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Sample records for activating neuropeptide receptor

  1. Neuropeptide receptor transcriptome reveals unidentified neuroendocrine pathways.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Naoki; Yamamoto, Sachie; Zitnan, Dusan; Watanabe, Ken; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Satake, Honoo; Kaneko, Yu; Hiruma, Kiyoshi; Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Kataoka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides are an important class of molecules involved in diverse aspects of metazoan development and homeostasis. Insects are ideal model systems to investigate neuropeptide functions, and the major focus of insect neuropeptide research in the last decade has been on the identification of their receptors. Despite these vigorous efforts, receptors for some key neuropeptides in insect development such as prothoracicotropic hormone, eclosion hormone and allatotropin (AT), remain undefined. In this paper, we report the comprehensive cloning of neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptors from the silkworm, Bombyx mori, and systematic analyses of their expression. Based on the expression patterns of orphan receptors, we identified the long-sought receptor for AT, which is thought to stimulate juvenile hormone biosynthesis in the corpora allata (CA). Surprisingly, however, the AT receptor was not highly expressed in the CA, but instead was predominantly transcribed in the corpora cardiaca (CC), an organ adjacent to the CA. Indeed, by using a reverse-physiological approach, we purified and characterized novel allatoregulatory peptides produced in AT receptor-expressing CC cells, which may indirectly mediate AT activity on the CA. All of the above findings confirm the effectiveness of a systematic analysis of the receptor transcriptome, not only in characterizing orphan receptors, but also in identifying novel players and hidden mechanisms in important biological processes. This work illustrates how using a combinatorial approach employing bioinformatic, molecular, biochemical and physiological methods can help solve recalcitrant problems in neuropeptide research. PMID:18725956

  2. Activation of Neuropeptide Y Receptors Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Physiology and Exerts Neuroprotective Actions In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Martins, João; Elvas, Filipe; Brudzewsky, Dan; Martins, Tânia; Kolomiets, Bogdan; Tralhão, Pedro; Gøtzsche, Casper R.; Cavadas, Cláudia; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Woldbye, David P. D.; Picaud, Serge; Santiago, Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in mammalian retina but the location and potential modulatory effects of NPY receptor activation remain largely unknown. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is a hallmark of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly glaucoma. Using purified RGCs and ex vivo rat retinal preparations, we have measured RGC intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and RGC spiking activity, respectively. We found that NPY attenuated the increase in the [Ca2+]i triggered by glutamate mainly via Y1 receptor activation. Moreover, (Leu31, Pro34)−NPY, a Y1/Y5 receptor agonist, increased the initial burst response of OFF-type RGCs, although no effect was observed on RGC spontaneous spiking activity. The Y1 receptor activation was also able to directly modulate RGC responses by attenuating the NMDA-induced increase in RGC spiking activity. These results suggest that Y1 receptor activation, at the level of inner or outer plexiform layers, leads to modulation of RGC receptive field properties. Using in vitro cultures of rat retinal explants exposed to NMDA, we found that NPY pretreatment prevented NMDA-induced cell death. However, in an animal model of retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury, pretreatment with NPY or (Leu31, Pro34)−NPY was not able to prevent apoptosis or rescue RGCs. In conclusion, we found modulatory effects of NPY application that for the first time were detected at the level of RGCs. However, further studies are needed to evaluate whether NPY neuroprotective actions detected in retinal explants can be translated into animal models of retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:26311075

  3. Identification of functionally important residues in the silkmoth pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide receptor, an insect ortholog of the vertebrate Neuromedin U Receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The biosynthesis of sex pheromone components in many lepidopteran insects is regulated by interactions between pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and the PBAN receptor (PBANR), a class-A G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). To identify functionally important amino acid residues in t...

  4. NMDA receptor activation and calpain contribute to disruption of dendritic spines by the stress neuropeptide CRH.

    PubMed

    Andres, Adrienne L; Regev, Limor; Phi, Lucas; Seese, Ronald R; Chen, Yuncai; Gall, Christine M; Baram, Tallie Z

    2013-10-23

    The complex effects of stress on learning and memory are mediated, in part, by stress-induced changes in the composition and structure of excitatory synapses. In the hippocampus, the effects of stress involve several factors including glucocorticoids and the stress-released neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which influence the integrity of dendritic spines and the structure and function of the excitatory synapses they carry. CRH, at nanomolar, presumed-stress levels, rapidly abolishes short-term synaptic plasticity and destroys dendritic spines, yet the mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that glutamate receptor-mediated processes, which shape synaptic structure and function, are engaged by CRH and contribute to spine destabilization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, CRH application reduced dendritic spine density in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and this action depended on the CRH receptor type 1. CRH-mediated spine loss required network activity and the activation of NMDA, but not of AMPA receptors; indeed GluR1-containing dendritic spines were resistant to CRH. Downstream of NMDA receptors, the calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, was recruited, resulting in the breakdown of spine actin-interacting proteins including spectrin. Pharmacological approaches demonstrated that calpain recruitment contributed critically to CRH-induced spine loss. In conclusion, the stress hormone CRH co-opts mechanisms that contribute to the plasticity and integrity of excitatory synapses, leading to selective loss of dendritic spines. This spine loss might function as an adaptive mechanism preventing the consequences of adverse memories associated with severe stress. PMID:24155300

  5. NMDA Receptor Activation and Calpain Contribute to Disruption of Dendritic Spines by the Stress Neuropeptide CRH

    PubMed Central

    Andres, Adrienne L.; Regev, Limor; Phi, Lucas; Seese, Ronald R.; Chen, Yuncai; Gall, Christine M.

    2013-01-01

    The complex effects of stress on learning and memory are mediated, in part, by stress-induced changes in the composition and structure of excitatory synapses. In the hippocampus, the effects of stress involve several factors including glucocorticoids and the stress-released neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which influence the integrity of dendritic spines and the structure and function of the excitatory synapses they carry. CRH, at nanomolar, presumed-stress levels, rapidly abolishes short-term synaptic plasticity and destroys dendritic spines, yet the mechanisms for these effects are not fully understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that glutamate receptor-mediated processes, which shape synaptic structure and function, are engaged by CRH and contribute to spine destabilization. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, CRH application reduced dendritic spine density in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and this action depended on the CRH receptor type 1. CRH-mediated spine loss required network activity and the activation of NMDA, but not of AMPA receptors; indeed GluR1-containing dendritic spines were resistant to CRH. Downstream of NMDA receptors, the calcium-dependent enzyme, calpain, was recruited, resulting in the breakdown of spine actin-interacting proteins including spectrin. Pharmacological approaches demonstrated that calpain recruitment contributed critically to CRH-induced spine loss. In conclusion, the stress hormone CRH co-opts mechanisms that contribute to the plasticity and integrity of excitatory synapses, leading to selective loss of dendritic spines. This spine loss might function as an adaptive mechanism preventing the consequences of adverse memories associated with severe stress. PMID:24155300

  6. Selective breeding for high anxiety introduces a synonymous SNP that increases neuropeptide S receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Slattery, David A; Naik, Roshan R; Grund, Thomas; Yen, Yi-Chun; Sartori, Simone B; Füchsl, Andrea; Finger, Beate C; Elfving, Betina; Nordemann, Uwe; Guerrini, Remo; Calo, Girolamo; Wegener, Gregers; Mathé, Aleksander A; Singewald, Nicolas; Czibere, Ludwig; Landgraf, Rainer; Neumann, Inga D

    2015-03-18

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has generated substantial interest due to its anxiolytic and fear-attenuating effects in rodents, while a corresponding receptor polymorphism associated with increased NPS receptor (NPSR1) surface expression and efficacy has been implicated in an increased risk of panic disorder in humans. To gain insight into this paradox, we examined the NPS system in rats and mice bred for high anxiety-related behavior (HAB) versus low anxiety-related behavior, and, thereafter, determined the effect of central NPS administration on anxiety- and fear-related behavior. The HAB phenotype was accompanied by lower basal NPS receptor (Npsr1) expression, which we could confirm via in vitro dual luciferase promoter assays. Assessment of shorter Npsr1 promoter constructs containing a sequence mutation that introduces a glucocorticoid receptor transcription factor binding site, confirmed via oligonucleotide pull-down assays, revealed increased HAB promoter activity-an effect that was prevented by dexamethasone. Analogous to the human NPSR1 risk isoform, functional analysis of a synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism in the coding region of HAB rodents revealed that it caused a higher cAMP response to NPS stimulation. Assessment of the behavioral consequence of these differences revealed that intracerebroventricular NPS reversed the hyperanxiety of HAB rodents as well as the impaired cued-fear extinction in HAB rats and the enhanced fear expression in HAB mice, respectively. These results suggest that alterations in the NPS system, conserved across rodents and humans, contribute to innate anxiety and fear, and that HAB rodents are particularly suited to resolve the apparent discrepancy between the preclinical and clinical findings to date. PMID:25788677

  7. The pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) receptor of Heliothis virescens: Identification, functional expression, and structure-activity relationships of ligand analogs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) promotes synthesis and release of sex pheromones in moths. We have identified and functionally expressed a PBAN receptor from Heliothis virescens (HevPBANR) and elucidated structure-activity relationships of PBAN analogs. Screening of a larval C...

  8. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Marques, Marisa; Aveleira, Célia A; Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-07-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  9. Caloric restriction stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons through neuropeptide Y and ghrelin receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    Carmo-Silva, Sara; Botelho, Mariana; de Almeida, Luís Pereira; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Caloric restriction is an anti-aging intervention known to extend lifespan in several experimental models, at least in part, by stimulating autophagy. Caloric restriction increases neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus and plasma ghrelin, a peripheral gut hormone that acts in hypothalamus to modulate energy homeostasis. NPY and ghrelin have been shown to be neuroprotective in different brain areas and to induce several physiological modifications similar to those induced by caloric restriction. However, the effect of NPY and ghrelin in autophagy in cortical neurons is currently not known. Using a cell culture of rat cortical neurons we investigate the involvement of NPY and ghrelin in caloric restriction-induced autophagy. We observed that a caloric restriction mimetic cell culture medium stimulates autophagy in rat cortical neurons and NPY or ghrelin receptor antagonists blocked this effect. On the other hand, exogenous NPY or ghrelin stimulate autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Moreover, NPY mediates the stimulatory effect of ghrelin on autophagy in rat cortical neurons. Since autophagy impairment occurs in aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases, NPY and ghrelin synergistic effect on autophagy stimulation may suggest a new strategy to delay aging process. PMID:27441412

  10. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) activates cancer-related pathways and is widely expressed in neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, V; Ezer, S; Sundman, L; Hagström, J; Remes, S; Söderhäll, C; Greco, D; Dario, G; Haglund, C; Kere, J; Arola, J

    2014-08-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) arise from disseminated neuroendocrine cells and express general and specific neuroendocrine markers. Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) is expressed in neuroendocrine cells and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) affects cell proliferation. Our aim was to study whether NPS/NPSR1 could be used as a biomarker for neuroendocrine neoplasms and to identify the gene pathways affected by NPS/NPSR1. We collected a cohort of NETs comprised of 91 samples from endocrine glands, digestive tract, skin, and lung. Tumor type was validated by immunostaining of chromogranin-A and synaptophysin expression and tumor grade was analyzed by Ki-67 proliferation index. NPS and NPSR1 expression was quantified by immunohistochemistry using polyclonal antibodies against NPS and monoclonal antibodies against the amino-terminus and carboxy-terminus of NPSR1 isoform A (NPSR1-A). The effects of NPS on downstream signaling were studied in a human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line which overexpresses NPSR1-A and is of neuroendocrine origin. NPSR1 and NPS were expressed in most NET tissues, with the exception of adrenal pheochromocytomas in which NPS/NPSR1 immunoreactivity was very low. Transcriptome analysis of NPSR1-A overexpressing cells revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, circadian activity, focal adhesion, transforming growth factor beta, and cytokine-cytokine interactions were the most altered gene pathways after NPS stimulation. Our results show that NETs are a source of NPS and NPSR1, and that NPS affects cancer-related pathways. PMID:24915894

  11. The Arginine Residue within the C-Terminal Active Core of Bombyx mori Pheromone Biosynthesis-Activating Neuropeptide is Essential for Receptor Binding and Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takeshi; Lee, Jae Min; Nagata, Koji; Matsumoto, Shogo; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    In most lepidopteran insects, the biosynthesis of sex pheromones is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN). Bombyx mori PBAN (BomPBAN) consists of 33 amino acid residues and contains a C-terminus FSPRLamide motif as the active core. Among neuropeptides containing the FXPRLamide motif, the arginine (Arg, R) residue at the second position from the C-terminus is highly conserved across several neuropeptides, which can be designated as RXamide peptides. The purpose of this study was to clarify the role of the Arg residue in the BomPBAN active core. We synthesized 10-residue peptides corresponding to the C-terminal part of BomPBAN with a series of replacements at the second position from the C-terminus, termed the C2 position, and measured their efficacy in stimulating Ca2+ influx in insect cells expressing a fluorescent PBAN receptor chimera (PBANR–EGFP) using the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, Fura Red–AM. The PBAN analogs with the C2 position replaced with alanine (Ala, A), aspartic acid (Asp, D), serine (Ser, S), or l-2-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc) decreased PBAN-like activity. RC2A (SKTRYFSPALamide) and RC2D (SKTRYFSPDLamide) had the lowest activity and could not inhibit the activity of PBAN C10 (SKTRYFSPRLamide). We also prepared Rhodamine Red-labeled peptides of the PBAN analogs and examined their ability to bind PBANR. In contrast to Rhodamine Red-PBAN C10 at 100 nM, none of the synthetic analogs exhibited PBANR binding at the same concentration. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the C2 Arg residue in BomPBAN is essential for PBANR binding and activation. PMID:22654866

  12. Neuropeptide Y1 receptor inhibits cell growth through inactivating mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiufang; Zhao, Fengbo; Huo, Xisong; Tang, Weidong; Hu, Baoying; Gong, Xiu; Yang, Juan; Shen, Qiujin; Qin, Wenxin

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers, and its incidence is increasing worldwide. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) broadly expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system. It participates in multiple physiological and pathological processes through specific receptors. Evidences are accumulating that NPY is involved in development and progression in neuro- or endocrine-related cancers. However, little is known about the potential roles and underlying mechanisms of NPY receptors in HCC. In this study, we analyzed the expression of NPY receptors by real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemical staining. Correlation between NPY1R levels and clinicopathological characteristics, and survival of HCC patients were explored, respectively. Cell proliferation was researched by CCK-8 in vitro, and tumor growth was studied by nude mice xenografts in vivo. We found that mRNA and protein level of NPY receptor Y1 subtype (NPY1R) significantly decreased in HCC tissues. Low expression of NPY1R closely correlated with poor prognosis in HCC patients. Proliferation of HCC cells was significantly inhibited by recombinant NPY protein in vitro. This inhibitory effect could be blocked by selected NPY1R antagonist BIBP3226. Furthermore, overexpression of NPY1R could significantly inhibit HCC cell proliferation. Knockdown of NPY1R promoted cell multiplication in vitro and increased tumorigenicity and tumor growth in vivo. NPY1R was found to participate in the inhibition of cell proliferation via inactivating mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway in HCC cells. Collectively, NPY1R plays an inhibitory role in tumor growth and may be a promising therapeutic target for HCC. PMID:27262566

  13. The neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor knockdown modulates activator protein 1-involved feeding behavior in amphetamine-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hypothalamic neuropeptide Y (NPY) and two immediate early genes, c-fos and c-jun, have been found to be involved in regulating the appetite-suppressing effect of amphetamine (AMPH). The present study investigated whether cerebral catecholamine (CA) might regulate NPY and POMC expression and whether NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) participated in activator protein-1 (AP-1)–mediated feeding. Methods Rats were given AMPH daily for 4 days. Changes in the expression of NPY, Y1R, c-Fos, c-Jun, and AP-1 were assessed and compared. Results Decreased CA could modulate NPY and melanocortin receptor 4 (MC4R) expressions. NPY and food intake decreased the most on Day 2, but Y1R, c-Fos, and c-Jun increased by approximately 350%, 280%, and 300%, respectively, on Day 2. Similarly, AP-1/DNA binding activity was increased by about 180% on Day 2. The expression patterns in Y1R, c-Fos, c-Jun, and AP-1/DNA binding were opposite to those in NPY during AMPH treatment. Y1R knockdown was found to modulate the opposite regulation between NPY and AP-1, revealing an involvement of Y1R in regulating NPY/AP-1–mediated feeding. Conclusions These results point to a molecular mechanism of CA/NPY/Y1R/AP-1 signaling in the control of AMPH-mediated anorexia and may advance the medical research of anorectic and anti-obesity drugs. PMID:24225225

  14. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Peng; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Wang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Li-Rong; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR). High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol) i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex (Pir), ventral tenia tecta (VTT), the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt). The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice. PMID:23614017

  15. Neuropeptide FF receptors as novel targets for limbic seizure attenuation.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Jeanelle; Meurs, Alfred; Bihel, Frederic; Hammoud, Hassan; Schmitt, Martine; De Kock, Joery; Utard, Valerie; Humbert, Jean-Paul; Bertin, Isabelle; Buffel, Ine; Coppens, Jessica; Tourwe, Dirk; Maes, Veronique; De Prins, An; Vanhaecke, Tamara; Massie, Ann; Balasubramaniam, Ambikaipakan; Boon, Paul; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Simonin, Frederic; Smolders, Ilse

    2015-08-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well established anticonvulsant and first-in-class antiepileptic neuropeptide. In this study, the controversial role of NPY1 receptors in epilepsy was reassessed by testing two highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands and a mixed NPY1/NPFF receptor antagonist BIBP3226 in a rat model for limbic seizures. While BIBP3226 significantly attenuated the pilocarpine-induced seizures, neither of the highly selective NPY1 receptor ligands altered the seizure severity. Administration of the NPFF1/NPFF2 receptor antagonist RF9 also significantly attenuated limbic seizure activity. To further prove the involvement of NPFF receptors in these seizure-modulating effects, low and high affinity antagonists for the NPFF receptors were tested. We observed that the low affinity ligand failed to exhibit anticonvulsant properties while the two high affinity ligands significantly attenuated the seizures. Continuous NPFF1 receptor agonist administration also inhibited limbic seizures whereas bolus administration of the NPFF1 receptor agonist was without effect. This suggests that continuous agonist perfusion could result in NPFF1 receptor desensitization and mimic NPFF1 receptor antagonist administration. Our data unveil for the first time the involvement of the NPFF system in the management of limbic seizures. PMID:25963417

  16. Identification of a small-molecule ligand that activates the neuropeptide receptor GPR171 and increases food intake.

    PubMed

    Wardman, Jonathan H; Gomes, Ivone; Bobeck, Erin N; Stockert, Jennifer A; Kapoor, Abhijeet; Bisignano, Paola; Gupta, Achla; Mezei, Mihaly; Kumar, Sanjai; Filizola, Marta; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2016-01-01

    Several neuropeptide systems in the hypothalamus, including neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP), control food intake. Peptides derived from proSAAS, a precursor implicated in the regulation of body weight, also control food intake. GPR171 is a heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR) for BigLEN (b-LEN), a peptide derived from proSAAS. To facilitate studies exploring the physiological role of GPR171, we sought to identify small-molecule ligands for this receptor by performing a virtual screen of a compound library for interaction with a homology model of GPR171. We identified MS0015203 as an agonist of GPR171 and demonstrated the selectivity of MS0015203 for GPR171 by testing the binding of this compound to 80 other membrane proteins, including family A GPCRs. Reducing the expression of GPR171 by shRNA (short hairpin RNA)-mediated knockdown blunted the cellular and tissue response to MS0015203. Peripheral injection of MS0015203 into mice increased food intake and body weight, and these responses were significantly attenuated in mice with decreased expression of GPR171 in the hypothalamus. Together, these results suggest that MS0015203 is a useful tool to probe the pharmacological and functional properties of GPR171 and that ligands targeting GPR171 may eventually lead to therapeutics for food-related disorders. PMID:27245612

  17. Identification of functionally important residues of the silkmoth pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide receptor, an insect ortholog of the vertebrate neuromedin U receptor.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Takeshi; Katayama, Yukie; Guo, Linjun; Liu, Desheng; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Kou; Lee, Jae Min; Nagamine, Toshihiro; Hull, J Joe; Matsumoto, Shogo; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagata, Koji

    2014-07-01

    The biosynthesis of sex pheromone components in many lepidopteran insects is regulated by the interaction between pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and the PBAN receptor (PBANR), a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. To identify functionally important amino acid residues in the silkmoth PBANR, a series of 27 alanine substitutions was generated using a PBANR chimera C-terminally fused with enhanced GFP. The PBANR mutants were expressed in Sf9 insect cells, and their ability to bind and be activated by a core PBAN fragment (C10PBAN(R2K)) was monitored. Among the 27 mutants, 23 localized to the cell surface of transfected Sf9 cells, whereas the other four remained intracellular. Reduced binding relative to wild type was observed with 17 mutants, and decreased Ca(2+) mobilization responses were observed with 12 mutants. Ala substitution of Glu-95, Glu-120, Asn-124, Val-195, Phe-276, Trp-280, Phe-283, Arg-287, Tyr-307, Thr-311, and Phe-319 affected both binding and Ca(2+) mobilization. The most pronounced effects were observed with the E120A mutation. A molecular model of PBANR indicated that the functionally important PBANR residues map to the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th transmembrane helices, implying that the same general region of class A G-protein-coupled receptors recognizes both peptidic and nonpeptidic ligands. Docking simulations suggest similar ligand-receptor recognition interactions for PBAN-PBANR and the orthologous vertebrate pair, neuromedin U (NMU) and NMU receptor (NMUR). The simulations highlight the importance of two glutamate residues, Glu-95 and Glu-120, in silkmoth PBANR and Glu-117 and Glu-142 in human NMUR1, in the recognition of the most functionally critical region of the ligands, the C-terminal residue and amide. PMID:24847080

  18. Identification of Functionally Important Residues of the Silkmoth Pheromone Biosynthesis-activating Neuropeptide Receptor, an Insect Ortholog of the Vertebrate Neuromedin U Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Takeshi; Katayama, Yukie; Guo, Linjun; Liu, Desheng; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Kou; Lee, Jae Min; Nagamine, Toshihiro; Hull, J. Joe; Matsumoto, Shogo; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagata, Koji

    2014-01-01

    The biosynthesis of sex pheromone components in many lepidopteran insects is regulated by the interaction between pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN) and the PBAN receptor (PBANR), a class A G-protein-coupled receptor. To identify functionally important amino acid residues in the silkmoth PBANR, a series of 27 alanine substitutions was generated using a PBANR chimera C-terminally fused with enhanced GFP. The PBANR mutants were expressed in Sf9 insect cells, and their ability to bind and be activated by a core PBAN fragment (C10PBANR2K) was monitored. Among the 27 mutants, 23 localized to the cell surface of transfected Sf9 cells, whereas the other four remained intracellular. Reduced binding relative to wild type was observed with 17 mutants, and decreased Ca2+ mobilization responses were observed with 12 mutants. Ala substitution of Glu-95, Glu-120, Asn-124, Val-195, Phe-276, Trp-280, Phe-283, Arg-287, Tyr-307, Thr-311, and Phe-319 affected both binding and Ca2+ mobilization. The most pronounced effects were observed with the E120A mutation. A molecular model of PBANR indicated that the functionally important PBANR residues map to the 2nd, 3rd, 6th, and 7th transmembrane helices, implying that the same general region of class A G-protein-coupled receptors recognizes both peptidic and nonpeptidic ligands. Docking simulations suggest similar ligand-receptor recognition interactions for PBAN-PBANR and the orthologous vertebrate pair, neuromedin U (NMU) and NMU receptor (NMUR). The simulations highlight the importance of two glutamate residues, Glu-95 and Glu-120, in silkmoth PBANR and Glu-117 and Glu-142 in human NMUR1, in the recognition of the most functionally critical region of the ligands, the C-terminal residue and amide. PMID:24847080

  19. Human Neuropeptide S Receptor Is Activated via a Gαq Protein-biased Signaling Cascade by a Human Neuropeptide S Analog Lacking the C-terminal 10 Residues.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yuan; Lu, Bin; Ma, Qiang; Wu, Gang; Lai, Xiangru; Zang, Jiashu; Shi, Ying; Liu, Dongxiang; Han, Feng; Zhou, Naiming

    2016-04-01

    Human neuropeptide S (NPS) and its cognate receptor regulate important biological functions in the brain and have emerged as a future therapeutic target for treatment of a variety of neurological and psychiatric diseases. The human NPS (hNPS) receptor has been shown to dually couple to Gαs- and Gαq-dependent signaling pathways. The human NPS analog hNPS-(1-10), lacking 10 residues from the C terminus, has been shown to stimulate Ca(2+)mobilization in a manner comparable with full-length hNPSin vitrobut seems to fail to induce biological activityin vivo Here, results derived from a number of cell-based functional assays, including intracellular cAMP-response element (CRE)-driven luciferase activity, Ca(2+)mobilization, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation, show that hNPS-(1-10) preferentially activates Gαq-dependent Ca(2+)mobilization while exhibiting less activity in triggering Gαs-dependent CRE-driven luciferase activity. We further demonstrate that both Gαq- and Gαs-coupled signaling pathways contribute to full-length hNPS-mediated activation of ERK1/2, whereas hNPS-(1-10)-promoted ERK1/2 activation is completely inhibited by the Gαqinhibitor UBO-QIC but not by the PKA inhibitor H89. Moreover, the results of Ala-scanning mutagenesis of hNPS-(1-13) indicated that residues Lys(11)and Lys(12)are structurally crucial for the hNPS receptor to couple to Gαs-dependent signaling. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that hNPS-(1-10) is a biased agonist favoring Gαq-dependent signaling. It may represent a valuable chemical probe for further investigation of the therapeutic potential of human NPS receptor-directed signalingin vivo. PMID:26865629

  20. Comparison of synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors and their gene expression in response to feeding in Ixodes scapularis (Ixodidae) vs. Ornithodoros turicata (Argasidae).

    PubMed

    Egekwu, N; Sonenshine, D E; Garman, H; Barshis, D J; Cox, N; Bissinger, B W; Zhu, J; M Roe, R

    2016-02-01

    Illumina GAII high-throughput sequencing was used to compare expressed genes for female synganglion neuropeptides, neuropeptide receptors and neurotransmitter receptors of the soft tick Ornithodoros turicata with the hard tick Ixodes scapularis. Gene ontology molecular level three mapping revealed no significant differences amongst the same categories represented in O. turicata and I. scapularis. Transcripts predicting 22 neuropeptides or their receptors in the O. turicata synganglion were similar to annotations for 23 neuropeptides or receptors previously identified from I scapularis, with minor exceptions. A transcript predicting ecdysis triggering hormone receptor was identified in O. turicata; transcripts encoding for proprotein convertase and glycoprotein B were identified in both species. Transcripts predicting the same neurotransmitter receptors were found in the synganglion of both species. Gene expression of the transcripts showed numerous differences in response to feeding. Major differences were observed in expression of genes believed important in regulating slow vs. rapid feeding, blood water elimination, cuticle synthesis plasticity and in signalling reproductive activity. Although the glutamate receptor was strongly upregulated in both species, the gamma aminobutyric acid receptor, which inhibits glutamate, was upregulated significantly only in I. scapularis. These differences are consistent with the slow vs. rapid action of the pharyngeal pump in the two species. PMID:26783017

  1. Neuropeptide-S (NPS) Receptor Genotype Modulates Basolateral Amygdala Responsiveness to Aversive Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Dannlowski, Udo; Kugel, Harald; Franke, Friederike; Stuhrmann, Anja; Hohoff, Christa; Zwanzger, Peter; Lenzen, Thomas; Grotegerd, Dominik; Suslow, Thomas; Arolt, Volker; Heindel, Walter; Domschke, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies point to a role of neuropeptide-S (NPS) in the etiology of anxiety disorders. In animal models, NPS and its receptor (NPSR) were shown to be highly expressed in the amygdala, a central structure in the fear circuit, also known to be hyper-responsive in anxiety disorders. Recently, a functional polymorphism in the NPSR gene (rs324981 A/T) has been associated with panic disorder and anxiety sensitivity. However, the role of NPSR gene variation in the modulation of fear-related amygdala responsiveness remains to be clarified. In 79 healthy subjects genotyped for NPSR rs324981, amygdala responses were assessed by means of fMRI. The participants were presented with fear-relevant faces in a robust emotion-processing paradigm frequently used to study amygdala responsiveness. We observed a strong association of NPSR T-alleles with right amygdala responsiveness to fear-relevant faces. The association peak was located in the BLA. Furthermore, responsiveness to aversive stimuli within this BLA cluster predicted a participant's self-reported harm avoidance but not depression level. We conclude that NPSR genotype is associated with increased amygdala responsiveness to fear-relevant stimuli. Thereby, NPSR rs324981 apparently causes an indirect effect on anxiety-related traits and potentially contributes to the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders by shaping fear-related limbic activity. PMID:21525857

  2. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization.

    PubMed

    Hull, J J; Lee, J M; Matsumoto, S

    2011-12-01

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Using fluorescent Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) chimeras to study PBANR regulation, we previously showed that BmPBANR undergoes rapid ligand-induced internalization, that the endocytotic motif resides between residues 358-367 of the BmPBANR C terminus, and that the internalization pathway is clathrin-dependent. Here, we sought to expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying BmPBANR function and regulation by transiently expressing a series of fluorescent BmPBANR chimeric constructs in cultured Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells and assaying for internalization of a fluorescently labelled ligand. Pharmacological inhibition of phospholipase C significantly reduced internalization, suggesting that BmPBANR regulation proceeds via a conventional G-protein-dependent pathway. This was further supported by impaired internalization following site-directed mutagenesis of R263 and R264, two basic residues at the transmembrane 6 intracellular junction that are thought to stabilize G-protein coupling via electrostatic interactions. Ala substitution of S333 and S366, two consensus protein kinase C sites in the C terminus, likewise impaired internalization, as did RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Sf9 protein kinase C. N-terminal truncations of BmPBANR indicate that the first 27 residues are not necessary for cell surface trafficking or receptor functionality. PMID:21955122

  3. Stimulatory effects of opioid neuropeptides on locomotory activity and conformational changes in invertebrate and human immunocytes: evidence for a subtype of delta receptor.

    PubMed

    Stefano, G B; Cadet, P; Scharrer, B

    1989-08-01

    The presence of opioid neuropeptides was shown to stimulate conformational changes and locomotory activity in immunocytes of two representatives of invertebrates as well as in human leukocytes. Cells were examined by use of phase-contrast and Nomarski optics coupled with a Zeiss Axiophot microscope, and of the Zeiss Videoplan/Vidas Image Analysis system. Immunocompetent blood cells, activated by exogenous opioids or stressful stimuli presumed to engage endogenous opioids, showed flattening, elongation, and formation of pseudopodia. In the mollusc Mytilus edulis, ameboid movements resulted in the formation of cell clusters, an activity not observed in untreated controls, or in immunocytes simultaneously exposed to opioid and naloxone. Tests with nine immunoreactive substances revealed immunocyte stimulation by delta, mu-, kappa-, and epsilon(?)-selective ligands. One of these, [D-Ala2,D-Met5]enkephalinamide (DAMA), active at a concentration of 10 pM, proved to be considerably more effective than the rest. The high pharmacological potency of DAMA, observed in both human and invertebrate immunocytes, sets this opioid apart from the closely related [D-Ala2,D-Leu5]enkephalin, a discrepancy not occurring in the mammalian nervous system. This suggests a specific function for [Met]enkephalin in immunoregulation, mediated perhaps by a special subtype of delta receptor. PMID:2548205

  4. Neuropeptide S ameliorates olfactory spatial memory impairment induced by scopolamine and MK801 through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the subiculum complex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Wang, Can; Xie, Jun-Fan; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Xin, Le; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Ren, Wen-Ting; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that neuropeptide S (NPS), via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPS receptor (NPSR) in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function. High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the subiculum complex of hippocampal formation suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory spatial memory. The present study was undertaken to investigate effects of NPS on the scopolamine- or MK801-induced impairment of olfactory spatial memory using computer-assisted 4-hole-board spatial memory test, and by monitoring Fos expression in the subiculum complex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence microscopy was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos-immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. Intracerebroventricular administration of NPS (0.5 nmol) significantly increased the number of visits to switched odorants in recall trial in mice suffering from odor-discriminating inability induced by scopolamine, a selective muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist, or MK801, a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, after training trials. The improvement of olfactory spatial memory by NPS was abolished by the NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS (40 nmol). Ex vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced Fos expression in the subiculum complex encompassing the subiculum (S), presubiculum (PrS) and parasubiculum (PaS). The percentages of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 91.3, 86.5 and 90.0 % in the S, PrS and PaS, respectively. The present findings demonstrate that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the subiculum complex, ameliorates olfactory spatial memory impairment induced by scopolamine and MK801 in mice. PMID:26323488

  5. Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptors (PBANRs) in moths: New developments regarding alternative splice variants and the potential for targeted disruption of PBANR in pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For most moths, the ability of conspecific males to locate receptive females is governed by the detection of a blend of semiochemicals known as sex pheromones. Sex pheromone components are de novo synthesized in the female pheromone gland in response to pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptid...

  6. Transcriptome analysis of neuropeptides and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) for neuropeptides in the brown planthopper Nilaparvata lugens.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshiaki; Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Noda, Hiroaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro

    2014-03-01

    The genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors were identified in the brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens (Stål) by transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Forty-eight candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or peptide hormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of neuropeptide-like precursor 2 (NPLP2) and trissin. The gene coding for prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) was first identified from hemimetabolous insect. A total of 57 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were identified and phylogenetic analysis showed most of them to be closely related to insect GPCRs. A notable finding was the occurrence of vertebrate hormone receptors, thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor (TRHR)-like GPCR and parathyroid hormone receptor (PTHR)-like GPCRs. These results suggest that N. lugens possesses the most comprehensive neuropeptide system yet found in insects. Moreover, our findings demonstrate the power of RNA-seq as a tool for analyzing the neuropeptide-related genes in the absence of whole genome sequence information. PMID:23932938

  7. Neuropeptide Y receptors in rat brain: autoradiographic localization

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, J.C.; St-Pierre, S.; Quirion, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor binding sites have been characterized in rat brain using both membrane preparations and receptor autoradiography. Radiolabelled NPY binds with high affinity and specificity to an apparent single class of sites in rat brain membrane preparations. The ligand selectivity pattern reveals strong similarities between central and peripheral NPY receptors. NPY receptors are discretely distributed in rat brain with high densities found in the olfactory bulb, superficial layers of the cortex, ventral hippocampus, lateral septum, various thalamic nuclei and area postrema. The presence of high densities of NPY and NPY receptors in such areas suggests that NPY could serve important functions as a major neurotransmitter/neuromodulator in the central nervous system.

  8. Discovery of sea urchin NGFFFamide receptor unites a bilaterian neuropeptide family

    PubMed Central

    Semmens, Dean C.; Beets, Isabel; Rowe, Matthew L.; Blowes, Liisa M.; Oliveri, Paola; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides are ancient regulators of physiology and behaviour, but reconstruction of neuropeptide evolution is often difficult owing to lack of sequence conservation. Here, we report that the receptor for the neuropeptide NGFFFamide in the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (phylum Echinodermata) is an orthologue of vertebrate neuropeptide-S (NPS) receptors and crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) receptors. Importantly, this has facilitated reconstruction of the evolution of two bilaterian neuropeptide signalling systems. Genes encoding the precursor of a vasopressin/oxytocin-type neuropeptide and its receptor duplicated in a common ancestor of the Bilateria. One copy of the precursor retained ancestral features, as seen in highly conserved vasopressin/oxytocin–neurophysin-type precursors. The other copy diverged, but this took different courses in protostomes and deuterostomes. In protostomes, the occurrence of a disulfide bridge in neuropeptide product(s) of the precursor was retained, as in CCAP, but with loss of the neurophysin domain. In deuterostomes, we see the opposite scenario—the neuropeptides lost the disulfide bridge, and neurophysin was retained (as in the NGFFFamide precursor) but was subsequently lost in vertebrate NPS precursors. Thus, the sea urchin NGFFFamide precursor and receptor are ‘missing links’ in the evolutionary history of neuropeptides that control ecdysis in arthropods (CCAP) and regulate anxiety in humans (NPS). PMID:25904544

  9. Androgen Receptors in the Posterior Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis Increase Neuropeptide Expression and the Stress-Induced Activation of the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Bingham, Brenda; Myung, Clara; Innala, Leyla; Gray, Megan; Anonuevo, Adam; Viau, Victor

    2011-01-01

    The posterior bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BST) are important neural substrate for relaying limbic influences to the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus to inhibit hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responses to emotional stress. Androgen receptor-expressing cells within the posterior BST have been identified as projecting to the PVN region. To test a role for androgen receptors in the posterior BST to inhibit PVN motor neurons, we compared the effects of the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the androgen receptor antagonist hydroxyflutamide (HF), or a combination of both drugs implanted unilaterally within the posterior BST. Rats bearing unilateral implants were analyzed for PVN Fos induction in response to acute-restraint stress and relative levels of corticotrophin-releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA. Glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) 65 and GAD 67 mRNA were analyzed in the posterior BST to test a local involvement of GABA. There were no changes in GAD expression to support a GABA-related mechanism in the BST. For PVN neuropeptide expression and Fos responses, basic effects were lateralized to the sides of the PVN ipsilateral to the implants. However, opposite to our expectations of an inhibitory influence of androgen receptors in the posterior BST, PVN AVP mRNA and stress-induced Fos were augmented in response to DHT and attenuated in response to HF. These results suggest that a subset of androgen receptor-expressing cells within the posterior BST region may be responsible for increasing the biosynthetic capacity and stress-induced drive of PVN motor neurons. PMID:21412226

  10. Oxytocin and vasopressin: linking pituitary neuropeptides and their receptors to social neurocircuits

    PubMed Central

    Baribeau, Danielle A.; Anagnostou, Evdokia

    2015-01-01

    Oxytocin and vasopressin are pituitary neuropeptides that have been shown to affect social processes in mammals. There is growing interest in these molecules and their receptors as potential precipitants of, and/or treatments for, social deficits in neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder. Numerous behavioral-genetic studies suggest that there is an association between these peptides and individual social abilities; however, an explanatory model that links hormonal activity at the receptor level to complex human behavior remains elusive. The following review summarizes the known associations between the oxytocin and vasopressin neuropeptide systems and social neurocircuits in the brain. Following a micro- to macro- level trajectory, current literature on the synthesis and secretion of these peptides, and the structure, function and distribution of their respective receptors is first surveyed. Next, current models regarding the mechanism of action of these peptides on microcircuitry and other neurotransmitter systems are discussed. Functional neuroimaging evidence on the acute effects of exogenous administration of these peptides on brain activity is then reviewed. Overall, a model in which the local neuromodulatory effects of pituitary neuropeptides on brainstem and basal forebrain regions strengthen signaling within social neurocircuits proves appealing. However, these findings are derived from animal models; more research is needed to clarify the relevance of these mechanisms to human behavior and treatment of social deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26441508

  11. Specific Activation of the G Protein-coupled Receptor BNGR-A21 by the Neuropeptide Corazonin from the Silkworm, Bombyx mori, Dually Couples to the Gq and Gs Signaling Cascades*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingwen; Huang, Haishan; Yang, Huipeng; He, Xiaobai; Jiang, Xue; Shi, Ying; Alatangaole, Damirin; Shi, Liangen; Zhou, Naiming

    2013-01-01

    Corazonin, an undecapeptide neurohormone sharing a highly conserved amino acid sequence across Insecta, plays different physiological roles in the regulation of heart contraction rates, silk spinning rates, the induction of dark color and morphometric phase changes, and ecdysis. Corazonin receptors have been identified in Drosophila melanogaster, Manduca sexta, and Musca domestica. However, detailed information on the signaling and major physiological functions of corazonin and its receptor is largely unknown. In the current study, using both the mammalian cell line HEK293 and insect cell lines BmN and Sf21, we paired the Bombyx corazonin neuropeptide as a specific endogenous ligand for the Bombyx neuropeptide G protein-coupled receptor A21 (BNGR-A21), and we therefore designated this receptor as BmCrzR. Further characterization indicated that synthetic BmCrz demonstrated a high affinity for and activated BmCrzR, resulting in intracellular cAMP accumulation, Ca2+ mobilization, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation via the Gq- and Gs-coupled signaling pathways. The direct interaction of BmCrzR with BmCrz was confirmed by a rhodamine-labeled BmCrz peptide. Moreover, experiments with double-stranded RNA and synthetic peptide injection suggested a possible role of BmCrz/BmCrzR in the regulation of larval growth and spinning rate. Our present results provide the first in-depth information on BmCrzR-mediated signaling for further elucidation of the BmCrz/BmCrzR system in the regulation of fundamental physiological processes. PMID:23457297

  12. Neuropeptides: metabolism to bioactive fragments and the pharmacology of their receptors.

    PubMed

    Hallberg, Mathias

    2015-05-01

    The proteolytic processing of neuropeptides has an important regulatory function and the peptide fragments resulting from the enzymatic degradation often exert essential physiological roles. The proteolytic processing generates, not only biologically inactive fragments, but also bioactive fragments that modulate or even counteract the response of their parent peptides. Frequently, these peptide fragments interact with receptors that are not recognized by the parent peptides. This review discusses tachykinins, opioid peptides, angiotensins, bradykinins, and neuropeptide Y that are present in the central nervous system and their processing to bioactive degradation products. These well-known neuropeptide systems have been selected since they provide illustrative examples that proteolytic degradation of parent peptides can lead to bioactive metabolites with different biological activities as compared to their parent peptides. For example, substance P, dynorphin A, angiotensin I and II, bradykinin, and neuropeptide Y are all degraded to bioactive fragments with pharmacological profiles that differ considerably from those of the parent peptides. The review discusses a selection of the large number of drug-like molecules that act as agonists or antagonists at receptors of neuropeptides. It focuses in particular on the efforts to identify selective drug-like agonists and antagonists mimicking the effects of the endogenous peptide fragments formed. As exemplified in this review, many common neuropeptides are degraded to a variety of smaller fragments but many of the fragments generated have not yet been examined in detail with regard to their potential biological activities. Since these bioactive fragments contain a small number of amino acid residues, they provide an ideal starting point for the development of drug-like substances with ability to mimic the effects of the degradation products. Thus, these substances could provide a rich source of new pharmaceuticals

  13. Neuropeptide S- and Neuropeptide S receptor-expressing neuron populations in the human pons

    PubMed Central

    Adori, Csaba; Barde, Swapnali; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Uhlén, Mathias; Reinscheid, Rainer R.; Kovacs, Gabor G.; Hökfelt, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a regulatory peptide with potent pharmacological effects. In rodents, NPS is expressed in a few pontine cell clusters. Its receptor (NPSR1) is, however, widely distributed in the brain. The anxiolytic and arousal-promoting effects of NPS make the NPS–NPSR1 system an interesting potential drug target in mood-related disorders. However, so far possible disease-related mechanisms involving NPS have only been studied in rodents. To validate the relevance of these animal studies for i.a. drug development, we have explored the distribution of NPS-expressing neurons in the human pons using in situ hybridization and stereological methods and we compared the distribution of NPS mRNA expressing neurons in the human and rat brain. The calculation revealed a total number of 22,317 ± 2411 NPS mRNA-positive neurons in human, bilaterally. The majority of cells (84%) were located in the parabrachial area in human: in the extension of the medial and lateral parabrachial nuclei, in the Kölliker-Fuse nucleus and around the adjacent lateral lemniscus. In human, in sharp contrast to the rodents, only very few NPS-positive cells (5%) were found close to the locus coeruleus. In addition, we identified a smaller cell cluster (11% of all NPS cells) in the pontine central gray matter both in human and rat, which has not been described previously even in rodents. We also examined the distribution of NPSR1 mRNA-expressing neurons in the human pons. These cells were mainly located in the rostral laterodorsal tegmental nucleus, the cuneiform nucleus, the microcellular tegmental nucleus region and in the periaqueductal gray. Our results show that both NPS and NPSR1 in the human pons are preferentially localized in regions of importance for integration of visceral autonomic information and emotional behavior. The reported interspecies differences must, however, be considered when looking for targets for new pharmacotherapeutical interventions. PMID:26441556

  14. Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) system in cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells: NPW and NPB inhibit proliferative activity of ROB cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Tyczewska, Marianna; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2009-12-01

    Neuropeptides B (NPB) and W (NPW) have been identified as endogenous ligands of two G-protein-coupled receptors, neuropeptides B/W receptor 1 (NPBWR1, formerly known as GPR7) and neuropeptides B/W receptor 2 (NPBWR2, formerly known as GPR8). In rodents where NPBWR2 is absent, its counterpart is named the similar to neuropeptides B/W receptor 2 (similar to NPBWR2, formerly GPR8-like). Both NPB and NPW play a role in the control of feeding, neuroendocrine axis functions, memory and learning processes as well as in pain regulation. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of NPB, NPW, NPBWR1 and the similar to NPBWR2 genes in cultured rat calvarial osteoblast-like (ROB) cells and the effects of both peptides on proliferative activity and osteocalcin secretion by ROB cells. Classic RT-PCR technique revealed the presence of ppNPB mRNA, ppNPW mRNA, and NPBWR1 mRNA, but not similar to NPBWR2 mRNA in ROB cells. QPCR revealed gradual (days 7, 14 and 21 of culture) increase of the ppNPB gene expression, while expression of ppNPW gene was the highest at day 14 and was comparable to that seen in freshly isolated cells. In ROB cells, expression of NPBWR1 gene was notable at day 7 of culture, lower at day 21, and negligible at day 14. Neither NPB nor NPW changed osteocalcin secretion by cultured osteoblast-like cells while both neuropeptides inhibited their proliferative activity. Results of the present study suggest that the systems of NPW, NPB and NPBWR1 directly regulate proliferative activity of cultured rat calvaria osteoblast-like cells. The physiological significance of this osteoblastic system remains unclear, and requires further investigation. PMID:19885618

  15. Identification of Neuropeptide Receptors Expressed by Melanin-Concentrating Hormone Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Parks, Gregory S.; Wang, Lien; Wang, Zhiwei; Civelli, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating Hormone (MCH) is a 19 amino acid cyclic neuropeptide that acts in rodents via the MCH receptor 1 (MCHR1) to regulate a wide variety of physiological functions. MCH is produced by a distinct population of neurons located in the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and zona incerta (ZI) but MCHR1 mRNA is widely expressed throughout the brain. The physiological responses and behaviors regulated by the MCH system have been investigated, but less is known about how MCH neurons are regulated. The effects of most classical neurotransmitters on MCH neurons have been studied, but those of neuropeptides are poorly understood. In order to gain insight into how neuropeptides regulate the MCH system, we investigated which neuropeptide receptors are expressed by MCH neurons using double in situ hybridization. In all, twenty receptors, selected based upon either a suspected interaction with the MCH system or demonstrated high expression levels in the LH and ZI, were tested to determine whether they are expressed by MCH neurons. Overall, eleven neuropeptide receptors were found to exhibit significant colocalization with MCH neurons: Nociceptin / Orphanin FQ Opioid receptor (NOP), MCHR1, both Orexin receptors (ORX), Somatostatin receptor 1 and 2 (SSTR1, SSTR2), the Kisspeptin receotor (KissR1), Neurotensin receptor 1 (NTSR1), Neuropeptide S receptor (NPSR), Cholecystokinin receptor A (CCKAR) and the κ-opioid receptor (KOR). Of these receptors, six have never before been linked to the MCH system. Surprisingly, several receptors thought to regulate MCH neurons displayed minimal colocalization with MCH, suggesting that they may not directly regulate the MCH system. PMID:24978951

  16. Rapid internalization and recycling of the human neuropeptide Y Y(1) receptor.

    PubMed

    Gicquiaux, Hervé; Lecat, Sandra; Gaire, Mireille; Dieterlen, Alain; Mély, Yves; Takeda, Kenneth; Bucher, Bernard; Galzi, Jean-Luc

    2002-02-22

    Desensitization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) involves receptor phosphorylation and reduction in the number of receptors at the cell surface. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y(1) receptor undergoes fast desensitization. We examined agonist-induced signaling and internalization using NPY Y(1) receptors fused to green fluorescent protein (EGFP). When expressed in HEK293 cells, EGFP-hNPY Y(1) receptors were localized at the plasma membrane, desensitized rapidly as assessed using calcium responses, and had similar properties compared to hNPY Y(1) receptors. Upon agonist challenge, the EGFP signal decreased rapidly (t(1/2) = 107 +/- 3 s) followed by a slow recovery. This decrease was blocked by BIBP3226, a Y(1) receptor antagonist, or by pertussis toxin, in agreement with Y(1) receptor activation. Internalization of EGFP-hNPY Y(1) receptors to acidic endosomal compartments likely accounts for the decrease in the EGFP signal, being absent after pretreatment with monensin. Concanavalin A and hypertonic sucrose, which inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis, blocked the decrease in fluorescence. After agonist, intracellular EGFP signals were punctate and co-localized with transferrin-Texas Red, a marker of clathrin-associated internalization and recycling, but not with LysoTracker Red, a lysosomal pathway marker, supporting receptor trafficking to recycling endosomes rather than the late endosomal/lysosomal pathway. Pulse-chase experiments revealed no receptor degradation after internalization. The slow recovery of fluorescence was unaffected by cycloheximide or actinomycin D, indicating that de novo synthesis of receptors was not limiting. Use of a multicompartment model to fit our fluorescence data allows simultaneous determination of internalization and recycling rate constants. We propose that rapid internalization of receptors via the clathrin-coated pits recycling pathway may largely account for the rapid desensitization of NPY Y(1) receptors. PMID:11741903

  17. FRPR-4 Is a G-Protein Coupled Neuropeptide Receptor That Regulates Behavioral Quiescence and Posture in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    York, Neil; Lee, Kun He; Schoofs, Liliane; Raizen, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides signal through G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) to regulate a broad array of animal behaviors and physiological processes. The Caenorhabditis elegans genome encodes approximately 100 predicted neuropeptide receptor GPCRs, but in vivo roles for only a few have been identified. We describe here a role for the GPCR FRPR-4 in the regulation of behavioral quiescence and locomotive posture. FRPR-4 is activated in cell culture by several neuropeptides with an amidated isoleucine-arginine-phenylalanine (IRF) motif or an amidated valine-arginine-phenylalanine (VRF) motif at their carboxy termini, including those encoded by the gene flp-13. Loss of frpr-4 function results in a minor feeding quiescence defect after heat-induced cellular stress. Overexpression of frpr-4 induces quiescence of locomotion and feeding as well as an exaggerated body bend posture. The exaggerated body bend posture requires the gene flp-13. While frpr-4 is expressed broadly, selective overexpression of frpr-4 in the proprioceptive DVA neurons results in exaggerated body bends that require flp-13 in the ALA neuron. Our results suggest that FLP-13 and other neuropeptides signal through FRPR-4 and other receptors to regulate locomotion posture and behavioral quiescence. PMID:26571132

  18. Expression Profiles of Neuropeptides, Neurotransmitters, and Their Receptors in Human Keratocytes In Vitro and In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Słoniecka, Marta; Le Roux, Sandrine; Boman, Peter; Byström, Berit; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    Keratocytes, the quiescent cells of the corneal stroma, play a crucial role in corneal wound healing. Neuropeptides and neurotransmitters are usually associated with neuronal signaling, but have recently been shown to be produced also by non-neuronal cells and to be involved in many cellular processes. The aim of this study was to assess the endogenous intracellular and secreted levels of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA), and of the neurotransmitters acetylcholine (ACh), catecholamines (adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine), and glutamate, as well as the expression profiles of their receptors, in human primary keratocytes in vitro and in keratocytes of human corneal tissue sections in situ. Cultured keratocytes expressed genes encoding for SP and NKA, and for catecholamine and glutamate synthesizing enzymes, as well as genes for neuropeptide, adrenergic and ACh (muscarinic) receptors. Keratocytes in culture produced SP, NKA, catecholamines, ACh, and glutamate, and expressed neurokinin-1 and -2 receptors (NK-1R and NK-2R), dopamine receptor D2, muscarinic ACh receptors, and NDMAR1 glutamate receptor. Human corneal sections expressed SP, NKA, NK-1R, NK-2R, receptor D2, choline acetyl transferase (ChAT), M3, M4 and M5 muscarinic ACh receptors, glutamate, and NMDAR1, but not catecholamine synthesizing enzyme or the α1 and β2 adrenoreceptors, nor M1 receptor. In addition, expression profiles assumed significant differences between keratocytes from the peripheral cornea as compared to those from the central cornea, as well as differences between keratocytes cultured under various serum concentrations. In conclusion, human keratocytes express an array of neuropeptides and neurotransmitters. The cells furthermore express receptors for neuropeptides/neurotransmitters, which suggests that they are susceptible to stimulation by these substances in the cornea, whether of neuronal or non-neuronal origin. As it has been shown that neuropeptides

  19. Neuropeptide Y inhibits the trigeminovascular pathway through NPY Y1 receptor: implications for migraine

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Margarida-Martins; Akerman, Simon; Tavares, Isaura; Goadsby, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Migraine is a painful neurologic disorder with premonitory symptomatology that can include disturbed appetite. Migraine pathophysiology involves abnormal activation of trigeminocervical complex (TCC) neurons. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is synthesized in the brain and is involved in pain modulation. NPY receptors are present in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis suggesting a role in migraine pathophysiology. The present study aimed to determine the effect of systemic administration of NPY on TCC neuronal activity in response to dural nociceptive trigeminovascular activation. We performed in vivo electrophysiology in anesthetized rats, administered NPY (10, 30, and 100 µg·kg−1), and investigated the receptors involved by studying NPY Y1 (30 µg·kg−1), Y2 (30 µg·kg−1), and Y5 receptor agonists (100·µg·kg−1), and NPY Y1 receptor antagonist (30 µg·kg−1). NPY (30 and 100 µg·kg−1) significantly reduced TCC neuronal firing in response to dural-evoked trigeminovascular activation, but only NPY (30 µg·kg−1) significantly reduced spontaneous trigeminal firing. NPY Y1 receptor agonist also significantly reduced dural-evoked and spontaneous TCC neuronal firing. NPY (10 µg·kg−1), NPY Y2, and Y5 receptor agonists, and the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist had no significant effects on nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the TCC or spontaneous trigeminal firing. This study demonstrates that NPY dose dependently inhibits dural-evoked trigeminal activity, through NPY Y1 receptor activation, indicating antinociceptive actions of NPY in a migraine animal model. Based on the role of NPY in appetite regulation, it is possible that disruption of the NPY system might explain changes of appetite in migraineurs. PMID:27023421

  20. Neuropeptide Y inhibits the trigeminovascular pathway through NPY Y1 receptor: implications for migraine.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Margarida-Martins; Akerman, Simon; Tavares, Isaura; Goadsby, Peter J

    2016-08-01

    Migraine is a painful neurologic disorder with premonitory symptomatology that can include disturbed appetite. Migraine pathophysiology involves abnormal activation of trigeminocervical complex (TCC) neurons. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is synthesized in the brain and is involved in pain modulation. NPY receptors are present in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis suggesting a role in migraine pathophysiology. The present study aimed to determine the effect of systemic administration of NPY on TCC neuronal activity in response to dural nociceptive trigeminovascular activation. We performed in vivo electrophysiology in anesthetized rats, administered NPY (10, 30, and 100 µg·kg), and investigated the receptors involved by studying NPY Y1 (30 µg·kg), Y2 (30 µg·kg), and Y5 receptor agonists (100·µg·kg), and NPY Y1 receptor antagonist (30 µg·kg). NPY (30 and 100 µg·kg) significantly reduced TCC neuronal firing in response to dural-evoked trigeminovascular activation, but only NPY (30 µg·kg) significantly reduced spontaneous trigeminal firing. NPY Y1 receptor agonist also significantly reduced dural-evoked and spontaneous TCC neuronal firing. NPY (10 µg·kg), NPY Y2, and Y5 receptor agonists, and the NPY Y1 receptor antagonist had no significant effects on nociceptive dural-evoked neuronal firing in the TCC or spontaneous trigeminal firing. This study demonstrates that NPY dose dependently inhibits dural-evoked trigeminal activity, through NPY Y1 receptor activation, indicating antinociceptive actions of NPY in a migraine animal model. Based on the role of NPY in appetite regulation, it is possible that disruption of the NPY system might explain changes of appetite in migraineurs. PMID:27023421

  1. Gqalpha-linked PLCbeta and PLCgamma are essential components of the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) signal transduction cascade

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production for most moths is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN). In Bombyx mori, PBAN binding triggers the opening of store-operated Ca2+ channels, suggesting the involvement of a receptor-activated phospholipase C (PLC). In this study, we found that P...

  2. Altered expression of neuropeptide Y receptors caused by focal cortical dysplasia in human intractable epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hanjiang; Guan, Yuguang; Zhou, Jian; Qi, Xueling; Li, Tianfu; Xu, Zhiqing David; Luan, Guo-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) is a common cause of pharmacologically-intractable epilepsy, however, the precise mechanisms underlying the epileptogenicity of FCD remains to be determined. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), an endogenous anticonvulsant in the central nervous system, plays an important role in the regulation of neuronal excitability. Increased expression of NPY and its receptors has been identified in the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, presumed to act as an endogenous anticonvulsant mechanism. Therefore, we investigated whether expression changes in NPY receptors occurs in patients with FCD. We specifically investigated the expression of seizure-related NPY receptor subtypes Y1, Y2, and Y5 in patients with FCD versus autopsy controls. We found that Y1R and Y2R were up-regulated at the mRNA and protein levels in the temporal and frontal lobes in FCD lesions. By contrast, there was no significant change in either receptor detected in parietal lesions. Notably, overexpression of Y5R was consistently observed in all FCD lesions. Our results demonstrate the altered expression of Y1R, Y2R and Y5R occurs in FCD lesions within the temporal, frontal and parietal lobe. Abnormal NPY receptor subtype expression may be associated with the onset and progression of epileptic activity and may act as a therapeutic candidate for the treatment of refractory epilepsy caused by FCD. PMID:26943580

  3. Immunohistochemical localization of the neuropeptide S receptor in the rat central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Leonard, S K; Ring, R H

    2011-01-13

    The neuropeptide S receptor (NPSR) is a G-protein coupled receptor that is potently activated by the linear 20 amino acid peptide, neuropeptide S (NPS). Central administration of NPS promotes arousal and anxiolytic-like effects in rodents, and fails to promote such effects in NPSR knockout animals or in the presence of NPSR-selective antagonists. In situ hybridization (ISH) studies in rat brain have revealed that the mRNAs encoding the NPS precursor and the NPS receptor are expressed at high levels in discrete regions of the rat CNS. The distribution of the NPSR protein in brain has not been reported due to a lack of available antibodies. We have generated and validated a NPSR-specific antibody and used it to determine the distribution of the NPSR in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat brain. The anti-NPSR antibody identified a single protein by Western blot with an estimated molecular weight of 65 kD, which was prevented by pre-incubation of the antibody with the immunizing peptide. The protein distribution identified with this antibody in rat brain was consistent both with the mRNA distribution identified by in situ hybridization, and to the localization pattern identified by a second NPSR-specific antibody against a distinct NPSR epitope. NPSR protein was identified in the medial amygdala (MeA), substantia nigra pars compacta, subiculum, dorsal raphe, and several hypothalamic and thalamic regions. Additionally, NPSR protein was localized in the pyramidal cell layer of the ventral hippocampus, the medial habenula (MHb), and was widely distributed in the cortex. The distribution of NPSR protein provides further insight into the organization of the NPS system and may guide future studies on the role of the NPSR in brain. PMID:20950671

  4. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Controls Ingestive Behavior, Agouti-Related Protein, and Neuropeptide Y mRNA in the Arcuate Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Garretson, John T.; Teubner, Brett J.W.; Grove, Kevin L.; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ controls ingestive behavior, agouti-related protein, and neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Garretson, John T; Teubner, Brett J W; Grove, Kevin L; Vazdarjanova, Almira; Ryu, Vitaly; Bartness, Timothy J

    2015-03-18

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is clinically targeted for type II diabetes treatment; however, rosiglitazone (ROSI), a PPARγ agonist, increases food intake and body/fat mass as side-effects. Mechanisms for these effects and the role of PPARγ in feeding are not understood. Therefore, we tested this role in Siberian hamsters, a model of human energy balance, and C57BL/6 mice. We tested the following: (1) how ROSI and/or GW9662 (2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide; PPARγ antagonist) injected intraperitoneally or into the third ventricle (3V) affected Siberian hamster feeding behaviors; (2) whether food deprivation (FD) co-increases agouti-related protein (AgRP) and PPARγ mRNA expression in Siberian hamsters and mice; (3) whether intraperitoneally administered ROSI increases AgRP and NPY in ad libitum-fed animals; (4) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ antagonism blocks FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY; and finally, (5) whether intraperitoneally administered PPARγ modulation affects plasma ghrelin. Third ventricular and intraperitoneally administered ROSI increased food hoarding and intake for 7 d, an effect attenuated by 3V GW9662, and also prevented (intraperitoneal) FD-induced feeding. FD hamsters and mice increased AgRP within the arcuate hypothalamic nucleus with concomitant increases in PPARγ exclusively within AgRP/NPY neurons. ROSI increased AgRP and NPY similarly to FD, and GW9662 prevented FD-induced increases in AgRP and NPY in both species. Neither ROSI nor GW9662 affected plasma ghrelin. Thus, we demonstrated that PPARγ activation is sufficient to trigger food hoarding/intake, increase AgRP/NPY, and possibly is necessary for FD-induced increases in feeding and AgRP/NPY. These findings provide initial evidence that FD-induced increases in AgRP/NPY may be a direct PPARγ-dependent process that controls ingestive behaviors. PMID:25788674

  6. Heat Avoidance Is Regulated by Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) Channels and a Neuropeptide Signaling Pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Glauser, Dominique A.; Chen, Will C.; Agin, Rebecca; MacInnis, Bronwyn L.; Hellman, Andrew B.; Garrity, Paul A.; Tan, Man-Wah; Goodman, Miriam B.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to avoid noxious extremes of hot and cold is critical for survival and depends on thermal nociception. The TRPV subset of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels is heat activated and proposed to be responsible for heat detection in vertebrates and fruit flies. To gain insight into the genetic and neural basis of thermal nociception, we developed assays that quantify noxious heat avoidance in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and used them to investigate the genetic basis of this behavior. First, we screened mutants for 18 TRP channel genes (including all TRPV orthologs) and found only minor defects in heat avoidance in single and selected double and triple mutants, indicating that other genes are involved. Next, we compared two wild isolates of C. elegans that diverge in their threshold for heat avoidance and linked this phenotypic variation to a polymorphism in the neuropeptide receptor gene npr-1. Further analysis revealed that loss of either the NPR-1 receptor or its ligand, FLP-21, increases the threshold for heat avoidance. Cell-specific rescue of npr-1 implicates the interneuron RMG in the circuit regulating heat avoidance. This neuropeptide signaling pathway operates independently of the TRPV genes, osm-9 and ocr-2, since mutants lacking npr-1 and both TRPV channels had more severe defects in heat avoidance than mutants lacking only npr-1 or both osm-9 and ocr-2. Our results show that TRPV channels and the FLP-21/NPR-1 neuropeptide signaling pathway determine the threshold for heat avoidance in C. elegans. PMID:21368276

  7. Select Neuropeptides and their G-Protein Coupled Receptors in Caenorhabditis Elegans and Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Bendena, William G.; Campbell, Jason; Zara, Lian; Tobe, Stephen S.; Chin-Sang, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    The G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family is comprised of seven transmembrane domain proteins and play important roles in nerve transmission, locomotion, proliferation and development, sensory perception, metabolism, and neuromodulation. GPCR research has been targeted by drug developers as a consequence of the wide variety of critical physiological functions regulated by this protein family. Neuropeptide GPCRs are the least characterized of the GPCR family as genetic systems to characterize their functions have lagged behind GPCR gene discovery. Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans are genetic model organisms that have proved useful in characterizing neuropeptide GPCRs. The strength of a genetic approach leads to an appreciation of the behavioral plasticity that can result from subtle alterations in GPCRs or regulatory proteins in the pathways that GPCRs control. Many of these invertebrate neuropeptides, GPCRs, and signaling pathway components serve as models for mammalian counterparts as they have conserved sequences and function. This review provides an overview of the methods to match neuropeptides to their cognate receptor and a state of the art account of neuropeptide GPCRs that have been characterized in D. melanogaster and C. elegans and the behaviors that have been uncovered through genetic manipulation. PMID:22908006

  8. Neuropeptide receptors provide a signalling pathway for trigeminal modulation of olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Daiber, Philipp; Genovese, Federica; Schriever, Valentin A; Hummel, Thomas; Möhrlen, Frank; Frings, Stephan

    2013-02-01

    The mammalian olfactory epithelium contains olfactory receptor neurons and trigeminal sensory endings. The former mediate odor detection, the latter the detection of irritants. The two apparently parallel chemosensory systems are in reality interdependent in various well-documented ways. Psychophysical studies have shown that virtually all odorants can act as irritants, and that most irritants have an odor. Thus, the sensory perception of odorants and irritants is based on simultaneous input from the two systems. Moreover, functional interactions between the olfactory system and the trigeminal system exist on both peripheral and central levels. Here we examine the impact of trigeminal stimulation on the odor response of olfactory receptor neurons. Using an odorant with low trigeminal potency (phenylethyl alcohol) and a non-odorous irritant (CO(2) ), we have explored this interaction in psychophysical experiments with human subjects and in electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings from rats. We have demonstrated that simultaneous activation of the trigeminal system attenuates the perception of odor intensity and distorts the EOG response. On the molecular level, we have identified a route for this cross-modal interaction. The neuropeptide calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), which is released from trigeminal sensory fibres upon irritant stimulation, inhibits the odor response of olfactory receptor neurons. CGRP receptors expressed by these neurons mediate this neuromodulatory effect. This study demonstrates a site of trigeminal-olfactory interaction in the periphery. It reveals a pathway for trigeminal impact on olfactory signal processing that influences odor perception. PMID:23205840

  9. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors. PMID:27353701

  10. Identification and expression profiles of neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Teng, Zi-Wen; Wu, Shun-Fan; Huang, Jia; Song, Qi-Sheng; Ye, Gong-Yin; Fang, Qi

    2016-01-01

    In insects, neuropeptides play important roles in the regulation of multiple physiological processes by binding to their corresponding receptors, which are primarily G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The genes encoding neuropeptides and their associated GPCRs in the rice stem borer Chilo suppressalis were identified by a transcriptomic analysis and were used to identify potential targets for the disruption of physiological processes and the protection of crops. Forty-three candidate genes were found to encode the neuropeptide precursors for all known insect neuropeptides except for arginine-vasopressin-like peptide (AVLP), CNMamide, neuropeptide-like precursors 2-4 (NPLP2-4), and proctolin. In addition, novel alternative splicing variants of three neuropeptide genes (allatostatin CC, CCHamide 1, and short neuropeptide F) are reported for the first time, and 51 putative neuropeptide GPCRs were identified. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrated that 44 of these GPCRs belong to the A-family (or rhodopsin-like), 5 belong to the B-family (or secretin-like), and 2 are leucine-rich repeat-containing GPCRs. These GPCRs and their likely ligands were also described. qRT-PCR analyses revealed the expression profiles of the neuropeptide precursors and GPCR genes in various tissues of C. suppressalis. Our study provides fundamental information that may further our understanding of neuropeptidergic signaling systems in Lepidoptera and aid in the design of peptidomimetics, pseudopeptides or small molecules capable of disrupting the physiological processes regulated by these signaling molecules and their receptors. PMID:27353701

  11. Synaptic actions of neuropeptide FF in the rat parabrachial nucleus: interactions with opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Zidichouski, J A; Harris, K H; Jhamandas, J H

    2000-08-01

    The pontine parabrachial nucleus (PBN) receives both opioid and Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) projections from the lower brain stem and/or the spinal cord. Because of this anatomical convergence and previous evidence that NPFF displays both pro- and anti-opioid activities, this study examined the synaptic effects of NPFF in the PBN and the mechanisms underlying these effects using an in vitro brain slice preparation and the nystatin-perforated patch-clamp recording technique. Under voltage-clamp conditions, NPFF reversibly reduced the evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was not accompanied by apparent changes in the holding current, the current-voltage relationship or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-induced inward currents in the PBN cells. When a paired-pulse protocol was used, NPFF increased the ratio of these synaptic currents. Analysis of miniature EPSCs showed that NPFF caused a rightward shift in the frequency-distribution curve, whereas the amplitude-distribution curve remained unchanged. Collectively, these experiments indicate that NPFF reduces the evoked EPSCs through a presynaptic mechanism of action. The synaptic effects induced by NPFF (5 microM) could not be blocked by the specific mu-opioid receptor antagonist, D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Arg-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH(2) (1 microM), but application of delta-opioid receptor antagonist Tyr-Tic-Phe-Phe (5 microM) almost completely prevented effects of NPFF. Moreover, the delta-opioid receptor agonist, Deltorphin (1 microM), mimicked the effects as NPFF and also occluded NPFF's actions on synaptic currents. These results indicate that NPFF modulates excitatory synaptic transmission in the PBN through an interaction with presynaptic delta-opioid receptors. These observations provide a cellular basis for NPFF enhancement of the antinociceptive effects consequent to central activation of delta-opioid receptors. PMID:10938301

  12. Involvement of neuropeptide FF receptors in neuroadaptive responses to acute and chronic opiate treatments

    PubMed Central

    Elhabazi, K; Trigo, JM; Mollereau, C; Moulédous, L; Zajac, J-M; Bihel, F; Schmitt, M; Bourguignon, JJ; Meziane, H; Petit-demoulière, B; Bockel, F; Maldonado, R; Simonin, F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Opiates remain the most effective compounds for alleviating severe pain across a wide range of conditions. However, their use is associated with significant side effects. Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) receptors have been implicated in several opiate-induced neuroadaptive changes including the development of tolerance. In this study, we investigated the consequences of NPFF receptor blockade on acute and chronic stimulation of opioid receptors in mice by using RF9, a potent and selective antagonist of NPFF receptors that can be administered systemically. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of RF9 were investigated on opioid pharmacological responses including locomotor activity, antinociception, opioid-induced hyperalgesia, rewarding properties and physical dependence. KEY RESULTS RF9 had no effect on morphine-induced horizontal hyperlocomotion and slightly attenuated the decrease induced in vertical activity. Furthermore, RF9 dose-dependently blocked the long-lasting hyperalgesia produced by either acute fentanyl or chronic morphine administration. RF9 also potentiated opiate early analgesic effects and prevented the development of morphine tolerance. Finally, RF9 increased morphine-induced conditioned place preference without producing any rewarding effect by itself and decreased naltrexone-precipitated withdrawal syndrome following chronic morphine treatment. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS The NPFF system is involved in the development of two major undesirable effects: tolerance and dependence, which are clinically associated with prolonged exposure to opiates. Our findings suggest that NPFF receptors are interesting therapeutic targets to improve the analgesic efficacy of opiates by limiting the development of tolerance, and for the treatment of opioid dependence. PMID:21718302

  13. Enkephalin levels and the number of neuropeptide Y-containing interneurons in the hippocampus are decreased in female cannabinoid-receptor 1 knock-out mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Sophie A; Kempen, Tracey A Van; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction requires learning and memory processes that are facilitated by activation of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) and opioid receptors in the hippocampus. This involves activity-dependent synaptic plasticity that is partially regulated by endogenous opioid (enkephalin and dynorphin) and non-opioid peptides, specifically cholecystokinin, parvalbumin and neuropeptide Y, the neuropeptides present in inhibitory interneurons that co-express CB1 or selective opioid receptors. We tested the hypothesis that CB1 receptor expression is a determinant of the availability of one or more of these peptide modulators in the hippocampus. This was achieved by quantitatively analyzing the immunoperoxidase labeling for each of these neuropeptide in the dorsal hippocampus of female wild-type (CB1+/+) and cannabinoid receptor 1 knockout (CB1-/-) C57/BL6 mice. The levels of Leu(5)-enkephalin-immunoreactivity were significantly reduced in the hilus of the dentate gyrus and in stratum lucidum of CA3 in CB1-/- mice. Moreover, the numbers of neuropeptide Y-immunoreactive interneurons in the dentate hilus were significantly lower in the CB1-/- compared to wild-type mice. However, CB1+/+ and CB1-/- mice did not significantly differ in expression levels of either dynorphin or cholecystokinin, and showed no differences in numbers of parvalbumin-containing interneurons. These findings suggest that the cannabinoid and opioid systems have a nuanced, regulatory relationship that could affect the balance of excitation and inhibition in the hippocampus and thus processes such as learning that rely on this balance. PMID:27012427

  14. Interaction between retinoid acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) and neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1) in asthma.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Sääf, Annika; Söderhäll, Cilla; Melén, Erik; Mandelin, Jami; Pietras, Christina Orsmark; Ezer, Sini; Karisola, Piia; Vendelin, Johanna; Gennäs, Gustav Boije af; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Alenius, Harri; von Mutius, Erika; Doekes, Gert; Braun-Fahrländer, Charlotte; Riedler, Josef; van Hage, Marianne; D'Amato, Mauro; Scheynius, Annika; Pershagen, Göran; Kere, Juha; Pulkkinen, Ville

    2013-01-01

    Retinoid acid receptor-related Orphan Receptor Alpha (RORA) was recently identified as a susceptibility gene for asthma in a genome-wide association study. To investigate the impact of RORA on asthma susceptibility, we performed a genetic association study between RORA single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the vicinity of the asthma-associated SNP (rs11071559) and asthma-related traits. Because the regulatory region of a previously implicated asthma susceptibility gene, Neuropeptide S receptor 1 (NPSR1), has predicted elements for RORA binding, we hypothesized that RORA may interact biologically and genetically with NPSR1. 37 RORA SNPs and eight NPSR1 SNPs were genotyped in the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE (2033 children) and the European cross-sectional PARSIFAL study (1120 children). Seven RORA SNPs confined into a 49 kb region were significantly associated with physician-diagnosed childhood asthma. The most significant association with rs7164773 (T/C) was driven by the CC genotype in asthma cases (OR = 2.0, 95%CI 1.36-2.93, p = 0.0003 in BAMSE; and 1.61, 1.18-2.19, p = 0.002 in the combined BAMSE-PARSIFAL datasets, respectively), and strikingly, the risk effect was dependent on the Gln344Arg mutation in NPSR1. In cell models, stimulation of NPSR1 activated a pathway including RORA and other circadian clock genes. Over-expression of RORA decreased NPSR1 promoter activity further suggesting a regulatory loop between these genes. In addition, Rora mRNA expression was lower in the lung tissue of Npsr1 deficient mice compared to wildtype littermates during the early hours of the light period. We conclude that RORA SNPs are associated with childhood asthma and show epistasis with NPSR1, and the interaction between RORA and NPSR1 may be of biological relevance. Combinations of common susceptibility alleles and less common functional polymorphisms may modify the joint risk effects on asthma susceptibility. PMID:23565190

  15. Neuropeptide FF-sensitive confinement of mu opioid receptor does not involve lipid rafts in SH-SY5Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mouledous, Lionel

    2008-08-15

    *: Mu opioid (MOP) receptor activation can be functionally modulated by stimulation of Neuropeptide FF 2 (NPFF{sub 2}) G protein-coupled receptors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments have shown that activation of the NPFF{sub 2} receptor dramatically reduces the fraction of MOP receptors confined in microdomains of the plasma membrane of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. The aim of the present work was to assess if the direct observation of receptor compartmentation by fluorescence techniques in living cells could be related to indirect estimation of receptor partitioning in lipid rafts after biochemical fractionation of the cell. Our results show that MOP receptor distribution in lipid rafts is highly dependent upon the method of purification, questioning the interpretation of previous data regarding MOP receptor compartmentation. Moreover, the NPFF analogue 1DMe does not modify the distribution profile of MOP receptors, clearly demonstrating that membrane fractionation data do not correlate with direct measurement of receptor compartmentation in living cells.

  16. Effects of Starvation on Brain Short Neuropeptide F-1, -2, and -3 Levels and Short Neuropeptide F Receptor Expression Levels of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Shinji; Matsumoto, Sumihiro; Nakane, Tomohiro; Ohara, Ayako; Morooka, Nobukatsu; Konuma, Takahiro; Nagai, Chiaki; Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2012-01-01

    In our previous report, we demonstrated the possibility that various regulatory neuropeptides influence feeding behavior in the silkworm, Bombyx mori. Among these feeding-related neuropeptides, short neuropeptide F (sNPF) exhibited feeding-accelerating activity when injected into B. mori larvae. Like other insect sNPFs, the deduced amino acid sequence of the cDNA encoding the sNPF precursor appears to produce multiple sNPF and sNPF-related peptides in B. mori. The presence of three sNPFs, sNPF-1, sNPF-2, and sNPF-3, in the brain of B. mori larvae was confirmed by direct MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric profiling. In addition, all three sNPFs are present in other larval ganglia. The presence of sNPF mRNA in the central nervous system (CNS) was also confirmed by Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Semi-quantitative analyses of sNPFs in the larval brain using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry further revealed that brain sNPF levels decrease in response to starvation, and that they recover with the resumption of feeding. These data suggest that sNPFs were depleted by the starvation process. Furthermore, food deprivation decreased the transcriptional levels of the sNPF receptor (BNGR-A10) in the brain and CNS, suggesting that the sNPF system is dependent on the feeding state of the insect and that the sNPF system may be linked to locomotor activity associated with foraging behavior. Since the injection of sNPFs accelerated the onset of feeding in B. mori larvae, we concluded that sNPFs are strongly related to feeding behavior. In addition, semi-quantitative MS analyses revealed that allatostatin, which is present in the larval brain, is also reduced in response to starvation, whereas the peptide level of Bommyosuppressin was not affected by different feeding states. PMID:22649403

  17. Neuronal Expression of the Human Neuropeptide S Receptor NPSR1 Identifies NPS-Induced Calcium Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Frank; Kügler, Sebastian; Blaesse, Peter; Lange, Maren D.; Skryabin, Boris V.; Pape, Hans-Christian; Jüngling, Kay

    2015-01-01

    The neuropeptide S (NPS) system was discovered as a novel neurotransmitter system a decade ago and has since been identified as a key player in the modulation of fear and anxiety. Genetic variations of the human NPS receptor (NPSR1) have been associated with pathologies like panic disorders. However, details on the molecular fundamentals of NPSR1 activity in neurons remained elusive. We expressed NPSR1 in primary hippocampal cultures. Using single-cell calcium imaging we found that NPSR1 stimulation induced calcium mobilization from the endoplasmic reticulum via activation of IP3 and ryanodine receptors. Store-operated calcium channels were activated in a downstream process mediating entry of extracellular calcium. We provide the first detailed analysis of NPSR1 activity and the underlying intracellular pathways with respect to calcium mobilization in neurons. PMID:25714705

  18. Radiosynthesis and in Vivo Evaluation of Neuropeptide Y5 Receptor (NPY5R) PET Tracers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J S Dileep; Walker, Mary; Packiarajan, Mathivanan; Jubian, Vrej; Prabhakaran, Jaya; Chandrasena, Gamini; Pratap, Mali; Parsey, Ramin V; Mann, J John

    2016-05-18

    Neuropeptide Y receptor type 5 (NPY5R) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that belongs to the subfamily of neuropeptide receptors (NPYR) that mediate the action of endogenous neuropeptide Y (NPY). Animal models and preclinical studies indicate a role for NPY5R in the pathophysiology of depression, anxiety, and obesity and as a target of potential therapeutic drugs. To better understand the pathophysiological involvement of NPY5R, and to measure target occupancy by potential therapeutic drugs, it would be advantageous to measure NPY5R binding in vivo by positron emission tomography (PET). Four potent and selective NPY5R antagonists were radiolabeled via nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions with [(18)F]fluoride. Of the four radioligands investigated, PET studies in anesthetized baboons showed that [(18)F]LuAE00654 ([(18)F]N-[trans-4-({[4-(2-fluoropyridin-3-yl)thiazol-2-yl]amino}methyl)cyclohexyl]propane-2-sulfonamide) penetrates blood brain barrier (BBB) and a small amount is retained in the brain. Slow metabolism of [(18)F]LuAE00654 was observed in baboon plasma. Blocking studies with a specific NPY5R antagonist demonstrated up to 60% displacement of radioactivity in striatum, the brain region with highest NPY5R binding. Our studies suggest that [(18)F]LuAE00654 can be a potential PET radiotracer for the quantification and occupancy studies of NPY5R drug candidates. PMID:26886507

  19. Neuropeptide Y receptors: a promising target for cancer imaging and therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; Tian, Yuchen; Wu, Aiguo

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) was first identified from porcine brain in 1982, and plays its biological functions in humans through NPY receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5). NPY receptors are known to mediate various physiological functions and involve in a majority of human diseases, such as obesity, hypertension, epilepsy and metabolic disorders. Recently, NPY receptors have been found to be overexpressed in many cancers, so they emerged as promising target in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This review focuses on the latest research about NPY and NPY receptors, and summarizes the current knowledge on NPY receptors expression in cancers, selective ligands for NPY receptors and their application in cancer imaging and therapy. PMID:26816643

  20. Involvement of serotonin 2C receptor RNA editing in accumbal neuropeptide Y expression and behavioural despair.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Miku; Watanabe, Yoshihisa; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Kanamura, Narisato; Tanaka, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin 2C receptors (5-HT2 C Rs) are widely expressed in the central nervous system, and are associated with various neurological disorders. 5-HT2 C R mRNA undergoes adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing at five sites within its coding sequence, resulting in expression of 24 different isoforms. Several edited isoforms show reduced activity, suggesting that RNA editing modulates serotonergic systems in the brain with causative relevance to neuropsychiatric disorders. Transgenic mice solely expressing the non-edited 5-HT2 C R INI-isoform (INI) or the fully edited VGV-isoform exhibit various phenotypes including metabolic abnormalities, aggressive behaviour, anxiety-like behaviour, and depression-like behaviour. Here, we examined the behavioural phenotype and molecular changes of INI mice on a C57BL/6J background. INI mice showed an enhanced behavioural despair in the forced swimming test, elevated sensitivity to the tricyclic antidepressant desipramine, and significantly decreased serotonin in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), amygdala, and striatum. They also showed reduced expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA in the NAc. In addition, by stereotactic injection of adeno-associated virus encoding NPY into the NAc, we demonstrated that accumbal NPY overexpression relieved behavioural despair. Our results suggest that accumbal NPY expression may be regulated by 5-HT2 C R RNA editing, and its impairment may be linked to mood disorders. PMID:26950265

  1. Neuropeptide Y Activity in the Nucleus Accumbens Modulates Feeding Behavior and Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    van den Heuvel, José K.; Furman, Kara; Gumbs, Myrtille C.R.; Eggels, Leslie; Opland, Darren M.; Land, Benjamin B.; Kolk, Sharon M.; Narayanan, Nandakumar; Fliers, Eric; Kalsbeek, Andries; DiLeone, Ralph J.; la Fleur, Susanne E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that plays a prominent role in feeding and energy homeostasis. Expression of the NPY Y1 receptor (Y1R) is highly concentrated in the nucleus accumbens (Acb), a region important in the regulation of palatable feeding. In this study, we performed a number of experiments to investigate the actions of NPY in the Acb. Methods First, we determined caloric intake and food choice after bilateral administration of NPY in the Acb in rats on a free-choice diet of saturated fat, 30% sucrose solution, and standard chow and whether this was mediated by the Y1R. Second, we measured the effect of intra-Acb NPY on neuronal activity using in vivo electrophysiology. Third, we examined co-localization of Y1R with enkephalin and dynorphin neurons and the effect of NPY on preproenkephalin messenger RNA levels in the striatum using fluorescent and radioactive in situ hybridization. Finally, using retrograde tracing, we examined whether NPY neurons in the arcuate nucleus projected to the Acb. Results In rats on the free-choice, high-fat, high-sugar diet, intra-Acb NPY increased intake of fat, but not sugar or chow, and this was mediated by the Y1R. Intra-Acb NPY reduced neuronal firing, as well as preproenkephalin messenger RNA expression in the striatum. Moreover, Acb enkephalin neurons expressed Y1R and arcuate nucleus NPY neurons projected to the Acb. Conclusions NPY reduces neuronal firing in the Acb resulting in increased palatable food intake. Together, our neuroanatomical, pharmacologic, and neuronal activity data support a role and mechanism for intra-Acb NPY-induced fat intake. PMID:25109664

  2. GRK2 Protein-mediated Transphosphorylation Contributes to Loss of Function of μ-Opioid Receptors Induced by Neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF2 receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF2 receptor by [d-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of Gi/o proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-d-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF2 receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex. PMID:22375000

  3. GRK2 protein-mediated transphosphorylation contributes to loss of function of μ-opioid receptors induced by neuropeptide FF (NPFF2) receptors.

    PubMed

    Moulédous, Lionel; Froment, Carine; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Zajac, Jean-Marie; Mollereau, Catherine

    2012-04-13

    Neuropeptide FF (NPFF) interacts with specific receptors to modulate opioid functions in the central nervous system. On dissociated neurons and neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) transfected with NPFF receptors, NPFF acts as a functional antagonist of μ-opioid (MOP) receptors by attenuating the opioid-induced inhibition of calcium conductance. In the SH-SY5Y model, MOP and NPFF(2) receptors have been shown to heteromerize. To understand the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-opioid activity of NPFF, we have investigated the phosphorylation status of the MOP receptor using phospho-specific antibody and mass spectrometry. Similarly to direct opioid receptor stimulation, activation of the NPFF(2) receptor by [D-Tyr-1-(NMe)Phe-3]NPFF (1DMe), an analog of NPFF, induced the phosphorylation of Ser-377 of the human MOP receptor. This heterologous phosphorylation was unaffected by inhibition of second messenger-dependent kinases and, contrarily to homologous phosphorylation, was prevented by inactivation of G(i/o) proteins by pertussis toxin. Using siRNA knockdown we could demonstrate that 1DMe-induced Ser-377 cross-phosphorylation and MOP receptor loss of function were mediated by the G protein receptor kinase GRK2. In addition, mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the phosphorylation pattern of MOP receptors was qualitatively similar after treatment with the MOP agonist Tyr-D-Ala-Gly (NMe)-Phe-Gly-ol (DAMGO) or after treatment with the NPFF agonist 1DMe, but the level of multiple phosphorylation was more intense after DAMGO. Finally, NPFF(2) receptor activation was sufficient to recruit β-arrestin2 to the MOP receptor but not to induce its internalization. These data show that NPFF-induced heterologous desensitization of MOP receptor signaling is mediated by GRK2 and could involve transphosphorylation within the heteromeric receptor complex. PMID:22375000

  4. Receptors for sensory neuropeptides in human inflammatory diseases: Implications for the effector role of sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Mantyh, P.W.; Catton, M.D.; Boehmer, C.G.; Welton, M.L.; Passaro, E.P. Jr.; Maggio, J.E.; Vigna, S.R. )

    1989-05-01

    Glutamate and several neuropeptides are synthesized and released by subpopulations of primary afferent neurons. These sensory neurons play a role in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in peripheral tissues. Using quantitative receptor autoradiography we have explored what changes occur in the location and concentration of receptor binding sites for sensory neurotransmitters in the colon in two human inflammatory diseases, ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. The sensory neurotransmitter receptors examined included bombesin, calcitonin gene related peptide-alpha, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, neurokinin A (substance K), substance P, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide. Of the nine receptor binding sites examined only substance P binding sites associated with arterioles, venules and lymph nodules were dramatically up-regulated in the inflamed tissue. These data suggest that substance P is involved in regulating the inflammatory and immune responses in human inflammatory diseases and indicate a specificity of efferent action for each sensory neurotransmitter in peripheral tissues.

  5. In silico cloning of genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors in a spider mite.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A; Rombauts, Stephane; Grbić, Miodrag

    2012-04-01

    The genome of the spider mite was prospected for the presence of genes coding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their putative G-protein coupled receptors. Fifty one candidate genes were found to encode neuropeptides or neurohormones. These include all known insect neuropeptides and neurohormones, with the exception of sulfakinin, corazonin, neuroparsin and PTTH. True orthologs of adipokinetic hormone (AKH) were neither found, but there are three genes encoding peptides similar in structure to both AKH and the AKH-corazonin-related peptide. We were also unable to identify the precursors for pigment dispersing factor (PDF) or the recently discovered trissin. However, the spider mite probably does have such genes, as we found their putative receptors. A novel arthropod neuropeptide gene was identified that shows similarity to previously described molluscan neuropeptide genes and was called EFLamide. A total of 65 putative neuropeptide GPCR genes were also identified, of these 58 belong to the A-family and 7 to the B-family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that 50 of them are closely related to insect GPCRs, which allowed the identification of their putative ligand in 39 cases with varying degrees of certainty. Other spider mite GPCRs however have no identifiable orthologs in the genomes of the four holometabolous insect species best analyzed. Whereas some of the latter have orthologs in hemimetabolous insect species, crustaceans or ticks, for others such arthropod homologs are currently unknown. PMID:22214827

  6. Behavioural phenotypic characterization of CD-1 mice lacking the neuropeptide S receptor.

    PubMed

    Ruzza, C; Pulga, A; Rizzi, A; Marzola, G; Guerrini, R; Calo', G

    2012-04-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is the endogenous ligand of a previously orphan receptor now named NPSR. In the brain NPS regulates several biological functions including anxiety, arousal, locomotion, food intake, learning and memory, pain and drug abuse. Mice lacking the NPSR gene (NPSR(-/-)) represent an useful tool to investigate the neurobiology of the NPS/NPSR system. NPSR(-/-) mice have been generated in a 129S6/SvEv genetic background. In the present study we generated CD-1 congenic NPSR(+/+) and NPSR(-/-) mice and investigated their phenotype and sensitivity to NPS in various behavioural assays. The phenotype analysis revealed no locomotor differences between NPSR(+/+) and NPSR(-/-) mice. The behaviour of NPSR(+/+) and NPSR(-/-) mice in the righting reflex test was superimposable. No differences were recorded between the two genotypes in the elevated plus maze, open field and stress-induced hyperthermia tests, with the exception of rearing behaviour that was reduced in knockout animals. Moreover the behaviour of NPSR(+/+) and NPSR(-/-) mice in the forced swimming, novel object recognition and formalin assays was similar. The stimulatory effects of NPS in the locomotor activity test and its anxiolytic-like actions in the elevated plus maze and open field assays were evident in NPSR(+/+) but not NPSR(-/-) animals. In conclusion, the present study indicates that the NPS/NPSR system does not tonically control locomotion, sensitivity to diazepam, anxiety, depressive-like behaviours, memory and pain transmission in mice. Furthermore our results clearly show that the product of the NPSR gene represents the mandatory protein for all the NPS biological effects so far described. PMID:22248636

  7. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN-RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  8. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α–melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN–RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  9. The neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor regulates leptin-mediated control of energy homeostasis and reproductive functions.

    PubMed

    Pralong, François P; Gonzales, Christine; Voirol, Marie-Jeanne; Palmiter, Richard D; Brunner, Hans-R; Gaillard, Rolf C; Seydoux, Josiane; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2002-05-01

    The orexigenic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays a central role in the hypothalamic control of food intake and energy balance. NPY also exerts an inhibition of the gonadotrope axis that could be important in the response to poor metabolic conditions. In contrast, leptin provides an anorexigenic signal to centrally control the body needs in energy. Moreover, leptin contributes to preserve adequate reproductive functions by stimulating the activity of the gonadotrope axis. It is of interest that hypothalamic NPY represents a primary target of leptin actions. To evaluate the importance of the NPY Y1 and Y5 receptors in the downstream pathways modulated by leptin and controlling energy metabolism as well as the activity of the gonadotrope axis, we studied the effects of leptin administration on food intake and reproductive functions in mice deficient for the expression of either the Y1 or the Y5 receptor. Furthermore, the role of the Y1 receptor in leptin resistance was determined in leptin-deficient ob/ob mice bearing a null mutation in the NPY Y1 locus. Results point to a crucial role for the NPY Y1 receptor in mediating the NPY pathways situated downstream of leptin actions and controlling food intake, the onset of puberty, and the maintenance of reproductive functions. PMID:11978737

  10. Oxytocin--a neuropeptide for affiliation: evidence from behavioral, receptor autoradiographic, and comparative studies.

    PubMed

    Insel, T R

    1992-01-01

    steroids can alter receptor expression in anatomically discrete target fields and thereby direct responsiveness to endogenous neuropeptide release. A model for OT's effects on social behavior is proposed, which relies on the heterologous regulation of the brain OT receptor. A third series of experiments tested the hypothesis that brain OT influences affiliation by comparing prairie and montane voles, two closely related species with dichotomous systems of social organization. Although no differences appear in the presynaptic expression of the neuropeptide, OT receptors are distributed in complementary patterns in the two species. In the highly affiliative prairie vole, receptors are most evident in the BNST and one of its primary afferents, the lateral amygdala, highlighting a circuit previously implicated in maternal behavior.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1319071

  11. Neuropeptide Y family receptors Y1 and Y2 from sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Lagman, David; Sundström, Görel; Larhammar, Dan

    2015-10-01

    The vertebrate gene family for neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors expanded by duplication of the chromosome carrying the ancestral Y1-Y2-Y5 gene triplet. After loss of some duplicates, the ancestral jawed vertebrate had seven receptor subtypes forming the Y1 (including Y1, Y4, Y6, Y8), Y2 (including Y2, Y7) and Y5 (only Y5) subfamilies. Lampreys are considered to have experienced the same chromosome duplications as gnathostomes and should also be expected to have multiple receptor genes. However, previously only a Y4-like and a Y5 receptor have been cloned and characterized. Here we report the cloning and characterization of two additional receptors from the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus. Sequence phylogeny alone could not with certainty assign their identity, but based on synteny comparisons of P. marinus and the Arctic lamprey, Lethenteron camtschaticum, with jawed vertebrates, the two receptors most likely are Y1 and Y2. Both receptors were expressed in human HEK293 cells and inositol phosphate assays were performed to determine the response to the three native lamprey peptides NPY, PYY and PMY. The three peptides have similar potencies in the nanomolar range for Y1. No obvious response to the three peptides was detected for Y2. Synteny analysis supports identification of the previously cloned receptor as Y4. No additional NPY receptor genes could be identified in the presently available lamprey genome assemblies. Thus, four NPY-family receptors have been identified in lampreys, orthologs of the same subtypes as in humans (Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5), whereas many other vertebrate lineages have retained additional ancestral subtypes. PMID:26255155

  12. Internalization mechanism of neuropeptide Y bound to its Y1 receptor investigated by high resolution microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, Noémie; Didier, Pascal; Postupalenko, Viktoriia; Bucher, Bernard; Mély, Yves

    2015-06-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) plays numerous biological roles that are mediated by a family of G-protein-coupled receptors. Among the latter, the NPY Y1 subtype receptor undergoes a rapid desensitization following agonist exposure. This desensitization was suggested to result from a rapid clathrin-dependent internalization of Y1 and its recycling at the plasma membrane via sorting/early endosomes (SE/EE) and recycling endosomes (RE). Herein, to validate and quantitatively consolidate the mechanism of NPY internalization, we quantitatively investigated the NPY-induced internalization of the Y1 receptor by direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM), a super-resolution imaging technique that can resolve EE and SE, which are below the resolution limit of conventional optical microscopes. Using Cy5-labeled NPY, we could monitor with time the internalization and recycling of NPY on HEK293 cells stably expressing eGFP-labeled Y1 receptors. Furthermore, by discriminating the SE/EE from the larger RE by their sizes and monitoring these two populations as a function of time, we could firmly consolidate the kinetic model describing the internalization mechanism of the Y1 receptors as the basis for their rapid desensitization following agonist exposure.

  13. Functional analysis of four neuropeptides, EH, ETH, CCAP and bursicon and their receptors, in adult ecdysis behavior of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecdysis behavior or shedding of the old cuticle in arthropods is driven by complex interactions among multiple neuropeptide signaling systems. To understand the roles of neuropeptides and their receptors in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, we performed systemic RNA interference (RNAi) uti...

  14. ETA and ETB receptors contribute to neuropeptide Y-induced secretion of endothelin-1 in right but not left human ventricular endocardial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Samad, Dima; Bkaily, Ghassan; Magder, Sheldon; Jacques, Danielle

    2016-02-01

    Our recent work showed that neuropeptide Y-induced secretion of endothelin-1 (ET-1) in left and right human ventricular endocardial endothelial cells (hLEECs or hREECs respectively) via the activation of neuropeptide Y2 or Y5 receptors depending on the cell type. The aim of this study was to verify whether hLEECs or hREECs secretion of ET-1 induced by NPY is due, in part, to the activation of ETA and/or ETB receptors by the secreted ET-1. Using the technique of indirect immunofluorescence coupled to real 3-D confocal microscopy, as well as ELISA, our results show that in hREECs, the NPY-induced release of ET-1 seems to be due, in part, to the activation of both ETA and ETB receptors. On the other hand, in hLEECs, ETA and ETB receptors do not contribute to the ET-1 released by NPY. Therefore, our results suggest that the NPY-induced release of ET-1 in EECRs is due to NPY receptor activation and the subsequent activation of the ETA and ETB receptors by the released ET-1. However, the release of ET-1 by NPY in hLEECs is mainly due to NPY receptor activation. Furthermore, this secretory process of ET-1 is different between the right and left ventricular cells and highlights the important tuning roles that right and left ventricular EECs possess as well as their contribution to the physiological and pathophysiological states of the underlying heart muscle. PMID:26803555

  15. Functional and Genetic Characterization of Neuropeptide Y-Like Receptors in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Liesch, Jeff; Bellani, Lindsay L.; Vosshall, Leslie B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are the principal vector for dengue fever, causing 50–100 million infections per year, transmitted between human and mosquito by blood feeding. Ae. aegypti host-seeking behavior is known to be inhibited for three days following a blood meal by a hemolymph-borne humoral factor. Head Peptide-I is a candidate peptide mediating this suppression, but the mechanism by which this peptide alters mosquito behavior and the receptor through which it signals are unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Head Peptide-I shows sequence similarity to short Neuropeptide-F peptides (sNPFs) that have been implicated in feeding behaviors and are known to signal through Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-Like Receptors (NPYLRs). We identified eight NPYLRs in the Ae. aegypti genome and screened each in a cell-based calcium imaging assay for sensitivity against a panel of peptides. Four of the Ae. aegypti NPYLRs responded to one or more peptide ligands, but only NYPLR1 responded to Head Peptide-I as well as sNPFs. Two NPYLR1 homologues identified in the genome of the Lyme disease vector, Ixodes scapularis, were also sensitive to Head Peptide-I. Injection of synthetic Head Peptide-I and sNPF-3 inhibited host-seeking behavior in non-blood-fed female mosquitoes, whereas control injections of buffer or inactive Head Peptide-I [Cys10] had no effect. To ask if NPYLR1 is necessary for blood-feeding-induced host-seeking inhibition, we used zinc-finger nucleases to generate five independent npylr1 null mutant strains and tested them for behavioral abnormalities. npylr1 mutants displayed normal behavior in locomotion, egg laying, sugar feeding, blood feeding, host seeking, and inhibition of host seeking after a blood meal. Conclusions In this work we deorphanized four Ae. aegypti NPYLRs and identified NPYLR1 as a candidate sNPF receptor that is also sensitive to Head Peptide-I. Yet npylr1 alone is not required for host-seeking inhibition and we conclude that other

  16. The stress response neuropeptide CRF increases amyloid-β production by regulating γ-secretase activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Ran, Yong; Jung, Joo In; Holmes, Oliver; Price, Ashleigh R; Smithson, Lisa; Ceballos-Diaz, Carolina; Han, Chul; Wolfe, Michael S; Daaka, Yehia; Ryabinin, Andrey E; Kim, Seong-Hun; Hauger, Richard L; Golde, Todd E; Felsenstein, Kevin M

    2015-01-01

    The biological underpinnings linking stress to Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk are poorly understood. We investigated how corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), a critical stress response mediator, influences amyloid-β (Aβ) production. In cells, CRF treatment increases Aβ production and triggers CRF receptor 1 (CRFR1) and γ-secretase internalization. Co-immunoprecipitation studies establish that γ-secretase associates with CRFR1; this is mediated by β-arrestin binding motifs. Additionally, CRFR1 and γ-secretase co-localize in lipid raft fractions, with increased γ-secretase accumulation upon CRF treatment. CRF treatment also increases γ-secretase activityin vitro, revealing a second, receptor-independent mechanism of action. CRF is the first endogenous neuropeptide that can be shown to directly modulate γ-secretase activity. Unexpectedly, CRFR1 antagonists also increased Aβ. These data collectively link CRF to increased Aβ through γ-secretase and provide mechanistic insight into how stress may increase AD risk. They also suggest that direct targeting of CRF might be necessary to effectively modulate this pathway for therapeutic benefit in AD, as CRFR1 antagonists increase Aβ and in some cases preferentially increase Aβ42 via complex effects on γ-secretase. PMID:25964433

  17. Neuropeptide derivatives to regulate the reproductive axis: Kisspeptin receptor (KISS1R) ligands and neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) ligands.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Shinya; Fujii, Nobutaka

    2016-11-01

    Recent research has indicated pivotal roles for neuropeptides and their cognate receptors in reproductive physiology. Kisspeptins are RF-amide neuropeptides that stimulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in the hypothalamus. Neurokinin B (NKB) is a member of the tachykinin family of neuropeptides and positively regulates pulsatile GnRH secretion. These peptides are coexpressed in kisspeptin/NKB/Dyn (KNDy) neurons of the arcuate nucleus, where they contribute to the regulation of puberty onset and other reproductive functions. In this review, the design of peptide ligands for the kisspeptin (KISS1R) and neurokinin-3 (NK3R) receptors are described. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 588-597, 2016. PMID:27271543

  18. Adult exposure to tributyltin affects hypothalamic neuropeptide Y, Y1 receptor distribution, and circulating leptin in mice.

    PubMed

    Bo, E; Farinetti, A; Marraudino, M; Sterchele, D; Eva, C; Gotti, S; Panzica, G

    2016-07-01

    Tributyltin (TBT), a pesticide used in antifouling paints, is toxic for aquatic invertebrates. In vertebrates, TBT may act in obesogen- inducing adipogenetic gene transcription for adipocyte differentiation. In a previous study, we demonstrated that acute administration of TBT induces c-fos expression in the arcuate nucleus. Therefore, in this study, we tested the hypothesis that adult exposure to TBT may alter a part of the nervous pathways controlling animal food intake. In particular, we investigated the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) immunoreactivity. This neuropeptide forms neural circuits dedicated to food assumption and its action is mediated by Y1 receptors that are widely expressed in the hypothalamic nuclei responsible for the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. To this purpose, TBT was orally administered at a dose of 0.025 mg/kg/day/body weight to adult animals [male and female C57BL/6 (Y1-LacZ transgenic mice] for 4 weeks. No differences were found in body weight and fat deposition, but we observed a significant increase in feed efficiency in TBT-treated male mice and a significant decrease in circulating leptin in both sexes. Computerized quantitative analysis of NPY immunoreactivity and Y1-related β-galactosidase activity demonstrated a statistically significant reduction in NPY and Y1 transgene expression in the hypothalamic circuit controlling food intake of treated male mice in comparison with controls. In conclusion, the present results indicate that adult exposure to TBT is profoundly interfering with the nervous circuits involved in the stimulation of food intake. PMID:27310180

  19. Neuropeptides and diabetic retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Gábriel, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy, a common complication of diabetes, develops in 75% of patients with type 1 and 50% of patients with type 2 diabetes, progressing to legal blindness in about 5%. In the recent years, considerable efforts have been put into finding treatments for this condition. It has been discovered that peptidergic mechanisms (neuropeptides and their analogues, activating a diverse array of signal transduction pathways through their multiple receptors) are potentially important for consideration in drug development strategies. A considerable amount of knowledge has been accumulated over the last three decades on human retinal neuropeptides and those elements in the pathomechanisms of diabetic retinopathy which might be related to peptidergic signal transduction. Here, human retinal neuropeptides and their receptors are reviewed, along with the theories relevant to the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy both in humans and in experimental models. By collating this information, the curative potential of certain neupeptides and their analogues/antagonists can also be discussed, along with the existing clinical treatments of diabetic retinopathy. The most promising peptidergic pathways for which treatment strategies may be developed at present are stimulation of the somatostatin-related pathway and the pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide-related pathway or inhibition of angiotensinergic mechanisms. These approaches may result in the inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor production and neuronal apoptosis; therefore, both the optical quality of the image and the processing capability of the neural circuit in the retina may be saved. PMID:23043302

  20. Neuropeptide S receptor gene variation modulates anterior cingulate cortex Glx levels during CCK-4 induced panic.

    PubMed

    Ruland, Tillmann; Domschke, Katharina; Schütte, Valerie; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Notzon, Swantje; Vennewald, Nadja; Ohrmann, Patricia; Arolt, Volker; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Zwanzger, Peter

    2015-10-01

    An excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmitter dysbalance has been suggested in pathogenesis of panic disorder. The neuropeptide S (NPS) system has been implicated in modulating GABA and glutamate neurotransmission in animal models and to genetically drive altered fear circuit function and an increased risk of panic disorder in humans. Probing a multi-level imaging genetic risk model of panic, in the present magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) study brain glutamate+glutamine (Glx) levels in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) during a pharmacological cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4) panic challenge were assessed depending on the functional neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) rs324981 A/T variant in a final sample of 35 healthy male subjects. The subjective panic response (Panic Symptom Scale; PSS) as well as cortisol and ACTH levels were ascertained throughout the experiment. CCK-4 injection was followed by a strong panic response. A significant time×genotype interaction was detected (p=.008), with significantly lower ACC Glx/Cr levels in T allele carriers as compared to AA homozygotes 5min after injection (p=.003). CCK-4 induced significant HPA axis stimulation, but no effect of genotype was discerned. The present pilot data suggests NPSR1 gene variation to modulate Glx levels in the ACC during acute states of stress and anxiety, with blunted, i.e. possibly maladaptive ACC glutamatergic reactivity in T risk allele carriers. Our results underline the notion of a genetically driven rapid and dynamic response mechanism in the neural regulation of human anxiety and further strengthen the emerging role of the NPS system in anxiety. PMID:26235955

  1. Centrally truncated and stabilized porcine neuropeptide Y analogs: design, synthesis, and mouse brain receptor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Krstenansky, J L; Owen, T J; Buck, S H; Hagaman, K A; McLean, L R

    1989-01-01

    Porcine neuropeptide Y (pNPY) has been proposed to form an intramolecularly stabilized structure characterized by N- and C-terminal helical regions arranged antiparallel due to a central turn region. Analogs based on this structural model that have the central turn region and various amounts of the helical regions removed, yet retain the N and C termini in a similar spatial orientation were designed. The gap formed by removal of the central residues (residues 8-17 or 7-20) was spanned with a single 8-aminooctanoic acid residue (Aoc) and the structure was further stabilized by the introduction of a disulfide bridge. [D-Cys7,Aoc8-17,Cys20]pNPY and [Cys5,Aoc7-20,D-Cys24]pNPY were synthesized and found to have receptor binding affinities of 2.3 nM and 150 nM, respectively, in mouse brain membranes (pNPY affinity is 3.6 nM in this assay). It is proposed that the central region (residues 7-17) of pNPY serves a structural role in the peptide and is not involved in direct receptor interaction. PMID:2543973

  2. Effects of the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-receptor antagonist BIBP3226 on vascular NPY-receptors with different ligand requirements.

    PubMed

    Grundemar, L; Ekelund, M

    1996-11-01

    The aim was to examine effects of a newly developed neuropeptide Y (NPY)-receptor antagonist, BIBP3226 and to characterize NPY-receptors in the isolated guinea pig caval vein and human subcutaneous artery, respectively. BIBP3226 < or = 1 microM did not affect the basal tension. Pretreatment with increasing concentrations of BIBP3226 (10 nM-1 microM) resulted in a progressive rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to the Y1-receptor selective agonist [Pro34]NPY in the guinea pig caval vein. Regression analysis of the Schild plot gave a pA2-value of 7.58 (7.20-8.33, 95% confidence interval), slope of regression line 0.96 (0.52-1.39, 95% confidence interval) and a correlation coefficient of 0.78. NPY and the C-terminal NPY 2-36 evoked equipotent concentration-dependent contractions, both of which were sensitive to BIBP3226. Although less potent than NPY 2-36, also the contraction induced by NPY 5-36 was antagonized by BIBP3226. In the human subcutaneous artery [Pro34]NPY but not NPY 2-36 (< or = 0.3 microM) evoked a concentration-dependent contraction. Pretreatment with BIBP3226 (0.1 microM) resulted in a rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to [Pro34]NPY (from 7.38 +/- 0.10 to 6.95 +/- 0.16 (P < 0.05, n = 6). The present study has shown that the Y1-receptor-selective antagonist BIBP3226 potently antagonizes vascular NPY-receptors with different ligand requirements in the guinea pig caval vein and human subcutaneous artery, respectively. It appears that the guinea pig Y1-receptor is much less stringent in its demand on the N-terminal part of NPY than that of human Y1-receptors. PMID:8936561

  3. Early vertebrate chromosome duplications and the evolution of the neuropeptide Y receptor gene regions

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background One of the many gene families that expanded in early vertebrate evolution is the neuropeptide (NPY) receptor family of G-protein coupled receptors. Earlier work by our lab suggested that several of the NPY receptor genes found in extant vertebrates resulted from two genome duplications before the origin of jawed vertebrates (gnathostomes) and one additional genome duplication in the actinopterygian lineage, based on their location on chromosomes sharing several gene families. In this study we have investigated, in five vertebrate genomes, 45 gene families with members close to the NPY receptor genes in the compact genomes of the teleost fishes Tetraodon nigroviridis and Takifugu rubripes. These correspond to Homo sapiens chromosomes 4, 5, 8 and 10. Results Chromosome regions with conserved synteny were identified and confirmed by phylogenetic analyses in H. sapiens, M. musculus, D. rerio, T. rubripes and T. nigroviridis. 26 gene families, including the NPY receptor genes, (plus 3 described recently by other labs) showed a tree topology consistent with duplications in early vertebrate evolution and in the actinopterygian lineage, thereby supporting expansion through block duplications. Eight gene families had complications that precluded analysis (such as short sequence length or variable number of repeated domains) and another eight families did not support block duplications (because the paralogs in these families seem to have originated in another time window than the proposed genome duplication events). RT-PCR carried out with several tissues in T. rubripes revealed that all five NPY receptors were expressed in the brain and subtypes Y2, Y4 and Y8 were also expressed in peripheral organs. Conclusion We conclude that the phylogenetic analyses and chromosomal locations of these gene families support duplications of large blocks of genes or even entire chromosomes. Thus, these results are consistent with two early vertebrate tetraploidizations forming a

  4. Intracerebroventricular responses to neuropeptide gamma in the conscious rat: characterization of its receptor with selective antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, P.; Couture, R.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cardiovascular and behavioural effects elicited by the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of neuropeptide gamma (NP gamma) in the conscious rat were assessed before and 5 min after i.c.v. pretreatment with antagonists selective for NK1 (RP 67,580), NK2 (SR 48,968) and NK3 (R 820) receptors. In addition, the central effects of NP gamma before and after desensitization of the NK1 and NK2 receptors with high doses of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) were compared. 2. Intracerebroventricular injection of NP gamma (10-780 pmol) evoked dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), face washing, head scratching, grooming and wet-dog shake behaviours. Similar injection of vehicle or 1 pmol NP gamma had no significant effect on those parameters. 3. The cardiovascular and behavioural responses elicited by NP gamma (25 pmol) were significantly and dose-dependently reduced by pretreatment with 650 pmol and 6.5 nmol of SR 48,968. No inhibition of NP gamma responses was observed when 6.5 nmol of RP 67,580 was used in a similar study. Moreover, the prior co-administration of SR 48,968 (6.5 nmol) and RP 67,580 (6.5 nmol) with or without R 820 (6.5 nmol) did not reduce further the central effects of NP gamma and significant residual responses (30-50%) remained. 4. No tachyphylaxis to NP gamma-induced cardiovascular and behavioural changes was observed when two consecutive injections of 25 pmol NP gamma were given 24 h apart. 5. Simultaneous NK1 and NK2 receptor desensitization reduced significantly central effects mediated by 25 pmol NP gamma. However, significant residual responses persisted as seen after pretreatment with SR 48,968. 6. The results suggest that the central effects of NP gamma are mediated partly by NK2 receptors and by another putative tachykinin receptor subtype (NP gamma receptor?) that appears to be different from NK1 and NK3 receptors. PMID:8789375

  5. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  6. Neuropeptide Y and Agouti-Related Peptide Mediate Complementary Functions of Hyperphagia and Reduced Energy Expenditure in Leptin Receptor Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Na; Marcelin, Genevieve; Liu, Shun Mei; Schwartz, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-related peptide (AGRP) can produce hyperphagia, reduce energy expenditure, and promote triglyceride deposition in adipose depots. As these two neuropeptides are coexpressed within the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and mediate a major portion of the obesity caused by leptin signaling deficiency, we sought to determine whether the two neuropeptides mediated identical or complementary actions. Because of separate neuropeptide receptors and signal transduction mechanisms, there is a possibility of distinct encoding systems for the feeding and energy expenditure aspects of leptin-regulated metabolism. We have genetically added NPY deficiency and/or AGRP deficiency to LEPR deficiency isolated to AGRP cells. Our results indicate that the obesity of LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons can produce obesity with either AGRP or NPY alone with AGRP producing hyperphagia while NPY promotes reduced energy expenditure. The absence of both NPY and AGRP prevents the development of obesity attributable to isolated LEPR deficiency in AGRP/NPY neurons. Operant behavioral testing indicated that there were no alterations in the reward for a food pellet from the AGRP-specific LEPR deficiency. PMID:21285324

  7. Neuropeptide Y receptor Y5 as an inducible pro-survival factor in neuroblastoma: implications for tumor chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Czarnecka, M; Trinh, E; Lu, C; Kuan-Celarier, A; Galli, S; Hong, S-H; Tilan, J U; Talisman, N; Izycka-Swieszewska, E; Tsuei, J; Yang, C; Martin, S; Horton, M; Christian, D; Everhart, L; Maheswaran, I; Kitlinska, J

    2015-06-11

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is a pediatric tumor of neural crest origin with heterogeneous phenotypes. Although low-stage tumors carry a favorable prognosis, >50% of high-risk NB relapses after treatment with a fatal outcome. Thus developing therapies targeting refractory NB remains an unsolved clinical problem. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its TrkB receptor are known to protect NB cells from chemotherapy-induced cell death, while neuropeptide Y (NPY), acting via its Y2 receptor (Y2R), is an autocrine proliferative and angiogenic factor crucial for maintaining NB tumor growth. Here we show that in NB cells, BDNF stimulates the synthesis of NPY and induces expression of another one of its receptors, Y5R. In human NB tissues, the expression of NPY and Y5R positively correlated with the expression of BDNF and TrkB. Functionally, BDNF triggered Y5R internalization in NB cells, whereas Y5R antagonist inhibited BDNF-induced p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation and its pro-survival activity. These observations suggested TrkB-Y5R transactivation that resulted in cross-talk between their signaling pathways. Additionally, NPY and Y5R were upregulated in a BDNF-independent manner in NB cells under pro-apoptotic conditions, such as serum deprivation and chemotherapy, as well as in cell lines and tissues derived from posttreatment NB tumors. Blocking Y5R in chemoresistant NB cells rich in this receptor sensitized them to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis and inhibited their growth in vivo by augmenting cell death. In summary, the NPY/Y5R axis is an inducible survival pathway activated in NB by BDNF or cellular stress. Upon such activation, Y5R augments the pro-survival effect of BDNF via its interactions with TrkB receptor and exerts an additional BDNF-independent anti-apoptotic effect, both of which contribute to NB chemoresistance. Therefore, the NPY/Y5R pathway may become a novel therapeutic target for patients with refractory NB, thus far an incurable form

  8. [Expression of neuropeptide Y and long leptin receptor in gastrointestinal tract of giant panda].

    PubMed

    Luo, Qihui; Tang, Xiuying; Chen, Zhengli; Wang, Kaiyu; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Li, Caiwu

    2015-08-01

    To study the expression and distribution of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and long leptin receptor (OB-Rb) in the gastrointestinal tract of giant panda, samples of three animals were collected from the key laboratory for reproduction and conservation genetics of endangered wildlife of Sichuan province, China conservation and research center for the giant panda. Paraffin sections of giant panda gastrointestinal tissue samples were observed using hematoxylin-eosin staining (HE) and strept actividin-biotin complex immunohistochemical staining (IHC). The results show that the intestinal histology of three pandas was normal and no pathological changes, and there were rich single-cell and multi-cell mucous glands, long intestinal villi and thick muscularis mucosa and muscle layer. Positive cells expressing NPY and OB-Rb were widely detected in the gastrointestinal tract by IHC methods. NPY positive nerve fibers and neuronal cell were widely distributed in submucosal plexus and myenteric plexus, especially in the former. They were arranged beaded or point-like shape. NPY positive cells were observed in the shape of ellipse and polygon and mainly located in the mucous layer and intestinal glands. OB-Rb positive cells were mainly distributed in the mucous layer and the laminae propria, especially the latter. These results confirmed that NPY and OB-Rb are widely distributed in the gut of the giant panda, which provide strong reference for the research between growth and development, digestion and absorption, and immune function. PMID:26762039

  9. Nonpeptide Small Molecule Agonist and Antagonist Original Leads for Neuropeptide FF1 and FF2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF1 and FF2 receptors (NPFF1-R and NPFF2-R), and their endogenous ligand NPFF, are one of only several systems responsible for mediating opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and dependence. Currently, no small molecules displaying good affinity or selectivity for either subtype have been reported, to decipher the role of NPFF2-R as it relates to opioid-mediated analgesia, for further exploration of NPFF1-R, or for medication development for either subtype. We report the first nonpeptide small molecule scaffold for NPFF1,2-R, the guanidino-piperidines, and SAR studies resulting in the discovery of a NPFF1 agonist (7b, Ki = 487 ± 117 nM), a NPFF1 antagonist (46, Ki = 81 ± 17 nM), and a NPFF2 partial antagonist (53a, Ki = 30 ± 5 nM), which serve as leads for the development of pharmacological probes and potential therapeutic agents. Testing of 46 alone was without effect in the mouse 48 °C warm-water tail-withdrawal test, but pretreatment with 46 prevented NPFF-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:25268943

  10. Intranasally Administered Neuropeptide S (NPS) Exerts Anxiolytic Effects Following Internalization Into NPS Receptor-Expressing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Irina A; Dine, Julien; Yen, Yi-Chun; Buell, Dominik R; Herrmann, Leonie; Holsboer, Florian; Eder, Matthias; Landgraf, Rainer; Schmidt, Ulrike

    2012-01-01

    Experiments in rodents revealed neuropeptide S (NPS) to constitute a potential novel treatment option for anxiety diseases such as panic and post-traumatic stress disorder. However, both its cerebral target sites and the molecular underpinnings of NPS-mediated effects still remain elusive. By administration of fluorophore-conjugated NPS, we pinpointed NPS target neurons in distinct regions throughout the entire brain. We demonstrated their functional relevance in the hippocampus. In the CA1 region, NPS modulates synaptic transmission and plasticity. NPS is taken up into NPS receptor-expressing neurons by internalization of the receptor–ligand complex as we confirmed by subsequent cell culture studies. Furthermore, we tracked internalization of intranasally applied NPS at the single-neuron level and additionally demonstrate that it is delivered into the mouse brain without losing its anxiolytic properties. Finally, we show that NPS differentially modulates the expression of proteins of the glutamatergic system involved inter alia in synaptic plasticity. These results not only enlighten the path of NPS in the brain, but also establish a non-invasive method for NPS administration in mice, thus strongly encouraging translation into a novel therapeutic approach for pathological anxiety in humans. PMID:22278093

  11. Genetic Association of Objective Sleep Phenotypes with a Functional Polymorphism in the Neuropeptide S Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Spada, Janek; Sander, Christian; Burkhardt, Ralph; Häntzsch, Madlen; Mergl, Roland; Scholz, Markus; Hegerl, Ulrich; Hensch, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Background The neuropeptide S receptor (NPSR1) and its ligand neuropeptide S (NPS) have received increased attention in the last few years, as both establish a previously unknown system of neuromodulation. Animal research studies have suggested that NPS may be involved in arousal/wakefulness and may also have a crucial role in sleep regulation. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs324981 in NPSR1 has begun to shed light on a function of the NPS-system in human sleep regulation. Due to an amino acid exchange, the T-allele leads to an increased sensitivity of the NPSR1. In the only genome-wide association study to date on circadian sleep parameters in humans, an association was found between rs324981 and regular bedtime. However, the sleep parameters in this study were only measured by self-rating. Therefore, our study aimed to replicate these findings using an objective measure of sleep. Methods The study included n = 393 white subjects (62–79 years) who participated in an actigraphic assessment for determining sleep duration, rest duration, sleep onset, rest onset and sleep onset latency. Genotyping of the SNP rs324981 was performed using the TaqMan OpenArray System. Results The genotype at rs324981 was not significantly associated with rest onset (bedtime) or sleep onset (p = .146 and p = .199, respectively). However, the SNP showed a significant effect on sleep- and rest duration (p = .007 and p = .003, respectively). Subjects that were homozygous for the minor T-allele had a significantly decreased sleep- and rest duration compared to A-allele carriers. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that the sleep pattern in humans is influenced by the NPS-system. However, the previously reported association between bedtime and rs324981 could not be confirmed. The current finding of decreased sleep duration in T/T allele carriers is in accordance with studies in rodents reporting similar results after NPS application. PMID:24896296

  12. Phase shifts to light are altered by antagonists to neuropeptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ryan K; Sterniczuk, Roxanne; Enkhbold, Yaruuna; Jeffers, Ryan T; Basu, Priyoneel; Duong, Bryan; Chow, Sue-Len; Smith, Victoria M; Antle, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a heterogeneous structure. Two key populations of cells that receive retinal input and are believed to participate in circadian responses to light are cells that contain vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). VIP acts primarily through the VPAC2 receptor, while GRP works primarily through the BB2 receptor. Both VIP and GRP phase shift the circadian clock in a manner similar to light when applied to the SCN, both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that they are sufficient to elicit photic-like phase shifts. However, it is not known if they are necessary signals for light to elicit phase shifts. Here we test the hypothesis that GRP and VIP are necessary signaling components for the photic phase shifting of the hamster circadian clock by examining two antagonists for each of these neuropeptides. The BB2 antagonist PD176252 had no effect on light-induced delays on its own, while the BB2 antagonist RC-3095 had the unexpected effect of significantly potentiating both phase delays and advances. Neither of the VIP antagonists ([d-p-Cl-Phe6, Leu17]-VIP, or PG99-465) altered phase shifting responses to light on their own. When the BB2 antagonist PD176252 and the VPAC2 antagonist PG99-465 were delivered together to the SCN, phase delays were significantly attenuated. These results indicate that photic phase shifting requires participation of either VIP or GRP; phase shifts to light are only impaired when signalling in both pathways are inhibited. Additionally, the unexpected potentiation of light-induced phase shifts by RC-3095 should be investigated further for potential chronobiotic applications. PMID:27090819

  13. μ Opioid receptor A118G polymorphism in association with striatal opioid neuropeptide gene expression in heroin abusers

    PubMed Central

    Drakenberg, Katarina; Nikoshkov, Andrej; Horváth, Monika Cs; Fagergren, Pernilla; Gharibyan, Anna; Saarelainen, Kati; Rahman, Sadia; Nylander, Ingrid; Bakalkin, Georgy; Rajs, Jovan; Keller, Eva; Hurd, Yasmin L.

    2006-01-01

    μ Opioid receptors are critical for heroin dependence, and A118G SNP of the μ opioid receptor gene (OPRM1) has been linked with heroin abuse. In our population of European Caucasians (n = 118), ≈90% of 118G allelic carriers were heroin users. Postmortem brain analyses showed the OPRM1 genotype associated with transcription, translation, and processing of the human striatal opioid neuropeptide system. Whereas down-regulation of preproenkephalin and preprodynorphin genes was evident in all heroin users, the effects were exaggerated in 118G subjects and were most prominent for preproenkephalin in the nucleus accumbens shell. Reduced opioid neuropeptide transcription was accompanied by increased dynorphin and enkephalin peptide concentrations exclusively in 118G heroin subjects, suggesting that the peptide processing is associated with the OPRM1 genotype. Abnormal gene expression related to peptide convertase and ubiquitin/proteosome regulation was also evident in heroin users. Taken together, alterations in opioid neuropeptide systems might underlie enhanced opiate abuse vulnerability apparent in 118G individuals. PMID:16682632

  14. Neuropeptide Y is produced in visceral adipose tissue and promotes proliferation of adipocyte precursor cells via the Y1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kaiping; Guan, Haiyan; Arany, Edith; Hill, David J; Cao, Xiang

    2008-07-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is synthesized in neural tissue of the central and peripheral nervous systems and has a number of important functions besides regulating appetite and energy homeostasis. Here we identify a novel site of NPY biosynthesis and a role for NPY in promoting proliferation of adipocyte precursor cells. We show that NPY mRNA is not only expressed in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) but that its levels are up-regulated 6-fold in our early-life programmed rat model of increased visceral adiposity. This is accompanied by a parallel rise in NPY protein, demonstrating that VAT is a novel peripheral site of NPY biosynthesis. Furthermore, NPY mRNA expression is also elevated >2-fold in VAT of obese Zucker rats. Importantly, NPY stimulates proliferation of primary rat preadipocytes as well as 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in vitro. This mitogenic effect appears to be mediated by the Y1 receptor and involves the activation of extracellular related kinase 1/2. In addition, insulin and glucocorticoid up-regulate VAT NPY expression in lean but not obese Zucker rats. Taken together, these results suggest that an enhanced local expression of NPY within VAT may be a common feature of and contribute to the molecular mechanisms underlying increased visceral adiposity. PMID:18323405

  15. Neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 regulate Caenorhabditis elegans avoidance response to the plant stress hormone methyl salicylate.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jintao; Xu, Zhaofa; Tan, Zhiping; Zhang, Zhuohua; Ma, Long

    2015-02-01

    Methyl salicylate (MeSa) is a stress hormone released by plants under attack by pathogens or herbivores . MeSa has been shown to attract predatory insects of herbivores and repel pests. The molecules and neurons underlying animal response to MeSa are not known. Here we found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a strong avoidance response to MeSa, which requires the activities of two closely related neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2. Molecular analyses suggest that NPR-1 expressed in the RMG inter/motor neurons is required for MeSa avoidance. An NPR-1 ligand FLP-18 is also required. Using a rescuing npr-2 promoter to drive a GFP transgene, we identified that NPR-2 is expressed in multiple sensory and interneurons. Genetic rescue experiments suggest that NPR-2 expressed in the AIZ interneurons is required for MeSa avoidance. We also provide evidence that the AWB sensory neurons might act upstream of RMGs and AIZs to detect MeSa. Our results suggest that NPR-2 has an important role in regulating animal behavior and that NPR-1 and NPR-2 act on distinct interneurons to affect C. elegans avoidance response to MeSa. PMID:25527285

  16. Neuropeptide Receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 Regulate Caenorhabditis elegans Avoidance Response to the Plant Stress Hormone Methyl Salicylate

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jintao; Xu, Zhaofa; Tan, Zhiping; Zhang, Zhuohua; Ma, Long

    2015-01-01

    Methyl salicylate (MeSa) is a stress hormone released by plants under attack by pathogens or herbivores . MeSa has been shown to attract predatory insects of herbivores and repel pests. The molecules and neurons underlying animal response to MeSa are not known. Here we found that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a strong avoidance response to MeSa, which requires the activities of two closely related neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2. Molecular analyses suggest that NPR-1 expressed in the RMG inter/motor neurons is required for MeSa avoidance. An NPR-1 ligand FLP-18 is also required. Using a rescuing npr-2 promoter to drive a GFP transgene, we identified that NPR-2 is expressed in multiple sensory and interneurons. Genetic rescue experiments suggest that NPR-2 expressed in the AIZ interneurons is required for MeSa avoidance. We also provide evidence that the AWB sensory neurons might act upstream of RMGs and AIZs to detect MeSa. Our results suggest that NPR-2 has an important role in regulating animal behavior and that NPR-1 and NPR-2 act on distinct interneurons to affect C. elegans avoidance response to MeSa. PMID:25527285

  17. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) receptors in rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, T.; Niwa, M.; Yamashita, K.; Kataoka, Y.; Shigematsu, K. )

    1990-12-01

    1. Specific binding sites for neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) were investigated in rat brain areas using quantitative receptor autoradiography with {sup 125}I-Bolton-Hunter NPY ({sup 125}I-BH-NPY) and {sup 125}I-PYY, radioligands for PP-fold family peptides receptors. 2. There were no differences between localization of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding sites in the rat brain. High densities of the binding sites were present in the anterior olfactory nucleus, lateral septal nucleus, stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus, and area postrema. 3. In cold ligand-saturation experiments done in the presence of increasing concentrations of unlabeled NPY and PYY, {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, molecular layer of the cerebellum, and area postrema was single and of a high affinity. There was a significant difference between the affinities of {sup 125}I-BH-NPY (Kd = 0.96 nM) and {sup 125}I-PYY binding (Kd = 0.05 nM) to the molecular layer of the cerebellum. The binding of the two radioligands to the other areas examined had the same affinities. 4. When comparing the potency of unlabeled rat pancreatic polypeptide (rPP), a family peptide of NPY and PYY, to inhibit the binding to the areas examined, rPP displaced {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY binding to the area postrema more potently than it did the binding to the stratum radiatum of the hippocampus, layer I of the somatosensory frontoparietal cortex, and molecular layer of the cerebellum. 5. Thus, the quantitative receptor autoradiographic method with {sup 125}I-BH-NPY and {sup 125}I-PYY revealed differences in binding characteristics of specific NPY and PYY binding sites in different areas of the rat brain. The results provide further evidence for the existence of multiple NPY-PYY receptors in the central nervous system.

  18. Neuropeptide W

    PubMed Central

    Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Hirako, Satoshi; Ota, Eiji; Wada, Nobuhiro; Ryushi, Tomoo; Shioda, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptide W (NPW), which was first isolated from the porcine hypothalamus, exists in two forms, consisting of 23 (NPW23) or 30 (NPW30) amino acids. These neuropeptides bind to one of two NPW receptors, either NPBWR1 (otherwise known as GPR7) or NPBWR2 (GPR8), which belong to the G protein-coupled receptor family. GPR7 is expressed in the brain and peripheral organs of both humans and rodents, whereas GPR8 is not found in rodents. GPR7 mRNA in rodents is widely expressed in several hypothalamic regions, including the paraventricular, supraoptic, ventromedial, dorsomedial, suprachiasmatic, and arcuate nuclei. These observations suggest that GPR7 plays a crucial role in the modulation of neuroendocrine function. The intracerebroventricular infusion of NPW has been shown to suppress food intake and body weight and to increase both heat production and body temperature, suggesting that NPW functions as an endogenous catabolic signaling molecule. Here we summarize our current understanding of the distribution and function of NPW in the brain. PMID:23267349

  19. Estrogen-related receptor β deletion modulates whole-body energy balance via estrogen-related receptor γ and attenuates neuropeptide Y gene expression.

    PubMed

    Byerly, Mardi S; Al Salayta, Muhannad; Swanson, Roy D; Kwon, Kiwook; Peterson, Jonathan M; Wei, Zhikui; Aja, Susan; Moran, Timothy H; Blackshaw, Seth; Wong, G William

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) α, β and γ are orphan nuclear hormone receptors with no known ligands. Little is known concerning the role of ERRβ in energy homeostasis, as complete ERRβ-null mice die mid-gestation. We generated two viable conditional ERRβ-null mouse models to address its metabolic function. Whole-body deletion of ERRβ in Sox2-Cre:ERRβ(lox/lox) mice resulted in major alterations in body composition, metabolic rate, meal patterns and voluntary physical activity levels. Nestin-Cre:ERRβ(lox/lox) mice exhibited decreased expression of ERRβ in hindbrain neurons, the predominant site of expression, decreased neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression in the hindbrain, increased lean body mass, insulin sensitivity, increased energy expenditure, decreased satiety and decreased time between meals. In the absence of ERRβ, increased ERRγ signaling decreased satiety and the duration of time between meals, similar to meal patterns observed for both the Sox2-Cre:ERRβ(lox/lox) and Nestin-Cre:ERRβ(lox/lox) strains of mice. Central and/or peripheral ERRγ signaling may modulate these phenotypes by decreasing NPY gene expression. Overall, the relative expression ratio between ERRβ and ERRγ may be important in modulating ingestive behavior, specifically satiety, gene expression, as well as whole-body energy balance. PMID:23360481

  20. Neuropeptide S receptor gene variant and environment: contribution to alcohol use disorders and alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Laas, Kariina; Reif, Andreas; Akkermann, Kirsti; Kiive, Evelyn; Domschke, Katharina; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2015-05-01

    The functional polymorphism Asn(107) Ile (rs324981, A > T) of the neuropeptide S receptor (NPSR1) gene is involved in the modulation of traits that affect alcohol use. Hence, we have examined whether the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism is associated with alcohol use disorders (AUD) and alcohol use in a population-representative sample. Lifetime AUD were assessed by the MINI psychiatric interview (n = 501) in the older cohort of the longitudinal Estonian Children Personality Behaviour and Health Study at age 25. Alcohol use, environmental adversities and personality were reported by both the younger (original n = 583) and the older cohort (original n = 593) in three study waves. NPSR1 associations with AUD and alcohol use differed by sex. In females, both AUD [odds ratio (OR) = 7.20 (0.94-55.0), P = 0.029] and harmful alcohol use were more prevalent in A-allele carriers. In contrast, in males, AUD was more frequent in T-allele carriers [OR = 2.75 (1.19-6.36), P = 0.017], especially if exposed to adverse environments at age 15 [OR = 10 (1.18-84.51), P = 0.019]. Alcohol use was higher in male T-allele carriers at ages 15 and 18 as well. Similarly to females, however, the risk allele for higher alcohol use for males at age 25 was the A-allele. Many of the effects on alcohol use were explained by genotype effects on measures of personality. In the general population, the NPSR1 Asn(107) Ile polymorphism is associated with AUD and alcohol consumption, dependent on sex, environment and age. The results are in line with the impulsivity and personality regulating role of the NPSR1. PMID:24754478

  1. Neuropeptide-inducible upregulation of proteasome activity precedes nuclear factor kappa B activation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Upregulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) activity and neuroendocrine differentiation are two mechanisms known to be involved in prostate cancer (PC) progression to castration resistance. We have observed that major components of these pathways, including NFκB, proteasome, neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and endothelin 1 (ET-1), exhibit an inverse and mirror image pattern in androgen-dependent (AD) and -independent (AI) states in vitro. Methods We have now investigated for evidence of a direct mechanistic connection between these pathways with the use of immunocytochemistry (ICC), western blot analysis, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and proteasome activity assessment. Results Neuropeptide (NP) stimulation induced nuclear translocation of NFκB in a dose-dependent manner in AI cells, also evident as reduced total inhibitor κB (IκB) levels and increased DNA binding in EMSA. These effects were preceded by increased 20 S proteasome activity at lower doses and at earlier times and were at least partially reversed under conditions of NP deprivation induced by specific NP receptor inhibitors, as well as NFκB, IκB kinase (IKK) and proteasome inhibitors. AD cells showed no appreciable nuclear translocation upon NP stimulation, with less intense DNA binding signal on EMSA. Conclusions Our results support evidence for a direct mechanistic connection between the NPs and NFκB/proteasome signaling pathways, with a distinct NP-induced profile in the more aggressive AI cancer state. PMID:22715899

  2. Morphine-induced early delays in wound closure: involvement of sensory neuropeptides and modification of neurokinin receptor expression

    PubMed Central

    Rook, Jerri M.; Hasan, Wohaib; McCarson, Kenneth E.

    2014-01-01

    Dose-limiting side effects of centrally-acting opioid drugs have led to the use of topical opioids to reduce the pain associated with chronic cutaneous wounds. However, previous studies indicate that topical morphine application impairs wound healing. This study was designed to elucidate the mechanisms by which morphine delays wound closure. Rats were depleted of sensory neuropeptides by treatment with capsaicin, and full-thickness 4 mm diameter wounds were excised from the intrascapular region. Wounds were treated topically twice daily with 5 mM morphine sulfate, 1 mM substance P, 1 mM neurokinin A, or 5 mM morphine combined with 1 m M substance P or neurokinin A and wound areas assessed. During closure, wound tissue was taken 1, 3, 5, and 8 days post-wounding from control and morphine-treated rats and immunostained for neurokinin receptors and markers for macrophages, myofibroblasts, and vasculature. Results obtained from capsaicin-treated animals demonstrated a significant delay in the early stages of wound contraction that was reversed by neuropeptide application. Treatment of capsaicin-treated rats with topical morphine did not further delay wound closure, suggesting that topical opioids impair wound closure via the inhibition of peripheral neuropeptide release into the healing wound. Morphine application altered neurokinin-1 and neurokinin-2 receptor expression in inflammatory and parenchymal cells essential for wound healing in a cell-specific manner, demonstrating a direct effect of morphine on neurokinin receptor regulation within an array of cells involved in wound healing. These data provide evidence indicating a potentially detrimental effect of topical morphine application on the dynamic wound healing process. PMID:19428329

  3. RF-amide neuropeptides and their receptors in Mammals: Pharmacological properties, drug development and main physiological functions.

    PubMed

    Quillet, Raphaëlle; Ayachi, Safia; Bihel, Frédéric; Elhabazi, Khadija; Ilien, Brigitte; Simonin, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    RF-amide neuropeptides, with their typical Arg-Phe-NH2 signature at their carboxyl C-termini, belong to a lineage of peptides that spans almost the entire life tree. Throughout evolution, RF-amide peptides and their receptors preserved fundamental roles in reproduction and feeding, both in Vertebrates and Invertebrates. The scope of this review is to summarize the current knowledge on the RF-amide systems in Mammals from historical aspects to therapeutic opportunities. Taking advantage of the most recent findings in the field, special focus will be given on molecular and pharmacological properties of RF-amide peptides and their receptors as well as on their implication in the control of different physiological functions including feeding, reproduction and pain. Recent progress on the development of drugs that target RF-amide receptors will also be addressed. PMID:26896564

  4. Interaction of the neuropeptide S receptor gene Asn¹⁰⁷Ile variant and environment: contribution to affective and anxiety disorders, and suicidal behaviour.

    PubMed

    Laas, Kariina; Reif, Andreas; Akkermann, Kirsti; Kiive, Evelyn; Domschke, Katharina; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide S is involved in anxiety and arousal modulation, and the functional polymorphism Asn107Ile (rs324981, A > T) of the neuropeptide S receptor gene (NPSR1) is associated with panic disorder and anxiety/fear-related traits. NPSR1 also interacts with the environment in shaping personality and impulsivity. We therefore examined whether the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism is associated with affective and anxiety disorders in a population-representative sample. Lifetime psychiatric disorders were assessed by MINI interview (n = 501) in the older cohort of the longitudinal Estonian Children Personality, Behaviour and Health Study (ECPBHS). Anxiety (STAI), self-esteem (RSES), depression (MÅDRS), suicide attempts and environmental factors were self-reported in both the younger (original n = 583) and the older cohort (original n = 593). Most of the NPSR1 effects were sex-specific and depended on environmental factors. Females with the functionally least active NPSR1 AA genotype and exposed to environmental adversity had affective/anxiety disorders more frequently; they also exhibited higher anxiety and depressiveness, and lower self-esteem. Female AA homozygotes also reported suicidal behaviour more frequently, and this was further accentuated by adverse family environment. In the general population, the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism together with environmental factors is associated with anxious, depressive and activity-related traits, increased prevalence of affective/anxiety disorders and a higher likelihood of suicidal behaviour. PMID:24331455

  5. Neuropeptide Y bioavailability is suppressed in the hindlimb of female Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Dwayne N; Milne, Kevin J; Noble, Earl G; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2005-01-01

    We recently reported that male, but not female, rats exhibit basal endogenous neuropeptide Y Y1-receptor modulation of hindlimb vasculature. The lack of baseline endo-genous Y1-receptor control in females was evident despite the expression of Y1-receptors and neuropeptide Y in hindlimb skeletal muscle tissue. The following study addressed the hypothesis that neuropeptide Y bioavailability is blunted in female rats under baseline conditions. It was further hypothesized that enhanced prejunctional autoinhibitory neuropeptide Y Y2-receptor expression and/or proteolytic processing of released neuropeptide Y may persist in female rats. Using western blot analysis, it was observed that females had greater overall neuropeptide Y Y2-receptor expression in skeletal muscle compared to males (P < 0.05). To address the prevalence/impact of baseline endogenous Y2-receptor activation on neuropeptide Y release in hindlimb vasculature, an arterial infusion of BIIE0246 (specific non-peptide Y2-receptor antagonist; 170 μg kg−1) was carried out on female and male rats. Y2-receptor blockade resulted in a decrease in hindlimb vascular conductance in females and males (P < 0.05). However, the BIIE0246-induced decrease in vascular conductance was Y1-receptor dependent in females, but not males (P < 0.05). In addition, compared to baseline, BIIE0246 infusion resulted in increased plasma neuropeptide Y concentration in females (P < 0.05), while there was no observable change in males. In a final experiment, systemic inhibition of proteolytic enzymes dipeptidylpeptidase IV (via 500 nm diprotin A) and aminopeptidase P (via 180 nm 2-mercaptoethanol) elicited a Y1-receptor-dependent decrease in hindlimb vascular conductance in females (P < 0.05). It was concluded that our previously reported lack of basal endogenous Y1-receptor activation in female hindlimb vasculature was (at least partially) due to prejunctional Y2-receptor autoinhibition and proteolytic processing of neuropeptide Y. PMID

  6. Interaction of mimetic analogs of insect kinin neuropeptides with arthropod receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect kinin neuropeptides share a common C-terminal pentapeptide sequence Phe1-Xaa1-2-Xaa2-3-Trp4-Gly5-NH2 (Xaa1-2 = His, Asn, Phe, Ser or Tyr; Xaa2-3 = Pro, Ser or Ala) and have been isolated from a number of insects, including species of Dictyoptera, Lepidoptera, and Orthoptera. They have been a...

  7. Localization of Neuropeptide Y1 Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Rat Retina and the Synaptic Connectivity of Y1 Immunoreactive Cells

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Iona; Oh, Su-Ja; Chun, Myung-Hoon; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), an inhibitory neuropeptide expressed by a moderately dense population of wide-field amacrine cells in the rat retina, acts through multiple (Y1–y6) G-protein–coupled receptors. This study determined the cellular localization of Y1 receptors and the synaptic connectivity of Y1 processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the rat retina. Specific Y1 immunoreactivity was localized to horizontal cell bodies in the distal inner nuclear layer and their processes in the outer plexiform layer. Immunoreactivity was also prominent in cell processes located in strata 2 and 4, and puncta in strata 4 and 5 of the IPL. Double-label immunohistochemical experiments with calbindin, a horizontal cell marker, confirmed Y1 immunostaining in all horizontal cells. Double-label immunohistochemical experiments, using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and vesicular acetylcholine transporter to label cholinergic amacrine cell processes, demonstrated that Y1 immunoreactivity in strata 2 and 4 of the IPL was localized to cholinergic amacrine cell processes. Electron microscopic studies of the inner retina showed that Y1-immunostained amacrine cell processes and puncta received synaptic inputs from unlabeled amacrine cell processes (65.2%) and bipolar cell axon terminals (34.8%). Y1-immunoreactive amacrine cell processes most frequently formed synaptic outputs onto unlabeled amacrine cell processes (34.0%) and ganglion cell dendrites (54.1%). NPY immunoreactivity in the rat retina is distributed primarily to strata 1 and 5 of the IPL, and the present findings, thus, suggest that NPY acts in a paracrine manner on Y1 receptors to influence both horizontal and amacrine cells. PMID:12455004

  8. The effects of serotonin1A receptor on female mice body weight and food intake are associated with the differential expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides and the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Butt, Isma; Hong, Andrew; Di, Jing; Aracena, Sonia; Banerjee, Probal; Shen, Chang-Hui

    2014-10-01

    Both common eating disorders anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa are characteristically diseases of women. To characterize the role of the 5-HT1A receptor (5-HT1A-R) in these eating disorders in females, we investigated the effect of saline or 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino) tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) treatment on feeding behavior and body weight in adult WT female mice and in adult 5-HT1A-R knockout (KO) female mice. Our results showed that KO female mice have lower food intake and body weight than WT female mice. Administration of 8-OH-DPAT decreased food intake but not body weight in WT female mice. Furthermore, qRT-PCR was employed to analyze the expression levels of neuropeptides, γ-aminobutyric acid A receptor subunit β (GABAA β subunits) and glutamic acid decarboxylase in the hypothalamic area. The results showed the difference in food intake between WT and KO mice was accompanied by differential expression of POMC, CART and GABAA β2, and the difference in body weight between WT and KO mice was associated with significantly different expression levels of CART and GABAA β2. As such, our data provide new insight into the role of 5-HT1A-R in both feeding behavior and the associated expression of neuropeptides and the GABAA receptor. PMID:25130282

  9. Hypoxia shifts activity of neuropeptide Y in Ewing sarcoma from growth-inhibitory to growth-promoting effects

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Susana; Izycka-Swieszewska, Ewa; Earnest, Joshua Patrick; Shabbir, Asim; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Wang, Shuo; Martin, Samantha; Horton, Meredith; Mahajan, Akanksha; Christian, David; O'Neill, Alison; Wang, Hongkun; Zhuang, Tingting; Czarnecka, Magdalena; Johnson, Michael D.; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Kitlinska, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is an aggressive malignancy driven by an oncogenic fusion protein, EWS-FLI1. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), and two of its receptors, Y1R and Y5R are up-regulated by EWS-FLI1 and abundantly expressed in ES cells. Paradoxically, NPY acting via Y1R and Y5R stimulates ES cell death. Here, we demonstrate that these growth-inhibitory actions of NPY are counteracted by hypoxia, which converts the peptide to a growth-promoting factor. In ES cells, hypoxia induces another NPY receptor, Y2R, and increases expression of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), an enzyme that cleaves NPY to a shorter form, NPY3-36. This truncated peptide no longer binds to Y1R and, therefore, does not stimulate ES cell death. Instead, NPY3-36 acts as a selective Y2R/Y5R agonist. The hypoxia-induced increase in DPPIV activity is most evident in a population of ES cells with high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity, rich in cancer stem cells (CSCs). Consequently, NPY, acting via Y2R/Y5Rs, preferentially stimulates proliferation and migration of hypoxic ALDHhigh cells. Hypoxia also enhances the angiogenic potential of ES by inducing Y2Rs in endothelial cells and increasing the release of its ligand, NPY3-36, from ES cells. In summary, hypoxia acts as a molecular switch shifting NPY activity away from Y1R/Y5R-mediated cell death and activating the Y2R/Y5R/DPPIV/NPY3-36 axis, which stimulates ES CSCs and promotes angiogenesis. Hypoxia-driven actions of the peptide such as these may contribute to ES progression. Due to the receptor-specific and multifaceted nature of NPY actions, these findings may inform novel therapeutic approaches to ES. PMID:24318733

  10. Behavioral effects of neuropeptide Y in F344 rat substrains with a reduced dipeptidyl-peptidase IV activity.

    PubMed

    Karl, Tim; Hoffmann, Torsten; Pabst, Reinhard; von Hörsten, Stephan

    2003-07-01

    Dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV/CD26) is involved in several physiological functions by cleavage of dipeptides with a Xaa-Pro or Xaa-Ala sequence of regulatory peptides such as neuropeptide Y (NPY). Cleavage of NPY by DPPIV results in NPY(3-36), which lacks affinity for the Y(1) but not for other NPY receptor subtypes. Among other effects, the NPY Y(1) receptor mediates anxiolytic-like effects of NPY. In previous studies with F344 rat substrains lacking endogenous DPPIV-like activity we found a reduced behavioral stress response, which might be due to a differential degradation of NPY. Here we tested this hypothesis and administered intracerebroventricularly two different doses of NPY (0.0, 0.2, 1.0 nmol) in mutant and wildtype-like F344 substrains. NPY dose-dependently stimulated food intake and feeding motivation, decreased motor activity in the plus maze and social interaction test, and exerted anxiolytic-like effects. More important for the present hypothesis, NPY administration was found to be more potent in the DPPIV-negative substrains in exerting anxiolytic-like effects (increased social interaction time in the social interaction test) and sedative-like effects (decreased motor activity in the elevated plus maze). These data demonstrate for the first time a differential potency of NPY in DPPIV-deficient rats and suggest a changed receptor-specificity of NPY, which may result from a differential degradation of NPY in this genetic model of DPPIV deficiency. Overall, these results provide direct evidence that NPY-mediated effects in the central nervous system are modulated by DPPIV-like enzymatic activity. PMID:12957230

  11. Structural characterization of Y1 and Y2 receptors for neuropeptide Y and peptide YY by affinity cross-linking

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikh, S.P.; Williams, J.A. )

    1990-05-15

    Pharmacological studies indicate that peptide YY (PYY) and neuropeptide Y interact with multiple binding sites, categorized as Y1 and Y2 subtypes. In order to identify and structurally characterize the Y1 and Y2 receptors we covalently cross-linked (125I-Tyr36)PYY to its receptors. The Y2 receptor in rat hippocampus and rabbit kidney membranes was affinity labeled using different homo- and heterobifunctional cross-linking reagents. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography resulted in a major labeled protein band of Mr = 50,000 in both hippocampal and kidney membranes, which was unaffected by reducing agents. The Y1 receptor was analyzed in membranes from the MC-IXC human neuroblastoma cell line. Autoradiography revealed two labeled bands at Mr = 70,000 and 45,000. As the intensity of the Mr = 45,000 band was reduced by protease inhibitors, it is likely that this band is a degradation product of the larger band. Labeling of these proteins was obtained only when N-5-azido-2-nitrobenzoyloxysuccinimide was employed for cross-linking followed by exposure to UV light. Labeling of the two cross-linked bands was unaffected by reducing agents. The binding of radiolabeled PYY and the intensity of the cross-linked bands, for both the Y1 and Y2 receptors, were inhibited similarly in a dose-dependent manner by increasing concentrations of unlabeled PYY. When exposed to agarose-coupled lectins, the detergent-solubilized Y1 receptor-hormone complex was completely adsorbed by wheat germ agglutinin and partially by ricin communis II. The cross-linked Y2 receptor was almost totally adsorbed by wheat germ agglutinin-agarose and partially adsorbed by concanavalin A. The adsorptions were in all cases blocked by the appropriate hapten sugar.

  12. The effects of aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment on circadian rhythms and suprachiasmatic nucleus expression of neuropeptide genes and 5-HT1B receptors

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Marilyn J.; Hester, James M.; Hopper, Jason A.; Franklin, Kathleen M.

    2010-01-01

    Age-related changes in circadian rhythms, including attenuation of photic phase shifts, are associated with changes in the central pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Aging decreases expression of mRNA for vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), a key neuropeptide for rhythm generation and photic phase shifts, and increases expression of serotonin transporters and 5-HT1B receptors, whose activation inhibits these phase shifts. Here we describe studies in hamsters showing that aging decreases SCN expression of mRNA for gastrin-releasing peptide, which also modulates photic phase resetting. Because serotonin innervation trophically supports SCN VIP mRNA expression, and serotonin transporters decrease extracellular serotonin, we predicted that chronic administration of the serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine, would attenuate the age-related changes in SCN VIP mRNA expression and 5-HT1B receptors. In situ hybridization studies showed that fluoxetine treatment does not alter SCN VIP mRNA expression, in either age group, at zeitgeber time (ZT)6 or 13 (ZT12 corresponds to lights off). However, receptor autoradiographic studies showed that fluoxetine prevents the age-related increase in SCN 5-HT1B receptors at ZT6, and decreases SCN 5-HT1B receptors in both ages at ZT13. Therefore, aging effects on SCN VIP mRNA and SCN 5-HT1B receptors are differentially regulated; the age-related increase in serotonin transporter sites mediates the latter but not the former. The studies also showed that aging and chronic fluoxetine treatment decrease total daily wheel running without altering the phase of the circadian wheel running rhythm, in contrast to previous reports of phase resetting by acute fluoxetine treatment. PMID:20525077

  13. Effects of the neuropeptide S receptor antagonist RTI-118 on abuse-related facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation produced by cocaine and methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bonano, Julie S.; Runyon, Scott P.; Hassler, Carla; Glennon, Richard A.; Negus, S. Stevens

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a neurotransmitter that activates the NPS receptor to modulate biological functions including anxiety-like behaviors, feeding, and drug reinforcement. RTI-118 is a novel NPS receptor antagonist that decreased cocaine self-administration in rats at doses that had little or no effect on food-maintained responding. To build on these previous findings, this study examined effects of RTI-118 on cocaine-induced facilitation of intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) in rats. To provide a context for data interpretation, effects of RTI-118 were compared to effects of the kappa opioid receptor agonist U69,593, because the kappa opioid receptor is another peptide neurotransmitter receptor reported to modulate abuse-related cocaine effects. RTI-118 effects were also examined on ICSS facilitation produced by methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), a novel designer drug of abuse with some cocaine-like effects. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=12) with electrodes targeting the medial forebrain bundle responded under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule for range of brain stimulation frequencies. Under control conditions, brain stimulation maintained a frequency-dependent increase in ICSS rates. Cocaine (1.0–10 mg/kg) and MDPV (3.2 mg/kg) facilitated ICSS. RTI-118 (3.2––32 mg/kg) alone produced little effect on ICSS but dose dependently blocked cocaine-induced ICSS facilitation. U69,593 (0.25–0.5 mg/kg) also attenuated cocaine effects, but blockade of cocaine effects was incomplete even at a U69,593 dose that alone depressed ICSS. RTI-118 (32 mg/kg) failed to block MDPV-induced ICSS facilitation. These results support further consideration of NPS receptor antagonists as candidate treatments for cocaine abuse and provide evidence for differential effects of a candidate treatment on abuse-related effects of cocaine and MDPV. PMID:25220242

  14. Aging and long-term caloric restriction regulate neuropeptide Y receptor subtype densities in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Quirion, Rémi; Ferland, Guylaine; Dumont, Yvan; Gaudreau, Pierrette

    2013-06-01

    The effects of aging and long-term caloric restriction (LTCR), on the regulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1, Y2 and Y5 receptors subtypes, was studied in 20-month-old male rats fed ad libitum (AL) or submitted to a 40% caloric restriction for 12 months. [(125)I]GR231118, a Y1 antagonist was used as Y1 receptor radioligand. [(125)I][Leu(31), Pro(34)]PYY, a high affinity agonist of Y1 and Y5 subtypes was used in the absence or presence of 100 nM BIBO3304 (a highly selective Y1 receptor antagonist) to assess the apparent levels of [(125)I][Leu(31), Pro(34)]PYY/BIBO3304 insensitive sites (Y5-like) from [(125)I][Leu(31), Pro(34)]PYY/BIBO3304 sensitive sites (Y1). [(125)I]PYY(3-36) was used to label the Y2 receptor. In the brain of 3-month-old AL rats, the distribution and densities of Y1, Y2 and Y5 receptors were in agreement with previous reports. In the brain of 20AL rats, a decrease of NPY receptor subtype densities in regions having important physiological functions such as the cingulate cortex, hippocampus and dentate gyrus, thalamus and hypothalamus was observed. In contrast, LTCR had multiple effects. It induced specific decreases of Y1-receptor densities in the dentate gyrus, thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area and Y2-receptor densities in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of hypothalamus. Moreover, it prevented the age-induced increase in Y1-receptor densities in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and decrease in the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus, and increased Y2-receptor densities in the CA2 subfield of the hippocampus. These results indicate that LTCR not only counteracts some of the deleterious effects of aging on NPY receptor subtype densities but exerts specific effects of its own. The overall impact of the regulation of NPY receptor subtypes in the brain of old calorie-restricted rats may protect the neural circuits involved in pain, emotions, feeding and memory functions. PMID:23410741

  15. Modulation of Locomotion and Reproduction by FLP Neuropeptides in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan-Jung; Burton, Tina; Ha, Lawrence; Huang, Zi; Olajubelo, Adewale; Li, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides function in animals to modulate most, if not all, complex behaviors. In invertebrates, neuropeptides can function as the primary neurotransmitter of a neuron, but more generally they co-localize with a small molecule neurotransmitter, as is commonly seen in vertebrates. Because a single neuron can express multiple neuropeptides and because neuropeptides can bind to multiple G protein-coupled receptors, neuropeptide actions increase the complexity by which the neural connectome can be activated or inhibited. Humans are estimated to have 90 plus neuropeptide genes; by contrast, nematodes, a relatively simple organism, have a slightly larger complement of neuropeptide genes. For instance, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has over 100 neuropeptide-encoding genes, of which at least 31 genes encode peptides of the FMRFamide family. To understand the function of this large FMRFamide peptide family, we isolated knockouts of different FMRFamide-encoding genes and generated transgenic animals in which the peptides are overexpressed. We assayed these animals on two basic behaviors: locomotion and reproduction. Modulating levels of different neuropeptides have strong as well as subtle effects on these behaviors. These data suggest that neuropeptides play critical roles in C. elegans to fine tune neural circuits controlling locomotion and reproduction. PMID:26406995

  16. Modulation of Locomotion and Reproduction by FLP Neuropeptides in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yan-Jung; Burton, Tina; Ha, Lawrence; Huang, Zi; Olajubelo, Adewale; Li, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides function in animals to modulate most, if not all, complex behaviors. In invertebrates, neuropeptides can function as the primary neurotransmitter of a neuron, but more generally they co-localize with a small molecule neurotransmitter, as is commonly seen in vertebrates. Because a single neuron can express multiple neuropeptides and because neuropeptides can bind to multiple G protein-coupled receptors, neuropeptide actions increase the complexity by which the neural connectome can be activated or inhibited. Humans are estimated to have 90 plus neuropeptide genes; by contrast, nematodes, a relatively simple organism, have a slightly larger complement of neuropeptide genes. For instance, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has over 100 neuropeptide-encoding genes, of which at least 31 genes encode peptides of the FMRFamide family. To understand the function of this large FMRFamide peptide family, we isolated knockouts of different FMRFamide-encoding genes and generated transgenic animals in which the peptides are overexpressed. We assayed these animals on two basic behaviors: locomotion and reproduction. Modulating levels of different neuropeptides have strong as well as subtle effects on these behaviors. These data suggest that neuropeptides play critical roles in C. elegans to fine tune neural circuits controlling locomotion and reproduction. PMID:26406995

  17. Control of arousal through neuropeptide afferents of the locus coeruleus.

    PubMed

    Zitnik, Gerard A

    2016-06-15

    The locus coeruleus-norepinephine (LC-NE) system is implicated in mediating several aspects of arousal. Alterations in LC neuronal discharge is associated with distinct changes in behavior, cognition, sensory processing and regulation of the sleep-wake cycle. Changes in LC output and subsequent release of NE in target brain regions help adjust arousal state to respond appropriately to environmental conditions and behavioral circumstances. One way in which LC activity is controlled is through release of endogenous neuropeptides. Based on the sleep-wake cycle and environmental cues specific neuropeptide afferent systems are activated, innervating the LC. These neuropeptides include: corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), orexin (ORX), endogenous opioids, substance P (SP), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SS). This review summarizes studies examining the neuroanatomical projections of these neuropeptides, their receptors in the LC, the actions on LC neurons and downstream NE release, as well as the behavioral and cognitive effects associated individual neuropeptide-mediated innervation of the LC. Finally, the relationship between individual neuropeptides, the LC-NE system and various clinical disorders is discussed, providing evidence for possible therapeutic targets for treatment of several arousal- and stress-related disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Noradrenergic System. PMID:26688115

  18. Neuropeptide action in insects and crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Mykles, Donald L; Adams, Michael E; Gäde, Gerd; Lange, Angela B; Marco, Heather G; Orchard, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Physiological processes are regulated by a diverse array of neuropeptides that coordinate organ systems. The neuropeptides, many of which act through G protein-coupled receptors, affect the levels of cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP) and Ca(2+) in target tissues. In this perspective, their roles in molting, osmoregulation, metabolite utilization, and cardiovascular function are highlighted. In decapod crustaceans, inhibitory neuropeptides (molt-inhibiting hormone and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone) suppress the molting gland through cAMP- and cGMP-mediated signaling. In insects, the complex movements during ecdysis are controlled by ecdysis-triggering hormone and a cascade of downstream neuropeptides. Adipokinetic/hypertrehalosemic/hyperprolinemic hormones mobilize energy stores in response to increased locomotory activity. Crustacean cardioacceleratory (cardioactive) peptide, proctolin, and FMRFamide-related peptides act on the heart, accessory pulsatile organs, and excurrent ostia to control hemolymph distribution to tissues. The osmoregulatory challenge of blood gorging in Rhodnius prolixus requires the coordinated release of serotonin and diuretic and antidiuretic hormones acting on the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These studies illustrate how multiple neuropeptides allow for flexibility in response to physiological challenges. PMID:20550437

  19. Sleep-active neuron specification and sleep induction require FLP-11 neuropeptides to systemically induce sleep

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Michal; Besseling, Judith; Spies, Jan-Philipp; König, Sabine; Bringmann, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is an essential behavioral state. It is induced by conserved sleep-active neurons that express GABA. However, little is known about how sleep neuron function is determined and how sleep neurons change physiology and behavior systemically. Here, we investigated sleep in Caenorhabditis elegans, which is induced by the single sleep-active neuron RIS. We found that the transcription factor LIM-6, which specifies GABAergic function, in parallel determines sleep neuron function through the expression of APTF-1, which specifies the expression of FLP-11 neuropeptides. Surprisingly FLP-11, and not GABA, is the major component that determines the sleep-promoting function of RIS. FLP-11 is constantly expressed in RIS. At sleep onset RIS depolarizes and releases FLP-11 to induce a systemic sleep state. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12499.001 PMID:26949257

  20. Neuropeptide Y, its localization in the human cervix and possible effect on the contractile activity of cervix smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Dahlström, A

    1992-01-01

    Immunochemical methods were used to identify neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the cervical tissue of women at early and term pregnancy. NPY-containing fibers could not be demonstrated in the upper and lower uterine segments at term, but the cervical innervation persisted during labor. Moreover, NPY alone did not affect cervical contractile activity, although the stimulatory effect of noradrenaline was enhanced. PMID:1427420

  1. Isolation and identification of the cDNA encoding the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide and additional neuropeptides in the oriental tobacco budworm, Helicoverpa assulta (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Choi, M Y; Tanaka, M; Kataoka, H; Boo, K S; Tatsuki, S

    1998-10-01

    The present study is concerned with cloning and characterizing Has-PBAN cDNA which is 756 nucleotides long, isolated from the brain and suboesophageal ganglion complex (Br-Sg) of Helicoverpa assulta adults. The 194-amino acid sequence deduced from this cDNA possessed the proteolytic endocleavage sites to generate multiple peptides. From the processing of the prepro-hormone, it can be predicted that the cDNA has a PBAN domain with 33 amino acids and four additional peptide domains: 24 amino acid-, 7 amino acid-, 18 amino acid- and 8 amino acid-long sequences, with FXPR (or K) L (X = G, T or S) amidated at their C-termini. The amino acid sequence of all five predicted peptides, including the PBAN, are identical to that of Helicoverpa zea (Raina, A.K., Jaffe, H., Kempe, T.G., Keim, P., Blacher, R.W., Fales, H.M., Riley, C.T., Klun, J.A., Ridgway, R.L., Hayes, D.K., 1989. Identification of a neuropeptide hormone that regulates sex pheromone production in female moths. Science 244, 796-798 and Ma, P.W.K., Knipple, D.C., Roelofs, W.L., 1994. Structural organization of the Helicoverpa zea gene encoding the precursor protein for pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide and other neuropeptides. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., U.S.A. 91, 506-510). A single mRNA species corresponding to the size of Has-PBAN cDNA was detected from the Br-Sg of 1-3-day old female and male adults, and their expression was also at a similar level. Pheromone production was induced upon injection of female or male Br-Sg extracts or synthetic PBAN into the haemocoel of decapitated 1-3-day old female adults during the photophase when they are not supposed to produce pheromone. From these results, H. assulta adult females seem to use their own PBAN for regulating sex pheromone biosynthesis. Functions of the four other peptides ending with FXPR (or K) L in the Has-PBAN cDNA and of the male PBAN remain to be elucidated. PMID:9807222

  2. Reciprocal mutations of neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 in human and chicken identify amino acids important for antagonist binding.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Magnus M; Fredriksson, Robert; Salaneck, Erik; Larhammar, Dan

    2002-05-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptor Y2 antagonist BIIE0246 has sub-nanomolar affinity for the human Y2 (hY2) receptor but binds very poorly to chicken Y2 (chY2) with micromolar affinity. Sequence comparisons identified several amino acids for investigation by mutagenesis. Reciprocal mutagenesis between hY2 and chY2 revealed that three of these, individually and in combination, are important for BIIE0246 binding, namely positions Gln(135) in transmembrane (TM) 3, Leu(227) in TM5, and Leu(284) in TM6. Mutagenesis of hY2 to the corresponding amino in chY2 (generating hY2[Q135H,L227Q,L284F]) made the affinity of BIIE0246 as low as for chY2. Introduction into chY2 of the three human residues resulted in antagonist affinity almost as high as for hY2. To distinguish between direct and indirect effects, each of the three residues in hY2 was replaced with alanine. BIIE0246 bound with 28-fold lower affinity to hY2[L227A], suggesting the Leu(227) interacts directly with the antagonist. The other two alanine mutants bound with unaltered affinity, suggesting that the corresponding chY2 residues abolish binding through steric hindrance or charge repulsion. Thus, three amino acid residues can in an additive manner completely account for the difference in antagonist binding between the hY2 and chY2 receptors. These results will be useful for construction of three-dimensional models of the widely divergent NPY receptor subtypes. PMID:11997008

  3. The orexin neuropeptide system: physical activity and hypothalamic function throughout the aging process

    PubMed Central

    Zink, Anastasia N.; Perez-Leighton, Claudio Esteban; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2014-01-01

    There is a rising medical need for novel therapeutic targets of physical activity. Physical activity spans from spontaneous, low intensity movements to voluntary, high-intensity exercise. Regulation of spontaneous and voluntary movement is distributed over many brain areas and neural substrates, but the specific cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for mediating overall activity levels are not well understood. The hypothalamus plays a central role in the control of physical activity, which is executed through coordination of multiple signaling systems, including the orexin neuropeptides. Orexin producing neurons integrate physiological and metabolic information to coordinate multiple behavioral states and modulate physical activity in response to the environment. This review is organized around three questions: (1) How do orexin peptides modulate physical activity? (2) What are the effects of aging and lifestyle choices on physical activity? (3) What are the effects of aging on hypothalamic function and the orexin peptides? Discussion of these questions will provide a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding hypothalamic orexin regulation of physical activity during aging and provide a platform on which to develop improved clinical outcomes in age-associated obesity and metabolic syndromes. PMID:25408639

  4. Molecular characterization of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide from the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.).

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Weon; Boo, Kyung Saeng

    2005-12-01

    Pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) produced in the subesophageal ganglion stimulates pheromone production in the pheromone gland. A cDNA isolated from female adult heads of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella (L.)) encodes 193 amino acids including PBAN, designated as Plx-PBAN, and four other neuropeptides (NPs): diapause hormone (DH) homologue, alpha-NP, beta-NP and gamma-NP. All of the peptides are amidated in their C-termini and shared a conserved motif, FXPR(or K)L structure, as reported from other PBAN cDNAs. Plx-PBAN consists of 30 amino acids, the shortest PBAN so far reported. Plx-PBAN exhibited below 50% homology, compared with other known PBANs. The Plx-DH homologue is structurally different from DH of Bombyx mori. The length of Plx-beta-NP (16 amino acids) was the shortest and showed relatively low similarity, whereas gamma-NP (10 amino acids in length) was the longest among examined gamma-NPs. When female adults were injected with synthetic Plx-PBAN, pheromone production showed a maximal increase 1h post-injection. RT-PCR screening revealed that Plx-PBAN cDNA was expressed in all examined body parts, with the highest expression level in the head of female adults. Analysis of RT-PCR products indicated the Plx-PBAN sequence was identical in all examined body parts of both sexes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Plx-PBAN gene is distantly related to other PBANs, demonstrated by the relatively low similarity. PMID:16005110

  5. Adeno-Associated Viral Vector-Induced Overexpression of Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptors in the Hippocampus Suppresses Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woldbye, David P. D.; Angehagen, Mikael; Gotzsche, Casper R.; Elbrond-Bek, Heidi; Sorensen, Andreas T.; Christiansen, Soren H.; Olesen, Mikkel V.; Nikitidou, Litsa; Hansen, Thomas v. O.; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Kokaia, Merab

    2010-01-01

    Gene therapy using recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors overexpressing neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus exerts seizure-suppressant effects in rodent epilepsy models and is currently considered for clinical application in patients with intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Seizure suppression by neuropeptide Y in the hippocampus is…

  6. Characterization, expression, and evolutionary aspects of Corazonin neuropeptide and its receptor from the House Fly, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae).

    PubMed

    Sha, Kai; Conner, W Craig; Choi, Dae Y; Park, Jae H

    2012-04-15

    In this article, we characterized structure and expression of genes encoding the neuropeptide Corazonin (MdCrz) and its putative receptor (MdCrzR) in the House Fly, Musca domestica. The MdCrz gene contains two introns, one within the 5' untranslated region and the other within the open reading frame. The 150-amino-acid precursor consists of an N-terminal signal peptide, and mature Crz followed by Crz-associated peptide (CAP). The CAP region is highly diverged from those of other insect precursors, whereas the mature Crz is identical in other dipteran members. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry consistently found a group of three MdCrz-producing neurons in the dorso-lateral protocerebrum, and eight pairs of bi-lateral neurons in the ventral nerve cord in the larvae. In adults, the expression was found exclusively in a cluster of five to seven neurons per brain lobe. Comparable expression patterns observed in other dipteran species suggest conserved regulatory mechanisms of Crz expression and functions during the course of evolution. MdCrzR deduced from the full-length cDNA sequence is a 655-amino acid polypeptide that contains seven trans-membrane (TM) domains and other motifs that are characteristics of Class-A G-protein coupled receptors. Although the TMs and loops between the TMs are conserved in other CrzRs, N-terminal extracellular domain is quite dissimilar. Tissue-specific RT-PCR revealed a high level of MdCrzR expression in the larval salivary glands and a moderate level in the CNS. In adults, the receptor was expressed both in the head and body, suggesting multifunctionality of the Crz signaling system. PMID:22326268

  7. Interaction of neuropeptide Y genotype and childhood emotional maltreatment on brain activity during emotional processing.

    PubMed

    Opmeer, Esther M; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Tol, Marie-José; van der Wee, Nic J A; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André

    2014-05-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has been associated with stress reactivity in affective disorders and is most densely expressed in the amygdala. An important stressor associated with affective disorders is the experience of childhood emotional maltreatment (CEM). We investigated whether the interaction of NPY risk genotype and CEM would affect brain activation. From The Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety, 33 healthy controls and 85 patients with affective disorders were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging while making gender decisions of emotional facial expressions. Results showed interactions between genotype and CEM, within carriers of the risk genotype, CEM was associated with higher amygdala activation, whereas CEM did not influence activation in non-risk carriers. In the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), less activation was seen in those with CEM and the risk genotype, whereas genotype did not influence PCC activation in those without CEM. In addition, those carrying the risk genotype and with experience of CEM made a faster gender decision than those without CEM. Thus, the combined effect of carrying NPY risk genotype and a history of CEM affected amygdala and PCC reactivity, areas related to emotion, self-relevance processing and autobiographical memory. These results are consistent with the notion that the combination of risk genotype and CEM may cause hypervigilance. PMID:23482625

  8. Site-directed mutagenesis and PBAN activation of the Helicoverpa zea PBAN-receptor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect neuropeptides are produced in the central or peripheral nerve tissues, and released to regulate various physiological and behavioral actions during development and reproduction. Pheromone biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide (PBAN)/Pyrokinin is a major neuropeptide family characterized with a...

  9. Selective and Brain Penetrant Neuropeptide Y Y2 Receptor Antagonists Discovered by Whole-Cell High-Throughput ScreeningS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Shaun P.; Saldanha, S. Adrian; Spicer, Timothy P.; Cameron, Michael; Mercer, Becky A.; Chase, Peter; McDonald, Patricia; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2010-01-01

    The role of neuropeptide Y Y2 receptor (Y2R) in human diseases such as obesity, mood disorders, and alcoholism could be better resolved by the use of small-molecule chemical probes that are substantially different from the currently available Y2R antagonist, N-[(1S)-4-[(aminoiminomethyl)amino]-1-[[[2-(3,5-dioxo-1,2-diphenyl-1,2,4-triazolidin-4-yl)ethyl]amino]carbonyl]butyl]-1-[2-[4-(6,11-dihydro-6-oxo-5H-dibenz[b,e]azepin-11-yl)-1-piperazinyl]-2-oxoethyl]-cyclopentaneacetamide) (BIIE0246). Presented here are five potent, selective, and publicly available Y2R antagonists identified by a high-throughput screening approach. These compounds belong to four chemical scaffolds that are structurally distinct from the peptidomimetic BIIE0246. In functional assays, IC50 values between 199 and 4400 nM against the Y2R were measured, with no appreciable activity against the related NPY-Y1 receptor (Y1R). Compounds also displaced radiolabeled peptide YY from the Y2R with high affinity (Ki values between 1.55 and 60 nM) while not displacing the same ligand from the Y1R. In contrast to BIIE0246, Schild analysis with NPY suggests that two of the five compounds behave as competitive antagonists. Profiling against a panel of 40 receptors, ion channels, and transporters found in the central nervous system showed that the five Y2R antagonists demonstrate greater selectivity than BIIE0246. Furthermore, the ability of these antagonists to penetrate the blood-brain barrier makes them better suited for pharmacological studies of Y2R function in both the brain and periphery. PMID:19837904

  10. Neuropeptide Regulation of Fear and Anxiety: Implications of Cholecystokinin, Endogenous Opioids, and Neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Mallory E.; Choi, Dennis C.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2012-01-01

    The neural circuitry of fear likely underlies anxiety and fear-related disorders such as specific and social phobia, panic disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. The primary pharmacological treatments currently utilized for these disorders include benzodiazepines, which act on the GABAergic receptor system, and antidepressants, which modulate the monamine systems. However, recent work on the regulation of fear neural circuitry suggests that specific neuropeptide modulation of this system is of critical importance. Recent reviews have examined the roles of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis neuropeptides as well as the roles of neurotrophic factors in regulating fear. The present review, instead, will focus on three neuropeptide systems which have received less attention in recent years but which are clearly involved in regulating fear and its extinction. The endogenous opioid system, particularly activating the μ opioid receptors, has been demonstrated to regulate fear expression and extinction, possibly through functioning as an error signal within the amygdala to mark unreinforced conditioned stimuli. The cholecystokinin (CCK) system initially led to much excitement through its potential role in panic disorder. More recent work in the CCK neuropeptide pathway suggests that it may act in concordance with the endogenous cannabinoid system in the modulation of fear inhibition and extinction. Finally, older as well as very recent data suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a very interesting role in counteracting stress effects, enhancing extinction, and enhancing resilience in fear and stress preclinical models. Future work in understanding the mechanisms of neuropeptide functioning, particularly within well-known behavioral circuits, are likely to provide fascinating new clues into the understanding of fear behavior as well as suggesting novel therapeutics for treating disorders of anxiety and fear dysregulation. PMID:22429904

  11. Gqalpha-linked phospholipase Cbeta1 and phospholipase Cgamma are essential components of the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) signal transduction cascade.

    PubMed

    Hull, J J; Lee, J M; Matsumoto, S

    2010-08-01

    Sex pheromone production for most moths is regulated by pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN). In Bombyx mori, PBAN binding triggers the opening of store-operated Ca(2+) channels, suggesting the involvement of a receptor-activated phospholipase C (PLC). In this study, we found that PLC inhibitors U73122 and compound 48/80 reduced sex pheromone production and that intracellular levels of (3)H-inositol phosphate species increased following PBAN stimulation. In addition, we amplified cDNAs from pheromone glands corresponding to PLCbeta1, PLCbeta4, PLCgamma and two G protein alpha subunits, Go and Gq. In vivo RNA interference-mediated knockdown analyses revealed that BmPLCbeta1, BmGq1, and unexpectedly, BmPLCgamma, are part of the PBAN signal transduction cascade. PMID:20546038

  12. Anti-tumor effects of peptide analogs targeting neuropeptide hormone receptors on mouse pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Ullrich, M; Schally, A V; Bergmann, R; Pietzsch, J; Gebauer, L; Gondek, K; Qin, N; Pacak, K; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Eisenhofer, G; Bornstein, S R

    2013-05-22

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare but potentially lethal chromaffin cell tumor with currently no effective treatment. Peptide hormone receptors are frequently overexpressed on endocrine tumor cells and can be specifically targeted by various anti-tumor peptide analogs. The present study carried out on mouse pheochromocytoma cells (MPCs) and a more aggressive mouse tumor tissue-derived (MTT) cell line revealed that these cells are characterized by pronounced expression of the somatostatin receptor 2 (sst2), growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor and the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor. We further demonstrated significant anti-tumor effects mediated by cytotoxic somatostatin analogs, AN-162 and AN-238, by LHRH antagonist, Cetrorelix, by the cytotoxic LHRH analog, AN-152, and by recently developed GHRH antagonist, MIA-602, on MPC and for AN-152 and MIA-602 on MTT cells. Studies of novel anti-tumor compounds on these mouse cell lines serve as an important basis for mouse models of metastatic pheochromocytoma, which we are currently establishing. PMID:23267837

  13. TRPV1-Mediated Neuropeptide Secretion and Depressor Effects: Role of Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Ca2+ Release Receptors in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wei; Wang, Hui; Galligan, James J.; Wang, Donna H.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study tests the hypothesis that the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1)-induced neuropeptide secretion and depressor response are mediated by, at least in part, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Ca2+ release receptors, leading to increased cytosolic Ca2+ in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods/Results Bolus injection of capsaicin (CAP, 10 or 50 μg/kg), a selective TRPV1 agonist, into anesthetized male Wistar rats caused dose-dependent decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP, P<0.05). CAP (50 μg/kg)-induced depressor effects and increases in plasma calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels (-29±2 mmHg, 82.2±5.0 pg/ml, respectively) were abolished by a selective TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine (3 mg/kg CAPZ, -4±1 mmHg, 41.8±4.4 pg/ml, P<0.01), and attenuated by a selective ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist, dantrolene (5 mg/kg, -12±1 mmHg, 57.2±2.6 pg/ml, P<0.01), but unaffected by an inhibitor of ER Ca2+-ATPase, thapsigargin (50 μg/kg TG, -30±1 mmHg, 73.8±2.3 pg/ml, P>0.05), or an antagonist of the inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (3 mg/kg 2-APB, -34±5 mmHg, 69.0±3.7 pg/ml, P>0.05). CGRP8-37 (1 mg/kg), a selective CGRP receptor antagonist, also blocked CAP-induced depressor effects. In contrast, dantrolene had no effect on CGRP (1 μg/kg)-induced depressor effects. In vitro, CAP (0.3 μM) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and CGRP release from freshly isolated sensory neurons in DRG (P<0.01), which were blocked by CAPZ (10 μM) and attenuated by dantrolene but not TG or 2-APB. Conclusion Our results indicate that TRPV1 activation triggers RyR- but not IP3R-dependent Ca2+ release from ER in DRG neurons leading to increased CGRP release and consequent depressor effects. PMID:18806620

  14. Neuropeptide GPCRs in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Frooninckx, Lotte; Van Rompay, Liesbeth; Temmerman, Liesbet; Van Sinay, Elien; Beets, Isabel; Janssen, Tom; Husson, Steven J.; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-01-01

    Like most organisms, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans relies heavily on neuropeptidergic signaling. This tiny animal represents a suitable model system to study neuropeptidergic signaling networks with single cell resolution due to the availability of powerful molecular and genetic tools. The availability of the worm’s complete genome sequence allows researchers to browse through it, uncovering putative neuropeptides and their cognate G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Many predictions have been made about the number of C. elegans neuropeptide GPCRs. In this review, we report the state of the art of both verified as well as predicted C. elegans neuropeptide GPCRs. The predicted neuropeptide GPCRs are incorporated into the receptor classification system based on their resemblance to orthologous GPCRs in insects and vertebrates. Appointing the natural ligand(s) to each predicted neuropeptide GPCR (receptor deorphanization) is a crucial step during characterization. The development of deorphanization strategies resulted in a significant increase in the knowledge of neuropeptidergic signaling in C. elegans. Complementary localization and functional studies demonstrate that neuropeptides and their GPCRs represent a rich potential source of behavioral variability in C. elegans. Here, we review all neuropeptidergic signaling pathways that so far have been functionally characterized in C. elegans. PMID:23267347

  15. The satiety signaling neuropeptide perisulfakinin inhibits the activity of central neurons promoting general activity.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC(50)=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca(2+) current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPgamma channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPgamma channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  16. The Satiety Signaling Neuropeptide Perisulfakinin Inhibits the Activity of Central Neurons Promoting General Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wicher, Dieter; Derst, Christian; Gautier, Hélène; Lapied, Bruno; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic state is one of the determinants of the general activity level. Satiety is related to resting or sleep whereas hunger correlates to wakefulness and activity. The counterpart to the mammalian satiety signal cholecystokinin (CCK) in insects are the sulfakinins. The aim of this study was to resolve the mechanism by which the antifeedant activity of perisulfakinin (PSK) in Periplaneta americana is mediated. We identified the sources of PSK which is used both as hormone and as paracrine messenger. PSK is found in the neurohemal organ of the brain and in nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. To correlate the distributions of PSK and its receptor (PSKR), we cloned the gene coding for PSKR and provide evidence for its expression within the nervous system. It occurs only in a few neurons, among them are the dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons which release octopamine thereby regulating the general level of activity. Application of PSK to DUM neurons attenuated the spiking frequency (EC50=11pM) due to reduction of a pacemaker Ca2+ current through cAMP-inhibited pTRPγ channels. PSK increased the intracellular cAMP level while decreasing the intracellular Ca2+ concentration in DUM neurons. Thus, the satiety signal conferred by PSK acts antagonistically to the hunger signal, provided by the adipokinetic hormone (AKH): PSK depresses the electrical activity of DUM neurons by inhibiting the pTRPγ channel that is activated by AKH under conditions of food shortage. PMID:18946521

  17. Neuropeptide-degrading endopeptidase activity of locust (Schistocerca gregaria) synaptic membranes.

    PubMed

    Isaac, R E

    1988-11-01

    Locust adipokinetic hormone (AKH, pGlu-Leu-Asn-Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp-Gly-Thr-NH2) was used as the substrate to measure neuropeptide-degrading endopeptidase activity in neutral membranes from ganglia of the locust Schistocerca gregaria. Initial hydrolysis of AKH at neural pH by peptidases of washed neural membranes generated pGlu-Leu-Asn and Phe-Thr-Pro-Asn-Trp-Gly-Thr-NH2 as primary metabolites, demonstrating that degradation was initiated by cleavage of the Asn-Phe bond. Amastatin protected the C-terminal fragment from further metabolism by aminopeptidase activity without inhibiting AKH degradation. The same fragments were generated on incubation of AKH with purified pig kidney endopeptidase 24.11, and enzyme known to cleave peptide bonds that involve the amino group of hydrophobic amino acids. Phosphoramidon (10 microM), a selective inhibitor of mammalian endopeptidase 24.11, partially inhibited the endopeptidase activity of locust neural membranes. This phosphoramidon-sensitive activity was shown to enriched in a synaptic membrane preparation with around 80% of the activity being inhibited by 10 microM-phosphoramidon (IC50 = 0.2 microM). The synaptic endopeptidase was also inhibited by 1 mM-EDTA, 1 mM-1,10-phenanthroline and 1 microM-thiorphan, and the activity was maximal between pH 7.3 and 8.0. Localization of the phosphoramidon-sensitive enzyme in synaptic membranes is consistent with a physiological role for this endopeptidase in the metabolism of insect peptides at the synapse. PMID:3063256

  18. Oxytocin and vasopressin receptor polymorphisms interact with circulating neuropeptides to predict human emotional reactions to stress

    PubMed Central

    Moons, Wesley G.; Way, Baldwin M.; Taylor, Shelley E.

    2014-01-01

    Oxytocin (OT) and a polymorphism (rs53576) in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) have been independently associated with stress reactivity, whereas oxytocin’s sister peptide, arginine vasopressin (AVP), and polymorphisms in the vasopressin receptor gene (AVPR1A) have been independently associated with aggressive behavior. In this study, 68 men and 98 women were genotyped for the OXTR rs53576 polymorphism and the AVPR1A RS1 polymorphism. Baseline and post-stressor levels of plasma OT, plasma AVP, positive affect, and anger were assessed. Women, but not men, with high levels of post-stressor OT and the GG genotype of rs53576 felt the most positive affect after the stressor. Men, but not women, with high levels of post-stressor AVP and with the 320allele of the RS1 polymorphism reported more post-stressor anger than non-carriers. These data constitute the first evidence that oxytocin and vasopressin receptor genes interact with levels of OT and AVP to predict sex-specific emotional stress responses. PMID:24660771

  19. Stimulation of neuropeptide Y gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor requires both the phospholipase Cgamma and Shc binding sites on its receptor, TrkB.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A G; Hargreaves, A C; Gunn-Moore, F J; Tavaré, J M

    1998-01-01

    In PC12 cells, it has been previously reported that nerve growth factor stimulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression. In the current study we examined the signalling pathways involved in this effect by transiently expressing in PC12 cells the receptor (TrkB) for the related neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF caused a 3-fold induction of luciferase expression from a transiently co-transfected plasmid possessing the firefly luciferase gene under the control of the NPY promoter. This effect of BDNF was completely blocked by either a Y484F mutation in TrkB (which blocks high-affinity Shc binding to TrkB) or by a Y785F substitution [which blocks the binding, phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma)]. Activation of the NPY promoter by neurotrophin-3 in PC12 cells overexpressing TrkC was also completely blocked by a naturally occurring kinase insert which prevents the high-affinity binding of Shc and PLCgamma. NPY promoter activation by BDNF was blocked by PD98059, suggesting a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Stimulation of NPY gene expression by PMA, but not by BDNF, was blocked by Ro-31-8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, excluding a role for this serine/threonine protein kinase in the effect of BDNF. In addition, BDNF did not cause an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Taken together, our results suggest that stimulation of the NPY promoter by BDNF requires the simultaneous activation of two distinct pathways; one involves Shc and MAP kinase, and the other appears to be PLCgamma-independent but requires an intact tyrosine-785 on TrkB and so may involve an effector of TrkB signalling that remains to be identified. PMID:9677306

  20. Identification and RNA Interference of the Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) in the Common Cutworm Moth Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Lu, Qin; Huang, Ling-Yan; Chen, Peng; Yu, Jin-Feng; Xu, Jin; Deng, Jian-Yu; Ye, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Spodoptera litura F. is one of the most destructive insect pests of many agricultural crops and notorious for developing insecticide resistance. Developing environmental friendly control methods such as novel pheromone and RNAi-related control strategies is imperative to control this pest. In the present study, the full-length cDNA encoding the diapause hormone and pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (DH-PBAN) was identified and characterized in S. litura. This 809-bp transcript contains a 573-nucleotide ORF encoding a 191-amino acid protein, from which five putative neuropeptides, including PBAN, DH, and α-, β-, and γ-subesophageal ganglion neuropeptides, were derived. Phylogenetic analysis showed that both the whole protein and each of the five neuropeptides have high similarities to those of DH-PBANs from other insect orders particularly Lepidoptera. Females treated with TKYFSPRLamide (the active core fragment of PBAN) produced significantly more four types of pheromone compounds (A; B; C; D) than controls. RNA interference by injection of PBAN dsRNA significantly reduced the relative expression levels of this gene in adult females (approximately reduced by 60%). As a consequence, females treated with PBAN dsRNA produced significantly less four types of pheromone compounds (A; B; C; D) than controls. These results suggest that PBAN function in activating sex pheromone biosynthesis and the RNAi of DH-PBAN gene can be induced by the injection of dsRNA into the body cavity in S. litura. This study suggests the possibility of novel pheromone-related pest control strategies based on RNAi techniques. PMID:26470263

  1. DNA Methylation in the Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) Promoter in Relation to Asthma and Environmental Factors

    PubMed Central

    Reinius, Lovisa E.; Gref, Anna; Sääf, Annika; Acevedo, Nathalie; Joerink, Maaike; Kupczyk, Maciej; D'Amato, Mauro; Bergström, Anna; Melén, Erik; Scheynius, Annika; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Pershagen, Göran; Söderhäll, Cilla; Kere, Juha

    2013-01-01

    Asthma and allergy are complex disorders influenced by both inheritance and environment, a relationship that might be further clarified by epigenetics. Neuropeptide S Receptor 1 (NPSR1) has been associated with asthma and allergy and a study suggested modulation of the genetic risk by environmental factors. We aimed to study DNA methylation in the promoter region of NPSR1 in relation to asthma and environmental exposures. Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) was used to investigate potential functional roles of both genotypes and methylation status in the NPSR1 promoter. DNA methylation was analysed using EpiTYPER in blood samples from two well-characterized cohorts; the BIOAIR study of severe asthma in adults and the Swedish birth cohort BAMSE. We observed that DNA methylation and genetic variants in the promoter influenced the binding of nuclear proteins to DNA, suggesting functional relevance. Significant, although small, differences in methylation were related to both adult severe asthma (p = 0.0001) and childhood allergic asthma (p = 0.01). Furthermore, DNA methylation was associated with exposures such as current smoking in adults for two CpG sites (p = 0.005 and 0.04), parental smoking during infancy in the children (p = 0.02) and in which month the sample was taken (p = 0.01). In summary, DNA methylation levels in the promoter of NPSR1 showed small but significant associations with asthma, both in adults and in children, and to related traits such as allergy and certain environmental exposures. Both genetic variation and the methylated state of CpG sites seem to have an effect on the binding of nuclear proteins in the regulatory region of NPSR1 suggesting complex regulation of this gene in asthma and allergy. PMID:23372674

  2. ASICs and neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Vick, Jonathan S; Askwith, Candice C

    2015-07-01

    The acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels expressed throughout the nervous system. ASICs are activated during acidic pH fluctuations, and recent work suggests that they are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission. ASICs can also induce neuronal degeneration and death during pathological extracellular acidosis caused by ischemia, autoimmune inflammation, and traumatic injury. Many endogenous neuromodulators target ASICs to affect their biophysical characteristics and contributions to neuronal activity. One of the most unconventional types of modulation occurs with the interaction of ASICs and neuropeptides. Collectively, FMRFamide-related peptides and dynorphins potentiate ASIC activity by decreasing the proton-sensitivity of steady state desensitization independent of G protein-coupled receptor activation. By decreasing the proton-sensitivity of steady state desensitization, the FMRFamide-related peptides and dynorphins permit ASICs to remain active at more acidic basal pH. Unlike the dynorphins, some FMRFamide-related peptides also potentiate ASIC activity by slowing inactivation and increasing the sustained current. Through mechanistic studies, the modulation of ASICs by FMRFamide-related peptides and dynorphins appears to be through distinct interactions with the extracellular domain of ASICs. Dynorphins are expressed throughout the nervous system and can increase neuronal death during prolonged extracellular acidosis, suggesting that the interaction between dynorphins and ASICs may have important consequences for the prevention of neurological injury. The overlap in expression of FMRFamide-related peptides with ASICs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord suggests that their interaction may have important consequences for the treatment of pain during injury and inflammation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Acid-Sensing Ion Channels in the Nervous System'. PMID:25592215

  3. ASICS AND NEUROPEPTIDES

    PubMed Central

    Vick, Jonathan S.; Askwith, Candice C.

    2015-01-01

    The acid sensing ion channels (ASICs) are proton-gated cation channels expressed throughout the nervous system. ASICs are activated during acidic pH fluctuations, and recent work suggests that they are involved in excitatory synaptic transmission. ASICs can also induce neuronal degeneration and death during pathological extracellular acidosis caused by ischemia, autoimmune inflammation, and traumatic injury. Many endogenous neuromodulators target ASICs to affect their biophysical characteristics and contributions to neuronal activity. One of the most unconventional types of modulation occurs with the interaction of ASICs and neuropeptides. Collectively, FMRFamide-related peptides and dynorphins potentiate ASIC activity by decreasing the proton-sensitivity of steady state desensitization independent of G protein-coupled receptor activation. By decreasing the proton-sensitivity of steady state desensitization, the FMRFamide-related peptides and dynorphins permit ASICs to remain active at more acidic basal pH. Unlike the dynorphins, some FMRFamide-related peptides also potentiate ASIC activity by slowing inactivation and increasing the sustained current. Through mechanistic studies, the modulation of ASICs by FMRFamide-related peptides and dynorphins appears to be through distinct interactions with the extracellular domain of ASICs. Dynorphins are expressed throughout the nervous system and can increase neuronal death during prolonged extracellular acidosis, suggesting that the interaction between dynorphins and ASICs may have important consequences for the prevention of neurological injury. The overlap in expression of FMRFamide-related peptides with ASICs in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord suggests that their interaction may have important consequences for the treatment of pain during injury and inflammation. PMID:25592215

  4. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XIII

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the thirteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide sequ...

  5. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides IX

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract This publication represents an introduction to the fifth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide ...

  6. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XV

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the fifteenth in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel invertebrate neuropeptide seque...

  7. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. PMID:26483343

  8. Neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) slows down Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Rat, Dorothea; Schmitt, Ulrich; Tippmann, Frank; Dewachter, Ilse; Theunis, Clara; Wieczerzak, Ewa; Postina, Rolf; van Leuven, Fred; Fahrenholz, Falk; Kojro, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) has neuroprotective and neurotrophic properties and is a potent α-secretase activator. As PACAP peptides and their specific receptor PAC1 are localized in central nervous system areas affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD), this study aims to examine the role of the natural peptide PACAP as a valuable approach in AD therapy. We investigated the effect of PACAP in the brain of an AD transgenic mouse model. The long-term intranasal daily PACAP application stimulated the nonamyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and increased expression of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor and of the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein. In addition, it caused a strong reduction of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) mRNA level. PACAP, by activation of the somatostatin-neprilysin cascade, also enhanced expression of the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin in the mouse brain. Furthermore, daily PAC1-receptor activation via PACAP resulted in an increased mRNA level of both the PAC1 receptor and its ligand PACAP. Our behavioral studies showed that long-term PACAP treatment of APP[V717I]-transgenic mice improved cognitive function in animals. Thus, nasal application of PACAP was effective, and our results indicate that PACAP could be of therapeutic value in treating AD.—Rat, D., Schmitt, U., Tippmann, F., Dewachter, I., Theunis, C., Wieczerzak, E, Postina, R., van Leuven, F., Fahrenholz, F., Kojro, E. Neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) slows down Alzheimer's disease-like pathology in amyloid precursor protein-transgenic mice. PMID:21593432

  9. Insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity in part by suppression of tonic inhibitory neuropeptide Y inputs into the paraventricular nucleus in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2016-07-01

    Following binding to receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ArcN), insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and baroreflex control of SNA via a pathway that includes the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Previous studies in males indicate that the sympathoexcitatory response is mediated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which binds to PVN melanocortin type 3/4 receptors (MC3/4R). The present study was conducted in α-chloralose-anesthetized female rats to test the hypothesis that suppression of inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) inputs to the PVN is also involved. In support of this, blockade of PVN NPY Y1 receptors with BIBO 3304 (NPY1x), ArcN insulin nanoinjections, and PVN NPY1x followed by ArcN insulin each increased lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation similarly. Moreover, prior PVN injections of NPY blocked the sympathoexcitatory effects of ArcN insulin. Finally, PVN nanoinjections of the MC3/4R inhibitor SHU9119 prevented both the acute (15 min) and longer, more slowly developing (60 min), increases in LSNA in response to ArcN insulin. In conclusion, in females, ArcN insulin increases LSNA, in part, by suppressing tonic PVN NPY inhibition, which unmasks excitatory α-MSH drive of LSNA. Moreover, the steadily increasing rise in LSNA induced by ArcN insulin is also dependent on PVN MC3/4R. PMID:27122366

  10. Neuropeptide Y is a physiological substrate of fibroblast activation protein: Enzyme kinetics in blood plasma and expression of Y2R and Y5R in human liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pok Fai; Gall, Margaret G; Bachovchin, William W; McCaughan, Geoffrey W; Keane, Fiona M; Gorrell, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast activation protein (FAP) is a dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) and endopeptidase that is weakly expressed in normal adult human tissues but is greatly up-regulated in activated mesenchymal cells of tumors and chronically injured tissue. The identities and locations of target substrates of FAP are poorly defined, in contrast to the related protease DPP4. This study is the first to characterize the physiological substrate repertoire of the DPP activity of endogenous FAP present in plasma. Four substrates, neuropeptide Y (NPY), peptide YY, B-type natriuretic peptide and substance P, were analyzed by mass spectrometry following proteolysis in human or mouse plasma, and by in vivo localization in human liver tissues with cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). NPY was the most efficiently cleaved substrate of both human and mouse FAP, whereas all four peptides were efficiently cleaved by endogenous DPP4, indicating that the in vivo degradomes of FAP and DPP4 differ. All detectable DPP-specific proteolysis and C-terminal processing of these neuropeptides was attributable to FAP and DPP4, and plasma kallikrein, respectively, highlighting their combined physiological significance in the regulation of these neuropeptides. In cirrhotic liver and HCC, NPY and its receptor Y2R, but not Y5R, were increased in hepatocytes near the parenchymal-stromal interface where there is an opportunity to interact with FAP expressed on nearby activated mesenchymal cells in the stroma. These novel findings provide insights into the substrate specificity of FAP, which differs greatly from DPP4, and reveal a potential function for FAP in neuropeptide regulation within liver and cancer biology. PMID:26621486

  11. Effects of sex and deletion of neuropeptide Y2 receptors from GABAergic neurons on affective and alcohol drinking behaviors in mice

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Nora M.; Sprow, Gretchen M.; Delpire, Eric; Thiele, Todd E.; Kash, Thomas L.; Pleil, Kristen E.

    2013-01-01

    A large literature has demonstrated that neuropeptide Y (NPY) regulates many emotional and reward-related behaviors via its primary receptors, Y1R and Y2R. Classically, NPY actions at postsynaptic Y1R decrease anxiety, depression, and alcohol drinking, while its actions at presynaptic Y2R produce the opposite behavioral phenotypes. However, emerging evidence suggests that activation of Y2R can also produce anxiolysis in a brain region and neurotransmitter system-dependent fashion. Further, numerous human and rodent studies have reported that females display higher levels of anxiety, depression, and alcohol drinking. In this study, we evaluated sex differences and the role of Y2R on GABAergic transmission in these behaviors using a novel transgenic mouse that lacks Y2R specifically in VGAT-expressing neurons (VGAT-Y2R knockout). First, we confirmed our genetic manipulation by demonstrating that Y2R protein expression was decreased and that a Y2R agonist could not alter GABAergic transmission in the extended amygdala, a limbic brain region critically implicated in the regulation of anxiety and alcohol drinking behaviors, using immunofluorescence and slice electrophysiology. Then, we tested male and female VGAT-Y2R knockout mice on a series of behavioral assays for anxiety, depression, fear, anhedonia, and alcohol drinking. We found that females displayed greater basal anxiety, higher levels of ethanol consumption, and faster fear conditioning than males, and that knockout mice exhibited enhanced depressive-like behavior in the forced swim test. Together, these results confirm previous studies that demonstrate higher expression of negative affective and alcohol drinking behaviors in females than males, and they highlight the importance of Y2R function in GABAergic systems in the expression of depressive-like behavior. PMID:24399943

  12. Neuropeptides and the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter; Farzi, Aitak

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides are important mediators both within the nervous system and between neurons and other cell types. Neuropeptides such as substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide and neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing factor are also likely to play a role in the bidirectional gut-brain communication. In this capacity they may influence the activity of the gastrointestinal microbiota and its interaction with the gut-brain axis. Current efforts in elucidating the implication of neuropeptides in the microbiota-gut-brain axis address 4 information carriers from the gut to the brain (vagal and spinal afferent neurons; immune mediators such as cytokines; gut hormones; gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) and 4 information carriers from the central nervous system to the gut (sympathetic efferent neurons; parasympathetic efferent neurons; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal medulla; neuroendocrine factors involving the adrenal cortex). Apart from operating as neurotransmitters, many biologically active peptides also function as gut hormones. Given that neuropeptides and gut hormones target the same cell membrane receptors (typically G protein-coupled receptors), the two messenger roles often converge in the same or similar biological implications. This is exemplified by NPY and peptide YY (PYY), two members of the PP-fold peptide family. While PYY is almost exclusively expressed by enteroendocrine cells, NPY is found at all levels of the gut-brain and brain-gut axis. The function of PYY-releasing enteroendocrine cells is directly influenced by short chain fatty acids generated by the intestinal microbiota from indigestible fibre, while NPY may control the impact of the gut microbiota on inflammatory processes, pain, brain function and behaviour. Although the impact of neuropeptides on the interaction between the gut microbiota and brain awaits to be analysed, biologically active peptides are

  13. Food deprivation explains effects of mouthbrooding on ovaries and steroid hormones, but not brain neuropeptide and receptor mRNAs, in an African cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Carpenter, Russ E.; Lee, Malinda; Maruska, Karen P.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2012-01-01

    Feeding behavior and reproduction are coordinately regulated by the brain via neurotransmitters, circulating hormones, and neuropeptides. Reduced feeding allows animals to engage in other behaviors important for fitness, including mating and parental care. Some fishes cease feeding for weeks at a time in order to provide care to their young by brooding them inside the male or female parent’s mouth. Maternal mouthbrooding is known to impact circulating hormones and subsequent reproductive cycles, but neither the full effects of food deprivation nor the neural mechanisms are known. Here we ask what effects mouthbrooding has on several physiological processes including gonad and body mass, brain neuropeptide and receptor gene expression, and circulating steroid hormones in a mouthbrooding cichlid species, Astatotilapia burtoni. We ask whether any observed changes can be explained by food deprivation, and show that during mouthbrooding, ovary size and circulating levels of androgens and estrogens match those seen during food deprivation. Levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 (GnRH1) mRNA in the brain were low in food-deprived females compared to controls and in mouthbrooding females compared to gravid females. Levels of mRNA encoding two peptides involved in regulating feeding, hypocretin and cholecystokinin, were increased in the brains of food-deprived females. Brain mRNA levels of two receptors, GnRH Receptor 2 and NPY receptor Y8c, were elevated in mouthbrooding females compared to the fed condition, but NPY receptor Y8b mRNA was differently regulated by mouthbrooding. These results suggest that many, but not all, of the characteristic physiological changes that occur during mouthbrooding are consequences of food deprivation. PMID:22561338

  14. Enhanced expression of neuropeptide S (NPS) receptor in eosinophils from severe asthmatics and subjects with total IgE above 100IU/ml.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Pinja; James, Anna; Moilanen, Eeva; Pulkkinen, Ville; Daham, Kameran; Saarelainen, Seppo; Laitinen, Tarja; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Kere, Juha; Dahlén, Barbro; Kankaanranta, Hannu

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are inflammatory cells of particular relevance to asthma exacerbations. Neuropeptide S (NPS) receptor was identified in a search for asthma susceptibility genes, where the risk haplotypes of the NPS receptor gene associated with total serum IgE above 100IU/ml and asthma. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare expression of NPS receptor in human peripheral blood eosinophils derived from subjects with total serum IgE above and below 100IU/ml and patients with different phenotypes of asthma. Additionally, we aimed to study the function of NPS receptor in human eosinophils. We found higher NPS receptor protein expression in eosinophils derived from subjects with high IgE when compared to those from subjects with low IgE and the level of NPS receptor positively correlated with serum IgE. NPS receptor expression was also higher in eosinophils from patients with severe asthma than in cells from mild asthmatics or healthy controls. The receptor agonist NPS was a chemotactic agent for eosinophils. NPS also increased N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP)-stimulated CD11b integrin levels in eosinophils from subjects with high IgE. Furthermore, eosinophils from those subjects exhibited Ca(2+) mobilization but not cAMP rise in response to NPS. Altogether, NPS receptor may have a pathological role in individuals with severe asthma and/or elevated serum IgE levels as eosinophils from these patients express higher levels of NPS receptor protein and respond to NPS by enhanced migration and adhesion molecule expression. PMID:24239856

  15. Effect of fasting on cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript, neuropeptide Y, and leptin receptor expression in the non-human primate hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Van Vugt, Dean A; Lujan, Marla E; Froats, Mark; Krzemien, Alicja; Couceyro, Pastor R; Reid, Robert L

    2006-01-01

    Leptin is a cytokine produced by white adipose tissue that circulates in direct proportion to adiposity and is an important signal of energy balance. Leptin inhibits food intake in rodents by inhibiting the orexigenic neuropetides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti regulated peptide (AgRP) and stimulating the anorexigenic neuropeptides alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) and cocaine-amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART). In order to extend our understanding of neuroendocrine regulation of appetite in the primate, we determined the effect of a metabolic challenge on CART, NPY, and leptin receptor (Ob-R) messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) in the nonhuman primate (NHP) hypothalamus. Ten adult female rhesus monkeys were either maintained on a regular diet or fasted for two days before euthanasia. CART, NPY, and Ob-R mRNA were measured by in situ hybridization histochemistry (ISHH). A 2-day fast decreased CART expression in the ARC, increased NPY gene expression in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and increased Ob-R expression in the ventromedial nucleus (VMN). This is the first report that fasting inhibits CART expression and stimulates Ob-R expression in monkeys. Increased NPY expression in the SON and PVN, but not the ARC of fasted monkeys also is novel. With some exceptions, our observations are confirmatory of findings in rodent studies. Similarities in the neuroendocrine responses to a metabolic challenge in monkeys and rodents support extending existing hypotheses of neuroendocrine control of energy homeostasis to primates. PMID:17124379

  16. Identification of a new member of PBAN family of neuropeptides from the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide hormones produced by neurosecretory cells in the central or peripheral nervous systems regulate various physiological and behavioral events during insect development and reproduction. Pyrokinin/Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide (PBAN) is a major neuropeptide family, chara...

  17. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  18. Neuropeptidomics: Mass Spectrometry-Based Identification and Quantitation of Neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Eun

    2016-03-01

    Neuropeptides produced from prohormones by selective action of endopeptidases are vital signaling molecules, playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes, such as addiction, depression, pain, and circadian rhythms. Neuropeptides bind to post-synaptic receptors and elicit cellular effects like classical neurotransmitters. While each neuropeptide could have its own biological function, mass spectrometry (MS) allows for the identification of the precise molecular forms of each peptide without a priori knowledge of the peptide identity and for the quantitation of neuropeptides in different conditions of the samples. MS-based neuropeptidomics approaches have been applied to various animal models and conditions to characterize and quantify novel neuropeptides, as well as known neuropeptides, advancing our understanding of nervous system function over the past decade. Here, we will present an overview of neuropeptides and MS-based neuropeptidomic strategies for the identification and quantitation of neuropeptides. PMID:27103886

  19. Calcium influx enhances neuropeptide activation of ecdysteroid hormone production by mosquito ovaries.

    PubMed

    McKinney, David A; Eum, Jai-Hoon; Dhara, Animesh; Strand, Michael R; Brown, Mark R

    2016-03-01

    A critical step in mosquito reproduction is the ingestion of a blood meal from a vertebrate host. In mosquitoes like Aedes aegypti, blood feeding stimulates the release of ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone (OEH) and insulin-like peptide 3 (ILP3). This induces the ovaries to produce ecdysteroid hormone (ECD), which then drives egg maturation. In many immature insects, prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) stimulates the prothoracic glands to produce ECD that directs molting and metamorphosis. The receptors for OEH, ILP3 and PTTH are different receptor tyrosine kinases with OEH and ILP3 signaling converging downstream in the insulin pathway and PTTH activating the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Calcium (Ca(2+)) flux and cAMP have also been implicated in PTTH signaling, but the role of Ca(2+) in OEH, ILP3, and cAMP signaling in ovaries is unknown. Here, we assessed whether Ca(2+) flux affects OEH, ILP3, and cAMP activity in A. aegypti ovaries and also asked whether PTTH stimulated ovaries to produce ECD. Results indicated that Ca(2+) flux enhanced but was not essential for OEH or ILP3 activity, whereas cAMP signaling was dependent on Ca(2+) flux. Recombinant PTTH from Bombyx mori fully activated ECD production by B. mori PTGs, but exhibited no activity toward A. aegypti ovaries. Recombinant PTTH from A. aegypti also failed to stimulate either B. mori PTGs or A. aegypti ovaries to produce ECD. We discuss the implications of these results in the context of mosquito reproduction and ECD biosynthesis by insects generally. PMID:26772671

  20. From a marine neuropeptide to antimicrobial pseudopeptides containing aza-β(3)-amino acids: structure and activity

    PubMed Central

    Laurencin, Mathieu; Legrand, Baptiste; Duval, Emilie; Henry, Joël; Baudy-Floc'H, Michèle; Zatylny-Gaudin, Céline; Bondon, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of aza-β3-amino acids into endogenous neuropeptide from mollusks (ALSGDAFLRF-NH2) with weak antimicrobial activities allows us to design new AMPs sequences. We find that, depending on the nature of the substitution, these could result either in inactive pseudopeptides or in a drastic enhancement of the antimicrobial activity without high cytotoxicity resulted. Structural studies perform by NMR and circular dichroism on the pseudopeptides show the impact of aza-β3-amino acids on the peptide structures. We obtain the first three-dimensional structures of pseudopeptides containing aza-β3-amino acids in aqueous micellar SDS and demonstrate that hydrazino turn can be formed in aqueous solution. Overall, these results demonstrate the ability to modulate AMPs activities through structural modifications induced by the nature and the position of these amino acid analogs in the peptide sequences. PMID:22320306

  1. Sensory neuropeptides and airway function.

    PubMed

    Solway, J; Leff, A R

    1991-12-01

    Sensory nerves synthesize tachykinins and calcitonin-gene related peptide and package these neuropeptides together in synaptic vesicles. Stimulation of these C-fibers by a range of chemical and physical factors results in afferent neuronal conduction that elicits central parasympathetic reflexes and in antidromic conduction that results in local release of neuropeptides through the axon reflex. In the airways, sensory neuropeptides act on bronchial smooth muscle, the mucosal vasculature, and submucosal glands to promote airflow obstruction, hyperemia, microvascular hyperpermeability, and mucus hypersecretion. In addition, tachykinins potentiate cholinergic neurotransmission. Proinflammatory effects of these peptides also promote the recruitment, adherence, and activation of granulocytes that may further exacerbate neurogenic inflammation (i.e., neuropeptide-induced plasma extravasation and vasodilation). Enzymatic degradation limits the physiological effects of tachykinins but may be impaired by respiratory infection or other factors. Given their sensitivity to noxious compounds and physical stimuli and their potent effects on airway function, it is possible that neuropeptide-containing sensory nerves play an important role in mediating airway responses in human disease. Supporting this view are the striking phenomenological similarities between hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) in guinea pigs and HIB in patients with exercise-induced asthma. Endogenous tachykinins released from airway sensory nerves mediate HIB in guinea pigs and also cause hyperpnea-induced bronchovascular hyperpermeability in these animals. On the basis of these observations, it is reasonable to speculate that sensory neuropeptides participate in the pathogenesis of hyperpnea-induced airflow obstruction in human asthmatic subjects as well. PMID:1663932

  2. Neuropeptide Substance-P-Conjugated Chitosan Nanofibers as an Active Modulator of Stem Cell Recruiting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min Sup; Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Wheemoon; Gu, Bon Kang; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The goal to successful wound healing is essentially to immobilize and recruit appropriate numbers of host stem or progenitor cells to the wound area. In this study, we developed a chitosan nanofiber-immobilized neuropeptide substance-P (SP), which mediates stem cell mobilization and migration, onto the surfaces of nanofibers using a peptide-coupling agent, and evaluated its biological effects on stem cells. The amount of immobilized SP on chitosan nanofibers was modulated over the range of 5.89 ± 3.27 to 75.29 ± 24.31 ng when reacted with 10 to 500 ng SP. In vitro migration assays showed that SP-incorporated nanofibers induced more rapid migration of human mesenchymal stem cells on nanofibers compared to pristine samples. Finally, the conjugated SP evoked a minimal foreign body reaction and recruited a larger number of CD29- and CD44-positive stem cells into nanofibers in a mouse subcutaneous pocket model. PMID:26751441

  3. Neuropeptide Substance-P-Conjugated Chitosan Nanofibers as an Active Modulator of Stem Cell Recruiting.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Sup; Park, Sang Jun; Cho, Wheemoon; Gu, Bon Kang; Kim, Chun-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The goal to successful wound healing is essentially to immobilize and recruit appropriate numbers of host stem or progenitor cells to the wound area. In this study, we developed a chitosan nanofiber-immobilized neuropeptide substance-P (SP), which mediates stem cell mobilization and migration, onto the surfaces of nanofibers using a peptide-coupling agent, and evaluated its biological effects on stem cells. The amount of immobilized SP on chitosan nanofibers was modulated over the range of 5.89 ± 3.27 to 75.29 ± 24.31 ng when reacted with 10 to 500 ng SP. In vitro migration assays showed that SP-incorporated nanofibers induced more rapid migration of human mesenchymal stem cells on nanofibers compared to pristine samples. Finally, the conjugated SP evoked a minimal foreign body reaction and recruited a larger number of CD29- and CD44-positive stem cells into nanofibers in a mouse subcutaneous pocket model. PMID:26751441

  4. Diuretic and myotropic activities of N-terminal truncated analogs of Musca domestica kinin neuropeptide.

    PubMed

    Coast, Geoffrey M; Zabrocki, Janusz; Nachman, Ronald J

    2002-04-01

    Musca kinin (Musdo-K; NTVVLGKKQRFHSWG-NH(2)) and N-terminal truncated analogs of 4-14 residues in length were assayed for diuretic and myotropic activity on housefly Malpighian tubules and hindgut, respectively. The pentapeptide was the minimum sequence required for biological activity, but it was > 5 orders of magnitude less potent than the intact peptide. The pharmacological profiles of the different analogs in the two assays were very similar, suggesting the same receptor is present on both tissues. Potency was little affected by the deletion of Asn(1), but was reduced > 10-fold after the removal of Thr(2). Deletion of the next 5 residues had relatively little effect, but after the second lysyl residue (Lys(8)) was removed potency fell by one to two orders of magnitude. There was a similar drop in potency after the removal of Arg(10), and at 100 microM the pentapeptide had only 20% of the diuretic activity of the intact peptide. The importance of Arg(10) was confirmed by comparing dose-response curves for Musdo-K [6-15] and Acheta kinin-V (AFSHWG-NH(2)) in the diuretic assay; the substitution of arginine by alanine produced a significant reduction in potency and some loss of activity. PMID:11897389

  5. Immunohistochemical distribution of neuropeptide Y, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide-like immunoreactivity and their receptors in the epidermal skin of healthy women.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Yvan; Bastianetto, Stéphane; Duranton, Albert; Breton, Lionel; Quirion, Rémi

    2015-08-01

    Few studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) could play an important role in skin functions. However, the expression of NPY, the related peptides, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) and their receptors have not been investigated in human skin. Using specific antisera directed against NPY, PYY, PP and the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptor subtypes, we investigated here the expression of these markers. NPY-like immunoreactivity (ir) in the epidermal skin could not be detected. For the first time we report the presence of positive PP-like ir immunofluorescent signals in epidermal cells, i.e. keratinocytes of skin from three areas (abdomen, breast and face) obtained as surgical left-overs. The immunofluorescent signal of PP-like ir varies from very low to high level in all three areas. In contrast, PYY-like ir is only expressed in some cells and with varied level of intensity. Furthermore and for the first time we observed specific Y1 and Y4 receptor-like ir in all epidermal layers, while the Y2 and Y5 subtypes were absent. Interestingly, as seen in human epidermis, in Episkin, a reconstituted human epidermal layer, we detected the presence of PP-like as well as Y1-like and Y4-like ir. These data have shown the presence and distribution of PYY, PP and Y1 and Y4 receptors in the human skin and Episkin, suggesting possible novel roles of NPY related peptides and their receptors in skin homeostasis. PMID:26002416

  6. Expression of the fructose receptor BmGr9 and its involvement in the promotion of feeding, suggested by its co-expression with neuropeptide F1 in Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Mang, Dingze; Shu, Min; Tanaka, Shiho; Nagata, Shinji; Takada, Tomoyuki; Endo, Haruka; Kikuta, Shingo; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Iwabuchi, Kikuo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-08-01

    Insect gustatory receptors (Grs) are members of a large family of proteins with seven transmembrane domains that provide insects with the ability to detect chemical signals critical for feeding, mating, and oviposition. To date, 69 Bombyx mori Grs (BmGrs) genes have been identified via genome studies. BmGr9 has been shown to respond specifically to fructose and to function as a ligand-gated ion channel selectively activated by fructose. However, the sites where this Gr are expressed remain unclear. We demonstrated using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR that BmGr9 is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), as well as oral sensory organs. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed using anti-BmGr9 antiserum to show that BmGr9 is expressed in cells of the oral sensory organs, including the maxillary galea, maxillary palps, labrum, and labium, as well as in putative neurosecretory cells of the CNS. Furthermore, double immunohistochemical analysis showed that most BmGr9-expressing cells co-localized with putative neuropeptide F1-expressing cells in the brain, suggesting that BmGr9 is involved in the promotion of feeding behaviors. In addition, a portion of BmGr9-expressing cells in the brain co-localized with cells expressing BmGr6, a molecule of the sugar receptor clade, suggesting that sugars other than fructose are involved in the regulation of feeding behaviors in B. mori larvae. PMID:27288056

  7. Evaluation of molecular chaperons Hsp72 and neuropeptide Y as characteristic markers of adaptogenic activity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Asea, Alexzander; Kaur, Punit; Panossian, Alexander; Wikman, Karl Georg

    2013-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that ADAPT-232, a fixed combination of adaptogenic substances derived from Eleutherococcus senticosus root extract, Schisandra chinensis berry extract, Rhodiola rosea root extract stimulated the expression and release of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and molecular chaperone Hsp72 from isolated human neurolgia cells. Both of these mediators of stress response are known to play an important role in regulation of neuroendocrine system and immune response. We further demonstrated that ADAPT-232 induced release of Hsp70 is mediated by NPY, suggesting an existence of NPY-mediated pathway of activation of Hsp72 release into the blood circulation system. The objective of this study was to determine whether this pathway is common for adaptogens and whether NPY and/or Hsp72 can be considered as necessary specific biomarkers for adaptogenic activity. The release of NPY and Hsp72 from neuroglia cells in response to treatment with various plant extracts (n=23) including selected validated adaptogens, partly validated adaptogens, claimed but negligibly validated adaptogens and some other plant extracts affecting neuroendocrine and immune systems but never considered as adaptogens was measured using high throughput ELISA techniques. We demonstrated that adaptogens, e.g. R. rosea, S. chinensis and E. senticosus stimulate both NPY and Hsp70 release from neuroblastoma cells, while tonics and stimulants have no significant effect on NPY in this in vitro test. In the groups of partly validated adaptogens the effect of Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera was not statistically significant both on NPY and Hsp70 release, while the activating effect of Bryonia alba and Rhaponticum cartamoides was significant only on Hsp70. In contrast, all tested non-adaptogens, such as antiinflammatoty plant extracts Matricaria recutita, Pelargonium sidoides, Hedera helix and Vitis vinifera significantly inhibit Hsp70 release and have no influence on NPY release from neuroblastoma

  8. Neuropeptide Y: A stressful review

    PubMed Central

    Reichmann, Florian; Holzer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Stress is defined as an adverse condition that disturbs the homeostasis of the body and activates adaptation responses. Among the many pathways and mediators involved, neuropeptide Y (NPY) stands out due to its unique stress-relieving, anxiolytic and neuroprotective properties. Stress exposure alters the biosynthesis of NPY in distinct brain regions, the magnitude and direction of this effect varying with the duration and type of stress. NPY is expressed in particular neurons of the brainstem, hypothalamus and limbic system, which explains why NPY has an impact on stress-related changes in emotional-affective behaviour and feeding as well as on stress coping. The biological actions of NPY in mammals are mediated by the Y1, Y2, Y4 and Y5 receptor, Y1 receptor stimulation being anxiolytic whereas Y2 receptor activation is anxiogenic. Emerging evidence attributes NPY a role in stress resilience, the ability to cope with stress. Thus there is a negative correlation between stress-induced behavioural disruption and cerebral NPY expression in animal models of post-traumatic stress disorder. Exogenous NPY prevents the negative consequences of stress, and polymorphisms of the NPY gene are predictive of impaired stress processing and increased risk of neuropsychiatric diseases. Stress is also a factor contributing to, and resulting from, neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease, in which NPY appears to play an important neuroprotective role. This review summarizes the evidence for an implication of NPY in stress-related and neurodegenerative pathologies and addresses the cerebral NPY system as a therapeutic target. PMID:26441327

  9. Development and characterization of a highly selective neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor agonist radioligand: [125I][hPP1-17, Ala31, Aib32]NPY.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Yvan; Thakur, Mira; Beck-Sickinger, Annette; Fournier, Alain; Quirion, Rémi

    2003-08-01

    (1) The existence of multiple classes of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors (Y(1), Y(2), Y(4), Y(5) and y(6)) is now well established. However, one of the major difficulties in the study of these various receptor subtypes is the current lack of highly selective probes to investigate a single receptor class. Up to most recently, this was particularly true for the Y(4) and Y(5) subtypes. (2) [hPP(1-17), Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY, the first highly selective Y(5) agonist, was iodinated using the chloramine T method and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. (3) Binding performed in rat brain homogenates revealed that equilibrium was reached after 120 min (t(1/2)=21 min) and 60 min (t(1/2)=12 min) at 25 and 100 pM [(125)I][hPP(1-17), Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY, respectively. (4) Isotherm saturation binding experiments demonstrated that [(125)I][hPP(1-17), Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY binds to an apparent single population with high-affinity (K(D) of 1.2 and 1.7 nM) and low-capacity (B(max) of 14+/-3 fmol/100,000 cells and 20+/-5 fmol/mg protein) sites in Y(5) receptor HEK293-transfected cells and rat brain membrane homogenates, respectively. No specific [(125)I][hPP(1-17), Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY binding sites could be detected in Y(1), Y(2) or Y(4) receptors transfected HEK293 cells, demonstrating the high selectivity of this ligand for the Y(5) subtype. (5) Competition binding experiments performed in rat brain membrane homogenates and Y(5)-receptor transfected HEK293 cells demonstrated that specific [(125)I][hPP(1-17), Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY binding was competed with high affinity by Y(5) agonists and antagonists such as [Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY, [hPP(1-17), Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY, hPP, CGP71683A and JCF109, but not by Y(1) (BIBP3226), Y(2) (BIIE0246) and Y(1)/Y(4) (GR231118) preferential ligands. (6) Taken together, these data demonstrate that [(125)I][hPP(1-17), Ala(31), Aib(32)]NPY is the first highly selective Y(5) radioligand to be developed. This new probe should prove most useful

  10. Pre-Diabetes Augments Neuropeptide Y1- and α1-Receptor Control of Basal Hindlimb Vascular Tone in Young ZDF Rats

    PubMed Central

    Novielli, Nicole M.; Al-Khazraji, Baraa K.; Medeiros, Philip J.; Goldman, Daniel; Jackson, Dwayne N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Peripheral vascular disease in pre-diabetes may involve altered sympathetically-mediated vascular control. Thus, we investigated if pre-diabetes modifies baseline sympathetic Y1-receptor (Y1R) and α1-receptor (α1R) control of hindlimb blood flow (Qfem) and vascular conductance (VC). Methods Qfem and VC were measured in pre-diabetic ZDF rats (PD) and lean controls (CTRL) under infusion of BIBP3226 (Y1R antagonist), prazosin (α1R antagonist) and BIBP3226+prazosin. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) concentration and Y1R and α1R expression were determined from hindlimb skeletal muscle samples. Results Baseline Qfem and VC were similar between groups. Independent infusions of BIBP3226 and prazosin led to increases in Qfem and VC in CTRL and PD, where responses were greater in PD (p<0.05). The percent change in VC following both drugs was also greater in PD compared to CTRL (p<0.05). As well, Qfem and VC responses to combined blockade (BIBP3226+prazosin) were greater in PD compared to CTRL (p<0.05). Interestingly, an absence of synergistic effects was observed within groups, as the sum of the VC responses to independent drug infusions was similar to responses following combined blockade. Finally, white and red vastus skeletal muscle NPY concentration, Y1R expression and α1R expression were greater in PD compared to CTRL. Conclusions For the first time, we report heightened baseline Y1R and α1R sympathetic control of Qfem and VC in pre-diabetic ZDF rats. In support, our data suggest that augmented sympathetic ligand and receptor expression in pre-diabetes may contribute to vascular dysregulation. PMID:23071607

  11. Endogenous neuropeptide-Y depresses the afferent signalling of gastric acid challenge to the mouse brainstem via Y2 and Y4 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wultsch, T.; Painsipp, E.; Thoeringer, C.K.; Herzog, H.; Sperk, G.; Holzer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Vagal afferents signal gastric acid challenge to the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of the rat brainstem. This study investigated whether NTS neurons in the mouse also respond to gastric acid challenge and whether this chemonociceptive input is modified by neuropeptide-Y (NPY) acting via Y2 or Y4 receptors. The gastric mucosa of female mice was exposed to different concentrations of HCl or saline, excitation of neurons in the NTS visualized by c-Fos immunohistochemistry, gastric emptying deduced from the gastric volume recovery, and gastric lesion formation evaluated by planimetry. Relative to saline, intragastric HCl (0.15-0.35 M) increased the number of c-Fos-expressing cells in the NTS in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited gastric emptying but failed to cause significant haemorrhagic injury in the stomach. Mice in which the NPY Y2 or Y4 receptor gene had been deleted responded to gastric acid challenge with a significantly higher expression of c-Fos in the NTS, the increases amounting to 39 and 31 %, respectively. The HCl-induced inhibition of gastric emptying was not altered by deletion of the Y2 or Y4 receptor gene. BIIE0246 (0.03 mmol/kg subcutaneously), a Y2 receptor antagonist which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, did not modify the c-Fos response to gastric acid challenge. The Y2 receptor agonist peptide YY-(3-36) (0.1 mg/kg intraperitoneally) likewise failed to alter the gastric HCl-evoked expression of c-Fos in the NTS. BIIE0246, however, prevented the effect of peptide YY-(3-36) to inhibit gastric acid secretion as deduced from measurement of intragastric pH. The current data indicate that gastric challenge with acid concentrations that do not induce overt injury but inhibit gastric emptying is signalled to the mouse NTS. Endogenous NPY acting via Y2 and Y4 receptors depresses the afferent input to the NTS by a presumably central site of action. PMID:16216428

  12. A case of autism with an interstitial deletion on 4q leading to hemizygosity for genes encoding for glutamine and glycine neurotransmitter receptor sub-units (AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB) and neuropeptide receptors NPY1R, NPY5R

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Subhadra; Woodroffe, Abigail; Flodman, Pamela L; Mays, Lee Z; Hanouni, Mona; Modahl, Charlotte B; Steinberg-Epstein, Robin; Bocian, Maureen E; Spence, M Anne; Smith, Moyra

    2004-01-01

    Background Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder characterized by a triad of deficits: qualitative impairments in social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior. Although autism is etiologically heterogeneous, family and twin studies have established a definite genetic basis. The inheritance of idiopathic autism is presumed to be complex, with many genes involved; environmental factors are also possibly contributory. The analysis of chromosome abnormalities associated with autism contributes greatly to the identification of autism candidate genes. Case presentation We describe a child with autistic disorder and an interstitial deletion on chromosome 4q. This child first presented at 12 months of age with developmental delay and minor dysmorphic features. At 4 years of age a diagnosis of Pervasive Developmental Disorder was made. At 11 years of age he met diagnostic criteria for autism. Cytogenetic studies revealed a chromosome 4q deletion. The karyotype was 46, XY del 4 (q31.3-q33). Here we report the clinical phenotype of the child and the molecular characterization of the deletion using molecular cytogenetic techniques and analysis of polymorphic markers. These studies revealed a 19 megabase deletion spanning 4q32 to 4q34. Analysis of existing polymorphic markers and new markers developed in this study revealed that the deletion arose on a paternally derived chromosome. To date 33 genes of known or inferred function are deleted as a consequence of the deletion. Among these are the AMPA 2 gene that encodes the glutamate receptor GluR2 sub-unit, GLRA3 and GLRB genes that encode glycine receptor subunits and neuropeptide Y receptor genes NPY1R and NPY5R. Conclusions The deletion in this autistic subject serves to highlight specific autism candidate genes. He is hemizygous for AMPA 2, GLRA3, GLRB, NPY1R and NPY5R. GluR2 is the major determinant of AMPA receptor structure. Glutamate receptors maintain structural

  13. 5-HT7 Receptors Are Not Involved in Neuropeptide Release in Primary Cultured Rat Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojuan; Hu, Rong; Liang, Jianbo; Li, Ze; Sun, Weiwen; Pan, Xiaoping

    2016-06-01

    Migraine is a common but complex neurological disorder. Its precise mechanisms are not fully understood. Increasing indirect evidence indicates that 5-HT7 receptors may be involved; however, their role remains unknown. Our previous in vivo study showed that selective blockade of 5-HT7 receptors caused decreased serum levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the external jugular vein following electrical stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion (TG) in an animal model of migraine. In the present study, we used an in vitro model of cultured TG cells to further investigate whether 5-HT7 receptors are directly responsible for the release of CGRP and substance P from TG neurons. We stimulated rat primary cultured TG neurons with capsaicin or potassium chloride (KCl) to mimic neurogenic inflammation, resulting in release of CGRP and substance P. 5-HT7 receptors were abundantly expressed in TG neurons. Greater than 93 % of 5-HT7 receptor-positive neurons co-expressed CGRP and 56 % co-expressed substance P. Both the capsaicin- and KCl-induced release of CGRP and substance P were unaffected by pretreatment of cultured TG cells with the selective 5-HT7 receptor agonist AS19 and antagonist SB269970. This study demonstrates for the first time that 5-HT7 receptors are abundantly co-expressed with CGRP and substance P in rat primary TG neurons and suggests that they are not responsible for the release of CGRP and substance P from cultured TG neurons evoked by capsaicin or KCl. PMID:26892478

  14. Leptin stimulates neuropeptide Y and cocaine amphetamine-regulated transcript coexpressing neuronal activity in the dorsomedial hypothalamus in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shin J; Verma, Saurabh; Simonds, Stephanie E; Kirigiti, Melissa A; Kievit, Paul; Lindsley, Sarah R; Loche, Alberto; Smith, M Susan; Cowley, Michael A; Grove, Kevin L

    2013-09-18

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons in both the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH) and the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) have been implicated in food intake and obesity. However, while ARH NPY is highly expressed in the lean animal, DMH NPY mRNA expression is observed only after diet-induced obesity (DIO). Furthermore, while ARH NPY neurons are inhibited by leptin, the effect of this adipokine on DMH NPY neurons is unknown. In this study we show that in contrast to the consistent expression in the ARH, DMH NPY mRNA expression was undetectable until after 10 weeks in mice fed a high-fat diet, and peaked at 20 weeks. Surprisingly, electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that leptin directly depolarized and increased the firing rate of DMH NPY neurons in DIO mice. To further differentiate the regulation of DMH and ARH NPY populations, fasting decreased expression of DMH NPY expression, while it increased ARH NPY expression. However, treatment with a leptin receptor antagonist failed to alter DMH NPY expression, indicating that leptin may not be the critical factor regulating mRNA expression. Importantly, we also demonstrated that DMH NPY neurons coexpress cocaine amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART); however, CART mRNA expression in the DMH peaked earlier in the progression of DIO. This study demonstrates novel and important findings. First, NPY and CART are coexpressed in the same neurons within the DMH, and second, leptin stimulates DMH NPY neurons. These studies suggest that during the progression of DIO, there is an unknown signal that drives the expression of the orexigenic NPY signal within the DMH, and that the chronic hyperleptinemia increases the activity of these NPY/CART neurons. PMID:24048859

  15. Introduction: Invertebrate Neuropeptides XI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This publication represents an introduction to the eleventh in a series of special issues of the Peptides journal dedicated to invertebrate neuropeptides. The issue addresses a number of aspects of invertebrate neuropeptide research including identification of novel characterization of new biologic...

  16. The Neuropeptide Y Y1 Receptor: A Diagnostic Marker? Expression in MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Is Down-Regulated by Antiestrogens In Vitro and in Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Memminger, Martin; Keller, Max; Lopuch, Miroslaw; Pop, Nathalie; Bernhardt, Günther; von Angerer, Erwin; Buschauer, Armin

    2012-01-01

    The neuropeptide Y (NPY) Y1 receptor (Y1R) has been suggested as a tumor marker for in vivo imaging and as a therapeutic target. In view of the assumed link between estrogen receptor (ER) and Y1R in mammary carcinoma and with respect to the development of new diagnostic tools, we investigated the Y1R protein expression in human MCF-7 cell variants differing in ER content and sensitivity against antiestrogens. ER and Y1R expression were quantified by radioligand binding using [3H]-17β-estradiol and the Y1R selective antagonist [3H]-UR-MK114, respectively. The latter was used for cellular binding studies and for autoradiography of MCF-7 xenografts. The fluorescent ligands Cy5-pNPY (universal Y1R, Y2R and Y5R agonist) and UR-MK22 (selective Y1R antagonist), as well as the selective antagonists BIBP3226 (Y1R), BIIE0246 (Y2R) and CGP71683 (Y5R) were used to identify the NPY receptor subtype(s) by confocal microscopy. Y1R functionality was determined by mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Sensitivity of MCF-7 cells against antiestrogen 4-hydroxytamoxifen correlated directly with the ER content. The exclusive expression of Y1Rs was confirmed by confocal microscopy. The Y1R protein was up-regulated (100%) by 17β-estradiol (EC50 20 pM) and the predominant role of ERα was demonstrated by using the ERα-selective agonist “propylpyrazole triol”. 17β-Estradiol-induced over-expression of functional Y1R protein was reverted by the antiestrogen fulvestrant (IC50 5 nM) in vitro. Furthermore, tamoxifen treatment of nude mice resulted in an almost total loss of Y1Rs in MCF-7 xenografts. In conclusion, the value of the Y1R as a target for therapy and imaging in breast cancer patients may be compromised due to Y1R down-regulation induced by hormonal (antiestrogen) treatment. PMID:23236424

  17. The neuropeptide bursicon acts in cuticle metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bursicon is a heterodimeric neuropeptide formed of bursicon a (burs a) and bursicon B (burs B) that controls cuticle tanning and wing expansion in insects. Burs a-a and burs B-B homodimers are also formed; they act via an unknown receptor to induce expression of prophylactic immune and stress genes ...

  18. Neuropeptides in the Gonads: From Evolution to Pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Nicolette L.; Bentley, George E.

    2010-01-01

    Vertebrate gonads are the sites of synthesis and binding of many peptides that were initially classified as neuropeptides. These gonadal neuropeptide systems are neither well understood in isolation, nor in their interactions with other neuropeptide systems. Further, our knowledge of the control of these gonadal neuropeptides by peripheral hormones that bind to the gonads, and which themselves are under regulation by true neuropeptide systems from the hypothalamus, is relatively meager. This review discusses the existence of a variety of neuropeptides and their receptors which have been discovered in vertebrate gonads, and the possible way in which such systems could have evolved. We then focus on two key neuropeptides for regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal axis: gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH). Comparative studies have provided us with a degree of understanding as to how a gonadal GnRH system might have evolved, and they have been responsible for the discovery of GnIH and its gonadal counterpart. We attempt to highlight what is known about these two key gonadal neuropeptides, how their actions differ from their hypothalamic counterparts, and how we might learn from comparative studies of them and other gonadal neuropeptides in terms of pharmacology, reproductive physiology and evolutionary biology. PMID:21607065

  19. Mesolimbic neuropeptide W coordinates stress responses under novel environments.

    PubMed

    Motoike, Toshiyuki; Long, Jeffrey M; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Sinton, Christopher M; Skach, Amber; Williams, S Clay; Hammer, Robert E; Sakurai, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2016-05-24

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) and neuropeptide W (NPW) are endogenous neuropeptide ligands for the G protein-coupled receptors NPBWR1 and NPBWR2. Here we report that the majority of NPW neurons in the mesolimbic region possess tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, indicating that a small subset of dopaminergic neurons coexpress NPW. These NPW-containing neurons densely and exclusively innervate two limbic system nuclei in adult mouse brain: the lateral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and the lateral part of the central amygdala nucleus (CeAL). In the CeAL of wild-type mice, restraint stress resulted in an inhibition of cellular activity, but this stress-induced inhibition was attenuated in the CeAL neurons of NPW(-/-) mice. Moreover, the response of NPW(-/-) mice to either formalin-induced pain stimuli or a live rat (i.e., a potential predator) was abnormal only when they were placed in a novel environment: The mice failed to show the normal species-specific self-protective and aversive reactions. In contrast, the behavior of NPW(-/-) mice in a habituated environment was indistinguishable from that of wild-type mice. These results indicate that the NPW/NPBWR1 system could play a critical role in the gating of stressful stimuli during exposure to novel environments. PMID:27140610

  20. Neuropeptide physiology in helminths.

    PubMed

    Mousley, Angela; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Kimber, Michael J; Day, Tim A

    2010-01-01

    Parasitic worms come from two distinct, distant phyla, Nematoda (roundworms) and Platyhelminthes (flatworms). The nervous systems of worms from both phyla are replete with neuropeptides and there is ample physiological evidence that these neuropeptides control vital aspects of worm biology. In each phyla, the physiological evidence for critical roles for helminth neuropeptides is derived from both parasitic and free-living members. In the nematodes, the intestinal parasite Ascaris suum and the free-living Caenorhabditis elegans have yielded most of the data; in the platyhelminths, the most physiological data has come from the blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. FMRFamide-like peptides (FLPs) have many varied effects (excitation, relaxation, or a combination) on somatic musculature, reproductive musculature, the pharynx and motor neurons in nematodes. Insulin-like peptides (INSs) play an essential role in nematode dauer formation and other developmental processes. There is also some evidence for a role in somatic muscle control for the somewhat heterogeneous grouping ofpeptides known as neuropeptide-like proteins (NLPs). In platyhelminths, as in nematodes, FLPs have a central role in somatic muscle function. Reports of FLP physiological action in platyhelminths are limited to a potent excitation of the somatic musculature. Platyhelminths are also abundantly endowed with neuropeptide Fs (NPFs), which appear absent from nematodes. There is not yet any data linking platyhelminth NPF to any particular physiological outcome, but this neuropeptide does potently and specifically inhibit cAMP accumulation in schistosomes. In nematodes and platyhelminths, there is an abundance of physiological evidence demonstrating that neuropeptides play critical roles in the biology of both free-living and parasitic helminths. While it is certainly true that there remains a great deal to learn about the biology of neuropeptides in both phyla, physiological evidence presently available points

  1. Environmental Enrichment Reduces Anxiety by Differentially Activating Serotonergic and Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-Ergic System in Indian Field Mouse (Mus booduga): An Animal Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ragu Varman, Durairaj; Rajan, Koilmani Emmanuvel

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to a predator elicits an innate fear response and mimics several behavioral disorders related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The protective role of an enriched condition (EC) against psychogenic stressors in various animal models has been well documented. However, this condition has not been tested in field mice in the context of PTSD. In this study, we show that field mice (Mus booduga) housed under EC exhibit predominantly proactive and less reactive behavior compared with mice housed under standard conditions (SC) during exposure to their natural predator (field rat Rattus rattus). Furthermore, we observed that EC mice displayed less anxiety-like behavior in an elevated plus maze (EPM) and light/dark-box after exposure to the predator (7 hrs/7 days). In EC mice, predator exposure elevated the level of serotonin (5-Hydroxytrypamine, [5-HT]) in the amygdala as part of the coping response. Subsequently, the serotonin transporter (SERT) and 5-HT1A receptor were up-regulated significantly, but the same did not occur in the 5-HT2C receptor, which is associated with the activation of calmodulin-dependent protein kinase-II (CaMKII) and a transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Our results show that predator exposure induced the activation of CaMKII/CREB, which is accompanied with increased levels of histone acetylation (H3, H4) and decreased histone deacetylases (HDAC1, 2). Subsequently, in the amygdala, the transcription of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its Y1 receptor were up-regulated, whereas the Y2 receptor was down-regulated. Therefore, EC facilitated a coping response against a fear associated cue in a PTSD animal model and reduced anxiety by differentially activating serotonergic and NPY-ergic systems. PMID:26016844

  2. Pharmacological characterization of EN-9, a novel chimeric peptide of endomorphin-2 and neuropeptide FF that produces potent antinociceptive activity and limited tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Long; Li, Ning; Wang, Pei; Tang, Hong-Hai; Han, Zheng-Lan; Song, Jing-Jing; Li, Xu-Hui; Yu, Hong-Ping; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Run; Xu, Biao; Zhang, Meng-Na; Fang, Quan; Wang, Rui

    2016-09-01

    Mounting evidences indicate the functional interactions between neuropeptide FF (NPFF) and opioids, including the endogenous opioids. In the present work, EN-9, a chimeric peptide containing the functional domains of the endogenous opioid endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and NPFF, was synthesized and pharmacologically characterized. In vitro cAMP assay demonstrated that EN-9 was a multifunctional agonist of κ-opioid, NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors. In the mouse tail-flick test, intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administration of EN-9 produced significant antinociception with an ED50 value of 13.44 nmol, which lasted longer than that of EM-2. In addition, EN-9 induced potent antinociception after both intravenous (i.v.) and subcutaneous (s.c.) injection. Furthermore, the experiments using the antagonists of opioid and NPFF receptors indicated that the central antinociception of EN-9 was mainly mediated by κ-opioid receptor, independently on NPFF receptors. Notably, the central antinociception of EN-9 was not reduced over a period of 6 days repeated i.c.v. injection. Repeated i.c.v. administration of EN-9 with the NPFF1 and NPFF2 receptors antagonist RF9 resulted in a progressive loss of analgesic potency, consistent with the development of tolerance. Moreover, central administration of EN-9 induced the place conditioning aversion only at a high dose of 60 nmol, but not at low doses. At supraspinal level, only high dose of EN-9 (60 nmol, i.c.v.) inhibited gastrointestinal transit via NPFF receptors. Similarly, systemic administration of EN-9 also inhibited gastrointestinal transit at high doses (10 and 30 mg/kg, i.v.). Taken together, the multifunctional agonist of κ-opioid and NPFF receptors EN-9 produced a potent, non-tolerance forming antinociception with limited side effects. PMID:26970017

  3. Differential effects of exercise on brain opioid receptor binding and activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; de Almeida, Alexandre Aparecido; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão; Zavala-Tecuapetla, Cecilia; Brand, Serge; Rocha, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise stimulates the release of endogenous opioid peptides supposed to be responsible for changes in mood, anxiety, and performance. Exercise alters sensitivity to these effects that modify the efficacy at the opioid receptor. Although there is evidence that relates exercise to neuropeptide expression in the brain, the effects of exercise on opioid receptor binding and signal transduction mechanisms downstream of these receptors have not been explored. Here, we characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor or delta opioid receptor in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. As regards short- (acute) or long-term effects (chronic) of exercise, overall, higher opioid receptor binding was observed in acute-exercise animals and the opposite was found in the chronic-exercise animals. The binding of [(35) S]GTPγS under basal conditions (absence of agonists) was elevated in sensorimotor cortex and hippocampus, an effect more evident after chronic exercise. Divergence of findings was observed for mu opioid receptor, kappa opioid receptor, and delta opioid receptor receptor activation in our study. Our results support existing evidence of opioid receptor binding and G protein activation occurring differentially in brain regions in response to diverse exercise stimuli. We characterized the binding and G protein activation of mu, kappa, and delta opioid receptors in several brain regions following acute (7 days) and chronic (30 days) exercise. Higher opioid receptor binding was observed in the acute exercise animal group and opposite findings in the chronic exercise group. Higher G protein activation under basal conditions was noted in rats submitted to chronic exercise, as visible in the depicted pseudo-color autoradiograms. PMID:25330347

  4. Mini-review: the evolution of neuropeptide signaling.

    PubMed

    Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P; Hauser, Frank

    2012-08-10

    Neuropeptides and their G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have an early evolutionary origin and are already abundant in basal animals with primitive nervous systems such as cnidarians (Hydra, jellyfishes, corals, and sea anemones). Most animals emerging after the Cnidaria belong to two evolutionary lineages, the Protostomia (to which the majority of invertebrates belong) and Deuterostomia (to which some minor groups of invertebrates, and all vertebrates belong). These two lineages split about 700 million years (Myr) ago. Many mammalian neuropeptide GPCRs have orthologues in the Protostomia and this is also true for some of the mammalian neuropeptides. Examples are oxytocin/vasopressin, GnRH, gastrin/CCK, and neuropeptide Y and their GPCRs. These results implicate that protostomes (for example insects and nematodes) can be used as models to study the biology of neuropeptide signaling. PMID:22726357

  5. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E; Scrivens, James H; Elphick, Maurice R

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates-for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome-the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  6. Urbilaterian origin of paralogous GnRH and corazonin neuropeptide signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Shi; Zandawala, Meet; Beets, Isabel; Baytemur, Esra; Slade, Susan E.; Scrivens, James H.; Elphick, Maurice R.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a key regulator of reproductive maturation in humans and other vertebrates. Homologs of GnRH and its cognate receptor have been identified in invertebrates–for example, the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and corazonin (CRZ) neuropeptide pathways in arthropods. However, the precise evolutionary relationships and origins of these signalling systems remain unknown. Here we have addressed this issue with the first identification of both GnRH-type and CRZ-type signalling systems in a deuterostome–the echinoderm (starfish) Asterias rubens. We have identified a GnRH-like neuropeptide (pQIHYKNPGWGPG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens GnRH-type receptor and a novel neuropeptide (HNTFTMGGQNRWKAG-NH2) that specifically activates an A. rubens CRZ-type receptor. With the discovery of these ligand-receptor pairs, we demonstrate that the vertebrate/deuterostomian GnRH-type and the protostomian AKH systems are orthologous and the origin of a paralogous CRZ-type signalling system can be traced to the common ancestor of the Bilateria (Urbilateria). PMID:27350121

  7. Atlas of Central Nervous System and the first Neuropeptide from Fire Ant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In some insects, especially lepidopteran species, regulation of pheromone biosynthesis and production is under hormonal control. The neuropeptide hormone responsible, PBAN (Pheromone Biosynthesis Activating Neuropeptide), is synthesized in the subesophageal ganglion (SG) and released into the hemoly...

  8. Microglia-Induced Maladaptive Plasticity Can Be Modulated by Neuropeptides In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Morara, Stefano; Colangelo, Anna Maria; Provini, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Microglia-induced maladaptive plasticity is being recognized as a major cause of deleterious self-sustaining pathological processes that occur in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory diseases. Microglia, the primary homeostatic guardian of the central nervous system, exert critical functions both during development, in neural circuit reshaping, and during adult life, in the brain physiological and pathological surveillance. This delicate critical role can be disrupted by neural, but also peripheral, noxious stimuli that can prime microglia to become overreactive to a second noxious stimulus or worsen underlying pathological processes. Among regulators of microglia, neuropeptides can play a major role. Their receptors are widely expressed in microglial cells and neuropeptide challenge can potently influence microglial activity in vitro. More relevantly, this regulator activity has been assessed also in vivo, in experimental models of brain diseases. Neuropeptide action in the central nervous system has been associated with beneficial effects in neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory pathological experimental models. This review describes some of the mechanisms of the microglia maladaptive plasticity in vivo and how neuropeptide activity can represent a useful therapeutical target in a variety of human brain pathologies. PMID:26273481

  9. Gene expression changes in serotonin, GABA-A receptors, neuropeptides and ion channels in the dorsal raphe nucleus of adolescent alcohol-preferring (P) rats following binge-like alcohol drinking

    PubMed Central

    McClintick, Jeanette N.; McBride, William J.; Bell, Richard L.; Ding, Zheng-Ming; Liu, Yunlong; Xuei, Xiaoling; Edenberg, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol binge-drinking during adolescence is a serious public health concern with long-term consequences. We used RNA sequencing to assess the effects of excessive adolescent ethanol binge-drinking on gene expression in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) of alcohol preferring (P) rats. Repeated binges across adolescence (three 1h sessions across the dark-cycle per day, 5 days per week for 3 weeks starting at 28 days of age; ethanol intakes of 2.5 – 3 g/kg/session) significantly altered the expression of approximately one-third of the detected genes. Multiple neurotransmitter systems were altered, with the largest changes in the serotonin system (21 of 23 serotonin-related genes showed decreased expression) and GABA-A receptors (8 decreased and 2 increased). Multiple neuropeptide systems were also altered, with changes in the neuropeptide Y and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems similar to those associated with increased drinking and decreased resistance to stress. There was increased expression of 21 of 32 genes for potassium channels. Expression of downstream targets of CREB signaling was increased. There were also changes in expression of genes involved in inflammatory processes, axonal guidance, growth factors, transcription factors, and several intracellular signaling pathways. These widespread changes indicate that excessive binge drinking during adolescence alters the functioning of the DRN and likely its modulation of many regions of the central nervous system, including the mesocorticolimbic system. PMID:25542586

  10. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  11. Neuropeptide Y is an angiogenic factor in cardiovascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Rabya; Mahmood, Feroze; Amir, Rabia; Matyal, Robina

    2016-04-01

    In diabetic cardiomyopathy, there is altered angiogenic signaling and increased oxidative stress. As a result, anti-angiogenic and pro-inflammatory pathways are activated. These disrupt cellular metabolism and cause fibrosis and apoptosis, leading to pathological remodeling. The autonomic nervous system and neurotransmitters play an important role in angiogenesis. Therapies that promote angiogenesis may be able to relieve the pathology in these disease states. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is the most abundantly produced and expressed neuropeptide in the central and peripheral nervous systems in mammals and plays an important role in promoting angiogenesis and cardiomyocyte remodeling. It produces effects through G-protein-coupled Y receptors that are widely distributed and also present on the myocardium. Some of these receptors are also involved in diseased states of the heart. NPY has been implicated as a potent growth factor, causing cell proliferation in multiple systems while the NPY3-36 fragment is selective in stimulating angiogenesis and cardiomyocyte remodeling. Current research is focusing on developing a drug delivery mechanism for NPY to prolong therapy without having significant systemic consequences. This could be a promising innovation in the treatment of diabetic cardiomyopathy and ischemic heart disease. PMID:26875634

  12. Dipeptidylpeptidase-IV, a key enzyme for the degradation of incretins and neuropeptides: activity and expression in the liver of lean and obese rats

    PubMed Central

    Tarantola, E.; Bertone, V.; Milanesi, G.; Capelli, E.; Ferrigno, A.; Neri, D.; Vairetti, M.; Barni, S.; Freitas, I.

    2012-01-01

    Given the scarcity of donors, moderately fatty livers (FLs) are currently being considered as possible grafts for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT), notwithstanding their poor tolerance to conventional cold preservation. The behaviour of parenchymal and sinusoidal liver cells during transplantation is being studied worldwide. Much less attention has been paid to the biliary tree, although this is considered the Achille's heel even of normal liver transplantation. To evaluate the response of the biliary compartment of FLs to the various phases of OLT reliable markers are necessary. Previously we demonstrated that Alkaline Phosphatase was scarcely active in bile canaliculi of FLs and thus ruled it out as a marker. As an alternative, dipeptidylpeptidase-IV (DPP-IV), was investigated. This ecto-peptidase plays an important role in glucose metabolism, rapidly inactivating insulin secreting hormones (incretins) that are important regulators of glucose metabolism. DPP-IV inhibitors are indeed used to treat Type II diabetes. Neuropeptides regulating bile transport and composition are further important substrates of DPP-IV in the enterohepatic axis. DPP-IV activity was investigated with an azo-coupling method in the liver of fatty Zucker rats (fa/fa), using as controls lean Zucker (fa/+) and normal Wistar rats. Protein expression was studied by immunofluorescence with the monoclonal antibody (clone 5E8). In Wistar rat liver, DPP-IV activity and expression were high in the whole biliary tree, and moderate in sinusoid endothelial cells, in agreement with the literature. Main substrates of DPP-IV in hepatocytes and cholangiocytes could be incretins GLP-1 and GIP, and neuropeptides such as vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and substance P, suggesting that these substances are inactivated or modified through the biliary route. In lean Zucker rat liver the enzyme reaction and protein expression patterns were similar to those of Wistar rat. In obese rat liver the patterns

  13. The role of protease-activated receptor type 2 in nociceptive signaling and pain.

    PubMed

    Mrozkova, P; Palecek, J; Spicarova, D

    2016-07-18

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) belong to the G-protein-coupled receptor family, that are expressed in many body tissues especially in different epithelial cells, mast cells and also in neurons and astrocytes. PARs play different physiological roles according to the location of their expression. Increased evidence supports the importance of PARs activation during nociceptive signaling and in the development of chronic pain states. This short review focuses on the role of PAR2 receptors in nociceptive transmission with the emphasis on the modulation at the spinal cord level. PAR2 are cleaved and subsequently activated by endogenous proteases such as tryptase and trypsin. In vivo, peripheral and intrathecal administration of PAR2 agonists induces thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity that is thought to be mediated by PAR2-induced release of pronociceptive neuropeptides and modulation of different receptors. PAR2 activation leads also to sensitization of transient receptor potential channels (TRP) that are crucial for nociceptive signaling and modulation. PAR2 receptors may play an important modulatory role in the development and maintenance of different pathological pain states and could represent a potential target for new analgesic treatments. PMID:27070742

  14. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice.

    PubMed

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  15. Small-molecule nociceptin receptor agonist ameliorates mast cell activation and pain in sickle mice

    PubMed Central

    Vang, Derek; Paul, Jinny A.; Nguyen, Julia; Tran, Huy; Vincent, Lucile; Yasuda, Dennis; Zaveri, Nurulain T.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of pain with morphine and its congeners in sickle cell anemia is suboptimal, warranting the need for analgesics devoid of side effects, addiction and tolerance liability. Small-molecule nociceptin opioid receptor ligands show analgesic efficacy in acute and chronic pain models. We show that AT-200, a high affinity nociceptin opioid receptor agonist with low efficacy at the mu opioid receptor, ameliorated chronic and hypoxia/reoxygenation-induced mechanical, thermal and deep tissue/musculoskeletal hyperalgesia in HbSS-BERK sickle mice. The antinociceptive effect of AT-200 was antagonized by SB-612111, a nociceptin opioid receptor antagonist, but not naloxone, a non-selective mu opioid receptor antagonist. Daily 7-day treatment with AT-200 did not develop tolerance and showed a sustained anti-nociceptive effect, which improved over time and led to reduced plasma serum amyloid protein, neuropeptides, inflammatory cytokines and mast cell activation in the periphery. These data suggest that AT-200 ameliorates pain in sickle mice via the nociceptin opioid receptor by reducing inflammation and mast cell activation without causing tolerance. Thus, nociceptin opioid receptor agonists are promising drugs for treating pain in sickle cell anemia. PMID:26294734

  16. The role of Neuropeptide Y in fear conditioning and extinction.

    PubMed

    Tasan, R O; Verma, D; Wood, J; Lach, G; Hörmer, B; de Lima, T C M; Herzog, H; Sperk, G

    2016-02-01

    While anxiety disorders are the brain disorders with the highest prevalence and constitute a major burden for society, a considerable number of affected people are still treated insufficiently. Thus, in an attempt to identify potential new anxiolytic drug targets, neuropeptides have gained considerable attention in recent years. Compared to classical neurotransmitters they often have a regionally restricted distribution and may bind to several distinct receptor subtypes. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a highly conserved neuropeptide that is specifically concentrated in limbic brain areas and signals via at least 5 different G-protein-coupled receptors. It is involved in a variety of physiological processes including the modulation of emotional-affective behaviors. An anxiolytic and stress-reducing property of NPY is supported by many preclinical studies. Whether NPY may also interact with processing of learned fear and fear extinction is comparatively unknown. However, this has considerable relevance since pathological, inappropriate and generalized fear expression and impaired fear extinction are hallmarks of human post-traumatic stress disorder and a major reason for its treatment-resistance. Recent evidence from different laboratories emphasizes a fear-reducing role of NPY, predominantly mediated by exogenous NPY acting on Y1 receptors. Since a reduction of fear expression was also observed in Y1 receptor knockout mice, other Y receptors may be equally important. By acting on Y2 receptors, NPY promotes fear extinction and generates a long-term suppression of fear, two important preconditions that could support cognitive behavioral therapies in human patients. A similar effect has been demonstrated for the closely related pancreatic polypeptide (PP) when acting on Y4 receptors. Preliminary evidence suggests that NPY modulates fear in particular by activation of Y1 and Y2 receptors in the basolateral and central amygdala, respectively. In the basolateral amygdala, NPY

  17. The Drosophila neuropeptides PDF and sNPF have opposing electrophysiological and molecular effects on central neurons.

    PubMed

    Vecsey, Christopher G; Pírez, Nicolás; Griffith, Leslie C

    2014-03-01

    Neuropeptides have widespread effects on behavior, but how these molecules alter the activity of their target cells is poorly understood. We employed a new model system in Drosophila melanogaster to assess the electrophysiological and molecular effects of neuropeptides, recording in situ from larval motor neurons, which transgenically express a receptor of choice. We focused on two neuropeptides, pigment-dispersing factor (PDF) and small neuropeptide F (sNPF), which play important roles in sleep/rhythms and feeding/metabolism. PDF treatment depolarized motor neurons expressing the PDF receptor (PDFR), increasing excitability. sNPF treatment had the opposite effect, hyperpolarizing neurons expressing the sNPF receptor (sNPFR). Live optical imaging using a genetically encoded fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensor for cyclic AMP (cAMP) showed that PDF induced a large increase in cAMP, whereas sNPF caused a small but significant decrease in cAMP. Coexpression of pertussis toxin or RNAi interference to disrupt the G-protein Gαo blocked the electrophysiological responses to sNPF, showing that sNPFR acts via Gαo signaling. Using a fluorescent sensor for intracellular calcium, we observed that sNPF-induced hyperpolarization blocked spontaneous waves of activity propagating along the ventral nerve cord, demonstrating that the electrical effects of sNPF can cause profound changes in natural network activity in the brain. This new model system provides a platform for mechanistic analysis of how neuropeptides can affect target cells at the electrical and molecular level, allowing for predictions of how they regulate brain circuits that control behaviors such as sleep and feeding. PMID:24353297

  18. Short neuropeptide F is a sleep-promoting inhibitory modulator

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Yuhua; Donelson, Nathan C.; Vecsey, Christopher G.; Guo, Fang; Rosbash, Michael; Griffith, Leslie C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY To advance the understanding of sleep regulation, we screened for sleep-promoting cells and identified neurons expressing neuropeptide Y-like short neuropeptide F (sNPF). Sleep-induction by sNPF meets all relevant criteria. Rebound sleep following sleep deprivation is reduced by activation of sNPF neurons and flies even experience negative sleep rebound upon cessation of sNPF neuronal stimulation, indicating that sNPF provides an important signal to the sleep homeostat. Only a subset of sNPF-expressing neurons, which includes the small ventrolateral clock neurons, is sleep-promoting. Their release of sNPF increases sleep consolidation in part by suppressing the activity of wake-promoting large ventrolateral clock neurons, and suppression of neuronal firing may be the general response to sNPF receptor activation. sNPF acutely increases sleep without altering feeding behavior, which it affects only on a much longer time scale. The profound effect of sNPF on sleep indicates that it is an important sleep-promoting molecule. PMID:24094110

  19. Paired inhibitory and activating receptor signals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, L S; Paul, S P; McVicar, D W

    2000-01-01

    The immunological literature has become inundated with reports regarding paired inhibitory receptors. Paired inhibitory receptor systems are highly conserved families that contain receptors involved in either cellular inhibition or activation. In most cases the paired putative biochemical antagonists are co-expressed on a given cell and thought to bind similar, if not identical, ligands making their biological role difficult to understand. Examples of these systems include immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptors (Killer Ig Receptors, Immunoglobulin-like Transcripts/Leukocyte Ig-like Receptors/Monocyte Macrophage Ig Receptors, and Paired Ig-like Receptors), and type II lectin-like receptor systems (NKG2 and Ly49). General characteristics of these inhibitory receptors include a cytoplasmic immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The ITIM is phosphorylated upon engagement and recruits protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate cellular substrates that would otherwise mediate activation. In contrast, the activating receptors of these pairs use charged residues within their transmembrane domains to associate with various signal transduction chains including the gamma chain of the receptor for the Fc portion of IgE, DAP12 or DAP10. Once phosphorylated, these chains direct the signal transduction cascade resulting in cellular activation. Here we review the signaling of several paired systems and present the current models for their signal transduction cascades. PMID:11258418

  20. FLP-4 neuropeptide and its receptor in a neuronal circuit regulate preference choice through functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yonglin; Zhi, Lingtong; Guan, Xiangmin; Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Preference choice on food is an important response strategy for animals living in the environment. Using assay system of preference choice on bacterial foods, OP50 and PA14, we identified the involvement of ADL sensory neurons in the control of preference choice in Caenorhabditis elegans. Both genetically silencing and ChR2-mediated activation of ADL sensory neurons significantly affected preference choice. ADL regulated preference choice by inhibiting function of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)/SRH-220. ADL sensory neurons might regulate preference choice through peptidergic signals of FLP-4 and NLP-10, and function of FLP-4 or NLP-10 in regulating preference choice was regulated by SRH-220. FLP-4 released from ADL sensory neurons further regulated preference choice through its receptor of NPR-4 in AIB interneurons. In AIB interneurons, NPR-4 was involved in the control of preference choice by activating the functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex consisting of SET-2, ASH-2, and WDR-5, implying the crucial role of molecular machinery of trimethylation of histone H3K4 in the preference choice control. The identified novel neuronal circuit and the underlying molecular mechanisms will strengthen our understanding neuronal basis of preference choice in animals. PMID:26887501

  1. FLP-4 neuropeptide and its receptor in a neuronal circuit regulate preference choice through functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yonglin; Zhi, Lingtong; Guan, Xiangmin; Wang, Daoyong; Wang, Dayong

    2016-01-01

    Preference choice on food is an important response strategy for animals living in the environment. Using assay system of preference choice on bacterial foods, OP50 and PA14, we identified the involvement of ADL sensory neurons in the control of preference choice in Caenorhabditis elegans. Both genetically silencing and ChR2-mediated activation of ADL sensory neurons significantly affected preference choice. ADL regulated preference choice by inhibiting function of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)/SRH-220. ADL sensory neurons might regulate preference choice through peptidergic signals of FLP-4 and NLP-10, and function of FLP-4 or NLP-10 in regulating preference choice was regulated by SRH-220. FLP-4 released from ADL sensory neurons further regulated preference choice through its receptor of NPR-4 in AIB interneurons. In AIB interneurons, NPR-4 was involved in the control of preference choice by activating the functions of ASH-2 trithorax complex consisting of SET-2, ASH-2, and WDR-5, implying the crucial role of molecular machinery of trimethylation of histone H3K4 in the preference choice control. The identified novel neuronal circuit and the underlying molecular mechanisms will strengthen our understanding neuronal basis of preference choice in animals. PMID:26887501

  2. QRFP and Its Receptors Regulate Locomotor Activity and Sleep in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Audrey; Chiu, Cindy N.; Mosser, Eric A.; Kahn, Sohini; Spence, Rory

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus plays an important role in regulating sleep, but few hypothalamic sleep-promoting signaling pathways have been identified. Here we demonstrate a role for the neuropeptide QRFP (also known as P518 and 26RFa) and its receptors in regulating sleep in zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate. We show that QRFP is expressed in ∼10 hypothalamic neurons in zebrafish larvae, which project to the hypothalamus, hindbrain, and spinal cord, including regions that express the two zebrafish QRFP receptor paralogs. We find that the overexpression of QRFP inhibits locomotor activity during the day, whereas mutation of qrfp or its receptors results in increased locomotor activity and decreased sleep during the day. Despite the restriction of these phenotypes to the day, the circadian clock does not regulate qrfp expression, and entrained circadian rhythms are not required for QRFP-induced rest. Instead, we find that QRFP overexpression decreases locomotor activity largely in a light-specific manner. Our results suggest that QRFP signaling plays an important role in promoting sleep and may underlie some aspects of hypothalamic sleep control. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The hypothalamus is thought to play a key role in regulating sleep in vertebrate animals, but few sleep-promoting signaling pathways that function in the hypothalamus have been identified. Here we use the zebrafish, a diurnal vertebrate, to functionally and anatomically characterize the neuropeptide QRFP. We show that QRFP is exclusively expressed in a small number of neurons in the larval zebrafish hypothalamus that project widely in the brain. We also show that QRFP overexpression reduces locomotor activity, whereas animals that lack QRFP signaling are more active and sleep less. These results suggest that QRFP signaling participates in the hypothalamic regulation of sleep. PMID:26865608

  3. Maturation of suprathreshold auditory nerve activity involves cochlear CGRP-receptor complex formation.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Ian M; Bussey-Gaborski, Rhiannon; Holt, Joseph C; Jordan, Paivi M; Luebke, Anne E

    2016-07-01

    In adult animals, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is contained in cochlear efferent fibers projecting out to the cochlea, and contributes to increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity in the adult auditory nerve. Similarly, CGRP applied to the lateral-line organ (hair cell organ) increases afferent nerve activity in adult frogs (post-metamorphic day 30), yet this increase is developmentally delayed from post-metamorphic day 4-30. In this study, we discovered that there was also a developmental delay in increased suprathreshold sound-evoked activity auditory nerve between juvenile and adult mice similar to what had been observed previously in frog. Moreover, juvenile mice with a targeted deletion of the αCGRP gene [CGRP null (-/-)] did not show a similar developmental increase in nerve activity, suggesting CGRP signaling is involved. This developmental delay is not due to a delay in CGRP expression, but instead is due to a delay in receptor formation. We observed that the increase in sound-evoked nerve activity is correlated with increased formation of cochlear CGRP receptors, which require three complexed proteins (CLR, RAMP1, RCP) to be functional. CGRP receptor formation in the cochlea was incomplete at 1 month of age (juvenile), but complete by 3 months (adult), which corresponded to the onset of suprathreshold enhancement of sound-evoked activity in wild-type animals. Taken together, these data support a model for cochlear function that is enhanced by maturation of CGRP receptor complexes. PMID:27440744

  4. Drosulfakinin activates CCKLR-17D1 and promotes larval locomotion and escape response in Drosophila

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptides are ubiquitous in both mammals and invertebrates and play essential roles in regulation and modulation of many developmental and physiological processes through activation of G-protein-coupled-receptors (GPCRs). However, the mechanisms by which many of the neuropeptides regulate speci...

  5. Sensory Neurons Arouse C. elegans Locomotion via Both Glutamate and Neuropeptide Release

    PubMed Central

    Chatzigeorgiou, Marios; Hu, Zhitao; Schafer, William R.; Kaplan, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    C. elegans undergoes periods of behavioral quiescence during larval molts (termed lethargus) and as adults. Little is known about the circuit mechanisms that establish these quiescent states. Lethargus and adult locomotion quiescence is dramatically reduced in mutants lacking the neuropeptide receptor NPR-1. Here, we show that the aroused locomotion of npr-1 mutants results from the exaggerated activity in multiple classes of sensory neurons, including nociceptive (ASH), touch sensitive (ALM and PLM), and stretch sensing (DVA) neurons. These sensory neurons accelerate locomotion via both neuropeptide and glutamate release. The relative contribution of these sensory neurons to arousal differs between larval molts and adults. Our results suggest that a broad network of sensory neurons dictates transitions between aroused and quiescent behavioral states. PMID:26154367

  6. Neuropeptides controlling energy balance: orexins and neuromedins

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Joshua P.; Kotz, Catherine M.; Novak, Colleen M.; Billington, Charles J.; Teske, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    In this section we review the feeding and energy expenditure effects of orexin (also known as hypocretin) and neuromedin. Orexins are multifunctional neuropeptides that affect energy balance by participating in regulation of appetite, arousal, and spontaneous physical activity. Central orexin signaling for all functions originates in the lateral hypothalamus–perifornical area, and is likely functionally differentiated based on site of action and on interacting neural influences. The effect of orexin on feeding is likely related to arousal in some ways, but is nonetheless a separate neural process that depends on interactions with other feeding related neuropeptides. In a pattern distinct from other neuropeptides, orexin stimulates both feeding and energy expenditure. Orexin increases in energy expenditure are mainly by increasing spontaneous physical activity, and this energy expenditure effect is more potent than the effect on feeding. Global orexin manipulations, such as in transgenic models, produce energy balance changes consistent with a dominant energy expenditure effect of orexin. Neuromedins are gut-brain peptides that reduce appetite. There are gut sources of neuromedin, but likely the key appetite related neuromedin producing neurons are in hypothalamus and parallel other key anorectic neuropeptide expression in the arcuate to paraventricular hypothalamic projection. As with other hypothalamic feeding related peptides, hindbrain sites are likely also important sources and targets of neuromedin anorectic action. Neuromedin increases physical activity in addition to reducing appetite, thus producing a consistent negative energy balance effect. Together with the various other neuro-peptides, -transmitters, -modulators and –hormones, neuromedin and orexin act in the appetite network to produce changes in food intake and energy expenditure, which ultimately influences the regulation of body weight. PMID:22249811

  7. Hormone activation of baculovirus expressed progesterone receptors.

    PubMed

    Elliston, J F; Beekman, J M; Tsai, S Y; O'Malley, B W; Tsai, M J

    1992-03-15

    Human and chicken progesterone receptors (A form) were overproduced in a baculovirus expression system. These recombinant progesterone receptors were full-length bound progesterone specifically and were recognized by monoclonal antibodies, AB52 and PR22, specific for human and chicken progesterone receptor, respectively. In gel retardation studies, binding of recombinant human and chicken progesterone receptors to their progesterone response element (PRE) was specific and was enhanced in the presence of progesterone. Binding of human progesterone receptor to the PRE was also enhanced in the presence of the antiprogestin, RU486, but very little effect was observed in the presence of estradiol, dexamethasone, testosterone, and vitamin D. In our cell-free transcription system, human progesterone receptor induced transcription in a receptor-dependent and hormone-activable manner. Receptor-stimulated transcription required the presence of the PRE in the test template and could be specifically inhibited by excess PRE oligonucleotides. Furthermore, chicken progesterone receptor also induced in vitro transcription in a hormone-activable manner. These results demonstrate that steroid receptors overexpressed in a baculovirus expression system are functional and exhibit steroid-responsive binding and transcription. These observations support our present understanding of the mechanism of steroid receptor-regulated gene expression and provide a technological format for studies of the role of hormone and antihormone in altering gene expression. PMID:1544902

  8. Calcium-dependent growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cells by neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Gudermann, Thomas; Roelle, Susanne

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 15-25% of all primary cancers of the lung are classified histologically as small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), a subtype characterized by rapid growth and a poor prognosis. Neuropeptide hormones like bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide, bradykinin or galanin are the principal mitogenic stimuli of this tumour entity. The mitogenic signal is transmitted into the cell via heptahelical neuropeptide hormone receptors, which couple to the heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gq/11 familiy. Subsequent activation of phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) entails the activation of protein kinase C and the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration. There is mounting evidence to support the notion that calcium mobilization is the key event that initiates different mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. Neuropeptide-dependent proliferation of SCLC cells relies on parallel activation of the Gq/11/PLCbeta/Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and the c-jun N-terminal kinase pathways, while selective engagement of either signalling cascade alone results in growth arrest and differentiation or apoptotic cell death. Basic experimental research has the potential to identify and validate novel therapeutic targets located at critical points of convergence of different mitogenic signal transduction pathways. In the case of SCLC, targeting the distinct components of the Ca2+ influx pathway as well as critical Ca2+-dependent cellular effectors may be rewarding in this regard. PMID:17158754

  9. The Evolution and Variety of RFamide-Type Neuropeptides: Insights from Deuterostomian Invertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Elphick, Maurice R.; Mirabeau, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Five families of neuropeptides that have a C-terminal RFamide motif have been identified in vertebrates: (1) gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), (2) neuropeptide FF (NPFF), (3) pyroglutamylated RFamide peptide (QRFP), (4) prolactin-releasing peptide (PrRP), and (5) Kisspeptin. Experimental demonstration of neuropeptide–receptor pairings combined with comprehensive analysis of genomic and/or transcriptomic sequence data indicate that, with the exception of the deuterostomian PrRP system, the evolutionary origins of these neuropeptides can be traced back to the common ancestor of bilaterians. Here, we review the occurrence of homologs of vertebrate RFamide-type neuropeptides and their receptors in deuterostomian invertebrates – urochordates, cephalochordates, hemichordates, and echinoderms. Extending analysis of the occurrence of the RFamide motif in other bilaterian neuropeptide families reveals RFamide-type peptides that have acquired modified C-terminal characteristics in the vertebrate lineage (e.g., NPY/NPF), neuropeptide families where the RFamide motif is unique to protostomian members (e.g., CCK/sulfakinins), and RFamide-type peptides that have been lost in the vertebrate lineage (e.g., luqins). Furthermore, the RFamide motif is also a feature of neuropeptide families with a more restricted phylogenetic distribution (e.g., the prototypical FMRFamide-related neuropeptides in protostomes). Thus, the RFamide motif is both an ancient and a convergent feature of neuropeptides, with conservation, acquisition, or loss of this motif occurring in different branches of the animal kingdom. PMID:24994999

  10. More than two decades of research on insect neuropeptide GPCRs: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Caers, Jelle; Verlinden, Heleen; Zels, Sven; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Vuerinckx, Kristel; Schoofs, Liliane

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the state of the art on neuropeptide receptors in insects. Most of these receptors are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and are involved in the regulation of virtually all physiological processes during an insect's life. More than 20 years ago a milestone in invertebrate endocrinology was achieved with the characterization of the first insect neuropeptide receptor, i.e., the Drosophila tachykinin-like receptor. However, it took until the release of the Drosophila genome in 2000 that research on neuropeptide receptors boosted. In the last decade a plethora of genomic information of other insect species also became available, leading to a better insight in the functions and evolution of the neuropeptide signaling systems and their intracellular pathways. It became clear that some of these systems are conserved among all insect species, indicating that they fulfill crucial roles in their physiological processes. Meanwhile, other signaling systems seem to be lost in several insect orders or species, suggesting that their actions were superfluous in those insects, or that other neuropeptides have taken over their functions. It is striking that the deorphanization of neuropeptide GPCRs gets much attention, but the subsequent unraveling of the intracellular pathways they elicit, or their physiological functions are often hardly examined. Especially in insects besides Drosophila this information is scarce if not absent. And although great progress made in characterizing neuropeptide signaling systems, even in Drosophila several predicted neuropeptide receptors remain orphan, awaiting for their endogenous ligand to be determined. The present review gives a précis of the insect neuropeptide receptor research of the last two decades. But it has to be emphasized that the work done so far is only the tip of the iceberg and our comprehensive understanding of these important signaling systems will still increase substantially in the coming years. PMID

  11. Brain neuropeptides in central ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation in trout

    PubMed Central

    Le Mével, Jean-Claude; Lancien, Frédéric; Mimassi, Nagi; Conlon, J. Michael

    2012-01-01

    Many neuropeptides and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are present within the brain area involved in ventilatory and cardiovascular regulation but only a few mammalian studies have focused on the integrative physiological actions of neuropeptides on these vital cardio-respiratory regulations. Because both the central neuroanatomical substrates that govern motor ventilatory and cardiovascular output and the primary sequence of regulatory peptides and their receptors have been mostly conserved through evolution, we have developed a trout model to study the central action of native neuropeptides on cardio-ventilatory regulation. In the present review, we summarize the most recent results obtained using this non-mammalian model with a focus on PACAP, VIP, tachykinins, CRF, urotensin-1, CGRP, angiotensin-related peptides, urotensin-II, NPY, and PYY. We propose hypotheses regarding the physiological relevance of the results obtained. PMID:23115556

  12. Neuropeptidergic Signaling and Active Feeding State Inhibit Nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ezcurra, Marina; Walker, Denise S; Beets, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter; Schafer, William R

    2016-03-16

    Food availability and nutritional status are important cues affecting behavioral states. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a cascade of dopamine and neuropeptide signaling acts to inhibit nociception in food-poor environments. In the absence of food, animals show decreased sensitivity and increased adaptation to soluble repellents sensed by the polymodal ASH nociceptors. The effects of food on adaptation are affected by dopamine and neuropeptide signaling; dopamine acts via the DOP-1 receptor to decrease adaptation on food, whereas the neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 act to increase adaptation off food. NPR-1 and NPR-2 function cell autonomously in the ASH neurons to increase adaptation off food, whereas the DOP-1 receptor controls neuropeptide release from interneurons that modulate ASH activity indirectly. These results indicate that feeding state modulates nociception through the interaction of monoamine and neuropeptide signaling pathways. PMID:26985027

  13. Neuropeptidergic Signaling and Active Feeding State Inhibit Nociception in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ezcurra, Marina; Walker, Denise S.; Beets, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Food availability and nutritional status are important cues affecting behavioral states. Here we report that, in Caenorhabditis elegans, a cascade of dopamine and neuropeptide signaling acts to inhibit nociception in food-poor environments. In the absence of food, animals show decreased sensitivity and increased adaptation to soluble repellents sensed by the polymodal ASH nociceptors. The effects of food on adaptation are affected by dopamine and neuropeptide signaling; dopamine acts via the DOP-1 receptor to decrease adaptation on food, whereas the neuropeptide receptors NPR-1 and NPR-2 act to increase adaptation off food. NPR-1 and NPR-2 function cell autonomously in the ASH neurons to increase adaptation off food, whereas the DOP-1 receptor controls neuropeptide release from interneurons that modulate ASH activity indirectly. These results indicate that feeding state modulates nociception through the interaction of monoamine and neuropeptide signaling pathways. PMID:26985027

  14. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tilan, Jason U.; Everhart, Lindsay M.; Abe, Ken; Kuo-Bonde, Lydia; Chalothorn, Dan; Kitlinska, Joanna; Burnett, Mary Susan; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faber, James E.; Zukowska, Zofia

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that the sympathetic neurotransmitter neuropeptide Y (NPY) is potently angiogenic, primarily through its Y2 receptor, and that endogenous NPY is crucial for capillary angiogenesis in rodent hindlimb ischemia. Here we sought to identify the source of NPY responsible for revascularization and its mechanisms of action. At d 3, NPY−/− mice demonstrated delayed recovery of blood flow and limb function, consistent with impaired collateral conductance, while ischemic capillary angiogenesis was reduced (∼70%) at d 14. This biphasic temporal response was confirmed by 2 peaks of NPY activation in rats: a transient early increase in neuronally derived plasma NPY and increase in platelet NPY during late-phase recovery. Compared to NPY-null platelets, collagen-activated NPY-rich platelets were more mitogenic (∼2-fold vs. ∼1.6-fold increase) for human microvascular endothelial cells, and Y2/Y5 receptor antagonists ablated this difference in proliferation. In NPY+/+ mice, ischemic angiogenesis was prevented by platelet depletion and then restored by transfusion of platelets from NPY+/+ mice, but not NPY−/− mice. In thrombocytopenic NPY−/− mice, transfusion of wild-type platelets fully restored ischemia-induced angiogenesis. These findings suggest that neuronally derived NPY accelerates the early response to femoral artery ligation by promoting collateral conductance, while platelet-derived NPY is critical for sustained capillary angiogenesis.—Tilan, J. U., Everhart, L. M., Abe, K., Kuo-Bonde, L., Chalothorn, D., Kitlinska, J., Burnett, M. S., Epstein, S. E., Faber, J. E., Zukowska, Z. Platelet neuropeptide Y is critical for ischemic revascularization in mice. PMID:23457218

  15. Subtype selectivity of the novel nonpeptide neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO 3304 and its effect on feeding in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, H A; Engel, W; Eberlein, W; Rudolf, K; Doods, H N

    1998-01-01

    The novel Y1-selective argininamide derivative BIBO 3304 ((R)-N-[[4-(aminocarbonylaminomethyl)phenyl]methyl]-N2-(diphenylacetyl)-argininamide trifluoroacetate) has been synthesized and was examined for its subtype selectivity, its in vitro antagonistic properties and its food intake inhibitory properties.BIBO 3304 displayed subnanomolar affinity for both the human and the rat Y1 receptor (IC50 values 0.38±0.06 nM and 0.72±0.42 nM, respectively). The inactive enantiomer of BIBO 3304 (BIBO 3457) had low affinity for both the human and rat Y1 receptor subtype (IC50>1000 nM). BIBO 3304 showed low affinity for the human Y2 receptor, human and rat Y4 receptor as well as for the human and rat Y5 receptor (IC50 values >1000 nM).30 μg BIBO 3304 administered into the paraventricular nucleus inhibited the feeding response induced by 1 μg NPY as well as the hyperphagia induced by a 24 h fast implying a role for Y1 receptors in NPY mediated feeding. The inactive enantiomer had no effect.BIBO 3304 inhibits neither the galanin nor the noradrenaline induced orexigenic response, but it blocked feeding behaviour elicited by both [Leu31, Pro34]NPY and NPY (3–36) suggesting an interplay between different NPY receptor subtypes in feeding behavior.The present study reveals that BIBO 3304 is a subtype selective nonpeptide antagonist with subnanomolar affinity for the Y1 receptor subtype that significantly inhibits food intake induced by application of NPY or by fasting. PMID:9806339

  16. Control of sleep-to-wake transitions via fast aminoacid and slow neuropeptide transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueiro, Thiago; de Lecea, Luis; Huerta, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    The Locus Coeruleus (LC) modulates cortical, subcortical, cerebellar, brainstem and spinal cord circuits and it expresses receptors for neuromodulators that operate in a time scale of several seconds. Evidences from anatomical, electrophysiological and optogenetic experiments have shown that LC neurons receive input from a group of neurons called Hypocretins (HCRTs) that release a neuropeptide called hypocretin. It is less known how these two groups of neurons can be coregulated using GABAergic neurons. Since the time scales of GABAA inhibition is several orders of magnitude faster than the hypocretin neuropeptide effect, we investigate the limits of circuit activity regulation using a realistic model of neurons. Our investigation shows that GABAA inhibition is insufficient to control the activity levels of the LCs. Despite slower forms of GABAA can in principle work, there is not much plausibility due to the low probability of the presence of slow GABAA and lack of robust stability at the maximum firing frequencies. The best possible control mechanism predicted by our modeling analysis is the presence of inhibitory neuropeptides that exert effects in a similar time scale as the hypocretin/orexin. Although the nature of these inhibitory neuropeptides has not been identified yet, it provides the most efficient mechanism in the modeling analysis. Finally, we present a reduced mean-field model that perfectly captures the dynamics and the phenomena generated by this circuit. This investigation shows that brain communication involving multiple time scales can be better controlled by employing orthogonal mechanisms of neural transmission to decrease interference between cognitive processes and hypothalamic functions. PMID:25598695

  17. Zinc regulation of food intake: new insights on the role of neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Levenson, Cathy W

    2003-07-01

    The role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in feeding behavior and zinc deficiency-induced anorexia has been controversial because hypothalamic NPY levels are elevated in both zinc deficiency and food restriction. A recent report shows that while NPY is released from terminals in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus of food-restricted animals, this release is significantly impaired in zinc-deficient animals. Zinc deficiency may therefore cause anorexia by inhibiting the release of NPY that is required for receptor activation. PMID:12918877

  18. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Imran; Houck, Keith; Judson, Richard S.; Kavlock, Robert J.; Martin, Matthew T.; Reif, David M.; Wambaugh, John; Dix, David J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic analysis of new in vitro human NR activity data on 309 environmental chemicals in relationship to their liver cancer-related chronic outcomes in rodents. Results The effects of 309 environmental chemicals on human constitutive androstane receptors (CAR/NR1I3), pregnane X receptor (PXR/NR1I2), aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR/NR1C), liver X receptors (LXR/NR1H), retinoic X receptors (RXR/NR2B) and steroid receptors (SR/NR3) were determined using in vitro data. Hepatic histopathology, observed in rodents after two years of chronic treatment for 171 of the 309 chemicals, was summarized by a cancer lesion progression grade. Chemicals that caused proliferative liver lesions in both rat and mouse were generally more active for the human receptors, relative to the compounds that only affected one rodent species, and these changes were significant for PPAR (p0.001), PXR (p0.01) and CAR (p0.05). Though most chemicals exhibited receptor promiscuity, multivariate analysis clustered them into relatively few NR activity combinations. The human NR activity pattern of chemicals weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer lesion progression (p0.05). Conclusions The rodent carcinogens had higher in vitro potency for human NR relative to non-carcinogens. Structurally diverse chemicals with similar NR promiscuity patterns weakly associated with the severity of rodent liver cancer progression. While these results do not prove the role of NR activation in human liver cancer, they do have implications for nuclear receptor chemical biology and provide insights into putative toxicity pathways. More importantly, these findings suggest the

  19. Conserved molecular switch interactions in modeled cardioactive RF-NH2 peptide receptors: Ligand binding and activation.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, M; Leander, M; Ons, S; Nichols, R

    2015-09-01

    Peptides may act through G protein-coupled receptors to influence cardiovascular performance; thus, delineating mechanisms involved in signaling is a molecular-based strategy to influence health. Molecular switches, often represented by conserved motifs, maintain a receptor in an inactive state. However, once the switch is broken, the transmembrane regions move and activation occurs. The molecular switches of Drosophila melanogaster myosuppressin (MS) receptors were previously identified to include a unique ionic lock and novel 3-6 lock, as well as transmission and tyrosine toggle switches. In addition to MS, cardioactive ligands structurally related by a C-terminal RF-NH2 include sulfakinin, neuropeptide F (NPF), short NPF, and FMRF-NH2-containing peptide subfamilies. We hypothesized receptor molecular switch motifs were conserved within a RF-NH2 subfamily and across species. Thus, we investigated RF-NH2 receptor (RFa-R) molecular switches in D. melanogaster, Tribolium castaneum, Anopheles gambiae, Rhodnius prolixus, and Bombyx mori. Adipokinetic hormone (AKH), which does not contain a RF-NH2, was also examined. The tyrosine toggle switch and ionic lock showed a higher degree of conservation within a RF-NH2 subfamily than the transmission switch and 3-7 lock. AKH receptor motifs were not representative of a RF-NH2 subfamily. The motifs and interactions of switches in the RFa-Rs were consistent with receptor activation and ligand-specific binding. PMID:26211890

  20. Peptidomics for the discovery and characterization of neuropeptides and hormones

    PubMed Central

    Romanova, Elena V.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of neuropeptides as signaling molecules with paracrine or hormonal regulatory functions has led to trailblazing advances in physiology and fostered the characterization of numerous neuropeptide-binding G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as potential drug targets. The impact on human health has been tremendous: approximately 30% of commercial drugs act via the GPCR pathway. However, about 25% of the GPCRs encoded by the mammalian genome still lack their pharmacological identity. Searching for the orphan GPCR endogenous ligands that likely are neuropeptides has proved to be a formidable task. Here we describe the mass spectrometry-based technologies and experimental strategies that have been successful in achieving high throughput characterization of endogenous peptides in nervous and endocrine systems. PMID:26143240

  1. Relationship of the Chemokine, CXCL12, to Effects of Dietary Fat on Feeding-Related Behaviors and Hypothalamic Neuropeptide Systems

    PubMed Central

    Poon, Kinning; Barson, Jessica R.; Ho, Hui T.; Leibowitz, Sarah F.

    2016-01-01

    The intake of a high fat diet (HFD), in addition to stimulating orexigenic neuropeptides in the hypothalamus while promoting overeating and reducing locomotor behavior, is known to increase inflammatory mediators that modulate neuronal systems in the brain. To understand the involvement of chemokines in the effects of a HFD, we examined in rats whether HFD intake affects a specific chemokine, CXCL12, and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7, in the hypothalamus together with the neuropeptides and whether CXCL12 itself acts similarly to a HFD in stimulating the neuropeptides and altering ingestion and locomotor behavior. Compared to low-fat chow, a HFD for 5 days significantly increased the expression of CXCL12 and its receptors, in both the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) where the neuropeptides enkephalin (ENK) and galanin were also stimulated and the perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PFLH) where orexin (OX) and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were increased. In contrast, the HFD had no impact on expression of CXCL12 or its receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) where the carbohydrate-related peptide, neuropeptide Y (NPY), was suppressed. Analysis of protein levels revealed a similar stimulatory effect of a HFD on CXCL12 levels in the PVN and PFLH, as well as in blood, and an increase in the number of CXCR4-positive cells in the PVN. In the ARC, in contrast, levels of CXCL12 and number of CXCR4-positive cells were too low to measure. When centrally administered, CXCL12 was found to have similar effects to a HFD. Injection of CXCL12 into the third cerebral ventricle immediately anterior to the hypothalamus significantly stimulated the ingestion of a HFD, reduced novelty-induced locomotor activity, and increased expression of ENK in the PVN where the CXCR4 receptors were dense. It had no impact, however, on NPY in the ARC or on OX and MCH in the PFLH where the CXCR4 receptors were not detected. These results, showing CXCL12 in the hypothalamus to be stimulated by a HFD

  2. Neuropeptides in depression: role of VGF

    PubMed Central

    Thakker-Varia, Smita; Alder, Janet

    2009-01-01

    The monoamine hypothesis of depression is increasingly called into question by newer theories that revolve around changes in neuronal plasticity, primarily in the hippocampus, at both the structural and functional levels. Chronic stress negatively regulates hippocampal function while antidepressants ameliorate the effects of stress on neuronal morphology and activity. Both stress and antidepressants have been shown to affect levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) whose transcription is dependent on cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). BDNF itself has antidepressant-like actions and can induce transcription of a number of molecules. One class of genes regulated by both BDNF and serotonin (5-HT) are neuropeptides including VGF (non-acryonimic) which has a novel role in depression. Neuropeptides are important modulators of neuronal function but their role in affective disorders is just emerging. Recent studies demonstrate that VGF, which is also a CREB-dependent gene, is upregulated by antidepressant drugs and voluntary exercise and is reduced in animal models of depression. VGF enhances hippocampal synaptic plasticity as well as neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus but the mechanisms of antidepressant-like actions of VGF in behavioral paradigms are not known. We summarize experimental data describing the roles of BDNF, VGF and other neuropeptides in depression and how they may be acting through the generation of new neurons and altered synaptic activity. Understanding the molecular and cellular changes that underlie the actions of neuropeptides and how these adaptations result in antidepressant-like effects will aid in developing drugs that target novel pathways for major depressive disorders. PMID:18983874

  3. Molecular characterization of a short neuropeptide F signaling system in the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans.

    PubMed

    Caers, Jelle; Peymen, Katleen; Van Hiel, Matthias B; Van Rompay, Liesbeth; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Schoofs, Liliane; Beets, Isabel

    2016-09-01

    Neuropeptides of the short neuropeptide F (sNPF) family are widespread among arthropods and found in every sequenced insect genome so far. Functional studies have mainly focused on the regulatory role of sNPF in feeding behavior, although this neuropeptide family has pleiotropic effects including in the control of locomotion, osmotic homeostasis, sleep, learning and memory. Here, we set out to characterize and determine possible roles of sNPF signaling in the haematophagous tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans, a vector of African Trypanosoma parasites causing human and animal African trypanosomiasis. We cloned the G. m. morsitans cDNA sequences of an sNPF-like receptor (Glomo-sNPFR) and precursor protein encoding four Glomo-sNPF neuropeptides. All four Glomo-sNPF peptides concentration-dependently activated Glomo-sNPFR in a cell-based calcium mobilization assay, with EC50 values in the nanomolar range. Gene expression profiles in adult female tsetse flies indicate that the Glomo-sNPF system is mainly restricted to the nervous system. Glomo-snpfr transcripts were also detected in the hindgut of adult females. In contrast to the Drosophila sNPF system, tsetse larvae lack expression of Glomo-snpf and Glomo-snpfr genes. While Glomo-snpf transcript levels are upregulated in pupae, the onset of Glomo-snpfr expression is delayed to adulthood. Expression profiles in adult tissues are similar to those in other insects suggesting that the tsetse sNPF system may have similar functions such as a regulatory role in feeding behavior, together with a possible involvement of sNPFR signaling in osmotic homeostasis. Our molecular data will enable further investigations into the functions of sNPF signaling in tsetse flies. PMID:27288635

  4. Characterization and pharmacological analysis of two adipokinetic hormone receptor variants of the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans.

    PubMed

    Caers, Jelle; Janssen, Tom; Van Rompay, Liesbeth; Broeckx, Valérie; Van Den Abbeele, Jan; Gäde, Gerd; Schoofs, Liliane; Beets, Isabel

    2016-03-01

    Adipokinetic hormones (AKH) are well known regulators of energy metabolism in insects. These neuropeptides are produced in the corpora cardiaca and perform their hormonal function by interacting with specific G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) at the cell membranes of target tissues, mainly the fat body. Here, we investigated the sequences, spatial and temporal distributions, and pharmacology of AKH neuropeptides and receptors in the tsetse fly, Glossina morsitans morsitans. The open reading frames of two splice variants of the Glomo-akh receptor (Glomo-akhr) gene and of the AKH neuropeptide encoding genes, gmmhrth and gmmakh, were cloned. Both tsetse AKHR isoforms show strong sequence conservation when compared to other insect AKHRs. Glomo-AKH prepropeptides also have the typical architecture of AKH precursors. In an in vitro Ca(2+) mobilization assay, Glomo-AKH neuropeptides activated each receptor isoform up to nanomolar concentrations. We identified structural features of tsetse AKH neuropeptides essential for receptor activation in vitro. Gene expression profiles suggest a function for AKH signaling in regulating Glossina energy metabolism, where AKH peptides are released from the corpora cardiaca and activate receptors mainly expressed in the fat body. This analysis of the ligand-receptor coupling, expression, and pharmacology of the two Glomo-AKHR variants facilitates further elucidation of the function of AKH in G. m. morsitans. PMID:26690928

  5. NMDA Receptor Activity in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lakhan, Shaheen E.; Caro, Mario; Hadzimichalis, Norell

    2013-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a variety of physiologic roles and their proper signaling is essential for cellular homeostasis. Any disruption in this pathway, leading to either enhanced or decreased activity, may result in the manifestation of neuropsychiatric pathologies such as schizophrenia, mood disorders, substance induced psychosis, Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus. Here, we explore the notion that the overlap in activity of at least one biochemical pathway, the NMDA receptor pathway, may be the link to understanding the overlap in psychotic symptoms between diseases. This review intends to present a broad overview of those neuropsychiatric disorders for which alternations in NMDA receptor activity is prominent thus suggesting that continued direction of pharmaceutical intervention to this pathway may present a viable option for managing symptoms. PMID:23772215

  6. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise.

  7. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation.

    PubMed

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  8. Mechanism of FGF receptor dimerization and activation

    PubMed Central

    Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Hristova, Kalina

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (fgfs) are widely believed to activate their receptors by mediating receptor dimerization. Here we show, however, that the FGF receptors form dimers in the absence of ligand, and that these unliganded dimers are phosphorylated. We further show that ligand binding triggers structural changes in the FGFR dimers, which increase FGFR phosphorylation. The observed effects due to the ligands fgf1 and fgf2 are very different. The fgf2-bound dimer structure ensures the smallest separation between the transmembrane (TM) domains and the highest possible phosphorylation, a conclusion that is supported by a strong correlation between TM helix separation in the dimer and kinase phosphorylation. The pathogenic A391E mutation in FGFR3 TM domain emulates the action of fgf2, trapping the FGFR3 dimer in its most active state. This study establishes the existence of multiple active ligand-bound states, and uncovers a novel molecular mechanism through which FGFR-linked pathologies can arise. PMID:26725515

  9. Levodopa replacement therapy alters enzyme activities in striatum and neuropeptide content in striatal output regions of 6-hydroxydopamine lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Engber, T M; Susel, Z; Kuo, S; Gerfen, C R; Chase, T N

    1991-06-21

    The effects of striatal dopamine denervation and levodopa replacement therapy on neuronal populations in the rat striatum were assessed by measurement of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activities in the striatum, dynorphin and substance P concentrations in the substantia nigra, and enkephalin concentration in the globus pallidus. Rats with a unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lesion of the nigrostriatal pathway were treated for 21 days with levodopa (100 mg/kg/day, i.p., with 25 mg/kg benserazide) on either an intermittent (b.i.d.) or continuous (osmotic pump infusion) regimen and sacrificed following a three day drug washout. In saline-treated control rats, striatal GAD activity and globus pallidus enkephalin content were elevated and nigral substance P content was reduced ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA lesion. Intermittent levodopa treatment further increased GAD activity, decreased CAT activity, restored substance P to control levels, markedly increased dynorphin content, and had no effect on enkephalin. In contrast, continuous levodopa elevated globus pallidus enkephalin beyond the levels occurring with denervation, but had no effect on any of the other neurochemical measures. These results indicate that striatal neuronal populations are differentially affected by chronic levodopa therapy and by the continuous or intermittent nature of the treatment regimen. With the exception of substance P, levodopa did not reverse the effects of the 6-OHDA lesion but, rather, either exacerbated the lesion-induced changes (e.g. GAD and enkephalin) or altered neurochemical markers which had been unaffected by the lesion (e.g. CAT and dynorphin).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1717109

  10. Stimulation of murine peritoneal macrophage functions by neuropeptide Y and peptide YY. Involvement of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, M; Bernaez, I; Del Rio, M; Hernanz, A

    1993-01-01

    The peptides neuropeptide Y (NPY) and peptide YY (PYY) at concentrations from 10(-12) M to 10(-8) M have been shown in this study to stimulate significantly, in vitro, several functions of resting peritoneal macrophages from BALB/c mice: adherence to substrate, chemotaxis, ingestion of inert particles (latex beads) and foreign cells (Candida albicans), and production of superoxide anion measured by nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. A dose-response relationship was observed, with a maximal stimulation of the macrophage functions studied at 10(-10) M. These effects seem to be produced by specific receptors for the neuropeptides studied in peritoneal macrophages. Whereas the two peptides induced no change of intracellular cyclic AMP, they caused a significant stimulation of protein kinase C (PKC) in murine macrophages. These results suggest that NPY and PYY produce their effects on macrophage function through PKC activation. PMID:8262554

  11. Ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone requires a receptor tyrosine kinase to activate egg formation in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Kevin J; Brown, Mark R; Strand, Michael R

    2015-04-21

    Mosquitoes are major disease vectors because most species must feed on blood from a vertebrate host to produce eggs. Blood feeding by the vector mosquito Aedes aegypti triggers the release of two neurohormones, ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone (OEH) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs), which activate multiple processes required for egg formation. ILPs function by binding to the insulin receptor, which activates downstream components in the canonical insulin signaling pathway. OEH in contrast belongs to a neuropeptide family called neuroparsins, whose receptor is unknown. Here we demonstrate that a previously orphanized receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) from A. aegypti encoded by the gene AAEL001915 is an OEH receptor. Phylogenetic studies indicated that the protein encoded by this gene, designated AAEL001915, belongs to a clade of RTKs related to the insulin receptor, which are distinguished by an extracellular Venus flytrap module. Knockdown of AAEL001915 by RNAi disabled OEH-mediated egg formation in A. aegypti. AAEL001915 was primarily detected in the mosquito ovary in association with follicular epithelial cells. Both monomeric and dimeric AAEL001915 were detected in mosquito ovaries and transfected Drosophila S2 cells. Functional assays further indicated that OEH bound to dimeric AAEL001915, which resulted in downstream phosphorylation of Ak strain transforming factor (Akt). We hypothesize that orthologs of AAEL001915 in other insects are neuroparsin receptors. PMID:25848040

  12. Ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone requires a receptor tyrosine kinase to activate egg formation in the mosquito Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Kevin J.; Brown, Mark R.; Strand, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Mosquitoes are major disease vectors because most species must feed on blood from a vertebrate host to produce eggs. Blood feeding by the vector mosquito Aedes aegypti triggers the release of two neurohormones, ovary ecdysteroidogenic hormone (OEH) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs), which activate multiple processes required for egg formation. ILPs function by binding to the insulin receptor, which activates downstream components in the canonical insulin signaling pathway. OEH in contrast belongs to a neuropeptide family called neuroparsins, whose receptor is unknown. Here we demonstrate that a previously orphanized receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) from A. aegypti encoded by the gene AAEL001915 is an OEH receptor. Phylogenetic studies indicated that the protein encoded by this gene, designated AAEL001915, belongs to a clade of RTKs related to the insulin receptor, which are distinguished by an extracellular Venus flytrap module. Knockdown of AAEL001915 by RNAi disabled OEH-mediated egg formation in A. aegypti. AAEL001915 was primarily detected in the mosquito ovary in association with follicular epithelial cells. Both monomeric and dimeric AAEL001915 were detected in mosquito ovaries and transfected Drosophila S2 cells. Functional assays further indicated that OEH bound to dimeric AAEL001915, which resulted in downstream phosphorylation of Ak strain transforming factor (Akt). We hypothesize that orthologs of AAEL001915 in other insects are neuroparsin receptors. PMID:25848040

  13. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Jain, N; Kemp, N; Adeyemo, O; Buchanan, P; Stone, T W

    1995-10-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  14. Anxiolytic activity of adenosine receptor activation in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, N.; Kemp, N.; Adeyemo, O.; Buchanan, P.; Stone, T. W.

    1995-01-01

    1. Purine analogues have been examined for anxiolytic- and anxiogenic-like activity in mice, by use of the elevated plus-maze. 2. The selective A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA) had marked anxiolytic-like activity at 10 and 50 microg kg(-1), with no effect on locomotor performance at these doses. 3. The A1 selective adenosine receptor antagonist, 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (CPX) had no significant effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotor behaviour, but blocked the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. The hydrophilic xanthine, 8-(p-sulphophenyl) theophylline did not prevent anxiolysis by CPA. 4. Caffeine had anxiogenic-like activity at 30 mg kg(-1) which was prevented by CPA at 50 micro kg(-1). 5. The A2 receptor agonist, N6-[2-(3,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-2(2-methylphenyl)-ethyl]adenosine (DPMA) had no effect on anxiety behaviour but depressed locomotor activity at the highest dose tested of 1 mg kg(-1). The A2 receptor antagonist, 1,3-dimethyl-l-propargylxanthine (DMPX) had no effect on anxiety-related measures or locomotion and did not modify the anxiolytic-like activity of CPA. 6. Administration of DPMA in combination with anxiolytic doses of CPA prevented the anxiolytic-like activity of the latter. 7. The results suggest that the selective activation of central A1 adenosine receptors induces anxiolytic-like behaviour, while the activation of A2 sites causes locomotor depression and reduces the effects of A1 receptor activation. The absence of any effect of CPX alone suggests that the receptors involved in modulating behaviour in the elevated plus-maze in mice are not activated tonically by endogenous adenosine. PMID:8640355

  15. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  16. Neuropeptide-Driven Cross-Modal Plasticity following Sensory Loss in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitch, Ithai; Laurent, Patrick; Zhao, Buyun; Walker, Denise; Beets, Isabel; Schoofs, Liliane; Bai, Jihong; Schafer, William R.; Treinin, Millet

    2016-01-01

    Sensory loss induces cross-modal plasticity, often resulting in altered performance in remaining sensory modalities. Whereas much is known about the macroscopic mechanisms underlying cross-modal plasticity, only scant information exists about its cellular and molecular underpinnings. We found that Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes deprived of a sense of body touch exhibit various changes in behavior, associated with other unimpaired senses. We focused on one such behavioral alteration, enhanced odor sensation, and sought to reveal the neuronal and molecular mechanisms that translate mechanosensory loss into improved olfactory acuity. To this end, we analyzed in mechanosensory mutants food-dependent locomotion patterns that are associated with olfactory responses and found changes that are consistent with enhanced olfaction. The altered locomotion could be reversed in adults by optogenetic stimulation of the touch receptor (mechanosensory) neurons. Furthermore, we revealed that the enhanced odor response is related to a strengthening of inhibitory AWC→AIY synaptic transmission in the olfactory circuit. Consistently, inserting in this circuit an engineered electrical synapse that diminishes AWC inhibition of AIY counteracted the locomotion changes in touch-deficient mutants. We found that this cross-modal signaling between the mechanosensory and olfactory circuits is mediated by neuropeptides, one of which we identified as FLP-20. Our results indicate that under normal function, ongoing touch receptor neuron activation evokes FLP-20 release, suppressing synaptic communication and thus dampening odor sensation. In contrast, in the absence of mechanosensory input, FLP-20 signaling is reduced, synaptic suppression is released, and this enables enhanced olfactory acuity; these changes are long lasting and do not represent ongoing modulation, as revealed by optogenetic experiments. Our work adds to a growing literature on the roles of neuropeptides in cross

  17. C-Terminus of the B-Chain of Relaxin-3 Is Important for Receptor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Shabanpoor, Fazel; Bathgate, Ross A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Human relaxin-3 is a neuropeptide that is structurally similar to human insulin with two chains (A and B) connected by three disulfide bonds. It is expressed primarily in the brain and has modulatory roles in stress and anxiety, feeding and metabolism, and arousal and behavioural activation. Structure-activity relationship studies have shown that relaxin-3 interacts with its cognate receptor RXFP3 primarily through its B-chain and that its A-chain does not have any functional role. In this study, we have investigated the effect of modification of the B-chain C-terminus on the binding and activity of the peptide. We have chemically synthesised and characterized H3 relaxin as C-termini acid (both A and B chains having free C-termini; native form) and amide forms (both chains’ C-termini were amidated). We have confirmed that the acid form of the peptide is more potent than its amide form at both RXFP3 and RXFP4 receptors. We further investigated the effects of amidation at the C-terminus of individual chains. We report here for the first time that amidation at the C-terminus of the B-chain of H3 relaxin leads to significant drop in the binding and activity of the peptide at RXFP3/RXFP4 receptors. However, modification of the A-chain C-terminus does not have any effect on the activity. We have confirmed using circular dichroism spectroscopy that there is no secondary structural change between the acid and amide form of the peptide, and it is likely that it is the local C-terminal carboxyl group orientation that is crucial for interacting with the receptors. PMID:24349312

  18. Progesterone receptors activation after acute cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui-Bing K; Fabian, Sosimo; Jenab, Shirzad; Quiñones-Jenab, Vanya

    2006-12-18

    Cocaine modulates serum levels of progesterone in intact female and male rats, as well as in pregnant dams, and progesterone decreases or attenuates cocaine-induced behavioral and reward responses. It has been postulated that cocaine's modulation of serum progesterone levels may in turn alter progesterone receptor activity, thereby contributing to cocaine-induced alterations of neuronal functions and genomic regulations. To test this hypothesis, intact male rats received acute injections of saline or cocaine (15 or 30 mg/kg, dissolved in 0.9% saline, intraperitoneal). Progesterone serum levels, progesterone receptor (PR) protein levels, and PR-DNA binding complexes were measured in the striatum by radioimmunoassay, Western blot, and gel shift analyses, respectively. After injection of 15 mg/kg of cocaine, induction of progesterone serum levels was closely followed by an increase in receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes. After injection of 30 mg/kg of cocaine, similar effects were observed along with an attenuation of receptor protein levels and DNA binding complexes at 60 min. Our results suggest that activation of progesterone receptors may be a mechanism by which cocaine mediates behavior through molecular alterations in the central nervous system. PMID:17109827

  19. Using Nuclear Receptor Activity to Stratify Hepatocarcinogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NR) are a superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors that control a range of cellular processes. Persistent stimulation of some NR is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. Here we report on a systematic an...

  20. Common mechanisms activate plant guard receptors and TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Kagan, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    In metazoans, the innate immune system uses Pattern Recognition Receptors to detect conserved microbial products, whereas in plants Guard Receptors detect virulence factors or activities encoded by pathogens. In a recent study, Williams and colleagues report that plant Guard receptors can be activated by a mechanism remarkably similar to that of mammalian Toll-like Receptor 4. PMID:25224694

  1. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor.

    PubMed

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick; Negishi, Masahiko

    2016-05-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)-forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  2. Phenobarbital and Insulin Reciprocate Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor through the Insulin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yasujima, Tomoya; Saito, Kosuke; Moore, Rick

    2016-01-01

    Phenobarbital (PB) antagonized insulin to inactivate the insulin receptor and attenuated the insulin receptor downstream protein kinase B (AKT)–forkhead box protein O1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signals in mouse primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. Hepatic AKT began dephosphorylation in an early stage of PB treatment, and blood glucose levels transiently increased in both wild-type and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) knockout (KO) mice. On the other hand, blood glucose levels increased in wild-type mice, but not KO mice, in later stages of PB treatment. As a result, PB, acting as an insulin receptor antagonist, elicited CAR-independent increases and CAR-dependent decreases of blood glucose levels at these different stages of treatment, respectively. Reciprocally, insulin activation of the insulin receptor repressed CAR activation and induction of its target CYP2B6 gene in HepG2 cells. Thus, PB and insulin cross-talk through the insulin receptor to regulate glucose and drug metabolism reciprocally. PMID:26994072

  3. Activation Requirements for Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Viaene, Angela N.; Petrof, Iraklis; Sherman, S. Murray

    2013-01-01

    It has been common experimentally to use high frequency, tetanic, stimulation to activate metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in cortex and thalamus. To determine what type of stimulation is actually necessary to activate mGluRs we examined the effects of varying stimulation duration and intensity on activating mGluR responses. We used a thalamocortical and an intracortical slice preparation from mice and performed whole cell recordings from neurons in the ventral posterior medial nucleus or in layer 4 of primary somatosensory cortex (S1) while electrically stimulating in layer 6 of S1. Extracellular ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and GABAA receptor antagonists were used to isolate Group I or Group II mGluR responses. We observed that high frequency stimulation is not necessary for the activation of either Group I or Group II mGluRs. Either could be activated with as few as 2-3 pulses at stimulation frequencies around 15-20Hz. Additionally, increasing the number of pulses, intensity of stimulation, or stimulation frequency increased amplitude and duration of the mGluR response. PMID:23416319

  4. A negatively charged transmembrane aspartate residue controls activation of the relaxin-3 receptor RXFP3.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Lei; Shao, Xiao-Xia; Hu, Meng-Jun; Liu, Ya-Li; Xu, Zeng-Guang; Guo, Zhan-Yun

    2016-08-15

    Relaxin-3 is an insulin/relaxin superfamily neuropeptide involved in the regulation of food intake and stress response via activation of its cognate receptor RXFP3, an A-class G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). In recent studies, a highly conserved ExxxD motif essential for binding of relaxin-3 has been identified at extracellular end of the second transmembrane domain (TMD2) of RXFP3. For most of the A-class GPCRs, a highly conserved negatively charged Asp residue (Asp(2.50) using Ballesteros-Weinstein numbering and Asp128 in human RXFP3) is present at the middle of TMD2. To elucidate function of the conserved transmembrane Asp128, in the present work we replaced it with other residues and the resultant RXFP3 mutants all retained quite high ligand-binding potency, but their activation and agonist-induced internalization were abolished or drastically decreased. Thus, the negatively charged transmembrane Asp128 controlled transduction of agonist-binding information from the extracellular region to the intracellular region through maintaining RXFP3 in a metastable state for efficient conformational change induced by binding of an agonist. PMID:27353281

  5. Equivalent Activities of Repulsive Axon Guidance Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Long, Hong; Yoshikawa, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    Receptors on the growth cone at the leading edge of elongating axons play critical guidance roles by recognizing cues via their extracellular domains and transducing signals via their intracellular domains, resulting in changes in direction of growth. An important concept to have emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a major guidance mechanism. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are likely to be qualitative differences in the signals they transduce. However, the nature of these possible differences is unknown. By creating chimeras using the extracellular and intracellular domains of three different Drosophila repulsive receptors, Unc5, Roundabout (Robo), and Derailed (Drl) and expressing them in defined cells within the embryonic nervous system, we examined the responses elicited by their intracellular domains systematically. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative differences in growth cone response or axon growth, suggesting that, despite their highly diverged sequences, each intracellular domain elicits repulsion via a common pathway. In terms of the signaling pathway(s) used by the repulsive receptors, mutations in the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Trio strongly enhance the repulsive activity of all three intracellular domains, suggesting that repulsion by Unc5, Robo, and Drl, and perhaps repulsion in general, involves Trio activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT A prevailing concept that has emerged in the axon guidance field is the importance of repulsion as a guidance mechanism for steering axons to their appropriate targets. Given the number and variety of different repulsive receptors, it is generally thought that there are differences in the signals that they transduce. However, this has never been tested directly. We have used the advanced genetics of Drosophila to compare directly the outputs of different repulsive receptors. Surprisingly, we found no qualitative

  6. The Bile Acid Receptor TGR5 Activates the TRPA1 Channel to Induce Itch in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, TinaMarie; Jayaweera, Gihan; Zhao, Peishen; Poole, Daniel P.; Jensen, Dane; Grace, Megan; McIntyre, Peter; Bron, Romke; Wilson, Yvette M.; Krappitz, Matteus; Haerteis, Silke; Korbmacher, Christoph; Steinhoff, Martin S.; Nassini, Romina; Materazzi, Serena; Geppetti, Pierangelo; Corvera, Carlos U.; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS Patients with cholestatic disease have increased systemic concentrations of bile acids (BAs) and profound pruritus. The G-protein–coupled BA receptor 1 TGR5 (encoded by GPBAR1) is expressed by primary sensory neurons; its activation induces neuronal hyperexcitability and scratching by unknown mechanisms. We investigated whether the transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) is involved in BA-evoked, TGR5-dependent pruritus in mice. METHODS Co-expression of TGR5 and TRPA1 in cutaneous afferent neurons isolated from mice was analyzed by immunofluorescence, in situ hybridization, and single-cell polymerase chain reaction. TGR5-induced activation of TRPA1 was studied in in HEK293 cells, Xenopus laevis oocytes, and primary sensory neurons by measuring Ca2+ signals. The contribution of TRPA1 to TGR5-induced release of pruritogenic neuropeptides, activation of spinal neurons, and scratching behavior were studied using TRPA1 antagonists or Trpa1−/− mice. RESULTS TGR5 and TRPA1 protein and messenger RNA were expressed by cutaneous afferent neurons. In HEK cells, oocytes, and neurons co-expressing TGR5 and TRPA1, BAs caused TGR5-dependent activation and sensitization of TRPA1 by mechanisms that required Gβγ, protein kinase C, and Ca2+. Antagonists or deletion of TRPA1 prevented BA-stimulated release of the pruritogenic neuropeptides gastrin-releasing peptide and atrial natriuretic peptide B in the spinal cord. Disruption of Trpa1 in mice blocked BA-induced expression of Fos in spinal neurons and prevented BA-stimulated scratching. Spontaneous scratching was exacerbated in transgenic mice that overexpressed TRG5. Administration of a TRPA1 antagonist or the BA sequestrant colestipol, which lowered circulating levels of BAs, prevented exacerbated spontaneous scratching in TGR5 overexpressing mice. CONCLUSIONS BAs induce pruritus in mice by co-activation of TGR5 and TRPA1. Antagonists of TGR5 and TRPA1, or inhibitors of the signaling mechanism by

  7. Neurotransmitters and Neuropeptides: New Players in the Control of Islet of Langerhans' Cell Mass and Function.

    PubMed

    Di Cairano, Eliana S; Moretti, Stefania; Marciani, Paola; Sacchi, Vellea Franca; Castagna, Michela; Davalli, Alberto; Folli, Franco; Perego, Carla

    2016-04-01

    Islets of Langerhans control whole body glucose homeostasis, as they respond, releasing hormones, to changes in nutrient concentrations in the blood stream. The regulation of hormone secretion has been the focus of attention for a long time because it is related to many metabolic disorders, including diabetes mellitus. Endocrine cells of the islet use a sophisticate system of endocrine, paracrine and autocrine signals to synchronize their activities. These signals provide a fast and accurate control not only for hormone release but also for cell differentiation and survival, key aspects in islet physiology and pathology. Among the different categories of paracrine/autocrine signals, this review highlights the role of neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. In a manner similar to neurons, endocrine cells synthesize, accumulate, release neurotransmitters in the islet milieu, and possess receptors able to decode these signals. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of neurotransmitter/neuropetide signaling pathways present within the islet. Then, we focus on evidence supporting the concept that neurotransmitters/neuropeptides and their receptors are interesting new targets to preserve β-cell function and mass. A greater understanding of how this network of signals works in physiological and pathological conditions would advance our knowledge of islet biology and physiology and uncover potentially new areas of pharmacological intervention. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 756-767, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26332080

  8. Hypothalamic neuropeptide signaling in alcohol addiction.

    PubMed

    Barson, Jessica R; Leibowitz, Sarah F

    2016-02-01

    The hypothalamus is now known to regulate alcohol intake in addition to its established role in food intake, in part through neuromodulatory neurochemicals termed neuropeptides. Certain orexigenic neuropeptides act in the hypothalamus to promote alcohol drinking, although they affect different aspects of the drinking response. These neuropeptides, which include galanin, the endogenous opioid enkephalin, and orexin/hypocretin, appear to stimulate alcohol intake not only through mechanisms that promote food intake but also by enhancing reward and reinforcement from alcohol. Moreover, these neuropeptides participate in a positive feedback relationship with alcohol, whereby they are upregulated by alcohol intake to promote even further consumption. They contrast with other orexigenic neuropeptides, such as melanin-concentrating hormone and neuropeptide Y, which promote alcohol intake under limited circumstances, are not consistently stimulated by alcohol, and do not enhance reward. They also contrast with neuropeptides that can be anorexigenic, including the endogenous opioid dynorphin, corticotropin-releasing factor, and melanocortins, which act in the hypothalamus to inhibit alcohol drinking as well as reward and therefore counter the ingestive drive promoted by orexigenic neuropeptides. Thus, while multiple hypothalamic neuropeptides may work together to regulate different aspects of the alcohol drinking response, excessive signaling from orexigenic neuropeptides or inadequate signaling from anorexigenic neuropeptides can therefore allow alcohol drinking to become dysregulated. PMID:25689818

  9. Structural requirements of bitter taste receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Niv, Masha Y.; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    An important question in taste research is how 25 receptors of the human TAS2R family detect thousands of structurally diverse compounds. An answer to this question may arise from the observation that TAS2Rs in general are broadly tuned to interact with numerous substances. Ultimately, interaction with chemically diverse agonists requires architectures of binding pockets tailored to combine flexibility with selectivity. The present study determines the structure of hTAS2R binding pockets. We focused on a subfamily of closely related hTAS2Rs exhibiting pronounced amino acid sequence identities but unique agonist activation spectra. The generation of chimeric and mutant receptors followed by calcium imaging analyses identified receptor regions and amino acid residues critical for activation of hTAS2R46, -R43, and -R31. We found that the carboxyl-terminal regions of the investigated receptors are crucial for agonist selectivity. Intriguingly, exchanging two residues located in transmembrane domain seven between hTAS2R46, activated by strychnine, and hTAS2R31, activated by aristolochic acid, was sufficient to invert agonist selectivity. Further mutagenesis revealed additional positions involved in agonist interaction. The transfer of functionally relevant amino acids identified in hTAS2R46 to the corresponding positions of hTAS2R43 and -R31 resulted in pharmacological properties indistinguishable from the parental hTAS2R46. In silico modeling of hTAS2R46 allowed us to visualize the putative mode of interaction between agonists and hTAS2Rs. Detailed structure-function analyses of hTAS2Rs may ultimately pave the way for the development of specific antagonists urgently needed for more sophisticated analyses of human bitter taste perception. PMID:20534469

  10. Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) – focus on receptor-receptor-interactions and their physiological and pathophysiological impact

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) are a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with four members, PAR1, PAR2, PAR3 and PAR4, playing critical functions in hemostasis, thrombosis, embryonic development, wound healing, inflammation and cancer progression. PARs are characterized by a unique activation mechanism involving receptor cleavage by different proteinases at specific sites within the extracellular amino-terminus and the exposure of amino-terminal “tethered ligand“ domains that bind to and activate the cleaved receptors. After activation, the PAR family members are able to stimulate complex intracellular signalling networks via classical G protein-mediated pathways and beta-arrestin signalling. In addition, different receptor crosstalk mechanisms critically contribute to a high diversity of PAR signal transduction and receptor-trafficking processes that result in multiple physiological effects. In this review, we summarize current information about PAR-initiated physical and functional receptor interactions and their physiological and pathological roles. We focus especially on PAR homo- and heterodimerization, transactivation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and receptor serine/threonine kinases (RSTKs), communication with other GPCRs, toll-like receptors and NOD-like receptors, ion channel receptors, and on PAR association with cargo receptors. In addition, we discuss the suitability of these receptor interaction mechanisms as targets for modulating PAR signalling in disease. PMID:24215724

  11. 5-OHKF and NorKA, Depsipeptides from a Hawaiian Collection of Bryopsis pennata: Binding Properties for NorKA to the Human Neuropeptide Y Y1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jiangtao; Caballero-George, Catherina; Wang, Bin; Rao, Karumanchi V.; Shilabin, Abbas Gholipour; Hamann, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    Two new cyclic depsipeptides, 5-OHKF (1) and norKA (2), together with the known congeners kahalalide F (3) and isokahalalide F ((4S)- methylhexanoic kahalalide F) (4) were isolated from the green alga Bryopsis pennata. The structures of the new compounds were established on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic analysis and mass spectrometric (ESIMS) data. The absolute configuration of each amino acid of 5-OHKF (1) and norKA (2) was determined by chemical degradation and Marfey’s analysis. The biological activities of these two compounds are also reported. PMID:19916528

  12. Evolutionary conservation of neuropeptide expression in the thymus of different species

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Alberto B; Aw, Danielle; Palmer, Donald B

    2006-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the immune and neuroendocrine systems cross talk by sharing ligands and receptors. Hormones and neuropeptides produced by the neuroendocrine system often modulate the function of lymphoid organs and immune cells. We have previously reported the intrathymic expression of somatostatin (SOM) in the mouse and that several neuropeptides, most notably calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), SOM and substance P (SP), can modulate thymocyte development. However, little is known about the intrathymic expression of these neuropeptides either in the mouse or in other species. Moreover, a comparative analysis of the expression of these molecules would highlight the evolutionary importance of intrathymic neuroendocrine interactions in T-cell development. We have studied the expression of different neuropeptides in the thymus of zebrafish, Xenopus, avians, rodent, porcine, equine and human by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. We found that CGRP, NPY, SOM, SP and vasointestinal polypeptide (VIP) are expressed in the thymus of all species investigated. The thymic location of many of these neuropeptides was conserved and appears to be within the stromal compartments. Interestingly, in the avian thymus the expression of CGRP, SOM and SP appears to change depending on the age of the tissue. These findings suggest that neuropeptides may play an important role in T-cell development and provide further evidence of cross talk between the immune and neuroendocrine systems. PMID:16630030

  13. Endothelin (ET)-1-induced inhibition of ATP release from PC-12 cells is mediated by the ETB receptor: differential response to ET-1 on ATP, neuropeptide Y, and dopamine levels.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A; Westfall, T C; Macarthur, H

    2005-06-01

    During sympathetic neurotransmitter release, there is evidence for differential modulation of cotransmitter release by endothelin (ET)-1. Using nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells, the effects of ET-1 on K(+)-stimulated release of ATP, dopamine (DA), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were quantified using high-pressure liquid chromatography or radioimmunoassay. ET-1, in a concentration-dependent manner, inhibited the release of ATP, but not DA and NPY. Preincubation with the ET(A/B) antagonist, PD 142893 (N-acetyl-beta-phenyl-D-Phe-Leu-Asp-Ile-Ile-Trp), reversed the inhibitory effect of ET-1 on ATP release, which remained unaffected in the presence of the ET(A)-specific antagonist BQ123 [cyclo(D-Asp-Pro-D-Val-Leu-D-Trp)]. The ET(B) agonists, sarafotoxin 6c (Cys-Thr-Cys-Asn-Asp-Met-Thr-Asp-Glu-Glu-Cys-Leu-Asn-Phe-Cys-His-Gln-Asp-Val-Ile-Trp), BQ 3020 (N-acetyl-[Ala(11,15)]-endothelin 1 fragment 6-21Ac-Leu-Met-Asp-Lys-Glu-Ala-Val-Tyr-Phe-Ala-His-Leu-Asp-IIe-IIe-Trp), and IRL 1620 (N-succinyl-[Glu(9), Ala(11,15)]-endothelin 1 fragment 8-21Suc-Asp-Glu-Glu-Ala-Val-Tyr-Phe-Ala-His-Leu-Asp-Ile-Ile-Trp), decreased K(+)-stimulated release of ATP in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was reversed by the ET(B) antagonists RES 701-1 [cyclic (Gly1-Asp9) (Gly-Asn-Trp-His-Gly-Thr-Ala-Pro-Asp-Trp-Phe-Phe-Asn-Tyr-Tyr-Trp)] and BQ 788 (N-[N-[N-[(2,6-dimethyl-1-piperidinyl)carbonyl]-4-methyl-l-leucyl]-1-(methoxycarbonyl)-D-tryptophyl]-D-norleucine sodium salt). Preincubation of PC12 cells with pertussis toxin reversed the ET-1-induced inhibition of the K(+)-evoked ATP release. Real-time intracellular calcium level recordings were performed on PC-12 cell suspensions, and ET-1 induced a dose-dependent decrease in the K(+)-evoked calcium levels. Nifedipine, the L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel antagonist, caused inhibition of the K(+)-stimulated ATP release, but the N-type Ca(2+) channel antagonist, omega-conotoxin GVIA, did not reverse the effect on ATP release

  14. Ant trail pheromone biosynthesis is triggered by a neuropeptide hormone.

    PubMed

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  15. Ant Trail Pheromone Biosynthesis Is Triggered by a Neuropeptide Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Man-Yeon; Vander Meer, Robert K.

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of insect chemical communication including pheromone identification, synthesis, and their role in behavior has advanced tremendously over the last half-century. However, endocrine regulation of pheromone biosynthesis has progressed slowly due to the complexity of direct and/or indirect hormonal activation of the biosynthetic cascades resulting in insect pheromones. Over 20 years ago, a neurohormone, pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN) was identified that stimulated sex pheromone biosynthesis in a lepidopteran moth. Since then, the physiological role, target site, and signal transduction of PBAN has become well understood for sex pheromone biosynthesis in moths. Despite that PBAN-like peptides (∼200) have been identified from various insect Orders, their role in pheromone regulation had not expanded to the other insect groups except for Lepidoptera. Here, we report that trail pheromone biosynthesis in the Dufour's gland (DG) of the fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, is regulated by PBAN. RNAi knock down of PBAN gene (in subesophageal ganglia) or PBAN receptor gene (in DG) expression inhibited trail pheromone biosynthesis. Reduced trail pheromone was documented analytically and through a behavioral bioassay. Extension of PBAN's role in pheromone biosynthesis to a new target insect, mode of action, and behavioral function will renew research efforts on the involvement of PBAN in pheromone biosynthesis in Insecta. PMID:23226278

  16. Origin of basal activity in mammalian olfactory receptor neurons

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian odorant receptors form a large, diverse group of G protein–coupled receptors that determine the sensitivity and response profile of olfactory receptor neurons. But little is known if odorant receptors control basal and also stimulus-induced cellular properties of olfactory receptor neurons other than ligand specificity. This study demonstrates that different odorant receptors have varying degrees of basal activity, which drives concomitant receptor current fluctuations and basal action potential firing. This basal activity can be suppressed by odorants functioning as inverse agonists. Furthermore, odorant-stimulated olfactory receptor neurons expressing different odorant receptors can have strikingly different response patterns in the later phases of prolonged stimulation. Thus, the influence of odorant receptor choice on response characteristics is much more complex than previously thought, which has important consequences on odor coding and odor information transfer to the brain. PMID:20974772

  17. Fatty acid activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR).

    PubMed

    Bocos, C; Göttlicher, M; Gearing, K; Banner, C; Enmark, E; Teboul, M; Crickmore, A; Gustafsson, J A

    1995-06-01

    Peroxisome proliferators such as clofibric acid, nafenopin, and WY-14,643 have been shown to activate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), a member of the steroid nuclear receptor superfamily. We have cloned the cDNA from rat that is homologous to that from mouse, which encodes a 97% similar protein. To search for physiologically occurring activators, we established a transcriptional transactivation assay by stably expressing in CHO cells a chimera of rat PPAR and the human glucocorticoid receptor that activates expression of the placental alkaline phosphatase reporter gene under the control of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter. 150 microM concentrations of arachidonic or linoleic acid but not of dehydroepiandrosterone, cholesterol, or 25-hydroxy-cholesterol, activated the receptor chimera. In addition, saturated fatty acids induced the reporter gene. Shortening the chain length to n = 6 or introduction of an omega-terminal carboxylic group abolished the activation potential of the fatty acid. To test whether a common PPAR binding metabolite might be formed from free fatty acids we tested the effects of differentially beta-oxidizable fatty acids and inhibitors of fatty acid metabolism. The peroxisomal proliferation-inducing, non-beta-oxidizable, tetradecylthioacetic acid activated PPAR to the same extent as the strong peroxisomal proliferator WY-14,643, whereas the homologous beta-oxidizable tetradecylthiopropionic acid was only as potent as a non-substituted fatty acid. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors, radical scavengers or cytochrome P450 inhibitors did not affect activation of PPAR. In conclusion, beta-oxidation is apparently not required for the formation of the PPAR-activating molecule and this moiety might be a fatty acid, its ester with CoA, or a further derivative of the activated fatty acid prior to beta-oxidation of the acyl-CoA ester. PMID:7626496

  18. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Facilitates Epileptiform Activity in the Entorhinal Cortex: Roles of CRF2 Receptors and PKA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kurada, Lalitha; Yang, Chuanxiu; Lei, Saobo

    2014-01-01

    Whereas corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) has been considered as the most potent epileptogenic neuropeptide in the brain, its action site and underlying mechanisms in epilepsy have not been determined. Here, we found that the entorhinal cortex (EC) expresses high level of CRF and CRF2 receptors without expression of CRF1 receptors. Bath application of CRF concentration-dependently increased the frequency of picrotoxin (PTX)-induced epileptiform activity recorded from layer III of the EC in entorhinal slices although CRF alone did not elicit epileptiform activity. CRF facilitated the induction of epileptiform activity in the presence of subthreshold concentration of PTX which normally would not elicit epileptiform activity. Bath application of the inhibitor for CRF-binding proteins, CRF6-33, also increased the frequency of PTX-induced epileptiform activity suggesting that endogenously released CRF is involved in epileptogenesis. CRF-induced facilitation of epileptiform activity was mediated via CRF2 receptors because pharmacological antagonism and knockout of CRF2 receptors blocked the facilitatory effects of CRF on epileptiform activity. Application of the adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitors blocked CRF-induced facilitation of epileptiform activity and elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) level by application of the AC activators or phosphodiesterase inhibitor increased the frequency of PTX-induced epileptiform activity, demonstrating that CRF-induced increases in epileptiform activity are mediated by an increase in intracellular cAMP. However, application of selective protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors reduced, not completely blocked CRF-induced enhancement of epileptiform activity suggesting that PKA is only partially required. Our results provide a novel cellular and molecular mechanism whereby CRF modulates epilepsy. PMID:24505399

  19. Propacetamol-Induced Injection Pain Is Associated with Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Channels.

    PubMed

    Schillers, Florian; Eberhardt, Esther; Leffler, Andreas; Eberhardt, Mirjam

    2016-10-01

    Propacetamol (PPCM) is a prodrug of paracetamol (PCM), which was generated to increase water solubility of PCM for intravenous delivery. PPCM is rapidly hydrolyzed by plasma esterases to PCM and diethylglycine and shares some structural and metabolic properties with lidocaine. Although PPCM is considered to be comparable to PCM regarding its analgesic properties, injection pain is a common side effect described for PPCM but not PCM. Injection pain is a frequent and unpleasant side effect of numerous drugs in clinical use, and previous reports have indicated that the ligand gated ion channels transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) can mediate this effect on sensory neurons. This study aimed to investigate molecular mechanisms by which PPCM, in contrast to PCM, causes injection pain. Therefore, human TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors were expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and investigated by means of whole-cell patch clamp and ratiometric calcium imaging. PPCM (but not PCM) activated TRPV1, sensitized heat-induced currents, and caused an increase in intracellular calcium. In TRPA1-expressing cells however, both PPCM and PCM evoked calcium responses but failed to induce inward currents. Intracutaneous injection of PPCM, but not of PCM, in human volunteers induced an intense and short-lasting pain and an increase in superficial blood flow, indicating activation of nociceptive C fibers and subsequent neuropeptide release. In conclusion, activation of human TRPV1 by PPCM seems to be a relevant mechanism for induction of pain upon intracutaneous injection and thus also for pain reported as an adverse side effect upon intravenous administration. PMID:27457427

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies to the Human Insulin Receptor that Activate Glucose Transport but not Insulin Receptor Kinase Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsayeth, John R.; Caro, Jose F.; Sinha, Madhur K.; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldfine, Ira D.

    1987-05-01

    Three mouse monoclonal antibodies were produced that reacted with the α subunit of the human insulin receptor. All three both immunoprecipitated 125I-labeled insulin receptors from IM-9 lymphocytes and competitively inhibited 125I-labeled insulin binding to its receptor. Unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor autophosphorylation in both intact IM-9 lymphocytes and purified human placental insulin receptors. Moreover, unlike insulin, the antibodies failed to stimulate receptor-mediated phosphorylation of exogenous substrates. However, like insulin, two of the three antibodies stimulated glucose transport in isolated human adipocytes. One antibody, on a molar basis, was as potent as insulin. These studies indicate, therefore, that monoclonal antibodies to the insulin receptor can mimic a major function of insulin without activating receptor kinase activity. They also raise the possibility that certain actions of insulin such as stimulation of glucose transport may not require the activation of receptor kinase activity.

  1. Evidence for the involvement of opioid neuropeptides in the adherence and migration of immunocompetent invertebrate hemocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Stefano, G B; Leung, M K; Zhao, X H; Scharrer, B

    1989-01-01

    Evidence for the participation of opioid neuropeptides in immunoregulatory activities, especially cellular adherence and migration, has been obtained in representatives of two phyla of invertebrates, the mollusc Mytilus edulis and the insect Leucophaea maderae. The injection of a synthetic analog of [Met]enkephalin [( D-Ala2,Met5]enkephalinamide, DAMA; 10(-6) M) had a stimulatory, naloxone-reversible effect on the directed migration of immunocompetent hemocytes. Incubation of hemolymph in the presence of exogenous or endogenous opioid material significantly enhanced the adherence of hemocytes on albumin-coated slides as demonstrated by use of indirect Zeiss-Zonax reflectance computer analysis. Conversely, hemocyte adherence was markedly reduced by the addition of naloxone (10(-8) M) to the incubation medium, either alone or in combination with DAMA. The antagonistic effects of naloxone on the stimulatory activities of opioids indicate that, like those previously reported in mammals, they are receptor-mediated. The presence of an endogenous [Met]enkephalin-like material was demonstrated in cell-free hemolymph as well as sequestered hemocytes by use of high-pressure liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. These results demonstrate that the capacity of immunocytes to release and respond to opioid neuropeptide messengers is not restricted to mammalian organisms but was developed early in the course of evolution. Images PMID:2536172

  2. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Kamel; Abdelaziz, Ahmed; Rybacka, Aleksandra; Roncaglioni, Alessandra; Tropsha, Alexander; Varnek, Alexandre; Zakharov, Alexey; Worth, Andrew; Richard, Ann M.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Trisciuzzi, Daniela; Fourches, Denis; Horvath, Dragos; Benfenati, Emilio; Muratov, Eugene; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Grisoni, Francesca; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe F.; Incisivo, Giuseppina M.; Hong, Huixiao; Ng, Hui W.; Tetko, Igor V.; Balabin, Ilya; Kancherla, Jayaram; Shen, Jie; Burton, Julien; Nicklaus, Marc; Cassotti, Matteo; Nikolov, Nikolai G.; Nicolotti, Orazio; Andersson, Patrik L.; Zang, Qingda; Politi, Regina; Beger, Richard D.; Todeschini, Roberto; Huang, Ruili; Farag, Sherif; Rosenberg, Sine A.; Slavov, Svetoslav; Hu, Xin; Judson, Richard S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Humans are exposed to thousands of man-made chemicals in the environment. Some chemicals mimic natural endocrine hormones and, thus, have the potential to be endocrine disruptors. Most of these chemicals have never been tested for their ability to interact with the estrogen receptor (ER). Risk assessors need tools to prioritize chemicals for evaluation in costly in vivo tests, for instance, within the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program. Objectives: We describe a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) and demonstrate the efficacy of using predictive computational models trained on high-throughput screening data to evaluate thousands of chemicals for ER-related activity and prioritize them for further testing. Methods: CERAPP combined multiple models developed in collaboration with 17 groups in the United States and Europe to predict ER activity of a common set of 32,464 chemical structures. Quantitative structure–activity relationship models and docking approaches were employed, mostly using a common training set of 1,677 chemical structures provided by the U.S. EPA, to build a total of 40 categorical and 8 continuous models for binding, agonist, and antagonist ER activity. All predictions were evaluated on a set of 7,522 chemicals curated from the literature. To overcome the limitations of single models, a consensus was built by weighting models on scores based on their evaluated accuracies. Results: Individual model scores ranged from 0.69 to 0.85, showing high prediction reliabilities. Out of the 32,464 chemicals, the consensus model predicted 4,001 chemicals (12.3%) as high priority actives and 6,742 potential actives (20.8%) to be considered for further testing. Conclusion: This project demonstrated the possibility to screen large libraries of chemicals using a consensus of different in silico approaches. This concept will be applied in future projects related to other

  3. Neuropeptides as lung cancer growth factors.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript is written in honor of the Festschrift for Abba Kastin. I met Abba at a Society for Neuroscience meeting and learned that he was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Peptides. I submitted manuscripts to the journal on "Neuropeptides as Growth Factors in Cancer" and subsequently was named to the Editorial Advisory Board. Over the past 30 years I have published dozens of manuscripts in Peptides and reviewed hundreds of submitted manuscripts. It was always rewarding to interact with Abba, a consummate professional. When I attended meetings in New Orleans I would sometimes go out to dinner with him at the restaurant "Commanders Palace". When I chaired the Summer Neuropeptide Conference we were honored to have him receive the Fleur Strand Award one year in Israel. I think that his biggest editorial contribution has been the "Handbook of Biologically Active Peptides." I served as a Section Editor on "Cancer/Anticancer Peptides" and again found that it was a pleasure working with him. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which bombesin-like peptides, neurotensin and vasoactive intestinal peptide regulate the growth of lung cancer. PMID:25836991

  4. Identification of specific sites in the third intracellular loop and carboxyl terminus of the Bombyx mori PBAN receptor crucial for ligand-induced internalization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is mediated by the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR). Similar to other rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors, the silkmoth Bombyx mori PBANR (BmPBANR) undergoes agonist-induced internalization. Despite interest in developing...

  5. Molecular and pharmacological characterization of the first Chelicerata pyrokinin receptor from a worldwide tick vector of zoonotic pathogens, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We identified the first pyrokinin receptor (Rhimi-PK-R) from the Chelicerata and analyzed structure-activity relationships of cognate ligand neuropeptides and their analogs. This receptor, which we cloned from larvae of the tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae), is the ortholog of the inse...

  6. How IGF-1 activates its receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kavran, Jennifer M; McCabe, Jacqueline M; Byrne, Patrick O; Connacher, Mary Katherine; Wang, Zhihong; Ramek, Alexander; Sarabipour, Sarvenaz; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Hristova, Kalina; Cole, Philip A; Leahy, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) is involved in growth and survival of normal and neoplastic cells. A ligand-dependent conformational change is thought to regulate IGF1R activity, but the nature of this change is unclear. We point out an underappreciated dimer in the crystal structure of the related Insulin Receptor (IR) with Insulin bound that allows direct comparison with unliganded IR and suggests a mechanism by which ligand regulates IR/IGF1R activity. We test this mechanism in a series of biochemical and biophysical assays and find the IGF1R ectodomain maintains an autoinhibited state in which the TMs are held apart. Ligand binding releases this constraint, allowing TM association and unleashing an intrinsic propensity of the intracellular regions to autophosphorylate. Enzymatic studies of full-length and kinase-containing fragments show phosphorylated IGF1R is fully active independent of ligand and the extracellular-TM regions. The key step triggered by ligand binding is thus autophosphorylation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03772.001 PMID:25255214

  7. Central effect of vasotocin 4 receptor (VT4R/V1aR) antagonists on the stress response and food intake in chicks given neuropeptide Y (NPY).

    PubMed

    Kuenzel, Wayne J; Hancock, Megan; Nagarajan, Gurueswar; Aman, N Alphonse; Kang, Seong W

    2016-05-01

    Previous studies identified SR-49059 as a most effective antagonist of the avian vasotocin 4 receptor (VT4R) compared to other candidate blockers including the Manning compound using in silico 3 dimensional (3D) modeling/docking analysis of the chicken VT4R and an in vitro anterior pituitary cell culture study. The present experiments were designed to validate whether SR-49059 and the Manning compound would likewise be effective in vivo in blocking the VT4R when applied intracerebroventricularly (ICV) to chicks. Two treatments were tested, a stressor (immobilization) and administration of neuropeptide Y (NPY), a potent orexigenic compound. In the first experiment, birds were given the Manning compound, SR-49059 or physiological saline ICV followed by immobilization stress. Blood samples were taken and corticosterone (CORT) was determined by radioimmunoassay. It was hypothesized that both antagonists would reduce the stress response. A second experiment examined the role of the VT4R in food intake regulation. The Manning compound, SR-49059 or physiological saline was administered prior to NPY and food intake was monitored for 1h. It was hypothesized that each of the two antagonists coupled with NPY would augment food intake above the intake resulting from saline plus NPY administration. Related to the second experiment was a third that examined the difference between the effect of central administration of NPY versus SR-49059 in releasing CORT. Results of the first study showed that the Manning compound or SR-49059 prior to stress decreased CORT levels compared to controls while the second experiment showed that SR-49059 or the Manning compound plus NPY, enhanced food intake above that of the experimental group given saline and NPY. The last study showed that NPY increased plasma CORT above birds given SR-49059 centrally or saline administered controls. Taken together, results suggest that the avian VT4R is involved in the central neuroendocrine stress response as

  8. Neuropeptide signaling remodels chemosensory circuit composition in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Leinwand, Sarah G.; Chalasani, Sreekanth H.

    2013-01-01

    Neural circuits detect environmental changes and drive behavior. The routes of information flow through dense neural networks are dynamic; however, the mechanisms underlying this circuit flexibility are poorly understood. Here, we define a novel, sensory context-dependent and neuropeptide-regulated switch in the composition of a C. elegans salt sensory circuit. The primary salt detectors, ASE sensory neurons, use BLI-4 endoprotease-dependent cleavage to release the insulin-like peptide INS-6 in response to large but not small changes in external salt stimuli. Insulins, signaling through the insulin receptor DAF-2, functionally switch the AWC olfactory sensory neuron into an interneuron in the salt circuit. Animals with disrupted insulin signaling have deficits in salt attraction, suggesting that peptidergic signaling potentiates responses to high salt stimuli, which may promote ion homeostasis. Our results show that sensory context and neuropeptide signaling modify neural networks and suggest general mechanisms for generating flexible behavioral outputs by modulating neural circuit composition. PMID:24013594

  9. Neuropeptide signaling remodels chemosensory circuit composition in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Leinwand, Sarah G; Chalasani, Sreekanth H

    2013-10-01

    Neural circuits detect environmental changes and drive behavior. The routes of information flow through dense neural networks are dynamic, but the mechanisms underlying this circuit flexibility are poorly understood. Here, we define a sensory context-dependent and neuropeptide-regulated switch in the composition of a C. elegans salt sensory circuit. The primary salt detectors, ASE sensory neurons, used BLI-4 endoprotease-dependent cleavage to release the insulin-like peptide INS-6 in response to large, but not small, changes in external salt stimuli. Insulins, signaling through the insulin receptor DAF-2, functionally switched the AWC olfactory sensory neuron into an interneuron in the salt circuit. Worms with disrupted insulin signaling had deficits in salt attraction, suggesting that peptidergic signaling potentiates responses to high salt stimuli, which may promote ion homeostasis. Our results indicate that sensory context and neuropeptide signaling modify neural networks and suggest general mechanisms for generating flexible behavioral outputs by modulating neural circuit composition. PMID:24013594

  10. Activation of the protein-tyrosine kinase associated with the bombesin receptor complex in small cell lung carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudino, G.; Cirillo, D.; Naldini, L.; Rossino, P.; Comoglio, P.M. )

    1988-04-01

    It has been hypothesized that bombesin-like peptides produced by small cell lung carcinomas may sustain deregulated proliferation through an autocrine mechanism. The authors have shown that the neuropeptide bombesin leads to the activation of a protein-tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates a 115-kDa protein (p115) associated with the bombesin receptor complex in mouse Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. They now report that phosphotyrosine antibodies recognize a 115-kDa protein, phosphorylated on tyrosine, in four human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines producing bombesin but not in a nonproducer variant line. p115 from detergent-treated small cell lung carcinoma cells binds to bombesin-Sepharose and can be phosphorylated on tyrosine in the presence of radiolabeled ATP and Mn{sup 2+}. As for the p115 immunoprecipitated from mouse fibroblast, the small cell lung carcinoma p115 can be phosphorylated in an immunocomplex kinase assay. However, the latter does not require the presence of exogenous bombesin for activity. Binding data, obtained by using radiolabeled ligand, suggest receptor occupancy in the cell lines producing bombesin. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that proliferation in some human small cell lung carcinoma lines is under autocrine control, regulated through activation of bombesin receptors.

  11. Leptin and its receptors.

    PubMed

    Wada, Nobuhiro; Hirako, Satoshi; Takenoya, Fumiko; Kageyama, Haruaki; Okabe, Mai; Shioda, Seiji

    2014-11-01

    Leptin is mainly produced in the white adipose tissue before being secreted into the blood and transported across the blood-brain barrier. Leptin binds to a specific receptor (LepR) that has numerous subtypes (LepRa, LepRb, LepRc, LepRd, LepRe, and LepRf). LepRb, in particular, is expressed in several brain nuclei, including the arcuate nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus, and the dorsomedial, lateral and ventromedial regions of the hypothalamus. LepRb is also co-expressed with several neuropeptides, including proopiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, galanin-like peptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide W. Functionally, LepRb induces activation of the JAK2/ERK, /STAT3, /STAT5 and IRS/PI3 kinase signaling cascades, which are important for the regulation of energy homeostasis and appetite in mammals. In this review, we discuss the structure, genetics and distribution of the leptin receptors, and their role in cell signaling mechanisms. PMID:25218975

  12. Activation of P2X(7) receptors stimulates the expression of P2Y(2) receptor mRNA in astrocytes cultured from rat brain.

    PubMed

    D'Alimonte, I; Ciccarelli, R; Di Iorio, P; Nargi, E; Buccella, S; Giuliani, P; Rathbone, M P; Jiang, S; Caciagli, F; Ballerini, P

    2007-01-01

    Under pathological conditions brain cells release ATP at concentrations reported to activate P2X(7) ionotropic receptor subtypes expressed in both neuronal and glial cells. In the present study we report that the most potent P2X(7) receptor agonist BzATP stimulates the expression of the metabotropic ATP receptor P2Y(2) in cultured rat brain astrocytes. In other cell types several kinds of stimulation, including stress or injury, induce P2Y(2) expression that, in turn, is involved in different cell reactions. Similarly, it has recently been found that in astrocytes and astrocytoma cells P2Y(2) sites can trigger neuroprotective pathways through the activation of several mechanisms, including the induction of genes for antiapoptotic factors, neurotrophins, growth factors and neuropeptides. Here we present evidence that P2Y(2) mRNA expression in cultured astrocytes peaks 6 h after BzATP exposure and returns to basal levels after 24 h. This effect was mimicked by high ATP concentrations (1 mM) and was abolished by P2X(7)-antagonists oATP and BBG. The BzATP-evoked P2Y(2) receptor up-regulation in cultured astrocytes was coupled to an increased UTP-mediated intracellular calcium response. This effect was inhibited by oATP and BBG and by P2Y(2)siRNA, thus supporting evidence of increased P2Y(2) activity. To further investigate the mechanisms by which P2X(7) receptors mediated the P2Y(2) mRNA up-regulation, the cells were pre-treated with the chelating agent EGTA, or with inhibitors of mitogen-activated kinase (MAPK) (PD98059) or protein kinase C, (GF109203X). Each inhibitor significantly reduced the extent to which BzATP induced P2Y(2) mRNA. Both BzATP and ATP (1 mM) increased ERK1/2 activation. P2X(7)-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation was unaffected by pre-treatment of astrocytes with EGTA whereas it was inhibited by GF109203X. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), an activator of PKCs, rapidly increased ERK1/2 activation. We conclude that activation of P2X(7) receptors in

  13. THE NEUROPEPTIDE VIP: DIRECT EFFECTS ON IMMUNE CELLS AND INVOLVEMENT IN INFLAMMATORY AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, Doina; Hooper, Kirsten M.; Kong, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides represent an important category of endogenous contributors to the establishment and maintenance of immune deviation in immune privileged organs such as the CNS, and in the control of acute inflammation in the peripheral immune organs. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a major immunoregulatory neuropeptide widely distributed in the central and peripheral nervous system. In addition to neurons, VIP is synthesized by immune cells which also express VIP receptors. Here we review the current information on VIP production and VIP receptor mediated effects in the immune system, the role of endogenous and exogenous VIP in inflammatory and autoimmune disorders, and present and future VIP therapeutic approaches. PMID:25422088

  14. Hypothalamic Neuropeptide 26RFa Acts as an Incretin to Regulate Glucose Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Prévost, Gaëtan; Jeandel, Lydie; Arabo, Arnaud; Coëffier, Moïse; El Ouahli, Mariama; Picot, Marie; Alexandre, David; Gobet, Françoise; Leprince, Jérôme; Berrahmoune, Hind; Déchelotte, Pierre; Malagon, Maria; Bonner, Caroline; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Chigr, Fatiha; Lefebvre, Hervé; Anouar, Youssef; Chartrel, Nicolas

    2015-08-01

    26RFa is a hypothalamic neuropeptide that promotes food intake. 26RFa is upregulated in obese animal models, and its orexigenic activity is accentuated in rodents fed a high-fat diet, suggesting that this neuropeptide might play a role in the development and maintenance of the obese status. As obesity is frequently associated with type 2 diabetes, we investigated whether 26RFa may be involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. In the current study, we show a moderate positive correlation between plasma 26RFa levels and plasma insulin in patients with diabetes. Plasma 26RFa concentration also increases in response to an oral glucose tolerance test. In addition, we found that 26RFa and its receptor GPR103 are present in human pancreatic β-cells as well as in the gut. In mice, 26RFa attenuates the hyperglycemia induced by a glucose load, potentiates insulin sensitivity, and increases plasma insulin concentrations. Consistent with these data, 26RFa stimulates insulin production by MIN6 insulinoma cells. Finally, we show, using in vivo and in vitro approaches, that a glucose load induces a massive secretion of 26RFa by the small intestine. Altogether, the present data indicate that 26RFa acts as an incretin to regulate glucose homeostasis. PMID:25858563

  15. The role of neuropeptide Y in the pathophysiology of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ping; Sun, Weiwei; Zhang, Chenliang; Song, Zhiyuan; Lin, Shu

    2016-10-01

    With average life expectancy rising greatly, the incidence rate of arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) has significantly increased. The heart disease has now become the number one killer that threatens the global population health, the second is stroke. It will be of great significance to investigate the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of ASCVD in order to promote effective prevention and treatment. The neuropeptide Y (NPY) has now been discovered for more than thirty years and is widely distributed in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral tissues. By combining with certain receptors, NPY performs a variety of physiological functions, including the regulation of food intake, cardiovascular effects, development, hormonal secretion, sexual behavior, biological rhythms, temperature and emotion. In ASCVD, increased peripheral NPY was involved in the pathophysiological process of atherosclerosis through affecting the vascular endothelial dysfunction, the formation of foam cells, the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells, the local inflammatory response of plaques and the activation and aggregation of platelets. Via central and/or the peripheral nervous system, increased NPY was associated with dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance, and smoking which are all risk factors for ASCVD. In this review, we summarize the role of neuropeptide Y in the development of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. PMID:27389447

  16. Immunoreactive intensity of FXPRL amide neuropeptides in response to environmental conditions in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Hagino, Ayako; Kitagawa, Norio; Imai, Kunio; Yamashita, Okitsugu; Shiomi, Kunihiro

    2010-12-01

    In the silkworm Bombyx mori, the diapause hormone-pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide gene, DH-PBAN, is a neuropeptide gene that encodes a polypeptide precursor consisting in five Phe-X-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH(2) (FXPRL) amide (FXPRLa) neuropeptides; DH (diapause hormone), PBAN (pheromone-biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide) and α-, β- and γ-SGNPs (subesophageal ganglion neuropeptides). These neuropeptides are synthesized in DH-PBAN-producing neurosecretory cells contained within three neuromeres, four mandibular cells, six maxillary cells, two labial cells (SLb) and four lateral cells of the subesophageal ganglion. DH is solely responsible, among the FXPRLa peptide family, for embryonic diapause. Functional differentiation has been previously suggested to occur at each neuromere, with the SLb cells releasing DH through brain innervation in order to induce embryonic diapause. We have investigated the immunoreactive intensity of DH in the SLb when thermal (25°C or 15°C) and light (continuous illumination or darkness) conditions are altered and following brain surgery that induces diapause or non-diapause eggs in the progeny. We have also examined the immunoreactivity of the other FXPRLa peptides by using anti-β-SGNP and anti-PBAN antibodies. Pupal SLb somata immunoreactivities seem to be affected by both thermal and light conditions during embryogenesis. Thus, we have been able to identify a close correlation between the immunoreactive intensity of neuropeptides and environmental conditions relating to the determination of embryonic diapause in B. mori. PMID:21103995

  17. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  18. Dendritic NMDA receptors activate axonal calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Jason M.; Jahr, Craig E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation can alter synaptic strength by regulating transmitter release from a variety of neurons in the CNS. As NMDARs are permeable to Ca2+ and monovalent cations, they could alter release directly by increasing presynaptic Ca2+ or indirectly by axonal depolarization sufficient to activate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Using two-photon microscopy to measure Ca2+ excursions, we found that somatic depolarization or focal activation of dendritic NMDARs elicited small Ca2+ transients in axon varicosities of cerebellar stellate cell interneurons. These axonal transients resulted from Ca2+ entry through VSCCs that were opened by the electrotonic spread of the NMDAR-mediated depolarization elicited in the dendrites. In contrast, we were unable to detect direct activation of NMDARs on axons indicating an exclusive somatodendritic expression of functional NMDARs. In cerebellar stellate cells, dendritic NMDAR activation masquerades as a presynaptic phenomenon and may influence Ca2+-dependent forms of presynaptic plasticity and release. PMID:18957221

  19. Model for growth hormone receptor activation based on subunit rotation within a receptor dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Richard J.; Adams, Julian J.; Pelekanos, Rebecca A.; Wan, Yu; McKinstry, William J.; Palethorpe, Kathryn; Seeber, Ruth M.; Monks, Thea A.; Eidne, Karin A.; Parker, Michael W.; Waters, Michael J.

    2010-07-13

    Growth hormone is believed to activate the growth hormone receptor (GHR) by dimerizing two identical receptor subunits, leading to activation of JAK2 kinase associated with the cytoplasmic domain. However, we have reported previously that dimerization alone is insufficient to activate full-length GHR. By comparing the crystal structure of the liganded and unliganded human GHR extracellular domain, we show here that there is no substantial change in its conformation on ligand binding. However, the receptor can be activated by rotation without ligand by inserting a defined number of alanine residues within the transmembrane domain. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and coimmunoprecipitation studies suggest that receptor subunits undergo specific transmembrane interactions independent of hormone binding. We propose an activation mechanism involving a relative rotation of subunits within a dimeric receptor as a result of asymmetric placement of the receptor-binding sites on the ligand.

  20. Activation of neurotensin receptor type 1 attenuates locomotor activity.

    PubMed

    Vadnie, Chelsea A; Hinton, David J; Choi, Sun; Choi, YuBin; Ruby, Christina L; Oliveros, Alfredo; Prieto, Miguel L; Park, Jun Hyun; Choi, Doo-Sup

    2014-10-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of neurotensin (NT) suppresses locomotor activity. However, the brain regions that mediate the locomotor depressant effect of NT and receptor subtype-specific mechanisms involved are unclear. Using a brain-penetrating, selective NT receptor type 1 (NTS1) agonist PD149163, we investigated the effect of systemic and brain region-specific NTS1 activation on locomotor activity. Systemic administration of PD149163 attenuated the locomotor activity of C57BL/6J mice both in a novel environment and in their homecage. However, mice developed tolerance to the hypolocomotor effect of PD149163 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.). Since NTS1 is known to modulate dopaminergic signaling, we examined whether PD149163 blocks dopamine receptor-mediated hyperactivity. Pretreatment with PD149163 (0.1 or 0.05 mg/kg, i.p.) inhibited D2R agonist bromocriptine (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-mediated hyperactivity. D1R agonist SKF-81297 (8 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hyperlocomotion was only inhibited by 0.1 mg/kg of PD149163. Since the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) have been implicated in the behavioral effects of NT, we examined whether microinjection of PD149163 into these regions reduces locomotion. Microinjection of PD149163 (2 pmol) into the NAc, but not the mPFC suppressed locomotor activity. In summary, our results indicate that systemic and intra-NAc activation of NTS1 is sufficient to reduce locomotion and NTS1 activation inhibits D2R-mediated hyperactivity. Our study will be helpful to identify pharmacological factors and a possible therapeutic window for NTS1-targeted therapies for movement disorders. PMID:24929110

  1. Effects of opioid antagonists naloxone and naltrexone on neuropeptide Y-induced feeding and brown fat thermogenesis in the rat. Neural site of action.

    PubMed Central

    Kotz, C M; Grace, M K; Briggs, J; Levine, A S; Billington, C J

    1995-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y administered intracerebroventricularly and into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus stimulates feeding and decreases brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. Although specific neuropeptide Y antagonists are not yet available, previous studies had shown that the opioid antagonist naloxone blocked neuropeptide Y-induced feeding when both drugs were injected intracerebroventricularly. We wanted to find out if naloxone injected into specific brain sites would block neuropeptide Y effects on feeding and brown fat thermogenesis. Rats were double injected in specific brain sites with neuropeptide Y and either naloxone or naltrexone (a congener of naloxone). Food intake and brown fat measures were assessed. Naloxone or naltrexone in the paraventricular nucleus weakly decreased paraventricular nucleus neuropeptide Y-induced feeding and did not affect neuropeptide Y-induced reductions in brown fat activity. Peripheral naloxone blocked intracerebroventricular neuropeptide Y-induced feeding and brown fat alterations. Fourth ventricular naloxone decreased paraventricular nucleus neuropeptide Y-induced feeding, and naltrexone given into the nucleus of the solitary tract blocked paraventricular nucleus neuropeptide Y-induced alterations in feeding and brown fat. These data indicate that neuropeptide Y in the paraventricular nucleus may act on feeding and brown fat thermogenesis through opioidergic pathways in the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:7615787

  2. Composition, assembly and activation of the avian progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Smith, D F; Toft, D O

    1992-03-01

    When isolated from chick oviduct cytosol by antibody adsorption, the inactive progesterone receptor is associated with the two heat shock proteins, hsp90 and hsp70, plus three additional proteins termed p54, p50, and p23 according to their molecular weights. While their functions remain unknown, all of these receptor associated proteins are dissociated upon receptor activation in intact cells. To better understand the assembly and activation mechanisms of progesterone receptor complexes, we have developed a cell-free system for studying receptor interactions with hsp90 and hsp70 and have used this system to examine requirements for hsp90 binding to the receptor. Purified receptor, free of hsp90 and immobilized on an antibody affinity resin, will rebind hsp90 in rabbit reticulocyte lysate when several conditions are met. These include: (1) absence of progesterone, (2) elevated temperature (30 degrees C), (3) presence of ATP, and (4) presence of Mg2+. We have obtained maximal hsp90 binding to receptor when lysate is supplemented with 3 mM MgCl2 and an ATP regenerating system. ATP depletion of lysate by dialysis or ATPase addition blocks hsp90 binding to the receptor. When progesterone is added to pre-formed receptor complexes in reticulocyte lysate it promotes activation and the dissociation of hsp90. This process is also dependent upon ATP. Thus, both the assembly, and activation of the progesterone receptor can be accomplished in the reticulocyte lysate system. PMID:1562503

  3. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Harriet A; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S; Gingell, Joseph J; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M W R; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W R; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Woolley, Michael J; Conner, Alex C; Pioszak, Augen A; Reynolds, Christopher A; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-05-27

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  4. Receptor Activity-modifying Proteins 2 and 3 Generate Adrenomedullin Receptor Subtypes with Distinct Molecular Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Harriet A.; Chakravarthy, Madhuri; Abhayawardana, Rekhati S.; Gingell, Joseph J.; Garelja, Michael; Pardamwar, Meenakshi; McElhinney, James M. W. R.; Lathbridge, Alex; Constantine, Arran; Harris, Paul W. R.; Yuen, Tsz-Ying; Brimble, Margaret A.; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R.; Woolley, Michael J.; Conner, Alex C.; Pioszak, Augen A.; Reynolds, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) is a peptide hormone with numerous effects in the vascular systems. AM signals through the AM1 and AM2 receptors formed by the obligate heterodimerization of a G protein-coupled receptor, the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 and 3 (RAMP2 and RAMP3), respectively. These different CLR-RAMP interactions yield discrete receptor pharmacology and physiological effects. The effective design of therapeutics that target the individual AM receptors is dependent on understanding the molecular details of the effects of RAMPs on CLR. To understand the role of RAMP2 and -3 on the activation and conformation of the CLR subunit of AM receptors, we mutated 68 individual amino acids in the juxtamembrane region of CLR, a key region for activation of AM receptors, and determined the effects on cAMP signaling. Sixteen CLR mutations had differential effects between the AM1 and AM2 receptors. Accompanying this, independent molecular modeling of the full-length AM-bound AM1 and AM2 receptors predicted differences in the binding pocket and differences in the electrostatic potential of the two AM receptors. Druggability analysis indicated unique features that could be used to develop selective small molecule ligands for each receptor. The interaction of RAMP2 or RAMP3 with CLR induces conformational variation in the juxtamembrane region, yielding distinct binding pockets, probably via an allosteric mechanism. These subtype-specific differences have implications for the design of therapeutics aimed at specific AM receptors and for understanding the mechanisms by which accessory proteins affect G protein-coupled receptor function. PMID:27013657

  5. Locus coeruleus response to single-prolonged stress and early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y.

    PubMed

    Sabban, Esther L; Laukova, Marcela; Alaluf, Lishay G; Olsson, Emelie; Serova, Lidia I

    2015-12-01

    Dysregulation of the central noradrenergic system is a core feature of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, we examined molecular changes in locus coeruleus (LC) triggered by single-prolonged stress (SPS) PTSD model at a time when behavioral symptoms are manifested, and the effect of early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). Immediately following SPS stressors, male SD rats were administered intranasal NPY (SPS/NPY) or vehicle (SPS/V). Seven days later, TH protein, but not mRNA, was elevated in LC only of the SPS/V group. Although 90% of TH positive cells expressed GR, its levels were unaltered. Compared to unstressed controls, LC of SPS/V, but not SPS/NPY, expressed less Y2 receptor mRNA with more CRHR1 mRNA in subset of animals, and elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in central nucleus of amygdala. Following testing for anxiety on elevated plus maze (EPM), there were significantly increased TH, DBH and NPY mRNAs in LC of SPS-treated, but not previously unstressed animals. Their levels highly correlated with each other but not with behavioral features on EPM. Thus, SPS triggers long-term noradrenergic activation and higher sensitivity to mild stressors, perhaps mediated by the up-regulation influence of amygdalar CRH input and down-regulation of Y2R presynaptic inhibition in LC. Results also demonstrate the therapeutic potential of early intervention with intranasal NPY for traumatic stress-elicited noradrenergic impairments. Single-prolonged stress (SPS)-triggered long-term changes in the locus coeruleus/norepinephrine (LC/NE) system with increased tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and CRH receptor 1(CRHR1) mRNA and lower neuropeptide Y receptor 2 (Y2R) mRNA levels as well as elevated corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the central nucleus of amygdala (CeA) that were prevented by early intervention with intranasal neuropeptide Y (NPY). SPS treatment led to increased sensitivity of LC to mild stress of elevated plus maze

  6. Methylglyoxal Activates Nociceptors through Transient Receptor Potential Channel A1 (TRPA1)

    PubMed Central

    Eberhardt, Mirjam J.; Filipovic, Milos R.; Leffler, Andreas; de la Roche, Jeanne; Kistner, Katrin; Fischer, Michael J.; Fleming, Thomas; Zimmermann, Katharina; Ivanovic-Burmazovic, Ivana; Nawroth, Peter P.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Reeh, Peter W.; Sauer, Susanne K.

    2012-01-01

    Neuropathic pain can develop as an agonizing sequela of diabetes mellitus and chronic uremia. A chemical link between both conditions of altered metabolism is the highly reactive compound methylglyoxal (MG), which accumulates in all cells, in particular neurons, and leaks into plasma as an index of the severity of the disorder. The electrophilic structure of this cytotoxic ketoaldehyde suggests TRPA1, a receptor channel deeply involved in inflammatory and neuropathic pain, as a molecular target. We demonstrate that extracellularly applied MG accesses specific intracellular binding sites of TRPA1, activating inward currents and calcium influx in transfected cells and sensory neurons, slowing conduction velocity in unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers, and stimulating release of proinflammatory neuropeptides from and action potential firing in cutaneous nociceptors. Using a model peptide of the N terminus of human TRPA1, we demonstrate the formation of disulfide bonds based on MG-induced modification of cysteines as a novel mechanism. In conclusion, MG is proposed to be a candidate metabolite that causes neuropathic pain in metabolic disorders and thus is a promising target for medicinal chemistry. PMID:22740698

  7. Re-evaluation of the PBAN receptor molecule: characterization of PBANR variants expressed in the pheromone glands of moths

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sex pheromone production in most moths is initiated following pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) activation. PBANR was initially cloned from pheromone glands (PGs) of Helicoverpa zea and Bombyx mori. The B. mori PBANR is characterized by a relatively long C-terminus that...

  8. Neuropeptides in experimental and degenerative arthritis.

    PubMed

    Niissalo, S; Hukkanen, M; Imai, S; Törnwall, J; Konttinen, Y T

    2002-06-01

    Classical symptoms of both inflammatory and degenerative arthritides may contribute to neurogenic responses like wheal, flare, edema, and pain. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease with an immunogenetic background. Neurogenic inflammation has been considered to play an essential role in RA, in part because of the symmetrical involvement (cross-spinal reflexes) and the predominant involvement of the most heavily innervated small joints of the hands and the feet (highly represented in the hominiculus). In contrast, osteoarthritis (OA) is considered to arise as a result of degeneration of the hyaline articular cartilage, which secondarily results in local inflammation and pain. However, it is possible that the age-related and predominant (compared to nociceptive nerves) degeneration of the proprioceptive, kinesthetic and vasoregulatory nerves can represent the primary pathogenic events. This leads to progressive damage of tissue with extremely poor capacity for self-regeneration. Inflammation, be it primary/autoimmune or secondary/degenerative, leads to peripheral sensitization and stimulation, which may further lead to central sensitization, neurogenic amplification of the inflammatory responses and activation of the neuro-endocrine axis. Neuropeptides serve as messengers, which modulate and mediate the actions in these cascades. Accordingly, many neuropeptides have been used successfully as experimental treatments, most recently VIP, which effectively controlled collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Therefore, it can safely be concluded that better treatment/control of disease activity and pain can be achieved by blocking the cascade leading to initiation and/or amplification of inflammatory process combined with effects on central nociceptive and neuroendocrine responses. PMID:12114296

  9. The insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in regulation of the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P; Baron, V; Alengrin, F; Takata, Y; Webster, N J; Olefsky, J M; Van Obberghen, E

    1993-09-21

    During the insulin receptor activation process, ligand binding and autophosphorylation induce two distinct conformational changes in the C-terminal domain of the receptor beta-subunit. To analyze the role of this domain and the involvement of the C-terminal autophosphorylation sites (Tyr1316 and Tyr1322) in receptor activation, we used (i) antipeptide antibodies against three different C-terminal sequences (1270-1281, 1294-1317, and 1309-1326) and (ii) an insulin receptor mutant (Y/F2) where Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 have been replaced by Phe. We show that the autophosphorylation-induced C-terminal conformational change is preserved in the Y/F2 receptor, indicating that this change is not induced by phosphorylation of the C-terminal sites but most likely by phosphorylation of the major sites in the kinase domain (Tyr1146, Tyr1150, and Tyr1151). Binding of antipeptide antibodies to the C-terminal domain modulated (activated or inhibited) both mutant and wild-type receptor-mediated phosphorylation of poly(Glu/Tyr). In contrast to the wild-type receptor, Y/F2 exhibited the same C-terminal configuration before and after insulin binding, evidencing that mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322 introduced conformational changes in the C-terminus. Finally, the mutant receptor was 2-fold more active than the wild-type receptor for poly(Glu/Tyr) phosphorylation. In conclusion, the whole C-terminal region of the insulin receptor beta-subunit is likely to exert a regulatory influence on the receptor kinase activity. Perturbations of the C-terminal region, such as binding of antipeptides or mutation of Tyr1316 and Tyr1322, provoke alterations at the receptor kinase level, leading to activation or inhibition of the enzymic activity. PMID:7690586

  10. Vasopressin indirectly excites dorsal raphe serotonin neurons through activation of the vasopressin1A receptor.

    PubMed

    Rood, B D; Beck, S G

    2014-02-28

    The neuropeptide vasopressin (AVP; arginine-vasopressin) is produced in a handful of brain nuclei located in the hypothalamus and extended amygdala and is released both peripherally as a hormone and within the central nervous system as a neurotransmitter. Central projections have been associated with a number of functions including regulation of physiological homeostasis, control of circadian rhythms, and modulation of social behavior. The AVP neurons located in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial amygdala (i.e., extended amygdala) in particular have been associated with affiliative social behavior in multiple species. It was recently demonstrated that in the mouse AVP projections emanating from extended amygdala neurons innervate a number of forebrain and midbrain brain regions including the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), the site of origin of most forebrain-projecting serotonin neurons. Based on the presence of AVP fibers in the DR, we hypothesized that AVP would alter the physiology of serotonin neurons via AVP 1A receptor (V1AR) activation. Using whole-cell electrophysiology techniques, we found that AVP increased the frequency and amplitude of excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) in serotonin neurons of male mice. The indirect stimulation of serotonin neurons was AMPA/kainate receptor dependent and blocked by the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin, suggesting an effect of AVP on glutamate neurons. Further, the increase in EPSC frequency induced by AVP was blocked by selective V1AR antagonists. Our data suggest that AVP had an excitatory influence on serotonin neurons. This work highlights a new target (i.e., V1AR) for manipulating serotonin neuron excitability. In light of our data, we propose that some of the diverse effects of AVP on physiology and behavior, including social behavior, may be due to activation of the DR serotonin system. PMID:24345477

  11. Spexin Enhances Bowel Movement through Activating L-type Voltage-dependent Calcium Channel via Galanin Receptor 2 in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cheng-yuan; Zhang, Man; Huang, Tao; Yang, Li-ling; Fu, Hai-bo; Zhao, Ling; Zhong, Linda LD; Mu, Huai-xue; Shi, Xiao-ke; Leung, Christina FP; Fan, Bao-min; Jiang, Miao; Lu, Ai-ping; Zhu, Li-xin; Bian, Zhao-xiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel neuropeptide spexin was found to be broadly expressed in various endocrine and nervous tissues while little is known about its functions. This study investigated the role of spexin in bowel movement and the underlying mechanisms. In functional constipation (FC) patients, serum spexin levels were significantly decreased. Consistently, in starved mice, the mRNA of spexin was significantly decreased in intestine and colon. Spexin injection increased the velocity of carbon powder propulsion in small intestine and decreased the glass beads expulsion time in distal colon in mice. Further, spexin dose-dependently stimulated the intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction. Galanin receptor 2 (GALR2) antagonist M871, but not Galanin receptor 3 (GALR3) antagonist SNAP37899, effectively suppressed the stimulatory effects of spexin on intestinal/colonic smooth muscle contraction, which could be eliminated by extracellular [Ca2+] removal and L-type voltage-dependentCa2+ channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine. Besides, spexin dramatically increased the [Ca2+]i in isolated colonic smooth muscle cells. These data indicate that spexin can act on GALR2 receptor to regulate bowel motility by activating L-type VDCC. Our findings provide evidence for important physiological roles of spexin in GI functions. Selective action on spexin pathway might have therapeutic effects on GI diseases with motility disorders. PMID:26160593

  12. Functional comparison of two evolutionary conserved insect neurokinin-like receptors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tachykinins are multifunctional neuropeptides that have been identified in vertebrates as well as invertebrates. The C-terminal FXGXRa-motif constitutes the consensus active core region of invertebrate tachykinins. In Drosophila, two putative G protein-coupled tachykinin receptors have been clone...

  13. Constitutive Activity of the Androgen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Siu Chiu; Dehm, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the United States. The androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis is central to all stages of PCa pathophysiology and serves as the main target for endocrine-based therapy. The most advanced stage of the disease, castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), is presently incurable and accounts for most PCa mortality. In this review, we highlight the mechanisms by which the AR signaling axis can bypass endocrine-targeted therapies and drive progression of CRPC. These mechanisms include alterations in growth factor, cytokine, and inflammatory signaling pathways, altered expression or activity of transcriptional co-regulators, AR point mutations, and AR gene amplification leading to AR protein overexpression. Additionally, we will discuss the mechanisms underlying the synthesis of constitutively active AR splice variants (AR-Vs) lacking the COOH-terminal ligand binding domain, as well as the role and regulation of AR-Vs in supporting therapeutic resistance in CRPC. Finally, we summarize the ongoing development of inhibitors targeting discrete AR functional domains as well as the status of new biomarkers for monitoring the AR signaling axis in patients. PMID:24931201

  14. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:19741045

  15. Mechanisms of xenobiotic receptor activation: Direct vs. indirect.

    PubMed

    Mackowiak, Bryan; Wang, Hongbing

    2016-09-01

    The so-called xenobiotic receptors (XRs) have functionally evolved into cellular sensors for both endogenous and exogenous stimuli by regulating the transcription of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters, as well as those involving energy homeostasis, cell proliferation, and/or immune responses. Unlike prototypical steroid hormone receptors, XRs are activated through both direct ligand-binding and ligand-independent (indirect) mechanisms by a plethora of structurally unrelated chemicals. This review covers research literature that discusses direct vs. indirect activation of XRs. A particular focus is centered on the signaling control of the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), the pregnane X receptor (PXR), and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). We expect that this review will shed light on both the common and distinct mechanisms associated with activation of these three XRs. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Xenobiotic nuclear receptors: New Tricks for An Old Dog, edited by Dr. Wen Xie. PMID:26877237

  16. Cell death sensitization of leukemia cells by opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Friesen, Claudia; Roscher, Mareike; Hormann, Inis; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf A.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates a number of cellular processes and modulates cell death induction. cAMP levels are altered upon stimulation of specific G-protein-coupled receptors inhibiting or activating adenylyl cyclases. Opioid receptor stimulation can activate inhibitory Gi-proteins which in turn block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. Opioids such as D,L-methadone induce cell death in leukemia cells. However, the mechanism how opioids trigger apoptosis and activate caspases in leukemia cells is not understood. In this study, we demonstrate that downregulation of cAMP induced by opioid receptor activation using the opioid D,L-methadone kills and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Enhancing cAMP levels by blocking opioid-receptor signaling strongly reduced D,L-methadone-induced apoptosis, caspase activation and doxorubicin-sensitivity. Induction of cell death in leukemia cells by activation of opioid receptors using the opioid D,L-methadone depends on critical levels of opioid receptor expression on the cell surface. Doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in leukemia cells. In addition, the opioid D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux in leukemia cells, suggesting that the opioid D,L-methadone as well as doxorubicin mutually increase their cytotoxic potential. Furthermore, we found that opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone alone or in addition to doxorubicin inhibits tumor growth significantly in vivo. These results demonstrate that opioid receptor activation via triggering the downregulation of cAMP induces apoptosis, activates caspases and sensitizes leukemia cells for doxorubicin treatment. Hence, opioid receptor activation seems to be a promising strategy to improve anticancer therapies. PMID:23633472

  17. Neuropeptide Y inhibits cholangiocarcinoma cell growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    DeMorrow, Sharon; Onori, Paolo; Venter, Julie; Invernizzi, Pietro; Frampton, Gabriel; White, Mellanie; Franchitto, Antonio; Kopriva, Shelley; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Francis, Heather; Coufal, Monique; Glaser, Shannon; Fava, Giammarco; Meng, Fanyin; Alvaro, Domenico; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    No information exists on the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cholangiocarcinoma growth. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and secretion of NPY and its subsequent effects on cholangiocarcinoma growth and invasion. Cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and nonmalignant cholangiocytes were used to assess NPY mRNA expression and protein secretion. NPY expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in human liver biopsies. Cell proliferation and migration were evaluated in vitro by MTS assays and matrigel invasion chambers, respectively, after treatment with NPY or a neutralizing NPY antibody. The effect of NPY or NPY depletion on tumor growth was assessed in vivo after treatment with NPY or the neutralizing NPY antibody in a xenograft model of cholangiocarcinoma. NPY secretion was upregulated in cholangiocarcinoma compared with normal cholangiocytes. Administration of exogenous NPY decreased proliferation and cell invasion in all cholangiocarcinoma cell lines studied and reduced tumor cell growth in vivo. In vitro, the effects of NPY on proliferation were blocked by specific inhibitors for NPY receptor Y2, but not Y1 or Y5, and were associated with an increase in intracellular d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and PKCα activation. Blocking of NPY activity using a neutralizing antibody promoted cholangiocarcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo and increased the invasiveness of cholangiocarcinoma in vitro. Increased NPY immunoreactivity in human tumor tissue occurred predominantly in the center of the tumor, with less expression toward the invasion front of the tumor. We demonstrated that NPY expression is upregulated in cholangiocarcinoma, which exerts local control on tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Modulation of NPY secretion may be important for the management of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:21270292

  18. Involvement of the neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ in kainate seizures.

    PubMed

    Bregola, Gianni; Zucchini, Silvia; Rodi, Donata; Binaschi, Anna; D'Addario, Claudio; Landuzzi, Daniela; Reinscheid, Rainer; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia; Simonato, Michele

    2002-11-15

    The neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) has been shown to modulate neuronal excitability and neurotransmitter release. Previous studies indicate that the mRNA levels for the N/OFQ precursor (proN/OFQ) are increased after seizures. However, it is unclear whether N/OFQ plays a role in seizure expression. Therefore, (1) we analyzed proN/OFQ mRNA levels and NOP (the N/OFQ receptor) mRNA levels and receptor density in the kainate model of epilepsy, using Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and receptor binding assay, and (2) we examined susceptibility to kainate seizure in mice treated with 1-[(3R, 4R)-1-cyclooctylmethyl-3-hydroxymethyl-4-piperidyl]-3-ethyl-1, 3-dihydro-benzimidazol-2-one (J-113397), a selective NOP receptor antagonist, and in proN/OFQ knock-out mice. After kainate administration, increased proN/OFQ gene expression was observed in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus and in the medial nucleus of the amygdala. In contrast, NOP mRNA levels and receptor density decreased in the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, and cortex. Mice treated with the NOP receptor antagonist J-113397 displayed reduced susceptibility to kainate-induced seizures (i.e., significant reduction of behavioral seizure scores). N/OFQ knock-out mice were less susceptible to kainate seizures compared with their wild-type littermates, in that lethality was reduced, latency to generalized seizure onset was prolonged, and behavioral seizure scores decreased. Intracerebroventricular administration of N/OFQ prevented reduced susceptibility to kainate seizures in N/OFQ knock-out mice. These data indicate that acute limbic seizures are associated with increased N/OFQ release in selected areas, causing downregulation of NOP receptors and activation of N/OFQ biosynthesis, and support the notion that the N/OFQ-NOP system plays a facilitatory role in kainate seizure expression. PMID:12427860

  19. Comparison of the activation kinetics of the M3 acetylcholine receptor and a constitutively active mutant receptor in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Nuber, Susanne; Zabel, Ulrike; Ziegler, Nicole; Winkler, Christiane; Hein, Peter; Berlot, Catherine H; Bünemann, Moritz; Lohse, Martin J

    2012-08-01

    Activation of G-protein-coupled receptors is the first step of the signaling cascade triggered by binding of an agonist. Here we compare the activation kinetics of the G(q)-coupled M(3) acetylcholine receptor (M(3)-AChR) with that of a constitutively active mutant receptor (M(3)-AChR-N514Y) using M(3)-AChR constructs that report receptor activation by changes in the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal. We observed a leftward shift in the concentration-dependent FRET response for acetylcholine and carbachol with M(3)-AChR-N514Y. Consistent with this result, at submaximal agonist concentrations, the activation kinetics of M(3)-AChR-N514Y were significantly faster, whereas at maximal agonist concentrations the kinetics of receptor activation were identical. Receptor deactivation was significantly faster with carbachol than with acetylcholine and was significantly delayed by the N514Y mutation. Receptor-G-protein interaction was measured by FRET between M(3)-AChR-yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) and cyan fluorescent protein (CFP)-Gγ(2). Agonist-induced receptor-G-protein coupling was of a time scale similar to that of receptor activation. As observed for receptor deactivation, receptor-G-protein dissociation was slower for acetylcholine than that for carbachol. Acetylcholine-stimulated increases in receptor-G-protein coupling of M(3)-AChR-N514Y reached only 12% of that of M(3)-AChR and thus cannot be kinetically analyzed. G-protein activation was measured using YFP-tagged Gα(q) and CFP-tagged Gγ(2). Activation of G(q) was significantly slower than receptor activation and indistinguishable for the two agonists. However, G(q) deactivation was significantly prolonged for acetylcholine compared with that for carbachol. Consistent with decreased agonist-stimulated coupling to G(q), agonist-stimulated G(q) activation by M(3)-AChR-N514Y was not detected. Taken together, these results indicate that the N514Y mutation produces constitutive activation of M(3

  20. The Orphan Nuclear Receptor TR4 Is a Vitamin A-activated Nuclear Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X. Edward; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Xu, Yong; Chan, Cee-Wah; Tanabe, Osamu; Kruse, Schoen W.; Reynolds, Ross; Engel, James Douglas; Xu, H. Eric

    2015-11-30

    Testicular receptors 2 and 4 (TR2/4) constitute a subgroup of orphan nuclear receptors that play important roles in spermatogenesis, lipid and lipoprotein regulation, and the development of the central nervous system. Currently, little is known about the structural features and the ligand regulation of these receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the ligand-free TR4 ligand binding domain, which reveals an autorepressed conformation. The ligand binding pocket of TR4 is filled by the C-terminal half of helix 10, and the cofactor binding site is occupied by the AF-2 helix, thus preventing ligand-independent activation of the receptor. However, TR4 exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity on multiple promoters, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, or ligand binding substantially reduce the transcriptional activity of this receptor. Importantly, both retinol and retinoic acid are able to promote TR4 to recruit coactivators and to activate a TR4-regulated reporter. These findings demonstrate that TR4 is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor and suggest that retinoids might have a much wider regulatory role via activation of orphan receptors such as TR4.

  1. The insulin receptor activation process involves localized conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Gautier, N; Van Obberghen, E

    1992-11-15

    The molecular process by which insulin binding to the receptor alpha-subunit induces activation of the receptor beta-subunit with ensuing substrate phosphorylation remains unclear. In this study, we aimed at approaching this molecular mechanism of signal transduction and at delineating the cytoplasmic domains implied in this process. To do this, we used antipeptide antibodies to the following sequences of the receptor beta-subunit: (i) positions 962-972 in the juxtamembrane domain, (ii) positions 1247-1261 at the end of the kinase domain, and (iii) positions 1294-1317 and (iv) positions 1309-1326, both in the receptor C terminus. We have previously shown that insulin binding to its receptor induces a conformational change in the beta-subunit C terminus. Here, we demonstrate that receptor autophosphorylation induces an additional conformational change. This process appears to be distinct from the one produced by ligand binding and can be detected in at least three different beta-subunit regions: the juxtamembrane domain, the kinase domain, and the C terminus. Hence, the cytoplasmic part of the receptor beta-subunit appears to undergo an extended conformational change upon autophosphorylation. By contrast, the insulin-induced change does not affect the juxtamembrane domain 962-972 nor the kinase domain 1247-1261 and may be limited to the receptor C terminus. Further, we show that the hormone-dependent conformational change is maintained in a kinase-deficient receptor due to a mutation at lysine 1018. Therefore, during receptor activation, the ligand-induced change could precede ATP binding and receptor autophosphorylation. We propose that insulin binding leads to a transient receptor form that may allow ATP binding and, subsequently, autophosphorylation. The second conformational change could unmask substrate-binding sites and stabilize the receptor in an active conformation. PMID:1331080

  2. Steroid receptor RNA activator: Biologic function and role in disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chan; Wu, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Neng; Shi, Ya-Ning; Liu, Zheng; Ao, Bao-Xue; Liao, Duan-Fang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Qin, Li

    2016-08-01

    Steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA) is a type of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) which coordinates the functions of various transcription factors, enhances steroid receptor-dependent gene expression, and also serves as a distinct scaffold. The novel, profound and expanded roles of SRA are emerging in critical aspects of coactivation of nuclear receptors (NRs). As a nuclear receptor coactivator, SRA can coactivate androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α (ERα), ERβ, progesterone receptor (PR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thyroid hormone receptor and retinoic acid receptor (RAR). Although SRA is one of the least well-understood molecules, increasing studies have revealed that SRA plays a key role in both biological processes, such as myogenesis and steroidogenesis, and pathological changes, including obesity, cardiomyopathy, and tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the SRA-related signaling pathways, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), Notch and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) pathways, play critical roles in the pathogenesis of estrogen-dependent breast cancers. In addition, the most recent data demonstrates that SRA expression may serve as a new prognostic marker in patients with ER-positive breast cancer. Thus, elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying SRA-mediated functions is important to develop proper novel strategies to target SRA in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. PMID:27282881

  3. Peptide YY receptors in the brain

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, A.; Oya, M.; Okita, M.; Inoue, T.; Sakatani, N.; Morioka, H.; Shii, K.; Yokono, K.; Mizuno, N.; Baba, S.

    1988-01-15

    Radiolabelled ligand binding studies demonstrated that specific receptors for peptide YY are present in the porcine as well as the canine brains. Peptide YY was bound to brain tissue membranes via high-affinity (dissociation constant, 1.39 X 10(-10)M) and low-affinity (dissociation constant, 3.72 X 10(-8)M) components. The binding sites showed a high specificity for peptide YY and neuropeptide Y, but not for pancreatic polypeptide or structurally unrelated peptides. The specific activity of peptide YY binding was highest in the hippocampus, followed by the pituitary gland, the hypothalamus, and the amygdala of the porcine brain, this pattern being similarly observed in the canine brain. The results suggest that peptide YY and neuropeptide Y may regulate the function of these regions of the brain through interaction with a common receptor site.

  4. The novel platelet activation receptor CLEC-2.

    PubMed

    Suzuki-Inoue, Katsue; Inoue, Osamu; Ozaki, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The c-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) was first identified from a bio-informatic screen for c-type lectin-like receptors. However, neither its function nor its ligand(s) had been elucidated for several years. In 2006, we reported that the receptor is expressed on the surface of platelets and serves as a receptor for the snake venom rhodocytin, which potently stimulates platelet aggregation. Since then CLEC-2 has been intensively investigated, and its endogenous/exogenous ligands and several physiological/pathological roles have been clarified. In this article and its accompanying poster, we outline the structure, distribution, signal transduction mechanism and functions of CLEC-2. PMID:21714702

  5. Neuropeptide Y and gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone (γ-MSH) share a common pressor mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, Kenneth A.; Fan, Wei; Akerberg, Helena; Larhammar, Dan; Chee, Melissa J. S.; Colmers, William F.; Cone, Roger D.

    2009-01-01

    Central circuits known to regulate food intake and energy expenditure also affect central cardiovascular regulation. For example, both the melanocortin and neuropeptide Y (NPY) peptide families, known to regulate food intake, also produce central hypertensive effects. Members of both families share a similar C-terminal amino acid residue sequence, RF(Y) amide, a sequence distinct from that required for melanocortin receptor binding. A recently delineated family of RFamide receptors recognizes both of these C-terminal motifs. We now present evidence that an antagonist with Y1 and RFamide receptor activity, BIBO3304, will attenuate the central cardiovascular effects of both gamma-melanocyte stimulating hormone (γ-MSH) and NPY. The use of synthetic melanocortin and NPY peptide analogs excluded an interaction with melanocortin or Y family receptors. We suggest that the anatomical convergence of NPY and melanocortin neurons on cardiovascular control centers may have pathophysiological implications through a common or similar RFamide receptor(s), much as they converge on other nuclei to coordinately control energy homeostasis. PMID:19363600

  6. Interdicting Gq Activation in Airway Disease by Receptor-Dependent and Receptor-Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard; Koziol-White, Cynthia; Zhang, Jie; Lam, Hong; An, Steven S; Tall, Gregory G; Panettieri, Reynold A; Benovic, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Gαqβγ heterotrimer (Gq), an important mediator in the pathology of airway disease, plays a central role in bronchoconstriction and airway remodeling, including airway smooth muscle growth and inflammation. Current therapeutic strategies to treat airway disease include the use of muscarinic and leukotriene receptor antagonists; however, these pharmaceuticals demonstrate a limited clinical efficacy as multiple Gq-coupled receptor subtypes contribute to these pathologies. Thus, broadly inhibiting the activation of Gq may be an advantageous therapeutic approach. Here, we investigated the effects of broadly inhibiting Gq activation in vitro and ex vivo using receptor-dependent and receptor-independent strategies. P4pal-10 is a protease activated receptor 4-derived pepducin that exhibits efficacy toward multiple Gq-coupled receptors. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that P4pal-10 selectively inhibits all G protein coupling to several Gq-coupled receptors, including protease activated receptor 1, muscarinic acetylcholine M3, and histamine H1 receptors, while demonstrating no direct effect on Gq. We also evaluated the ability of FR900359, also known as UBO-QIC, to directly inhibit Gq activation. FR900359 inhibited spontaneous Gαq nucleotide exchange, while having little effect on Gαsβγ, Gαiβγ, or Gα12/13βγ heterotrimer activity. Both P4pal-10 and FR900359 inhibited Gq-mediated intracellular signaling and primary human airway smooth muscle growth, whereas only FR900359 effectively interdicted agonist-promoted airway contraction in human precision cut lung slices. These studies serve as a proof of concept that the broad-based inhibition of Gq activation may be a useful therapeutic approach to treat multiple common pathologies of airway disease. PMID:26464325

  7. Prothymosin alpha selectively enhances estrogen receptor transcriptional activity by interacting with a repressor of estrogen receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Martini, P G; Delage-Mourroux, R; Kraichely, D M; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    2000-09-01

    We find that prothymosin alpha (PTalpha) selectively enhances transcriptional activation by the estrogen receptor (ER) but not transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors. This selectivity for ER is explained by PTalpha interaction not with ER, but with a 37-kDa protein denoted REA, for repressor of estrogen receptor activity, a protein that we have previously shown binds to ER, blocking coactivator binding to ER. We isolated PTalpha, known to be a chromatin-remodeling protein associated with cell proliferation, using REA as bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen with a cDNA library from MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. PTalpha increases the magnitude of ERalpha transcriptional activity three- to fourfold. It shows lesser enhancement of ERbeta transcriptional activity and has no influence on the transcriptional activity of other nuclear hormone receptors (progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, thyroid hormone receptor, or retinoic acid receptor) or on the basal activity of ERs. In contrast, the steroid receptor coactivator SRC-1 increases transcriptional activity of all of these receptors. Cotransfection of PTalpha or SRC-1 with increasing amounts of REA, as well as competitive glutathione S-transferase pulldown and mammalian two-hybrid studies, show that REA competes with PTalpha (or SRC-1) for regulation of ER transcriptional activity and suppresses the ER stimulation by PTalpha or SRC-1, indicating that REA can function as an anticoactivator in cells. Our data support a model in which PTalpha, which does not interact with ER, selectively enhances the transcriptional activity of the ER but not that of other nuclear receptors by recruiting the repressive REA protein away from ER, thereby allowing effective coactivation of ER with SRC-1 or other coregulators. The ability of PTalpha to directly interact in vitro and in vivo with REA, a selective coregulator of the ER, thereby enabling the interaction of ER with coactivators, appears to explain

  8. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells.

    PubMed

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M; Yang, Enjun; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-08-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  9. Activating Receptor Signals Drive Receptor Diversity in Developing Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Jacquelyn; May, Rebecca M.; Li, Hongchuan; McCullen, Matthew; Zhang, Bin; Lenvik, Todd; Cichocki, Frank; Anderson, Stephen K.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2016-01-01

    It has recently been appreciated that NK cells exhibit many features reminiscent of adaptive immune cells. Considerable heterogeneity exists with respect to the ligand specificity of individual NK cells and as such, a subset of NK cells can respond, expand, and differentiate into memory-like cells in a ligand-specific manner. MHC I-binding inhibitory receptors, including those belonging to the Ly49 and KIR families, are expressed in a variegated manner, which creates ligand-specific diversity within the NK cell pool. However, how NK cells determine which inhibitory receptors to express on their cell surface during a narrow window of development is largely unknown. In this manuscript, we demonstrate that signals from activating receptors are critical for induction of Ly49 and KIR receptors during NK cell development; activating receptor-derived signals increased the probability of the Ly49 bidirectional Pro1 promoter to transcribe in the forward versus the reverse direction, leading to stable expression of Ly49 receptors in mature NK cells. Our data support a model where the balance of activating and inhibitory receptor signaling in NK cells selects for the induction of appropriate inhibitory receptors during development, which NK cells use to create a diverse pool of ligand-specific NK cells. PMID:27500644

  10. Chronic hyperammonemia induces tonic activation of NMDA receptors in cerebellum.

    PubMed

    ElMlili, Nisrin; Boix, Jordi; Ahabrach, Hanan; Rodrigo, Regina; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente

    2010-02-01

    Reduced function of the glutamate--nitric oxide (NO)--cGMP pathway is responsible for some cognitive alterations in rats with hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy. Hyperammonemia impairs the pathway in cerebellum by increasing neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) phosphorylation in Ser847 by calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), reducing nNOS activity, and by reducing nNOS amount in synaptic membranes, which reduces its activation following NMDA receptors activation. The reason for increased CaMKII activity in hyperammonemia remains unknown. We hypothesized that it would be as a result of increased tonic activation of NMDA receptors. The aims of this work were to assess: (i) whether tonic NMDA activation receptors is increased in cerebellum in chronic hyperammonemia in vivo; and (ii) whether this tonic activation is responsible for increased CaMKII activity and reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. Blocking NMDA receptors with MK-801 increases cGMP and NO metabolites in cerebellum in vivo and in slices from hyperammonemic rats. This is because of reduced phosphorylation and activity of CaMKII, leading to normalization of nNOS phosphorylation and activity. MK-801 also increases nNOS in synaptic membranes and reduces it in cytosol. This indicates that hyperammonemia increases tonic activation of NMDA receptors leading to reduced activity of nNOS and of the glutamate--NO--cGMP pathway. PMID:20002515

  11. Biological activity of a polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Dyachenko, I A; Andreev, Ya A; Logashina, Yu A; Murashev, A N; Grishin, E V

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents data on the activity of a new APHC2 polypeptide modulator of TRPV1 receptors, which was isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis crispa. It has been shown that APHC2 has an analgesic activity, does not impair normal motor activity, and does not change body temperature of experimental animals, which has a great practical value for design of potent analgesics of a new generation. Further study of the characteristics of binding of the polypeptide to the TRPV1 receptor may show approaches to the development of other antagonists of this receptor that do not influence the body temperature. PMID:26725234

  12. Complex steroid-peptide-receptor cascade controls insect ecdysis.

    PubMed

    Zitnan, D; Kim, Y-J; Zitnanová, I; Roller, L; Adams, M E

    2007-01-01

    Insect ecdysis sequence is composed of pre-ecdysis, ecdysis and post-ecdysis behaviors controlled by a complex cascade of peptide hormones from endocrine Inka cells and neuropeptides in the central nervous system (CNS). Inka cells produce pre-ecdysis and ecdysis triggering hormones (ETH) which activate the ecdysis sequence through receptor-mediated actions on specific neurons in the CNS. Multiple experimental approaches have been used to determine mechanisms of ETH expression and release from Inka cells and its action on the CNS of moths and flies. During the preparatory phase 1-2 days prior to ecdysis, high ecdysteroid levels induce expression of ETH receptors in the CNS and increased ETH production in Inka cells, which coincides with expression of nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) and transcription factor cryptocephal (CRC). However, high ecdysteroid levels prevent ETH release from Inka cells. Acquisition of Inka cell competence to release ETH requires decline of ecdysteroid levels and beta-FTZ-F1 expression few hours prior to ecdysis. The behavioral phase is initiated by ETH secretion into the hemolymph, which is controlled by two brain neuropeptides-corazonin and eclosion hormone (EH). Corazonin acts on its receptor in Inka cells to elicit low level ETH secretion and initiation of pre-ecdysis, while EH induces cGMP-mediated ETH depletion and consequent activation of ecdysis. The activation of both behaviors is accomplished by ETH action on central neurons expressing ETH receptors A and B (ETHR-A and B). These neurons produce numerous excitatory or inhibitory neuropeptides which initiate or terminate different phases of the ecdysis sequence. Our data indicate that insect ecdysis is a very complex process characterized by two principal steps: (1) ecdysteroid-induced expression of receptors and transcription factors in the CNS and Inka cells. (2) Release and interaction of Inka cell peptide hormones and multiple central neuropeptides to control consecutive phases of

  13. COMPLEX STEROID-PEPTIDE-RECEPTOR CASCADE CONTROLS INSECT ECDYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Žitňan, D.; Kim, Y-J.; Žitňanová, I.; Roller, L.; Adams, M.E.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Insect ecdysis sequence is composed of pre-ecdysis, ecdysis and post-ecdysis behaviors controlled by a complex cascade of peptide hormones from endocrine Inka cells and neuropeptides in the central nervous system (CNS). Inka cells produce pre-ecdysis and ecdysis triggering hormones (ETH) which activate the ecdysis sequence through receptor-mediated actions on specific neurons in the CNS. Multiple experimental approaches have been used to determine mechanisms of ETH expression and release from Inka cells and its action on the CNS of moths and flies. During the preparatory phase 1–2 days prior to ecdysis, high ecdysteroid levels induce expression of ETH receptors in the CNS and increased ETH production in Inka cells, which coincides with expression of nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) and transcription factor cryptocephal (CRC). However, high ecdysteroid levels prevent ETH release from Inka cells. Acquisition of Inka cell competence to release ETH requires decline of ecdysteroid levels and β-FTZ-F1 expression few hours prior to ecdysis. The behavioral phase is initiated by ETH secretion into the hemolymph, which is controlled by two brain neuropeptides - corazonin and eclosion hormone (EH). Corazonin acts on its receptor in Inka cells to elicit low level ETH secretion and initiation of pre-ecdysis, while EH induces cGMP-mediated ETH depletion and consequent activation of ecdysis. The activation of both behaviors is accomplished by ETH action on central neurons expressing ETH receptors A and B (ETHR-A and B). These neurons produce numerous excitatory or inhibitory neuropeptides which initiate or terminate different phases of the ecdysis sequence. Our data indicate that insect ecdysis is a very complex process characterized by two principal steps: 1) Ecdysteroid-induced expression of receptors and transcription factors in the CNS and Inka cells. 2) Release and interaction of Inka cell peptide hormones and multiple central neuropeptides to control consecutive

  14. Human receptor activation by aroclor 1260, a polychlorinated biphenyl mixture.

    PubMed

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K Cameron; Clair, Heather B; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A; States, J Christopher; Coslo, Denise M; Omiecinski, Curtis J; Cave, Matthew C

    2014-08-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  15. Human Receptor Activation by Aroclor 1260, a Polychlorinated Biphenyl Mixture

    PubMed Central

    Wahlang, Banrida; Falkner, K. Cameron; Clair, Heather B.; Al-Eryani, Laila; Prough, Russell A.; States, J. Christopher; Coslo, Denise M.; Omiecinski, Curtis J.; Cave, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are persistent environmental toxicants, present in 100% of U.S. adults and dose-dependently associated with obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PCBs are predicted to interact with receptors previously implicated in xenobiotic/energy metabolism and NAFLD. These receptors include the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR), constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), liver-X-receptor (LXRα), and farnesoid-X-receptor (FXR). This study evaluates Aroclor 1260, a PCB mixture with congener composition mimicking that of human adipose tissue, and selected congeners, as potential ligands for these receptors utilizing human hepatoma-derived (HepG2) and primate-derived (COS-1) cell lines, and primary human hepatocytes. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) activated AhR, and PCB 126, a minor component, was a potent inducer. Aroclor 1260 activated PXR in a simple concentration-dependent manner at concentrations ≥10 μg/ml. Among the congeners tested, PCBs 138, 149, 151, 174, 183, 187, and 196 activated PXR. Aroclor 1260 activated CAR2 and CAR3 variants at lower concentrations and antagonize CAR2 activation by the CAR agonist, CITCO, at higher concentrations (≥20 μg/ml). Additionally, Aroclor 1260 induced CYP2B6 in primary hepatocytes. At subtoxic doses, Aroclor 1260 did not activate LXR or FXR and had no effect on LXR- or FXR-dependent induction by the agonists T0901317 or GW4064, respectively. Aroclor 1260 (20 μg/ml) suppressed PPARα activation by the agonist nafenopin, although none of the congeners tested demonstrated significant inhibition. The results suggest that Aroclor 1260 is a human AhR, PXR and CAR3 agonist, a mixed agonist/antagonist for CAR2, and an antagonist for human PPARα. PMID:24812009

  16. Effects of loratadine and cetirizine on serum levels of neuropeptides in patients with chronic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Başak, Pinar Y; Vural, Huseyin; Kazanoglu, Oya O; Erturan, Ijlal; Buyukbayram, Halil I

    2014-12-01

    H1-receptor inhibiting drugs, namely loratadine and cetirizine, were frequently used in treatment of chronic urticaria. Urticarial weal and flare reactions, a neurogenic reflex due to neuropeptides, were reported to be more effectively inhibited by cetirizine than loratadine. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the effects of systemic loratadine and cetirizine treatments on serum levels of selected neuropeptides in chronic urticaria. Treatment groups of either systemic loratadine or cetirizine (10 mg/d), consisting of 16 and 22 patients, respectively, were included. Serum levels of stem cell factor (SCF), neuropeptide Y (NPY), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nerve growth factor (NGF), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and substance P (SP) were detected before and after one week of treatment with antihistamines. Serum NPY and VIP levels were significantly decreased when compared before and after treatment with antihistamines (P < 0.001 and P < 0.01, respectively). SCF and NGF values were also decreased after antihistamine treatment (P < 0.05). Post-treatment levels of CGRP were significantly higher compared with pretreatment values, while no significant difference was detected between pre and post treatment levels of SP. Cetirizine was significantly more effective than loratadine on lowering serum levels of SCF among the other neuropeptides. Systemic loratadine and cetirizine treatments in patients with chronic urticaria precisely caused variations in serum levels of neuropeptides. The predominant effect of cetirizine compared to loratadine on reducing serum SCF levels might be explained with anti-inflammatory properties of cetirizine. PMID:25209952

  17. Polymorphic variation as a driver of differential neuropeptide gene expression.

    PubMed

    Quinn, John P; Warburton, Alix; Myers, Paul; Savage, Abigail L; Bubb, Vivien J

    2013-12-01

    The regulation of neuropeptide gene expression and their receptors in a tissue specific and stimulus inducible manner will determine in part behaviour and physiology. This can be a dynamic process resulting from short term changes in response to the environment or long term modulation imposed by epigenetically determined mechanisms established during life experiences. The latter underpins what is termed 'nature and nurture, or 'gene×environment interactions'. Dynamic gene expression of neuropeptides or their receptors is a key component of signalling in the CNS and their inappropriate regulation is therefore a predicted target underpinning psychiatric disorders and neuropathological processes. Finding the regulatory domains within our genome which have the potential to direct gene expression is a difficult challenge as 98% of our genome is non-coding and, with the exception of proximal promoter regions, such elements can be quite distant from the gene that they regulate. This review will deal with how we can find such domains by addressing both the most conserved non-exonic regions in the genome using comparative genomics and the most recent or constantly evolving DNA such as repetitive DNA or retrotransposons. We shall also explore how polymorphic changes in such domains can be associated with CNS disorders by altering the appropriate gene expression patterns which maintain normal physiology. PMID:24210140

  18. Neuropeptides Modulate Female Chemosensory Processing upon Mating in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mo; Loschek, Laura F.; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C.

    2016-01-01

    A female’s reproductive state influences her perception of odors and tastes along with her changed behavioral state and physiological needs. The mechanism that modulates chemosensory processing, however, remains largely elusive. Using Drosophila, we have identified a behavioral, neuronal, and genetic mechanism that adapts the senses of smell and taste, the major modalities for food quality perception, to the physiological needs of a gravid female. Pungent smelling polyamines, such as putrescine and spermidine, are essential for cell proliferation, reproduction, and embryonic development in all animals. A polyamine-rich diet increases reproductive success in many species, including flies. Using a combination of behavioral analysis and in vivo physiology, we show that polyamine attraction is modulated in gravid females through a G-protein coupled receptor, the sex peptide receptor (SPR), and its neuropeptide ligands, MIPs (myoinhibitory peptides), which act directly in the polyamine-detecting olfactory and taste neurons. This modulation is triggered by an increase of SPR expression in chemosensory neurons, which is sufficient to convert virgin to mated female olfactory choice behavior. Together, our data show that neuropeptide-mediated modulation of peripheral chemosensory neurons increases a gravid female’s preference for important nutrients, thereby ensuring optimal conditions for her growing progeny. PMID:27145127

  19. Neuropeptides Modulate Female Chemosensory Processing upon Mating in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ashiq; Üçpunar, Habibe K; Zhang, Mo; Loschek, Laura F; Grunwald Kadow, Ilona C

    2016-05-01

    A female's reproductive state influences her perception of odors and tastes along with her changed behavioral state and physiological needs. The mechanism that modulates chemosensory processing, however, remains largely elusive. Using Drosophila, we have identified a behavioral, neuronal, and genetic mechanism that adapts the senses of smell and taste, the major modalities for food quality perception, to the physiological needs of a gravid female. Pungent smelling polyamines, such as putrescine and spermidine, are essential for cell proliferation, reproduction, and embryonic development in all animals. A polyamine-rich diet increases reproductive success in many species, including flies. Using a combination of behavioral analysis and in vivo physiology, we show that polyamine attraction is modulated in gravid females through a G-protein coupled receptor, the sex peptide receptor (SPR), and its neuropeptide ligands, MIPs (myoinhibitory peptides), which act directly in the polyamine-detecting olfactory and taste neurons. This modulation is triggered by an increase of SPR expression in chemosensory neurons, which is sufficient to convert virgin to mated female olfactory choice behavior. Together, our data show that neuropeptide-mediated modulation of peripheral chemosensory neurons increases a gravid female's preference for important nutrients, thereby ensuring optimal conditions for her growing progeny. PMID:27145127

  20. Characterization of peroxisome proliferator-activiated receptor alpha (PPARalpha)-independent effects of PPARalpha activators in the rodent liver: Di(2-ethylehexyl) phthalate activates the constitutive activated receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC) are thought to mediate their effects in rodents on hepatocyte growth and liver cancer through the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha). Recent studies indicate that the plasticizer di-2-ethylhexyl ph...

  1. Neuropeptide signaling sequences identified by pyrosequencing of the American dog tick synganglion transcriptome during blood feeding and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Donohue, Kevin V; Khalil, Sayed M S; Ross, E; Grozinger, Christina M; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Michael Roe, R

    2010-01-01

    Ticks are important vectors of numerous pathogens that impact human and animal health. The tick central nervous system represents an understudied area in tick biology and no tick synganglion-specific transcriptome has been described to date. Here we characterize whole or partial cDNA sequences of fourteen putative neuropeptides (allatostatin, insulin-like peptide, ion-transport peptide, sulfakinin, bursicon alpha/beta, eclosion hormone, glycoprotein hormone alpha/beta, corazonin, four orcokinins) and five neuropeptide receptors (gonadotropin receptor, leucokinin-like receptor, sulfakinin receptor, calcitonin receptor, pyrokinin receptor) translated from cDNA synthesized from the synganglion of unfed, partially fed and replete female American dog ticks, Dermacentor variabilis. Their homology to the same neuropeptides in other taxa is discussed. Many of these neuropeptides such as an allatostatin, insulin-like peptide, eclosion hormone, bursicon alpha and beta and glycoprotein hormone alpha and beta have not been previously described in the Chelicerata. An insulin-receptor substrate protein was also found indicating that an insulin signaling network is present in ticks. A putative type-2 proprotein processing convertase was also sequenced that may be involved in cleavage at monobasic and dibasic endoproteolytic cleavage sites in prohormones. The possible physiological role of the proteins discovered in adult tick blood feeding and reproduction will be discussed. PMID:20060044

  2. Amyloid β peptide oligomers directly activate NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Texidó, Laura; Martín-Satué, Mireia; Alberdi, Elena; Solsona, Carles; Matute, Carlos

    2011-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers accumulate in the brain tissue of Alzheimer disease patients and are related to disease pathogenesis. The precise mechanisms by which Aβ oligomers cause neurotoxicity remain unknown. We recently reported that Aβ oligomers cause intracellular Ca(2+) overload and neuronal death that can be prevented by NMDA receptor antagonists. This study investigated whether Aβ oligomers directly activated NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using NR1/NR2A and NR1/NR2B receptors that were heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Indeed, Aβ oligomers induced inward non-desensitizing currents that were blocked in the presence of the NMDA receptor antagonists memantine, APV, and MK-801. Intriguingly, the amplitude of the responses to Aβ oligomers was greater for NR1/NR2A heteromers than for NR1/NR2B heteromers expressed in oocytes. Consistent with these findings, we observed that the increase in the cytosolic concentration of Ca(2+) induced by Aβ oligomers in cortical neurons is prevented by AP5, a broad spectrum NMDA receptor antagonist, but slightly attenuated by ifenprodil which blocks receptors with the NR2B subunit. Together, these results indicate that Aβ oligomers directly activate NMDA receptors, particularly those with the NR2A subunit, and further suggest that drugs that attenuate the activity of such receptors may prevent Aβ damage to neurons in Alzheimeŕs disease. PMID:21349580

  3. Specific activation of the thyrotropin receptor by trypsin.

    PubMed

    Van Sande, J; Massart, C; Costagliola, S; Allgeier, A; Cetani, F; Vassart, G; Dumont, J E

    1996-05-31

    The identification of 16 different activating mutations in the TSH receptor, found in patients suffering from toxic autonomous adenomas or congenital hyperthyroidism, leads to the concept that this receptor is in a constrained conformation in its wild-type form. We used mild trypsin treatment of CHO-K1 cells or COS-7 cells, stably or transiently transfected with the human TSH receptor, respectively, and measured its consequences on the TSH receptor coupled cascades, i.e. cyclic AMP and inositol-phosphates accumulation. A 2-min, 0.01% trypsin treatment increased stably cyclic AMP but not inositol-phosphates formation. This was not observed after chymotrypsin, thrombin and endoproteinase glu C treatment. The TSH action on cyclic AMP was decreased by only 25%. The effect was also observed in cells expressing the dog TSH receptor. It was not observed in MSH receptor, LH receptor expressing or mock transfected cells (vector alone). It is therefore specific for the TSH receptor, for its action on the Gs/adenylate cyclase cascade, and for the proteolytic cleavage caused by trypsin. Using monoclonal (A. Johnstone and P. Shepherd, personal communication) and polyclonal antibodies directed against the extracellular domain of the TSH receptor, it was shown that treatment by trypsin removes or destroys a VFFEEQ epitope (residues 354-359) from the receptor. The effect mimics the action of TSH as it activates Gs alpha and enhances the action of forskolin. It is not reversible in 1 h. The results support the concept that activation of the receptor (by hormone, autoantibodies, mutations or mild proteolysis) might involve the relief of a built-in negative constrain. They suggest that the C-terminal portion of the large extracellular domain plays a role in the maintenance of this constrain. PMID:8807635

  4. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  5. Creating leptin-like biofunctions by active immunization against chicken leptin receptor in growing chickens.

    PubMed

    Lei, M M; Wu, S Q; Shao, X B; Li, X W; Chen, Z; Ying, S J; Shi, Z D

    2015-01-01

    In this study, immunization against chicken leptin receptor (cLEPR) extracellular domain (ECD) was applied to investigate leptin regulation and LEPR biofunction in growing chicken pullets. A recombinant protein (cLEPR ECD) based on the cLEPR complemenary DNA sequence corresponding to the 582nd to 796th amino acid residues of cLEPR mature peptide was prepared and used as antigen. Immunization against cLEPR ECD in growing chickens increased anti-cLEPR ECD antibody titers in blood, enhanced proportions of phosphorylated janus kinase 2 (JAK2) and served as signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) protein in liver tissue. Chicken live weight gain and abdominal fat mass were significantly decreased (P < 0.05), but feed intake was stimulated by cLEPR ECD immunization (P < 0.05). The treatment also upregulated the gene expression levels of lepR, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), acetyl CoA carboxylase-2 (ACC2), and uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) in liver, abdominal fat, and breast muscle (P < 0.05) but decreased fasn expression levels (P < 0.01). Apart from that of lepR, the expression of appetite-regulating genes, such as orexigenic genes, agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY), were upregulated (P < 0.01), whereas the anorexigenic gene proopiomelanocortin (POMC) was downregulated in the hypothalamic tissue of cLEPR-immunized pullets (P < 0.01). Blood concentrations of metabolic molecules, such as glucose, triglycerides, and very-low-density lipoprotein, were significantly decreased in cLEPR-immunized pullets but those of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and low-density lipoprotein increased. These results demonstrate that antibodies to membrane proximal cLEPR ECD enhance cLEPR signal transduction, which stimulates metabolism and reduces fat deposition in chickens. PMID:25447880

  6. Neuropeptide evolution: Chelicerate neurohormone and neuropeptide genes may reflect one or more whole genome duplications.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A

    2016-04-01

    Four genomes and two transcriptomes from six Chelicerate species were analyzed for the presence of neuropeptide and neurohormone precursors and their GPCRs. The genome from the spider Stegodyphus mimosarum yielded 87 neuropeptide precursors and 120 neuropeptide GPCRs. Many neuropeptide transcripts were also found in the transcriptomes of three other spiders, Latrodectus hesperus, Parasteatoda tepidariorum and Acanthoscurria geniculata. For the scorpion Mesobuthus martensii the numbers are 79 and 93 respectively. The very small genome of the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides farinae, on the other hand contains a much smaller number of such genes. A few new putative Arthropod neuropeptide genes were discovered. Thus, both spiders and the scorpion have an achatin gene and in spiders there are two different genes encoding myosuppressin-like peptides while spiders also have two genes encoding novel LGamides. Another finding is the presence of trissin in spiders and scorpions, while neuropeptide genes that seem to be orthologs of Lottia LFRYamide and Platynereis CCRFamide were also found. Such genes were also found in various insect species, but seem to be lacking from the Holometabola. The Chelicerate neuropeptide and neuropeptide GPCR genes often have paralogs. As the large majority of these are probably not due to local gene duplications, is plausible that they reflect the effects of one or more ancient whole genome duplications. PMID:26928473

  7. Receptor tyrosine kinases: mechanisms of activation and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Stevan R.; Miller, W. Todd

    2008-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are essential components of signal transduction pathways that mediate cell-to-cell communication. These single-pass transmembrane receptors, which bind polypeptide ligands — mainly growth factors — play key roles in processes such as cellular growth, differentiation, metabolism and motility. Recent progress has been achieved towards an understanding of the precise (and varied) mechanisms by which RTKs are activated by ligand binding and by which signals are propagated from the activated receptors to downstream targets in the cell. PMID:17306972

  8. The neuropeptide bursicon acts in cuticle metabolism.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shengzhang; Zhang, Hongwei; Chen, Xi; Stanley, David; Yu, Xiaoping; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-01

    Bursicon is a heterodimeric neuropeptide formed of bursicon α (burs α) and bursicon β (burs β) that controls cuticle tanning and wing expansion in insects. Burs α-α and burs β-β homodimers are also formed; they act via an unknown receptor to induce expression of prophylactic immune and stress genes during molting. Based on the hypothesis that burs β-β and/or bursicon influence expression of additional genes acting after the molt, we prepared and sequenced six Drosophila cDNA libraries from groups of flies separately injected with burs β-β, bursicon, or blank control. Compared to the control, the burs β-β treatments led to upregulation (by at least 1.5-fold) of 262 genes at 0.5 h postinjection (PI) and 298 genes at 1 h PI; 323 genes at 0.5 h PI and 269 genes at 1h PI were downregulated (by at least 0.67). Similar changes were recorded following bursicon injections. Of these genes, expression of seven transcripts encoding cuticle proteins was upregulated and three downregulated by burs β-β; expression of nine transcripts encoding cuticle proteins were upregulated and four downregulated following bursicon treatments. Expression of dozens of genes involved in chitin metabolism was altered by the experimental treatments. We recorded parallel changes in expression of selected genes by transcriptome and qPCR analysis. These findings support our hypothesis that burs β-β and bursicon influence expression of additional genes acting after the molt. We report that burs β-β and bursicon act in cuticle synthesis and degradation by regulating the expression of cuticular protein and chitin metabolizing related genes. PMID:25821138

  9. Quantitative structure-activity relationship models with receptor-dependent descriptors for predicting peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lather, Viney; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X

    2009-04-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship study has been carried out, in which the relationship between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonistic activities of thiazolidinedione and oxazolidinedione derivatives and quantitative descriptors, V(site) calculated in a receptor-dependent manner is modeled. These descriptors quantify the volume occupied by the optimized ligands in regions that are either common or specific to the superimposed binding sites of the targets under consideration. The quantitative structure-activity relationship models were built by forward stepwise linear regression modeling for a training set of 27 compounds and validated for a test set of seven compounds, resulting in a squared correlation coefficient value of 0.90 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and of 0.89 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. The leave-one-out cross-validation and test set predictability squared correlation coefficient values for these models were 0.85 and 0.62 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and 0.89 and 0.50 for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma respectively. A dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor model has also been developed, and it indicates the structural features required for the design of ligands with dual peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor activity. These quantitative structure-activity relationship models show the importance of the descriptors here introduced in the prediction and interpretation of the compounds affinity and selectivity. PMID:19243388

  10. Mincle suppresses Toll-like receptor 4 activation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Stephanie H; Mahmood, Syed Kashif; Vahle, Anne-Kristin; Ochi, Atsuo; Batel, Jennifer; Deutsch, Michael; Barilla, Rocky; Seifert, Lena; Pachter, H Leon; Daley, Donnele; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Miller, George

    2016-07-01

    Regulation of Toll-like receptor responses is critical for limiting tissue injury and autoimmunity in both sepsis and sterile inflammation. We found that Mincle, a C-type lectin receptor, regulates proinflammatory Toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Specifically, Mincle ligation diminishes Toll-like receptor 4-mediated inflammation, whereas Mincle deletion or knockdown results in marked hyperresponsiveness to lipopolysaccharide in vitro, as well as overwhelming lipopolysaccharide-mediated inflammation in vivo. Mechanistically, Mincle deletion does not up-regulate Toll-like receptor 4 expression or reduce interleukin 10 production after Toll-like receptor 4 ligation; however, Mincle deletion decreases production of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent inhibitory intermediate suppressor of cytokine signaling 1, A20, and ABIN3 and increases expression of the Toll-like receptor 4 coreceptor CD14. Blockade of CD14 mitigates the increased sensitivity of Mincle(-/-) leukocytes to Toll-like receptor 4 ligation. Collectively, we describe a major role for Mincle in suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 responses and implicate its importance in nonmycobacterial models of inflammation. PMID:26747838

  11. Receptor activity-modifying proteins; multifunctional G protein-coupled receptor accessory proteins.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Walker, Christopher S; Gingell, Joseph J; Ladds, Graham; Reynolds, Christopher A; Poyner, David R

    2016-04-15

    Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) are single pass membrane proteins initially identified by their ability to determine the pharmacology of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a family B G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR). It is now known that RAMPs can interact with a much wider range of GPCRs. This review considers recent developments on the structure of the complexes formed between the extracellular domains (ECDs) of CLR and RAMP1 or RAMP2 as these provide insights as to how the RAMPs direct ligand binding. The range of RAMP interactions is also considered; RAMPs can interact with numerous family B GPCRs as well as examples of family A and family C GPCRs. They influence receptor expression at the cell surface, trafficking, ligand binding and G protein coupling. The GPCR-RAMP interface offers opportunities for drug targeting, illustrated by examples of drugs developed for migraine. PMID:27068971

  12. New roles of a neuropeptide cortistatin in the immune system and cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Yan, Shaoyu; Fisher, William E; Chen, Changyi; Yao, Qizhi

    2005-03-01

    Cortistatin (CST) is a neuropeptide that strongly resembles somatostatin (SS) structurally and functionally. CST binds to all five SS receptors (SSTR1-SSTR5) with high affinity and exerts its function mainly through SSTRs. Despite many similar functions between these two neuropeptides, they are products of different genes. Recently, some distinct functions and receptor usage of CST have been reported. Some of the interesting functions of CST were not found with SS. Therefore CST could have potential new roles in an ex-neuronal system that regulates immune responses as well as other cellular functions in the body. In this review, we discuss the new functions of CST in the immune system, cancer pathogenesis, and possible CST-specific receptors. PMID:15696397

  13. Functions of the extracellular histidine residues of receptor activity-modifying proteins vary within adrenomedullin receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwasako, Kenji Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Kato, Johji

    2008-12-05

    Receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP)-2 and -3 chaperone calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to the plasma membrane, where together they form heterodimeric adrenomedullin (AM) receptors. We investigated the contributions made by His residues situated in the RAMP extracellular domain to AM receptor trafficking and receptor signaling by co-expressing hCRLR and V5-tagged-hRAMP2 or -3 mutants in which a His residue was substituted with Ala in HEK-293 cells. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that hRAMP2-H71A mediated normal hCRLR surface delivery, but the resultant heterodimers showed significantly diminished [{sup 125}I]AM binding and AM-evoked cAMP production. Expression of hRAMP2-H124A and -H127A impaired surface delivery of hCRLR, which impaired or abolishing AM binding and receptor signaling. Although hRAMP3-H97A mediated full surface delivery of hCRLR, the resultant heterodimers showed impaired AM binding and signaling. Other His residues appeared uninvolved in hCRLR-related functions. Thus, the His residues of hRAMP2 and -3 differentially govern AM receptor function.

  14. Activation of G protein by opioid receptors: role of receptor number and G-protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Remmers, A E; Clark, M J; Alt, A; Medzihradsky, F; Woods, J H; Traynor, J R

    2000-05-19

    The collision-coupling model for receptor-G-protein interaction predicts that the rate of G-protein activation is dependent on receptor density, but not G-protein levels. C6 cells expressing mu- or delta-opioid receptors, or SH-SY5Y cells, were treated with beta-funaltrexamine (mu) or naltrindole-5'-isothiocyanate (delta) to decrease receptor number. The time course of full or partial agonist-stimulated ¿35SGTPgammaS binding did not vary in C6 cell membranes containing <1-25 pmol/mg mu-opioid receptor, or 1. 4-4.3 pmol/mg delta-opioid receptor, or in SHSY5Y cells containing 0. 16-0.39 pmol/mg receptor. The association of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding was faster in membranes from C6mu cells than from C6delta cells. A 10-fold reduction in functional G-protein, following pertussis toxin treatment, lowered the maximal level of ¿35SGTPgammaS binding but not the association rate. These data indicate a compartmentalization of opioid receptors and G protein at the cell membrane. PMID:10822058

  15. Retinoic Acid-mediated Nuclear Receptor Activation and Hepatocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bushue, Nathan; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Due to their well-known differentiation and apoptosis-inducing abilities, retinoic acid (RA) and its analogs have strong anti-cancer efficacy in human cancers. However, in vivo RA is a liver mitogen. While speculation has persisted that RA-mediated signaling is likely involved in hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration, direct evidence is still required. Findings in support of this proposition include observations that a release of retinyl palmitate (the precursor of RA) occurs in liver stellate cells following liver injury. Nevertheless, the biological action of this released vitamin A is virtually unknown. More likely is that the released vitamin A is converted to RA, the biological form, and then bound to a specific receptor (retinoid x receptor; RXRα), which is most abundantly expressed in the liver. Considering the mitogenic effects of RA, the RA-activated RXRα would likely then influence hepatocyte proliferation and liver tissue repair. At present, the mechanism by which RA stimulates hepatocyte proliferation is largely unknown. This review summarizes the activation of nuclear receptors (peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α, pregnane x receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and farnesoid x receptor) in an RXRα dependent manner to induce hepatocyte proliferation, providing a link between RA and its proliferative role.

  16. Cloning, constitutive activity and expression profiling of two receptors related to relaxin receptors in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Van Hiel, Matthias B; Vandersmissen, Hans Peter; Proost, Paul; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2015-06-01

    Leucine-rich repeat containing G protein-coupled receptors (LGRs) comprise a cluster of transmembrane proteins, characterized by the presence of a large N-terminal extracellular domain. This receptor group can be classified into three subtypes. Belonging to the subtype C LGRs are the mammalian relaxin receptors LGR7 (RXFP1) and LGR8 (RXFP2), which mediate important reproductive and other processes. We identified two related receptors in the genome of the fruit fly and cloned their open reading frames into an expression vector. Interestingly, dLGR3 demonstrated constitutive activity at very low doses of transfected plasmid, whereas dLGR4 did not show any basal activity. Both receptors exhibited a similar expression pattern during development, with relatively high transcript levels during the first larval stage. In addition, both receptors displayed higher expression in male adult flies as compared to female flies. Analysis of the tissue distribution of both receptor transcripts revealed a high expression of dLGR3 in the female fat body, while the expression of dLGR4 peaked in the midgut of both the wandering and adult stage. PMID:25064813

  17. A dual mechanism for impairment of GABAA receptor activity by NMDA receptor activation in rat cerebellum granule cells.

    PubMed

    Robello, M; Amico, C; Cupello, A

    1997-01-01

    The function of the GABAA receptor has been studied using the whole cell voltage clamp recording technique in rat cerebellum granule cells in culture. Activation of NMDA-type glutamate receptors causes a reduction in the effect of GABA. Full GABAA receptor activity was recovered after washing out NMDA and NMDA action was prevented in a Mg+2 containing medium. The NMDA effect was also absent when extracellular Ca+2 was replaced by Ba+2 and when 10 mM Bapta was present in the intracellular solution. Charge accumulations via voltage activated Ca+2 channels greater than the ones via NMDA receptors do not cause any reduction in GABAA receptor function, suggesting that Ca+2 influx through NMDA receptor channels is critical for the effect. The NMDA effect was reduced by including adenosine-5'-O-3-thiophosphate (ATP-gamma-S) in the internal solution and there was a reduction in the NMDA effect caused by deltamethrin, a calcineurin inhibitor. Part of the NMDA induced GABAA receptor impairment was prevented by prior treatment with L-arginine. Analogously, part of the NMDA effect was prevented by blockage of NO-synthase activity by N omega-nitro-L-arginine. A combination of NO-synthase and calcineurin inhibitors completely eliminated the NMDA action. An analogous result was obtained by combining the NO-synthase inhibitor with the addition of ATP-gamma-S to the pipette medium. The additivity of the prevention of the NMDA impairment of GABAA receptor by blocking the L-arginine/NO pathway and inhibiting calcineurin activity suggests an independent involvement of these two pathways in the interaction between NMDA and the GABAA receptor. On the one hand Ca+2 influx across NMDA channels activates calcineurin and dephosphorylates the GABAA receptor complex directly or dephosphorylates proteins critical for the function of the receptor. On the other hand, Ca+2 influx activates NO-synthase and induces nitric oxide production, which regulates such receptors via protein kinase G

  18. Protease-Activated Receptors and other G-Protein-Coupled Receptors: the Melanoma Connection

    PubMed Central

    Rosero, Rebecca A.; Villares, Gabriel J.; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2016-01-01

    The vast array of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play crucial roles in both physiological and pathological processes, including vision, coagulation, inflammation, autophagy, and cell proliferation. GPCRs also affect processes that augment cell proliferation and metastases in many cancers including melanoma. Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer, yet limited therapeutic modalities are available to patients with metastatic melanoma. Studies have found that both chemokine receptors and protease-activated receptors, both of which are GPCRs, are central to the metastatic melanoma phenotype and may serve as potential targets in novel therapies against melanoma and other cancers. PMID:27379162

  19. Advances in understanding the peptide neurotransmitter NAAG and appearance of a new member of the NAAG neuropeptide family.

    PubMed

    Neale, Joseph H; Olszewski, Rafal T; Zuo, Daiying; Janczura, Karolina J; Profaci, Caterina P; Lavin, Kaleen M; Madore, John C; Bzdega, Tomasz

    2011-08-01

    A substantial body of data was reported between 1984 and 2000 demonstrating that the neuropeptide N-acetylaspartylglutamate (NAAG) not only functions as a neurotransmitter but also is the third most prevalent transmitter in the mammalian nervous system behind glutamate and GABA. By 2005, this conclusion was validated further through a series of studies in vivo and in vitro. The primary enzyme responsible for the inactivation of NAAG following its synaptic release had been cloned, characterized and knocked out. Potent inhibitors of this enzyme were developed and their efficacy has been extensively studied in a series of animal models of clinical conditions, including stroke, peripheral neuropathy, traumatic brain injury, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, cocaine addiction, and schizophrenia. Considerable progress also has been made in defining further the mechanism of action of these peptidase inhibitors in elevating synaptic levels of NAAG with the consequent inhibition of transmitter release via the activation of pre-synaptic metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 by this peptide. Very recent discoveries include identification of two different nervous system enzymes that mediate the synthesis of NAAG from N-acetylaspartate and glutamate and the finding that one of these enzymes also mediates the synthesis of a second member of the NAAG family of neuropeptides, N-acetylaspartylglutamylglutamate. PMID:21644997

  20. Conservation of the function counts: homologous neurons express sequence-related neuropeptides that originate from different genes.

    PubMed

    Neupert, Susanne; Huetteroth, Wolf; Schachtner, Joachim; Predel, Reinhard

    2009-11-01

    By means of single-cell matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we analysed neuropeptide expression in all FXPRLamide/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide synthesizing neurons of the adult tobacco hawk moth, Manduca sexta. Mass spectra clearly suggest a completely identical processing of the pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide-precursor in the mandibular, maxillary and labial neuromeres of the subesophageal ganglion. Only in the pban-neurons of the labial neuromere, products of two neuropeptide genes, namely the pban-gene and the capa-gene, were detected. Both of these genes expressed, amongst others, sequence-related neuropeptides (extended WFGPRLamides). We speculate that the expression of the two neuropeptide genes is a plesiomorph character typical of moths. A detailed examination of the neuroanatomy and the peptidome of the (two) pban-neurons in the labial neuromere of moths with homologous neurons of different insects indicates a strong conservation of the function of this neuroendocrine system. In other insects, however, the labial neurons either express products of the fxprl-gene or products of the capa-gene. The processing of the respective genes is reduced to extended WFGPRLamides in each case and yields a unique peptidome in the labial cells. Thus, sequence-related messenger molecules are always produced in these cells and it seems that the respective neurons recruited different neuropeptide genes for this motif. PMID:19712058

  1. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships.

    PubMed

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-01-01

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers' attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one's favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands. PMID:26449882

  2. The neuropeptide oxytocin modulates consumer brand relationships

    PubMed Central

    Fürst, Andreas; Thron, Jesko; Scheele, Dirk; Marsh, Nina; Hurlemann, René

    2015-01-01

    Each year, companies invest billions of dollars into marketing activities to embellish brands as valuable relationship partners assuming that consumer brand relationships (CBRs) and interpersonal relationships rest upon the same neurobiological underpinnings. Given the crucial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) in social bonding, this study tests whether OXT-based mechanisms also determine the bond between consumers and brands. We conducted a randomized, placebo-controlled study involving 101 subjects and analyzed the effect of intranasal OXT on consumers’ attribution of relationship qualities to brands, brands paired with human celebrity endorsers, and familiar persons. OXT indeed promoted the attribution of relationship qualities not only in the case of social and semi-social stimuli, but also brands. Intriguingly, for subjects scoring high on autistic-like traits, the effect of OXT was completely reversed, evident in even lower relationship qualities across all stimulus categories. The importance of OXT in a CBR context is further corroborated by a three-fold increase in endogenous release of OXT following exposure to one’s favorite brand and positive associations between baseline peripheral OXT concentrations and brand relationship qualities. Collectively, our findings indicate that OXT not only plays a fundamental role in developing interpersonal relationships, but also enables relationship formation with objects such as brands. PMID:26449882

  3. Clinically used selective oestrogen receptor modulators increase LDL receptor activity in primary human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cerrato, F; Fernández-Suárez, M E; Alonso, R; Alonso, M; Vázquez, C; Pastor, O; Mata, P; Lasunción, M A; Gómez-Coronado, D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Treatment with selective oestrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) reduces low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels. We assessed the effect of tamoxifen, raloxifene and toremifene and their combinations with lovastatin on LDL receptor activity in lymphocytes from normolipidaemic and familial hypercholesterolaemic (FH) subjects, and human HepG2 hepatocytes and MOLT-4 lymphoblasts. Experimental Approach Lymphocytes were isolated from peripheral blood, treated with different compounds, and 1,1′-dioctadecyl-3,3,3,3′-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (DiI)-labelled LDL uptake was analysed by flow cytometry. Key Results Tamoxifen, toremifene and raloxifene, in this order, stimulated DiI-LDL uptake by lymphocytes by inhibiting LDL-derived cholesterol trafficking and subsequent down-regulation of LDL receptor expression. Differently to what occurred in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells, only tamoxifen consistently displayed a potentiating effect with lovastatin in primary lymphocytes. The SERM-mediated increase in LDL receptor activity was not altered by the anti-oestrogen ICI 182 780 nor was it reproduced by 17β-oestradiol. However, the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen was equally effective as tamoxifen. The SERMs produced similar effects on LDL receptor activity in heterozygous FH lymphocytes as in normal lymphocytes, although none of them had a potentiating effect with lovastatin in heterozygous FH lymphocytes. The SERMs had no effect in homozygous FH lymphocytes. Conclusions and Implications Clinically used SERMs up-regulate LDL receptors in primary human lymphocytes. There is a mild enhancement between SERMs and lovastatin of lymphocyte LDLR activity, the potentiation being greater in HepG2 and MOLT-4 cells. The effect of SERMs is independent of oestrogen receptors but is preserved in the tamoxifen-active metabolite endoxifen. This mechanism may contribute to the cholesterol-lowering action of SERMs. PMID:25395200

  4. Transcriptional activation of nuclear estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Xin, Qi-Liang; Qiu, Jing-Tao; Cui, Sheng; Xia, Guo-Liang; Wang, Hai-Bin

    2016-08-25

    Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) are two important members of steroid receptors family, an evolutionarily conserved family of transcription factors. Upon binding to their ligands, ER and PR enter cell nucleus to interact with specific DNA element in the context of chromatin to initiate the transcription of diverse target genes, which largely depends on the timely recruitment of a wide range of cofactors. Moreover, the interactions between steroid hormones and their respective receptors also trigger post-translational modifications on these receptors to fine-tune their transcriptional activities. Besides the well-known phosphorylation modifications on tyrosine and serine/threonine residues, recent studies have identified several other covalent modifications, such as ubiquitylation and sumoylation. These post-translational modifications of steroid receptors affect its stability, subcellular localization, and/or cofactor recruitment; eventually influence the duration and extent of transcriptional activation. This review is to focus on the recent research progress on the transcriptional activation of nuclear ER and PR as well as their physiological functions in early pregnancy, which may help us to better understand related female reproductive diseases. PMID:27546504

  5. Analyzing the activation of the melanocortin-2 receptor of tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Dores, Robert M; Liang, Liang

    2014-07-01

    Following the biochemical characterization of the pituitary hormone, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), in the 1950's, a number of structure/function studies were done which identifies two amino acid motifs in ACTH, the HFRW motif and KKRR motif, as critical for the activation of the "ACTH" receptor on adrenal cortex cells. In the 1990's the "ACTH" receptor was identified as a member of the melanocortin receptor gene family, and given the name melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R). Since that time a number of studies on both tetrapod and teleost MC2R orthologs have established that these orthologs can only be activated by ACTH, but not by any of the MSH-sized melanocortin ligands, and these orthologs require interaction with the melanocortin-2 receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for functional expression. This review summarizes recent structure/function studies on human ACTH, and points out the importance of the GKPVG motif in ACTH for the activation of the receptor. In this regard, a multiple-step model for the activation of tetrapod and teleost MC2R orthologs is presented, and the evolution of gnathostome MC2R ligand selectivity and the requirement for MRAP interaction is discussed in light of a recent study on a cartilaginous fish MC2R ortholog. This review contains excerpts from the Gorbman/Bern Lecture presented at the Second Meeting of the North American Society for Comparative Endocrinology (NASCE). PMID:24713445

  6. Monitoring leptin activity using the chicken leptin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hen, Gideon; Yosefi, Sera; Ronin, Ana; Einat, Paz; Rosenblum, Charles I; Denver, Robert J; Friedman-Einat, Miriam

    2008-05-01

    We report on the construction of a leptin bioassay based on the activation of chicken leptin receptor in cultured cells. A human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cell line, stably transfected with the full-length cDNA of chicken leptin receptor together with a STAT3-responsive reporter gene specifically responded to recombinant human and Xenopus leptins. The observed higher sensitivity of chicken leptin receptor to the former is in agreement with the degree of sequence similarity among these species (about 60 and 38% identical amino acids between humans and chickens, and between humans and Xenopus respectively). The specific activation of signal transduction through the chicken leptin receptor, shown here for the first time, suggests that the transition of Gln269 (implicated in the Gln-to-Pro Zucker fatty mutation in rats) to Glu in chickens does not impair its activity. Analysis of leptin-like activity in human serum samples of obese and lean subjects coincided well with leptin levels determined by RIA. Serum samples of pre- and post partum cows showed a tight correlation with the degree of adiposity. However, specific activation of the chicken leptin receptor in this assay was not observed with serum samples from broiler or layer chickens (representing fat and lean phenotypes respectively) or with those from turkey. Similar leptin receptor activation profiles were observed with cells transfected with human leptin receptor. Further work is needed to determine whether the lack of leptin-like activity in the chicken serum samples is due to a lack of leptin in this species or simply to a serum level of leptin that is below the detection threshold. PMID:18434362

  7. Identification of COUP-TFII Orphan Nuclear Receptor as a Retinoic Acid-Activated Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Kruse, Schoen W; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Zhou, X Edward; Kretschman, Jennifer E; Reynolds, Ross; Vonrhein, Clemens; Xu, Yong; Wang, Liliang; Tsai, Sophia Y; Tsai, Ming-Jer; Xu, H Eric

    2010-01-12

    The chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors (COUP-TFI and II) make up the most conserved subfamily of nuclear receptors that play key roles in angiogenesis, neuronal development, organogenesis, cell fate determination, and metabolic homeostasis. Although the biological functions of COUP-TFs have been studied extensively, little is known of their structural features or aspects of ligand regulation. Here we report the ligand-free 1.48 {angstrom} crystal structure of the human COUP-TFII ligand-binding domain. The structure reveals an autorepressed conformation of the receptor, where helix {alpha}10 is bent into the ligand-binding pocket and the activation function-2 helix is folded into the cofactor binding site, thus preventing the recruitment of coactivators. In contrast, in multiple cell lines, COUP-TFII exhibits constitutive transcriptional activity, which can be further potentiated by nuclear receptor coactivators. Mutations designed to disrupt cofactor binding, dimerization, and ligand binding, substantially reduce the COUP-TFII transcriptional activity. Importantly, retinoid acids are able to promote COUP-TFII to recruit coactivators and activate a COUP-TF reporter construct. Although the concentration needed is higher than the physiological levels of retinoic acids, these findings demonstrate that COUP-TFII is a ligand-regulated nuclear receptor, in which ligands activate the receptor by releasing it from the autorepressed conformation.

  8. The biologically active conformations of ligand CCK B receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Kuznetsova, Nina B.; Schulgin, Sergey V.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Sinyakov, Valeriy V.; Kovtun, Viktor A.

    2006-07-01

    We analyzed literature data about structures of ligands of CCK B receptor. The structure of the binding site (fragments of the third extracellular loop and the seventh transmembrane helix of CCK B receptor) was determined recently by experiments. We were finding presumable biologically active conformations (BAC) of the ligands by two methods. One of them is based on the fact that the most stable conformations of the biologically active peptide on the phase interface "water-lipophilic medium" are often similar to the BAC. Another method is based on the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure. We used Monte-Carlo method with the fixed geometry of the receptor and the optimized geometry of tetrapeptide cholecystokinin (CCK-4). It has been shown, that the first method should be used to find BAC of antagonists of CCK B receptor. The strategy of the formation of the stable ligand-receptor complex during the modeling procedure can be used for the designing of peptide agonists of CCK B receptor.

  9. Opportunistic activation of TRP receptors by endogenous lipids: Exploiting lipidomics to understand TRP receptor cellular communication

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Heather B.; Raboune, Siham; Hollis, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    Transient receptor potential channels (TRPs) form a large family of ubiquitous non-selective cation channels that function as cellular sensors and in many cases regulate intracellular calcium. Identification of the endogenous ligands that activate these TRP receptors is still under intense investigation with the majority of these channels still remaining “orphans”. That these channels respond to a variety of external stimuli (e.g. plant-derived lipids, changes in temperature, and changes in pH) provides a framework for their abilities as cellular sensors, however, the mechanism of direct activation is still under much debate and research. In the cases where endogenous ligands (predominately lipids) have shown direct activation of a channel, multiple ligands have been shown to activate the same channel suggesting that these receptors are “promiscuous” in nature. Lipidomics of a growing class of endogenous lipids, N-acyl amides, the most famous of which is N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (the endogenous cannabinoid, Anandamide) is providing a novel set of ligands that have been shown to activate some members of the TRP family and have the potential to deorphanize many more. Here it is argued that activation of TRPV receptors, a subset of the larger family of TRPs, by multiple endogenous lipids that are structurally analogous is a model system to drive our understanding that many TRP receptors are not promiscuous, but are more characteristically “opportunistic” in nature; exploiting the structural similarity and biosynthesis of a narrow range of analogous endogenous lipids. In addition, this manuscript will compare the activation properties of TRPC5 to the activity profile of an “orphan” lipid, N-palmitoyl glycine; further demonstrating that lipidomics aimed at expanding our knowledge of the family of N-acyl amides has the potential to provide novel avenues of research for TRP receptors. PMID:23178153

  10. Flavonoids as dietary regulators of nuclear receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Avior, Yishai; Bomze, David; Ramon, Ory

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity, type II diabetes, and dyslipidemia are a rising cause of mortality worldwide. The progression of many metabolic diseases is fundamentally regulated on the transcriptional level by a family of ligand-activated transcription factors, called nuclear receptors, which detect and respond to metabolic changes. Their role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis makes nuclear receptors an important pharmaceutical and dietary target. This review will present the growing evidence that flavonoids, natural secondary plant metabolites, are important regulators of nuclear receptor activity. Structural similarities between flavonoids and cholesterol derivatives combined with the promiscuous nature of most nuclear receptors provide a wealth of possibilities for pharmaceutical and dietary modulation of metabolism. While the challenges of bringing flavonoid-derived therapeutics to the market are significant, we consider this rapidly growing field to be an essential aspect of the functional food initiative and an important mine for pharmaceutical compounds. PMID:23598551

  11. Ligands for the Nuclear Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Sascha

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear receptors are ligand-activated transcription factors, which represent a primary class of drug targets. The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key player in various biological processes. PPARγ is widely known as the target protein of the thiazolidinediones for treating type 2 diabetes. Moreover, PPARγ ligands can induce anti-inflammatory and potentially additional beneficial effects. Recent mechanistic insights of PPARγ modulation give hope the next generation of efficient PPARγ-based drugs with fewer side effects can be developed. Furthermore, chemical approaches that make use of synergistic action of combinatorial ligands are promising alternatives for providing tailored medicine. Lessons learned from fine-tuning the action of PPARγ can provide avenues for efficient molecular intervention via many other nuclear receptors to combat common diseases. PMID:26435213

  12. Prolonged activation of NMDA receptors promotes dephosphorylation and alters postendocytic sorting of GABAB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Terunuma, Miho; Vargas, Karina J.; Wilkins, Megan E.; Ramírez, Omar A.; Jaureguiberry-Bravo, Matías; Pangalos, Menelas N.; Smart, Trevor G.; Moss, Stephen J.; Couve, Andrés

    2010-01-01

    Slow and persistent synaptic inhibition is mediated by metabotropic GABAB receptors (GABABRs). GABABRs are responsible for the modulation of neurotransmitter release from presynaptic terminals and for hyperpolarization at postsynaptic sites. Postsynaptic GABABRs are predominantly found on dendritic spines, adjacent to excitatory synapses, but the control of their plasma membrane availability is still controversial. Here, we explore the role of glutamate receptor activation in regulating the function and surface availability of GABABRs in central neurons. We demonstrate that prolonged activation of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) leads to endocytosis, a diversion from a recycling route, and subsequent lysosomal degradation of GABABRs. These sorting events are paralleled by a reduction in GABABR-dependent activation of inwardly rectifying K+ channel currents. Postendocytic sorting is critically dependent on phosphorylation of serine 783 (S783) within the GABABR2 subunit, an established substrate of AMP-dependent protein kinase (AMPK). NMDA-R activation leads to a rapid increase in phosphorylation of S783, followed by a slower dephosphorylation, which results from the activity of AMPK and protein phosphatase 2A, respectively. Agonist activation of GABABRs counters the effects of NMDA. Thus, NMDA-R activation alters the phosphorylation state of S783 and acts as a molecular switch to decrease the abundance of GABABRs at the neuronal plasma membrane. Such a mechanism may be of significance during synaptic plasticity or pathological conditions, such as ischemia or epilepsy, which lead to prolonged activation of glutamate receptors. PMID:20643948

  13. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  14. Neuroleptics Affect Neuropeptide S and NPSR mRNA Levels in the Rat Brain.

    PubMed

    Pałasz, Artur; Rojczyk, Ewa

    2015-11-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) has a multidirectional regulatory activity, especially when considered as a potent endogenous anxiolytic factor. Accumulating data suggests that neuroleptics affect peptidergic signaling in various brain structures. However, there is no information regarding the influence of treatment with antipsychotics on brain NPS expression. In the current study, we assessed the NPS and NPS receptor (NPSR) mRNA levels in the brains of rats shortly and chronically treated with chlorpromazine and olanzapine using quantitative real-time PCR. Both single-dose and long-term (4 months) olanzapine treatment led to the upregulation of NPS expression in the rat hypothalamus. It supports the hypothesis that NPS is involved in the dopamine-dependent anxiolytic actions of selected neuroleptics and possibly also in the pathophysiology of mental disorders. On the other hand, NPSR expression decreased after single-dose and chronic chlorpromazine administration in the hypothalamus, as well as after chronic olanzapine and chlorpromazine administration in the striatum and hippocampus. These results cast a new light on the pharmacology of antipsychotics and contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms responsible for their action. Furthermore, our findings underline the complex nature of potential interactions between dopamine receptors and brain peptidergic pathways, which has potential clinical applications. PMID:26227793

  15. Structural mechanism of glutamate receptor activation and desensitization.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Joel R; Kumar, Janesh; Chittori, Sagar; Rao, Prashant; Pierson, Jason; Bartesaghi, Alberto; Mayer, Mark L; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2014-10-16

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the vertebrate brain. To gain a better understanding of how structural changes gate ion flux across the membrane, we trapped rat AMPA (α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid) and kainate receptor subtypes in their major functional states and analysed the resulting structures using cryo-electron microscopy. We show that transition to the active state involves a 'corkscrew' motion of the receptor assembly, driven by closure of the ligand-binding domain. Desensitization is accompanied by disruption of the amino-terminal domain tetramer in AMPA, but not kainate, receptors with a two-fold to four-fold symmetry transition in the ligand-binding domains in both subtypes. The 7.6 Å structure of a desensitized kainate receptor shows how these changes accommodate channel closing. These findings integrate previous physiological, biochemical and structural analyses of glutamate receptors and provide a molecular explanation for key steps in receptor gating. PMID:25119039

  16. Redefining the concept of protease-activated receptors: cathepsin S evokes itch via activation of Mrgprs

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Vemuri B.; Sun, Shuohao; Azimi, Ehsan; Elmariah, Sarina B.; Dong, Xinzhong; Lerner, Ethan A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory neurons expressing Mas-related G protein coupled receptors (Mrgprs) mediate histamine-independent itch. We show that the cysteine protease cathepsin S activates MrgprC11 and evokes receptor-dependent scratching in mice. In contrast to its activation of conventional protease-activated receptors, cathepsin S mediated activation of MrgprC11 did not involve the generation of a tethered ligand. We demonstrate further that different cysteine proteases selectively activate specific mouse and human Mrgpr family members. This expansion of our understanding by which proteases interact with GPCRs redefines the concept of what constitutes a protease-activated receptor. The findings also implicate proteases as ligands to members of this orphan receptor family while providing new insights into how cysteine proteases contribute to itch. PMID:26216096

  17. Interfering with mineralocorticoid receptor activation: the past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aldosterone is a potent mineralocorticoid produced by the adrenal gland. Aldosterone binds to and activates the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in a plethora of tissues, but the cardiovascular actions of aldosterone are of primary interest clinically. Although MR antagonists were developed as antihypertensive agents, they are now considered to be important therapeutic options for patients with heart failure. Specifically, blocking only the MR has proven to be a difficult task because of its similarity to other steroid receptors, including the androgen and progesterone receptors. This lack of specificity caused the use of the first-generation mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists to be fraught with difficulty because of the side effects produced by drug administration. However, in recent years, several advances have been made that could potentially increase the clinical use of agents that inhibit the actions of aldosterone. These will be discussed here along with some examples of the beneficial effects of these new therapeutic agents. PMID:25165560

  18. Regulation of Proteome Maintenance Gene Expression by Activators of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor a (PPARa)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) is activated by a large number of xenobiotic and hypolipidemic compounds called peroxisome proliferator chemicals (PPC). One agonist of PPARa (WY-14,643) regulates responses in the mouse liver to chemic...

  19. Aib-containing analogues of the insect kinin neuropeptide family demonstrate resistance to an insect angiotensin-converting enzyme and potent diuretic activity.

    PubMed

    Nachman, R J; Isaac, R E; Coast, G M; Holman, G M

    1997-01-01

    Analogues of the insect kinin family in which the Xaa2 residue of the C-terminal pentapeptide core sequence Phe-Xaa1-Xaa2-Trp-Gly-NH2 (Xaa1 = Asn, His, Phe, Ser, or Tyr; Xaa2 = Ala, Ser, or Pro) is replaced with sterically hindered aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) prove to be resistant to hydrolysis by housefly (Musca domestica) angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE), an endopeptidase capable of hydrolysis and inactivation of the naturally occurring insect kinin peptides. The Aib residue is compatible with formation of turn in the active core region that is important for the biological activity of the insect kinins. One of the Aib-containing analogues, pGlu-Lys-Phe-Phe-Aib-Trp-Gly-NH2, is five- and eightfold more active than the most active endogenous insect kinins in cockroach (Leucophaea maderae) hindgut myotropic and cricket (Acheta domesticus) Malpighian tubule fluid secretion assays, respectively. As the analogue is blocked at both the amino- and the carboxyl-terminus and resistant to an endopeptidase present in insects, it is better adapted than the endogenous peptides to survive for long periods in the hemolymph. Enzyme-resistant insect kinin analogues can provide useful tools to insect researchers studying the neuroendocrine control of water and ion balance and the physiological consequences of challenging insect with diuretic factors that demonstrate enhanced resistance to peptidase attack. If these analogues, whether in isolation or in combination with other factors, can disrupt the water and/or ion balance they hold potential utility for the control of pest insect populations in the future. PMID:9114452

  20. Identification of GPR83 as the receptor for the neuroendocrine peptide PEN.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Ivone; Bobeck, Erin N; Margolis, Elyssa B; Gupta, Achla; Sierra, Salvador; Fakira, Amanda K; Fujita, Wakako; Müller, Timo D; Müller, Anne; Tschöp, Matthias H; Kleinau, Gunnar; Fricker, Lloyd D; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2016-01-01

    PEN is an abundant peptide in the brain that has been implicated in the regulation of feeding. We identified a receptor for PEN in mouse hypothalamus and Neuro2A cells. PEN bound to and activated GPR83, a G protein (heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide)-binding protein)-coupled receptor (GPCR). Reduction of GPR83 expression in mouse brain and Neuro2A cells reduced PEN binding and signaling, consistent with GPR83 functioning as the major receptor for PEN. In some brain regions, GPR83 colocalized with GPR171, a GPCR that binds the neuropeptide bigLEN, another neuropeptide that is involved in feeding and is generated from the same precursor protein as is PEN. Coexpression of these two receptors in cell lines altered the signaling properties of each receptor, suggesting a functional interaction. Our data established PEN as a neuropeptide that binds GPR83 and suggested that these two ligand-receptor systems-PEN-GPR83 and bigLEN-GPR171-may be functionally coupled in the regulation of feeding. PMID:27117253

  1. Stress-related neuropeptides and alcoholism: CRH, NPY, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ciccocioppo, Roberto; Gehlert, Donald R; Ryabinin, Andrey; Kaur, Simranjit; Cippitelli, Andrea; Thorsell, Annika; Lê, Anh D; Hipskind, Philip A; Hamdouchi, Chafiq; Lu, Jianliang; Hembre, Erik J; Cramer, Jeffrey; Song, Min; McKinzie, David; Morin, Michelle; Economidou, Daina; Stopponi, Serena; Cannella, Nazzareno; Braconi, Simone; Kallupi, Marsida; de Guglielmo, Giordano; Massi, Maurizio; George, David T; Gilman, Jody; Hersh, Jacqueline; Tauscher, Johannes T; Hunt, Stephen P; Hommer, Daniel; Heilig, Markus

    2009-11-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium held at the conference on "Alcoholism and Stress: A Framework for Future Treatment Strategies" in Volterra, Italy, May 6-9, 2008. Chaired by Markus Heilig and Roberto Ciccocioppo, this symposium offered a forum for the presentation of recent data linking neuropetidergic neurotransmission to the regulation of different alcohol-related behaviors in animals and in humans. Dr. Donald Gehlert described the development of a new corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 antagonist and showed its efficacy in reducing alcohol consumption and stress-induced relapse in different animal models of alcohol abuse. Dr. Andrey Ryabinin reviewed recent findings in his laboratory, indicating a role of the urocortin 1 receptor system in the regulation of alcohol intake. Dr. Annika Thorsell showed data supporting the significance of the neuropeptide Y receptor system in the modulation of behaviors associated with a history of ethanol intoxication. Dr. Roberto Ciccocioppo focused his presentation on the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) receptors as treatment targets for alcoholism. Finally, Dr. Markus Heilig showed recent preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting that neurokinin 1 antagonism may represent a promising new treatment for alcoholism. Collectively, these investigators highlighted the significance of neuropeptidergic neurotransmission in the regulation of neurobiological mechanisms of alcohol addiction. Data also revealed the importance of these systems as treatment targets for the development of new medication for alcoholism. PMID:19913192

  2. Multiple amidated neuropeptides are required for normal circadian locomotor rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Taghert, P H; Hewes, R S; Park, J H; O'Brien, M A; Han, M; Peck, M E

    2001-09-01

    In Drosophila, the amidated neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF) is expressed by the ventral subset of lateral pacemaker neurons and is required for circadian locomotor rhythms. Residual rhythmicity in pdf mutants likely reflects the activity of other neurotransmitters. We asked whether other neuropeptides contribute to such auxiliary mechanisms. We used the gal4/UAS system to create mosaics for the neuropeptide amidating enzyme PHM; amidation is a highly specific and widespread modification of secretory peptides in Drosophila. Three different gal4 drivers restricted PHM expression to different numbers of peptidergic neurons. These mosaics displayed aberrant locomotor rhythms to degrees that paralleled the apparent complexity of the spatial patterns. Certain PHM mosaics were less rhythmic than pdf mutants and as severe as per mutants. Additional gal4 elements were added to the weakly rhythmic PHM mosaics. Although adding pdf-gal4 provided only partial improvement, adding the widely expressed tim-gal4 largely restored rhythmicity. These results indicate that, in Drosophila, peptide amidation is required for neuropeptide regulation of behavior. They also support the hypothesis that multiple amidated neuropeptides, acting upstream, downstream, or in parallel to PDF, help organize daily locomotor rhythms. PMID:11517257

  3. Mechanisms of Activation of Receptor Tyrosine Kinases: Monomers or Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Ichiro N.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) play essential roles in cellular processes, including metabolism, cell-cycle control, survival, proliferation, motility and differentiation. RTKs are all synthesized as single-pass transmembrane proteins and bind polypeptide ligands, mainly growth factors. It has long been thought that all RTKs, except for the insulin receptor (IR) family, are activated by ligand-induced dimerization of the receptors. An increasing number of diverse studies, however, indicate that RTKs, previously thought to exist as monomers, are present as pre-formed, yet inactive, dimers prior to ligand binding. The non-covalently associated dimeric structures are reminiscent of those of the IR family, which has a disulfide-linked dimeric structure. Furthermore, recent progress in structural studies has provided insight into the underpinnings of conformational changes during the activation of RTKs. In this review, I discuss two mutually exclusive models for the mechanisms of activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, the neurotrophin receptor and IR families, based on these new insights. PMID:24758840

  4. Biologic activity of antigen receptors artificially incorporated onto B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Peacock, J S; Londo, T R; Roess, D A; Barisas, B G

    1986-09-15

    We describe a method for incorporating monoclonal antibody molecules onto viable murine lymphocytes and summarize the biologic activity of these artificial receptors on B cells. Mouse spleen cells incubated overnight with palmitate conjugates of a monoclonal anti-DNP IgA (protein 315) in the presence of deoxycholic acid incorporate about 50,000 antibody molecules per cell. When concentrations of deoxycholate and palmitoyl-protein 315 are carefully controlled, this labeling procedure does not affect the viability or the normal functions of the receptor-decorated cells. The incorporated antibody specifically binds DNP-antigens, although it appears to be unable to communicate directly with internal cellular components. Yet when these receptor-decorated, unprimed cells are challenged with any one of several DNP-antigens, up to 42,000 per 10(6) B cells differentiate into Ig-secreting cells. This response is about 23-fold greater than that induced in normal cell cultures and is of the same magnitude as that induced by the polyclonal B cell activator LPS. This, in addition to the observation that only about 3.6% of receptor-decorated B cells responding to DNP-conjugated polymerized flagellin (DNP-POL) produce hapten-specific antibody, demonstrates that these antigens cause polyclonal B cell differentiation. Normal spleen cells in the presence of DNP-POL and irradiated spleen cells bearing the artificial receptors do not exhibit the polyclonal antibody response. Also, the response of receptor-decorated B cell is blocked by high but nontoxic concentrations of the nonimmunogenic hapten DNP-lysine. These observations demonstrate that the polyclonal B cell response in this system requires the binding of antigen to artificial receptors on functionally viable cells. The polyclonal B cell response to a thymus-dependent antigen DNP-conjugated bovine gamma-globulin (DNP-BGG) requires the presence of the carrier-primed T cells. On the other hand, T cell depletion by anti-Thy-1

  5. Neuropeptides: conductors of the immune orchestra.

    PubMed

    Morley, J E; Kay, N E; Solomon, G F; Plotnikoff, N P

    1987-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for a bidirectional communications system between the immune system and the brain. Many of the substances involved in this communication appear to be neuropeptides. These findings have given biochemical validity to the clinical and epidemiological studies that have suggested that psychosocial factors can modulate the response to infections and neoplasms. PMID:3298913

  6. Neuropeptide Trefoil Factor 3 Reverses Depressive-Like Behaviors by Activation of BDNF-ERK-CREB Signaling in Olfactory Bulbectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiali; Luo, Yixiao; Zhang, Ruoxi; Shi, Haishui; Zhu, Weili; Shi, Jie

    2015-01-01

    The trefoil factors (TFFs) are a family of three polypeptides, among which TFF1 and TFF3 are widely distributed in the central nervous system. Our previous study indicated that TFF3 was a potential rapid-onset antidepressant as it reversed the depressive-like behaviors induced by acute or chronic mild stress. In order to further identify the antidepressant-like effect of TFF3, we applied an olfactory bulbectomy (OB), a classic animal model of depression, in the present study. To elucidate the mechanism underlying the antidepressant-like activity of TFF3, we tested the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK)-cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB) signaling in the hippocampus in the process. Chronic systemic administration of TFF3 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) for seven days not only produced a significant antidepressant-like efficacy in the OB paradigm, but also restored the expression of BDNF, pERK, and pCREB in the hippocampal CA3. Inhibition of BDNF or extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) signaling in CA3 blocked the antidepressant-like activity of TFF3 in OB rats. Our findings further confirmed the therapeutic effect of TFF3 against depression and suggested that the normalization of the BDNF-ERK-CREB pathway was involved in the behavioral response of TFF3 for the treatment of depression. PMID:26633367

  7. Liver X Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Agonist from Cornus alternifolia

    PubMed Central

    He, Yang-Qing; Ma, Guo-Yi; Peng, Jiang-nan; Ma, Zhan-Ying; Hamann, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear receptors superfamily and are transcription factors activated by specific ligands. Liver X receptors (LXR) belong to the nuclear hormone receptors and have been shown to play an important role in cholesterol homeostasis. From the previous screening of several medicinal plants for potential partial PPARγ agonists, the extracts of Cornus alternifolia were found to exhibit promising bioactivity. In this paper, we report the isolation and structural elucidation of four new compounds and their potential as ligands for PPAR. Methods The new compounds were extracted from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia and fractionated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and analysis of their hydrolysis products. Results Three new iridoid glycosides including an iridolactone, alternosides A-C (1–3), a new megastigmane glycoside, cornalternoside (4) and 10 known compounds, were obtained from the leaves of Cornus alternifolia. Kaempferol-3-O-β-glucopyranoside (5) exhibited potent agonistic activities for PPARα, PPARγ and LXR with EC50 values of 0.62, 3.0 and 1.8 μ M, respectively. Conclusions We isolated four new and ten known compounds from Cornus alternifolia, and one known compound showed agonistic activities for PPARα, PPARγ and LXR. General significance Compound 1 is the first example of a naturally occurring iridoid glycoside containing a β-glucopyranoside moiety at C-6. PMID:22353334

  8. Prevertebrate Local Gene Duplication Facilitated Expansion of the Neuropeptide GPCR Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Yun, Seongsik; Furlong, Michael; Sim, Mikang; Cho, Minah; Park, Sumi; Cho, Eun Bee; Reyes-Alcaraz, Arfaxad; Hwang, Jong-Ik; Kim, Jaebum; Seong, Jae Young

    2015-11-01

    In humans, numerous genes encode neuropeptides that comprise a superfamily of more than 70 genes in approximately 30 families and act mainly through rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Two rounds of whole-genome duplication (2R WGD) during early vertebrate evolution greatly contributed to proliferation within gene families; however, the mechanisms underlying the initial emergence and diversification of these gene families before 2R WGD are largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed 25 vertebrate rhodopsin-like neuropeptide GPCR families and their cognate peptides using phylogeny, synteny, and localization of these genes on reconstructed vertebrate ancestral chromosomes (VACs). Based on phylogeny, these GPCR families can be divided into five distinct clades, and members of each clade tend to be located on the same VACs. Similarly, their neuropeptide gene families also tend to reside on distinct VACs. Comparison of these GPCR genes with those of invertebrates including Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Branchiostoma floridae, and Ciona intestinalis indicates that these GPCR families emerged through tandem local duplication during metazoan evolution prior to 2R WGD. Our study describes a presumptive evolutionary mechanism and development pathway of the vertebrate rhodopsin-like GPCR and cognate neuropeptide families from the urbilaterian ancestor to modern vertebrates. PMID:26337547

  9. A Phytochrome Sensory Domain Permits Receptor Activation by Red Light.

    PubMed

    Reichhart, Eva; Ingles-Prieto, Alvaro; Tichy, Alexandra-Madelaine; McKenzie, Catherine; Janovjak, Harald

    2016-05-17

    Optogenetics and photopharmacology enable the spatio-temporal control of cell and animal behavior by light. Although red light offers deep-tissue penetration and minimal phototoxicity, very few red-light-sensitive optogenetic methods are currently available. We have now developed a red-light-induced homodimerization domain. We first showed that an optimized sensory domain of the cyanobacterial phytochrome 1 can be expressed robustly and without cytotoxicity in human cells. We then applied this domain to induce the dimerization of two receptor tyrosine kinases-the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 and the neurotrophin receptor trkB. This new optogenetic method was then used to activate the MAPK/ERK pathway non-invasively in mammalian tissue and in multicolor cell-signaling experiments. The light-controlled dimerizer and red-light-activated receptor tyrosine kinases will prove useful to regulate a variety of cellular processes with light. PMID:27101018

  10. Structural basis for selective activation of ABA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, Francis C.; Burgie, E. Sethe; Park, Sang-Youl; Jensen, Davin R.; Weiner, Joshua J.; Bingman, Craig A.; Chang, Chia-En A.; Cutler, Sean R.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Volkman, Brian F.

    2010-11-01

    Changing environmental conditions and lessening fresh water supplies have sparked intense interest in understanding and manipulating abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, which controls adaptive responses to drought and other abiotic stressors. We recently discovered a selective ABA agonist, pyrabactin, and used it to discover its primary target PYR1, the founding member of the PYR/PYL family of soluble ABA receptors. To understand pyrabactin's selectivity, we have taken a combined structural, chemical and genetic approach. We show that subtle differences between receptor binding pockets control ligand orientation between productive and nonproductive modes. Nonproductive binding occurs without gate closure and prevents receptor activation. Observations in solution show that these orientations are in rapid equilibrium that can be shifted by mutations to control maximal agonist activity. Our results provide a robust framework for the design of new agonists and reveal a new mechanism for agonist selectivity.

  11. Novel positive allosteric modulators of GABAA receptors with anesthetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Maldifassi, Maria C.; Baur, Roland; Pierce, David; Nourmahnad, Anahita; Forman, Stuart A.; Sigel, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    GABAA receptors are the main inhibitory neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and are targets for numerous clinically important drugs such as benzodiazepines, anxiolytics and anesthetics. We previously identified novel ligands of the classical benzodiazepine binding pocket in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors using an experiment-guided virtual screening (EGVS) method. This screen also identified novel ligands for intramembrane low affinity diazepam site(s). In the current study we have further characterized compounds 31 and 132 identified with EGVS as well as 4-O-methylhonokiol. We investigated the site of action of these compounds in α1β2γ2 GABAA receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using voltage-clamp electrophysiology combined with a benzodiazepine site antagonist and transmembrane domain mutations. All three compounds act mainly through the two β+/α− subunit transmembrane interfaces of the GABAA receptors. We then used concatenated receptors to dissect the involvement of individual β+/α− interfaces. We further demonstrated that these compounds have anesthetic activity in a small aquatic animal model, Xenopus laevis tadpoles. The newly identified compounds may serve as scaffolds for the development of novel anesthetics. PMID:27198062

  12. Neuromedin B and gastrin releasing peptide excite arcuate nucleus neuropeptide Y neurons in a novel transgenic mouse expressing strong renilla GFP in NPY neurons

    PubMed Central

    van den Pol, Anthony N.; Yao, Yang; Fu, Li-Ying; Foo, Kylie; Huang, Hao; Coppari, Roberto; Lowell, Brad; Broberger, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is one of the most widespread neuropeptides in the brain. Transgenic mice were generated that expressed bright renilla GFP in most or all of the known NPY cells in the brain, which otherwise were not identifiable. GFP expression in NPY cells was confirmed with immunocytochemistry and single cell RT-PCR. NPY neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus play an important role in energy homeostasis and endocrine control. Whole cell patch clamp recording was used to study identified arcuate NPY cells. Primary agents that regulate energy balance include melanocortin receptor agonists, AgRP, and cannabinoids; none of these substances substantially influenced electrical properties of NPY neurons. In striking contrast, neuropeptides of the bombesin family, including gastrin releasing peptide and neuromedin B which are found in axons in the arcuate nucleus and may also be released from the gut to signal the brain, showed strong direct excitatory actions at nanomolar levels on the NPY neurons, stronger than the actions of ghrelin and hypocretin/orexin. Bombesin-related peptides reduced input resistance and depolarized the membrane potential. The depolarization was attenuated by several factors: substitution of choline for sodium, extracellular Ni2+, inclusion of BAPTA in the pipette, KB-R7943 and SKF96365. Reduced extracellular calcium enhanced the current, which reversed around − 20 mV. Together, these data suggest two mechanisms, activation of non-selective cation channels and the sodium/calcium exchanger. Since both NPY and POMC neurons, which we also studied, are similarly directly excited by bombesin-like peptides, the peptides may function to initiate broad activation, rather than the cell-type selective activation or inhibition reported for many other compounds that modulate energy homeostasis. PMID:19357287

  13. Endocannabinoid tone versus constitutive activity of cannabinoid receptors

    PubMed Central

    Howlett, Allyn C; Reggio, Patricia H; Childers, Steven R; Hampson, Robert E; Ulloa, Nadine M; Deutsch, Dale G

    2011-01-01

    This review evaluates the cellular mechanisms of constitutive activity of the cannabinoid (CB) receptors, its reversal by inverse agonists, and discusses the pitfalls and problems in the interpretation of the research data. The notion is presented that endogenously produced anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) serve as autocrine or paracrine stimulators of the CB receptors, giving the appearance of constitutive activity. It is proposed that one cannot interpret inverse agonist studies without inference to the receptors' environment vis-à-vis the endocannabinoid agonists which themselves are highly lipophilic compounds with a preference for membranes. The endocannabinoid tone is governed by a combination of synthetic pathways and inactivation involving transport and degradation. The synthesis and degradation of 2-AG is well characterized, and 2-AG has been strongly implicated in retrograde signalling in neurons. Data implicating endocannabinoids in paracrine regulation have been described. Endocannabinoid ligands can traverse the cell's interior and potentially be stored on fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Molecular modelling predicts that the endocannabinoids derived from membrane phospholipids can laterally diffuse to enter the CB receptor from the lipid bilayer. Considering that endocannabinoid signalling to CB receptors is a much more likely scenario than is receptor activation in the absence of agonist ligands, researchers are advised to refrain from assuming constitutive activity except for experimental models known to be devoid of endocannabinoid ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Cannabinoids in Biology and Medicine. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2011.163.issue-7 PMID:21545414

  14. Identification of specific calcitonin-like receptor residues important for calcitonin gene-related peptide high affinity binding

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Sugato; Evanson, Janel; Harris, Erik; Lowe, Stephen L; Thomasson, Kathryn A; Porter, James E

    2006-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a vasoactive neuropeptide whose biological activity has potential therapeutic value for many vascular related diseases. CGRP is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide that signals through a G protein-coupled receptor belonging to the secretin receptor family. Previous studies on the calcitonin-like receptor (CLR), which requires co-expression of the receptor-activity-modifying protein-1 (RAMP1) to function as a CGRP receptor, have shown an 18 amino acid N-terminus sequence important for binding CGRP. Moreover, several investigations have recognized the C-terminal amidated phenylalanine (F37) of CGRP as essential for docking to the mature receptor. Therefore, we hypothesize that hydrophobic amino acids within the previously characterized 18 amino acid CLR N-terminus domain are important binding contacts for the C-terminal phenylalaninamide of CGRP. Results Two leucine residues within this previously characterized CLR N-terminus domain, when mutated to alanine and expressed on HEK293T cells stably transfected with RAMP1, demonstrated a significantly decreased binding affinity for CGRP compared to wild type receptor. Additional decreases in binding affinity for CGRP were not found when both leucine mutations were expressed in the same CLR construct. Decreased binding characteristic of these leucine mutant receptors was observed for all CGRP ligands tested that contained the necessary amidated phenylalanine at their C-terminus. However, there was no difference in the potency of CGRP to increase cAMP production by these leucine mutant receptors when compared to wild type CLR, consistent with the notion that the neuropeptide C-terminal F37 is important for docking but not activation of the receptor. This observation was conserved when modified CGRP ligands lacking the amidated F37 demonstrated similar potencies to generate cAMP at both wild type and mutant CLRs. Furthermore, these modified CGRP ligands displayed a significant

  15. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Bishop-Bailey, David

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)s are a family of three nuclear hormone receptors, PPARα, -δ, and -γ, which are members of the steriod receptor superfamily. The first member of the family (PPARα) was originally discovered as the mediator by which a number of xenobiotic drugs cause peroxisome proliferation in the liver. Defined functions for all these receptors, until recently, mainly concerned their ability to regulate energy balance, with PPARα being involved in β-oxidation pathways, and PPARγ in the differentiation of adipocytes. Little is known about the functions of PPARδ, though it is the most ubiquitously expressed. Since their discovery, PPARs have been shown to be expressed in monocytes/macrophages, the heart, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and in atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, PPARs can be activated by a vast number of compounds including synthetic drugs, of the clofibrate, and anti-diabetic thiazoldinedione classes, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and a number of eicosanoids, including prostaglandins, lipoxygenase products, and oxidized low density lipoprotein. This review will aim to introduce the field of PPAR nuclear hormone receptors, and discuss the discovery and actions of PPARs in the cardiovascular system, as well as the source of potential ligands. PMID:10696077

  16. Interaction of the C-terminal acidic domain of the insulin receptor with histone modulates the receptor kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Baron, V; Kaliman, P; Alengrin, F; Van Obberghen, E

    1995-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of the insulin receptor domain 1270-1280, an acid-rich sequence located in the receptor C-terminus. Antipeptide IgG raised against this sequence were obtained and used to analyze their effect on receptor function. Antipeptide IgG inhibited receptor autophosphorylation at Tyr1146, Tyr1150 and Tyr1151. These sites are known to be key modulators of the receptor activity. Autophosphorylation at other sites may also have been inhibited. The antipeptide antibody decreased the receptor kinase activity measured with poly(Glu80Tyr20) and a synthetic peptide corresponding to the proreceptor sequence 1142-1158. We provide evidence that the effect of the antibody on substrate phosphorylation may result from the control of the phosphorylation level of the receptor. Concerning the action of the antipeptide IgG on the receptor kinase activity, histone did not behave similarly to poly(Glu80Tyr20). The antibody recognizing sequence 1270-1280 competed with histone for an overlapping binding site. Histone also modulated insulin receptor autophosphorylation, supporting the idea that interference with domain 1270-1280 alters the receptor kinase. Our data suggest that the acidic region including residues 1270-1280 of the insulin receptor C-terminus is involved in the following events: (a) receptor binding with histone, an exogenous substrate of the receptor kinase, and (b) the regulation of receptor autophosphorylation and kinase activity. Based on these observations, we would like to propose that this insulin receptor domain could interact with cellular proteins modulating the receptor kinase. PMID:7744039

  17. OX1 orexin/hypocretin receptor activation of phospholipase D

    PubMed Central

    Jäntti, MH; Putula, J; Somerharju, P; Frohman, MA; Kukkonen, JP

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Orexin receptors potently signal to lipid messenger systems, and our previous studies have suggested that PLD would be one of these. We thus wanted to verify this by direct measurements and clarify the molecular mechanism of the coupling. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Orexin receptor-mediated PLD activation was investigated in CHO cells stably expressing human OX1 orexin receptors using [14C]-oleic acid-prelabelling and the transphosphatidylation assay. KEY RESULTS Orexin stimulation strongly increased PLD activity – even more so than the phorbol ester TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate), a highly potent activator of PLD. Both orexin and TPA responses were mediated by PLD1. Orexin-A and -B showed approximately 10-fold difference in potency, and the concentration–response curves were biphasic. Using pharmacological inhibitors and activators, both orexin and TPA were shown to signal to PLD1 via the novel PKC isoform, PKCδ. In contrast, pharmacological or molecular biological inhibitors of Rho family proteins RhoA/B/C, cdc42 and Rac did not inhibit the orexin (or the TPA) response, nor did the molecular biological inhibitors of PKD. In addition, neither cAMP elevation, Gαi/o nor Gβγ seemed to play an important role in the orexin response. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Stimulation of OX1 receptors potently activates PLD (probably PLD1) in CHO cells and this is mediated by PKCδ but not other PKC isoforms, PKDs or Rho family G-proteins. At present, the physiological significance of orexin-induced PLD activation is unknown, but this is not the first time we have identified PKCδ in orexin signalling, and thus some specific signalling cascade may exist between orexin receptors and PKCδ. PMID:21718304

  18. Covalent agonists for studying G protein-coupled receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Dietmar; Kruse, Andrew C.; Manglik, Aashish; Hiller, Christine; Zhang, Cheng; Hübner, Harald; Kobilka, Brian K.; Gmeiner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Structural studies on G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provide important insights into the architecture and function of these important drug targets. However, the crystallization of GPCRs in active states is particularly challenging, requiring the formation of stable and conformationally homogeneous ligand-receptor complexes. Native hormones, neurotransmitters, and synthetic agonists that bind with low affinity are ineffective at stabilizing an active state for crystallogenesis. To promote structural studies on the pharmacologically highly relevant class of aminergic GPCRs, we here present the development of covalently binding molecular tools activating Gs-, Gi-, and Gq-coupled receptors. The covalent agonists are derived from the monoamine neurotransmitters noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin, and histamine, and they were accessed using a general and versatile synthetic strategy. We demonstrate that the tool compounds presented herein display an efficient covalent binding mode and that the respective covalent ligand-receptor complexes activate G proteins comparable to the natural neurotransmitters. A crystal structure of the β2-adrenoreceptor in complex with a covalent noradrenaline analog and a conformationally selective antibody (nanobody) verified that these agonists can be used to facilitate crystallogenesis. PMID:25006259

  19. The cardiovascular effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Sayuri N; Leong, Aaron; Filion, Kristian B; Genest, Jacques; Lega, Iliana C; Mottillo, Salvatore; Poirier, Paul; Reoch, Jennifer; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2012-02-01

    Although peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists are prescribed to improve cardiovascular risk factors, their cardiovascular safety is controversial. We therefore reviewed the literature to identify landmark randomized controlled trials evaluating the effect of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma agonists (pioglitazone and rosiglitazone), alpha agonists (fenofibrate and gemfibrozil), and pan agonists (bezafibrate, muraglitazar, ragaglitazar, tesaglitazar, and aleglitazar) on cardiovascular outcomes. Pioglitazone may modestly reduce cardiovascular events but also may increase the risk of bladder cancer. Rosiglitazone increases the risk of myocardial infarction and has been withdrawn in European and restricted in the United States. Fibrates improve cardiovascular outcomes only in select subgroups: fenofibrate in diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome, gemfibrozil in patients with dyslipidemia, and bezafibrate in patients with diabetes or metabolic syndrome. The cardiovascular safety of the new pan agonist aleglitazar, currently in phase II trials, remains to be determined. The heterogenous effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists to date highlight the importance of postmarketing surveillance. The critical question of why peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists seem to improve cardiovascular risk factors without significantly improving cardiovascular outcomes requires further investigation. PMID:22269613

  20. Nuclear Receptor Activity and Liver Cancer Lesion Progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are ligand-activated transcription factors that control diverse cellular processes. Chronic stimulation of some NRs is a non-genotoxic mechanism of rodent liver cancer with unclear relevance to humans. We explored this question using human CAR, PXR, PPARα,...

  1. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor and glucocorticoid receptor interact to activate human metallothionein 2A

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Shoko; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Tomita, Shuhei; Tohkin, Masahiro; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Komai, Michio

    2013-11-15

    Although the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) play essential roles in mammalian development, stress responses, and other physiological events, crosstalk between these receptors has been the subject of much debate. Metallothioneins are classic glucocorticoid-inducible genes that were reported to increase upon treatment with AHR agonists in rodent tissues and cultured human cells. In this study, the mechanism of human metallothionein 2A (MT2A) gene transcription activation by AHR was investigated. Cotreatment with 3-methylcholanthrene and dexamethasone, agonists of AHR and GR respectively, synergistically increased MT2A mRNA levels in HepG2 cells. MT2A induction was suppressed by RNA interference against AHR or GR. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed a physical interaction between AHR and GR proteins. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that AHR was recruited to the glucocorticoid response element in the MT2A promoter. Thus, we provide a novel mechanism whereby AHR modulates expression of human MT2A via the glucocorticoid response element and protein–protein interactions with GR. - Highlights: • Aryl hydrocarbon receptor forms a complex with glucocorticoid receptor in cells. • Human metallothionein gene is regulated by the AHR and GR interaction. • AHR–GR complex binds to glucocorticoid response element in metallothionein gene. • We demonstrated a novel transcriptional mechanism via AHR and GR interaction.

  2. Protease-activated-receptor-2 affects protease-activated-receptor-1-driven breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaber, Mohammad; Maoz, Miriam; Kancharla, Arun; Agranovich, Daniel; Peretz, Tamar; Grisaru-Granovsky, Sorina; Uziely, Beatrice; Bar-Shavit, Rachel

    2014-07-01

    Mammalian protease-activated-receptor-1 and -2 (PAR1 and PAR2) are activated by proteases found in the flexible microenvironment of a tumor and play a central role in breast cancer. We propose in the present study that PAR1 and PAR2 act together as a functional unit during malignant and physiological invasion processes. This notion is supported by assessing pro-tumor functions in the presence of short hairpin; shRNA knocked-down hPar2 or by the use of a truncated PAR2 devoid of the entire cytoplasmic tail. Silencing of hPar2 by shRNA-attenuated thrombin induced PAR1 signaling as recapitulated by inhibiting the assembly of Etk/Bmx or Akt onto PAR1-C-tail, by thrombin-instigated colony formation and invasion. Strikingly, shRNA-hPar2 also inhibited the TFLLRN selective PAR1 pro-tumor functions. In addition, while evaluating the physiological invasion process of placenta extravillous trophoblast (EVT) organ culture, we observed inhibition of both thrombin or the selective PAR1 ligand; TFLLRNPNDK induced EVT invasion by shRNA-hPar2 but not by scrambled shRNA-hPar2. In parallel, when a truncated PAR2 was utilized in a xenograft mouse model, it inhibited PAR1-PAR2-driven tumor growth in vivo. Similarly, it also attenuated the interaction of Etk/Bmx with the PAR1-C-tail in vitro and decreased markedly selective PAR1-induced Matrigel invasion. Confocal images demonstrated co-localization of PAR1 and PAR2 in HEK293T cells over-expressing YFP-hPar2 and HA-hPar1. Co-immuno-precipitation analyses revealed PAR1-PAR2 complex formation but no PAR1-CXCR4 complex was formed. Taken together, our observations show that PAR1 and PAR2 act as a functional unit in tumor development and placenta-uterus interactions. This conclusion may have significant consequences on future breast cancer therapeutic modalities and improved late pregnancy outcome. PMID:24177339

  3. Lysophosphatidylserine analogues differentially activate three LysoPS receptors.

    PubMed

    Uwamizu, Akiharu; Inoue, Asuka; Suzuki, Kensuke; Okudaira, Michiyo; Shuto, Akira; Shinjo, Yuji; Ishiguro, Jun; Makide, Kumiko; Ikubo, Masaya; Nakamura, Sho; Jung, Sejin; Sayama, Misa; Otani, Yuko; Ohwada, Tomohiko; Aoki, Junken

    2015-03-01

    Lysophosphatidylserine (1-oleoyl-2 R-lysophosphatidylserine, LysoPS) has been shown to have lipid mediator-like actions such as stimulation of mast cell degranulation and suppression of T lymphocyte proliferation, although the mechanisms of LysoPS actions have been elusive. Recently, three G protein-coupled receptors (LPS1/GPR34, LPS2/P2Y10 and LPS3/GPR174) were found to react specifically with LysoPS, raising the possibility that LysoPS serves as a lipid mediator that exerts its role through these receptors. Previously, we chemically synthesized a number of LysoPS analogues and evaluated them as agonists for mast-cell degranulation. Here, we used a transforming growth factor-α (TGFα) shedding assay to see if these LysoPS analogues activated the three LysoPS receptors. Modification of the serine moiety significantly reduced the ability of the analogues to activate the three LysoPS receptors, whereas modification of other parts resulted in loss of activity in receptor-specific manner. We found that introduction of methyl group to serine moiety (1-oleoyl-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and removal of sn-2 hydroxyl group (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-LysoPS) resulted in reduction of reactivity with LPS1 and LPS3, respectively. Accordingly, we synthesized a LysoPS analogue with the two modifications (1-oleoyl-2-deoxy-lysophosphatidylallothreonine) and found it to be an LPS2-selective agonist. These pharmacological tools will definitely help to identify the biological roles of these LysoPS receptors. PMID:25320102

  4. Receptor antagonism/agonism can be uncoupled from pharmacoperone activity.

    PubMed

    Janovick, Jo Ann; Spicer, Timothy P; Smith, Emery; Bannister, Thomas D; Kenakin, Terry; Scampavia, Louis; Conn, P Michael

    2016-10-15

    Pharmacoperones rescue misrouted mutants of the vasopressin receptor type 2 (V2R) and enable them to traffic to the correct biological locus where they function. Previously, a library of nearly 645,000 structures was interrogated with a high throughput screen; pharmacoperones were identified for V2R mutants with a view toward correcting the underlying mutational defects in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. In the present study, an orthologous assay was used to evaluate hits from the earlier study. We found no consistent relation between antagonism or agonism and pharmacoperone activity. Active pharmacoperones were identified which had minimal antagonistic activity. This increases the therapeutic reach of these drugs, since virtually all pharmacoperone drugs reported to date were selected from peptidomimetic antagonists. Such mixed-activity drugs have a complex pharmacology limiting their therapeutic utility and requiring their removal prior to stimulation of the receptor with agonist. PMID:27389877

  5. Central NPY-Y5 receptors activation plays a major role in fasting-induced pituitary-thyroid axis suppression in adult rat.

    PubMed

    Costa-e-Sousa, Ricardo Henrique; Souza, Luana Lopes; Calviño, Camila; Cabanelas, Adriana; Almeida, Norma Aparecida Santos; Oliveira, Karen Jesus; Pazos-Moura, Carmen Cabanelas

    2011-11-10

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) inhibits TRH neurons in fed state, and hypothalamic NPY higher expression during fasting has been proposed to be involved in fasting-induced suppression of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. We investigated the role of central Y5 receptors in the control of thyrotropin (TSH) and thyroid hormone (TH) secretion. Fed and fasting rats received twice daily central injections (3rd ventricle) of Y5 receptor antagonist (CGP71683; 15nmol/rat) for 72h. Fasted rats also received a single central injection of CGP71683 (15nmol/rat) at the end of 72h of fasting. In fed rats, Y5 receptor blockade reduced total food intake by 32% and body mass by almost 10% (p<0.01), corroborating the role of this receptor in food intake control. 72h-fasted rats exhibited a 4-fold increase in serum TSH (p<0.001), 1h after a single injection of Y5 antagonist. Also with multiple injections during 72h of fasting, Y5 blockade resulted in activation of thyroid axis, as demonstrated by a 3-times rise in serum T4 (p<0.001), accompanied by unchanged TSH and T3. In fed rats, the chronic central administration of CGP71683 resulted in reduced total serum T4 without changes in free T4 and TSH. Serum leptin and PYY were not altered by the NPY central blockade in both fed and fasted rats, suggesting no role of these hormones in the alterations observed. Therefore, the inhibition of central Y5 neurotransmission resulted in activation of thyroid axis during fasting suggesting that NPY-Y5 receptors contribute to fasting-induced TSH and TH suppression. PMID:21771616

  6. Mechanisms of NOD-like receptor-associated inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Wen, Haitao; Miao, Edward A; Ting, Jenny P-Y

    2013-09-19

    A major function of a subfamily of NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing, or NOD-like receptor) proteins is in inflammasome activation, which has been implicated in a multitude of disease models and human diseases. This work will highlight key progress in understanding the mechanisms that activate the best-studied NLRs (NLRP3, NLRC4, NAIP, and NLRP1) and in uncovering inflammasome NLRs. PMID:24054327

  7. Adenosine kinase inhibitors attenuate opiate withdrawal via adenosine receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Coyle, T S

    1998-11-27

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. This study examines the effects of indirect activation of adenosine receptors, via treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, on the expression of opiate withdrawal in mice. Mice receive chronic morphine treatment via implantation of subcutaneous morphine pellets (75 mg) for 72 h. Mice then receive parenteral treatment with adenosine kinase inhibitors, either 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (2, 5, 20, 40 mg/kg, intraperitoneal or i.p.) or iodotubericidin (1, 2, 5 mg/kg, i.p.), followed by naloxone injection and opiate withdrawal signs are measured over 20 min. Both adenosine kinase inhibitors significantly reduce the following opiate withdrawal signs in a dose-dependent manner compared to vehicle: withdrawal jumps, teeth chattering, forepaw tremors, and forepaw treads. Additionally, 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine significantly reduces withdrawal-induced diarrhea and weight loss. Effects of 5'-amino-5'-deoxyadenosine (40 mg/kg) on opiate withdrawal signs appear to be mediated via adenosine receptor activation as they are reversed by pretreatment by adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (20 mg, i.p.) but not by selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor Ro 20-1724 (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Adenosine receptor activation via adenosine kinase inhibitor treatment attenuates opiate withdrawal and these agents may be generally useful in the treatment of drug withdrawal syndromes. PMID:9865523

  8. Receptor Activity-Modifying Proteins (RAMPs): New Insights and Roles.

    PubMed

    Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2016-01-01

    It is now recognized that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), once considered largely independent functional units, have a far more diverse molecular architecture. Receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) provide an important example of proteins that interact with GPCRs to modify their function. RAMPs are able to act as pharmacological switches and chaperones, and they can regulate signaling and/or trafficking in a receptor-dependent manner. This review covers recent discoveries in the RAMP field and summarizes the known GPCR partners and functions of RAMPs. We also discuss the first peptide-bound structures of RAMP-GPCR complexes, which give insight into the molecular mechanisms that enable RAMPs to alter the pharmacology and signaling of GPCRs. PMID:26514202

  9. Allatotropin: An Ancestral Myotropic Neuropeptide Involved in Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Alzugaray, María Eugenia; Adami, Mariana Laura; Diambra, Luis Anibal; Hernandez-Martinez, Salvador; Damborenea, Cristina; Noriega, Fernando Gabriel; Ronderos, Jorge Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-cell interactions are a basic principle for the organization of tissues and organs allowing them to perform integrated functions and to organize themselves spatially and temporally. Peptidic molecules secreted by neurons and epithelial cells play fundamental roles in cell-cell interactions, acting as local neuromodulators, neurohormones, as well as endocrine and paracrine messengers. Allatotropin (AT) is a neuropeptide originally described as a regulator of Juvenile Hormone synthesis, which plays multiple neural, endocrine and myoactive roles in insects and other organisms. Methods A combination of immunohistochemistry using AT-antibodies and AT-Qdot nanocrystal conjugates was used to identify immunoreactive nerve cells containing the peptide and epithelial-muscular cells targeted by AT in Hydra plagiodesmica. Physiological assays using AT and AT- antibodies revealed that while AT stimulated the extrusion of the hypostome in a dose-response fashion in starved hydroids, the activity of hypostome in hydroids challenged with food was blocked by treatments with different doses of AT-antibodies. Conclusions AT antibodies immunolabeled nerve cells in the stalk, pedal disc, tentacles and hypostome. AT-Qdot conjugates recognized epithelial-muscular cell in the same tissues, suggesting the existence of anatomical and functional relationships between these two cell populations. Physiological assays indicated that the AT-like peptide is facilitating food ingestion. Significance Immunochemical, physiological and bioinformatics evidence advocates that AT is an ancestral neuropeptide involved in myoregulatory activities associated with meal ingestion and digestion. PMID:24143240

  10. Relaxin family peptides and their receptors.

    PubMed

    Bathgate, R A D; Halls, M L; van der Westhuizen, E T; Callander, G E; Kocan, M; Summers, R J

    2013-01-01

    There are seven relaxin family peptides that are all structurally related to insulin. Relaxin has many roles in female and male reproduction, as a neuropeptide in the central nervous system, as a vasodilator and cardiac stimulant in the cardiovascular system, and as an antifibrotic agent. Insulin-like peptide-3 (INSL3) has clearly defined specialist roles in male and female reproduction, relaxin-3 is primarily a neuropeptide involved in stress and metabolic control, and INSL5 is widely distributed particularly in the gastrointestinal tract. Although they are structurally related to insulin, the relaxin family peptides produce their physiological effects by activating a group of four G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), relaxin family peptide receptors 1-4 (RXFP1-4). Relaxin and INSL3 are the cognate ligands for RXFP1 and RXFP2, respectively, that are leucine-rich repeat containing GPCRs. RXFP1 activates a wide spectrum of signaling pathways to generate second messengers that include cAMP and nitric oxide, whereas RXFP2 activates a subset of these pathways. Relaxin-3 and INSL5 are the cognate ligands for RXFP3 and RXFP4 that are closely related to small peptide receptors that when activated inhibit cAMP production and activate MAP kinases. Although there are still many unanswered questions regarding the mode of action of relaxin family peptides, it is clear that they have important physiological roles that could be exploited for therapeutic benefit. PMID:23303914

  11. Interaction of receptor-activity-modifying protein1 with tubulin.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Thomas H; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Schwerdtfeger, Kerstin; Kleinert, Peter; Troxler, Heinz; Kelm, Jens M; Ittner, Lars M; Fischer, Jan A; Born, Walter

    2007-08-01

    Receptor-activity-modifying protein (RAMP) 1 is an accessory protein of the G protein-coupled calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR). The CLR/RAMP1 heterodimer defines a receptor for the potent vasodilatory calcitonin gene-related peptide. A wider tissue distribution of RAMP1, as compared to that of the CLR, is consistent with additional biological functions. Here, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down, coimmunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid experiments identified beta-tubulin as a novel RAMP1-interacting protein. GST pull-down experiments indicated interactions between the N- and C-terminal domains of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Yeast two-hybrid experiments confirmed the interaction between the N-terminal region of RAMP1 and beta-tubulin. Interestingly, alpha-tubulin was co-extracted with beta-tubulin in pull-down experiments and immunoprecipitation of RAMP1 coprecipitated alpha- and beta-tubulin. Confocal microscopy indicated colocalization of RAMP1 and tubulin predominantly in axon-like processes of neuronal differentiated human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. In conclusion, the findings point to biological roles of RAMP1 beyond its established interaction with G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:17493758

  12. Neuropeptide Y, peptide YY and pancreatic polypeptide in the gut–brain axis

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Peter; Reichmann, Florian; Farzi, Aitak

    2012-01-01

    The gut–brain axis refers to the bidirectional communication between the gut and the brain. Four information carriers (vagal and spinal afferent neurons, immune mediators such as cytokines, gut hormones and gut microbiota-derived signalling molecules) transmit information from the gut to the brain, while autonomic neurons and neuroendocrine factors carry outputs from the brain to the gut. The members of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) family of biologically active peptides, NPY, peptide YY (PYY) and pancreatic polypeptide (PP), are expressed by cell systems at distinct levels of the gut–brain axis. PYY and PP are exclusively expressed by endocrine cells of the digestive system, whereas NPY is found at all levels of the gut–brain and brain–gut axis. The major systems expressing NPY comprise enteric neurons, primary afferent neurons, several neuronal pathways throughout the brain and sympathetic neurons. In the digestive tract, NPY and PYY inhibit gastrointestinal motility and electrolyte secretion and in this way modify the input to the brain. PYY is also influenced by the intestinal microbiota, and NPY exerts, via stimulation of Y1 receptors, a proinflammatory action. Furthermore, the NPY system protects against distinct behavioural disturbances caused by peripheral immune challenge, ameliorating the acute sickness response and preventing long-term depression. At the level of the afferent system, NPY inhibits nociceptive input from the periphery to the spinal cord and brainstem. In the brain, NPY and its receptors (Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5) play important roles in regulating food intake, energy homeostasis, anxiety, mood and stress resilience. In addition, PP and PYY signal to the brain to attenuate food intake, anxiety and depression-related behaviour. These findings underscore the important role of the NPY-Y receptor system at several levels of the gut–brain axis in which NPY, PYY and PP operate both as neural and endocrine messengers. PMID:22979996

  13. CINPA1 Is an Inhibitor of Constitutive Androstane Receptor That Does Not Activate Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Cherian, Milu T; Lin, Wenwei; Wu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) are xenobiotic sensors that enhance the detoxification and elimination of xenobiotics and endobiotics by modulating the expression of genes encoding drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. Elevated levels of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters, resulting from CAR activation in various cancers, promote the elimination of chemotherapeutic agents, leading to reduced therapeutic effectiveness and acquired drug resistance. CAR inhibitors, in combination with existing chemotherapeutics, could therefore be used to attenuate multidrug resistance in cancers. Interestingly, all previously reported CAR inverse-agonists are also activators of PXR, rendering them mechanistically counterproductive in tissues where both these xenobiotic receptors are present and active. We used a directed high-throughput screening approach, followed by subsequent mechanistic studies, to identify novel, potent, and specific small-molecule CAR inhibitors that do not activate PXR. We describe here one such inhibitor, CINPA1 (CAR inhibitor not PXR activator 1), capable of reducing CAR-mediated transcription with an IC50 of ∼70 nM. CINPA1 1) is a specific xenobiotic receptor inhibitor and has no cytotoxic effects up to 30 µM; 2) inhibits CAR-mediated gene expression in primary human hepatocytes, where CAR is endogenously expressed; 3) does not alter the protein levels or subcellular localization of CAR; 4) increases corepressor and reduces coactivator interaction with the CAR ligand-binding domain in mammalian two-hybrid assays; and 5) disrupts CAR binding to the promoter regions of target genes in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. CINPA1 could be used as a novel molecular tool for understanding CAR function. PMID:25762023

  14. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling.

    PubMed

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook; Baek, Songjoon; Sung, Myong-Hee; Zhao, Li; Park, Jeong Won; Nielsen, Ronni; Walker, Robert L; Zhu, Yuelin J; Meltzer, Paul S; Hager, Gordon L; Cheng, Sheue-yann

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and facilitates recruitment of co-activators to activate transcription. Here we show that in addition to hormone-independent TR occupancy, ChIP-seq against endogenous TR in mouse liver tissue demonstrates considerable hormone-induced TR recruitment to chromatin associated with chromatin remodelling and activated gene transcription. Genome-wide footprinting analysis using DNase-seq provides little evidence for TR footprints both in the absence and presence of hormone, suggesting that unliganded TR engagement with repressive complexes on chromatin is, similar to activating receptor complexes, a highly dynamic process. This dynamic and ligand-dependent interaction with chromatin is likely shared by all steroid hormone receptors regardless of their capacity to repress transcription in the absence of ligand. PMID:25916672

  15. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  16. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  17. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  18. Disruption of diapause induction by TALEN-based gene mutagenesis in relation to a unique neuropeptide signaling pathway in Bombyx.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, Kunihiro; Takasu, Yoko; Kunii, Masayo; Tsuchiya, Ryoma; Mukaida, Moeka; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Sezutsu, Hideki; Ichida Takahama, Masatoshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The insect neuropeptide family FXPRLa, which carries the Phe-Xaa-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH2 sequence at the C-terminus, is involved in many physiological processes. Although ligand-receptor interactions in FXPRLa signaling have been examined using in vitro assays, the correlation between these interactions and in vivo physiological function is unclear. Diapause in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is thought to be elicited by diapause hormone (DH, an FXPRLa) signaling, which consists of interactions between DH and DH receptor (DHR). Here, we performed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-based mutagenesis of the Bombyx DH-PBAN and DHR genes and isolated the null mutants of these genes in a bivoltine strain. All mutant silkworms were fully viable and showed no abnormalities in the developmental timing of ecdysis or metamorphosis. However, female adults oviposited non-diapause eggs despite diapause-inducing temperature and photoperiod conditions. Therefore, we conclude that DH signaling is essential for diapause induction and consists of highly sensitive and specific interactions between DH and DHR selected during ligand-receptor coevolution in Bombyx mori. PMID:26497859

  19. Disruption of diapause induction by TALEN-based gene mutagenesis in relation to a unique neuropeptide signaling pathway in Bombyx

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Kunihiro; Takasu, Yoko; Kunii, Masayo; Tsuchiya, Ryoma; Mukaida, Moeka; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Sezutsu, Hideki; Ichida Takahama, Masatoshi; Mizoguchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The insect neuropeptide family FXPRLa, which carries the Phe-Xaa-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH2 sequence at the C-terminus, is involved in many physiological processes. Although ligand–receptor interactions in FXPRLa signaling have been examined using in vitro assays, the correlation between these interactions and in vivo physiological function is unclear. Diapause in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, is thought to be elicited by diapause hormone (DH, an FXPRLa) signaling, which consists of interactions between DH and DH receptor (DHR). Here, we performed transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-based mutagenesis of the Bombyx DH-PBAN and DHR genes and isolated the null mutants of these genes in a bivoltine strain. All mutant silkworms were fully viable and showed no abnormalities in the developmental timing of ecdysis or metamorphosis. However, female adults oviposited non-diapause eggs despite diapause-inducing temperature and photoperiod conditions. Therefore, we conclude that DH signaling is essential for diapause induction and consists of highly sensitive and specific interactions between DH and DHR selected during ligand–receptor coevolution in Bombyx mori. PMID:26497859

  20. Postulated Vasoactive Neuropeptide Autoimmunity in Fatigue-Related Conditions: A Brief Review and Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Staines, Donald R.

    2006-01-01

    Disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and gulf war syndrome (GWS) are characterised by prolonged fatigue and a range of debilitating symptoms of pain, intellectual and emotional impairment, chemical sensitivities and immunological dysfunction. Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) surprisingly may have certain features in common with these conditions. Post-infection sequelae may be possible contributing factors although ongoing infection is unproven. Immunological aberration may prove to be associated with certain vasoactive neuropeptides (VN) in the context of molecular mimicry, inappropriate immunological memory and autoimmunity. Adenylate cyclase-activating VNs including pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) act as hormones, neurotransmitters, neuroregulators, immune modulators and neurotrophic substances. They and their receptors are potentially immunogenic. VNs are widely distributed in the body particularly in the central and peripheral nervous systems and have been identified in the gut, adrenal gland, blood cells, reproductive system, lung, heart and other tissues. They have a vital role in maintaining cardio-respiratory function, thermoregulation, memory, concentration and executive functions such as emotional responses including social cues and appropriate behaviour. They are co-transmitters for a number of neurotransmitters including acetylcholine and gaseous transmitters, are potent immune regulators with primarily anti-inflammatory activity, and have a significant role in protection of the nervous system against toxic assault as well as being important in the maintenance of homeostasis. This paper describes a biologically plausible mechanism for the development of certain fatigue-related syndromes based on loss of immunological tolerance to these VNs or their receptors following infection, other events or de novo resulting in significant

  1. The homeostatic role of neuropeptide Y in immune function and its impact on mood and behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Aitak; Reichmann, Florian; Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), one of the most abundant peptides in the nervous system, exerts its effects via 5 receptor types, termed Y1, Y2, Y4, Y5 and y6. NPY’s pleiotropic functions comprise the regulation of brain activity, mood, stress coping, ingestion, digestion, metabolism, vascular and immune function. Nerve-derived NPY directly affects immune cells while NPY also acts as a paracrine and autocrine immune mediator, since immune cells themselves are capable of producing and releasing NPY. NPY is able to induce immune activation or suppression, depending on a myriad of factors such as the Y receptors activated and cell types involved. There is an intricate relationship between psychological stress, mood disorders and the immune system. While stress represents a risk factor for the development of mood disorders, it exhibits diverse actions on the immune system as well. Conversely, inflammation is regarded as an internal stressor and is increasingly recognized to contribute to the pathogenesis of mood and metabolic disorders. Intriguingly, the cerebral NPY system has been found to protect against distinct disturbances in response to immune challenge, attenuating the sickness response and preventing the development of depression. Thus, NPY plays an important homeostatic role in balancing disturbances of physiological systems caused by peripheral immune challenge. This implication is particularly evident in the brain in which NPY counteracts the negative impact of immune challenge on mood, emotional processing and stress resilience. NPY thus acts as a unique signalling molecule in the interaction of the immune system with the brain in health and disease. PMID:25545642

  2. Deficiency of prohormone convertase dPC2 (AMONTILLADO) results in impaired production of bioactive neuropeptide hormones in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Christian; Herbert, Henrik; Kahnt, Jörg; Bender, Michael; Rhea, Jeanne M

    2011-08-01

    Peptide hormones synthesized by secretory neurons in the CNS are important regulators of physiology, behavior, and development. Like other neuropeptides, they are synthesized from larger precursor molecules by a specific set of enzymes. Using a combination of neurogenetics, immunostainings, and direct mass spectrometric profiling, we show that the presence of Drosophila prohormone convertase 2 encoded by the gene amontillado (amon) is a prerequisite for the proper processing of neuropeptide hormones from the major neurohemal organs of the CNS. A loss of amon correlates with a loss of neuropeptide hormone signals from the larval ring gland and perisympathetic organs. Neuropeptide hormone signals were still detectable in the adult corpora cardiaca of older amon-deficient flies which were amon heat-shock-rescued until eclosion. A semiquantification by direct peptide profiling using stable isotopic standards showed, however, that their neuropeptide hormone levels are strongly reduced. Targeted expression of GFP under the control of amon regulatory regions revealed a co-localization with the investigated peptide hormones in secretory neurons of the brain and ventral nerve cord. The lack of AMON activity resulted in a deficiency of L3 larva to enter the wandering phase. In conclusion, our findings provide the first direct evidence that AMON is a key enzyme in the production of neuropeptides in the fruitfly. PMID:21138435

  3. Allosteric receptor activation by the plant peptide hormone phytosulfokine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizong; Li, Hongju; Han, Zhifu; Zhang, Heqiao; Wang, Tong; Lin, Guangzhong; Chang, Junbiao; Yang, Weicai; Chai, Jijie

    2015-09-10

    Phytosulfokine (PSK) is a disulfated pentapeptide that has a ubiquitous role in plant growth and development. PSK is perceived by its receptor PSKR, a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK). The mechanisms underlying the recognition of PSK, the activation of PSKR and the identity of the components downstream of the initial binding remain elusive. Here we report the crystal structures of the extracellular LRR domain of PSKR in free, PSK- and co-receptor-bound forms. The structures reveal that PSK interacts mainly with a β-strand from the island domain of PSKR, forming an anti-β-sheet. The two sulfate moieties of PSK interact directly with PSKR, sensitizing PSKR recognition of PSK. Supported by biochemical, structural and genetic evidence, PSK binding enhances PSKR heterodimerization with the somatic embryogenesis receptor-like kinases (SERKs). However, PSK is not directly involved in PSKR-SERK interaction but stabilizes PSKR island domain for recruitment of a SERK. Our data reveal the structural basis for PSKR recognition of PSK and allosteric activation of PSKR by PSK, opening up new avenues for the design of PSKR-specific small molecules. PMID:26308901

  4. Substance P Inhibits Hyperosmotic Stress-Induced Apoptosis in Corneal Epithelial Cells through the Mechanism of Akt Activation and Reactive Oxygen Species Scavenging via the Neurokinin-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lingling; Sui, Wenjie; Li, Yunqiu; Qi, Xia; Wang, Yao; Zhou, Qingjun; Gao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Hyperosmolarity has been recognized as an important pathological factor in dry eye leading to ocular discomfort and damage. As one of the major neuropeptides of corneal innervation, substance P (SP) has been shown to possess anti-apoptotic effects in various cells. The aim of this study was to determine the capacity and mechanism of SP against hyperosmotic stress-induced apoptosis in cultured corneal epithelial cells. The cells were exposed to hyperosmotic stress by the addition of high glucose in the presence or absence of SP. The results showed that SP inhibited hyperosmotic stress-induced apoptosis of mouse corneal epithelial cells. Moreover, SP promoted the recovery of phosphorylated Akt level, mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca2+ contents, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione levels that impaired by hyperosmotic stress. However, the antiapoptotic capacity of SP was partially suppressed by Akt inhibitor or glutathione depleting agent, while the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor antagonist impaired Akt activation and ROS scavenging that promoted by SP addition. In conclusion, SP protects corneal epithelial cells from hyperosmotic stress-induced apoptosis through the mechanism of Akt activation and ROS scavenging via the NK-1 receptor. PMID:26901348

  5. Pyrimidinergic Receptor Activation Controls Toxoplasma gondii Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina Abreu; Marinho, Ygor; Correa, Gladys; Santoro, Giani França; Coutinho, Claudia Mara Lara Melo; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Infection by the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii is highly prevalent worldwide and may have serious clinical manifestations in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects almost any cell type in mammalian hosts, including immune cells. The immune cells express purinergic P2 receptors in their membrane – subdivided into P2Y and P2X subfamilies - whose activation is important for infection control. Here, we examined the effect of treatment with UTP and UDP in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with T. gondii tachyzoites. Treatment with these nucleotides reduced parasitic load by 90%, but did not increase the levels of the inflammatory mediators NO and ROS, nor did it modulate host cell death by apoptosis or necrosis. On the other hand, UTP and UDP treatments induced early egress of tachyzoites from infected macrophages, in a Ca2+-dependent manner, as shown by scanning electron microscopy analysis, and videomicroscopy. In subsequent infections, prematurely egressed parasites had reduced infectivity, and could neither replicate nor inhibit the fusion of lysosomes to the parasitophorous vacuole. The use of selective agonists and antagonists of the receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2Y4 and P2Y6 showed that premature parasite egress may be mediated by the activation of these receptor subtypes. Our results suggest that the activity of P2Y host cell receptors controls T. gondii infection in macrophages, highlighting the importance of pyrimidinergic signaling for innate immune system response against infection. Finally the P2Y receptors should be considered as new target for the development of drugs against T. gondii infection. PMID:26192447

  6. Relation between pulpal neuropeptides and dental caries

    PubMed Central

    Kangarlou Haghighi, Ali; Nafarzadeh, Shima; Shantiaee, Yazdan; Naseri, Mandana; Ahangari, Zohreh

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Dental pulp has neural fibers that produce neuropeptides like Substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The inflammation of dental pulp can lead to an increase amount of SP and CGRP release, especially in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Therefore, it can be assumed that neuropeptides have some role in the progression of inflammation of the dental pulp. The aim of this study was to determine the relation between the presence and concentration of neuropeptides in dental pulps of carious teeth caries. MATERIALS AND METHODS: For this purpose, pulpal tissues were collected from 40 teeth (20 carious and 20 intact). Pulpal samples were cultured for 72 hours. ELISA reader was used for the detection of SP and CGRP in supernatant fluids. Statistical analysis was made by Mann-Whitney U and Chi square tests. RESULTS: SP and CGRP were present in 65% and 20% of inflamed pulpal samples, respectively and 40% and 5% of normal pulpal samples, respectively. Level of SP was significantly higher in inflamed pulp samples compared to intact pulps; however, there was no statistical difference when the other groups and neuropeptides were compared. The mean concentration of SP in normal pulps was 3.4 times greater than that of CGRP; interestingly in inflamed pulps the concentration of SP was 22.3 times greater than CGRP. CONCLUSION: We can conclude that in inflamed dental pulps, the concentration of SP is higher than CGRP. It can be hypothesized that CGRP has less effect on the inflammatory changes of dental pulps. PMID:24778684

  7. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Chan, H C Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir; Stevens, Raymond C; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-08-22

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1 R) is activated by adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1 R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 μs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1 R activation. PMID:27460867

  8. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  9. Neurosteroid Structure-Activity Relationships for Functional Activation of Extrasynaptic δGABA(A) Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carver, Chase Matthew; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-04-01

    Synaptic GABAA receptors are primary mediators of rapid inhibition in the brain and play a key role in the pathophysiology of epilepsy and other neurologic disorders. The δ-subunit GABAA receptors are expressed extrasynaptically in the dentate gyrus and contribute to tonic inhibition, promoting network shunting as well as reducing seizure susceptibility. However, the neurosteroid structure-function relationship at δGABA(A) receptors within the native hippocampus neurons remains unclear. Here we report a structure-activity relationship for neurosteroid modulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptor-mediated tonic inhibition in the murine dentate gyrus granule cells. We recorded neurosteroid allosteric potentiation of GABA as well as direct activation of tonic currents using a wide array of natural and synthetic neurosteroids. Our results shows that, for all neurosteroids, the C3α-OH group remains obligatory for extrasynaptic receptor functional activity, as C3β-OH epimers were inactive in activating tonic currents. Allopregnanolone and related pregnane analogs exhibited the highest potency and maximal efficacy in promoting tonic currents. Alterations at the C17 or C20 region of the neurosteroid molecule drastically altered the transduction kinetics of tonic current activation. The androstane analogs had the weakest modulatory response among the analogs tested. Neurosteroid potentiation of tonic currents was completely (approximately 95%) diminished in granule cells from δ-knockout mice, suggesting that δ-subunit receptors are essential for neurosteroid activity. The neurosteroid sensitivity of δGABA(A) receptors was confirmed at the systems level using a 6-Hz seizure test. A consensus neurosteroid pharmacophore model at extrasynaptic δGABA(A) receptors is proposed based on a structure-activity relationship for activation of tonic current and seizure protection. PMID:26857959

  10. An allosteric role for receptor activity-modifying proteins in defining GPCR pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    J Gingell, Joseph; Simms, John; Barwell, James; Poyner, David R; Watkins, Harriet A; Pioszak, Augen A; Sexton, Patrick M; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are allosteric proteins that control transmission of external signals to regulate cellular response. Although agonist binding promotes canonical G protein signalling transmitted through conformational changes, G protein-coupled receptors also interact with other proteins. These include other G protein-coupled receptors, other receptors and channels, regulatory proteins and receptor-modifying proteins, notably receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). RAMPs have at least 11 G protein-coupled receptor partners, including many class B G protein-coupled receptors. Prototypic is the calcitonin receptor, with altered ligand specificity when co-expressed with RAMPs. To gain molecular insight into the consequences of this protein–protein interaction, we combined molecular modelling with mutagenesis of the calcitonin receptor extracellular domain, assessed in ligand binding and functional assays. Although some calcitonin receptor residues are universally important for peptide interactions (calcitonin, amylin and calcitonin gene-related peptide) in calcitonin receptor alone or with receptor activity-modifying protein, others have RAMP-dependent effects, whereby mutations decreased amylin/calcitonin gene-related peptide potency substantially only when RAMP was present. Remarkably, the key residues were completely conserved between calcitonin receptor and AMY receptors, and between subtypes of AMY receptor that have different ligand preferences. Mutations at the interface between calcitonin receptor and RAMP affected ligand pharmacology in a RAMP-dependent manner, suggesting that RAMP may allosterically influence the calcitonin receptor conformation. Supporting this, molecular dynamics simulations suggested that the calcitonin receptor extracellular N-terminal domain is more flexible in the presence of receptor activity-modifying protein 1. Thus, RAMPs may act in an allosteric manner to generate a spectrum of unique calcitonin receptor

  11. Human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor mRNA and protein expression during development

    EPA Science Inventory

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) are nuclear hormone receptors that regulate lipid and glucose homeostasis and are important in reproduction and development. PPARs are targets ofpharmaceuticals and are also activated by environmental contaminants, including ...

  12. Mammalian EGF receptor activation by the rhomboid protease RHBDL2.

    PubMed

    Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Zettl, Markus; Hu, Landian; Lemberg, Marius K; Freeman, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has several functions in mammalian development and disease, particularly cancer. Most EGF ligands are synthesized as membrane-tethered precursors, and their proteolytic release activates signalling. In Drosophila, rhomboid intramembrane proteases catalyse the release of EGF-family ligands; however, in mammals this seems to be primarily achieved by ADAM-family metalloproteases. We report here that EGF is an efficient substrate of the mammalian rhomboid RHBDL2. RHBDL2 cleaves EGF just outside its transmembrane domain, thereby facilitating its secretion and triggering activation of the EGFR. We have identified endogenous RHBDL2 activity in several tumour cell lines. PMID:21494248

  13. Mammalian EGF receptor activation by the rhomboid protease RHBDL2

    PubMed Central

    Adrain, Colin; Strisovsky, Kvido; Zettl, Markus; Hu, Landian; Lemberg, Marius K; Freeman, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has several functions in mammalian development and disease, particularly cancer. Most EGF ligands are synthesized as membrane-tethered precursors, and their proteolytic release activates signalling. In Drosophila, rhomboid intramembrane proteases catalyse the release of EGF-family ligands; however, in mammals this seems to be primarily achieved by ADAM-family metalloproteases. We report here that EGF is an efficient substrate of the mammalian rhomboid RHBDL2. RHBDL2 cleaves EGF just outside its transmembrane domain, thereby facilitating its secretion and triggering activation of the EGFR. We have identified endogenous RHBDL2 activity in several tumour cell lines. PMID:21494248

  14. Bisphenol A and Its Analogues Activate Human Pregnane X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yipeng; Ai, Ni; Park, Se-Hyung; Rios-Pilier, Jennifer; Perkins, Jordan T.; Welsh, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Bisphenol A (BPA) is a base chemical used extensively in many consumer products. BPA and its analogues are present in environmental and human samples. Many endocrine-disrupting chemicals, including BPA, have been shown to activate the pregnane X receptor (PXR), a nuclear receptor that functions as a master regulator of xenobiotic metabolism. However, the detailed mechanism by which these chemicals activate PXR remains unknown. Objective: We investigated the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates PXR and examined selected BPA analogues to determine whether they bind to and activate PXR. Methods: Cell-based reporter assays, in silico ligand–PXR docking studies, and site-directed mutagenesis were combined to study the interaction between BPA and PXR. We also investigated the influence of BPA and its analogues on the regulation of PXR target genes in human LS180 cells. Results: We found that BPA and several of its analogues are potent agonists for human PXR (hPXR) but do not affect mouse PXR activity. We identified key residues within hPXR’s ligand-binding pocket that constitute points of interaction with BPA. We also deduced the structural requirements of BPA analogues that activate hPXR. BPA and its analogues can also induce PXR target gene expression in human LS180 cells. Conclusions: The present study advances our understanding of the mechanism by which BPA interacts with and activates human PXR. Activation of PXR by BPA may explain some of the adverse effects of BPA in humans. PMID:22214767

  15. A second trigeminal CGRP receptor: function and expression of the AMY1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christopher S; Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Bower, Rebekah L; Wilderman, Andrea; Insel, Paul A; Edvinsson, Lars; Waldvogel, Henry J; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Russo, Andrew F; Hay, Debbie L

    2015-01-01

    Objective The trigeminovascular system plays a central role in migraine, a condition in need of new treatments. The neuropeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is proposed as causative in migraine and is the subject of intensive drug discovery efforts. This study explores the expression and functionality of two CGRP receptor candidates in the sensory trigeminal system. Methods Receptor expression was determined using Taqman G protein-coupled receptor arrays and immunohistochemistry in trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the spinal trigeminal complex of the brainstem in rat and human. Receptor pharmacology was quantified using sensitive signaling assays in primary rat TG neurons. Results mRNA and histological expression analysis in rat and human samples revealed the presence of two CGRP-responsive receptors (AMY1: calcitonin receptor/receptor activity-modifying protein 1 [RAMP1]) and the CGRP receptor (calcitonin receptor-like receptor/RAMP1). In support of this finding, quantification of agonist and antagonist potencies revealed a dual population of functional CGRP-responsive receptors in primary rat TG neurons. Interpretation The unexpected presence of a functional non-canonical CGRP receptor (AMY1) at neural sites important for craniofacial pain has important implications for targeting the CGRP axis in migraine. PMID:26125036

  16. A brominated-fluorene insect neuropeptide analog exhibits pyrokinin/PBAN-specific toxicity for adult females of the tobacco budworm moth.

    PubMed

    Teal, Peter E A; Nachman, Ronald J

    2002-04-01

    An analog of the insect pyrokinin/PBAN class of neuropeptides, which features a 2-amino7-bromofluorene attached to the carboxy-terminal bioactive core of the insect pyrokinin/PBAN class of neuropeptides (Phe-Thr-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH(2)), via a succinnic acid linker, was tested in adult H. virescens moths. This analog was found to induce pheromone production when injected into or applied topically to moths. Topical application of as much as 1 nmol of the analog to moths induced production of significant amounts of pheromone for only 1-2 h, whereas injection of 500 pmol induced pheromone production for up to 20 h. All insects died within 24 h after injection of 500 pmol of the analog. Mortality studies indicated that the LD(50) for the analog was 0.7 pmol when injected. A non-pyrokinin/PBAN peptide analog formed by attachment of 2-amino-7-bromofluorene to Ala-Ala-Arg-Ala-Ala-NH(2) (via the succinnic acid linker) did not induce mortality when injected at 1 nmol. Similarly no mortality was found when up to 2 nmol of an analog containing a non-brominated fluorene ring, formed by attachment of 9-fluoreneacetic acid to Phe-Thr-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH(2,) was injected into moths. The data indicated that both the bromine and active core of the pyrokinin neuropeptides (Phe-Thr-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH(2)) were critical for a specific toxic action and suggested that the brominated analog poisoned the moths by interacting with pyrokinin receptors. PMID:11897401

  17. Molecular and pharmacological characterization of the Chelicerata pyrokinin receptor from the southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunlong; Nachman, Ronald J; Pietrantonio, Patricia V

    2015-05-01

    We identified the first pyrokinin receptor (Rhimi-PKR) in Chelicerata and analyzed structure-activity relationships of cognate ligand neuropeptides and their analogs. Based on comparative and phylogenetic analyses, this receptor, which we cloned from larvae of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae), is the ortholog of the insect pyrokinin (PK)/pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide (PBAN)/diapause hormone (DH) neuropeptide family receptor. Rhimi-PKR functional analyses using calcium bioluminescence were performed with a developed stable recombinant CHO-K1 cell line. Rhimi-PKR was activated by four endogenous PKs from the Lyme disease vector, the tick Ixodes scapularis (EC50s range: 85.4 nM-546 nM), and weakly by another tick PRX-amide peptide, periviscerokinin (PVK) (EC50 = 24.5 μM). PK analogs with substitutions of leucine, isoleucine or valine at the C-terminus for three tick PK peptides, Ixosc-PK1, Ixosc-PK2, and Ixosc-PK3, retained their potency on Rhimi-PKR. Therefore, Rhimi-PKR is less selective and substantially more tolerant than insect PK receptors of C-terminal substitutions of leucine to isoleucine or valine, a key structural feature that serves to distinguish insect PK from PVK/CAP2b receptors. In females, ovary and synganglion had the highest Rhimi-PKR relative transcript abundance followed by the rectal sac, salivary glands, Malpighian tubules, and midgut. This is the first pharmacological analysis of a PK/PBAN/DH-like receptor from the Chelicerata, which will now permit the discovery of the endocrinological roles of this neuropeptide family in vectors of vertebrate pathogens. PMID:25747529

  18. The Neuropeptide Allatostatin A Regulates Metabolism and Feeding Decisions in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hentze, Julie L; Carlsson, Mikael A; Kondo, Shu; Nässel, Dick R; Rewitz, Kim F

    2015-01-01

    Coordinating metabolism and feeding is important to avoid obesity and metabolic diseases, yet the underlying mechanisms, balancing nutrient intake and metabolic expenditure, are poorly understood. Several mechanisms controlling these processes are conserved in Drosophila, where homeostasis and energy mobilization are regulated by the glucagon-related adipokinetic hormone (AKH) and the Drosophila insulin-like peptides (DILPs). Here, we provide evidence that the Drosophila neuropeptide Allatostatin A (AstA) regulates AKH and DILP signaling. The AstA receptor gene, Dar-2, is expressed in both the insulin and AKH producing cells. Silencing of Dar-2 in these cells results in changes in gene expression and physiology associated with reduced DILP and AKH signaling and animals lacking AstA accumulate high lipid levels. This suggests that AstA is regulating the balance between DILP and AKH, believed to be important for the maintenance of nutrient homeostasis in response to changing ratios of dietary sugar and protein. Furthermore, AstA and Dar-2 are regulated differentially by dietary carbohydrates and protein and AstA-neuronal activity modulates feeding choices between these types of nutrients. Our results suggest that AstA is involved in assigning value to these nutrients to coordinate metabolic and feeding decisions, responses that are important to balance food intake according to metabolic needs. PMID:26123697

  19. Neuropeptide B and W regulate leptin and resistin secretion, and stimulate lipolysis in isolated rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Pruszyńska-Oszmałek, Ewa; Ruciński, Marcin; Szczepankiewicz, Dawid; Sassek, Maciej; Wojciechowicz, Tatiana; Kaczmarek, Przemysław; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Strowski, Mathias Z; Malendowicz, Ludwik K; Nowak, Krzysztof W

    2012-06-10

    Neuropeptide B (NPB) and W (NPW) regulate food intake and energy homeostasis in humans via two G-protein-coupled receptor subtypes, termed as GPR7 and GPR8. Rodents express GPR7 only. In animals, NPW decreases insulin and leptin levels, whereas the deletion of either NPB or GPR7 leads to obesity and hyperphagia. Metabolic and endocrine in vitro activities of NPW/NPB in adipocytes are unknown. We therefore characterize the effects of NPB and NPW on the secretion and expression of leptin and resistin, and on lipolysis, using rat adipocytes. Isolated rat adipocytes express GPR7 mRNA. NPB and NPW are expressed in macrophages and preadipocytes but are absent in mature adipocytes. Both, NPB and NPW reduce the secretion and expression of leptin from isolated rat adipocytes. NPB stimulates the secretion and expression of resistin, whereas both, NPB and NPW increase lipolysis. Our study demonstrates for the first time that NPB and NPW regulate the expression and secretion of leptin and resistin, and increase lipolysis in isolated rat adipocytes. These effects are presumably mediated via GPR7. The increase of resistin secretion, stimulation of lipolysis and the decrease of leptin secretion may represent mechanisms, through which NPB and NPW can affect glucose and lipid homeostasis, and food intake in rodents. PMID:22484289

  20. Salusin-β as a powerful endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki-Kemuriyama, Noriko; Nakano-Tateno, Tae; Tani, Yuji; Hirata, Yukio; Shichiri, Masayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Salusin-β is an endogenous parasympathomimetic peptide, predominantly localized to the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary. Subcutaneously administered salusin-β (50 nmol/mouse) significantly increased water intake but did not affect locomotor activity or food intake. The salusin-β-induced increase in water intake was completely abrogated by pretreatment with muscarinic antagonist, atropine sulphate. In contrast, intracerebroventricular injection of salusin-β, at lower doses (10–100 fmol/mouse) caused a long-lasting decrease in water intake and locomotor activity throughout the entire dark phase of the diurnal cycle. Pre-injection of intracerebroventricular anti-salusin-β IgG completely abrogated the central salusin-β mediated suppression of water intake and locomotor activity. These results demonstrate contrasting actions of salusin-β in the control of water intake via the central and peripheral systems and highlight it as a potent endogenous antidipsogenic neuropeptide. PMID:26869388

  1. Activity of muscarinic, galanin and cannabinoid receptors in the prodromal and advanced stages in the triple transgenic mice model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Iván; Lombardero, Laura; LaFerla, Frank M; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; Rodríguez-Puertas, Rafael

    2016-08-01

    Neurochemical alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include cholinergic neuronal loss in the nucleus basalis of Meynert (nbM) and a decrease in densities of the M2 muscarinic receptor subtype in areas related to learning and memory. Neuromodulators present in the cholinergic pathways, such as neuropeptides and neurolipids, control these cognitive processes and have become targets of research in order to understand and treat the pathophysiological and clinical stages of the disease. This is the case of the endocannabinoid and galaninergic systems, which have been found to be up-regulated in AD, and could therefore have a neuroprotective role. In the present study, the functional coupling of Gi/o protein-coupled receptors to GalR1, and the CB1 receptor subtype for endocannabinoids were analyzed in the 3xTg-AD mice model of AD. In addition, the activity mediated by Gi/o protein-coupled M2/4 muscarinic receptor subtypes was also analyzed in brain areas involved in anxiety and cognition. Thus, male mice were studied at 4 and 15months of age (prodromal and advanced stages, respectively) and compared to age-matched non-transgenic (NTg) mice (adult and old, respectively). In 4-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, the [(35)S]GTPγS binding stimulated by galanin was significantly increased in the hypothalamus, but a decrease of functional M2/4 receptors was observed in the posterior amygdala. The CB1 cannabinoid receptor activity was up-regulated in the anterior thalamus at that age. In 15-month-old 3xTg-AD mice, muscarinic receptor activity was found to be increased in motor cortex, while CB1 activity was decreased in nbM. No changes were found in GalR1-mediated activity at this age. Our results provide further evidence of the relevance of limbic areas in the prodromal stage of AD, the profile of which is characterized by anxiety. The up-regulation of galaninergic and endocannabinoid systems support the hypothesis of their neuroprotective roles, and these are established prior to the

  2. Estrogen receptor- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor-mediated activities of a coal-tar creosote

    SciTech Connect

    Fielden, M.R.; Wu, Z.F.; Sinal, C.J.; Jury, H.H.; Bend, J.R.; Hammond, G.L.; Zacharewski, T.R.

    2000-05-01

    A coal-tar creosote was examined for estrogen receptor (ER)- and aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-mediated activity using a battery of mechanistically based assays. In vitro, creosote was found to bind to the mouse ER, bind to the human sex hormone-binding globulin, and elicit partial agonist activity in reporter gene assays in transiently transfected MCF-7 cells. Based on competitive binding to the mouse ER, creosote contains approximately 165 mg/L of estradiol-equivalents. Creosote effectively transformed the AhR in vitro and induced a Cyplal-regulated luciferase reporter gene in transiently transfected Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Based on dose-response curves, creosote contains approximately 730 mg/L of dioxin-equivalents. Creosote did not exhibit any AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity in vitro. In vivo, creosote significantly induced liver pentoxyresorufin O-depentylation and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylation (EROD) in a dose-dependent manner in ovariectomized (OVX) ICR mice, but did not increase uterine weight wet or vaginal cornification, due possibly to AhR-mediated antiestrogenic activity. In OVX DBA/2 mice, a strain less responsive to AhR ligands, creosote induced liver EROD to a lesser extent, but still did not show an increase in uterine wet weight or vaginal cornification. These results demonstrate that coal-tar creosote exhibits AhR- and ER-mediated activity in vitro, but its dioxinlike activity may suppress estrogenic responses in vivo.

  3. Allosterism and Structure in Thermally Activated Transient Receptor Potential Channels.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Franulic, Ignacio; Poblete, Horacio; Miño-Galaz, Germán; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramón

    2016-07-01

    The molecular sensors that mediate temperature changes in living organisms are a large family of proteins known as thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels. These membrane proteins are polymodal receptors that can be activated by cold or hot temperatures, depending on the channel subtype, voltage, and ligands. The stimuli sensors are allosterically coupled to a pore domain, increasing the probability of finding the channel in its ion conductive conformation. In this review we first discuss the allosteric coupling between the temperature and voltage sensor modules and the pore domain, and then discuss the thermodynamic foundations of thermo-TRP channel activation. We provide a structural overview of the molecular determinants of temperature sensing. We also posit an anisotropic thermal diffusion model that may explain the large temperature sensitivity of TRP channels. Additionally, we examine the effect of several ligands on TRP channel function and the evidence regarding their mechanisms of action. PMID:27297398

  4. Manipulation of P2X Receptor Activities by Light Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Seong

    2016-01-01

    P2X receptors are involved in amplification of inflammatory responses in peripheral nociceptive fibers and in mediating pain-related signals to the CNS. Control of P2X activation has significant importance in managing unwanted hypersensitive neuron responses. To overcome the limitations of chemical ligand treatment, optical stimulation methods of optogenetics and photoswitching achieve efficient control of P2X activation while allowing specificity at the target site and convenient stimulation by light illumination. There are many potential applications for photosensitive elements, such as improved uncaging methods, photoisomerizable ligands, photoswitches, and gold nanoparticles. Each technique has both advantages and downsides, and techniques are selected according to the purpose of the application. Technical advances not only provide novel approaches to manage inflammation or pain mediated by P2X receptors but also suggest a similar approach for controlling other ion channels. PMID:26884649

  5. Activation of the chicken gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor reduces gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2010-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic peptide from the RFamide peptide family that has been identified in multiple avian species. Although GnIH has clearly been shown to reduce LH release from the anterior pituitary gland, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. The overall objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R) signaling pathway, (2) to evaluate potential interactions with gonadotropin releasing hormone type III receptor (GnRH-R-III) signaling, and (3) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which GnIH and GnRH regulate pituitary gonadotrope function during a reproductive cycle in the chicken. Using real-time PCR, we showed that in the chicken pituitary gland, GnIH-R mRNA levels fluctuate in an opposite manner to GnRH-R-III, with higher and lower levels observed during inactive and active reproductive stages, respectively. We demonstrated that the chicken GnIH-R signals by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase cAMP production, most likely by coupling to G(alphai). We also showed that this inhibition is sufficient to significantly reduce GnRH-induced cAMP responsive element (CRE) activation in a dose-dependent manner, and that the ratio of GnRH/GnIH receptors is a significant factor. We propose that in avian species, sexual maturation is characterized by a change in GnIH/GnRH receptor ratio, resulting in a switch in pituitary sensitivity from inhibitory (involving GnIH) to stimulatory (involving GnRH). In turn, decreasing GnIH-R signaling, combined with increasing GnRH-R-III signaling, results in significant increases in CRE activation, possibly initiating gonadotropin synthesis. PMID:20350548

  6. Relative Timing Between Kappa Opioid Receptor Activation and Cocaine Determines the Impact on Reward and Dopamine Release.

    PubMed

    Chartoff, Elena H; Ebner, Shayla R; Sparrow, Angela; Potter, David; Baker, Phillip M; Ragozzino, Michael E; Roitman, Mitchell F

    2016-03-01

    Negative affective states can increase the rewarding value of drugs of abuse and promote drug taking. Chronic cocaine exposure increases levels of the neuropeptide dynorphin, an endogenous ligand at kappa opioid receptors (KOR) that suppresses dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and elicits negative affective states upon drug withdrawal. However, there is evidence that the effects of KOR activation on affective state are biphasic: immediate aversive effects are followed by delayed increases in reward. The impact of KOR-induced affective states on reward-related effects of cocaine over time is not known. We hypothesize that the initial aversive effects of KOR activation increase, whereas the delayed rewarding effects decrease, the net effects of cocaine on reward and dopamine release. We treated rats with cocaine at various times (15 min to 48 h) after administration of the selective KOR agonist salvinorin A (salvA). Using intracranial self-stimulation and fast scan cyclic voltammetry, we found that cocaine-induced increases in brain stimulation reward and evoked dopamine release in the NAc core were potentiated when cocaine was administered within 1 h of salvA, but attenuated when administered 24 h after salvA. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to show that KOR and prodynorphin mRNA levels were decreased in the NAc, whereas tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter mRNA levels and tissue dopamine content were increased in the ventral tegmental area 24 h post-salvA. These findings raise the possibility that KOR activation-as occurs upon withdrawal from chronic cocaine-modulates vulnerability to cocaine in a time-dependent manner. PMID:26239494

  7. Substance P and the neurokinin-1 receptor regulate electroencephalogram non-rapid eye movement sleep slow-wave activity locally

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Mark R.; Karpova, Svetlana A.; Yang, Xiaomei; Gerashchenko, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P is an excitatory neurotransmitter produced by various cells including neurons and microglia that is involved in regulating inflammation and cerebral blood flow—functions that affect sleep and slow-wave activity (SWA). Substance P is the major ligand for the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R), which is found throughout the brain including the cortex. The NK-1R is found on sleep-active cortical neurons expressing neuronal nitric oxide synthase whose activity is associated with SWA. We determined the effects of local cortical administration of a NK-1R agonist (substance P-fragment 1, 7) and a NK-1R antagonist (CP96345) on sleep and SWA in mice. The NK-1R agonist significantly enhanced SWA for several hours when applied locally to the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere as the electroencephalogram (EEG) electrode but not after application to the contralateral hemisphere when compared to saline vehicle control injections. In addition, a significant compensatory reduction in SWA was found after the NK-1R agonist-induced enhancements in SWA. Conversely, injections of the NK-1R antagonist into the cortex of the ipsilateral hemisphere of the EEG electrode attenuated SWA compared to vehicle injections but this effect was not found after injections of the NK-1R antagonist into contralateral hemisphere as the EEG electrode. Non-rapid eye movement sleep and rapid eye movement sleep duration responses after NK-1R agonist and antagonist injections were not significantly different from the responses to the vehicle. Our findings indicate that the substance P and the NK-1R are involved in regulating SWA locally. PMID:25301750

  8. Activation of signalling by the activin receptor complex.

    PubMed Central

    Attisano, L; Wrana, J L; Montalvo, E; Massagué, J

    1996-01-01

    Activin exerts its effects by simultaneously binding to two types of p rotein serine/threonine kinase receptors, each type existing in various isoforms. Using the ActR-IB and ActR-IIB receptor isoforms, we have investigated the mechanism of activin receptor activation. ActR-IIB are phosphoproteins with demonstrable affinity for each other. However, activin addition strongly promotes an interaction between these two proteins. Activin binds directly to ActR-IIB, and this complex associates with ActR-IB, which does not bind ligand on its own. In the resulting complex, ActR-IB becomes hyperphosphorylated, and this requires the kinase activity of ActR-IIB. Mutation of conserved serines and threonines in the GS domain, a region just upstream of the kinase domain in ActR-IB, abrogates both phosphorylation and signal propagation, suggesting that this domain contains phosphorylation sites required for signalling. ActR-IB activation can be mimicked by mutation of Thr-206 to aspartic acid, which yields a construct, ActR-IB(T206D), that signals in the absence of ligand. Furthermore, the signalling activity of this mutant construct is undisturbed by overexpression of a dominant negative kinase-defective ActR-IIB construct, indicating that ActR-IB(T206D) can signal independently of ActR-IIB. The evidence suggests that ActR-IIB acts as a primary activin receptor and ActR-IB acts as a downstream transducer of activin signals. PMID:8622651

  9. VPS10P-domain receptors - regulators of neuronal viability and function.

    PubMed

    Willnow, Thomas E; Petersen, Claus M; Nykjaer, Anders

    2008-12-01

    VPS10P-domain receptors, such as SORLA and sortilin, constitute a recently identified class of type-1 receptors that are expressed in neurons. Family members are multifunctional proteins that target a range of ligands, including trophic factors and neuropeptides but also other transmembrane proteins. New findings have revealed unexpected roles for VPS10P-domain receptors as regulators of neuronal viability and function through the regulation of both protein transport and signal transduction. Loss of these activities might contribute to the pathophysiology of devastating disorders of the nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease, affective disorders and post-traumatic neuronal cell death. PMID:19002190

  10. Structural insights into μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weijiao; Manglik, Aashish; Venkatakrishnan, A. J.; Laeremans, Toon; Feinberg, Evan N.; Sanborn, Adrian L.; Kato, Hideaki E.; Livingston, Kathryn E.; Thorsen, Thor S.; Kling, Ralf; Granier, Sébastien; Gmeiner, Peter; Husbands, Stephen M.; Traynor, John R.; Weis, William I.; Steyaert, Jan; Dror, Ron O.; Kobilka, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Activation of the μ-opioid receptor (μOR) is responsible for the efficacy of the most effective analgesics. To understand the structural basis for μOR activation, we obtained a 2.1 Å X-ray crystal structure of the μOR bound to the morphinan agonist BU72 and stabilized by a G protein-mimetic camelid-antibody fragment. The BU72-stabilized changes in the μOR binding pocket are subtle and differ from those observed for agonist-bound structures of the β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) and the M2 muscarinic receptor (M2R). Comparison with active β2AR reveals a common rearrangement in the packing of three conserved amino acids in the core of the μOR, and molecular dynamics simulations illustrate how the ligand-binding pocket is conformationally linked to this conserved triad. Additionally, an extensive polar network between the ligand-binding pocket and the cytoplasmic domains appears to play a similar role in signal propagation for all three GPCRs. PMID:26245379

  11. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34+ human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  12. Pharmacological activation of lysophosphatidic acid receptors regulates erythropoiesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Hung; Ho, Ya-Hsuan; Chiang, Jui-Chung; Li, Meng-Wei; Lin, Shi-Hung; Chen, Wei-Min; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Lin, Yu-Nung; Yang, Ya-Jan; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Lu, Jenher; Huang, Chang-Jen; Tigyi, Gabor; Yao, Chao-Ling; Lee, Hsinyu

    2016-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a growth factor-like phospholipid, regulates numerous physiological functions, including cell proliferation and differentiation. In a previous study, we have demonstrated that LPA activates erythropoiesis by activating the LPA 3 receptor subtype (LPA3) under erythropoietin (EPO) induction. In the present study, we applied a pharmacological approach to further elucidate the functions of LPA receptors during red blood cell (RBC) differentiation. In K562 human erythroleukemia cells, knockdown of LPA2 enhanced erythropoiesis, whereas knockdown of LPA3 inhibited RBC differentiation. In CD34(+) human hematopoietic stem cells (hHSC) and K526 cells, the LPA3 agonist 1-oleoyl-2-methyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphothionate (2S-OMPT) promoted erythropoiesis, whereas the LPA2 agonist dodecyl monophosphate (DMP) and the nonlipid specific agonist GRI977143 (GRI) suppressed this process. In zebrafish embryos, hemoglobin expression was significantly increased by 2S-OMPT treatment but was inhibited by GRI. Furthermore, GRI treatment decreased, whereas 2S-OMPT treatment increased RBC counts and amount of hemoglobin level in adult BALB/c mice. These results indicate that LPA2 and LPA3 play opposing roles during RBC differentiation. The pharmacological activation of LPA receptor subtypes represent a novel strategies for augmenting or inhibiting erythropoiesis. PMID:27244685

  13. Ultrastructural and biochemical analysis of fibrinogen receptors on activated thrombocytes

    SciTech Connect

    O'Toole, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    The present studies have been concerned with the role of fibrinogen and its receptor, GP IIb/IIIa, during the activation and early aggregation of pigeon thrombocytes. Thrombocytes were surface labeled with {sup 125}I then separated on SDS-PAGE. Analysis by gel autoradiography revealed major bands at MW 145 kd and 98 kd, which corresponded to human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Immunologic similarity of the pigeon and human receptor components was established by dot blot analysis using polyclonal antibodies directed against human GPIIb and GPIIIa. Pigeon fibrinogen, isolated by plasma precipitation with PEG-1000 and purified over Sepharose 4B, was used to study receptor-ligand interaction. Separation of pigeon fibrinogen on SDS-PAGE resulted in three peptides having apparent MW of 62kd, 55kd, and 47kd which are comparable to human fibrinogen. Further similarity of human and pigeon fibrinogen was verified by immonodiffusion against an antibody specific for the human protein. The role of fibrinogen and its receptor in thrombocyte function was established by turbidimetric aggregation using thrombin as an agonist under conditions requiring Ca++ and fibrinogen.

  14. Dynamic correlation networks in human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor protein.

    PubMed

    Fidelak, Jeremy; Ferrer, Silvia; Oberlin, Michael; Moras, Dino; Dejaegere, Annick; Stote, Roland H

    2010-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ nuclear receptor (PPAR-γ) belongs to the superfamily of nuclear receptor proteins that function as ligand-dependent transcription factors and plays a specific physiological role as a regulator of lipid metabolism. A number of experimental studies have suggested that allostery plays an important role in the functioning of PPAR-γ. Here we use normal-mode analysis of PPAR-γ to characterize a network of dynamically coupled amino acids that link physiologically relevant binding surfaces such as the ligand-dependent activation domain AF-2 with the ligand binding site and the heterodimer interface. Multiple calculations were done in both the presence and absence of the agonist rosiglitazone, and the differences in dynamics were characterized. The global dynamics of the ligand binding domain were affected by the ligand, and in particular, changes to the network of dynamically correlated amino acids were observed with only small changes in conformation. These results suggest that changes in dynamic couplings can be functionally significant with respect to the transmission of allosteric signals. PMID:20496064

  15. Propofol Restores Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid Receptor Subtype-1 Sensitivity via Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin Receptor Subtype-1 in Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyu; Wickley, Peter J.; Sinha, Sayantani; Bratz, Ian N.; Damron, Derek S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Crosstalk between peripheral nociceptors belonging to the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor subtype-1 (TRPV1) and ankyrin subtype-1 (TRPA1) family has recently been demonstrated. Moreover, the intravenous anesthetic propofol has been shown to directly activate TRPA1 receptors, and indirectly restore sensitivity of TRPV1 receptors in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 activation is involved in mediating the propofol-induced restoration of TRPV1 sensitivity. Methods Mouse DRG neurons were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and grown for 24 h. F-11 cells were transfected with complementary DNA for both TRPV1 and TRPA1 or TRPV1 only. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration was measured in individual cells via fluorescence microscopy. Following TRPV1 de-sensitization with capsaicin (100 nM), cells were treated with propofol (1, 5 and 10 μM) alone, propofol in the presence of the TRPA1 antagonist, HC-030031 (0.5 μM) or the TRPA1 agonist, Allyl isothiocyanate (AITC, 100 μM) and capsaicin was then reapplied. Results In DRG neurons that contain both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in DRG neurons containing only TRPV1 receptors, exposure to propofol or AITC following de-sensitization did not restore capsaicin-induced TRPV1 sensitivity. Similarly, in F-11 cells transfected with both TRPV1 and TRPA1, propofol and AITC restored TRPV1 sensitivity. However, in F-11 cells transfected with TRPV1 only, neither propofol nor AITC were capable of restoring TRPV1 sensitivity. Conclusions These data demonstrate that propofol restores TRPV1 sensitivity in primary DRG neurons and in cultured F-11 cells transfected with both the TRPV1 and TRPA1 receptors via a TRPA1-dependent process. Propofol’s effects on sensory neurons may be clinically important and contribute to peripheral sensitization to nociceptive stimuli in traumatized tissue. PMID:21364461

  16. Differential effect of meclizine on the activity of human pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor.

    PubMed

    Lau, Aik Jiang; Yang, Guixiang; Rajaraman, Ganesh; Baucom, Christie C; Chang, Thomas K H

    2011-03-01

    Conflicting data exist as to whether meclizine is an activator of human pregnane X receptor (hPXR). Therefore, we conducted a detailed, systematic investigation to determine whether meclizine affects hPXR activity by performing a cell-based reporter gene assay, a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer competitive ligand-binding assay, a mammalian two-hybrid assay to assess coactivator recruitment, and a hPXR target gene expression assay. In pregnane X receptor (PXR)-transfected HepG2 cells, meclizine activated hPXR to a greater extent than rat PXR. It bound to hPXR ligand-binding domain and recruited steroid receptor coactivator-1 to the receptor. Consistent with its hPXR agonism, meclizine increased hPXR target gene expression (CYP3A4) in human hepatocytes. However, it did not increase but decreased testosterone 6β-hydroxylation, suggesting inhibition of CYP3A catalytic activity. Meclizine has also been reported to be an inverse agonist and antagonist of human constitutive androstane receptor (hCAR). Therefore, given that certain tissues (e.g., liver) express both hPXR and hCAR and that various genes are cross-regulated by them, we quantified the expression of a hCAR- and hPXR-regulated gene (CYP2B6) in cultured human hepatocytes treated with meclizine. This drug did not decrease constitutive CYP2B6 mRNA expression or attenuate hCAR agonist-mediated increase in CYP2B6 mRNA and CYP2B6-catalyzed bupropion hydroxylation levels. These observations reflect hPXR agonism and the lack of hCAR inverse agonism and antagonism by meclizine, which were assessed by a hCAR reporter gene assay and mammalian two-hybrid assay. In conclusion, meclizine is a hPXR agonist, and it does not act as a hCAR inverse agonist or antagonist in cultured human hepatocytes. PMID:21131266

  17. Transgenic silkworms expressing human insulin receptors for evaluation of therapeutically active insulin receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Ishii, Kenichi; Miyaguchi, Wataru; Horie, Ryo; Inagaki, Yoshinori; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Tatematsu, Ken-ichiro; Uchino, Keiro; Tamura, Toshiki; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2014-12-12

    We established a transgenic silkworm strain expressing the human insulin receptor (hIR) using the GAL4/UAS system. Administration of human insulin to transgenic silkworms expressing hIR decreased hemolymph sugar levels and facilitated Akt phosphorylation in the fat body. The decrease in hemolymph sugar levels induced by injection of human insulin in the transgenic silkworms expressing hIR was blocked by co-injection of wortmannin, a phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor. Administration of bovine insulin, an hIR ligand, also effectively decreased sugar levels in the transgenic silkworms. These findings indicate that functional hIRs that respond to human insulin were successfully induced in the transgenic silkworms. We propose that the humanized silkworm expressing hIR is useful for in vivo evaluation of the therapeutic activities of insulin receptor agonists. PMID:25449269

  18. Detecting constitutive activity and protean agonism at cannabinoid-2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Beltramo, Massimiliano; Brusa, Rossella; Mancini, Isabella; Scandroglio, Paola

    2010-01-01

    Since the cannabinoid system is involved in regulating several physiological functions such as locomotor activity, cognition, nociception, food intake, and inflammatory reaction, it has been the subject of intense study. Research on the pharmacology of this system has enormously progressed in the last 20years. One intriguing aspect that emerged from this research is that cannabinoid receptors (CBs) express a high level of constitutive activity. Investigation on this particular aspect of receptor pharmacology has largely focused on CB1, the CB subtype highly expressed in several brain regions. More recently, research on constitutive activity on the other CB subtype, CB2, was stimulated by the increasing interest on its potential as target for the treatment of various pathologies (e.g., pain and inflammation). There are several possible implications of constitutive activity on the therapeutic action of both agonists and antagonists, and consequently, it is important to have valuable methods to study this aspect of CB2 pharmacology. In the present chapter, we describe three methods to study constitutive activity at CB2: two classical methods relying on the detection of changes in cAMP level and GTPγS binding and a new one based on cell impedance measurement. In addition, we also included a section on detection of protean agonism, which is an interesting pharmacological phenomenon strictly linked to constitutive activity. PMID:21036225

  19. Bioluminescence imaging of estrogen receptor activity during breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Vantaggiato, Cristina; Dell’Omo, Giulia; Ramachandran, Balaji; Manni, Isabella; Radaelli, Enrico; Scanziani, Eugenio; Piaggio, Giulia; Maggi, Adriana; Ciana, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ER) are known to play an important regulatory role in mammary gland development as well as in its neoplastic transformation. Although several studies highlighted the contribution of ER signaling in the breast transformation, little is known about the dynamics of ER state of activity during carcinogenesis due to the lack of appropriate models for measuring the extent of receptor signaling in time, in the same animal. To this aim, we have developed a reporter mouse model for the non-invasive in vivo imaging of ER activity: the ERE-Luc reporter mouse. ERE-Luc is a transgenic mouse generated with a firefly luciferase (Luc) reporter gene driven by a minimal promoter containing an estrogen responsive element (ERE). This model allows to measure receptor signaling in longitudinal studies by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Here, we have induced sporadic mammary cancers by treating systemically ERE-Luc reporter mice with DMBA (9,10-dimethyl 1,2-benzanthracene) and measured receptor signaling by in vivo imaging in individual animals from early stage until a clinically palpable tumor appeared in the mouse breast. We showed that DMBA administration induces an increase of bioluminescence in the whole abdominal area 6 h after treatment, the signal rapidly disappears. Several weeks later, strong bioluminescence is observed in the area corresponding to the mammary glands. In vivo and ex vivo imaging analysis demonstrated that this bioluminescent signal is localized in the breast area undergoing neoplastic transformation. We conclude that this non-invasive assay is a novel relevant tool to identify the activation of the ER signaling prior the morphological detection of the neoplastic transformation. PMID:27069764

  20. Propagation of conformational changes during μ-opioid receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Sounier, Rémy; Mas, Camille; Steyaert, Jan; Laeremans, Toon; Manglik, Aashish; Huang, Weijiao; Kobilka, Brian; Déméné, Héléne; Granier, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    μ-Opioid receptors (μOR) are G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that are activated by a structurally diverse spectrum of natural and synthetic agonists including endogenous endorphin peptides, morphine and methadone. The recent structures of the μOR in inactive1 and agonist-induced active states (companion article) provide snapshots of the receptor at the beginning and end of a signaling event, but little is known about the dynamic sequence of events that span these two states. Here we report the use of solution-state NMR to examine the process of μOR activation. We obtained spectra of the μOR in the absence of ligand, and in the presence of the high-affinity agonist BU72 alone, or with BU72 and a G protein mimetic nanobody. Our results show that conformational changes in transmembrane segments (TM) 5 and 6, which are required for the full engagement of a G protein, are almost completely dependent on the presence of both the agonist and the G protein mimetic nanobody revealing a weak allosteric coupling between the agonist binding pocket and the G protein coupling interface (TM5 and TM6) similar to what has been observed for the β2-adrenergic recep