fluxes that significantly improves a prediction of hydrogen isotope accumulation in different plasma devices, including ITER and DEMO. The developed model can be used for many system of hydrogen in a metal in both normal and extreme environments (high fluxes, elevated temperatures, neutron irradiation, etc.). This new model allows, for the first time, to validate density function theory (DFT) predictions of multiple occupation of a defect with deuterium against experimental data that bridge the gap in length and time scale between DFT calculations and experiments. By comparing first-principle calculations based on DFT and semi-empirical “adsorption model,” it was proved that the mechanism of hydrogen isotope trapping in a vacancy cluster is similar to a chemisorption on a surface. Binding energies of deuterium with different types of defects in W were defined. Moreover, the surface barrier of deuterium to be chemisorbed on a clean W surface was found to be less than 1 eV and kinetics of deuterium release is limited by de-trapping from defects rather than to be limited by surface effects.

  1. Numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence: From spot formation to decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rempel, M.; Cheung, M. C. M.

    2014-04-20

    We present numerical simulations of active region scale flux emergence covering a time span of up to 6 days. Flux emergence is driven by a bottom boundary condition that advects a semi-torus of magnetic field with 1.7 × 10{sup 22} Mx flux into the computational domain. The simulations show that, even in the absence of twist, the magnetic flux is able the rise through the upper 15.5 Mm of the convection zone and emerge into the photosphere to form spots. We find that spot formation is sensitive to the persistence of upflows at the bottom boundary footpoints, i.e., a continuing upflow would prevent spot formation. In addition, the presence of a torus-aligned flow (such flow into the retrograde direction is expected from angular momentum conservation during the rise of flux ropes through the convection zone) leads to a significant asymmetry between the pair of spots, with the spot corresponding to the leading spot on the Sun being more axisymmetric and coherent, but also forming with a delay relative to the following spot. The spot formation phase transitions directly into a decay phase. Subsurface flows fragment the magnetic field and lead to intrusions of almost field free plasma underneath the photosphere. When such intrusions reach photospheric layers, the spot fragments. The timescale for spot decay is comparable to the longest convective timescales present in the simulation domain. We find that the dispersal of flux from a simulated spot in the first two days of the decay phase is consistent with self-similar decay by turbulent diffusion.

  2. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-01

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ( ωeτe≫1 ), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient c T /(16 e B ) , which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  3. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in magnetized liner inertial fusion-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2015-04-15

    The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) approach to inertial confinement fusion [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010); Cuneo et al., IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 40, 3222 (2012)] involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a deuterium-tritium plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion, and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot compressed magnetized plasma to the cold liner is dominated by transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter (ω{sub e}τ{sub e}≫1), the effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux to the liner wall are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient cT/(16eB), which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. We demonstrate how this family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  4. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. II. Finite Plasma Beta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-04-01

    The propagation of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves is an area that has been thoroughly studied for idealised static and steady state magnetised plasma systems applied to numerous solar structures. By applying the generalisation of a temporally varying background density to an open magnetic flux tube, mimicking the observed slow evolution of such waveguides in the solar atmosphere, further investigations into the propagation of both fast and slow MHD waves can take place. The assumption of a zero-beta plasma (no gas pressure) was applied in Williamson and Erdélyi ( Solar Phys. 2013, doi:10.1007/s11207-013-0366-9, Paper I) is now relaxed for further analysis here. Firstly, the introduction of a finite thermal pressure to the magnetic flux tube equilibrium modifies the existence of fast MHD waves which are directly comparable to their counterparts found in Paper I. Further, as a direct consequence of the non-zero kinetic plasma pressure, a slow MHD wave now exists, and is investigated. Analysis of the slow wave shows that, similar to the fast MHD wave, wave amplitude amplification takes place in time and height. The evolution of the wave amplitude is determined here analytically. We conclude that for a temporally slowly decreasing background density both propagating magnetosonic wave modes are amplified for over-dense magnetic flux tubes. This information can be very practical and useful for future solar magneto-seismology applications in the study of the amplitude and frequency properties of MHD waveguides, e.g. for diagnostic purposes, present in the solar atmosphere.

  5. Comparing Different Models for Fast Earthward Flows in the Magnetotail: Moving Flux Ropes, Unsteady Reconnection, Pressure-Depleted Plasma Bubbles, and Atypical Currents Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnov, M. I.; Runov, A. V.; Ohtani, S.

    2007-12-01

    The physics of fast earthward flows or BBFs, a major mechanism of bursty transfer of the plasma and magnetic flux in the terrestrial magnetotail, remains uncertain and controversial. A part of observations can be explained as signatures of earthward moving flux ropes or secondary plasmoids dragged by the earthward part a larger-scale reconnection region [Slavin et al., 2003]. The statistics of variations of the z-component of the magnetospheric magnetic field in the central plasma sheet [Ohtani et al., 2004] suggest no changes of the magnetic field topology for another group of BBFs. These observations can be explained as signatures of either unsteady reconnection, which remains located tailward of the spacecraft, or other phenomena that are connected but not identical to reconnection in its active phase. These are the plasma bubbles, flux tubes with the reduced specific entropy that may move earthward faster than the neighboring flux tubes due to the buoyancy force. However, the original model of bubbles arising from local reductions of the plasma pressure [Pontius and Wolf, 1990] also explains only a part of observations. Another part [Angelopoulos et al., 1992] reveals no reduction of the plasma pressure in BBFs. One more model, which explains both missing magnetic topology changes and no reduction of the plasma pressure [Sitnov et al., 2005] describes the bubble as a seam in the body of the tail plasma, which appears after the formation and tailward retreat of a small plasmoid, and which is composed of atypical, embedded and bifurcated thin current sheets. Signatures of such atypical current sheets have been convincingly demonstrated recently in CLUSTER observations [Runov et al., 2003]. In this presentation we elaborate the BBF models and compare them with 2001 and 2002 tail CLUSTER observations in the central plasma sheet. These include full-particle simulations of the secondary plasmoid formation in tail-like systems, two- and three- dimensional features and

  6. A flux-coordinate independent field-aligned approach to plasma turbulence simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariri, F.; Ottaviani, M.

    2013-11-01

    This work illustrates a new approach to field-aligned coordinates for plasma turbulence simulations which is not based on flux variables. The method employs standard Cartesian or polar coordinates to discretize the fields. Parallel derivatives are computed directly along a coordinate that follows the local field, and poloidal derivatives are computed in the original Cartesian frame. Several advantages of this approach are presented. The tests on a drift-wave model demonstrate that the method is well suited to exploit the flute property of small parallel gradients by minimizing the number of degrees of freedom needed to treat a given problem in an accurate and efficient manner.

  7. Functional Implications of Plasma Membrane Condensation for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Carmel M.; Engelhardt, Karin; Williamson, David; Grewal, Thomas; Jessup, Wendy; Harder, Thomas; Gaus, Katharina

    2008-01-01

    The T lymphocyte plasma membrane condenses at the site of activation but the functional significance of this receptor-mediated membrane reorganization is not yet known. Here we demonstrate that membrane condensation at the T cell activation sites can be inhibited by incorporation of the oxysterol 7-ketocholesterol (7KC), which is known to prevent the formation of raft-like liquid-ordered domains in model membranes. We enriched T cells with 7KC, or cholesterol as control, to assess the importance of membrane condensation for T cell activation. Upon 7KC treatment, T cell antigen receptor (TCR) triggered calcium fluxes and early tyrosine phosphorylation events appear unaltered. However, signaling complexes form less efficiently on the cell surface, fewer phosphorylated signaling proteins are retained in the plasma membrane and actin restructuring at activation sites is impaired in 7KC-enriched cells resulting in compromised downstream activation responses. Our data emphasizes lipids as an important medium for the organization at T cell activation sites and strongly indicates that membrane condensation is an important element of the T cell activation process. PMID:18509459

  8. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + O (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: Δ G° = -64,300(±700) + 19.8(±3.5) T J/mol (1373 to 1623 K) The activities of calcium in the CaOsatd-Ca- MF2 ( M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaOsatd-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF2, BaF2, and MgF2 at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  9. The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo

    1995-08-01

    The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + {und O} (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}64,300({+-}700) + 19.8({+-}3.5)T J/mol (1,373 to 1,623 K). The activities of calcium in the CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-MF{sub 2} (M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1,473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2} at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

  10. Influence of tungsten microstructure and ion flux on deuterium plasma-induced surface modifications and deuterium retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzi, L.; De Temmerman, G.; Unterberg, B.; Reinhart, M.; Dittmar, T.; Matveev, D.; Linsmeier, Ch.; Breuer, U.; Kreter, A.; Van Oost, G.

    2015-08-01

    The influence of surface temperature, particle flux density and material microstructure on the surface morphology and deuterium retention was studied by exposing tungsten targets (20 μm and 40 μm grain size) to deuterium plasma at the same particle fluence (1026 m-2) and incident ion energy (40 eV) to two different ion fluxes (low flux: 1022 m-2 s-1, high flux: 1024 m-2 s-1). The maximum of deuterium retention was observed at ∼630 K for low flux density and at ∼870 K for high flux density, as indicated from the thermal desorption spectroscopy data (TDS). Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed the presence of blisters with a diameter of up to 1 μm which were formed at high flux density and high temperature (1170 K) contrasting with previously reported surface modification results at such exposure conditions.

  11. A magnetron system for high-flux plasma-surface interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmoth, B.; Ilyinsky, L.; Hultberg, S.; Barchenko, V.; Nasarov, O.

    1997-04-01

    A new compact magnetron plasma system and its characteristics are described. The system makes it possible to carry out ion irradiation experiments at high fluxes of 10 18 ions/cm 2·s and to reach fluences of 10 22 cm -2, with a homogeneous distribution over an area of 0.3 × 0.2 cm 2. The sample temperature, the distribution of ion flux densities within the sputtering zone, and the energy spectrum of ions are in situ measured during irradiation. The device is capable of producing a discharge current of up to 1.2 A and mean current densities of up to 100 mA/cm 2. The mean ion energy can be regulated in the range 50-500 eV by changing the working pressure and the discharge self-sustaining degree. The plasma can be swept over the interaction zone by using a moving magnet controlled by a stepping motor. The VC characteristics and discharge current relations were measured for several different gases and at different pressures in the plasma. Integral ion energy and current density distributions at the cathode surface were measured at different parameters. In the first experiments targets of graphite, silicon, molybdenum and titanium were used and exposed under similar plasma conditions using deuterium in the discharge, energies of 150 eV and fluences of 10 21 cm -2. RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) and NRA (Nuclear reaction analysis) were analytical techniques for the determination of deposited layers with respect to the quantity of deposits and for the study of the purity and homogeneity of the irradiated layers.

  12. Biochar activated by oxygen plasma for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rakesh Kumar; Dubey, Mukul; Kharel, Parashu; Gu, Zhengrong; Fan, Qi Hua

    2015-01-01

    Biochar, also known as black carbon, is a byproduct of biomass pyrolysis. As a low-cost, environmental-friendly material, biochar has the potential to replace more expensive synthesized carbon nanomaterials (e.g. carbon nanotubes) for use in future supercapacitors. To achieve high capacitance, biochar requires proper activation. A conventional approach involves mixing biochar with a strong base and baking at a high temperature. However, this process is time consuming and energy inefficient (requiring temperatures >900 °C). This work demonstrates a low-temperature (<150 °C) plasma treatment that efficiently activates a yellow pine biochar. Particularly, the effects of oxygen plasma on the biochar microstructure and supercapacitor characteristics are studied. Significant enhancement of the capacitance is achieved: 171.4 F g-1 for a 5-min oxygen plasma activation, in comparison to 99.5 F g-1 for a conventional chemical activation and 60.4 F g-1 for untreated biochar. This enhancement of the charge storage capacity is attributed to the creation of a broad distribution in pore size and a larger surface area. The plasma activation mechanisms in terms of the evolution of the biochar surface and microstructure are further discussed.

  13. Dust-ion acoustic cnoidal waves and associated nonlinear ion flux in a nonthermal dusty plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ur-Rehman, Hafeez; Mahmood, S.

    2016-09-01

    The dust-ion acoustic nonlinear periodic (cnoidal) waves and solitons are investigated in a dusty plasma containing dynamic cold ions, superthermal kappa distributed electrons and static charged dust particles. The massive dust particles can have positive or negative charge depending on the plasma environment. Using reductive perturbation method (RPM) with appropriate periodic boundary conditions, the evolution equations for the first and second order nonlinear potentials are derived. The first order potential is determined through Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation which gives dust-ion acoustic cnoidal waves and solitons structures. The solution of second order nonlinear potential is obtained through an inhomogeneous differential equation derived from collecting higher order terms of dynamic equations, which is linear for second order electrostatic potential. The nonlinear ion flux associated with the cnoidal waves is also found out numerically. The numerical plots of the dust-ion acoustic cnoidal wave and soliton structures for both positively and negatively charged dust particles cases and nonthermal electrons are also presented for illustration. It is found that only compressive nonlinear electrostatic structures are formed in case of positively dust charged particles while both compressive and rarefactive nonlinear structures are obtained in case of negatively charged particles depending on the negatively charged dust density in a nonthermal dusty plasma. The numerical results are obtained using data of the ionospheric region containing dusty plasma exist in the literature.

  14. Transition region fluxes in A-F Dwarfs: Basal fluxes and dynamo activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Frederick M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Boyd, William

    1988-01-01

    The transition region spectra of 87 late A and early F dwarfs and subgiants were analyzed. The emission line fluxes are uniformly strong in the early F stars, and drop off rapidly among the late A stars. The basal flux level in the F stars is consistent with an extrapolation of that observed among the G stars, while the magnetic component displays the same flux-flux relations seen among solar-like stars. Despite the steep decrease in transition region emission flux for B-V less than 0.28, C II emission is detected in alpha Aql (B-V = 0.22). The dropoff in emission is inconsistent with models of the mechanically generated acoustic flux available. It is concluded that, although the nonmagnetic basal heating is an increasingly important source of atmospheric heating among the early F stars, magnetic heating occurs in any star which has a sufficiently thick convective zone to generate acoustic heating.

  15. U.S. BURNING PLASMA ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond J. Fonck

    2009-08-11

    The national U.S. Burning Plasma Organization (USBPO) was formed to provide an umbrella structure in the U.S. fusion science research community. Its main purpose is the coordination of research activities in the U.S. program relevant to burning plasma science and preparations for participation in the international ITER experiment. This grant provided support for the continuing development and operations of the USBPO in its first years of existence. A central feature of the USBPO is the requirement for broad community participation in and governance of this effort. We concentrated on five central areas of activity of the USBPO during this grant period. These included: 1) activities of the Director and support staff in continuing management and development of the USBPO activity; 2) activation of the advisory Council; 3) formation and initial research activities of the research community Topical Groups; 4) formation of Task Groups to perform specific burning plasma related research and development activities; 5) integration of the USBPO community with the ITER Project Office as needed to support ITER development in the U.S.

  16. Multiple plasma enzyme activities in liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hargreaves, T.; Janota, I.; Smith, M. J. H.

    1961-01-01

    The measurement of the plasma activities of glutamic-oxaloacetic and glutamic-pyruvic transaminases, aldolase, cholinesterase, and isocitric, lactic, and phosphogluconic dehydrogenases in random samples of blood was found to be of no value in the differential diagnosis of hepatitis, obstructive jaundice, hepatic cirrhosis, and neoplastic conditions involving the liver. Serial determinations of the enzyme activities provided useful information about the course of certain hepatic disorders, particularly acute viral hepatitis. PMID:13711559

  17. Contributions of nonlinear fluxes to the temporal response of fluid plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byunghoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae

    2015-09-01

    Nonlinear energy fluxes are known to redistribute energy according to detailed conservation laws. In addition, the temporal response of plasma is altered by the linear reaction due to the nonlinear fluxes that are not involved in the transport of the energy. Simulations for three cases of the adiabaticity parameter α =0.1 , 1.0 and 10.0 are performed in relation to the Hasegawa-Wakatani model and the frequency alterations are found to be notable for k{ρ\\text{s}}\\gt0.5 where k is the Fourier scale and {ρ\\text{s}} is the ion gyro-radius computed at the electron temperature. The levels of the density fluctuation {{n}{k}} and the potential {{\\varphi}{k}} get closer to each other as α increases and they are equal for α =10 . Yet, the frequencies are still discernible for α =10.0 . Non-transporting fluxes (NTFs) turned out to be anisotropic because the phase difference {δ{k}} between {{n}{k}} and {{\\varphi}{k}} has symmetry so that \\text{cos}{δ{k}} is isotropic in the Fourier space while \\text{sin}{δ{k}} is odd in k y . The NTF of the energy is approximated to be proportional to the gradient of the energy in the y direction of the Fourier space with the proportionality coefficient being dimensionally advecting velocity.

  18. Heat flux effects on the dispersion relation for geodesic modes in rotating plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, V. N.; Sgalla, R. J. F.; Elfimov, A. G.; Galvão, R. M. O.

    2015-03-01

    The MHD theory of the effect of toroidal and poloidal rotations on the dynamics of Zonal Flows - ZFs and Geodesic Acoustic Modes - GAMs in axisymmetric magnetic confinement configurations is revisited. The MHD model has an arbitrariness regarding the energy conservation equation and previous works on the effect of rotation on ZFs and GAMs adopted an adiabatic law, or other simplifying assumptions, to treat this problem. However, in fusion grade plasmas, the heat transport along the magnetic field lines is rather fast and, therefore, a somewhat more appropriate model is to assume isothermal flux surfaces. This implies to take into account the heat transport equation in the model and, in the presence of rotation, this leads to an increase in the degree of the dispersion relation for these modes, giving rise to a low-frequency third branch of these modes. This has been previously obtained by Elfimov, Galvão and Sgalla [1] employing a model of circular flux surfaces from the outset. In this paper, the theoretical development is generalized by using flux coordinates, following the method of Ilgisonis et al [2]. This allows a better assessment of the applicability of the results and to investigate the relevance of the low frequency mode in non-circular tokamaks. Specific results for the TCABR tokamak are presented.

  19. A theoretical interpretation of the main scrape-off layer heat-flux width scaling for tokamak inner-wall limited plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halpern, F. D.; Horacek, J.; Pitts, R. A.; Ricci, P.

    2016-08-01

    The International Tokamak Physics Activity Topical Group on scrape-off layer and divertor physics has amassed a database comprising hundreds of reciprocating Langmuir probe measurements of the main scrape-off layer heat-flux width {λq} in inner-wall limited discharges. We have carried out an analysis, based on turbulent transport theory, of the variation of {λq} with respect to the dimensionless plasma parameters. Restricting our analysis to circular plasmas, we find that a model based on non-linearly saturated turbulence can well reproduce the {λq} values found in the database.

  20. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Velikovich, A. L. Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-15

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ω{sub e}τ{sub e} effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ω{sub e}τ{sub e} as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  1. Magnetic flux and heat losses by diffusive, advective, and Nernst effects in MagLIF-like plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    The MagLIF approach to inertial confinement fusion involves subsonic/isobaric compression and heating of a DT plasma with frozen-in magnetic flux by a heavy cylindrical liner. The losses of heat and magnetic flux from the plasma to the liner are thereby determined by plasma advection and gradient-driven transport processes, such as thermal conductivity, magnetic field diffusion and thermomagnetic effects. Theoretical analysis based on obtaining exact self-similar solutions of the classical collisional Braginskii's plasma transport equations in one dimension demonstrates that the heat loss from the hot plasma to the cold liner is dominated by the transverse heat conduction and advection, and the corresponding loss of magnetic flux is dominated by advection and the Nernst effect. For a large electron Hall parameter ωeτe effective diffusion coefficients determining the losses of heat and magnetic flux are both shown to decrease with ωeτe as does the Bohm diffusion coefficient, which is commonly associated with low collisionality and two-dimensional transport. This family of exact solutions can be used for verification of codes that model the MagLIF plasma dynamics.

  2. Ion flux enhancements and oscillations in spatially confined laser produced aluminum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S. C. Fallon, C.; Hayden, P.; Yeates, P.; Costello, J. T.; Mujawar, M.

    2014-09-15

    Ion signals from laser produced plasmas (LPPs) generated inside aluminum rectangular cavities at a fixed depth d = 2 mm and varying width, x = 1.0, 1.6, and 2.75 mm were obtained by spatially varying the position of a negatively biased Langmuir probe. Damped oscillatory features superimposed on Maxwellian distributed ion signals were observed. Depending on the distance of the probe from the target surface, three to twelve fold enhancements in peak ion density were observed via confinement of the LPP, generated within rectangular cavities of varying width which constrained the plasma plume to near one dimensional expansion in the vertical plane. The effects of lateral spatial confinement on the expansion velocity of the LPP plume front, the temperature, density and expansion velocity of ions, enhancement of ion flux, and ion energy distribution were recorded. The periodic behavior of ion signals was analyzed and found to be related to the electron plasma frequency and electron-ion collision frequency. The effects of confinement and enhancement of various ion parameters and expansion velocities of the LPP ion plume are explained on the basis of shock wave theory.

  3. High Heat Flux Interactions and Tritium Removal from Plasma Facing Components by a Scanning Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.H. Skinner; C.A. Gentile; A. Hassanein

    2002-01-28

    A new technique for studying high heat flux interactions with plasma facing components is presented. The beam from a continuous wave 300 W neodymium laser was focused to 80 W/mm2 and scanned at high speed over the surface of carbon tiles. These tiles were previously used in the TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] inner limiter and have a surface layer of amorphous hydrogenated carbon that was codeposited during plasma operations. Laser scanning released up to 84% of the codeposited tritium. The temperature rise of the codeposit on the tiles was significantly higher than that of the manufactured material. In one experiment, the codeposit surface temperature rose to 1,770 C while for the same conditions, the manufactured surface increased to only 1,080 C. The peak temperature did not follow the usual square-root dependence on heat pulse duration. Durations of order 100 ms resulted in brittle destruction and material loss from the surface, while a duration of approximately 10 ms showed minimal change. A digital microscope imaged the codeposit before, during, and after the interaction with the laser and revealed hot spots on a 100-micron scale. These results will be compared to analytic modeling and are relevant to the response of plasma facing components to disruptions and vertical displacement events (VDEs) in next-step magnetic fusion devices.

  4. Numerical study of the plasma wall-bias effect on the ion flux through acceleration grid hole

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seung-Hoon; Chang, C. S.

    2010-07-15

    In the extraction of ion beams from a source plasma through a grid acceleration structure, one of the key improvement issues is the fluence of the ion flux. Theoretical research has usually been focused on the structure of the grid system and the distribution of the electrostatic voltages over the grid layers. In the present work, using a self-consistent computer simulation between the plasma source, sheath potential, and the grid system, the effect of the source-wall biasing on the fluence of the ion flux through a three-grid acceleration system has been examined. It is found that a strongly positive wall-biasing can significantly enhance the ion flux by improving the shape of the plasma sheath potential meniscus at the entrance to the grid hole structure.

  5. Ultrasharp-front laser pulses generated by energetic-electron flux triggering of laser propagation in overdense plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Ya; Yu, Yong; Shen, Bai-Fei; Wang, Jia-Xiang; Zhu, Wen-Jun; Chen, Zi-Yu; Ye, Yan

    2013-08-01

    This paper reports that an initially opaque plasma foil, irradiated by a laser pulse with intensity below the self-induced transparency (SIT) threshold, will become transparent, if a flux of energetic electrons is present. Based on this phenomenon, named flux-induced transparency (FIT), an approach to obtaining ultrasharp-front laser pulses is proposed. With the presence of an energetic-electron flux generated by a p-polarized laser irradiating an overdense plasma foil from the rear side, the propagation of an s-polarized laser irradiating the front surface of the foil can be manipulated. The transmitted s-polarized laser pulse has an ultrasharp front which rises by three orders of magnitude within a few laser cycles. The profile of the transmitted pulse is tunable by controlling the time at which the energetic-electron flux arrives at the front surface.

  6. First result of deuterium retention in neutron-irradiated tungsten exposed to high flux plasma in TPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Masashi; Hatano, Y.; Calderoni, P.; Oda, T.; Oya, Y.; Sokolov, M.; Zhang, K.; Cao, G.; Kolasinski, R.; Sharpe, J. P.

    2011-08-01

    With the Japan-US joint research project Tritium, Irradiations, and Thermofluids for America and Nippon (TITAN), an initial set of tungsten samples (99.99% purity, A.L.M.T. Co.) were irradiated by high flux neutrons at 323 K to 0.025 dpa in High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Subsequently, one of the neutron-irradiated tungsten samples was exposed to a high-flux deuterium plasma (ion flux: 5 × 1021 m-2 s-1, ion fluence: 4 × 1025 m-2) in the Tritium Plasma Experiment (TPE) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The deuterium retention in the neutron-irradiated tungsten was 40% higher in comparison to the unirradiated tungsten. The observed broad desorption spectrum from neutron-irradiated tungsten and associated TMAP modeling of the deuterium release suggest that trapping occurs in the bulk material at more than three different energy sites.

  7. Fission and activation of uranium by fusion-plasma neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hohl, F.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid reactors are discussed in terms of two main purposes: to breed fissile materials (Pu 233 and Th 233 from U 238 or Th 232) for use in low-reactivity breeders, and to produce tritium from lithium to refuel fusion plasma cores. Neutron flux generation is critical for both processes. Various methods for generating the flux are described, with attention to new geometries for multiple plasma focus arrays, e.g., hypocycloidal pinch and staged plasma focus devices. These methods are evaluated with reference to their applicability to D-D fusion reactors, which will ensure a virtually unlimited energy supply. Accurate observations of the neutron flux from such schemes are obtained by using different target materials in the plasma focus.

  8. Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in High-Performance H-mode Plasmas in the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    SciTech Connect

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D; Menard, J; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, R E; Bush, C; Kaita, R

    2008-09-22

    Experiments conducted in high-performance 1.0-1.2 MA 6 MW NBI-heated H-mode plasmas with a high flux expansion radiative divertor in NSTX demonstrate that significant divertor peak heat flux reduction and access to detachment may be facilitated naturally in a highly-shaped spherical torus (ST) configuration. Improved plasma performance with high {beta}{sub p} = 15-25%, a high bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} = 45-50%, longer plasma pulses, and an H-mode regime with smaller ELMs has been achieved in the lower single null configuration with higher-end elongation 2.2-2.4 and triangularity 0.6-0.8. Divertor peak heat fluxes were reduced from 6-12 MW/m{sup 2} to 0.5-2 MW/m{sup 2} in ELMy H-mode discharges using high magnetic flux expansion and partial detachment of the outer strike point at several D{sub 2} injection rates, while good core confinement and pedestal characteristics were maintained. The partially detached divertor regime was characterized by a 30-60% increase in divertor plasma radiation, a peak heat flux reduction by up to 70%, measured in a 10 cm radial zone, a five-fold increase in divertor neutral pressure, and a significant volume recombination rate increase.

  9. Blister formation and deuterium retention on tungsten exposed to low energy and high flux deuterium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunaga, K.; Baldwin, M. J.; Doerner, R. P.; Noda, N.; Kubota, Y.; Yoshida, N.; Sogabe, T.; Kato, T.; Schedler, B.

    2005-03-01

    Deuterium ion irradiation on tungsten has been carried out with incident energies of 100 eV and flux of 1 × 10 22 D + m -2 s -1 at a temperature in range between 333 K and 1130 K up to a dose of 1 × 10 26 D + m -2. Three kinds of tungsten used are pure tungsten made by powder metallurgy tungsten (PM-W), vacuum plasma spray tungsten (VPS-W) and single crystal tungsten (SC-W). Surface morphology before and after the irradiation is observed with an SEM. In addition, retention property of deuterium after the irradiation is also examined with a TDS. Behavior of blister formation depends on the kind of the samples and the irradiation temperatures. TDS measurement also shows that deuterium is not retained in sample, which the blisters are not formed. The behavior of the blister formation and deuterium retention is influenced by the manufacturing process and the sample history of tungsten.

  10. Fast pyrobolometers for measurements of plasma heat fluxes and radiation losses in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Frank, J.; Holly, D.

    1993-01-07

    Two types of fast bolometers are described for the plasma energy transport study in the Madison Symmetric Torus plasma confinement device. Both types use pyrocrystals of LiTaO[sub 3] or LiNbO[sub 3] as the sensors. One type is used for measurements of the radiated heat losses and is situated at the vacuum shell inner surface. Another type is insertable in the plasma and measures the plasma particle heat flux. The frequency response of the bolometers is measured to be in the 150--200 kHz range. The range of the measured power fluxes is 0.1 W/cm[sup 2] 10 kW/cm[sup 2] and can be adjusted by changing the size of the entrance aperture. The lower limit is determined by the amplifier noise and the frequency bandwidth, the higher limit by destruction of the bolometer sensor.

  11. Fast pyrobolometers for measurements of plasma heat fluxes and radiation losses in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Fiksel, G.; Frank, J.; Holly, D.

    1993-01-07

    Two types of fast bolometers are described for the plasma energy transport study in the Madison Symmetric Torus plasma confinement device. Both types use pyrocrystals of LiTaO{sub 3} or LiNbO{sub 3} as the sensors. One type is used for measurements of the radiated heat losses and is situated at the vacuum shell inner surface. Another type is insertable in the plasma and measures the plasma particle heat flux. The frequency response of the bolometers is measured to be in the 150--200 kHz range. The range of the measured power fluxes is 0.1 W/cm{sup 2} 10 kW/cm{sup 2} and can be adjusted by changing the size of the entrance aperture. The lower limit is determined by the amplifier noise and the frequency bandwidth, the higher limit by destruction of the bolometer sensor.

  12. Contact Activation of Blood Plasma Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    This opinion identifies inconsistencies in the generally-accepted surface biophysics involved in contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation, reviews recent experimental work aimed at resolving inconsistencies, and concludes that this standard paradigm requires substantial revision to accommodate new experimental observations. Foremost among these new findings is that surface-catalyzed conversion of the blood zymogen factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) to the enzyme FXIIa ( FXII→surfaceFXIIa, a.k.a. autoactivation) is not specific for anionic surfaces, as proposed by the standard paradigm. Furthermore, it is found that surface activation is moderated by the protein composition of the fluid phase in which FXII autoactivation occurs by what appears to be a protein adsorption-competition effect. Both of these findings argue against the standard view that contact activation of plasma coagulation is potentiated by assembly of activation-complex proteins (FXII, FXI, prekallikrein, and high-molecular-weight kininogen) directly onto activating surfaces (procoagulants) through specific protein/surface interactions. These new findings supplement the observation that adsorption behavior of FXII and FXIIa is not remarkably different from a wide variety of other blood proteins surveyed. Similarity in adsorption properties further undermines the idea that FXII and/or FXIIa are distinguished from other blood proteins by unusual adsorption properties resulting in chemically-specific interactions with activating anionic surfaces. PMID:19168215

  13. Microstructural modifications in tungsten induced by high flux plasma exposure: TEM examination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, A.; Bakaeva, A.; Hernández-Mayoral, M.; Terentyev, D.; De Temmerman, G.; Noterdaeme, J.-M.

    2016-02-01

    We have performed microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques to reveal nanometric features in the sub-surface region of tungsten samples exposed to high flux, low energy deuterium plasma. TEM examination revealed formation of a dense dislocation network and dislocation tangles, overall resulting in a strong increase in the dislocation density by at least one order of magnitude as compared to the initial one. Plasma-induced dislocation microstructure vanishes beyond a depth of about 10 μm from the top of the exposed surface where the dislocation density and its morphology becomes comparable to the reference microstructure. Interstitial edge dislocation loops with Burgers vector a 0/2<111> and a 0<100> were regularly observed within 6 μm of the sub-surface region of the exposed samples, but absent in the reference material. The presence of these loops points to a co-existence of nanometric D bubbles, growing by loop punching mechanism, and sub-micron deuterium flakes, resulting in the formation of surface blisters, also observed here by scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasma along open magnetic field lines: Parallel heat flux

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Zehua; Tang Xianzhu

    2012-06-15

    In a long mean-free-path plasma where temperature anisotropy can be sustained, the parallel heat flux has two components with one associated with the parallel thermal energy and the other the perpendicular thermal energy. Due to the large deviation of the distribution function from local Maxwellian in an open field line plasma with low collisionality, the conventional perturbative calculation of the parallel heat flux closure in its local or non-local form is no longer applicable. Here, a non-perturbative calculation is presented for a collisionless plasma in a two-dimensional flux expander bounded by absorbing walls. Specifically, closures of previously unfamiliar form are obtained for ions and electrons, which relate two distinct components of the species parallel heat flux to the lower order fluid moments such as density, parallel flow, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, and the field quantities such as the magnetic field strength and the electrostatic potential. The plasma source and boundary condition at the absorbing wall enter explicitly in the closure calculation. Although the closure calculation does not take into account wave-particle interactions, the results based on passing orbits from steady-state collisionless drift-kinetic equation show remarkable agreement with fully kinetic-Maxwell simulations. As an example of the physical implications of the theory, the parallel heat flux closures are found to predict a surprising observation in the kinetic-Maxwell simulation of the 2D magnetic flux expander problem, where the parallel heat flux of the parallel thermal energy flows from low to high parallel temperature region.

  15. Heat flux modeling using ion drift effects in DIII-D H-mode plasmas with resonant magnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Wingen, A.; Schmitz, O.; Evans, T. E.; Spatschek, K. H.

    2014-01-15

    The heat flux patterns measured in low-collisionality DIII-D H-mode plasmas strongly deviate from simultaneously measured CII emission patterns, used as indicator of particle flux, during applied resonant magnetic perturbations. While the CII emission clearly shows typical striations, which are similar to magnetic footprint patterns obtained from vacuum field line tracing, the heat flux is usually dominated by one large peak at the strike point position. The vacuum approximation, which only considers applied magnetic fields and neglects plasma response and plasma effects, cannot explain the shape of the observed heat flux pattern. One possible explanation is the effect of particle drifts. This is included in the field line equations and the results are discussed with reference to the measurement. Electrons and ions show different drift motions at thermal energy levels in a guiding center approximation. While electrons hardly deviate from the field lines, ions can drift several centimetres away from field line flux surfaces. A model is presented in which an ion heat flux, based on the ion drift motion from various kinetic energies as they contribute to a thermal Maxwellian distribution, is calculated. The simulated heat flux is directly compared to measurements with a varying edge safety factor q{sub 95}. This analysis provides evidence for the dominate effect of high-energy ions in carrying heat from the plasma inside the separatrix to the target. High-energy ions are deposited close to the unperturbed strike line, while low-energy ions can travel into the striated magnetic topology.

  16. Bayesian calibration of reactor neutron flux spectrum using activation detectors measurements: Application to CALIBAN reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Cartier, J.; Casoli, P.; Chappert, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present calibration methods in order to estimate reactor neutron flux spectrum and its uncertainties by using integral activation measurements. These techniques are performed using Bayesian and MCMC framework. These methods are applied to integral activation experiments in the cavity of the CALIBAN reactor. We estimate the neutron flux and its related uncertainties. The originality of this work is that these uncertainties take into account measurements uncertainties, cross-sections uncertainties and model error. In particular, our results give a very good approximation of the total flux and indicate that neutron flux from MCNP simulation for energies above about 5 MeV seems to overestimate the 'real flux'. (authors)

  17. ISEE-1 and 2 observations of magnetic flux ropes in the magnetotail - FTE's in the plasma sheet?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elphic, R. C.; Russell, C. T.; Cattell, C. A.; Takahasi, K.; Bame, S. J.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic field observations on ISEE-1 and 2 in and near the neutral sheet about 20 Re down the near-earth magnetotail reveal the occurrence of structures resembling magnetic flux ropes. Both electric field and fast plasma data show that these structures convect across the spacecraft at speeds of 200 - 600 km/s, and that they have scale sizes of roughly 3 5 Re. The rope axis orientation is across the tail, approximately in the -Y GSM direction. Their magnetic structure is strikingly similar to magnetic flux ropes observed in the Venus ionosphere, and to flux transfer events observed at the dayside magnetopause. The total field-aligned current within these ropes may approach a million amps. These structures may arise because of patchy reconnection within the plasma sheet, or may be tearing islands formed when the plasma sheet magnetic field has a cross-tail component. Plasma sheet flux ropes are not a common feature at ISEE orbital altitudes; this suggests that near-earth neutral line formation within ISEE apogee (22 Re) may be equally rare.

  18. Flux of OH and O radicals onto a surface by an atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet measured by laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemori, Seiya; Ono, Ryo

    2014-03-01

    The atmospheric-pressure helium plasma jet is of emerging interest as a cutting-edge biomedical device for cancer treatment, wound healing and sterilization. Reactive oxygen species such as OH and O radicals are considered to be major factors in the application of biological plasma. In this study, density distribution, temporal behaviour and flux of OH and O radicals on a surface are measured using laser-induced fluorescence. A helium plasma jet is generated by applying pulsed high voltage of 8 kV with 10 kHz using a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 4 mm. To evaluate the relation between the surface condition and active species production, three surfaces are used: dry, wet and rat skin. When the helium flow rate is 1.5 l min-1, radial distribution of OH density on the rat skin surface shows a maximum density of 1.2 × 1013 cm-3 at the centre of the plasma-mediated area, while O atom density shows a maximum of 1.0 × 1015 cm-3 at 2.0 mm radius from the centre of the plasma-mediated area. Their densities in the effluent of the plasma jet are almost constant during the intervals of the discharge pulses because their lifetimes are longer than the pulse interval. Their density distribution depends on the helium flow rate and the surface humidity. With these results, OH and O production mechanisms in the plasma jet and their flux onto the surface are discussed.

  19. Three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and divertor fluxes during application of resonant magnetic perturbations on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, O.; Becoulet, M.; Cahyna, P.; Evans, T. E.; Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Loarte, A.; Pitts, R. A.; Reiser, D.; Fenstermacher, M. E.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Kukushkin, A.; Lunt, T.; Saibene, G.; Reiter, D.; Samm, U.; Wiesen, S.

    2016-06-01

    Results from three-dimensional modeling of plasma edge transport and plasma–wall interactions during application of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for control of edge-localized modes in the ITER standard 15 MA Q  =  10 H-mode are presented. The full 3D plasma fluid and kinetic neutral transport code EMC3-EIRENE is used for the modeling. Four characteristic perturbed magnetic topologies are considered and discussed with reference to the axisymmetric case without RMP fields. Two perturbation field amplitudes at full and half of the ITER ELM control coil current capability using the vacuum approximation are compared to a case including a strongly screening plasma response. In addition, a vacuum field case at high q 95  =  4.2 featuring increased magnetic shear has been modeled. Formation of a three-dimensional plasma boundary is seen for all four perturbed magnetic topologies. The resonant field amplitudes and the effective radial magnetic field at the separatrix define the shape and extension of the 3D plasma boundary. Opening of the magnetic field lines from inside the separatrix establishes scrape-off layer-like channels of direct parallel particle and heat flux towards the divertor yielding a reduction of the main plasma thermal and particle confinement. This impact on confinement is most accentuated at full RMP current and is strongly reduced when screened RMP fields are considered, as well as for the reduced coil current cases. The divertor fluxes are redirected into a three-dimensional pattern of helical magnetic footprints on the divertor target tiles. At maximum perturbation strength, these fingers stretch out as far as 60 cm across the divertor targets, yielding heat flux spreading and the reduction of peak heat fluxes by 30%. However, at the same time substantial and highly localized heat fluxes reach divertor areas well outside of the axisymmetric heat flux decay profile. Reduced RMP amplitudes due to screening or reduced

  20. Ion Energy Distribution Measurements Downstream of the High Power Helicon Plasma Thruster with a Flux Conserving Nozzle Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slobodov, Ilia; Winglee, Robert; Prager, James; Ziemba, Tim; Race Roberson, B.

    2010-11-01

    The high power helicon (HPH) deposits up to 40 kW of power into a plasma, generating a plasma beam with a measured source density of 1x10^20 m-3 and energies in the range of 20-40 eV. Recently, the arrangement of magnetic nozzles downstream of the plasma source has been modified in order to produce a flux conserving configuration. Retarded field energy analyzer (RFEA) measurements of the ion energy distribution functions at two locations downstream of the plasma source, 67 cm and 144 cm away, have been carried out. Data on the number density, ion velocity, and energy density of the plasma beam at these locations will be presented. An improvement in performance over the previous nozzle configuration is observed. Additionally, results suggest that the energy density of the beam does not decrease with distance from the source between the two locations.

  1. Lunar dusty plasma: A result of interaction of the solar wind flux and ultraviolet radiation with the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisin, E. A.; Tarakanov, V. P.; Popel, S. I.; Petrov, O. F.

    2015-11-01

    One of the main problems of future missions to the Moon is associated with lunar dust. Solar wind flux and ultraviolet radiation interact with the lunar surface. As a result, there is a substantial surface change and a near-surface plasma sheath. Dust particles from the lunar regolith, which turned in this plasma because of any mechanical processes, can levitate above the surface, forming dust clouds. In preparing of the space experiments “Luna-Glob” and “Luna-Resource” particle-in-cell calculations of the near-surface plasma sheath parameters are carried out. Here we present some new results of particle-in-cell simulation of the plasma sheath formed near the surface of the moon as a result of interaction of the solar wind and ultraviolet radiation with the lunar surface. The conditions of charging and stable levitation of dust particles in plasma above the lunar surface are also considered.

  2. Proceedings of US/Japan workshop, Q219 on high heat flux components and plasma surface interactions for next fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Stevens, P.L.; Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.

    1996-12-01

    This report contains the viewgraphs from the proceedings of US/Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices. Some of the general topics covered by this report are: PFC/PSI in tokamak and helical devices; development of high heat flux components; PSIS and plasma facing materials;tritium; and material damage.

  3. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics. PMID:27300989

  4. Hydrogen atom in a quantum plasma environment under the influence of Aharonov-Bohm flux and electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falaye, Babatunde James; Sun, Guo-Hua; Silva-Ortigoza, Ramón; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2016-05-01

    This study presents the confinement influences of Aharonov-Bohm (AB) flux and electric and magnetic fields directed along the z axis and encircled by quantum plasmas on the hydrogen atom. The all-inclusive effects result in a strongly attractive system while the localizations of quantum levels change and the eigenvalues decrease. We find that the combined effect of the fields is stronger than a solitary effect and consequently there is a substantial shift in the bound state energy of the system. We also find that to perpetuate a low-energy medium for the hydrogen atom in quantum plasmas, a strong electric field and weak magnetic field are required, whereas the AB flux field can be used as a regulator. The application of the perturbation technique utilized in this paper is not restricted to plasma physics; it can also be applied in molecular physics.

  5. Magnetic flux cancellation and Doppler shifts in flaring active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtseva, Olga; Petrie, Gordon

    2016-05-01

    Flux cancellation plays an important role in some theories of solar eruptions. The mechanism of flux cancellation is suggested by many models to be a necessary condition of flare initiation as a part of slow reconnection processes in the lower atmosphere. In our earlier work we analyzed flux cancellation events during major flares using GONG line-of-sight magnetograms. In this work we use vector magnetic field data from SDO/HMI for better interpretation of the longitudinal field changes. We also compute Doppler velocity shifts at the cancellation sites in attempt to distinguish between the three physical processes that could stand behind flux removal from the photosphere: submergence of U-shaped loops, emergence of Ω-shaped loops and magnetic reconnection.

  6. Ultrahigh heat flux plasma-facing components for magnetic fusion energy

    SciTech Connect

    Youchison, D. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Ultramet partnered to design and test refractory metal plasma-facing components and heat exchangers for advanced, high-temperature power conversion systems. These devices consisted of high-temperature helium-to-helium and lithium-to-helium heat exchangers that operate with high efficiency due to the porous foam inserts used in the gas stream, which promote turbulence and provide extended surface area for enhanced convection. Single- and multi-channel helium panels and the Li-He heat exchanger were fabricated from either pure molybdenum, TZM, or tungsten. The design was carried out through an Ultramet subcontractor. The flow path was carefully tailored to minimize the pressure drop while maximizing the heat transfer. The single- and multi-channel helium panels were tested at Sandia's PMTF using an electron beam system and the closed helium flow loop. In 2006, a single-channel tungsten tube was successfully tested to an average heat flux of 14 MW/m{sup 2} with a localized peak of 22 MW/m{sup 2} along the axial centerline at the outer radius. Under this CRADA, multiple square-channel molybdenum components were successfully tested to heat flux levels approaching 8.5 MW/m{sup 2}. The three multi-channel prototypes experienced mechanical failure due to issues related to the design of the large unsupported span of the heated faceplates in combination with prototype material and braze selection. The Li-He heat exchanger was both designed and partially tested at the PMTF for helium and lithium flow.

  7. A spectral study of a radio-frequency plasma-generated flux of atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batten, Carmen E.; Brown, Kenneth G.; Lewis, Beverley W.

    1994-01-01

    The active environment of a radio-frequency (RF) plasma generator, with and without low-pressure oxygen, has been characterized through the identification of emission lines in the spectral region from 250 to 900 nm. The environment is shown to be dependent on the partial pressure of oxygen and the power applied to the RF generator. Atomic oxygen has been found in significant amounts as well as atomic hydrogen and the molecular oxygen species O2((sup 1)Sigma). The only charged species observed was the singly charged molecular ion O2(+). With a polymer specimen in the plasma chamber, carbon monoxide was also observed. The significance of these observations with respect to previous studies using this type of generator to stimulate material degradation in space is discussed. The possibility of using these generators as atomic oxygen sources in the development of oxygen atom fluorescence sensors is explored.

  8. A flux-splitting method for hyperbolic-equation system of magnetized electron fluids in quasi-neutral plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Rei; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Schönherr, Tony

    2016-04-01

    A flux-splitting method is proposed for the hyperbolic-equation system (HES) of magnetized electron fluids in quasi-neutral plasmas. The numerical fluxes are split into four categories, which are computed by using an upwind method which incorporates a flux-vector splitting (FVS) and advection upstream splitting method (AUSM). The method is applied to a test calculation condition of uniformly distributed and angled magnetic lines of force. All of the pseudo-time advancement terms converge monotonically and the conservation laws are strictly satisfied in the steady state. The calculation results are compared with those computed by using the elliptic-parabolic-equation system (EPES) approach using a magnetic-field-aligned mesh (MFAM). Both qualitative and quantitative comparisons yield good agreements of results, indicating that the HES approach with the flux-splitting method attains a high computational accuracy.

  9. Influence of the normalized ion flux on the constitution of alumina films deposited by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Kurapov, Denis; Reiss, Jennifer; Trinh, David H.; Hultman, Lars; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2007-07-15

    Alumina thin films were deposited onto tempered hot working steel substrates from an AlCl{sub 3}-O{sub 2}-Ar-H{sub 2} gas mixture by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. The normalized ion flux was varied during deposition through changes in precursor content while keeping the cathode voltage and the total pressure constant. As the precursor content in the total gas mixture was increased from 0.8% to 5.8%, the deposition rate increased 12-fold, while the normalized ion flux decreased by approximately 90%. The constitution, morphology, impurity incorporation, and the elastic properties of the alumina thin films were found to depend on the normalized ion flux. These changes in structure, composition, and properties induced by normalized ion flux may be understood by considering mechanisms related to surface and bulk diffusion.

  10. [Plasma cholinesterase activity in hepatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Araoud, Manel; Mhenni, Hamida; Hellara, Ilhem; Hellara, Olfa; Neffati, Fadoua; Douki, Wahiba; Mili, Marwa; Saffar, Hammouda; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cholinesterase activity (ChE) may vary in some pathological circumstances. We studied the changes in activity of this enzyme according to the type of liver injury, to assess the interest of this parameter in the diagnosis of liver diseases. Our study was performed on 102 patients with different liver diseases and 53 healthy controls. The ChE activity was lower in patients compared to control group (p < 0.0001), and more pronounced in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from hepatitis. Elevated activities of AST, ALT, GGT and ALP and bilirubinemia, and decreased albuminemia were noted in patients compared to controls (p < 0.001). Hypoalbuminemia was significantly important in cirrhotic patients compared to those suffering from cholestasis or hepatitis. A correlation between ChE and bilirubin, albumin and serum protein was found in patients with cirrhosis or those with chronic hepatitis. A significantly lower activity of ChE was found in patients with hepatic insufficiency (HI). In case of suspicion of HI, the prescription of ChE activity could guide or confirm the diagnosis of the impairment. PMID:23747666

  11. The plasma flux and oxidation rate of ornithine adaptively decline with restricted arginine intake.

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, L; Sánchez, M; Chapman, T E; Ajami, A; Burke, J F; Young, V R

    1994-01-01

    We hypothesized recently that arginine homeostasis is achieved in humans largely by modulating the rate of arginine degradation. We have tested this hypothesis further by measuring in vivo the whole body rate of conversion of arginine to ornithine and ornithine oxidation in six healthy young adults. Subjects received for 6 days an L-amino acid-based diet supplying an arginine-rich or arginine-free intake and on day 7, following an overnight fast, an 8-h tracer protocol (first 3 h, fast state; next 5 h, fed state) was conducted; L-[guanidino-15N2; 5,5-2H]arginine and L-[5-13C]ornithine were given as primed, constant intravenous tracers; measurements of the abundances of various isotopologs of arginine, ornithine, and citrulline in plasma were made, and from these the various kinetic parameters of the metabolism of these amino acids were derived. Arginine and ornithine fluxes were significantly (P < 0.001) reduced in the fed state with arginine-free feeding. The rates of conversion (mumol.kg-1.h-1; mean +/- SD) of plasma arginine to ornithine for arginine-rich were 12.9 +/- 2.6 and 24.7 +/- 4.8 for fast and fed states. These values were 11.1 +/- 3.5 and 9.6 +/- 1.2 (P > 0.05 and P < 0.001), respectively, with an arginine-free diet. [13C]Ornithine oxidation was reduced (P < 0.001) by 46% during the fed state when the arginine-free diet was given. The findings strengthen our hypothesis that homeostasis of arginine metabolism in the human host depends importantly upon a regulation in the rate of arginine degradation with, perhaps, little involvement in the de novo net rate of arginine synthesis. PMID:8022794

  12. Variability of the Lyman alpha flux with solar activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lean, J.L.; Skumanich, A.

    1983-07-01

    A three-component model of the solar chromosphere, developed from ground based observations of the Ca II K chromospheric emission, is used to calculate the variability of the Lyman alpha flux between 1969 and 1980. The Lyman alpha flux at solar minimum is required in the model and is taken as 2.32 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s. This value occurred during 1975 as well as in 1976 near the commencement of solar cycle 21. The model predicts that the Lyman alpha flux increases to as much as 5 x 10/sup 11/ photons/cm/sup 2//s at the maximum of the solar cycle. The ratio of the average fluxes for December 1979 (cycle maximum) and July 1976 (cycle minimum) is 1.9. During solar maximum the 27-day solar rotation is shown to cause the Lyman alpha flux to vary by as much as 40% or as little as 5%. The model also shows that the Lyman alpha flux varies over intermediate time periods of 2 to 3 years, as well as over the 11-year sunspot cycle. We conclude that, unlike the sunspot number and the 10.7-cm radio flux, the Lyman alpha flux had a variability that was approximately the same during each of the past three cycles. Lyman alpha fluxes calculated by the model are consistent with measurements of the Lyman alpha flux made by 11 of a total of 14 rocket experiments conducted during the period 1969--1980. The model explains satisfactorily the absolute magnitude, long-term trends, and the cycle variability seen in the Lyman alpha irradiances by the OSO 5 satellite experiment. The 27-day variability observed by the AE-E satellite experiment is well reproduced. However, the magntidue of the AE-E 1 Lyman alpha irradiances are higher than the model calculations by between 40% and 80%. We suggest that the assumed calibration of the AE-E irradiances is in error.

  13. Plasma-Activated Sintering of Aluminum Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hensley, J. E.; Risbud, S. H.; Groza, J. R.; Yamazaki, K.

    1993-10-01

    The use of a new plasma- activated sintering (PAS) process to densify aluminum nitride (AIN) powders to nearly full theoretical density (97 to >99%) in 5 to 10 min was investigated. The process consists of a pulse activation step, followed by sintering at 1730 to 1800 °C using resistance heating in carbon dies. Submicron size (~0.44 μm) AIN powders of low oxygen content (<1 wt%) were consolidated to near full density in both air and vacuum with no sintering aids or binders. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) examination revealed an equiaxed, submicron grain structure (~0.77 μm) with no apparent pores or intergranular phases. X- ray powder diffraction revealed no secondary crystalline phases.

  14. Effect of high-flux H/He plasma exposure on tungsten damage due to transient heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Temmerman, G.; Morgan, T. W.; van Eden, G. G.; de Kruif, T.; Wirtz, M.; Matejicek, J.; Chraska, T.; Pitts, R. A.; Wright, G. M.

    2015-08-01

    The thermal shock behaviour of tungsten exposed to high-flux plasma is studied using a high-power laser. The cases of laser-only, sequential laser and hydrogen (H) plasma and simultaneous laser plus H plasma exposure are studied. H plasma exposure leads to an embrittlement of the material and the appearance of a crack network originating from the centre of the laser spot. Under simultaneous loading, significant surface melting is observed. In general, H plasma exposure lowers the heat flux parameter (FHF) for the onset of surface melting by ∼25%. In the case of He-modified (fuzzy) surfaces, strong surface deformations are observed already after 1000 laser pulses at moderate FHF = 19 MJ m-2 s-1/2, and a dense network of fine cracks is observed. These results indicate that high-fluence ITER-like plasma exposure influences the thermal shock properties of tungsten, lowering the permissible transient energy density beyond which macroscopic surface modifications begin to occur.

  15. Effects of solar and geomagnetic activities on the zonal drift of equatorial plasma bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Song; Roddy, Patrick A.

    2016-01-01

    Equatorial plasma bubbles are mostly generated in the postsunset sector and then move in the zonal direction. Plasma bubbles can last for several hours and move over hundreds of kilometers (even more than 1000 km). In this study, we use measurements of ion density by the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecasting System satellite to determine the orbit-averaged drift velocity of plasma bubbles. The objective of the study is to identify the dependence of the bubble drift on the solar radio flux and geomagnetic activities. In total, 5463 drift velocities are derived over May 2008 to April 2014, and a statistical analysis is performed. The average pattern of the bubble drift is in good agreement with the zonal drift of the equatorial F region plasma. The zonal drift velocity of plasma bubbles increases with the solar radio flux. However, the increase shows different features at different local times. Geomagnetic activities cause a decrease of the eastward drift velocity of plasma bubbles, equivalent to the occurrence of a westward drift, through disturbance dynamo process. In particular, the decrease of the eastward drift velocity appears to become accelerated when the Dst index is smaller than -60 nT or Kp is larger than 4.

  16. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Salabei, Joshua K; Gibb, Andrew A; Hill, Bradford G

    2014-02-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method for measuring mitochondrial function in cells and tissues. Although this technique is commonly used to measure bioenergetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin (SAP), digitonin (DIG) or recombinant perfringolysin O (rPFO) (XF-plasma membrane permeabilizer (PMP) reagent), and they are provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or complex II-mediated respiratory activity, complex III+IV respiratory activity or complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid (FA) oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol uses a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols and does not require isolation of mitochondria. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, after preparative steps, it takes 6-8 h to complete. PMID:24457333

  17. Ion flux to a Sphere in a Collisionless Flowing Plasma: a surprising solution to a 40 year old basic plasma physics challenge.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, Ian H.

    2003-10-01

    The interaction of a spherical ion-absorbing body with an unmagnetized collisionless plasma is the archetype of plasma probe problems and is vital to calculating the plasma charging of dust grains and spacecraft. The problem was solved for stationary plasmas in the 1960s, but in a flowing plasma the spherical symmetry of the surrounding potential is broken and a multidimensional calculation is required, which has not been fully carried out until now. This talk will report results obtained with the Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals in Cell PIC code (SCEPTIC) written for the purpose. The code takes into account the self-consistently shielded electric field and the full particle dynamics. It models the full ion distribution function, including all ion kinetic effects, for arbitrary Debye length, ion temperature, flow velocity, and sphere potential. The angular dependence of the ion flux to the sphere is the quantity most important for practical purposes. It provides the calibration of a Mach Probe for measuring the velocity by observation of the upstream to downstream ratio of ion saturation current, and it determines the surface charging rate and its asymmetries for grains and spacecraft. The results show that for infinitesimal Debye length (compared to probe radius), a consistent Mach Probe calibration is obtained. As the Debye length increases, however, a dramatic and unexpected effect occurs. The direction of ion flux asymmetry reverses! That is, the upstream collection flux becomes smaller than the downstream flux. This counter-intuitive effect is caused not by the potential's deviations from spherical symmetry, but its radial dependence. When the Debye length becomes much larger than the probe (so that a Coulomb potential variation is obtained) the symmetry direction reverts to its more intuitive direction.

  18. Capacitively coupled hydrogen plasmas sustained by tailored voltage waveforms: excitation dynamics and ion flux asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruneau, B.; Diomede, P.; Economou, D. J.; Longo, S.; Gans, T.; O’Connell, D.; Greb, A.; Johnson, E.; Booth, J.-P.

    2016-08-01

    Parallel plate capacitively coupled plasmas in hydrogen at relatively high pressure (~1 Torr) are excited with tailored voltage waveforms containing up to five frequencies. Predictions of a hybrid model combining a particle-in-cell simulation with Monte Carlo collisions and a fluid model are compared to phase resolved optical emission spectroscopy measurements, yielding information on the dynamics of the excitation rate in these discharges. When the discharge is excited with amplitude asymmetric waveforms, the discharge becomes electrically asymmetric, with different ion energies at each of the two electrodes. Unexpectedly, large differences in the \\text{H}2+ fluxes to each of the two electrodes are caused by the different \\text{H}3+ energies. When the discharge is excited with slope asymmetric waveforms, only weak electrical asymmetry of the discharge is observed. In this case, electron power absorption due to fast sheath expansion at one electrode is balanced by electron power absorption at the opposite electrode due to a strong electric field reversal.

  19. 3D Dynamics of Magnetic Flux Ropes Across Scales: Solar Eruptions and Sun-Earth Plasma Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, James

    2012-10-01

    Central to the understanding of the eruptive phenomena on the Sun and their impact on the terrestrial plasma environment is the dynamics of coronal mass ejections (CMEs)---a 3D magnetic flux rope configuration---and the evolution of their magnetic fields. I will discuss the basic physics of CME eruption and solar flare energy release in the context of the analytic erupting flux rope model of CMEs. In this ideal MHD model, a CME is treated as a 3D flux rope with its two stationary footpoints anchored in the Sun. The model structure is non-axisymmetric and embedded in a model corona/solar wind. The initial flux rope is driven out of equilibrium by ``injection'' of poloidal flux and propagates under the Lorentz hoop force from the Sun to 1 AU, across a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Comparisons of the model results and recent STEREO observations show that the solutions that best fit the observed CME position-time data (to within 1-2% of data) also correctly replicate the temporal profiles of associated flare X-ray emissions (GOES data) and the in situ magnetic field and plasma data of the CME ejecta at 1 AU where such data are available (e.g., ACE and STEREO/IMPAXCT/PLASTIC data), providing a unified basis of understanding CME dynamics and flare energetics.

  20. Comparing Simulations of Rising Flux Tubes Through the Solar Convection Zone with Observations of Solar Active Regions: Constraining the Dynamo Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. A.; Fan, Y.; Miesch, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    We study how active-region-scale flux tubes rise buoyantly from the base of the convection zone to near the solar surface by embedding a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of solar-like turbulent convection. These toroidal flux tubes that we simulate range in magnetic field strength from 15 kG to 100 kG at initial latitudes of 1∘ to 40∘ in both hemispheres. This article expands upon Weber, Fan, and Miesch ( Astrophys. J. 741, 11, 2011) (Article 1) with the inclusion of tubes with magnetic flux of 1020 Mx and 1021 Mx, and more simulations of the previously investigated case of 1022 Mx, sampling more convective flows than the previous article, greatly improving statistics. Observed properties of active regions are compared to properties of the simulated emerging flux tubes, including: the tilt of active regions in accordance with Joy's Law as in Article 1, and in addition the scatter of tilt angles about the Joy's Law trend, the most commonly occurring tilt angle, the rotation rate of the emerging loops with respect to the surrounding plasma, and the nature of the magnetic field at the flux tube apex. We discuss how these diagnostic properties constrain the initial field strength of the active-region flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone, and suggest that flux tubes of initial magnetic field strengths of ≥ 40 kG are good candidates for the progenitors of large (1021 Mx to 1022 Mx) solar active regions, which agrees with the results from Article 1 for flux tubes of 1022 Mx. With the addition of more magnetic flux values and more simulations, we find that for all magnetic field strengths, the emerging tubes show a positive Joy's Law trend, and that this trend does not show a statistically significant dependence on the magnetic flux.

  1. Trend of photospheric helicity flux in active regions generating halo CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyrli, Aimilia; Zuccarello, Francesco; Zuccarello, Francesca; Romano, Paolo; Guglielmino, Salvatore Luigi; Spadaro, Daniele; Hood, Alan; Mackay, Duncan

    Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are very energetic events initiated in the solar atmosphere, re-sulting in the expulsion of magnetized plasma clouds that propagate into interplanetary space. It has been proposed that CMEs can play an important role in shedding magnetic helicity, avoiding its endless accumulation in the corona. We therefore investigated the behavior of magnetic helicity accumulation in sites where the initiation of CMEs occurred, in order to de-termine whether and how changes in magnetic helicity accumulation are temporally correlated with CME occurrence. After identifying the active regions (AR) where the CMEs were ini-tiated by means of a double cross-check based on the flaring-eruptive activity and the use of SOHO/EIT difference images, we used MDI magnetograms to calculate magnetic flux evolu-tion, magnetic helicity injection rate and magnetic helicity injection in 10 active regions that gave rise to 12 halo CMEs observed during the period February 2000 -June 2003. No unique behavior in magnetic helicity injection accompanying halo CME occurrence is found. In fact, in some cases there is an abrupt change in helicity injection timely correlated with the CME event, while in some others no significant variation is recorded. However, our analysis show that the most significant changes in magnetic flux and magnetic helicity injection are associated with impulsive CMEs rather than gradual CMEs. Moreover, the most significant changes in mag-netic helicity are observed when X-class flares or eruptive filaments occur, while the occurrence of flares of class C or M seems not to affect significantly the magnetic helicity accumulation.

  2. First-flight escape from spheres with R(-2) density distribution. [particle flux from comets, stars and unconfined plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.; Keady, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Energy-independent first-flight transport kernels are evaluated for a spherical region with an R(-2) density distribution. The uncollided angular-flux distribution is obtained and integrated for a source distribution that is proportional to the density to give the uncollided emitted particle flux and current density. These are useful for the calculation of mass, energy, and momentum carried away by fast particles born in the medium. The data are relevant to estimate escape from weakly bound atmospheres such as comet comae, dilute circumstellar envelopes, and some unconfined laboratory plasmas.

  3. Model-Based Assessment of Plasma Citrate Flux Into the Liver: Implications for NaCT as a Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Erion, D M; Maurer, T S

    2016-03-01

    Cytoplasmic citrate serves as an important regulator of gluconeogenesis and carbon source for de novo lipogenesis in the liver. For this reason, the sodium-coupled citrate transporter (NaCT), a plasma membrane transporter that governs hepatic influx of plasma citrate in human, is being explored as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. As cytoplasmic citrate also originates from intracellular mitochondria, the relative contribution of these two pathways represents critical information necessary to underwrite confidence in this target. In this work, hepatic influx of plasma citrate was quantified via pharmacokinetic modeling of published clinical data. The influx was then compared to independent literature estimates of intracellular citrate flux in human liver. The results indicate that, under normal conditions, <10% of hepatic citrate originates from plasma. Similar estimates were determined experimentally in mice and rats. This suggests that NaCT inhibition will have a limited impact on hepatic citrate concentrations across species. PMID:27069776

  4. Model‐Based Assessment of Plasma Citrate Flux Into the Liver: Implications for NaCT as a Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Erion, DM; Maurer, TS

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic citrate serves as an important regulator of gluconeogenesis and carbon source for de novo lipogenesis in the liver. For this reason, the sodium‐coupled citrate transporter (NaCT), a plasma membrane transporter that governs hepatic influx of plasma citrate in human, is being explored as a potential therapeutic target for metabolic disorders. As cytoplasmic citrate also originates from intracellular mitochondria, the relative contribution of these two pathways represents critical information necessary to underwrite confidence in this target. In this work, hepatic influx of plasma citrate was quantified via pharmacokinetic modeling of published clinical data. The influx was then compared to independent literature estimates of intracellular citrate flux in human liver. The results indicate that, under normal conditions, <10% of hepatic citrate originates from plasma. Similar estimates were determined experimentally in mice and rats. This suggests that NaCT inhibition will have a limited impact on hepatic citrate concentrations across species. PMID:27069776

  5. Prolylcarboxypeptidase Independently Activates Plasma Prekallikrein (Fletcher Factor)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J.; Matafonov, A.; Madkhali, H.; Mahdi, F.; Watson, D.; Schmaier, A.H.; Gailani, D.; Shariat-Madar, Z.

    2015-01-01

    Prolylcarboxypeptidase isoform 1 (PRCP1) is capable of regulating numerous autocrines and hormones, such as angiotensin II, angiotensin III, αMSH1-13, and DesArg9 bradykinin. It does so by cleaving a C-terminal PRO-X bond. Recent work also indicates that the human PRCP1 activates plasma prekallikrein (PK) to kallikrein on endothelial cells through an uncharacterized mechanism. This study aims to identify PRCP1 binding interaction and cleavage site on PK. Recently, a cDNA encoding a novel splice variant of the human PRCP1 was identified. This isoform differed only in the N-terminal region of the deduced amino acid sequence. Using structural and functional studies, a combination of peptide mapping and site-directed mutagenesis approaches were employed to investigate the interaction of PRCP1 with PK. Three PRCP peptides, in decreasing order of potency, from 1) the N-terminus of the secreted protein, 2) spanning the opening of the active site pocket, and 3) in the dimerization region inhibit PRCP activation of PK on endothelial cells. Investigations also tested the hypothesis that PRCP cleavage site on PK is between its C-terminal Pro 637 (P637) and Ala 638 (A638). Recombinant forms of PK with C-terminal alanine mutagenesis or a stop codon is activated equally as wild type PK by PRCP. In conclusion, PRCP1 interacts with PK at multiple sites for PK activation. PRCP1 also enhances FXIIa activation of PK, suggesting that its activation site on PK is not identical to that of FXIIa. PMID:25324000

  6. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume III. Strategy for international collaborations in the areas of plasma materials interactions and high heat flux materials and components development

    SciTech Connect

    Gauster, W.B.; Bauer, W.; Roberto, J.B.; Post, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this summary is to assess opportunities for such collaborations in the specific areas of Plasma Materials Interaction and High Heat Flux Materials and Components Development, and to aid in developing a strategy to take advantage of them. After some general discussion of international collaborations, we summarize key technical issues and the US programs to address them. Then follows a summary of present collaborations and potential opportunities in foreign laboratories.

  7. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    deCastro, F.J.

    1990-04-01

    Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.

  8. Magnetic reconnection in plasma under inertial confinement fusion conditions driven by heat flux effects in Ohm's law.

    PubMed

    Joglekar, A S; Thomas, A G R; Fox, W; Bhattacharjee, A

    2014-03-14

    In the interaction of high-power laser beams with solid density plasma there are a number of mechanisms that generate strong magnetic fields. Such fields subsequently inhibit or redirect electron flows, but can themselves be advected by heat fluxes, resulting in complex interplay between thermal transport and magnetic fields. We show that for heating by multiple laser spots reconnection of magnetic field lines can occur, mediated by these heat fluxes, using a fully implicit 2D Vlasov-Fokker-Planck code. Under such conditions, the reconnection rate is dictated by heat flows rather than Alfvènic flows. We find that this mechanism is only relevant in a high β plasma. However, the Hall parameter ωcτei can be large so that thermal transport is strongly modified by these magnetic fields, which can impact longer time scale temperature homogeneity and ion dynamics in the system. PMID:24679302

  9. Observation of fluctuation-driven particle flux reduction by low-frequency zonal flow in a linear magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, R.; Xie, J. L. Yu, C. X.; Liu, A. D.; Lan, T.; Li, H.; Liu, W. D.; Zhang, S. B.; Kong, D. F.; Hu, G. H.

    2015-01-15

    Low-frequency zonal flow (ZF) has been observed in a linear magnetic plasma device, exhibiting significant intermittency. Using the conditional analysis method, a time-averaged fluctuation-induced particle flux was observed to consistently decrease as ZF increased in amplitude. A dominant fraction of the flux, which is driven by drift-wave harmonics, is reversely modulated by ZF in the time domain. Spectra of the flux, together with each of the related turbulence properties, are estimated subject to two conditions, i.e., when potential fluctuation series represents a strong ZF intermittency or a very weak ZF component. Comparison of frequency-domain results demonstrates that ZF reduces the cross-field particle transport primarily by suppressing the density fluctuation as well as decorrelating density and potential fluctuations.

  10. Deuterium retention in codeposited layers and carbon materials exposed to high flux D-plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkhipov, I. I.; Gorodetsky, A. E.; Zalavutdinov, R. Kh; Zakharov, A. P.; Burtseva, T. A.; Mazul, I. V.; Khripunov, B. I.; Shapkin, V. V.; Petrov, V. B.

    A ceramic BCN target with samples of dense RG-Ti-91 without boron, RG-Ti-B with boron (0.1 at.%) and porous POCO AXF-5Q graphites was exposed in a stationary D-plasma of the `Lenta' device with an ion energy of 200 eV and an ion flux of (3 - 6) × 10 17 D/cm 2s at 1040 and 1400 K to a fluence of ˜1 × 10 22 D/cm 2. Codeposited layers were obtained for comparison on the target surface. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) showed that the amount of deuterium in RG-Ti after exposure at 1040 K was more than an order of magnitude higher than in POCO (9 × 10 17 and 7 × 10 16 D/cm 2, respectively). The retention took place preferentially in a surface layer about 100 μm thick. The bulk deuterium concentration in both RG-Ti and POCO was lower than 1 appm. The irradiated RG-Ti surface was subjected to strong erosion and consisted of `columnar' grains covered with TiC at their tips. The deuterium in RG-Ti irradiated at 1400 K was located in the surface layer (1.5 × 10 16 D/cm 2). The value of the bulk concentration did not exceed 0.1 appm while in POCO it was equal to about 20 appm. TDS for deuterium in RG-Ti demonstrated a spectrum similar to that for codeposited layers on a target surface. The differences in deuterium retention in the graphites are explained on the basis of structural differences. Considering tritium inventory assessment for ITER, dense graphites like RG-Ti are preferred for working divertor plates at high temperatures.

  11. PLASMA JETS AND ERUPTIONS IN SOLAR CORONAL HOLES: A THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLUX EMERGENCE EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno-Insertis, F.

    2013-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) numerical experiment of the launching of a hot and fast coronal jet followed by several violent eruptions is analyzed in detail. These events are initiated through the emergence of a magnetic flux rope from the solar interior into a coronal hole. We explore the evolution of the emerging magnetically dominated plasma dome surmounted by a current sheet and the ensuing pattern of reconnection. A hot and fast coronal jet with inverted-Y shape is produced that shows properties comparable to those frequently observed with EUV and X-ray detectors. We analyze its 3D shape, its inhomogeneous internal structure, and its rise and decay phases, lasting for some 15-20 minutes each. Particular attention is devoted to the field line connectivities and the reconnection pattern. We also study the cool and high-density volume that appears to encircle the emerged dome. The decay of the jet is followed by a violent phase with a total of five eruptions. The first of them seems to follow the general pattern of tether-cutting reconnection in a sheared arcade, although modified by the field topology created by the preceding reconnection evolution. The two following eruptions take place near and above the strong-field concentrations at the surface. They show a twisted, {Omega}-loop-like rope expanding in height, with twist being turned into writhe, thus hinting at a kink instability (perhaps combined with a torus instability) as the cause of the eruption. The succession of a main jet ejection and a number of violent eruptions that resemble mini-CMEs and their physical properties suggest that this experiment may provide a model for the blowout jets recently proposed in the literature.

  12. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design and implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.

  13. High-heat-flux testing of irradiated tungsten-based materials for fusion applications using infrared plasma arc lamps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Schaich, Charles R.; Ueda, Yoshio; Harper, David C.; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Byun, Thak S.

    2014-11-01

    Testing of advanced materials and component mock-ups under prototypical fusion high-heat-flux conditions, while historically a mainstay of fusion research, has proved to be quite challenging, especially for irradiated materials. A new high-heat-flux–testing (HHFT) facility based on water-wall plasma arc lamps (PALs) is now introduced for materials and small-component testing. Two PAL systems, utilizing a 12 000°C plasma arc contained in a quartz tube cooled by a spiral water flow over the inside tube surface, provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over areas of 9×12 and 1×10 cm2, respectively. This paper will present the overall design andmore » implementation of a PAL-based irradiated material target station (IMTS). The IMTS is primarily designed for testing the effects of heat flux or thermal cycling on material coupons of interest, such as those for plasma-facing components. Temperature results are shown for thermal cycling under HHFT of tungsten coupon specimens that were neutron irradiated in HFIR. Finally, radiological surveys indicated minimal contamination of the 36×36×18 cm test section, demonstrating the capability of the new facility to handle irradiated specimens at high temperature.« less

  14. A Simple Ion Flux Estimation in a Low Pressure R.F. Plasma (13.56MHz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grenier, I.; Massereau, V.; Celerier, A.; Machet, J.

    1997-04-01

    A new application of the sputtering rate measurement is given in this paper. In fact, by measuring the sputtering rate of different materials fixed on the radio frequency (r.f.) biased electrode, it is possible to determine easily ion flux that falls onto this biased electrode. This study is realized in a low pressure (0.4 Pa) argon planar r.f. discharge system (13.56 MHz). This sputtering method is interesting to have informations about the deposition process in physical vapour deposition. In order to demonstrate the validity of this method, experiments have been carried out in two reactors, each one with different geometrical parameters and the results obtained have been compared and confirmed using the Child-Langmuir law. The ion flux increases as a function of the incident r.f power (0 300 W). The values obtained range from 10^{18} to 10^{19} ions m^{-2} s^{-1}. These results in an argon plasma are applied to estimate incident ion flux in a nitrogen atmosphere. Finally, we show that it is possible to evaluate the incident ion flux by measuring the sputtering rate when the plasma is densified using either an auxiliary hot cathode discharge or an additional magnetic field. These experimental cases correspond respectively to r.f. triode ion plating or r.f. magnetron sputtering.

  15. Facility for high-heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabau, Adrian S.; Ohriner, Evan K.; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C.; Snead, Lance L.; Schaich, Charles R.

    2014-04-01

    A new high-heat flux testing (HHFT) facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon plasma arc lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can accommodate irradiated plasma facing component materials and sub-size mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW m-2, which are prototypic of fusion steady state heat flux conditions, over a heated area of 9 × 12 and 1 × 10 cm2, respectively. The use of PAL permits the heat source to be environmentally separated from the components of the test chamber, simplifying the design to accommodate safe testing of low-level irradiated articles and materials under high-heat flux. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing of tungsten samples are presented and discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this photon-based HHFT facility are compared to existing e-beam and particle beam facilities used for similar purposes.

  16. Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S; Ohriner, Evan Keith; Kiggans, Jim; Harper, David C; Snead, Lance Lewis; Schaich, Charles Ross

    2014-01-01

    A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

  17. High heat flux testing of divertor plasma facing materials and components using the HHF test facility at IPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Yashashri; Khirwadkar, S. S.; Belsare, Sunil; Swamy, Rajamannar; Tripathi, Sudhir; Bhope, Kedar; Kanpara, Shailesh

    2016-02-01

    The High Heat Flux Test Facility (HHFTF) was designed and established recently at Institute for Plasma Research (IPR) in India for testing heat removal capability and operational life time of plasma facing materials and components of the ITER-like tokamak. The HHFTF is equipped with various diagnostics such as IR cameras and IR-pyrometers for surface temperature measurements, coolant water calorimetry for absorbed power measurements and thermocouples for bulk temperature measurements. The HHFTF is capable of simulating steady state heat load of several MW m-2 as well as short transient heat loads of MJ m-2. This paper presents the current status of the HHFTF at IPR and high heat flux tests performed on the curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups as well as transient heat flux tests carried out on pure tungsten materials using the HHFTF. Curved tungsten monoblock type of test mock-ups were fabricated using hot radial pressing (HRP) technique. Two curved tungsten monoblock type test mock-ups successfully sustained absorbed heat flux up to 14 MW m-2 with thermal cycles of 30 s ON and 30 s OFF duration. Transient high heat flux tests or thermal shock tests were carried out on pure tungsten hot-rolled plate material (Make:PLANSEE) with incident power density of 0.49 GW m-2 for 20 milliseconds ON and 1000 milliseconds OFF time. A total of 6000 thermal shock cycles were completed on pure tungsten material. Experimental results were compared with mathematical simulations carried out using COMSOL Multiphysics for transient high heat flux tests.

  18. Characteristics of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Source for the Production of Active Nitrogen Species in III-V Nitride Epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    A simple analysis is provided to determine the characteristics of an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma source for the generation of active nitrogen species in the molecular beam epitaxy of III-V nitrides. The effects of reactor geometry, pressure, power, and flow rate on the dissociation efficiency and ion flux are presented. Pulsing the input power is proposed to reduce the ion flux.

  19. Neutron Unfolding Code System for Calculating Neutron Flux Spectra from Activation Data of Dosimeter Foils.

    1982-04-30

    Version 00 As a part of the measurement and analysis plan for the Dosimetry Experiment at the "JOYO" experimental fast reactor, neutron flux spectral analysis is performed using the NEUPAC (Neutron Unfolding Code Package) code system. NEUPAC calculates the neutron flux spectra and other integral quantities from the activation data of the dosimeter foils.

  20. Effect of Li coatings on coarse-grained W exposed to high flux He plasmas at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Anton; Allain, Jean Paul; Morgan, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Tungsten is appealing as a plasma facing component (PFC) because of its high sputter threshold, high melting temperature, and good thermal conductivity. However, when exposed to He ions at low energy and high flux, like those in a tokamak divertor, the surface microstructure changes detrimentally, creating bubbles, holes, and fuzz. Recent studies show that adding impurities (C and Be) to the He plasma can inhibit the growth of fuzz. Additionally, lithium as a PFC coating in multiple tokamaks has improved plasma performance. We investigated the effect that a thin ~500 nm Li coating had on the formation of these surface defects in W. Samples were exposed in the linear plasma device Magnum PSI, at fluxes of ~1024 m-2 s-1 and Tsurf > 700& circ; C. After irradiation, the surface of the samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These results will be presented along with XPS and SIMS results investigating the survivability of the Li coating under these conditions. This work is supported by US DOE Contracts: DE-SC0010717 and DE-SC0010719.

  1. High heat-flux self-rotating plasma-facing component: Concept and loading test in TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, A.; Sergienko, G.; Hubeny, M.; Huber, A.; Mertens, Ph.; Philipps, V.

    2015-08-01

    This contribution reports on the concept of a circular self-rotating and temperature self-stabilising plasma-facing component (PFC), and test of a related prototype in TEXTOR tokamak. This PFC uses the Lorentz force induced by plasma current and magnet field (J × B) to create a torque applied on metallic discs which produce a rotational movement. Additional thermionic current, present at high operation temperatures, brings additional temperature stabilisation ability. This self-rotating disk limiter was exposed to plasma in the TEXTOR tokamak under different radial positions to vary the heat flux. This disk structure shows the interesting ability to stabilise its maximum temperature through the fact that the self-induced rotation is modulated by the thermal emission current. It was observed that the rotation speed increased following both the current collected by the limiter, and the temperature of the tungsten disks.

  2. Enzymatically active high-flux selectively gas-permeable membranes

    DOEpatents

    Jiang, Ying-Bing; Cecchi, Joseph L.; Rempe, Susan; FU, Yaqin; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2016-01-26

    An ultra-thin, catalyzed liquid transport medium-based membrane structure fabricated with a porous supporting substrate may be used for separating an object species such as a carbon dioxide object species. Carbon dioxide flux through this membrane structures may be several orders of magnitude higher than traditional polymer membranes with a high selectivity to carbon dioxide. Other gases such as molecular oxygen, molecular hydrogen, and other species including non-gaseous species, for example ionic materials, may be separated using variations to the membrane discussed.

  3. Microbial Activity and Volatile Fluxes in Seafloor Hydrothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrigan, R. S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding geographically and biologically the production or utilization of volatile chemical species such as CO2, CH4, and H2 is crucial not only for understanding hydrothermal processes but also for understanding life processes in the oceanic crust. To estimate the microbial effect on the transport of these volatiles, we consider a double-loop single pass model as shown in Figure 1 to estimate the mass fluxes shown. We then use a simple mixing formulation: C4Q4 = C3 (Q1 -Q3)+ C2Q2, where C2 is the concentration of the chemical in seawater, C3 is the average concentration of the chemical in high temperature focused flow, C4 is the expected concentration of the chemical as a result of mixing, and the relevant mass flows are as shown in Figure 1. Finally, we compare the calculated values of CO2, CH4, and H2 in diffuse flow fluids to those observed. The required data are available for both the Main Endeavour Field on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and the East Pacific Rise 9°50' N systems. In both cases we find that, although individual diffuse flow sites have observed concentrations of some elements that are greater than average, the average concentration of these volatiles is smaller in all cases than the concentration that would be expected from simple mixing. This indicates that subsurface microbes are net utilizers of these chemical constituents at the Main Endeavour Field and at EPR 9°50' N on the vent field scale. Figure 1. Schematic of a 'double-loop' single-pass model above a convecting, crystallizing, replenished AMC (not to scale). Heat transfer from the vigorously convecting, cooling, and replenished AMC across the conductive boundary layer δ drives the overlying hydrothermal system. The deep circulation represented by mass flux Q1 and black smoker temperature T3 induces shallow circulation noted by Q2. Some black smoker fluid mixes with seawater resulting in diffuse discharge Q4, T4, while the direct black smoker mass flux with temperature T3 is reduced

  4. AGE-DEPENDENT CHANGES IN ACTIVITY OF MALLARD PLASMA CHOLINESTERASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Plasma acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butrylcholinesterase (BChE) activity was measured repeatedly in 27 mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings between 7 and 85 days of age to determine age-dependent changes in enzyme activity. Plasma AChE, BChe, and total cholinesterase (ChE) a...

  5. Evidence from mathematical modeling that carbonic anhydrase II and IV enhance CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Boron, Walter F.

    2014-01-01

    Exposing an oocyte to CO2/HCO3− causes intracellular pH (pHi) to decline and extracellular-surface pH (pHS) to rise to a peak and decay. The two companion papers showed that oocytes injected with cytosolic carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) or expressing surface CA IV exhibit increased maximal rate of pHi change (dpHi/dt)max, increased maximal pHS changes (ΔpHS), and decreased time constants for pHi decline and pHS decay. Here we investigate these results using refinements of an earlier mathematical model of CO2 influx into a spherical cell. Refinements include 1) reduced cytosolic water content, 2) reduced cytosolic diffusion constants, 3) refined CA II activity, 4) layer of intracellular vesicles, 5) reduced membrane CO2 permeability, 6) microvilli, 7) refined CA IV activity, 8) a vitelline membrane, and 9) a new simulation protocol for delivering and removing the bulk extracellular CO2/HCO3− solution. We show how these features affect the simulated pHi and pHS transients and use the refined model with the experimental data for 1.5% CO2/10 mM HCO3− (pHo = 7.5) to find parameter values that approximate ΔpHS, the time to peak pHS, the time delay to the start of the pHi change, (dpHi/dt)max, and the change in steady-state pHi. We validate the revised model against data collected as we vary levels of CO2/HCO3− or of extracellular HEPES buffer. The model confirms the hypothesis that CA II and CA IV enhance transmembrane CO2 fluxes by maximizing CO2 gradients across the plasma membrane, and it predicts that the pH effects of simultaneously implementing intracellular and extracellular-surface CA are supra-additive. PMID:24965589

  6. Evidence from mathematical modeling that carbonic anhydrase II and IV enhance CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Occhipinti, Rossana; Musa-Aziz, Raif; Boron, Walter F

    2014-11-01

    Exposing an oocyte to CO2/HCO3 (-) causes intracellular pH (pHi) to decline and extracellular-surface pH (pHS) to rise to a peak and decay. The two companion papers showed that oocytes injected with cytosolic carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) or expressing surface CA IV exhibit increased maximal rate of pHi change (dpHi/dt)max, increased maximal pHS changes (ΔpHS), and decreased time constants for pHi decline and pHS decay. Here we investigate these results using refinements of an earlier mathematical model of CO2 influx into a spherical cell. Refinements include 1) reduced cytosolic water content, 2) reduced cytosolic diffusion constants, 3) refined CA II activity, 4) layer of intracellular vesicles, 5) reduced membrane CO2 permeability, 6) microvilli, 7) refined CA IV activity, 8) a vitelline membrane, and 9) a new simulation protocol for delivering and removing the bulk extracellular CO2/HCO3 (-) solution. We show how these features affect the simulated pHi and pHS transients and use the refined model with the experimental data for 1.5% CO2/10 mM HCO3 (-) (pHo = 7.5) to find parameter values that approximate ΔpHS, the time to peak pHS, the time delay to the start of the pHi change, (dpHi/dt)max, and the change in steady-state pHi. We validate the revised model against data collected as we vary levels of CO2/HCO3 (-) or of extracellular HEPES buffer. The model confirms the hypothesis that CA II and CA IV enhance transmembrane CO2 fluxes by maximizing CO2 gradients across the plasma membrane, and it predicts that the pH effects of simultaneously implementing intracellular and extracellular-surface CA are supra-additive. PMID:24965589

  7. NEW VACUUM SOLAR TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS OF A FLUX ROPE TRACKED BY A FILAMENT ACTIVATION

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Zhong; Xiang, Yongyuan E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2014-04-01

    One main goal of the New Vacuum Solar Telescope (NVST) which is located at the Fuxian Solar Observatory is to image the Sun at high resolution. Based on the high spatial and temporal resolution NVST Hα data and combined with the simultaneous observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory for the first time, we investigate a flux rope tracked by filament activation. The filament material is initially located at one end of the flux rope and fills in a section of the rope; the filament is then activated by magnetic field cancellation. The activated filament rises and flows along helical threads, tracking the twisted flux rope structure. The length of the flux rope is about 75 Mm, the average width of its individual threads is 1.11 Mm, and the estimated twist is 1π. The flux rope appears as a dark structure in Hα images, a partial dark and partial bright structure in 304 Å, and as a bright structure in 171 Å and 131 Å images. During this process, the overlying coronal loops are quite steady since the filament is confined within the flux rope and does not erupt successfully. It seems that, for the event in this study, the filament is located and confined within the flux rope threads, instead of being suspended in the dips of twisted magnetic flux.

  8. Demonstration of HNO3 Eddy Flux Measurements at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory Using Active Passivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscioli, J. R.; Herndon, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; Nelson, D. D.; Zaragoza, J.; Pollack, I. B.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Eddy flux measurements of "sticky" molecules have historically proven difficult due to strong interactions with instrument surfaces. A novel approach has been developed to improve these response times, enabling flux measurements of nitric acid (HNO3) and and ammonia (NH3). Deliberate addition of the vapor of perfluorinated acids and bases into a sample stream serves to eject existing surface-bound sample molecules and passivate instrument surfaces. HNO3 response times for an Aerodyne quantum cascade laser absorption spectrometer (QCLAS) improve by a factor of 60-fold when actively passivating. This approach was used during field measurements of HNO3 fluxes at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, where an actively passivated inertial inlet at 8 m height yielded HNO3 deposition fluxes of 0.5 - 2 nmol/m2/sec. The dependence of the deposition flux upon urban vs rural outflow is discussed.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Plasma Active Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baigang; Li, Feng; Zhang, Shanshan; Wang, Jingyu; Zhang, Lijuan; Zhao, Erlei

    2010-12-01

    Based on the theory of EHD (electronhydrodynamic), a simplified volume force model is applied to simulation to analyze the traits of plasma flow control in flow field, in which the cold plasma is generated by a DBD (dielectric-barrier-discharge) actuator. With the para-electric action of volume force in electric field, acceleration characteristics of the plasma flow are investigated for different excitation intensities of RF (radio frequency) power for the actuator. Furthermore, the plasma acceleration leads to an asymmetric distribution of flow field, and hence induces the deflection of jet plume, then results in a significant deflection angle of 6.26° thrust-vectoring effect. It appears that the plasma flow control technology is a new tentative method for the thrust-vectoring control of a space vehicle.

  10. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Kosuga, Y.

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  11. Testing of actively cooled high heat flux mock-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rödig, M.; Duwe, R.; Kühnlein, W.; Linke, J.; Scheerer, M.; Smid, I.; Wiechers, B.

    1998-10-01

    Several un-irradiated CFC monoblock mock-ups have been loaded in thermal fatigue tests up to 1000 cycles at power densities <25 MW/m 2. No indication of failure was observed for these loading conditions. Two of the mock-ups were inspected by ultra-sonic methods before thermal cycling. It could be proved that the voids found in the post-mortem metallography existed before and had no effect on the integrity of the mock-up. For the first time, neutron-irradiated CFC monoblock mock-ups have been tested in the electron beam facility JUDITH. These mock-ups had been irradiated before in the High Flux Reactor at Petten up to 0.3 dpa at 320°C and 770°C. All samples showed a significant increase of surface temperature, due to the irradiation induced decrease in thermal conductivity of the CFC materials.

  12. A low-level activation technique for monitoring thermonuclear fusion plasma conditions.

    PubMed

    Gasparro, Joël; Hult, Mikael; Bonheure, Georges; Johnston, Peter N

    2006-01-01

    Optimisation of the confinement and sustainability of a thermonuclear plasma requires methods to monitor processes in the plasma. In this work three materials were used as activation targets (Ti, MgF2 and a TiVAl compound). They were placed inside the joint European Torus (JET) vacuum chamber. Certain gamma-ray emitting radionuclides (7Be, 54Mn, 56Co, 57Co, 58Co and 46Sc) were measured using ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry in an underground laboratory 1-2 months after activation. They were found to arise from neutron activation of bulk sample material and surface contaminants sputtered from other Tokamak parts. Decision thresholds for some activation products were determined in order to aid in giving upper bounds for the flux of charged particles. PMID:16580838

  13. Ion Energy and Ion Flux Distributions of CF4/Ar/O2 Inductively Coupled Plasmas in a GEC Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Cruden, Brett; Sharma, Surendra; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    Knowledge of ion kinetics in plasma processing gas mixtures, such as CF4:Ar:O2, is important for understanding plasma assisted etching and deposition of materials. Ion energies and ion fluxes were measured in this mixture for 80:10:10, 60:20:20, and 40:30:30 mixture ratios in the pressure range of 10-50 mTorr, and at 200 and 300 W of RF power. Ions from plasma, sampled through a 10 micron orifice in the center of the lower plane electrode, were energy and mass analyzed by a combination of electrostatic energy and quadrupole mass filters. CFx(+) (x = 1 - 3), F2(+), F(+), C(+) from CF4, Ar(+) from Ar, and O2(+) and O(+) from O2, and by-product ions SiFx(+)(x = 1 - 3) from etching of quartz coupling window, COFx(+)(x = 1 - 3), CO(+), CO2(+), and OF(+) were detected. In all conditions ion flux decreases with increase of pressure but increase with increase of RF power. Ar(+) signal decreases with increase of pressure while CF3(+), which is the dominant ion at all conditions, increases with increase in pressure. The loss mechanism for Ar(+) and increase of CF3(+) is due to large cross section for Ar(+) + CF4 yields Ar + CF3(+) + F. Ion energies, which range from 15-25 eV depending on plasma operating conditions, are nearly Gaussian. By-product ion signals are higher at lower pressures indicating stronger plasma interaction with quartz window.

  14. On the origin of the MeV energy nucleon flux associated with CIRs. [plasma interaction regions corotating with sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of recurrent enhancements of interplanetary nucleon flux in the MeV energy range are presented and interpreted. The features recur at the solar rotation period in association with stream-stream plasma interaction regions corotating with the sun. At distances from the sun less than 1 AU, the maximum intensities of the hydrogen and helium components increase with increasing distance between 300%/AU and 600%/AU. A model is proposed which predicts the acceleration of nuclei from keV plasma energies to MeV energies by means of transit time damping of magnetosonic waves as solar wind plasma flows from the sun. Numerical solutions of the transport equation are derived to demonstrate that the model does not reproduce radial variations of hydrogen and helium fluxes, and estimates are made of the radial diffusive mean free path. Finally, the observations are found to be consistent with nucleon acceleration at the CIR shocks beyond 1 AU with subsequent diffusion toward the sun.

  15. Coupled interactions between tungsten surfaces and transient high-heat-flux deuterium plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, S.; Uesugi, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Fundamental studies on the interactions between transient deuterium-plasma heat pulses and tungsten surfaces were carried out in terms of electrical, mechanical and thermal response in a compact plasma device AIT-PID (Aichi Institute of Technology-Plasma Irradiation Device). Firstly, electron-emission-induced surface-temperature increase is discussed in the surface-temperature range near tungsten's melting point, which is accomplished by controlling the sheath voltage and power transmission factor. Secondly, anomalous penetration of tungsten atomic efflux into the surrounding plasma was observed in addition to a normal layered population; it is discussed in terms of the effect of substantial tungsten influx into the deuterium plasma, which causes dissipation of plasma electron energy. Thirdly, a momentum input from pulsed plasma onto a tungsten target was observed visually. The force is estimated numerically by the accelerated ion flow to the target as well as the reaction of tungsten-vapour efflux. Finally, a discussion follows on the effects of the plasma heat pulses on the morphology of tungsten surface (originally a helium-induced ‘fuzzy’ nanostructure). A kind of bifurcated effect is obtained: melting and annealing. Open questions remain for all the phenomena observed, although sheath-voltage-dependent plasma-heat input may be a key parameter. Discussions on all these phenomena are provided by considering their implications to tokamak fusion devices.

  16. Magnetic Flux Transport and the Long-term Evolution of Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Upton, Lisa; Warren, Harry P.; Hathaway, David H.

    2015-12-01

    With multiple vantage points around the Sun, Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) and Solar Dynamics Observatory imaging observations provide a unique opportunity to view the solar surface continuously. We use He ii 304 Å data from these observatories to isolate and track ten active regions and study their long-term evolution. We find that active regions typically follow a standard pattern of emergence over several days followed by a slower decay that is proportional in time to the peak intensity in the region. Since STEREO does not make direct observations of the magnetic field, we employ a flux-luminosity relationship to infer the total unsigned magnetic flux evolution. To investigate this magnetic flux decay over several rotations we use a surface flux transport model, the Advective Flux Transport model, that simulates convective flows using a time-varying velocity field and find that the model provides realistic predictions when information about the active region's magnetic field strength and distribution at peak flux is available. Finally, we illustrate how 304 Å images can be used as a proxy for magnetic flux measurements when magnetic field data is not accessible.

  17. Modulation of plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity differentially activates wound and pathogen defense responses in tomato plants.

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, A; Oecking, C

    1999-01-01

    Systemin is an important mediator of wound-induced defense gene activation in tomato plants, and it elicits a rapid alkalinization of the growth medium of cultured Lycopersicon peruvianum cells. A possible mechanistic link between proton fluxes across the plasma membrane and the induction of defense genes was investigated by modulating plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity. Inhibitors of H+-ATPase (erythrosin B, diethyl stilbestrol, and vanadate) were found to alkalinize the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and to induce wound response genes in whole tomato plants. Conversely, an activator of the H+-ATPase (fusicoccin) acidified the growth medium of L. peruvianum cell cultures and suppressed systemin-induced medium alkalinization. Likewise, in fusicoccin-treated tomato plants, the wound- and systemin-triggered accumulation of wound-responsive mRNAs was found to be suppressed. However, fusicoccin treatment of tomato plants led to the accumulation of salicylic acid and the expression of pathogenesis-related genes. Apparently, the wound and pathogen defense signaling pathways are differentially regulated by changes in the proton electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane. In addition, alkalinization of the L. peruvianum cell culture medium was found to depend on the influx of Ca2+ and the activity of a protein kinase. Reversible protein phosphorylation was also shown to be involved in the induction of wound response genes. The plasma membrane H+-ATPase as a possible target of a Ca2+-activated protein kinase and its role in defense signaling are discussed. PMID:9927643

  18. Ir Thermographic Measurements of Temperatures and Heat Fluxes in Hypersonic Plasma Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardone, G.; Tortora, G.; del Vecchio, A.

    2005-02-01

    The technological development achieved in instruments and methodology concerning both flights and ground hypersonic experiment (employed in space plane planning) goes towards an updating and a standardization of the heat flux technical measurements. In fact, the possibility to simulate high enthalpy flow relative to reentry condition by hypersonic arc-jet facility needs devoted methods to measure heat fluxes. Aim of this work is to develop an experimental numerical technique for the evaluation of heat fluxes over Thermal Protection System (TPS) by means of InfraRed (IR) thermographic temperature measurements and a new heat flux sensor (IR-HFS). We tackle the numerical validation of IR-HFS, apply the same one to the Hyflex nose cap model and compare the obtained results with others ones obtained by others methodology.

  19. An anisotropic character of nonlinear fluxes not involved in the plasma energy transport in the Hasegawa-Wakatani model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Byunghoon; An, Chan-Yong; Kim, Chang-Bae; Lee, Gun Bok

    2015-04-01

    Fluxes of both the vorticity and the plasma density due to the nonlinear E × B convective derivatives are divided into two parts. One part, which is almost isotropic, is well known to engage in the transfer of energies from the energy-producing scale where the phase mismatch between the density and the electric potential is large. The other part, in the Fourier space , is found to be highly anisotropic. If it is summed over k y , the result is nearly random around zero in k x while the sum over k x is approximately proportional to k y . In Fourier space, such anisotropic fluxes are found to be closely related to the gradients of the squares of the vorticity and the electric potential, respectively. We argue that the advecting velocities in Fourier space may be predicted on dimensional grounds.

  20. Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer on the spherical tokamak QUEST with inboard poloidal field null configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, Takumi; Zushi, Hideki; Mishra, Kishore; Hanada, Kazuaki; Idei, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kazuo; Fujisawa, Akihide; Nagashima, Yoshihiko; Hasegawa, Makoto; Kuzmin, Arseny; Nagaoka, Kenichi; QUEST Team

    2014-10-01

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape off layer (SOL) are examined in the inboard poloidal null (IPN) configuration on the spherical tokamak (ST) QUEST. In the ST, trapped energetic electrons on the low field side are widely excursed from the last closed flux surface to SOL so that significant heat loss occurs. Interestingly, plasma flows in the core and the SOL are also observed in IPN though no inductive force like ohmic heating is applied. High heat flux (>1 MW/m2) and sonic flow (M > 1) in far-SOL arise in current ramp-up phase. In quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of plasma current with 20 Hz has been observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in far-SOL are well correlated to plasma current oscillation. The toroidal Mach number largely increases from Mφ ~ 0.1 to ~ 0.5 and drops although the amplitude of plasma current is about 10% of that. Note that such flow modification occurs before plasma current crash, there may be some possibility that phenomena in the SOL or the edge trigger reactions in the core plasma. This work is supported by Grants-in-aid for Scientific Research (S24226020), NIFS Collaboration Research Program (NIFS12KUTR081), and the Collaborative Research Program of Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University.

  1. Ion flux onto conducting and isolated surfaces in the beam-plasma discharge: Computer simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Klykov, I. L.; Shustin, E. G.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2010-12-15

    A physical model which allows the use of the program code KARAT for simulating the quasisteady state of the beam-plasma discharge with plasma regeneration from a neutral gas is developed. The results of simulation of the modes of discharge at different potentials at the discharge collector are reported. The results obtained for isolated and grounded ion collectors are compared.

  2. Ion flux onto conducting and isolated surfaces in the beam-plasma discharge: Computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klykov, I. L.; Shustin, E. G.; Tarakanov, V. P.

    2010-12-01

    A physical model which allows the use of the program code KARAT for simulating the quasisteady state of the beam-plasma discharge with plasma regeneration from a neutral gas is developed. The results of simulation of the modes of discharge at different potentials at the discharge collector are reported. The results obtained for isolated and grounded ion collectors are compared.

  3. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatible with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.

  4. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatiblemore » with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-ε turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.« less

  5. Comparison of Plasma Activation of Thin Water Layers by Direct and Remote Plasma Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushner, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Plasma activation of liquids is now being investigated for a variety of biomedical applications. The plasma sources used for this activation can be generally classified as direct (the plasma is in contact with the surface of the liquid) or remote (the plasma does not directly touch the liquid). The direct plasma source may be a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) where the surface of the liquid is a floating electrode or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave forming the plasma plume reaches the liquid. The remote plasma source may be a DBD with electrodes electrically isolated from the liquid or a plasma jet in which the ionization wave in the plume does not reach the liquid. In this paper, a comparison of activation of thin water layers on top of tissue, as might be encountered in wound healing, will be discussed using results from numerical investigations. We used the modeling platform nonPDPSIM to simulate direct plasma activation of thin water layers using DBDs and remote activation using plasma jets using up to hundreds of pulses. The DBDs are sustained in humid air while the plasma jets consist of He/O2 mixtures flowed into humid air. For similar number of pulses and energy deposition, the direct DBD plasma sources produce more acidification and higher production of nitrates/nitrites in the liquid. This is due to the accumulation of NxOy plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with newly produced reactive species. in the gas phase. In the plasma jets, the convective flow removes many of these species prior to their diffusing into the water or reacting to form higher nitrogen oxides. This latter effect is sensitive to the repetition rate which determines whether reactive species formed during prior pulses overlap with

  6. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  7. Magnetic Flux Concentrations in Stratified Turbulent Plasma Due to Negative Effective Magnetic Pressure Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jabbari, Sarah

    2015-08-01

    We study a system of a highly stratified turbulent plasma. In such a system, when the magnetic Reynolds number is large enough and there is a background field of suitable strength, a new effect will play role in con- centrating magnetic fields such that it leads to the formation of magnetic spots and bipolar regions. This effect is due to the fact that the turbu- lent pressure is suppressed by the large-scale magnetic field, which adds a negative term to the total mean-field (effective) pressure. This leads to an instability, which is known as the negative effective magnetic pressure instability (NEMPI). Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of isothermally forced turbulence have shown that NEMPI leads to the formation of spots in the presence of an imposed field. Our main aim now is to use NEMPI to explain the formation of active regions and sunspots. To achieve this goal, we need to move progressively to more realistic models. Here we extend our model by allowing the magnetic field to be generated by a dy- namo. A dynamo plays an important role in solar activity. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate NEMPI in the presence of dynamo-generated magnetic fields. Mean-field simulations (MFS) of such systems in spheri- cal geometry have shown how these two instabilities work in concert. In fact NEMPI will be activated as long as the strength of the magnetic field generated by the dynamo is in a proper range (for more detail see Jab- bari et al. 2013). In our new study, we use DNS to investigate a similar system. The turbulence is forced in the entire spherical shell, but the forc- ing is made helical in the lower 30% of the shell, similar to the model of Mitra et al. (2014). We perform simulations using the Pencil Code for different density contrasts and other input parameters. We applied ver- tical field boundary conditions in the r direction. The results show that, when the stratification is high enough, intense bipolar regions form and as time passes, they expand

  8. Biological Studies in Childhood Schizophrenia: Plasma and RBC Cholinesterase Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, Alexander R.; And Others

    1971-01-01

    A comparison of plasma (pseudo) cholinesterase and erythrocyte (true) cholinesterase activity in 16 male childhood schizophrenic patients and 16 male nonpsychotic hospitalized controls revealed no significant differences between the two groups. (Author)

  9. Flux rope proxies and fan-spine structures in active region NOAA 11897

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Y. J.; Li, T.; Zhang, J.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Flux ropes are composed of twisted magnetic fields and are closely connected with coronal mass ejections. The fan-spine magnetic topology is another type of complex magnetic fields. It has been reported by several authors, and is believed to be associated with null-point-type magnetic reconnection. Aims: We try to determine the number of flux rope proxies and reveal fan-spine structures in the complex active region (AR) NOAA 11897. Methods: Employing the high-resolution observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we statistically investigated flux rope proxies in NOAA AR 11897 from 14 November 2013 to 19 November 2013 and display two fan-spine structures in this AR. Results: For the first time, we detect flux rope proxies of NOAA 11897 for a total of 30 times in four different locations during this AR's transference from solar east to west on the disk. Moreover, we notice that these flux rope proxies were tracked by active or eruptive material of filaments 12 times, while for the remaining 18 times they appeared as brightenings in the corona. These flux rope proxies were either tracked in both lower and higher temperature wavelengths or only detected in hot channels. None of these flux rope proxies was observed to erupt; they faded away gradually. In addition to these flux rope proxies, we detect for the first time a secondary fan-spine structure. It was covered by dome-shaped magnetic fields that belong to a larger fan-spine topology. Conclusions: These new observations imply that many flux ropes can exist in an AR and that the complexity of AR magnetic configurations is far beyond our imagination. Movies 1-8 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Filament Activation in Response to Magnetic Flux Emergence and Cancellation in Filament Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Haisheng

    2015-06-01

    We conducted a comparative analysis of two filaments that showed a quite different activation in response to the flux emergence within the filament channels. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) were made to analyze the two filaments on 2013 August 17 - 20 (SOL2013-08-17) and September 29 (SOL2013-09-29). The first event showed that the main body of the filament was separated into two parts when an active region (AR) emerged with a maximum magnetic flux of about 6.4×1021 Mx underlying the filament. The close neighborhood and common direction of the bright threads in the filament and the open AR fan loops suggest a similar magnetic connectivity of these two flux systems. The equilibrium of the filament was not destroyed three days after the start of the emergence of the AR. To our knowledge, similar observations have never been reported before. In the second event, the emerging flux occurred nearby a barb of the filament with a maximum magnetic flux of 4.2×1020 Mx, about one order of magnitude lower than that of the first event. Two patches of parasitic polarity in the vicinity of the barb merged, then cancelled with nearby network fields. About 20 hours after the onset of the emergence, the filament erupted. Our findings imply that the location of emerging flux within the filament channel is probably crucial to filament evolution. If the flux emergence appears nearby the barbs, it is highly likely that the emerging flux and the filament magnetic fields will cancel, which may lead to the eruption of the filament. The comparison of the two events shows that the emergence of a small AR may still not be enough to disrupt the stability of a filament system, and the actual eruption only occurs after the flux cancellation sets in.

  11. Parallel heat flux and flow acceleration in open field line plasmas with magnetic trapping

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu; McDevitt, Chris

    2014-10-15

    The magnetic field strength modulation in a tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) provides both flux expansion next to the divertor plates and magnetic trapping in a large portion of the SOL. Previously, we have focused on a flux expander with long mean-free-path, motivated by the high temperature and low density edge anticipated for an absorbing boundary enabled by liquid lithium surfaces. Here, the effects of magnetic trapping and a marginal collisionality on parallel heat flux and parallel flow acceleration are examined. The various transport mechanisms are captured by kinetic simulations in a simple but representative mirror-expander geometry. The observed parallel flow acceleration is interpreted and elucidated with a modified Chew-Goldberger-Low model that retains temperature anisotropy and finite collisionality.

  12. Plasma wall sheath contributions to flux retention during the formation of field-reversed configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, R. D.; Slough, J. T.; Hoffman, A. L.

    1984-06-01

    Flux loss during field reversal on the TRX-1 field-reversed θ pinch is found to be much less than predicted by the inertial model of Green and Newton. This can be explained by a pressure bearing, conducting sheath which naturally forms at the wall and limits the flux loss. A one-dimensional (r-t) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) numerical model has been used to study the formation and effectiveness of the sheath. The calculations are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements over a wide range of operating parameters. The results indicate that good flux trapping can be achieved through the field reversal phase of FRC formation with much slower external field reversal rates than in current experiments.

  13. Identities in flux: cognitive network activation in times of change.

    PubMed

    Menon, Tanya; Smith, Edward Bishop

    2014-05-01

    Using a dynamic cognitive model, we experimentally test two competing hypotheses that link identity and cognitive network activation during times of change. On one hand, affirming people's sense of power might give them confidence to think beyond the densest subsections of their social networks. Alternatively, if such power affirmations conflict with people's more stable status characteristics, this could create tension, deterring people from considering their networks' diversity. We test these competing hypotheses experimentally by priming people at varying levels of status with power (high/low) and asking them to report their social networks. We show that confirming identity-not affirming power-cognitively prepares people to broaden their social networks when the world is changing around them. The emotional signature of having a confirmed identity is feeling comfortable and in control, which mediates network activation. We suggest that stable, confirmed identities are the foundation from which people can exhibit greater network responsiveness. PMID:24576631

  14. Ion flux onto a nonconducting surface in a beam-plasma discharge: Simulation and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kurnaev, V. A.; Peskov, V. V.; Chmil', A. I.; Shustin, E. G.

    2010-12-15

    Computer simulations of a plasma sheath formed near a nonconducting surface in a beamplasma discharge (BPD) at a low magnetic field in the reactor chamber are performed. The results of computer simulations are compared with experimental data. The optimal mode of GaAs etching in a BPD-based plasma processing reactor is chosen using results of computer simulations. Simulations for carbon (DLC) film sputtering modes in the framework of a similar model are also performed.

  15. Improved thrust calculations of active magnetic bearings considering fringing flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Seok-Myeong; Kim, Kwan-Ho; Ko, Kyoung-Jin; Choi, Ji-Hwan; Sung, So-Young; Lee, Yong-Bok

    2012-04-01

    A methodology for deriving fringing permeance in axisymmetric devices such as active thrust magnetic bearings (ATMBs) is presented. The methodology is used to develop an improved equivalent magnetic circuit (EMC) for ATMBs, which considers the fringing effect. This EMC was used to characterize the force between the housing and mover and the dependence of thrust and inductance on the air gap and input current, respectively. These characteristics were validated by comparison with those obtained by the finite element method and in experiments.

  16. Neutron Flux Spectra Determination by Multiple Foil Activation - Iterative Method.

    1994-07-08

    Version 00 Neutron energy spectra are determined by an analysis of experimental activation detector data. As with the original CCC-112/SAND-II program, which was developed at Air Force Weapons Laboratory, this code system consists of four modules, CSTAPE, SLACTS, SLATPE, and SANDII. The first three modules pre-process the dosimetry cross sections and the trial function spectrum library. The last module, SANDII, actually performs the iterative spectrum characterization.

  17. Flux amplification and sustainment of ST plasmas by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection on HIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashi, T.; Ishihara, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The Helicity Injected Spherical Torus (HIST) device has been developed towards high-current start up and sustainment by Multi-pulsed Coaxial Helicity Injection (M-CHI) method. Multiple pulses operation of the coaxial plasma gun can build the magnetic field of STs and spheromak plasmas in a stepwise manner. So far, successive gun pulses on SSPX at LLNL were demonstrated to maintain the magnetic field of spheromak in a quasi-steady state against resistive decay [1]. The resistive 3D-MHD numerical simulation [2] for STs reproduced the current amplification by the M-CHI method and confirmed that stochastic magnetic field was reduced during the decay phase. By double pulsed operation on HIST, the plasma current was effectively amplified against the resistive decay. The life time increases up to 10 ms which is longer than that in the single CHI case (4 ms). The edge poloidal fields last between 0.5 ms and 6 ms like a repetitive manner. During the second driven phase, the toroidal ion flow is driven in the same direction as the plasma current as well as in the initial driven phase. At the meeting, we will discuss a current amplification mechanism based on the merging process with the plasmoid injected secondly from the gun. [1] B. Hudson et al., Phys. Plasmas Vol.15, 056112 (2008). [2] Y. Kagei et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. Vol.79, 217 (2003).

  18. Plasma and magnetospheric research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, R. H.; Horwitz, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Research activities on the following topics were summarized: (1) software for the Space Plasma computer Analysis Network (SPAN), (2) plasmaspheric field-aligned temperature gradients, (3) the shift in spacecraft potential as a function of plasma density, (4) plasma flow, (5) the Fabry-Perot interferometer, and (6) the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP).

  19. ISS Plasma Contactor Units Operations During Strong Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alred, J.; Mikatarian, R.; Barsamian, H.; Minow, J.; Koontz, S.

    2003-12-01

    The large structure and high voltage arrays of the ISS represent a complex system that interacts with the Earth's ionosphere. To mitigate spacecraft charging problems on the ISS, two Plasma Contactor Units discharge ionized xenon gas to "clamp" the potential of the ISS with respect to the low Earth orbit plasma. The Plasma Interaction Model, a model of ISS plasma interaction developed from the basic physics of the interaction phenomena, includes magnetic induction effects, plasma temperature and density effects, interaction of the high voltage solar arrays with ionospheric plasma, and accounts for other conductive areas on the ISS. To augment this model, the PCU discharge current has been monitored for the ISS in a variety of flight attitudes as well as during the annual seasons. A review of the PCU discharge currents shows a correlation to the geomagnetic activity. The variation in the PCU discharge current during strong geomagnetic activity will be presented. Also, the PCU discharge currents during periods of low geomagnetic activity will be discussed. The presentation will conclude with a comparison of satellite plasma measurements during different stages of geomagnetic activity.

  20. ACTIVE: a program to calculate and plot reaction rates from ANISN calculated fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, J.L.

    1981-12-01

    The ACTIVE code calculates spatial heating rates, tritium production rates, neutron reaction rates, and energy spectra from particle fluxes calculated by ANISN. ACTIVE has a variety of input options including the capability to plot all calculated spatial distributions. The code was primarily designed for use with fusion first wall/blanket systems, but could be applied to any one-dimensional problem.

  1. Decrease in T Cell Activation and Calcium Flux during Clinorotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence; Holtzclaw, J. David

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effect of altered gravitational environments on T cell activation. We isolated human, naive T cells (CD3+CD14-CD19-CD16-CD56-CD25-CD69-CD45RA-) following IRB approved protocols. These purified T cells were then incubated with 6 mm polystyrene beads coated with OKT3 (Ortho Biotech, Raritan, NJ) and antiCD28 (Becton Dickinson (BD), San Jose, CA) at 37 C for 24 hours. Antibodies were at a 1:1 ratio and the bead-to-cell ratio was 2:1. Four incubation conditions existed: 1) static or "1g"; 2) centrifugation at 10 relative centrifugal force (RCF) or "10g"; 3) clinorotation at 25 RPM (functional weightlessness or "0g"); and 4) clinorotation at 80 RPM ("1g" plus net shear force approx.30 dynes/sq cm). Following incubation, T cells were stained for CD25 expression (BD) and intracellular calcium (ratio of Fluo4 to Fura Red, Molecular Probes, Eugene, OR) and analyzed by flow cytometry (Coulter EPICS XL, Miami, FL). Results: Static or "1g" T cells had the highest level of CD25 expression and intracellular calcium. T cells centrifuged at 10 RCF ("10g") had lower CD25 expression and calcium levels compared to the static control. However, cells centrifuged at 10 RCF had higher CD25 expression and calcium levels than those exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation ("0g"). T cells exposed to 24 RPM clinorotation had lower CD25 expression, but the approximately the same calcium levels than T cells exposed to 80 RPM clinorotation. These data suggest that stress-activated calcium channel exist in T cells and may play a role during T cell activation.

  2. Heat-flux footprints for I-mode and EDA H-mode plasmas on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, J. L.; LaBombard, B.; Brunner, D.; Hughes, J. W.; Reinke, M. L.; Whyte, D. G.

    2013-07-01

    IR thermography is used to measure the heat flux footprints on C-Mod's outer target in I-mode and EDA H-mode plasmas. The footprint profiles are fit to a function with a simple physical interpretation. The fit parameter that is sensitive to the power decay length into the SOL, λSOL, is ˜1-3× larger in I-modes than in H-modes at similar plasma current, which is the dominant dependence for the H-mode λSOL. In contrast, the fit parameter sensitive to transport into the private-flux-zone along the divertor leg is somewhat smaller in I-mode than in H-mode, but otherwise displays no obvious dependence on Ip, Bt, or stored energy. A third measure of the footprint width, the "integral width", is not significantly different between H- and I-modes. Also discussed are significant differences in the global power flows of the H-modes with "favorable"∇B drift direction and those of the I-modes with "unfavorable"∇B drift direction.

  3. Plasma cathepsin D isoforms and their active metabolites increase after myocardial infarction and contribute to plasma renin activity.

    PubMed

    Naseem, R Haris; Hedegard, Wade; Henry, Timothy D; Lessard, Jennifer; Sutter, Kathryn; Katz, Stephen A

    2005-03-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) is often found to increase after myocardial infarction (MI). Elevated PRA may contribute to increased myocardial angiotensin II that is responsible for maladaptive remodeling of the myocardium after MI. We hypothesized that MI would also result in cardiac release of cathepsin D, a ubiquitous lysosomal enzyme with high renin sequence homology. Cathepsin D release from damaged myocardial tissue could contribute to angiotensin formation by acting as an enzymatic alternate to renin. We assessed circulating renin and cathepsin D from both control and MI patient plasma (7-20 hours after MI) using shallow gradient focusing that allowed for independent measurement of both enzymes. Cathepsin D was increased significantly in the plasma after MI (P < 0.001). Furthermore, circulating active cathepsin D metabolites were also significantly elevated after MI (P < 0.04), and contained the majority of cathepsin D activity in plasma. Spiking control plasma with cathepsin D resulted in a variable but significant (P = 0.005) increase in PRA using a clinical assay. We conclude that 7-20 hours after MI, plasma cathepsin D is significantly elevated and most of the active enzymatic activity is circulating as plasma metabolites. Circulating cathepsin D can falsely increase clinical PRA determinations, and may also provide an alternative angiotensin formation pathway after MI. PMID:15739123

  4. Active plasma resonance spectroscopy: eigenfunction solutions in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberrath, J.; Brinkmann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    The term active plasma resonance spectroscopy denotes a class of related techniques which utilize, for diagnostic purposes, the natural ability of plasmas to resonate on or near the electron plasma frequency ωpe: a radio frequent signal (in the GHz range) is coupled into the plasma via an antenna or probe, the spectral response is recorded, and a mathematical model is used to determine plasma parameters like the electron density. The mathematical model of an arbitrarily shaped probe-plasma system can be written in an abstract but very compact equation. It contains an appropriate operator, which describes the dynamical behavior and can be split into a conservative and a dissipative part. Based on the cold plasma model, this manuscript provides a solution strategy to determine the electrical admittance of a specific probe-plasma system derived from the abstract dynamical equation. Focusing on probes with a spherical-shaped probe tip the general admittance can be derived analytically. Therefore, the matrix representation of the resolvent of the dynamical operator is determined. This matrix representation is derived by means of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues of the conservative operator. It can be shown that these eigenvalues represent the resonance frequencies of the probe-plasma system which are simply connected to the electron density. As an example, the result is applied to established probe designs: the spherical impedance probe and the multipole resonance probe.

  5. In-situ observations of flux ropes formed in association with a pair of spiral nulls in magnetotail plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ruilong; Pu, Zuyin; Chen, Li-Jen; Fu, Suiyan; Xie, Lun; Wang, Xiaogang; Dunlop, Malcolm; Bogdanova, Yulia V.; Yao, Zhonghua; Xiao, Chijie; He, Jiansen; Fazakerley, Andrew N.

    2016-05-01

    Signatures of secondary islands are frequently observed in the magnetic reconnection regions of magnetotail plasmas. In this paper, magnetic structures with the secondary-island signatures observed by Cluster are reassembled by a fitting-reconstruction method. The results show three-dimensionally that a secondary island event can manifest the flux rope formed with an As-type null and a Bs-type null paired via their spines. We call this As-spine-Bs-like configuration the helically wrapped spine model. The reconstructed field lines wrap around the spine to form the flux rope, and an O-type topology is therefore seen on the plane perpendicular to the spine. Magnetized electrons are found to rotate on and cross the fan surface, suggesting that both the torsional-spine and the spine-fan reconnection take place in the configuration. Furthermore, detailed analysis implies that the spiral nulls and flux ropes were locally generated nearby the spacecraft in the reconnection outflow region, indicating that secondary reconnection may occur in the exhaust away from the primary reconnection site.

  6. Solar Activity and GCR Particle Flux Variations: Assessment and Modeling with Ulysses and ACE/CRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saganti, Premkumar

    Galactic Cosmic Ray (GCR) environment during the current and historically known lower solar minimum condition indicate some of the very high anticipated measurements of particle spectral data. Data from the Ulysses spacecraft in the polar orbit about the sun during the years 2004 and 2008 (about 5 AU) provided proton and alpha particle flux data and showed such anticipated high particle flux variations. Also, ACE/CRIS spacecraft data during the years 2007 and 2009 showed some of the high particle flux measurements of several heavy ions such as oxygen and iron. We present Ulysses and ACE/CRIS measured particle flux data and discuss their high density and variations in the context of the current low solar activity for depicting current space radiation environment.

  7. Modeling of Particle Transport on Channels and Gaps Exposed to Plasma Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto-Pérez, Martin

    2008-04-01

    Many problems in particle transport in fusion devices involve the transport of plasma or eroded particles through channels or gaps, such as in the case of trying to assess damage to delicate optical diagnostics collecting light through a slit or determining the deposition and codeposition on the gaps between tiles of plasma-facing components. A dynamic-composition Monte Carlo code in the spirit of TRIDYN, previously developed to study composition changes on optical mirrors subject to ion bombardment, has been upgraded to include motion of particles through a volume defined by sets of plane surfaces. Particles sputtered or reflected from the walls of the channel/gap can be tracked as well, allowing the calculation of wall impurity transport, either back to the plasma (for the case of a gap) or to components separated from the plasma by a channel/slit (for the case of optical diagnostics). Two examples of the code application to particle transport in fusion devices will be presented in this work: one will evaluate the erosion/impurity deposition rate on a mirror separated from a plasma source by a slit; the other case will look at the enhanced emission of tile material in the region of the gap between two tiles.

  8. Structure of interplanetary fluxes based on plasma and magnetic field measurements by Prognoz-6 satellite on 25-26 November 1977

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeroshenko, Ye. G.; Ivanov, K. G.; Verigin, M. I.; Kotova, G. A.; Styazhkin, V. A.

    1989-01-01

    Two fluxes from a flare and a coronal hole on 25 to 26 November 1977 were observed aboard the Prognoz-6 satellite. A comparative analysis is presented of the magnetic and plasma data based on these observations and observations of other Soviet and American spacecraft which were located at that time near a line between the Sun and the Earth. The Prognoz-6 data recored disturbances in the magnetic field and plasma near the Earth during passage of the isolated flare flux and the quasisteady flux from the coronal hole. A perpendicular to the head of the shock wave of the flare flux was found. The magnetic cloud from the flare was measured over a period of 19 hours as an area of relatively strong field, sparse plasma with near regular variations of all B components. The normal and inner structure of the magnetic cloud magnetopause were measured. More than 10 intersections with the leading edge of the magnetospheric shock wave were recorded while the geomagnetosphere was within the magnetic cloud, indicating an increase in the cross section of the transient area as the magnetosphere and cloud interacted. The boundary of the quasisteady flux was identified and had almost the same changes in plasma and magnetic field parameters as the flare flux boundary.

  9. Lipid-induced NOX2 activation inhibits autophagic flux by impairing lysosomal enzyme activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Jaishy, Bharat; Zhang, Quanjiang; Chung, Heaseung S.; Riehle, Christian; Soto, Jamie; Jenkins, Stephen; Abel, Patrick; Cowart, L. Ashley; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Abel, E. Dale

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a catabolic process involved in maintaining energy and organelle homeostasis. The relationship between obesity and the regulation of autophagy is cell type specific. Despite adverse consequences of obesity on cardiac structure and function, the contribution of altered cardiac autophagy in response to fatty acid overload is incompletely understood. Here, we report the suppression of autophagosome clearance and the activation of NADPH oxidase (Nox)2 in both high fat-fed murine hearts and palmitate-treated H9C2 cardiomyocytes (CMs). Defective autophagosome clearance is secondary to superoxide-dependent impairment of lysosomal acidification and enzyme activity in palmitate-treated CMs. Inhibition of Nox2 prevented superoxide overproduction, restored lysosome acidification and enzyme activity, and reduced autophagosome accumulation in palmitate-treated CMs. Palmitate-induced Nox2 activation was dependent on the activation of classical protein kinase Cs (PKCs), specifically PKCβII. These findings reveal a novel mechanism linking lipotoxicity with a PKCβ-Nox2-mediated impairment in pH-dependent lysosomal enzyme activity that diminishes autophagic turnover in CMs. PMID:25529920

  10. Core plasma behavior during sawtooth activities in highly-elongated ohmic/ECH tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junghee; Lee, Seung Hun; Turri, G.; Weisen, H.; Choe, W.

    2008-11-01

    MHD instabilities arising from the combination of pressure and current profiles can deform the core plasma shape. The sawtoothing highly-elongated plasma shows various topological behaviors inside the q=1 surface. The irreversible topology-breaking of the core plasma occurs distinctively in highly-elongated ohmic plasma. On the contrary, the topological change does not occur in the ECH plasma under the same shaping factors because the increased conductivity results in the change of the current profile and thus affecting the Mercier criterion. In addition, the topology-breaking depends on the heating position. The ECH on the off-axis or the q=1 surface preserves the core topology during the crash. However, the intense on-axis ECH can change the core topology, which is reversible. The explanation for these activities is given by topological categorization and the stability analyses of the kink mode with pressure and current profiles.

  11. Heat flux and crustal radio-activity near the Sudbury neutrino observatory, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, J.; Perry, C.; Jaupart, C.

    2009-05-01

    During its next phase, the Sudbury neutrino observatory (SNO) will detect geoneutrinos, antineutrinos produced by the decay of U and Th in the Earth. These observations will provide direct constraints on the contribution of radiogenic heat production in the crust and mantle to the energy budget of the Earth. The geoneutrino flux at SNO depends on the local level of crustal radio-activity. Surface heat flux data record average crustal radio-activity unaffected by small scale heterogeneities. We review all available heat flux data measurements in the Sudbury structure as well as measurements of U, Th, and K concentrations in the main geological units of the area. With all available data, the average heat flux in the Sudbury basin is ~53mW m-2, higher than the mean value of 42mW m-2 for the entire Canadian Shield. The elevated heat flux is due to high heat production in the shallow crust. We estimate that the average heat production of the upper crust near Sudbury is >1.5μ W m-3 compared to an average of 0.95μ W m-3 for the Superior Province. The high crustal radio-activity near Sudbury results in an about 50% increase of the local crustal component of the geoneutrino flux. Crustal radio-activity is highest in the southern part of the structure, near the Creighton mine where SNO is located. High heat flux and heat production values are also found in the Southern Province, on the margin of the Superior Province. An azimuthal variation in the geoneutrino flux with a higher flux from the south than from the north is expected on the basis on the present information. However, we shall need better estimates of the contribution of the rocks in the Superior Province to the North to assess the extent of azimuthal effects. The many available exploration drill holes and core samples provide an opportunity to determine the spatial variations in crustal radioactivity near SNO and improve the interpretation of future measurements of the geoneutrino flux.

  12. Calculation of low-Z impurity pellet induced fluxes of charge exchange neutral particles escaping from magnetically confined toroidal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Goncharov, P R; Ozaki, T; Sudo, S; Tamura, N; Tolstikhina, I Yu; Sergeev, V Yu

    2008-10-01

    Measurements of energy- and time-resolved neutral hydrogen and helium fluxes from an impurity pellet ablation cloud, referred to as pellet charge exchange or PCX experiments, can be used to study local fast ion energy distributions in fusion plasmas. The estimation of the local distribution function f(i)(E) of fast ions entering the cloud requires knowledge of both the fraction F(0)(E) of incident ions exiting the cloud as neutral atoms and the attenuation factor A(E,rho) describing the loss of fast atoms in the plasma. Determination of A(E,rho), in turn, requires the total stopping cross section sigma(loss) of neutral atoms in the plasma and the Jacobian reflecting the measurement geometry and the magnetic surface shape. The obtained functions F(0)(E) and A(E,rho) enter multiplicatively into the probability density for escaping neutral particle kinetic energy. A general calculation scheme has been developed and realized as a FORTRAN code, which is to be applied for the calculation of f(i)(E) from PCX experimental results obtained with low-Z impurity pellets. PMID:19044625

  13. Development of high flux thermal neutron generator for neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vainionpaa, Jaakko H.; Chen, Allan X.; Piestrup, Melvin A.; Gary, Charles K.; Jones, Glenn; Pantell, Richard H.

    2015-05-01

    The new model DD110MB neutron generator from Adelphi Technology produces thermal (<0.5 eV) neutron flux that is normally achieved in a nuclear reactor or larger accelerator based systems. Thermal neutron fluxes of 3-5 · 107 n/cm2/s are measured. This flux is achieved using four ion beams arranged concentrically around a target chamber containing a compact moderator with a central sample cylinder. Fast neutron yield of ∼2 · 1010 n/s is created at the titanium surface of the target chamber. The thickness and material of the moderator is selected to maximize the thermal neutron flux at the center. The 2.5 MeV neutrons are quickly thermalized to energies below 0.5 eV and concentrated at the sample cylinder. The maximum flux of thermal neutrons at the target is achieved when approximately half of the neutrons at the sample area are thermalized. In this paper we present simulation results used to characterize performance of the neutron generator. The neutron flux can be used for neutron activation analysis (NAA) prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) for determining the concentrations of elements in many materials. Another envisioned use of the generator is production of radioactive isotopes. DD110MB is small enough for modest-sized laboratories and universities. Compared to nuclear reactors the DD110MB produces comparable thermal flux but provides reduced administrative and safety requirements and it can be run in pulsed mode, which is beneficial in many neutron activation techniques.

  14. Ertel's vorticity theorem and new flux surfaces in multi-fluid plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hameiri, Eliezer

    2013-09-15

    Dedicated to Professor Harold Weitzner on the occasion of his retirement“Say to wisdom ‘you are my sister,’ and to insight ‘you are my relative.’”—Proverbs 7:4Based on an extension to plasmas of Ertel's classical vorticity theorem in fluid dynamics, it is shown that for each species in a multi-fluid plasma there can be constructed a set of nested surfaces that have this species' fluid particles confined within them. Variational formulations for the plasma evolution and its equilibrium states are developed, based on the new surfaces and all of the dynamical conservation laws associated with them. It is shown that in the general equilibrium case, the energy principle lacks a minimum and cannot be used as a stability criterion. A limit of the variational integral yields the two-fluid Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model. A further special limit yields MHD equilibria and can be used to approximate the equilibrium state of a Hall-MHD plasma in a perturbative way.

  15. Phenylbutyrate reduces plasma leucine concentrations without affecting the flux of leucine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylbutyrate (PB) has been used as an alternative pathway to excrete nitrogen in urea cycle disorder patients for the last 20 years. PB, after oxidation to phenylacetate, is conjugated with glutamine and excreted in the urine. A reduction in the plasma concentration of branched amino acids (BCAA) ...

  16. Advanced Thomson scattering system for high-flux linear plasma generator

    SciTech Connect

    Meiden, H. J. van der; Lof, A. R.; Berg, M. A. van den; Brons, S.; Eck, H. J. N. van; Koelman, P. M. J.; Koppers, W. R.; Kruijt, O. G.; Oyevaar, T.; Prins, P. R.; Rapp, J.; Scholten, J.; Smeets, P. H. M.; Star, G. van der; Zeijlmans van Emmichoven, P. A.; Donne, A. J. H.; Schram, D. C.; Naumenko, N. N.; Tugarinov, S. N.

    2012-12-15

    An advanced Thomson scattering system has been built for a linear plasma generator for plasma surface interaction studies. The Thomson scattering system is based on a Nd:YAG laser operating at the second harmonic and a detection branch featuring a high etendue (f /3) transmission grating spectrometer equipped with an intensified charged coupled device camera. The system is able to measure electron density (n{sub e}) and temperature (T{sub e}) profiles close to the output of the plasma source and, at a distance of 1.25 m, just in front of a target. The detection system enables to measure 50 spatial channels of about 2 mm each, along a laser chord of 95 mm. By summing a total of 30 laser pulses (0.6 J, 10 Hz), an observational error of 3% in n{sub e} and 6% in T{sub e} (at n{sub e}= 9.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} m{sup -3}) can be obtained. Single pulse Thomson scattering measurements can be performed with the same accuracy for n{sub e} > 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. The minimum measurable density and temperature are n{sub e} < 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} m{sup -3} and T{sub e} < 0.07 eV, respectively. In addition, using the Rayleigh peak, superimposed on the Thomson scattered spectrum, the neutral density (n{sub 0}) of the plasma can be measured with an accuracy of 25% (at n{sub 0}= 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}). In this report, the performance of the Thomson scattering system will be shown along with unprecedented accurate Thomson-Rayleigh scattering measurements on a low-temperature argon plasma expansion into a low-pressure background.

  17. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Han, Baoxi; Johnson, Rolland P.; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P; Welton, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H- ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by long time plasma electrode activation, without adding Cs from Cs supply, by heating the collar to high temperature using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, perfect cesiation was produced (without additional Cs supply) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces.

  18. Studies of dynamic processes related to active experiments in space plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Peter M.; Neubert, Torsten

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report for grant NAGw-2055, 'Studies of Dynamic Processes Related to Active Experiments in Space Plasmas', covering research performed at the University of Michigan. The grant was awarded to study: (1) theoretical and data analysis of data from the CHARGE-2 rocket experiment (1keV; 1-46 mA electron beam ejections) and the Spacelab-2 shuttle experiment (1keV; 100 mA); (2) studies of the interaction of an electron beam, emitted from an ionospheric platform, with the ambient neutral atmosphere and plasma by means of a newly developed computer simulation model, relating model predictions with CHARGE-2 observations of return currents observed during electron beam emissions; and (3) development of a self-consistent model for the charge distribution on a moving conducting tether in a magnetized plasma and for the potential structure in the plasma surrounding the tether. Our main results include: (1) the computer code developed for the interaction of electrons beams with the neutral atmosphere and plasma is able to model observed return fluxes to the CHARGE-2 sounding rocket payload; and (2) a 3-D electromagnetic and relativistic particle simulation code was developed.

  19. A novel heat flux study of a geothermally active lake - Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivey, Maurice A.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Tontini, Fabio Caratori; Walker, Sharon L.; Fornari, Daniel J.

    2016-03-01

    A new technique for measuring conductive heat flux in a lake was adapted from the marine environment to allow for multiple measurements to be made in areas where bottom sediment cover is sparse, or even absent. This thermal blanket technique, pioneered in the deep ocean for use in volcanic mid-ocean rift environments, was recently used in the geothermally active Lake Rotomahana, New Zealand. Heat flow from the lake floor propagates into the 0.5 m diameter blanket and establishes a thermal gradient across the known blanket thickness and thereby provides an estimate of the conductive heat flux of the underlying terrain. This approach allows conductive heat flux to be measured over a spatially dense set of stations in a relatively short period of time. We used 10 blankets and deployed them for 1 day each to complete 110 stations over an 11-day program in the 6 × 3 km lake. Results show that Lake Rotomahana has a total conductive heat flux of about 47 MW averaging 6 W/m2 over the geothermally active lake. The western half of the lake has two main areas of high heat flux; 1) a high heat flux area averaging 21.3 W/m2 along the western shoreline, which is likely the location of the pre-existing geothermal system that fed the famous Pink Terraces, mostly destroyed during the 1886 eruption 2) a region southwest of Patiti Island with a heat flux averaging 13.1 W/m2 that appears to be related to the explosive rift that formed the lake in the 1886 Tarawera eruption. A small rise in bottom water temperature over the survey period of 0.01 °C/day suggests the total thermal output of the lake is ~ 112-132 MW and when compared to the conductive heat output suggests that 18-42% of the total thermal energy is by conductive heat transfer.

  20. The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Sun Zaijing

    2013-04-19

    One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

  1. The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Zaijing, Sun

    2013-04-01

    One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

  2. Heat flux and plasma flow in the far scrape-off layer of the inboard poloidal field null configuration in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Onchi, T.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Kuzmin, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Watanabe, O.; Mishra, K.; Mahira, Y.; Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Nagaoka, K.

    2015-08-15

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are examined for the inboard poloidal field null (IPN) configuration of the spherical tokamak QUEST. In the plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up phase, high heat flux (>1 MW/m{sup 2}) and supersonic flow (Mach number M > 1) are found to be present simultaneously in the far-SOL. The heat flux is generated by energetic electrons excursed from the last closed flux surface. Supersonic flows in the poloidal and toroidal directions are correlated with each other. In the quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of I{sub p} at 20 Hz is observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in the far-SOL are modified corresponding to the I{sub p}-oscillation. The heat flow caused by motion of energetic electrons and the bulk-particle transport to the far-SOL is enhanced during the low-I{sub p} phase. Modification of plasma flow in the far SOL occurs earlier than the I{sub p} crash. The M–I{sub p} curve has a limit-cycle characteristic with sawtooth-like oscillation. Such a core–SOL relationship indicates that the far-SOL flow plays an important role in sustaining the oscillation of I{sub p} in the IPN configuration.

  3. Heat flux and plasma flow in the far scrape-off layer of the inboard poloidal field null configuration in QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onchi, T.; Zushi, H.; Mishra, K.; Mahira, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Hanada, K.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Tashima, S.; Banerjee, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Watanabe, O.

    2015-08-01

    Heat flux and plasma flow in the scrape-off layer (SOL) are examined for the inboard poloidal field null (IPN) configuration of the spherical tokamak QUEST. In the plasma current (Ip) ramp-up phase, high heat flux (>1 MW/m2) and supersonic flow (Mach number M > 1) are found to be present simultaneously in the far-SOL. The heat flux is generated by energetic electrons excursed from the last closed flux surface. Supersonic flows in the poloidal and toroidal directions are correlated with each other. In the quasi-steady state, sawtooth-like oscillation of Ip at 20 Hz is observed. Heat flux and subsonic plasma flow in the far-SOL are modified corresponding to the Ip-oscillation. The heat flow caused by motion of energetic electrons and the bulk-particle transport to the far-SOL is enhanced during the low-Ip phase. Modification of plasma flow in the far SOL occurs earlier than the Ip crash. The M-Ip curve has a limit-cycle characteristic with sawtooth-like oscillation. Such a core-SOL relationship indicates that the far-SOL flow plays an important role in sustaining the oscillation of Ip in the IPN configuration.

  4. Nanostructures and pinholes on W surfaces exposed to high flux D plasma at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. Z.; Liu, W.; Xu, B.; Luo, G.-N.; Li, C.; Fu, B. Q.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructures and pinholes formed on tungsten surface exposed to high fluxes (1024 m-2 s-1) deuterium ions at 943 K and 1073 K were studied by scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction. Nanostructure formation is observed at 943 K and 1073 K, and exhibits a strong dependence on the surface orientation. With increasing fluence, pinholes appear on the surface and are mainly observed on grains with surface normal near [1 1 1]. The pinholes are speculated to be caused by the rupture of bubbles formed near the surface. The formation of pinholes has no obvious relationship with the surface nanostructures.

  5. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  6. Comparison Between the Integrated Ion Outflow Fluxes from the North and South Hemispheres Under Sustained Geomagnetically Active Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, A. R.; Schunk, R. W.; Eccles, J. V.

    2015-12-01

    The Generalized Polar Wind (GPW) model is used to simulate the polar ionosphere during the September/October 2002 storm. The simulation period is near equinox when the north and south hemispheres are similarly exposed to solar radiation. We present a model simulation of the eight day period 2002 September 27 (DOY 270) through October 4 (DOY 277). The first three days have relatively quiet magnetic activity as indicated by low Kp values. The fourth day (270) is moderately active, and over the last four days (1-4 October) a strong magnetic storm takes place where Kp reaches values greater than 7 and Dst reaches values below -170. The GPW model was utilized to simulate the behavior of the plasma outflow from both hemispheres over the eight-day period. This storm differs from idealized storm that was the subject of a number of previous studies by Schunk and coauthors in the following ways. First, the interplanetary magnetic field changed in a complex manner in contrast to the previous studies where the IMF remained in the negative z direction. Second, Kp variation is more complex than the previous investigations. Third, the simulation period of eight days is much longer than the previous simulations (less than 18 hours). Finally, both hemispheres are considered, in contrast to previous simulations that investigated the northern hemisphere only. This investigation focuses on the variation of the integrated flux (from the poles to 45 degrees of latitude). We discuss how the integrated flux depends on the ion species (O+ vs. H+) and on the hemisphere (north vs. south). We also investigated the integrated flux dependence on the physical conditions, e.g., Kp, Dst universal time, etc. This statistical approach helped extract important simple conclusions from the complex behavior of the ion outflow during real a storm.

  7. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-15

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath (''plasma shield'') that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  8. Development of active porous medium filters based on plasma textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Ivan A.; Saveliev, Alexei V.; Rasipuram, Srinivasan; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Brown, Alan; Jasper, Warren

    2012-05-01

    Inexpensive, flexible, washable, and durable materials that serve as antimicrobial filters and self-decontaminating fabrics are needed to provide active protection to people in areas regularly exposed to various biohazards, such as hospitals and bio research labs working with pathogens. Airlines and cruise lines need such material to combat the spread of infections. In households these materials can be used in HVAC filters to fight indoor pollution, which is especially dangerous to people suffering from asthma. Efficient filtering materials are also required in areas contaminated by other types of hazardous dust particulates, such as nuclear dust. The primary idea that guided the undertaken study is that a microplasma-generating structure can be embedded in a textile fabric to generate a plasma sheath ("plasma shield") that kills bacterial agents coming in contact with the fabric. The research resulted in the development of a plasma textile that can be used for producing new types of self-decontaminating garments, fabrics, and filter materials, capable of activating a plasma sheath that would filter, capture, and destroy any bacteriological agent deposited on its surface. This new material relies on the unique antimicrobial and catalytic properties of cold (room temperature) plasma that is benign to people and does not cause thermal damage to many polymer textiles, such as Nomex and polypropylene. The uniqueness of cold plasma as a disinfecting agent lies in the inability of bacteria to develop resistance to plasma exposure, as they can for antibiotics. Plasma textiles could thus be utilized for microbial destruction in active antimicrobial filters (for continuous decontamination and disinfection of large amounts of air) as well as in self-decontaminating surfaces and antibacterial barriers (for example, for creating local antiseptic or sterile environments around wounds and burns).

  9. Super-saturated hydrogen effects on radiation damages in tungsten under the high-flux divertor plasma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, D.; Iwakiri, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Morishita, K.; Muroga, T.

    2015-08-01

    Tungsten is a prime candidate as the divertor material of the ITER and DEMO reactors, which would be exposed to unprecedentedly high-flux plasmas as well as neutrons. For a better characterization of radiation damages in the tungsten under the divertor condition, we examine influences of super-saturated hydrogen on vacancies in the tungsten. The present calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) reveal unusual phenomena predicted at a super-saturated hydrogen concentration: (1) strongly enhanced vacancy concentration with the super-saturated hydrogen concentration is predicted by a thermodynamics model assuming multiple-hydrogen trapping, i.e. hydrogen clusters formation, in the vacancies; and (2) DFT molecular dynamics revealed that hydrogen clusters can prevent a vacancy from recombining with the neighboring crowdion-type self-interstitial-atom. This suggests that neutron damage effects will be increased in the presence of the hydrogen clusters.

  10. Quantifying the Sensitivity of Energy Fluxes to Land Surface Parameter Selection Using the Active Subspace Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jefferson, J.; Gilbert, J. M.; Maxwell, R. M.; Constantine, P. G.

    2015-12-01

    Complex hydrologic models are commonly used as computational tools to assess and quantify fluxes at the land surface and for forecasting and prediction purposes. When estimating water and energy fluxes from vegetated surfaces, the equations solved within these models require that multiple input parameters be specified. Some parameters characterize land cover properties while others are constants used to model physical processes like transpiration. As a result, it becomes important to understand the sensitivity of output flux estimates to uncertain input parameters. The active subspace method identifies the most important direction in the high-dimensional space of model inputs. Perturbations of input parameters in this direction influence output quantities more, on average, than perturbations in other directions. The components of the vector defining this direction quantify the sensitivity of the model output to the corresponding inputs. Discovering whether or not an active subspace exists is computationally efficient compared to several other sensitivity analysis methods. Here, we apply this method to evaluate the sensitivity of latent, sensible and ground heat fluxes from the ParFlow-Common Land Model (PF-CLM). Of the 19 input parameters used to specify properties of a grass covered surface, between three and six parameters are identified as important for heat flux estimates. Furthermore, the 19-dimenision input parameter space is reduced to one active variable and the relationship between the inputs and output fluxes for this case is described by a quadratic polynomial. The input parameter weights and the input-output relationship provide a powerful combination of information that can be used to understand land surface dynamics. Given the success of this proof-of-concept example, extension of this method to identify important parameters within the transpiration computation will be explored.

  11. Magnetosheath-ionospheric plasma interactions in the cusp/cleft. 1: Observations of modulated injections and upwelling ion fluxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.; Menietti, J. D.; Peterson, W. K.; Burch, J. L.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Giles, B.

    1993-01-01

    In situ observations of the cusp/cleft are important as they allow a direct investigation of coupling solar wind energy to the ionosphere, plus they provide an opportunity for the remote sensing of the magnetopause. High time resolution observations from Dynamic Explorer 1 are used to investigate these processes. It is shown that in the spacecraft frame the injection is modulated or pulsating with a period of approximately 18-30 s with the injection duration possibly being as short as 6 s. This modulation indicates that there may be fast time scale and/or short scale length processes modulating the injection of the magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause. In addition, the pulsating injection is seen to modulate the outflow of upwelling ionospheric ions to the magnetosphere. These upwelling ions are seen prior to the magnetosheath ion injection and therefore are not directly created by the injection. During the injection itself, the intensity of the upwelling ions is seen to dramatically decrease but their average energy increases. At end of the magnetosheath injections, the intensity of the upwelling ion flux is seen to increase to levels comparable to levels prior to the magnetosheath injection. On two occasions during the encounter, the particle fluxes are sufficiently high that enhanced downward flows of perpendicularly heated ions, of presumably ionospheric origin, are observed in association with a reduction in the intensity of the upwelling ions. These observations are probably the first detection of downward conics and suggest that there is momentum transfer between the magnetosheath and ionospheric ions. This momentum transfer eventually leads to an enhanced outflow of heated ionospheric plasma where their energy has been raised from a few tens of eV to a few hundred eV.

  12. Modulation of Erythrocyte Plasma Membrane Redox System Activity by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prabhakar; Kesharwani, Rajesh Kumar; Misra, Krishna; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) is an electron transport chain system ubiquitously present throughout all cell types. It transfers electron from intracellular substrates to extracellular acceptors for regulation of redox status. Curcumin, isolated from Curcuma longa, has modulatory effects on cellular physiology due to its membrane interaction ability and antioxidant potential. The present study investigates the effect of curcumin on PMRS activity of erythrocytes isolated from Wistar rats in vitro and in vivo and validated through an in silico docking simulation study using Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD). Effects of curcumin were also evaluated on level of glutathione (GSH) and the oxidant potential of plasma measured in terms of plasma ferric equivalent oxidative potentials (PFEOP). Results show that curcumin significantly (p < 0.01) downregulated the PMRS activity in a dose-dependent manner. Molecular docking results suggest that curcumin interacts with amino acids at the active site cavity of cytochrome b5 reductase, a key constituent of PMRS. Curcumin also increased the GSH level in erythrocytes and plasma while simultaneously decreasing the oxidant potential (PFEOP) of plasma. Altered PMRS activity and redox status are associated with the pathophysiology of several health complications including aging and diabetes; hence, the above finding may explain part of the role of curcumin in health beneficial effects. PMID:26904287

  13. Gamma-ray-spectroscopy following high-flux 14-MeV neutron activation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-10-12

    The Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I), a high-intensity source of 14-MeV neutrons at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), has been used for applications in activation analysis, inertial-confinement-fusion diagnostic development, and fission decay-heat studies. The fast-neutron flux from the RTNS-I is at least 50 times the maximum fluxes available from typical neutron generators, making these applications possible. Facilities and procedures necessary for gamma-ray spectroscopy of samples irradiated at the RTNS-I were developed.

  14. Polyamines cause plasma membrane depolarization, activate Ca2+-, and modulate H+-ATPase pump activity in pea roots.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Velarde-Buendía, Ana María; Bose, Jayakumar; Fuglsang, Anja T; Shabala, Sergey

    2014-06-01

    Polyamines regulate a variety of cation and K(+) channels, but their potential effects on cation-transporting ATPases are underexplored. In this work, noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation and conventional microelectrode techniques were applied to study the effects of polyamines on Ca(2+) and H(+) transport and membrane potential in pea roots. Externally applied spermine or putrescine (1mM) equally activated eosin yellow (EY)-sensitive Ca(2+) pumping across the root epidermis and caused net H(+) influx or efflux. Proton influx induced by spermine was suppressed by EY, supporting the mechanism in which Ca(2+) pump imports 2 H(+) per each exported Ca(2+). Suppression of the Ca(2+) pump by EY diminished putrescine-induced net H(+) efflux instead of increasing it. Thus, activities of Ca(2+) and H(+) pumps were coupled, likely due to the H(+)-pump inhibition by intracellular Ca(2+). Additionally, spermine but not putrescine caused a direct inhibition of H(+) pumping in isolated plasma membrane vesicles. Spermine, spermidine, and putrescine (1mM) induced membrane depolarization by 70, 50, and 35 mV, respectively. Spermine-induced depolarization was abolished by cation transport blocker Gd(3+), was insensitive to anion channels' blocker niflumate, and was dependent on external Ca(2+). Further analysis showed that uptake of polyamines but not polyamine-induced cationic (K(+)+Ca(2+)+H(+)) fluxes were a main cause of membrane depolarization. Polyamine increase is a common component of plant stress responses. Activation of Ca(2+) efflux by polyamines and contrasting effects of polyamines on net H(+) fluxes and membrane potential can contribute to Ca(2+) signalling and modulate a variety of transport processes across the plasma membrane under stress. PMID:24723394

  15. Manufacturing and High Heat Flux Testing of Brazed Flat-Type W/CuCrZr Plasma Facing Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lian, Youyun; Liu, Xiang; Feng, Fan; Chen, Lei; Cheng, Zhengkui; Wang, Jin; Chen, Jiming

    2016-02-01

    Water-cooled flat-type W/CuCrZr plasma facing components with an interlayer of oxygen-free copper (OFC) have been developed by using vacuum brazing route. The OFC layer for the accommodation of thermal stresses was cast onto the surface of W at a temperature range of 1150 °C-1200 °C in a vacuum furnace. The W/OFC cast tiles were vacuum brazed to a CuCrZr heat sink at 940 °C using the silver-free filler material CuMnSiCr. The microstructure, bonding strength, and high heat flux properties of the brazed W/CuCrZr joint samples were investigated. The W/Cu joint exhibits an average tensile strength of 134 MPa, which is about the same strength as pure annealed copper. High heat flux tests were performed in the electron beam facility EMS-60. Experimental results indicated that the brazed W/CuCrZr mock-up experienced screening tests of up to 15 MW/m2 and cyclic tests of 9 MW/m2 for 1000 cycles without visible damage. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11205049) and the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (No. 2011GB110004)

  16. Deriving plasma densities in tenuous plasma regions, with the spacecraft potential under active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriopoulou, M.; Nakamura, R.; Torkar, K.; Baumjohann, W.; Hoelzl, B.

    2015-11-01

    Variations of the floating potential on spacecraft are often used to derive plasma densities, complementing the plasma instrument measurements. All spacecraft of the Cluster mission are equipped with Active Spacecraft POtential Control (ASPOC) instruments that control the spacecraft potential. Although the ASPOC operation increases the accuracy of electric field and plasma measurements, it prevents a direct use of the spacecraft potential variations to derive plasma densities. In this work we develop a new reconstruction method of uncontrolled spacecraft potential from controlled spacecraft potential data and a derived photoelectron curve, using multispacecraft observations. We assume that the same curve governs the plasma environment for the spacecraft with ASPOC on and off. The current work focuses on reconstructions in the magnetotail region. The period that was more extensively studied was the one from August to October 2003, when the spacecraft were close to each other, while results from the periods of August-October 2001, 2002, and 2004, when the Cluster spacecraft had their apogee in the magnetotail region, are also presented. In this way, we investigate how the photoelectron curve varies at different time intervals and also how the reconstruction results are modified when the distance between the spacecraft is increasing. Finally, by using the reconstructed results, we proceed by estimating the plasma densities and we discuss the uncertainties of such estimations. While, on average, spacecraft potential measurements are successfully reconstructed, plasma and solar activity variations on short timescales seem to affect the reconstructions, requiring in some cases more detailed analysis in order to achieve results with higher accuracy. Moreover, there are some limitations while deriving results in very tenuous plasma regions due to increased uncertainties in some of the scientific measurements used there. The results and the methods developed for this work

  17. Linear MHD Wave Propagation in Time-Dependent Flux Tube. I. Zero Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Erdélyi, R.

    2014-03-01

    MHD waves and oscillations in sharply structured magnetic plasmas have been studied for static and steady systems in the thin tube approximation over many years. This work will generalize these studies by introducing a slowly varying background density in time, in order to determine the changes to the wave parameters introduced by this temporally varying equilibrium, i.e. to investigate the amplitude, frequency, and wavenumber for the kink and higher order propagating fast magnetohydrodynamic wave in the leading order approximation to the WKB approach in a zero- β plasma representing the upper solar atmosphere. To progress, the thin tube and over-dense loop approximations are used, restricting the results found here to the duration of a number of multiples of the characteristic density change timescale. Using such approximations it is shown that the amplitude of the kink wave is enhanced in a manner proportional to the square of the Alfvén speed, . The frequency of the wave solution tends to the driving frequency of the system as time progresses; however, the wavenumber approaches zero after a large multiple of the characteristic density change timescale, indicating an ever increasing wavelength. For the higher order fluting modes the changes in amplitude are dependent upon the wave mode; for the m=2 mode the wave is amplified to a constant level; however, for all m≥3 the fast MHD wave is damped within a relatively small multiple of the characteristic density change timescale. Understanding MHD wave behavior in time-dependent plasmas is an important step towards a more complete model of the solar atmosphere and has a key role to play in solar magneto-seismological applications.

  18. Equilibrium and MHD Activity in PEGASUS Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garstka, G. D.

    2000-10-01

    The primary research goals of the PEGASUS toroidal experiment involve the exploration of MHD stability boundaries at high beta and extremely low aspect ratio. A novel nonlinear least-squares fitting technique is used to reconstruct equilibria; the more conventional TokaMac equilibrium code is used as well. The continuous resistive vacuum vessel is modeled as a set of inductively coupled coils for the purpose of the reconstructions. A variety of MHD phenomena have been observed on PEGASUS ohmic discharges. Internal reconnection events (IREs) are often seen. The characteristics of these events match those observed on other STs: they are observed more frequently when the machine is dirty and when the plasma is overdriven into the central column. An n=1 mode with a frequency of 3-8 kHz is often present throughout the discharge. This mode is associated with fast current ramps (> 30 MA/s) and can limit the discharge evolution. There is also substantial evidence of double tearing modes during fast current ramps. Present work involves the exploration of the edge kink stability boundary at near-unity aspect ratio.

  19. Midtail plasma flows and the relationship to near-Earth substorm activity: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, R. E.; Goodrich, C. C.; Reeves, G. D.; Belian, R. D.; Taktakishvili, A.

    1994-01-01

    Recent simulations of magnetotail reconnection have pointed to a link between plasma flows, dipolarization, and the substorm current wedge. In particular, Hesse and Birn (1991) have proposed that earthward jetting of plasma from the reconnection region transports flux into the near-Earth region. At the inner edge of the plasma sheet this flux piles up, producing a dipolarization of the magnetic field. The vorticity produced by the east-west deflection of the flow at the inner edge of the plasma sheet gives rise to field-aligned currents that have region 1 polarity. Thus in this scenario the earthward flow from the reconnection region produces the dipolarization ad the current wedge in a self-consistent fashion. In this study we examine observations made on April 8, 1985 by the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE)/Ion Release Module (IRM), the geosynchronous satellites 1979-053, 1983-019, and 1984-037, and Syowa station, as well as AE. This event is unique because IRM was located near the neutral sheet in the midnight sector for am extended period of time. Ground data show that there was ongoing activity in the IRM local time sector for several hours, beginning at 1800 UT and reaching a crescendo at 2300 UT. This activity was also accompanied by energetic particle variations, including injections, at geosynchronous orbit in the nighttime sector. Significantly, there were no fast flows at the neutral sheet until the great intensification of activity at 2300 UT. At that time, IRM recorded fast eartheard flow simultaneous with a dipolatization of the magetic field. We conclude that while the aforementioned scenario for the creation of the current wedge encounters serious problems explaining the earlier activity, the observations at 2300 UT are consistent with the scenario of Hesse and Birn (1191). On that basis it is argued that the physics of substorms is not exclusively rooted in the development of a global tearing mode. Processes at the inner edge

  20. Control analysis applied to the whole body: control by body organs over plasma concentrations and organ fluxes of substances in the blood.

    PubMed

    Brown, G C

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic control analysis is adapted as a method for describing and analysing the control by organs in the body over the fluxes and concentrations of substances carried in the blood. This physiological control analysis can most usefully be applied to substances with fluxes into and out of organs that are uniquely dependent only on their plasma concentrations. The organ flux of a substance is defined as the steady-state net flux of a substance into a particular organ. The organ flux control coefficients quantify the extent to which a particular organ controls the flux of a substance into the same or another particular organ. Organ concentration control coefficients quantify the extent to which an organ controls the steady-state concentration of a substance in the blood. The control coefficients are additive and obey summation, connectivity and branching theorems. Thus the control coefficients can be determined experimentally by measuring the sensitivities (elasticities) of organ fluxes to the plasma concentration of the substance. As an example of the application of these concepts, the control of ketone-body metabolism in vivo is analysed using data from the literature. PMID:8280089

  1. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M D; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-26

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL. PMID:26517672

  2. Niacin alleviates TRAIL-mediated colon cancer cell death via autophagy flux activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Wook; Lee, Ju-Hee; Moon, Ji-Hong; Nazim, Uddin M.D.; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Hur, Jin; Eo, Seong-Kug; Lee, John-Hwa; Park, Sang-Youel

    2016-01-01

    Niacin, also known as vitamin B3 or nicotinamide is a water-soluble vitamin that is present in black beans and rice among other foods. Niacin is well known as an inhibitor of metastasis in human breast carcinoma cells but the effect of niacin treatment on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis is unknown. Here, we show that niacin plays an important role in the regulation of autophagic flux and protects tumor cells against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis. Our results indicated that niacin activated autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells and the autophagic flux activation protected tumor cells from TRAIL-induced dysfunction of mitochondrial membrane potential and tumor cell death. We also demonstrated that ATG5 siRNA and autophagy inhibitor blocked the niacin-mediated inhibition of TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study is the first report demonstrating that niacin inhibits TRAIL-induced apoptosis through activation of autophagic flux in human colon cancer cells. And our results also suggest that autophagy inhibitors including genetic and pharmacological tools may be a successful therapeutics during anticancer therapy using TRAIL. PMID:26517672

  3. Basic properties of magnetic flux tubes and restrictions on theories of solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, E. N.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that the mean longitudinal field in a magnetic flux tube is reduced, rather than enhanced, by twisting the tube to form a rope. It is shown that there is no magnetohydrostatic equilibrium when one twisted rope is wound around another. Instead there is rapid line cutting (neutral point annihilation). It is shown that the twisting increases, and the field strength decreases, along a flux tube extending upward through a stratified atmosphere. These facts are at variance with Piddington's (1975) recent suggestion that solar activity is to be understood as the result of flux tubes which are enormously concentrated by twisting, which consist of several twisted ropes wound around each other, and which came untwisted where they emerge through the photosphere.

  4. Generation of the cosmic rays flux variations due to surfatron acceleration of charges by electromagnetic waves in space plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erokhin, Nikolay; Loznikov, Vladimir; Shkevov, Rumen; Zolnikova, Nadezhda; Mikhailovskaya, Ludmila

    2016-07-01

    The analysis of experimental data on the spectra of cosmic rays (CR) has shown their variability on time scales of a few years, in particular, CR variations observed in E / Z range from TeV to 10000 TeV, where E is the energy of the particle, Z is its charge number. Consequently, the source of these variations must be located at a distance of no more than 1 parsec from the sun in the closest local interstellar clouds. As a mechanism of such variations appearance it is considered the surfatron acceleration of CR particles by electromagnetic wave in a relatively quiet space plasma. On the basis of developed model the numerical calculations were performed for particle capture dynamics (electrons, protons, helium and iron nuclei) in the wave effective potential well with a following growth their energy by 3-6 orders of magnitude. Optimal conditions for the implementation of charged particles surfatron acceleration in space plasma, the rate of trapped particles energy growth, the dynamics of wave phase on the captured particle trajectory, a temporal dynamics of components for charge impulse momentum and speed were studied. It is indicated that the capture of a small fraction of particles by wave for energies about TeV and less followed by their surfatron acceleration to an energy of about 10000 TeV will lead to a significant increase in the CR flux at such high energies. Thus CL flow variations are conditioned by changes in the space weather parameters

  5. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil.

    PubMed

    Schroth, M H; Eugster, W; Gómez, K E; Gonzalez-Gil, G; Niklaus, P A; Oester, P

    2012-05-01

    Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH(4)). However, much of the CH(4) produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH(4) fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH(4) ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH(4) into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH(4) concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH(4) fluxes and CH(4) loading were estimated from soil-gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH(4) oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH(4) emissions from the test section (daily mean up to ∼91,500μmolm(-2)d(-1)), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH(4) concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH(4) (uptake up to -380μmolm(-2)d(-1)) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH(4) loading over short distances in the cover soil, while potential methanotrophic activity derived from GPPTs was high (v(max)∼13mmolL(-1)(soil air)h(-1)) at a location with substantial CH(4) loading. Our results provide a basis to assess spatial and temporal variability of CH(4) dynamics in the complex terrain of a landfill-cover soil. PMID:22143049

  6. High Resolution Simulations of Tearing and Flux-Rope Formation in Active Region Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyper, P. F.; DeVore, C. R.; Karpen, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations of coronal jets increasingly suggest that local fragmentation and the generation of small-scale structure plays an important role in the dynamics of these events. In the magnetically closed corona, jets most often occur near active regions and are associated with an embedded-bipole topology consisting of a 3D magnetic null point atop a domed fan separatrix surface at the base of a coronal loop. Impulsive reconnection in the vicinity of the null point between the magnetic fluxes inside and outside the dome launches the jet along the loop. Wyper & Pontin 2014 showed that the 3D current layers that facilitate such reconnection are explosively unstable to tearing, generating complex flux-rope structures. Utilizing the adaptive mesh capabilities of the Adaptively Refined Magnetohydrodynamics Solver, we investigate the generation of such fine-scale structure in high-resolution simulations of active-region jets. We observe the formation of multiple flux-rope structures forming across the fan separatrix surface and discuss the photospheric signatures of these flux ropes and the associated local topology change. We also introduce a new way of identifying such flux ropes in the magnetic field, based on structures observed in the magnetic squashing factor calculated on the photosphere. By tracking the position and number of new null points produced by the fragmentation, we also show that the formation of flux ropes can occur away from the main null region on the flanks of the separatrix dome and that the jet curtain has a highly complex magnetic structure. This work was funded through an appointment to the NASA Postdoctoral Program and by NASA's Living With a Star TR&T program.

  7. Role of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in ion flux-mediated turgor regulation in fungi.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Levina, Natalia N; Shabala, Lana; Anderca, Marinela I; Shabala, Sergey N

    2006-03-01

    Fungi normally maintain a high internal hydrostatic pressure (turgor) of about 500 kPa. In response to hyperosmotic shock, there are immediate electrical changes: a transient depolarization (1 to 2 min) followed by a sustained hyperpolarization (5 to 10 min) prior to turgor recovery (10 to 60 min). Using ion-selective vibrating probes, we established that the transient depolarization is due to Ca(2+) influx and the sustained hyperpolarization is due to H(+) efflux by activation of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Protein synthesis is not required for H(+)-ATPase activation. Net K(+) and Cl(-) uptake occurs at the same time as turgor recovery. The magnitude of the ion uptake is more than sufficient to account for the osmotic gradients required for turgor to return to its original level. Two osmotic mutants, os-1 and os-2, homologs of a two-component histidine kinase sensor and the yeast high osmotic glycerol mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, respectively, have lower turgor than the wild type and do not exhibit the sustained hyperpolarization after hyperosmotic treatment. The os-1 mutant does not exhibit all of the wild-type turgor-adaptive ion fluxes (Cl(-) uptake increases, but net K(+) flux barely changes and net H(+) efflux declines) (os-2 was not examined). Both os mutants are able to regulate turgor but at a lower level than the wild type. Our results demonstrate that a MAP kinase cascade regulates ion transport, activation of the H(+)-ATPase, and net K(+) and Cl(-) uptake during turgor regulation. Other pathways regulating turgor must also exist. PMID:16524903

  8. Role of a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Cascade in Ion Flux-Mediated Turgor Regulation in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Roger R.; Levina, Natalia N.; Shabala, Lana; Anderca, Marinela I.; Shabala, Sergey N.

    2006-01-01

    Fungi normally maintain a high internal hydrostatic pressure (turgor) of about 500 kPa. In response to hyperosmotic shock, there are immediate electrical changes: a transient depolarization (1 to 2 min) followed by a sustained hyperpolarization (5 to 10 min) prior to turgor recovery (10 to 60 min). Using ion-selective vibrating probes, we established that the transient depolarization is due to Ca2+ influx and the sustained hyperpolarization is due to H+ efflux by activation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. Protein synthesis is not required for H+-ATPase activation. Net K+ and Cl− uptake occurs at the same time as turgor recovery. The magnitude of the ion uptake is more than sufficient to account for the osmotic gradients required for turgor to return to its original level. Two osmotic mutants, os-1 and os-2, homologs of a two-component histidine kinase sensor and the yeast high osmotic glycerol mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, respectively, have lower turgor than the wild type and do not exhibit the sustained hyperpolarization after hyperosmotic treatment. The os-1 mutant does not exhibit all of the wild-type turgor-adaptive ion fluxes (Cl− uptake increases, but net K+ flux barely changes and net H+ efflux declines) (os-2 was not examined). Both os mutants are able to regulate turgor but at a lower level than the wild type. Our results demonstrate that a MAP kinase cascade regulates ion transport, activation of the H+-ATPase, and net K+ and Cl− uptake during turgor regulation. Other pathways regulating turgor must also exist. PMID:16524903

  9. Surface Plasma Source Electrode Activation by Surface Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    Dudnikov, Vadim; Johnson, Rolland P.; Han, B.; Murray, S. N.; Pennisi, T. R.; Santana, M.; Stockli, Martin P.; Welton, R. F.

    2011-09-26

    In experiments with RF saddle antenna surface plasma sources (SPS), the efficiency of H{sup -} ion generation was increased by up to a factor of 5 by plasma electrode 'activation', without supplying additional Cs, by heating the collar to high temperature for several hours using hot air flow and plasma discharge. Without cracking or heating the cesium ampoule, but likely with Cs recovery from impurities, the achieved energy efficiency was comparable to that of conventionally cesiated SNS RF sources with an external or internal Cs supply. In the experiments, optimum cesiation was produced (without additional Cs) by the collection and trapping of traces of remnant cesium compounds from SPS surfaces. Such activation by accumulation of impurities on electrode surfaces can be a reason for H{sup -} emission enhancement in other so-called 'volume' negative ion sources.

  10. The influence of plasma horizontal position on the neutron rate and flux of neutral atoms in injection heating experiment on the TUMAN-3M tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornev, V. A.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Melnik, A. D.; Askinazi, L. G.; Wagner, F.; Vildjunas, M. I.; Zhubr, N. A.; Krikunov, S. V.; Lebedev, S. V.; Razumenko, D. V.; Tukachinsky, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    Horizontal displacement of plasma along the major radius has been found to significantly influence the fluxes of 2.45 MeV DD neutrons and high-energy charge-exchange atoms from neutral beam injection (NBI) heated plasma of the TUMAN-3M tokamak. An inward shift by Δ R = 1 cm causes 1.2-fold increase in the neutron flux and 1.9-fold increase in the charge-exchange atom flux. The observed increase in the neutron flux is attributed to joint action of several factors-in particular, improved high-energy ion capture and confinement and, probably, decreased impurity inflow from the walls, which leads to an increase in the density of target ions. A considerable increase in the flux of charge-exchange neutrals in inward-shifted plasma is due to the increased number of captured high-energy ions and, to some extent, the increased density of the neutral target. As a result of the increase in the content of high-energy ions, the central ion temperature T i (0) increased from 250 to 350 eV. The dependence of the neutron rate on major radius R 0 should be taken into account when designing compact tokamak-based neutron sources.

  11. Calcium fluxes across the plasma membrane of Commelina communis L. assayed in a cell-free system

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, B.; Graef, P.; Weiler, E.W. )

    1990-07-01

    The inside-out fraction of plasma membrane-rich vesicles prepared from leaves of Commelina communis L. by aqueous two-phase partitioning was loaded with {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} through the action of the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. Results suggest the presence of a Ca{sup 2+} channel in the plasma membrane of C. communis. The channel is obtained in a Ca{sup 2+}-inactivated state after preparation and Ca{sup 2+}-loading of the vesicles. The inactivation is removed by TFP (trifluoperazine) or W-7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide), presumably due to the Ca{sup 2+}-mobilizing effect of these compounds. The activated Ca{sup 2+} channel is La{sup 3+} sensitive and, in the cell, would allow for passage of Ca{sup 2+} into the cell. The possibility that TFP or W-7 act independent of CM, or through CM tightly associated with the plasma membrane, is discussed.

  12. Features of the Active Evening Plasma Sheet from MMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Avanov, L. A.; Burch, J. L.; Coffey, V. N.; Ergun, R. E.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Giles, B. L.; Lavraud, B.; MacDonald, E.; Mauk, B.; Mukai, T.; Nakamura, R.; Pollock, C. J.; Russell, C. T.; Saito, Y.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Torbert, R. B.; Yokota, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission, consisting of four identical plasmas and fields observatories, was launched into a 12 RE elliptical equatorial orbit in March 2015 and was in the process of being commissioned through August 2015. During commissioning, the orbit apogee rotated from near midnight through the evening toward the dusk sector and occasionally captured new observations of the plasma sheet, its boundary layers, and the magnetospheric tail lobes. On 22-23 June, an especially active plasma sheet was involved in a major geospace storm that developed a ring current with 200 nT DST. We report on the ion kinetic and flow features of this active plasma sheet, comparing them with familiar observations from earlier missions, as an exercise in validating the MMS observations and assessing their capabilities to provide higher time resolution in multi-point views of thin, fast-moving structures. The observed features include but are not limited to cold lobal wind streams in the lobes, tailward flowing auroral beams and conics, hot earthward field-aligned flows and counter-flows, fast cross-field convection of some flows toward the neutral sheet, and the hot isotropic plasma sheet proper. Relationships between these features, the ionosphere, and the reconnecting magnetotail will be explored and discussed, seeking preliminary conclusions.

  13. EVOLUTION OF SPINNING AND BRAIDING HELICITY FLUXES IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 10930

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindra, B.; Yoshimura, Keiji; Dasso, Sergio E-mail: yosimura@solar.physics.montana.edu

    2011-12-10

    The line-of-sight magnetograms from Solar Optical Telescope Narrowband Filter Imager observations of NOAA Active Region 10930 have been used to study the evolution of spinning and braiding helicities over a period of five days starting from 2006 December 9. The north (N) polarity sunspot was the follower and the south (S) polarity sunspot was the leader. The N-polarity sunspot in the active region was rotating in the counterclockwise direction. The rate of rotation was small during the first two days of observations and it increased up to 8 Degree-Sign hr{sup -1} on the third day of the observations. On the fourth and fifth days it remained at 4 Degree-Sign hr{sup -1} with small undulations in its magnitude. The sunspot rotated about 260 Degree-Sign in the last three days. The S-polarity sunspot did not complete more than 20 Degree-Sign in five days. However, it changed its direction of rotation five times over a period of five days and injected both the positive and negative type of spin helicity fluxes into the corona. Through the five days, both the positive and negative sunspot regions injected equal amounts of spin helicity. The total injected helicity is predominantly negative in sign. However, the sign of the spin and braiding helicity fluxes computed over all the regions were reversed from negative to positive five times during the five-day period of observations. The reversal in spinning helicity flux was found before the onset of the X3.4-class flare, too. Though, the rotating sunspot has been observed in this active region, the braiding helicity has contributed more to the total accumulated helicity than the spinning helicity. The accumulated helicity is in excess of -7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 43} Mx{sup 2} over a period of five days. Before the X3.4-class flare that occurred on 2006 December 13, the rotation speed and spin helicity flux increased in the S-polarity sunspot. Before the flare, the total injected helicity was larger than -6

  14. Dynamics of multiple flux tubes in sawtoothing KSTAR plasmas heated by electron cyclotron waves: I. Experimental analysis of the tube structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G. H.; Yun, G. S.; Nam, Y.; Lee, W.; Park, H. K.; Bierwage, A.; Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C., Jr.; Jeong, J. H.; Bae, Y. S.; the KSTAR Team

    2015-01-01

    Multiple (two or more) flux tubes are commonly observed inside and/or near the q = 1 flux surface in KSTAR tokamak plasmas with localized electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive (ECH/CD). Detailed 2D and quasi-3D images of the flux tubes obtained by an advanced imaging diagnostic system showed that the flux tubes are m/n = 1/1 field-aligned structures co-rotating around the magnetic axis. The flux tubes typically merge together and become like the internal kink mode of the usual sawtooth, which then collapses like a usual sawtooth crash. A systematic scan of ECH/CD beam position showed a strong correlation with the number of flux tubes. In the presence of multiple flux tubes close to the q = 1 surface, the radially outward heat transport was enhanced, which explains naturally temporal changes of electron temperature. We emphasize that the multiple flux tubes are a universal feature distinct from the internal kink instability and play a critical role in the control of sawteeth using ECH/CD.

  15. Active Plasma Lensing for Relativistic Laser-Plasma-Accelerated Electron Beams.

    PubMed

    van Tilborg, J; Steinke, S; Geddes, C G R; Matlis, N H; Shaw, B H; Gonsalves, A J; Huijts, J V; Nakamura, K; Daniels, J; Schroeder, C B; Benedetti, C; Esarey, E; Bulanov, S S; Bobrova, N A; Sasorov, P V; Leemans, W P

    2015-10-30

    Compact, tunable, radially symmetric focusing of electrons is critical to laser-plasma accelerator (LPA) applications. Experiments are presented demonstrating the use of a discharge-capillary active plasma lens to focus 100-MeV-level LPA beams. The lens can provide tunable field gradients in excess of 3000 T/m, enabling cm-scale focal lengths for GeV-level beam energies and allowing LPA-based electron beams and light sources to maintain their compact footprint. For a range of lens strengths, excellent agreement with simulation was obtained. PMID:26565471

  16. Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux--Scaling with stored energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S.; Saw, S. H.

    2012-11-01

    Measurements on plasma focus ion beams include various advanced techniques producing a variety of data which has yet to produce benchmark numbers [A Bernard et al., J. Mosc. Phys. Soc. 8, 93-170 (1998)]. This present paper uses the Lee Model code [S Lee, http://www.plasmafocus.net (2012)], integrated with experimental measurements to provide the basis for reference numbers and the scaling of deuteron beams versus stored energy E0. The ion number fluence (ions m-2) and energy fluence (J m-2) computed as 2.4-7.8 × 1020 and 2.2-33 × 106, respectively, are found to be independent of E0 from 0.4 to 486 kJ. Typical inductance machines (33-55 nH) produce 1.2-2 × 1015 ions per kJ carrying 1.3%-4% E0 at mean ion energy 50-205 keV, dropping to 0.6 × 1015 ions per kJ carrying 0.7% E0 for the high inductance INTI PF.

  17. Magnetic flux transport of decaying active regions and enhanced magnetic network. [of solar supergranulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Haimin; Zirin, Harold; Ai, Guoxiang

    1991-01-01

    Several series of coordinated observations on decaying active regions and enhanced magnetic network regions on the sun were carried out jointly at Big Bear Solar Observatory and at the Huairou Solar Observing Station of the Bejing Astronomical Observatory in China. The magnetic field evolution in several regions was followed closely for three to seven days. The magnetic flux transport from the remnants of decayed active regions was studied, along with the evolution and lifetime of the magnetic network which defines the boundaries of supergranules. The magnetic flux transport in an enhanced network region was studied in detail and found to be negative. Also briefly described are some properties of moving magnetic features around a sunspot. Results of all of the above studies are presented.

  18. Galactic cosmic ray flux in the mid of 1700 from 44Ti activity of Agen meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, Carla; Sinha, Neeharika; Bhandari, Narendra; Colombetti, Paolo; Mancuso, Salvatore; Rubinetti, Sara; Barghini, Dario

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic isotopes produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR) in meteorites offer the opportunity to reveal the heliospheric magnetic field modulation in the interplanetary space between heliocentric distances of 1 and 3 AU. We present the gamma-activity measurement of Agen meteorite, a H5 chondrite that fell on September 5, 1814 in Aquitaine, France. Its 44Ti activity reflects GCR flux integrated since the mid of 1700 to the time of fall and confirms the decreasing trend of GCR flux that we previously suggested on the basis of measurements of other meteorites which fell in the last 250 years as well as the centennial modulation of GCR due to the Gleissberg solar cycle This result was obtained thanks to the high-efficiency and selective configuration of the gamma-ray spectrometer (HPGe+NaI) operating at the underground Laboratory of Monte dei Cappuccini (OATo, INAF) in Torino, Italy.

  19. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine. PMID:26931617

  20. Influence of plasma-activated compounds on melanogenesis and tyrosinase activity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Anser; Ashraf, Zaman; Kumar, Naresh; Rafiq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Farukh; Park, Ji Hoon; Choi, Ki Hong; Lee, SeungHyun; Seo, Sung-Yum; Choi, Eun Ha; Attri, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    Many organic chemists around the world synthesize medicinal compounds or extract multiple compounds from plants in order to increase the activity and quality of medicines. In this work, we synthesized new eugenol derivatives (ED) and then treated them with an N2 feeding gas atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) to increase their utility. We studied the tyrosinase-inhibition activity (activity test) and structural changes (circular dichroism) of tyrosinase with ED and plasma activated eugenol derivatives (PAED) in a cell-free environment. Later, we used docking studies to determine the possible interaction sites of ED and PAED compounds with tyrosinase enzyme. Moreover, we studied the possible effect of ED and PAED on melanin synthesis and its mechanism in melanoma (B16F10) cells. Additionally, we investigated the structural changes that occurred in activated ED after plasma treatment using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hence, this study provides a new perspective on PAED for the field of plasma medicine. PMID:26931617

  1. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  2. Flux-tube geometry and solar wind speed during an activity cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S.; Rouillard, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The solar wind speed at 1 AU shows cyclic variations in latitude and in time which reflect the evolution of the global background magnetic field during the activity cycle. It is commonly accepted that the terminal (asymptotic) wind speed in a given magnetic flux-tube is generally anti-correlated with its total expansion ratio, which motivated the definition of widely used semi-empirical scaling laws relating one to the other. In practice, such scaling laws require ad hoc corrections (especially for the slow wind in the vicinities of streamer/coronal hole boundaries) and empirical fits to in situ spacecraft data. A predictive law based solely on physical principles is still missing. Aims: We test whether the flux-tube expansion is the controlling factor of the wind speed at all phases of the cycle and at all latitudes (close to and far from streamer boundaries) using a very large sample of wind-carrying open magnetic flux-tubes. We furthermore search for additional physical parameters based on the geometry of the coronal magnetic field which have an influence on the terminal wind flow speed. Methods: We use numerical magneto-hydrodynamical simulations of the corona and wind coupled to a dynamo model to determine the properties of the coronal magnetic field and of the wind velocity (as a function of time and latitude) during a whole 11-yr activity cycle. These simulations provide a large statistical ensemble of open flux-tubes which we analyse conjointly in order to identify relations of dependence between the wind speed and geometrical parameters of the flux-tubes which are valid globally (for all latitudes and moments of the cycle). Results: Our study confirms that the terminal (asymptotic) speed of the solar wind depends very strongly on the geometry of the open magnetic flux-tubes through which it flows. The total flux-tube expansion is more clearly anti-correlated with the wind speed for fast rather than for slow wind flows, and effectively controls the

  3. Mass flux measurements at active lava lakes: Implications for magma recycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Andrew J. L.; Flynn, Luke P.; Rothery, David A.; Oppenheimer, Clive; Sherman, Sarah B.

    1999-04-01

    Remotely sensed and field data can be used to estimate heat and mass fluxes at active lava lakes. Here we use a three thermal component pixel model with three bands of Landsat thematic mapper (TM) data to constrain the thermal structure of, and flux from, active lava lakes. Our approach considers that a subpixel lake is surrounded by ground at ambient temperatures and that the surface of the lake is composed of crusted and/or molten material. We then use TM band 6 (10.42-12.42 μm) with bands 3 (0.63-0.69 μm) or 4 (0.76-0.90 μm) and 5 (1.55-1.75 μm) or 7 (2.08-2.35 μm), along with field data (e.g., lava lake area), to place limits on the size and temperature of each thermal component. Previous attempts to achieve this have used two bands of TM data with a two-component thermal model. Using our model results with further field data (e.g., petrological data) for lava lakes at Erebus, Erta 'Ale, and Pu'u 'O'o, we calculate combined radiative and convective fluxes of 11-20, 14-27 and 368-373 MW, respectively. These yield mass fluxes, of 30-76, 44-104 and 1553-2079 kg s-1, respectively. We also identify a hot volcanic feature at Nyiragongo during 1987 from which a combined radiative and convective flux of 0.2-0.6 MW implies a mass flux of 1-2 kg s-1. We use our mass flux estimates to constrain circulation rates in each reservoir-conduit-lake system and consider four models whereby circulation results in intrusion within or beneath the volcano (leading to endogenous or cryptic growth) and/or magma mixing in the reservoir (leading to recycling). We suggest that the presence of lava lakes does not necessarily imply endogenous or cryptic growth: lava lakes could be symptomatic of magma recycling in supraliquidus reservoirs.

  4. HDAC6 activity is not required for basal autophagic flux in metastatic prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Gregory W; Wickramasekara, Samanthi; Fang, Yufeng; Maier, Claudia S; Williams, David E; Dashwood, Roderick H; Perez, Viviana I; Ho, Emily

    2016-06-01

    Histone deacetylase 6 is a multifunctional lysine deacetylase that is recently emerging as a central facilitator of response to stress and may play an important role in cancer cell proliferation. The histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin has been shown to slow the growth of metastatic prostate cancer cells and sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the proteins histone deacetylase 6 interacts with, and thus its role in cancer cells, remains poorly characterized. Histone deacetylase 6 deacetylase activity has recently been shown to be required for efficient basal autophagic flux. Autophagy is often dysregulated in cancer cells and may confer stress resistance and allow for cell maintenance and a high proliferation rate. Tubacin may therefore slow cancer cell proliferation by decreasing autophagic flux. We characterized the histone deacetylase 6-interacting proteins in LNCaP metastatic prostate cancer cells and found that histone deacetylase 6 interacts with proteins involved in several cellular processes, including autophagy. Based on our interaction screen, we assessed the impact of the histone deacetylase 6-inhibitor tubacin on autophagic flux in two metastatic prostate cancer cell lines and found that tubacin does not influence autophagic flux. Histone deacetylase 6 therefore influences cell proliferation through an autophagy-independent mechanism. PMID:26643866

  5. Finger heat flux/temperature as an indicator of thermal imbalance with application for extravehicular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koscheyev, Victor S.; Leon, Gloria R.; Coca, Aitor

    2005-11-01

    The designation of a simple, non-invasive, and highly precise method to monitor the thermal status of astronauts is important to enhance safety during extravehicular activities (EVA) and onboard emergencies. Finger temperature ( Tfing), finger heat flux, and indices of core temperature ( Tc) [rectal ( Tre), ear canal ( Tec)] were assessed in 3 studies involving different patterns of heat removal/insertion from/to the body by a multi-compartment liquid cooling/warming garment (LCWG). Under both uniform and nonuniform temperature conditions on the body surface, Tfing and finger heat flux were highly correlated with garment heat flux, and also highly correlated with each other. Tc responses did not adequately reflect changes in thermal balance during the ongoing process of heat insertion/removal from the body. Overall, Tfing/finger heat flux adequately reflected the initial destabilization of thermal balance, and therefore appears to have significant potential as a useful index for monitoring and maintaining thermal balance and comfort in extreme conditions in space as well as on Earth.

  6. Active Trans-Plasma Membrane Water Cycling in Yeast Is Revealed by NMR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma membrane water transport is a crucial cellular phenomenon. Net water movement in response to an osmotic gradient changes cell volume. Steady-state exchange of water molecules, with no net flux or volume change, occurs by passive diffusion through the phospholipid bilayer and passage through membrane proteins. The hypothesis is tested that plasma membrane water exchange also correlates with ATP-driven membrane transport activity in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Longitudinal 1H2O NMR relaxation time constant (T1) values were measured in yeast suspensions containing extracellular relaxation reagent. Two-site-exchange analysis quantified the reversible exchange kinetics as the mean intracellular water lifetime (τi), where τi−1 is the pseudo-first-order rate constant for water efflux. To modulate cellular ATP, yeast suspensions were bubbled with 95%O2/5%CO2 (O2) or 95%N2/5%CO2 (N2). ATP was high during O2, and τi−1 was 3.1 s−1 at 25°C. After changing to N2, ATP decreased and τi−1 was 1.8 s−1. The principal active yeast ion transport protein is the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. Studies using the H+-ATPase inhibitor ebselen or a yeast genetic strain with reduced H+-ATPase found reduced τi−1, notwithstanding high ATP. Steady-state water exchange correlates with H+-ATPase activity. At volume steady state, water is cycling across the plasma membrane in response to metabolic transport activity. PMID:22261073

  7. Measurement of surface mercury fluxes at active industrial gold mines in Nevada (USA).

    PubMed

    Eckley, C S; Gustin, M; Marsik, F; Miller, M B

    2011-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) may be naturally associated with the rock units hosting precious and base metal deposits. Active gold mines are known to have point source releases of Hg associated with ore processing facilities. The nonpoint source release of Hg to the air from the large area (hundreds to thousands of hectares) of disturbed and processed material at industrial open pit gold mines has not been quantified. This paper describes the field data collected as part of a project focused on estimating nonpoint source emissions of Hg from two active mines in Nevada, USA. In situ Hg flux data were collected on diel and seasonal time steps using a dynamic flux chamber from representative mine surfaces. Hg fluxes ranged from <1500 ng m(-2) day(-1) for waste rock piles (0.6-3.5 μg g(-1)) to 684,000 ng m(-2) day(-1) for tailings (2.8-58 μg g(-1)). Releases were positively correlated with material Hg concentrations, surface grain size, and moisture content. Highest Hg releases occurred from materials under active cyanide leaching and from tailings impoundments containing processed high-grade ore. Data collected indicate that as mine sites are reclaimed and material disturbance ceases, emissions will decline. Additionally local cycling of atmospheric Hg (deposition and re-emission) was found to occur. PMID:21078520

  8. Ionospheric outflows as possible source of the low-energy plasma flux tubes controlling the dimension of pulsating auroral patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J.; Donovan, E.; Nishimura, T.; Yang, B.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    Conjunctive observations of low-Earth-orbit satellites and optical auroral imagers have indicated that, a majority of pulsating auroral patches (PAPs) are associated with low-energy ion (LEI) precipitation structures with core energies ranging from several tens of eV up to a few hundred eV. This result is consistent with a long-standing proposal that the PAPs connect to flux tubes filled with enhanced "cold" plasma. To further explore the origin and generation mechanism of those LEI structures, we investigate a few THEMIS events when the in-situ probes are conceived as conjugate to PAPs, judging by an apparent correlation between the in-situ whistler-mode chorus and the oscillation of the PAP luminosity [Nishimura et al., 2011]. We notice a common existence of LEI structures from THEMIS in-situ data during those conjugacy event intervals. Such LEI structures are always strongly field-aligned, with core energies ranging from several tens of eV up to a few hundred eV, and often exhibit distinct energy dispersion features. Contingent upon the energy range and time, the pitch-angle distribution of the LEI structures can be either heavily biased toward parallel direction, or biased toward anti-parallel direction, or roughly symmetric between parallel and anti-parallel directions. The above observations allude to the ion outflows from the ionosphere as a plausible origin of the observed LEI structures. To check the above notion, we perform particle simulations assuming that the low-energy ions originate from the ion outflows in topside ionosphere and bounce between hemispheres while convecting with EXB drift. The simulation results can reproduce some of the basic observable features of the LEI structures, such as the energy dispersion and the variation of pitch-angle distribution versus time and energy. Combining the results from low-Earth-orbit satellites observations, THEMIS in-situ observations, and simulations, we propose that the ion outflows into the magnetosphere

  9. Hollow cathode plasma source for active spacecraft charge control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, William D.; Aston, Graeme; Pless, Lewis C.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype plasma source spacecraft discharge device has been developed to control overall and differential spacecraft surface charging. The plasma source is based on a unique hollow cathode discharge, where the plasma generation process is contained completely within the cathode. This device can be operated on argon, krypton, or xenon and has a rapid cold start time of less than 4 s. The discharge system design includes a spacecraft-discharge/net-charge sensing circuit which provides the ability to measure the polarity, magnitude, pulse shape, and time duration of a discharging event. Ion currents of up to 325 microA and electron currents ranging from 0.02 to 6.0 A have been extracted from the device. In addition, the spacecraft discharge device successfully discharged capacitively biased plates, from as high as + or - 2500 V, to ground potential, and discharged and clamped actively biased plates at +5 V with respect to ground potential during ground simulation testing.

  10. Self-Organized Criticality Properties of the Turbulence-Induced Particle Flux at the Plasma Edge of the HT-6M Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wen-Hao; Yu, Chang-Xuan; Wen, Yi-Zhi; Xu, Yu-Hong; Ling, Bi-Li; Gong, Xian-Zu; Liu, Bao-Hua; Wan, Bao-Nian

    2001-06-01

    The power spectrum and the probability distribution function (PDF) of the turbulence-induced particle flux Γ in the velocity shear layer of the HT-6M edge region have been measured and analysed. Three regions of frequency dependence (f 0, f-1, f-4) have been observed in the spectrum of the flux. The PDF of the flux displays a Γ-1 scaling over one decade in Γ. Using the rescaled-range statistical technique, we find that the degree of the self-similarity (Hurst exponent) of the particle flux in the measured region ranges from 0.64 to 0.83. All of these results may mean that the plasma transport is in a state characterized by self-organized criticality.

  11. Plasma thymic hormone activity in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, C. H.; Greenberg, Lynn E.; Chapman, S. W.; Goldstein, G.; Lewis, Verna M.; Twomey, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    To further characterize the immunological abnormalities in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, the thymic hormone activity in their plasma was measured. Of the sixteen patients in the study, seven had chronic diffuse candidiasis, five had candidiasis with endocrinopathies and four had candidiasis with thymoma. Only one patient, an anergic child with chronic diffuse candidiasis had severe deficiency of plasma thymic hormone activity. Two patients, a woman with candidiasis and multiple endocrinopathies and an elderly man with metastatic epithelial thymoma had supranormal values. These studies indicate that the immunological deficit in most patients with these forms of chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis is not due to deficiency of a thymic inductive activity and suggest that an intrinsic defect exists in the maturation of antigen-responsive lymphoid cells. PMID:743805

  12. TAE modes and MHD activity in TFTR DT plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, E.; Batha, S.; Bell, M.

    1995-03-01

    The high power deuterium and tritium experiments on TFTR have produced fusion a parameters similar to those expected on ITER. The achieved {beta}{sub {alpha}}/{beta} and the R{triangledown}{beta}{sub {alpha}} in TFRR D-T shots are 1/2 to 1/3 those predicted in the ITER EDA. Studies of the initial TFTR D-T plasmas find no evidence that the presence of the fast fusion {alpha} population has affected the stability of MHD, with the possible exception of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes (TAE`s). The initial TFTR DT plasmas had MHD activity similar to that commonly seen in deuterium plasmas. Operation of TFTR at plasma currents of 2.0--2.5 MA has greatly reduced the deleterious effects of MHD commonly observed at lower currents. Even at these higher currents, the performance of TFTR is limited by {beta}-limit disruptions. The effects of MHD on D-T fusion {alpha}`s was similar to effects observed on other fusion products in D only plasmas.

  13. YANA – a software tool for analyzing flux modes, gene-expression and enzyme activities

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Roland; Musch, Patrick; von Kamp, Axel; Engels, Bernd; Schirmer, Heiner; Schuster, Stefan; Dandekar, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Background A number of algorithms for steady state analysis of metabolic networks have been developed over the years. Of these, Elementary Mode Analysis (EMA) has proven especially useful. Despite its low user-friendliness, METATOOL as a reliable high-performance implementation of the algorithm has been the instrument of choice up to now. As reported here, the analysis of metabolic networks has been improved by an editor and analyzer of metabolic flux modes. Analysis routines for expression levels and the most central, well connected metabolites and their metabolic connections are of particular interest. Results YANA features a platform-independent, dedicated toolbox for metabolic networks with a graphical user interface to calculate (integrating METATOOL), edit (including support for the SBML format), visualize, centralize, and compare elementary flux modes. Further, YANA calculates expected flux distributions for a given Elementary Mode (EM) activity pattern and vice versa. Moreover, a dissection algorithm, a centralization algorithm, and an average diameter routine can be used to simplify and analyze complex networks. Proteomics or gene expression data give a rough indication of some individual enzyme activities, whereas the complete flux distribution in the network is often not known. As such data are noisy, YANA features a fast evolutionary algorithm (EA) for the prediction of EM activities with minimum error, including alerts for inconsistent experimental data. We offer the possibility to include further known constraints (e.g. growth constraints) in the EA calculation process. The redox metabolism around glutathione reductase serves as an illustration example. All software and documentation are available for download at . Conclusion A graphical toolbox and an editor for METATOOL as well as a series of additional routines for metabolic network analyses constitute a new user-friendly software for such efforts. PMID:15929789

  14. Betaine increases the butyrylcholinesterase activity in rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Šišková, K; Dubničková, M; Pašková, Ľ; Rajdl, D; Ďuračková, Z; Muchová, J; Pauliková, I; Racek, J

    2016-03-14

    The physiological function of butyrylcholinesterase (EC 3.1.1.8, BChE) is not clearly understood, but a role was suggested in the fat utilization process, resulting in positive correlation between plasma triglyceride (TG) levels and BChE activity. Consequently we tested the hypothesis that regular intake of betaine, a natural compound intervening in the liver TG metabolism could influence the BChE activity. The BChE activity was estimated spectrophotometrically in plasma of rats fed with betaine enriched standard (B) or high-fat diet (HFB). The results confirmed decreased TG plasma levels after betaine treatment independently on the type of diet (0.15+/-0.03 (B) vs. 0.27+/-0.08 (control) mmol/l; p=0.003 and 0.13+/-0.03 (HFB) vs. 0.27+/-0.08 (control) mmol/l; p=0.005). The BChE activity increased significantly with betaine administration, however the change was more distinct in the HFB group (0.84+/-0.34 (HFB) vs. 0.22+/-0.04 (control) O.D./min/mg; p<0.001 and 0.41+/-0.11 (B) vs. 0.22+/-0.04 (control) O.D./min/mg; p=0.001). In conclusion, betaine intake led to elevated BChE activity in plasma and this effect was potentiated by the HF diet. Since betaine is in general used as a supplement in the treatment of liver diseases accompanied by TG overload, its impact on the BChE activity in the role of the liver function marker should be taken into account. PMID:26596326

  15. Electron acceleration associated with the magnetic flux pileup regions in the near-Earth plasma sheet: A multicase study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, C. L.; Zhou, M.; Yao, Z. H.; Shi, F.

    2016-05-01

    Using the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) observations, we study electron acceleration (<30 keV) in the magnetic flux pileup regions (FPRs) in the near-Earth plasma sheet (X ~ -10 RE). We present three cases of FRPs associated with dipolarization fronts and substorm dipolarization. Based on the characteristics of the magnetic field, we defined the magnetic field enhancement region (MFER) as the magnetic field with significant ramp that is usually observed near the dipolarization front boundary layer. On the other side, the increased magnetic field without a significant ramp is the rest of a FPR. Our results show that betatron acceleration dominates for 10-30 keV electrons inside the MFER, whereas Fermi acceleration dominates for 10-30 keV electrons inside the rest of the FPR. Betatron acceleration is caused by the enhancement of the local magnetic field, whereas Fermi acceleration is related to the shrinking length of magnetic field line. These accelerated electrons inside the FPRs in the near-Earth tail play a potentially important role in the evolution of the Earth's electron radiation belt and substorms.

  16. Plasma lysosomal enzyme activity in acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Welman, E; Selwyn, A P; Peters, T J; Colbeck, J F; Fox, K M

    1978-02-01

    N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.30, recommended name beta-N-Acetylglucosaminidase) was found to be a constituent of human cardiac lysosomes. beta-glucuronidase was also found in this tissue, while lysozyme, an enzyme present in leucocyte lysosomes, was not detectable in the heart. The activities of both N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase and beta-glucuronidase were elevated in plasma during the first 24 h after the onset of chest pain in patients with acute myocardial infarction and the peak levels of N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase correlated well with those of creatine kinase. N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase showed a further rise in plasma activity which gave a peak at 72 h after the onset of chest pain and this was accompanied by a rise in lysozyme activity. It is suggested that lysosome disruption caused by myocardial cell necrosis was responsible for the initial rise in plasma lysosomal enzyme activity and that the subsequent inflammatory reaction gave rise to the second peak. PMID:647716

  17. Fast plasma shutdown by killer pellet injection in JT-60U with reduced heat flux on the divertor plate and avoiding runaway electron generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshino, R.; Kondoh, T.; Neyatani, Y.; Itami, K.; Kawano, Y.; Isei, N.

    1997-02-01

    A killer pellet is an impurity pellet that is injected into a tokamak plasma in order to terminate a discharge without causing serious damage to the tokamak machine. In JT-60U neon ice pellets have been injected into OH and NB heated plasmas and fast plasma shutdowns have been demonstrated without large vertical displacement. The heat pulse on the divertor plate has been greatly reduced by killer pellet injection (KPI), but a low-power heat flux tail with a long time duration is observed. The total energy on the divertor plate increases with longer heat flux tail, so it has been reduced by shortening the tail. Runaway electron (RE) generation has been observed just after KPI and/or in the later phase of the plasma current quench. However, RE generation has been avoided when large magnetic perturbations are excited. These experimental results clearly show that KPI is a credible fast shutdown method avoiding large vertical displacement, reducing heat flux on the divertor plate, and avoiding (or minimizing) RE generation.

  18. Quasi-biennial modulation of solar neutrino flux: connections with solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchio, A.; Laurenza, M.; D'alessi, L.; Carbone, V.; Storini, M.

    2011-12-01

    A quasi-biennial periodicity has been recently found (Vecchio et al., 2010) in the solar neutrino flux, as detected at the Homestake experiment, as well as in the flux of solar energetic protons, by means of the Empirical Modes Decomposition technique. Moreover, both fluxes have been found to be significantly correlated at the quasi-biennial timescale, thus supporting the hypothesis of a connection between solar neutrinos and solar activity. The origin of this connection is investigated, by modeling how the standard Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect (the process for which the well-known neutrino flavor oscillations are modified in passing through the material) could be influenced by matter fluctuations. As proposed by Burgess et al., 2004, by introducing a background magnetic field in the helioseismic model, density fluctuations can be excited in the radiative zone by the resonance between helioseismic g-modes and Alfvén waves. In particular, with reasonable values of the background magnetic field (10-100 kG), the distance between resonant layers could be of the same order of neutrino oscillation length. We study the effect over this distance of a background magnetic field which is variable with a ~2 yr period, in agreement with typical variations of solar activity. Our findings suggest that the quasi-biennial modulation of the neutrino flux is theoretically possible as a consequence of the magnetic field variations in the solar interior. A. Vecchio, M. Laurenza, V. Carbone, M. Storini, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, 709, L1-L5 (2010). C. Burgess, N. S. Dzhalilov, T. I. Rashba, V., B.Semikoz, J. W. F. Valle, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc., 348, 609-624 (2004).

  19. Plasma catecholamines and renin activity in wrestlers following vigorous swimming.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Celko, J; Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to exercise in a physically fit and an untrained group of young healthy subjects were compared to study the significance of physical fitness for performance in a discipline for which the athletes were not trained. Ten wrestlers of national rank prepared for an international competition (age 18 years) and 9 untrained healthy males (age 21 years). Exercise consisted of 27-min swimming, freestyle, in water of 29 degrees C, with last 3 min increased to maximal effort. The blood pressure, heart rate and sublingual temperature were measured and blood samples were withdrawn before exercise, immediately after and after a 30 min period of rest. Catecholamines were analyzed by radioenzymatic method and plasma renin activity (PRA) using commercial kits. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate after swimming were increased comparably in the two groups, diastolic pressure was unchanged in the controls and decreased in the wrestlers. Plasma cortisol remained unchanged. Plasma glucose tended to increase in the controls and so decrease in wrestlers, with a significant difference between them after swimming (p < 0.05). However, plasma adrenaline was concomitantly increased in both groups (p < 0.01). Noradrenaline and PRA were increased after swimming in both the control and trained group. The increments of noradrenaline and PRA in wrestlers were significantly reduced compared to the control group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Higher physical fitness in athletes significantly reduced plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin responses to maximal exercise demanding special skill in work performance which had not been included in their training program. Training of wrestlers did not cause an exaggerated plasma adrenaline response to exercise. PMID:9803484

  20. Detailed study of the plasma-activated catalytic generation of ammonia in N2-H2 plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Helden, J. H.; Wagemans, W.; Yagci, G.; Zijlmans, R. A. B.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.; Lombardi, G.; Stancu, G. D.; Röpcke, J.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the efficiency and formation mechanism of ammonia generation in recombining plasmas generated from mixtures of N2 and H2 under various plasma conditions. In contrast to the Haber-Bosch process, in which the molecules are dissociated on a catalytic surface, under these plasma conditions the precursor molecules, N2 and H2, are already dissociated in the gas phase. Surfaces are thus exposed to large fluxes of atomic N and H radicals. The ammonia production turns out to be strongly dependent on the fluxes of atomic N and H radicals to the surface. By optimizing the atomic N and H fluxes to the surface using an atomic nitrogen and hydrogen source ammonia can be formed efficiently, i.e., more than 10% of the total background pressure is measured to be ammonia. The results obtained show a strong similarity with results reported in literature, which were explained by the production of ammonia at the surface by stepwise addition reactions between adsorbed nitrogen and hydrogen containing radicals at the surface and incoming N and H containing radicals. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ammonia production is independent of wall material. The high fluxes of N and H radicals in our experiments result in a passivated surface, and the actual chemistry, leading to the formation of ammonia, takes place in an additional layer on top of this passivated surface.

  1. Erosional flux from tectonically active landscapes: Case studies from Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roda-Boluda, Duna; D'Arcy, Mitch; Whittaker, Alex; Allen, Philip; Gheorghiu, Delia; Rodes, Angel

    2016-04-01

    Erosion and sediment supply are fundamentally important controls on landscape evolution, governing the denudation of relief, the stratigraphy deposited in basins, and the ultimate destruction of orogens. However, quantifying the rates, timescales, and predominant processes of erosion remains a major challenge in many tectonically active areas. Here, we use Southern Italy as a case study to demonstrate how these challenges can be overcome. We present 15 new 10Be catchment-averaged erosion rates, for systems distributed along 5 active normal faults for which we have excellent constraints on throw rates along strike and uplift history. These footwall catchments have a total relief of up to 1800 m and throw rates up to 1.4 mm/yr. We show that sediment supply estimates based on the 10Be erosion rates agree well with sediment supply predictions based on the fault throw profiles. Our results suggest that about 80% of the material uplifted by the faults is being eroded at a similar magnitude to the fault throw rates, offering new insights into the topographic balance of uplift and erosion in this area. These findings imply that active normal faulting is the primary control on sediment supply in Southern Italy. Our field observations suggest that landslides are an important source of sediment in our study area, and are largely driven by incision in response to fault activity. Using a field-calibrated landslide inventory, we estimate landslide-derived sediment flux for our sampled catchments. These estimates correlate well with total sediment flux estimates, demonstrating quantitatively that landslides must be a major source of sediment. Their erosional signal is adequately captured by the 10Be analyses most likely because of the high frequency of small landslides and their high spatial density in these catchments (typically >10% of the total area), which ensures sufficient sediment mixing. Finally, we use our results to calibrate the BQART model of sediment supply, enabling

  2. CXCL13 is a plasma biomarker of germinal center activity.

    PubMed

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Lindqvist, Madelene; Heit, Antje; Wu, Jennifer E; Reiss, Samantha M; Kendric, Kayla; Bélanger, Simon; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Landais, Elise; Akondy, Rama S; McGuire, Helen M; Bothwell, Marcella; Vagefi, Parsia A; Scully, Eileen; Tomaras, Georgia D; Davis, Mark M; Poignard, Pascal; Ahmed, Rafi; Walker, Bruce D; Pulendran, Bali; McElrath, M Juliana; Kaufmann, Daniel E; Crotty, Shane

    2016-03-01

    Significantly higher levels of plasma CXCL13 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 13] were associated with the generation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against HIV in a large longitudinal cohort of HIV-infected individuals. Germinal centers (GCs) perform the remarkable task of optimizing B-cell Ab responses. GCs are required for almost all B-cell receptor affinity maturation and will be a critical parameter to monitor if HIV bnAbs are to be induced by vaccination. However, lymphoid tissue is rarely available from immunized humans, making the monitoring of GC activity by direct assessment of GC B cells and germinal center CD4(+) T follicular helper (GC Tfh) cells problematic. The CXCL13-CXCR5 [chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 5] chemokine axis plays a central role in organizing both B-cell follicles and GCs. Because GC Tfh cells can produce CXCL13, we explored the potential use of CXCL13 as a blood biomarker to indicate GC activity. In a series of studies, we found that plasma CXCL13 levels correlated with GC activity in draining lymph nodes of immunized mice, immunized macaques, and HIV-infected humans. Furthermore, plasma CXCL13 levels in immunized humans correlated with the magnitude of Ab responses and the frequency of ICOS(+) (inducible T-cell costimulator) Tfh-like cells in blood. Together, these findings support the potential use of CXCL13 as a plasma biomarker of GC activity in human vaccine trials and other clinical settings. PMID:26908875

  3. Red wine activates plasma membrane redox system in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Idolo; Moccia, Stefania; Volpe, Silvestro; Alfieri, Giovanna; Strollo, Daniela; Bilotto, Stefania; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Di Renzo, Massimo; Aquino, Rita P; Russo, Gian Luigi

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, we report that polyphenols present in red wine obtained by a controlled microvinification process are able to protect human erythrocytes from oxidative stress and to activate Plasma Membrane Redox System (PMRS). Human plasma obtained from healthy subjects was incubated in the presence of whole red wine at a concentration corresponding to 9.13-73 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents to verify the capacity to protect against hypochlorous acid (HOCl)-induced plasma oxidation and to minimize chloramine formation. Red wine reduced hemolysis and chloramine formation induced by HOCl of 40 and 35%, respectively. PMRS present on human erythrocytes transfers electrons from intracellular molecules to extracellular electron acceptors. We demonstrated that whole red wine activated PMRS activity in human erythrocytes isolated from donors in a dose-dependent manner with a maximum at about 70-100 μg/ml gallic acid equivalents. We also showed that red wine increased glutathione (GSH) levels and erythrocytic antioxidant capacity, measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) quenching assay. Furthermore, we reported that GSH played a crucial role in regulating PMRS activity in erythrocytes. In fact, the effect of iodoacetamide, an alkylating agent that induces depletion of intracellular GSH, was completely counteracted by red wine. Bioactive compounds present in red wine, such as gallic acid, resveratrol, catechin, and quercetin were unable to activate PMRS when tested at the concentrations normally present in aged red wines. On the contrary, the increase of PMRS activity was associated with the anthocyanin fraction, suggesting the capacity of this class of compounds to positively modulate PMRS enzymatic activity. PMID:26866566

  4. Comprehensive measurement of respiratory activity in permeabilized cells using extracellular flux analysis

    PubMed Central

    Salabei, Joshua K.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Hill, Bradford G.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular flux (XF) analysis has become a mainstream method to measure bioenergetic function in cells and tissues. While this technique is commonly used to measure energetics in intact cells, we outline here a detailed XF protocol for measuring respiration in permeabilized cells. Cells are permeabilized using saponin, digitonin, or recombinant perfringolysin O (XF PMP reagent) and provided with specific substrates to measure complex I- or II-mediated respiratory activity, Complex III+IV respiratory activity, or Complex IV activity. Medium- and long-chain acylcarnitines or glutamine may also be provided for measuring fatty acid oxidation or glutamine oxidation, respectively. This protocol allows for such measurements using a minimal number of cells compared with other protocols, without the need for mitochondrial isolation. The results are highly reproducible, and mitochondria remain well coupled. Collectively, this protocol provides comprehensive and detailed information regarding mitochondrial activity and efficiency, and, following preparative steps, takes approximately 6 hours to complete. PMID:24457333

  5. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, S.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.; Röpcke, J.

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  6. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen.

    PubMed

    Hamann, S; Börner, K; Burlacov, I; Spies, H-J; Strämke, M; Strämke, S; Röpcke, J

    2015-12-01

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH4, C2H2, HCN, and NH3). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined. PMID:26724023

  7. Plasma nitriding monitoring reactor: A model reactor for studying plasma nitriding processes using an active screen

    SciTech Connect

    Hamann, S. Röpcke, J.; Börner, K.; Burlacov, I.; Spies, H.-J.; Strämke, M.; Strämke, S.

    2015-12-15

    A laboratory scale plasma nitriding monitoring reactor (PLANIMOR) has been designed to study the basics of active screen plasma nitriding (ASPN) processes. PLANIMOR consists of a tube reactor vessel, made of borosilicate glass, enabling optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and infrared absorption spectroscopy. The linear setup of the electrode system of the reactor has the advantages to apply the diagnostic approaches on each part of the plasma process, separately. Furthermore, possible changes of the electrical field and of the heat generation, as they could appear in down-scaled cylindrical ASPN reactors, are avoided. PLANIMOR has been used for the nitriding of steel samples, achieving similar results as in an industrial scale ASPN reactor. A compact spectrometer using an external cavity quantum cascade laser combined with an optical multi-pass cell has been applied for the detection of molecular reaction products. This allowed the determination of the concentrations of four stable molecular species (CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, HCN, and NH{sub 3}). With the help of OES, the rotational temperature of the screen plasma could be determined.

  8. Procoagulant activity on platelets adhered to collagen or plasma clot.

    PubMed

    Ilveskero, S; Siljander, P; Lassila, R

    2001-04-01

    In a new 2-stage assay of platelet procoagulant activity (PCA), we first subjected gel-filtered platelets to adhesion on collagen (as a model of primary hemostasis) or plasma clots (as a model of preformed thrombus) for 30 minutes, and then the adherent platelets were supplemented with pooled, reptilase-treated, diluted plasma. Defibrinated plasma provided coagulation factors for assembly on platelet membranes without uncontrolled binding of thrombin to fibrin(ogen). Platelet adhesion to both surfaces showed modest individual variation, which increased at platelet densities that allowed aggregation. However, adhesion-induced PCA varied individually and surface-independently >3-fold, suggesting a uniform platelet procoagulant mechanism. Permanently adhered platelets showed markedly enhanced PCA when compared with the platelet pool in suspension, even after strong activation. The rate of thrombin generation induced by clot-adherent platelets was markedly faster than on collagen-adherent platelets during the initial phase of coagulation, whereas collagen-induced PCA proceeded slowly, strongly promoted by tissue thromboplastin. Therefore at 10 minutes, after adjustment for adhered platelets, collagen supported soluble thrombin formation as much as 5 times that of the thrombin-retaining clots. Activation of platelets by their firm adhesion was accompanied by formation of microparticles, representing about one third of the total soluble PCA. Collagen-adhered platelets provide soluble thrombin and microparticles, whereas the preformed clot serves to localize and accelerate hemostasis at the injury site, with the contribution of retained thrombin and microparticles. PMID:11304482

  9. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil

    SciTech Connect

    Schroth, M.H.; Eugster, W.; Gomez, K.E.; Gonzalez-Gil, G.; Niklaus, P.A.; Oester, P.

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantify above- and below-ground CH{sub 4} fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} loading from the waste body. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH{sub 4}). However, much of the CH{sub 4} produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH{sub 4} fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH{sub 4} into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH{sub 4} concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH{sub 4} fluxes and CH{sub 4} loading were estimated from soil-gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH{sub 4} oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH{sub 4} emissions from the test section (daily mean up to {approx}91,500 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH{sub 4} concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a

  10. Temperature dependence of emission measure in solar X-ray plasmas. 1: Non-flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, K. J. H.

    1974-01-01

    X-ray and ultraviolet line emission from hot, optically thin material forming coronal active regions on the sun may be described in terms of an emission measure distribution function, Phi (T). A relationship is developed between line flux and Phi (T), a theory which assumes that the electron density is a single-valued function of temperature. The sources of error involved in deriving Phi (T) from a set of line fluxes are examined in some detail. These include errors in atomic data (collisional excitation rates, assessment of other mechanisms for populating excited states of transitions, element abundances, ion concentrations, oscillator strengths) and errors in observed line fluxes arising from poorly - known instrumental responses. Two previous analyses are discussed in which Phi (T) for a non-flaring active region is derived. A least squares method of Batstone uses X-ray data of low statistical significance, a fact which appears to influence the results considerably. Two methods for finding Phi (T) ab initio are developed. The coefficients are evaluated by least squares. These two methods should have application not only to active-region plasmas, but also to hot, flare-produced plasmas.

  11. The geometrical-optics law of reflection for electromagnetic waves in magnetically confined plasmas: Specular reflection of rays at the last closed flux surface

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, Joao P. S.

    2010-10-15

    Within the geometrical-optics approximation, it is shown that the reflection of rays describing the propagation of electromagnetic waves in fusion-grade, magnetically confined plasmas and impinging on the last closed flux surface, or plasma surface, is necessarily specular or mirror-like. More precisely, the component of the wave vector tangential to that surface does not change, whereas the component normal to it reverses its sign while keeping its magnitude. The well-known law of reflection, stating that the angle of incidence equals that of reflection, is thus generalized to anisotropic media.

  12. Calcium Modulation of Plant Plasma Membrane-Bound Atpase Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, C.

    1983-01-01

    The kinetic properties of barley enzyme are discussed and compared with those of other plants. Possibilities for calcium transport in the plasma membrane by proton pump and ATPase-dependent calcium pumps are explored. Topics covered include the ph phase of the enzyme; high affinity of barley for calcium; temperature dependence, activation enthalpy, and the types of ATPase catalytic sites. Attention is given to lipids which are both screened and bound by calcium. Studies show that barley has a calmodulin activated ATPase that is found in the presence of magnesium and calcium.

  13. INCLINATION-DEPENDENT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FLUX PROFILES FROM STRONG LENSING OF THE KERR SPACETIME

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Dai, Xinyu; Baron, E.

    2013-01-10

    Recent quasar microlensing observations have constrained the X-ray emission sizes of quasars to be about 10 gravitational radii, one order of magnitude smaller than the optical emission sizes. Using a new ray-tracing code for the Kerr spacetime, we find that the observed X-ray flux is strongly influenced by the gravity field of the central black hole, even for observers at moderate inclination angles. We calculate inclination-dependent flux profiles of active galactic nuclei in the optical and X-ray bands by combining the Kerr lensing and projection effects for future reference. We further study the dependence of the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio on the inclination angle caused by differential lensing distortion of the X-ray and optical emission, assuming several corona geometries. The strong lensing X-ray-to-optical magnification ratio can change by a factor of {approx}10 for normal quasars in some cases, and a further factor of {approx}10 for broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and obscured quasars. Comparing our results with the observed distributions in normal and BAL quasars, we find that the inclination angle dependence of the magnification ratios can significantly change the X-ray-to-optical flux ratio distributions. In particular, the mean value of the spectrum slope parameter {alpha}{sub ox}, 0.3838log F {sub 2keV}/F {sub 2500A}, can differ by {approx}0.1-0.2 between normal and BAL quasars, depending on corona geometries, suggesting larger intrinsic absorptions in BAL quasars.

  14. Calcium flux-independent NMDA receptor activity is required for Aβ oligomer-induced synaptic loss

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, J H; Bali, J; Rajendran, L; Nitsch, R M; Tackenberg, C

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic loss is one of the major features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and correlates with the degree of dementia. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) have been shown to mediate downstream effects of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in AD models. NMDARs can trigger intracellular cascades via Ca2+ entry, however, also Ca2+-independent (metabotropic) functions of NMDARs have been described. We aimed to determine whether ionotropic or metabotropic NMDAR signaling is required for the induction of synaptic loss by Aβ. We show that endogenous Aβ as well as exogenously added synthetic Aβ oligomers induced dendritic spine loss and reductions in pre- and postsynaptic protein levels in hippocampal slice cultures. Synaptic alterations were mitigated by blocking glutamate binding to NMDARs using NMDAR antagonist APV, but not by preventing ion flux with Ca2+ chelator BAPTA or open-channel blockers MK-801 or memantine. Aβ increased the activity of p38 MAPK, a kinase involved in long-term depression and inhibition of p38 MAPK abolished the loss of dendritic spines. Aβ-induced increase of p38 MAPK activity was prevented by APV but not by BAPTA, MK-801 or memantine treatment highlighting the role of glutamate binding to NMDARs but not Ca2+ flux for synaptic degeneration by Aβ. We further show that treatment with the G protein inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) did not prevent dendritic spine loss in the presence of Aβ oligomers. Our data suggest that Aβ induces the activation of p38 MAPK and subsequent synaptic loss through Ca2+ flux- and G protein-independent mechanisms. PMID:26086964

  15. Calcium flux-independent NMDA receptor activity is required for Aβ oligomer-induced synaptic loss.

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J H; Bali, J; Rajendran, L; Nitsch, R M; Tackenberg, C

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic loss is one of the major features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and correlates with the degree of dementia. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) have been shown to mediate downstream effects of the β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in AD models. NMDARs can trigger intracellular cascades via Ca(2+) entry, however, also Ca(2+)-independent (metabotropic) functions of NMDARs have been described. We aimed to determine whether ionotropic or metabotropic NMDAR signaling is required for the induction of synaptic loss by Aβ. We show that endogenous Aβ as well as exogenously added synthetic Aβ oligomers induced dendritic spine loss and reductions in pre- and postsynaptic protein levels in hippocampal slice cultures. Synaptic alterations were mitigated by blocking glutamate binding to NMDARs using NMDAR antagonist APV, but not by preventing ion flux with Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA or open-channel blockers MK-801 or memantine. Aβ increased the activity of p38 MAPK, a kinase involved in long-term depression and inhibition of p38 MAPK abolished the loss of dendritic spines. Aβ-induced increase of p38 MAPK activity was prevented by APV but not by BAPTA, MK-801 or memantine treatment highlighting the role of glutamate binding to NMDARs but not Ca(2+) flux for synaptic degeneration by Aβ. We further show that treatment with the G protein inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX) did not prevent dendritic spine loss in the presence of Aβ oligomers. Our data suggest that Aβ induces the activation of p38 MAPK and subsequent synaptic loss through Ca(2+) flux- and G protein-independent mechanisms. PMID:26086964

  16. Characteristics of fluxes of energetic electrons in the transition region during times of enhanced geophysical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev, Y.V.; Spir'kova, E.S.

    1986-05-01

    In January 1976, the Interplanetary Magnetospheric Study (IMS) began. During the period January-March 1976, geomagnetic disturbances coincided mainly with a recurring sequence of earth passages through sector structures in the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). In March, unusually large enhancements in energetic electron fluxes were recorded by Prognoz 4. The observations were made during intersections of the flanks of the transition region (TR) in conditions of enhanced geomagnetic activity, and the enhancements were of significant duration. Intense bursts of these particles were also observed in the outer magnetosphere at high latitudes. We discuss possible mechanisms for creating such formations.

  17. On the area expansion of magnetic flux tubes in solar active regions

    SciTech Connect

    Dudík, Jaroslav; Dzifčáková, Elena; Cirtain, Jonathan W. E-mail: elena@asu.cas.cz

    2014-11-20

    We calculated the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of the area expansion factors in a potential magnetic field, extrapolated from the high-resolution Hinode/SOT magnetogram of the quiescent active region NOAA 11482. Retaining only closed loops within the computational box, we show that the distribution of area expansion factors show significant structure. Loop-like structures characterized by locally lower values of the expansion factor are embedded in a smooth background. These loop-like flux tubes have squashed cross-sections and expand with height. The distribution of the expansion factors show an overall increase with height, allowing an active region core characterized by low values of the expansion factor to be distinguished. The area expansion factors obtained from extrapolation of the Solar Optical Telescope magnetogram are compared to those obtained from an approximation of the observed magnetogram by a series of 134 submerged charges. This approximation retains the general flux distribution in the observed magnetogram, but removes the small-scale structure in both the approximated magnetogram and the 3D distribution of the area expansion factors. We argue that the structuring of the expansion factor can be a significant ingredient in producing the observed structuring of the solar corona. However, due to the potential approximation used, these results may not be applicable to loops exhibiting twist or to active regions producing significant flares.

  18. Integrin activation by a cold atmospheric plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volotskova, Olga; Stepp, Mary Ann; Keidar, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. In this paper, we explore potential mechanisms by which CAP alters cell migration and influences cell adhesion. We focus on the study of CAP interaction with fibroblasts and corneal epithelial cells. The data show that fibroblasts and corneal epithelial cells have different thresholds (treatment times) required to achieve maximum inhibition of cell migration. Both cell types reduced their migration rates by ˜30-40% after CAP compared to control cells. Also, the impact of CAP treatment on cell migration and persistence of fibroblasts after integrin activation by MnCl2, serum starvation or replating cells onto surfaces coated with integrin ligands is assessed; the results show that activation by MnCl2 or starvation attenuates cells’ responses to plasma. Studies carried out to assess the impact of CAP treatment on the activation state of β1 integrin and focal adhesion size by using immunofluorescence show that fibroblasts have more active β1 integrin on their surface and large focal adhesions after CAP treatment. Based on these data, a thermodynamic model is presented to explain how CAP leads to integrin activation and focal adhesion assembly.

  19. Sensitivity of quasi-periodic outer rainband activity of tropical cyclones to the surface entropy flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingqing; Duan, Yihong

    2013-10-01

    The influence of outer-core surface entropy fluxes (SEFs) on tropical cyclone (TC) outer rainband activity is investigated in this study with a fully compressible, nonhydrostatic model. A control simulation and two sensitivity experiments with the outer-core SEF artificially increased and decreased by 20% respectively were conducted to examine the quasi-periodic outer rainband behavior. Larger negative horizontal advection due to the greater radial wind and the positive contribution by asymmetric eddies leads to a longer period of outerrainband activity in the SEF-enhanced experiment. The well-developed outer rainbands in the control and SEF-reduced simulations significantly limit the TC intensity, whereas such an intensity suppression influence is not pronounced in the SEF-enhanced experiment. As diabatic heating in outer rainbands strengthens the outer-core tangential wind, the quasi-periodic activity of outer rainbands contributes to the quasi-periodic variations of the inner-core size of the TCs.

  20. Purification of human plasma platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Stafforini, D.M.; Prescott, S.M.; McIntyre, T.M.

    1986-05-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF;1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine is synthesized by a variety of cells. It induces hypotension, and activates platelets, neutrophils, and macrophages at nanomolar concentrations. Removal of the acetate abolishes biological activity, and is catalyzed by a specific PAF acetylhydrolase present in plasma and tissues. The authors developed a rapid assay, based on separation of (/sup 3/H)acetate from (/sup 3/H-acetyl)PAF by reversed-phase chromatography. In human plasma the enzyme exhibits an apparent Km of 5.7..mu..M, with a Vmax of 0.027..mu..mol/h/mg. Ultracentrifugation in density gradients showed that 30% of the activity is associated with high density lipoproteins (HDL) and 70% with low density lipoproteins (LDL). The enzyme was purified from LDL by precipitation with Na phosphotungstate and MgCl/sub 2/, solubilization with Tween 20, column chromatography and electrophoresis. This procedure resulted in a preparation that was 21,000-fold purified from plasma (spec. act. 575..mu..mol/h/mg) with a recovery of 10%. The purified enzyme has a molecular weight of about 43,000, a broad pH optimum (peak 7.5-8.0), and a pl of 4.6. It has greater activity when PAF is in a micellar, as compared to monomeric, and exhibits surface dilution kinetics, which may be important in vivo. The purification and characterization of this enzyme will allow detailed studies of its role in PAF metabolism.

  1. Plasma material interaction studies on low activation materials used for plasma facing or blanket component

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hino, T.; Hirohata, Y.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hashiba, M.; Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Lee, Y.; Jinushi, T.; Akiba, M.; Nakamura, K.; Yoshida, H.; Sengoku, S.; Tsuzuki, K.; Kusama, Y.; Yamaguchi, K.; Muroga, T.

    2004-08-01

    Numerous issues on the plasma material interactions were investigated for low activation materials. Co-deposited carbon dust was prepared and the deuterium concentration was measured. The concentration was approximately half of the present design value for ITER. For ferritic steel, the deuterium retention was observed to be comparable to that of stainless steel. Physical sputtering yield was roughly the same as that for stainless steel. For the reduction of absorption rate in vanadium alloy, titanium oxide coating was conducted, and the coating was observed to be very effective for reduction of hydrogen absorption. Helium gas permeability was measured for numerous SiC/SiC composites, and the SiC/SiC composite made by the NITE process showed quite low permeability. The SiC/SiC blanket may be able to be used without helium leakage into plasma.

  2. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  3. GaN Etch Rates Compared with Atomic Chlorine Density and Ion Flux in an Argon/Chlorine Inductively Coupled Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahony, C. M. O.; Rizvi, S. A.; Maguire, P. D.; Garcia, F.; Graham, W. G.

    2004-09-01

    We present GaN etch rates (maximum 700nm/min), atomic chlorine densities (via Laser Induced Fluorescence at 200W RF power), positive ion densities (Langmuir probe) and positive ion wall flux (capacitive planar probe) using an Inductively Coupled Plasma as a function of chlorine in argon gas fraction from 0% to 100% at maximum RF power and pressure of 400 W and 20 mTorr respectively. In general, with chlorine addition, etch rates rise initially then tend to saturate at fractions above 50% Cl_2. Wall flux and n^+ approximate the inverse of this behaviour. The atomic chlorine density at 200W RF power rises monotonically with a pronounced inflection near 50% Cl_2. The positive ion wall flux - atomic chlorine density product strongly correlates with etch rate suggesting physical etching dominates below 50% Cl2 and chemical processes above. This is reflected in changes of the Ga/N surface stoichiometry, determined by XPS analysis.

  4. Significance of Plasma Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Activity as an Index of Sympathetic Neuronal Function

    PubMed Central

    Reid, John L.; Kopin, Irwin J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma norepinephrine and dopamine β-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.17.1) activity were measured in rats. Adrenergic neuron blockade with bretylium for 4 hr and ganglion blockade with chlorisondamine for 72 hr lowered plasma norepinephrine. Neither treatment altered plasma dopamine β-hydroxylase activity. Phenoxybenzamine for up to 48 hr markedly raised plasma norepinephrine and transiently lowered plasma dopamine β-hydroxylase at 24 hr. Prolonged pharmacological modification of sympathetic nervous activity and plasma norepinephrine were not attended by parallel changes in circulating dopamine β-hydroxylase activity. Plasma dopamine β-hydroxylase activity does not appear to be a sensitive index of prolonged alterations in sympathetic neural activity. Norepinephrine in plasma, however, appears to reflect sensitively and accurately the rate of release of the neurotransmitter. PMID:4530990

  5. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2013-11-04

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  6. Plasma-activated medium induced apoptosis on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. In this study, the fresh medium was treated with our developed NEAPP, ultra-high electron density (approximately 2 × 1016 cm-3). The medium called the plasma-activated medium (PAM) killed not normal cells but tumor cells through induction of apoptosis. Cell proliferation assays showed that the tumor cells were selectively killed by the PAM. Those cells induced apoptosis using an apoptotic molecular marker, cleaved Caspase3/7. The molecular mechanisms of PAM-mediated apoptosis in the tumor cells were also found that the PAM downregulated the expression of AKT kinase, a marker molecule in a survival signal transduction pathway. These results suggest that PAM may be a promising tool for tumor therapy by downregulating the survival signals in cancers.

  7. Numerical investigation of edge plasma phenomena in an enhanced D-alpha discharge at Alcator C-Mod: Parallel heat flux and quasi-coherent edge oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D. A.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2012-08-15

    Reduced-model scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) simulations of an enhanced D-alpha (EDA) H-mode shot observed in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak were conducted to compare with observed variations in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) width of the parallel heat flux profile. In particular, the role of the competition between sheath- and conduction-limited parallel heat fluxes in determining that width was studied for the turbulent SOL plasma that emerged from the simulations. The SOL width decreases with increasing input power and with increasing separatrix temperature in both the experiment and the simulation, consistent with the strong temperature dependence of the parallel heat flux in balance with the perpendicular transport by turbulence and blobs. The particularly strong temperature dependence observed in the case analyzed is attributed to the fact that these simulations produce SOL plasmas which are in the conduction-limited regime for the parallel heat flux. A persistent quasi-coherent (QC) mode dominates the SOLT simulations and bears considerable resemblance to the QC mode observed in C-Mod EDA operation. The SOLT QC mode consists of nonlinearly saturated wave-fronts located just inside the separatrix that are convected poloidally by the mean flow, continuously transporting particles and energy and intermittently emitting blobs into the SOL.

  8. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  9. The dynamic evolution of active-region-scale magnetic flux tubes in the turbulent solar convective envelope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Maria Ann

    2014-12-01

    The Sun exhibits cyclic properties of its large-scale magnetic field on the order of sigma22 years, with a ˜11 year frequency of sunspot occurrence. These sunspots, or active regions, are the centers of magnetically driven phenomena such as flares and coronal mass ejections. Volatile solar magnetic events directed toward the Earth pose a threat to human activities and our increasingly technological society. As such, the origin and nature of solar magnetic flux emergence is a topic of global concern. Sunspots are observable manifestations of solar magnetic fields, thus providing a photospheric link to the deep-seated dynamo mechanism. However, the manner by which bundles of magnetic field, or flux tubes, traverse the convection zone to eventual emergence at the solar surface is not well understood. To provide a connection between dynamo-generated magnetic fields and sunspots, I have performed simulations of magnetic flux emergence through the bulk of a turbulent, solar convective envelope by employing a thin flux tube model subject to interaction with flows taken from a hydrodynamic convection simulation computed through the Anelastic Spherical Harmonic (ASH) code. The convective velocity field interacts with the flux tube through the drag force it experiences as it traverses through the convecting medium. Through performing these simulations, much insight has been gained about the influence of turbulent solar-like convection on the flux emergence process and resulting active region properties. I find that the dynamic evolution of flux tubes change from convection dominated to magnetic buoyancy dominated as the initial field strength of the flux tubes increases from 15 kG to 100 kG. Additionally, active-region-scale flux tubes of 40 kG and greater exhibit properties similar to those of active regions on the Sun, such as: tilt angles, rotation rates, and morphological asymmetries. The joint effect of the Coriolis force and helical motions present in convective

  10. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  11. How to Patch Active Plasma and Collisionless Sheath: Practical Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2002-08-22

    Most plasmas have a very thin sheath compared with the plasma dimension. This necessitates separate calculations of the plasma and sheath. The Bohm criterion provides the boundary condition for calculation of plasma profiles. To calculate sheath properties, a value of electric field at the plasma-sheath interface has to be specified in addition to the Bohm criterion. The value of the boundary electric field and robust procedure to approximately patch plasma and collisionless sheath with a very good accuracy are reported.

  12. Plasma Beta Above a Solar Active Region: Rethinking the Paradigm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. Allen; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we present a model of the plasma beta above an active region and discuss its consequences in terms of coronal magnetic field modeling. The beta-plasma model is representative and derived from a collection of sources. The resulting beta variation with height is used to emphasize the assumption that the magnetic pressure dominates over the plasma pressure must be carefully considered depending on what part of the solar atmosphere is being considered. This paper points out (1) that the paradigm that the coronal magnetic field can be constructed from a force-free magnetic field must be used in the correct context, since the forcefree region is sandwiched between two regions which have beta greater than 1, (2) that the chromospheric MgIICIV magnetic measurements occur near the beta-minimum, and (3) that, moving from the photosphere upwards, beta can return to 1 at relatively low coronal heights, e.g. R approximately 1.2R(sub)s.

  13. Plasma lipid levels in active and sedentary premenopausal females.

    PubMed

    Perry, A C; Shaw, M H; Hsia, L; Nash, M S; Kaplan, T; Signorile, J F; Appleyate, B

    1992-04-01

    Cross-sectional data on 19 long-distance runners (LD), 17 aerobic dancers (AD), 19 recreational joggers (RJ), and 15 inactive controls (IC) were examined for cardiovascular endurance and determination of plasma lipoproteins. Subjects included premenopausal eumenorrheic females who were non-smokers and presently not using oral contraceptives. Results indicated that all groups were similar in age, height and weight. Only the AD group had a significantly lower percent body fat (p less than .001) than the other groups. The LD, AD and RJ groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the IC group (p less than .05), and the LD and AD groups had a significantly higher VO2max than the RJ group (p less than .05). Analysis of a one-day food log indicated that the only difference in diet among the groups was a significantly lower intake of total and monounsaturated fat in the AD group (p less than .05) and a significantly lower intake of carbohydrates in the IC group than the AD group (p less than .05). Analysis of plasma lipids revealed no significant differences in any lipid variables among the groups. These findings indicate that healthy premenopausal eumenorrheic females with similar physical characteristics also have similar plasma lipid profiles regardless of their physical activity level. PMID:1601555

  14. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  15. Identifying signatures of plasma waves and reconnection associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas Wesley

    The magnetopause marks the boundary between the shocked solar wind and magnetospheric plasma. Understanding the dynamics of the plasma processes at the magnetopause boundary is crucial to the study of plasma transport into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have shown that there exists a temperature asymmetry in the plasma sheet. During northward IMF, the cold component ions are 30-40% hotter in the dawn flank plasma sheet compared to the dusk flank. However, the mechanisms responsible are still not entirely clear. Recent work has shown that reconnection in Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices can transport plasma into the magnetosphere. Previous studies have also shown that mode conversion at the magnetopause can generate kinetic Alfven wave (KAW) activity. Both magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity can heat plasma. In this thesis we look for new cases of Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability (KHI) from Cluster spacecraft data and search for signatures of associated magnetic reconnection and plasma wave activity.

  16. Micro-Biocidal Activity of Yeast Cells by Needle Plasma Irradiation at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurumi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Taima, Tomohito; Suzuki, Kaoru; Hirose, Hideharu; Masutani, Shigeyuki

    In this study, we report on the biocidal activity technique by needle helium plasma irradiation at atmospheric pressure using borosilicate capillary nozzle to apply for the oral surgery. The diameter of needle plasma was less than 50 µm, and temperature of plasma irradiated area was less than body temperature. Needle plasma showed emission due to OH and O radical. Raman spectra and methylene blue stain showed yeast cells were inactivated by needle plasma irradiation.

  17. Effect of clofibrate on the enzyme activity of rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Renaud, G; Foliot, A; Marais, J; Infante, R

    1980-03-15

    The activity of 3 plasma membranes marker enzymes (5'-nucleotidase, Mg++-ATPase and alkaline phosphodiesterase-I) was determined in plasma membranes isolated from liver of control and of clofibrate-treated rats. A complete indentity of plasma membranes enzyme activity in the 2 groups of experimental animals was observed for the 3 enzymes studied. PMID:6102923

  18. EMERGENCE OF HELICAL FLUX AND THE FORMATION OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT CHANNEL

    SciTech Connect

    Lites, B. W.; Kubo, M.; Berger, T.; Frank, Z.; Shine, R.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.; Okamoto, T. J.; Otsuji, K.

    2010-07-20

    We present comprehensive observations of the formation and evolution of a filament channel within NOAA Active Region (AR) 10978 from Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope and TRACE. We employ sequences of Hinode spectro-polarimeter maps of the AR, accompanying Hinode Narrowband Filter Instrument magnetograms in the Na I D1 line, Hinode Broadband Filter Instrument filtergrams in the Ca II H line and G-band, Hinode X-ray telescope X-ray images, and TRACE Fe IX 171 A image sequences. The development of the channel resembles qualitatively that presented by Okamoto et al. in that many indicators point to the emergence of a pre-existing sub-surface magnetic flux rope. The consolidation of the filament channel into a coherent structure takes place rapidly during the course of a few hours, and the filament form then gradually shrinks in width over the following two days. Particular to this filament channel is the observation of a segment along its length of horizontal, weak (500 G) flux that, unlike the rest of the filament channel, is not immediately flanked by strong vertical plage fields of opposite polarity on each side of the filament. Because this isolated horizontal field is observed in photospheric lines, we infer that it is unlikely that the channel formed as a result of reconnection in the corona, but the low values of inferred magnetic fill fraction along the entire length of the filament channel suggest that the bulk of the field resides somewhat above the low photosphere. Correlation tracking of granulation in the G band presents no evidence for either systematic flows toward the channel or systematic shear flows along it. The absence of these flows, along with other indications of these data from multiple sources, reinforces (but does not conclusively demonstrate) the picture of an emerging flux rope as the origin of this AR filament channel.

  19. Comparisons of Simulated and Observed Stormtime Magnetic Intensities, Ion Plasma Parameters, and ENA Proton Flux in the Ring Current During Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, M. W.; Lemon, C.; Guild, T. B.; Schulz, M.; Roeder, J. L.; Le, G.; Lui, T.; Goldstein, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this study we compare simulated and observed stormtime magnetic intensities, proton flux spectra and/or ENA fluxes for two storm events to test how well self-consistent simulations can simultaneously reproduce these quantities. We simulate the ring current and plasma sheet using the magnetically and electrostatically self-consistent Rice Convection Model-Equilibrium (RCM-E) [Lemon et al., JGR, 2004] with a time-varying magnetopause driven by upstream solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) conditions. Using either in-situ data (e.g., LANL/MPA and SOPA) or the empirical IMF-dependent model of Tsyganenko and Mukai [JGR, 2003], we specify the plasma sheet pressure and density at 10 Earth radii as the plasma boundary location in the RCM-E. We compare the simulated magnetic intensity with the magnetic intensity measured by magnetometers on the GOES satellites at geosynchronous altitude (6.6 Earth radii) and any other available satellite. We simulate a larger (11 August 2000; minimum Dst = -106 nT) and a smaller (6 April 2010; minimum Dst = 73 nT) storm. For the 11 August 2000 storm, we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (LANL/MPA and SOPA and Polar/CAMMICE). For the more recent 6 April 2010 storm we compare simulated and observed proton spectra (THEMIS) and energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux (TWINS). We discuss the response of the ring current magnetic field and ion flux distribution to expansions and compressions of the magnetosphere associated with the dynamic solar wind pressure for these storm events.

  20. Glycolytic Flux Is Adjusted to Nitrogenase Activity in Nodules of Detopped and Argon-Treated Alfalfa Plants1

    PubMed Central

    Curioni, Paola M.G.; Hartwig, Ueli A.; Nösberger, Josef; Schuller, Kathryn A.

    1999-01-01

    To investigate the short-term (30–240 min) interactions among nitrogenase activity, NH4+ assimilation, and plant glycolysis, we measured the concentrations of selected C and N metabolites in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) root nodules after detopping and during continuous exposure of the nodulated roots to Ar:O2 (80:20, v/v). Both treatments caused an increase in the ratios of glucose-6-phosphate to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, fructose-6-phosphate to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate, and PEP to malate. This suggested that glycolytic flux was inhibited at the steps catalyzed by phosphofructokinase, pyruvate kinase, and PEP carboxylase. In the Ar:O2-treated plants the apparent inhibition of glycolytic flux was reversible, whereas in the detopped plants it was not. In both groups of plants the apparent inhibition of glycolytic flux was delayed relative to the decline in nitrogenase activity. The decline in nitrogenase activity was followed by a dramatic increase in the nodular glutamate to glutamine ratio. In the detopped plants this was coincident with the apparent inhibition of glycolytic flux, whereas in the Ar:O2-treated plants it preceded the apparent inhibition of glycolytic flux. We propose that the increase in the nodular glutamate to glutamine ratio, which occurs as a result of the decline in nitrogenase activity, may act as a signal to decrease plant glycolytic flux in legume root nodules. PMID:9952439

  1. Crystal Structure of Human Plasma Platelet-Activating Factor Acetylhydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Samanta, U.; Bahnson, B

    2008-01-01

    Human plasma platelet-activating factor (PAF) acetylhydrolase functions by reducing PAF levels as a general anti-inflammatory scavenger and is linked to anaphylactic shock, asthma, and allergic reactions. The enzyme has also been implicated in hydrolytic activities of other pro-inflammatory agents, such as sn-2 oxidatively fragmented phospholipids. This plasma enzyme is tightly bound to low and high density lipoprotein particles and is also referred to as lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A{sub 2}. The crystal structure of this enzyme has been solved from x-ray diffraction data collected to a resolution of 1.5{angstrom}. It has a classic lipase {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold, and it contains a catalytic triad of Ser{sup 273}, His{sup 351}, and Asp{sup 296}. Two clusters of hydrophobic residues define the probable interface-binding region, and a prediction is given of how the enzyme is bound to lipoproteins. Additionally, an acidic patch of 10 carboxylate residues and a neighboring basic patch of three residues are suggested to play a role in high density lipoprotein/low density lipoprotein partitioning. A crystal structure is also presented of PAF acetylhydrolase reacted with the organophosphate compound paraoxon via its active site Ser{sup 273}. The resulting diethyl phosphoryl complex was used to model the tetrahedral intermediate of the substrate PAF to the active site. The model of interface binding begins to explain the known specificity of lipoprotein-bound substrates and how the active site can be both close to the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface and at the same time be accessible to the aqueous phase.

  2. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-08-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding "hot-spots", and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations. PMID:19096530

  3. Flux Tensor Constrained Geodesic Active Contours with Sensor Fusion for Persistent Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Bunyak, Filiz; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Nath, Sumit Kumar; Seetharaman, Gunasekaran

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes new contributions in motion detection, object segmentation and trajectory estimation to create a successful object tracking system. A new efficient motion detection algorithm referred to as the flux tensor is used to detect moving objects in infrared video without requiring background modeling or contour extraction. The flux tensor-based motion detector when applied to infrared video is more accurate than thresholding ”hot-spots”, and is insensitive to shadows as well as illumination changes in the visible channel. In real world monitoring tasks fusing scene information from multiple sensors and sources is a useful core mechanism to deal with complex scenes, lighting conditions and environmental variables. The object segmentation algorithm uses level set-based geodesic active contour evolution that incorporates the fusion of visible color and infrared edge informations in a novel manner. Touching or overlapping objects are further refined during the segmentation process using an appropriate shape-based model. Multiple object tracking using correspondence graphs is extended to handle groups of objects and occlusion events by Kalman filter-based cluster trajectory analysis and watershed segmentation. The proposed object tracking algorithm was successfully tested on several difficult outdoor multispectral videos from stationary sensors and is not confounded by shadows or illumination variations. PMID:19096530

  4. Control of Pitching Airfoil Aerodynamics by Vorticity Flux Modification using Active Bleed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, John; Glezer, Ari

    2014-11-01

    Distributed active bleed driven by pressure differences across a pitching airfoil is used to regulate the vorticity flux over the airfoil's surface and thereby to control aerodynamic loads in wind tunnel experiments. The range of pitch angles is varied beyond the static stall margin of the 2-D VR-7 airfoil at reduced pitching rates up to k = 0.42. Bleed is regulated dynamically using piezoelectric louvers between the model's pressure side near the trailing edge and the suction surface near the leading edge. The time-dependent evolution of vorticity concentrations over the airfoil and in the wake during the pitch cycle is investigated using high-speed PIV and the aerodynamic forces and moments are measured using integrated load cells. The timing of the dynamic stall vorticity flux into the near wake and its effect on the flow field are analyzed in the presence and absence of bleed using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD). It is shown that bleed actuation alters the production, accumulation, and advection of vorticity concentrations near the surface with significant effects on the evolution, and, in particular, the timing of dynamic stall vortices. These changes are manifested by alteration of the lift hysteresis and improvement of pitch stability during the cycle, while maintaining cycle-averaged lift to within 5% of the base flow level with significant implications for improvement of the stability of flexible wings and rotor blades. This work is supported by the Rotorcraft Center (VLRCOE) at Georgia Tech.

  5. Formation of δ-Sunspot in Simulations of Active-Region-Scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-04-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging pattherns similar to those formed in observations, e.g. the inverted polarity against Hale’s law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the PIL. Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the -spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  6. δ-Sunspot Formation in Simulation of Active-region-scale Flux Emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Fang; Fan, Yuhong

    2015-06-01

    δ-sunspots, with highly complex magnetic structures, are very productive in energetic eruptive events, such as X-class flares and homologous eruptions. We here study the formation of such complex magnetic structures by numerical simulations of magnetic flux emergence from the convection zone into the corona in an active-region-scale domain. In our simulation, two pairs of bipolar sunspots form on the surface, originating from two buoyant segments of a single subsurface twisted flux rope, following the approach of Toriumi et al. Expansion and rotation of the emerging fields in the two bipoles drive the two opposite polarities into each other with apparent rotating motion, producing a compact δ-sunspot with a sharp polarity inversion line. The formation of the δ-sunspot in such a realistic-scale domain produces emerging patterns similar to those formed in observations, e.g., the inverted polarity against Hale's law, the curvilinear motion of the spot, and strong transverse field with highly sheared magnetic and velocity fields at the polarity inversion line (PIL). Strong current builds up at the PIL, giving rise to reconnection, which produces a complex coronal magnetic connectivity with non-potential fields in the δ-spot overlaid by more relaxed fields connecting the two polarities at the two ends.

  7. Computer modeling of active experiments in space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollens, Ross John

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of space plasmas is expanding rapidly. This is, in large part, due to the ambitious efforts of scientists from around the world who are performing large scale active experiments in the space plasma surrounding the earth. One such effort was designated the Active Magnetospheric Particle Tracer Explorers (AMPTE) and consisted of a series of plasma releases that were completed during 1984 and 1985. What makes the AMPTE experiments particularly interesting was the occurrence of a dramatic anomaly that was completely unpredicted. During the AMPTE experiment, three satellites traced the solar wind flow into the earth's magnetosphere. One satellite, built by West Germany, released a series of barium and lithium canisters that were detonated and subsequently photoionized via solar radiation, thereby creating an artificial comet. Another satellite, built by Great Britain and in the vicinity during detonation, carried, as did the first satellite, a comprehensive set of magnetic field, particle, and wave instruments. Upon detonation, what was observed by the satellites, as well as by aircraft and ground-based observers, was quite unexpected. The initial deflection of the ion clouds was not in the ambient solar wind's flow direction (V) but rather in the direction transverse to the solar wind and the background magnetic field (V x B). This result was not predicted by any existing theories or simulation models; it is the main subject discussed in this dissertation. A large three dimensional computer simulation was produced to demonstrate that this transverse motion can be explained in terms of a rocket effect. Due to the extreme computer resources utilized in producing this work, the computer methods used to complete the calculation and the visualization techniques used to view the results are also discussed.

  8. Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) clotting activity in human plasma in health and disease in various animal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Goldsmith, G; Waldmann, R

    1976-12-01

    Fitzgerald factor (high molecular weight kininogen) is an agent in normal human plasma that corrects the impaired in vitro surface-mediated plasma reactions of blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, and kinin generation observed in Fitzgerald trait plasma. To assess the possible pathophysiologic role of Fitzgerald factor, its titer was measured by a functional clot-promoting assay. Mean +/- SD in 42 normal adults was 0.99+/-0.25 units/ml, one unit being the activity in 1 ml of normal pooled plasma. No difference in titer was noted between normal men and women, during pregnancy, or after physical exercise. Fitzgerald factor activity was significantly reduced in the plasmas of eight patients with advanced hepatic cirrhosis (0.40+/-0.09 units/ml) and of ten patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (0.60+/-0.30 units/ml), but was normal in plasmas of patients with other congenital clotting factor deficiencies, nephrotic syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or sarcoidosis, or under treatment with warfarin. The plasmas of 21 mammalian species tested appeared to contain Fitzgerald factor activity, but those of two avian, two repitilian, and one amphibian species did not correct the coagulant defect in Fitzgerald trait plasmas. PMID:1000085

  9. Influence of decavanadate on rat synaptic plasma membrane ATPases activity.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Danijela; Colović, Mirjana; Bosnjaković-Pavlović, Nada; Spasojević-De Bire, Anne; Vasić, Vesna

    2009-09-01

    The in vitro influence of decameric vanadate species on Na+/K+-ATPase, plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA)-calcium pump and ecto-ATPase activity, using rat synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) as model system was investigated, whereas the commercial porcine cerebral cortex Na+/K+-ATPase served as a reference. The thermal behaviour of the synthesized decavanadate (V10) has been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis, while the type of polyvanadate anion was identified using the IR spectroscopy. The concentration-dependent responses to V10 of all enzymes were obtained. The half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) of the enzyme activity was achieved at (4.74 +/- 1.15) x 10(-7) mol/l for SPM Na+/K+-ATPase, (1.30 +/- 0.10) x 10(-6) mol/l for commercial Na+/K+-ATPase and (3.13 +/- 1.70) x 10(-8) mol/l for Ca2+-ATPase, while ecto-ATPase is significantly less sensitive toward V10 (IC50 = (1.05 +/- 0.10) x 10(-4) mol/l) than investigated P-type ATPases. Kinetic analysis showed that V10 inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase by reducing the maximum enzymatic velocity and apparent affinity for ATP (increasing K(m) value), implying a mixed mode of interaction between V10 and P-type ATPases. PMID:20037196

  10. Surface response of tungsten to helium and hydrogen plasma flux as a function of temperature and incident kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, Harikrishnan

    formation process, helium clusters create self-interstitial defect clusters in tungsten by a trap mutation process, followed by the migration of these defects to the surface that leads to the formation of layers of adatom islands on the tungsten surface. As the helium clusters grow into nanometer sized bubbles, their proximity to the surface and extremely high gas pressures can cause them to rupture the surface thus enabling helium release. Helium bubble bursting induces additional surface damage and tungsten mass loss which varies depending on the nature of the surface. We then show tendril-like geometries have surfaces that are more resilient to helium clustering and bubble formation and rupture. Finally, the study includes hydrogen to reveal the effect of a mixed 90%H-10%He plasma mix on the tungsten surface. We find that hydrogen greatly affects the tungsten surface, with a near surface hydrogen saturation layer, and that helium clusters still form and are attractive trapping sites for hydrogen. Molecular dynamics simulations have also investigated the effect of sub-surface helium bubble evolution on tungsten surface morphology. The helium bubble/tungsten surface interaction has been systematically studied to determine how parameters such as bubble shape and size, temperature, tungsten surface orientation and ligament thickness above the bubble impact bubble stability and surface evolution. The tungsten surface is roughened by a combination of adatom islands, craters and pinholes. The study provides insight into the mechanisms and conditions leading to various tungsten topology changes, most notably the formation of nanoscale fuzz. An atomistic study of the mechanisms behind initial phases of tungsten nano-fuzz growth has determined that tungsten surfaces are affected by sub-displacement energy helium and hydrogen fluxes through a series of mechanisms. Sub-surface helium atom clustering, bubble nucleation, growth and rupture lead to tungsten surface deformation. Helium

  11. Controlled deposition of plasma activated coatings on zirconium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhavan, Behnam; Bilek, Marcela

    2015-12-01

    Zirconium-based alloys are promising materials for orthopedic prostheses due to their low toxicity, superb corrosion resistivity, and favorable mechanical properties. The integration of such bio-implantable devices with local host tissues can strongly be improved by the development of a plasma polymerized acetylene and nitrogen (PPAN) that immobilizes bio-active molecules. The surface chemistry of PPAN is critically important as it plays a key role in affecting the surface free energy that alters the functionality of bio-active molecules at the surface. The cross-linking degree of PPAN is another key property that directly influences the water-permeability and thus also the stability of films in aqueous media. In this study we demonstrate that by simply tuning the zirconium bias voltage, control over the surface chemistry and cross-linking degree of PANN is achieved.

  12. High quality actively cooled plasma facing components for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Nygren, R.

    1993-12-31

    This paper interweaves some suggestions for developing actively-cooled PFCs (plasma facing components) for future fusion devices with supporting examples taken from the design, fabrication and operation of Tore Supra`s Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter (OPL). This actively-cooled midplane limiter, designed for heat and particle removal during long pulse operation, has been operated in essentially thermally steady state conditions. From experience with testing to identify braze flaws in the OPL, recommendations are made to analyze the impact of joining flaws on thermal-hydraulic performance of PFCs and to validate a method of inspection for such flaws early in the design development. Capability for extensive in-service monitoring of future PFCs is also recommended and the extensive calorimetry and IR thermography used to confirm and update safe operating limits for power handling of the OPL are reviewed.

  13. Surface flux transport simulations. Inflows towards active regions and the modulation of the solar cycle.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Belda, David; Cameron, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Aims. We investigate the way near-surface converging flows towards active regions affect the build-up of magnetic field at the Sun's polar caps. In the Babcock-Leighton dynamo framework, this modulation of the polar fields could explain the variability of the solar cycle. Methods. We develop a surface flux transport code incorporating a parametrized model of the inflows and run simulations spanning several cycles. We carry out a parameter study to test how the strength and extension of the inflows affect the amplitude of the polar fields. Results. Inflows are seen to play an important role in the build-up of the polar fields, and can act as the non-linearity feedback mechanism required to limit the strength of the solar cycles in the Babcock-Leighton dynamo framework.

  14. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield.

    PubMed

    Merz, Stefan; Djuricic, Mile; Villa, Mario; Böck, Helmuth; Steinhauser, Georg

    2011-11-01

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10(9)cm(-2)s(-1) at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. PMID:21646026

  15. Formation of a double-decker magnetic flux rope in the sigmoidal solar active region 11520

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Guo, Y.; Sun, X. D.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-10

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s{sup –1}. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  16. Formation of a Double-decker Magnetic Flux Rope in the Sigmoidal Solar Active Region 11520

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, X.; Ding, M. D.; Zhang, J.; Sun, X. D.; Guo, Y.; Wang, Y. M.; Kliem, B.; Deng, Y. Y.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we address the formation of a magnetic flux rope (MFR) that erupted on 2012 July 12 and caused a strong geomagnetic storm event on July 15. Through analyzing the long-term evolution of the associated active region observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, it is found that the twisted field of an MFR, indicated by a continuous S-shaped sigmoid, is built up from two groups of sheared arcades near the main polarity inversion line a half day before the eruption. The temperature within the twisted field and sheared arcades is higher than that of the ambient volume, suggesting that magnetic reconnection most likely works there. The driver behind the reconnection is attributed to shearing and converging motions at magnetic footpoints with velocities in the range of 0.1-0.6 km s-1. The rotation of the preceding sunspot also contributes to the MFR buildup. Extrapolated three-dimensional non-linear force-free field structures further reveal the locations of the reconnection to be in a bald-patch region and in a hyperbolic flux tube. About 2 hr before the eruption, indications of a second MFR in the form of an S-shaped hot channel are seen. It lies above the original MFR that continuously exists and includes a filament. The whole structure thus makes up a stable double-decker MFR system for hours prior to the eruption. Eventually, after entering the domain of instability, the high-lying MFR impulsively erupts to generate a fast coronal mass ejection and X-class flare; while the low-lying MFR remains behind and continuously maintains the sigmoidicity of the active region.

  17. EISCAT observations of pump-enhanced plasma temperature and optical emission excitation rate as a function of power flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryers, C. J.; Kosch, M. J.; Senior, A.; Rietveld, M. T.; Yeoman, T. K.

    2012-09-01

    We analyze optical emissions and enhanced electron temperatures induced by high power HF radio waves as a function of power flux using the EISCAT heater with a range of effective radiated powers. The UHF radar was used to measure the electron temperatures and densities. The Digital All Sky Imager was used to record the 630.0 nm optical emission intensities. We quantify the HF flux loss due to self-absorption in the D-region (typically 3-11 dB) and refraction in the F-region to determine the flux which reaches the upper-hybrid resonance height. We find a quasi-linear relationship between the HF flux and both the temperature enhancement and the optical emission excitation rate with a threshold at ˜37.5 μWm-2. On average ˜70% of the HF flux at the upper-hybrid resonance height goes in to heating the electrons for fluxes above the threshold compared to ˜40% for fluxes below the threshold.

  18. Interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions for different solar activities interacting with spacecraft and astronauts in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat, Cyrus

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine the interplanetary proton flux and solar wind conditions by using data from several satellites such as Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) in particular GOES 9, GOES 11, GOES 12, GOES 13, and Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) to determine proton flux in different solar wind conditions. The data from above satellites were used to determine space weather conditions in which the goals are to evaluate proton fluxes for four periods of solar cycle activity: a solar cycle 23/24 minimum (2008), close to a solar cycle 22/23 minimum (1997), with intermediate activity (2011) and for about maximum activity for the cycle 23 (2003), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 2003 and 2008 (Max vs. Min), to compare data of two period of solar cycle in 1997 and 2008 (Min vs. Min), to compare soft X-ray flux from SOHO with proton 1-10 MeV flux from GOES 9 for strong flare in 1997. To conclude the above evaluations are being used to determine the interaction between the space weather conditions and the following consequences of these conditions important for astronautics and everyday human activity: 1- Satellite and Spacecraft charging, 2-Dangerous conditions for onboard electronics and astronauts during strong solar flare events, and 3- Total Electron Content (TEC), Global Positioning System (GPS), and radio communication problems related to solar activity.

  19. High-time resolution measurements of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions during flux transfer events at the Earth's dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Jamey D.; Carrell, Cynthia

    1993-01-01

    We present preliminary results of a study of upstream magnetic field and plasma conditions measured by IRM during flux transfer events observed at the Earth's magnetopause by CCE. This study was designed to determine the importance of various upstream factors in the formation of bipolar magnetic field signatures called flux transfer events (FTEs). Six FTE encounters were examined. In three cases, the two satellites were on similar magnetic field lines. Preliminary investigation showed that fluctuations occurred in the Bz component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) resulting in a southward field preceding the FTE in all three of these cases. In two of these cases, the changes were characterized by a distinct rotation from a strong southward to a strong northward field. There were also accompanying changes in the dynamic and thermal pressure in the solar wind immediately before the FTE was encountered. Examination of the 3D plasma distributions showed that these pulses were due to the addition of energetic upstreaming foreshock particles. There were no consistent changes in either Bz or the plasma pressure at IRM for the three events when the satellites were not connected by the IMF.

  20. Calculation of thermal fluxes of plasma torch reradiation under the action of laser radiation on a condensed target

    SciTech Connect

    Rudenko, V. V.

    2010-12-15

    The problem of laser deposition with allowance for thermal radiation transport inside and outside the laser torch is considered in a multigroup approximation. The energy fluxes of laser torch thermal radiation onto a target in the far and near zones are calculated as functions of time and the character of the exposure. It is shown that absorption of thermal fluxes in the substrate and target in the course of laser deposition results in their substantial heating. The possibility of diagnosing thermal radiation fluxes from the laser torch by using photodetectors is demonstrated.

  1. Quantifying the Topology and Evolution of a Magnetic Flux Rope Associated with Multi-flare Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Yang; Ding, M. D.

    2016-06-01

    Magnetic flux ropes (MFRs) play an important role in solar activities. The quantitative assessment of the topology of an MFR and its evolution is crucial for a better understanding of the relationship between the MFR and associated activities. In this paper, we investigate the magnetic field of active region (AR) 12017 from 2014 March 28–29, during which time 12 flares were triggered by intermittent eruptions of a filament (either successful or confined). Using vector magnetic field data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we calculate the magnetic energy and helicity injection in the AR, and extrapolate the 3D magnetic field with a nonlinear force-free field model. From the extrapolations, we find an MFR that is cospatial with the filament. We further determine the configuration of this MFR from the closed quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) around it. Then, we calculate the twist number and the magnetic helicity for the field lines composing the MFR. The results show that the closed QSL structure surrounding the MFR becomes smaller as a consequence of flare occurrence. We also find that the flares in our sample are mainly triggered by kink instability. Moreover, the twist number varies more sensitively than other parameters with the occurrence of flares.

  2. Partial pressure analysis of plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Dylla, H.F.

    1984-11-01

    The application of partial pressure analysis for plasma diagnostic measurements is reviewed. A comparison is made between the techniques of plasma flux analysis and partial pressure analysis for mass spectrometry of plasmas. Emphasis is given to the application of quadrupole mass spectrometers (QMS). The interface problems associated with the coupling of a QMS to a plasma device are discussed including: differential-pumping requirements, electromagnetic interferences from the plasma environment, the detection of surface-active species, ion source interactions, and calibration procedures. Example measurements are presented from process monitoring of glow discharge plasmas which are useful for cleaning and conditioning vacuum vessels.

  3. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  4. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  5. Status of the ITER plasma modeling activities in JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Junya; Honda, Mitsuru; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Aiba, Nobuyuki; Toma, Mitsunori; Matsuyama, Akinobu; Naito, Osamu; Miyata, Yoshiaki; Inoue, Shizuo; Narita, Emi; Shimizu, Katsuhiro; Hamamatsu, Kiyotaka; Ide, Shunsuke; Yagi, Masatoshi

    2015-11-01

    JAEA has been contributing to the ITER plasma modeling in a wide range of research areas. Among them we report recent integrated modeling activities in JAEA. The integrated modeling is indispensable for predictive simulations of autonomous ITER plasmas, which exhibit multi-physics nature. JAEA has been developing an integrated modeling code, the TOPICS suite. The TOPICS suite has been incorporating many physics factors to enhance its prediction capability and has delivered many important findings on ITER plasm. A recent achievement is the success of predictive simulation of toroidal rotation in ITER. The TOPICS suite has been coupled with the 3D equilibrium code VMEC and the 3D drift-kinetic solver FORTEC-3D to compute the NTV, the radial electric field, and the resultant toroidal rotation self-consistently. Another achievement is the quantitative estimate of reduction of ELM energy loss by pellet injection in ITER. The TOPICS suite has been coupled with a new pellet model and with the MHD stability code MARG2D to calculate finite-n modes for modeling the ELM-enhanced diffusivities.

  6. Determination of human plasma xanthine oxidase activity by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Moriwaki, Y; Takahashi, S; Tsutsumi, Z; Yamakita, J; Nasako, Y; Hiroishi, K; Higashino, K

    1996-06-01

    An assay for human plasma xanthine oxidase activity was developed with pterin as the substrate and the separation of product (isoxanthopterin) by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector. The reaction mixture consists of 60 microliters of plasma and 240 microliters of 0.2 M Tris-HCl buffer (pH 9.0) containing 113 microM pterin. With this assay, the activity of plasma xanthine oxidase could be easily determined despite its low activity. As a result, it could be demonstrated that the intravenous administration of heparin or the oral administration of ethanol did not increase plasma xanthine oxidase activity in normal subjects, and also that plasma xanthine oxidase activity was higher in patients with hepatitis C virus infection than in healthy subjects or patients with gout. In addition, a single patient with von Gierke's disease showed a marked increase in the plasma activity of this enzyme, relative to that apparent in normal subjects. PMID:8811453

  7. Mass spectrometry-based microassay of (2)H and (13)C plasma glucose labeling to quantify liver metabolic fluxes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hasenour, Clinton M; Wall, Martha L; Ridley, D Emerson; Hughey, Curtis C; James, Freyja D; Wasserman, David H; Young, Jamey D

    2015-07-15

    Mouse models designed to examine hepatic metabolism are critical to diabetes and obesity research. Thus, a microscale method to quantitatively assess hepatic glucose and intermediary metabolism in conscious, unrestrained mice was developed. [(13)C3]propionate, [(2)H2]water, and [6,6-(2)H2]glucose isotopes were delivered intravenously in short- (9 h) and long-term-fasted (19 h) C57BL/6J mice. GC-MS and mass isotopomer distribution (MID) analysis were performed on three 40-μl arterial plasma glucose samples obtained during the euglycemic isotopic steady state. Model-based regression of hepatic glucose and citric acid cycle (CAC)-related fluxes was performed using a comprehensive isotopomer model to track carbon and hydrogen atom transitions through the network and thereby simulate the MIDs of measured fragment ions. Glucose-6-phosphate production from glycogen diminished, and endogenous glucose production was exclusively gluconeogenic with prolonged fasting. Gluconeogenic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) remained stable, whereas that from glycerol modestly increased from short- to long-term fasting. CAC flux [i.e., citrate synthase (VCS)] was reduced with long-term fasting. Interestingly, anaplerosis and cataplerosis increased with fast duration; accordingly, pyruvate carboxylation and the conversion of oxaloacetate to PEP were severalfold higher than VCS in long-term fasted mice. This method utilizes state-of-the-art in vivo methodology and comprehensive isotopomer modeling to quantify hepatic glucose and intermediary fluxes during physiological stress in mice. The small plasma requirements permit serial sampling without stress and the affirmation of steady-state glucose kinetics. Furthermore, the approach can accommodate a broad range of modeling assumptions, isotope tracers, and measurement inputs without the need to introduce ad hoc mathematical approximations. PMID:25991647

  8. Central magnetohydrodynamic activity in pellet-fueled JT-60 plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Y.; Ozeki, T.; Azumi, M. )

    1992-01-01

    The central magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities are strongly affected by hydrogen pellet injection. The change in the sawtooth characteristics (viz., crash time, crash mechanisms, and sawtooth period) seem to be dependent on the density (and pressure) peakedness. With deepening pellet penetration, the sawtooth frequency becomes longer. At the sawtooth emerging after the deep pellet penetration into high-{ital I}{sub {ital p}} limiter discharges, only a small amount of the central kinetic energy is released and the crash does not follow the fully reconnecting style. The sawtooth crash after the pellet injection tends to have more ideal-like characteristics for higher density and pressure peaking factors. At each sawtooth, the {ital m}=1 rotation frequency changes suddenly to the ion-diamagnetic direction or the codirection (parallel to the plasma current).

  9. Pair Plasmas in the Central Engine of Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuruta, S.; Tritz, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    As the most promising model for the X-ray emission from a class of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) represented by radio-quiet quasars and Seyfert nuclei, here we introduce the non-thermal pair cascade model, where soft photons are Comptonized by non-thermal electron-positron pair plasmas produced by (gamma)-rays. After summarizing the simplest model of this kind, the "homogeneous spherical cascade model", our most recent work on the "surface cascade model" is presented, where a geometrical effect is introduced. Many characteristics of this model are qualitatively similar to the homogeneous cascade model. However, an important difference is that (gamma)-ray depletion is much more efficient in the surface cascade, and consequently this model naturally satisfies the severe observational constraint imposed by the (gamma)-ray background radiation.

  10. Formation mechanism of bubbles and holes on tungsten surface with low-energy and high-flux helium plasma irradiation in NAGDIS-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Dai; Ye, M. Y.; Ohno, N.; Takamura, S.

    2004-08-01

    A systematic study on the formation mechanism of micron-sized He bubbles and holes in powder metallurgy tungsten due to helium ion irradiation with an ion energy below 30 eV and a particle flux above 10 22 m -2 s -1 has been performed in the linear divertor plasma simulator NAGDIS-II. Holes are formed with incident helium ion energy above 5 eV, which could be related to the surface barrier potential energy for He penetrating into tungsten. Tungsten surface temperature strongly influences the number and size of hole. Above 1600 K, bubbles and/or holes with several hundreds nano-meter diameter appear on the tungsten surface. Single crystal tungsten, which has much fewer intrinsic defects than powder metallurgy tungsten, was also irradiated by He plasmas. There is no qualitative difference in the hole formation between the two grades of tungsten. Bubble and hole formation mechanisms are discussed based on the experimental results.

  11. Photospheric Vertical Current Density and Overlying Atmospheric Activity in an Emerging Flux Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgoulis, M. K.; Rust, D. M.; Bernasconi, P. N.; Schmieder, B.

    2002-05-01

    Using high-resolution vector magnetograms obtained by the balloon-borne Flare Genesis Experiment (FGE), we construct maps of the vertical current density in the emerging flux region NOAA 8844. The vertical current density has been decomposed into components that are field-aligned and perpendicular to the magnetic field, thus allowing a straightforward identification of force-free areas, as well as of areas where the force-free approximation breaks down. Small-scale chromospheric activity, such as H α Ellerman bombs and Ultraviolet bright points in 1600 Åshow a remarkable correlation with areas of strong current density. Simultaneous data of overlying coronal loops, observed by TRACE in the Extreme Ultraviolet (171 Åand 195 Å), have been carefully co-aligned with the FGE photospheric maps. We find that the footpoints of the TRACE loops always coincide with strong vertical currents and enhancements of the current helicity density. We also investigate whether the force-free approximation is valid on the photosphere during various evolutionary stages of the active region.

  12. Shift in principal equilibrium current from a vertical to a toroidal one towards the initiation of a closed flux surface in ECR plasmas in the LATE device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Kengoh; Wada, Manato; Uchida, Masaki; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Maekawa, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    In toroidal electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasmas under a weak external vertical field {{B}\\text{V}} a part of the pressure driven vertical charge separation current returns along the helical field lines, generating a toroidal current. The rest circulates via the conducting vacuum vessel. Only the toroidal current contributes to the production of a closed flux surface. Both the toroidal and vertical currents are an equilibrium current that provides a radial force by the interaction with the vertical field and the toroidal field, respectively, to counter-balance the outward pressure ballooning force. We have done experiments using 2.45 GHz microwaves in the low aspect ratio torus experiment (LATE) device to investigate in what way and how much the toroidal current is generated towards the initiation of a closed flux surface. In steady discharges by {{P}\\text{inj}}=1.5 kW under various {{B}\\text{V}} both the pressure and the toroidal current become large with {{B}\\text{V}} . When {{B}\\text{V}}=6.8 G, a toroidal current of 290 A is generated and the vertical field is reduced to 1.2 G inside the current channel, being close to the initiation of a closed flux surface. In this plasma the return current does not obey Ohm’s law. Instead, the return current flows so that the electric force on the electron fluid is balanced with the pressure gradient along the field lines. Near the top and bottom boundaries superthermal electrons flow beyond the potential barrier onto the walls along the field lines. In another discharge by the low power of {{P}\\text{inj}}=1.0 kW under {{B}\\text{V}}=8.3 G, both the toroidal current and the pressure steadily increase for an initial duration of 1.1 s and then abruptly jump, generating an initial closed flux surface. While the counter force from the vertical current is initially dominant, that from the toroidal current gradually increases and becomes four times larger than that from the vertical current just before the initiation

  13. Evaluation of CETP activity in vivo under non-steady-state conditions: influence of anacetrapib on HDL-TG flux.

    PubMed

    McLaren, David G; Previs, Stephen F; Phair, Robert D; Stout, Steven J; Xie, Dan; Chen, Ying; Salituro, Gino M; Xu, Suoyu S; Castro-Perez, Jose M; Opiteck, Gregory J; Akinsanya, Karen O; Cleary, Michele A; Dansky, Hayes M; Johns, Douglas G; Roddy, Thomas P

    2016-03-01

    Studies in lipoprotein kinetics almost exclusively rely on steady-state approaches to modeling. Herein, we have used a non-steady-state experimental design to examine the role of cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) in mediating HDL-TG flux in vivo in rhesus macaques, and therefore, we developed an alternative strategy to model the data. Two isotopomers ([(2)H11] and [(13)C18]) of oleic acid were administered (orally and intravenously, respectively) to serve as precursors for labeling TGs in apoB-containing lipoproteins. The flux of a specific TG (52:2) from these donor lipoproteins to HDL was used as the measure of CETP activity; calculations are also presented to estimate total HDL-TG flux. Based on our data, we estimate that the peak total postprandial TG flux to HDL via CETP is ∼ 13 mg · h(-1) · kg(-1) and show that this transfer was inhibited by 97% following anacetrapib treatment. Collectively, these data demonstrate that HDL TG flux can be used as a measure of CETP activity in vivo. The fact that the donor lipoproteins can be labeled in situ using well-established stable isotope tracer techniques suggests ways to measure this activity for native lipoproteins in free-living subjects under any physiological conditions. PMID:26658238

  14. High-resolution digital movies of emerging flux and horizontal flows in active regions on the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topka, K.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Tarbell, T.; Title, A.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution observations of active regions in many wavelength bands obtained at the Vacuum Tower Telescope of NSO/Sunspot (Sacramento Peak) are presented. The SOUP tunable filter, HRSO 1024 x 1024 CCD camera, and a sunspot tracker for image stabilization were used. Subarrays of 512 x 512 pixels were processed digitally and recorded on videodisk in movie format. The movies with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations were shown: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Doppler velocity, Fe I 5576 A line center, H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The best set of movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field-of-view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Flux emergence is most easily discovered in line center movies: an elongated dark feature appears first, followed soon after by bright points at one or both ends. A brief, strong upflow is seen when the dark feature first appears; downflow in the bright points persists much longer. The magnetic flux appears to increase gradually over this extended period. Some of the flux emergence events were studied in detail, with measurements of horizontal and vertical velocities and magnetic flux versus time within one footpoint of the loop.

  15. High flux irradiations of Li coatings on polycrystalline W and ATJ graphite with D, He, and He-seeded D plasmas at Magnum PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, A. L.; Allain, J. P.; Bedoya, F.; Morgan, T. W.; De Temmerman, G.

    2015-08-01

    Lithium wall conditioning on PFCs (Plasma Facing Components) on a variety of substrate platforms (e.g. graphite, Mo, etc.) has resulted in improved plasma performance on multiple magnetic fusion devices. On graphite, this improvement occurs through the control of retention and recycling of hydrogen at the plasma-material interface by the chemical bonding of Li, O, and D at the surface. Moderate fluence (1 × 1021 m-2) studies of Li on W, performed in PRIHSM (Particle Radiation in Soft and Hard Matter), demonstrated that H retention is similar to Li on ATJ graphite but He ions, when mixed in a D beam, can inhibit the retention. To expand these studies closer to reactor relevant regimes like inside ITER, irradiations were carried out in Magnum-PSI at DIFFER up to fluences of ∼1025 m-2 with D, He, and He-seeded D plasmas (He 5-10%). Results show that D is still retained at higher fluxes and fluences.

  16. Numerical simulation of non-equilibrium plasma flow in a cylindrical MPD thruster using a high-order flux-difference splitting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahangar, Mahdy; Ebrahimi, Reza; Shams, Mehrzad

    2014-10-01

    A two-dimensional axisymmetric computational algorithm is developed to simulate the plasma flow field in a self-field MPD thruster, in order to determine the flow behavior and the electromagnetic characteristics distribution. The convective flux vector is computed by using Roe's scheme in combination with Powell's eigensystem technique, and a new modified MUSCL technique called OMUSCL2 is employed to obtain the stable high-accuracy solution. Madrane-Tadmor entropy correction is used to prevent unrealistic expansion shocks near the electrodes tips. To accurately capture the physics of plasma in the system, different physical-chemical sub-models including multi-level non-equilibrium ionization model, generalized Ohm's law for partially ionized plasma, micro-instabilities effects, two-temperature model, and a real equation of state are considered. Numerical results of plasma flow simulation in a cylindrical lab-scale thruster, with mass flow rate of 6 g/s and total discharge current of 8 kA, are presented and comparison with experimental data shows good agreement between the predicted and measured contours of enclosed current and electric potential. The estimated thrust is 16.34 N which exhibits less than 5% difference compared with measured value. Furthermore, this simulation properly predicts the experimentally observed argon jet structure.

  17. The role of magnetic flux tube deformation and magnetosheath plasma beta in the saturation of the Region 1 field-aligned current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Eriksson, S.; Wiltberger, M.

    2015-03-01

    The phenomena of cross polar cap potential (CPCP) and ionospheric field-aligned current (FAC) saturation remain largely unexplained. In the present study, we expand upon the Alfvén wing model of CPCP saturation by investigating its impact on the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system, particularly the Region 1 FAC input into the polar cap. Our hypothesis is that the ability of open flux tubes to deform in response to applied fluid stress from the magnetosheath is governed by the magnetosheath plasma beta, which in turn governs the Maxwell stress imposed on ionospheric plasma from the magnetosphere. We performed 32 MHD simulations with varying solar wind density and interplanetary magnetic field strength and show that the plasma beta does govern the deformation of open field lines, as well as the nonlinear response of the Region 1 FAC system to increasingly southward interplanetary magnetic field. Further, we show that the current-voltage relationship in the ionosphere also shows a dependence on the plasma beta in the magnetosheath, with the ionosphere becoming more resistive at lower beta.

  18. The Role of Polar Cap Flux Tube Deformation and Magnetosheath Plasma Beta in the Saturation of the Region 1 Field-Aligned Current System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder, F. D.; Eriksson, S.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The phenomena of cross-polar cap potential (CPCP) and ionospheric field-aligned current (FAC) saturation remains largely unexplained. In this study, we expand upon the Alfvén Wing model of CPCP saturation by investigating its impact on the magnetosphere-ionosphere current system, particularly the Region 1 FAC input into the polar cap. Our hypothesis is that the ability of open flux tubes to deform in response to applied fluid stress from the magnetosheath is governed by the magnetosheath plasma beta, which in turn governs the Maxwell stress imposed on ionospheric plasma from the magnetosphere. This leads both the Region 1 FAC input as well as the ionospheric convection strength, as represented by the CPCP, to saturate in response to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) driving. We perform 32 simulations using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (LFM) Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model with varying solar wind density and IMF strength, and demonstrate that the plasma beta does govern the deformation of polar cap and lobe field lines, as well as the non-linear response of the Region 1 FAC system to increasingly southward IMF. Further, we show that the current-voltage relationship in the ionosphere also shows a dependence on the plasma beta in the magnetosheath, with the ionosphere becoming more resistive at lower beta.

  19. Sex and storage affect cholinesterase activity in blood plasma of Japanese quail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1989-01-01

    Freezing at -25?C had confounding effects on cholinesterase (ChE) activity in blood plasma from breeding female quail, but did not affect ChE activity in plasma from males. Plasma ChE activity of control females increased consistently during 28 days of storage while both carbamate- and cidrotophos-inhibited ChE decreased. Refrigeration of plasma at 4?C for 2 days had little effect of ChE activity. Plasma ChE activity was averaged about 34% higher in breeding males than in females. Extreme caution should be exercised in use of blood plasma for evaluation of anti ChE exposure in free-living birds.

  20. Plasma and energetic electron flux variations in the Mercury 1 C event - Evidence for a magnetospheric boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christon, S. P.

    1989-01-01

    Charge-particle and magnetic-field data obtained during the first encounter (on March 29, 1974) of Mariner 10 with the planet Mercury are reexamined, and a new interpretation of the Mariner 10 energetic electron, plasma electron, and magnetic field data near the outbound magnetopause at Mercury is presented. It is shown that Mariner 10 sampled the hot substorm energized magnetospheric plasma sheet for the first 36 sec of the C event and, for the next 48 sec, alternatively sampled hot (plasma sheet) and cold (boundary-layer magnetosheathlike) plasma regions. It is argued that the counting rate of the ID1 event (i.e., a particle event triggering detector D1 but not the D2, D3, or D7 detectors) throughout the C event most probably represents a pulse pileup response to about 35-175 keV electrons, rather than the nominal above-175 keV electrons presumed in the earlier interpretations.

  1. Modification of divertor heat and article flux profiles with applied 3D fields in NSTX H-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Joon-Wook; Canik, John; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Maingi, Rajesh; Battaglia, D. J.

    2010-04-01

    Externally imposed non-axisymmetric magnetic perurbations are observed to alter divertor heat and particle flux profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The divertor profiles are foud to have a modust level of multiple local peaks, characteristic of strike poimt splitting or the "magnetis lob" structure, even before the application of the 3D fields in some (but not all) NSTX discharges. This is thought to be due to the intrinsic error fields. The applied 3D fields augmented the intrinsic strike point splitting, making the ampliture of local peaks, and valleys larger in the divertor profile and striations at the divertor surface brighter. The measured heat flux profile shows that the radial location and spacing of the strations are qualitativel consistent witth a vacuum field tracing calcultion. 3D field application did not change the peak divertor heat and particle fluxes at the toroidal location of measurement. Spatial characteristics of the observed patterns are also reported in the paper.

  2. INITIATION AND ERUPTION PROCESS OF MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE FROM SOLAR ACTIVE REGION NOAA 11719 TO EARTH-DIRECTED CME

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Zhang, J.

    2014-12-20

    An eruption event launched from the solar active region (AR) NOAA 11719 is investigated based on coronal EUV observations and photospheric magnetic field measurements obtained from the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The AR consists of a filament channel originating from a major sunspot and its south section is associated with an inverse-S sigmoidal system as observed in Atmospheric Imaging Assembly passbands. We regard the sigmoid as the main body of the flux rope (FR). There also exists a twisted flux bundle crossing over this FR. This overlying flux bundle transforms in shape similar to kink-rise evolution, which corresponds with the rise motion of the FR. The emission measure and temperature along the FR exhibits an increasing trend with its rising motion, indicating reconnection in the thinning current sheet underneath the FR. Net magnetic flux of the AR, evaluated at north and south polarities, showed decreasing behavior whereas the net current in these fluxes exhibits an increasing trend. Because the negative (positive) flux has a dominant positive (negative) current, the chirality of AR flux system is likely negative (left handed) in order to be consistent with the chirality of inverse S-sigmoidal FR. This analysis of magnetic fields of the source AR suggests that the cancelling fluxes are prime factors of the monotonous twisting of the FR system, reaching to a critical state to trigger kink instability and rise motion. This rise motion may have led to the onset of the torus instability, resulting in an Earth-directed coronal mass ejection, and the progressive reconnection in the thinning current sheet beneath the rising FR led to the M6.5 flare.

  3. Cardiac lipoprotein lipase activity in the hypertrophied heart may be regulated by fatty acid flux

    PubMed Central

    Hauton, David; Caldwell, Germaine M.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is characterised by an imbalance between lipid uptake and fatty acid β-oxidation leading to an accumulation of lipids, particularly triacylglycerol (TAG). It is unclear whether uptake mechanisms such as lipoprotein lipase (LPL) can be attenuated to diminish this uptake. Rats were cold acclimated to induce cardiac hypertrophy and increase cardiac LPL. Lipid uptake and metabolism were altered by feeding a ‘Western-style’ high fat diet (WSD) or feeding oxfenicine (2 g/L) in the drinking water. Diastolic stiffness (increased volume change/unit pressure change) was induced in hypertrophied hearts for rats fed WSD (P < 0.05) or WSD + oxfenicine (P < 0.01), although absolute performance of cardiac muscle, estimated from stress–strain calculations was unchanged. Cold acclimation increased cardiac endothelial LPL (P < 0.05) but this was diminished following oxfenicine. Following WSD LPL was further decreased below WSD-fed control hearts (P < 0.05) with no further decrease by oxfenicine supplementation. A negative correlation was noted between plasma TAG and endothelial LPL (correlation coefficient = − 0.654; P < 0.001) but not cardiac TAG concentration. Transcript levels of angiopoietin-like protein-4 (ANGPTL4) were increased 6-fold by WSD (P < 0.05) and increased 15-fold following WSD + oxfenicine (P < 0.001). For CA-hearts fed WSD or WSD + oxfenicine ANGPTL4 mRNA levels were preserved at chow-fed levels. VLDLR protein levels were increased 10-fold (P < 0.01) by CA. ANGPTL4 protein levels were increased 2-fold (P < 0.05) by WSD, but restored following oxfenicine. For CA-hearts WSD increased ANGPTL4 protein levels 3-fold (P < 0.01) with WSD + oxfenicine increasing ANGPTL4 protein 4-fold (P < 0.01). These data suggest that endothelial LPL levels in the heart are altered to maintain FA flux and may exploit ANGPTL4. PMID:22226882

  4. Plasma Hazards and Acceptance for International Space Station Extravehicular Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    Extravehicular activity(EVA) is accepted by NASA and other space faring agencies as a necessary risk in order to build and maintain a safe and efficient laboratory in space. EVAs are used for standard construction and as contingency operations to repair critical equipment for vehicle sustainability and safety of the entire crew in the habitable volume. There are many hazards that are assessed for even the most mundane EVA for astronauts, and the vast majority of these are adequately controlled per the rules of the International Space Station Program. The need for EVA repair and construction has driven acceptance of a possible catastrophic hazard to the EVA crewmember which cannot currently be controlled adequately. That hazard is electrical shock from the very environment in which they work. This paper describes the environment, causes and contributors to the shock of EVA crewmembers attributed to the ionospheric plasma environment in low Earth orbit. It will detail the hazard history, and acceptance process for the risk associated with these hazards that give assurance to a safe EVA. In addition to the hazard acceptance process this paper will explore other factors that go into the decision to accept a risk including criticality of task, hardware design and capability, and the probability of hazard occurrence. Also included will be the required interaction between organizations at NASA(EVA Office, Environments, Engineering, Mission Operations, Safety) in order to build and eventually gain adequate acceptance rationale for a hazard of this kind. During the course of the discussion, all current methods of mitigating the hazard will be identified. This paper will capture the history of the plasma hazard analysis and processes used by the International Space Station Program to formally assess and qualify the risk. The paper will discuss steps that have been taken to identify and perform required analysis of the floating potential shock hazard from the ISS environment

  5. Cathepsin G activity lowers plasma LDL and reduces atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Sjöberg, Sara; Tang, Ting-Ting; Öörni, Katariina; Wu, Wenxue; Liu, Conglin; Secco, Blandine; Tia, Viviane; Sukhova, Galina K.; Fernandes, Cleverson; Lesner, Adam; Kovanen, Petri T.; Libby, Peter; Cheng, Xiang; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Cathepsin G (CatG), a serine protease present in mast cells and neutrophils, can produce angiotensin-II (Ang-II) and degrade elastin. Here we demonstrate increased CatG expression in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells (ECs), macrophages, and T cells from human atherosclerotic lesions. In low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-deficient (Ldlr−/−) mice, the absence of CatG reduces arterial wall elastin degradation and attenuates early atherosclerosis when mice consume a Western diet for 3 months. When mice consume this diet for 6 months, however, CatG deficiency exacerbates atherosclerosis in aortic arch without affecting lesion inflammatory cell content or extracellular matrix accumulation, but raises plasma total cholesterol and LDL levels without affecting high-density lipoprotein (HDL) or triglyceride levels. Patients with atherosclerosis also have significantly reduced plasma CatG levels that correlate inversely with total cholesterol (r= −0.535, P<0.0001) and LDL cholesterol (r= −0.559, P<0.0001), but not with HDL cholesterol (P=0.901) or triglycerides (P=0.186). Such inverse correlations with total cholesterol (r= −0.504, P<0.0001) and LDL cholesterol (r= −0.502, P<0.0001) remain significant after adjusting for lipid lowering treatments among this patient population. Human CatG degrades purified human LDL, but not HDL. This study suggests that CatG promotes early atherogenesis through its elastinolytic activity, but suppresses late progression of atherosclerosis by degrading LDL without affecting HDL or triglycerides. PMID:25092171

  6. Convective radial energy flux due to resonant magnetic perturbations and magnetic curvature at the tokamak plasma edge

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, F. A.; Beyer, P.; Fuhr, G.; Monnier, A.; Benkadda, S.

    2014-08-15

    With the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) consolidating as an important tool to control the transport barrier relaxation, the mechanism on how they work is still a subject to be clearly understood. In this work, we investigate the equilibrium states in the presence of RMPs for a reduced MHD model using 3D electromagnetic fluid numerical code with a single harmonic RMP (single magnetic island chain) and multiple harmonics RMPs in cylindrical and toroidal geometry. Two different equilibrium states were found in the presence of the RMPs with different characteristics for each of the geometries used. For the cylindrical geometry in the presence of a single RMP, the equilibrium state is characterized by a strong convective radial thermal flux and the generation of a mean poloidal velocity shear. In contrast, for toroidal geometry, the thermal flux is dominated by the magnetic flutter. For multiple RMPs, the high amplitude of the convective flux and poloidal rotation are basically the same in cylindrical geometry, but in toroidal geometry the convective thermal flux and the poloidal rotation appear only with the islands overlapping of the linear coupling between neighbouring poloidal wavenumbers m, m – 1, and m + 1.

  7. Magnetic fusion energy plasma interactive and high heat flux components. Volume I. Technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the plasma materials interaction field

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, R.W.; Gauster, W.B.; Heifetz, D.; Marmar, E.; Wilson, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    A technical assessment of the critical issues and problem areas in the field of plasma materials interactions (PMI) in magnetic fusion devices shows these problems to be central for near-term experiments, for intermediate-range reactor devices including D-T burning physics experiments, and for long-term reactor machines. Critical technical issues are ones central to understanding and successful operation of existing and near-term experiments/reactors or devices of great importance for the long run, i.e., ones which will require an extensive, long-term development effort and thus should receive attention now. Four subgroups were formed to assess the critical PMI issues along four major lines: (1) PMI and plasma confinement physics experiments; (2) plasma-edge modelling and theory; (3) surface physics; and (4) materials technology for in-vessel components and the first wall. The report which follows is divided into four major sections, one for each of these topics.

  8. The role of parallel heat transport in the relation between upstream scrape-off layer widths and target heat flux width in H-mode plasmas of NSTX.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, J W; Boedo, J A; Maingi, R; Soukhanovskii, V A

    2009-01-05

    The physics of parallel heat transport was tested in the Scrape-off Layer (SOL) plasma of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000) and S. M. Kaye, et al., Nucl. Fusion 45, S168 (2005)] tokamak by comparing the upstream electron temperature (T{sub e}) and density (n{sub e}) profiles measured by the mid-plane reciprocating probe to the heat flux (q{sub {perpendicular}}) profile at the divertor plate measured by an infrared (IR) camera. It is found that electron conduction explains the near SOL width data reasonably well while the far SOL, which is in the sheath limited regime, requires an ion heat flux profile broader than the electron one to be consistent with the experimental data. The measured plasma parameters indicate that the SOL energy transport should be in the conduction-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} (radial distance from the separatrix location) < 2-3 cm. The SOL energy transport should transition to the sheath-limited regime for R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm. The T{sub e}, n{sub e}, and q{sub {perpendicular}} profiles are better described by an offset exponential function instead of a simple exponential. The conventional relation between mid plane electron temperature decay length ({lambda}{sub Te}) and target heat flux decay length ({lambda}{sub q}) is {lambda}{sub Te} = 7/2{lambda}{sub q}, whereas the newly-derived relation, assuming offset exponential functional forms, implies {lambda}{sub Te} = (2-2.5){lambda}{sub q}. The measured values of {lambda}{sub Te}/{lambda}{sub q} differ from the new prediction by 25-30%. The measured {lambda}{sub q} values in the far SOL (R-R{sub sep} > 2-3cm) are 9-10cm, while the expected values are 2.7 < {lambda}{sub q} < 4.9 cm (for sheath-limited regime). We propose that the ion heat flux profile is substantially broader than the electron heat flux profile as an explanation for this discrepancy in the far SOL.

  9. Study on the role of active radicals on plasma sterilization inside small diameter flexible polymeric tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mstsuura, Hiroto; Fujiyama, Takatomo; Okuno, Yasuki; Furuta, Masakazu; Okuda, Shuichi; Takemura, Yuichiro

    2015-09-01

    Recently, atmospheric pressure discharge plasma has gathered attention in various fields. Among them, plasma sterilization with many types of plasma source has studied for decades and its mechanism is still an open question. If active radicals produced in plasma has main contribution of killing bacterias, direct contact of the so-called plasma flame might not be necessary. To confirm this, sterilization inside small diameter flexible polymeric tubes is studied in present work. DBD type plasma jet is produce by flowing helium gas in a glass tube. A long polymeric tube is connected and plasma jet is introduced into it. Plasma flame length depends on helium gas flow rate, but limited to about 10 cm in our experimental condition. E.colis set at the exit plasma source is easily killed during 10 min irradiation. At the tube end (about 20 cm away from plasma source exit), sterilization is possible with 30 min operation. This result shows that active radical is produced with helium plasma and mist contained in sample, and it can be transferred more than 20 cm during it life time. More plasma diagnostic data will also be shown at the conference. This work was partially supported by the ''ZE Research Program, IAE(ZE27B-4).

  10. Longitudinal photons in a relativistic magneto-active plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tsintsadze, N. L.; Rehman, Ayesha; Murtaza, G.; Shah, H. A.

    2007-10-15

    This paper presents some aspects of interaction of superstrong high-frequency electromagnetic waves with strongly magnetized plasmas. The case in which the photon-photon interaction dominates the photon-plasma particle interaction is considered. Strictly speaking, the photon and photon bunch interaction leads to the self-modulation of the photon gas. Assuming that the density of the plasma does not change, the dispersion relation, which includes relativistic self-modulation, is investigated. The existence of longitudinal photons in a strong magnetic field has the well-known Bogoliubov-type energy spectrum. The stability of the photon flow is investigated and an expression for Landau damping of the photons is obtained. Finally, it has been shown that the interaction of even a very strong electromagnetic radiation with a plasma does not always lead to instability, but causes only a change in plasma properties, whereby the plasma remains stable.

  11. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    SciTech Connect

    Coates, Don M.; Rosocha, Louis A.

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  12. Active region upflow plasma: its relation to small activity and the solar wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrini, Cristina H.; Culhane, J. Leonard; Cristiani, Germán; Vásquez, Alberto; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, Lidia; Baker, Deborah; Pick, Monique; Demoulin, Pascal; Nuevo, Federico

    Recent studies show that active region (AR) upflowing plasma, observed by the Hinode EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), can gain access to open field lines and be released into the solar wind via magnetic interchange reconnection occurring below the source surface at magnetic null-points in pseudo-streamer configurations. When only one simple bipolar AR is present on the Sun and it is fully covered by the separatrix of a streamer, like AR 10978 on December 2007, it seems unlikely that the upflowing AR plasma could find its way into the slow solar wind. However, signatures of plasma with AR composition at 1 AU that appears to originate from the West of AR 10978 were recently found by Culhane and coworkers. We present a detailed topology analysis of AR 10978 based on a linear force-free magnetic field model at the AR scale, combined with a global PFSS model. This allows us, on one hand, to explain the variations observed in the upflows to the West of the AR as the result of magnetic reconnection at quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs). While at a global scale, we show that reconnection, occurring in at least two main steps, first at QSLs and later at a high-altitude coronal null-point, allows the AR plasma to get around the topological obstacle of the streamer separatrix and be released into the solar wind.

  13. Eruption of the magnetic flux rope in a fast decayed active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Shangbin

    2012-07-01

    An isolated and fast decayed active region was observed when passing through solar disk. There is only one CME related with it that give us a good opportunity to investigate the whole process of the CME. Filament in this active region rises up rapidly and then hesitates and disintegrates into flare loops. The rising filament from EIT images separates into two parts just before eruption. It is interesting that this filament rises up with positive kink which is opposite to the negative helicity according to the inverse S-shaped X-ray sigmoid and accumulated magnetic helicity. A new filament reforms several hours later after CME and the axis of this new one rotates clockwise about 22° comparing with that of the former one. We also observed a bright transient J-shaped X-ray sigmoid immediately appears after filament eruption. It quickly develops into a soft X-ray cusp and rises up firstly then drops down. We propose that field lines underneath bald-patch sparatrix surface (BPSS) where for the formation of a magnetic tangential discontinuity are locally rooted to the photosphere near the bald-patch (BP) inversion line. Field lines above the surface are detached from the photosphere to form this CME and partially open the field which make the filament loses equilibrium to rise quickly and then be drawn back by the tension force of magnetic field after eruption to form a new filament. Two magnetic cancelation regions have been observed clearly just before filament eruption that reflect the existence of BPs. On the other hand, the values of total magnetic helicity to the corona taken by emergence and differential rotation normalized by the square total magnetic flux implies the possibility of upper bound on the total magnetic helicity that a force-free field can contain.

  14. Modulation of intracellular calcium waves and triggered activities by mitochondrial ca flux in mouse cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenghang; Gordan, Richard; Wen, Hairuo; Fefelova, Nadezhda; Zang, Wei-Jin; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that mitochondria may play important roles in the Ca(2+) homeostasis of cardiac myocytes. However, it is still unclear if mitochondrial Ca(2+) flux can regulate the generation of Ca(2+) waves (CaWs) and triggered activities in cardiac myocytes. In the present study, intracellular/cytosolic Ca(2+) (Cai (2+)) was imaged in Fluo-4-AM loaded mouse ventricular myocytes. Spontaneous sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) release and CaWs were induced in the presence of high (4 mM) external Ca(2+) (Cao (2+)). The protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy)phenylhydrazone (FCCP) reversibly raised basal Cai (2+) levels even after depletion of SR Ca(2+) in the absence of Cao (2+) , suggesting Ca(2+) release from mitochondria. FCCP at 0.01 - 0.1 µM partially depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ m ) and increased the frequency and amplitude of CaWs in a dose-dependent manner. Simultaneous recording of cell membrane potentials showed the augmentation of delayed afterdepolarization amplitudes and frequencies, and induction of triggered action potentials. The effect of FCCP on CaWs was mimicked by antimycin A (an electron transport chain inhibitor disrupting Δψ m ) or Ru360 (a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter inhibitor), but not by oligomycin (an ATP synthase inhibitor) or iodoacetic acid (a glycolytic inhibitor), excluding the contribution of intracellular ATP levels. The effects of FCCP on CaWs were counteracted by the mitochondrial permeability transition pore blocker cyclosporine A, or the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activator kaempferol. Our results suggest that mitochondrial Ca(2+) release and uptake exquisitely control the local Ca(2+) level in the micro-domain near SR ryanodine receptors and play an important role in regulation of intracellular CaWs and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:24348912

  15. AMPK activation protects cells from oxidative stress-induced senescence via autophagic flux restoration and intracellular NAD(+) elevation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojuan; Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jiao; Wei, Xiawei; Ding, Yi; Gong, Hui; Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Jie; Qin, Jianqiong; Ma, Yuanji; Huang, Ning; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    AMPK activation is beneficial for cellular homeostasis and senescence prevention. However, the molecular events involved in AMPK activation are not well defined. In this study, we addressed the mechanism underlying the protective effect of AMPK on oxidative stress-induced senescence. The results showed that AMPK was inactivated in senescent cells. However, pharmacological activation of AMPK by metformin and berberine significantly prevented the development of senescence and, accordingly, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C was accelerated. Importantly, AMPK activation prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced impairment of the autophagic flux in senescent cells, evidenced by the decreased p62 degradation, GFP-RFP-LC3 cancellation, and activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also found that AMPK activation restored the NAD(+) levels in the senescent cells via a mechanism involving mostly the salvage pathway for NAD(+) synthesis. In addition, the mechanistic relationship of autophagic flux and NAD(+) synthesis and the involvement of mTOR and Sirt1 activities were assessed. In summary, our results suggest that AMPK prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence by improving autophagic flux and NAD(+) homeostasis. This study provides a new insight for exploring the mechanisms of aging, autophagy and NAD(+) homeostasis, and it is also valuable in the development of innovative strategies to combat aging. PMID:26890602

  16. Investigating Plasma Motion of Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU through a Velocity-modified Cylindrical Force-free Flux Rope Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shen, C.; Liu, R.; Zhou, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are the interplanetary counterparts of coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Due to the very low value of Can't connect to bucket.int.confex.com:4201 (Connection refused) LWP::Protocol::http::Socket: connect: Connection refused at /usr/local/lib/perl5/site_perl/5.8.8/LWP/Protocol/http.pm line 51. in MCs, they are believed to be in a nearly force-free state and therefore are able to be modeled by a cylindrical force-free flux rope. However, the force-free state only describes the magnetic field topology but not the plasma motion of a MC. For a MC propagating in interplanetary space, the global plasma motion has three possible components: linear propagating motion of a MC away from the Sun, expanding motion and circular motion with respect to the axis of the MC. By assuming the quasi-steady evolution and self-similar expansion, we introduced the three-component motion into the cylindrical force-free flux rope model, and developed a velocity-modified model. Then we applied the model to 73 MCs observed by Wind spacecraft to investigate the properties of the plasma motion of MCs. It is found that (1) some MCs did not propagate along the Sun-Earth line, suggesting the direct evidence of the CME's deflected propagation and/or rotation in interplanetary space, (2) the expansion speed is correlated with the radial propagation speed and 62%/17% of MCs underwent a under/over-expansion at 1 AU, and (3) the circular motion does exists though it is only on the order of 10 km s-1. These findings advance our understanding of the MC's properties at 1 AU as well as the dynamic evolution of CMEs from the Sun to interplanetary space.

  17. Ultrafine tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion devices: effect of high flux, high fluence low energy helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atwani, O.; Gonderman, Sean; Efe, Mert; De Temmerman, Gregory; Morgan, Thomas; Bystrov, Kirill; Klenosky, Daniel; Qiu, Tian; Allain, J. P.

    2014-08-01

    This work discusses the response of ultrafine-grained tungsten materials to high-flux, high-fluence, low energy pure He irradiation. Ultrafine-grained tungsten samples were exposed in the Pilot-PSI (Westerhout et al 2007 Phys. Scr. T128 18) linear plasma device at the Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER) in Nieuwegein, the Netherlands. The He flux on the tungsten samples ranged from 1.0 × 1023-2.0 × 1024 ions m-2 s-1, the sample bias ranged from a negative (20-65) V, and the sample temperatures ranged from 600-1500 °C. SEM analysis of the exposed samples clearly shows that ultrafine-grained tungsten materials have a greater fluence threshold to the formation of fuzz by an order or magnitude or more, supporting the conjecture that grain boundaries play a major role in the mechanisms of radiation damage. Pre-fuzz damage analysis is addressed, as in the role of grain orientation on structure formation. Grains of (1 1 0) and (1 1 1) orientation showed only pore formation, while (0 0 1) oriented grains showed ripples (higher structures) decorated with pores. Blistering at the grain boundaries is also observed in this case. In situ TEM analysis during irradiation revealed facetted bubble formation at the grain boundaries likely responsible for blistering at this location. The results could have significant implications for future plasma-burning fusion devices given the He-induced damage could lead to macroscopic dust emission into the fusion plasma.

  18. Improved L-lysine production with Corynebacterium glutamicum and systemic insight into citrate synthase flux and activity.

    PubMed

    van Ooyen, Jan; Noack, Stephan; Bott, Michael; Reth, Alexander; Eggeling, Lothar

    2012-08-01

    We here developed a series of Corynebacterium glutamicum strains with gradual decreased specific citrate synthase (CS) activity and quantified in a multifaceted approach the consequences of residual activity on the transcriptome, metabolome, and fluxome level as well as on L-lysine formation and growth. We achieved an intended gradual L-lysine yield increase and recognized and overcame further new limitations in the L-lysine biosynthesis pathway to result in a strain with the highest yield reported so far when assayed under comparable conditions. As a non-intended outcome, a detailed flux analysis revealed an almost constant flux through CS at 10% remaining CS activity, whereas the metabolome data revealed an increase in the oxaloacetate and acetyl-CoA concentrations. Hence reduced CS activity is apparently efficiently buffered by increased concentrations of CS substrates, implying a certain robustness of the central metabolism in response of the imposed gene expressions. PMID:22392073

  19. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Kamali, F; Edwards, C; Wood, P; Wynne, H A; Kesteven, P

    2001-11-01

    There is no information available on temporal variability in plasma vitamin K concentrations and its relationship to coagulation processes. We investigated the possible existence of temporal changes in plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and activity of clotting factors II, VII, IX, and X and relationships between these variables. Plasma vitamin K and lipid concentrations and clotting factor activity were measured at four-hour intervals for 28 hours in a group of healthy volunteers. Temporal variations existed in plasma vitamin K concentrations, with a mean maximum at 22:00 hr and a mean minimum (32% of the maximum) at 10:00 hr. Plasma triglycerol concentrations mirrored the changes in vitamin K concentrations. Mean factor VII activity was positively correlated with mean total plasma cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.714; P < 0.0001) and with mean plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations (r = 0.461; P < 0.0001). No distinct correlations were found between plasma vitamin K concentrations and either high density lipoprotein (HDL) or LDL cholesterol concentrations, or between triglycerol, HDL, or LDL cholesterol concentrations and functional activity of factors II, IX, and X. Plasma vitamin K concentrations did not correlate with the functional activity of any of the clotting factors. The presence of a correlation between plasma cholesterol concentrations and factor VII activity for blood samples collected at four-hour intervals suggests that plasma cholesterol concentrations may have a more acute effect on factor VII activity. Temporal variations in plasma vitamin K concentrations indicate that a single time point measurement may be an inappropriate method of establishing vitamin K status in an individual. PMID:11754396

  20. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M.; Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  1. Evaluation of the effects of a plasma activated medium on cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mohades, S.; Laroussi, M. Sears, J.; Barekzi, N.; Razavi, H.

    2015-12-15

    The interaction of low temperature plasma with liquids is a relevant topic of study to the field of plasma medicine. This is because cells and tissues are normally surrounded or covered by biological fluids. Therefore, the chemistry induced by the plasma in the aqueous state becomes crucial and usually dictates the biological outcomes. This process became even more important after the discovery that plasma activated media can be useful in killing various cancer cell lines. Here, we report on the measurements of concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, a species known to have strong biological effects, produced by application of plasma to a minimum essential culture medium. The activated medium is then used to treat SCaBER cancer cells. Results indicate that the plasma activated medium can kill the cancer cells in a dose dependent manner, retain its killing effect for several hours, and is as effective as apoptosis inducing drugs.

  2. Melt-layer ejection and material changes of three different tungsten materials under high heat-flux conditions in the tokamak edge plasma of TEXTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, J. W.; Philipps, V.; Brezinsek, S.; Pintsuk, G.; Uytdenhouwen, I.; Wirtz, M.; Kreter, A.; Sugiyama, K.; Kurishita, H.; Torikai, Y.; Ueda, Y.; Samm, U.; TEXTOR-Team

    2011-11-01

    The behaviour of tungsten (W) plasma-facing components (PFCs) has been investigated in the plasma edge of the TEXTOR tokamak to study melt-layer ejection, macroscopic tungsten erosion from the melt layer as well as the changes of material properties such as grain-size and abundance of voids or bubbles. The parallel heat flux at the radial position of the exposed tungsten tile in the plasma ranges around q|| ~ 45 MW m-2 causing samples to be exposed at an impact angle of 35° to 20-30 MW m-2. Locally the temperature reached up to 6000 K, high levels of evaporation and boiling are causing significant erosion in the form of continuous fine spray or droplet ejection. The amount of fine-spray tungsten emission depends strongly on the material properties: in the case of the tungsten-tantalum alloy the effect of spraying and droplet emission is significantly higher at even low temperatures when compared with regular tungsten or even ultra-high purity tungsten which shows almost no spraying at all. Differences in the material composition, grain structure and size may be related to the different evolution of macroscopic erosion. In addition the re-solidified material is studied and strong differences in terms of re-crystallized grain size and evolution of the grain structure and grain orientation are observed. The build up of large voids has been observed.

  3. Compact steady-state and high-flux Falcon ion source for tests of plasma-facing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, O.; Bizyukov, I.; Sereda, K.; Bizyukov, A.; Gutkin, M.; Sleptsov, V.

    2012-08-15

    This paper describes the design and operation of the Falcon ion source. It is based on conventional design of anode layer thrusters. This ion source is a versatile, compact, affordable, and highly functional in the research field of the fusion materials. The reversed magnetic field configuration of the source allows precise focusing of the ion beam into small spot of Almost-Equal-To 3 mm and also provides the limited capabilities for impurity mass-separation. As the result, the source generates steady-state ion beam, which irradiates surface with high heat (0.3 - 21 MW m{sup -2}) and particle fluxes (4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21}- 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} m{sup -2}s{sup -1}), which approaches the upper limit for the flux range expected in ITER.

  4. Plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition of silicon dioxide films using plasma-activated triisopropylsilane as a precursor

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Ki-Moon; Shin, Jae-Su; Yun, Ju-Young; Jun Lee, Sang; Kang, Sang-Woo

    2014-05-15

    The plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PEALD) process was developed as a growth technique of SiO{sub 2} thin films using a plasma-activated triisopropylsilane [TIPS, ((iPr){sub 3}SiH)] precursor. TIPS was activated by an argon plasma at the precursor injection stage of the process. Using the activated TIPS, it was possible to control the growth rate per cycle of the deposited films by adjusting the plasma ignition time. The PEALD technique allowed deposition of SiO{sub 2} films at temperatures as low as 50 °C without carbon impurities. In addition, films obtained with plasma ignition times of 3 s and 10 s had similar values of root-mean-square surface roughness. In order to evaluate the suitability of TIPS as a precursor for low-temperature deposition of SiO{sub 2} films, the vapor pressure of TIPS was measured. The thermal stability and the reactivity of the gas-phase TIPS with respect to water vapor were also investigated by analyzing the intensity changes of the C–H and Si–H peaks in the Fourier-transform infrared spectrum of TIPS.

  5. CPEP Fusion/Plasma Physics Education Materials/Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightner, G. Samuel; Zaleskiewicz, T. P.; Reiland, Robert

    2001-10-01

    The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a not-for-profit organization of teachers, educators, and physicists (see http://cpepweb.org). The goals in its charter include the development and implementation of teaching materials about contemporary physics topics for use in the introductory courses. To this end, the CPEP Fusion/plasma group has produced the teaching chart, ``FUSION-Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source''. Ancillary materials including an Instructors Guide and a packet of classroom activities are under development. In order to promote effective classroom use of its educational materials, CPEP presents workshops for high school and college teachers. These workshops have been sponsored by or held in conjunction with a variety of organizations including; the APS/DPP, the AAPT, the Space Science Institute, the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association, The Allegheny Intermediate Unit, and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. The chart is available in wall-size, poster-size and student notebook-size, and has been translated into six languages. Laminated versions of the poster and notebook size charts are also available as well as an overhead transparency of the chart. For more information, visit the CPEP/Fusion website (http://FusEdWeb.llnl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html)

  6. CPEP Fusion/Plasma Physics Education Materials/Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightner, G. Samuel; Zaleskiewicz, Ted; Reiland, Robert

    1999-11-01

    The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a not-for-profit organization of teachers, educators, and physicists. The goals in its charter include the development and implementation of teaching materials about contemporary physics topics for use in the introductory courses. To this end, the CPEP Fusion/plasma group has produced the teaching chart, "FUSION-Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source". This chart is available in wall-size, poster-size and student notebook-size, and has been translated into six languages. Ancillary materials, including an Instructors Guide and a packet of classroom activities, are under development. In order to promote effective classroom use of its educational materials, CPEP presents workshops for high school and college teachers. These workshops have been sponsored by or held in conjuction with a variety of organizations including; the APS/DPP, the AAPT, the Space Science Institute, the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association, and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. For more information, visit the CPEP/Fusion website (http://FusEdWeb.pppl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html)

  7. CPEP Fusion/Plasma Physics Education Materials/Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightner, G. Samuel; Zaleskiewicz, P. T.; Reiland, Robert

    2000-10-01

    The Contemporary Physics Education Project (CPEP) is a not-for-profit organization of teachers, educators, and physicists (see http://cpepweb.org). The goals in its charter include the development and implementation of teaching materials about contemporary physics topics for use in the introductory courses. To this end, the CPEP Fusion/plasma group has produced the teaching chart, "FUSION-Physics of a Fundamental Energy Source". Ancillary materials including an Instructors Guide and a packet of classroom activities are under development. In order to promote effective classroom use of its educational materials, CPEP presents workshops for high school and college teachers. These workshops have been sponsored by or held in conjunction with a variety of organizations including; the APS/DPP, the AAPT, the Space Science Institute, the American Nuclear Science Teachers Association, and the University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg. The chart is available in wall-size, poster-size and student notebook-size, and has been translated into six languages. Laminated versions of the poster and notebook size charts are also available as well as an overhead transparency of the chart. For more information, visit the CPEP/Fusion website (http://FusEdWeb.pppl.gov/CPEP/Chart.html)

  8. Design of an actively cooled plate calorimeter for the investigation of pool fire heat fluxes

    SciTech Connect

    Koski, J. A.; Keltner, N. R.; Nicolette, V. F.; Wix, S. D.

    1992-01-01

    For final qualification of shipping containers for transport of hazardous materials, thermal testing in accordance with regulations such as 10CFR71 must be completed. Such tests typically consist of 30 minute exposures with the container fully engulfed in flames from a large, open pool of JP4 jet engine fuel. Despite careful engineering analyses of the container, testing often reveals design problems that must be solved by modification and expensive retesting of the container. One source of this problem is the wide variation in surface heat flux to the container that occurs in pool fires. Average heat fluxes of 50 to 60 kW/m{sup 2} are typical and close the values implied by the radiation model in 10CFR71, but peak fluxes up to 150 kW/m{sup 2} are routinely observed in fires. Heat fluxes in pool fires have been shown to be a function of surface temperature of the container, height above the pool, surface orientation, wind, and other variables. If local variations in the surface heat flux to the container could be better predicted, design analyses would become more accurate, and fewer problems will be uncovered during testing. The objective of the calorimeter design described in this paper is to measure accurately pool fire heat fluxes under controlled conditions, and to provide data for calibration of improved analytical models of local flame-surface interactions.

  9. Effect of plasma activated water on the postharvest quality of button mushrooms, Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingyin; Tian, Ying; Ma, Ruonan; Liu, Qinghong; Zhang, Jue

    2016-04-15

    Non-thermal plasma is a new approach to improving microbiological safety while maintaining the sensory attributes of the treated foods. Recent research has reported that plasma activated water (PAW) can also efficiently inactivate a wide variety of microorganisms. This study invested the effects of plasma-activated water soaking on the postharvest preservation of button mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus) over seven days of storage at 20°C. Plasma activated water reduced the microbial counts by 1.5 log and 0.5 log for bacteria and fungi during storage, respectively. Furthermore, the corresponding physicochemical and biological properties were assessed between plasma activated water soaking groups and control groups. The results for firmness, respiration rate and relative electrical conductivity suggested that plasma activated water soaking can delay mushroom softening. Meanwhile, no significant change was observed in the color, pH, or antioxidant properties of A. bisporus treated with plasma activated water. Thus, plasma activated water soaking is a promising method for postharvest fresh-keeping of A. bisporus. PMID:26616972

  10. Formation of sunspots and active regions through the emergence of magnetic flux generated in a solar convective dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng; Rempel, Matthias D.; Fan, Yuhong

    2016-05-01

    We present a realistic numerical model of sunspot and active region formation through the emergence of flux tubes generated in a solar convective dynamo. The magnetic and velocity fields in a horizontal layer near the top boundary of the solar convective dynamo simulation are used as a time-dependent bottom boundary to drive the near surface layer radiation MHD simulations of magneto-convection and flux emergence with the MURaM code. The latter code simulates the emergence of the flux tubes through the upper most layer of the convection zone to the photosphere.The emerging flux tubes interact with the convection and break into small scale magnetic elements that further rise to the photosphere. At the photosphere, several bipolar pairs of sunspots are formed through the coalescence of the small scale magnetic elements. The sunspot pairs in the simulation successfully reproduce the fundamental observed properties of solar active regions, including the more coherent leading spots with a stronger field strength, and the correct tilts of the bipolar pairs. These asymmetries come most probably from the intrinsic asymmetries in the emerging fields imposed at the bottom boundary, where the horizontal fields are already tilted and the leading sides of the emerging flux tubes are usually up against the downdraft lanes of the giant cells. It is also found that penumbrae with numerous filamentary structures form in regions of strong horizontal magnetic fields that naturally comes from the ongoing flux emergence. In contrast to previous models, the penumbrae and umbrae are divided by very sharp boarders, which is highly consistent with observations.

  11. Gravity wave activity in the thermosphere inferred from GOCE data, and its dependence on solar flux conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Raphael F.; Bruinsma, Sean; Doornbos, Eelco; Massarweh, Lotfi

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on the effect of solar flux conditions on the dynamics of Gravity Waves (GW) in thermosphere. Air density and cross-wind in situ estimates from the Gravity Field and Steady-State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) accelerometers are analyzed for the whole mission duration. The analysis was performed in the Fourier spectral domain averaging spectral results over periods of 2 months close to solstices. First the Amplitude Spectral Density (ASD) and the Magnitude Squared Coherence (MSC) of physical parameters are linked to local gravity waves. Then, a new GW marker (called Cf3) was introduced here to constrain GWs activity under Low, Medium and High solar flux conditions, showing a clear solar dumping effect on GW activity. Most of GW signal has been found in a spectral range above 8 mHz in GOCE data, meaning a maximum horizontal wavelength around 1000 km. The level GW activity at GOCE altitude is strongly decreasing with increasing solar flux. Furthermore, a shift in the dominant frequency with solar flux conditions has been noted, leading to a larger horizontal wavelengths (from 200 to 500 km) during high solar flux conditions. The influence of correlated error sources, between air density and cross-winds, is discussed. Consistency of the spectral domain results has been verified in time-domain with a global mapping of high frequency perturbations along GOCE orbit. This analysis shows a clear dependence with geomagnetic latitude with strong perturbations at magnetic poles, and an extension to lower latitudes favoured by low solar activity conditions. Various possible causes of this spatial trend are discussed.

  12. Gas flux measurements of episodic bimodal eruptive activity at Karymsky volcano (Kamchatka, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arellano, S.; Galle, B.; Melnikov, D.

    2012-04-01

    Volcanoes of intermediate magmatic composition commonly exhibit episodes of intermittent gas and ash emission of variable duration. Due to the multiple conditions present at each system, different mechanisms have been proposed to account for the observed activity, and without key measurements at hand, a definite understanding of the situation might not be singled out. Karymsky, the most active volcano of Central Kamchatka, has presented a remarkably stable pattern of bimodal eruption since a few weeks after its violent reactivation in 1996. Periods of quasi-periodic explosive emissions with typical recurrence intervals of 3-10 min are alternated with episodes of semi-continuous discharge which intensity has a typical modulation at a frequency of 1 Hz. Geophysical studies at Karymsky have identified the main visual, seismic and acoustic features of these two eruption modalities. From these observations, the time scales of the processes have been defined and relevant models have been formulated, according to which the two modes are controlled by the rheological properties of an intruding gas-saturated magma batch and a shallow gas-depleted magma plug. Explosions are explained as the consequence of the formation of temporary sealing, overpressure buildup and vent clearance. Clearly, direct measurements of the gas emission rate are the key parameter to test such models. In this work, we report on the results of a field campaign for SO2 gas measurements carried out at Karymsky during 10-14 September 2011. We deployed 2 NOVAC-type, scanning DOAS systems as well as 1 rapid wide-Field of View mini-DOAS plume tracker. With this setup, we derived time-resolved SO2 flux, plume height, direction and speed, and detected pulses of increasing emission with high temporal resolution. We observed phases of explosive and quiescent degassing with variable amounts of ash emission and detected intensity changes of the associated acoustic signals. The repose time intervals between these

  13. Impact of seabird activity on nitrous oxide and methane fluxes from High Arctic tundra in Svalbard, Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Renbin; Chen, Qingqing; Ding, Wei; Xu, Hua

    2012-12-01

    In this study, tundra N2O and CH4 fluxes were measured from one seabird sanctuary (SBT) and two non-seabird colonies (NST-I and NST-II) in Ny-Ålesund (79°55'N, 11°56'E), Svalbard during the summers of 2008 and 2009. N2O and CH4 fluxes from SBT showed large temporal and spatial variations depending on the intensity of seabird activity. High seabird activity sites showed large N2O and CH4 emissions while low N2O and CH4 emissions, even CH4 uptake occurred at medium and low seabird activity sites. Overall the mean fluxes were 18.3 ± 3.6 μg N2O m-2 h-1 and 53.5 ± 20.3 μg CH4 m-2 h-1 from tundra SBT whereas tundra NST-I and NST-II represented a relatively weak N2O source (8.3 ± 13.2 μg N2O m-2 h-1) and strong CH4 sink (-82.8 ± 22.3 μg CH4 m-2 h-1). Seabird activity was the strongest control of N2O and CH4 fluxes compared with soil temperature and moisture, and high N2O and CH4 emissions were created by soil physical and chemical processes (the sufficient supply of nutrients NH4+-N, NO3--N, total nitrogen, total phosphorus and total carbon from seabird guano, seabird tramp and appropriate water content) related to the seabird activity. Our work suggests that tundra ecosystems impacted by seabird activity are the potential "hotspots" for N2O and CH4 emissions although these sources have been largely neglected at present. Furthermore the combination of seabird activity and warming climate will likely further enhance N2O and CH4 emissions from the High Arctic tundra.

  14. Plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate: relationship to plasma phospholipid and cholesteryl ester transfer activities and lipid parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheung, M C; Wolfbauer, G; Albers, J J

    1996-09-27

    Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) has been shown to facilitate the transfer of phospholipid from liposomes or isolated very low and low density lipoproteins to high density lipoproteins. Its activity in plasma and its physiological function are presently unknown. To elucidate the role of PLTP in lipoprotein metabolism and to delineate factors that may affect the rate of phospholipid transfer between lipoproteins, we determined the plasma phospholipid mass transfer rate (PLTR) in 16 healthy adult volunteers and assessed its relationship to plasma lipid levels, and to phospholipid transfer activity (PLTA) and cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) measured by radioassays. The plasma PLTR in these subjects was 27.2 +/- 11.8 nmol/ml per h at 37 degrees C (mean +/- S.D.), and their PLTA and CETA were 13.0 +/- 1.7 mumol/ml per h and 72.8 +/- 15.7 nmol/ml per h, respectively. Plasma PLTR was correlated directly with total, non-HDL, and HDL triglyceride (rs = 0.76, P < 0.001), total and non-HDL phospholipid (rs > 0.53, P < 0.05), and inversely with HDL free cholesterol (rs = -0.54, P < 0.05), but not with plasma PLTA and CETA. When 85% to 96% of the PLTA in plasma was removed by polyclonal antibodies against recombinant human PLTP, phospholipid mass transfer from VLDL and LDL to HDL was reduced by 50% to 72%, but 80% to 100% of CETA could still be detected. These studies demonstrate that PLTP plays a major role in facilitating the transfer of phospholipid between lipoproteins, and suggest that triglyceride is a significant modulator of intravascular phospholipid transport. Furthermore, most of the PLTP and CETP in human plasma is associated with different particles. Plasma PLTA and CETA were also measured in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, dog, pig, and monkey. Compared to human, PLTA in rat and mouse was significantly higher and in rabbit and guinea pig was significantly lower while the remaining animal species had PLTA similar to humans. No

  15. Aerobic and resistance training do not influence plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Stegen, Sanne; Sigal, Ronald J; Kenny, Glen P; Khandwala, Farah; Yard, Benito; De Heer, Emile; Baelde, Hans; Peersman, Wim; Derave, Wim

    2015-10-01

    A particular allele of the carnosinase gene (CNDP1) is associated with reduced plasma carnosinase activity and reduced risk for nephropathy in diabetic patients. On the one hand, animal and human data suggest that hyperglycemia increases plasma carnosinase activity. On the other hand, we recently reported lower carnosinase activity levels in elite athletes involved in high-intensity exercise compared with untrained controls. Therefore, this study investigates whether exercise training and the consequent reduction in hyperglycemia can suppress carnosinase activity and content in adults with type 2 diabetes. Plasma samples were taken from 243 males and females with type 2 diabetes (mean age = 54.3 yr, SD = 7.1) without major microvascular complications before and after a 6-mo exercise training program [4 groups: sedentary control (n = 61), aerobic exercise (n = 59), resistance exercise (n = 63), and combined exercise training (n = 60)]. Plasma carnosinase content and activity, hemoglobin (Hb) A1c, lipid profile, and blood pressure were measured. A 6-mo exercise training intervention, irrespective of training modality, did not decrease plasma carnosinase content or activity in type 2 diabetic patients. Plasma carnosinase content and activity showed a high interindividual but very low intraindividual variability over the 6-mo period. Age and sex, but not Hb A1c, were significantly related to the activity or content of this enzyme. It can be concluded that the beneficial effects of exercise training on the incidence of diabetic complications are probably not related to a lowering effect on plasma carnosinase content or activity. PMID:26389600

  16. Active interrogation of plasma-liquid boundary using 2D plasma-in-liquid apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Janis; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    Plasma medicine and plasma-based water purification technologies rely on the production and transport of plasma-derived (direct or indirect) reactive species into the bulk medium. This interaction takes place at the interface between the gas phase plasma and the liquid medium. The nature of radical production and subsequent radical transport from this region or boundary layer is not well understood due to the difficulty of implementing diagnostics to interrogate this region. We present a 2-D plasma-in-liquid water apparatus that makes the interface region assessable to optical diagnostics. Using colorimetric chemical probes, acidification and oxidation fronts are tracked using high-speed imaging and spectroscopy. Additionally, observed, plasma-induced fluid dynamical effects are also discussed. Forces at the interface can play a key role in the transport of radicals into the bulk solution. The role of plasma-driven interfacial forces as well as that of the applied, local electric field on chemical front propagation velocity and induced circulation are also discussed. Supported by grants NSF CBET 1336375 and DOE DE-SC0001939.

  17. Plasma Characterization of Hall Thruster with Active and Passive Segmented Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Raitses, Y.; Staack, D.; Fisch, N.J.

    2002-09-04

    Non-emissive electrodes and ceramic spacers placed along the Hall thruster channel are shown to affect the plasma potential distribution and the thruster operation. These effects are associated with physical properties of the electrode material and depend on the electrode configuration, geometry and the magnetic field distribution. An emissive segmented electrode was able to maintain thruster operation by supplying an additional electron flux to sustain the plasma discharge between the anode and cathode neutralizer. These results indicate the possibility of new configurations for segmented electrode Hall thruster.

  18. Enzyme activities in plasma, liver, and kidney of black ducks and mallards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    Activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were measured in plasma, liver, and kidney, and gamma-glutamyl transferase (GGT) was measured in liver and kidney of black ducks (Anas rubripes). Activities of ALT, AST, GGT, and ornithine carbamyl transferase (OCT) were assayed in plasma, liver, and kidney of game-farm mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). Appreciable OCT and AST activity occurred in both liver and kidney. Activities of ALT, CPK, ALP and GGT were higher in kidney, while LDH was higher in liver, GGT was detected in plasma from one of four mallards.

  19. Bioturbation and dissolved organic matter enhance contaminant fluxes from sediment treated with powdered and granular activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Kupryianchyk, D; Noori, A; Rakowska, M I; Grotenhuis, J T C; Koelmans, A A

    2013-05-21

    Sediment amendment with activated carbon (AC) is a promising technique for in situ sediment remediation. To date it is not clear whether this technique sufficiently reduces sediment-to-water fluxes of sediment-bound hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in the presence of bioturbators. Here, we report polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) pore water concentrations, fluxes, mass transfer coefficients, and survival data of two benthic species, for four treatments: no AC addition (control), powdered AC addition, granular AC addition and addition and subsequent removal of GAC (sediment stripping). AC addition decreased mass fluxes but increased apparent mass transfer coefficients because of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) facilitated transport across the benthic boundary layer (BBL). In turn, DOC concentrations depended on bioturbator activity which was high for the PAC tolerant species Asellus aquaticus and low for AC sensitive species Lumbriculus variegatus. A dual BBL resistance model combining AC effects on gradients, DOC facilitated transport and biodiffusion was evaluated against the data and showed how the type of resistance differs with treatment and chemical hydrophobicity. Data and simulations illustrate the complex interplay between AC and contaminant toxicity to benthic organisms and how differences in species tolerance affect mass fluxes from sediment to the water column. PMID:23590290

  20. Measurements of Ion Energy and Ion Flux Distributions in Inductively Coupled Plasmas in CF4/O2/Ar Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, M. V. V. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cappelli, M. A.; Sharma, Surendra; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We report mass spectrometric studies of energy distributions and absolute concentrations of ions generated in CF4/O2/Ar inductively coupled rf plasmas. The ions were collected through a 100 mm orifice in the grounded and water cooled lower electrode in a GEC cell configuration. The measurements were made at gas pressures in the 10-50 mTorr range and rf coil power in the 100-300 W range. The observed ions are CF3(+), CF2(+), CF(+), C(+), F(+), COF(+), CO(+), O2(+), and O(+). The relative abundance of these ions varies with pressure and rf power. The energy distribution and absolute concentrations are correlated with electron number density and floating plasma potential measured by a compensated Langmuir probe.

  1. Real-time temperature monitoring of Si substrate during plasma processing and its heat-flux analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsutsumi, Takayoshi; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Kondo, Hiroki; Ohta, Takayuki; Ito, Masafumi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru

    2016-01-01

    Actual Si wafer temperatures during plasma etching processes were temporally measured using a real-time wafer-temperature monitoring system with autocorrelation-type frequency-domain low-coherence interferometry. Indeed, the Si wafer temperature, which was 20 °C before the process, rapidly increased in 10 s. Then, the temperature rise gradually slowed, but continued to increase and reached 45 °C after 600 s. This can be due to the fact that there exists a heat source for the wafer other than the plasma. Reasonably, the Si wafer was found to be sensitive to the temperature of the disk covering the area around the wafer, i.e., the focus ring. Usually, the temperature of the focus ring is not controlled and causes the radial distribution of Si wafer temperature. Consequently, the Si wafer temperature should be controlled with the temperature increase of other heat sources, especially the focus ring.

  2. River solute fluxes reflecting active hydrothermal chemical weathering of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurwitz, S.; Evans, William C.; Lowenstern, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    In the past few decades numerous studies have quantified the load of dissolved solids in large rivers to determine chemical weathering rates in orogenic belts and volcanic areas, mainly motivated by the notion that over timescales greater than ~100kyr, silicate hydrolysis may be the dominant sink for atmospheric CO2, thus creating a feedback between climate and weathering. Here, we report the results of a detailed study during water year 2007 (October 1, 2006 to September 30, 2007) in the major rivers of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field (YPVF) which hosts Earth's largest "restless" caldera and over 10,000 thermal features. The chemical compositions of rivers that drain thermal areas in the YPVF differ significantly from the compositions of rivers that drain non-thermal areas. There are large seasonal variations in river chemistry and solute flux, which increases with increasing water discharge. The river chemistry and discharge data collected periodically over an entire year allow us to constrain the annual solute fluxes and to distinguish between low-temperature weathering and hydrothermal flux components. The TDS flux from Yellowstone Caldera in water year 2007 was 93t/km2/year. Extensive magma degassing and hydrothermal interaction with rocks accounts for at least 82% of this TDS flux, 83% of the cation flux and 72% of the HCO3- flux. The low-temperature chemical weathering rate (17t/km2/year), calculated on the assumption that all the Cl- is of thermal origin, could include a component from low-temperature hydrolysis reactions induced by CO2 ascending from depth rather than by atmospheric CO2. Although this uncertainty remains, the calculated low-temperature weathering rate of the young rhyolitic rocks in the Yellowstone Caldera is comparable to the world average of large watersheds that drain also more soluble carbonates and evaporates but is slightly lower than calculated rates in other, less-silicic volcanic regions. Long-term average fluxes at

  3. Evidence of flux rope and sigmoid in Active Regions prior eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, Brigitte; Aulanier, Guillaume; Janvier, Miho; Bommier, Veronique; Dudik, Jaroslav; Gilchrist, Stuart; Zhao, Jie

    2016-07-01

    In the solar corona, the magnetic field is dominant, and the current density vector is nearly aligned with the magnetic field lines for strong and stressed field regions. Stressed and highly twisted flux ropes are at the origin of eruptive events such as flares and coronal mass ejections, which inject material into the interplanetary medium. The standard three dimensional (3D) flare model predicts the complex evolution of flare loops and the flux rope before the eruption. Flux ropes are not directly observed in the corona, however it has started to be possible to detect their footprints in the photosphere. Recent high spatial and temporal resolution spectro-polarimeters have allowed us to compute the photospheric electric currents and follow their evolution. Characteristics pattern like J-shaped ribbons indicate the presence of a flux rope before the flare. The results confirm the predictions of the 3D MHD standard model of eruptive flares. It is interesting to compare the magnetic helicity of the ejected flux rope with the in situ measurements of the corresponding ICME at L1. We will show some examples (February 15 2011, July 12 2012, Sept 10 2014).

  4. Mechanism of Growth Enhancement of Plants Induced by Active Species in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya

    2015-09-01

    Plant growth enhances when seeds are irradiated by plasma. However the mechanism of the growth enhancement by plasma has not been clarified. In this study, growth enhancement of plants using various active species and variation of plant cells are investigated. RF plasma is generated under conditions where pressure is 60 Pa and input electrical power is 60 W. Irradiation period varies from 0 (control) to 75 min. Air plasma shows maximum growth of plants with irradiation period of 60 min on the other hand, oxygen plasma shows the maximum growth with irradiation period of 15 min. From change of gaseous species and pressure dependence, growth enhancing factor is expected to be active oxygen species produced in plasma. According to gene expression analysis of Arabidopsis, there are two speculated mechanism of plant growth enhancement. The first is acceleration of cell cycle by gene expressions of photosynthesis and glycolytic pathway, and the second is increase of cell size via plant hormone production.

  5. Magnetic Flux Cancellation and Formation of Prominence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miley, George; Kim, Mun Song; Chon Nam, Sok; Kim, Kyong Chol

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic flux cancellation appears to be closely related to various kinds of solar activities such as flares, microflares/surges/jets, X-ray bright points, erupting mini-filaments, transition region explosive events, filament formation, filament activation and eruption, and coronal mass ejections. It is commonly believed that magnetic reconnections in the low atmosphere are responsible for canceling magnetic features, and magnetic fragments are observed to originate as bipoles. According to the Sweet-Parker type reconnection model, the inflow speed closely corresponds to the converging speed of each pole in a canceling magnetic feature and the rate of flux cancellation must be explained by the observed converging speed. As distinct from the corona, the efficiency of photospheric magnetic reconnection may be due to the small Cowling conductivity, instead of the Spitzer, of weakly ionized and magnetized plasma in the low atmosphere of the sun. Using the VAL-C atmospheric model and Cowling conductivity, we have computed the parameters describing Sweet-Parker type reconnecting current sheets in the plasma of the solar photosphere and chromosphere, and particularly for the phenomena of magnetic flux cancellation and dark filament formation which occurred on July 2, 1994 we have estimated the rate of flux cancellation, the inflow speed(the converging speed) and the upward mass flux to compare with the observation. The results show that when taking account of the Cowling conductivity in the low atmosphere, large flux cancellation rates(>1019Mxhr-1) in solar active regions are better explained than by the Spitzer conductivity-considered reconnection model. Particularly for the flux cancellation event on July 2, 1994, the inflow speed(0.26kms-1)is almost similar to the converging speed(0.22kms-1)and the upward mass flux(3.3X1012gs-1) in the model is sufficient for the large dark filament formation in a time of several hours through magnetic flux cancellation process.

  6. The effect of substrate temperature and source flux on cubic ZnMgO UV sensors grown by plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutwell, R. Casey; Wei, Ming; Schoenfeld, Winston V.

    2013-11-01

    Cubic ZnMgO films were grown by plasma-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy on MgO substrates. Interdigitatal metal-semiconductor-metal contacts were fabricated with Ni/Mg/Au to investigate the effect of growth temperature and source flux ratio on UV sensor properties. Device spectral responsivity was found to decrease with increasing Mg content, while UV-visible rejection ratio correspondingly increased. Peak responsivities ranged from 236 nm to 260 nm, spanning from 10 mA/W in the single crystal, high Mg case to ∼500 A/W for phase segregated films. UV-visible rejection ratios increased with increasing Mg content to three orders of magnitude. Solar blind detectors were realized with single-crystal ZnMgO, while effective visible blind detectors were made with phase-segregated ZnMgO films.

  7. Electrostatic heat flux instabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, P. J.; Ionson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The electrostatic cyclotron and ion acoustic instabilities in a plasma driven by a combined heat flux and current were investigated. The minimum critical heat conduction speed (above which the plasma is unstable) is given as a function of the ratio of electron to ion temperatures.

  8. Plasma parameters of an active cathode during relativistic magnetron operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadas, Y.; Kweller, T.; Sayapin, A.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2009-09-01

    The results of time- and space-resolved spectroscopic studies of the plasma produced at the surface of the ferroelectric cathode during the operation of an S-band relativistic magnetron generating ˜50 MW microwave power at f =3005 MHz and powered by a linear induction accelerator (LIA) (150 kV, 1.5 kA, 250 ns) are presented. The surface plasma was produced by a driving pulse (3 kV, 150 ns) prior to the application of the LIA accelerating high-voltage pulse. The cathode plasma electron density and temperature were obtained by analyzing hydrogen Hα and Hβ, and carbon ions CII and CIII spectral lines, and using the results of nonstationary collision radiative modeling. It was shown that the microwave generation causes an increase in plasma ion and electron temperature up to ˜4 and ˜7 eV, respectively, and the plasma density increases up to ˜7×1014 cm-3. Estimates of the plasma transport parameters and its interaction with microwave radiation are also discussed.

  9. Effect of zinc concentration on the activity of angiotensin converting enzyme in human plasma and serum

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, P.G.; Carl, G.F.; Smith, D.K.; O'Dell, B.L.

    1986-03-05

    The activity of angiotensin converting enzyme is measured clinically to assist in the diagnosis of sarcoidosis and to monitor therapy with steroids, and with antihypertensive drugs that inhibit the enzyme. Even though it has been known for some time that ACE is a zinc dependent enzyme, it was discovered only recently that zinc, in addition to endogenous levels in the assay mixture, is required for maximal activity of rat serum ACE. The present experiment was designed to determine if additional zinc is required for maximal activation of ACE in plasma and serum of human subjects. Plasma or serum samples were incubated at 37/sup 0/ in a zinc-free medium, pH 7.4, containing hippurylglyclglycine as the substrate. The addition of 20 ..mu..M zinc significantly increased ACE activity in plasma (95.4 +/- 11.9 vs 192.8 +/- 24.3 U/L) and in serum (89.9 +/- 5.6 vs 195.7 +/- 9.3 U/L) compared to samples without added zinc. Enzyme activity was increased 2.4-fold when zinc was added to plasma from a patient with low plasma zinc. These data suggest that the endogenous level of zinc in the assay mixture resulting from the addition of an aliquot of plasma or serum is insufficient to obtain maximal activity of ACE. The addition of zinc to zinc deficient plasma increased ACE activity even more.

  10. EMIC-wave-moderated flux limitations of ring current energetic ion intensities in the multi-species plasmas of Earth's inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauk, B.

    2013-12-01

    One of the early sophisticated integrations of theory and observations of the space age was the development in 1966 of the integral Kennel-Petschek flux limit for trapped energetic electrons and ions within Earth's inner magnetosphere. Specifically, it was proposed that: 1) trapped particle distributions in the magnetic bottle configuration of the inner magnetosphere are intrinsically unstable to the generation various plasma waves and 2) ionospheric reflection of some waves back into the trapped populations leads to runaway growth of the waves and dramatic loss of particles for particle integral intensities that rise above a fairly rigidly specified upper limit. While there has been a long hiatus in utilization of the KP limit in inner magnetospheric research, there have been recent highly successful reconsiderations of more general forms of the KP limit for understanding radiation belt electron intensities and spectral shapes, resulting from improvements in theoretical tools. Such a reconsideration has not happened for energetic trapped ions, perhaps due to the perceived immense complexity of the generation of the Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves, that scatter the energetic ions, for plasmas containing multiple ionic species (H, He, O). Here, a differential Kennel-Petschek (KP) flux limit for magnetospheric energetic ions is devised taking into account multiple ion species effects on the EMIC waves. This new theoretical approach is applied to measured Earth magnetosphere energetic ion spectra (~ keV to ~ 1 MeV) for radial positions (L) 3 to 6.7 RE. The flatness of the most intense spectral shapes for <100 keV indicate sculpting by just such a mechanism, but modifications of traditional KP parameters are needed to account for maximum intensities up to 5 times greater than expected. Future work using the Van Allen Probes mission will likely resolve outstanding uncertainties.

  11. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  12. Thermally Activated Energy and Flux-flow Hall Effect of Fe1+y(Te1+xSx)z

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, C.; Lei, H.; Hu, R.; Choi, E.S.

    2010-10-19

    Thermally activated flux flow (TAFF) and flux-flow Hall effect (FFHE) of Fe(Te,S) single crystal in the mixed state are studied in magnetic fields up to 35 T. Thermally activated energy (TAE) is analyzed using conventional Arrhenius relation and modified TAFF theory which is closer to experimental results. The results indicate that there is a crossover from single-vortex pinning region to collective creep pinning region with increasing magnetic field. The temperature dependence of TAE is different for H {parallel} ab and H {parallel} c. On the other hand, the analysis of FFHE in the mixed state indicates that there is no Hall sign reversal. We also observe scaling behavior |{rho}{sub xy}(H)|=A{rho}{sub xx}(H){sup {beta}}.

  13. Fusicoccin Binding to Its Plasma Membrane Receptor and the Activation of the Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    De Michelis, Maria Ida; Pugliarello, Maria Chiara; Rasi-Caldogno, Franca

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of fusicoccin binding were investigated in microsomes from 24-h-old radish (Raphanus sativus L.) seedlings. The time course of fusicoccin binding depended on fusicoccin concentration: equilibrium was reached much faster at 10 nanomolar fusicoccin than at 0.3 nanomolar fusicoccin. Scatchard analysis of equilibrium binding as a function of fusicoccin concentration indicated a single class of receptor sites with a Kd of 1.8 nanomolar and a site density of 6.3 picomoles per milligram protein. Similar values (Kd 1.7 nanomolar and site density 7 picomoles per milligram protein) were obtained from the analysis of the dependence of equilibrium binding on membrane concentration at fixed fusicoccin concentrations. Fusicoccin binding comigrated with the plasma membrane H+-ATPase in an equilibrium sucrose density gradient: both activities formed a sharp peak (1.18 grams per milliliter) clearly distinct from that of markers of other membranes which all peaked at lower densities. The saturation profiles of fusicoccin binding and of fusicoccin-induced activation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase, measured under identical conditions, were similar, supporting the view that fusicoccin-induced activation of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase is mediated by fusicoccin binding to its plasma membrane receptor. PMID:16666723

  14. Gas- and plasma-driven hydrogen permeation through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Haishan; Hirooka, Yoshi; Ashikawa, Naoko; Muroga, Takeo; Sagara, Akio

    2014-12-01

    The first wall of a magnetic fusion power reactor will be subjected to hydrogen isotope permeation by the two mechanisms: one is gas-driven and the other is plasma-driven. Hydrogen transport through a reduced activation ferritic steel alloy F82H has been investigated using a steady-state laboratory-scale plasma device. Permeation parameters including permeability, solubility and diffusivity have been measured in the temperature range from 150 to 520 °C. The surface recombination coefficient for hydrogen has also been estimated by a one-dimensional steady-state permeation model with the input data taken from experiments. Using these parameters, the hydrogen plasma-driven permeation flux and inventory for a 0.5 cm thick first wall around 500 °C are estimated to be ∼1.0 × 1013 atom cm-2 s-1 and ∼2 × 1016 atom cm-3, respectively. Also, the implications of all these data on reactor operation are discussed.

  15. Note: A single-chamber tool for plasma activation and surface functionalization in microfabrication

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Adam J.; Scherrer, Joseph R.; Reiserer, Ronald S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple apparatus for improved surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. A single treatment chamber for plasma activation and chemical/physical vapor deposition steps minimizes the time-dependent degradation of surface activation that is inherent in multi-chamber techniques. Contamination and deposition irregularities are also minimized by conducting plasma activation and treatment phases in the same vacuum environment. An inductively coupled plasma driver allows for interchangeable treatment chambers. Atomic force microscopy confirms that silane deposition on PDMS gives much better surface quality than standard deposition methods, which yield a higher local roughness and pronounced irregularities in the surface. PMID:26133881

  16. Note: A single-chamber tool for plasma activation and surface functionalization in microfabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Adam J.; Scherrer, Joseph R.; Reiserer, Ronald S.

    2015-06-01

    We present a simple apparatus for improved surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. A single treatment chamber for plasma activation and chemical/physical vapor deposition steps minimizes the time-dependent degradation of surface activation that is inherent in multi-chamber techniques. Contamination and deposition irregularities are also minimized by conducting plasma activation and treatment phases in the same vacuum environment. An inductively coupled plasma driver allows for interchangeable treatment chambers. Atomic force microscopy confirms that silane deposition on PDMS gives much better surface quality than standard deposition methods, which yield a higher local roughness and pronounced irregularities in the surface.

  17. Comparison of enzyme activities in plasma and leukocytes in dairy and beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Arai, Toshiro; Inoue, Akira; Takeguchi, Akira; Mizutani, Hisashi; Shimoo, Megumi; Sako, Toshinori; Yoshimura, Itaru; Kimura, Nobuhiro

    2003-11-01

    Concentrations of plasma glucose, immunoreactive insulin (IRI) and free fatty acid (FFA) and activities of enzymes related to energy metabolism and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) isoenzyme pattern in plasma and leukocytes were investigated in lactating Holstein cows (dairy cattle) and fattening Japanese Black Wagyu x Holstein steers (beef cattle). IRI concentrations and LDH and malate dehydrogenase (MDH) activities in the plasma of beef cattle were significantly higher than those in dairy cattle. The cytosolic ratio of MDH/LDH activity in the leukocytes of beef cattle was significantly higher than that of dairy cattle. These findings might be associated with the different energy metabolism between dairy and beef cattle. PMID:14665755

  18. Note: A single-chamber tool for plasma activation and surface functionalization in microfabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Adam J.; Scherrer, Joseph R.; Reiserer, Ronald S.

    2015-06-15

    We present a simple apparatus for improved surface modification of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices. A single treatment chamber for plasma activation and chemical/physical vapor deposition steps minimizes the time-dependent degradation of surface activation that is inherent in multi-chamber techniques. Contamination and deposition irregularities are also minimized by conducting plasma activation and treatment phases in the same vacuum environment. An inductively coupled plasma driver allows for interchangeable treatment chambers. Atomic force microscopy confirms that silane deposition on PDMS gives much better surface quality than standard deposition methods, which yield a higher local roughness and pronounced irregularities in the surface.

  19. Fitting Transporter Activities to Cellular Drug Concentrations and Fluxes: Why the Bumblebee Can Fly

    PubMed Central

    Mendes, Pedro; Oliver, Stephen G.; Kell, Douglas B.

    2015-01-01

    A recent paper in this journal argued that reported expression levels, kcat and Km for drug transporters could be used to estimate the likelihood that drug fluxes through Caco-2 cells could be accounted for solely by protein transporters. It was in fact concluded that if five such transporters contributed ‘randomly’ they could account for the flux of the most permeable drug tested (verapamil) 35% of the time. However, the values of permeability cited for verapamil were unusually high; this and other drugs have much lower permeabilities. Even for the claimed permeabilities, we found that a single ‘random’ transporter could account for the flux 42% of the time, and that two transporters can achieve 10 · 10−6 cm·s−1 90% of the time. Parameter optimisation methods show that even a single transporter can account for Caco-2 drug uptake of the most permeable drug. Overall, the proposal that ‘phospholipid bilayer diffusion (of drugs) is negligible’ is not disproved by the calculations of ‘likely’ transporter-based fluxes. PMID:26538313

  20. Rapid Ca2+ flux through the transverse tubular membrane, activated by individual action potentials in mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Launikonis, Bradley S; Stephenson, D George; Friedrich, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Periods of low frequency stimulation are known to increase the net Ca2+ uptake in skeletal muscle but the mechanism responsible for this Ca2+ entry is not known. In this study a novel high-resolution fluorescence microscopy approach allowed the detection of an action potential-induced Ca2+ flux across the tubular (t-) system of rat extensor digitorum longus muscle fibres that appears to be responsible for the net uptake of Ca2+ in working muscle. Action potentials were triggered in the t-system of mechanically skinned fibres from rat by brief field stimulation and t-system [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]t-sys) and cytoplasmic [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]cyto) were simultaneously resolved on a confocal microscope. When initial [Ca2+]t-sys was ≥ 0.2 mm a Ca2+ flux from t-system to the cytoplasm was observed following a single action potential. The action potential-induced Ca2+ flux and associated t-system Ca2+ permeability decayed exponentially and displayed inactivation characteristics such that further Ca2+ entry across the t-system could not be observed after 2–3 action potentials at 10 Hz stimulation rate. When [Ca2+]t-sys was closer to 0.1 mm, a transient rise in [Ca2+]t-sys was observed almost concurrently with the increase in [Ca2+]cyto following the action potential. The change in direction of Ca2+ flux was consistent with changes in the direction of the driving force for Ca2+. This is the first demonstration of a rapid t-system Ca2+ flux associated with a single action potential in mammalian skeletal muscle. The properties of this channel are inconsistent with a flux through the L-type Ca2+ channel suggesting that an as yet unidentified t-system protein is conducting this current. This action potential-activated Ca2+ flux provides an explanation for the previously described Ca2+ entry and accumulation observed with prolonged, intermittent muscle activity. PMID:19332499

  1. Alternative pathways of thromboplastin-dependent activation of human factor X in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marlar, R.A.; Griffin, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    To determine the interrelationships of the major coagulation pathways, the activation of 3H-labeled factor X in normal and various deficient human plasmas was evaluated when clotting was triggered by dilute rabbit or human thromboplastin. Various dilutions of thromboplastin and calcium were added to plasma samples containing 3H-factor X, and the time course of factor X activation was determined. At a 1/250 dilution of rabbit brain thromboplastin, the rate of factor X activation in plasmas deficient in factor VIII or factor IX was 10% of the activation rate of normal plasma or of factor XI deficient plasma. Reconstitution of the deficient plasmas with factors VIII or IX, respectively, reconstituted normal factor X activation. Similar results were obtained when various dilutions of human thromboplastin replaced the rabbit thromboplastin. From these plasma experiments, it is inferred that the dilute thromboplastin-dependent activation of factor X requires factors VII, IX, and VIII. An alternative extrinsic pathway that involves factors IX and VIII may be the physiologic extrinsic pathway and hence help to explain the consistent clinical observations of bleeding diatheses in patients deficient in factors IX or VIII.

  2. CO2 Flux Inversion Error Analyses for Future Active Space CO2 Missions like ASCENDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, D. F.; Kawa, S. R.; Rayner, P. J.; Browell, E. V.; Menzies, R. T.; Abshire, J. B.

    2011-12-01

    We assess the ability of different proposed CO2 lidar measurement approaches to constrain surface CO2 fluxes, as part of the development of science requirements for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) are performed for different overall measurement uncertainty levels and vertical weightings to determine what designs will yield useful new information on the global carbon cycle. The OSSEs are based on a variational data assimilation method that models the measurements at the time and location they occur with minimal averaging and solves for the surface fluxes at regional spatial scales. Measurements are simulated using the PCTM off-line atmospheric transport model driven by GEOS5 analysis data (winds and vertical mixing parameters) and forced by realistic modeled CO2 fluxes. Both day- and night-side fluxes are estimated in weekly blocks at 4.5°x6° resolution (lat/lon) using a full year of simulated data. Error estimates are computed by direct comparison to the known truth; only random errors in the measurements and assumed flux prior are considered here. Relative measurement uncertainties and vertical averaging kernels have been derived for lidar measurements made using CO2 absorption lines in the 1.57 and 2.06 micron bands using realistic assumptions about clouds, aerosols, and surface reflectivity taken from CALIPSO and MODIS. Two measurement cases are considered for the 1.57 μm band, one using a vertical weighting function weighted to the mid- to lower troposphere, and one combining this with a function peaking near the tropopause. A third case is considered for measurements in the 2.06 μm band, with a vertical weighting peaking strongly near the surface. For each of these cases, three overall measurement uncertainty levels are examined (tied to reference uncertainties of 1.0, 0.5, and 0.2 ppm (1σ) at Railroad Valley, Nevada). OSSEs with simple measurement biases are run to test how the random-error-only findings hold in

  3. The distribution of reconnection geometry in flux transfer events using energetic ion, plasma and magnetic data. [on dayside magnetopause

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daly, P. W.; Rijnbeek, R. P.; Sckopke, N.; Russell, C. T.; Saunders, M. A.

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of energetic ion anisotropies in flux transfer events (FTEs) about the dayside magnetopause has been determined for ISEE 2 crossings of the boundary in 1977 and 1978. When the events are sorted according to the sign of the east-west component of the magnetic field in the magnetosphere, a clear correlation is observed on the northern morningside. When the field is eastward, particles flow antiparallel to the field, implying field line connection to the Northern Hemisphere; when the field is westward, the opposite is true. On the afternoonside, the particle anisotropies are correlated with latitude. Explanations for this pattern are discussed which involve FTE formation at low latitudes with subsequent motion at a velocity given by the vector superposition of the Alfven velocity from the release of magnetic tension and the magnetosheath bulk flow velocity. Evidence that the geomagnetic and not the geocentric solar magnetospheric equator is the source of FTEs is considered.

  4. A 3D immersed finite element method with non-homogeneous interface flux jump for applications in particle-in-cell simulations of plasma-lunar surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Daoru; Wang, Pu; He, Xiaoming; Lin, Tao; Wang, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by the need to handle complex boundary conditions efficiently and accurately in particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, this paper presents a three-dimensional (3D) linear immersed finite element (IFE) method with non-homogeneous flux jump conditions for solving electrostatic field involving complex boundary conditions using structured meshes independent of the interface. This method treats an object boundary as part of the simulation domain and solves the electric field at the boundary as an interface problem. In order to resolve charging on a dielectric surface, a new 3D linear IFE basis function is designed for each interface element to capture the electric field jump on the interface. Numerical experiments are provided to demonstrate the optimal convergence rates in L2 and H1 norms of the IFE solution. This new IFE method is integrated into a PIC method for simulations involving charging of a complex dielectric surface in a plasma. A numerical study of plasma-surface interactions at the lunar terminator is presented to demonstrate the applicability of the new method.

  5. Cross-field motion of plasma blob-filaments and related particle flux in an open magnetic field line configuration on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. Q.; Hanada, K.; Nishino, N.; Ogata, R.; Ishiguro, M.; Gao, X.; Zushi, H.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Idei, H.; Hasegawa, M.; Quest Group

    2013-07-01

    Blob-filaments have been observed by combined measurement with a fast camera and a movable Langmuir probe in an open magnetic field line configuration of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating plasma in QUEST. Blob-filaments extended along field lines do correspond to over-dense plasma structures and propagated across the field lines to the outer wall. The radial velocity of the blob structure, Vb, was obtained by three methods and was dominantly driven by the E × B force. The radial velocity, size of the blob showed good agreements with the results obtained by sheath-connected interchange theoretical model. Vb corresponds to roughly 0.02-0.07 of the local sound speed (Cs) in QUEST. The higher moments (skewness S and kurtosis K) representing the shape of PDF of density fluctuation are studied. Their least squares fitting with quadratic polynomial is K = (1.60 ± 0.27)S2 - (0.46 ± 0.20). The larger blob structures, occurring only 10% of the time, can carry more than 60% loss of the entire radial particle flux.

  6. NPA binding activity is peripheral to the plasma membrane and is associated with the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed Central

    Cox, D N; Muday, G K

    1994-01-01

    N-1-Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) binding activity is released into the supernatant when plasma membranes are subjected to high-salt treatment, indicating that this activity is peripherally associated with the membrane. Extraction of plasma membrane vesicles with Triton X-100 resulted in retention of NPA binding activity in the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. Treatment of this pellet with KI released NPA binding activity, actin, and alpha-tubulin. Dialysis to remove KI led to the repolymerization of cytoskeletal elements and movement of NPA binding activity into an insoluble cytoskeletal pellet. NPA binding activity partitioned into the detergent-insoluble cytoskeletal pellet obtained from both zucchini and maize membranes and was released from these pellets by KI treatment. Treatment of a cytoskeletal pellet with cytochalasin B doubled NPA binding activity in the resulting supernatant. Together, these experiments indicate that NPA binding activity is peripherally associated with the plasma membrane and interacts with the cytoskeleton in vitro. PMID:11536654

  7. Polyamines interact with hydroxyl radicals in activating Ca(2+) and K(+) transport across the root epidermal plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Zepeda-Jazo, Isaac; Velarde-Buendía, Ana María; Enríquez-Figueroa, René; Bose, Jayakumar; Shabala, Sergey; Muñiz-Murguía, Jesús; Pottosin, Igor I

    2011-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of the plant adaptive responses to environment. Importantly, ROS affect the intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics by activating a range of nonselective Ca(2+)-permeable channels in plasma membrane (PM). Using patch-clamp and noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring techniques, we have characterized ionic currents and net K(+) and Ca(2+) fluxes induced by hydroxyl radicals (OH(•)) in pea (Pisum sativum) roots. OH(•), but not hydrogen peroxide, activated a rapid Ca(2+) efflux and a more slowly developing net Ca(2+) influx concurrent with a net K(+) efflux. In isolated protoplasts, OH(•) evoked a nonselective current, with a time course and a steady-state magnitude similar to those for a K(+) efflux in intact roots. This current displayed a low ionic selectivity and was permeable to Ca(2+). Active OH(•)-induced Ca(2+) efflux in roots was suppressed by the PM Ca(2+) pump inhibitors eosine yellow and erythrosine B. The cation channel blockers gadolinium, nifedipine, and verapamil and the anionic channel blockers 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoate and niflumate inhibited OH(•)-induced ionic currents in root protoplasts and K(+) efflux and Ca(2+) influx in roots. Contrary to expectations, polyamines (PAs) did not inhibit the OH(•)-induced cation fluxes. The net OH(•)-induced Ca(2+) efflux was largely prolonged in the presence of spermine, and all PAs tested (spermine, spermidine, and putrescine) accelerated and augmented the OH(•)-induced net K(+) efflux from roots. The latter effect was also observed in patch-clamp experiments on root protoplasts. We conclude that PAs interact with ROS to alter intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis by modulating both Ca(2+) influx and efflux transport systems at the root cell PM. PMID:21980172

  8. Boost of plasma current with active magnetic field shaping coils in rotamak discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xiaokang; Goss, Jermain; Kalaria, Dhara; Huang, Tian Sen

    2011-08-15

    A set of magnetic shaping coils is installed on the Prairie View (PV) rotamak for the study of active plasma shape control in the regimes with and without toroidal field (TF). In the spherical tokamak regime (with TF), plasma current I{sub p} can be boosted by 200% when all five shaping coils (connected in series) are energized. The enhancement of current drive efficiency is mainly attributed to the radial compression and the substantially axial extension of the plasma column; this in turn improves the impedance matching and thus increases antenna input power. In the field-reversed configuration (without TF), plasma current can be boosted by 100% when one middle coil is used; the appearance of radial shift mode limits the achievable value of I{sub p}. The experiments clearly demonstrate that the plasma shape control plays a role in effectively driving plasma current in rotamaks.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  10. Body tissue activation using micro-spot atmospheric pressure plasma source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Takumi; Hirata, Takamichi; Tsutsui, Chihiro; Akiya, Masahiro; Mori, Akira

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been performed involving directly irradiating body tissues with atmospheric pressure plasma for various medical engineering applications of plasmas. Plasma irradiation was used to burn back dermis of rats. Then, healing and improvement of the scald areas were observed. Additionally, we devoted attention to the angiogenesis, which is a key component of the healing mechanism. Plasma irradiated rats and non treatment were performed an intravenous injection of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) labelled tomato-lectin. The neo-vascular vessels were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscopy, and the quantities were calculated. Each quantity was the non treatment: 9.2 +/-- 0.77 and plasma irradiation: 18.4 +/-- 2.9. These data indicates that direct plasma irradiation involving ion/radical may promote angiogenesis, and it promotes living-body activation.