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Sample records for activating phosphorylation site

  1. Sites of Regulated Phosphorylation that Control K-Cl Cotransporter Activity

    PubMed Central

    Rinehart, Jesse; Maksimova, Yelena D.; Tanis, Jessica E.; Stone, Kathryn L.; Hodson, Caleb A.; Zhang, Junhui; Risinger, Mary; Pan, Weijun; Wu, Dianqing; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Forbush, Biff; Joiner, Clinton H.; Gulcicek, Erol E.; Gallagher, Patrick G.; Lifton, Richard P.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Modulation of intracellular chloride concentration ([Cl−]i) plays a fundamental role in cell volume regulation and neuronal response to GABA. Cl− exit via K-Cl cotransporters (KCCs) is a major determinant of [Cl−]I; however, mechanisms governing KCC activities are poorly understood. We identified two sites in KCC3 that are rapidly dephosphorylated in hypotonic conditions in cultured cells and human red blood cells in parallel with increased transport activity. Alanine substitutions at these sites result in constitutively active cotransport. These sites are highly phosphorylated in plasma membrane KCC3 in isotonic conditions, suggesting that dephosphorylation increases KCC3's intrinsic transport activity. Reduction of WNK1 expression via RNA interference reduces phosphorylation at these sites. Homologous sites are phosphorylated in all human KCCs. KCC2 is partially phosphorylated in neonatal mouse brain and dephosphorylated in parallel with KCC2 activation. These findings provide insight into regulation of [Cl−]i and have implications for control of cell volume and neuronal function. PMID:19665974

  2. Site-specific Interaction Mapping of Phosphorylated Ubiquitin to Uncover Parkin Activation.

    PubMed

    Yamano, Koji; Queliconi, Bruno B; Koyano, Fumika; Saeki, Yasushi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Tanaka, Keiji; Matsuda, Noriyuki

    2015-10-16

    Damaged mitochondria are eliminated through autophagy machinery. A cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin, a gene product mutated in familial Parkinsonism, is essential for this pathway. Recent progress has revealed that phosphorylation of both Parkin and ubiquitin at Ser(65) by PINK1 are crucial for activation and recruitment of Parkin to the damaged mitochondria. However, the mechanism by which phosphorylated ubiquitin associates with and activates phosphorylated Parkin E3 ligase activity remains largely unknown. Here, we analyze interactions between phosphorylated forms of both Parkin and ubiquitin at a spatial resolution of the amino acid residue by site-specific photo-crosslinking. We reveal that the in-between-RING (IBR) domain along with RING1 domain of Parkin preferentially binds to ubiquitin in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Furthermore, another approach, the Fluoppi (fluorescent-based technology detecting protein-protein interaction) assay, also showed that pathogenic mutations in these domains blocked interactions with phosphomimetic ubiquitin in mammalian cells. Molecular modeling based on the site-specific photo-crosslinking interaction map combined with mass spectrometry strongly suggests that a novel binding mechanism between Parkin and ubiquitin leads to a Parkin conformational change with subsequent activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:26260794

  3. Site-specific phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics control Pyrin inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Yang, Jieling; Liu, Wang; Wang, Yupeng; Shao, Feng

    2016-08-16

    Pyrin, encoded by the MEFV gene, is best known for its gain-of-function mutations causing familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), an autoinflammatory disease. Pyrin forms a caspase-1-activating inflammasome in response to inactivating modifications of Rho GTPases by various bacterial toxins or effectors. Pyrin-mediated innate immunity is unique in that it senses bacterial virulence rather than microbial molecules, but its mechanism of activation is unknown. Here we show that Pyrin was phosphorylated in bone marrow-derived macrophages and dendritic cells. We identified Ser-205 and Ser-241 in mouse Pyrin whose phosphorylation resulted in inhibitory binding by cellular 14-3-3 proteins. The two serines underwent dephosphorylation upon toxin stimulation or bacterial infection, triggering 14-3-3 dissociation, which correlated with Pyrin inflammasome activation. We developed antibodies specific for phosphorylated Ser-205 and Ser-241, which confirmed the stimuli-induced dephosphorylation of endogenous Pyrin. Mutational analyses indicated that both phosphorylation and signal-induced dephosphorylation of Ser-205/241 are important for Pyrin activation. Moreover, microtubule drugs, including colchicine, commonly used to treat FMF, effectively blocked activation of the Pyrin inflammasome. These drugs did not affect Pyrin dephosphorylation and 14-3-3 dissociation but inhibited Pyrin-mediated apoptosis-associated Speck-like protein containing CARD (ASC) aggregation. Our study reveals that site-specific (de)phosphorylation and microtubule dynamics critically control Pyrin inflammasome activation, illustrating a fine and complex mechanism in cytosolic immunity. PMID:27482109

  4. Characterizing Active Site Conformational Heterogeneity along the Trajectory of an Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer Reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Cathleen; Werbeck, Nicolas D; Zimmermann, Sabine; Reinstein, Jochen; Hansen, D Flemming

    2016-09-12

    States along the phosphoryl transfer reaction catalyzed by the nucleoside monophosphate kinase UmpK were captured and changes in the conformational heterogeneity of conserved active site arginine side-chains were quantified by NMR spin-relaxation methods. In addition to apo and ligand-bound UmpK, a transition state analog (TSA) complex was utilized to evaluate the extent to which active site conformational entropy contributes to the transition state free energy. The catalytically essential arginine side-chain guanidino groups were found to be remarkably rigid in the TSA complex, indicating that the enzyme has evolved to restrict the conformational freedom along its reaction path over the energy landscape, which in turn allows the phosphoryl transfer to occur selectively by avoiding side reactions. PMID:27534930

  5. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-01-01

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser696 and Ser698 in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser886 and/or Ser893 in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser717 in the JM, and at Ser733, Thr752, Ser783, Ser864, Ser911, Ser958 and Thr998 in the kinase domain. The LC–ESI–MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr890, Ser893 and Thr894) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr890, Ser893, Thr894 and Thr899, differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  6. Conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation loop of the Arabidopsis phytosulfokine receptor PSKR1 differentially affect kinase and receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Jens; Linke, Dennis; Bönniger, Christine; Tholey, Andreas; Sauter, Margret

    2015-12-15

    PSK (phytosulfokine) is a plant peptide hormone perceived by a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase. Phosphosite mapping of epitope-tagged PSKR1 (phytosulfokine receptor 1) from Arabidopsis thaliana plants identified Ser(696) and Ser(698) in the JM (juxtamembrane) region and probably Ser(886) and/or Ser(893) in the AL (activation loop) as in planta phosphorylation sites. In vitro-expressed kinase was autophosphorylated at Ser(717) in the JM, and at Ser(733), Thr(752), Ser(783), Ser(864), Ser(911), Ser(958) and Thr(998) in the kinase domain. The LC-ESI-MS/MS spectra provided support that up to three sites (Thr(890), Ser(893) and Thr(894)) in the AL were likely to be phosphorylated in vitro. These sites are evolutionarily highly conserved in PSK receptors, indicative of a conserved function. Site-directed mutagenesis of the four conserved residues in the activation segment, Thr(890), Ser(893), Thr(894) and Thr(899), differentially altered kinase activity in vitro and growth-promoting activity in planta. The T899A and the quadruple-mutated TSTT-A (T890A/S893A/T894A/T899A) mutants were both kinase-inactive, but PSKR1(T899A) retained growth-promoting activity. The T890A and S893A/T894A substitutions diminished kinase activity and growth promotion. We hypothesize that phosphorylation within the AL activates kinase activity and receptor function in a gradual and distinctive manner that may be a means to modulate the PSK response. PMID:26472115

  7. The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and the origin of hyperhomocysteinemia in aging and dementia.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kilmer S

    2015-01-01

    The active site of oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis in mitochondria is proposed to consist of two molecules of thioretinamide bound to cobalamin, forming thioretinaco, complexed with ozone, oxygen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. and inorganic phosphate, TR2CoO3O2NAD(+)H2PO4(-). Reduction of the pyridinium nitrogen of the nicotinamide group by an electron from electron transport complexes initiates polymerization of phosphate with adenosine diphosphate, yielding nicotinamide riboside and ATP bound to thioretinaco ozonide oxygen. A second electron reduces oxygen to hydroperoxyl radical, releasing ATP from the active site. A proton gradient is created within F1F0 ATPase complexes of mitochondria by reaction of protons with reduced nicotinamide riboside and with hydroperoxyl radical, yielding reduced nicotinamide riboside and hydroperoxide. The hyperhomocysteinemia of aging and dementia is attributed to decreased synthesis of adenosyl methionine by thioretinaco ozonide and ATP, causing decreased allosteric activation of cystathionine synthase and decreased allosteric inhibition of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase and resulting in dysregulation of methionine metabolism. PMID:25887881

  8. Artificial phosphorylation sites modulate the activity of a voltage-gated potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    The KvAP potassium channel is representative of a family of voltage-gated ion channels where the membrane potential is sensed by a transmembrane helix containing several positively charged arginines. Previous work by Wang and Zocchi [A. Wang and G. Zocchi, PLoS ONE 6, e18598 (2011), 10.1371/journal.pone.0018598] showed how a negatively charged polyelectrolyte attached in proximity to the voltage sensing element can bias the opening probability of the channel. Here we introduce three phosphorylation sites at the same location and show that the response curve of the channel shifts by about 20 mV upon phosphorylation, while other characteristics such as the single-channel conductance are unaffected. In summary, we construct an artificial phosphorylation site which confers allosteric regulation to the channel.

  9. Phosphorylation site prediction in plants.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Schulze, Waltraud X; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation events on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues are the most pervasive protein covalent bond modifications in plant signaling. Both low and high throughput studies reveal the importance of phosphorylation in plant molecular biology. Although becoming more and more common, the proteome-wide screening on phosphorylation by experiments remains time consuming and costly. Therefore, in silico prediction methods are proposed as a complementary analysis tool to enhance the phosphorylation site identification, develop biological hypothesis, or help experimental design. These methods build statistical models based on the experimental data, and they do not have some of the technical-specific bias, which may have advantage in proteome-wide analysis. More importantly computational methods are very fast and cheap to run, which makes large-scale phosphorylation identifications very practical for any types of biological study. Thus, the phosphorylation prediction tools become more and more popular. In this chapter, we will focus on plant specific phosphorylation site prediction tools, with essential illustration of technical details and application guidelines. We will use Musite, PhosPhAt and PlantPhos as the representative tools. We will present the results on the prediction of the Arabidopsis protein phosphorylation events to give users a general idea of the performance range of the three tools, together with their strengths and limitations. We believe these prediction tools will contribute more and more to the plant phosphorylation research community. PMID:25930706

  10. Regulatory roles of conserved phosphorylation sites in the activation T-loop of the MAP kinase ERK1

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Shenshen; Pelech, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic domains of most eukaryotic protein kinases are highly conserved in their primary structures. Their phosphorylation within the well-known activation T-loop, a variable region between protein kinase catalytic subdomains VII and VIII, is a common mechanism for stimulation of their phosphotransferase activities. Extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1 (ERK1), a member of the extensively studied mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, serves as a paradigm for regulation of protein kinases in signaling modules. In addition to the well-documented T202 and Y204 stimulatory phosphorylation sites in the activation T-loop of ERK1 and its closest relative, ERK2, three additional flanking phosphosites have been confirmed (T198, T207, and Y210 from ERK1) by high-throughput mass spectrometry. In vitro kinase assays revealed the functional importance of T207 and Y210, but not T198, in negatively regulating ERK1 catalytic activity. The Y210 site could be important for proper conformational arrangement of the active site, and a Y210F mutant could not be recognized by MEK1 for phosphorylation of T202 and Y204 in vitro. Autophosphorylation of T207 reduces the catalytic activity and stability of activated ERK1. We propose that after the activation of ERK1 by MEK1, subsequent slower phosphorylation of the flanking sites results in inhibition of the kinase. Because the T207 and Y210 phosphosites of ERK1 are highly conserved within the eukaryotic protein kinase family, hyperphosphorylation within the kinase activation T-loop may serve as a general mechanism for protein kinase down-regulation after initial activation by their upstream kinases. PMID:26823016

  11. P21-activated protein kinase (PAK2)-mediated c-Jun phosphorylation at 5 threonine sites promotes cell transformation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Zhang, Jishuai; Zhu, Feng; Wen, Weihong; Zykova, Tatyana; Li, Xiang; Liu, Kangdong; Peng, Cong; Ma, Weiya; Shi, Guozheng; Dong, Ziming; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang

    2011-01-01

    The oncoprotein c-Jun is one of the components of the activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor complex. AP-1 regulates the expression of many genes and is involved in a variety of biological functions such as cell transformation, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. AP-1 activates a variety of tumor-related genes and therefore promotes tumorigenesis and malignant transformation. Here, we found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces phosphorylation of c-Jun by P21-activated kinase (PAK) 2. Our data showed that PAK2 binds and phosphorylates c-Jun at five threonine sites (Thr2, Thr8, Thr89, Thr93 and Thr286) in vitro and ex vivo. Knockdown of PAK2 in JB6 Cl41 (P+) cells had no effect on c-Jun phosphorylation at Ser63 or Ser73 but resulted in decreases in EGF-induced anchorage-independent cell transformation, proliferation and AP-1 activity. Mutation at all five c-Jun threonine sites phosphorylated by PAK2 decreased the transforming ability of JB6 cells. Knockdown of PAK2 in SK-MEL-5 melanoma cells also decreased colony formation, proliferation and AP-1 activity. These results indicated that PAK2/c-Jun signaling plays an important role in EGF-induced cell proliferation and transformation. PMID:21177766

  12. Phosphorylation of protein kinase C sites in NBD1 and the R domain control CFTR channel activation by PKA.

    PubMed

    Chappe, V; Hinkson, D A; Zhu, T; Chang, X-B; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    2003-04-01

    Activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel by protein kinase A (PKA) is enhanced by protein kinase C (PKC). However, the mechanism of modulation is not known and it remains uncertain whether PKC acts directly on CFTR or through phosphorylation of an ancillary protein. Using excised patches that had been pre-treated with phosphatases, we found that PKC exposure results in much larger PKA-activated currents and shifts the PKA concentration dependence. To examine if these effects are mediated by direct PKC phosphorylation of CFTR, a mutant was constructed in which serines or threonines at nine PKC consensus sequences on CFTR were replaced by alanines (i.e. the '9CA' mutant T582A/T604A/S641A/T682A/S686A/S707A/S790A/T791A/S809A). In excised patches, 9CA channels had greatly reduced responses to PKA (i.e. 5-10 % that of wild-type), which were not enhanced by PKC pre-treatment, although the mutant channels were still functional according to iodide efflux assays. Stimulation of iodide efflux by chlorophenylthio-cAMP (cpt-cAMP) was delayed in cells expressing 9CA channels, and a similar delay was observed when cells expressing wild-type CFTR were treated with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine. This suggests that weak activation by PKA in excised patches and slow stimulation of iodide efflux from intact cells are specifically due to the loss of PKC phosphorylation. Finally, PKC caused a slight activation of wild-type channels when added to excised patches after phosphatase pre-treatment but had no effect on the mutant. We conclude that direct phosphorylation of CFTR at one or more of the nine sites mutated in 9CA is required for both the partial activation by PKC and for its modulation of CFTR responses to PKA. PMID:12588899

  13. Phosphorylation of protein kinase C sites in NBD1 and the R domain control CFTR channel activation by PKA

    PubMed Central

    Chappe, V; Hinkson, D A; Zhu, T; Chang, X-B; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    2003-01-01

    Activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel by protein kinase A (PKA) is enhanced by protein kinase C (PKC). However, the mechanism of modulation is not known and it remains uncertain whether PKC acts directly on CFTR or through phosphorylation of an ancillary protein. Using excised patches that had been pre-treated with phosphatases, we found that PKC exposure results in much larger PKA-activated currents and shifts the PKA concentration dependence. To examine if these effects are mediated by direct PKC phosphorylation of CFTR, a mutant was constructed in which serines or threonines at nine PKC consensus sequences on CFTR were replaced by alanines (i.e. the ‘9CA’ mutant T582A/T604A/S641A/T682A/S686A/S707A/S790A/T791A/S809A). In excised patches, 9CA channels had greatly reduced responses to PKA (i.e. 5–10 % that of wild-type), which were not enhanced by PKC pre-treatment, although the mutant channels were still functional according to iodide efflux assays. Stimulation of iodide efflux by chlorophenylthio-cAMP (cpt-cAMP) was delayed in cells expressing 9CA channels, and a similar delay was observed when cells expressing wild-type CFTR were treated with the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine. This suggests that weak activation by PKA in excised patches and slow stimulation of iodide efflux from intact cells are specifically due to the loss of PKC phosphorylation. Finally, PKC caused a slight activation of wild-type channels when added to excised patches after phosphatase pre-treatment but had no effect on the mutant. We conclude that direct phosphorylation of CFTR at one or more of the nine sites mutated in 9CA is required for both the partial activation by PKC and for its modulation of CFTR responses to PKA. PMID:12588899

  14. A novel phosphorylation site at Ser130 adjacent to the pseudosubstrate domain contributes to the activation of protein kinase C-δ.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jianli; Holewinski, Ronald J; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Steinberg, Susan F

    2016-02-01

    Protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is a signalling kinase that regulates many cellular responses. Although most studies focus on allosteric mechanisms that activate PKCδ at membranes, PKCδ also is controlled via multi-site phosphorylation [Gong et al. (2015) Mol. Cell. Biol. 35: , 1727-1740]. The present study uses MS-based methods to identify PKCδ phosphorylation at Thr(50) and Ser(645) (in resting and PMA-treated cardiomyocytes) as well as Thr(37), Thr(38), Ser(130), Thr(164), Thr(211), Thr(215), Ser(218), Thr(295), Ser(299) and Thr(656) (as sites that increase with PMA). We focused on the consequences of phosphorylation at Ser(130) and Thr(141) (sites just N-terminal to the pseudosubstrate domain). We show that S130D and T141E substitutions co-operate to increase PKCδ's basal lipid-independent activity and that Ser(130)/Thr(141) di-phosphorylation influences PKCδ's substrate specificity. We recently reported that PKCδ preferentially phosphorylates substrates with a phosphoacceptor serine residue and that this is due to constitutive phosphorylation at Ser(357), an ATP-positioning G-loop site that limits PKCδ's threonine kinase activity [Gong et al. (2015) Mol. Cell. Biol. 35: , 1727-1740]. The present study shows that S130D and T141E substitutions increase PKCδ's threonine kinase activity indirectly by decreasing G loop phosphorylation at Ser(357). A S130F substitution [that mimics a S130F single-nt polymorphism (SNP) identified in some human populations] also increases PKCδ's maximal lipid-dependent catalytic activity and confers threonine kinase activity. Finally, we show that Ser(130)/Thr(141) phosphorylations relieve auto-inhibitory constraints that limit PKCδ's activity and substrate specificity in a cell-based context. Since phosphorylation sites map to similar positions relative to the pseudosubstrate domains of other PKCs, our results suggest that phosphorylation in this region of the enzyme may constitute a general mechanism to control PKC isoform

  15. A novel phosphorylation site at Ser130 adjacent to the pseudosubstrate domain contributes to the activation of protein kinase C-δ

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianli; Holewinski, Ronald J.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Steinberg, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) is a signalling kinase that regulates many cellular responses. Although most studies focus on allosteric mechanisms that activate PKCδ at membranes, PKCδ also is controlled via multi-site phosphorylation [Gong et al. (2015) Mol. Cell. Biol. 35, 1727–1740]. The present study uses MS-based methods to identify PKCδ phosphorylation at Thr50 and Ser645 (in resting and PMA-treated cardiomyocytes) as well as Thr37, Thr38, Ser130, Thr164, Thr211, Thr215, Ser218, Thr295, Ser299 and Thr656 (as sites that increase with PMA). We focused on the consequences of phosphorylation at Ser130 and Thr141 (sites just N-terminal to the pseudosubstrate domain).We show that S130D and T141E substitutions co-operate to increase PKCδ’s basal lipid-independent activity and that Ser130/Thr141 di-phosphorylation influences PKCδ’s substrate specificity. We recently reported that PKCδ preferentially phosphorylates substrates with a phosphoacceptor serine residue and that this is due to constitutive phosphorylation at Ser357, an ATP-positioning G-loop site that limits PKCδ’s threonine kinase activity [Gong et al. (2015) Mol. Cell. Biol. 35, 1727–1740]. The present study shows that S130D and T141E substitutions increase PKCδ’s threonine kinase activity indirectly by decreasing G loop phosphorylation at Ser357. A S130F substitution [that mimics a S130F single-nt polymorphism (SNP) identified in some human populations] also increases PKCδ’s maximal lipid-dependent catalytic activity and confers threonine kinase activity. Finally, we show that Ser130/Thr141 phosphorylations relieve auto-inhibitory constraints that limit PKCδ’s activity and substrate specificity in a cell-based context. Since phosphorylation sites map to similar positions relative to the pseudosubstrate domains of other PKCs, our results suggest that phosphorylation in this region of the enzyme may constitute a general mechanism to control PKC isoform activity. PMID:26546672

  16. The Plastid Casein Kinase 2 Phosphorylates Rubisco Activase at the Thr-78 Site but Is Not Essential for Regulation of Rubisco Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Y.; Bender, Kyle W.; Walker, Berkley J.; Zielinski, Raymond E.; Spalding, Martin H.; Ort, Donald R.; Huber, Steven C.

    2016-01-01

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is composed of a large RCAα and small RCAβ isoform that are formed by alternative splicing of a single gene (At2g39730). The activity of Rubisco is controlled in response to changes in irradiance by regulation of RCA activity, which is known to involve a redox-sensitive disulfide bond located in the carboxy-terminal extension of the RCAα subunit. Additionally, phosphorylation of RCA threonine-78 (Thr-78) has been reported to occur in the dark suggesting that phosphorylation may also be associated with dark-inactivation of RCA and deactivation of Rubisco. In the present study, we developed site-specific antibodies to monitor phosphorylation of RCA at the Thr-78 site and used non-reducing SDS-PAGE to monitor the redox status of the RCAα subunit. By immunoblotting, phosphorylation of both RCA isoforms occurred at low light and in the dark and feeding peroxide or DTT to leaf segments indicated that redox status of the chloroplast stroma was a critical factor controlling RCA phosphorylation. Use of a knockout mutant identified the plastid-targeted casein kinase 2 (cpCK2α) as the major protein kinase involved in RCA phosphorylation. Studies with recombinant cpCK2α and synthetic peptide substrates identified acidic residues at the –1, +2, and +3 positions surrounding Thr-78 as strong positive recognition elements. The cpck2 knockout mutant had strongly reduced phosphorylation at the Thr-78 site but was similar to wild type plants in terms of induction kinetics of photosynthesis following transfer from darkness or low light to high light, suggesting that if phosphorylation of RCA Thr-78 plays a direct role it would be redundant to redox regulation for control of Rubisco activation state under normal conditions. PMID:27064346

  17. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kooyeon; Jo, Su-Hyun; Seo, Su Ryeon

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  18. Prioritizing functional phosphorylation sites based on multiple feature integration

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Qingyu; Miao, Benpeng; Bi, Jie; Wang, Zhen; Li, Yixue

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important type of post-translational modification that is involved in a variety of biological activities. Most phosphorylation events occur on serine, threonine and tyrosine residues in eukaryotes. In recent years, many phosphorylation sites have been identified as a result of advances in mass-spectrometric techniques. However, a large percentage of phosphorylation sites may be non-functional. Systematically prioritizing functional sites from a large number of phosphorylation sites will be increasingly important for the study of their biological roles. This study focused on exploring the intrinsic features of functional phosphorylation sites to predict whether a phosphosite is likely to be functional. We found significant differences in the distribution of evolutionary conservation, kinase association, disorder score, and secondary structure between known functional and background phosphorylation datasets. We built four different types of classifiers based on the most representative features and found that their performances were similar. We also prioritized 213,837 human phosphorylation sites from a variety of phosphorylation databases, which will be helpful for subsequent functional studies. All predicted results are available for query and download on our website (Predict Functional Phosphosites, PFP, http://pfp.biosino.org/). PMID:27090940

  19. The C-terminal tail inhibitory phosphorylation sites of PTEN regulate its intrinsic catalytic activity and the kinetics of its binding to phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Chia, Yeong-Chit Joel; Catimel, Bruno; Lio, Daisy Sio Seng; Ang, Ching-Seng; Peng, Benjamin; Wu, Hong; Zhu, Hong-Jian; Cheng, Heung-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Dephosphorylation of four major C-terminal tail sites and occupancy of the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]-binding site of PTEN cooperate to activate its phospholipid phosphatase activity and facilitate its recruitment to plasma membrane. Our investigation of the mechanism by which phosphorylation of these C-terminal sites controls the PI(4,5)P2-binding affinity and catalytic activity of PTEN resulted in the following findings. First, dephosphorylation of all four sites leads to full activation; and phosphorylation of any one site significantly reduces the intrinsic catalytic activity of PTEN. These findings suggest that coordinated inhibition of the upstream protein kinases and activation of the protein phosphatases targeting the four sites are needed to fully activate PTEN phosphatase activity. Second, PI(4,5)P2 cannot activate the phosphopeptide phosphatase activity of PTEN, suggesting that PI(4,5)P2 can only activate the phospholipid phosphatase activity but not the phosphoprotein phosphatase activity of PTEN. Third, dephosphorylation of all four sites significantly decreases the affinity of PTEN for PI(4,5)P2. Since PI(4,5)P2 is a major phospholipid co-localizing with the phospholipid- and phosphoprotein-substrates in plasma membrane, we hypothesise that the reduced affinity facilitates PTEN to "hop" on the plasma membrane to dephosphorylate these substrates. PMID:26471078

  20. Tyrosine hydroxylase is activated and phosphorylated at different sites in rat pheochromocytoma PC 12 cells treated with phorbol ester and forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, E.; Tank, A.W.; Weiner, D.H.; Mosimann, W.F.; Yanagihara, N.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of phorbol ester (4..beta..-phorbol, 12..beta..-myristate, 13..cap alpha..-acetate; TPA), an activator of Ca/sup + +//phospholipid-dependent protein kinase (PK-C), and forskolin, which stimulates adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAMP-PK), on the activation and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells were examined. Incubation of the cells with TPA (0.01-1 ..mu..M) or forskolin (0.01-0.1 ..mu..M) produces increases in activation and phosphorylation of TH in a concentration-dependent manner. The stimulatory effects of TPA are dependent on extracellular Ca/sup + +/ and are inhibited by pretreatment of the cells with trifluoperazine (TFP). The effects of forskolin are independent of Ca/sup + +/ and are not inhibited by TFP. In cells treated with forskolin, the time course of the increase in cAMP correlates with the increases in TH activity and phosphorylation. cAMP levels do not increase in cells treated with TPA. There is an increase in the phosphorylation of only one tryptic phosphopeptide derived from TH in cells treated with either forskolin or TPA. The peptide phosphorylated in TPA-treated cells exhibits different elution characteristics on HPLC from that in forskolin-treated cells. The authors conclude that TH in PC 12 cells is phosphorylated on different sites by cAMP-PK and PK-C. Phosphorylation of either of these sites is associated with enzyme activation.

  1. Akt2 influences glycogen synthase activity in human skeletal muscle through regulation of NH2-terminal (sites 2 + 2a) phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Jesper B.; Richter, Erik A.; Ribel-Madsen, Rasmus; Pehmøller, Christian; Hansen, Bo Falck; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Hirshman, Michael F.; Goodyear, Laurie J.; Vaag, Allan; Poulsen, Pernille; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F. P.

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by reduced muscle glycogen synthesis. The key enzyme in this process, glycogen synthase (GS), is activated via proximal insulin signaling, but the exact molecular events remain unknown. Previously, we demonstrated that phosphorylation of Thr308 on Akt (p-Akt-Thr308), Akt2 activity, and GS activity in muscle were positively associated with insulin sensitivity. Here, in the same study population, we determined the influence of several upstream elements in the canonical PI3K signaling on muscle GS activation. One-hundred eighty-one nondiabetic twins were examined with the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp combined with excision of muscle biopsies. Insulin signaling was evaluated at the levels of the insulin receptor, IRS-1-associated PI3K (IRS-1-PI3K), Akt, and GS employing activity assays and phosphospecific Western blotting. The insulin-stimulated GS activity was positively associated with p-Akt-Thr308 (P = 0.01) and Akt2 activity (P = 0.04) but not p-Akt-Ser473 or IRS-1-PI3K activity. Furthermore, p-Akt-Thr308 and Akt2 activity were negatively associated with NH2-terminal GS phosphorylation (P = 0.001 for both), which in turn was negatively associated with insulin-stimulated GS activity (P < 0.001). We found no association between COOH-terminal GS phosphorylation and Akt or GS activity. Employing whole body Akt2-knockout mice, we validated the necessity for Akt2 in insulin-mediated GS activation. However, since insulin did not affect NH2-terminal phosphorylation in mice, we could not use this model to validate the observed association between GS NH2-terminal phosphorylation and Akt activity in humans. In conclusion, our study suggests that although COOH-terminal dephosphorylation is likely necessary for GS activation, Akt2-dependent NH2-terminal dephosphorylation may be the site for “fine-tuning” insulin-mediated GS activation in humans. PMID:23321478

  2. Site- and kinase-specific phosphorylation-mediated activation of SLAC1, a guard cell anion channel stimulated by abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Maierhofer, Tobias; Diekmann, Marion; Offenborn, Jan Niklas; Lind, Christof; Bauer, Hubert; Hashimoto, Kenji; S Al-Rasheid, Khaled A; Luan, Sheng; Kudla, Jörg; Geiger, Dietmar; Hedrich, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Under drought stress, abscisic acid (ABA) triggers closure of leaf cell pores called stomata, which are formed by two specialized cells called guard cells in plant epidermis. Two pathways downstream of ABA stimulate phosphorylation of the S-type anion channels SLAC1 (slow anion channel associated 1) and SLAH3 (SLAC1 homolog 3), which causes these channels to open, reducing guard cell volume and triggering stomatal closure. One branch involves OST1 (open stomata 1), a calcium-independent SnRK2-type kinase, and the other branch involves calcium-dependent protein kinases of the CPK (calcium-dependent protein kinase) family. We used coexpression analyses in Xenopus oocytes to show that the calcineurin B-like (CBL) calcium sensors CBL1 and CBL9 and their interacting protein kinase CIPK23 also triggered SLAC1 and SLAH3 opening. We analyzed whether regulation of SLAC1 opening by these different families of kinases involved the same or different sites on SLAC1 by measuring channel conductance of SLAC1 with mutations in the putative phosphorylation sites in the amino or carboxyl termini coexpressed with specific kinases in Xenopus oocytes. SLAC1 mutants lacking the OST1-phosphorylated site were still activated by CPK or by CBL/CIPK complexes. Phosphorylation and activation of SLAC1 by any of the kinases were inhibited by the phosphatase ABI1 (ABA insensitive 1), which is inactivated in response to ABA signaling. These findings identified CBL/CIPK complexes as potential regulators of stomatal aperture through S-type anion channels and indicated that phosphorylation at distinct sites enables SLAC1 activation by both calcium-dependent and calcium-independent pathways downstream of ABA. PMID:25205850

  3. Immunodetection of phosphorylation sites gives new insights into the mechanisms underlying phospholamban phosphorylation in the intact heart.

    PubMed

    Mundiña-Weilenmann, C; Vittone, L; Ortale, M; de Cingolani, G C; Mattiazzi, A

    1996-12-27

    Phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, quantification of 32P incorporation into phospholamban, and simultaneous measurements of mechanical activity were used in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts to provide further insights into the underlying mechanisms of phospholamban phosphorylation. Immunological detection of phospholamban phosphorylation sites showed that the isoproterenol concentration-dependent increase in phospholamban phosphorylation was due to increases in phosphorylation of both Ser16 and Thr17 residues. When isoproterenol concentration was increased at extremely low Ca2+ supply to the myocardium, phosphorylation of Thr17 was virtually absent. Under these conditions, 32P incorporation into phospholamban, due to Ser16, decreased by 50%. Changes in Ca2+ supply to the myocardium either at constant beta-adrenergic stimulation or in the presence of okadaic acid, a phosphatase inhibitor, exclusively modified Thr17 phosphorylation. Changes in phospholamban phosphorylation due to either Ser16 and/or Thr17 were paralleled by changes in myocardial relaxation. The results indicate that cAMP- (Ser16) and Ca2+-calmodulin (Thr17)-dependent pathways of phospholamban phosphorylation can occur independently of each other. However, in the absence of beta-adrenergic stimulation, phosphorylation of Thr17 could only be detected after simultaneous activation of Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and inactivation of phosphatase. It is suggested that under physiological conditions, this requisite is only filled by cAMP-dependent mechanisms. PMID:8969222

  4. Sequence- and Structure-Based Analysis of Tissue-Specific Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Karabulut, Nermin Pinar; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most widespread and well studied reversible posttranslational modification. Discovering tissue-specific preferences of phosphorylation sites is important as phosphorylation plays a role in regulating almost every cellular activity and disease state. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of global and tissue-specific sequence and structure properties of phosphorylation sites utilizing recent proteomics data. We identified tissue-specific motifs in both sequence and spatial environments of phosphorylation sites. Target site preferences of kinases across tissues indicate that, while many kinases mediate phosphorylation in all tissues, there are also kinases that exhibit more tissue-specific preferences which, notably, are not caused by tissue-specific kinase expression. We also demonstrate that many metabolic pathways are differentially regulated by phosphorylation in different tissues. PMID:27332813

  5. [Sugar phosphorylation activities in acetogenic bacteria].

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Patterson, J A

    1999-12-01

    Seven acetogenic bacteria (Acetitomaculum ruminis, Acetobacterium woodii, Eubacterium limosum as well as isolates A2, A4, A10 and H3HH) were tested for PEP- and ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glucose and 2-deoxyglucose. Although all organisms had detectable phosphorylation activity, substantial variation existed in the rates of both PEP- and ATP-dependent phosphorylation. Isolate Alo had the highest rate of PEP-dependent phosphorylation of 11.62 nmol.L-1.mg-1.min-1. Isolate A10, H3HH as well as E. limosum most likely have a glucose phosphotransferase system(PTS). In contrast, A ruminis, A. woodii and isolate A2, A4 had PEP-dependent glucose phosphorylation rates very similar to control rates, suggesting the lack of PTS activity. The rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation were higher than PEP-dependent phosphorylation in all organisms surveyed. However, substantial variation existed in the rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation. The glucose PTS of isolates A10 and H3HH were induced by the presence of extracellular glucose. Moreover, the specific activity of the glucose PTS of both isolates increased as cultures progressed from the early log to late log phase of growth. ATP- and PEP-dependent maltose and sucrose phosphorylation was detected in isolates A10 and H3HH. Although activity was detected in both isolates(A10 and H3HH), the rate of activity varied considerably, depending on the sugar and organism tested. PMID:12555560

  6. A grammar inference approach for predicting kinase specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Kinase mediated phosphorylation site detection is the key mechanism of post translational mechanism that plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes and phenotypes. Many diseases, like cancer are related with the signaling defects which are associated with protein phosphorylation. Characterizing the protein kinases and their substrates enhances our ability to understand the mechanism of protein phosphorylation and extends our knowledge of signaling network; thereby helping us to treat such diseases. Experimental methods for predicting phosphorylation sites are labour intensive and expensive. Also, manifold increase of protein sequences in the databanks over the years necessitates the improvement of high speed and accurate computational methods for predicting phosphorylation sites in protein sequences. Till date, a number of computational methods have been proposed by various researchers in predicting phosphorylation sites, but there remains much scope of improvement. In this communication, we present a simple and novel method based on Grammatical Inference (GI) approach to automate the prediction of kinase specific phosphorylation sites. In this regard, we have used a popular GI algorithm Alergia to infer Deterministic Stochastic Finite State Automata (DSFA) which equally represents the regular grammar corresponding to the phosphorylation sites. Extensive experiments on several datasets generated by us reveal that, our inferred grammar successfully predicts phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. It performs significantly better when compared with the other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. We have also compared our inferred DSFA with two other GI inference algorithms. The DSFA generated by our method performs superior which indicates that our method is robust and has a potential for predicting the phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. PMID:25886273

  7. A Grammar Inference Approach for Predicting Kinase Specific Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2015-01-01

    Kinase mediated phosphorylation site detection is the key mechanism of post translational mechanism that plays an important role in regulating various cellular processes and phenotypes. Many diseases, like cancer are related with the signaling defects which are associated with protein phosphorylation. Characterizing the protein kinases and their substrates enhances our ability to understand the mechanism of protein phosphorylation and extends our knowledge of signaling network; thereby helping us to treat such diseases. Experimental methods for predicting phosphorylation sites are labour intensive and expensive. Also, manifold increase of protein sequences in the databanks over the years necessitates the improvement of high speed and accurate computational methods for predicting phosphorylation sites in protein sequences. Till date, a number of computational methods have been proposed by various researchers in predicting phosphorylation sites, but there remains much scope of improvement. In this communication, we present a simple and novel method based on Grammatical Inference (GI) approach to automate the prediction of kinase specific phosphorylation sites. In this regard, we have used a popular GI algorithm Alergia to infer Deterministic Stochastic Finite State Automata (DSFA) which equally represents the regular grammar corresponding to the phosphorylation sites. Extensive experiments on several datasets generated by us reveal that, our inferred grammar successfully predicts phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. It performs significantly better when compared with the other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. We have also compared our inferred DSFA with two other GI inference algorithms. The DSFA generated by our method performs superior which indicates that our method is robust and has a potential for predicting the phosphorylation sites in a kinase specific manner. PMID:25886273

  8. Identifying Human Kinase-Specific Protein Phosphorylation Sites by Integrating Heterogeneous Information from Various Sources

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tingting; Du, Pufeng; Xu, Nanfang

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an important type of protein post-translational modification. Identification of possible phosphorylation sites of a protein is important for understanding its functions. Unbiased screening for phosphorylation sites by in vitro or in vivo experiments is time consuming and expensive; in silico prediction can provide functional candidates and help narrow down the experimental efforts. Most of the existing prediction algorithms take only the polypeptide sequence around the phosphorylation sites into consideration. However, protein phosphorylation is a very complex biological process in vivo. The polypeptide sequences around the potential sites are not sufficient to determine the phosphorylation status of those residues. In the current work, we integrated various data sources such as protein functional domains, protein subcellular location and protein-protein interactions, along with the polypeptide sequences to predict protein phosphorylation sites. The heterogeneous information significantly boosted the prediction accuracy for some kinase families. To demonstrate potential application of our method, we scanned a set of human proteins and predicted putative phosphorylation sites for Cyclin-dependent kinases, Casein kinase 2, Glycogen synthase kinase 3, Mitogen-activated protein kinases, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C families (avaiable at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/huphospho). The predicted phosphorylation sites can serve as candidates for further experimental validation. Our strategy may also be applicable for the in silico identification of other post-translational modification substrates. PMID:21085571

  9. Phosphoproteomics Identified an NS5A Phosphorylation Site Involved in Hepatitis C Virus Replication.

    PubMed

    Chong, Weng Man; Hsu, Shih-Chin; Kao, Wei-Ting; Lo, Chieh-Wen; Lee, Kuan-Ying; Shao, Jheng-Syuan; Chen, Yi-Hung; Chang, Justin; Chen, Steve S-L; Yu, Ming-Jiun

    2016-02-19

    The non-structural protein 5A (NS5A) is a hepatitis C virus (HCV) protein indispensable for the viral life cycle. Many prior papers have pinpointed several serine residues in the low complexity sequence I region of NS5A responsible for NS5A phosphorylation; however, the functions of specific phosphorylation sites remained obscure. Using phosphoproteomics, we identified three phosphorylation sites (serines 222, 235, and 238) in the NS5A low complexity sequence I region. Reporter virus and replicon assays using phosphorylation-ablated alanine mutants of these sites showed that Ser-235 dominated over Ser-222 and Ser-238 in HCV replication. Immunoblotting using an Ser-235 phosphorylation-specific antibody showed a time-dependent increase in Ser-235 phosphorylation that correlated with the viral replication activity. Ser-235 phosphorylated NS5A co-localized with double-stranded RNA, consistent with its role in HCV replication. Mechanistically, Ser-235 phosphorylation probably promotes the replication complex formation via increasing NS5A interaction with the human homologue of the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. Casein kinase Iα (CKIα) directly phosphorylated Ser-235 in vitro. Inhibition of CKIα reduced Ser-235 phosphorylation and the HCV RNA levels in the infected cells. We concluded that NS5A Ser-235 phosphorylated by CKIα probably promotes HCV replication via increasing NS5A interaction with the 33-kDa vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein. PMID:26702051

  10. Mapping of phosphorylation sites in polyomavirus large T antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Hassauer, M.; Scheidtmann, K.H.; Walter, G.

    1986-06-01

    The phosphorylation sites of polyomavirus large T antigen from infected or transformed cells were investigated. Tryptic digestion of large T antigen from infected, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled cells revealed seven major phosphopeptides. Five of these were phosphorylated only at serine residues, and two were phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues. The overall ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine was 6:1. The transformed cell line B4 expressed two polyomavirus-specific phosphoproteins: large T antigen, which was only weakly phosphorylated, and a truncated form of large T antigen of 34,000 molecular weight which was heavily phosphorylated. Both showed phosphorylation patterns similar to that of large T antigen from infected cells. Peptide analyses of large T antigens encoded by the deletion mutants dl8 and dl23 or of specific fragments of wild-type large T antigen indicated that the phosphorylation sites are located in an amino-terminal region upstream of residue 194. The amino acid composition of the phosphopeptides as revealed by differential labeling with various amino acids indicated that several phosphopeptides contain overlapping sequences and that all phosphorylation sites are located in four tryptic peptides derived from a region between Met71 and Arg191. Two of the potential phosphorylation sites were identified as Ser81 and Thr187. The possible role of this modification of large T antigen is discussed.

  11. Phosphorylation site on yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex

    SciTech Connect

    Uhlinger, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Yeast cells were disrupted in a Manton-Gaulin laboratory homogenizer. The pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was purified by fractionation with polyethylene glycol, isoelectric precipitation, ultracentrifugation and chromatography on hydroxylapatite. Final purification of the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was achieved by cation-exchange high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). No endogenous pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity was detected during the purification. However, the yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was phosphorylated and inactivated with purified pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase from bovine kidney. Tryptic digestion of the /sup 32/P-labeled complex yielded a single phosphopeptide which was purified to homogeniety. The tryptic digest was subjected to chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. Radioactive fractions were pooled, concentrated, and subjected to anion-exchange HPLC. The column was developed with a linear gradient of ammonium acetate. Final purification of the phosphopeptide was achieved by chromatography on a C-18 reverse phase HPLC column developed with a linear gradient of acetonitrile. The amino acid sequence of the homogeneous peptide was determined by manual modified Edman degradation.

  12. Casein Kinase 2 Binds to the C Terminus of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) and Stimulates NHE3 Basal Activity by Phosphorylating a Separate Site in NHE3

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Rafiquel; Grønborg, Mads; Cha, Boyoung; Mohan, Sachin; Chen, Yueping; Pandey, Akhilesh; Litchfield, David

    2008-01-01

    Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) is the epithelial-brush border isoform responsible for most intestinal and renal Na+ absorption. Its activity is both up- and down-regulated under normal physiological conditions, and it is inhibited in most diarrheal diseases. NHE3 is phosphorylated under basal conditions and Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitors stimulate basal exchange activity; however, the kinases involved are unknown. To identify kinases that regulate NHE3 under basal conditions, NHE3 was immunoprecipitated; LC-MS/MS of trypsinized NHE3 identified a novel phosphorylation site at S719 of the C terminus, which was predicted to be a casein kinase 2 (CK2) phosphorylation site. This was confirmed by an in vitro kinase assay. The NHE3-S719A mutant but not NHE3-S719D had reduced NHE3 activity due to less plasma membrane NHE3. This was due to reduced exocytosis plus decreased plasma membrane delivery of newly synthesized NHE3. Also, NHE3 activity was inhibited by the CK2 inhibitor 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole DMAT when wild-type NHE3 was expressed in fibroblasts and Caco-2 cells, but the NHE3-S719 mutant was fully resistant to DMAT. CK2 bound to the NHE3 C-terminal domain, between amino acids 590 and 667, a site different from the site it phosphorylates. CK2 binds to the NHE3 C terminus and stimulates basal NHE3 activity by phosphorylating a separate single site on the NHE3 C terminus (S719), which affects NHE3 trafficking. PMID:18614797

  13. Predicting and analyzing protein phosphorylation sites in plants using musite.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuming; Gao, Jianjiong; Bollinger, Curtis; Thelen, Jay J; Xu, Dong

    2012-01-01

    Although protein phosphorylation sites can be reliably identified with high-resolution mass spectrometry, the experimental approach is time-consuming and resource-dependent. Furthermore, it is unlikely that an experimental approach could catalog an entire phosphoproteome. Computational prediction of phosphorylation sites provides an efficient and flexible way to reveal potential phosphorylation sites and provide hypotheses in experimental design. Musite is a tool that we previously developed to predict phosphorylation sites based solely on protein sequence. However, it was not comprehensively applied to plants. In this study, the phosphorylation data from Arabidopsis thaliana, B. napus, G. max, M. truncatula, O. sativa, and Z. mays were collected for cross-species testing and the overall plant-specific prediction as well. The results show that the model for A. thaliana can be extended to other organisms, and the overall plant model from Musite outperforms the current plant-specific prediction tools, Plantphos, and PhosphAt, in prediction accuracy. Furthermore, a comparative study of predicted phosphorylation sites across orthologs among different plants was conducted to reveal potential evolutionary features. A bipolar distribution of isolated, non-conserved phosphorylation sites, and highly conserved ones in terms of the amino acid type was observed. It also shows that predicted phosphorylation sites conserved within orthologs do not necessarily share more sequence similarity in the flanking regions than the background, but they often inherit protein disorder, a property that does not necessitate high sequence conservation. Our analysis also suggests that the phosphorylation frequencies among serine, threonine, and tyrosine correlate with their relative proportion in disordered regions. Musite can be used as a web server (http://musite.net) or downloaded as an open-source standalone tool (http://musite.sourceforge.net/). PMID:22934099

  14. Crosstalk between signaling pathways provided by single and multiple protein phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Hafumi; Demir, Emek; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular fate depends on the spatio-temporal separation and integration of signaling processes which can be provided by phosphorylation events. In this study we identify the crucial points in signaling crosstalk which can be triggered by discrete phosphorylation events on a single target protein. We integrated the data on individual human phosphosites with the evidence on their corresponding kinases, the functional consequences on phosphorylation on activity of the target protein and corresponding pathways. Our results show that there is a substantial fraction of phosphosites that can play critical roles in crosstalk between alternative or redundant pathways and regulatory outcome of phosphorylation can be linked to a type of phosphorylated residue. These regulatory phosphosites can serve as hubs in the signal flow and their functional roles are directly connected to their specific properties. Namely, phosphosites with similar regulatory functions are phosphorylated by the same kinases and participate in regulation of similar biochemical pathways. Such sites are more likely to cluster in sequence and space unlike sites with antagonistic outcomes of their phosphorylation on a target protein. In addition we found that in silico phosphorylation of sites with similar functional consequences have comparable outcomes on a target protein stability. An important role of phosphorylation sites in biological crosstalk is evident from the analysis of their evolutionary conservation. PMID:25451034

  15. Binding to serine 65-phosphorylated ubiquitin primes Parkin for optimal PINK1-dependent phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Martínez-Torres, R Julio; Wilkie, Scott; Kumar, Atul; Peltier, Julien; Gonzalez, Alba; Johnson, Clare; Zhang, Jinwei; Hope, Anthony G; Peggie, Mark; Trost, Matthias; van Aalten, Daan MF; Alessi, Dario R; Prescott, Alan R; Knebel, Axel; Walden, Helen; Muqit, Miratul MK

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial protein kinase PINK1 are associated with autosomal recessive Parkinson disease (PD). We and other groups have reported that PINK1 activates Parkin E3 ligase activity both directly via phosphorylation of Parkin serine 65 (Ser65)—which lies within its ubiquitin-like domain (Ubl)—and indirectly through phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65. How Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65) contributes to Parkin activation is currently unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 binding to Parkin dramatically increases the rate and stoichiometry of Parkin phosphorylation at Ser65 by PINK1 in vitro. Analysis of the Parkin structure, corroborated by site-directed mutagenesis, shows that the conserved His302 and Lys151 residues play a critical role in binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, thereby promoting Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation and activation of its E3 ligase activity in vitro. Mutation of His302 markedly inhibits Parkin Ser65 phosphorylation at the mitochondria, which is associated with a marked reduction in its E3 ligase activity following mitochondrial depolarisation. We show that the binding of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 to Parkin disrupts the interaction between the Ubl domain and C-terminal region, thereby increasing the accessibility of Parkin Ser65. Finally, purified Parkin maximally phosphorylated at Ser65 in vitro cannot be further activated by the addition of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65. Our results thus suggest that a major role of ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 is to promote PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of Parkin at Ser65, leading to maximal activation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. His302 and Lys151 are likely to line a phospho-Ser65-binding pocket on the surface of Parkin that is critical for the ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65 interaction. This study provides new mechanistic insights into Parkin activation by ubiquitinPhospho-Ser65, which could aid in the development of Parkin activators that mimic the effect of

  16. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G.; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A.; Brunner, Michael R.; Davidson, Iain F.; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/CCDC20 activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/CCDC20 activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/CCDC20 activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  17. Mechanism of APC/CCDC20 activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Renping; Weissmann, Florian; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Brown, Nicholas G; VanderLinden, Ryan; Imre, Richard; Jarvis, Marc A; Brunner, Michael R; Davidson, Iain F; Litos, Gabriele; Haselbach, David; Mechtler, Karl; Stark, Holger; Schulman, Brenda A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2016-05-10

    Chromosome segregation and mitotic exit are initiated by the 1.2-MDa ubiquitin ligase APC/C (anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome) and its coactivator CDC20 (cell division cycle 20). To avoid chromosome missegregation, APC/C(CDC20) activation is tightly controlled. CDC20 only associates with APC/C in mitosis when APC/C has become phosphorylated and is further inhibited by a mitotic checkpoint complex until all chromosomes are bioriented on the spindle. APC/C contains 14 different types of subunits, most of which are phosphorylated in mitosis on multiple sites. However, it is unknown which of these phospho-sites enable APC/C(CDC20) activation and by which mechanism. Here we have identified 68 evolutionarily conserved mitotic phospho-sites on human APC/C bound to CDC20 and have used the biGBac technique to generate 47 APC/C mutants in which either all 68 sites or subsets of them were replaced by nonphosphorylatable or phospho-mimicking residues. The characterization of these complexes in substrate ubiquitination and degradation assays indicates that phosphorylation of an N-terminal loop region in APC1 is sufficient for binding and activation of APC/C by CDC20. Deletion of the N-terminal APC1 loop enables APC/C(CDC20) activation in the absence of mitotic phosphorylation or phospho-mimicking mutations. These results indicate that binding of CDC20 to APC/C is normally prevented by an autoinhibitory loop in APC1 and that its mitotic phosphorylation relieves this inhibition. The predicted location of the N-terminal APC1 loop implies that this loop controls interactions between the N-terminal domain of CDC20 and APC1 and APC8. These results reveal how APC/C phosphorylation enables CDC20 to bind and activate the APC/C in mitosis. PMID:27114510

  18. Whi5 Regulation by Site Specific CDK-Phosphorylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Michelle V.; Smolka, Marcus B.; de Bruin, Rob A. M.; Zhou, Huilin; Wittenberg, Curt; Dowdy, Steven F.

    2009-01-01

    The Whi5 transcriptional repressor is a negative regulator of G1 cell cycle progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is functionally equivalent to the Retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor protein in mammals. In early G1, Whi5 binds to and inhibits SBF (Swi4/Swi6) transcriptional complexes. At Start, Cln:Cdc28 kinases phosphorylate and inactivate Whi5, causing its dissociation from SBF promoters and nuclear export, allowing activation of SBF transcription and entry into late G1. In an analysis of Whi5 phosphorylation, we found that 10 of the 12 putative CDK phosphorylation sites on Whi5 were occupied in vivo in asynchronously growing cells. In addition, we identified 6 non-CDK Whi5 phosphorylation sites. Whi5 CDK and non-CDK phosphorylation mutants were functional and able to rescue the small cell size of whi5Δ cells. However, the Whi5 CDK mutant with all 12 putative CDK sites changed to alanine causes a dramatic cell cycle phenotype when expressed with a Swi6 CDK phosphorylation mutant. Mutational analysis of Whi5 determined that only four C-terminal CDK sites were necessary and sufficient for Whi5 inactivation when Swi6 CDK sites were also mutated. Although these four Whi5 CDK sites do not wholly determine Whi5 nuclear export, they do impact regulation of cell size. Taken together, these observations begin to dissect the regulatory role of specific phosphorylation sites on Whi5. PMID:19172996

  19. Stat5a serine phosphorylation. Serine 779 is constitutively phosphorylated in the mammary gland, and serine 725 phosphorylation influences prolactin-stimulated in vitro DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Beuvink, I; Hess, D; Flotow, H; Hofsteenge, J; Groner, B; Hynes, N E

    2000-04-01

    The activity of transcription factors of the Stat family is controlled by phosphorylation of a conserved, carboxyl-terminal tyrosine residue. Tyrosine phosphorylation is essential for Stat dimerization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation. Phosphorylation of Stats on specific serine residues has also been described. We have previously shown that in HC11 mammary epithelial cells Stat5a is phosphorylated on Tyr(694) in a prolactin-sensitive manner, whereas serine phosphorylation is constitutive (Wartmann, M., Cella, N., Hofer, P., Groner, B., Xiuwen, L., Hennighausen, L., and Hynes, N. E. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31863-31868). By using mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis, we have now identified Ser(779), located in a unique Stat5a SP motif, as the site of serine phosphorylation. By using phospho-Ser(779)-specific antiserum, we have determined that Ser(779) is constitutively phosphorylated in mammary glands taken from different developmental stages. Stat5a isolated from spleen, heart, brain, and lung was also found to be phosphorylated on Ser(779). Ser(725) in Stat5a has also been identified as a phosphorylation site (Yamashita, H., Xu, J., Erwin, R. A., Farrar, W. L., Kirken, R. A., and Rui, H. (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 30218-30224). Here we show that mutagenesis of Ser(725), Ser(779), or a combination of Ser(725/779) to an Ala had no effect on prolactin-induced transcriptional activation of a beta-casein reporter construct. However, following prolactin induction the Ser(725) mutant displayed sustained DNA binding activity compared with that of wild type Stat5a. The results suggest that Ser(725) phosphorylation has an impact on signal duration. PMID:10744710

  20. Biochemical and biological analysis of Mek1 phosphorylation site mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, W; Kessler, D S; Erikson, R L

    1995-01-01

    Recently, we described the constitutive activation of Mek1 by mutation of its two serine phosphorylation sites. We have now characterized the biochemical properties of these Mek1 mutants and performed microinjection experiments to investigate the effect of an activated Mek on oocyte maturation. Single acidic substitution of either serine 218 or 222 activated Mek1 by 10-50 fold. The double acidic substitutions, [Asp218, Asp222] and [Asp218, Glu222], activated Mek1 over 6000-fold. The specific activity of the [Asp218, Asp222] and [Asp218, Glu222] Mek1 mutants, 29 nanomole phosphate per minute per milligram, is similar to that of wild-type Mek1 activated by Raf-1 in vitro. Although the mutants with double acidic substitutions could not be further activated by Raf-1, three of those with single acidic substitution were activated by Raf-1 to the specific activity of activated wild-type Mek1. Injection of the [Asp218, Asp222] Mek1 mutant into Xenopus oocytes activated both MAP kinase and histone H1 kinase and induced germinal vesicle breakdown, an effect that was only partially blocked by inhibition of protein synthesis. These data provide a measure of Mek's potential to influence cell functions and a quantitative basis to assess the biological effects of Mek1 mutants in a variety of circumstances. Images PMID:7612960

  1. Identification of Ser-543 as the major regulatory phosphorylation site in spinach leaf nitrate reductase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachmann, M.; Shiraishi, N.; Campbell, W. H.; Yoo, B. C.; Harmon, A. C.; Huber, S. C.; Davies, E. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Spinach leaf NADH:nitrate reductase (NR) responds to light/dark signals and photosynthetic activity in part as a result of rapid regulation by reversible protein phosphorylation. We have identified the major regulatory phosphorylation site as Ser-543, which is located in the hinge 1 region connecting the cytochrome b domain with the molybdenum-pterin cofactor binding domain of NR, using recombinant NR fragments containing or lacking the phosphorylation site sequence. Studies with NR partial reactions indicated that the block in electron flow caused by phosphorylation also could be localized to the hinge 1 region. A synthetic peptide (NR6) based on the phosphorylation site sequence was phosphorylated readily by NR kinase (NRk) in vitro. NR6 kinase activity tracked the ATP-dependent inactivation of NR during several chromatographic steps and completely inhibited inactivation/phosphorylation of native NR in vitro. Two forms of NRk were resolved by using anion exchange chromatography. Studies with synthetic peptide analogs indicated that both forms of NRk had similar specificity determinants, requiring a basic residue at P-3 (i.e., three amino acids N-terminal to the phosphorylated serine) and a hydrophobic residue at P-5. Both forms are strictly calcium dependent but belong to distinct families of protein kinases because they are distinct immunochemically.

  2. Sugar phosphorylation activity in ruminal acetogens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W; Pinder, R S; Patterson, J A; Ricke, S C

    2012-01-01

    Acetogenic bacteria Acetitomaculum ruminis, Acetobacterium woodii, and Eubacterium limosum were compared for phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) and ATP-dependent phosphorylation of glucose and 2-deoxy-glucose. Rate of phosphorylation activity was measured in toluene-treated acetogenic cells using PEP and ATP and radiolabled glucose or 2-deoxy glucose. Eubacterium limosum, most likely has a glucose phosphotransferase system (PTS). In contrast, A. ruminis, and A. woodii had PEP-dependent glucose phosphorylation rates very similar to control rates, suggesting the lack of PTS activity. These results were confirmed by PEP dependent 2-deoxyglucose phosphorylation data. The rates of ATP-dependent glucose phosphorylation were higher than PEP-dependent glucose dependent in all organisms surveyed. Only E. limosum appeared to have PTS. The presence of PTS in E. limosum could explain why it is not capable of utilizing sugars and H(2)/CO(2) simultaneously and why acetogenesis is not as prominant in the rumen because of the availability of carbohydrates as alternative energy substrates. PMID:22423990

  3. Determining in vivo Phosphorylation Sites using Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Breitkopf, Susanne B.; Asara, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most studied protein post-translational modification (PTM) in biological systems since it controls cell growth, proliferation, survival, etc. High resolution/high mass accuracy mass spectrometers are used to identify protein phosphorylation sites due to their speed, sensitivity, selectivity and throughput. The protocol described here focuses on two common strategies: 1) Identifying phosphorylation sites from individual proteins and small protein complexes, and 2) Identifying global phosphorylation sites from whole cell and tissue extracts. For the first, endogenous or epitope tagged proteins are typically immunopurified (IP) from cell lysates, purified via gel electrophoresis or precipitation and enzymatically digested into peptides. Samples can be optionally enriched for phosphopeptides using immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or titanium dioxide (TiO2) and then analyzed by microcapillary liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Global phosphorylation site analyses that capture pSer/pThr/pTyr sites from biological sources sites are more resource and time-consuming and involve digesting the whole cell lysate, followed by peptide fractionation by strong cation exchange chromatography (SCX), phosphopeptide enrichment by IMAC or TiO2 and LC-MS/MS. Alternatively, one can fractionate the protein lysate by SDS-PAGE, followed by digestion, phosphopeptide enrichment and LC-MS/MS. One can also IP only phospho-tyrosine peptides using a pTyr antibody followed by LC-MS/MS. PMID:22470061

  4. Phosphorylation Modulates Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterial Sirtuins

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Ghanshyam S.; Ravala, Sandeep K.; Malhotra, Neha; Chakraborti, Pradip K.

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are NAD+-dependent deacetylases involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and are conserved throughout phylogeny. Here we report about in vitro transphosphorylation of the only NAD+-dependent deacetylase (mDAC) present in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases, particularly PknA. The phosphorylated mDAC displayed decreased deacetylase activity compared to its unphosphorylated counterpart. Mass-spectrometric study identified seven phosphosites in mDAC; however, mutational analysis highlighted major contribution of Thr-214 for phosphorylation of the protein. In concordance to this observation, variants of mDAC substituting Thr-214 with either Ala (phospho-ablated) or Glu (phosphomimic) exhibited significantly reduced deacetylase activity suggesting phosphorylation mediated control of enzymatic activity. To assess the role of phosphorylation towards functionality of mDAC, we opted for a sirtuin knock-out strain of Escherichia coli (Δdac), where interference of endogenous mycobacterial kinases could be excluded. The Δdac strain in nutrient deprived acetate medium exhibited compromised growth and complementation with mDAC reversed this phenotype. The phospho-ablated or phosphomimic variant, on the other hand, was unable to restore the functionality of mDAC indicating the role of phosphorylation per se in the process. We further over-expressed mDAC or mDAC-T214A as His-tagged protein in M. smegmatis, where endogenous eukaryotic-type Ser/Thr kinases are present. Anti-phosphothreonine antibody recognized both mDAC and mDAC-T214A proteins in western blotting. However, the extent of phosphorylation as adjudged by scanning the band intensity, was significantly low in the mutant protein (mDAC-T214A) compared to that of the wild-type (mDAC). Furthermore, expression of PknA in the mDAC complemented Δdac strain was able to phosphorylate M. tuberculosis sirtuin. The growth profile of this culture in acetate medium was

  5. Role of individual R domain phosphorylation sites in CFTR regulation by protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Hegedus, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Mengos, April; Cui, Liying; Jensen, Timothy J; Riordan, John R

    2009-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) plays a critical role in transcellular ion transport and when defective, results in the genetic disease cystic fibrosis. CFTR is novel in the ATP-binding cassette superfamily as an ion channel that is enabled by a unique unstructured regulatory domain. This R domain contains multiple protein kinase A sites, which when phosphorylated allow channel gating. Most of the sites have been indicated to stimulate channel activity, while two of them have been suggested to be inhibitory. It is unknown whether individual sites act coordinately or distinctly. To address this issue, we raised monoclonal antibodies recognizing the unphosphorylated, but not the phosphorylated states of four functionally relevant sites (700, 737, 768, and 813). This enabled simultaneous monitoring of their phosphorylation and dephosphorylation and revealed that both processes occurred rapidly at the first three sites, but more slowly at the fourth. The parallel phosphorylation rates of the stimulatory 700 and the putative inhibitory 737 and 768 sites prompted us to reexamine the role of the latter two. With serines 737 and 768 reintroduced individually into a PKA insensitive variant, in which serines at 15 sites had been replaced by alanines, a level of channel activation by PKA was restored, showing that these sites can mediate stimulation. Thus, we have provided new tools to study the CFTR regulation by phosphorylation and found that sites proposed to inhibit channel activity can also participate in stimulation. PMID:19328185

  6. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C.

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  7. Structural basis for Mep2 ammonium transceptor activation by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Bert; Chembath, Anupama; Jefferies, Damien; Basle, Arnaud; Khalid, Syma; Rutherford, Julian C

    2016-01-01

    Mep2 proteins are fungal transceptors that play an important role as ammonium sensors in fungal development. Mep2 activity is tightly regulated by phosphorylation, but how this is achieved at the molecular level is not clear. Here we report X-ray crystal structures of the Mep2 orthologues from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans and show that under nitrogen-sufficient conditions the transporters are not phosphorylated and present in closed, inactive conformations. Relative to the open bacterial ammonium transporters, non-phosphorylated Mep2 exhibits shifts in cytoplasmic loops and the C-terminal region (CTR) to occlude the cytoplasmic exit of the channel and to interact with His2 of the twin-His motif. The phosphorylation site in the CTR is solvent accessible and located in a negatively charged pocket ∼30 Å away from the channel exit. The crystal structure of phosphorylation-mimicking Mep2 variants from C. albicans show large conformational changes in a conserved and functionally important region of the CTR. The results allow us to propose a model for regulation of eukaryotic ammonium transport by phosphorylation. PMID:27088325

  8. Methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Appella, Ettore; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides methods for generating phosphorylation site-specific immunological reagents. More specifically, a phosphopeptide mimetic is incorporated into a polypeptide in place of a phosphorylated amino acid. The polypeptide is used as antigen by standard methods to generate either monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies which cross-react with the naturally phosphorylated polypeptide. The phosphopeptide mimetic preferably contains a non-hydrolyzable linkage from the appropriate carbon atom of the amino acid residue to a phosphate group. A preferred linkage is a CF.sub.2 group. Such a linkage is used to generate the phosphoserine mimetic F.sub.2 Pab, which is incorporated into a polypeptide sequence derived from p53 to produce antibodies which recognize a specific phosphorylation state of p53. A CF.sub.2 group linkage is also used to produce the phosphothreonine mimetic F.sub.2 Pmb, and to produce the phosphotyrosine mimetic, F.sub.2 Pmp.

  9. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites Regulating sst3 Somatostatin Receptor Trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Andreas; Kliewer, Andrea; Günther, Thomas; Nagel, Falko; Schulz, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    The human somatostatin receptor 3 (sst3) is expressed in about 50% of all neuroendocrine tumors and hence a promising target for multireceptor somatostatin analogs. The sst3 receptor is unique among ssts in that it exhibits a very long intracellular C-terminal tail containing a huge number of potential phosphate acceptor sites. Consequently, our knowledge about the functional role of the C-terminal tail in sst3 receptor regulation is very limited. Here, we have generated a series of phosphorylation-deficient mutants that enabled us to determine crucial sites for its agonist-induced β-arrestin mobilization, internalization, and down-regulation. Based on this information, we generated phosphosite-specific antibodies for C-terminal Ser(337)/Thr(341), Thr(348), and Ser(361) that enabled us to investigate the temporal patterns of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. We found that the endogenous ligand somatostatin induced a rapid and robust phosphorylation that was completely blocked by the sst3 antagonist NVP-ACQ090. The stable somatostatin analogs pasireotide and octreotide promoted clearly less phosphorylation compared with somatostatin. We also show that sst3 phosphorylation occurred within seconds to minutes, whereas dephosphorylation of the sst3 receptor occurred at a considerable slower rate. In addition, we also identified G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 and 3 and protein phosphatase 1α and 1β as key regulators of sst3 phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Thus, we here define the C-terminal phosphorylation motif of the human sst3 receptor that regulates its agonist-promoted phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and internalization of this clinically relevant receptor. PMID:27101376

  10. Identification of the sites for CaMK-II-dependent phosphorylation of GABA(A) receptors.

    PubMed

    Houston, Catriona M; Lee, Henry H C; Hosie, Alastair M; Moss, Stephen J; Smart, Trevor G

    2007-06-15

    Phosphorylation can affect both the function and trafficking of GABA(A) receptors with significant consequences for neuronal excitability. Serine/threonine kinases can phosphorylate the intracellular loops between M3-4 of GABA(A) receptor beta and gamma subunits thereby modulating receptor function in heterologous expression systems and in neurons (1, 2). Specifically, CaMK-II has been demonstrated to phosphorylate the M3-4 loop of GABA(A) receptor subunits expressed as GST fusion proteins (3, 4). It also increases the amplitude of GABA(A) receptor-mediated currents in a number of neuronal cell types (5-7). To identify which substrate sites CaMK-II might phosphorylate and the consequent functional effects, we expressed recombinant GABA(A) receptors in NG108-15 cells, which have previously been shown to support CaMK-II modulation of GABA(A) receptors containing the beta3 subunit (8). We now demonstrate that CaMK-II mediates its effects on alpha1beta3 receptors via phosphorylation of Ser(383) within the M3-4 domain of the beta subunit. Ablation of beta3 subunit phosphorylation sites for CaMK-II revealed that for alphabetagamma receptors, CaMK-II has a residual effect on GABA currents that is not mediated by previously identified sites of CaMK-II phosphorylation. This residual effect is abolished by mutation of tyrosine phosphorylation sites, Tyr(365) and Tyr(367), on the gamma2S subunit, and by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These results suggested that CaMK-II is capable of directly phosphorylating GABA(A) receptors and activating endogenous tyrosine kinases to phosphorylate the gamma2 subunit in NG108-15 cells. These findings were confirmed in a neuronal environment by expressing recombinant GABA(A) receptors in cerebellar granule neurons. PMID:17442679

  11. Synthesis of Isomeric Phosphoubiquitin Chains Reveals that Phosphorylation Controls Deubiquitinase Activity and Specificity.

    PubMed

    Huguenin-Dezot, Nicolas; De Cesare, Virginia; Peltier, Julien; Knebel, Axel; Kristaryianto, Yosua Adi; Rogerson, Daniel T; Kulathu, Yogesh; Trost, Matthias; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-26

    Ubiquitin is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation at several sites, but the consequences of these modifications are largely unknown. Here, we synthesize multi-milligram quantities of ubiquitin phosphorylated at serine 20, serine 57, and serine 65 via genetic code expansion. We use these phosphoubiquitins for the enzymatic assembly of 20 isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers, with different sites of isopeptide linkage and/or phosphorylation. We discover that phosphorylation of serine 20 on ubiquitin converts UBE3C from a dual-specificity E3 ligase into a ligase that primarily synthesizes K48 chains. We profile the activity of 31 deubiquitinases on the isomeric phosphoubiquitin dimers in 837 reactions, and we discover that phosphorylation at distinct sites in ubiquitin can activate or repress cleavage of a particular linkage by deubiquitinases and that phosphorylation at a single site in ubiquitin can control the specificity of deubiquitinases for distinct ubiquitin linkages. PMID:27425610

  12. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Oxombre, Bénédicte; Kouach, Mostafa; Moerman, Ericka; Formstecher, Pierre; Laine, Bernard

    2004-11-01

    HNF4alpha (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic beta-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4alpha gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115-->Ser) HNF4alpha mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4alpha-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic beta-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4alpha transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1alpha, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115-->Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4alpha DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4alpha function. PMID:15233628

  13. The G115S mutation associated with maturity-onset diabetes of the young impairs hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α activities and introduces a PKA phosphorylation site in its DNA-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    HNF4α (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α) belongs to a complex transcription factor network that is crucial for the function of hepatocytes and pancreatic β-cells. In these cells, it activates the expression of a very large number of genes, including genes involved in the transport and metabolism of glucose and lipids. Mutations in the HNF4α gene correlate with MODY1 (maturity-onset diabetes of the young 1), a form of type II diabetes characterized by an impaired glucose-induced insulin secretion. The MODY1 G115S (Gly115→Ser) HNF4α mutation is located in the DNA-binding domain of this nuclear receptor. We show here that the G115S mutation failed to affect HNF4α-mediated transcription on apolipoprotein promoters in HepG2 cells. Conversely, in pancreatic β-cell lines, this mutation resulted in strong impairments of HNF4α transcriptional activity on the promoters of LPK (liver pyruvate kinase) and HNF1α, with this transcription factor playing a key role in endocrine pancreas. We show as well that the G115S mutation creates a PKA (protein kinase A) phosphorylation site, and that PKA-mediated phosphorylation results in a decreased transcriptional activity of the mutant. Moreover, the G115E (Gly115→Glu) mutation mimicking phosphorylation reduced HNF4α DNA-binding and transcriptional activities. Our results may account for the 100% penetrance of diabetes in human carriers of this mutation. In addition, they suggest that introduction of a phosphorylation site in the DNA-binding domain may represent a new mechanism by which a MODY1 mutation leads to loss of HNF4α function. PMID:15233628

  14. Identification of four novel phosphorylation sites in estrogen receptor α: impact on receptor-dependent gene expression and phosphorylation by protein kinase CK2

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα) phosphorylation is important for estrogen-dependent transcription of ER-dependent genes, ligand-independent receptor activation and endocrine therapy response in breast cancer. However ERα phosphorylation at the previously identified sites does not fully account for these receptor functions. To determine if additional ERα phosphorylation sites exist, COS-1 cells expressing human ERα were labeled with [32P]H3PO4 in vivo and ERα tryptic phosphopeptides were isolated to identify phosphorylation sites. Results Previously uncharacterized phosphorylation sites at serines 46/47, 282, 294, and 559 were identified by manual Edman degradation and phosphoamino acid analysis and confirmed by mutagenesis and phospho-specific antibodies. Antibodies detected phosphorylation of endogenous ERα in MCF-7, MCF-7-LCC2, and Ishikawa cancer cell lines by immunoblot. Mutation of Ser-282 and Ser-559 to alanine (S282A, S559A) resulted in ligand independent activation of ERα as determined by both ERE-driven reporter gene assays and endogenous pS2 gene expression in transiently transfected HeLa cells. Mutation of Ser-46/47 or Ser-294 to alanine markedly reduced estradiol dependent reporter activation. Additionally protein kinase CK2 was identified as a kinase that phosphorylated ERα at S282 and S559 using motif analysis, in vitro kinase assays, and incubation of cells with CK2 kinase inhibitor. Conclusion These novel ERα phosphorylation sites represent new means for modulation of ERα activity. S559 represents the first phosphorylation site identified in the extreme C-terminus (F domain) of a steroid receptor. PMID:20043841

  15. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of Caspase-8 Abrogates Its Apoptotic Activity and Promotes Activation of c-Src

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Jennifer LY; Jia, Song Hui; Parodo, Jean; Plant, Pamela; Lodyga, Monika; Charbonney, Emmanuel; Szaszi, Katalin; Kapus, Andras; Marshall, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) phosphorylate caspase-8A at tyrosine (Y) 397 resulting in suppression of apoptosis. In addition, the phosphorylation of caspase-8A at other sites including Y465 has been implicated in the regulation of caspase-8 activity. However, the functional consequences of these modifications on caspase-8 processing/activity have not been elucidated. Moreover, various Src substrates are known to act as potent Src regulators, but no such role has been explored for caspase-8. We asked whether the newly identified caspase-8 phosphorylation sites might regulate caspase-8 activation and conversely, whether caspase-8 phosphorylation might affect Src activity. Here we show that Src phosphorylates caspase-8A at multiple tyrosine sites; of these, we have focused on Y397 within the linker region and Y465 within the p12 subunit of caspase-8A. We show that phosphomimetic mutation of caspase-8A at Y465 prevents its cleavage and the subsequent activation of caspase-3 and suppresses apoptosis. Furthermore, simultaneous phosphomimetic mutation of caspase-8A at Y397 and Y465 promotes the phosphorylation of c-Src at Y416 and increases c-Src activity. Finally, we demonstrate that caspase-8 activity prevents its own tyrosine phosphorylation by Src. Together these data reveal that dual phosphorylation converts caspase-8 from a pro-apoptotic to a pro-survival mediator. Specifically, tyrosine phosphorylation by Src renders caspase-8 uncleavable and thereby inactive, and at the same time converts it to a Src activator. This novel dynamic interplay between Src and caspase-8 likely acts as a potent signal-integrating switch directing the cell towards apoptosis or survival. PMID:27101103

  16. Distinct and Site-Specific Phosphorylation of the Retinoblastoma Protein at Serine 612 in Differentiated Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Takayuki; Uchida, Chiharu; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Yamamoto, Naoki; Naito, Mikihiko; Taya, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    The retinoblastoma susceptibility protein (pRB) is a phosphoprotein that regulates cell cycle progression at the G1/S transition. In quiescent and early G1 cells, pRB predominantly exists in the active hypophosphorylated form. The cyclin/cyclin-dependent protein kinase complexes phosphorylate pRB at the late G1 phase to inactivate pRB. This event leads to the dissociation and activation of E2F family transcriptional factors. At least 12 serine/threonine residues in pRB are phosphorylated in vivo. Although there have been many reports describing bulk phosphorylation of pRB, detail research describing the function of each phosphorylation site remains unknown. Besides its G1/S inhibitory function, pRB is involved in differentiation, prevention of cell death and control of tissue fate. To uncover the function of phosphorylation of pRB in various cellular conditions, we have been investigating phosphorylation of each serine/threonine residue in pRB with site-specific phospho-serine/threonine antibodies. Here we demonstrate that pRB is specifically phosphorylated at Ser612 in differentiated cells in a known kinase-independent manner. We also found that pRB phosphorylated at Ser612 still associates with E2F-1 and tightly binds to nuclear structures including chromatin. Moreover, expression of the Ser612Ala mutant pRB failed to induce differentiation. The findings suggest that phosphorylation of Ser612 provides a distinct function that differs from the function of phosphorylation of other serine/threonine residues in pRB. PMID:24466208

  17. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in c-jun directly targeted in vitro by protein kinase D

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, Richard T. . E-mail: rwaldron@mednet.ucla.edu; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Faull, Kym F.; Rozengurt, Enrique

    2007-05-04

    Protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylates the c-jun amino-terminal in vitro at site(s) distinct from JNK [C. Hurd, R.T. Waldron, E. Rozengurt, Protein kinase D complexes with c-jun N-terminal kinase via activation loop phosphorylation and phosphorylates the c-jun N-terminus, Oncogene 21 (2002) 2154-2160], but the sites have not been identified. Here, metabolic {sup 32}P-labeling of c-jun protein in COS-7 cells indicated that PKD phosphorylates c-jun in vivo at a site(s) between aa 43-93, a region containing important functional elements. On this basis, the PKD-mediated phosphorylation site(s) was further characterized in vitro using GST-c-jun fusion proteins. PKD did not incorporate phosphate into Ser63 and Ser73, the JNK sites in GST-c-jun(1-89). Rather, PKD and JNK could sequentially phosphorylate distinct site(s) simultaneously. By mass spectrometry of tryptic phosphopeptides, Ser58 interposed between the JNK-binding portion of the delta domain and the adjacent TAD1 was identified as a prominent site phosphorylated in vitro by PKD. These data were further supported by kinase reactions using truncations or point-mutations of GST-c-jun. Together, these data suggest that PKD-mediated phosphorylation modulates c-jun at the level of its N-terminal functional domains.

  18. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  19. Functions of the major tyrosine phosphorylation site of the PDGF receptor beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskas, A; Durden, D L; Cooper, J A

    1991-01-01

    Two tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the human platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) beta subunit have been mapped previously to tyrosine (Y)751, in the kinase insert, and Y857, in the kinase domain. Y857 is the major site of tyrosine phosphorylation in PDGF-stimulated cells. To evaluate the importance of these phosphorylations, we have characterized the wild-type (WT) and mutant human PDGF receptor beta subunits in dog kidney epithelial cells. Replacement of either Y751 or Y857 with phenylalanine (F) reduced PDGF-stimulated DNA synthesis to approximately 50% of the WT level. A mutant receptor with both tyrosines mutated was unable to initiate DNA synthesis, as was a kinase-inactive mutant receptor. Transmodulation of the epidermal growth factor receptor required Y857 but not Y751. We also tested the effects of phosphorylation site mutations on PDGF-stimulated receptor kinase activity. PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of two cellular proteins, phospholipase C gamma 1 (PLC gamma 1) and the GTPase activating protein of Ras (GAP), was assayed in epithelial cells expressing each of the mutant receptors. Tyrosine phosphorylation of GAP and PLC gamma 1 was reduced markedly by the F857 mutation but not significantly by the F751 mutation. Reduced kinase activity of F857 receptors was also evident in vitro. Immunoprecipitated WT receptors showed a two- to fourfold increase in specific kinase activity if immunoprecipitated from PDGF-stimulated cells. The F751 receptors showed a similar increase in activity, but F857 receptors did not. Our data suggest that phosphorylation of Y857 may be important for stimulation of kinase activity of the receptors and for downstream actions such as epidermal growth factor receptor transmodulation and mitogenesis. Images PMID:1653029

  20. The retinoblastoma protein is phosphorylated on multiple sites by human cdc2.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, J A; Buchkovich, K J; Marshak, D R; Anderson, C W; Harlow, E

    1991-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) is a nuclear phosphoprotein that is thought to play a key role in the negative regulation of cellular proliferation. pRB is phosphorylated in a cell cycle dependent manner, and studies in both actively dividing and differentiated cells suggest that this modification may be essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle. Using tryptic phosphopeptide mapping we have shown that pRB is phosphorylated on multiple serine and threonine residues in vivo and that many of these phosphorylation events can be mimicked in vitro using purified p34cdc2. Using synthetic peptides corresponding to potential cdc2 phosphorylation sites, we have developed a strategy which has allowed the identification of five sites. S249, T252, T373, S807 and S811 are phosphorylated in vivo, and in each case these sites correspond closely to the consensus sequence for phosphorylation by p34cdc2. This and the observation that pRB forms a specific complex with p34cdc2 in vivo suggests that p34cdc2 or a p34cdc2-related protein is a major pRB kinase. Images PMID:1756735

  1. Synaptic activation of ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation occurs locally in activated dendritic domains.

    PubMed

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6) locally near active synapses. Using antibodies specific for phosphorylation at different sites (ser235/236 versus ser240/244), we show that strong synaptic activation led to dramatic increases in immunostaining throughout postsynaptic neurons with selectively higher staining for p-ser235/236 in the activated dendritic lamina. Following LTP induction, phosphorylation at ser235/236 was detectable by 5 min, peaked at 30 min, and was maintained for hours. Phosphorylation at both sites was completely blocked by local infusion of the NMDA receptor antagonist, APV. Despite robust induction of p-rpS6 following high frequency stimulation, assessment of protein synthesis by autoradiography revealed no detectable increases. Exploration of a novel environment led to increases in the number of p-rpS6-positive neurons throughout the forebrain in a pattern reminiscent of immediate early gene induction and many individual neurons that were p-rpS6-positive coexpressed Arc protein. Our results constrain hypotheses about the possible role of rpS6 phosphorylation in regulating postsynaptic protein synthesis during induction of synaptic plasticity. PMID:27194793

  2. Molecular mechanism of APC/C activation by mitotic phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Suyang; Chang, Leifu; Alfieri, Claudio; Zhang, Ziguo; Yang, Jing; Maslen, Sarah; Skehel, Mark; Barford, David

    2016-05-12

    In eukaryotes, the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C, also known as the cyclosome) regulates the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of specific cell-cycle proteins to coordinate chromosome segregation in mitosis and entry into the G1 phase. The catalytic activity of the APC/C and its ability to specify the destruction of particular proteins at different phases of the cell cycle are controlled by its interaction with two structurally related coactivator subunits, Cdc20 and Cdh1. Coactivators recognize substrate degrons, and enhance the affinity of the APC/C for its cognate E2 (refs 4-6). During mitosis, cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and polo-like kinase (Plk) control Cdc20- and Cdh1-mediated activation of the APC/C. Hyperphosphorylation of APC/C subunits, notably Apc1 and Apc3, is required for Cdc20 to activate the APC/C, whereas phosphorylation of Cdh1 prevents its association with the APC/C. Since both coactivators associate with the APC/C through their common C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs, the mechanism underlying this differential regulation is unclear, as is the role of specific APC/C phosphorylation sites. Here, using cryo-electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we define the molecular basis of how phosphorylation of human APC/C allows for its control by Cdc20. An auto-inhibitory segment of Apc1 acts as a molecular switch that in apo unphosphorylated APC/C interacts with the C-box binding site and obstructs engagement of Cdc20. Phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment displaces it from the C-box-binding site. Efficient phosphorylation of the auto-inhibitory segment, and thus relief of auto-inhibition, requires the recruitment of Cdk-cyclin in complex with a Cdk regulatory subunit (Cks) to a hyperphosphorylated loop of Apc3. We also find that the small-molecule inhibitor, tosyl-l-arginine methyl ester, preferentially suppresses APC/C(Cdc20) rather than APC/C(Cdh1), and interacts with the binding sites of both the C-box and Ile-Arg tail motifs. Our

  3. Mechanisms regulating phosphatase specificity and the removal of individual phosphorylation sites during mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; McCloy, Rachael; Watkins, D Neil; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Entry into mitosis is driven by the activity of kinases, which phosphorylate over 7000 proteins on multiple sites. For cells to exit mitosis and segregate their genome correctly, these phosphorylations must be removed in a specific temporal order. This raises a critical and important question: how are specific phosphorylation sites on an individual protein removed? Traditionally, the temporal order of dephosphorylation was attributed to decreasing kinase activity. However, recent evidence in human cells has identified unique patterns of dephosphorylation during mammalian mitotic exit that cannot be fully explained by the loss of kinase activity. This suggests that specificity is determined in part by phosphatases. In this review, we explore how the physicochemical properties of an individual phosphosite and its surrounding amino acids can affect interactions with a phosphatase. These positive and negative interactions in turn help determine the specific pattern of dephosphorylation required for correct mitotic exit. PMID:27417119

  4. Site-specific Proteasome Phosphorylation Controls Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xing; Wang, Xiaorong; Wang, Zhiping; Banerjee, Sourav; Yang, Jing; Huang, Lan; Dixon, Jack E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of proteasomal degradation in cells, little is known about whether and how the 26S proteasome itself is regulated in coordination with various physiological processes. Here we show that the proteasome is dynamically phosphorylated during cell cycle at Thr25 of the 19S subunit Rpt3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, RNA interference and biochemical studies demonstrate that blocking Rpt3-Thr25 phosphorylation markedly impairs proteasome activity and impedes cell proliferation. Through a kinome-wide screen, we have identified dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) as the primary kinase that phosphorylates Rpt3-Thr25, leading to enhanced substrate translocation and degradation. Importantly, loss of the single phosphorylation of Rpt3-Thr25 or knockout of DYRK2 significantly inhibits tumor formation by proteasome-addicted human breast cancer cells in mice. These findings define an important mechanism for proteasome regulation and demonstrate the biological significance of proteasome phosphorylation in regulating cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. PMID:26655835

  5. Tyrosine Phosphorylation of SGEF Regulates RhoG Activity and Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Okuyama, Yusuke; Umeda, Kentaro; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori

    2016-01-01

    SGEF and Ephexin4 are members of the Ephexin subfamily of RhoGEFs that specifically activate the small GTPase RhoG. It is reported that Ephexin1 and Ephexin5, two well-characterized Ephexin subfamily RhoGEFs, are tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src, and that their phosphorylation affect their activities and functions. In this study, we show that SGEF, but not Ephexin4, is tyrosine-phosphorylated by Src. Tyrosine phosphorylation of SGEF suppresses its interaction with RhoG, the elevation of RhoG activity, and SGEF-mediated promotion of cell migration. We identified tyrosine 530 (Y530), which is located within the Dbl homology domain, as a major phosphorylation site of SGEF by Src, and Y530F mutation blocked the inhibitory effect of Src on SGEF. Taken together, these results suggest that the activity of SGEF is negatively regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation of the DH domain. PMID:27437949

  6. Syntheses and insulin-like activity of phosphorylated galactose derivatives.

    PubMed

    Caro, H N; Martín-Lomas, M; Bernabé, M

    1993-02-24

    The syntheses of the poly-phosphorylated galactosides 6, 8, 10, 13, 16, and 20, isolated as sodium salts, have been performed. The non-phosphorylated disaccharide 17 and trisaccharide 21 have been prepared via glycosylation of the 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl galactosides 3 and 2, respectively, and subsequent complete deprotection. Preliminary insulin-like activity of the phosphorylated derivatives is reported. PMID:8458006

  7. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  8. Novel method for the high-throughput production of phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Kurosawa, Nobuyuki; Wakata, Yuka; Inobe, Tomonao; Kitamura, Haruki; Yoshioka, Megumi; Matsuzawa, Shun; Kishi, Yoshihiro; Isobe, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    Threonine phosphorylation accounts for 10% of all phosphorylation sites compared with 0.05% for tyrosine and 90% for serine. Although monoclonal antibody generation for phospho-serine and -tyrosine proteins is progressing, there has been limited success regarding the production of monoclonal antibodies against phospho-threonine proteins. We developed a novel strategy for generating phosphorylation site-specific monoclonal antibodies by cloning immunoglobulin genes from single plasma cells that were fixed, intracellularly stained with fluorescently labeled peptides and sorted without causing RNA degradation. Our high-throughput fluorescence activated cell sorting-based strategy, which targets abundant intracellular immunoglobulin as a tag for fluorescently labeled antigens, greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of antigen-specific plasma cell isolation, enabling the high-efficiency production of monoclonal antibodies with desired antigen specificity. This approach yielded yet-undescribed guinea pig monoclonal antibodies against threonine 18-phosphorylated p53 and threonine 68-phosphorylated CHK2 with high affinity and specificity. Our method has the potential to allow the generation of monoclonal antibodies against a variety of phosphorylated proteins. PMID:27125496

  9. Rictor Phosphorylation on the THR-1135 Site Does Not Require Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 2

    PubMed Central

    Boulbes, Delphine; Chen, Chien-Hung; Shaikenov, Tattym; Agarwal, Nitin K.; Peterson, Timothy R.; Addona, Terri A.; Keshishian, Hasmik; Carr, Steven A.; Magnuson, Mark A.; Sabatini, David M.; Sarbassov, Dos D.

    2010-01-01

    In animal cells growth factors coordinate cell proliferation and survival by regulating the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Deregulation of this signaling pathway is common in a variety of human cancers. The PI3K dependent signaling kinase complex defined as mTORC2 functions as a regulatory Ser-473 kinase of Akt. We find that activation of mTORC2 by growth factor signaling is linked to the specific phosphorylation of its component rictor on Thr-1135. The phosphorylation of this site is induced by the growth factor stimulation and expression of the oncogenic forms of ras or PI3K. Rictor phosphorylation is sensitive to inhibition of PI3K, mTOR, or expression of ILK. The substitution of wild-type rictor with its specific phospho-mutants in rictor null mouse embryonic fibroblasts did not alter the growth factor-dependent phosphorylation of Akt indicating that the rictor Thr-1135 phosphorylation is not critical in regulation of the mTORC2 kinase activity. We found that this rictor phosphorylation takes place in the mTORC2-deficient cells suggesting that this modification might play a role in regulation not only mTORC2 but also the mTORC2-independent function of rictor. PMID:20501647

  10. Asp295 stabilizes the active-site loop structure of pyruvate dehydrogenase, facilitating phosphorylation of Ser292 by pyruvate dehydrogenase-kinase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have developed an invitro system for detailed analysis of reversible phosphorylation of the plant mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, comprising recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana a2b2-hetero tetrameric pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) plus A.thaliana E1-kinase (AtPDK). Upon addition of MgATP...

  11. Tautomeric states of the active-site histidines of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated IIIGlc, a signal-transducing protein from Escherichia coli, using two-dimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Pelton, J. G.; Torchia, D. A.; Meadow, N. D.; Roseman, S.

    1993-01-01

    IIIGlc is an 18.1-kDa signal-transducing phosphocarrier protein of the phosphoenolpyruvate:glycose phosphotransferase system from Escherichia coli. The 1H, 15N, and 13C histidine ring NMR signals of both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc have been assigned using two-dimensional 1H-15N and 1H-13C heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence (HMQC) experiments and a two-dimensional 13C-13C-1H correlation spectroscopy via JCC coupling experiment. The data were acquired on uniformly 15N-labeled and uniformly 15N/13C-labeled protein samples. The experiments rely on one-bond and two-bond J couplings that allowed for assignment of the signals without the need for the analysis of through-space (nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy) correlations. The 15N and 13C chemical shifts were used to determine that His-75 exists predominantly in the N epsilon 2-H tautomeric state in both the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of IIIGlc, and that His-90 exists primarily in the N delta 1-H state in the unphosphorylated protein. Upon phosphorylation of the N epsilon 2 nitrogen of His-90, the N delta 1 nitrogen remains protonated, resulting in the formation of a charged phospho-His-90 moiety. The 1H, 15N, and 13C signals of the phosphorylated and unphosphorylated proteins showed only minor shifts in the pH range from 6.0 to 9.0. These data indicate that the pK alpha values for both His-75 and His-90 in IIIGlc and His-75 in phospho-IIIGlc are less than 5.0, and that the pK alpha value for phospho-His-90 is greater than 10. The results are presented in relation to previously obtained structural data on IIIGlc, and implications for proposed mechanisms of phosphoryl transfer are discussed. PMID:8518729

  12. Phosphorylation of influenza A virus NS1 protein at threonine 49 suppresses its interferon antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Kathum, Omer Abid; Schräder, Tobias; Anhlan, Darisuren; Nordhoff, Carolin; Liedmann, Swantje; Pande, Amit; Mellmann, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Christina; Wixler, Viktor; Ludwig, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation acts as a fundamental molecular switch that alters protein function and thereby regulates many cellular processes. The non-structural protein 1 (NS1) of influenza A virus is an important factor regulating virulence by counteracting cellular immune responses against viral infection. NS1 was shown to be phosphorylated at several sites; however, so far, no function has been conclusively assigned to these post-translational events yet. Here, we show that the newly identified phospho-site threonine 49 of NS1 is differentially phosphorylated in the viral replication cycle. Phosphorylation impairs binding of NS1 to double-stranded RNA and TRIM25 as well as complex formation with RIG-I, thereby switching off its interferon antagonistic activity. Because phosphorylation was shown to occur at later stages of infection, we hypothesize that at this stage other functions of the multifunctional NS1 beyond its interferon-antagonistic activity are needed. PMID:26687707

  13. Structural and Dynamic Features of F-recruitment Site Driven Substrate Phosphorylation by ERK2.

    PubMed

    Piserchio, Andrea; Ramakrishan, Venkatesh; Wang, Hsin; Kaoud, Tamer S; Arshava, Boris; Dutta, Kaushik; Dalby, Kevin N; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2015-01-01

    The F-recruitment site (FRS) of active ERK2 binds F-site (Phe-x-Phe-Pro) sequences found downstream of the Ser/Thr phospho-acceptor on cellular substrates. Here we apply NMR methods to analyze the interaction between active ERK2 (ppERK2), and a 13-residue F-site-bearing peptide substrate derived from its cellular target, the transcription factor Elk-1. Our results provide detailed insight into previously elusive structural and dynamic features of FRS/F-site interactions and FRS-driven substrate phosphorylation. We show that substrate F-site engagement significantly quenches slow dynamics involving the ppERK2 activation-loop and the FRS. We also demonstrate that the F-site phenylalanines make critical contacts with ppERK2, in contrast to the proline whose cis-trans isomerization has no significant effect on F-site recognition by the kinase FRS. Our results support a mechanism where phosphorylation of the disordered N-terminal phospho-acceptor is facilitated by its increased productive encounters with the ppERK2 active site due to docking of the proximal F-site at the kinase FRS. PMID:26054059

  14. Structural and Dynamic Features of F-recruitment Site Driven Substrate Phosphorylation by ERK2

    PubMed Central

    Piserchio, Andrea; Ramakrishan, Venkatesh; Wang, Hsin; Kaoud, Tamer S.; Arshava, Boris; Dutta, Kaushik; Dalby, Kevin N.; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2015-01-01

    The F-recruitment site (FRS) of active ERK2 binds F-site (Phe-x-Phe-Pro) sequences found downstream of the Ser/Thr phospho-acceptor on cellular substrates. Here we apply NMR methods to analyze the interaction between active ERK2 (ppERK2), and a 13-residue F-site-bearing peptide substrate derived from its cellular target, the transcription factor Elk-1. Our results provide detailed insight into previously elusive structural and dynamic features of FRS/F-site interactions and FRS-driven substrate phosphorylation. We show that substrate F-site engagement significantly quenches slow dynamics involving the ppERK2 activation-loop and the FRS. We also demonstrate that the F-site phenylalanines make critical contacts with ppERK2, in contrast to the proline whose cis-trans isomerization has no significant effect on F-site recognition by the kinase FRS. Our results support a mechanism where phosphorylation of the disordered N-terminal phospho-acceptor is facilitated by its increased productive encounters with the ppERK2 active site due to docking of the proximal F-site at the kinase FRS. PMID:26054059

  15. Identification of Multiple Phosphorylation Sites on Maize Endosperm Starch Branching Enzyme IIb, a Key Enzyme in Amylopectin Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Makhmoudova, Amina; Williams, Declan; Brewer, Dyanne; Massey, Sarah; Patterson, Jenelle; Silva, Anjali; Vassall, Kenrick A.; Liu, Fushan; Subedi, Sanjeena; Harauz, George; Siu, K. W. Michael; Tetlow, Ian J.; Emes, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Starch branching enzyme IIb (SBEIIb) plays a crucial role in amylopectin biosynthesis in maize endosperm by defining the structural and functional properties of storage starch and is regulated by protein phosphorylation. Native and recombinant maize SBEIIb were used as substrates for amyloplast protein kinases to identify phosphorylation sites on the protein. A multidisciplinary approach involving bioinformatics, site-directed mutagenesis, and mass spectrometry identified three phosphorylation sites at Ser residues: Ser649, Ser286, and Ser297. Two Ca2+-dependent protein kinase activities were partially purified from amyloplasts, termed K1, responsible for Ser649 and Ser286 phosphorylation, and K2, responsible for Ser649 and Ser297 phosphorylation. The Ser286 and Ser297 phosphorylation sites are conserved in all plant branching enzymes and are located at opposite openings of the 8-stranded parallel β-barrel of the active site, which is involved with substrate binding and catalysis. Molecular dynamics simulation analysis indicates that phospho-Ser297 forms a stable salt bridge with Arg665, part of a conserved Cys-containing domain in plant branching enzymes. Ser649 conservation appears confined to the enzyme in cereals and is not universal, and is presumably associated with functions specific to seed storage. The implications of SBEIIb phosphorylation are considered in terms of the role of the enzyme and the importance of starch biosynthesis for yield and biotechnological application. PMID:24550386

  16. PINK1 phosphorylates ubiquitin to activate Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Lesley A.; Lazarou, Michael; Fogel, Adam I.; Li, Yan; Yamano, Koji; Sarraf, Shireen A.; Banerjee, Soojay

    2014-01-01

    PINK1 kinase activates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to induce selective autophagy of damaged mitochondria. However, it has been unclear how PINK1 activates and recruits Parkin to mitochondria. Although PINK1 phosphorylates Parkin, other PINK1 substrates appear to activate Parkin, as the mutation of all serine and threonine residues conserved between Drosophila and human, including Parkin S65, did not wholly impair Parkin translocation to mitochondria. Using mass spectrometry, we discovered that endogenous PINK1 phosphorylated ubiquitin at serine 65, homologous to the site phosphorylated by PINK1 in Parkin’s ubiquitin-like domain. Recombinant TcPINK1 directly phosphorylated ubiquitin and phospho-ubiquitin activated Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in cell-free assays. In cells, the phosphomimetic ubiquitin mutant S65D bound and activated Parkin. Furthermore, expression of ubiquitin S65A, a mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PINK1, inhibited Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria. These results explain a feed-forward mechanism of PINK1-mediated initiation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:24751536

  17. PINK1 phosphorylates ubiquitin to activate Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Kane, Lesley A; Lazarou, Michael; Fogel, Adam I; Li, Yan; Yamano, Koji; Sarraf, Shireen A; Banerjee, Soojay; Youle, Richard J

    2014-04-28

    PINK1 kinase activates the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin to induce selective autophagy of damaged mitochondria. However, it has been unclear how PINK1 activates and recruits Parkin to mitochondria. Although PINK1 phosphorylates Parkin, other PINK1 substrates appear to activate Parkin, as the mutation of all serine and threonine residues conserved between Drosophila and human, including Parkin S65, did not wholly impair Parkin translocation to mitochondria. Using mass spectrometry, we discovered that endogenous PINK1 phosphorylated ubiquitin at serine 65, homologous to the site phosphorylated by PINK1 in Parkin's ubiquitin-like domain. Recombinant TcPINK1 directly phosphorylated ubiquitin and phospho-ubiquitin activated Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in cell-free assays. In cells, the phosphomimetic ubiquitin mutant S65D bound and activated Parkin. Furthermore, expression of ubiquitin S65A, a mutant that cannot be phosphorylated by PINK1, inhibited Parkin translocation to damaged mitochondria. These results explain a feed-forward mechanism of PINK1-mediated initiation of Parkin E3 ligase activity. PMID:24751536

  18. Mechanism of SNARE protein binding and regulation of Cav2 channels by phosphorylation of the synaptic protein interaction site.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Charles T; Myers, Scott J; Fu, Jian; Mockus, Susan M; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2005-01-01

    Ca(v)2.1 and Ca(v)2.2 channels conduct P/Q-type and N-type Ca(2+) currents that initiate neurotransmission and bind SNARE proteins through a synaptic protein interaction (synprint) site. PKC and CaMKII phosphorylate the synprint site and inhibit SNARE protein binding in vitro. Here we identify two separate microdomains that each bind syntaxin 1A and SNAP-25 in vitro and are regulated by PKC phosphorylation at serines 774 and 898 and CaMKII phosphorylation at serines 784 and 896. Activation of PKC resulted in its recruitment to and phosphorylation of Ca(V)2.2 channels, but PKC phosphorylation did not dissociate Ca(V)2.2 channel/syntaxin 1A complexes. Chimeric Ca(V)2.1a channels containing the synprint site of Ca(v)2.2 gain modulation by syntaxin 1A, which is blocked by PKC phosphorylation at the sites identified above. Our results support a bipartite model for the synprint site in which each SNARE-binding microdomain is controlled by a separate PKC and CaMKII phosphorylation site that regulates channel modulation by SNARE proteins. PMID:15607937

  19. Coarse-grained molecular simulation of epidermal growth factor receptor protein tyrosine kinase multi-site self-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Koland, John G

    2014-01-01

    Upon the ligand-dependent dimerization of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), the intrinsic protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of one receptor monomer is activated, and the dimeric receptor undergoes self-phosphorylation at any of eight candidate phosphorylation sites (P-sites) in either of the two C-terminal (CT) domains. While the structures of the extracellular ligand binding and intracellular PTK domains are known, that of the ∼225-amino acid CT domain is not, presumably because it is disordered. Receptor phosphorylation on CT domain P-sites is critical in signaling because of the binding of specific signaling effector molecules to individual phosphorylated P-sites. To investigate how the combination of conventional substrate recognition and the unique topological factors involved in the CT domain self-phosphorylation reaction lead to selectivity in P-site phosphorylation, we performed coarse-grained molecular simulations of the P-site/catalytic site binding reactions that precede EGFR self-phosphorylation events. Our results indicate that self-phosphorylation of the dimeric EGFR, although generally believed to occur in trans, may well occur with a similar efficiency in cis, with the P-sites of both receptor monomers being phosphorylated to a similar extent. An exception was the case of the most kinase-proximal P-site-992, the catalytic site binding of which occurred exclusively in cis via an intramolecular reaction. We discovered that the in cis interaction of P-site-992 with the catalytic site was facilitated by a cleft between the N-terminal and C-terminal lobes of the PTK domain that allows the short CT domain sequence tethering P-site-992 to the PTK core to reach the catalytic site. Our work provides several new mechanistic insights into the EGFR self-phosphorylation reaction, and demonstrates the potential of coarse-grained molecular simulation approaches for investigating the complexities of self-phosphorylation in molecules such as EGFR

  20. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  1. Phosphorylation in intrinsically disordered regions regulates the activity of Neurogenin2

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuronal differentiation is largely under the control of basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) proneural transcription factors that play key roles during development of the embryonic nervous system. In addition to well-characterised regulation of their expression, increasing evidence is emerging for additional post-translational regulation of proneural protein activity. Of particular interest is the bHLH proneural factor Neurogenin2 (Ngn2), which orchestrates progression from neural progenitor to differentiated neuron in several regions of the central nervous system. Previous studies have demonstrated a key role for cell cycle-dependent multi-site phosphorylation of Ngn2 protein at Serine-Proline (SP) sites for regulation of its neuronal differentiation activity, although the potential structural and functional consequences of phosphorylation at different regions of the protein are unclear. Results Here we characterise the role of phosphorylation of specific regions of Ngn2 on the stability of Ngn2 protein and on its neuronal differentiation activity in vivo in the developing embryo, demonstrating clearly that the location of SP sites is less important than the number of SP sites available for control of Ngn2 activity in vivo. We also provide structural evidence that Ngn2 contains large, intrinsically disordered regions that undergo phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks). Conclusions Phosphorylation of Ngn2 occurs in both the N- and C-terminal regions, either side of the conserved basic Helix-Loop-Helix domain. While these phosphorylation events do not change the intrinsic stability of Ngn2, phosphorylation on multiple sites acts to limit its ability to drive neuronal differentiation in vivo. Phosphorylated regions of Ngn2 are predicted to be intrinsically disordered and cdk-dependent phosphorylation of these intrinsically disordered regions contributes to Ngn2 regulation. PMID:25374254

  2. Computational Analysis of the Predicted Evolutionary Conservation of Human Phosphorylation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Brett; Kusalik, Anthony; Napper, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation is among the most important post-translational modifications. However, few phosphorylation sites have been experimentally identified for most species, making it difficult to determine the degree to which phosphorylation sites are conserved. The goal of this study was to use computational methods to characterize the conservation of human phosphorylation sites in a wide variety of eukaryotes. Using experimentally-determined human sites as input, homologous phosphorylation sites were predicted in all 432 eukaryotes for which complete proteomes were available. For each pair of species, we calculated phosphorylation site conservation as the number of phosphorylation sites found in both species divided by the number found in at least one of the two species. A clustering of the species based on this conservation measure was concordant with phylogenies based on traditional genomic measures. For a subset of the 432 species, phosphorylation site conservation was compared to conservation of both protein kinases and proteins in general. Protein kinases exhibited the highest degree of conservation, while general proteins were less conserved and phosphorylation sites were least conserved. Although preliminary, these data tentatively suggest that variation in phosphorylation sites may play a larger role in explaining phenotypic differences among organisms than differences in the complements of protein kinases or general proteins. PMID:27046079

  3. An isotope labeling strategy for quantifying the degree of phosphorylation at multiple sites in proteins.

    PubMed

    Hegeman, Adrian D; Harms, Amy C; Sussman, Michael R; Bunner, Anne E; Harper, Jeffrey F

    2004-05-01

    A procedure for determining the extent of phosphorylation at individual sites of multiply phosphorylated proteins was developed and applied to two polyphosphorylated proteins. The protocol, using simple chemical (Fischer methyl-esterification) and enzymatic (phosphatase) modification steps and an accessible isotopic labeling reagent (methyl alcohol-d(4)), is described in detail. Site-specific phosphorylation stoichiometries are derived from the comparison of chemically identical but isotopically distinct peptide species analyzed by microspray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (microLC-MS) using a Micromass Q-TOF2 mass spectrometer. Ten phosphorylation sites were unambiguously identified in tryptic digests of both proteins, and phosphorylation stoichiometries were determined for eight of the ten sites using the isotope-coded strategy. The extent of phosphorylation was also estimated from the mass spectral peak areas for the phosphorylated and unmodified peptides, and these estimates, when compared with stoichiometries determined using the isotope-coded technique, differed only marginally (within approximately 20%). PMID:15121193

  4. Comparison of alternative MS/MS and bioinformatics approaches for confident phosphorylation site localization.

    PubMed

    Wiese, Heike; Kuhlmann, Katja; Wiese, Sebastian; Stoepel, Nadine S; Pawlas, Magdalena; Meyer, Helmut E; Stephan, Christian; Eisenacher, Martin; Drepper, Friedel; Warscheid, Bettina

    2014-02-01

    Over the past years, phosphoproteomics has advanced to a prime tool in signaling research. Since then, an enormous amount of information about in vivo protein phosphorylation events has been collected providing a treasure trove for gaining a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in cell signaling. Yet, we still face the problem of how to achieve correct modification site localization. Here we use alternative fragmentation and different bioinformatics approaches for the identification and confident localization of phosphorylation sites. Phosphopeptide-enriched fractions were analyzed by multistage activation, collision-induced dissociation and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), yielding complementary phosphopeptide identifications. We further found that MASCOT, OMSSA and Andromeda each identified a distinct set of phosphopeptides allowing the number of site assignments to be increased. The postsearch engine SLoMo provided confident phosphorylation site localization, whereas different versions of PTM-Score integrated in MaxQuant differed in performance. Based on high-resolution ETD and higher collisional dissociation (HCD) data sets from a large synthetic peptide and phosphopeptide reference library reported by Marx et al. [Nat. Biotechnol. 2013, 31 (6), 557-564], we show that an Andromeda/PTM-Score probability of 1 is required to provide an false localization rate (FLR) of 1% for HCD data, while 0.55 is sufficient for high-resolution ETD spectra. Additional analyses of HCD data demonstrated that for phosphotyrosine peptides and phosphopeptides containing two potential phosphorylation sites, PTM-Score probability cutoff values of <1 can be applied to ensure an FLR of 1%. Proper adjustment of localization probability cutoffs allowed us to significantly increase the number of confident sites with an FLR of <1%.Our findings underscore the need for the systematic assessment of FLRs for different score values to report confident modification site

  5. Reevaluation of Phosphorylation Sites in the Parkinson Disease-associated Leucine-rich Repeat Kinase 2*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaojie; Moore, Darren J.; Xiong, Yulan; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene have been identified as an important cause of late-onset, autosomal dominant familial Parkinson disease and contribute to sporadic Parkinson disease. LRRK2 is a large complex protein with multiple functional domains, including a Roc-GTPase, protein kinase, and multiple protein-protein interaction domains. Previous studies have suggested an important role for kinase activity in LRRK2-induced neuronal toxicity and inclusion body formation. Disease-associated mutations in LRRK2 also tend to increase kinase activity. Thus, enhanced kinase activity may therefore underlie LRRK2-linked disease. Similar to the closely related mixed-lineage kinases, LRRK2 can undergo autophosphorylation in vitro. Three putative autophosphorylation sites (Thr-2031, Ser-2032, and Thr-2035) have been identified within the activation segment of the LRRK2 kinase domain based on sequence homology to mixed-lineage kinases. Phosphorylation at one or more of these sites is critical for the kinase activity of LRRK2. Sensitive phopho-specific antibodies to each of these three sites have been developed and validated by ELISA, dot-blot, and Western blot analysis. Using these antibodies, we have found that all three putative sites are phosphorylated in LRRK2, and Ser-2032 and Thr-2035 are the two important sites that regulate LRRK2 kinase activity. PMID:20595391

  6. The delayed neurotoxic effect of some organophosphorus compounds. Identification of the phosphorylation site as an esterase

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. K.

    1969-01-01

    1. Organophosphorus compounds that produce a delayed neurotoxic effect in hens phosphorylate a specific site in the brain soon after administration. 2. Phosphorylation of the specific site by di-isopropyl [32P]phosphorofluoridate in vitro is blocked by the prior addition of phenyl phenylacetate. 3. A small proportion of the total activity of hen brain hydrolysing phenyl phenylacetate in vitro was shown to be due to an enzyme different from two others previously described. 4. This enzyme is only slightly inhibited in vitro by concentrations of tetraethyl pyrophosphate and paraoxon (diethyl 4-nitrophenyl phosphate) up to 64μm and is completely inhibited by 6μm-di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate and 128μm-mipafox. 5. It is also inhibited in vivo by effective doses of neurotoxic organophosphorus compounds but not by high doses of non-neurotoxic analogues. 6. It is deduced that the active site of this enzyme is the phosphorylation site associated with the genesis of delayed neurotoxicity. PMID:4310054

  7. Research Resource: Identification of Novel Growth Hormone-Regulated Phosphorylation Sites by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Bridgette N.; Kweon, Hye Kyong; Argetsinger, Lawrence S.; Fingar, Diane C.; Andrews, Philip C.

    2012-01-01

    GH and GH receptors are expressed throughout life, and GH elicits a diverse range of responses, including growth and altered metabolism. It is therefore important to understand the full spectrum of GH signaling pathways and cellular responses. We applied mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics combined with stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture to identify proteins rapidly phosphorylated in response to GH in 3T3-F442A preadipocytes. We identified 132 phosphosites in 95 proteins that exhibited rapid (5 or 15 min) GH-dependent statistically significant increases in phosphorylation by more than or equal to 50% and 96 phosphosites in 46 proteins that were down-regulated by GH by more than or equal to 30%. Several of the GH-stimulated phosphorylation sites were known (e.g. regulatory Thr/Tyr in Erks 1 and 2, Tyr in signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) 5a and 5b, Ser939 in tuberous sclerosis protein (TSC) 2 or tuberin). The remaining 126 GH-stimulated sites were not previously associated with GH. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis of GH-stimulated sites indicated enrichment in proteins associated with the insulin and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and focal adhesions. Akt/protein kinase A consensus sites (RXRXXS/T) were the most commonly phosphorylated consensus sites. Immunoblotting confirmed GH-stimulated phosphorylation of all seven novel GH-dependent sites tested [regulatory sites in proline-rich Akt substrate, 40 kDA (PRAS40), regulatory associated protein of mTOR, ATP-citrate lyase, Na+/H+ exchanger-1, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1, and Shc]). The immunoblot results suggest that many, if not most, of the GH-stimulated phosphosites identified in this large-scale quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, including sites in multiple proteins in the Akt/ mTOR complex 1 pathway, are phosphorylated in response to GH. Their identification significantly

  8. DNA Replication Stress Phosphoproteome Profiles Reveal Novel Functional Phosphorylation Sites on Xrs2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dongqing; Piening, Brian D; Kennedy, Jacob J; Lin, Chenwei; Jones-Weinert, Corey W; Yan, Ping; Paulovich, Amanda G

    2016-05-01

    In response to replication stress, a phospho-signaling cascade is activated and required for coordination of DNA repair and replication of damaged templates (intra-S-phase checkpoint) . How phospho-signaling coordinates the DNA replication stress response is largely unknown. We employed state-of-the-art liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approaches to generate high-coverage and quantitative proteomic and phospho-proteomic profiles during replication stress in yeast, induced by continuous exposure to the DNA alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) . We identified 32,057 unique peptides representing the products of 4296 genes and 22,061 unique phosphopeptides representing the products of 3183 genes. A total of 542 phosphopeptides (mapping to 339 genes) demonstrated an abundance change of greater than or equal to twofold in response to MMS. The screen enabled detection of nearly all of the proteins known to be involved in the DNA damage response, as well as many novel MMS-induced phosphorylations. We assessed the functional importance of a subset of key phosphosites by engineering a panel of phosphosite mutants in which an amino acid substitution prevents phosphorylation. In total, we successfully mutated 15 MMS-responsive phosphorylation sites in seven representative genes including APN1 (base excision repair); CTF4 and TOF1 (checkpoint and sister-chromatid cohesion); MPH1 (resolution of homologous recombination intermediates); RAD50 and XRS2 (MRX complex); and RAD18 (PRR). All of these phosphorylation site mutants exhibited MMS sensitivity, indicating an important role in protecting cells from DNA damage. In particular, we identified MMS-induced phosphorylation sites on Xrs2 that are required for MMS resistance in the absence of the MRX activator, Sae2, and that affect telomere maintenance. PMID:27017623

  9. E2 superfamily of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes: constitutively active or activated through phosphorylation in the catalytic cleft

    PubMed Central

    Valimberti, Ilaria; Tiberti, Matteo; Lambrughi, Matteo; Sarcevic, Boris; Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a modification that offers a dynamic and reversible mechanism to regulate the majority of cellular processes. Numerous diseases are associated with aberrant regulation of phosphorylation-induced switches. Phosphorylation is emerging as a mechanism to modulate ubiquitination by regulating key enzymes in this pathway. The molecular mechanisms underpinning how phosphorylation regulates ubiquitinating enzymes, however, are elusive. Here, we show the high conservation of a functional site in E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes. In catalytically active E2s, this site contains aspartate or a phosphorylatable serine and we refer to it as the conserved E2 serine/aspartate (CES/D) site. Molecular simulations of substrate-bound and -unbound forms of wild type, mutant and phosphorylated E2s, provide atomistic insight into the role of the CES/D residue for optimal E2 activity. Both the size and charge of the side group at the site play a central role in aligning the substrate lysine toward E2 catalytic cysteine to control ubiquitination efficiency. The CES/D site contributes to the fingerprint of the E2 superfamily. We propose that E2 enzymes can be divided into constitutively active or regulated families. E2s characterized by an aspartate at the CES/D site signify constitutively active E2s, whereas those containing a serine can be regulated by phosphorylation. PMID:26463729

  10. Characterization of beta2 (CD18) integrin phosphorylation in phorbol ester-activated T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Valmu, L; Hilden, T J; van Willigen, G; Gahmberg, C G

    1999-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane proteins involved in cell-cell and cell-extracellular-matrix interactions. The affinity and avidity of integrins for their ligands change in response to cytoplasmic signals. This 'inside-out' activation has been reported to occur also with beta2 integrins (CD18). The beta2 integrin subunit has previously been shown to become phosphorylated in T lymphocytes on cytoplasmic serine and the functionally important threonine residues after treatment with phorbol esters or on triggering of T-cell receptors. We have now characterized the phosphorylation of beta2 integrins in T-cells in more detail. When T-cells were activated by phorbol esters the phosphorylation was mainly on Ser756. After inhibition of serine/threonine phosphatases, phosphorylation was also found in two of the threonine residues in the threonine triplet 758-760 of the beta2 cytoplasmic domain. Activation of T-cells by phorbol esters resulted in phosphorylation in only approx. 10% of the integrin molecules. Okadaic acid increased this phosphorylation to approx. 30% of the beta2 molecules, assuming three phosphorylation sites. This indicates that a strong dynamic phosphorylation exists in serine and threonine residues of the beta2 integrins. PMID:10085235

  11. Phosphorylation regulates the water channel activity of the seed-specific aquaporin alpha-TIP.

    PubMed

    Maurel, C; Kado, R T; Guern, J; Chrispeels, M J

    1995-07-01

    The vacuolar membrane protein alpha-TIP is a seed-specific protein of the Major Intrinsic Protein family. Expression of alpha-TIP in Xenopus oocytes conferred a 4- to 8-fold increase in the osmotic water permeability (Pf) of the oocyte plasma membrane, showing that alpha-TIP forms water channels and is thus a new aquaporin. alpha-TIP has three putative phosphorylation sites on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane (Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99), one of which (Ser7) has been shown to be phosphorylated. We present several lines of evidence that the activity of this aquaporin is regulated by phosphorylation. First, mutation of the putative phosphorylation sites in alpha-TIP (Ser7Ala, Ser23Ala and Ser99Ala) reduced the apparent water transport activity of alpha-TIP in oocytes, suggesting that phosphorylation of alpha-TIP occurs in the oocytes and participates in the control of water channel activity. Second, exposure of oocytes to the cAMP agonists 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, which stimulate endogenous protein kinase A (PKA), increased the water transport activity of alpha-TIP by 80-100% after 60 min. That the protein can be phosphorylated by PKA was demonstrated by phosphorylating alpha-TIP in isolated oocyte membranes with the bovine PKA catalytic subunit. Third, the integrity of the three sites at positions 7, 23 and 99 was necessary for the cAMP-dependent increase in the Pf of oocytes expressing alpha-TIP, as well as for in vitro phosphorylation of alpha-TIP. These findings demonstrate that the alpha-TIP water channel can be modulated via phosphorylation of Ser7, Ser23 and Ser99.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7542585

  12. Evolution of nuclear retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARα) phosphorylation sites. Serine gain provides fine-tuned regulation.

    PubMed

    Samarut, Eric; Amal, Ismail; Markov, Gabriel V; Stote, Roland; Dejaegere, Annick; Laudet, Vincent; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2011-07-01

    The human nuclear retinoic acid (RA) receptor alpha (hRARα) is a ligand-dependent transcriptional regulator, which is controlled by a phosphorylation cascade. The cascade starts with the RA-induced phosphorylation of a serine residue located in the ligand-binding domain, S(LBD), allowing the recruitment of the cdk7/cyclin H/MAT1 subcomplex of TFIIH through the docking of cyclin H. It ends by the subsequent phosphorylation by cdk7 of an other serine located in the N-terminal domain, S(NTD). Here, we show that this cascade relies on an increase in the flexibility of the domain involved in cyclin H binding, subsequently to the phosphorylation of S(LBD). Owing to the functional importance of RARα in several vertebrate species, we investigated whether the phosphorylation cascade was conserved in zebrafish (Danio rerio), which expresses two RARα genes: RARα-A and RARα-B. We found that in zebrafish RARαs, S(LBD) is absent, whereas S(NTD) is conserved and phosphorylated. Therefore, we analyzed the pattern of conservation of the phosphorylation sites and traced back their evolution. We found that S(LBD) is most often absent outside mammalian RARα and appears late during vertebrate evolution. In contrast, S(NTD) is conserved, indicating that the phosphorylation of this functional site has been under ancient high selection constraint. This suggests that, during evolution, different regulatory circuits control RARα activity. PMID:21297158

  13. Phosphorylation Sites Identified in the NEIL1 DNA Glycosylase Are Potential Targets for the JNK1 Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Aishwarya; Cao, Vy Bao; Doublié, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    The NEIL1 DNA glycosylase is one of eleven mammalian DNA glycosylases that partake in the first step of the base excision repair (BER) pathway. NEIL1 recognizes and cleaves mainly oxidized pyrimidines from DNA. The past decade has witnessed the identification of an increasing number of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in BER enzymes including phosphorylation, acetylation, and sumoylation, which modulate enzyme function. In this work, we performed the first comprehensive analysis of phosphorylation sites in human NEIL1 expressed in human cells. Mass spectrometry (MS) analysis revealed phosphorylation at three serine residues: S207, S306, and a third novel site, S61. We expressed, purified, and characterized phosphomimetic (glutamate) and phosphoablating (alanine) mutants of the three phosphorylation sites in NEIL1 revealed by the MS analysis. All mutant enzymes were active and bound tightly to DNA, indicating that phosphorylation does not affect DNA binding and enzyme activity at these three serine sites. We also characterized phosphomimetic mutants of two other sites of phosphorylation, Y263 and S269, reported previously, and observed that mutation of Y263 to E yielded a completely inactive enzyme. Furthermore, based on sequence motifs and kinase prediction algorithms, we identified the c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1) as the kinase involved in the phosphorylation of NEIL1. JNK1, a member of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) family, was detected in NEIL1 immunoprecipitates, interacted with NEIL1 in vitro, and was able to phosphorylate the enzyme at residues S207, S306, and S61. PMID:27518429

  14. Phosphorylation acts positively and negatively to regulate MRTF-A subcellular localisation and activity.

    PubMed

    Panayiotou, Richard; Miralles, Francesc; Pawlowski, Rafal; Diring, Jessica; Flynn, Helen R; Skehel, Mark; Treisman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) regulate cytoskeletal genes through their partner transcription factor SRF. The MRTFs bind G-actin, and signal-regulated changes in cellular G-actin concentration control their nuclear accumulation. The MRTFs also undergo Rho- and ERK-dependent phosphorylation, but the function of MRTF phosphorylation, and the elements and signals involved in MRTF-A nuclear export are largely unexplored. We show that Rho-dependent MRTF-A phosphorylation reflects relief from an inhibitory function of nuclear actin. We map multiple sites of serum-induced phosphorylation, most of which are S/T-P motifs and show that S/T-P phosphorylation is required for transcriptional activation. ERK-mediated S98 phosphorylation inhibits assembly of G-actin complexes on the MRTF-A regulatory RPEL domain, promoting nuclear import. In contrast, S33 phosphorylation potentiates the activity of an autonomous Crm1-dependent N-terminal NES, which cooperates with five other NES elements to exclude MRTF-A from the nucleus. Phosphorylation thus plays positive and negative roles in the regulation of MRTF-A. PMID:27304076

  15. Phosphorylation acts positively and negatively to regulate MRTF-A subcellular localisation and activity

    PubMed Central

    Panayiotou, Richard; Miralles, Francesc; Pawlowski, Rafal; Diring, Jessica; Flynn, Helen R; Skehel, Mark; Treisman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTF-A and MRTF-B) regulate cytoskeletal genes through their partner transcription factor SRF. The MRTFs bind G-actin, and signal-regulated changes in cellular G-actin concentration control their nuclear accumulation. The MRTFs also undergo Rho- and ERK-dependent phosphorylation, but the function of MRTF phosphorylation, and the elements and signals involved in MRTF-A nuclear export are largely unexplored. We show that Rho-dependent MRTF-A phosphorylation reflects relief from an inhibitory function of nuclear actin. We map multiple sites of serum-induced phosphorylation, most of which are S/T-P motifs and show that S/T-P phosphorylation is required for transcriptional activation. ERK-mediated S98 phosphorylation inhibits assembly of G-actin complexes on the MRTF-A regulatory RPEL domain, promoting nuclear import. In contrast, S33 phosphorylation potentiates the activity of an autonomous Crm1-dependent N-terminal NES, which cooperates with five other NES elements to exclude MRTF-A from the nucleus. Phosphorylation thus plays positive and negative roles in the regulation of MRTF-A. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15460.001 PMID:27304076

  16. The plastid casein kinase 2 phosphorylates Rubisco activase at the Thr-78 site but is not essential for regulation of Rubisco activation state

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rubisco activase (RCA) is essential for the activation of Rubisco, the carboxylating enzyme of photosynthesis. In Arabidopsis, RCA is encoded by a single gene (At2g39730) that is alternatively spliced to form a large alpha-RCA and small beta-RCA isoform. The activity of Rubisco is controlled in res...

  17. Effects of kinase inhibitors and potassium phosphate (KPi) on site-specific phosphorylation of branched chain. cap alpha. -ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH)

    SciTech Connect

    Kuntz, M.J.; Shimomura, Y.; Ozawa, T.; Harris, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    BCKDH is phosphorylated by a copurifying kinase at two serine residues on the El..cap alpha.. subunit. Phosphorylation of both sites occurs at about the same rate initially, but inactivation is believed associated only with site 1 phosphorylation. The effects of KPi and known inhibitors of BCKDH kinase, ..cap alpha..-chloroisocaproate (CIC) and branched chain ..cap alpha..-ketoacids (BCKA), on the phosphorylation of purified rat liver BCKDH were studied. Site-specific phosphorylation was quantitated by thin-layer electrophoresis of tryptic peptides followed by densitometric scanning of autoradiograms. Addition of 5 mM KPi was found necessary to stabilize the BCKDH activity at 37/sup 0/C. Increasing the KPi to 50 mM dramatically increased the CIC and BCKA inhibition of site 1 and site 2 phosphorylation. The finding of enhanced sensitivity of inhibitors with 50 mM KPi may facilitate identification of physiologically important kinase effectors. Regardless of the KPi concentration, CIC and the BCKA showed much more effective inhibition of site 2 than site 1 phosphorylation. Although site 1 is the primary inactivating site, predominant inhibition of site 2 phosphorylation may provide a means of modulating kinase/phosphatase control of BCKDH activity under steady state conditions.

  18. Identification and Functional Characterization of Phosphorylation Sites on GTP Cyclohydrolase I

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jianhai; Wei, Na; Xu, Hao; Ge, Ying; Vásquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Guan, Tongju; Oldham, Keith T.; Pritchard, Kirkwood A.; Shi, Yang

    2009-01-01

    Objective The post-translational regulation of GTP cyclohydrolase I (GCH-1), the rate-limiting enzyme for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) synthesis, remains elusive. Here, we identified specific phosphorylation sites on GCH-1 and characterized the function of these sites. Methods and Results Mass spectrometry studies showed overexpressed rat GCH-1 was phosphorylated at serine (S) 51, S167 and threonine (T) 231 in HEK293 cells whereas a computational analysis of GCH-1 revealed 8 potential phosphorylation sites [S51, S72, T85, T91, T103, S130, S167 and T231]. GCH-1 activity and BH4 were significantly decreased in cells transfected with the phospho-defective mutants (S72A, T85A, T91A, T103A or S130A) and increased in cells transfected with the T231A mutant. BH4 and BH2 were increased in cells transfected with S51E, S72E, T85E, T91E, T103D or T130D mutants, but decreased in cells transfected with the T231D mutant, while cells transfected with the S167A or the S167E mutant had increased BH2. Additionally, cells transfected with the T231A mutant had reduced GCH-1 nuclear localization and nuclear GCH-1 activity. Conclusion Our data suggest GCH-1 activity is regulated either positively by phosphorylation S51, S72, T85, T91, T103 and S130, or negatively at T231. Such information might be useful in designing new therapies aiming at improving BH4 bioavailability. PMID:19762783

  19. Functional phosphorylation sites in cardiac myofilament proteins are evolutionarily conserved in skeletal myofilament proteins.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Lehman, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating cardiac contractile function, but phosphorylation is not thought to play a regulatory role in skeletal muscle. To examine how myofilament phosphorylation arose in the human heart, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of 25 cardiac phosphorylation sites in animals ranging from fruit flies to humans. These analyses indicated that of the 25 human phosphorylation sites examined, 11 have been conserved across vertebrates and four have been sporadically present in vertebrates. Furthermore, all 11 of the cardiac sites found across vertebrates were present in skeletal muscle isoforms, along with three sites that were sporadically present. Based on the conservation of amino acid sequences between cardiac and skeletal contractile proteins, we tested for phosphorylation in mammalian skeletal muscle using several biochemical techniques and found evidence that multiple myofilament proteins were phosphorylated. Several of these phosphorylation sites were validated using mass spectrometry, including one site that is present in slow- and fast-twitch troponin I (TnI), but was lost in cardiac TnI. Thus, several myofilament phosphorylation sites present in the human heart likely arose in invertebrate muscle, have been evolutionarily conserved in skeletal muscle, and potentially have functional effects in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. PMID:26993364

  20. Phosphorylation in vitro of human fibrinogen with casein kinase TS and characterization of phosphorylated sites

    SciTech Connect

    Heldin, P.

    1987-09-01

    Human fibrinogen was phosphorylated by casein kinase TS. The (/sup 32/P)phosphate incorporated varied between 0.5 and 1 mol of phosphate per mole of fibrinogen. The phosphate was localized to Ser523 and Ser590 and serine and threonine residues between amino acids 259 and 268 in the A alpha-chain. In addition, Thr416 and Ser420 were phosphorylated in the gamma'-chain, which is a variant of the gamma-chain, constituting 7-10% of the gamma-chain population. The functional significance of casein kinase TS-induced phosphorylation of fibrinogen remains unknown; however, a slight but consistent increase of the turbidity in a gelation assay was observed for phosphorylated compared to unphosphorylated fibrinogen.

  1. Phosphorylation of EBP50 negatively regulates β-PIX-dependent Rac1 activity in anoikis.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-Y; Lin, Y-Y; Jou, T-S

    2012-06-01

    We demonstrated a protein kinase C (PKC)-dependent phosphorylation of canine ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM)-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) at serine 347/348 by site-directed mutagenesis and a phospho-specific antibody. Cell fractionation and confocal imaging revealed the relocation of EBP50 from the plasma membrane to cytosol that accompanied this phosphorylation event. Increased phosphorylation at these serine residues led to the dissociation of EBP50 from ezrin and β-PIX, which are two upstream regulators of Rac1 activation. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant, mimicking serine 347/348 phosphorylation, became refractory to hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell spreading and scattering, which is normally mediated by Rac1 activation. Detachment of cells from the substratum also elicited an increase in EBP50 phosphorylation, apparently due to counteracting activities of PKC and protein phosphastase 2A, which resulted in decreased Rac1 activation and induction of anoikis. Cells overexpressing an EBP50 mutant defective in serine 347/348 phosphorylation did not undergo apoptosis in suspension culture. These studies reveal a signaling cascade in which different phosphorylation states and subcellular localization of EBP50 regulate Rac1 function. PMID:22301917

  2. Mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin affects its chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Ecroyd, Heath; Meehan, Sarah; Horwitz, Joseph; Aquilina, J Andrew; Benesch, Justin L P; Robinson, Carol V; Macphee, Cait E; Carver, John A

    2007-01-01

    AlphaB-crystallin is a member of the sHsp (small heat-shock protein) family that prevents misfolded target proteins from aggregating and precipitating. Phosphorylation at three serine residues (Ser19, Ser45 and Ser59) is a major post-translational modification that occurs to alphaB-crystallin. In the present study, we produced recombinant proteins designed to mimic phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin by incorporating a negative charge at these sites. We employed these mimics to undertake a mechanistic and structural investigation of the effect of phosphorylation on the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin to protect against two types of protein misfolding, i.e. amorphous aggregation and amyloid fibril assembly. We show that mimicking phosphorylation of alphaB-crystallin results in more efficient chaperone activity against both heat-induced and reduction-induced amorphous aggregation of target proteins. Mimick-ing phosphorylation increased the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin against one amyloid-forming target protein (kappa-casein), but decreased it against another (ccbeta-Trp peptide). We observed that both target protein identity and solution (buffer) conditions are critical factors in determining the relative chaperone ability of wild-type and phosphorylated alphaB-crystallins. The present study provides evidence for the regulation of the chaperone activity of alphaB-crystallin by phosphorylation and indicates that this may play an important role in alleviating the pathogenic effects associated with protein conformational diseases. PMID:16928191

  3. Dual-site phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator impacts group a streptococcal global gene expression and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Horstmann, Nicola; Saldaña, Miguel; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Thompson, Erika; Koller, Antonius; Shelburne, Samuel A

    2014-05-01

    Phosphorylation relays are a major mechanism by which bacteria alter transcription in response to environmental signals, but understanding of the functional consequences of bacterial response regulator phosphorylation is limited. We sought to characterize how phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein from the major human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) influences GAS global gene expression and pathogenesis. CovR mainly serves to repress GAS virulence factor-encoding genes and has been shown to homodimerize following phosphorylation on aspartate-53 (D53) in vitro. We discovered that CovR is phosphorylated in vivo and that such phosphorylation is partially heat-stable, suggesting additional phosphorylation at non-aspartate residues. Using mass spectroscopy along with targeted mutagenesis, we identified threonine-65 (T65) as an additional CovR phosphorylation site under control of the serine/threonine kinase (Stk). Phosphorylation on T65, as mimicked by the recombinant CovR T65E variant, abolished in vitro CovR D53 phosphorylation. Similarly, isoallelic GAS strains that were either unable to be phosphorylated at D53 (CovR-D53A) or had functional constitutive phosphorylation at T65 (CovR-T65E) had essentially an identical gene repression profile to each other and to a CovR-inactivated strain. However, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E isoallelic strains retained the ability to positively influence gene expression that was abolished in the CovR-inactivated strain. Consistent with these observations, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E strains were hypervirulent compared to the CovR-inactivated strain in a mouse model of invasive GAS disease. Surprisingly, an isoalleic strain unable to be phosphorylated at CovR T65 (CovR-T65A) was hypervirulent compared to the wild-type strain, as auto-regulation of covR gene expression resulted in lower covR gene transcript and CovR protein levels in the CovR-T65A strain. Taken together, these data establish that Cov

  4. Dual-Site Phosphorylation of the Control of Virulence Regulator Impacts Group A Streptococcal Global Gene Expression and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, Nicola; Saldaña, Miguel; Sahasrabhojane, Pranoti; Yao, Hui; Su, Xiaoping; Thompson, Erika; Koller, Antonius; Shelburne, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation relays are a major mechanism by which bacteria alter transcription in response to environmental signals, but understanding of the functional consequences of bacterial response regulator phosphorylation is limited. We sought to characterize how phosphorylation of the control of virulence regulator (CovR) protein from the major human pathogen group A Streptococcus (GAS) influences GAS global gene expression and pathogenesis. CovR mainly serves to repress GAS virulence factor-encoding genes and has been shown to homodimerize following phosphorylation on aspartate-53 (D53) in vitro. We discovered that CovR is phosphorylated in vivo and that such phosphorylation is partially heat-stable, suggesting additional phosphorylation at non-aspartate residues. Using mass spectroscopy along with targeted mutagenesis, we identified threonine-65 (T65) as an additional CovR phosphorylation site under control of the serine/threonine kinase (Stk). Phosphorylation on T65, as mimicked by the recombinant CovR T65E variant, abolished in vitro CovR D53 phosphorylation. Similarly, isoallelic GAS strains that were either unable to be phosphorylated at D53 (CovR-D53A) or had functional constitutive phosphorylation at T65 (CovR-T65E) had essentially an identical gene repression profile to each other and to a CovR-inactivated strain. However, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E isoallelic strains retained the ability to positively influence gene expression that was abolished in the CovR-inactivated strain. Consistent with these observations, the CovR-D53A and CovR-T65E strains were hypervirulent compared to the CovR-inactivated strain in a mouse model of invasive GAS disease. Surprisingly, an isoalleic strain unable to be phosphorylated at CovR T65 (CovR-T65A) was hypervirulent compared to the wild-type strain, as auto-regulation of covR gene expression resulted in lower covR gene transcript and CovR protein levels in the CovR-T65A strain. Taken together, these data establish that Cov

  5. Functional phosphoproteomic profiling of phosphorylation sites in membrane fractions of salt-stressed Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Under conditions of salt stress, plants respond by initiating phosphorylation cascades. Many key phosphorylation events occur at the membrane. However, to date only limited sites have been identified that are phosphorylated in response to salt stress in plants. Results Membrane fractions from three-day and 200 mM salt-treated Arabidopsis suspension plants were isolated, followed by protease shaving and enrichment using Zirconium ion-charged magnetic beads, and tandem mass spectrometry analyses. From this isolation, 18 phosphorylation sites from 15 Arabidopsis proteins were identified. A unique phosphorylation site in 14-3-3-interacting protein AHA1 was predominately identified in 200 mM salt-treated plants. We also identified some phosphorylation sites in aquaporins. A doubly phosphorylated peptide of PIP2;1 as well as a phosphopeptide containing a single phosphorylation site (Ser-283) and a phosphopeptide containing another site (Ser-286) of aquaporin PIP2;4 were identified respectively. These two sites appeared to be novel of which were not reported before. In addition, quantitative analyses of protein phosphorylation with either label-free or stable-isotope labeling were also employed in this study. The results indicated that level of phosphopeptides on five membrane proteins such as AHA1, STP1, Patellin-2, probable inactive receptor kinase (At3g02880), and probable purine permease 18 showed at least two-fold increase in comparison to control in response to 200 mM salt-stress. Conclusion In this study, we successfully identified novel salt stress-responsive protein phosphorylation sites from membrane isolates of abiotic-stressed plants by membrane shaving followed by Zr4+-IMAC enrichment. The identified phosphorylation sites can be important in the salt stress response in plants. PMID:19900291

  6. Assigning Quantitative Function to Post-Translational Modifications Reveals Multiple Sites of Phosphorylation That Tune Yeast Pheromone Signaling Output

    SciTech Connect

    Pincus, David; Ryan, Christopher J.; Smith, Richard D.; Brent, Roger; Resnekov, Orna; Hakimi, Mohamed Ali

    2013-03-12

    Cell signaling systems transmit information by post-­translationally modifying signaling proteins, often via phosphorylation. While thousands of sites of phosphorylation have been identified in proteomic studies, the vast majority of sites have no known function. Assigning functional roles to the catalog of uncharacterized phosphorylation sites is a key research challenge. Here we present a general approach to address this challenge and apply it to a prototypical signaling pathway, the pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The pheromone pathway includes a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade activated by a G-­protein coupled receptor (GPCR). We used mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify sites whose phosphorylation changed when the system was active, and evolutionary conservation to assign priority to a list of candidate MAPK regulatory sites. We made targeted alterations in those sites, and measured the effects of the mutations on pheromone pathway output in single cells. Our work identified six new sites that quantitatively tuned system output. We developed simple computational models to find system architectures that recapitulated the quantitative phenotypes of the mutants. Our results identify a number of regulated phosphorylation events that contribute to adjust the input-­output relationship of this model eukaryotic signaling system. We believe this combined approach constitutes a general means not only to reveal modification sites required to turn a pathway on and off, but also those required for more subtle quantitative effects that tune pathway output. Our results further suggest that relatively small quantitative influences from individual regulatory phosphorylation events endow signaling systems with plasticity that evolution may exploit to quantitatively tailor signaling outcomes.

  7. Histidine to aspartate phosphotransferase activity of nm23 proteins: phosphorylation of aldolase C on Asp-319.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, P D; Vu, N D

    2000-01-01

    nm23 genes have been implicated in the suppression of tumour metastasis and cell motility; however, the biochemical mechanisms for these suppressions are not known. We have previously described the transfer of phosphate from the catalytic histidine residues of nm23 proteins to an aspartic or a glutamic residue on one or more 43 kDa proteins in detergent extracts of bovine brain membranes. To gain a better understanding of this transferase activity, we partly purified this 43 kDa protein and identified aldolases A and C as the major 43 kDa proteins present in the preparation. Aldolase was purified from brain cytosol; its phosphorylation by rat liver nm23 proteins and by recombinant human nm23-H1 was examined. The site of phosphorylation was identified as Asp-319 on aldolase C. The equivalent residue on aldolase A, a glutamic residue, was not phosphorylated. Aldolase C was rapidly phosphorylated by wild-type nm23-H1 but was not phosphorylated, or was phosphorylated very slowly, by either nm23-H1(P96S) or nm23-H1(S120G), mutants of nm23-H1 that do not suppress cell motility. This is the first identification of a protein that is phosphorylated on an aspartic residue by nm23 proteins. The sequence around Asp-319 of aldolase C has some similarities to those around the histidine residues on ATP-citrate lyase and succinic thiokinase that are phosphorylated by nm23 proteins. PMID:10698688

  8. Hydrophobic motif site-phosphorylated protein kinase CβII between mTORC2 and Akt regulates high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Das, Falguni; Ghosh-Choudhury, Nandini; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh

    2016-04-01

    PKCβII controls the pathologic features of diabetic nephropathy, including glomerular mesangial cell hypertrophy. PKCβII contains the COOH-terminal hydrophobic motif site Ser-660. Whether this hydrophobic motif phosphorylation contributes to high glucose-induced mesangial cell hypertrophy has not been determined. Here we show that, in mesangial cells, high glucose increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner. Using siRNAs to downregulate PKCβII, dominant negative PKCβII, and PKCβII hydrophobic motif phosphorylation-deficient mutant, we found that PKCβII regulates activation of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and mesangial cell hypertrophy by high glucose. PKCβII via its phosphorylation at Ser-660 regulated phosphorylation of Akt at both catalytic loop and hydrophobic motif sites, resulting in phosphorylation and inactivation of its substrate PRAS40. Specific inhibition of mTORC2 increased mTORC1 activity and induced mesangial cell hypertrophy. In contrast, inhibition of mTORC2 decreased the phosphorylation of PKCβII and Akt, leading to inhibition of PRAS40 phosphorylation and mTORC1 activity and prevented mesangial cell hypertrophy in response to high glucose; expression of constitutively active Akt or mTORC1 restored mesangial cell hypertrophy. Moreover, constitutively active PKCβII reversed the inhibition of high glucose-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and mesangial cell hypertrophy induced by suppression of mTORC2. Finally, using renal cortexes from type 1 diabetic mice, we found that increased phosphorylation of PKCβII at Ser-660 was associated with enhanced Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation. Collectively, our findings identify a signaling route connecting PI3-kinase to mTORC2 to phosphorylate PKCβII at the hydrophobic motif site necessary for Akt phosphorylation and mTORC1 activation, leading to mesangial cell hypertrophy. PMID:26739493

  9. Water transport activity of the plasma membrane aquaporin PM28A is regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, I; Karlsson, M; Shukla, V K; Chrispeels, M J; Larsson, C; Kjellbom, P

    1998-01-01

    PM28A is a major intrinsic protein of the spinach leaf plasma membrane and the major phosphoprotein. Phosphorylation of PM28A is dependent in vivo on the apoplastic water potential and in vitro on submicromolar concentrations of Ca2+. Here, we demonstrate that PM28A is an aquaporin and that its water channel activity is regulated by phosphorylation. Wild-type and mutant forms of PM28A, in which putative phosphorylation sites had been knocked out, were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the resulting increase in osmotic water permeability was measured in the presence or absence of an inhibitor of protein kinases (K252a) or of an inhibitor of protein phosphatases (okadaic acid). The results indicate that the water channel activity of PM28A is regulated by phosphorylation of two serine residues, Ser-115 in the first cytoplasmic loop and Ser-274 in the C-terminal region. Labeling of spinach leaves with 32P-orthophosphate and subsequent sequencing of PM28A-derived peptides demonstrated that Ser-274 is phosphorylated in vivo, whereas phosphorylation of Ser-115, a residue conserved among all plant plasma membrane aquaporins, could not be demonstrated. This identifies Ser-274 of PM28A as the amino acid residue being phosphorylated in vivo in response to increasing apoplastic water potential and dephosphorylated in response to decreasing water potential. Taken together, our results suggest an active role for PM28A in maintaining cellular water balance. PMID:9501117

  10. γ-Aminobutyric Acid Type A (GABAA) Receptor Activation Modulates Tau Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Nykänen, Niko-Petteri; Kysenius, Kai; Sakha, Prasanna; Tammela, Päivi; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau are hallmarks of various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease. Molecular mechanisms that regulate Tau phosphorylation are complex and currently incompletely understood. We have developed a novel live cell reporter system based on protein-fragment complementation assay to study dynamic changes in Tau phosphorylation status. In this assay, fusion proteins of Tau and Pin1 (peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans-isomerase 1) carrying complementary fragments of a luciferase protein serve as a sensor of altered protein-protein interaction between Tau and Pin1, a critical regulator of Tau dephosphorylation at several disease-associated proline-directed phosphorylation sites. Using this system, we identified several structurally distinct GABAA receptor modulators as novel regulators of Tau phosphorylation in a chemical library screen. GABAA receptor activation promoted specific phosphorylation of Tau at the AT8 epitope (Ser-199/Ser-202/Thr-205) in cultures of mature cortical neurons. Increased Tau phosphorylation by GABAA receptor activity was associated with reduced Tau binding to protein phosphatase 2A and was dependent on Cdk5 but not GSK3β kinase activity. PMID:22235112

  11. Novel Phosphorylation Sites in the S. cerevisiae Cdc13 Protein Reveal New Targets for Telomere Length Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yun; DiMaggio, Peter A.; Perlman, David H.; Zakian, Virginia A.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2013-01-01

    The S. cerevisiae Cdc13 is a multifunctional protein with key roles in regulation of telomerase, telomere end protection, and conventional telomere replication, all of which are cell cycle-regulated processes. Given that phosphorylation is a key mechanism for regulating protein function, we identified sites of phosphorylation using nano liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS). We also determined phosphorylation abundance on both wild type (WT) and a telomerase deficient form of Cdc13, encoded by the cdc13-2 allele, in both G1 phase cells, when telomerase is not active, and G2/M phase cells, when it is. We identified 21 sites of in vivo phosphorylation, of which only five had been reported previously. In contrast, phosphorylation of two in vitro targets of the ATM-like Tel1 kinase, S249 and S255, was not detected. This result helps resolve conflicting data on the importance of phosphorylation of these residues in telomerase recruitment. multiple residues showed differences in their cell cycle pattern of modification. For example, phosphorylation of S314 was significantly higher in the G2/M compared to the G1 phase and in WT versus mutant Cdc13, and a S314D mutation negatively affected telomere length. Our findings provide new targets in a key telomerase regulatory protein for modulation of telomere dynamics. PMID:23181431

  12. Survey of phosphorylation near drug binding sites in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and their effects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle P; Gifford, Kathleen M; Waitzman, Joshua S; Rice, Sarah E

    2015-01-01

    While it is currently estimated that 40 to 50% of eukaryotic proteins are phosphorylated, little is known about the frequency and local effects of phosphorylation near pharmaceutical inhibitor binding sites. In this study, we investigated how frequently phosphorylation may affect the binding of drug inhibitors to target proteins. We examined the 453 non-redundant structures of soluble mammalian drug target proteins bound to inhibitors currently available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We cross-referenced these structures with phosphorylation data available from the PhosphoSitePlus database. Three hundred twenty-two of 453 (71%) of drug targets have evidence of phosphorylation that has been validated by multiple methods or labs. For 132 of 453 (29%) of those, the phosphorylation site is within 12 Å of the small molecule-binding site, where it would likely alter small molecule binding affinity. We propose a framework for distinguishing between drug-phosphorylation site interactions that are likely to alter the efficacy of drugs versus those that are not. In addition we highlight examples of well-established drug targets, such as estrogen receptor alpha, for which phosphorylation may affect drug affinity and clinical efficacy. Our data suggest that phosphorylation may affect drug binding and efficacy for a significant fraction of drug target proteins. PMID:24833420

  13. Survey of phosphorylation near drug binding sites in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and their effects

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle P.; Gifford, Kathleen M.; Waitzman, Joshua S.; Rice, Sarah E.

    2014-01-01

    While it is currently estimated that 40–50% of eukaryotic proteins are phosphorylated, little is known about the frequency and local effects of phosphorylation near pharmaceutical inhibitor binding sites. In this study, we investigated how frequently phosphorylation may affect the binding of drug inhibitors to target proteins. We examined the 453 non-redundant structures of soluble mammalian drug target proteins bound to inhibitors currently available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We cross-referenced these structures with phosphorylation data available from the PhosphoSitePlus database. 322/453 (71%) of drug targets have evidence of phosphorylation that has been validated by multiple methods or labs. For 132/453 (29%) of those, the phosphorylation site is within 12Å of the small molecule-binding site, where it would likely alter small molecule binding affinity. We propose a framework for distinguishing between drug-phosphorylation site interactions that are likely to alter the efficacy of drugs vs. those that are not. In addition we highlight examples of well-established drug targets, such as estrogen receptor alpha, for which phosphorylation may affect drug affinity and clinical efficacy. Our data suggest that phosphorylation may affect drug binding and efficacy for a significant fraction of drug target proteins. PMID:24833420

  14. Phosphorylation is an on/off switch for 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde O-methyltransferase activity in poplar monolignol biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jack P.; Chuang, Ling; Loziuk, Philip L.; Chen, Hao; Lin, Ying-Chung; Shi, Rui; Qu, Guan-Zheng; Muddiman, David C.; Sederoff, Ronald R.; Chiang, Vincent L.

    2015-01-01

    Although phosphorylation has long been known to be an important regulatory modification of proteins, no unequivocal evidence has been presented to show functional control by phosphorylation for the plant monolignol biosynthetic pathway. Here, we present the discovery of phosphorylation-mediated on/off regulation of enzyme activity for 5-hydroxyconiferaldehyde O-methyltransferase 2 (PtrAldOMT2), an enzyme central to monolignol biosynthesis for lignification in stem-differentiating xylem (SDX) of Populus trichocarpa. Phosphorylation turned off the PtrAldOMT2 activity, as demonstrated in vitro by using purified phosphorylated and unphosphorylated recombinant PtrAldOMT2. Protein extracts of P. trichocarpa SDX, which contains endogenous kinases, also phosphorylated recombinant PtrAldOMT2 and turned off the recombinant protein activity. Similarly, ATP/Mn2+-activated phosphorylation of SDX protein extracts reduced the endogenous SDX PtrAldOMT2 activity by ∼60%, and dephosphorylation fully restored the activity. Global shotgun proteomic analysis of phosphopeptide-enriched P. trichocarpa SDX protein fractions identified PtrAldOMT2 monophosphorylation at Ser123 or Ser125 in vivo. Phosphorylation-site mutagenesis verified the PtrAldOMT2 phosphorylation at Ser123 or Ser125 and confirmed the functional importance of these phosphorylation sites for O-methyltransferase activity. The PtrAldOMT2 Ser123 phosphorylation site is conserved across 93% of AldOMTs from 46 diverse plant species, and 98% of the AldOMTs have either Ser123 or Ser125. PtrAldOMT2 is a homodimeric cytosolic enzyme expressed more abundantly in syringyl lignin-rich fiber cells than in guaiacyl lignin-rich vessel cells. The reversible phosphorylation of PtrAldOMT2 is likely to have an important role in regulating syringyl monolignol biosynthesis of P. trichocarpa. PMID:26109572

  15. Identification of in vitro autophosphorylation sites and effects of phosphorylation on the Arabidopsis CRINKLY4 (ACR4) receptor-like kinase intracellular domain: insights into conformation, oligomerization, and activity.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Matthew R; Lichti, Cheryl F; Townsend, R Reid; Rao, A Gururaj

    2011-03-29

    Arabidopsis CRINKLY4 (ACR4) is a receptor-like kinase (RLK) that consists of an extracellular domain and an intracellular domain (ICD) with serine/threonine kinase activity. While genetic and cell biology experiments have demonstrated that ACR4 is important in cell fate specification and overall development of the plant, little is known about the biochemical properties of the kinase domain and the mechanisms that underlie the overall function of the receptor. To complement in planta studies of the function of ACR4, we have expressed the ICD in Escherichia coli as a soluble C-terminal fusion to the N-utilization substance A (NusA) protein, purified the recombinant protein, and characterized the enzymatic and conformational properties. The protein autophosphorylates via an intramolecular mechanism, prefers Mn(2+) over Mg(2+) as the divalent cation, and displays typical Michaelis-Menten kinetics with respect to ATP with an apparent K(m) of 6.67 ± 2.07 μM and a V(max) of 1.83 ± 0.18 nmol min(-1) mg(-1). Autophosphorylation is accompanied by a conformational change as demonstrated by circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy, and limited proteolysis with trypsin. Analysis by nanoliquid chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed 16 confirmed sites of phosphorylation at Ser and Thr residues. Sedimentation velocity and gel filtration experiments indicate that the ICD has a propensity to oligomerize and that this property is lost upon autophosphorylation. PMID:21294549

  16. Phosphorylation of Leukotriene C4 Synthase at Serine 36 Impairs Catalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shabbir; Ytterberg, A Jimmy; Thulasingam, Madhuranayaki; Tholander, Fredrik; Bergman, Tomas; Zubarev, Roman; Wetterholm, Anders; Rinaldo-Matthis, Agnes; Haeggström, Jesper Z

    2016-08-26

    Leukotriene C4 synthase (LTC4S) catalyzes the formation of the proinflammatory lipid mediator leukotriene C4 (LTC4). LTC4 is the parent molecule of the cysteinyl leukotrienes, which are recognized for their pathogenic role in asthma and allergic diseases. Cellular LTC4S activity is suppressed by PKC-mediated phosphorylation, and recently a downstream p70S6k was shown to play an important role in this process. Here, we identified Ser(36) as the major p70S6k phosphorylation site, along with a low frequency site at Thr(40), using an in vitro phosphorylation assay combined with mass spectrometry. The functional consequences of p70S6k phosphorylation were tested with the phosphomimetic mutant S36E, which displayed only about 20% (20 μmol/min/mg) of the activity of WT enzyme (95 μmol/min/mg), whereas the enzyme activity of T40E was not significantly affected. The enzyme activity of S36E increased linearly with increasing LTA4 concentrations during the steady-state kinetics analysis, indicating poor lipid substrate binding. The Ser(36) is located in a loop region close to the entrance of the proposed substrate binding pocket. Comparative molecular dynamics indicated that Ser(36) upon phosphorylation will pull the first luminal loop of LTC4S toward the neighboring subunit of the functional homotrimer, thereby forming hydrogen bonds with Arg(104) in the adjacent subunit. Because Arg(104) is a key catalytic residue responsible for stabilization of the glutathione thiolate anion, this phosphorylation-induced interaction leads to a reduction of the catalytic activity. In addition, the positional shift of the loop and its interaction with the neighboring subunit affect active site access. Thus, our mutational and kinetic data, together with molecular simulations, suggest that phosphorylation of Ser(36) inhibits the catalytic function of LTC4S by interference with the catalytic machinery. PMID:27365393

  17. Assigning Quantitative Function to Post-Translational Modifications Reveals Multiple Sites of Phosphorylation That Tune Yeast Pheromone Signaling Output

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, David; Ryan, Christopher J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Cell signaling systems transmit information by post-translationally modifying signaling proteins, often via phosphorylation. While thousands of sites of phosphorylation have been identified in proteomic studies, the vast majority of sites have no known function. Assigning functional roles to the catalog of uncharacterized phosphorylation sites is a key research challenge. Here we present a general approach to address this challenge and apply it to a prototypical signaling pathway, the pheromone response pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The pheromone pathway includes a mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade activated by a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR). We used published mass spectrometry-based proteomics data to identify putative sites of phosphorylation on pheromone pathway components, and we used evolutionary conservation to assign priority to a list of candidate MAPK regulatory sites. We made targeted alterations in those sites, and measured the effects of the mutations on pheromone pathway output in single cells. Our work identified six new sites that quantitatively tuned system output. We developed simple computational models to find system architectures that recapitulated the quantitative phenotypes of the mutants. Our results identify a number of putative phosphorylation events that contribute to adjust the input-output relationship of this model eukaryotic signaling system. We believe this combined approach constitutes a general means not only to reveal modification sites required to turn a pathway on and off, but also those required for more subtle quantitative effects that tune pathway output. Our results suggest that relatively small quantitative influences from individual phosphorylation events endow signaling systems with plasticity that evolution may exploit to quantitatively tailor signaling outcomes. PMID:23554854

  18. Phosphorylation of Serine 402 Regulates RacGAP Protein Activity of FilGAP Protein.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Yuji; Tsutsumi, Koji; Ohta, Yasutaka

    2015-10-23

    FilGAP is a Rho GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that specifically regulates Rac. FilGAP is phosphorylated by ROCK, and this phosphorylation stimulates its RacGAP activity. However, it is unclear how phosphorylation regulates cellular functions and localization of FilGAP. We found that non-phosphorylatable FilGAP (ST/A) mutant is predominantly localized to the cytoskeleton along actin filaments and partially co-localized with vinculin around cell periphery, whereas phosphomimetic FilGAP (ST/D) mutant is diffusely cytoplasmic. Moreover, phosphorylated FilGAP detected by Phos-tag is also mainly localized in the cytoplasm. Of the six potential phosphorylation sites in FilGAP tested, only mutation of serine 402 to alanine (S402A) resulted in decreased cell spreading on fibronectin. FilGAP phosphorylated at Ser-402 is localized to the cytoplasm but not at the cytoskeleton. Although Ser-402 is highly phosphorylated in serum-starved quiescent cells, dephosphorylation of Ser-402 is accompanied with the cell spreading on fibronectin. Treatment of the cells expressing wild-type FilGAP with calyculin A, a Ser/Thr phosphatase inhibitor, suppressed cell spreading on fibronectin, whereas cells transfected with FilGAP S402A mutant were not affected by calyculin A. Expression of constitutively activate Arf6 Q67L mutant stimulated membrane blebbing activity of both non-phosphorylatable (ST/A) and phosphomimetic (ST/D) FilGAP mutants. Conversely, depletion of endogenous Arf6 suppressed membrane blebbing induced by FilGAP (ST/A) and (ST/D) mutants. Our study suggests that Arf6 and phosphorylation of FilGAP may regulate FilGAP, and phosphorylation of Ser-402 may play a role in the regulation of cell spreading on fibronectin. PMID:26359494

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  20. AMP-activated protein kinase modulates tau phosphorylation and tau pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Domise, Manon; Didier, Sébastien; Marinangeli, Claudia; Zhao, Haitian; Chandakkar, Pallavi; Buée, Luc; Viollet, Benoit; Davies, Peter; Marambaud, Philippe; Vingtdeux, Valérie

    2016-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) are the pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases commonly known as tauopathies. NFTs result from the intracellular aggregation of abnormally and hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Tau functions, which include the regulation of microtubules dynamics, are dependent on its phosphorylation status. As a consequence, any changes in tau phosphorylation can have major impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory. Recently, it has been demonstrated that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was deregulated in the brain of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients where it co-localized with phosphorylated tau in pre-tangle and tangle-bearing neurons. Besides, it was found that AMPK was a tau kinase in vitro. Here, we find that endogenous AMPK activation in mouse primary neurons induced an increase of tau phosphorylation at multiple sites, whereas AMPK inhibition led to a rapid decrease of tau phosphorylation. We further show that AMPK mice deficient for one of the catalytic alpha subunits displayed reduced endogenous tau phosphorylation. Finally, we found that AMPK deficiency reduced tau pathology in the PS19 mouse model of tauopathy. These results show that AMPK regulates tau phosphorylation in mouse primary neurons as well as in vivo, and thus suggest that AMPK could be a key player in the development of AD pathology. PMID:27230293

  1. EGFR phosphorylates FAM129B to promote Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haitao; Lee, Jong-Ho; Wang, Yugang; Pang, Yilin; Zhang, Tao; Xia, Yan; Zhong, Lianjin; Lyu, Jianxin; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Ras GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are important regulators for Ras activation, which is instrumental in tumor development. However, the mechanism underlying this regulation remains elusive. We demonstrate here that activated EGFR phosphorylates the Y593 residue of the protein known as family with sequence similarity 129, member B (FAM129B), which is overexpressed in many types of human cancer. FAM129B phosphorylation increased the interaction between FAM129B and Ras, resulting in reduced binding of p120-RasGAP to Ras. FAM129B phosphorylation promoted Ras activation, increasing ERK1/2- and PKM2-dependent β-catenin transactivation and leading to the enhanced glycolytic gene expression and the Warburg effect; promoting tumor cell proliferation and invasion; and supporting brain tumorigenesis. Our studies unearthed a novel and important mechanism underlying EGFR-mediated Ras activation in tumor development. PMID:26721396

  2. Characterization of a novel phosphorylation site in the sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC.

    PubMed

    Rosenbaek, L L; Assentoft, M; Pedersen, N B; MacAulay, N; Fenton, R A

    2012-12-01

    The sodium-chloride cotransporter, NCC, is essential for renal electrolyte balance. NCC function can be modulated by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we characterized the role and physiological regulation of a novel phosphorylation site in NCC at Ser124 (S124). Novel phospho-specific antibodies targeting pS124-NCC demonstrated a band of 160 kDa in the kidney cortex, but not medulla, which was preabsorbed by a corresponding phosphorylated peptide. Confocal microscopy with kidney tubule segment-specific markers localized pS124-NCC to all distal convoluted tubule cells. Double immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that pS124-NCC co-localized with total NCC in the apical plasma membrane of distal convoluted tubule cells and intracellular vesicles. Acute treatment of Munich-Wistar rats or vasopressin-deficient Brattleboro rats with the vasopressin type 2 receptor-specific agonist dDAVP significantly increased pS124-NCC abundance, with no changes in total NCC plasma membrane abundance. pS124-NCC levels also increased in abundance in rats after stimulation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by dietary low sodium intake. In contrast to other NCC phosphorylation sites, the STE20/SPS1-related proline-alanine-rich kinase and oxidative stress-response kinases (SPAK and OSR1) were not able to phosphorylate NCC at S124. Protein kinase arrays identified multiple kinases that were able to bind to the region surrounding S124. Four of these kinases (IRAK2, CDK6/Cyclin D1, NLK and mTOR/FRAP) showed weak but significant phosphorylation activity at S124. In oocytes, (36)Cl uptake studies combined with biochemical analysis showed decreased activity of plasma membrane-associated NCC when replacing S124 with alanine (A) or aspartic acid (D). In novel tetracycline-inducible MDCKII-NCC cell lines, S124A and S124D mutants were able to traffic to the plasma membrane similarly to wildtype NCC. PMID:22966159

  3. An Extensive Survey of Tyrosine Phosphorylation Revealing New Sites in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heibeck, Tyler H.; Ding, Shi-Jian; Opresko, Lee K.; Zhao, Rui; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Wiley, H. S.; Qian, Weijun

    2009-08-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation is a central regulatory mechanism in cell signaling. To extensively characterize the site-specific tyrosine phosphorylation in human cells, we present here a global survey of tyrosine phosphorylation sites in a normal-derived human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) line by applying anti-phosphotyrosine (pTyr) peptide immunoaffinity purification (IP) coupled with high sensitivity LC-MS/MS. A total of 481 tyrosine phosphorylation sites (covered by 716 unique peptides) from 285 proteins were confidently identified in HMEC following the analysis of both the basal condition and an acute stimulated condition with epidermal growth factor (EGF). The estimated false discovery rate is 1.0% as measured by comparison against a scrambled database search. Comparison of these data to the literature showed significant agreement in site matches. Additionally 281 sites were not previously observed in HMEC culture were found. Twenty-nine of these sites have not been reported in any human cell or tissue system. The global profiling also allowed us to examine the phosphorylation stoichiometry differences based on spectral count information. Comparison of the data to a previous global proteome profiling study illustrates that most of the highly phoshorylated proteins are of relatively low-abundance. Large differences in phosphorylation stoichiometry for sites within the same protein were also observed for many of the identified proteins, suggesting potentially more important functional roles for those highly phosphorylated pTyr sites within a given protein. By mapping to major signaling networks such as EGF receptor and insulin growth factor-1 receptor signaling pathways, many known proteins involved in these pathways were revealed to be tyrosine phosphorylated, which should allow us to select interesting targeted involved in a given pathway for more directed studies. This extensive HMEC tyrosine phosphorylation dataset represents an important database

  4. Analysis of acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation sites using antibodies to synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Safran, A; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Three peptides corresponding to residues 354-367, 364-374, 373-387 of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) delta subunit were synthesized. These peptides represent the proposed phosphorylation sites of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the tyrosine-specific protein kinase and the calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase respectively. Using these peptides as substrates for phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase it was shown that only peptides 354-367 was phosphorylated whereas the other two were not. These results verify the location of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site within the AChR delta subunit. Antibodies elicited against these peptides reacted with the delta subunit. The antipeptide antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 5.46) specific for the delta subunit were tested for their binding to non-phosphorylated receptor and to receptor phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Antibodies to peptide 354-367 were found to react preferentially with non-phosphorylated receptor whereas the two other anti-peptide antibodies bound equally to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated receptors. Monoclonal antibody 7F2 reacted preferentially with the phosphorylated form of the receptor whereas monoclonal antibody 5.46 did not distinguish between the two forms. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3816758

  5. Phosphorylation of a C-terminal auto-inhibitory domain increases SMARCAL1 activity.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Clinton; Bansbach, Carol E; Zhao, Runxiang; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun; Cortez, David

    2014-01-01

    SMARCAL1 promotes the repair and restart of damaged replication forks. Either overexpression or silencing SMARCAL1 causes the accumulation of replication-associated DNA damage. SMARCAL1 is heavily phosphorylated. Here we identify multiple phosphorylation sites, including S889, which is phosphorylated even in undamaged cells. S889 is highly conserved through evolution and it regulates SMARCAL1 activity. Specifically, S889 phosphorylation increases the DNA-stimulated ATPase activity of SMARCAL1 and increases its ability to catalyze replication fork regression. A phosphomimetic S889 mutant is also hyperactive when expressed in cells, while a non-phosphorylatable mutant is less active. S889 lies within a C-terminal region of the SMARCAL1 protein. Deletion of the C-terminal region also creates a hyperactive SMARCAL1 protein suggesting that S889 phosphorylation relieves an auto-inhibitory function of this SMARCAL1 domain. Thus, S889 phosphorylation is one mechanism by which SMARCAL1 activity is regulated to ensure the proper level of fork remodeling needed to maintain genome integrity during DNA synthesis. PMID:24150942

  6. GIT1 Phosphorylation on Serine 46 by PKD3 Regulates Paxillin Trafficking and Cellular Protrusive Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Huck, Bettina; Kemkemer, Ralf; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Hausser, Angelika; Olayioye, Monilola A.

    2012-01-01

    The continuous assembly and disassembly of focal adhesions is required for efficient cell spreading and migration. The G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein 1 (GIT1) is a multidomain protein whose dynamic localization to sites of cytoskeletal remodeling is critically involved in the regulation of these processes. Here we provide evidence that the subcellular localization of GIT1 is regulated by protein kinase D3 (PKD3) through direct phosphorylation on serine 46. GIT1 phosphorylation on serine 46 was abrograted by PKD3 depletion, thereby identifying GIT1 as the first specific substrate for this kinase. A GIT1 S46D phosphomimetic mutant localized to motile, paxillin-positive cytoplasmic complexes, whereas the phosphorylation-deficient GIT1 S46A was enriched in focal adhesions. We propose that phosphorylation of GIT1 on serine 46 by PKD3 represents a molecular switch by which GIT1 localization, paxillin trafficking, and cellular protrusive activity are regulated. PMID:22893698

  7. Cdk1 Phosphorylates SPAT-1/Bora to Promote Plk1 Activation in C. elegans and Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Yann; Cirillo, Luca; Panbianco, Costanza; Martino, Lisa; Tavernier, Nicolas; Schwager, Françoise; Van Hove, Lucie; Joly, Nicolas; Santamaria, Anna; Pintard, Lionel; Gotta, Monica

    2016-04-19

    The conserved Bora protein is a Plk1 activator, essential for checkpoint recovery after DNA damage in human cells. Here, we show that Bora interacts with Cyclin B and is phosphorylated by Cyclin B/Cdk1 at several sites. The first 225 amino acids of Bora, which contain two Cyclin binding sites and three conserved phosphorylated residues, are sufficient to promote Plk1 phosphorylation by Aurora A in vitro. Mutating the Cyclin binding sites or the three conserved phosphorylation sites abrogates the ability of the N terminus of Bora to promote Plk1 activation. In human cells, Bora-carrying mutations of the three conserved phosphorylation sites cannot sustain mitotic entry after DNA damage. In C. elegans embryos, mutation of the three conserved phosphorylation sites in SPAT-1, the Bora ortholog, results in a severe mitotic entry delay. Our results reveal a crucial and conserved role of phosphorylation of the N terminus of Bora for Plk1 activation and mitotic entry. PMID:27068477

  8. Phosphorylation sites of the B2 chain of bovine alpha-crystallin

    SciTech Connect

    Chiesa, R.; Gawinowicz-Kolks, M.A.; Kleiman, N.J.; Spector, A.

    1987-05-14

    The B2 chain of bovine lens alpha-crystallin is phosphorylated in a cAMP-dependent reaction. By analysis of /sup 32/P-labelled chymotryptic peptides isolated from alpha-crystallin obtained from lenses labelled in organ culture, two phosphorylated B2 chain fragments were found. Sequence analysis of the fragments gave the following results: Arg-Ala-Pro-Ser-Trp-Ile-Asp-Thr-Gly-Leu and Ser-Leu-Ser-Pro-Phe corresponding to residues 56 to 65 and 43 to 47, respectively. It is established by this work that B1 is a phosphorylated post-translational product of B2. Both the A2 and B2 chains of alpha-crystallin are phosphorylated at a similar site with the sequence Arg-(X)-Pro-Ser. This is an unusual site for cAMP-phosphorylation since the phosphorylated serine is preceded by a proline residue. It may also be of significance that the other B2 chain phosphorylation site even more radically differs from previously reported cAMP-dependent phosphorylation sites.

  9. A Broadly Conserved G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase Phosphorylation Mechanism Controls Drosophila Smoothened Activity

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Dominic; Cheng, Shuofei; Faubert, Denis; Hipfner, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling is essential for normal growth, patterning, and homeostasis of many tissues in diverse organisms, and is misregulated in a variety of diseases including cancer. Cytoplasmic Hedgehog signaling is activated by multisite phosphorylation of the seven-pass transmembrane protein Smoothened (Smo) in its cytoplasmic C-terminus. Aside from a short membrane-proximal stretch, the sequence of the C-terminus is highly divergent in different phyla, and the evidence suggests that the precise mechanism of Smo activation and transduction of the signal to downstream effectors also differs. To clarify the conserved role of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in Smo regulation, we mapped four clusters of phosphorylation sites in the membrane-proximal C-terminus of Drosophila Smo that are phosphorylated by Gprk2, one of the two fly GRKs. Phosphorylation at these sites enhances Smo dimerization and increases but is not essential for Smo activity. Three of these clusters overlap with regulatory phosphorylation sites in mouse Smo and are highly conserved throughout the bilaterian lineages, suggesting that they serve a common function. Consistent with this, we find that a C-terminally truncated form of Drosophila Smo consisting of just the highly conserved core, including Gprk2 regulatory sites, can recruit the downstream effector Costal-2 and activate target gene expression, in a Gprk2-dependent manner. These results indicate that GRK phosphorylation in the membrane proximal C-terminus is an evolutionarily ancient mechanism of Smo regulation, and point to a higher degree of similarity in the regulation and signaling mechanisms of bilaterian Smo proteins than has previously been recognized. PMID:25009998

  10. Phosphorylation of IGFBP-1 at discrete sites elicits variable effects on IGF-I receptor autophosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Abu Shehab, Majida; Iosef, Cristiana; Wildgruber, Robert; Sardana, Girish; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2013-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that hypoxia and leucine deprivation cause hyperphosphorylation of IGF-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) at discrete sites that markedly enhanced IGF-I affinity and inhibited IGF-I-stimulated cell growth. In this study we investigated the functional role of these phosphorylation sites using mutagenesis. We created three IGFBP-1 mutants in which individual serine (S119/S169/S98) residues were substituted with alanine and S101A was recreated for comparison. The wild-type (WT) and mutant IGFBP-1 were expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells and IGFBP-1 in cell media was isolated using isoelectric-focusing-free-flow electrophoresis. BIACore analysis indicated that the changes in IGF-I affinity for S98A and S169A were moderate, whereas S119A greatly reduced the affinity of IGFBP-1 for IGF-I (100-fold, P < .0001). Similar results were obtained with S101A. The IGF-I affinity changes of the mutants were reflected in their ability to inhibit IGF-I-induced receptor autophosphorylation. Employing receptor-stimulation assay using IGF-IR-overexpressing P6 cells, we found that WT-IGFBP-1 inhibited IGF-IRβ autophosphorylation (~2-fold, P < .001), possibly attributable to sequestration of IGF-I. Relative to WT, S98A and S169A mutants did not inhibit receptor autophosphorylation. S119A, on the other hand, greatly stimulated the receptor (2.3-fold, P < .05). The data with S101A matched S119A. In summary, we show that phosphorylation at S98 and S169 resulted in milder changes in IGF-I action; nonetheless most dramatic inhibitory effects on the biological activity of IGF-I were due to IGFBP-1 phosphorylation at S119. Our results provide novel demonstration that IGFBP-1 phosphorylation at S119 can enhance affinity for IGF-I possibly through stabilization of the IGF-IGFBP-1 complex. These data also propose that the synergistic interaction of distinct phosphorylation sites may be important in eliciting more pronounced effects on IGF-I affinity that needs further

  11. Phosphorylation and Activation of RhoA by ERK in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Junfeng; Li, Laiji; Ballermann, Barbara; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA has been implicated in various cellular activities, including the formation of stress fibers, cell motility, and cytokinesis. In addition to the canonical GTPase cycle, recent findings have suggested that phosphorylation further contributes to the tight regulation of Rho GTPases. Indeed, RhoA is phosphorylated on serine 188 (188S) by a number of protein kinases. We have recently reported that Rac1 is phosphorylated on threonine 108 (108T) by extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Here, we provide evidence that RhoA is phosphorylated by ERK on 88S and 100T in response to EGF stimulation. We show that ERK interacts with RhoA and that this interaction is dependent on the ERK docking site (D-site) at the C-terminus of RhoA. EGF stimulation enhanced the activation of the endogenous RhoA. The phosphomimetic mutant, GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E, when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, displayed higher GTP-binding than wild type RhoA. Moreover, the expression of GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E increased actin stress fiber formation in COS-7 cells, which is consistent with its higher activity. In contrast to Rac1, phosphorylation of RhoA by ERK does not target RhoA to the nucleus. Finally, we show that regardless of the phosphorylation status of RhoA and Rac1, substitution of the RhoA PBR with the Rac1 PBR targets RhoA to the nucleus and substitution of Rac1 PBR with RhoA PBR significantly reduces the nuclear localization of Rac1. In conclusion, ERK phosphorylates RhoA on 88S and 100T in response to EGF, which upregulates RhoA activity. PMID:26816343

  12. Phosphorylation and Activation of RhoA by ERK in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Junfeng; Li, Laiji; Ballermann, Barbara; Wang, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoA has been implicated in various cellular activities, including the formation of stress fibers, cell motility, and cytokinesis. In addition to the canonical GTPase cycle, recent findings have suggested that phosphorylation further contributes to the tight regulation of Rho GTPases. Indeed, RhoA is phosphorylated on serine 188 (188S) by a number of protein kinases. We have recently reported that Rac1 is phosphorylated on threonine 108 (108T) by extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation. Here, we provide evidence that RhoA is phosphorylated by ERK on 88S and 100T in response to EGF stimulation. We show that ERK interacts with RhoA and that this interaction is dependent on the ERK docking site (D-site) at the C-terminus of RhoA. EGF stimulation enhanced the activation of the endogenous RhoA. The phosphomimetic mutant, GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E, when transiently expressed in COS-7 cells, displayed higher GTP-binding than wild type RhoA. Moreover, the expression of GFP-RhoA S88E/T100E increased actin stress fiber formation in COS-7 cells, which is consistent with its higher activity. In contrast to Rac1, phosphorylation of RhoA by ERK does not target RhoA to the nucleus. Finally, we show that regardless of the phosphorylation status of RhoA and Rac1, substitution of the RhoA PBR with the Rac1 PBR targets RhoA to the nucleus and substitution of Rac1 PBR with RhoA PBR significantly reduces the nuclear localization of Rac1. In conclusion, ERK phosphorylates RhoA on 88S and 100T in response to EGF, which upregulates RhoA activity. PMID:26816343

  13. An ensemble method approach to investigate kinase-specific phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Datta, Sutapa; Mukhopadhyay, Subhasis

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most significant and well-studied post-translational modifications, and it plays an important role in various cellular processes. It has made a considerable impact in understanding the protein functions which are involved in revealing signal transductions and various diseases. The identification of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites has an important role in elucidating the mechanism of phosphorylation; however, experimental techniques for identifying phosphorylation sites are labor intensive and expensive. An exponentially increasing number of protein sequences generated by various laboratories across the globe require computer-aided procedures for reliably and quickly identifying the phosphorylation sites, opening a new horizon for in silico analysis. In this regard, we have introduced a novel ensemble method where we have selected three classifiers (least square support vector machine, multilayer perceptron, and k-Nearest Neighbor) and three different feature encoding parameters (dipeptide composition, physicochemical properties of amino acids, and protein-protein similarity score). Each of these classifiers is trained on each of the three different parameter systems. The final results of the ensemble method are obtained by fusing the results of all the classifiers by a weighted voting algorithm. Extensive experiments reveal that our proposed method can successfully predict phosphorylation sites in a kinase-specific manner and performs significantly better when compared with other existing phosphorylation site prediction methods. PMID:24872686

  14. Phosphorylation-independent stimulation of DNA topoisomerase II alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Saijo, M; Tanaka, M; Enomoto, T

    1996-05-01

    It has been suggested that casein kinase II phosphorylates DNA topoisomerase II alpha (topo II alpha) in mouse FM3A cells, by comparison of phosphopeptide maps of topo II alpha labeled in intact cells and of topo II alpha phosphorylated by various kinases in vitro. The phosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by casein kinase II, which attached a maximum of two phosphate groups per topo II alpha molecule, had no effect on the activity of topo II alpha. Dephosphorylation of purified topo II alpha by potato acid phosphatase, which almost completely dephosphorylated the topo II alpha, did not reduce the activity of topo II alpha. The incubation itself, regardless of phosphorylation or dephosphorylation status, stimulated the enzyme activity in both reactions. Topo II alpha activity was stimulated by incubation in a medium containing low concentrations of glycerol but not in that containing high concentrations of glycerol, such as the 50% in which purified topo II alpha is stored. The stimulation of topo II alpha activity by incubation was dependent on the concentration of topo II alpha, requiring a relatively high concentration of topo II alpha. PMID:8631919

  15. Phosphorylation of McArdle phosphorylase induces activity.

    PubMed Central

    Cerri, C G; Willner, J H

    1981-01-01

    In McArdle disease, myophosphorylase deficiency, enzyme activity is absent but the presence of an altered enzyme protein can frequently be demonstrated. We have found that phosphorylation of this protein in vitro can result in catalytic activity. We studied muscle of four patients; all lacked myophosphorylase activity, but myophosphorylase protein was demonstrated by immunodiffusion or gel electrophoresis. Incubation of muscle homogenate supernatants with cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and ATP resulted in phosphorylase activity. The activated enzyme comigrated with normal human myophosphorylase in gel electrophoresis. Incubation with [gamma-32P]ATP resulted in incorporatin of 32P into the band possessing phosphorylase activity. Activation of phosphorylase by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was inhibited by antibodies to normal human myophosphorylase or by inhibitory protein to cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Incubation of muscle homogenates with phosphorylase b kinase and ATP also resulted in phosphorylase activity. After the action of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, the resulting activity was similar to that of phosphorylase b. However, incubation with phosphorylase kinase resulted in activity similar to that of phosphorylase a. For several reasons, it is not likely that McArdle disease is due to lack of normal phosphorylation, but restoration of activity to the mutant protein by phosphorylation may provide a clue to understanding the mechanism of this genetic defect. Images PMID:6265901

  16. RF-Phos: A Novel General Phosphorylation Site Prediction Tool Based on Random Forest

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Hamid D.; Jones, Ahoi; Kim, Jung H.; Newman, Robert H.; KC, Dukka B.

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most widespread regulatory mechanisms in eukaryotes. Over the past decade, phosphorylation site prediction has emerged as an important problem in the field of bioinformatics. Here, we report a new method, termed Random Forest-based Phosphosite predictor 2.0 (RF-Phos 2.0), to predict phosphorylation sites given only the primary amino acid sequence of a protein as input. RF-Phos 2.0, which uses random forest with sequence and structural features, is able to identify putative sites of phosphorylation across many protein families. In side-by-side comparisons based on 10-fold cross validation and an independent dataset, RF-Phos 2.0 compares favorably to other popular mammalian phosphosite prediction methods, such as PhosphoSVM, GPS2.1, and Musite. PMID:27066500

  17. Differential roles of phosphorylation in the formation of transcriptional active RNA polymerase I

    PubMed Central

    Fath, Stephan; Milkereit, Philipp; Peyroche, Gerald; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe; Tschochner, Herbert

    2001-01-01

    Regulation of rDNA transcription depends on the formation and dissociation of a functional complex between RNA polymerase I (pol I) and transcription initiation factor Rrn3p. We analyzed whether phosphorylation is involved in this molecular switch. Rrn3p is a phosphoprotein that is predominantly phosphorylated in vivo when it is not bound to pol I. In vitro, Rrn3p is able both to associate with pol I and to enter the transcription cycle in its nonphosphorylated form. By contrast, phosphorylation of pol I is required to form a stable pol I-Rrn3p complex for efficient transcription initiation. Furthermore, association of pol I with Rrn3p correlates with a change in the phosphorylation state of pol I in vivo. We suggest that phosphorylation at specific sites of pol I is a prerequisite for proper transcription initiation and that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of pol I is one possibility to modulate cellular rDNA transcription activity. PMID:11717393

  18. Mimicking phosphorylation of αB-crystallin affects its chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Ecroyd, Heath; Meehan, Sarah; Horwitz, Joseph; Aquilina, J. Andrew; Benesch, Justin L. P.; Robinson, Carol V.; Macphee, Cait E.; Carver, John A.

    2006-01-01

    αB-crystallin is a member of the sHsp (small heat-shock protein) family that prevents misfolded target proteins from aggregating and precipitating. Phosphorylation at three serine residues (Ser19, Ser45 and Ser59) is a major post-translational modification that occurs to αB-crystallin. In the present study, we produced recombi-nant proteins designed to mimic phosphorylation of αB-crystallin by incorporating a negative charge at these sites. We employed these mimics to undertake a mechanistic and structural invest-igation of the effect of phosphorylation on the chaperone activity of αB-crystallin to protect against two types of protein misfolding, i.e. amorphous aggregation and amyloid fibril assembly. We show that mimicking phosphorylation of αB-crystallin results in more efficient chaperone activity against both heat-induced and reduc-tion-induced amorphous aggregation of target proteins. Mimick-ing phosphorylation increased the chaperone activity of αB-crystallin against one amyloid-forming target protein (κ-casein), but decreased it against another (ccβ-Trp peptide). We observed that both target protein identity and solution (buffer) conditions are critical factors in determining the relative chaperone ability of wild-type and phosphorylated αB-crystallins. The present study provides evidence for the regulation of the chaperone activity of αB-crystallin by phosphorylation and indicates that this may play an important role in alleviating the pathogenic effects associated with protein conformational diseases. PMID:16928191

  19. Sites and roles of phosphorylation of the human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase subunit UL44

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Laurie A.; Strang, Blair L.; Lin, Eric W.; Kamil, Jeremy P.; Coen, Donald M.

    2011-09-01

    The human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase subunit UL44 is a phosphoprotein, but its sites and roles of phosphorylation have not been investigated. We compared sites of phosphorylation of UL44 in vitro by the viral protein kinase UL97 and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 with those in infected cells. Transient treatment of infected cells with a UL97 inhibitor greatly reduced labeling of two minor UL44 phosphopeptides. Viruses containing alanine substitutions of most UL44 residues that are phosphorylated in infected cells exhibited at most modest effects on viral DNA synthesis and yield. However, substitution of highly phosphorylated sites adjacent to the nuclear localization signal abolished viral replication. The results taken together are consistent with UL44 being phosphorylated directly by UL97 during infection, and a crucial role for phosphorylation-mediated nuclear localization of UL44 for viral replication, but lend little support to the widely held hypothesis that UL97-mediated phosphorylation of UL44 is crucial for viral DNA synthesis.

  20. Rapamycin enhances eIF4E phosphorylation by activating MAP kinase-interacting kinase 2a (Mnk2a).

    PubMed

    Stead, Rebecca L; Proud, Christopher G

    2013-08-19

    Eukaryotic initiation factor eIF4E and its phosphorylation play key roles in cell transformation and tumorigenesis. eIF4E is phosphorylated by the Mnks (MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase-interacting kinases). Rapamycin increases eIF4E phosphorylation in cancer cells, potentially limiting their anti-cancer effects. Here we show that the rapamycin-induced increase in eIF4E phosphorylation reflects increased activity of Mnk2 but not Mnk1. This activation requires a novel phosphorylation site in Mnk2a, Ser437. Our findings have potentially important implications for the use of rapamycin and its analogues in cancer therapy, suggesting that inhibitors of mTOR and Mnk (or Mnk2) may be more efficacious than rapalogs alone. PMID:23831578

  1. Molecular profiling of activated neurons by phosphorylated ribosome capture.

    PubMed

    Knight, Zachary A; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L; Wysocki, Robert W; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-21

    The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, thereby enriching directly for the mRNAs expressed in discrete subpopulations of activated cells. We use this approach to identify neurons in the hypothalamus regulated by changes in salt balance or food availability. We show that galanin neurons are activated by fasting and that prodynorphin neurons restrain food intake during scheduled feeding. These studies identify elements of the neural circuit that controls food intake and illustrate how the activity-dependent capture of cell-type-specific transcripts can elucidate the functional organization of a complex tissue. PMID:23178128

  2. Characterization of the reversible phosphorylation and activation of ERK8

    PubMed Central

    Klevernic, Iva V.; Stafford, Margaret J.; Morrice, Nicholas; Peggie, Mark; Morton, Simon; Cohen, Philip

    2005-01-01

    ERK8 (extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase 8) expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells was catalytically active and phosphorylated at both residues of the Thr-Glu-Tyr motif. Dephosphorylation of the threonine residue by PP2A (protein serine/threonine phosphatase 2A) decreased ERK8 activity by over 95% in vitro, whereas complete dephosphorylation of the tyrosine residue by PTP1B (protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B) decreased activity by only 15–20%. Wild-type ERK8 expressed in HEK-293 cells was over 100-fold less active than the enzyme expressed in bacteria or insect cells, but activity could be increased by exposure to hydrogen peroxide, by incubation with the protein serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid, or more weakly by osmotic shock. In unstimulated cells, ERK8 was monophosphorylated at Tyr-177, and exposure to hydrogen peroxide induced the appearance of ERK8 that was dually phosphorylated at both Thr-175 and Tyr-177. IGF-1 (insulin-like growth factor 1), EGF (epidermal growth factor), PMA or anisomycin had little effect on activity. In HEK-293 cells, phosphorylation of the Thr-Glu-Tyr motif of ERK8 was prevented by Ro 318220, a potent inhibitor of ERK8 in vitro. The catalytically inactive mutants ERK8[D154A] and ERK8[K42A] were not phosphorylated in HEK-293 cells or E. coli, whether or not the cells had been incubated with protein phosphatase inhibitors or exposed to hydrogen peroxide. Our results suggest that the activity of ERK8 in transfected HEK-293 cells depends on the relative rates of ERK8 autophosphorylation and dephosphorylation by one or more members of the PPP family of protein serine/threonine phosphatases. The major residue in myelin basic protein phosphorylated by ERK8 (Ser-126) was distinct from that phosphorylated by ERK2 (Thr-97), demonstrating that, although ERK8 is a proline-directed protein kinase, its specificity is distinct from ERK1/ERK2. PMID:16336213

  3. GPS 2.0, a Tool to Predict Kinase-specific Phosphorylation Sites in Hierarchy *S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yu; Ren, Jian; Gao, Xinjiao; Jin, Changjiang; Wen, Longping; Yao, Xuebiao

    2008-01-01

    Identification of protein phosphorylation sites with their cognate protein kinases (PKs) is a key step to delineate molecular dynamics and plasticity underlying a variety of cellular processes. Although nearly 10 kinase-specific prediction programs have been developed, numerous PKs have been casually classified into subgroups without a standard rule. For large scale predictions, the false positive rate has also never been addressed. In this work, we adopted a well established rule to classify PKs into a hierarchical structure with four levels, including group, family, subfamily, and single PK. In addition, we developed a simple approach to estimate the theoretically maximal false positive rates. The on-line service and local packages of the GPS (Group-based Prediction System) 2.0 were implemented in Java with the modified version of the Group-based Phosphorylation Scoring algorithm. As the first stand alone software for predicting phosphorylation, GPS 2.0 can predict kinase-specific phosphorylation sites for 408 human PKs in hierarchy. A large scale prediction of more than 13,000 mammalian phosphorylation sites by GPS 2.0 was exhibited with great performance and remarkable accuracy. Using Aurora-B as an example, we also conducted a proteome-wide search and provided systematic prediction of Aurora-B-specific substrates including protein-protein interaction information. Thus, the GPS 2.0 is a useful tool for predicting protein phosphorylation sites and their cognate kinases and is freely available on line. PMID:18463090

  4. Phosphorylation sites in BubR1 that regulate kinetochore attachment, tension, and mitotic exit

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Haomin; Hittle, James; Zappacosta, Francesca; Annan, Roland S.; Hershko, Avram; Yen, Timothy J.

    2008-01-01

    BubR1 kinase is essential for the mitotic checkpoint and also for kinetochores to establish microtubule attachments. In this study, we report that BubR1 is phosphorylated in mitosis on four residues that differ from sites recently reported to be phosphorylated by Plk1 (Elowe, S., S. Hummer, A. Uldschmid, X. Li, and E.A. Nigg. 2007. Genes Dev. 21:2205–2219; Matsumura, S., F. Toyoshima, and E. Nishida. 2007. J. Biol. Chem. 282:15217–15227). S670, the most conserved residue, is phosphorylated at kinetochores at the onset of mitosis and dephosphorylated before anaphase onset. Unlike the Plk1-dependent S676 phosphorylation, S670 phosphorylation is sensitive to microtubule attachments but not to kinetochore tension. Functionally, phosphorylation of S670 is essential for error correction and for kinetochores with end-on attachments to establish tension. Furthermore, in vitro data suggest that the phosphorylation status of BubR1 is important for checkpoint inhibition of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome. Finally, RNA interference experiments show that Mps1 is a major but not the exclusive kinase that specifies BubR1 phosphorylation in vivo. The combined data suggest that BubR1 may be an effector of multiple kinases that are involved in discrete aspects of kinetochore attachments and checkpoint regulation. PMID:19015317

  5. Tau phosphorylation at Alzheimer's disease-related Ser356 contributes to tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is elevated.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kanae; Oka, Mikiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Shimizu, Sawako; Hisanaga, Shin-Ichi; Iijima, Koichi M

    2016-09-16

    Abnormal phosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein tau is observed in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD-related phosphorylation of two tau residues, Ser262 and Ser356, by PAR-1/MARK stabilizes tau in the initial phase of mismetabolism, leading to subsequent phosphorylation events, accumulation, and toxicity. However, the relative contribution of phosphorylation at each of these sites to tau stabilization has not yet been elucidated. In a Drosophila model of human tau toxicity, we found that tau was phosphorylated at Ser262, but not at Ser356, and that blocking Ser262 phosphorylation decreased total tau levels. By contrast, when PAR-1 was co-overexpressed with tau, tau was hyperphosphorylated at both Ser262 and Ser356. Under these conditions, the protein levels of tau were significantly elevated, and prevention of tau phosphorylation at both residues was necessary to completely suppress this elevation. These results suggest that tau phosphorylation at Ser262 plays the predominant role in tau stabilization when PAR-1/MARK activity is normal, whereas Ser356 phosphorylation begins to contribute to this process when PAR-1/MARK activity is abnormally elevated, as in diseased brains. PMID:27520376

  6. Identification of in vivo protein phosphorylation sites in human pathogen Schistosoma japonicum by a phosphoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Luo, Rong; Zhou, Chunjing; Lin, Jiaojiao; Yang, Dehao; Shi, Yaojun; Cheng, Guofeng

    2012-01-01

    Schistosome is the causative agent of human schistosomiasis and related animal disease. Reversible protein phosphorylation plays a key role in signaling processing that are vital for a cell and organism. However, it remains to be undercharacterized in schistosomes. In the present study, we characterized in vivo protein phosphorylation events in different developmental stages (schistosomula and adult worms) of Schistosoma japonicum by using microvolume immobilized metal-ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) pipette tips coupled to nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS. In total, 127 distinct phosphorylation sites were identified in 92 proteins in S. japonicum. A comparison of the phosphopeptides identified between the schistosomula and the adult worms revealed 30 phosphoproteins co-detected in both of the two worms. These proteins included several signal molecules and enzymes such as 14-3-3 protein, cysteine string protein, heat shock protein 90, epidermal growth factor receptor pathway substrate 8, proliferation-associated protein 2G4, peptidyl-prolyl isomerase G, phosphofructokinase and thymidylate kinase. Additionally, the phosphorylation sites were examined for phosphorylation specific motif and evolutionarily conservation. The study represents the first attempt to determine in vivo protein phosphorylation in S. japonicum by using a phosphoproteomic approach. The results by providing an inventory of phosphorylated proteins may facilitate to further understand the mechanisms involved in schistosome development and growth, and then may result in the development of novel vaccine candidates and drug targets for schistosomiasis control. PMID:22036931

  7. PKC phosphorylates HEXIM1 and regulates P-TEFb activity

    PubMed Central

    Fujinaga, Koh; Barboric, Matjaz; Li, Qintong; Luo, Zeping; Price, David H.; Peterlin, B. Matija

    2012-01-01

    The positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. In cells, P-TEFb partitions between small active and larger inactive states. In the latter, HEXIM1 binds to 7SK snRNA and recruits as well as inactivates P-TEFb in the 7SK snRNP. Several stimuli can affect this P-TEFb equilibrium. In this study, we demonstrate that protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates the serine at position158 (S158) in HEXIM1. This phosphorylated HEXIM1 protein neither binds to 7SK snRNA nor inhibits P-TEFb. Phorbol esters or the engagement of the T cell antigen receptor, which activate PKC and the expression of the constitutively active (CA) PKCθ protein, which is found in T cells, inhibit the formation of the 7SK snRNP. All these stimuli increase P-TEFb-dependent transcription. In contrast, the kinase-negative PKCθ and the mutant HEXIM1 (S158A) proteins block effects of these PKC-activating stimuli. These results indicate that the phosphorylation of HEXIM1 by PKC represents a major regulatory step of P-TEFb activity in cells. PMID:22821562

  8. Phosphorylation of ferredoxin and regulation of renal mitochondrial 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Nemani, R; Ghazarian, J G; Moorthy, B; Wongsurawat, N; Strong, R; Armbrecht, H J

    1989-09-15

    The kidney is the principal physiologic site of production of biologically active 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The 25-hydroxyvitamin D-1 alpha-hydroxylase (1-OHase) activity found in renal mitochondria is under tight hormonal control. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the renal conversion of 25-hydroxyvitamin D to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D in young animals, which is accompanied by dephosphorylation of ferredoxin (Fx), a component of the mitochondrial 1-OHase enzyme complex (Siegel, N., Wongsurawat, N., and Armbrecht, H. J. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 16998-17003). The present study investigates the capacity of Fx to be phosphorylated in vitro and to modulate the 1-OHase activity of a reconstituted system. Fx was phosphorylated by renal mitochondrial type II protein kinase. Phosphorylation did not alter Fx mobility on sodium dodecyl sulfate gels but did decrease the pI as measured by isoelectric focusing. Amino acid analysis demonstrated that 1 mol of serine and 1 mol of threonine were phosphorylated per mol of Fx. Peptide mapping of phosphorylated Fx was consistent with phosphorylation of serine 88 and threonine 85 or 97. Fx was selectively dephosphorylated by rabbit skeletal muscle protein phosphatase C2 but not C1. Phosphorylation of Fx significantly inhibited the 1-OHase activity of a reconstituted system consisting of Fx reductase, Fx, and renal mitochondrial cytochrome P-450. These findings suggest that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of Fx may play a role in modulating renal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D production. PMID:2768268

  9. Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Akt Phosphorylation Regulates Bax Activation

    PubMed Central

    Sadidi, Mahdieh; Lentz, Stephen I.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) are involved in many cellular processes that positively and negatively regulate cell fate. H2O2, acting as an intracellular messenger, activates phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream target Akt, and promotes cell survival. The aim of the current study was to understand the mechanism by which PI3K/Akt signaling promotes survival in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. We demonstrate that PI3K/Akt mediates phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member Bax. This phosphorylation suppresses apoptosis and promotes cell survival. Increased survival in the presence of H2O2 was blocked by LY294002, an inhibitor of PI3K activation. LY294002 prevented Bax phosphorylation and resulted in Bax translocation to the mitochondria, cytochrome c release, caspase-3 activation, and cell death. Collectively, these findings reveal a mechanism by which H2O2-induced activation of PI3K/Akt influences posttranslational modification of Bax and inactivate a key component of the cell death machinery. PMID:19278624

  10. Multiple phosphorylation events control chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor I orphan nuclear receptor activity.

    PubMed

    Gay, Frédérique; Baráth, Peter; Desbois-Le Péron, Christine; Métivier, Raphaël; Le Guével, Rémy; Birse, Darcy; Salbert, Gilles

    2002-06-01

    Chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor I (COUP-TFI) is an orphan member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily that comprises key regulators of many biological functions, such as embryonic development, metabolism, homeostasis, and reproduction. Although COUP-TFI can both actively silence gene transcription and antagonize the functions of various other nuclear receptors, the COUP-TFI orphan receptor also acts as a transcriptional activator in certain contexts. Moreover, COUP-TFI has recently been shown to serve as an accessory factor for some ligand-bound nuclear receptors, suggesting that it may modulate, both negatively and positively, a wide range of hormonal responses. In the absence of any identified cognate ligand, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of COUP-TFI activity remain unclear. The elucidation of several putative phosphorylation sites for MAPKs, PKC, and casein kinase II within the sequence of this orphan receptor led us to investigate phosphorylation events regulating the various COUP-TFI functions. After showing that COUP-TFI is phosphorylated in vivo, we provide evidence that in vivo inhibition of either MAPK or PKC signaling pathway leads to a specific and pronounced decrease in COUP-TFI-dependent transcriptional activation of the vitronectin gene promoter. Focusing on the molecular mechanisms underlying the MAPK- and PKC-mediated regulation of COUP-TFI activity, we show that COUP-TFI can be directly targeted by PKC and MAPK. These phosphorylation events differentially modulate COUP-TFI functions: PKC-mediated phosphorylation enhances COUP-TFI affinity for DNA and MAPK-mediated phosphorylation positively regulates the transactivation function of COUP-TFI, possibly through enhancing specific coactivator recruitment. These data provide evidence that COUP-TFI is likely to integrate distinct signaling pathways and raise the possibility that multiple extracellular signals influence biological processes controlled by COUP

  11. Impairments in Site-Specific AS160 Phosphorylation and Effects of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Consitt, Leslie A.; Van Meter, Jessica; Newton, Christopher A.; Collier, David N.; Dar, Moahad S.; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen F.P.; Treebak, Jonas T.; Tanner, Charles J.; Houmard, Joseph A.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if site-specific phosphorylation at the level of Akt substrate of 160 kDa (AS160) is altered in skeletal muscle from sedentary humans across a wide range of the adult life span (18–84 years of age) and if endurance- and/or strength-oriented exercise training could rescue decrements in insulin action and skeletal muscle AS160 phosphorylation. A euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp and skeletal muscle biopsies were performed in 73 individuals encompassing a wide age range (18–84 years of age), and insulin-stimulated AS160 phosphorylation was determined. Decrements in whole-body insulin action were associated with impairments in insulin-induced phosphorylation of skeletal muscle AS160 on sites Ser-588, Thr-642, Ser-666, and phospho-Akt substrate, but not Ser-318 or Ser-751. Twelve weeks of endurance- or strength-oriented exercise training increased whole-body insulin action and reversed impairments in AS160 phosphorylation evident in insulin-resistant aged individuals. These findings suggest that a dampening of insulin-induced phosphorylation of AS160 on specific sites in skeletal muscle contributes to the insulin resistance evident in a sedentary aging population and that exercise training is an effective intervention for treating these impairments. PMID:23801578

  12. RpoS proteolysis is regulated by a mechanism that does not require the SprE (RssB) response regulator phosphorylation site.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Celeste N; Ruiz, Natividad; Silhavy, Thomas J

    2004-11-01

    In Escherichia coli the response regulator SprE (RssB) facilitates degradation of the sigma factor RpoS by delivering it to the ClpXP protease. This process is regulated: RpoS is degraded in logarithmic phase but becomes stable upon carbon starvation, resulting in its accumulation. Because SprE contains a CheY domain with a conserved phosphorylation site (D58), the prevailing model posits that this control is mediated by phosphorylation. To test this model, we mutated the conserved response regulator phosphorylation site (D58A) of the chromosomal allele of sprE and monitored RpoS levels in response to carbon starvation. Though phosphorylation contributed to the SprE basal activity, we found that RpoS proteolysis was still regulated upon carbon starvation. Furthermore, our results indicate that phosphorylation of wild-type SprE occurs by a mechanism that is independent of acetyl phosphate. PMID:15489452

  13. A Novel Effect of MARCKS Phosphorylation by Activated PKC: The Dephosphorylation of Its Serine 25 in Chick Neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R.; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  14. A novel effect of MARCKS phosphorylation by activated PKC: the dephosphorylation of its serine 25 in chick neuroblasts.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Andrea; Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich C Kinase Substrate) is a peripheral membrane protein, especially abundant in the nervous system, and functionally related to actin organization and Ca-calmodulin regulation depending on its phosphorylation by PKC. However, MARCKS is susceptible to be phosphorylated by several different kinases and the possible interactions between these phosphorylations have not been fully studied in intact cells. In differentiating neuroblasts, as well as some neurons, there is at least one cell-type specific phosphorylation site: serine 25 (S25) in the chick. We demonstrate here that S25 is included in a highly conserved protein sequence which is a Cdk phosphorylatable region, located far away from the PKC phosphorylation domain. S25 phosphorylation was inhibited by olomoucine and roscovitine in neuroblasts undergoing various states of cell differentiation in vitro. These results, considered in the known context of Cdks activity in neuroblasts, suggest that Cdk5 is the enzyme responsible for this phosphorylation. We find that the phosphorylation by PKC at the effector domain does not occur in the same molecules that are phosphorylated at serine 25. The in situ analysis of the subcellular distribution of these two phosphorylated MARCKS variants revealed that they are also segregated in different protein clusters. In addition, we find that a sustained stimulation of PKC by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) provokes the progressive disappearance of phosphorylation at serine 25. Cells treated with PMA, but in the presence of several Ser/Thr phosphatase (PP1, PP2A and PP2B) inhibitors indicated that this dephosphorylation is achieved via a phosphatase 2A (PP2A) form. These results provide new evidence regarding the existence of a novel consequence of PKC stimulation upon the phosphorylated state of MARCKS in neural cells, and propose a link between PKC and PP2A activity on MARCKS. PMID:23634231

  15. Phosphorylation of Atg9 regulates movement to the phagophore assembly site and the rate of autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuchen; Backues, Steven K; Baba, Misuzu; Heo, Jin-Mi; Harper, J Wade; Klionsky, Daniel J

    2016-04-01

    Macroautophagy is primarily a degradative process that cells use to break down their own components to recycle macromolecules and provide energy under stress conditions, and defects in macroautophagy lead to a wide range of diseases. Atg9, conserved from yeast to mammals, is the only identified transmembrane protein in the yeast core macroautophagy machinery required for formation of the sequestering compartment termed the autophagosome. This protein undergoes dynamic movement between the phagophore assembly site (PAS), where the autophagosome precursor is nucleated, and peripheral sites that may provide donor membrane for expansion of the phagophore. Atg9 is a phosphoprotein that is regulated by the Atg1 kinase. We used stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to identify phosphorylation sites on this protein and identified an Atg1-independent phosphorylation site at serine 122. A nonphosphorylatable Atg9 mutant showed decreased autophagy activity, whereas the phosphomimetic mutant enhanced activity. Electron microscopy analysis suggests that the different levels of autophagy activity reflect differences in autophagosome formation, correlating with the delivery of Atg9 to the PAS. Finally, this phosphorylation regulates Atg9 interaction with Atg23 and Atg27. PMID:27050455

  16. Regulation of Ci-SCFSlimb binding, Ci proteolysis and Hedgehog pathway activity by Ci phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Smelkinson, Margery G.; Zhou, Qianhe; Kalderon, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) proteins signal by inhibiting the proteolytic processing of Ci/Gli family transcription factors and by increasing Ci/Gli specific activity. In the absence of Hh, phosphorylation of Ci/Gli triggers binding to SCF ubiquitin ligase complexes and consequent proteolysis. Here we define the principal SCFSlimb binding site in Ci as an extended variant of a canonical Slimb/β-TRCP binding motif that can be created by PKA-priming of five successive CK1 sites. GSK3 enhances binding primarily through a nearby region of Ci, which may contact an SCF component other than Slimb. Studies of Ci variants with altered CK1 and GSK3 sites suggest that the large number of phosphorylation sites that direct SCFSlimb binding confers a Hh response that is both sensitive and graded, and that in the Drosophila wing disc, morphogenetic responses involve changes in both the level and specific activity of Ci. We also show that when Ci proteolysis is compromised, its specific activity is limited principally by Su(fu) and not by Cos2 cytoplasmic tethering or PKA phosphorylation. PMID:17925225

  17. Mutation of potential phosphorylation sites in the recombinant R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has significant effects on domain conformation.

    PubMed

    Dulhanty, A M; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R

    1995-01-01

    Mutation of potential cAMP dependent protein kinase sites in the R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator has significant effects on protein function. Mutation of the potential phosphorylation sites from serine to alanine, to abolish the site, reduced sensitivity to activation, or to glutamic acid, to mimic phosphorylation, caused some constitutive activity. To explore the structural effects of these mutations, recombinant R domain peptides were studied: the wild type, a mutant with nine serine residues changed to alanine, and a mutant with eight serine residues changed to glutamic acid. As assessed by C.D. spectroscopy, the mutants have substantially different secondary structure than the wild type, in agreement with the predictive algorithm of Gascuel and Golmard. The results show that mutagenesis of residues alters the polypeptide structurally as well as preventing it from serving as a phosphorylation substrate. Hence, the functional consequences of the mutations may not be entirely due to effects on phosphorylation. PMID:7529497

  18. Systematic Mapping of Posttranslational Modifications in Human Estrogen Receptor-α with Emphasis on Novel Phosphorylation Sites*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Atsriku, Christian; Britton, David J.; Held, Jason M.; Schilling, Birgit; Scott, Gary K.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Benz, Christopher C.; Baldwin, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    A systematic study of posttranslational modifications of the estrogen receptor isolated from the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line is reported. Proteolysis with multiple enzymes, mass spectrometry, and tandem mass spectrometry achieved very high sequence coverage for the full-length 66-kDa endogenous protein from estradiol-treated cell cultures. Nine phosphorylated serine residues were identified, three of which were previously unreported and none of which were previously observed by mass spectrometry by any other laboratory. Two additional modified serine residues were identified in recombinant protein, one previously reported but not observed here in endogenous protein and the other previously unknown. Although major emphasis was placed on identifying new phosphorylation sites, N-terminal loss of methionine accompanied by amino acetylation and a lysine side chain acetylation (or possibly trimethylation) were also detected. The use of both HPLC-ESI and MALDI interfaced to different mass analyzers gave higher sequence coverage and identified more sites than could be achieved by either method alone. The estrogen receptor is critical in the development and progression of breast cancer. One previously unreported phosphorylation site identified here was shown to be strongly dependent on estradiol, confirming its potential significance to breast cancer. Greater knowledge of this array of posttranslational modifications of estrogen receptor, particularly phosphorylation, will increase our understanding of the processes that lead to estradiol-induced activation of this protein and may aid the development of therapeutic strategies for management of hormone-dependent breast cancer. PMID:18984578

  19. Structural basis of how stress-induced MDMX phosphorylation activates p53.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Gohain, N; Zhan, C; Lu, W-Y; Pazgier, M; Lu, W

    2016-04-14

    The tumor-suppressor protein p53 is tightly controlled in normal cells by its two negative regulators--the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 and its homolog MDMX. Under stressed conditions such as DNA damage, p53 escapes MDM2- and MDMX-mediated functional inhibition and degradation, acting to prevent damaged cells from proliferating through induction of cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, senescence or apoptosis. Ample evidence suggests that stress signals induce phosphorylation of MDM2 and MDMX, leading to p53 activation. However, the structural basis of stress-induced p53 activation remains poorly understood because of the paucity of technical means to produce site-specifically phosphorylated MDM2 and MDMX proteins for biochemical and biophysical studies. Herein, we report total chemical synthesis, via native chemical ligation, and functional characterization of (24-108)MDMX and its Tyr99-phosphorylated analog with respect to their ability to interact with a panel of p53-derived peptide ligands and PMI, a p53-mimicking but more potent peptide antagonist of MDMX, using FP and surface plasmon resonance techniques. Phosphorylation of MDMX at Tyr99 weakens peptide binding by approximately two orders of magnitude. Comparative X-ray crystallographic analyses of MDMX and of pTyr99 MDMX in complex with PMI as well as modeling studies reveal that the phosphate group of pTyr99 imposes extensive steric clashes with the C-terminus of PMI or p53 peptide and induces a significant lateral shift of the peptide ligand, contributing to the dramatic decrease in the binding affinity of MDMX for p53. Because DNA damage activates c-Abl tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates MDMX at Tyr99, our findings afford a rare glimpse at the structural level of how stress-induced MDMX phosphorylation dislodges p53 from the inhibitory complex and activates it in response to DNA damage. PMID:26148237

  20. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site in adipose triglyceride lipase as a regulator of lipid droplet localization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xitao; Langlais, Paul; Zhang, Xiaodong; Heckmann, Bradlee L; Saarinen, Alicia M; Mandarino, Lawrence J; Liu, Jun

    2014-06-15

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), the rate-limiting enzyme for triacylglycerol (TG) hydrolysis, has long been known to be a phosphoprotein. However, the potential phosphorylation events that are involved in the regulation of ATGL function remain incompletely defined. Here, using a combinatorial proteomics approach, we obtained evidence that at least eight different sites of ATGL can be phosphorylated in adipocytes. Among them, Thr³⁷² resides within the hydrophobic region known to mediate lipid droplet (LD) targeting. Although it had no impact on the TG hydrolase activity, substitution of phosphorylation-mimic Asp for Thr³⁷² eliminated LD localization and LD-degrading capacity of ATGL expressed in HeLa cells. In contrast, mutation of Thr³⁷² to Ala gave a protein that bound LDs and functioned the same as the wild-type protein. In nonstimulated adipocytes, the Asp mutation led to decreased LD association and basal lipolytic activity of ATGL, whereas the Ala mutation produced opposite effects. Moreover, the LD translocation of ATGL upon β-adrenergic stimulation was also compromised by the Asp mutation. In accord with these findings, the Ala mutation promoted and the Asp mutation attenuated the capacity of ATGL to mediate lipolysis in adipocytes under both basal and stimulated conditions. Collectively, these studies identified Thr³⁷² as a novel phosphorylation site that may play a critical role in determining subcellular distribution as well as lipolytic action of ATGL. PMID:24801391

  1. Functional Implications of O-GlcNAcylation-dependent Phosphorylation at a Proximal Site on Keratin 18.

    PubMed

    Kakade, Poonam S; Budnar, Srikanth; Kalraiya, Rajiv D; Vaidya, Milind M

    2016-06-01

    Keratins 8/18 (K8/18) are phosphoglycoproteins and form the major intermediate filament network of simple epithelia. The three O-GlcNAcylation (Ser(29), Ser(30), and Ser(48)) and two phosphorylation (Ser(33) and Ser(52)) serine sites on K18 are well characterized. Both of these modifications have been reported to increase K18 solubility and regulate its filament organization. In this report, we investigated the site-specific interplay between these two modifications in regulating the functional properties of K18, like solubility, stability, and filament organization. An immortalized hepatocyte cell line (HHL-17) stably expressing site-specific single, double, and triple O-GlcNAc and phosphomutants of K18 were used to identify the site(s) critical for regulating these functions. Keratin 18 mutants where O-GlcNAcylation at Ser(30) was abolished (K18-S30A) exhibited reduced phosphorylation induced solubility, increased stability, defective filament architecture, and slower migration. Interestingly, K18-S30A mutants also showed loss of phosphorylation at Ser(33), a modification known to regulate the solubility of K18. Further to this, the K18 phosphomutant (K18-S33A) mimicked K18-S30A in its stability, filament organization, and cell migration. These results indicate that O-GlcNAcylation at Ser(30) promotes phosphorylation at Ser(33) to regulate the functional properties of K18 and also impact cellular processes like migration. O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation on the same or adjacent sites on most proteins antagonize each other in regulating protein functions. Here we report a novel, positive interplay between O-GlcNAcylation and phosphorylation at adjacent sites on K18 to regulate its fundamental properties. PMID:27059955

  2. Regulation of WT1 by phosphorylation: inhibition of DNA binding, alteration of transcriptional activity and cellular translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Y; Raychaudhuri, B; Gurney, A; Campbell, C E; Williams, B R

    1996-01-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the major post-translational mechanisms by which the activity of transcription factors is regulated. We have investigated the role of phosphorylation in the regulation of nucleic acid binding activity and the nuclear translocation of WT1. Two recombinant WT1 proteins containing the DNA binding domain with or without a three amino acid (KTS) insertion (WT1ZF + KTS and WT1ZF - KTS) were strongly phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC) in vitro. Both PKA and PKC phosphorylation inhibited the ability of WT1ZF + KTS or WT1ZF - KTS to bind to a sequence derived from the WT1 promoter region in gel mobility shift assays. The binding of WT1ZF - KTS to an EGR1 consensus binding site was also inhibited by prior PKA and PKC phosphorylation. We also demonstrate the RNA binding activity of WT1, but this was not altered by phosphorylation. PKA activation by dibutyryl cAMP in WT1-transfected cells resulted in the reversal of WT1 suppression of a reporter construct. Although WT1 protein is predominantly localized to the nucleus, this expression pattern is altered upon PKA activation, resulting in the cytoplasmic retention of WT1. Accordingly, phosphorylation may play a role in modulating the transcriptional regulatory activity of WT1 through interference with nuclear translocation, as well as by inhibition of WT1 DNA binding. Images PMID:8896454

  3. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-08-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  4. Protein kinase A-dependent phosphorylation modulates DNA-binding activity of hepatocyte nuclear factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Viollet, B; Kahn, A; Raymondjean, M

    1997-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4), a liver-enriched transcription factor of the nuclear receptor superfamily, is critical for development and liver-specific gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that its DNA-binding activity is modulated posttranslationally by phosphorylation in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro. In vivo, HNF4 DNA-binding activity is reduced by fasting and by inducers of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. A consensus protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation site located within the A box of its DNA-binding domain has been identified, and its role in phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of HNF4 DNA-binding activity has been investigated. Mutants of HNF4 in which two potentially phosphorylatable serines have been replaced by either neutral or charged amino acids were able to bind DNA in vitro with affinity similar to that of the wild-type protein. However, phosphorylation by PKA strongly repressed the binding affinity of the wild-type factor but not that of HNF4 mutants. Accordingly, in transfection assays, expression vectors for the mutated HNF4 proteins activated transcription more efficiently than that for the wild-type protein-when cotransfected with the PKA catalytic subunit expression vector. Therefore, HNF4 is a direct target of PKA which might be involved in the transcriptional inhibition of liver genes by cAMP inducers. PMID:9234678

  5. Phosphorylation of inhibitor-2 and activation of MgATP-dependent protein phosphatase by rat skeletal muscle glycogen synthase kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hegazy, M.G.; Reimann, E.M.; Thysseril, T.J.; Schlender, K.K.

    1986-05-01

    Rat skeletal muscle contains a glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-M) which is not stimulated by Ca/sup 2 +/ or cAMP. This kinase has an apparent Mr of 62,000 and uses ATP but not GTP as a phosphoryl donor. GSK-M phosphorylated glycogen synthase at sites 2 and 3. It phosphorylated ATP-citrate lyase and activated MgATP-dependent phosphatase in the presence of ATP but not GTP. As expected, the kinase also phosphorylated phosphatase inhibitor 2 (I-2). Phosphatase incorporation reached approximately 0.3 mol/mol of I-2. Phosphopeptide maps were obtained by digesting /sup 32/P-labeled I-2 with trypsin and separating the peptides by reversed phase HPLC. Two partially separated /sup 32/P-labeled peaks were obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with either GSK-M or glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) and these peptides were different from those obtained when I-2 was phosphorylated with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CSU) or casein kinase II (CK-II). When I-2 was phosphorylated with GSK-M or GSK-3 and cleaved by CNBr, a single radioactive peak was obtained. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that I-2 was phosphorylated by GSK-M or GSK-3 predominately in Thr whereas CSU and CK-II phosphorylated I-2 exclusively in Ser. These results indicate that GSK-M is similar to GSK-3 and to ATP-citrate lyase kinase. However, it appears to differ in Mr from ATP-citrate lyase kinase and it differs from GSK-3 in that it phosphorylates glycogen synthase at site 2 and it does not use GTP as a phosphoryl donor.

  6. Interrogation of MDM2 phosphorylation in p53 activation using native chemical ligation: the functional role of Ser17 phosphorylation in MDM2 reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Changyou; Varney, Kristen; Yuan, Weirong; Zhao, Le; Lu, Wuyuan

    2012-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 functions as a crucial negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor protein by antagonizing p53 transactivation activity and targeting p53 for degradation. Cellular stress activates p53 by alleviating MDM2-mediated functional inhibition, even though the molecular mechanisms of stress-induced p53 activation still remain poorly understood. Two opposing models have been proposed to describe the functional and structural role in p53 activation of Ser17 phosphorylation in the N-terminal “lid” (residues 1–24) of MDM2. Using the native chemical ligation technique, we synthesized the p53-binding domain (1–109)MDM2 and its Ser17-phosphorylated analog (1–109)MDM2 pS17 as well as (1–109)MDM2 S17D and (25–109)MDM2, and comparatively characterized their interactions with a panel of p53-derived peptide ligands using surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence polarization, and NMR and CD spectroscopic techniques. We found that the lid is partially structured in apo-MDM2 and occludes p53 peptide binding in a ligand size-dependent manner. Binding of (1–109)MDM2 by the (15–29)p53 peptide fully displaces the lid and renders it completely disordered in the peptide-protein complex. Importantly, neither Ser17 phosphorylation nor the phospho-mimetic mutation S17D has any functional impact on p53 peptide binding to MDM2. Although Ser17 phosphorylation or its mutation to Asp contributes marginally to the stability of the lid conformation in apo-MDM2, neither modification stabilizes apo-MDM2 globally or the displaced lid locally. Our findings demonstrate that Ser17 phosphorylation is functionally neutral with respect to p53 binding, suggesting that MDM2 phosphorylation at a single site is unlikely to play a dominant role in stress-induced p53 activation. PMID:22444248

  7. Tyrosine kinase BMX phosphorylates phosphotyrosine-primed motif mediating the activation of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sen; Jiang, Xinnong; Gewinner, Christina A; Asara, John M; Simon, Nicholas I; Cai, Changmeng; Cantley, Lewis C; Balk, Steven P

    2013-05-28

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase BMX (bone marrow tyrosine kinase gene on chromosome X) is abundant in various cell types and activated downstream of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and the kinase Src, but its substrates are unknown. Positional scanning peptide library screening revealed a marked preference for a priming phosphorylated tyrosine (pY) in the -1 position, indicating that BMX substrates may include multiple tyrosine kinases that are fully activated by pYpY sites in the kinase domain. BMX phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) at Tyr⁵⁷⁷ subsequent to its Src-mediated phosphorylation at Tyr⁵⁷⁶. Loss of BMX by RNA interference or by genetic deletion in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) markedly impaired FAK activity. Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in the kinase domain at Tyr¹¹⁸⁹ and Tyr¹¹⁹⁰, as well as Tyr¹¹⁸⁵, and downstream phosphorylation of the kinase AKT at Thr³⁰⁸ were similarly impaired by BMX deficiency. However, insulin-induced phosphorylation of AKT at Ser⁴⁷³ was not impaired in Bmx knockout MEFs or liver tissue from Bmx knockout mice, which also showed increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, possibly because of decreased abundance of the phosphatase PHLPP (PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase). Thus, by identifying the pYpY motif as a substrate for BMX, our findings suggest that BMX functions as a central regulator among multiple signaling pathways mediated by tyrosine kinases. PMID:23716717

  8. Site-specific IGFBP-1 hyper-phosphorylation in fetal growth restriction: clinical and functional relevance.

    PubMed

    Abu Shehab, Majida; Khosravi, Javad; Han, Victor K M; Shilton, Brian H; Gupta, Madhulika B

    2010-04-01

    Phosphorylation enhances IGFBP-1 binding to IGF-I, thereby limiting the bioavailability of IGF-I that may be important in fetal growth. Our goal in this study was to determine whether changes in site-specific IGFBP-1 phosphorylation were unique to fetal growth restriction. To establish a link, we compared IGFBP-1 phosphorylation (sites and degree) in amniotic fluid from FGR (N = 10) and controls (N = 12). The concentration of serine phosphorylated IGFBP-1 showed a negative correlation with birth weight in FGR (P = 0.049). LC-MS/MS analysis revealed all four previously identified phosphorylation sites (Ser98, Ser101, Ser119, and Ser169) to be common to FGR and control groups. Relative phosphopeptide intensities (LC-MS) between FGR and controls demonstrated 4-fold higher intensity for Ser101 (P = 0.026), 7-fold for Ser98/Ser101 (P = 0.02), and 23-fold for Ser169 (P = 0.002) in the FGR group. Preliminary BIAcore data revealed 4-fold higher association and 1.7-fold lower dissociation constants for IGFBP-1/IGF-I in FGR. A structural model of IGFBP-1 bound to IGF-I indicates that all the phosphorylation sites are on relatively mobile regions of the IGFBP-1 sequence. Residues Ser98, Ser101, and Ser169 are close to structured regions that are involved in IGF-I binding and, therefore, could potentially make direct contact with IGF-I. On the other hand, residue Ser119 is in the middle of the unstructured linker that connects the N- and C-terminal domains of IGFBP-1. The model is consistent with the assumption that residues Ser98, Ser101, and Ser169 could directly interact with IGF-I, and therefore phosphorylation at these sites could change IGF-I interactions. We suggest that site-specific increase in IGFBP-1 phosphorylation limits IGF-I bioavailability, which directly contributes to the development of FGR. This study delineates the potential role of higher phosphorylation of IGFBP-1 in FGR and provides the basis to substantiate these findings with larger sample size. PMID

  9. Determination of sites of U50,488H-promoted phosphorylation of the mouse κ opioid receptor (KOPR): disconnect between KOPR phosphorylation and internalization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chongguang; Chiu, Yi-Ting; Wu, Wenman; Huang, Peng; Mann, Anika; Schulz, Stefan; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-15

    Phosphorylation sites of KOPR (κ opioid receptor) following treatment with the selective agonist U50,488H {(-)(trans)-3,4-dichloro-N-methyl-N-[2-(1-pyrrolidiny)cyclo-hexyl]benzeneacetamide} were identified after affinity purification, SDS/PAGE, in-gel digestion with Glu-C and HPLC-MS/MS. Single- and double-phosphorylated peptides were identified containing phosphorylated Ser(356), Thr(357), Thr(363) and Ser(369) in the C-terminal domain. Antibodies were generated against three phosphopeptides containing pSer(356)/pThr(357), pThr(363) and pSer(369) respectively, and affinity-purified antibodies were found to be highly specific for phospho-KOPR. U50,488H markedly enhanced staining of the KOPR by pThr(363)-, pSer(369)- and pSer(356)/pThr(357)-specific antibodies in immunoblotting, which was blocked by the selective KOPR antagonist norbinaltorphimine. Ser(369) phosphorylation affected Thr(363) phosphorylation and vice versa, and Thr(363) or Ser(369) phosphorylation was important for Ser(356)/Thr(357) phosphorylation, revealing a phosphorylation hierarchy. U50,488H, but not etorphine, promoted robust KOPR internalization, although both were full agonists. U50,488H induced higher degrees of phosphorylation than etorphine at Ser(356)/Thr(357), Thr(363) and Ser(369) as determined by immunoblotting. Using SILAC (stable isotope labelling by amino acids in cell culture) and HPLC-MS/MS, we found that, compared with control (C), U50,488H (U) and etorphine (E) KOPR promoted single phosphorylation primarily at Thr(363) and Ser(369) with U/E ratios of 2.5 and 2 respectively. Both induced double phosphorylation at Thr(363)+Ser(369) and Thr(357)+Ser(369) with U/E ratios of 3.3 and 3.4 respectively. Only U50,488H induced triple phosphorylation at Ser(356)+Thr(357)+Ser(369). An unphosphorylated KOPR-(354-372) fragment containing all of the phosphorylation sites was detected with a C/E/U ratio of 1/0.7/0.4, indicating that ∼60% and ∼30% of the mouse KOPR are phosphorylated

  10. Phosphofructokinase from Fasciola hepatica: activation by phosphorylation and other regulatory properties distinct from the mammalian enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kamemoto, E S; Iltzsch, M H; Lan, L; Mansour, T E

    1987-10-01

    Phosphofructokinase from the liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, was phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase isolated from this organism. Phosphorylated fluke phosphofructokinase had a sevenfold lower apparent Km for its substrate, Fru-6-P, and an eightfold higher 0.5 Vopt for ATP, the enzyme's primary inhibitor, than native phosphofructokinase. Activation of fluke phosphofructokinase following phorphorylation by a mammalian protein kinase catalytic subunit was previously reported (E. S. Kamemoto and T. E. Mansour (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 4346-4351). The catalytic subunit of protein kinase isolated from the liver fluke phosphorylated sites on fluke phosphofructokinase similar to those phosphorylated by the mammalian enzyme. Maximal phosphate incorporation was 0.3 mol P/mol of protomer. The native enzyme was found to contain 1.3 mol P/mol of protomer. In contrast to fluke phosphofructokinase, activity of the mammalian heart enzyme was slightly decreased following phosphorylation. The dependence of allosteric interaction on an acidic pH observed with the mammalian phosphofructokinase was not observed with the fluke enzyme. Unlike mammalian phosphofructokinase, allosteric kinetics of the fluke enzyme was observed at alkaline pH (8.0). Fluke phosphofructokinase was found to be relatively insensitive to inhibition by citrate, a known potent inhibitor of the mammalian enzyme. Fru-2,6-P2, a potent modifier of phosphofructokinase from a variety of sources, was found to activate both native and phosphorylated fluke phosphofructokinase. The most potent activators of fluke phosphofructokinase were found to be Fru-2,6-P2, AMP, and phosphorylation. The endogenous level of Fru-2,6-P2 in the flukes was determined to be 29 +/- 1.3 nmol/g wet wt, a level that may well modulate enzyme activity. Fru-6-P,2-kinase, the enzyme responsible for synthesis of Fru-2,6-P2, was found to be present in the flukes. Our results suggest physiological roles for

  11. Activation of F-Actin Binding Capacity of Ezrin: Synergism of PIP2 Interaction and Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Bosk, Sabine; Braunger, Julia A.; Gerke, Volker; Steinem, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Ezrin is a membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein that can bind F-actin in its active conformation. Several means of regulation of ezrin's activity have been described including phosphorylation of Thr-567 and binding of L-α-phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). However, the relative contributions of these events toward activation of the protein and their potential interdependence are not known. We developed an assay based on solid-supported membranes, to which different ezrin mutants (ezrin T567A (inactive mutant), wild-type, and T567D (active pseudophosphorylated mutant)) were bound, that enabled us to analyze the influence of phosphorylation and PIP2 binding on ezrin's activation state in vitro. The lipid bilayers employed contained either DOGS-NTA-Ni to bind the proteins via an N-terminal His-tag, or PIP2, to which ezrin binds via specific binding sites located in the N-terminal region of the protein. Quantitative analysis of the binding behavior of all three proteins to the two different receptor lipids revealed that all three bind with high affinity and specificity to the two receptor lipids. Fluorescence microscopy on ezrin-decorated solid-supported membranes showed that, dependent on the mode of binding and the phosphorylation state, ezrin is capable of binding actin filaments. A clear synergism between phosphorylation and the receptor lipid PIP2 was observed, suggesting a conformational switch from the dormant to the active, F-actin binding state by recognition of PIP2, which is enhanced by the phosphorylation. PMID:21463584

  12. Preferential Phosphorylation of R-domain Serine 768 Dampens Activation of CFTR Channels by PKA

    PubMed Central

    Csanády, László; Seto-Young, Donna; Chan, Kim W.; Cenciarelli, Cristina; Angel, Benjamin B.; Qin, Jun; McLachlin, Derek T.; Krutchinsky, Andrew N.; Chait, Brian T.; Nairn, Angus C.; Gadsby, David C.

    2005-01-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the protein whose dysfunction causes cystic fibrosis, is a chloride ion channel whose gating is controlled by interactions of MgATP with CFTR's two cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains, but only after several serines in CFTR's regulatory (R) domain have been phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Whereas eight R-domain serines have previously been shown to be phosphorylated in purified CFTR, it is not known how individual phosphoserines regulate channel gating, although two of them, at positions 737 and 768, have been suggested to be inhibitory. Here we show, using mass spectrometric analysis, that Ser 768 is the first site phosphorylated in purified R-domain protein, and that it and five other R-domain sites are already phosphorylated in resting Xenopus oocytes expressing wild-type (WT) human epithelial CFTR. The WT channels have lower activity than S768A channels (with Ser 768 mutated to Ala) in resting oocytes, confirming the inhibitory influence of phosphoserine 768. In excised patches exposed to a range of PKA concentrations, the open probability (Po) of mutant S768A channels exceeded that of WT CFTR channels at all [PKA], and the half-maximally activating [PKA] for WT channels was twice that for S768A channels. As the open burst duration of S768A CFTR channels was almost double that of WT channels, at both low (55 nM) and high (550 nM) [PKA], we conclude that the principal mechanism by which phosphoserine 768 inhibits WT CFTR is by hastening the termination of open channel bursts. The right-shifted Po-[PKA] curve of WT channels might explain their slower activation, compared with S768A channels, at low [PKA]. The finding that phosphorylation kinetics of WT or S768A R-domain peptides were similar provides no support for an alternative explanation, that early phosphorylation of Ser 768 in WT CFTR might also impair subsequent phosphorylation of stimulatory R-domain serines. The

  13. Multiple phosphorylation sites at the C-terminus regulate nuclear import of HCMV DNA polymerase processivity factor ppUL44

    SciTech Connect

    Alvisi, Gualtiero; Marin, Oriano; Pari, Gregory; Mancini, Manuela; Avanzi, Simone; Loregian, Arianna; Jans, David A.; Ripalti, Alessandro

    2011-09-01

    The processivity factor of human cytomegalovirus DNA polymerase, phosphoprotein ppUL44, is essential for viral replication. During viral infection ppUL44 is phosphorylated by the viral kinase pUL97, but neither the target residues on ppUL44 nor the effect of phosphorylation on ppUL44's activity are known. We report here that ppUL44 is phosphorylated when transiently expressed in mammalian cells and coimmunoprecipitates with cellular kinases. Of three potential phosphorylation sites (S413, S415, S418) located upstream of ppUL44's nuclear localization signal (NLS) and one (T427) within the NLS itself, protein kinase CK2 (CK2) specifically phosphorylates S413, to trigger a cascade of phosphorylation of S418 and S415 by CK1 and CK2, respectively. Negative charge at the CK2/CK1 target serine residues facilitates optimal nuclear accumulation of ppUL44, whereas negative charge on T427, a potential cyclin-dependent 1 phosphorylation site, strongly decreases nuclear accumulation. Thus, nuclear transport of ppUL44 is finely tuned during viral infection through complex phosphorylation events.

  14. The Transcription Factor Bach2 Is Phosphorylated at Multiple Sites in Murine B Cells but a Single Site Prevents Its Nuclear Localization.

    PubMed

    Ando, Ryo; Shima, Hiroki; Tamahara, Toru; Sato, Yoshihiro; Watanabe-Matsui, Miki; Kato, Hiroki; Sax, Nicolas; Motohashi, Hozumi; Taguchi, Keiko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Nio, Masaki; Maeda, Tatsuya; Ochiai, Kyoko; Muto, Akihiko; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-22

    The transcription factor Bach2 regulates the immune system at multiple points, including class switch recombination (CSR) in activated B cells and the function of T cells in part by restricting their terminal differentiation. However, the regulation of Bach2 expression and its activity in the immune cells are still unclear. Here, we demonstrated that Bach2 mRNA expression decreased in Pten-deficient primary B cells. Bach2 was phosphorylated in primary B cells, which was increased upon the activation of the B cell receptor by an anti-immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody or CD40 ligand. Using specific inhibitors of kinases, the phosphorylation of Bach2 in activated B cells was shown to depend on the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. The complex of mTOR and Raptor phosphorylated Bach2 in vitro. We identified multiple new phosphorylation sites of Bach2 by mass spectrometry analysis of epitope-tagged Bach2 expressed in the mature B cell line BAL17. Among the sites identified, serine 535 (Ser-535) was critical for the regulation of Bach2 because a single mutation of Ser-535 abolished cytoplasmic accumulation of Bach2, promoting its nuclear accumulation in pre-B cells, whereas Ser-509 played an auxiliary role. Bach2 repressor activity was enhanced by the Ser-535 mutation in B cells. These results suggest that the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway inhibits Bach2 by both repressing its expression and inducing its phosphorylation in B cells. PMID:26620562

  15. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation. PMID:26004805

  16. Quantitative in vivo Analyses Reveal Calcium-dependent Phosphorylation Sites and Identifies a Novel Component of the Toxoplasma Invasion Motor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Nebl, Thomas; Prieto, Judith Helena; Kapp, Eugene; Smith, Brian J.; Williams, Melanie J.; Yates, John R.; Cowman, Alan F.; Tonkin, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites depend on the invasion of host cells for survival and proliferation. Calcium-dependent signaling pathways appear to be essential for micronemal release and gliding motility, yet the target of activated kinases remains largely unknown. We have characterized calcium-dependent phosphorylation events during Toxoplasma host cell invasion. Stimulation of live tachyzoites with Ca2+-mobilizing drugs leads to phosphorylation of numerous parasite proteins, as shown by differential 2-DE display of 32[P]-labeled protein extracts. Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) identified ∼546 phosphorylation sites on over 300 Toxoplasma proteins, including 10 sites on the actomyosin invasion motor. Using a Stable Isotope of Amino Acids in Culture (SILAC)-based quantitative LC-MS/MS analyses we monitored changes in the abundance and phosphorylation of the invasion motor complex and defined Ca2+-dependent phosphorylation patterns on three of its components - GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA. Furthermore, calcium-dependent phosphorylation of six residues across GAP45, MLC1 and MyoA is correlated with invasion motor activity. By analyzing proteins that appear to associate more strongly with the invasion motor upon calcium stimulation we have also identified a novel 15-kDa Calmodulin-like protein that likely represents the MyoA Essential Light Chain of the Toxoplasma invasion motor. This suggests that invasion motor activity could be regulated not only by phosphorylation but also by the direct binding of calcium ions to this new component. PMID:21980283

  17. Identification of phosphorylation sites on AChR delta-subunit associated with dispersal of AChR clusters on the surface of muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nimnual, A S; Chang, W; Chang, N S; Ross, A F; Gelman, M S; Prives, J M

    1998-10-20

    The innervation of embryonic skeletal muscle cells is marked by the redistribution of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on muscle surface membranes into high-density patches at nerve-muscle contacts. To investigate the role of protein phosphorylation pathways in the regulation of AChR surface distribution, we have identified the sites on AChR delta-subunits that undergo phosphorylation associated with AChR cluster dispersal in cultured myotubes. We found that PKC-catalyzed AChR phosphorylation is targeted to Ser378, Ser393, and Ser450, all located in the major intracellular domain of the AChR delta-subunit. Adjacent to one of these sites is a PKA consensus target site (Ser377) that was efficiently phosphorylated by purified PKA in vitro. The PKC activator 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) and the phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OA) produced increased phosphorylation of AChR delta-subunits on the three serine residues that were phosphorylated by purified PKC in vitro. In contrast, treatment of these cells with the PKA activator forskolin, or with the cell-permeable cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP, did not alter the phosphorylation state of surface AChR, suggesting that PKA does not actively phosphorylate the delta-subunit in intact chick myotubes. The effects of TPA and OA included an increase in the proportion of surface AChR that is extracted in Triton X-100, as well as the spreading of AChR from cluster regions to adjacent areas of the muscle cell surface. These findings suggest that PKC-catalyzed phosphorylation on the identified serine residues of AChR delta-subunits may play a role in the surface distribution of these receptors. PMID:9778356

  18. Combinatorial control of cyclin B1 nuclear trafficking through phosphorylation at multiple sites.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Song, H; Walsh, S; Bardes, E S; Kornbluth, S

    2001-02-01

    Entry into mitosis is regulated by the Cdc2 kinase complexed to B-type cyclins. We and others recently reported that cyclin B1/Cdc2 complexes, which appear to be constitutively cytoplasmic during interphase, actually shuttle continually into and out of the nucleus, with the rate of nuclear export exceeding the import rate (). At the time of entry into mitosis, the import rate is increased, whereas the export rate is decreased, leading to rapid nuclear accumulation of Cdc2/cyclin B1. Although it has recently been reported that phosphorylation of 4 serines within cyclin B1 promotes the rapid nuclear translocation of Cdc2/cyclin B1 at G(2)/M, the role that individual phosphorylation sites play in this process has not been examined (, ). We report here that phosphorylation of a single serine residue (Ser(113) of Xenopus cyclin B1) abrogates nuclear export of cyclin B1. This serine lies directly within the cyclin B1 nuclear export sequence and, when phosphorylated, prevents binding of the nuclear export factor, CRM1. In contrast, analysis of phosphorylation site mutants suggests that coordinate phosphorylation of all 4 serines (94, 96, 101, and 113) is required for the accelerated nuclear import of cyclin B1/Cdc2 characteristic of G(2)/M. Additionally, binding of cyclin B1 to importin-beta, the factor known to be responsible for the slow interphase nuclear entry of cyclin B1, appears to be unaffected by the phosphorylation state of cyclin B. These data suggest that a distinct import factor must be recruited to enhance nuclear entry of Cdc2/cyclin B1 at the G(2)/M transition. PMID:11060306

  19. Structural Characterizations of Glycerol Kinase: Unraveling Phosphorylation-Induced Long-Range Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Joanne I.; Kettering, Regina; Saxl, Ruth; Bourand, Alexa; Darbon, Emmanuelle; Joly, Nathalie; Briozzo, Pierre; Deutscher, Josef

    2009-09-11

    Glycerol metabolism provides a central link between sugar and fatty acid catabolism. In most bacteria, glycerol kinase plays a crucial role in regulating channel/facilitator-dependent uptake of glycerol into the cell. In the firmicute Enterococcus casseliflavus, this enzyme's activity is enhanced by phosphorylation of the histidine residue (His232) located in its activation loop, approximately 25 A from its catalytic cleft. We reported earlier that some mutations of His232 altered enzyme activities; we present here the crystal structures of these mutant GlpK enzymes. The structure of a mutant enzyme with enhanced enzymatic activity, His232Arg, reveals that residues at the catalytic cleft are more optimally aligned to bind ATP and mediate phosphoryl transfer. Specifically, the position of Arg18 in His232Arg shifts by approximately 1 A when compared to its position in wild-type (WT), His232Ala, and His232Glu enzymes. This new conformation of Arg18 is more optimally positioned at the presumed gamma-phosphate location of ATP, close to the glycerol substrate. In addition to structural changes exhibited at the active site, the conformational stability of the activation loop is decreased, as reflected by an approximately 35% increase in B factors ('thermal factors') in a mutant enzyme displaying diminished activity, His232Glu. Correlating conformational changes to alteration of enzymatic activities in the mutant enzymes identifies distinct localized regions that can have profound effects on intramolecular signal transduction. Alterations in pairwise interactions across the dimer interface can communicate phosphorylation states over 25 A from the activation loop to the catalytic cleft, positioning Arg18 to form favorable interactions at the beta,gamma-bridging position with ATP. This would offset loss of the hydrogen bonds at the gamma-phosphate of ATP during phosphoryl transfer to glycerol, suggesting that appropriate alignment of the second substrate of glycerol kinase

  20. Effect of phosphorylation on hydrogen-bonding interactions of the active site histidine of the phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system determined by sup 15 N NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    van Dijk, A.A.; de Lange, L.C.M.; Robillard, G.T. ); Bachovchin, W.W. )

    1990-09-04

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this histidine was examined with {sup 15}N NMR. For this purpose we selectively enriched the histidine imidazole nitrogens with {sup 15}N by supplying an E. coli histidine auxotroph with the amino acid labeled either at the N{delta}1 and N{epsilon}2 positions or at only the N{delta}1 position. {sup 15}N NMR spectra of two synthesized model compound, phosphoimidazole and phosphomethylimidazole, were also recorded. The authors show that, prior to phosphorylation, the protonated His15 N{epsilon}2 is strongly hydrogen bonded, most probably to a carboxylate moiety. The H-bond should strengthen the nucleophilic character of the deprotonated N{delta}1, resulting in a good acceptor for the phosphoryl group. The hydrogen bond to the His15 N{delta}1 breaks upon phosphorylation of the residue. Implications of the H-bond structure for the mechanism of phosphorylation of HPr are discussed.

  1. Effect of phosphorylation on hydrogen-bonding interactions of the active site histidine of the phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase system determined by 15N NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, A A; de Lange, L C; Bachovchin, W W; Robillard, G T

    1990-09-01

    The phosphocarrier protein HPr of the phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent sugar transport system of Escherichia coli can exist in a phosphorylated and a nonphosphorylated form. During phosphorylation, the phosphoryl group is carried on a histidine residue, His15. The hydrogen-bonding state of this histidine was examined with 15N NMR. For this purpose we selectively enriched the histidine imidazole nitrogens with 15N by supplying an E. coli histidine auxotroph with the amino acid labeled either at the N delta 1 and N epsilon 2 positions or at only the N delta 1 position. 15N NMR spectra of two synthesized model compounds, phosphoimidazole and phosphomethylimidazole, were also recorded. We show that, prior to phosphorylation, the protonated His15 N epsilon 2 is strongly hydrogen bonded, most probably to a carboxylate moiety. The H-bond should strengthen the nucleophilic character of the deprotonated N delta 1, resulting in a good acceptor for the phosphoryl group. The hydrogen bond to the His15 N delta 1 breaks upon phosphorylation of the residue. Implications of the H-bond structure for the mechanism of phosphorylation of HPr are discussed. PMID:2261470

  2. Identification of phosphorylation sites in Hansenula polymorpha Pex14p by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Soeda, Maiko; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Takenaka, Shigeo; Komori, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    Pex14p is a peroxisomal membrane protein that is involved in both peroxisome biogenesis and selective peroxisome degradation. Previously, we showed that Hansenula polymorpha Pex14p was phosphorylated in vivo. In this study, we identified its phosphorylation site by mass spectrometry. Recombinant His-tagged Pex14p (H6-Pex14p) was overexpressed and purified from the yeast. The protein band corresponding to H6-Pex14p was in-gel digested with trypsin and subjected to LC/MS. As a result of LC/MS, Thr(248) and Ser(258) were identified as the phosphorylated sites. To confirm the phosphorylation sites and explore its functions, we made Ala mutants of the candidate amino acids. In the western blot analysis with anti-Pex14p, S258A mutant gave doublet bands while wild type (WT) and T248A mutants gave triplet bands. Moreover, the double mutant (T248A/S258A) gave a single band. WT and all mutant Pex14p labeled with [(32)P] orthophosphate were immunoprecipitated and analyzed by autoradiography. The phosphorylation of Pex14p was suppressed in S258A mutant, but enhanced in T248A mutant compared to WT. Moreover, the phosphorylated Pex14p was not detected in the T248A/S258A double mutant. All mutants were able to grow on methanol and their matrix proteins (alcohol oxidase and amine oxidase) were mostly localized in peroxisomes. Furthermore all mutants showed selective degradation of peroxisome like WT during the glucose-induced macropexophagy. PMID:23847754

  3. Identification of phosphorylation sites in Hansenula polymorpha Pex14p by mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Katsuhiro; Soeda, Maiko; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Takenaka, Shigeo; Komori, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    Pex14p is a peroxisomal membrane protein that is involved in both peroxisome biogenesis and selective peroxisome degradation. Previously, we showed that Hansenula polymorpha Pex14p was phosphorylated in vivo. In this study, we identified its phosphorylation site by mass spectrometry. Recombinant His-tagged Pex14p (H6-Pex14p) was overexpressed and purified from the yeast. The protein band corresponding to H6-Pex14p was in-gel digested with trypsin and subjected to LC/MS. As a result of LC/MS, Thr248 and Ser258 were identified as the phosphorylated sites. To confirm the phosphorylation sites and explore its functions, we made Ala mutants of the candidate amino acids. In the western blot analysis with anti-Pex14p, S258A mutant gave doublet bands while wild type (WT) and T248A mutants gave triplet bands. Moreover, the double mutant (T248A/S258A) gave a single band. WT and all mutant Pex14p labeled with [32P] orthophosphate were immunoprecipitated and analyzed by autoradiography. The phosphorylation of Pex14p was suppressed in S258A mutant, but enhanced in T248A mutant compared to WT. Moreover, the phosphorylated Pex14p was not detected in the T248A/S258A double mutant. All mutants were able to grow on methanol and their matrix proteins (alcohol oxidase and amine oxidase) were mostly localized in peroxisomes. Furthermore all mutants showed selective degradation of peroxisome like WT during the glucose-induced macropexophagy. PMID:23847754

  4. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  5. C/EBPβ-Thr217 Phosphorylation Stimulates Macrophage Inflammasome Activation and Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Buck, Martina; Solis-Herruzo, Jose; Chojkier, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Amplification of liver injury is mediated by macrophages but the signaling by which the macrophage inflammasome enhances liver injury is not completely understood. The CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein-β (C/EBPβ) is a critical signaling molecule for macrophages because expression of a dominant inhibitor of C/EBPβ DNA-binding sites or a targeted deletion of C/EBPβ results in impaired macrophage differentiation. We reported that expression of the phosphorylation-mutant C/EBPβ-Glu217, which mimics phosphorylated C/EBPβ-Thr217, was sufficient to confer macrophage survival to Anthrax lethal toxin. Here, using primary hepatocytes, primary liver macrophages, dominant positive and negative transgenic mice of the C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphoacceptor, macrophage ablation, and an inhibitory peptide of C/EBPβ-Thr217 phosphorylation, we determined that this phosphorylation is essential for the activation of the inflammasome in liver macrophages and for the hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hepatotoxins that results in liver injury. Similar findings were observed in the livers of patients with acute injury induced by Toxic Oil Syndrome. PMID:27067260

  6. Subcellular localization and Ser-137 phosphorylation regulate tumor-suppressive activity of profilin-1.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Marc I; Cai, Shirong; Boudreau, Aaron; Carey, Clifton J; Lyle, Nicholas; Pappu, Rohit V; Swamidass, S Joshua; Bissell, Mina; Piwnica-Worms, Helen; Shao, Jieya

    2015-04-01

    The actin-binding protein profilin-1 (Pfn1) inhibits tumor growth and yet is also required for cell proliferation and survival, an apparent paradox. We previously identified Ser-137 of Pfn1 as a phosphorylation site within the poly-l-proline (PLP) binding pocket. Here we confirm that Ser-137 phosphorylation disrupts Pfn1 binding to its PLP-containing ligands with little effect on actin binding. We find in mouse xenografts of breast cancer cells that mimicking Ser-137 phosphorylation abolishes cell cycle arrest and apoptotic sensitization by Pfn1 and confers a growth advantage to tumors. This indicates a previously unrecognized role of PLP binding in Pfn1 antitumor effects. Spatial restriction of Pfn1 to the nucleus or cytoplasm indicates that inhibition of tumor cell growth by Pfn1 requires its nuclear localization, and this activity is abolished by a phosphomimetic mutation on Ser-137. In contrast, cytoplasmic Pfn1 lacks inhibitory effects on tumor cell growth but rescues morphological and proliferative defects of PFN1 null mouse chondrocytes. These results help reconcile seemingly opposed cellular effects of Pfn1, provide new insights into the antitumor mechanism of Pfn1, and implicate Ser-137 phosphorylation as a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. PMID:25681442

  7. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  8. Regulation of Smoothened Phosphorylation and High-Level Hedgehog Signaling Activity by a Plasma Membrane Associated Kinase.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuangxi; Li, Shuang; Han, Yuhong; Tong, Chao; Wang, Bing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling controls embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-family protein Smoothened (Smo). Upon stimulation, Smo accumulates on the cell surface in Drosophila or primary cilia in vertebrates, which is thought to be essential for its activation and function, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here we show that Hh stimulates the binding of Smo to a plasma membrane-associated kinase Gilgamesh (Gish)/CK1γ and that Gish fine-tunes Hh pathway activity by phosphorylating a Ser/Thr cluster (CL-II) in the juxtamembrane region of Smo carboxyl-terminal intracellular tail (C-tail). We find that CL-II phosphorylation is promoted by protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of Smo C-tail and depends on cell surface localization of both Gish and Smo. Consistent with CL-II being critical for high-threshold Hh target gene expression, its phosphorylation appears to require higher levels of Hh or longer exposure to the same level of Hh than PKA-site phosphorylation on Smo. Furthermore, we find that vertebrate CK1γ is localized at the primary cilium to promote Smo phosphorylation and Sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway activation. Our study reveals a conserved mechanism whereby Hh induces a change in Smo subcellular localization to promote its association with and activation by a plasma membrane localized kinase, and provides new insight into how Hh morphogen progressively activates Smo. PMID:27280464

  9. Differences in the sites of phosphorylation of the insulin receptor in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.F.; Takayama, S.; Kahn, C.R.

    1985-08-05

    Phosphorylation of the insulin receptor was studied in intact well differentiated hepatoma cells (Fao) and in a solubilized and partially purified receptor preparation obtained from these cells by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin agarose. Tryptic peptides containing the phosphorylation sites of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor were analyzed by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Phosphoamino acid content of these peptides was determined by acid hydrolysis and high voltage electrophoresis. Separation of the phosphopeptides from unstimulated Fao cells revealed one major and two minor phosphoserine-containing peptides and a single minor phosphothreonine-containing peptide. Insulin (10(-7) M) increased the phosphorylation of the beta-subunit of the insulin receptor 3- to 4-fold in the intact Fao cell. After insulin stimulation, two phosphotyrosine-containing peptides were identified. Tyrosine phosphorylation reached a steady state within 20 s after the addition of insulin and remained nearly constant for 1 h. Under our experimental conditions, no significant change in the amount of (TSP)phosphoserine or (TSP)phosphothreonine associated with the beta-subunit was found during the initial response of cells to insulin. When the insulin receptor was extracted from the Fao cells and incubated in vitro with (gamma-TSP)ATP and MnS , very little phosphorylation occurred in the absence of insulin.

  10. Pairwise detection of site-specific receptor phosphorylations using single-molecule blotting

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Lock; Kim, Daehyung; Lee, Seongsil; Kim, Su-Jeong; Noh, Jung Eun; Kim, Joung-Hun; Chae, Young Chan; Lee, Jong-Bong; Ryu, Sung Ho

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) at the plasma membrane (PM) determine the signal transduction efficacy alone and in combination. However, current approaches to identify PTMs provide ensemble results, inherently overlooking combinatorial PTMs in a single polypeptide molecule. Here, we describe a single-molecule blotting (SiMBlot) assay that combines biotinylation of cell surface receptors with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. This method enables quantitative measurement of the phosphorylation status of individual membrane receptor molecules and colocalization analysis of multiple immunofluorescence signals to directly visualize pairwise site-specific phosphorylation patterns at the single-molecule level. Strikingly, application of SiMBlot to study ligand-dependent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, which is widely thought to be multi-phosphorylated, reveals that EGFR on cell membranes is hardly multi-phosphorylated, unlike in vitro autophosphorylated EGFR. Therefore, we expect SiMBlot to aid understanding of vast combinatorial PTM patterns, which are concealed in ensemble methods, and to broaden knowledge of RTK signaling. PMID:27009355

  11. Dual control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the budding yeast APC/C ubiquitin ligase activator Cdh1.

    PubMed

    Höckner, Sebastian; Neumann-Arnold, Lea; Seufert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-15

    The antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) and the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1 is central to eukaryotic cell cycle control. APC/C-Cdh1 targets cyclin B and other regulatory proteins for degradation, whereas Cdks disable APC/C-Cdh1 through phosphorylation of the Cdh1 activator protein at multiple sites. Budding yeast Cdh1 carries nine Cdk phosphorylation sites in its N-terminal regulatory domain, most or all of which contribute to inhibition. However, the precise role of individual sites has remained unclear. Here, we report that the Cdk phosphorylation sites of yeast Cdh1 are organized into autonomous subgroups and act through separate mechanisms. Cdk sites 1-3 had no direct effect on the APC/C binding of Cdh1 but inactivated a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS) and thereby controlled the partitioning of Cdh1 between cytoplasm and nucleus. In contrast, Cdk sites 4-9 did not influence the cell cycle-regulated localization of Cdh1 but prevented its binding to the APC/C. Cdk sites 4-9 reside near two recently identified APC/C interaction motifs in a pattern conserved with the human Cdh1 orthologue. Thus a Cdk-inhibited NLS goes along with Cdk-inhibited APC/C binding sites in yeast Cdh1 to relay the negative control by Cdk1 phosphorylation of the ubiquitin ligase APC/C-Cdh1. PMID:27226481

  12. Small Molecule Substrate Phosphorylation Site Inhibitors of Protein Kinases: Approaches and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are important mediators of cellular communication and attractive drug targets for many diseases. Although success has been achieved with developing ATP-competitive kinase inhibitors, the disadvantages of ATP-competitive inhibitors have led to increased interest in targeting sites outside of the ATP binding pocket. Kinase inhibitors with substrate-competitive, ATP-noncompetitive binding modes are promising due to the possibility of increased selectivity and better agreement between biochemical and in vitro potency. However, the difficulty of identifying these types of inhibitors has resulted in significantly fewer small molecule substrate phosphorylation site inhibitors being reported compared to ATP-competitive inhibitors. This review surveys reported substrate phosphorylation site inhibitors and methods that can be applied to the discovery of such inhibitors, including a discussion of the challenges inherent to these screening methods. PMID:25494294

  13. Non-canonical Smads phosphorylation induced by the glutamate release inhibitor, riluzole, through GSK3 activation in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Abushahba, Walid; Olabisi, Oyenike O; Jeong, Byeong-Seon; Boregowda, Rajeev K; Wen, Yu; Liu, Fang; Goydos, James S; Lasfar, Ahmed; Cohen-Solal, Karine A

    2012-01-01

    Riluzole, an inhibitor of glutamate release, has shown the ability to inhibit melanoma cell xenograft growth. A phase 0 clinical trial of riluzole as a single agent in patients with melanoma resulted in involution of tumors associated with inhibition of both the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phophoinositide-3-kinase/AKT (PI3K/AKT) pathways in 34% of patients. In the present study, we demonstrate that riluzole inhibits AKT-mediated glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) phosphorylation in melanoma cell lines. Because we have demonstrated that GSK3 is involved in the phosphorylation of two downstream effectors of transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), Smad2 and Smad3, at their linker domain, our aim was to determine whether riluzole could induce GSK3β-mediated linker phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3. We present evidence that riluzole increases Smad2 and Smad3 linker phosphorylation at the cluster of serines 245/250/255 and serine 204 respectively. Using GSK3 inhibitors and siRNA knock-down, we demonstrate that the mechanism of riluzole-induced Smad phosphorylation involved GSK3β. In addition, GSK3β could phosphorylate the same linker sites in vitro. The riluzole-induced Smad linker phosphorylation is mechanistically different from the Smad linker phosphorylation induced by TGFβ. We also demonstrate that riluzole-induced Smad linker phosphorylation is independent of the expression of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (GRM1), which is one of the glutamate receptors whose involvement in human melanoma has been documented. We further show that riluzole upregulates the expression of INHBB and PLAU, two genes associated with the TGFβ signaling pathway. The non-canonical increase in Smad linker phosphorylation induced by riluzole could contribute to the modulation of the pro-oncogenic functions of Smads in late stage melanomas. PMID:23077590

  14. Mechanism of influence of phosphorylation on serine 124 on a decrease of catalytic activity of human thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Jarmuła, Adam; Fraczyk, Tomasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Rode, Wojciech

    2010-05-15

    Regulation by phosphorylation is a well-established mechanism for controlling biological activity of proteins. Recently, phosphorylation of serine 124 in human thymidylate synthase (hTS) has been shown to lower the catalytic activity of the enzyme. To clarify a possible mechanism of the observed influence, molecular dynamics (MD), essential dynamics (ED) and MM-GBSA studies were undertaken. Structures derived from the MD trajectories reveal incorrect binding alignment between the pyrimidine ring of the substrate, dUMP, and the pterine ring of the cofactor analogue, THF, in the active site of the phosphorylated enzyme. The ED analysis indicates changes in the behavior of collective motions in the phosphorylated enzyme, suggesting that the formation of the closed ternary complex is hindered. Computed free energies, in agreement with structural analysis, predict that the binding of dUMP and THF to hTS is favored in the native compared to phosphorylated state of the enzyme. The paper describes at the structural level how phosphorylation at the distant site influences the ligand binding. We propose that the 'phosphorylation effect' is transmitted from the outside loop of Ser 124 into the active site via a subtle mechanism initiated by the long-range electrostatic repulsion between the phosphate groups of dUMP and Ser124. The mechanism can be described in terms of the interplay between the two groups of amino acids: the link (residues 125-134) and the patch (residues 189-192), resulting in the change of orientation of the pyrimidine ring of dUMP, which, in turn, prevents the correct alignment between the latter ring and the pterin ring of THF. PMID:20430630

  15. Mechanism of influence of phosphorylation on serine 124 on a decrease of catalytic activity of human thymidylate synthase

    PubMed Central

    Jarmuła, Adam; Frączyk, Tomasz; Cieplak, Piotr; Rode, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Regulation by phosphorylation is a well-established mechanism for controlling biological activity of proteins. Recently, phosphorylation of serine 124 in human thymidylate synthase (hTS) has been shown to lower the catalytic activity of the enzyme. To clarify a possible mechanism of the observed influence, molecular dynamics (MD), essential dynamics (ED) and MM-GBSA studies were undertaken. Structures derived from the MD trajectories reveal incorrect binding alignment between the pyrimidine ring of the substrate, dUMP, and the pterine ring of the cofactor analogue, THF, in the active site of the phosphorylated enzyme. The ED analysis indicates changes in the behavior of collective motions in the phosphorylated enzyme, suggesting that the formation of the closed ternary complex is hindered. Computed free energies, in agreement with structural analysis, predict that the binding of dUMP and THF to hTS is favored in the native compared to phosphorylated state of the enzyme. The paper describes at the structural level how phosphorylation at the distant site influences the ligand binding. We propose that the ‘phosphorylation effect’ is transmitted from the outside loop of Ser 124 into the active site via a subtle mechanism initiated by the long-range electrostatic repulsion between the phosphate groups of dUMP and Ser124. The mechanism can be described in terms of the interplay between the two groups of amino acids: the link (residues 125–134) and the patch (residues 189–192), resulting in the change of orientation of the pyrimidine ring of dUMP, which, in turn, prevents the correct alignment between the latter ring and the pterin ring of THF. PMID:20430630

  16. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels with R domain deletions and translocations show phosphorylation-dependent and -independent activity.

    PubMed

    Baldursson, O; Ostedgaard, L S; Rokhlina, T; Cotten, J F; Welsh, M J

    2001-01-19

    Phosphorylation of the R domain regulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activity. Earlier studies suggested that the R domain controls activity via more than one mechanism; a phosphorylated R domain may stimulate activity, and an unphosphorylated R domain may prevent constitutive activity, i.e. opening with ATP alone. However, the mechanisms responsible for these two regulatory properties are not understood. In this study we asked whether the two effects are dependent on its position in the protein and whether smaller regions from the R domain mediate the effects. We found that several portions of the R domain conferred phosphorylation-stimulated activity. This was true whether the R domain sequences were present in their normal location or were translocated to the C terminus. We also found that some parts of the R domain could be deleted without inducing constitutive activity. However, when residues 760-783 were deleted, channels opened without phosphorylation. Translocation of the R domain to the C terminus did not prevent constitutive activity. These results suggest that different parts of the phosphorylated R domain can stimulate activity and that their location within the protein is not critical. In contrast, prevention of constitutive activity required a short specific sequence that could not be moved to the C terminus. These results are consistent with a recent model of an R domain composed primarily of random coil in which more than one phosphorylation site is capable of stimulating channel activity, and net activity reflects interactions between multiple sites in the R domain and the rest of the channel. PMID:11038358

  17. Genetic mapping of a major site of phosphorylation in adenovirus type 2 E1A proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamotot, A.S.; Ponticelli, A.; Berk, A.J.; Gaynor, R.B.

    1986-07-01

    Adenovirus early region 1A (E1A) encodes two acidic phosphoproteins which are required for transactivation of viral transcription, efficient viral DNA replication in phase G/sub 0/-arrested human cells, and oncogenic transformation of rodent cells. Biochemical analysis of in vivo /sup 32/P-labeled adenovirus type 2 E1A proteins purified with monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that these proteins were phosphorylated at multiple serine residues. Two-dimensional phosphotryptic peptide maps of wild-type and mutant E1A proteins were used to locate a major site of E1A protein phosphorylation at serine-219 of the large E1A protein. Although this serine fell within a consensus sequence for phosphorylation by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinases, experiments with mutant CHO cells defective in these enzymes indicated that it was not. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis was used to substitute an alanine for serine-219. This mutation prevented phosphorylation at this site. Nonetheless, the mutant was indistinguishable from the wild type for early gene transactivation, replication on G/sub 0/-arrested WI-38 cells, and transformation of cloned rat embryo fibroblast cells.

  18. Membrane protein assembly: two cytoplasmic phosphorylated serine sites of Vpu from HIV-1 affect oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Pei; Lin, Meng-Han; Chan, Ya-Ting; Chen, Li-Chyong; Ma, Che; Fischer, Wolfgang B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral protein U (Vpu) encoded by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a short integral membrane protein which is known to self-assemble within the lipid membrane and associate with host factors during the HIV-1 infectivity cycle. In this study, full-length Vpu (M group) from clone NL4-3 was over-expressed in human cells and purified in an oligomeric state. Various single and double mutations were constructed on its phosphorylation sites to mimic different degrees of phosphorylation. Size exclusion chromatography of wild-type Vpu and mutants indicated that the smallest assembly unit of Vpu was a dimer and over time Vpu formed higher oligomers. The rate of oligomerization increased when (i) the degree of phosphorylation at serines 52 and 56 was decreased and (ii) when the ionic strength was increased indicating that the cytoplasmic domain of Vpu affects oligomerization. Coarse-grained molecular dynamic simulations with models of wild-type and mutant Vpu in a hydrated lipid bilayer supported the experimental data in demonstrating that, in addition to a previously known role in downregulation of host factors, the phosphorylation sites of Vpu also modulate oligomerization. PMID:27353136

  19. Phosphorylation of Simian Cytomegalovirus Assembly Protein Precursor (pAPNG.5) and Proteinase Precursor (pAPNG1): Multiple Attachment Sites Identified, Including Two Adjacent Serines in a Casein Kinase II Consensus Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Scott M.; Woods, Amina S.; Gibson, Wade

    1999-01-01

    The assembly protein precursor (pAP) of cytomegalovirus (CMV), and its homologs in other herpesviruses, functions at several key steps during the process of capsid formation. This protein, and the genetically related maturational proteinase, is distinguished from the other capsid proteins by posttranslational modifications, including phosphorylation. The objective of this study was to identify sites at which pAP is phosphorylated so that the functional significance of this modification and the enzyme(s) responsible for it can be determined. In the work reported here, we used peptide mapping, mass spectrometry, and site-directed mutagenesis to identify two sets of pAP phosphorylation sites. One is a casein kinase II (CKII) consensus sequence that contains two adjacent serines, both of which are phosphorylated. The other site(s) is in a different domain of the protein, is phosphorylated less frequently than the CKII site, does not require preceding CKII-site phosphorylation, and causes an electrophoretic mobility shift when phosphorylated. Transfection/expression assays for proteolytic activity showed no gross effect of CKII-site phosphorylation on the enzymatic activity of the proteinase or on the substrate behavior of pAP. Evidence is presented that both the CKII sites and the secondary sites are phosphorylated in virus-infected cells and plasmid-transfected cells, indicating that these modifications can be made by a cellular enzyme(s). Apparent compartmental differences in phosphorylation of the CKII-site (cytoplasmic) and secondary-site (nuclear) serines suggest the involvement of more that one enzyme in these modifications. PMID:10516011

  20. Cyclin Y phosphorylation- and 14-3-3-binding-dependent activation of PCTAIRE-1/CDK16

    PubMed Central

    Shehata, Saifeldin N.; Deak, Maria; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Ohta, Eriko; Hunter, Roger W.; Kalscheuer, Vera M.; Sakamoto, Kei

    2015-01-01

    PCTAIRE-1 [also known as cyclin-dependent kinase 16 (CDK16)] is implicated in various physiological processes such as neurite outgrowth and vesicle trafficking; however, its molecular regulation and downstream targets are largely unknown. Cyclin Y has recently been identified as a key interacting/activating cyclin for PCTAIRE-1; however, the molecular mechanism by which it activates PCTAIRE-1 is undefined. In the present study, we initially performed protein sequence analysis and identified two candidate phosphorylation sites (Ser12 and Ser336) on cyclin Y that might be catalysed by PCTAIRE-1. Although in vitro peptide analysis favoured Ser12 as the candidate phosphorylation site, immunoblot analysis of cell lysates that had been transfected with wild-type (WT) or kinase-inactive (KI) PCTAIRE-1 together with WT or phospho-deficient mutants of cyclin Y suggested Ser336, but not Ser12, as a PCTAIRE-1-dependent phosphorylation site. Monitoring phosphorylation of Ser336 may provide a useful read-out to assess cellular activity of PCTAIRE-1 in vivo; however, a phospho-deficient S336A mutant displayed normal interaction with PCTAIRE-1. Unbiased mass spectrometry and targeted mutagenesis analysis of cyclin Y identified key phosphorylation sites (Ser100 and Ser326) required for 14-3-3 binding. Recombinant WT cyclin Y, but not a S100A/S326A mutant, prepared in COS-1 cells co-purified with 14-3-3 and was able to activate bacterially expressed recombinant PCTAIRE-1 in cell-free assays. Finally, we observed that recently identified PCTAIRE-1 variants found in patients with intellectual disability were unable to interact with cyclin Y, and were inactive enzymes. Collectively, the present work has revealed a new mechanistic insight into activation of PCTAIRE-1, which is mediated through interaction with the phosphorylated form of cyclin Y in complex with 14-3-3. PMID:26205494

  1. Cyclin Y phosphorylation- and 14-3-3-binding-dependent activation of PCTAIRE-1/CDK16.

    PubMed

    Shehata, Saifeldin N; Deak, Maria; Morrice, Nicholas A; Ohta, Eriko; Hunter, Roger W; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Sakamoto, Kei

    2015-08-01

    PCTAIRE-1 [also known as cyclin-dependent kinase 16 (CDK16)] is implicated in various physiological processes such as neurite outgrowth and vesicle trafficking; however, its molecular regulation and downstream targets are largely unknown. Cyclin Y has recently been identified as a key interacting/activating cyclin for PCTAIRE-1; however, the molecular mechanism by which it activates PCTAIRE-1 is undefined. In the present study, we initially performed protein sequence analysis and identified two candidate phosphorylation sites (Ser(12) and Ser(336)) on cyclin Y that might be catalysed by PCTAIRE-1. Although in vitro peptide analysis favoured Ser(12) as the candidate phosphorylation site, immunoblot analysis of cell lysates that had been transfected with wild-type (WT) or kinase-inactive (KI) PCTAIRE-1 together with WT or phospho-deficient mutants of cyclin Y suggested Ser(336), but not Ser(12), as a PCTAIRE-1-dependent phosphorylation site. Monitoring phosphorylation of Ser(336) may provide a useful read-out to assess cellular activity of PCTAIRE-1 in vivo; however, a phospho-deficient S336A mutant displayed normal interaction with PCTAIRE-1. Unbiased mass spectrometry and targeted mutagenesis analysis of cyclin Y identified key phosphorylation sites (Ser(100) and Ser(326)) required for 14-3-3 binding. Recombinant WT cyclin Y, but not a S100A/S326A mutant, prepared in COS-1 cells co-purified with 14-3-3 and was able to activate bacterially expressed recombinant PCTAIRE-1 in cell-free assays. Finally, we observed that recently identified PCTAIRE-1 variants found in patients with intellectual disability were unable to interact with cyclin Y, and were inactive enzymes. Collectively, the present work has revealed a new mechanistic insight into activation of PCTAIRE-1, which is mediated through interaction with the phosphorylated form of cyclin Y in complex with 14-3-3. PMID:26205494

  2. EMT phenotype is induced by increased Src kinase activity via Src-mediated caspase-8 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yang; Li, XiaoJun; Sun, XiangFei; Zhang, YunFeng; Ren, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Caspase-8 governs multiple cell responses to the microenvironmental cues. However, its integration of "death-life" signalings remains elusive. In our study, the role of caspase-8-Src is well-established as a promoter for migration or metastasis in Casp8(+)Src(+) A549/H226 cells in vivo and in vitro. In particular for nude mice models, mice implanted with Casp8(+)Src(+) A459/H226 cells remarkably increased spontaneous tumor metastatic burden with a significant survival disadvantage. Additionally, we detect that Src-mediated caspase-8 phosphorylation stimulates Src phosphorylation at Tyr-416 via the linkage of Src SH2 domain with phosph-Tyr-380 site of caspase-8. In turn, activated Src can efficiently induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic features to promote tumor cells metastasis. Surprisingly, RXDLL motif deletion in the DEDa of caspase-8 attenuates tumor cell migration or metastasis via impairing the recruitment of caspase-8 into the cellular periphery where activated Src is subject to caspase-8 phosphorylation. Together, a simple model is that the peripherization of caspase-8 is well-poised to facilitate Src-mediated caspase-8 phosphrylation at Tyr-380, then binding of phospho-Tyr380 of caspase-8 to Src SH2 domain may maintain Src in an active conformation to induce EMT phenotype, a key step toward cancer metastasis. PMID:22508042

  3. Ceramide-mediated depression in cardiomyocyte contractility through PKC activation and modulation of myofilament protein phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jillian N.; Chowdhury, Shamim A.K.; Warren, Chad M.; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Wieczorek, David F.; Solaro, R. John; Wolska, Beata M.

    2015-01-01

    Although ceramide accumulation in the heart is considered a major factor in promoting apoptosis and cardiac disorders, including heart failure, lipotoxicity and ischemia-reperfusion injury, little is known about ceramide’s role in mediating changes in contractility. In the present study, we measured the functional consequences of acute exposure of isolated field stimulated adult rat cardiomyocytes to C6-ceramide. Exogenous ceramide treatment depressed the peak amplitude and the maximal velocity of shortening without altering intracellular calcium levels or kinetics. The inactive ceramide analog C6-dihydroceramide had no effect on myocyte shortening or [Ca2+]i transients. Experiments testing a potential role for C6-ceramide-mediated effects on activation of protein kinase C (PKC) demonstrated evidence for signaling through the calcium-independent isoform, PKCε. We employed 2 dimensional electrophoresis and anti-phospho-peptide antibodies to test whether treatment of the cardiomyocytes with C6-ceramide altered myocyte shortening via PKC dependent phosphorylation of myofilament proteins. Compared to controls, myocytes treated with ceramide exhibited increased phosphorylation of myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C), specifically at Ser273 and Ser302, and troponin I (cTnI) at sites apart from Ser23/24, which could be attenuated with PKC inhibition. We conclude that the altered myofilament response to calcium resulting from multiple sites of PKC-dependent phosphorylation contributes to contractile dysfunction that is associated with cardiac diseases in which elevations in ceramides are present. PMID:25280528

  4. A small ribozyme with dual-site kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Biondi, Elisa; Maxwell, Adam W.R.; Burke, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfer onto backbone hydroxyls is a recognized catalytic activity of nucleic acids. We find that kinase ribozyme K28 possesses an unusually complex active site that promotes (thio)phosphorylation of two residues widely separated in primary sequence. After allowing the ribozyme to radiolabel itself by phosphoryl transfer from [γ-32P]GTP, DNAzyme-mediated cleavage yielded two radiolabeled cleavage fragments, indicating phosphorylation sites within each of the two cleavage fragments. These sites were mapped by alkaline digestion and primer extension pausing. Enzymatic digestion and mutational analysis identified nucleotides important for activity and established the active structure as being a constrained pseudoknot with unusual connectivity that may juxtapose the two reactive sites. Nuclease sensitivities for nucleotides near the pseudoknot core were altered in the presence of GTPγS, indicating donor-induced folding. The 5′ target site was more strongly favored in full-length ribozyme K28 (128 nt) than in truncated RNAs (58 nt). Electrophoretic mobilities of self-thiophosphorylated products on organomercurial gels are distinct from the 5′ mono-thiophosphorylated product produced by reaction with polynucleotide kinase, potentially indicating simultaneous labeling of both sites within individual RNA strands. Our evidence supports a single, compact structure with local dynamics, rather than global rearrangement, as being responsible for dual-site phosphorylation. PMID:22618879

  5. Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization but partially affects its apoptotic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.-H.; Cheng, C.-M.; Chang, Y.-F.; Wang, T.-Y.; Yuo, C.-Y.; E-mail: m815006@kmu.edu.tw

    2007-03-09

    Apoptin, a chicken anemia virus-encoded protein, induces apoptosis in human tumor cells but not in normal cells. In addition, Apoptin also exhibits tumor-specific nuclear localization and tumor-specific phosphorylation on threonine 108 (T108). Here, we studied the effects of T108 phosphorylation on the tumor-specific nuclear localization and apoptotic activity of Apoptin. We first showed that a hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged Apoptin, but not the green fluorescent protein-fused Apoptin used in many previous studies, exhibited the same intracellular distribution pattern as native Apoptin. We then made and analyzed an HA-Apoptin mutant with its T108 phosphorylation site abolished. We found that Apoptin T108 phosphorylation is not required for its tumor-specific nuclear localization and abolishing the T108 phosphorylation of Apoptin does affect its apoptotic activity in tumor cells but only partially. Our results support the previous finding that Apoptin contains two distinct apoptosis domains located separately at the N- and C-terminal regions and suggest that the T108 phosphorylation may only be required for the apoptotic activity mediated through the C-terminal apoptosis domain.

  6. Oestradiol stimulates tyrosine phosphorylation and hormone binding activity of its own receptor in a cell-free system.

    PubMed Central

    Auricchio, F; Migliaccio, A; Di Domenico, M; Nola, E

    1987-01-01

    Recent experiments have shown that calf uterus oestrogen receptor exists in a tyrosine-phosphorylated hormone binding form and in non-phosphorylated, non-hormone binding form. We report here that physiological concentrations of oestradiol in complex with the receptor stimulate the calf uterus receptor kinase that converts the non-hormone binding receptor into hormone binding receptor through phosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine. The activity of this enzyme has been followed by reactivation of hormone binding sites and phosphorylation on tyrosine of calf uterus phosphatase-inactivated receptor. Phosphorylation of the receptor has been demonstrated by interaction of kinase 32P-phosphorylated proteins with anti-receptor antibody followed either by sucrose gradient centrifugation or SDS-PAGE of the immunoprecipitated proteins. Hormone stimulation of the kinase is inhibited by receptor occupancy of the anti-oestrogen tamoxifen. Oestradiol-receptor complex increases the affinity of the kinase for the dephosphorylated receptor. Findings of this report are consistent with the observation that several protein tyrosine kinases that are associated with peptide hormone receptors are stimulated by the binding of the hormone to the receptor. This is the first report on the activation of a tyrosine kinase by a steroid hormone. The finding that hormones can regulate their own receptor binding activity through a tyrosine kinase is also new. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3691476

  7. CPhos: a program to calculate and visualize evolutionarily conserved functional phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Boyang; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Knepper, Mark A; Saeed, Fahad

    2012-11-01

    Profiling using high-throughput MS has discovered an overwhelming number of novel protein phosphorylation sites ("phosphosites"). However, the functional relevance of these sites is not always clear. In light of recent studies on the evolutionary mechanism of phosphorylation, we have developed CPhos, a Java program that can assess the conservation of phosphosites among species using an information theory-based approach. The degree of conservation established using CPhos can be used to assess the functional significance of phosphosites. CPhos has a user friendly graphical user interface and is available both as a web service and as a standalone Java application to assist phosphoproteomic researchers in analyzing and prioritizing lists of phosphosites for further experimental validation. CPhos can be accessed or downloaded at http://helixweb.nih.gov/CPhos/. PMID:23001821

  8. Hyperosmotic stress activates Rho: differential involvement in Rho kinase-dependent MLC phosphorylation and NKCC activation.

    PubMed

    Di Ciano-Oliveira, Caterina; Sirokmány, Gábor; Szászi, Katalin; Arthur, William T; Masszi, András; Peterson, Mark; Rotstein, Ori D; Kapus, András

    2003-09-01

    Hyperosmotic stress initiates adaptive responses, including phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC) and concomitant activation of Na+-K+-Cl- cotransporter (NKCC). Because the small GTPase Rho is a key regulator of MLC phosphorylation, we investigated 1) whether Rho is activated by hyperosmotic stress, and if so, what the triggering factors are, and 2) whether the Rho/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway is involved in MLC phosphorylation and NKCC activation. Rho activity was measured in tubular epithelial cells by affinity pulldown assay. Hyperosmolarity induced rapid (<1 min) and sustained (>20 min) Rho activation that was proportional to the osmotic concentration and reversed within minutes upon restoration of isotonicity. Both decreased cell volume at constant ionic strength and elevated total ionic strength at constant cell volume were capable of activating Rho. Changes in [Na+] and [K+] at normal total salinity failed to activate Rho, and Cl- depletion did not affect the hyperosmotic response. Thus alterations in cellular volume and ionic strength but not individual ion concentrations seem to be the critical triggering factors. Hyperosmolarity induced mono- and diphosphorylation of MLC, which was abrogated by the Rho-family blocker Clostridium toxin B. ROK inhibitor Y-27632 suppressed MLC phosphorylation under isotonic conditions and prevented its rise over isotonic levels in hypertonically stimulated cells. ML-7 had a smaller inhibitory effect. In contrast, it abolished the hypertonic activation of NKCC, whereas Y-27632 failed to inhibit this response. Thus hyperosmolarity activates Rho, and Rho/ROK pathway contributes to basal and hyperosmotic MLC phosphorylation. However, the hypertonic activation of NKCC is ROK independent, implying that the ROK-dependent component of MLC phosphorylation can be uncoupled from NKCC activation. PMID:12748065

  9. Activation of protein kinase Cα increases phosphorylation of the UT-A1 urea transporter at serine 494 in the inner medullary collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Blount, Mitsi A; Cipriani, Penelope; Redd, Sara K; Ordas, Ronald J; Black, Lauren N; Gumina, Diane L; Hoban, Carol A; Klein, Janet D; Sands, Jeff M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertonicity increases urea transport, as well as the phosphorylation and membrane accumulation of UT-A1, the transporter responsible for urea permeability in the inner medullary collect duct (IMCD). Hypertonicity stimulates urea transport through PKC-mediated phosphorylation. To determine whether PKC phosphorylates UT-A1, eight potential PKC phosphorylation sites were individually replaced with alanine and subsequently transfected into LLC-PK1 cells. Of the single mutants, only ablation of the S494 site dampened induction of total UT-A1 phosphorylation by the PKC activator phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu). This result was confirmed using a newly generated antibody that specifically detected phosphorylation of UT-A1 at S494. Hypertonicity increased UT-A1 phosphorylation at S494. In contrast, activators of cAMP pathways (PKA and Epac) did not increase UT-A1 phosphorylation at S494. Activation of both PKC and PKA pathways increased plasma membrane accumulation of UT-A1, although activation of PKC alone did not do so. However, ablating the PKC site S494 decreased UT-A1 abundance in the plasma membrane. This suggests that the cAMP pathway promotes UT-A1 trafficking to the apical membrane where the PKC pathway can phosphorylate the transporter, resulting in increased UT-A1 retention at the apical membrane. In summary, activation of PKC increases the phosphorylation of UT-A1 at a specific residue, S494. Although there is no cross talk with the cAMP-signaling pathway, phosphorylation of S494 through PKC may enhance vasopressin-stimulated urea permeability by retaining UT-A1 in the plasma membrane. PMID:26333598

  10. Nitration of JAK-2 at the 1007Y-1008Y activation epitope impedes phosphorylation at this site: defining a GH, AKT/protein kinase B and nitric oxide synthase axis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Generalized liver protein tyrosine nitration (3’-nitrotyrosine, 3’-NT) increases in vivo after GH injection with immunohistocellular patterns strikingly similar to those we observed for a specific nitration of JAK2 at its 1007Y-1008Y regulatory phosphorylation epitope following proinflammatory chall...

  11. Identification of the in vitro phosphorylation sites on Gs alpha mediated by pp60c-src.

    PubMed

    Moyers, J S; Linder, M E; Shannon, J D; Parsons, S J

    1995-01-15

    Overexpression of pp60c-src in mouse fibroblasts potentiates both agonist-induced signalling through beta-adrenergic receptors and cyclic AMP accumulation in response to cholera toxin [Bushman, Wilson, Luttrell, Moyers and Parsons (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 7462-7466; Moyers, Bouton and Parsons (1993) Mol. Cell. Biol. 13, 2391-2400]. In reconstitution experiments in vitro, phosphorylation of Gs alpha by immune-complexed pp60c-src resulted in enhanced rates of receptor-mediated guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) binding and GTP hydrolysis [Hausdorff, Pitcher, Luttrell, Linder, Kurose, Parsons, Caron and Lefkowitz (1992) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 89, 5720-5724]. These results suggest that one mechanism by which pp60c-src affects signalling through the beta-adrenergic receptor is by phosphorylation and functional alteration of the G protein. To elucidate how phosphorylation of Gs alpha might affect its function, we subjected phosphorylated, recombinant Gs alpha to tryptic phosphopeptide analysis. Phosphotryptic peptides were purified by h.p.l.c. and analysed by Edman degradation to determine the cycle numbers at which radiolabelled phosphotyrosine was released. Candidate peptides that contained Tyr residues at the corresponding positions were synthesized, phosphorylated in vitro by pp60c-src, and their migrations in two-dimensional electrophoresis/t.l.c. were compared with those of tryptic phosphopeptides from intact Gs alpha. We report here that Gs alpha is phosphorylated on two residues by pp60c-src, namely, Tyr-37 and Tyr-377. Tyr-37 lies near the site of beta gamma binding in the N-terminus, within a region postulated to modulate GDP dissociation and activation by GTP [Johnson, Dhanasekaran, Gupta, Lowndes, Vaillancourt and Ruoho (1991) J. Cell Biochem. 47, 136-146], while Tyr-377 is located in the extreme C-terminus, within a region of Gs alpha important for receptor interaction [Sullivan, Miller, Masters, Beiderman, Heideman and

  12. Identification of Phosphorylation Sites within the Signaling Adaptor APPL1 by Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Gant-Branum, Randi L.; Broussard, Joshua A.; Mahsut, Ablatt; Webb, Donna J.; McLean, John A.

    2010-01-01

    APPL1 is a membrane-associated adaptor protein implicated in various cellular processes, including apoptosis, proliferation, and survival. Although there is increasing interest in the biological roles as well as the protein and membrane interactions of APPL1, a comprehensive phosphorylation profile has not been generated. In this study, we use mass spectrometry (MS) to identify 13 phosphorylated residues within APPL1. By using multiple proteases (trypsin, chymotrypsin, and Glu C) and replicate experiments of linear ion trap (LTQ) MS and LTQ-Orbitrap-MS, a combined sequence coverage of 99.6% is achieved. Four of the identified sites are located in important functional domains, suggesting a potential role in regulating APPL1. One of these sites is within the BAR domain, two cluster near the edge of the PH domain, and one is located within the PTB domain. These phosphorylation sites may control APPL1 function by regulating the ability of APPL1 domains to interact with other proteins and membranes. PMID:20095645

  13. DNA-PK and ATM phosphorylation sites in XLF/Cernunnos are not required for repair of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yaping; Mahaney, Brandi L; Yano, Ken-Ichi; Ye, Ruiqiong; Fang, Shujuan; Douglas, Pauline; Chen, David J; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2008-10-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. NHEJ requires the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), Ku70, Ku80, XRCC4, DNA ligase IV and Artemis, as well as DNA polymerases mu and lambda and polynucleotide kinase. Recent studies have identified an additional participant, XLF, for XRCC4-like factor (also called Cernunnos), which interacts with the XRCC4-DNA ligase IV complex and stimulates its activity in vitro, however, its precise role in the DNA damage response is not fully understood. Since the protein kinase activity of DNA-PKcs is required for NHEJ, we asked whether XLF might be a physiological target of DNA-PK. Here, we have identified two major in vitro DNA-PK phosphorylation sites in the C-terminal region of XLF, serines 245 and 251. We show that these represent the major phosphorylation sites in XLF in vivo and that serine 245 is phosphorylated in vivo by DNA-PK, while serine 251 is phosphorylated by Ataxia-Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM). However, phosphorylation of XLF did not have a significant effect on the ability of XLF to interact with DNA in vitro or its recruitment to laser-induced DSBs in vivo. Similarly, XLF in which the identified in vivo phosphorylation sites were mutated to alanine was able to complement the DSB repair defect as well as radiation sensitivity in XLF-deficient 2BN cells. We conclude that phosphorylation of XLF at these sites does not play a major role in the repair of IR-induced DSBs in vivo. PMID:18644470

  14. Slack sodium-activated potassium channel membrane expression requires p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Gururaj, Sushmitha; Fleites, John; Bhattacharjee, Arin

    2016-04-01

    p38 MAPK has long been understood as an inducible kinase under conditions of cellular stress, but there is now increasing evidence to support its role in the regulation of neuronal function. Several phosphorylation targets have been identified, an appreciable number of which are ion channels, implicating the possible involvement of p38 MAPK in neuronal excitability. The KNa channel Slack is an important protein to be studied as it is highly and ubiquitously expressed in DRG neurons and is important in the maintenance of their firing accommodation. We sought to examine if the Slack channel could be a substrate of p38 MAPK activity. First, we found that the Slack C-terminus contains two putative p38 MAPK phosphorylation sites that are highly conserved across species. Second, we show via electrophysiology experiments that KNa currents and further, Slack currents, are subject to tonic modulation by p38 MAPK. Third, biochemical approaches revealed that Slack channel regulation by p38 MAPK occurs through direct phosphorylation at the two putative sites of interaction, and mutating both sites prevented surface expression of Slack channels. Based on these results, we conclude that p38 MAPK is an obligate regulator of Slack channel function via the trafficking of channels into the membrane. The present study identifies Slack KNa channels as p38 MAPK substrates. PMID:26721627

  15. Protein kinase C catalyses the phosphorylation and activation of rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, M; Pajares, M A; Renart, M F; Mato, J M

    1987-01-01

    When a partially purified rat liver phospholipid methyltransferase is incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP and rat brain protein kinase C, phospholipid methyltransferase (Mr 50,000, pI 4.75) becomes phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of the enzyme showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase was accompanied by an approx. 2-fold activation of the enzyme activity. Activity changes and enzyme phosphorylation showed the same time course. Activation of the enzyme also showed Ca2+/lipid-dependency. Protein kinase C mediates phosphorylation of predominantly serine residues of the methyltransferase. One major peak of phosphorylation was identified by analysis of tryptic phosphopeptides by isoelectrofocusing. This peak (pI 5.2) differs from that phosphorylated by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (pI 7.2), demonstrating the specificity of phosphorylation of protein kinase C. Tryptic-peptide mapping by h.p.l.c. of the methyltransferase phosphorylated by protein kinase C revealed one major peak of radioactivity, which could be resolved into two labelled phosphopeptides by t.l.c. The significance of protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation of phospholipid methyltransferase is discussed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 4. PMID:3593229

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM

  17. AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP signalling via phosphorylation-induced activation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B

    PubMed Central

    Johanns, M.; Lai, Y.-C.; Hsu, M.-F.; Jacobs, R.; Vertommen, D.; Van Sande, J.; Dumont, J. E.; Woods, A.; Carling, D.; Hue, L.; Viollet, B.; Foretz, M; Rider, M H

    2016-01-01

    Biguanides such as metformin have previously been shown to antagonize hepatic glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) via direct inhibition of adenylate cyclase by AMP. Here we show that incubation of hepatocytes with the small-molecule AMPK activator 991 decreases glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity and downstream PKA target phosphorylation. Moreover, incubation of hepatocytes with 991 increases the Vmax of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) without affecting intracellular adenine nucleotide concentrations. The effects of 991 to decrease glucagon-stimulated cAMP concentrations and activate PDE4B are lost in hepatocytes deleted for both catalytic subunits of AMPK. PDE4B is phosphorylated by AMPK at three sites, and by site-directed mutagenesis, Ser304 phosphorylation is important for activation. In conclusion, we provide a new mechanism by which AMPK antagonizes hepatic glucagon signalling via phosphorylation-induced PDE4B activation. PMID:26952277

  18. Small-Molecule Inhibition and Activation-Loop Trans-Phosphorylation of the IGF1 Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu,J.; Li, W.; Craddock, B.; Foreman, K.; Mulvihill, M.; Ji, Q.; Miller, W.; Hubbard, S.

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) that has a critical role in mitogenic signalling during embryogenesis and an antiapoptotic role in the survival and progression of many human tumours. Here, we present the crystal structure of the tyrosine kinase domain of IGF1R (IGF1RK), in its unphosphorylated state, in complex with a novel compound, cis-3-[3-(4-methyl-piperazin-l-yl)-cyclobutyl]-1-(2-phenyl-quinolin-7-yl)-imidazo[1, 5-a]pyrazin-8-ylamine (PQIP), which we show is a potent inhibitor of both the unphosphorylated (basal) and phosphorylated (activated) states of the kinase. PQIP interacts with residues in the ATP-binding pocket and in the activation loop, which confers specificity for IGF1RK and the highly related insulin receptor (IR) kinase. In this crystal structure, the IGF1RK active site is occupied by Tyr1135 from the activation loop of an symmetry (two-fold)-related molecule. This dimeric arrangement affords, for the first time, a visualization of the initial trans-phosphorylation event in the activation loop of an RTK, and provides a molecular rationale for a naturally occurring mutation in the activation loop of the IR that causes type II diabetes mellitus.

  19. Identification of phosphorylation sites in the nucleocapsid protein (N protein) of SARS-coronavirus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liang; Shao, Jianmin; Sun, Maomao; Liu, Jinxiu; Xu, Gongjin; Zhang, Xumin; Xu, Ningzhi; Wang, Rong; Liu, Siqi

    2007-12-01

    After decoding the genome of SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV), next challenge is to understand how this virus causes the illness at molecular bases. Of the viral structural proteins, the N protein plays a pivot role in assembly process of viral particles as well as viral replication and transcription. The SARS-CoV N proteins expressed in the eukaryotes, such as yeast and HEK293 cells, appeared in the multiple spots on two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), whereas the proteins expressed in E. coli showed a single 2DE spotE These 2DE spots were further examined by Western blot and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS, and identified as the N proteins with differently apparent pI values and similar molecular mass of 50 kDa. In the light of the observations and other evidences, a hypothesis was postulated that the SARS-CoV N protein could be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. To locate the plausible regions of phosphorylation in the N protein, two truncated N proteins were generated in E. coli and treated with PKC[alpha]. The two truncated N proteins after incubation of PKC[alpha] exhibited the differently electrophoretic behaviors on 2DE, suggesting that the region of 1-256 aa in the N protein was the possible target for PKC[alpha] phosphorylation. Moreover, the SARS-CoV N protein expressed in yeast were partially digested with trypsin and carefully analyzed by MALDI-TOF/TOF MS. In contrast to the completely tryptic digestion, these partially digested fragments generated two new peptide mass signals with neutral loss, and MS/MS analysis revealed two phosphorylated peptides located at the "dense serine" island in the N protein with amino acid sequences, GFYAEGSRGGSQASSRSSSR and GNSGNSTPGSSRGNSPARMASGGGK. With the PKC[alpha] phosphorylation treatment and the partially tryptic digestion, the N protein expressed in E. coli released the same peptides as observed in yeast cells. Thus, this investigation provided the preliminary data to determine the phosphorylation sites in the SARS-CoV N protein, and

  20. New partners and phosphorylation sites of focal adhesion kinase identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Masdeu, Maria del Mar; Armendáriz, Beatriz G; Soriano, Eduardo; Ureña, Jesús Mariano; Burgaya, Ferran

    2016-07-01

    The regulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) involves phosphorylation and multiple interactions with other signaling proteins. Some of these pathways are relevant for nervous system functions such as branching, axonal guidance, and plasticity. In this study, we screened mouse brain to identify FAK-interactive proteins and phosphorylatable residues as a first step to address the neuronal functions of this kinase. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified new phosphorylated sites (Thr 952, Thr 1048, and Ser 1049), which lie in the FAT domain; and putative new partners for FAK, which include cytoskeletal proteins such as drebrin and MAP 6, adhesion regulators such as neurabin-2 and plakophilin 1, and synapse-associated proteins such as SynGAP and a NMDA receptor subunit. Our findings support the participation of brain-localized FAK in neuronal plasticity. PMID:27033120

  1. Serine-15 is the regulatory seryl-phosphorylation site in C sub 4 -leaf phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPCase) from maize

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Jinan; Chollet, R. )

    1990-05-01

    The {sup 32}P-labeled regulatory site phosphopeptide was purified from a tryptic digest of in vitro phosphorylated/activated dark-form PEPCase by metal ion affinity and reversed-phase chromatography and subjected to automated Edman degradation analysis. The amino acid sequence of this phosphoseryl peptide is His-His-Ser(P)-Ile-Asp-Ala-Gln-Leu-Arg. This nonapeptide, which corresponds exactly to residues 13-21 in the deduced primary sequence of the maize leaf carboxylase, is far removed from a recently identified active-site cysteine (Cys-553) in the C-terminal region of the primary structure. Comparative analysis of the deduced N-terminal sequences of C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and CAM leaf PEPCases suggests that the motif of Lys/Arg-X-X-Ser is an important structural requirement of the C{sub 4}- and CAM-leaf protein-serine kinases.

  2. Novel autophosphorylation sites of Src family kinases regulate kinase activity and SH2 domain-binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Weir, Marion E; Mann, Jacqueline E; Corwin, Thomas; Fulton, Zachary W; Hao, Jennifer M; Maniscalco, Jeanine F; Kenney, Marie C; Roman Roque, Kristal M; Chapdelaine, Elizabeth F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Deming, Paula B; Ballif, Bryan A; Hinkle, Karen L

    2016-04-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) are critical players in normal and aberrant biological processes. While phosphorylation importantly regulates SFKs at two known tyrosines, large-scale phosphoproteomics have revealed four additional tyrosines commonly phosphorylated in SFKs. We found these novel tyrosines to be autophosphorylation sites. Mimicking phosphorylation at the C-terminal site to the activation loop decreased Fyn activity. Phosphomimetics and direct phosphorylation at the three SH2 domain sites increased Fyn activity while reducing phosphotyrosine-dependent interactions. While 68% of human SH2 domains exhibit conservation of at least one of these tyrosines, few have been found phosphorylated except when found in cis to a kinase domain. PMID:27001024

  3. Increased phospholipase A2 activity with phosphorylation of peroxiredoxin 6 requires a conformational change in the protein

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Hamidur; Zhou, Suiping; Dodia, Chandra; Feinstein, Sheldon I.; Huang, Shaohui; Speicher, David; Fisher, Aron B.

    2012-01-01

    We have shown previously and confirmed in the present study that the phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity of peroxiredoxin 6 (Prdx6) is markedly increased by phosphorylation. This report evaluated the conformation and thermodynamic stability of Prdx6 protein after phosphorylation to understand the physical basis for increased activity. Phosphorylation resulted in decreased negative far-UV CD, increased ANS binding, and lack of rigid tertiary structure, compatible with a change in conformation to that of a molten globule. The ΔGDo was 3.3 ± 0.3 kcal mol-1 for Prdx6 and 1.7 ± 0.7 kcal mol-1 for pPrdx6 suggesting that phosphorylation destabilizes the protein. Phosphorylation of Prdx6 changed the conformation of the N-terminal domain exposing Trp 33, as determined by tryptophan fluorescence and NaI fluorescence quenching. The kinetics of interaction of proteins with unilamellar liposomes (DPPC/egg PC/cholesterol/PG; 50:25:15:10, mol/mol) was evaluated with tryptophan fluorescence. pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with higher affinity (Kd, 5.6 ± 1.2 μM) in comparison to Prdx6 (Kd, 24.9 ± 4.5 μM). By isothermal titration calorimetry, pPrdx6 bound to liposomes with a large exothermic heat loss (ΔH = -31.49 ± 0.22 kcal mol-1). Correlating our conformation studies with the published crystal structure of oxidized Prdx6 suggests that phosphorylation results in exposure of hydrophobic residues, thereby providing accessibility to the sites for liposome binding. Because binding of the enzyme to the phospholipid substrate interface is a requirement for PLA2 activity, these results indicate that a change in the conformation of Prdx6 upon its phosphorylation is the basis for enhancement of PLA2 enzymatic activity. PMID:22663767

  4. Novel method demonstrates differential ligand activation and phosphatase-mediated deactivation of insulin receptor tyrosine-specific phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Cieniewicz, Anne M; Cooper, Philip R; McGehee, Jennifer; Lingham, Russell B; Kihm, Anthony J

    2016-08-01

    Insulin receptor signaling is a complex cascade leading to a multitude of intracellular functional responses. Three natural ligands, insulin, IGF1 and IGF2, are each capable of binding with different affinities to the insulin receptor, and result in variable biological responses. However, it is likely these affinity differences alone cannot completely explain the myriad of diverse cellular outcomes. Ligand binding initiates activation of a signaling cascade resulting in phosphorylation of the IR itself and other intracellular proteins. The direct catalytic activity along with the temporally coordinated assembly of signaling proteins is critical for insulin receptor signaling. We hypothesized that determining differential phosphorylation among individual tyrosine sites activated by ligand binding or dephosphorylation by phosphatases could provide valuable insight into insulin receptor signaling. Here, we present a sensitive, novel immunoassay adapted from Meso Scale Discovery technology to quantitatively measure changes in site-specific phosphorylation levels on endogenous insulin receptors from HuH7 cells. We identified insulin receptor phosphorylation patterns generated upon differential ligand activation and phosphatase-mediated deactivation. The data demonstrate that insulin, IGF1 and IGF2 elicit different insulin receptor phosphorylation kinetics and potencies that translate to downstream signaling. Furthermore, we show that insulin receptor deactivation, regulated by tyrosine phosphatases, occurs distinctively across specific tyrosine residues. In summary, we present a novel, quantitative and high-throughput assay that has uncovered differential ligand activation and site-specific deactivation of the insulin receptor. These results may help elucidate some of the insulin signaling mechanisms, discriminate ligand activity and contribute to a better understanding of insulin receptor signaling. We propose this methodology as a powerful approach to characterize

  5. Flagellin-induced NLRC4 phosphorylation primes the inflammasome for activation by NAIP5.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Magdalena; Van Opdenbosch, Nina; Vande Walle, Lieselotte; Sirard, Jean-Claude; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Lamkanfi, Mohamed

    2015-02-01

    The Nlrc4 inflammasome contributes to immunity against intracellular pathogens that express flagellin and type III secretion systems, and activating mutations in NLRC4 cause autoinflammation in patients. Both Naip5 and phosphorylation of Nlrc4 at Ser533 are required for flagellin-induced inflammasome activation, but how these events converge upon inflammasome activation is not known. Here, we showed that Nlrc4 phosphorylation occurs independently of Naip5 detection of flagellin because Naip5 deletion in macrophages abolished caspase-1 activation, interleukin (IL)-1β secretion, and pyroptosis, but not Nlrc4 phosphorylation by cytosolic flagellin of Salmonella Typhimurium and Yersinia enterocolitica. ASC speck formation and caspase-1 expression also were dispensable for Nlrc4 phosphorylation. Interestingly, Helicobacter pylori flagellin triggered robust Nlrc4 phosphorylation, but failed to elicit caspase-1 maturation, IL-1β secretion, and pyroptosis, suggesting that it retained Nlrc4 Ser533 phosphorylating-activity despite escaping Naip5 detection. In agreement, the flagellin D0 domain was required and sufficient for Nlrc4 phosphorylation, whereas deletion of the S. Typhimurium flagellin carboxy-terminus prevented caspase-1 maturation only. Collectively, this work suggests a biphasic activation mechanism for the Nlrc4 inflammasome in which Ser533 phosphorylation prepares Nlrc4 for subsequent activation by the flagellin sensor Naip5. PMID:25605939

  6. Structures of KaiC Circadian Clock Mutant Proteins: A New Phosphorylation Site at T426 and Mechanisms of Kinase, ATPase and Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Mori, Tetsuya; Xu, Yao; Pattanayek, Sabuj; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin

    2010-09-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro by three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. Homo-hexameric KaiC displays kinase, phosphatase and ATPase activities; KaiA enhances KaiC phosphorylation and KaiB antagonizes KaiA. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the two known sites in the C-terminal half of KaiC subunits, T432 and S431, follow a strict order (TS {yields} pTS {yields} pTpS {yields} TpS {yields} TS) over the daily cycle, the origin of which is not understood. To address this void and to analyze the roles of KaiC active site residues, in particular T426, we determined structures of single and double P-site mutants of S. elongatus KaiC. The conformations of the loop region harboring P-site residues T432 and S431 in the crystal structures of six KaiC mutant proteins exhibit subtle differences that result in various distances between Thr (or Ala/Asn/Glu) and Ser (or Ala/Asp) residues and the ATP {gamma}-phosphate. T432 is phosphorylated first because it lies consistently closer to P{gamma}. The structures of the S431A and T432E/S431A mutants reveal phosphorylation at T426. The environments of the latter residue in the structures and functional data for T426 mutants in vitro and in vivo imply a role in dephosphorylation. We provide evidence for a third phosphorylation site in KaiC at T426. T426 and S431 are closely spaced and a KaiC subunit cannot carry phosphates at both sites simultaneously. Fewer subunits are phosphorylated at T426 in the two KaiC mutants compared to phosphorylated T432 and/or S431 residues in the structures of wt and other mutant KaiCs, suggesting that T426 phosphorylation may be labile. The structures combined with functional data for a host of KaiC mutant proteins help rationalize why S431 trails T432 in the loss of its phosphate and shed light on the mechanisms of the KaiC kinase, ATPase and phosphatase activities.

  7. Identification of Light-Sensitive Phosphorylation Sites on PERIOD That Regulate the Pace of Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Evrim; Chiu, Joanna C; Edery, Isaac

    2016-03-01

    The main components regulating the pace of circadian (≅24 h) clocks in animals are PERIOD (PER) proteins, transcriptional regulators that undergo daily changes in levels and nuclear accumulation by means of complex multisite phosphorylation programs. In the present study, we investigated the function of two phosphorylation sites, at Ser826 and Ser828, located in a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) on the Drosophila melanogaster PER protein. These sites are phosphorylated by DOUBLETIME (DBT; Drosophila homolog of CK1δ/ε), the key circadian kinase regulating the daily changes in PER stability and phosphorylation. Mutant flies in which phosphorylation at Ser826/Ser828 is blocked manifest behavioral rhythms with periods slightly longer than 1 h and with altered temperature compensation properties. Intriguingly, although phosphorylation at these sites does not influence PER stability, timing of nuclear entry, or transcriptional autoinhibition, the phospho-occupancy at Ser826/Ser828 is rapidly stimulated by light and blocked by TIMELESS (TIM), the major photosensitive clock component in Drosophila and a crucial binding partner of PER. Our findings identify the first phosphorylation sites on core clock proteins that are acutely regulated by photic cues and suggest that some phosphosites on PER proteins can modulate the pace of downstream behavioral rhythms without altering central aspects of the clock mechanism. PMID:26711257

  8. Purification of catalytic domain of rat spleen p72syk kinase and its phosphorylation and activation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Borowski, P; Heiland, M; Kornetzky, L; Medem, S; Laufs, R

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic domain of p72(syk) kinase (CDp72(syk)) was purified from a 30000 g particulate fraction of rat spleen. The purification procedure employed sequential chromatography on columns of DEAE-Sephacel and Superdex-200, and elution from HA-Ultrogel by chloride. The analysis of the final CDp72(syk) preparation by SDS/PAGE revealed a major silver-stained 40 kDa protein. The kinase was identified by covalent modification of its ATP-binding site with [14C]5'-fluorosulphonylbenzoyladenosine and by immunoblotting with a polyclonal antibody against the 'linker' region of p72(syk). By using poly(Glu4, Tyr1) as a substrate, the specific activity of the enzyme was determined as 18.5 nmol Pi/min per mg. Casein, histones H1 and H2B and myelin basic protein were efficiently phosphorylated by CDp72(syk). The kinase exhibited a limited ability to phosphorylate random polymers containing tyrosine residues. CDp72(syk) autophosphorylation activity was associated with an activation of the kinase towards exogenous substrates. The extent of activation was dependent on the substrates added. CDp72(syk) was phosphorylated by protein kinase C (PKC) on serine and threonine residues. With a newly developed assay method, we demonstrated that the PKC-mediated phosphorylation had a strong activating effect on the tyrosine kinase activity of CDp72(syk). Studies extended to conventional PKC isoforms revealed an isoform-dependent manner (alpha > betaI = betaII > gamma) of CDp72(syk) phosphorylation. The different phosphorylation efficiencies of the PKC isoforms closely correlated with the ability to enhance the tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:9531509

  9. A novel protein kinase D phosphorylation site in the tumor suppressor Rab interactor 1 is critical for coordination of cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Susanne; Eiseler, Tim; Scholz, Rolf-Peter; Beck, Alexander; Link, Gisela; Hausser, Angelika

    2011-01-01

    The multifunctional signal adapter protein Ras and Rab interactor 1 (RIN1) is a Ras effector protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell processes such as cell migration and endocytosis. RIN1 signals via two downstream pathways, namely the activation of Rab5 and Abl family kinases. Protein kinase D (PKD) phosphorylates RIN1 at serine 351 in vitro, thereby regulating interaction with 14–3-3 proteins. Here, we report the identification of serine 292 in RIN1 as an in vivo PKD phosphorylation site. PKD-mediated phosphorylation at this site was confirmed with a phospho-specific antibody and by mass spectrometry. We demonstrate that phosphorylation at serine 292 controls RIN1-mediated inhibition of cell migration by modulating the activation of Abl kinases. We further provide evidence that RIN1 in vivo phosphorylation at serine 351 occurs independently of PKD. Collectively, our data identify a novel PKD signaling pathway through RIN1 and Abl kinases that is involved in the regulation of actin remodeling and cell migration. PMID:21209314

  10. Activation of ERK induces phosphorylation of MAPK phosphatase-7, a JNK specific phosphatase, at Ser-446.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Kouhei; Shima, Hiroshi; Katagiri, Chiaki; Kikuchi, Kunimi

    2003-08-22

    We previously showed that MKP-7 suppresses MAPK activation in COS-7 cells in the order of selectivity, JNK > p38 > ERK, but interacts with ERK as well as JNK and p38. In this study we found that, when expressed in COS-7 cells with HA-ERK2, the mobility of FLAG-MKP-7 was decreased on SDS-PAGE gels depending on several stimuli, including phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, fetal bovine serum, epidermal growth factor, H2O2, and ionomycin. By using U0126, a MEK inhibitor, and introducing several point mutations, we demonstrated that this upward mobility shift is because of phosphorylation and identified Ser-446 of MKP-7 as the phosphorylation site targeted by ERK activation. To determine how MKP-7 interacts with MAPKs, we identified three domains in MKP-7 required for interaction with MAPKs, namely, putative MAP kinase docking domains (D-domain) I and II and a long COOH-terminal stretch unique to MKP-7. The D-domain I is required for interaction with ERK and p38, whereas the D-domain II is required for interaction with JNK and p38, which is likely to be important for MKP-7 to suppress JNK and p38 activations. The COOH-terminal stretch of MKP-7 was shown to determine JNK preference for MKP-7 by masking MKP-7 activity toward p38 and is a domain bound by ERK. These data strongly suggested that Ser-446 of MKP-7 is phosphorylated by ERK. PMID:12794087

  11. Complete topographical distribution of both the in vivo and in vitro phosphorylation sites of bone sialoprotein and their biological implications.

    PubMed

    Salih, Erdjan; Flückiger, Rudolf

    2004-05-01

    Bone sialoprotein (BSP) is a multifunctional, highly phosphorylated, and glycosylated protein with key roles in biomineralization and tissue remodeling. This work identifies the complete topographical distribution and precise location of both the in vitro and in vivo phosphorylation sites of bovine BSP by a combination of state-of-the-art techniques and approaches. In vitro phosphorylation of native and deglycosylated BSPs by casein kinase II identified seven phosphorylation sites by solid-phase N-terminal peptide sequencing that were within peptides 12-22 (LEDS(P)EENGVFK), 42-62 (FAVQSSSDSS(P)EENGNGDS(P)S(P)EE), 80-91 (EDS(P)DENEDEES(P)E), and 135-145 (EDES(P)DEEEEEE). The in vivo phosphorylation regions and sites were identified by use of a novel thiol reagent, 1-S-mono[(14)C]carboxymethyldithiothreitol. This approach identified all of the phosphopeptides defined by in vitro phosphorylation, but two additional phosphopeptides were defined at residues, 250-264 (DNGYEIYES(P)ENGDPR), and 282-289 (GYDS(P)YDGQ). Furthermore, use of native BSP and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry identified several of the above peptides, including an additional phosphopeptide at residues 125-130 (AGAT(P)GK) that was not defined in either of the in vitro and in vivo studies described above. Overall, 7 in vitro and 11 in vivo phosphorylation sites were identified unequivocally, with natural variation in the quantitative extent of phosphorylation at each in vivo phosphorylation site. PMID:15004024

  12. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Zeltwanger, S; Hu, S; Hwang, T C

    2000-05-01

    In cell-attached patches stimulated with cAMP agonists, the single-channel open probability (Po) of the phenylalanine 508-deleted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (DeltaF508-CFTR) channel, the most common disease-associated mutation in cystic fibrosis, was abnormally low (a functional defect). To investigate the mechanism for the poor response of DeltaF508-CFTR to cAMP stimulation, we examined, in excised inside-out patches, protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation activation and ATP-dependent gating of wild-type (WT) and DeltaF508-CFTR channels expressed in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts. For WT-CFTR, the activation time course of CFTR channel current upon addition of PKA and ATP followed a sigmoidal function with time constants that decreased as [PKA] was increased. The curvilinear relationship between [PKA] and the apparent activation rate suggests an incremental phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR at multiple phosphorylation sites. The time course of PKA-dependent activation of DeltaF508-CFTR channel current also followed a sigmoidal function, but the rate of activation was at least 7-fold slower than that with WT channels. This result suggests that deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the CFTR chloride channel. Once DeltaF508-CFTR channels were maximally activated with PKA, the mutant channel and WT channel had indistinguishable steady-state Po values, ATP dose-response relationships and single-channel kinetics, indicating that DeltaF508-CFTR is not defective in ATP-dependent gating. By measuring whole-cell current density, we compared the number of functional channels in WT- and DeltaF508-CFTR cell membrane. Our data showed that the estimated channel density for DeltaF508-CFTR was approximately 10-fold lower than that for WT-CFTR, but the cAMP-dependent whole-cell current density differed by approximately 200-fold. We thus conclude that the functional defect (a decrease in Po) of Delta

  13. Deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR chloride channels

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zeltwanger, Shawn; Hu, Shenghui; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2000-01-01

    In cell-attached patches stimulated with cAMP agonists, the single-channel open probability (Po) of the phenylalanine 508-deleted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ΔF508-CFTR) channel, the most common disease-associated mutation in cystic fibrosis, was abnormally low (a functional defect). To investigate the mechanism for the poor response of ΔF508-CFTR to cAMP stimulation, we examined, in excised inside-out patches, protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation activation and ATP-dependent gating of wild-type (WT) and ΔF508-CFTR channels expressed in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts.For WT-CFTR, the activation time course of CFTR channel current upon addition of PKA and ATP followed a sigmoidal function with time constants that decreased as [PKA] was increased. The curvilinear relationship between [PKA] and the apparent activation rate suggests an incremental phosphorylation-dependent activation of CFTR at multiple phosphorylation sites.The time course of PKA-dependent activation of ΔF508-CFTR channel current also followed a sigmoidal function, but the rate of activation was at least 7-fold slower than that with WT channels. This result suggests that deletion of phenylalanine 508 causes attenuated PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the CFTR chloride channel.Once ΔF508-CFTR channels were maximally activated with PKA, the mutant channel and WT channel had indistinguishable steady-state Po values, ATP dose-response relationships and single-channel kinetics, indicating that ΔF508-CFTR is not defective in ATP-dependent gating.By measuring whole-cell current density, we compared the number of functional channels in WT- and ΔF508-CFTR cell membrane. Our data showed that the estimated channel density for ΔF508-CFTR was ∼10-fold lower than that for WT-CFTR, but the cAMP-dependent whole-cell current density differed by ∼200-fold. We thus conclude that the functional defect (a decrease in Po) of ΔF508-CFTR is as important as the trafficking defect (a

  14. Cellular progesterone receptor phosphorylation in response to ligands activating protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, K.V.; Peralta, W.D.; Greene, G.L.; Fox, C.F.

    1987-08-14

    Progesterone receptors were immunoprecipitated with monoclonal antibodies KD68 from lysates of human breast carcinoma T47D cells labelled to steady state specific activity with /sup 32/Pi. The 120 kDa /sup 32/P-labelled progesterone receptor band was resolved by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified by autoradiography. Phosphoamino acid analysis revealed serine phosphorylation, but no threonine or tyrosine phosphorylation. Treatment of the /sup 32/Pi-labelled cells with EGF, TPA or dibutyryl cAMP had no significant quantitative effect on progesterone receptor phosphorylation, though the EGF receptor and the cAMP-dependent protein kinases have been reported to catalyze phosphorylation of purified avian progesterone receptor preparations in cell free systems. Progesterone receptor phosphorylation on serine residues was increased by 2-fold in cells treated with 10 nM progesterone; EGF had no effect on progesterone-mediated progesterone receptor phosphorylation.

  15. Simultaneous Identification of Tyrosine Phosphorylation and Sulfation Sites Utilizing Tyrosine-Specific Bromination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Seo; Song, Si-Uk; Kim, Hie-Joon

    2011-11-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation and sulfation play many key roles in the cell. Isobaric phosphotyrosine and sulfotyrosine residues in peptides were determined by mass spectrometry using phosphatase or sulfatase to remove the phosphate or the sulfate group. Unique Br signature was introduced to the resulting tyrosine residues by incubation with 32% HBr at -20 °C for 20 min. MS/MS analysis of the brominated peptide enabled unambiguous determination of the phosphotyrosine and the sulfotyrosine sites. When phosphotyrosine and sulfotyrosine as well as free tyrosine were present in the same peptide, they could be determined simultaneously using either phosphatase or sulfatase following acetylation of the free tyrosine.

  16. PAS kinase is activated by direct SNF1-dependent phosphorylation and mediates inhibition of TORC1 through the phosphorylation and activation of Pbp1

    PubMed Central

    DeMille, Desiree; Badal, Bryan D.; Evans, J. Brady; Mathis, Andrew D.; Anderson, Joseph F.; Grose, Julianne H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the interplay between three sensory protein kinases in yeast: AMP-regulated kinase (AMPK, or SNF1 in yeast), PAS kinase 1 (Psk1 in yeast), and the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1). This signaling cascade occurs through the SNF1-dependent phosphorylation and activation of Psk1, which phosphorylates and activates poly(A)- binding protein binding protein 1 (Pbp1), which then inhibits TORC1 through sequestration at stress granules. The SNF1-dependent phosphorylation of Psk1 appears to be direct, in that Snf1 is necessary and sufficient for Psk1 activation by alternate carbon sources, is required for altered Psk1 protein mobility, is able to phosphorylate Psk1 in vitro, and binds Psk1 via its substrate-targeting subunit Gal83. Evidence for the direct phosphorylation and activation of Pbp1 by Psk1 is also provided by in vitro and in vivo kinase assays, including the reduction of Pbp1 localization at distinct cytoplasmic foci and subsequent rescue of TORC1 inhibition in PAS kinase–deficient yeast. In support of this signaling cascade, Snf1-deficient cells display increased TORC1 activity, whereas cells containing hyperactive Snf1 display a PAS kinase–dependent decrease in TORC1 activity. This interplay between yeast SNF1, Psk1, and TORC1 allows for proper glucose allocation during nutrient depletion, reducing cell growth and proliferation when energy is low. PMID:25428989

  17. Functional regulation of PVBV Nuclear Inclusion protein-a protease activity upon interaction with Viral Protein genome-linked and phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, C.; Jimsheena, V.K.; Banerjee, S.; Makinen, K.; Gowda, L.R.; Savithri, H.S.

    2012-01-20

    Regulation of NIa-Pro is crucial for polyprotein processing and hence, for successful infection of potyviruses. We have examined two novel mechanisms that could regulate NIa-Pro activity. Firstly, the influence of VPg domain on the proteolytic activity of NIa-Pro was investigated. It was shown that the turnover number of the protease increases when these two domains interact (cis: two-fold; trans: seven-fold) with each other. Secondly, the protease activity of NIa-Pro could also be modulated by phosphorylation at Ser129. A mutation of this residue either to aspartate (phosphorylation-mimic) or alanine (phosphorylation-deficient) drastically reduces the protease activity. Based on these observations and molecular modeling studies, we propose that interaction with VPg as well as phosphorylation of Ser129 could relay a signal through Trp143 present at the protein surface to the active site pocket by subtle conformational changes, thus modulating protease activity of NIa-Pro.

  18. The stress-responsive kinases MAPKAPK2/MAPKAPK3 activate starvation-induced autophagy through Beclin 1 phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Zhongju; Sumpter, Rhea; Su, Minfei; Zang, Xiao; Sinha, Sangita; Gaestel, Matthias; Levine, Beth

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a fundamental adaptive response to amino acid starvation orchestrated by conserved gene products, the autophagy (ATG) proteins. However, the cellular cues that activate the function of ATG proteins during amino acid starvation are incompletely understood. Here we show that two related stress-responsive kinases, members of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway MAPKAPK2 (MK2) and MAPKAPK3 (MK3), positively regulate starvation-induced autophagy by phosphorylating an essential ATG protein, Beclin 1, at serine 90, and that this phosphorylation site is essential for the tumor suppressor function of Beclin 1. Moreover, MK2/MK3-dependent Beclin 1 phosphorylation (and starvation-induced autophagy) is blocked in vitro and in vivo by BCL2, a negative regulator of Beclin 1. Together, these findings reveal MK2/MK3 as crucial stress-responsive kinases that promote autophagy through Beclin 1 S90 phosphorylation, and identify the blockade of MK2/3-dependent Beclin 1 S90 phosphorylation as a mechanism by which BCL2 inhibits the autophagy function of Beclin 1. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05289.001 PMID:25693418

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylates CtBP1 and down-regulates its activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Choi, Soo-Youn; Kang, Byung-Hee; Lee, Soon-Min; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► AMPK phosphorylates CtBP1 on serine 158. ► AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of CtBP1 causes the ubiquitination and nuclear export of CtBP1. ► AMPK downregulates the CtBP1-mediated repression of Bax transcription. -- Abstract: CtBP is a transcriptional repressor which plays a significant role in the regulation of cell proliferation and tumor progression. It was reported that glucose withdrawal causes induction of Bax due to the dissociation of CtBP from the Bax promoter. However, the precise mechanism involved in the regulation of CtBP still remains unclear. In this study, we found that an activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylates CtBP1 on Ser-158 upon metabolic stresses. Moreover, AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of CtBP1 (S158) attenuates the repressive function of CtBP1. We also confirmed that triggering activation of AMPK by various factors resulted in an increase of Bax gene expression. These findings provide connections of AMPK with CtBP1-mediated regulation of Bax expression for cell death under metabolic stresses.

  20. Activation loop phosphorylation regulates B-Raf in vivo and transformation by B-Raf mutants.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Martin; Röring, Michael; Schorch, Björn; Heilmann, Katharina; Stickel, Natalie; Fiala, Gina J; Schmitt, Lisa C; Braun, Sandra; Ehrenfeld, Sophia; Uhl, Franziska M; Kaltenbacher, Thorsten; Weinberg, Florian; Herzog, Sebastian; Zeiser, Robert; Schamel, Wolfgang W; Jumaa, Hassan; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-18

    Despite being mutated in cancer and RASopathies, the role of the activation segment (AS) has not been addressed for B-Raf signaling in vivo. Here, we generated a conditional knock-in mouse allowing the expression of the B-Raf(AVKA) mutant in which the AS phosphoacceptor sites T599 and S602 are replaced by alanine residues. Surprisingly, despite producing a kinase-impaired protein, the Braf(AVKA) allele does not phenocopy the lethality of Braf-knockout or paradoxically acting knock-in alleles. However, Braf(AVKA) mice display abnormalities in the hematopoietic system, a distinct facial morphology, reduced ERK pathway activity in the brain, and an abnormal gait. This phenotype suggests that maximum B-Raf activity is required for the proper development, function, and maintenance of certain cell populations. By establishing conditional murine embryonic fibroblast cultures, we further show that MEK/ERK phosphorylation and the immediate early gene response toward growth factors are impaired in the presence of B-Raf(AVKA). Importantly, alanine substitution of T599/S602 impairs the transformation potential of oncogenic non-V600E B-Raf mutants and a fusion protein, suggesting that blocking their phosphorylation could represent an alternative strategy to ATP-competitive inhibitors. PMID:26657898

  1. Regulation of CDK9 activity by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nekhai, Sergei; Petukhov, Michael; Breuer, Denitra

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 transcription is regulated by CDK9/cyclin T1, which, unlike a typical cell cycle-dependent kinase, is regulated by associating with 7SK small nuclear ribonuclear protein complex (snRNP). While the protein components of this complex are well studied, the mechanism of the complex formation is still not fully understood. The association of CDK9/cyclin T1 with 7SK snRNP is, in part, regulated by a reversible CDK9 phosphorylation. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the kinases and phosphatases involved in CDK9 phosphorylation and discuss their role in regulation of HIV-1 replication and potential for being targeted for drug development. We propose a novel pathway of HIV-1 transcription regulation via CDK9 Ser-90 phosphorylation by CDK2 and CDK9 Ser-175 dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase-1. PMID:24524087

  2. Heat Shock Proteins Regulate Activation-induced Proteasomal Degradation of the Mature Phosphorylated Form of Protein Kinase C*

    PubMed Central

    Lum, Michelle A.; Balaburski, Gregor M.; Murphy, Maureen E.; Black, Adrian R.; Black, Jennifer D.

    2013-01-01

    Although alterations in stimulus-induced degradation of PKC have been implicated in disease, mechanistic understanding of this process remains limited. Evidence supports the existence of both proteasomal and lysosomal mechanisms of PKC processing. An established pathway involves rate-limiting priming site dephosphorylation of the activated enzyme and proteasomal clearance of the dephosphorylated protein. However, here we show that agonists promote down-regulation of endogenous PKCα with minimal accumulation of a nonphosphorylated species in multiple cell types. Furthermore, proteasome and lysosome inhibitors predominantly protect fully phosphorylated PKCα, pointing to this form as a substrate for degradation. Failure to detect substantive dephosphorylation of activated PKCα was not due to rephosphorylation because inhibition of Hsp70/Hsc70, which is required for re-priming, had only a minor effect on agonist-induced accumulation of nonphosphorylated protein. Thus, PKC degradation can occur in the absence of dephosphorylation. Further analysis revealed novel functions for Hsp70/Hsc70 and Hsp90 in the control of agonist-induced PKCα processing. These chaperones help to maintain phosphorylation of activated PKCα but have opposing effects on degradation of the phosphorylated protein; Hsp90 is protective, whereas Hsp70/Hsc70 activity is required for proteasomal processing of this species. Notably, down-regulation of nonphosphorylated PKCα shows little Hsp70/Hsc70 dependence, arguing that phosphorylated and nonphosphorylated species are differentially targeted for proteasomal degradation. Finally, lysosomal processing of activated PKCα is not regulated by phosphorylation or Hsps. Collectively, these data demonstrate that phosphorylated PKCα is a direct target for agonist-induced proteasomal degradation via an Hsp-regulated mechanism, and highlight the existence of a novel pathway of PKC desensitization in cells. PMID:23900841

  3. PINK1-Mediated Phosphorylation of Parkin Boosts Parkin Activity in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shiba-Fukushima, Kahori; Inoshita, Tsuyoshi; Hattori, Nobutaka; Imai, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    Two genes linked to early onset Parkinson's disease, PINK1 and Parkin, encode a protein kinase and a ubiquitin-ligase, respectively. Both enzymes have been suggested to support mitochondrial quality control. We have reported that Parkin is phosphorylated at Ser65 within the ubiquitin-like domain by PINK1 in mammalian cultured cells. However, it remains unclear whether Parkin phosphorylation is involved in mitochondrial maintenance and activity of dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Here, we examined the effects of Parkin phosphorylation in Drosophila, in which the phosphorylation residue is conserved at Ser94. Morphological changes of mitochondria caused by the ectopic expression of wild-type Parkin in muscle tissue and brain dopaminergic neurons disappeared in the absence of PINK1. In contrast, phosphomimetic Parkin accelerated mitochondrial fragmentation or aggregation and the degradation of mitochondrial proteins regardless of PINK1 activity, suggesting that the phosphorylation of Parkin boosts its ubiquitin-ligase activity. A non-phosphorylated form of Parkin fully rescued the muscular mitochondrial degeneration due to the loss of PINK1 activity, whereas the introduction of the non-phosphorylated Parkin mutant in Parkin-null flies led to the emergence of abnormally fused mitochondria in the muscle tissue. Manipulating the Parkin phosphorylation status affected spontaneous dopamine release in the nerve terminals of dopaminergic neurons, the survivability of dopaminergic neurons and flight activity. Our data reveal that Parkin phosphorylation regulates not only mitochondrial function but also the neuronal activity of dopaminergic neurons in vivo, suggesting that the appropriate regulation of Parkin phosphorylation is important for muscular and dopaminergic functions. PMID:24901221

  4. Ground State Destabilization by Anionic Nucleophiles Contributes to the Activity of Phosphoryl Transfer Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Logan D.; Fenn, Tim D.; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes stabilize transition states of reactions while limiting binding to ground states, as is generally required for any catalyst. Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and other nonspecific phosphatases are some of Nature's most impressive catalysts, achieving preferential transition state over ground state stabilization of more than 1022-fold while utilizing interactions with only the five atoms attached to the transferred phosphorus. We tested a model that AP achieves a portion of this preference by destabilizing ground state binding via charge repulsion between the anionic active site nucleophile, Ser102, and the negatively charged phosphate monoester substrate. Removal of the Ser102 alkoxide by mutation to glycine or alanine increases the observed Pi affinity by orders of magnitude at pH 8.0. To allow precise and quantitative comparisons, the ionic form of bound Pi was determined from pH dependencies of the binding of Pi and tungstate, a Pi analog lacking titratable protons over the pH range of 5–11, and from the 31P chemical shift of bound Pi. The results show that the Pi trianion binds with an exceptionally strong femtomolar affinity in the absence of Ser102, show that its binding is destabilized by ≥108-fold by the Ser102 alkoxide, and provide direct evidence for ground state destabilization. Comparisons of X-ray crystal structures of AP with and without Ser102 reveal the same active site and Pi binding geometry upon removal of Ser102, suggesting that the destabilization does not result from a major structural rearrangement upon mutation of Ser102. Analogous Pi binding measurements with a protein tyrosine phosphatase suggest the generality of this ground state destabilization mechanism. Our results have uncovered an important contribution of anionic nucleophiles to phosphoryl transfer catalysis via ground state electrostatic destabilization and an enormous capacity of the AP active site for specific and strong recognition of the phosphoryl group in the transition

  5. AMP-activated Protein Kinase Directly Phosphorylates and Destabilizes Hedgehog Pathway Transcription Factor GLI1 in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yen-Hsing; Luo, Jia; Mosley, Yung-Yi C.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Chang, Julia; Zhang, GuangJun; Wang, Yu-Kuo; Banko, Max R.; Brunet, Anne; Kuang, Shihuan; Wu, Jen-Leih; Chang, Chun-Ju; Scott, Matthew P.; Yang, Jer-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Summary The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway regulates cell differentiation and proliferation during development by controlling the Gli transcription factors. Cell fate decisions and progression toward organ and tissue maturity must be coordinated and how energy sensor regulates Hh pathway is not clear. AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energy stores that controls protein synthesis and other energy-intensive processes. AMPK is directly responsive to intracellular AMP levels, inhibiting a wide range of cell activities if ATP is low and AMP is high. Thus, AMPK can affect development by influencing protein synthesis and other processes needed for growth and differentiation. Activation of AMPK reduces GLI1 protein levels and stability, thus blocking Sonic hedgehog-induced transcriptional activity. AMPK phosphorylates GLI1 at serines 102 and 408 and threonine 1074. Mutation of these three sites into alanine prevents phosphorylation by AMPK. This in turn leads to increased GLI1 protein stability, transcriptional activity, and oncogenic potency. PMID:26190112

  6. cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator residue Ser-753 and its role in channel activation.

    PubMed

    Seibert, F S; Tabcharani, J A; Chang, X B; Dulhanty, A M; Mathews, C; Hanrahan, J W; Riordan, J R

    1995-02-01

    Hormonal regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel is largely mediated via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). CFTR contains 10 dibasic consensus sites for potential PKA phosphorylation ((R/K) (R/K)X(S*/T*)). Previous studies (Chang, X.-B., Tabcharani, J. A., Hou, Y.-X., Jensen, T. J., Kartner, N., Alon, N., Hanrahan, J. W., and Riordan, J.R (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 11304-11311) showed that approximately 25% of the CFTR wild-type response to PKA activation remained upon inhibition of most detectable phosphorylation by in vitro mutagenesis of all 10 dibasic consensus sites (10SA CFTR). To identify potential additional sites responsible for the residual activity, large amounts of this mutant CFTR were phosphorylated with PKA using high specific activity [gamma-32P]ATP. Cyanogen bromide cleavage indicated that a large portion of the observed PKA phosphorylation occurred within a 5.8-kDa fragment of the R domain between residues 722-773. Removal of serines at potential PKA sites in this fragment showed that Ser-753 accounted for all of the gamma-32P labeling of the 5.8-kDa peptide. Replacement of Ser-753 with alanine reduced the level of residual CFTR activity by a further 40%, indicating that phosphorylation at this previously unidentified site contributes to the activation of 10SA CFTR. PMID:7530719

  7. The condensing activities of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis type II fatty acid synthase are differentially regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Molle, Virginie; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S; Cozzone, Alain J; Kremer, Laurent

    2006-10-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) has recently become of major physiological importance because of its possible involvement in virulence of bacterial pathogens. Although Mycobacterium tuberculosis has eleven STPKs, the nature and function of the substrates of these enzymes remain largely unknown. In this work, we have identified for the first time STPK substrates in M. tuberculosis forming part of the type II fatty acid synthase (FAS-II) system involved in mycolic acid biosynthesis: the malonyl-CoA::AcpM transacylase mtFabD, and the beta-ketoacyl AcpM synthases KasA and KasB. All three enzymes were phosphorylated in vitro by different kinases, suggesting a complex network of interactions between STPKs and these substrates. In addition, both KasA and KasB were efficiently phosphorylated in M. bovis BCG each at different sites and could be dephosphorylated by the M. tuberculosis Ser/Thr phosphatase PstP. Enzymatic studies revealed that, whereas phosphorylation decreases the activity of KasA in the elongation process of long chain fatty acids synthesis, this modification enhances that of KasB. Such a differential effect of phosphorylation may represent an unusual mechanism of FAS-II system regulation, allowing pathogenic mycobacteria to produce full-length mycolates, which are required for adaptation and intracellular survival in macrophages. PMID:16873379

  8. Lectin-induced activation of platelets may require only limited phosphorylation of the 47K protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, C.; Chelladurai, M.; Ganguly, P.

    1986-05-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an N-acetylglucosamine (Glc-NAc) specific lectin which can activate platelets. Like thrombin, stimulation of platelets by WGA is accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of two polypeptides of M/sub r/ 47K and 20K. Addition of GlcNAc at different time intervals arrested that aggregation of platelets by WGA and paralleled the modification of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide. So, the phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide may regulate the WGA-receptor mediated stimulation of platelets. However, the ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine in the 47K protein was markedly different in WGA-activated than thrombin-stimulated platelets. Thus, the molecular mechanism of action of thrombin and WGA could be different. To explore this idea, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled platelets were stimulated with WGA and the activation arrested with N-acetyl-glucosamine at different times. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of total protein at 5s showed only two phosphorylated species of 47K protein. At 60s, maximally four phosphorylated species were noted. In contrast, with thrombin using the same technique, seven to nine phosphorylated components have been reported. These results suggest that the different activators of platelets may act by different mechanisms. In addition, activation of platelets may require only limited levels of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide.

  9. Interactions between Multiple Phosphorylation Sites in the Inactivation Particle of a K+ Channel

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Edward J.; Sorensen, Roger G.; Slater, Simon J.; Covarrubias, Manuel

    1998-01-01

    Protein kinase C inhibits inactivation gating of Kv3.4 K+ channels, and at least two NH2-terminal serines (S15 and S21) appeared involved in this interaction (Covarrubias et al. 1994. Neuron. 13:1403–1412). Here we have investigated the molecular mechanism of this regulatory process. Site-directed mutagenesis (serine → alanine) revealed two additional sites at S8 and S9. The mutation S9A inhibited the action of PKC by ∼85%, whereas S8A, S15A, and S21A exhibited smaller reductions (41, 35, and 50%, respectively). In spite of the relatively large effects of individual S → A mutations, simultaneous mutation of the four sites was necessary to completely abolish inhibition of inactivation by PKC. Accordingly, a peptide corresponding to the inactivation domain of Kv3.4 was phosphorylated by specific PKC isoforms, but the mutant peptide (S[8,9,15,21]A) was not. Substitutions of negatively charged aspartate (D) for serine at positions 8, 9, 15, and 21 closely mimicked the effect of phosphorylation on channel inactivation. S → D mutations slowed the rate of inactivation and accelerated the rate of recovery from inactivation. Thus, the negative charge of the phosphoserines is an important incentive to inhibit inactivation. Consistent with this interpretation, the effects of S8D and S8E (E = Glu) were very similar, yet S8N (N = Asn) had little effect on the onset of inactivation but accelerated the recovery from inactivation. Interestingly, the effects of single S → D mutations were unequal and the effects of combined mutations were greater than expected assuming a simple additive effect of the free energies that the single mutations contribute to impair inactivation. These observations demonstrate that the inactivation particle of Kv3.4 does not behave as a point charge and suggest that the NH2-terminal phosphoserines interact in a cooperative manner to disrupt inactivation. Inspection of the tertiary structure of the inactivation domain of Kv3.4 revealed the

  10. Activation of PI3-kinase stimulates endocytosis of ROMK via Akt1/SGK1-dependent phosphorylation of WNK1.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Huang, Chou-Long

    2011-03-01

    WNK kinases stimulate endocytosis of ROMK channels to regulate renal K+ handling. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-activating hormones, such as insulin and IGF 1, phosphorylate WNK1, but how this affects the regulation of ROMK abundance is unknown. Here, serum starvation of ROMK-transfected HEK cells led to an increase of ROMK current density; subsequent addition of insulin or IGF1 inhibited ROMK currents in a PI3K-dependent manner. Serum and insulin also increased phosphorylation of the downstream kinases Akt1 and SGK1 as well as WNK1. A biotinylation assay suggested that insulin and IGF1 inhibit ROMK by enhancing its endocytosis, a process that WNK1 may mediate. Knockdown of WNK1 with siRNA or expression of a phospho-deficient WNK1 mutant (T58A) both prevented insulin-induced inhibition of ROMK currents, suggesting that phosphorylation at Threonine-58 of WNK1 is important to mediate the inhibition of ROMK by PI3K-activating hormones or growth factors. In vitro and in vivo kinase assays supported the notion that Akt1 and SGK1 can phosphorylate WNK1 at this site, and we established that Akt1 and SGK1 synergistically inhibit ROMK through WNK1. We used dominant-negative intersectin and dynamin constructs to show that SGK1-mediated phosphorylation of WNK1 inhibits ROMK by promoting its endocytosis. Taken together, these results suggest that PI3K-activating hormones inhibit ROMK by enhancing its endocytosis via a mechanism that involves phosphorylation of WNK1 by Akt1 and SGK1. PMID:21355052

  11. New structural insights into phosphorylation-free mechanism for full cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)-cyclin activity and substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fei; Quiocho, Florante A

    2013-10-18

    Pho85 is a versatile cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) found in budding yeast that regulates a myriad of eukaryotic cellular functions in concert with 10 cyclins (called Pcls). Unlike cell cycle CDKs that require phosphorylation of a serine/threonine residue by a CDK-activating kinase (CAK) for full activation, Pho85 requires no phosphorylation despite the presence of an equivalent residue. The Pho85-Pcl10 complex is a key regulator of glycogen metabolism by phosphorylating the substrate Gsy2, the predominant, nutritionally regulated form of glycogen synthase. Here we report the crystal structures of Pho85-Pcl10 and its complex with the ATP analog, ATPγS. The structure solidified the mechanism for bypassing CDK phosphorylation to achieve full catalytic activity. An aspartate residue, invariant in all Pcls, acts as a surrogate for the phosphoryl adduct of the phosphorylated, fully activated CDK2, the prototypic cell cycle CDK, complexed with cyclin A. Unlike the canonical recognition motif, SPX(K/R), of phosphorylation sites of substrates of several cell cycle CDKs, the motif in the Gys2 substrate of Pho85-Pcl10 is SPXX. CDK5, an important signal transducer in neural development and the closest known functional homolog of Pho85, does not require phosphorylation either, and we found that in its crystal structure complexed with p25 cyclin a water/hydroxide molecule remarkably plays a similar role to the phosphoryl or aspartate group. Comparison between Pho85-Pcl10, phosphorylated CDK2-cyclin A, and CDK5-p25 complexes reveals the convergent structural characteristics necessary for full kinase activity and the variations in the substrate recognition mechanism. PMID:24022486

  12. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Signaling Mediates Phosphorylation of Polycomb Ortholog Cbx7*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsan-au; Balsbaugh, Jeremy L.; Chandler, Hollie; Georgilis, Athena; Zullow, Hayley; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Gil, Jesus; Peters, Gordon; Bernstein, Emily

    2013-01-01

    Cbx7 is one of five mammalian orthologs of the Drosophila Polycomb. Cbx7 recognizes methylated lysine residues on the histone H3 tail and contributes to gene silencing in the context of the Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). However, our knowledge of Cbx7 post-translational modifications remains limited. Through combined biochemical and mass spectrometry approaches, we report a novel phosphorylation site on mouse Cbx7 at residue Thr-118 (Cbx7T118ph), near the highly conserved Polycomb box. The generation of a site-specific antibody to Cbx7T118ph demonstrates that Cbx7 is phosphorylated via MAPK signaling. Furthermore, we find Cbx7T118 phosphorylation in murine mammary carcinoma cells, which can be blocked by MEK inhibitors. Upon EGF stimulation, Cbx7 interacts robustly with other members of PRC1. To test the role of Cbx7T118 phosphorylation in gene silencing, we employed a RAS-induced senescence model system. We demonstrate that Cbx7T118 phosphorylation moderately enhances repression of its target gene p16. In summary, we have identified and characterized a novel MAPK-mediated phosphorylation site on Cbx7 and propose that mitogen signaling to the chromatin template regulates PRC1 function. PMID:24194518

  13. Distinct phosphorylation sites on the ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, establish a code that determines the functions of ß-arrestins.

    PubMed

    Bouzo-Lorenzo, Monica; Santo-Zas, Icía; Lodeiro, Maria; Nogueiras, Rubén; Casanueva, Felipe F; Castro, Marian; Pazos, Yolanda; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J; Camiña, Jesús P

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR1a, mediates the biological activities of ghrelin, which includes the secretion of growth hormone, as well as the stimulation of appetite, food intake and maintenance of energy homeostasis. Mapping phosphorylation sites on GHSR1a and knowledge of how these sites control specific functional consequences unlocks new strategies for the development of therapeutic agents targeting individual functions. Herein, we have identified the phosphorylation of different sets of sites within GHSR1a which engender distinct functionality of ß-arrestins. More specifically, the Ser(362), Ser(363) and Thr(366) residues at the carboxyl-terminal tail were primarily responsible for ß-arrestin 1 and 2 binding, internalization and ß-arrestin-mediated proliferation and adipogenesis. The Thr(350) and Ser(349) are not necessary for ß-arrestin recruitment, but are involved in the stabilization of the GHSR1a-ß-arrestin complex in a manner that determines the ultimate cellular consequences of ß-arrestin signaling. We further demonstrated that the mitogenic and adipogenic effect of ghrelin were mainly dependent on the ß-arrestin bound to the phosphorylated GHSR1a. In contrast, the ghrelin function on GH secretion was entirely mediated by G protein signaling. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that the phosphorylation pattern on the C terminus of GHSR1a determines the signaling and physiological output. PMID:26935831

  14. Distinct phosphorylation sites on the ghrelin receptor, GHSR1a, establish a code that determines the functions of ß-arrestins

    PubMed Central

    Bouzo-Lorenzo, Monica; Santo-Zas, Icía; Lodeiro, Maria; Nogueiras, Rubén; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Castro, Marian; Pazos, Yolanda; Tobin, Andrew B; Butcher, Adrian J.; Camiña, Jesús P.

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone secretagogue receptor, GHSR1a, mediates the biological activities of ghrelin, which includes the secretion of growth hormone, as well as the stimulation of appetite, food intake and maintenance of energy homeostasis. Mapping phosphorylation sites on GHSR1a and knowledge of how these sites control specific functional consequences unlocks new strategies for the development of therapeutic agents targeting individual functions. Herein, we have identified the phosphorylation of different sets of sites within GHSR1a which engender distinct functionality of ß-arrestins. More specifically, the Ser362, Ser363 and Thr366 residues at the carboxyl-terminal tail were primarily responsible for ß-arrestin 1 and 2 binding, internalization and ß-arrestin-mediated proliferation and adipogenesis. The Thr350 and Ser349 are not necessary for ß-arrestin recruitment, but are involved in the stabilization of the GHSR1a-ß-arrestin complex in a manner that determines the ultimate cellular consequences of ß-arrestin signaling. We further demonstrated that the mitogenic and adipogenic effect of ghrelin were mainly dependent on the ß-arrestin bound to the phosphorylated GHSR1a. In contrast, the ghrelin function on GH secretion was entirely mediated by G protein signaling. Our data is consistent with the hypothesis that the phosphorylation pattern on the C terminus of GHSR1a determines the signaling and physiological output. PMID:26935831

  15. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Activated by Prostaglandin E2 Phosphorylates Connexin 43 and Closes Osteocytic Hemichannels in Response to Continuous Flow Shear Stress.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Manuel A; Burra, Sirisha; Kar, Rekha; Lampe, Paul D; Jiang, Jean X

    2015-11-20

    Cx43 hemichannels serve as a portal for the release of prostaglandins, a critical process in mediating biological responses of mechanical loading on bone formation and remodeling. We have previously observed that fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) opens hemichannels; however, sustained FFSS results in hemichannel closure, as continuous opening of hemichannels is detrimental to cell viability and bone remodeling. However, the mechanism that regulates the closure of the hemichannels is unknown. Here, we show that activation of p44/42 ERK upon continuous FFSS leads to Cx43 phosphorylation at Ser(279)-Ser(282), sites known to be phosphorylated sites by p44/42 MAPK. Incubation of osteocytic MLO-Y4 cells with conditioned media (CM) collected after continuous FFSS increased MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43. CM treatment inhibited hemichannel opening and this inhibition was reversed when cells were pretreated with the MAPK pathway inhibitor. We found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) accumulates in the CM in a time-dependent manner. Treatment with PGE2 increased phospho-p44/42 ERK levels and also Cx43 phosphorylation at Ser(279)-Ser(282) sites. Depletion of PGE2 from CM, and pre-treatment with a p44/42 ERK pathway-specific inhibitor, resulted in a complete inhibition of ERK-dependent Cx43 phosphorylation and attenuated the inhibition of hemichannels by CM and PGE2. Consistently, the opening of hemichannels by FFSS was blocked by PGE2 and CM and this blockage was reversed by U0126 and the CM depleted of PGE2. A similar observation was also obtained in isolated primary osteocytes. Together, results from this study suggest that extracellular PGE2 accumulated after continuous FFSS is responsible for activation of p44/42 ERK signaling and subsequently, direct Cx43 phosphorylation by activated ERK leads to hemichannel closure. PMID:26442583

  16. Binding of cGMP to both allosteric sites of cGMP-binding cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE5) is required for its phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Turko, I V; Francis, S H; Corbin, J D

    1998-01-01

    cGMP-binding phosphodiesterases contain two homologous allosteric cGMP-binding sites (sites a and b) that are arranged in tandem; they constitute a superfamily of mammalian cyclic nucleotide receptors distinct from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases/cation channels family. The functional role of each of these two sites in the phosphodiesterases is not known. The cGMP-binding sites of one of these phosphodiesterases, the cGMP-binding cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (cGB-PDE, PDE5), have been analysed by using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutations that affect cGMP binding to either one or both allosteric sites do not influence cGMP hydrolysis in the catalytic site under the conditions used. However, compared with wild-type enzyme, the D289A, D478A and D289A/D478A mutants, which are defective in cGMP binding to either site a or site b, or both allosteric sites, require much higher cGMP concentrations for the allosteric stimulation of phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The cGMP effect is on the cGB-PDE rather than on the catalytic subunit of the protein kinase because the latter enzyme does not require cGMP for activity. The D289N mutant, which has higher binding affinity for cGMP than does the wild-type enzyme, is phosphorylated at lower concentrations of cGMP than is the wild-type enzyme. It is concluded that cGMP binding to the allosteric sites of cGB-PDE does not directly affect catalysis, but binding to both of these sites regulates phosphorylation of this enzyme. PMID:9445376

  17. Fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation in HUVEC

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Hisashi; Murakami, Ryuichiro . E-mail: ryuichi@med.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kambe, Fukushi; Cao, Xia; Takahashi, Ryotaro; Asai, Toru; Hirai, Toshihisa; Numaguchi, Yasushi; Okumura, Kenji; Seo, Hisao; Murohara, Toyoaki

    2006-03-24

    Fenofibrate improves endothelial function by lipid-lowering and anti-inflammatory effects. Additionally, fenofibrate has been demonstrated to upregulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been reported to phosphorylate eNOS at Ser-1177 and stimulate vascular endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO) production. We report here that fenofibrate activates AMPK and increases eNOS phosphorylation and NO production in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Incubation of HUVEC with fenofibrate increased the phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Fenofibrate simultaneously increased eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Inhibitors of protein kinase A and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase failed to suppress the fenofibrate-induced eNOS phosphorylation. Neither bezafibrate nor WY-14643 activated AMPK in HUVEC. Furthermore, fenofibrate activated AMPK without requiring any transcriptional activities. These results indicate that fenofibrate stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production through AMPK activation, which is suggested to be a novel characteristic of this agonist and unrelated to its effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}.

  18. The C2 Domain and Altered ATP-Binding Loop Phosphorylation at Ser359 Mediate the Redox-Dependent Increase in Protein Kinase C-δ Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Jianli; Yao, Yongneng; Zhang, Pingbo; Udayasuryan, Barath; Komissarova, Elena V.; Chen, Ju; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2015-01-01

    The diverse roles of protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ) in cellular growth, survival, and injury have been attributed to stimulus-specific differences in PKCδ signaling responses. PKCδ exerts membrane-delimited actions in cells activated by agonists that stimulate phosphoinositide hydrolysis. PKCδ is released from membranes as a Tyr313-phosphorylated enzyme that displays a high level of lipid-independent activity and altered substrate specificity during oxidative stress. This study identifies an interaction between PKCδ's Tyr313-phosphorylated hinge region and its phosphotyrosine-binding C2 domain that controls PKCδ's enzymology indirectly by decreasing phosphorylation in the kinase domain ATP-positioning loop at Ser359. We show that wild-type (WT) PKCδ displays a strong preference for substrates with serine as the phosphoacceptor residue at the active site when it harbors phosphomimetic or bulky substitutions at Ser359. In contrast, PKCδ-S359A displays lipid-independent activity toward substrates with either a serine or threonine as the phosphoacceptor residue. Additional studies in cardiomyocytes show that oxidative stress decreases Ser359 phosphorylation on native PKCδ and that PKCδ-S359A overexpression increases basal levels of phosphorylation on substrates with both phosphoacceptor site serine and threonine residues. Collectively, these studies identify a C2 domain-pTyr313 docking interaction that controls ATP-positioning loop phosphorylation as a novel, dynamically regulated, and physiologically relevant structural determinant of PKCδ catalytic activity. PMID:25755284

  19. Parkin is activated by PINK1-dependent phosphorylation of ubiquitin at Ser65

    PubMed Central

    Kazlauskaite, Agne; Kondapalli, Chandana; Gourlay, Robert; Campbell, David G.; Ritorto, Maria Stella; Hofmann, Kay; Alessi, Dario R.; Knebel, Axel; Trost, Matthias; Muqit, Miratul M. K.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that the Parkinson's disease-associated kinase PINK1 (PTEN-induced putative kinase 1) is activated by mitochondrial depolarization and stimulates the Parkin E3 ligase by phosphorylating Ser65 within its Ubl (ubiquitin-like) domain. Using phosphoproteomic analysis, we identified a novel ubiquitin phosphopeptide phosphorylated at Ser65 that was enriched 14-fold in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells overexpressing wild-type PINK1 stimulated with the mitochondrial uncoupling agent CCCP (carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone), to activate PINK1, compared with cells expressing kinase-inactive PINK1. Ser65 in ubiquitin lies in a similar motif to Ser65 in the Ubl domain of Parkin. Remarkably, PINK1 directly phosphorylates Ser65 of ubiquitin in vitro. We undertook a series of experiments that provide striking evidence that Ser65-phosphorylated ubiquitin (ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65) functions as a critical activator of Parkin. First, we demonstrate that a fragment of Parkin lacking the Ubl domain encompassing Ser65 (ΔUbl-Parkin) is robustly activated by ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65, but not by non-phosphorylated ubiquitin. Secondly, we find that the isolated Parkin Ubl domain phosphorylated at Ser65 (UblPhospho−Ser65) can also activate ΔUbl-Parkin similarly to ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65. Thirdly, we establish that ubiquitinPhospho−Ser65, but not non-phosphorylated ubiquitin or UblPhospho−Ser65, activates full-length wild-type Parkin as well as the non-phosphorylatable S65A Parkin mutant. Fourthly, we provide evidence that optimal activation of full-length Parkin E3 ligase is dependent on PINK1-mediated phosphorylation of both Parkin at Ser65 and ubiquitin at Ser65, since only mutation of both proteins at Ser65 completely abolishes Parkin activation. In conclusion, the findings of the present study reveal that PINK1 controls Parkin E3 ligase activity not only by phosphorylating Parkin at Ser65, but also by phosphorylating ubiquitin at Ser65

  20. Potential regulatory phosphorylation sites in a Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump implicated during early symbiotic signaling in roots.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thao T; Volkening, Jeremy D; Rose, Christopher M; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Westphall, Michael S; Coon, Joshua J; Ané, Jean-Michel; Sussman, Michael R

    2015-08-01

    In plants and fungi the plasma membrane proton pump generates a large proton-motive force that performs essential functions in many processes, including solute transport and the control of cell elongation. Previous studies in yeast and higher plants have indicated that phosphorylation of an auto-inhibitory domain is involved in regulating pump activity. In this report we examine the Medicago truncatula plasma membrane proton pump gene family, and in particular MtAHA5. Yeast complementation assays with phosphomimetic mutations at six candidate sites support a phosphoregulatory role for two residues, suggesting a molecular model to explain early Nod factor-induced changes in the plasma membrane proton-motive force of legume root cells. PMID:26188545

  1. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism.

    PubMed

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  2. HIPK2 restricts SIRT1 activity upon severe DNA damage by a phosphorylation-controlled mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, E; Polonio-Vallon, T; Meister, M; Matt, S; Bitomsky, N; Herbel, C; Liebl, M; Greiner, V; Kriznik, B; Schumacher, S; Krieghoff-Henning, E; Hofmann, T G

    2016-01-01

    Upon severe DNA damage a cellular signalling network initiates a cell death response through activating tumour suppressor p53 in association with promyelocytic leukaemia (PML) nuclear bodies. The deacetylase Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) suppresses cell death after DNA damage by antagonizing p53 acetylation. To facilitate efficient p53 acetylation, SIRT1 function needs to be restricted. How SIRT1 activity is regulated under these conditions remains largely unclear. Here we provide evidence that SIRT1 activity is limited upon severe DNA damage through phosphorylation by the DNA damage-responsive kinase HIPK2. We found that DNA damage provokes interaction of SIRT1 and HIPK2, which phosphorylates SIRT1 at Serine 682 upon lethal damage. Furthermore, upon DNA damage SIRT1 and HIPK2 colocalize at PML nuclear bodies, and PML depletion abrogates DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation. We show that Ser682 phosphorylation inhibits SIRT1 activity and impacts on p53 acetylation, apoptotic p53 target gene expression and cell death. Mechanistically, we found that DNA damage-induced SIRT1 Ser682 phosphorylation provokes disruption of the complex between SIRT1 and its activator AROS. Our findings indicate that phosphorylation-dependent restriction of SIRT1 activity by HIPK2 shapes the p53 response. PMID:26113041

  3. How Phosphorylation and ATPase Activity Regulate Anion Flux though the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR).

    PubMed

    Zwick, Matthias; Esposito, Cinzia; Hellstern, Manuel; Seelig, Anna

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, ABCC7), mutations of which cause cystic fibrosis, belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family and works as a channel for small anions, such as chloride and bicarbonate. Anion channel activity is known to depend on phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and CFTR-ATPase activity. Whereas anion channel activity has been extensively investigated, phosphorylation and CFTR-ATPase activity are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the two processes can be measured in a label-free and non-invasive manner in real time in live cells, stably transfected with CFTR. This study reveals three key findings. (i) The major contribution (≥90%) to the total CFTR-related ATP hydrolysis rate is due to phosphorylation by PKA and the minor contribution (≤10%) to CFTR-ATPase activity. (ii) The mutant CFTR-E1371S that is still conductive, but defective in ATP hydrolysis, is not phosphorylated, suggesting that phosphorylation requires a functional nucleotide binding domain and occurs in the post-hydrolysis transition state. (iii) CFTR-ATPase activity is inversely related to CFTR anion flux. The present data are consistent with a model in which CFTR is in a closed conformation with two ATPs bound. The open conformation is induced by ATP hydrolysis and corresponds to the post-hydrolysis transition state that is stabilized by phosphorylation and binding of chloride channel potentiators. PMID:27226582

  4. Phosphorylation-Regulated Transitions in an Oligomeric State Control the Activity of the Sae2 DNA Repair Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiong; Chow, Julia; Bernstein, Kara A.; Makharashvili, Nodar; Arora, Sucheta; Lee, Chia-Fang; Person, Maria D.; Rothstein, Rodney

    2014-01-01

    In the DNA damage response, many repair and signaling molecules mobilize rapidly at the sites of DNA double-strand breaks. This network of immediate responses is regulated at the level of posttranslational modifications that control the activation of DNA processing enzymes, protein kinases, and scaffold proteins to coordinate DNA repair and checkpoint signaling. Here we investigated the DNA damage-induced oligomeric transitions of the Sae2 protein, an important enzyme in the initiation of DNA double-strand break repair. Sae2 is a target of multiple phosphorylation events, which we identified and characterized in vivo in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Both cell cycle-dependent and DNA damage-dependent phosphorylation sites in Sae2 are important for the survival of DNA damage, and the cell cycle-regulated modifications are required to prime the damage-dependent events. We found that Sae2 exists in the form of inactive oligomers that are transiently released into smaller active units by this series of phosphorylations. DNA damage also triggers removal of Sae2 through autophagy and proteasomal degradation, ensuring that active Sae2 is present only transiently in cells. Overall, this analysis provides evidence for a novel type of protein regulation where the activity of an enzyme is controlled dynamically by posttranslational modifications that regulate its solubility and oligomeric state. PMID:24344201

  5. Sequential myosin phosphorylation activates tarantula thick filament via a disorder-order transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscles and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscles, which is regulated by Ca(2+)via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca(2+)4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectory analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridge network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates the formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif formed by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of the blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural changes. However, phosphorylation of the free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks a compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by the subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID

  6. Sequential Myosin Phosphorylation Activates Tarantula Thick Filament via a Disorder-Order Transition

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza-Fonseca, L. Michel; Alamo, Lorenzo; Pinto, Antonio; Thomas, David D.; Padrón, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) N-terminal extension (NTE) activates myosin in thick filaments. RLC phosphorylation plays a primary regulatory role in smooth muscle and a secondary (modulatory) role in striated muscle, which is regulated by Ca2+ via TnC/TM on the thin filament. Tarantula striated muscle exhibits both regulatory systems: one switches on/off contraction through thin filament regulation, and another through PKC constitutively Ser35 phosphorylated swaying free heads in the thick filaments that produces quick force on twitches regulated from 0 to 50% and modulation is accomplished recruiting additional force-potentiating free and blocked heads via Ca2+4-CaM-MLCK Ser45 phosphorylation. We have used microsecond molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of tarantula RLC NTE to understand the structural basis for phosphorylation-based regulation in tarantula thick filament activation. Trajectories analysis revealed that an inter-domain salt bridges network (R39/E58,E61) facilitates formation of a stable helix-coil-helix (HCH) motif made up by helices P and A in the unphosphorylated NTE of both myosin heads. Phosphorylation of blocked head on Ser45 does not induce any substantial structural change. However, phosphorylation of free head on Ser35 disrupts this salt bridge network and induces a partial extension of helix P along RLC helix A. While not directly participating in the HCH inter-domain folding, phosphorylation of Ser35 unlocks compact structure and allows the NTE to spontaneously undergo coil-helix transitions. The modest structural change induced by subsequent Ser45 diphosphorylation monophosphorylated Ser35 free head, facilitates full helix P extension into a single structurally stable α-helix through a network of intra-domain salt bridges (pS35/R38,R39,R42). We conclude that tarantula thick filament activation is controlled by sequential Ser35-Ser45 phosphorylation via a conserved disorder-to-order transition. PMID:26038232

  7. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Lithium suppresses Akt activity by reducing PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation. • Lithium enhances GSK-3β activity by reducing Akt-mediated GSK-3β phosphorylation. • Lithium suppresses GSK-3β activity through its direct inhibition. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P{sub 3} production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity.

  8. Potential sites of CFTR activation by tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Timothy J; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Riordan, John R; Hanrahan, John W

    2016-05-01

    The CFTR chloride channel is tightly regulated by phosphorylation at multiple serine residues. Recently it has been proposed that its activity is also regulated by tyrosine kinases, however the tyrosine phosphorylation sites remain to be identified. In this study we examined 2 candidate tyrosine residues near the boundary between the first nucleotide binding domain and the R domain, a region which is important for channel function but devoid of PKA consensus sequences. Mutating tyrosines at positions 625 and 627 dramatically reduced responses to Src or Pyk2 without altering the activation by PKA, suggesting they may contribute to CFTR regulation. PMID:26645934

  9. Quantification of gel-separated proteins and their phosphorylation sites by LC-MS using unlabeled internal standards: analysis of phosphoprotein dynamics in a B cell lymphoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Cutillas, Pedro R; Geering, Barbara; Waterfield, Mike D; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart

    2005-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays a critical role in normal cellular function and is often subverted in disease. Although major advances have recently been made in identification and quantitation of protein phosphorylation sites by MS, current methodological limitations still preclude routine, easily usable, and comprehensive quantitative analysis of protein phosphorylation. Here we report a simple LC-MS method to quantify gel-separated proteins and their sites of phosphorylation; in this approach, integrated chromatographic peak areas of peptide analytes from proteins under study are normalized to those of a non-isotopically labeled internal standard protein spiked into the excised gel samples just prior to in-gel digestion. The internal standard intensities correct for differences in enzymatic activities and sample losses that may occur during the processes of in-gel digestion and peptide extraction from the gel pieces. We used this method of peak area measurement with an internal standard to investigate the effects of pervanadate on protein phosphorylation in the WEHI-231 B cell lymphoma cell line and to assess the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in these phosphorylation events. Phosphoproteins, isolated from total cell lysates using IMAC or by immunoprecipitation using Tyr(P) antibodies, were analyzed using this method, leading to identification of >400 proteins, several of which were found at higher levels in phosphoprotein fractions after pervanadate treatment. Pretreatment of cells with the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin reduced the phosphorylation level of certain proteins (e.g. STAT1 and phospholipase Cgamma2) while increasing the phosphorylation of several others. Peak area measurement with an internal standard was also used to follow the dynamics of PI3K-dependent and -independent changes in the post-translational modification of both known and novel phospholipase Cgamma2 phosphorylation sites. Our results illustrate the capacity of this conceptually

  10. Phosphorylation Status of 72 kDa MMP-2 Determines Its Structure and Activity in Response to Peroxynitrite

    PubMed Central

    Jacob-Ferreira, Anna Laura; Kondo, Marcia Yuri; Baral, Pravas Kumar; James, Michael N. G.; Holt, Andrew; Fan, Xiaohu; Schulz, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is a key intra- and extra-cellular protease which contributes to several oxidative stress related pathologies. A molecular understanding of 72 kDa MMP-2 activity, directly mediated by S-glutathiolation of its cysteine residues in the presence of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and by phosphorylation of its serine and threonine residues, is essential to develop new generation inhibitors of intracellular MMP-2. Within its propeptide and collagen binding domains there is an interesting juxtaposition of predicted phosphorylation sites with nearby cysteine residues which form disulfide bonds. However, the combined effect of these two post-translational modifications on MMP-2 activity has not been studied. The activity of human recombinant 72 kDa MMP-2 (hrMMP-2) following in vitro treatments was measured by troponin I proteolysis assay and a kinetic activity assay using a fluorogenic peptide substrate. ONOO− treatment in the presence of 30 µM glutathione resulted in concentration-dependent changes in MMP-2 activity, with 0.1–1 µM increasing up to twofold and 100 µM attenuating its activity. Dephosphorylation of MMP-2 with alkaline phosphatase markedly increased its activity by sevenfold, either with or without ONOO−. Dephosphorylation of MMP-2 also affected the conformational structure of the enzyme as revealed by circular dichroism studies, suggesting an increase in the proportion of α-helices and a decrease in β-strands compared to the phosphorylated form of MMP-2. These results suggest that ONOO− activation (at low µM) and inactivation (at high µM) of 72 kDa MMP-2, in the presence or absence of glutathione, is also influenced by its phosphorylation status. These insights into the role of post-translational modifications in the structure and activity of 72 kDa MMP-2 will aid in the development of inhibitors specifically targeting intracellular MMP-2. PMID:24013357

  11. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor rapidly increases NMDA receptor channel activity through Fyn-mediated phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fei; Plummer, Mark R; Len, Guo-Wei; Nakazawa, Takanobu; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Black, Ira B; Wu, Kuo

    2006-11-22

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a potent modulator of hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Previously, we found that one of the targets of BDNF modulation is NR2B-containing NMDA receptors. Furthermore, exposure to the trophin rapidly increases NMDA receptor activity and enhances tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B in cortical and hippocampal postsynaptic densities (PSDs), potentially linking receptor phosphorylation to synaptic plasticity. To define the specific NR2B residue(s) regulated by BDNF, we focused on tyrosine 1472, phosphorylation of which increases after LTP. BDNF rapidly increased phosphorylation in cortical PSDs. The tyrosine kinase Fyn is critical since BDNF-dependent phosphorylation was abolished in Fyn knockout mice. Single-channel patch clamp recordings showed that Fyn is required for the increase in NMDA receptor activity elicited by BDNF. Collectively, our results suggest that BDNF enhances phosphorylation of NR2B tyrosine 1472 through activation of Fyn, leading to alteration of NMDA receptor activity and increased synaptic transmission. PMID:17045972

  12. Cofactor-Activated Phosphorylation Is Required for Inhibition of Cortical Neuron Differentiation by Groucho/TLE1

    PubMed Central

    Buscarlet, Manuel; Hermann, Robert; Lo, Rita; Tang, Yeman; Joachim, Kerline; Stifani, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Background Transcriptional co-repressors of the Groucho/transducin-like Enhancer of split (Gro/TLE) family regulate the expression of a variety of genes and are involved in numerous developmental processes in both invertebrate and vertebrate species. More specifically, Gro/TLE1 participates in mechanisms that inhibit/delay the differentiation of cerebral cortex neural progenitor cells into neurons during mammalian forebrain development. The anti-neurogenic function of Gro/TLE1 depends on the formation of protein complexes with specific DNA-binding transcription factors that engage Gro/TLE1 through WRP(W/Y) sequences. Interaction with those transcription partners results in Gro/TLE1 recruitment to selected DNA sites and causes increased Gro/TLE1 phosphorylation. The physiological significance of the latter event, termed “cofactor-activated phosphorylation,” had not been determined. Therefore, this study aimed at clarifying the role of cofactor-activated phosphorylation in the anti-neurogenic function of Gro/TLE1. Methods and Principal Findings A combination of site-directed mutagenesis, mass spectrometry, biochemistry, primary cell culture, and immunocytochemical assays was utilized to characterize point mutations of Ser-286, a residue that is phosphorylated in vivo and is located within the serine/proline-rich (SP) domain of Gro/TLE1. Mutation of Ser-286 to alanine or glutamic acid does not perturb the interaction of Gro/TLE1 with DNA-binding partners, including the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Hes1, a prototypical anti-neurogenic WRP(W/Y) motif protein. Ser-286 mutations do not prevent the recruitment of Gro/TLE1 to DNA, but they impair cofactor-activated phosphorylation and weaken the interaction of Gro/TLE1 with chromatin. These effects are correlated with an impairment of the anti-neurogenic activity of Gro/TLE1. Similar results were obtained when mutations of Ser-289 and Ser-298, which are also located within the SP domain of Gro/TLE1, were

  13. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-18

    Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li2CO3 significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li2CO3 did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P3 production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li2CO3 on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li2CO3 significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li2CO3 significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity. PMID:24950409

  14. Tyrosine 601 of Bacillus subtilis DnaK Undergoes Phosphorylation and Is Crucial for Chaperone Activity and Heat Shock Survival‡

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Macek, Boris; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In order to screen for cellular substrates of the Bacillus subtilis BY-kinase PtkA, and its cognate phosphotyrosine-protein phosphatase PtpZ, we performed a triple Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. Detected tyrosine phosphorylation sites for which the phosphorylation level decreased in the ΔptkA strain and increased in the ΔptpZ strain, compared to the wild type (WT), were considered as potential substrates of PtkA/PtpZ. One of those sites was the residue tyrosine 601 of the molecular chaperone DnaK. We confirmed that DnaK is a substrate of PtkA and PtpZ by in vitro phosphorylation and dephosphorylation assays. In vitro, DnaK Y601F mutant exhibited impaired interaction with its co-chaperones DnaJ and GrpE, along with diminished capacity to hydrolyze ATP and assist the re-folding of denatured proteins. In vivo, loss of DnaK phosphorylation in the mutant strain dnaK Y601F, or in the strain overexpressing the phosphatase PtpZ, led to diminished survival upon heat shock, consistent with the in vitro results. The decreased survival of the mutant dnaK Y601F at an elevated temperature could be rescued by complementing with the WT dnaK allele expressed ectopically. We concluded that the residue tyrosine 601 of DnaK can be phosphorylated and dephosphorylated by PtkA and PtpZ, respectively. Furthermore, Y601 is important for DnaK chaperone activity and heat shock survival of B. subtilis. PMID:27148221

  15. Nanog Increases Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Promoter Activity and Expression and Directly Binds to FAK Protein to Be Phosphorylated*

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Baotran; Olson, Gretchen; Figel, Sheila; Gelman, Irwin; Cance, William G.; Golubovskaya, Vita M.

    2012-01-01

    Nanog and FAK were shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. In this report, the Nanog overexpression increased FAK expression in 293, SW480, and SW620 cancer cells. Nanog binds the FAK promoter and up-regulates its activity, whereas Nanog siRNA decreases FAK promoter activity and FAK mRNA. The FAK promoter contains four Nanog-binding sites. The site-directed mutagenesis of these sites significantly decreased up-regulation of FAK promoter activity by Nanog. EMSA showed the specific binding of Nanog to each of the four sites, and binding was confirmed by ChIP assay. Nanog directly binds the FAK protein by pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays, and proteins co-localize by confocal microscopy. Nanog binds the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, FAK directly phosphorylates Nanog in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro kinase assay and in cancer cells in vivo. The site-directed mutagenesis of Nanog tyrosines, Y35F and Y174F, blocked phosphorylation and binding by FAK. Moreover, overexpression of wild type Nanog increased filopodia/lamellipodia formation, whereas mutant Y35F and Y174F Nanog did not. The wild type Nanog increased cell invasion that was inhibited by the FAK inhibitor and increased by FAK more significantly than with the mutants Y35F and Y174F Nanog. Down-regulation of Nanog with siRNA decreased cell growth reversed by FAK overexpression. Thus, these data demonstrate the regulation of the FAK promoter by Nanog, the direct binding of the proteins, the phosphorylation of Nanog by FAK, and the effect of FAK and Nanog cross-regulation on cancer cell morphology, invasion, and growth that plays a significant role in carcinogenesis. PMID:22493428

  16. Nanog increases focal adhesion kinase (FAK) promoter activity and expression and directly binds to FAK protein to be phosphorylated.

    PubMed

    Ho, Baotran; Olson, Gretchen; Figel, Sheila; Gelman, Irwin; Cance, William G; Golubovskaya, Vita M

    2012-05-25

    Nanog and FAK were shown to be overexpressed in cancer cells. In this report, the Nanog overexpression increased FAK expression in 293, SW480, and SW620 cancer cells. Nanog binds the FAK promoter and up-regulates its activity, whereas Nanog siRNA decreases FAK promoter activity and FAK mRNA. The FAK promoter contains four Nanog-binding sites. The site-directed mutagenesis of these sites significantly decreased up-regulation of FAK promoter activity by Nanog. EMSA showed the specific binding of Nanog to each of the four sites, and binding was confirmed by ChIP assay. Nanog directly binds the FAK protein by pulldown and immunoprecipitation assays, and proteins co-localize by confocal microscopy. Nanog binds the N-terminal domain of FAK. In addition, FAK directly phosphorylates Nanog in a dose-dependent manner by in vitro kinase assay and in cancer cells in vivo. The site-directed mutagenesis of Nanog tyrosines, Y35F and Y174F, blocked phosphorylation and binding by FAK. Moreover, overexpression of wild type Nanog increased filopodia/lamellipodia formation, whereas mutant Y35F and Y174F Nanog did not. The wild type Nanog increased cell invasion that was inhibited by the FAK inhibitor and increased by FAK more significantly than with the mutants Y35F and Y174F Nanog. Down-regulation of Nanog with siRNA decreased cell growth reversed by FAK overexpression. Thus, these data demonstrate the regulation of the FAK promoter by Nanog, the direct binding of the proteins, the phosphorylation of Nanog by FAK, and the effect of FAK and Nanog cross-regulation on cancer cell morphology, invasion, and growth that plays a significant role in carcinogenesis. PMID:22493428

  17. Activation of 6-phosphofructokinase via phosphorylation by Pkn4, a protein Ser/Thr kinase of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Nariya, Hirofumi; Inouye, Sumiko

    2002-12-01

    Myxococcus xanthus is a Gram-negative bacterium that exhibits a communal lifestyle during vegetative growth and multicellular development, forming fruiting bodies filled with spores. It contains at least 13 eukaryotic-like protein Ser/Thr kinases (PSTKs from Pkn1 to Pkn13). In the present report, we demonstrate that Pkn4, the gene located 18 bp downstream of the gene for 6-phosphofructokinase (PFK), is a PSTK for M. xanthus PFK (Mx-PFK), the key regulatory enzyme in glycolysis. Both Pkn4 and Mx-PFK were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Mx-PFK was found to be phosphorylated by Pkn4 at Thr-226, which is presumed to be located in the allosteric effector site of the PFK. The phosphorylation of Mx-PFK enhanced its activity 2.7-fold, indicating that Pkn4 plays an important role in glucose metabolism. Although PFKs from other organisms are known to be tetrameric enzymes, Mx-PFK is composed of an octamer and is dissociated to tetramers in the presence of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP), an allosteric inhibitor for PFK. Furthermore, phosphorylation of PFK by Pkn4 is almost completely inhibited by PEP. Mx-PFK is associated with the regulatory domain of Pkn4, and this association is inhibited by PEP. This is the first demonstration that a prokaryotic PFK is regulated by phosphorylation by PSTK in prokaryotes. PMID:12453221

  18. Low dose cadmium poisoning results in sustained ERK phosphorylation and caspase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Patrick . E-mail: pmartin@unice.fr; Poggi, Marie Christine . E-mail: poggi@unice.fr; Chambard, Jean Claude . E-mail: chambard@unice.fr; Boulukos, Kim E. . E-mail: boulukos@unice.fr; Pognonec, Philippe . E-mail: pognonec@unice.fr

    2006-11-24

    Cadmium poisoning has been known to result in a wide variety of cellular responses, including oxidative stress and kinase activation. It has been reported that ERK is activated following acute cadmium exposure, and this response is commonly seen as a classical ERK survival mechanism. Here, we analyzed different cell types for their responses to low concentrations of cadmium poisoning. We found that there is an association between cell susceptibility to cadmium toxicity and ERK activation. This activation is atypical, since it consists of a sustained ERK phosphorylation, that lasts up to 6 days post stimulation. This activation is associated with the appearance of cleaved caspases 8 and 3, processed PARP, and irreversible damage. Pharmacological inhibition of ERK phosphorylation results in the ability of cells to resist cadmium poisoning. Our data indicate that low cadmium concentrations result in an unconventional ERK sustained phosphorylation, which in turn leads to death signaling.

  19. Modulation of activation-loop phosphorylation by JAK inhibitors is binding mode dependent

    PubMed Central

    Bonenfant, Débora; Rubert, Joëlle; Vangrevelinghe, Eric; Scheufler, Clemens; Marque, Fanny; Régnier, Catherine H.; De Pover, Alain; Ryckelynck, Hugues; Bhagwat, Neha; Koppikar, Priya; Goel, Aviva; Wyder, Lorenza; Tavares, Gisele; Baffert, Fabienne; Pissot-Soldermann, Carole; Manley, Paul W.; Gaul, Christoph; Voshol, Hans; Levine, Ross L.; Sellers, William R.; Hofmann, Francesco; Radimerski, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    JAK inhibitors are being developed for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, myeloproliferative neoplasms and leukemias. Most of these drugs target the ATP-binding pocket and stabilize the active conformation of the JAK kinases. This type-I binding mode leads to an increase in JAK activation-loop phosphorylation, despite blockade of kinase function. Here we report that stabilizing the inactive state via type-II inhibition acts in the opposite manner, leading to a loss of activation-loop phosphorylation. We used X-ray crystallography to corroborate the binding mode and report for the first time the crystal structure of the JAK2 kinase domain in an inactive conformation. Importantly, JAK inhibitor-induced activation-loop phosphorylation requires receptor interaction, as well as intact kinase and pseudokinase domains. Hence, depending on the respective conformation stabilized by a JAK inhibitor, hyperphosphorylation of the activation-loop may or may not be elicited. PMID:22684457

  20. Identification of the site on calcineurin phosphorylated by Ca sup + /CaM-dependent kinase II: Modification of the CaM-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Martensen, T.M.; Kincaid, R.L. ); Martin, B.M. )

    1989-11-28

    The catalytic subunit of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin- (CaM) dependent phosphoprotein phosphatase calcineurin (CN) was phosphorylated by an activated form of Ca{sup 2+}/CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaM-kinase II) incorporating approximately 1 mol of phosphoryl group/mol of catalytic subunit, in agreement with a value previously reported. Cyanogen bromide cleavage of radiolabeled CN followed by peptide fractionation using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography yielded a single labeled peptide that contained a phosphoserine residue. Microsequencing of the peptide allowed both the determination of the cleavage cycle that released ({sup 32}P)phosphoserine and the identity of amino acids adjacent to it. Comparison of this sequence with the sequences of methionyl peptides deduced from the cDNA structure of CN allowed the phosphorylated serine to be uniquely identified. Interestingly, the phosphoserine exists in the sequence Met-Ala-Arg-Val-Phe-Ser(P)-Val-Leu-Arg-Glu, part of which lies within the putative CaM-binding sites. The phosphorylated serine residue was resistant to autocatalytic dephosphorylation, yet the slow rate of hydrolysis could be powerfully stimulated by effectors of CN phosphatase activity. The mechanism of dephosphorylation may be intramolecular since the initial rate was the same at phosphoCN concentrations of 2.5-250 nM.

  1. Multisite phosphorylation of c-Jun at threonine 91/93/95 triggers the onset of c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity in cerebellar granule neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C E; Albanito, L; De Marco, P; Aiello, D; Maggiolini, M; Napoli, A; Musti, A M

    2013-01-01

    Cerebellar granule cell (CGC) apoptosis by trophic/potassium (TK) deprivation is a model of election to study the interplay of pro-apoptotic and pro-survival signaling pathways in neuronal cell death. In this model, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) induces pro-apoptotic genes through the c-Jun/activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor. On the other side, a survival pathway initiated by lithium leads to repression of pro-apoptotic c-Jun/AP-1 target genes without interfering with JNK activity. Yet, the mechanism by which lithium inhibits c-Jun activity remains to be elucidated. Here, we used this model system to study the regulation and function of site-specific c-Jun phosphorylation at the S63 and T91/T93 JNK sites in neuronal cell death. We found that TK-deprivation led to c-Jun multiphosphorylation at all three JNK sites. However, immunofluorescence analysis of c-Jun phosphorylation at single cell level revealed that the S63 site was phosphorylated in all c-Jun-expressing cells, whereas the response of T91/T93 phosphorylation was more sensitive, mirroring the switch-like apoptotic response of CGCs. Conversely, lithium prevented T91T93 phosphorylation and cell death without affecting the S63 site, suggesting that T91T93 phosphorylation triggers c-Jun pro-apoptotic activity. Accordingly, a c-Jun mutant lacking the T95 priming site for T91/93 phosphorylation protected CGCs from apoptosis, whereas it was able to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. Vice versa, a c-Jun mutant bearing aspartate substitution of T95 overwhelmed lithium-mediate protection of CGCs from TK-deprivation, validating that inhibition of T91/T93/T95 phosphorylation underlies the effect of lithium on cell death. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed multiphosphorylation of c-Jun at T91/T93/T95 in cells. Moreover, JNK phosphorylated recombinant c-Jun at T91/T93 in a T95-dependent manner. On the basis of our results, we propose that T91/T93/T95 multiphosphorylation of c-Jun functions as a

  2. Ground state destabilization by anionic nucleophiles contributes to the activity of phosphoryl transfer enzymes.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Logan D; Fenn, Tim D; Herschlag, Daniel

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes stabilize transition states of reactions while limiting binding to ground states, as is generally required for any catalyst. Alkaline Phosphatase (AP) and other nonspecific phosphatases are some of Nature's most impressive catalysts, achieving preferential transition state over ground state stabilization of more than 10²²-fold while utilizing interactions with only the five atoms attached to the transferred phosphorus. We tested a model that AP achieves a portion of this preference by destabilizing ground state binding via charge repulsion between the anionic active site nucleophile, Ser102, and the negatively charged phosphate monoester substrate. Removal of the Ser102 alkoxide by mutation to glycine or alanine increases the observed Pi affinity by orders of magnitude at pH 8.0. To allow precise and quantitative comparisons, the ionic form of bound P(i) was determined from pH dependencies of the binding of Pi and tungstate, a P(i) analog lacking titratable protons over the pH range of 5-11, and from the ³¹P chemical shift of bound P(i). The results show that the Pi trianion binds with an exceptionally strong femtomolar affinity in the absence of Ser102, show that its binding is destabilized by ≥10⁸-fold by the Ser102 alkoxide, and provide direct evidence for ground state destabilization. Comparisons of X-ray crystal structures of AP with and without Ser102 reveal the same active site and P(i) binding geometry upon removal of Ser102, suggesting that the destabilization does not result from a major structural rearrangement upon mutation of Ser102. Analogous Pi binding measurements with a protein tyrosine phosphatase suggest the generality of this ground state destabilization mechanism. Our results have uncovered an important contribution of anionic nucleophiles to phosphoryl transfer catalysis via ground state electrostatic destabilization and an enormous capacity of the AP active site for specific and strong recognition of the phosphoryl group in

  3. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  4. Phosphorylation of eIF2α is responsible for the failure of the picornavirus internal ribosome entry site to direct translation from Sindbis virus replicons.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Miguel Angel; Redondo, Natalia; García-Moreno, Manuel; Carrasco, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Translation directed by the poliovirus (PV) or encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) is very inefficient when expressed from Sindbis virus (SV) replicons. This inhibition can be rescued by co-expression of PV 2A protease (2A(pro)). Inhibition correlates with the extensive phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α induced by SV replication. Confirmation that PV or EMCV IRES-driven translation can function when eIF2α is not phosphorylated was obtained in dsRNA-activated protein kinase knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (PKR(-/-) MEFs), where SV replication cannot induce eIF2α phosphorylation, and in variant S51A MEFs that express an unphosphorylatable eIF2α. In these cells, PV or EMCV IRES-dependent translation operated more efficiently than in wild-type MEFs. However, this translation was potently blocked when eIF2α was phosphorylated by the addition of thapsigargin to PKR(-/-) MEFs. In addition, when wild-type eIF2α was expressed in S51A MEFs or PKR was expressed in PKR(-/-) MEFs, PV IRES-dependent translation decreased. In both cases, the decrease in PV IRES-dependent translation correlated with the phosphorylation of eIF2α. Notably, PV 2A(pro) expression rescued PV IRES-driven translation in thapsigargin-treated PKR(-/-) MEFs. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PV IRES-driven translation can take place from SV replicons if eIF2α remains unphosphorylated. Remarkably, PV IRES-dependent translation was fully functional in this system when PV 2A(pro) was present, even if eIF2α was phosphorylated. PMID:23255624

  5. Phosphorylation and activation of ubiquitin-specific protease-14 by Akt regulates the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daichao; Shan, Bing; Lee, Byung-Hoon; Zhu, Kezhou; Zhang, Tao; Sun, Huawang; Liu, Min; Shi, Linyu; Liang, Wei; Qian, Lihui; Xiao, Juan; Wang, Lili; Pan, Lifeng; Finley, Daniel; Yuan, Junying

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which controls the turnover of short-lived proteins in eukaryotic cells, is critical in maintaining cellular proteostasis. Here we show that USP14, a major deubiquitinating enzyme that regulates the UPS, is a substrate of Akt, a serine/threonine-specific protein kinase critical in mediating intracellular signaling transducer for growth factors. We report that Akt-mediated phosphorylation of USP14 at Ser432, which normally blocks its catalytic site in the inactive conformation, activates its deubiquitinating activity in vitro and in cells. We also demonstrate that phosphorylation of USP14 is critical for Akt to regulate proteasome activity and consequently global protein degradation. Since Akt can be activated by a wide range of growth factors and is under negative control by phosphoinosotide phosphatase PTEN, we suggest that regulation of UPS by Akt-mediated phosphorylation of USP14 may provide a common mechanism for growth factors to control global proteostasis and for promoting tumorigenesis in PTEN-negative cancer cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10510.001 PMID:26523394

  6. S6 kinase in quiescent Swiss mouse 3T3 cells is activated by phosphorylation in response to serum treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, L.M.; Siegmann, M.; Thomas, G. )

    1988-10-01

    To investigate the role of phosphorylation in the activation of S6 kinase, the enzyme was isolated from {sup 32}P-labeled Swiss mouse 3T3 cells before and after stimulation with serum. The kinase activity was followed through several purification steps, and a radioactive protein of M{sub r} 70,000 was obtained from the stimulated cells. This band was not detected in resting cells. The M{sub r} 70,000 protein exhibited the same size upon NaDodSO{sub 4}/PAGE as the homogeneous kinase, and it comigrated with the in vitro autophosphorylated form of the enzyme. Treatment of the in vivo-labeled material with phosphatase 2A led to a loss of kinase activity concomitant with a release of {sup 32}P{sub i} from the M{sub r} 70,000 protein. The partially dephosphorylated protein migrated faster during PAGE, displaying distinct species of M{sub r} 69,000 and 68,000. Most importantly, phospho amino acid analysis of the labeled S6 kinase showed only phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. These results argue that the S6 kinase is phosphorylated at multiple sites in vivo and that it is activated by serine/threonine phosphorylation.

  7. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein C Phosphorylation Affects Cross-Bridge Cycle's Elementary Steps in a Site-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Kawai, Masakata

    2014-01-01

    Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302), DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302), SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302), and t/t (cMyBP-C null) genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT) cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi), and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc), and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases. PMID:25420047

  8. CASEIN KINASE-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION OF SERINE 839 IS NECESSARY FOR BASOLATERAL LOCALIZATION OF THE Ca2+-ACTIVATED NON-SELECTIVE CATION CHANNEL TRPM4

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Cáceres, Mónica; Park, Kang-Sik; Leiva-Salcedo, Elías; Romero, Aníbal; Varela, Diego

    2014-01-01

    TRPM4 is a Ca2+-activated non-selective cation channel expressed in a wide range of human tissues. TRPM4 participates in a variety of physiological processes such as T cell activation, myogenic vasoconstriction and allergic reactions. TRPM4 Ca2+ sensitivity is enhanced by calmodulin (CaM) and phosphathydilinositol 4, 5-biphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) binding, as well as, under certain conditions, PKC activation. However, information as to the mechanisms of modulation of this channel remain unknown, including direct identification of phosphorylation sites on TRPM4 and their role in channel features. Here, we use mass-spectrometric-based proteomic approaches (immunoprecipitation and tandem mass spectrometry), to unambiguously identify S839 as a phosphorylation site present on human TRPM4 expressed in a human cell line. Site-directed mutagenesis employing a serine to alanine mutation to eliminate phosphorylation, and a phospho-mimetic aspartate mutation, as well as biochemical and immunocytochemical experiments, revealed a role for S839 phosphorylation in the basolateral expression of TRPM4 channels in epithelial cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that casein kinase 1 (CK1) phosphorylates S839 and is responsible for the basolateral localization of TRPM4. PMID:25231975

  9. Optimal Replication Activity of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus RNA Polymerase Requires Phosphorylation of a Residue(s) at Carboxy-Terminal Domain II of Its Accessory Subunit, Phosphoprotein P

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Leroy N.; Englund, Nathan; Das, Tapas; Banerjee, Amiya K.; Pattnaik, Asit K.

    1999-01-01

    The phosphoprotein, P, of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is a key subunit of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase complex. The protein is phosphorylated at multiple sites in two different domains. We recently showed that specific serine and threonine residues within the amino-terminal acidic domain I of P protein must be phosphorylated for in vivo transcription activity, but not for replication activity, of the polymerase complex. To examine the role of phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of the P protein in transcription and replication, we have used a panel of mutant P proteins in which the phosphate acceptor sites (Ser-226, Ser-227, and Ser-233) were altered to alanines either individually or in various combinations. Analyses of the mutant proteins for their ability to support replication of a VSV minigenomic RNA suggest that phosphorylation of either Ser-226 or Ser-227 is necessary for optimal replication activity of the protein. The mutant protein (P226/227) in which both of these residues were altered to alanines was only about 8% active in replication compared to the wild-type (wt) protein. Substitution of alanine for Ser-233 did not have any adverse effect on replication activity of the protein. In contrast, all the mutant proteins showed activities similar to that of the wt protein in transcription. These results indicate that phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain II residues of P protein are required for optimal replication activity but not for transcription activity. Furthermore, substitution of glutamic acid residues for Ser-226 and Ser-227 resulted in a protein that was only 14% active in replication but almost fully active in transcription. Taken together, these results, along with our earlier studies, suggest that phosphorylation of residues at two different domains in the P protein regulates its activity in transcription and replication of the VSV genome. PMID:10364310

  10. Hedgehog-induced phosphorylation by CK1 sustains the activity of Ci/Gli activator

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Qing; Li, Shuang; Li, Shuangxi; Jiang, Alice; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling governs many developmental processes by regulating the balance between the repressor (CiR/GliR) and activator (CiA/GliA) forms of Cubitus interruptus (Ci)/glioma-associated oncogene homolog (Gli) transcription factors. Although much is known about how CiR/GliR is controlled, the regulation of CiA/GliA remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Casein kinase 1 (CK1) sustains Hh signaling downstream of Costal2 and Suppressor of fused (Sufu) by protecting CiA from premature degradation. We show that Hh stimulates Ci phosphorylation by CK1 at multiple Ser/Thr-rich degrons to inhibit its recognition by the Hh-induced MATH and BTB domain containing protein (HIB), a substrate receptor for the Cullin 3 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. In Hh-receiving cells, reduction of CK1 activity accelerated HIB-mediated degradation of CiA, leading to premature loss of pathway activity. We also provide evidence that GliA is regulated by CK1 in a similar fashion and that CK1 acts downstream of Sufu to promote Sonic hedgehog signaling. Taken together, our study not only reveals an unanticipated and conserved mechanism by which phosphorylation of Ci/Gli positively regulates Hh signaling but also provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, that substrate recognition by the Cullin 3 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases is negatively regulated by a kinase. PMID:25512501

  11. Phosphorylation-dependent control of Pc2 SUMO E3 ligase activity by its substrate protein HIPK2.

    PubMed

    Roscic, Ana; Möller, Andreas; Calzado, Marco A; Renner, Florian; Wimmer, Verena C; Gresko, Ekaterina; Lüdi, Katharina Schmid; Schmitz, M Lienhard

    2006-10-01

    Sumoylation serves to control key cellular functions, but the regulation of SUMO E3 ligase activity is largely unknown. Here we show that the polycomb group protein Pc2 binds to and colocalizes with homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) and serves as a SUMO E3 ligase for this kinase. DNA damage-induced HIPK2 directly phosphorylates Pc2 at multiple sites, which in turn controls Pc2 sumoylation and intranuclear localization. Inducible phosphorylation of Pc2 at threonine 495 is required for its ability to increase HIPK2 sumoylation in response to DNA damage, thereby establishing an autoregulatory feedback loop between a SUMO substrate and its cognate E3 ligase. Sumoylation enhances the ability of HIPK2 to mediate transcriptional repression, thus providing a mechanistic link for DNA damage-induced transcriptional silencing. PMID:17018294

  12. Allosteric Activation of Bacterial Response Regulators: the Role of the Cognate Histidine Kinase Beyond Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Trajtenberg, Felipe; Albanesi, Daniela; Ruétalo, Natalia; Botti, Horacio; Mechaly, Ariel E.; Nieves, Marcos; Aguilar, Pablo S.; Cybulski, Larisa; Larrieux, Nicole; de Mendoza, Diego

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Response regulators are proteins that undergo transient phosphorylation, connecting specific signals to adaptive responses. Remarkably, the molecular mechanism of response regulator activation remains elusive, largely because of the scarcity of structural data on multidomain response regulators and histidine kinase/response regulator complexes. We now address this question by using a combination of crystallographic data and functional analyses in vitro and in vivo, studying DesR and its cognate sensor kinase DesK, a two-component system that controls membrane fluidity in Bacillus subtilis. We establish that phosphorylation of the receiver domain of DesR is allosterically coupled to two distinct exposed surfaces of the protein, controlling noncanonical dimerization/tetramerization, cooperative activation, and DesK binding. One of these surfaces is critical for both homodimerization- and kinase-triggered allosteric activations. Moreover, DesK induces a phosphorylation-independent activation of DesR in vivo, uncovering a novel and stringent level of specificity among kinases and regulators. Our results support a model that helps to explain how response regulators restrict phosphorylation by small-molecule phosphoryl donors, as well as cross talk with noncognate sensors. PMID:25406381

  13. Hedgehog induces formation of PKA-Smoothened complexes to promote Smoothened phosphorylation and pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuang; Ma, Guoqiang; Wang, Bing; Jiang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) is a secreted glycoprotein that binds its receptor Patched to activate the G protein-coupled receptor-like protein Smoothened (Smo). In Drosophila, protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylates and activates Smo in cells stimulated with Hh. In unstimulated cells, PKA phosphorylates and inhibits the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci). Here, we found that in cells exposed to Hh, the catalytic subunit of PKA (PKAc) bound to the juxtamembrane region of the C terminus of Smo. PKA-mediated phosphorylation of Smo further enhanced its association with PKAc to form stable kinase-substrate complexes that promoted the PKA-mediated trans-phosphorylation of Smo dimers. We identified multiple basic residues in the C-terminus of Smo that were required for interaction with PKAc, Smo phosphorylation, and Hh pathway activation. Hh induced a switch from the association of PKAc with a cytosolic complex of Ci and the kinesin-like protein Costal2 (Cos2) to a membrane-bound Smo-Cos2 complex. Thus, our study uncovers a previously uncharacterized mechanism for regulation of PKA activity and demonstrates that the signal-regulated formation of kinase-substrate complexes plays a central role in Hh signal transduction. PMID:24985345

  14. The conserved dual phosphorylation sites of the Candida albicans Hog1 protein are crucial for white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Han; Liang, Shen-Huan; Deng, Fu-Sheng; Lin, Ching-Hsuan

    2016-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen capable of causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has a unique morphological transition between white and opaque phases. These two cells differ in virulence, mating capability, biofilm formation, and host-cell interaction. Previous studies revealed that deletion of the SSK2, PBS2, or HOG1 gene resulted in 100% opaque cell formation and suppressed the mating response. Thr-174 and Tyr-176 of the Hog1 protein are important phosphoacceptors and can be activated in response to stimuli. In this study, we first demonstrated the importance of two conserved phosphorylation sites in white-opaque switching, mating, and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesion. Six Hog1 point-mutated strains were generated, including nonphosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174A), Hog1(Y176F), and Hog1(T174A,Y176F)) and negatively charged phosphorylated strains (Hog1(T174D), Hog1(Y176D), and Hog1(T174D,Y176D)). Point mutation on Thr-174, Tyr-176 or in combination with the Hog1 protein in C. albicans MTL homozygous strains stimulated opaque cell formation at a frequency of 100%. Furthermore, mating projections of point-mutated strains were significantly shorter and their mating efficiencies and pheromone-stimulated cell adhesive numbers were lower than those of the wild-type. By investigating the effects of Hog1 phosphorylation in ssk1Δ and sln1Δ, we also demonstrate that the phosphorylation intensity of Hog1p is directly involved in the white-opaque switching. Taken together, the results of our study demonstrate that dual phosphorylation sites of C. albicans are crucial for white-opaque transition, sexual mating, and pheromone-induced cell adhesion. PMID:27118797

  15. Interferon regulatory factor 4 is activated through c-Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation in virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Ning, Shunbin

    2013-09-01

    The importance of the oncogenic transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in hematological malignancies has been increasingly recognized. We have previously identified the B cell integration cluster (BIC), the gene encoding miR-155, as the first microRNA (miRNA)-encoding gene transcriptionally targeted by IRF4 in virus-transformed cancer cells. Activation of IRFs is prerequisite for their functions. However, how IRF4 is activated in cancer is an open question. Our phosphoproteome profiling has identified several tyrosine phosphorylation sites on IRF4 in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cells. Further, we show here that c-Src dramatically stimulates IRF4 phosphorylation and activity and that Y61 and Y124 are two key sites responding to c-Src-mediated activation. Consistently, c-Src is constitutively expressed and active in EBV-transformed cells. However, c-Src is unlikely to be a direct kinase for IRF4. Furthermore, we have a polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-IRF4(Y121/124) developed in rabbit. We have further shown that inhibition of c-Src activity reduces p-IRF4(Y121/124) and significantly represses transcription of the IRF4 target BIC in EBV-transformed cells. Our results therefore, for the first time, demonstrate that IRF4 is phosphorylated and activated through a c-Src-mediated pathway in virus-transformed cells. These findings will improve our understanding of IRF4 in neoplasia and will provide profound insights into the interaction of oncogenic viruses with IRF4 in the development of hematological malignancies. PMID:23804646

  16. Repair of chromosomal RAG-mediated DNA breaks by mutant RAG proteins lacking phosphatidylinositol 3-like kinase consensus phosphorylation sites.

    PubMed

    Gapud, Eric J; Lee, Baeck-Seung; Mahowald, Grace K; Bassing, Craig H; Sleckman, Barry P

    2011-08-15

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunits (DNA-PKcs) are members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-like family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate serines or threonines when positioned adjacent to a glutamine residue (SQ/TQ). Both kinases are activated rapidly by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulate the function of proteins involved in DNA damage responses. In developing lymphocytes, DSBs are generated during V(D)J recombination, which is required to assemble the second exon of all Ag receptor genes. This reaction is initiated through a DNA cleavage step by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which together comprise an endonuclease that generates DSBs at the border of two recombining gene segments and their flanking recombination signals. This DNA cleavage step is followed by a joining step, during which pairs of DNA coding and signal ends are ligated to form a coding joint and a signal joint, respectively. ATM and DNA-PKcs are integrally involved in the repair of both signal and coding ends, but the targets of these kinases involved in the repair process have not been fully elucidated. In this regard, the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which each have several SQ/TQ motifs, have been implicated in the repair of RAG-mediated DSBs. In this study, we use a previously developed approach for studying chromosomal V(D)J recombination that has been modified to allow for the analysis of RAG1 and RAG2 function. We show that phosphorylation of RAG1 or RAG2 by ATM or DNA-PKcs at SQ/TQ consensus sites is dispensable for the joining step of V(D)J recombination. PMID:21742970

  17. Incorporating substrate sequence motifs and spatial amino acid composition to identify kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on protein three-dimensional structures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by kinases plays crucial regulatory roles in cellular processes. Given the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based experiments, the desire to annotate the catalytic kinases for in vivo phosphorylation sites has motivated. Thus, a variety of computational methods have been developed for performing a large-scale prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites. However, most of the proposed methods solely rely on the local amino acid sequences surrounding the phosphorylation sites. An increasing number of three-dimensional structures make it possible to physically investigate the structural environment of phosphorylation sites. Results In this work, all of the experimental phosphorylation sites are mapped to the protein entries of Protein Data Bank by sequence identity. It resulted in a total of 4508 phosphorylation sites containing the protein three-dimensional (3D) structures. To identify phosphorylation sites on protein 3D structures, this work incorporates support vector machines (SVMs) with the information of linear motifs and spatial amino acid composition, which is determined for each kinase group by calculating the relative frequencies of 20 amino acid types within a specific radial distance from central phosphorylated amino acid residue. After the cross-validation evaluation, most of the kinase-specific models trained with the consideration of structural information outperform the models considering only the sequence information. Furthermore, the independent testing set which is not included in training set has demonstrated that the proposed method could provide a comparable performance to other popular tools. Conclusion The proposed method is shown to be capable of predicting kinase-specific phosphorylation sites on 3D structures and has been implemented as a web server which is freely accessible at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/PhosK3D/. Due to the difficulty of identifying the kinase-specific phosphorylation

  18. High LET - induced H2AX phosphorylation at sites of DNA double strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, N.; Cucinotta, F.; Wu, H.

    Within cell nuclei, traversing charged heavy ion particles lead to the accumulation of proteins related to DNA lesions and repair along the ion trajectories. Irradiation using a standard geometric setup with the beam path perpendicular to the cell monolayer generates discrete foci of several proteins known to localize at sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). One such molecule is the histone protein H2AX (gamma-H2AX), which gets rapidly phosphorylated in response to ionizing radiation. Here we present data obtained with a modified irradiation geometry characterized by a beam path parallel to a monolayer of human fibroblast cells. This new irradiation geometry leads to the formation of gamma-H2AX aggregates in the shape of streaks stretching over several micrometers in the x/y plane, thus enabling the analysis of the fluorescence distributions along the particle trajectories. Qualitative analysis of these distributions presented insights into the DNA repair kinetics along the primary track structure and visualization of possible chromatin movement. We also present evidence of colocalization of gamma-H2AX with several other proteins in responses to ionizing radiation exposure. Analysis of gamma-H2AX has the potential to provide useful information on human cell responses to high LET radiation after exposure to space-like radiation.

  19. Hedgehog-regulated atypical PKC promotes phosphorylation and activation of Smoothened and Cubitus interruptus in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Liu, Yajuan; Fan, Junkai; Epperly, Garretson; Gao, Tianyan; Jiang, Jin; Jia, Jianhang

    2014-11-11

    Smoothened (Smo) is essential for transduction of the Hedgehog (Hh) signal in both insects and vertebrates. Cell surface/cilium accumulation of Smo is thought to play an important role in Hh signaling, but how the localization of Smo is controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that atypical PKC (aPKC) regulates Smo phosphorylation and basolateral accumulation in Drosophila wings. Inactivation of aPKC by either RNAi or a mutation inhibits Smo basolateral accumulation and attenuates Hh target gene expression. In contrast, expression of constitutively active aPKC elevates basolateral accumulation of Smo and promotes Hh signaling. The aPKC-mediated phosphorylation of Smo at Ser680 promotes Ser683 phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 (CK1), and these phosphorylation events elevate Smo activity in vivo. Moreover, aPKC has an additional positive role in Hh signaling by regulating the activity of Cubitus interruptus (Ci) through phosphorylation of the Zn finger DNA-binding domain. Finally, the expression of aPKC is up-regulated by Hh signaling in a Ci-dependent manner. Our findings indicate a direct involvement of aPKC in Hh signaling beyond its role in cell polarity. PMID:25349414

  20. Hedgehog-regulated atypical PKC promotes phosphorylation and activation of Smoothened and Cubitus interruptus in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Kai; Liu, Yajuan; Fan, Junkai; Epperly, Garretson; Gao, Tianyan; Jiang, Jin; Jia, Jianhang

    2014-01-01

    Smoothened (Smo) is essential for transduction of the Hedgehog (Hh) signal in both insects and vertebrates. Cell surface/cilium accumulation of Smo is thought to play an important role in Hh signaling, but how the localization of Smo is controlled remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that atypical PKC (aPKC) regulates Smo phosphorylation and basolateral accumulation in Drosophila wings. Inactivation of aPKC by either RNAi or a mutation inhibits Smo basolateral accumulation and attenuates Hh target gene expression. In contrast, expression of constitutively active aPKC elevates basolateral accumulation of Smo and promotes Hh signaling. The aPKC-mediated phosphorylation of Smo at Ser680 promotes Ser683 phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 (CK1), and these phosphorylation events elevate Smo activity in vivo. Moreover, aPKC has an additional positive role in Hh signaling by regulating the activity of Cubitus interruptus (Ci) through phosphorylation of the Zn finger DNA-binding domain. Finally, the expression of aPKC is up-regulated by Hh signaling in a Ci-dependent manner. Our findings indicate a direct involvement of aPKC in Hh signaling beyond its role in cell polarity. PMID:25349414

  1. Synaptic Activation of Ribosomal Protein S6 Phosphorylation Occurs Locally in Activated Dendritic Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhoy, Patricia Salgado; Farris, Shannon; Steward, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) induces phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) in postsynaptic neurons, but the functional significance of rpS6 phosphorylation is poorly understood. Here, we show that synaptic stimulation that induces perforant path LTP triggers phosphorylation of rpS6 (p-rpS6)…

  2. Posttranslational modifications of bovine osteopontin: identification of twenty-eight phosphorylation and three O-glycosylation sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, E. S.; Højrup, P.; Petersen, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a multiphosphorylated glycoprotein found in bone and other normal and malignant tissues, as well as in the physiological fluids urine and milk. The present study demonstrates that bovine milk osteopontin is phosphorylated at 27 serine residues and 1 threonine residue. Phosphoamino acids were identified by a combination of amino acid analysis, sequence analysis of S-ethylcysteine-derivatized phosphopeptides, and mass spectrometric analysis. Twenty-five phosphoserines and one phosphothreonine were located in Ser/Thr-X-Glu/Ser(P)/Asp motifs, and two phosphoserines were found in the sequence Ser-X-X-Glu/Ser(P). These sequence motifs are identical with the recognition sequences of mammary gland casein kinase and casein kinase II, respectively. Examination of the phosphorylation pattern revealed that the phosphorylations were clustered in groups of approximately three spanned by unphosphorylated regions of 11-32 amino acids. This pattern is probably of importance in the multiple functions of OPN involving interaction with Ca2+ and inorganic calcium salts. Furthermore, three O-glycosylated threonines (Thr 115, Thr 124, and Thr 129) have been identified in a threonine- and proline-rich region of the protein. Three putative N-glycosylation sites (Asn 63, Asn 85, and Asn 193) are present in bovine osteopontin, but sequence and mass spectrometric analysis showed that none of these asparagines were glycosylated in bovine mammary gland osteopontin. Alignment analysis showed that the majority of the phosphorylation sites in bovine osteopontin as well as all three O-glycosylation sites were conserved in other mammalian sequences. This conservation of serines, even in otherwise less well-conserved regions of the protein, indicates that the phosphorylation of osteopontin at specific sites is essential for the function of the protein. PMID:8535240

  3. Site-specific anti-phosphopeptide antibodies: use in assessing insulin receptor serine/threonine phosphorylation state and identification of serine-1327 as a novel site of phorbol ester-induced phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Coghlan, M P; Pillay, T S; Tavaré, J M; Siddle, K

    1994-01-01

    Rabbit antisera were raised against synthetic phosphopeptides corresponding to defined or putative sites of insulin receptor serine/threonine phosphorylation (Ser-1305, Ser-1327, Thr-1348). All of these antibodies bound specifically to the immunogenic phosphopeptide but not to the non-phosphorylated form of the peptide or to other phosphopeptides, in a microtitre plate competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Anti-PS1327 antibody reacted well with native insulin receptor prepared from phorbol ester-treated transfected CHO.T cells, but showed little reaction with receptor from untreated cells. Anti-PT1348 antibody in crude form reacted substantially with receptor from both phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-treated and untreated cells, but displayed specificity for phosphoreceptor after adsorption to remove antibodies reactive with dephosphopeptide. The ability to discriminate between receptor from cells treated with or without phorbol ester was retained when these antibodies were used to probe denatured receptor on Western blots. Thus anti-PS1327 and anti-PT1348 react with insulin receptor in a site-specific and phosphorylation-state-dependent manner. Anti-PT1348, but not anti-PS1327, also showed increased reactivity with receptor prepared from insulin-treated cells. The third antibody, anti-PS1305, did not react with intact insulin receptor under any conditions. It is concluded that serine 1327 is a major, previously unrecognized, site of phorbol ester-induced receptor phosphorylation, and that anti-phosphopeptide antibodies will be valuable reagents with which to examine the serine/threonine phosphorylation state of receptor extracted from tissues. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7980459

  4. Phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 serine 307 correlates with JNK activity in atrophic skeletal muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilder, Thomas L.; Tou, Janet C L.; Grindeland, Richard E.; Wade, Charles E.; Graves, Lee M.

    2003-01-01

    c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to negatively regulate insulin signaling through serine phosphorylation of residue 307 within the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) in adipose and liver tissue. Using a rat hindlimb suspension model for muscle disuse atrophy, we found that JNK activity was significantly elevated in atrophic soleus muscle and that IRS-1 was phosphorylated on Ser(307) prior to the degradation of the IRS-1 protein. Moreover, we observed a corresponding reduction in Akt activity, providing biochemical evidence for the development of insulin resistance in atrophic skeletal muscle.

  5. Stimulation of glycogen synthesis by heat shock in L6 skeletal-muscle cells: regulatory role of site-specific phosphorylation of glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1.

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Byoung; Duddy, Noreen; Ragolia, Louis; Begum, Najma

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that glycogen-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP-1(G)) is essential for basal and exercise-induced glycogen synthesis, which is mediated in part by dephosphorylation and activation of glycogen synthase (GS). In the present study, we examined the potential role of site-specific phosphorylation of PP-1(G) in heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. L6 rat skeletal-muscle cells were stably transfected with wild-type PP-1(G) or with PP-1(G) mutants in which site-1 (S1) Ser(48) and site-2 (S2) Ser(67) residues were substituted with Ala. Cells expressing wild-type and PP-1(G) mutants, S1, S2 and S1/S2, were examined for potential alterations in glycogen synthesis after a 60 min heat shock at 45 degrees C, followed by analysis of [(14)C]glucose incorporation into glycogen at 37 degrees C. PP-1(G) S1 mutation caused a 90% increase in glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment, whereas the PP-1(G) S2 mutant was not sensitive to heat stress. The S1/S2 double mutant was comparable with wild-type, which showed a 30% increase over basal. Heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis was accompanied by increased PP-1 and GS activities. The highest activation was observed in S1 mutant. Heat shock also resulted in a rapid and sustained Akt/ glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3 beta) phosphorylation. Wortmannin blocked heat-shock-induced Akt/GSK-3 beta phosphorylation, prevented 2-deoxyglucose uptake and abolished the heat-shock-induced glycogen synthesis. Muscle glycogen levels regulate GS activity and glycogen synthesis and were found to be markedly depleted in S1 mutant on heat-shock treatment, suggesting that PP-1(G) S1 Ser phosphorylation may inhibit glycogen degradation during thermal stimulation, as S1 mutation resulted in excessive glycogen synthesis on heat-shock treatment. In contrast, PP-1(G) S2 Ser phosphorylation may promote glycogen breakdown under stressful conditions. Heat-shock-induced glycogenesis appears to be mediated via phosphoinositide 3

  6. Three distinct patterns of histone H3Y41 phosphorylation mark active genes.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Mark A; Foster, Samuel D; Bannister, Andrew J; Robson, Samuel C; Hannah, Rebecca; Wang, Xiaonan; Xhemalce, Blerta; Wood, Andrew D; Green, Anthony R; Göttgens, Berthold; Kouzarides, Tony

    2012-09-27

    The JAK2 tyrosine kinase is a critical mediator of cytokine-induced signaling. It plays a role in the nucleus, where it regulates transcription by phosphorylating histone H3 at tyrosine 41 (H3Y41ph). We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) to define the genome-wide pattern of H3Y41ph in human erythroid leukemia cells. Our results indicate that H3Y41ph is located at three distinct sites: (1) at a subset of active promoters, where it overlaps with H3K4me3, (2) at distal cis-regulatory elements, where it coincides with the binding of STAT5, and (3) throughout the transcribed regions of active, tissue-specific hematopoietic genes. Together, these data extend our understanding of this conserved and essential signaling pathway and provide insight into the mechanisms by which extracellular stimuli may lead to the coordinated regulation of transcription. PMID:22999934

  7. Three Distinct Patterns of Histone H3Y41 Phosphorylation Mark Active Genes

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Mark A.; Foster, Samuel D.; Bannister, Andrew J.; Robson, Samuel C.; Hannah, Rebecca; Wang, Xiaonan; Xhemalce, Blerta; Wood, Andrew D.; Green, Anthony R.; Göttgens, Berthold; Kouzarides, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Summary The JAK2 tyrosine kinase is a critical mediator of cytokine-induced signaling. It plays a role in the nucleus, where it regulates transcription by phosphorylating histone H3 at tyrosine 41 (H3Y41ph). We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) to define the genome-wide pattern of H3Y41ph in human erythroid leukemia cells. Our results indicate that H3Y41ph is located at three distinct sites: (1) at a subset of active promoters, where it overlaps with H3K4me3, (2) at distal cis-regulatory elements, where it coincides with the binding of STAT5, and (3) throughout the transcribed regions of active, tissue-specific hematopoietic genes. Together, these data extend our understanding of this conserved and essential signaling pathway and provide insight into the mechanisms by which extracellular stimuli may lead to the coordinated regulation of transcription. PMID:22999934

  8. Structural Basis of Human p70 Ribosomal S6 Kinase-1 Regulation by Activation Loop Phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Sunami, Tomoko; Byrne, Noel; Diehl, Ronald E.; Funabashi, Kaoru; Hall, Dawn L.; Ikuta, Mari; Patel, Sangita B.; Shipman, Jennifer M.; Smith, Robert F.; Takahashi, Ikuko; Zugay-Murphy, Joan; Iwasawa, Yoshikazu; Lumb, Kevin J.; Munshi, Sanjeev K.; Sharma, Sujata

    2010-03-04

    p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K) is a downstream effector of the mTOR signaling pathway involved in cell proliferation, cell growth, cell-cycle progression, and glucose homeostasis. Multiple phosphorylation events within the catalytic, autoinhibitory, and hydrophobic motif domains contribute to the regulation of p70S6K. We report the crystal structures of the kinase domain of p70S6K1 bound to staurosporine in both the unphosphorylated state and in the 3{prime}-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1-phosphorylated state in which Thr-252 of the activation loop is phosphorylated. Unphosphorylated p70S6K1 exists in two crystal forms, one in which the p70S6K1 kinase domain exists as a monomer and the other as a domain-swapped dimer. The crystal structure of the partially activated kinase domain that is phosphorylated within the activation loop reveals conformational ordering of the activation loop that is consistent with a role in activation. The structures offer insights into the structural basis of the 3{prime}-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1-induced activation of p70S6K and provide a platform for the rational structure-guided design of specific p70S6K inhibitors.

  9. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1.

    PubMed

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  10. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Activates mTORC1 by Phosphorylating AKT1S1

    PubMed Central

    He, Chang-Liang; Bian, Yang-Yang; Xue, Yu; Liu, Ze-Xian; Zhou, Kai-Qiang; Yao, Cui-Fang; Lin, Yan; Zou, Han-Fa; Luo, Fang-Xiu; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Jian-Yuan; Ye, Ming-Liang; Zhao, Shi-Min; Xu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In cancer cells, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) that requires hormonal and nutrient signals for its activation, is constitutively activated. We found that overexpression of pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) activates mTORC1 signaling through phosphorylating mTORC1 inhibitor AKT1 substrate 1 (AKT1S1). An unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomic survey identified 974 PKM2 substrates, including serine202 and serine203 (S202/203) of AKT1S1, in the proteome of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Phosphorylation of S202/203 of AKT1S1 by PKM2 released AKT1S1 from raptor and facilitated its binding to 14-3-3, resulted in hormonal- and nutrient-signals independent activation of mTORC1 signaling and led accelerated oncogenic growth and autophagy inhibition in cancer cells. Decreasing S202/203 phosphorylation by TEPP-46 treatment reversed these effects. In RCCs and breast cancers, PKM2 overexpression was correlated with elevated S202/203 phosphorylation, activated mTORC1 and inhibited autophagy. Our results provided the first phosphorylome of PKM2 and revealed a constitutive mTORC1 activating mechanism in cancer cells. PMID:26876154

  11. Phosphorylation of Deinococcus radiodurans RecA Regulates Its Activity and May Contribute to Radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Bihani, Subhash C; Waldor, Matthew K; Misra, Hari S

    2016-08-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans has a remarkable capacity to survive exposure to extreme levels of radiation that cause hundreds of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). DSB repair in this bacterium depends on its recombinase A protein (DrRecA). DrRecA plays a pivotal role in both extended synthesis-dependent strand annealing and slow crossover events of DSB repair during the organism's recovery from DNA damage. The mechanisms that control DrRecA activity during the D. radiodurans response to γ radiation exposure are unknown. Here, we show that DrRecA undergoes phosphorylation at Tyr-77 and Thr-318 by a DNA damage-responsive serine threonine/tyrosine protein kinase (RqkA). Phosphorylation modifies the activity of DrRecA in several ways, including increasing its affinity for dsDNA and its preference for dATP over ATP. Strand exchange reactions catalyzed by phosphorylated versus unphosphorylated DrRecA also differ. In silico analysis of DrRecA structure support the idea that phosphorylation can modulate crucial functions of this protein. Collectively, our findings suggest that phosphorylation of DrRecA enables the recombinase to selectively use abundant dsDNA substrate present during post-irradiation recovery for efficient DSB repair, thereby promoting the extraordinary radioresistance of D. radiodurans. PMID:27255712

  12. Putative phosphorylation sites on WCA domain of HA2 is essential for Helicoverpa armigera single nucleopolyhedrovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Lv, Yi-pin; Wang, Qian; Wu, Chun-chen; Pei, Rong-juan; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xin-wen

    2011-08-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modification processes that play an essential role in regulating protein functionality. The Helicoverpa armigera single nucleopolyhedrovirus (HearNPV) orf2-encoded nucleocapsid protein HA2 participates in orchestration of virus-induced actin polymerization through its WCA domain, in which phosphorylation status are supposed to be critical in respect to actin polymerization. In the present study, two putative phosphorylation sites ((232)Thr and (250)Ser) and a highly conserved Serine ((245)Ser) on the WCA domain of HA2 were mutated, and their phenotypes were characterized by reintroducing the mutated HA2 into the HearNPV genome. Viral infectivity assays demonstrated that only the recombinant HearNPV bearing HA2 mutation at (245)Ser can produce infectious virions, both (232)Thr and (250)Ser mutations were lethal to the virus. However, actin polymerization assay demonstrated that all the three viruses bearing HA2 mutations were still capable of initiating actin polymerization in the host nucleus, which indicated the putative phosphorylation sites on HA2 may contribute to HearNPV replication through another unidentified pathway. PMID:21847755

  13. Structure of BRCA1-BRCT/Abraxas Complex Reveals Phosphorylation-Dependent BRCT Dimerization at DNA Damage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qian; Paul, Atanu; Su, Dan; Mehmood, Shahid; Foo, Tzeh Keong; Ochi, Takashi; Bunting, Emma L.; Xia, Bing; Robinson, Carol V.; Wang, Bin; Blundell, Tom L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites is an important step for its function in the DNA damage response and in DNA repair. BRCA1-BRCT domains bind to proteins containing the phosphorylated serine-proline-x-phenylalanine (pSPxF) motif including Abraxas, Bach1/FancJ, and CtIP. In this study, we demonstrate that ionizing radiation (IR)-induces ATM-dependent phosphorylation of serine 404 (S404) next to the pSPxF motif. Crystal structures of BRCT/Abraxas show that phosphorylation of S404 is important for extensive interactions through the N-terminal sequence outside the pSPxF motif and leads to formation of a stable dimer. Mutation of S404 leads to deficiency in BRCA1 accumulation at DNA damage sites and cellular sensitivity to IR. In addition, two germline mutations of BRCA1 are found to disrupt the dimer interface and dimer formation. Thus, we demonstrate a mechanism involving IR-induced phosphorylation and dimerization of the BRCT/Abraxas complex for regulating Abraxas-mediated recruitment of BRCA1 in response to IR. PMID:26778126

  14. Identification of a region within the ubiquitin-activating enzyme required for nuclear targeting and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Stephen, A G; Trausch-Azar, J S; Handley-Gearhart, P M; Ciechanover, A; Schwartz, A L

    1997-04-18

    The ubiquitin-activating enzyme exists as two isoforms: E1a, localized predominantly in the nucleus, and E1b, localized in the cytoplasm. Previously we generated hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged cDNA constructs, HA1-E1 (epitope tag placed after the first methionine) and HA2-E1 (epitope tag placed after the second methionine) (Handley-Gearhart, P. M., Stephen, A. G., Trausch-Azar, J. S., Ciechanover, A., and Schwartz, A. L. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 33171-33178), which represent the native isoforms. HA1-E1 is exclusively nuclear, whereas HA2-E1 is found predominantly in the cytoplasm. Using high resolution isoelectric focusing and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we confirm that these epitope-tagged constructs HA1-E1 and HA2-E1 represent the two isoforms E1a and E1b. HA1-E1/E1a exists as one non-phosphorylated and four phosphorylated forms, and HA2-E1/E1b exists as one predominant non-phosphorylated form and two minor phosphorylated forms. We demonstrate that the first 11 amino acids are essential for phosphorylation and exclusive nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Within this region are four serine residues and a putative nuclear localization sequence (NLS; 5PLSKKRR). Removal of these four serine residues reduced phosphorylation levels by 60% but had no effect on nuclear localization of HA1-E1. Each serine residue was independently mutated to an alanine and analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis; only serine 4 was phosphorylated. Disruption of the basic amino acids within the NLS resulted in loss of exclusive nuclear localization and a 90-95% decrease in the phosphorylation of HA1-E1. This putative NLS was able to confer nuclear import on a non-nuclear protein in digitonin-permeabilized cells in a temperature- and ATP-dependent manner. Thus the predominant requirement for efficient phosphorylation of HA1-E1/E1a is a functional NLS, suggesting that E1a may be phosphorylated within the nucleus. PMID:9099746

  15. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1more » acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.« less

  16. Arabidopsis Receptor of Activated C Kinase1 Phosphorylation by WITH NO LYSINE8 KINASE

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Daisuke; Czarnecki, Olaf; Wang, Xiaoping; Jones, Alan M.; Chen, Jin-Gui

    2014-12-08

    Receptor of activated C kinase1 (RACK1) is a versatile scaffold protein that binds to numerous proteins to regulate diverse cellular pathways in mammals. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), RACK1 has been shown to regulate plant hormone signaling, stress responses, and multiple processes of growth and development. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying these regulations. In this paper, we show that an atypical serine (Ser)/threonine (Thr) protein kinase, WITH NO LYSINE8 (WNK8), phosphorylates RACK1. WNK8 physically interacted with and phosphorylated RACK1 proteins at two residues: Ser-122 and Thr-162. Genetic epistasis analysis of rack1 wnk8 double mutants indicated that RACK1 acts downstream of WNK8 in the glucose responsiveness and flowering pathways. The phosphorylation-dead form, RACK1AS122A/T162A, but not the phosphomimetic form, RACK1AS122D/T162E, rescued the rack1a null mutant, implying that phosphorylation at Ser-122 and Thr-162 negatively regulates RACK1A function. The transcript of RACK1AS122D/T162E accumulated at similar levels as those of RACK1S122A/T162A. However, although the steady-state level of the RACK1AS122A/T162A protein was similar to wild-type RACK1A protein, the RACK1AS122D/T162E protein was nearly undetectable, suggesting that phosphorylation affects the stability of RACK1A proteins. In conclusion, these results suggest that RACK1 is phosphorylated by WNK8 and that phosphorylation negatively regulates RACK1 function by influencing its protein stability.

  17. Nerve Agent Exposure Elicits Site-Specific Changes in Protein Phosphorylation in Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongwen; O’Brien, Jennifer J.; O’Callaghan, James P.; Miller, Diane B.; Zhang, Qiang; Rana, Minal; Tsui, Tiffany; Peng, Youyi; Tomesch, John; Hendrick, Joseph P.; Wennogle, Lawrence P; Snyder, Gretchen L.

    2010-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) compounds cause toxic symptoms, including convulsions, coma, and death, as the result of irreversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). The development of effective treatments to block these effects and attenuate long-term cognitive and motor disabilities that result from OP intoxication is hampered by a limited understanding of the CNS pathways responsible for these actions. We employed a candidate method (called CNSProfile™) to identify changes in the phosphorylation state of key neuronal phosphoproteins evoked by the OP compound, diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). Focused microwave fixation was used to preserve the phosphorylation state of phosphoproteins in brains of DFP-treated mice; hippocampus and striatum were analyzed by immunoblotting with a panel of phospho-specific antibodies. DFP exposure elicited comparable effects on phosphorylation of brain phosphoproteins in both C57BL/6 and FVB mice. DFP treatment significantly altered phosphorylation at regulatory residues on glutamate receptors, including Serine897 (S897) of the NR1 NMDA receptor. NR1 phosphorylation was bi-directionally regulated after DFP in striatum versus hippocampus. NR1 phosphorylation was reduced in striatum, but elevated in hippocampus, compared with controls. DARPP-32 phosphorylation in striatum was selectively increased at the Cdk5 kinase substrate, Threonine75 (T75). Phencynonate hydrochloride, a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist, prevented seizure-like behaviors and the observed changes in phosphorylation induced by DFP. The data reveal region-specific effects of nerve agent exposure on intracellular signaling pathways that correlate with seizure-like behavior and which are reversed by the muscarinic receptor blockade. This approach identifies specific targets for nerve agents, including substrates for Cdk5 kinase, which may be the basis for new anti-convulsant therapies. PMID:20423708

  18. SMRT-mediated co-shuttling enables export of class IIa HDACs independent of their CaM kinase phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Soriano, Francesc X; Chawla, Sangeeta; Skehel, Paul; Hardingham, Giles E

    2013-01-01

    The Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDAC)4 and HDAC5 play a role in neuronal survival and behavioral adaptation in the CNS. Phosphorylation at 2/3 N-terminal sites promote their nuclear export. We investigated whether non-canonical signaling routes to Class IIa HDAC export exist because of their association with the co-repressor Silencing Mediator Of Retinoic And Thyroid Hormone Receptors (SMRT). We found that, while HDAC5 and HDAC4 mutants lacking their N-terminal phosphorylation sites (HDAC4MUT, HDAC5MUT) are constitutively nuclear, co-expression with SMRT renders them exportable by signals that trigger SMRT export, such as synaptic activity, HDAC inhibition, and Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) signaling. We found that SMRT's repression domain 3 (RD3) is critical for co-shuttling of HDAC5MUT, consistent with the role for this domain in Class IIa HDAC association. In the context of BDNF signaling, we found that HDAC5WT, which was more cytoplasmic than HDAC5MUT, accumulated in the nucleus after BDNF treatment. However, co-expression of SMRT blocked BDNF-induced HDAC5WT import in a RD3-dependent manner. In effect, SMRT-mediated HDAC5WT export was opposing the BDNF-induced HDAC5 nuclear accumulation observed in SMRT's absence. Thus, SMRT's presence may render Class IIa HDACs exportable by a wider range of signals than those which simply promote direct phosphorylation. PMID:23083128

  19. LATS1 phosphorylates forkhead L2 and regulates its transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Pisarska, Margareta D; Kuo, Fang-Ting; Bentsi-Barnes, Ikuko K; Khan, Salma; Barlow, Gillian M

    2010-07-01

    Forkhead L2 (FOXL2) is expressed in the ovary and acts as a transcriptional repressor of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) gene, a marker of granulosa cell differentiation. Human FOXL2 mutations that produce truncated proteins lacking the COOH terminus result in blepharophimosis/ptosis/epicanthus inversus (BPES) syndrome type I, which is associated with premature ovarian failure (POF). In this study, we investigated whether FOXL2's activity as a transcriptional repressor is regulated by phosphorylation. We found that FOXL2 is phosphorylated at a serine residue and, using yeast two-hybrid screening, identified LATS1 as a potential FOXL2-interacting protein. LATS1 is a serine/threonine kinase whose deletion in mice results in an ovarian phenotype similar to POF. Using coimmunoprecipitation and kinase assays, we confirmed that LATS1 binds to FOXL2 and demonstrated that LATS1 phosphorylates FOXL2 at a serine residue. Moreover, we found that FOXL2 and LATS1 are coexpressed in developing mouse gonads and in granulosa cells of small and medium follicles in the mouse ovary. Last, we demonstrated that coexpression with LATS1 enhances FOXL2's activity as a repressor of the StAR promoter, and this results from the kinase activity of LATS1. These results provide novel evidence that FOXL2 is phosphorylated by LATS1 and that this phosphorylation enhances the transcriptional repression of the StAR gene, a marker of granulosa cell differentiation. These data support our hypothesis that phosphorylation of FOXL2 may be a control mechanism regulating the rate of granulosa cell differentiation and hence, follicle maturation, and its dysregulation may contribute to accelerated follicular development and POF in BPES type I. PMID:20407010

  20. Regulation of Xenopus laevis DNA topoisomerase I activity by phosphorylation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiserman, H.B.; Ingebritsen, T.S.; Benbow, R.M.

    1988-05-03

    DNA topoisomerase I has been purified to electrophoretic homogeneity from ovaries of the frog Xenopus laevis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the most purified fraction revealed a single major band at 110 kDa and less abundant minor bands centered at 62 kDa. Incubation of the most purified fraction with immobilized calf intestinal alkaline phosphatase abolished all DNA topoisomerase enzymatic activity in a time-dependent reaction. Treatment of the dephosphorylated X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I with a X. laevis casein kinase type II activity and ATP restored DNA topoisomerase activity to a level higher than that observed in the most purified fraction. In vitro labeling experiments which employed the most purified DNA topoisomerase I fraction, (..gamma..-/sup 32/P)ATP, and the casein kinase type II enzyme showed that both the 110- and 62-kDa bands became phosphorylated in approximately molar proportions. Phosphoamino acid analysis showed that only serine residues became phosphorylated. Phosphorylation was accompanied by an increase in DNA topoisomerase activity in vitro. Dephosphorylation of DNA topoisomerase I appears to block formation of the initial enzyme-substrate complex on the basis of the failure of the dephosphorylated enzyme to nick DNA in the presence of camptothecin. The authors conclude that X. laevis DNA topoisomerase I is partially phosphorylated as isolated and that this phosphorylation is essential for expression of enzymatic activity in vitro. On the basis of the ability of the casein kinase type II activity to reactivate dephosphorylated DNA topoisomerase I, they speculate that this kinase may contribute to the physiological regulation of DNA topoisomerase I activity.

  1. Histamine H4 receptor activation alleviates neuropathic pain through differential regulation of ERK, JNK, and P38 MAPK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sanna, Maria D; Stark, Holger; Lucarini, Laura; Ghelardini, Carla; Masini, Emanuela; Galeotti, Nicoletta

    2015-12-01

    Histamine plays a complex role in pain modulation with opposite roles in nociception for histamine receptor subtypes 1, 2, and 3. The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is expressed primarily on cells involved in inflammation and immune responses with a proinflammatory activity, but little is known about the role in nociception of neuronal H4R. To investigate the effects of neuronal H4R in pain transmission, the effects produced by the H4R agonist ST-1006 were detected in the spared nerve injury model of neuropathic pain. ST-1006 counteracted mechanical allodynia in neuropathic mice, an effect prevented by the H4R antagonist JNJ 10191584. In spared nerve injury mice, an early over-phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2 was observed in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG), spinal cord, and sciatic nerve. A progressive and long-lasting activation of JNK1 was observed in the sciatic nerve and, to a lesser extent, in the spinal cord and DRG. An increased p-P38 content was detected in the spinal cord and DRG, with no modification in the sciatic nerve. Administration of ST-1006 prevented phosphorylation of all 3 MAPK within DRG, and phosphorylation of ERK1, ERK2, and pJNK1 in the sciatic nerve. In the spinal cord, the H4R agonist prevented selectively the pERK2 increase with no effect on pJNK1 and p-P38 levels. Double immunofluorescence experiments showed a neuronal localization and site of action for H4R. These findings suggest a prevalent modulation of ERK activity after H4R stimulation and indicate the DRG as prominent site of action for H4R-mediated antineuropathic activity. Targeting neuronal H4R with selective agonists could have therapeutic potential for neuropathic pain treatment. PMID:26270581

  2. Insulin-stimulated kinase from rat fat cells that phosphorylates initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 on the rapamycin-insensitive site (serine-111).

    PubMed Central

    Heesom, K J; Avison, M B; Diggle, T A; Denton, R M

    1998-01-01

    The effects of insulin and rapamycin on the phosphorylation of the translation regulator, initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) have been studied in rat fat cells by following changes in the incorporation of 32P from [32P]Pi under steady-state conditions. Both unbound 4E-BP1 and 4E-BP1 bound to eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) were isolated from the cells and then digested with trypsin and other proteases; the radiolabelled phosphopeptides were then separated by two-dimensional thin- layer analysis and HPLC. The results provide confirmation of the conclusion of Fadden, Haystead and Lawrence [J. Biol. Chem. (1997) 272, 10240-10247] that insulin increases the phosphorylation of four sites that fit a Ser/Thr-Pro motif (Thr-36, Thr-45, Ser-64 and Thr-69) and that taken together these phosphorylations result in the dissociation of 4E-BP1 from eIF4E. The effects of insulin on the phosphorylation of these sites, and hence dissociation from eIF4E, are blocked by rapamycin. However, the present study also provides evidence that insulin increases the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 bound to eIF4E on a further site (Ser-111) and that this is by a rapamycin-insensitive mechanism. Extraction of rat epididymal fat cells followed by chromatography on Mono-S and Superose 12 columns resulted in the separation of both an insulin-stimulated eIF4E kinase and an apparently novel kinase that is highly specific for Ser-111 of 4E-BP1. The 4E-BP1 kinase was activated more than 10-fold by incubation of the cells with insulin and was markedly more active towards 4E-BP1 bound to eIF4E than towards unbound 4E-BP1. The effects of insulin were blocked by wortmannin, but not by rapamycin. A 14-mer peptide based on the sequence surrounding Ser-111 of 4E-BP1 was also a substrate for the kinase, but peptide substrates for other known protein kinases were not. The kinase is quite distinct from casein kinase 2, which also phosphorylates Ser-111 of 4E-BP1. The possible importance of these

  3. Activation and inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase-2 by phosphorylation; a molecular dynamics study reveals the functional importance of the glycine-rich loop

    PubMed Central

    Bártová, Iveta; Otyepka, Michal; Kříž, Zdeněk; Koča, Jaroslav

    2004-01-01

    Nanoseconds long molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories of differently active complexes of human cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (inactive CDK2/ATP, semiactive CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP, fully active pT160-CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP, inhibited pT14-; pY15-; and pT14,pY15,pT160-CDK2/Cyclin A/ATP) were compared. The MD simulations results of CDK2 inhibition by phosphorylation at T14 and/or Y15 sites provide insight into the structural aspects of CDK2 deactivation. The inhibitory sites are localized in the glycine-rich loop (G-loop) positioned opposite the activation T-loop. Phosphorylation of T14 and both inhibitory sites T14 and Y15 together causes ATP misalignment for phosphorylation and G-loop conformational change. This conformational change leads to the opening of the CDK2 substrate binding box. The phosphorylated Y15 residue negatively affects substrate binding or its correct alignment for ATP terminal phospho-group transfer to the CDK2 substrate. The MD simulations of the CDK2 activation process provide results in agreement with previous X-ray data. PMID:15133164

  4. Hypoxia activates Akt and induces phosphorylation of GSK-3 in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Beitner-Johnson, D; Rust, R T; Hsieh, T C; Millhorn, D E

    2001-01-01

    Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that has been shown to play a central role in promoting cell survival and opposing apoptosis. We evaluated the effect of hypoxia on Akt in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. PC12 cells were exposed to varying levels of hypoxia, including 21%, 15%, 10%, 5%, and 1% O(2). Hypoxia dramatically increased phosphorylation of Akt (Ser(473)). This effect peaked after 6 h exposure to hypoxia, but persisted strongly for up to 24 h. Phosphorylation of Akt was paralleled with a progressive increase in phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3), one of its downstream substrates. The effect of hypoxia on phosphorylation of Akt was completely blocked by pretreatment of the cells with wortmannin (100 nM), indicating that this effect is mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (P13K). In contrast, whereas hypoxia also strongly induced phosphorylation of the transcription factors CREB and EPAS1, these effects persisted in the presence of wortmannin. Thus, hypoxia regulates both P13K-dependent and P13K-independent signaling pathways. Furthermore, activation of the P13K and Akt signaling pathways may be one mechanism by which cells adapt and survive under conditions of hypoxia. PMID:11257444

  5. Protein Kinase C-mediated Phosphorylation and Activation of PDE3A Regulate cAMP Levels in Human Platelets*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Roger W.; MacKintosh, Carol; Hers, Ingeborg

    2009-01-01

    The elevation of [cAMP]i is an important mechanism of platelet inhibition and is regulated by the opposing activity of adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase (PDE). In this study, we demonstrate that a variety of platelet agonists, including thrombin, significantly enhance the activity of PDE3A in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Stimulation of platelets with the PAR-1 agonist SFLLRN resulted in rapid and transient phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser312, Ser428, Ser438, Ser465, and Ser492, in parallel with the PKC (protein kinase C) substrate, pleckstrin. Furthermore, phosphorylation and activation of PDE3A required the activation of PKC, but not of PI3K/PKB, mTOR/p70S6K, or ERK/RSK. Activation of PKC by phorbol esters also resulted in phosphorylation of the same PDE3A sites in a PKC-dependent, PKB-independent manner. This was further supported by the finding that IGF-1, which strongly activates PI3K/PKB, but not PKC, did not regulate PDE3A. Platelet activation also led to a PKC-dependent association between PDE3A and 14-3-3 proteins. In contrast, cAMP-elevating agents such as PGE1 and forskolin-induced phosphorylation of Ser312 and increased PDE3A activity, but did not stimulate 14-3-3 binding. Finally, complete antagonism of PGE1-evoked cAMP accumulation by thrombin required both Gi and PKC activation. Together, these results demonstrate that platelet activation stimulates PKC-dependent phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser312, Ser428, Ser438, Ser465, and Ser492 leading to a subsequent increase in cAMP hydrolysis and 14-3-3 binding. PMID:19261611

  6. Cell-cycle-regulated activation of Akt kinase by phosphorylation at its carboxyl terminus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengda; Begley, Michael; Michowski, Wojciech; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Ginzberg, Miriam; Gao, Daming; Tsou, Peiling; Gan, Wenjian; Papa, Antonella; Kim, Byeong Mo; Wan, Lixin; Singh, Amrik; Zhai, Bo; Yuan, Min; Wang, Zhiwei; Gygi, Steven P.; Lee, Tae Ho; Lu, Kun-Ping; Toker, Alex; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Asara, John M.; Kirschner, Marc W.; Sicinski, Piotr; Cantley, Lewis; Wei, Wenyi

    2014-01-01

    Akt, also known as protein kinase B, plays key roles in cell proliferation, survival and metabolism. Akt hyperactivation contributes to many pathophysiological conditions, including human cancers1–3, and is closely associated with poor prognosis and chemo- or radio-therapeutic resistance4. Phosphorylation of Akt at S473 (ref. 5) and T308 (ref. 6) activates Akt. However, it remains unclear whether further mechanisms account for full Akt activation, and whether Akt hyperactivation is linked to misregulated cell cycle progression, another cancer hallmark7. Here we report that Akt activity fluctuates across the cell cycle, mirroring cyclin A expression. Mechanistically, phosphorylation of S477 and T479 at the Akt extreme carboxy terminus by cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2)/cyclin A or mTORC2, under distinct physiological conditions, promotes Akt activation through facilitating, or functionally compensating for, S473 phosphorylation. Furthermore, deletion of the cyclin A2 allele in the mouse olfactory bulb leads to reduced S477/T479 phosphorylation and elevated cellular apoptosis. Notably, cyclin A2-deletion-induced cellular apoptosis in mouse embryonic stem cells is partly rescued by S477D/T479E-Akt1, supporting a physiological role for cyclin A2 in governing Akt activation. Together, the results of our study show Akt S477/T479 phosphorylation to be an essential layer of the Akt activation mechanism to regulate its physiological functions, thereby providing a new mechanistic link between aberrant cell cycle progression and Akt hyperactivation in cancer. PMID:24670654

  7. Phosphorylation of Mutationally Introduced Tyrosine in the Activation Loop of HER2 Confers Gain-of-Function Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zexi; Wan, Xiaobo; Hao, Rui; Zhang, Heng; Li, Li; Li, Lin; Xie, Qiang; Wang, Peng; Gao, Yibo; Chen, She; Wei, Min; Luan, Zhidong; Zhang, Aiqun; Huang, Niu; Chen, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Amplification, overexpression, and somatic mutation of the HER2 gene have been reported to play a critical role in tumorigenesis of various cancers. The HER2 H878Y mutation was recently reported in 11% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. However, its functional impact on the HER2 protein and its role in tumorigenesis has not been determined. Here, we show that HER2 H878Y is a gain-of-function mutation. Y878 represents a phosphorylation site, and phospho-Y878 interacts with R898 residue to stabilize the active conformation of HER2, thereby enhancing its kinase activity. H878Y mutant is transforming and the transformed cells are sensitive to HER2 kinase inhibitors. Thus, our study reveals the following novel mechanism underlying the tumorigenic function of the HER2 H878Y mutation: the introduction of a tyrosine residue into the kinase activation loop via mutagenesis modulates the conformation of the kinase, thereby enhancing its activity. PMID:25853726

  8. Protein-tyrosine phosphorylation interaction network in Bacillus subtilis reveals new substrates, kinase activators and kinase cross-talk

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Pigeonneau, Nathalie; Ventroux, Magali; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Bidnenko, Vladimir; Mijakovic, Ivan; Noirot-Gros, Marie-Françoise

    2014-01-01

    Signal transduction in eukaryotes is generally transmitted through phosphorylation cascades that involve a complex interplay of transmembrane receptors, protein kinases, phosphatases and their targets. Our previous work indicated that bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases may exhibit similar properties, since they act on many different substrates. To capture the complexity of this phosphorylation-based network, we performed a comprehensive interactome study focused on the protein-tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. The resulting network identified many potential new substrates of kinases and phosphatases, some of which were experimentally validated. Our study highlighted the role of tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases and phosphatases in DNA metabolism, transcriptional control and cell division. This interaction network reveals significant crosstalk among different classes of kinases. We found that tyrosine kinases can bind to several modulators, transmembrane or cytosolic, consistent with a branching of signaling pathways. Most particularly, we found that the division site regulator MinD can form a complex with the tyrosine kinase PtkA and modulate its activity in vitro. In vivo, it acts as a scaffold protein which anchors the kinase at the cell pole. This network highlighted a role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the spatial regulation of the Z-ring during cytokinesis. PMID:25374563

  9. A transcriptionally active form of GAL4 is phosphorylated and associated with GAL80.

    PubMed Central

    Parthun, M R; Jaehning, J A

    1992-01-01

    The GAL4 activator and GAL80 repressor proteins regulate the expression of yeast genes in response to galactose. A complex of the two proteins isolated from glucose-grown cells is inactive in an in vitro transcription reaction but binds DNA and blocks activation by the GAL4-VP16 chimeric activator. The complex purified from galactose-grown cells contains a mixture of phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of GAL4. The galactose-induced form of GAL4 activates in vitro transcription to levels similar to those seen with GAL4-VP16. The induced GAL4 complex is indistinguishable in size and apparent shape from the uninduced complex, consistent with a continued association with GAL80. These results confirm in vivo analyses that correlate GAL4 phosphorylation with galactose induction and support a model of transcriptional activation that does not require GAL80 dissociation. Images PMID:1406674

  10. Importance of the Ser-132 phosphorylation site in cell transformation and apoptosis induced by the adenovirus type 5 E1A protein.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Barbeau, D; Branton, P E

    1996-01-01

    The 289-residue (289R) and 243R early region 1A (E1A) proteins of human adenovirus type 5 induce cell transformation in cooperation with either E1B or activated ras. Here we report that Ser-132 in both E1A products is a site of phosphorylation in vivo and is the only site phosphorylated in vitro by purified casein kinase II. Ser-132 is located in conserved region 2 near the primary binding site for the pRB tumor suppressor and, in 289R, just upstream of the conserved region 3 transactivation domain involved in regulation of early viral gene expression. Mutants containing alanine or glycine in place of Ser-132 interacted with pRB-related proteins at somewhat reduced efficiency; however, all Ser-132 mutants transformed primary rat cells in cooperation with E1B as well as or better than the wild type when both major E1A proteins were expressed. Such was not the case with mutants expressing only 289R. In cooperation with E1B, the Asp-132 and Gly-132 mutants yielded reduced numbers of smaller transformed foci. With activated ras, all Ser-132 mutants were significantly defective for transformation and the rare foci produced were small and contained extensive areas populated by low densities of flat cells. In the absence of E1B, all Ser-132 mutants induced p53-independent cell death more readily than virus expressing wild-type 289R. These results suggested that phosphorylation at Ser-132 may enhance the binding of pRB and related proteins and also reduce the toxicity of E1A 289R, thus increasing transforming activity. PMID:8764048

  11. Phosphorylation within the transactivation domain of adenovirus E1A protein by mitogen-activated protein kinase regulates expression of early region 4.

    PubMed Central

    Whalen, S G; Marcellus, R C; Whalen, A; Ahn, N G; Ricciardi, R P; Branton, P E

    1997-01-01

    A critical role of the 289-residue (289R) E1A protein of human adenovirus type 5 during productive infection is to transactivate expression of all early viral transcription. Sequences within and proximal to conserved region 3 (CR3) promote expression of these viral genes through interactions with a variety of transcription factors requiring the zinc binding motif in CR3 and in some cases a region at the carboxy-terminal end of CR3, including residues 183 to 188. It is known that 3',5' cyclic AMP (cAMP) reduces the level of phosphorylation of the 289R E1A protein through the activation of protein phosphatase 2A by the E4orf4 protein. This study was designed to identify the E1A phosphorylation sites affected by E4orf4 expression and to determine their importance in regulation of E1A activity. We report here that two previously unidentified sites at Ser-185 and Ser-188 are the targets for decreased phosphorylation in response to cAMP. At least one of these sites, presumably Ser-185, is phosphorylated in vitro by purified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and both are hyperphosphorylated in cells which express a constitutively active form of MAPK kinase. Analysis of E1A-mediated transactivation activity indicated that elevated phosphorylation at these sites increased expression of the E4 promoter but not that of E3. We have recently shown that one or more E4 products induce cell death due to p53-independent apoptosis, and thus it seems likely that one role of the E4orf4 protein is to limit production of toxic E4 products by limiting expression of the E4 promoter. PMID:9094626

  12. Smad3 linker phosphorylation attenuates Smad3 transcriptional activity and TGF-β1/Smad3-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eunjin; Kim, Seong-Jin; Hong, Suntaek; Liu, Fang; Ooshima, Akira

    2012-10-26

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) has a distinct role in renal fibrosis associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the renal tubules and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Smad3 plays an essential role in fibrosis initiated by EMT. Phosphorylation of Smad3 in the C-terminal SSXS motif by type I TGF-β receptor kinase is essential for mediating TGF-β response. Smad3 activity is also regulated by phosphorylation in the linker region. However, the functional role of Smad3 linker phosphorylation is not well characterized. We now show that Smad3 EPSM mutant, which mutated the four phosphorylation sites in the linker region, markedly enhanced TGF-β1-induced EMT of Smad3-deficient primary renal tubular epithelial cells, whereas Smad3 3S-A mutant, which mutated the C-terminal phosphorylation sites, was unable to induce EMT in response to TGF-β1. Furthermore, immunoblotting and RT-PCR analysis showed a marked induction of fibrogenic gene expression with a significant reduction in E-cadherin in HK2 human renal epithelial cells expressing Smad3 EPSM. TGF-β1 could not induce the expression of α-SMA, vimentin, fibronectin and PAI-1 or reduce the expression of E-cadherin in HK2 cells expressing Smad3 3S-A in response to TGF-β1. Our results suggest that Smad3 linker phosphorylation has a negative regulatory role on Smad3 transcriptional activity and TGF-β1/Smad3-induced renal EMT. Elucidation of mechanism regulating the Smad3 linker phosphorylation can provide a new strategy to control renal fibrosis. PMID:23022526

  13. Novel protein phosphorylation site identification in spinach stroma membranes by titanium dioxide microcolumns and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rinalducci, Sara; Larsen, Martin R; Mohammed, Shabaz; Zolla, Lello

    2006-04-01

    In this work, spinach stroma membrane, instead of thylakoid, has been investigated for the presence of phosphorylated proteins. We identified seven previously unknown phosphorylation sites by taking advantage of TiO(2) phosphopeptides enrichment coupled to mass spectrometric analysis. Upon illumination at 100 micromol m(-2) s(-1), two novel phosphopeptides belonging to the N-terminal region of Lhcb1 light-harvesting protein were detected: NVSSGS(p)PWYGPDR and T(p)VQSSSPWYGPDR. Moreover, three new threonine residues in CP43 (Thr-6, Thr-8, and Thr-346) and, for the first time, two amino acid residues of the N-terminus of Rieske Fe-S protein of the cytochrome b(6)f complex (Thr-2 and Ser-3) were revealed to be phosphorylated. Since Lhcb1 and CP43 have been reported as mobile proteins, it may be suggested that illumination derived phosphorylation, and consequently the addition of negatively charged groups to the protein, is a necessary condition to induce a significant protein structural change. PMID:16602705

  14. CDK phosphorylates the polarisome scaffold Spa2 to maintain its localization at the site of cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Huang, Zhen-Xing; Au Yong, Jie Ying; Zou, Hao; Zeng, Guisheng; Gao, Jiaxin; Wang, Yanming; Wong, Ada Hang-Heng; Wang, Yue

    2016-07-01

    Polarisome is a protein complex that plays an important role in polarized growth in fungi by assembling actin cables towards the site of cell growth. For proper morphogenesis, the polarisome must localize to the right place at the right time. However, the mechanisms that control polarisome localization remain poorly understood. In this study, using the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans as a model, we have discovered that the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) Cdc28 phosphorylates the polarisome scaffold protein Spa2 to govern polarisome localization during both yeast and hyphal growth. In a yeast cell cycle, Cdc28-Clb2 phosphorylates Spa2 and controls the timing of polarisome translocation from the bud tip to the bud neck. And during hyphal development, Cdc28-Clb2 and the hyphal-specific Cdc28-Hgc1 cooperate to enhance Spa2 phosphorylation to maintain the polarisome at the hyphal tip. Blocking the CDK phosphorylation causes premature tip-to-neck translocation of Spa2 during yeast growth and inappropriate septal localization of Spa2 in hyphae and abnormal hyphal morphology under certain inducing conditions. Together, our results generate new insights into the mechanisms by which fungi regulate polarisome localization in the control of polarized growth. PMID:27061942

  15. PD Trafficking of Potato Leaf Roll Virus Movement Protein in Arabidopsis Depends on Site-specific Protein Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Sonnewald, Uwe

    2011-01-01

    Many plant viruses encode for specialized movement proteins (MP) to facilitate passage of viral material to and through plasmodesmata (PD). To analyze intracellular trafficking of potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) movement protein (MP17) we performed GFP fusion experiments with distinct deletion variants of MP17. These studies revealed that the C-terminus of MP17 is essential but not sufficient for PD targeting. Interestingly, fusion of GFP to three C-terminal MP17 deletion variants resulted in the accumulation of GFP in chloroplasts. This indicates that MP17 harbors hidden plastid targeting sequences. Previous studies showed that posttranslational protein phosphorylation influences PD targeting of MP and virus spread. Analysis of MP17-derived phospho-peptides by mass spectrometry revealed four phosphorylated serine residues (S71, S79, S137, and S140). Site-directed mutagenesis of S71/S79 and S137/S140 showed that the C-terminal serine residues S137/S140 are dispensable for PD targeting. However, exchange of S71/S79 to A71/A79 abolished PD targeting of the mutated MP17 protein. To mimic phosphorylation of S71/S79 both amino acids were substituted by aspartic acid. The resulting D71/D79 variant of MP17 was efficiently targeted to PD. Further deletion analysis showed that PD targeting of MP17 is dependent on the C-terminus, phosphorylation of S71 and/or S79 and a N-terminal domain. PMID:22645527

  16. Characterization of the phosphorylation sites of human high molecular weight neurofilament protein by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and database searching.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, H; Veeranna; Shetty, K T; Pant, H C

    1998-03-17

    Hyperphosphorylated high molecular weight neurofilament protein (NF-H) exhibits extensive phosphorylation on lysine-serine-proline (KSP) repeats in the C-terminal domain of the molecule. Specific phosphorylation sites in human NF-H were identified by proteolytic digestion and analysis of the resulting digests by a combination of microbore liquid chromatography, electrospray ionization tandem (MS/MS) ion trap mass spectrometry, and database searching. The computer programs utilized (PEPSEARCH and SEQUEST) are capable of identifying peptides and phosphorylation sites from uninterpreted MS/MS spectra, and by use of these methods, 27 phosphopeptides and their phosphorylated residues were identified. On the basis of these phosphopeptides, 38 phosphorylation sites in human NF-H were characterized. These include 33 KSP, lysine-threonine-proline (KTP) or arginine-serine-proline (RSP) sites and four unphosphorylated sites, all of which occur in the KSP repeat domain (residues 502-823); and one threonine phosphorylation site observed in a KVPTPEK motif. Six KSP sites were not characterized because of the failure to isolate and identify corresponding phosphopeptides. Heterogeneity in serine and threonine phosphorylation was observed at three sites or deduced to occur at three sites on the basis of enzyme specificity. As a result of the phosphorylated motifs identified (KSPAKEE, KSPVKEE, KS/TPEKAK, KSPEKEE, KSPVKAE, KSPAEAK, KSPPEAK, KSPEAKT, KSPAEVK, and KVPTPEK), human NF-H tail domain is postulated to be a substrate of proline-directed kinases. The threonine-phosphorylated KVPTPEK motif suggested the existence of a novel proline-directed kinase. PMID:9521714

  17. Pin1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 increases Sp1 stability and decreases its DNA-binding activity during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hang-Che; Chuang, Jian-Ying; Jeng, Wen-Yih; Liu, Chia-I; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chang, Wen-Chang; Hung, Jan-Jong

    2014-12-16

    We have shown that Sp1 phosphorylation at Thr739 decreases its DNA-binding activity. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of Sp1 at Thr739 alone is necessary, but not sufficient for the inhibition of its DNA-binding activity during mitosis. We demonstrated that Pin1 could be recruited to the Thr739(p)-Pro motif of Sp1 to modulate the interaction between phospho-Sp1 and CDK1, thereby facilitating CDK1-mediated phosphorylation of Sp1 at Ser720, Thr723 and Thr737 during mitosis. Loss of the C-terminal end of Sp1 (amino acids 741-785) significantly increased Sp1 phosphorylation, implying that the C-terminus inhibits CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation. Binding analysis of Sp1 peptides to Pin1 by isothermal titration calorimetry indicated that Pin1 interacts with Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide but not with Thr739-Sp1 peptide. X-ray crystallography data showed that the Thr739(p)-Sp1 peptide occupies the active site of Pin1. Increased Sp1 phosphorylation by CDK1 during mitosis not only stabilized Sp1 levels by decreasing interaction with ubiquitin E3-ligase RNF4 but also caused Sp1 to move out of the chromosomes completely by decreasing its DNA-binding activity, thereby facilitating cell cycle progression. Thus, Pin1-mediated conformational changes in the C-terminal region of Sp1 are critical for increased CDK1-mediated Sp1 phosphorylation to facilitate cell cycle progression during mitosis. PMID:25398907

  18. A phosphorylation site in brain and the delayed neurotoxic effect of some organophosphorus compounds

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. K.

    1969-01-01

    1. It is proposed that part of a neurotoxic dose of di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate will be covalently bound in vivo to a specific component in the brain and spinal cord as the initial biochemical event in the genesis of the lesion. 2. A test system in vitro was devised that removes many di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate-binding sites and indicates that the specific component may be a protein present in brain at a concentration comparable with that of the cholinesterases. 3. The site was found to be present and capable of binding di-isopropyl phosphorofluoridate in vitro in brain samples taken from either normal hens or those dosed with organophosphorus esterase inhibitors that are not neurotoxic. 4. Very little of the specific binding activity was found in brain samples from hens pre-dosed with a variety of neurotoxic organophosphorus compounds. 5. A solubilized preparation of the active brain component was obtained, suitable for further purification and study. PMID:5774473

  19. Tyrosines 1021 and 1009 are phosphorylation sites in the carboxy terminus of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta subunit and are required for binding of phospholipase C gamma and a 64-kilodalton protein, respectively.

    PubMed Central

    Valius, M; Bazenet, C; Kazlauskas, A

    1993-01-01

    Binding of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) to the PDGF receptor (PDGFR) beta subunit triggers receptor tyrosine phosphorylation and the stable association of a number of signal transduction molecules, including phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma), the GTPase activating protein of ras (GAP), and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K). Previous reports have identified three PDGFR tyrosine phosphorylation sites in the kinase insert domain that are important for stable association of GAP and PI3K. Two of them, tyrosine (Y) 740, and Y-751 are required for the stable association of PI3K, while Y-771 is required for binding of GAP. Here we present data for two additional tyrosine phosphorylation sites, Y-1009 and Y-1021, that are both in the carboxy-terminal region of the PDGFR. Characterization of PDGFR mutants in which these phosphorylation sites are substituted with phenylalanine (F) indicated that Y-1021 and Y-1009 were required for the stable association of PLC gamma and a 64-kDa protein, respectively. An F-1009/F-1021 double mutant selectively failed to bind both PLC gamma and the 64-kDa protein, whereas all of the carboxy-terminal mutants bound wild-type levels of GAP and PI3K. The carboxy terminus encodes the complete binding site for PLC gamma, since a phosphorylated carboxy-terminal fusion protein selectively bound PLC gamma. To determine the biological consequences of failure to associate with PLC gamma, we measured PDGF-dependent inositol phosphate production and initiation of DNA synthesis. The PDGFR mutants that failed to associate with PLC gamma were not able to mediate the PDGF-dependent production of inositol phosphates. Since tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma enhances its enzymatic activity, we speculated that PDGFR mutants that failed to activate PLC gamma were unable to mediate its tyrosine phosphorylation. Surprisingly, the F-1021 receptor mediated readily detectable levels of PDGF-dependent PLC gamma tyrosine phosphorylation. Thus, the

  20. Protein phosphorylation as a mechanism for regulation of spinach leaf sucrose-phosphate synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, J.L.A.; Huber, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been identified as a mechanism for the light-dark regulation of spinach sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS) activity, previously shown to involve some type of covalent modification of the enzyme. The 120 kD subunit of SPS in extracts of light-treated leaves was labeled with {sup 32}P in the presence of ({gamma}-{sup 32}P) ATP. In this in vitro system, {sup 32}P incorporation into light-activated SPS was dependent upon ATP and magnesium concentrations as well as time, and was closely paralleled by inactivation of the enzyme. The soluble protein kinase involved in the interconversion of SPS between activated and deactivated forms may be specific for SPS as it co-purifies with SPS during partial purification of the enzyme. The kinase appears not to be calcium activated and no evidence has been obtained for metabolite control of SPS phosphorylation/inactivation.

  1. Characterization of a Mn sup 2+ -dependent membrane serine kinase that is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J. )

    1991-03-11

    It is hypothesized that the insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase may directly phosphorylate and activate one or more serine kinases. The identities of such serine kinases as well as their modes of activation are unclear. The authors have described a serine kinase from rat liver membranes that copurifies with the IR on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-sepharose. The kinase is activated after phosphorylation of the WGA-sepharose-purified fraction by casein kinase-1, casein kinase-2, or casein kinase-3. A tyrosine kinase, possibly IR tyrosine kinase, also participates in the activation process since a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor such as vanadate, p-nitrophenyl phosphate, or phosphotyrosine is required in reaction mixtures for activation to be observed. By contrast, phosphoserine and phosphothreonine do not support activation. The activated kinase can use IR {beta}-subunit, myelin basic protein (MBP), and histones as substrates. IR {beta}-subunit phosphorylation was stimulated by MBP, histones, and polylysine, and inhibited by heparin and poly(glu, tyr). The kinase prefers Mn{sup 2+} over Mg{sup 2+} as a metal cofactor.

  2. Oxidative stress–dependent phosphorylation activates ZNRF1 to induce neuronal/axonal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wakatsuki, Shuji; Furuno, Akiko; Ohshima, Makiko

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a well-known inducer of neuronal apoptosis and axonal degeneration. We previously showed that the E3 ubiquitin ligase ZNRF1 promotes Wallerian degeneration by degrading AKT to induce GSK3B activation. We now demonstrate that oxidative stress serves as an activator of the ubiquitin ligase activity of ZNRF1 by inducing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)–mediated phosphorylation at the 103rd tyrosine residue and that the up-regulation of ZNRF1 activity by oxidative stress leads to neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. We also show that nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate–reduced oxidase activity is required for the EGFR-dependent phosphorylation-induced activation of ZNRF1 and resultant AKT degradation via the ubiquitin proteasome system to induce Wallerian degeneration. These results indicate the pathophysiological significance of the EGFR–ZNRF1 pathway induced by oxidative stress in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis and Wallerian degeneration. A deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanism for ZNRF1 catalytic activity via phosphorylation will provide a potential therapeutic avenue for neurodegeneration. PMID:26572622

  3. Active Site Inhibitors Protect Protein Kinase C from Dephosphorylation and Stabilize Its Mature Form*

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Christine M.; Antal, Corina E.; Reyes, Gloria; Kunkel, Maya T.; Adams, Ryan A.; Ziyar, Ahdad; Riveros, Tania; Newton, Alexandra C.

    2011-01-01

    Conformational changes acutely control protein kinase C (PKC). We have previously shown that the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate must be removed from the active site in order for 1) PKC to be phosphorylated by its upstream kinase phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1), 2) the mature enzyme to bind and phosphorylate substrates, and 3) the mature enzyme to be dephosphorylated by phosphatases. Here we show an additional level of conformational control; binding of active site inhibitors locks PKC in a conformation in which the priming phosphorylation sites are resistant to dephosphorylation. Using homogeneously pure PKC, we show that the active site inhibitor Gö 6983 prevents the dephosphorylation by pure protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) or the hydrophobic motif phosphatase, pleckstrin homology domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP). Consistent with results using pure proteins, treatment of cells with the competitive inhibitors Gö 6983 or bisindolylmaleimide I, but not the uncompetitive inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide IV, prevents the dephosphorylation and down-regulation of PKC induced by phorbol esters. Pulse-chase analyses reveal that active site inhibitors do not affect the net rate of priming phosphorylations of PKC; rather, they inhibit the dephosphorylation triggered by phorbol esters. These data provide a molecular explanation for the recent studies showing that active site inhibitors stabilize the phosphorylation state of protein kinases B/Akt and C. PMID:21715334

  4. The ubiquitin-associated domain of AMPK-related kinases regulates conformation and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Jaleel, Mahaboobi; Villa, Fabrizio; Deak, Maria; Toth, Rachel; Prescott, Alan R.; van Aalten, Daan M. F.; Alessi, Dario R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent work indicates that the LKB1 tumour suppressor protein kinase, which is mutated in Peutz–Jeghers cancer syndrome, phosphorylates and activates a group of protein kinases that are related to AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase). Ten of the 14 AMPK-related protein kinases activated by LKB1, including SIK (salt-induced kinase), MARK (microtubule-affinity-regulating kinase) and BRSK (brain-specific kinase) isoforms, possess a ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain immediately C-terminal to the kinase catalytic domain. These are the only protein kinases in the human genome known to possess a UBA domain, but their roles in regulating AMPK-related kinases are unknown. We have investigated the roles that the UBA domain may play in regulating these enzymes. Limited proteolysis of MARK2 revealed that the kinase and UBA domains were contained within a fragment that was resistant to trypsin proteolysis. SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) analysis of inactive and active LKB1-phosphorylated MARK2 revealed that activation of MARK2 is accompanied by a significant conformational change that alters the orientation of the UBA domain with respect to the catalytic domain. Our results indicate that none of the UBA domains found in AMPK-related kinases interact with polyubiquitin or other ubiquitin-like molecules. Instead, the UBA domains appear to play an essential conformational role and are required for the LKB1-mediated phosphorylation and activation of AMPK-related kinases. This is based on the findings that mutation or removal of the UBA domains of several AMPK-related kinases, including isoforms of MARK, SIK and BRSK, markedly impaired the catalytic activity and LKB1-mediated phosphorylation of these enzymes. We also provide evidence that the UBA domains do not function as LKB1–STRAD (STE20-related adaptor)–MO25 (mouse protein 25) docking/interacting sites and that mutations in the UBA domain of SIK suppressed the ability of SIK to localize within punctate regions of the

  5. Epileptogenesis and epileptic maturation in phosphorylation site-specific SNAP-25 mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Shigeru; Yamamori, Saori; Otsuka, Shintaro; Saito, Masanori; Suzuki, Eiji; Kataoka, Masakazu; Miyaoka, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masami

    2015-09-01

    Snap25(S187A/S187A) mouse is a knock-in mouse with a single amino acid substitution at a protein kinase C-dependent phosphorylation site of the synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), which is a target-soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (t-SNARE) protein essential for neurotransmitter release. Snap25(S187A/S187A) mice exhibit several distinct phenotypes, including reductions in dopamine and serotonin release in the brain, anxiety-like behavior, and cognitive dysfunctions. Homozygous mice show spontaneous epileptic convulsions, and about 15% of the mice die around three weeks after birth. The remaining mice survive for almost two years and exhibit spontaneous recurrent seizures throughout their lifetime. Here, we conducted long-term continuous video electroencephalogram recording of the mice and analyzed the process of epileptogenesis and epileptic maturation in detail. Spikes and slow-wave discharges (SWDs) were observed in the cerebral cortex and thalamus before epileptic convulsions began. SWDs showed several properties similar to those observed in absence seizures including (1) lack of in the hippocampus, (2) movement arrest during SWDs, and (3) inhibition by ethosuximide. Multiple generalized seizures occurred in all homozygous mice around three weeks after birth. However, seizure generation stopped within several days, and a seizure-free latent period began. Following a spike-free quiet period, the number of spikes increased gradually, and epileptic seizures reappeared. Subsequently, spontaneous seizures occurred cyclically throughout the life of the mice, and several progressive changes in seizure frequency, seizure duration, seizure cycle interval, seizure waveform, and the number and waveform of epileptic discharges during slow-wave sleep occurred with different time courses over 10 weeks. Anxiety-related behaviors appeared suddenly within three days after epileptic seizures began and were delayed markedly by oral administration of

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis supports protein tyrosine phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Kusebauch, Ulrike; Ortega, Corrie; Ollodart, Anja; Rogers, Richard S.; Sherman, David R.; Moritz, Robert L.; Grundner, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation determines growth and adaptive decisions in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). At least 11 two-component systems and 11 Ser/Thr protein kinases (STPKs) mediate phosphorylation on Asp, His, Ser, and Thr. In contrast, protein phosphorylation on Tyr has not been described previously in Mtb. Here, using a combination of phospho-enrichment and highly sensitive mass spectrometry, we show extensive protein Tyr phosphorylation of diverse Mtb proteins, including STPKs. Several STPKs function as dual-specificity kinases that phosphorylate Tyr in cis and in trans, suggesting that dual-specificity kinases have a major role in bacterial phospho-signaling. Mutation of a phosphotyrosine site of the essential STPK PknB reduces its activity in vitro and in live Mtb, indicating that Tyr phosphorylation has a functional role in bacterial growth. These data identify a previously unrecognized phosphorylation system in a human pathogen that claims ∼1.4 million lives every year. PMID:24927537

  7. Replication stress induced site-specific phosphorylation targets WRN to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Fengtao; Bhattacharya, Souparno; Abdisalaam, Salim; Mukherjee, Shibani; Yajima, Hirohiko; Yang, Yanyong; Mishra, Ritu; Srinivasan, Kalayarasan; Ghose, Subroto; Chen, David J.; Yannone, Steven M.; Asaithamby, Aroumougame

    2016-01-01

    Faithful and complete genome replication in human cells is essential for preventing the accumulation of cancer-promoting mutations. WRN, the protein defective in Werner syndrome, plays critical roles in preventing replication stress, chromosome instability, and tumorigenesis. Herein, we report that ATR-mediated WRN phosphorylation is needed for DNA replication and repair upon replication stress. A serine residue, S1141, in WRN is phosphorylated in vivo by the ATR kinase in response to replication stress. ATR-mediated WRN S1141 phosphorylation leads to ubiquitination of WRN, facilitating the reversible interaction of WRN with perturbed replication forks and subsequent degradation of WRN. The dynamic interaction between WRN and DNA is required for the suppression of new origin firing and Rad51-dependent double-stranded DNA break repair. Significantly, ATR-mediated WRN phosphorylation is critical for the suppression of chromosome breakage during replication stress. These findings reveal a unique role for WRN as a modulator of DNA repair, replication, and recombination, and link ATR-WRN signaling to the maintenance of genome stability. PMID:26695548

  8. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John Je; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. PMID:27115346

  9. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKY(Y115E) phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  10. Tyrosine phosphorylation and protein degradation control the transcriptional activity of WRKY involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIQ) are among the most structurally diverse and pharmaceutically valuable secondary metabolites. A plant-specific WRKY-type transcription factor, CjWRKY1, was isolated from Coptis japonica and identified as a transcriptional activator of BIQ biosynthesis. However, the expression of CjWRKY1 gene alone was not sufficient for the activation of genes encoding biosynthetic enzymes. Here, we report the importance of post-translational regulation of CjWRKY1 in BIQ biosynthesis. First, we detected the differential accumulation of CjWRKY1 protein in two cell lines with similar CjWRKY1 gene expression but different levels of accumulated alkaloids. Further investigation of the WRKY protein identified the phosphorylation of the WRKYGQK core domain at Y115. The CjWRKYY115E phosphorylation-mimic mutant showed loss of nuclear localization, DNA-binding activity, and transactivation activity compared to wild-type CjWRKY1. Rapid degradation of the CjWRKY1 protein was also confirmed following treatment with inhibitors of the 26S proteasome and protease inhibitors. The existence of two independent degradation pathways as well as protein phosphorylation suggests the fine-tuning of CjWRKY1 activities is involved in the regulation of biosynthesis of BIQs. PMID:27552928

  11. CDK1 phosphorylation of TAZ in mitosis inhibits its oncogenic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Chen, Xingcheng; Stauffer, Seth; Yang, Shuping; Chen, Yuanhong; Dong, Jixin

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) is a downstream effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, which plays important roles in cancer and stem cell biology. Hippo signaling inactivates TAZ through phosphorylation (mainly at S89). In the current study, we define a new layer of regulation of TAZ activity that is critical for its oncogenic function. We found that TAZ is phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by the mitotic kinase CDK1 at S90, S105, T326, and T346 during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Interestingly, mitotic phosphorylation inactivates TAZ oncogenic activity, as the non-phosphorylatable mutant (TAZ-S89A/S90A/S105A/T326A/T346A, TAZ-5A) possesses higher activity in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, anchorage-independent growth, cell migration, and invasion when compared to the TAZ-S89A mutant. Accordingly, TAZ-5A has higher transcriptional activity compared to the TAZ-S89A mutant. Finally, we show that TAZ-S89A or TAZ-5A (to a greater extent) was sufficient to induce spindle and centrosome defects, and chromosome misalignment/missegregation in immortalized epithelial cells. Together, our results reveal a previously unrecognized connection between TAZ oncogenicity and mitotic phospho-regulation. PMID:26375055

  12. PLK1-dependent activation of LRRK1 regulates spindle orientation by phosphorylating CDK5RAP2.

    PubMed

    Hanafusa, Hiroshi; Kedashiro, Shin; Tezuka, Motohiro; Funatsu, Motoki; Usami, Satoshi; Toyoshima, Fumiko; Matsumoto, Kunihiro

    2015-08-01

    Correct formation of the cell division axis requires the initial precise orientation of the mitotic spindle. Proper spindle orientation depends on centrosome maturation, and Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is known to play a crucial role in this process. However, the molecular mechanisms that function downstream of PLK1 are not well understood. Here we show that LRRK1 is a PLK1 substrate that is phosphorylated on Ser 1790. PLK1 phosphorylation is required for CDK1-mediated activation of LRRK1 at the centrosomes, and this in turn regulates mitotic spindle orientation by nucleating the growth of astral microtubules from the centrosomes. Interestingly, LRRK1 in turn phosphorylates CDK5RAP2(Cep215), a human homologue of Drosophila Centrosomin (Cnn), in its γ-tubulin-binding motif, thus promoting the interaction of CDK5RAP2 with γ-tubulin. LRRK1 phosphorylation of CDK5RAP2 Ser 140 is necessary for CDK5RAP2-dependent microtubule nucleation. Thus, our findings provide evidence that LRRK1 regulates mitotic spindle orientation downstream of PLK1 through CDK5RAP2-dependent centrosome maturation. PMID:26192437

  13. SIRT1 phosphorylation by AMP-activated protein kinase regulates p53 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Alan W; Liu, Pengda; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Gao, Daming

    2014-01-01

    The deacetylase SIRT1 regulates multiple biological processes including cellular metabolism and aging. Importantly, SIRT1 can also inactivate the p53 tumor suppressor via deacetylation, suggesting a role in oncogenesis. Recently, SIRT1 was shown to be released from its endogenous inhibitor DBC1 by a process requiring AMPK and the phosphorylation of SIRT1 by yet undefined kinase(s). Here we provide further evidence that AMPK directly phosphorylates SIRT1 on T344, releasing it from DBC1. Furthermore, a phospho-mimetic SIRT1 (T334E) showed decreased binding to DBC1, supporting the importance of this phosphorylation in AMPK-mediated regulation of SIRT1 activity. In addition, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C led to increased p53 acetylation, suggesting a role for the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway in regulating p53 signaling. Together, our results support a hypothesis that AMPK negatively regulates p53 acetylation via phosphorylation of SIRT1 on T344. Furthermore, our findings also define the AMPK/SIRT1 axis as a possible targetable pathway to regulate p53 function. PMID:24959379

  14. Glucose derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae correlates with phosphorylation of the gene activator Cat8p.

    PubMed Central

    Randez-Gil, F; Bojunga, N; Proft, M; Entian, K D

    1997-01-01

    The Cat8p zinc cluster protein is essential for growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with nonfermentable carbon sources. Expression of the CAT8 gene is subject to glucose repression mainly caused by Mig1p. Unexpectedly, the deletion of the Mig1p-binding motif within the CAT8 promoter did not increase CAT8 transcription; moreover, it resulted in a loss of CAT8 promoter activation. Insertion experiments with a promoter test plasmid confirmed that this regulatory 20-bp element influences glucose repression and derepression as well. This finding suggests an upstream activating function of this promoter region, which is Mig1p independent, as delta mig1 mutants are still able to derepress the CAT8 promoter. No other putative binding sites such as a Hap2/3/4/5p site and an Abf1p consensus site were functional with respect to glucose-regulated CAT8 expression. Fusions of Cat8p with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain mediated transcriptional activation. This activation capacity was still carbon source regulated and depended on the Cat1p (Snf1p) protein kinase, which indicated that Cat8p needs posttranslational modification to reveal its gene-activating function. Indeed, Western blot analysis on sodium dodecyl sulfate-gels revealed a single band (Cat8pI) with crude extracts from glucose-grown cells, whereas three bands (Cat8pI, -II, and -III) were identified in derepressed cells. Derepression-specific Cat8pII and -III resulted from differential phosphorylation, as shown by phosphatase treatment. Only the most extensively phosphorylated modification (Cat8pIII) depended on the Cat1p (Snf1p) kinase, indicating that another protein kinase is responsible for modification form Cat8pII. The occurrence of Cat8pIII was strongly correlated with the derepression of gluconeogenic enzymes (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase) and gluconeogenic PCK1 mRNA. Furthermore, glucose triggered the dephosphorylation of Cat8pIII, but this did not depend on the Glc7p (Cid1p

  15. Regulation by phosphorylation of Xenopus laevis poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme activity during oocyte maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Aoufouchi, S; Shall, S

    1997-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is an abundant nuclear enzyme that is dependent on DNA breaks and nicks for its enzyme activity. These DNA nicks and breaks function as allosteric effectors of the enzyme activity. This reaction is important for efficient DNA base excision repair, although it is not a component of the elementary repair pathway itself. The physiological relevance of this reaction might be to ensure correct and efficient DNA repair. We have examined the enzyme activity of PARP in oocytes and eggs of Xenopus laevis. Although both oocytes and eggs contain approximately the same amounts of enzyme protein, there is no detectable enzyme activity in the oocytes, whereas in the eggs the enzyme is active. Enzyme activity appears during oocyte maturation, approx. 4 h after induction by progesterone. This enzyme activation coincides with the appearance of active maturation-promoting factor. Enzyme activation is accompanied by a shift in the electrophoretic mobility of the polypeptide, from an apparent molecular mass of 116 kDa to 125 kDa. Treatment with either bacterial or potato phosphatase reverses the mobility shift and abolishes enzyme activity. Incubation of maturing X. laevis eggs with radioactive inorganic phosphate and subsequent immunoprecipitation demonstrate that the PARP protein is phosphorylated in vivo. We show that maturation-promoting factor (Cyclin B/cdc2) cannot itself be responsible for the phosphorylation and activation of PARP in maturing X. laevis eggs. Together, these results demonstrate that the enzyme activity of PARP in X. laevis oocytes and eggs is regulated by post-translational, covalent phosphorylation. PMID:9230139

  16. Phosphorylation of sites 3 and 2 in rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase by a multifunctional protein kinase (ATP-citrate lyase kinase)

    SciTech Connect

    Sheorain, V.S.; Ramakrishna, S.; Benjamin, W.B.; Soderling, T.R.

    1985-10-05

    A multifunctional protein kinase, purified from rat liver as ATP-citrate lyase kinase, has been identified as a glycogen synthase kinase. This kinase catalyzed incorporation of up to 1.5 mol of and)2numberSPO4/mol of synthase subunit associated with a decrease in the glycogen synthase activity ratio from 0.85 to a value of 0.15. Approximately 65-70% of the TUPO4 was incorporated into site 3 and 30-35% into site 2 as determined by reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography. This multifunctional kinase was distinguished from glycogen synthase kinase-3 on the basis of nucleotide and protein substrate specificities. Since the phosphate contents in glycogen synthase of sites 3 and 2 are altered in diabetes and by insulin administration, the possible involvement of the multifunctional kinase was explored. Glycogen synthase purified from diabetic rabbits was phosphorylated in vitro by this multifunctional kinase at only 10% of the rate compared to synthase purified from control rabbits. Treatment of the diabetics with insulin restored the synthase to a form that was readily phosphorylated in vitro.

  17. Microglia activation regulates GluR1 phosphorylation in chronic unpredictable stress-induced cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingchao; Li, Juan; Dai, Peng; Zhao, Fang; Zheng, Gang; Jing, Jinfei; Wang, Jiye; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is considered to be a major risk factor in the development of psychopathological syndromes in humans. Cognitive impairments and long-term potentiation (LTP) impairments are increasingly recognized as major components of depression, anxiety disorders and other stress-related chronic psychological illnesses. It seems timely to systematically study the potentially underlying neurobiological mechanisms of altered cognitive and synaptic plasticity in the course of chronic stress. In the present study, a rat model of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) induced a cognitive impairment in spatial memory in the Morris water maze (MWM) test and a hippocampal LTP impairment. CUS also induced hippocampal microglial activation and attenuated phosphorylation of glutamate receptor 1 (GluR1 or GluA1). Moreover, chronic treatment with the selective microglial activation blocker, minocycline (120 mg/kg per day), beginning 3 d before CUS treatment and continuing through the behavioral testing period, prevented the CUS-induced impairments of spatial memory and LTP induction. Additional studies showed that minocycline-induced inhibition of microglia activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of GluR1. These results suggest that hippocampal microglial activation modulates the level of GluR1 phosphorylation and might play a causal role in CUS-induced cognitive and LTP disturbances. PMID:25472821

  18. Site-directed spectroscopy of cardiac myosin-binding protein C reveals effects of phosphorylation on protein structural dynamics.

    PubMed

    Colson, Brett A; Thompson, Andrew R; Espinoza-Fonseca, L Michel; Thomas, David D

    2016-03-22

    We have used the site-directed spectroscopies of time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) and double electron-electron resonance (DEER), combined with complementary molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, to resolve the structure and dynamics of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C), focusing on the N-terminal region. The results have implications for the role of this protein in myocardial contraction, with particular relevance to β-adrenergic signaling, heart failure, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. N-terminal cMyBP-C domains C0-C2 (C0C2) contain binding regions for potential interactions with both thick and thin filaments. Phosphorylation by PKA in the MyBP-C motif regulates these binding interactions. Our spectroscopic assays detect distances between pairs of site-directed probes on cMyBP-C. We engineered intramolecular pairs of labeling sites within cMyBP-C to measure, with high resolution, the distance and disorder in the protein's flexible regions using TR-FRET and DEER. Phosphorylation reduced the level of molecular disorder and the distribution of C0C2 intramolecular distances became more compact, with probes flanking either the motif between C1 and C2 or the Pro/Ala-rich linker (PAL) between C0 and C1. Further insight was obtained from microsecond MD simulations, which revealed a large structural change in the disordered motif region in which phosphorylation unmasks the surface of a series of residues on a stable α-helix within the motif with high potential as a protein-protein interaction site. These experimental and computational findings elucidate structural transitions in the flexible and dynamic portions of cMyBP-C, providing previously unidentified molecular insight into the modulatory role of this protein in cardiac muscle contractility. PMID:26908877

  19. Phosphorylation and activation of calcineurin by glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, T.J.; Wang, J.H.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin is a phosphoprotein phosphatase that is activated by divalent cations and further stimulated by calmodulin. In this study calcineurin is shown to be a substrate for both glycogen synthase (casein) kinase-1 (CK-1) and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (A-kinase). Either kinase can catalyze the incorporation of 1.0-1.4 mol /sup 32/P/mol calcineurin. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed that only the ..cap alpha.. subunit is phosphorylated. Phosphorylation of calcineurin by either kinase leads to its activation. Using p-nitrophenyl phosphate as a substrate the authors observed a 2-3 fold activation of calcineurin by either Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ (in the presence or absence of calmodulin) after phosphorylation of calcineurin by either CK-1 or A-kinase. In the absence of Mn/sup 2 +/ or Ni/sup 2 +/ phosphorylated calcineurin, like the nonphosphorylated enzyme, showed very little activity. Ni/sup 2 +/ was a more potent activator of phosphorylated calcineurin compared to Mn/sup 2 +/. Higher levels of activation (5-8 fold) of calcineurin by calmodulin was observed when phosphorylated calcineurin was pretreated with Ni/sup 2 +/ before measurement of phosphatase activity. These results indicate that phosphorylation may be an important mechanism by which calcineurin activity is regulated by Ca/sup 2 +/.

  20. Site on the human erythrocyte glucose transporter phosphorylated by protein kinase C resides on the protein's hydrophilic domain

    SciTech Connect

    Deziel, M.R.; McReynolds, J.H.; Lippes, H.A.; Jung, C.Y.

    1986-05-01

    A recently published model of the human erythrocyte hexose transporter deduced from the protein's primary structure proposes that the transporter is organized into two membrane domains comprising 77% of the protein's mass and three hydrophilic domains, a short segment that includes the polypeptide's N-terminus and two larger segments, one lying between the membrane domains and the other at the protein's C-terminus. Limited tryptic digestion of the transporter produces two membrane-bound fragments corresponding to the proposed membrane domains and releases a number of soluble peptides. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectroscopic analysis of the released peptides and comparison of the peptide's masses with the transporter's amino acid sequence revealed that tryptic peptides corresponding to at least 63% of the hydrophilic domains' mass were recovered. The site of phosphorylation by protein kinase C, tagged using (/sup 32/P)-ATP, was also released from the transporter under these conditions, (in contrast to sites located within the protein's membrane domains), indicating that this site is located within one of the hydrophilic domains. Tryptic digestion at elevated ionic strength or cleavage with S. Aureus V8 protease results in the recovery of the /sup 32/P label on the carbohydrate-bearing membrane domain that is located near the protein's N-terminus, thus eliminating the C-terminal hydrophilic segment as a possible site of phosphorylation.

  1. P2X-mediated AMPA receptor internalization and synaptic depression is controlled by two CaMKII phosphorylation sites on GluA1 in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pougnet, Johan-Till; Compans, Benjamin; Martinez, Audrey; Choquet, Daniel; Hosy, Eric; Boué-Grabot, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Plasticity at excitatory synapses can be induced either by synaptic release of glutamate or the release of gliotransmitters such as ATP. Recently, we showed that postsynaptic P2X2 receptors activated by ATP released from astrocytes downregulate synaptic AMPAR, providing a novel mechanism by which glial cells modulate synaptic activity. ATP- and lNMDA-induced depression in the CA1 region of the hippocampus are additive, suggesting distinct molecular pathways. AMPARs are homo-or hetero-tetramers composed of GluA1-A4. Here, we first show that P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition is dependent on the subunit composition of AMPAR. GluA3 homomers are insensitive and their presence in heteromers alters P2X-mediated inhibition. Using a mutational approach, we demonstrate that the two CaMKII phosphorylation sites S567 and S831 located in the cytoplasmic Loop1 and C-terminal tail of GluA1 subunits, respectively, are critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR inhibition recorded from co-expressing Xenopus oocytes and removal of surface AMPAR at synapses of hippocampal neurons imaged by the super-resolution dSTORM technique. Finally, using phosphorylation site-specific antibodies, we show that P2X-induced depression in hippocampal slices produces a dephosphorylation of the GluA1 subunit at S567, contrary to NMDAR-mediated LTD. These findings indicate that GluA1 phosphorylation of S567 and S831 is critical for P2X2-mediated AMPAR internalization and ATP-driven synaptic depression. PMID:27624155

  2. Basal aurora kinase B activity is sufficient for histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase

    PubMed Central

    Le, Ly-Thuy-Tram; Vu, Hong-Lien; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Molla, Annie

    2013-01-01

    Summary Histone H3 phosphorylation is the hallmark of mitosis deposited by aurora kinase B. Benzo[e]pyridoindoles are a family of potent, broad, ATP-competitive aurora kinase inhibitors. However, benzo[e]pyridoindole C4 only inhibits histone H3 phosphorylation in prophase but not in metaphase. Under the C4 treatment, the cells enter into mitosis with dephosphorylated histone H3, assemble chromosomes normally and progress to metaphase, and then to anaphase. C4 also induces lagging chromosome in anaphase but we demonstrated that these chromosome compaction defects are not related to the absence of H3 phosphorylation in prophase. As a result of C4 action, mitosis lasts longer and the cell cycle is slowed down. We reproduced the mitotic defects with reduced concentrations of potent pan aurora kinase as well as with a specific aurora B ATP-competitive inhibitor; we therefore propose that histone H3 phosphorylation and anaphase chromosome compaction involve the basal activity of aurora kinase B. Our data suggest that aurora kinase B is progressively activated at mitosis entry and at anaphase onset. The full activation of aurora kinase B by its partners, in prometaphase, induces a shift in the catalytic domain of aurora B that modifies its affinity for ATP. These waves of activation/deactivation of aurora B correspond to different conformations of the chromosomal complex revealed by FRAP. The presence of lagging chromosomes may have deleterious consequences on the daughter cells and, unfortunately, the situation may be encountered in patients receiving treatment with aurora kinase inhibitors. PMID:23616922

  3. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    PubMed

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  4. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Tracy L.; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G. Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  5. Pdx1 Is Post-Translationally Modified In vivo and Serine 61 Is the Principal Site of Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Frogne, Thomas; Sylvestersen, Kathrine Beck; Kubicek, Stefan; Nielsen, Michael Lund; Hecksher-Sørensen, Jacob

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining sufficient levels of Pdx1 activity is a prerequisite for proper regulation of blood glucose homeostasis and beta cell function. Mice that are haploinsufficient for Pdx1 display impaired glucose tolerance and lack the ability to increase beta cell mass in response to decreased insulin signaling. Several studies have shown that post-translational modifications are regulating Pdx1 activity through intracellular localization and binding to co-factors. Understanding the signaling cues converging on Pdx1 and modulating its activity is therefore an attractive approach in diabetes treatment. We employed a novel technique called Nanofluidic Proteomic Immunoassay to characterize the post-translational profile of Pdx1. Following isoelectric focusing in nano-capillaries, this technology relies on a pan specific antibody for detection and it therefore allows the relative abundance of differently charged protein species to be examined simultaneously. In all eukaryotic cells tested we find that the Pdx1 protein separates into four distinct peaks whereas Pdx1 protein from bacteria only produces one peak. Of the four peaks in eukaryotic cells we correlate one of them to a phosphorylation Using alanine scanning and mass spectrometry we map this phosphorylation to serine 61 in both Min6 cells and in exogenous Pdx1 over-expressed in HEK293 cells. A single phosphorylation is also present in cultured islets but it remains unaffected by changes in glucose levels. It is present during embryogenesis but is not required for pancreas development. PMID:22509401

  6. Electrical stimulation affects metabolic enzyme phosphorylation, protease activation, and meat tenderization in beef.

    PubMed

    Li, C B; Li, J; Zhou, G H; Lametsch, R; Ertbjerg, P; Brüggemann, D A; Huang, H G; Karlsson, A H; Hviid, M; Lundström, K

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the response of sarcoplasmic proteins in bovine LM to low-voltage electrical stimulation (ES; 80 V, 35 s) after dressing and its contribution to meat tenderization at an early postmortem time. Proteome analysis showed that ES resulted in decreased (P < 0.05) phosphorylation of creatine kinase M chain, fructose bisphosphate aldolase C-A, β-enolase, and pyruvate kinase at 3 h postmortem. Zymography indicated an earlier (P < 0.05) activation of μ-calpain in ES muscles. Free lysosomal cathepsin B and L activity increased faster (P < 0.05) in ES muscles up to 24 h. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy further indicated that lysosomal enzymes were released at an early postmortem time. Electrical stimulation also induced ultrastructural disruption of sarcomeres. In addition, ES accelerated (P < 0.05) the depletion of ATP, creatine phosphate, and glycogen, as well as a pH decline and the more preferred pH/temperature decline mode. Finally, ES accelerated meat tenderization, resulting in lesser (P < 0.05) shear force values than the control over the testing time. A possible relationship was suggested between a change in the phosphorylation of energy metabolic enzymes and the postmortem tenderization of beef. Our results suggested the possible importance of the activation of μ-calpain, phosphorylation of sarcoplasmic proteins, and release of lysosomal enzymes for ES-induced tenderization of beef muscle. PMID:22147478

  7. A tyrosine-phosphorylated carboxy-terminal peptide of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (Flg) is a binding site for the SH2 domain of phospholipase C-gamma 1.

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, M; Honegger, A M; Rotin, D; Fischer, R; Bellot, F; Li, W; Dionne, C A; Jaye, M; Rubinstein, M; Schlessinger, J

    1991-01-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma (PLC-gamma) is a substrate of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR; encoded by the flg gene) and other receptors with tyrosine kinase activity. It has been demonstrated that the src homology region 2 (SH2 domain) of PLC-gamma and of other signalling molecules such as GTPase-activating protein and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-associated p85 direct their binding toward tyrosine-autophosphorylated regions of the epidermal growth factor or platelet-derived growth factor receptor. In this report, we describe the identification of Tyr-766 as an autophosphorylation site of flg-encoded FGFR by direct sequencing of a tyrosine-phosphorylated tryptic peptide isolated from the cytoplasmic domain of FGFR expressed in Escherichia coli. The same phosphopeptide was found in wild-type FGFR phosphorylated either in vitro or in living cells. Like other growth factor receptors, tyrosine-phosphorylated wild-type FGFR or its cytoplasmic domain becomes associated with intact PLC-gamma or with a fusion protein containing the SH2 domain of PLC-gamma. To delineate the site of association, we have examined the capacity of a 28-amino-acid tryptic peptide containing phosphorylated Tyr-766 to bind to various constructs containing SH2 and other domains of PLC-gamma. It is demonstrated that the tyrosine-phosphorylated peptide binds specifically to the SH2 domain but not to the SH3 domain or other regions of PLC-gamma. Hence, Tyr-766 and its flanking sequences represent a major binding site in FGFR for PLC-gamma. Alignment of the amino acid sequences surrounding Tyr-766 with corresponding regions of other FGFRs revealed conserved tyrosine residues in all known members of the FGFR family. We propose that homologous tyrosine-phosphorylated regions in other FGFRs also function as binding sites for PLC-gamma and therefore are involved in coupling to phosphatidylinositol breakdown. Images PMID:1656221

  8. Mutations of cellulose synthase (CESA1) phosphorylation sites modulate anisotropic cell expansion and bidirectional mobility of cellulose synthase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shaolin; Ehrhardt, David W.; Somerville, Chris R.

    2010-01-01

    The CESA1 component of cellulose synthase is phosphorylated at sites clustered in two hypervariable regions of the protein. Mutations of the phosphorylated residues to Ala (A) or Glu (E) alter anisotropic cell expansion and cellulose synthesis in rapidly expanding roots and hypocotyls. Expression of T166E, S686E, or S688E mutants of CESA1 fully rescued the temperature sensitive cesA1-1 allele (rsw1) at a restrictive temperature whereas mutations to A at these positions caused defects in anisotropic cell expansion. However, mutations to E at residues surrounding T166 (i.e., S162, T165, and S167) caused opposite effects. Live-cell imaging of fluorescently labeled CESA showed close correlations between tissue or cell morphology and patterns of bidirectional motility of CESA complexes in the plasma membrane. In the WT, CESA complexes moved at similar velocities in both directions along microtubule tracks. By contrast, the rate of movement of CESA particles was directionally asymmetric in mutant lines that exhibited abnormal tissue or cell expansion, and the asymmetry was removed upon depolymerizing microtubules with oryzalin. This suggests that phosphorylation of CESA differentially affects a polar interaction with microtubules that may regulate the length or quantity of a subset of cellulose microfibrils and that this, in turn, alters microfibril structure in the primary cell wall resulting in or contributing to the observed defect in anisotropic cell expansion. PMID:20855602

  9. Phosphorylated H2AX in parthenogenetically activated, in vitro fertilized and cloned bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A F; Melo, L M; Freitas, V J F; Salamone, D F

    2015-08-01

    In vitro embryo production methods induce DNA damage in the embryos. In response to these injuries, histone H2AX is phosphorylated (γH2AX) and forms foci at the sites of DNA breaks to recruit repair proteins. In this work, we quantified the DNA damage in bovine embryos undergoing parthenogenetic activation (PA), in vitro fertilization (IVF) or somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) by measuring γH2AX accumulation at different developmental stages: 1-cell, 2-cell and blastocyst. At the 1-cell stage, IVF embryos exhibited a greater number of γH2AX foci (606.1 ± 103.2) and greater area of γH2AX staining (12923.6 ± 3214.1) than did PA and SCNT embryos. No differences at the 2-cell stage were observed among embryo types. Although PA, IVF and SCNT were associated with different blastocyst formation rates (31.1%, 19.7% and 8.3%, P < 0.05), no differences in the number of γH2AX foci or area were detected among the treatments. γH2AX is detected in bovine preimplantation embryos produced by PA, IVF and SCNT; the amount of DNA damage was comparable among those embryos developing to the blastocyst stage among different methods for in vitro embryo production. While IVF resulted in increased damage at the 1-cell embryo stage, no difference was observed between PA and SCNT embryos at any developmental stage. The decrease in the number of double-stranded breaks at the blastocyst stage seems to indicate that DNA repair mechanisms are functional during embryo development. PMID:24735637

  10. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ime2 phosphorylates Sic1 at multiple PXS/T sites but is insufficient to trigger Sic1 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Sedgwick, Chantelle; Rawluk, Matthew; Decesare, James; Raithatha, Sheetal; Wohlschlegel, James; Semchuk, Paul; Ellison, Michael; Yates, John; Stuart, David

    2006-01-01

    The initiation of DNA replication in Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends upon the destruction of the Clb–Cdc28 inhibitor Sic1. In proliferating cells Cln–Cdc28 complexes phosphorylate Sic1, which stimulates binding of Sic1 to SCFCdc4 and triggers its proteosome mediated destruction. During sporulation cyclins are not expressed, yet Sic1 is still destroyed at the G1-/S-phase boundary. The Cdk (cyclin dependent kinase) sites are also required for Sic1 destruction during sporulation. Sic1 that is devoid of Cdk phosphorylation sites displays increased stability and decreased phosphorylation in vivo. In addition, we found that Sic1 was modified by ubiquitin in sporulating cells and that SCFCdc4 was required for this modification. The meiosis-specific kinase Ime2 has been proposed to promote Sic1 destruction by phosphorylating Sic1 in sporulating cells. We found that Ime2 phosphorylates Sic1 at multiple sites in vitro. However, only a subset of these sites corresponds to Cdk sites. The identification of multiple sites phosphorylated by Ime2 has allowed us to propose a motif for phosphorylation by Ime2 (PXS/T) where serine or threonine acts as a phospho-acceptor. Although Ime2 phosphorylates Sic1 at multiple sites in vitro, the modified Sic1 fails to bind to SCFCdc4. In addition, the expression of Ime2 in G1 arrested haploid cells does not promote the destruction of Sic1. These data support a model where Ime2 is necessary but not sufficient to promote Sic1 destruction during sporulation. PMID:16776651

  12. Salt site performance assessment activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kircher, J.F.; Gupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    During this year the first selection of the tools (codes) for performance assessments of potential salt sites have been tentatively selected and documented; the emphasis has shifted from code development to applications. During this period prior to detailed characterization of a salt site, the focus is on bounding calculations, sensitivity and with the data available. The development and application of improved methods for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis is a focus for the coming years activities and the subject of a following paper in these proceedings. Although the assessments to date are preliminary and based on admittedly scant data, the results indicate that suitable salt sites can be identified and repository subsystems designed which will meet the established criteria for protecting the health and safety of the public. 36 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  13. Eriocalyxin B Inhibits STAT3 Signaling by Covalently Targeting STAT3 and Blocking Phosphorylation and Activation of STAT3.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaokui; He, Li; Cao, Peng; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Activated STAT3 plays an important role in oncogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and resisting apoptosis. STAT3 therefore is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We have screened a traditional Chinese herb medicine compound library and found Eriocalyxin B (EB), a diterpenoid from Isodon eriocalyx, as a specific inhibitor of STAT3. EB selectively inhibited constitutive as well as IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and induced apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. EB did not affect the upstream protein tyrosine kinases or the phosphatase (PTPase) of STAT3, but rather interacted directly with STAT3. The effects of EB could be abolished by DTT or GSH, suggesting a thiol-mediated covalent linkage between EB and STAT3. Site mutagenesis of cysteine in and near the SH2 domain of STAT3 identified Cys712 to be the critical amino acid for the EB-induced inactivation of STAT3. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analyses demonstrated that an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl of EB covalently interacted with the Cys712 of STAT3. Computational modeling analyses also supported a direct interaction between EB and the Cys712 of STAT3. These data strongly suggest that EB directly targets STAT3 through a covalent linkage to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of STAT3 and induces apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. PMID:26010889

  14. Eriocalyxin B Inhibits STAT3 Signaling by Covalently Targeting STAT3 and Blocking Phosphorylation and Activation of STAT3

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaokui; He, Li; Cao, Peng; Yu, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Activated STAT3 plays an important role in oncogenesis by stimulating cell proliferation and resisting apoptosis. STAT3 therefore is an attractive target for cancer therapy. We have screened a traditional Chinese herb medicine compound library and found Eriocalyxin B (EB), a diterpenoid from Isodon eriocalyx, as a specific inhibitor of STAT3. EB selectively inhibited constitutive as well as IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and induced apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. EB did not affect the upstream protein tyrosine kinases or the phosphatase (PTPase) of STAT3, but rather interacted directly with STAT3. The effects of EB could be abolished by DTT or GSH, suggesting a thiol-mediated covalent linkage between EB and STAT3. Site mutagenesis of cysteine in and near the SH2 domain of STAT3 identified Cys712 to be the critical amino acid for the EB-induced inactivation of STAT3. Furthermore, LC/MS/MS analyses demonstrated that an α, β-unsaturated carbonyl of EB covalently interacted with the Cys712 of STAT3. Computational modeling analyses also supported a direct interaction between EB and the Cys712 of STAT3. These data strongly suggest that EB directly targets STAT3 through a covalent linkage to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of STAT3 and induces apoptosis of STAT3-dependent tumor cells. PMID:26010889

  15. Cardiac Myosin-binding Protein C and Troponin-I Phosphorylation Independently Modulate Myofilament Length-dependent Activation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mohit; Govindan, Suresh; Zhang, Mengjie; Khairallah, Ramzi J; Martin, Jody L; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; de Tombe, Pieter P

    2015-12-01

    β-Adrenergic stimulation in heart leads to increased contractility and lusitropy via activation of protein kinase A (PKA). In the cardiac sarcomere, both cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) and troponin-I (cTnI) are prominent myofilament targets of PKA. Treatment of permeabilized myocardium with PKA induces enhanced myofilament length-dependent activation (LDA), the cellular basis of the Frank-Starling cardiac regulatory mechanism. It is not known, however, which of these targets mediates the altered LDA and to what extent. Here, we employed two genetic mouse models in which the three PKA sites in cMyBP-C were replaced with either phospho-mimic (DDD) or phospho-null (AAA) residues. AAA- or DDD-permeabilized myocytes (n = 12-17) were exchanged (~93%) for recombinant cTnI in which the two PKA sites were mutated to either phospho-mimic (DD) or phospho-null (AA) residues. Force-[Ca(2+)] relationships were determined at two sarcomere lengths (SL = 1.9 μm and SL = 2.3 μm). Data were fit to a modified Hill equation for each individual cell preparation at each SL. LDA was indexed as ΔEC50, the difference in [Ca(2+)] required to achieve 50% force activation at the two SLs. We found that PKA-mediated phosphorylation of cMyBP-C and cTnI each independently contribute to enhance myofilament length-dependent activation properties of the cardiac sarcomere, with relative contributions of ~67 and ~33% for cMyBP-C for cTnI, respectively. We conclude that β-adrenergic stimulation enhances the Frank-Starling regulatory mechanism predominantly via cMyBP-C PKA-mediated phosphorylation. We speculate that this molecular mechanism enhances cross-bridge formation at long SL while accelerating cross-bridge detachment and relaxation at short SLs. PMID:26453301

  16. Single phosphorylation sites in Acc1 and Acc2 regulate lipid homeostasis and the insulin–sensitizing effects of metformin

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Morgan D.; Galic, Sandra; Marcinko, Katarina; Sikkema, Sarah; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; Chen, Zhi–Ping; O’Neill, Hayley M.; Ford, Rebecca J.; Palanivel, Rengasamy; O’Brien, Matthew; Hardie, D. Grahame; Macaulay, S. Lance; Schertzer, Jonathan D.; Dyck, Jason R. B.; van Denderen, Bryce J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Steinberg, Gregory R.

    2016-01-01

    The obesity epidemic has led to an increased incidence of non–alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and type 2 diabetes. AMP–activated protein kinase (Ampk) regulates energy homeostasis and is activated by cellular stress, hormones and the widely prescribed anti–type 2 diabetic drug metformin1,2. Ampk phosphorylates murine acetyl–CoA carboxylase3,4 (Acc) 1 at Ser79 and Acc2 at Ser212, inhibiting the conversion of acetyl–CoA to malonyl–CoA, a precursor in fatty acid synthesis5 as well as an allosteric inhibitor of fatty acid transport into mitochondria for oxidation6. To test the physiological impact of these phosphorylation events we generated mice with alanine knock–in mutations in both Acc1 (Ser79) and Acc2 (Ser212) (Acc double knock–in, AccDKI). These mice have elevated lipogenesis and lower fatty acid oxidation compared to wild–type (WT) mice, which contribute to the progression of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance and NAFLD, but not obesity. Remarkably, AccDKI mice made obese by high–fat feeding, are refractory to the lipid–lowering and insulin–sensitizing effects of metformin. These findings establish that inhibitory phosphorylation of Acc by Ampk is essential for the control of lipid metabolism, and in the setting of obesity, for metformin–induced improvements in insulin action. PMID:24185692

  17. Inhibition of Rb Phosphorylation Leads to mTORC2-Mediated Activation of Akt.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinfang; Xu, Kai; Liu, Pengda; Geng, Yan; Wang, Bin; Gan, Wenjian; Guo, Jianping; Wu, Fei; Chin, Y Rebecca; Berrios, Christian; Lien, Evan C; Toker, Alex; DeCaprio, James A; Sicinski, Piotr; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-06-16

    The retinoblastoma (Rb) protein exerts its tumor suppressor function primarily by inhibiting the E2F family of transcription factors that govern cell-cycle progression. However, it remains largely elusive whether the hyper-phosphorylated, non-E2F1-interacting form of Rb has any physiological role. Here we report that hyper-phosphorylated Rb directly binds to and suppresses the function of mTORC2 but not mTORC1. Mechanistically, Rb, but not p107 or p130, interacts with Sin1 and blocks the access of Akt to mTORC2, leading to attenuated Akt activation and increased sensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. As such, inhibition of Rb phosphorylation by depleting cyclin D or using CDK4/6 inhibitors releases Rb-mediated mTORC2 suppression. This, in turn, leads to elevated Akt activation to confer resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs in Rb-proficient cells, which can be attenuated with Akt inhibitors. Therefore, our work provides a molecular basis for the synergistic usage of CDK4/6 and Akt inhibitors in treating Rb-proficient cancer. PMID:27237051

  18. Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C is phosphorylated and inhibited by 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Peraldi, P; Zhao, Z; Filloux, C; Fischer, E H; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Protein-tyrosine-phosphatase 2C (PTP2C, also named SHPTP2, SHPTP3, or PTP1D) is a cytosolic enzyme with two Src homology 2 domains. We have investigated its regulation by phosphorylation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells. In untreated cells, PTP2C was phosphorylated predominantly on serine residues. A 5-min treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced an increase in phosphorylation on threonine and, to a lesser degree, on serine. After 45 min of exposure to EGF, PTP2C phosphorylation returned to basal levels. Using an in vitro kinase assay, we found that the 44-kDa mitogen-activated protein kinase, p44mapk, phosphorylated PTP2C on serine and threonine residues. This phosphorylation resulted in a pronounced inhibition of PTP2C enzyme activity measured with phosphorylated EGF receptors as substrate. Moreover, in intact PC12 cells, PTP2C was also inhibited following a short EGF treatment, but its activity returned to normal when the exposure to EGF was maintained for 45 min. The profile of this response to EGF can be inversely correlated to that of the stimulatory action of EGF on p44mapk. These data suggest that the EGF-induced regulation of PTP2C activity is mediated by p44mapk. These findings provide evidence for an additional role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade--namely, the regulation of a PTP. Images PMID:8197172

  19. Premature lethality, hyperactivity, and aberrant phosphorylation in transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active form of Fyn

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Di; Götz, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The kinase Fyn, the microtubule-associated protein tau and the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ) constitute a toxic triad in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau's subcellular localization is mainly regulated by phosphorylation whereas Fyn's localization is dictated by palmitoylation targeting it to the plasma membrane in a reversible manner. We have previously shown that tau is required for Fyn to be targeted to the dendritic spine. We had also shown that a truncated form of tau (Δtau) that accumulates in the cell soma is capable of trapping Fyn and preventing it from entering the spine. Here we determined that palmitoylation is required for Fyn's membrane and spine localization. We further evaluated the functional consequences of neuronal over-expression of the constitutively active Y531F mutant form of Fyn (FynCA) in transgenic mice. We found that the FynCA transgenic mice displayed a reduced weight, a massively reduced lifespan and a high level of hyperactivity. The lifespan of the FynCA mice was only slightly extended by crossing them with Δtau transgenic mice, possibly reflecting differences in expression patterns of the transgenes and high levels of transgenic FynCA compared to endogenous Fyn. Analysis of synaptosomes revealed that FynCA accumulated at high levels in the spine, resulting in increased levels of the NMDA receptor subunit NR2b phosphorylated at residue Y1472. Tau was strongly phosphorylated at the AT8 epitope S202/T205 as shown by Western blot and immunohistochemistry indicating that an increased tyrosine kinase activity of Fyn has down-stream consequences for serine/threonine-directed phosphorylation. PMID:24860422

  20. TIMP-2 Modulates VEGFR-2 Phosphorylation and Enhances Phosphodiesterase Activity in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seo-Jin; Tsang, Patricia; Diaz, Tere; Wei, Bei-yang; Stetler-Stevenson, William George

    2010-01-01

    In the present study we examine the effects of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) on the phosphorylation status of specific phosphotyrosine residues on the vascular endothelial cell growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) cytoplasmic tail and examine the effects on associated downstream signaling pathways. In order to focus on metalloproteinase-independent mechanisms, we utilized the TIMP-2 analog known as Ala+TIMP-2 that is deficient in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitory activity. Our experiments are designed to compare the effects of VEGF-A stimulation with or without Ala+TIMP-2 pretreatment, as well as basal responses in human microvascular endothelial cells. Our results show that Ala+TIMP-2 selectively alters the phosphorylation pattern of VEGFR-2 following VEGF-A stimulation and disrupts the downstream activation of PLC-γ, Ca+2 flux, Akt, and eNOS, as well as decreasing cGMP levels. Moreover, we observed an Ala+TIMP-2-induced reduction in cGMP levels typically elevated by exogenous NO donors implicating Ala+TIMP-2 in the direct activation of an isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX)-sensitive cGMP phosphodiesterase activity. TIMP-2 suppression of endothelial mitogenesis and angiogenesis involves at least two mechanisms, one mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibition of VEGFR-2 activation and downstream signaling and a second mechanism involving direct activation of an IBMX-sensitive phosphodiesterase activity. PMID:20084057

  1. Immunoprecipitation of Plasma Membrane Receptor-Like Kinases for Identification of Phosphorylation Sites and Associated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kadota, Yasuhiro; Macho, Alberto P; Zipfel, Cyril

    2016-01-01

    Membrane proteins are difficult to study for numerous reasons. The surface of membrane proteins is relatively hydrophobic and sometimes very unstable, additionally requiring detergents for their extraction from the membrane. This leads to challenges at all levels, including expression, solubilization, purification, identification of associated proteins, and the identification of post-translational modifications. However, recent advances in immunoprecipitation technology allow to isolate membrane proteins efficiently, facilitating the study of protein-protein interactions, the identification of novel associated proteins, and to identify post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation. Here, we describe an optimized immunoprecipitation protocol for plant plasma membrane receptor-like kinases. PMID:26577786

  2. Localisation of the sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitochondria using top-down elasticity analysis.

    PubMed

    Kesseler, A; Brand, M D

    1994-11-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the significant sites of action of cadmium on oxidative phosphorylation in potato tuber mitocondria. We simplified the system to three convenient subsystems linked via the production or consumption of a common intermediate, namely protonmotive force. The three subsystems were substrate oxidation, which produces protonmotive force, and the proton leak reactions and the phosphorylation reactions, which consume protonmotive force. By measuring the effect of cadmium on the kinetic response of each subsystem to protonmotive force (top-down elasticity analysis), we found that cadmium stimulated proton leak reactions and strongly inhibited substrate oxidation, but had no measurable effect on the phosphorylation reactions. Cadmium therefore decreases the amount of ATP produced/oxygen consumed (the effective P/O ratio) not by inhibiting the phosphorylation reactions directly, but by inhibiting the production of protonmotive force and by diverting proton flux from phosphorylation reactions to the proton leak reactions. PMID:7957227

  3. Cardiac myosin light chain is phosphorylated by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent and -independent kinase activities.

    PubMed

    Chang, Audrey N; Mahajan, Pravin; Knapp, Stefan; Barton, Hannah; Sweeney, H Lee; Kamm, Kristine E; Stull, James T

    2016-07-01

    The well-known, muscle-specific smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) (smMLCK) and skeletal muscle MLCK (skMLCK) are dedicated protein kinases regulated by an autoregulatory segment C terminus of the catalytic core that blocks myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) binding and phosphorylation in the absence of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM). Although it is known that a more recently discovered cardiac MLCK (cMLCK) is necessary for normal RLC phosphorylation in vivo and physiological cardiac performance, information on cMLCK biochemical properties are limited. We find that a fourth uncharacterized MLCK, MLCK4, is also expressed in cardiac muscle with high catalytic domain sequence similarity with other MLCKs but lacking an autoinhibitory segment. Its crystal structure shows the catalytic domain in its active conformation with a short C-terminal "pseudoregulatory helix" that cannot inhibit catalysis as a result of missing linker regions. MLCK4 has only Ca(2+)/CaM-independent activity with comparable Vmax and Km values for different RLCs. In contrast, the Vmax value of cMLCK is orders of magnitude lower than those of the other three MLCK family members, whereas its Km (RLC and ATP) and KCaM values are similar. In contrast to smMLCK and skMLCK, which lack activity in the absence of Ca(2+)/CaM, cMLCK has constitutive activity that is stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM. Potential contributions of autoregulatory segment to cMLCK activity were analyzed with chimeras of skMLCK and cMLCK. The constitutive, low activity of cMLCK appears to be intrinsic to its catalytic core structure rather than an autoinhibitory segment. Thus, RLC phosphorylation in cardiac muscle may be regulated by two different protein kinases with distinct biochemical regulatory properties. PMID:27325775

  4. A vitellogenin polyserine cleavage site: highly disordered conformation protected from proteolysis by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Havukainen, Heli; Underhaug, Jarl; Wolschin, Florian; Amdam, Gro; Halskau, Øyvind

    2012-06-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is an egg-yolk precursor protein in most oviparous species. In honeybee (Apis mellifera), the protein (AmVg) also affects social behavior and life-span plasticity. Despite its manifold functions, the AmVg molecule remains poorly understood. The subject of our structure-oriented AmVg study is its polyserine tract - a little-investigated repetitive protein segment mostly found in insects. We previously reported that AmVg is tissue specifically cleaved in the vicinity of this tract. Here, we show that, despite its potential for an open, disordered structure, AmVg is unexpectedly resistant to trypsin/chymotrypsin digestion at the tract. Our findings suggest that multiple phosphorylation plays a role in this resilience. Sequence variation is highly pronounced at the polyserine region in insect Vgs. We demonstrate that sequence differences in this region can lead to structural variation, as NMR and circular dichroism (CD) evidence assign different conformational propensities to polyserine peptides from the honeybee and the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis; the former is extended and disordered and the latter more compact and helical. CD analysis of the polyserine region of bumblebee Bombus ignitus and wasp Pimpla nipponica supports a random coil structure in these species. The spectroscopic results strengthen our model of the AmVg polyserine tract as a flexible domain linker shielded by phosphorylation. PMID:22573762

  5. A vitellogenin polyserine cleavage site: highly disordered conformation protected from proteolysis by phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Underhaug, Jarl; Wolschin, Florian; Amdam, Gro; Halskau, Øyvind

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Vitellogenin (Vg) is an egg-yolk precursor protein in most oviparous species. In honeybee (Apis mellifera), the protein (AmVg) also affects social behavior and life-span plasticity. Despite its manifold functions, the AmVg molecule remains poorly understood. The subject of our structure-oriented AmVg study is its polyserine tract — a little-investigated repetitive protein segment mostly found in insects. We previously reported that AmVg is tissue specifically cleaved in the vicinity of this tract. Here, we show that, despite its potential for an open, disordered structure, AmVg is unexpectedly resistant to trypsin/chymotrypsin digestion at the tract. Our findings suggest that multiple phosphorylation plays a role in this resilience. Sequence variation is highly pronounced at the polyserine region in insect Vgs. We demonstrate that sequence differences in this region can lead to structural variation, as NMR and circular dichroism (CD) evidence assign different conformational propensities to polyserine peptides from the honeybee and the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis; the former is extended and disordered and the latter more compact and helical. CD analysis of the polyserine region of bumblebee Bombus ignitus and wasp Pimpla nipponica supports a random coil structure in these species. The spectroscopic results strengthen our model of the AmVg polyserine tract as a flexible domain linker shielded by phosphorylation. PMID:22573762

  6. Synthesis and characterization of phosphorylated galactomannan: the effect of DS on solution conformation and antioxidant activities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Ting; Tian, Jia; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Xiaofang; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-11-26

    Phosphorylated derivatives of galactomannan from guar gum (GG) with the degree of substitution (DS) of 0.35-0.52 were synthesized using POCl3/pyridine. FT-IR, (13)C NMR and XPS results revealed that phosphorylation had occurred and C-6 substitution was predominant in phosphorylated guar gum (PGG). PGG showed an increase in Mw and more broad molar mass distribution in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) analysis. Higher reaction temperature (above 60 °C) resulted in a higher MW value in PGG. It might be due to the cross-linking of polysaccharide chains by POCl3 via di-ester which was also supported by monosaccharide composition result. Results of M(W) - (S(2))(z)(1/2) showed a decrease in fractal dimension (df) values. DS had greater influence on its conformation in aqueous solution. The introduction of -PO3H2 groups improved significantly the stiffness of the chains due to the electrostatic effect. Furthermore, antioxidant experiments revealed that high DS could enhance the scavenging activities of radicals of PGG in vitro. PMID:25256491

  7. Casein Kinase 1 α Phosphorylates the Wnt Regulator Jade-1 and Modulates Its Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Borgal, Lori; Rinschen, Markus M.; Dafinger, Claudia; Hoff, Sylvia; Reinert, Matthäus J.; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Lienkamp, Soeren S.; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    Tight regulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critical for vertebrate development and tissue maintenance, and deregulation can lead to a host of disease phenotypes, including developmental disorders and cancer. Proteins associated with primary cilia and centrosomes have been demonstrated to negatively regulate canonical Wnt signaling in interphase cells. The plant homeodomain zinc finger protein Jade-1 can act as an E3 ubiquitin ligase-targeting β-catenin for proteasomal degradation and concentrates at the centrosome and ciliary basal body in addition to the nucleus in interphase cells. We demonstrate that the destruction complex component casein kinase 1α (CK1α) phosphorylates Jade-1 at a conserved SLS motif and reduces the ability of Jade-1 to inhibit β-catenin signaling. Consistently, Jade-1 lacking the SLS motif is more effective than wild-type Jade-1 in reducing β-catenin-induced secondary axis formation in Xenopus laevis embryos in vivo. Interestingly, CK1α also phosphorylates β-catenin and the destruction complex component adenomatous polyposis coli at a similar SLS motif to the effect that β-catenin is targeted for degradation. The opposing effect of Jade-1 phosphorylation by CK1α suggests a novel example of the dual functions of CK1α activity to either oppose or promote canonical Wnt signaling in a context-dependent manner. PMID:25100726

  8. Secreted beta-amyloid precursor protein stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase and enhances tau phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, S M; Koo, E H; Selkoe, D J; Qiu, W Q; Kosik, K S

    1994-01-01

    Biological effects related to cell growth, as well as a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease, have been ascribed to the beta-amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP). Little is known, however, about the intracellular cascades that mediate these effects. We report that the secreted form of beta-APP potently stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Brief exposure of PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells to beta-APP secreted by transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells stimulated the 43-kDa form of MAPK by > 10-fold. Induction of a dominant inhibitory form of ras in a PC12-derived cell line prevented the stimulation of MAPK by secreted beta-APP, demonstrating the dependence of the effect upon p21ras. Because the microtubule-associated protein tau is hyperphosphorylated in Alzheimer disease, we sought and found a 2-fold enhancement in tau phosphorylation associated with the beta-APP-induced MAPK stimulation. In the ras dominant inhibitory cell line, beta-APP failed to enhance phosphorylation of tau. The data presented here provide a link between secreted beta-APP and the phosphorylation state of tau. Images PMID:8041753

  9. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Tarantula Myosin Filaments Suggests How Phosphorylation May Regulate Myosin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Alamo, Lorenzo; Wriggers, Willy; Pinto, Antonio; Bártoli, Fulvia; Salazar, Leiría; Zhao, Fa-Qing; Craig, Roger; Padrón, Raúl

    2008-01-01

    Summary Muscle contraction involves the interaction of the myosin heads of the thick filaments with actin subunits of the thin filaments. Relaxation occurs when this interaction is blocked by molecular switches on these filaments. In many muscles, myosin-linked regulation involves phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chains (RLC). Electron microscopy of vertebrate smooth muscle myosin molecules (regulated by phosphorylation) has provided insight into the relaxed structure, revealing that myosin is switched off by intramolecular interactions between its two heads, the free-head and the blocked head. Three-dimensional reconstruction of frozen-hydrated specimens reveals that this asymmetric head interaction is also present in native thick filaments of tarantula striated muscle. Our goal here has been to elucidate the structural features of the tarantula filament involved in phosphorylation-based regulation. A new reconstruction reveals intra- and intermolecular myosin interactions in addition to those seen previously. To help interpret the interactions, we sequenced the tarantula RLC, and fitted to the reconstruction an atomic model of the myosin head that included the predicted RLC atomic structure and an S2 crystal structure. The fitting suggests an intramolecular interaction between the cardiomyopathy loop of the free-head and its own S2 and two intermolecular interactions—between the cardio-loop of the free head and the ELC of the blocked head, and between the Leu-305 - Gln-327 “interaction loop” (loop I) of the free-head and the N-terminal fragment of the RLC of the blocked-head. These interactions, added to those previously described, would help to switch off the thick filament. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest how phosphorylation could increase the helical content of the RLC N-terminus, weakening these interactions, thus releasing both heads and activating the thick filament. PMID:18951904

  10. The upregulation of NR2A-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor function by tyrosine phosphorylation of postsynaptic density 95 via facilitating Src/proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chao; Du, Cai-Ping; Peng, Yan; Xu, Zhen; Sun, Chang-Cheng; Liu, Yong; Hou, Xiao-Yu

    2015-04-01

    The activation of postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is required for long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. Postsynaptic density 95 (PSD-95) serves as a scaffold protein that tethers NMDA receptor subunits, kinases, and signal molecules. Our previous study proves that PSD-95 is a substrate of Src/Fyn and identifies Y523 on PSD-95 as a principal phosphorylation site. In this paper, we try to define an involvement and molecular consequences of PSD-95 phosphorylation by Src in NMDA receptor regulation. We found that either NMDA or chemical LTP induction leads to rapid phosphorylation of PSD-95 by Src in cultured cortical neurons. The phosphorylation of Y523 on PSD-95 potentiates NR2A-containing NMDA receptor current amplitude, implying an important role of Src-mediated PSD-95 phosphorylation in NMDA receptor activation. Comparing to wild-type PSD-95, overexpression of nonphosphorylatable mutant PSD-95Y523F attenuated the NMDA-stimulated NR2A tyrosine phosphorylation that enhances electrophysiological responses of NMDA receptor channels, while did not affect the membrane localization of NR2A subunits. PSD-95Y523D, a phosphomimetic mutant of PSD-95, induced NR2A tyrosine phosphorylation even if there was no NMDA treatment. In addition, the deficiency of Y523 phosphorylation on PSD-95 impaired the facilitatory effect of PSD-95 on the activation of Src and proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2) and decreased the binding of Pyk2 with PSD-95. These results indicate that PSD-95 phosphorylation by Src facilitates the integration of Pyk2 to PSD-95 signal complex, the activation of Pyk2/Src, as well as the subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2A, which ultimately results in the upregulation of NMDA receptor function and synaptic transmission. PMID:24981431

  11. Phosphorylation at the carboxy terminus of the 55-kilodalton adenovirus type 5 E1B protein regulates transforming activity.

    PubMed Central

    Teodoro, J G; Halliday, T; Whalen, S G; Takayesu, D; Graham, F L; Branton, P E

    1994-01-01

    The 55-kDa product of early region 1B (E1B) of human adenoviruses is required for viral replication and participates in cell transformation through complex formation with and inactivation of the cellular tumor suppressor p53. We have used both biochemical and genetic approaches to show that this 496-residue (496R) protein of adenovirus type 5 is phosphorylated at serine and threonine residues near the carboxy terminus within sequences characteristic of substrates of casein kinase II. Mutations which converted serines 490 and 491 to alanine residues decreased viral replication and greatly reduced the efficiency of transformation of primary baby rat kidney cells. Such mutant 496R proteins interacted with p53 at efficiencies similar to those of wild-type 496R but only partially inhibited p53 transactivation activity. These results indicated that phosphorylation at these carboxy-terminal sites either regulates the inhibition of p53 or regulates some other 496R function required for cell transformation. Images PMID:8289381

  12. Glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in neurons and astrocytes during network activity in hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Anton I; Malkov, Anton E; Waseem, Tatsiana; Mukhtarov, Marat; Buldakova, Svetlana; Gubkina, Olena; Zilberter, Misha; Zilberter, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    Network activation triggers a significant energy metabolism increase in both neurons and astrocytes. Questions of the primary neuronal energy substrate (e.g., glucose vs. lactate) as well as the relative contributions of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation and their cellular origin (neurons vs. astrocytes) are still a matter of debates. Using simultaneous measurements of electrophysiological and metabolic parameters during synaptic stimulation in hippocampal slices from mature mice, we show that neurons and astrocytes use both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to meet their energy demands. Supplementation or replacement of glucose in artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) with pyruvate or lactate strongly modifies parameters related to network activity-triggered energy metabolism. These effects are not induced by changes in ATP content, pHi, [Ca2+]i or accumulation of reactive oxygen species. Our results suggest that during network activation, a significant fraction of NAD(P)H response (its overshoot phase) corresponds to glycolysis and the changes in cytosolic NAD(P)H and mitochondrial FAD are coupled. Our data do not support the hypothesis of a preferential utilization of astrocyte-released lactate by neurons during network activation in slices—instead, we show that during such activity glucose is an effective energy substrate for both neurons and astrocytes. PMID:24326389

  13. Variants of the yeast MAPK Mpk1 are fully functional independently of activation loop phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Bai, Chen; Ahn, Natalie G; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-09-01

    MAP kinases of the ERK family are conserved from yeast to humans. Their catalytic activity is dependent on dual phosphorylation of their activation loop's TEY motif, catalyzed by MAPK kinases (MEKs). Here we studied variants of Mpk1, a yeast orthologue of Erk, which is essential for cell wall integrity. Cells lacking MPK1, or the genes encoding the relevant MEKs, MKK1 and MKK2, do not proliferate under cell wall stress, imposed, for example, by caffeine. Mutants of Mpk1, Mpk1(Y268C) and Mpk1(Y268A), function independently of Mkk1 and Mkk2. We show that these variants are phosphorylated at their activation loop in mkk1∆mkk2∆ and mkk1∆mkk2∆pbs2∆ste7∆ cells, suggesting that they autophosphorylate. However, strikingly, when Y268C/A mutations were combined with the kinase-dead mutation, K54R, or mutations at the TEY motif, T190A+Y192F, the resulting proteins still allowed mkk1∆mkk2∆ cells to proliferate under caffeine stress. Mutating the equivalent residue, Tyr-280/Tyr-261, in Erk1/Erk2 significantly impaired Erk1/2's catalytic activity. This study describes the first case in which a MAPK, Erk/Mpk1, imposes a phenotype via a mechanism that is independent of TEY phosphorylation and an unusual case in which an equivalent mutation in a highly conserved domain of yeast and mammalian Erks causes an opposite effect. PMID:27413009

  14. 2-Methoxyestradiol induced Bax phosphorylation and apoptosis in human retinoblastoma cells via p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Min, Hongbo; Ghatnekar, Gautam S; Ghatnekar, Angela V; You, Xiaohong; Bu, Min; Guo, Xinyi; Bu, Shizhong; Shen, Bo; Huang, Qin

    2012-07-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is a common childhood intraocular cancer that affects approximately 300 children each year in the United States alone. 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME), an endogenous metabolite of 17-β-estradiol that dose not bind to nuclear estrogen receptor, exhibits potent apoptotic activity against rapidly growing tumor cells. Here, we report that 2ME induction of apoptosis was demonstrated by early fragmented DNA after 48 h of incubation with 10 µM 2ME in Rb cell lines. Subsequently, a decrease of proliferation was observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Further analysis of the mechanism indicates that p38 kinase plays a critical role in 2ME-induced apoptosis in Y79 cells, even though ERK was also activated by 2ME under the same conditions. Activation of p38 kinase also mediates 2ME induced Bax phosphorylated at Thr(167) after a 6 h treatment of 2ME, which in turn prevents formation of the Bcl-2-Bax heterodimer. Both p38 specific inhibitor, SB 203580, or p38 knockdown by specific siRNA, blocked 2ME induction of Bax phosphorylation. Furthermore, only transiently transfected mutant BaxT167A, but not Bax S163A, inhibited 2ME-induced apoptosis. In summary, our data suggest that 2ME induces apoptosis in human Rb cells by causing phosphorylation of p38 Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), which appears to be correlated with phosphorlation of Bax. This understanding of 2ME's ability may help develop it as a promising therapeutic candidate by inducing apoptosis in a Rb. PMID:21769948

  15. Dual function of partitioning-defective 3 in the regulation of YAP phosphorylation and activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Wang, Shuting; Wang, Sai; Qiao, Jing; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Zhengjun

    2016-01-01

    Partitioning-defective 3 (Par3), a key component of the evolutionarily conserved polarity PAR complex (Par3/Par6/aPKC), controls cell polarity and contributes to cell migration, proliferation and tumor development. Emerging evidence indicates that cell polarity proteins function as upstream modulators that regulate the Hippo pathway. However, little is known about Par3’s involvement in the Hippo pathway. Here, we find Par3 and YAP dynamically co-localize in different subcellular compartments; that is, the membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, in a cell-density-dependent manner. Interestingly, Par3 knockdown promotes YAP phosphorylation, leading to a significant impairment of YAP nuclear translocation at low cell density, but not at high density, in MDCK cells. Furthermore, via its third PDZ domain, Par3 directly binds to the PDZ-binding motif of YAP. The interaction is required for regulating YAP phosphorylation and nuclear localization. Mechanistically, Par3, as a scaffold protein, associates with LATS1 and protein phosphatase 1, α subunit (PP1A) in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Par3 promotes the dephosphorylation of LATS1 and YAP, thus enhancing YAP activation and cell proliferation. Strikingly, we also find that under the condition of PP1A knockdown, Par3 expression promotes YAP hyperphosphorylation, leading to the suppression of YAP activity and its downstream targets. Par3 expression results in differential effects on YAP phosphorylation and activation in different tumor cell lines. These findings indicate that Par3 may have a dual role in regulating the activation of the Hippo pathway, in a manner possibly dependent on cellular context or cell type in response to cell–cell contact and cell polarity signals. PMID:27462467

  16. Overexpression of α-synuclein simultaneously increases glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation and reduces glucocerebrosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Junfeng; Hertz, Ellen; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Leinartaité, Lina; Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Li, Jie; Svenningsson, Per

    2016-01-12

    Progressive accumulation of α-synuclein (α-syn)-containing protein aggregates throughout the nervous system is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD). The mechanisms whereby α-syn exerts neurodegeneration remain to be fully understood. Here we show that overexpression of α-syn in transgenic mice leads to increased phosphorylation of glutamate NMDA receptor (NMDAR) subunits NR1 and NR2B in substantia nigra and striatum as well as reduced glucocerebrosidase (GCase) levels. Similarly, molecular studies performed in mouse N2A cells stably overexpressing human α-syn ((α-syn)N2A) showed that phosphorylation states of the same NMDAR subunits were increased, whereas GCase levels and lysosomal GCase activity were reduced. (α-syn)N2A cells showed an increased sensitivity to neurotoxicity towards 6-hydroxydopamine and NMDA. However, wildtype N2A, but not (α-syn)N2A cells, showed a further reduction in viability when co-incubated with 6-hydroxydopamine and the lysosomal inhibitors NH4Cl and leupeptin, suggesting that α-syn per se perturbs lysosomal functions. NMDA treatment reduced lysosomal GCase activity to the same extent in (α-syn)N2A cells as in wildtype N2A cells, indicating that the α-syn-dependent difference in NMDA neurotoxicity is unrelated to an altered GCase activity. Nevertheless, these data provide molecular evidence that overexpression of α-syn simultaneously induces two potential neurotoxic hits by increasing glutamate NMDA receptor phosphorylation, consistent with increased NMDA receptors functionality, and reducing GCase activity. PMID:26610904

  17. Identification of the chicken MARCKS phosphorylation site specific for differentiating neurons as Ser 25 using a monoclonal antibody and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Durán, Rosario; Engström, Ulla; Cerveñansky, Carlos; Hellman, Ulf; Arruti, Cristina

    2004-01-01

    MARCKS is an actin-modulating protein that can be phosphorylated in multiple sites by PKC and proline-directed kinases. We have previously described a phosphorylated form of this protein specific for differentiating chick neurons, detected with mAb 3C3. Here, we show that this antibody binds to MARCKS only when it is phosphorylated at Ser 25. These and previous data provide hints for a possible answer to the question of why this ubiquitous protein seems to be essential only for neural development. PMID:14998167

  18. A Novel Regulatory Locus of Phosphorylation in the C Terminus of the Potassium Chloride Cotransporter KCC2 That Interferes with N-Ethylmaleimide or Staurosporine-mediated Activation*♦

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Maren; Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Beyer, Timo; Ripperger, Anne; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2014-01-01

    The neuron-specific cation chloride cotransporter KCC2 plays a crucial role in hyperpolarizing synaptic inhibition. Transporter dysfunction is associated with various neurological disorders, raising interest in regulatory mechanisms. Phosphorylation has been identified as a key regulatory process. Here, we retrieved experimentally observed phosphorylation sites of KCC2 from public databases and report on the systematic analysis of six phosphorylated serines, Ser25, Ser26, Ser937, Ser1022, Ser1025, and Ser1026. Alanine or aspartate substitutions of these residues were analyzed in HEK-293 cells. All mutants were expressed in a pattern similar to wild-type KCC2 (KCC2WT). Tl+ flux measurements demonstrated unchanged transport activity for Ser25, Ser26, Ser1022, Ser1025, and Ser1026 mutants. In contrast, KCC2S937D, mimicking phosphorylation, resulted in a significant up-regulation of transport activity. Aspartate substitution of Thr934, a neighboring putative phosphorylation site, resulted in a comparable increase in KCC2 transport activity. Both KCC2T934D and KCC2S937D mutants were inhibited by the kinase inhibitor staurosporine and by N-ethylmaleimide, whereas KCC2WT, KCC2T934A, and KCC2S937A were activated. The inverse staurosporine effect on aspartate versus alanine substitutions reveals a cross-talk between different phosphorylation sites of KCC2. Immunoblot and cell surface labeling experiments detected no alterations in total abundance or surface expression of KCC2T934D and KCC2S937D compared with KCC2WT. These data reveal kinetic regulation of transport activity by these residues. In summary, our data identify a novel key regulatory phosphorylation site of KCC2 and a functional interaction between different conformation-changing post-translational modifications. The action of pharmacological agents aimed to modulate KCC2 activity for therapeutic benefit might therefore be highly context-specific. PMID:24849604

  19. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    PubMed

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. PMID:26315778

  20. Augmented AMPK activity inhibits cell migration by phosphorylating the novel substrate Pdlim5

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yi; Tsukamoto, Osamu; Nakano, Atsushi; Kato, Hisakazu; Kioka, Hidetaka; Ito, Noriaki; Higo, Shuichiro; Yamazaki, Satoru; Shintani, Yasunori; Matsuoka, Ken; Liao, Yulin; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Asakura, Masanori; Takafuji, Kazuaki; Minamino, Tetsuo; Asano, Yoshihiro; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Takashima, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Augmented AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity inhibits cell migration, possibly contributing to the clinical benefits of chemical AMPK activators in preventing atherosclerosis, vascular remodelling and cancer metastasis. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we identify PDZ and LIM domain 5 (Pdlim5) as a novel AMPK substrate and show that it plays a critical role in the inhibition of cell migration. AMPK directly phosphorylates Pdlim5 at Ser177. Exogenous expression of phosphomimetic S177D-Pdlim5 inhibits cell migration and attenuates lamellipodia formation. Consistent with this observation, S177D-Pdlim5 suppresses Rac1 activity at the cell periphery and displaces the Arp2/3 complex from the leading edge. Notably, S177D-Pdlim5, but not WT-Pdlim5, attenuates the association with Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors at the cell periphery. Taken together, our findings indicate that phosphorylation of Pdlim5 on Ser177 by AMPK mediates inhibition of cell migration by suppressing the Rac1-Arp2/3 signalling pathway. PMID:25635515

  1. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8

    PubMed Central

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  2. Ligand stimulation of CD95 induces activation of Plk3 followed by phosphorylation of caspase-8.

    PubMed

    Helmke, Christina; Raab, Monika; Rödel, Franz; Matthess, Yves; Oellerich, Thomas; Mandal, Ranadip; Sanhaji, Mourad; Urlaub, Henning; Rödel, Claus; Becker, Sven; Strebhardt, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    Upon interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand, sequential association of the adaptor molecule FADD (MORT1), pro-forms of caspases-8/10, and the caspase-8/10 regulator c-FLIP leads to the formation of a death-inducing signaling complex. Here, we identify polo-like kinase (Plk) 3 as a new interaction partner of the death receptor CD95. The enzymatic activity of Plk3 increases following interaction of the CD95 receptor with its ligand. Knockout (KO) or knockdown of caspase-8, CD95 or FADD prevents activation of Plk3 upon CD95 stimulation, suggesting a requirement of a functional DISC for Plk3 activation. Furthermore, we identify caspase-8 as a new substrate for Plk3. Phosphorylation occurs on T273 and results in stimulation of caspase-8 proapoptotic function. Stimulation of CD95 in cells expressing a non-phosphorylatable caspase-8-T273A mutant in a rescue experiment or in Plk3-KO cells generated by CRISPR/Cas9 reduces the processing of caspase-8 prominently. Low T273 phosphorylation correlates significantly with low Plk3 expression in a cohort of 95 anal tumor patients. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of kinase activation within the Plk family and propose a new model for the stimulation of the extrinsic death pathway in tumors with high Plk3 expression. PMID:27325299

  3. SAD-B Phosphorylation of CAST Controls Active Zone Vesicle Recycling for Synaptic Depression.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Sumiko; Hida, Yamato; Tanifuji, Shota; Hagiwara, Akari; Hamada, Shun; Abe, Manabu; Ma, Huan; Yasumura, Misato; Kitajima, Isao; Sakimura, Kenji; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa

    2016-09-13

    Short-term synaptic depression (STD) is a common form of activity-dependent plasticity observed widely in the nervous system. Few molecular pathways that control STD have been described, but the active zone (AZ) release apparatus provides a possible link between neuronal activity and plasticity. Here, we show that an AZ cytomatrix protein CAST and an AZ-associated protein kinase SAD-B coordinately regulate STD by controlling reloading of the AZ with release-ready synaptic vesicles. SAD-B phosphorylates the N-terminal serine (S45) of CAST, and S45 phosphorylation increases with higher firing rate. A phosphomimetic CAST (S45D) mimics CAST deletion, which enhances STD by delaying reloading of the readily releasable pool (RRP), resulting in a pool size decrease. A phosphonegative CAST (S45A) inhibits STD and accelerates RRP reloading. Our results suggest that the CAST/SAD-B reaction serves as a brake on synaptic transmission by temporal calibration of activity and synaptic depression via RRP size regulation. PMID:27626661

  4. [PKA-regulated phosphorylation status of S149 and S321 sites of CDC25B inhibits mitosis of fertilized mouse eggs].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jian-Ying; Liu, Chao; Sun, Xiao-Han; Yu, Bing-Zhi

    2012-02-25

    To further test whether protein kinase A (PKA) can affect the mitotic cell cycle, one-cell stage mouse embryos at S phase (22 h after hCG injection) were incubated in M16 medium containing various concentrations of H-89, a PKA inhibitor. With increasing concentrations of H-89 (0-50 μmol/L), the G(2) phase of eggs was decreased and the cleavage rate was accelerated. A concentration of 40 μmol/L H-89 led to all of the mouse eggs entering the M phase of mitosis. Furthermore, to study the role of PKA in regulating the phosphorylation status of S149 and S321 sites of cell division cycle 25B (CDC25B) on one-cell stage fertilized mouse eggs, pBSK-CDC25B-WT, pBSK-CDC25B-S149A, pBSK-CDC25B-S321A and pBSK-CDC25B-S149A/S321A were transcribed into mRNAs in vitro, then mRNAs were microinjected into S phase of mouse fertilized eggs and cultured in M16 medium pretreated with H-89. Then, the cleavage of fertilized eggs, maturation promoting factor (MPF) activity and phosphorylation status of CDC2-Tyr15 were observed. In the presence of 40 μmol/L H-89, the cleavage rate of fertilized eggs in CDC25B-S/A-mRNAs and CDC25B-WT-mRNA injected groups was significantly higher than that in the control groups, and the peak of MPF activity appeared in the CDC25B-S/A-mRNAs and CDC25B-WT-mRNA injected groups earlier than that in the control groups. CDC2-Tyr15 phosphorylation state was consistent with MPF activity. In conclusion, the present study suggests that PKA regulates the early development of mouse embryos by phosphorylation of S149 and S321 of CDC25B, which plays an important role in the regulation of G(2)/M transition in the mitotic cell cycle of fertilized mouse eggs. PMID:22348958

  5. Rapid estrogen signaling negatively regulates PTEN activity through phosphorylation in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Melanie M.; Palacios-Helgeson, Leslie K.; Wah, Lah S.; Jackson, Twila A.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperestrogenicity is a risk factor for endometrial cancer. 17β-estradiol (E2) is known to stimulate both genomic and nongenomic estrogen receptor-α (ERα) actions in a number of reproductive tissues. However, the contributions of transcription-independent ERα signaling on normal and malignant endometrium are not fully understood. Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor that decreases cellular mitosis primarily through negative regulation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT signaling axis. PTEN levels are elevated during the E2 dominated, mitotically active, proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle, indicating possible hormonal regulation of PTEN in the uterus. In order to determine if rapid E2 signaling regulates PTEN, we used ERα positive, PTEN positive, endometrial cells. We show that cytosolic E2/ERα signaling leads to increased phosphorylation of PTEN at key regulatory residues. Importantly, E2 stimulation decreased PTEN lipid phosphatase activity and caused consequent increases in phospho-AKT. We further demonstrate that cytosolic ERα forms a complex with PTEN in an E2-dependent manner, and that ERα constitutively complexes with protein kinase2-α (CK2α), a kinase previously shown to phosphorylate the C-terminal tail of PTEN. These results provide mechanistic support for an E2-dependent, ERα cytosolic signaling complex that negatively regulates PTEN activity through carboxy terminus phosphorylation. Using an animal model, we show that sustained E2 signaling results in increased phospho-PTEN (S380, T382, T383), total PTEN and phospho-AKT (S473). Taken together, we provide a novel mechanism in which transcription-independent E2/ERα signaling may promote a pro-tumorigenic environment in the endometrium. PMID:24844349

  6. Direct Phosphorylation and Activation of a Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase by a Calcium-Dependent Protein Kinase in Rice[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Kabin; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Qin; Yang, Yinong

    2014-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is a pivotal point of convergence for many signaling pathways in eukaryotes. In the classical MAPK cascade, a signal is transmitted via sequential phosphorylation and activation of MAPK kinase kinase, MAPK kinase (MKK), and MAPK. The activation of MAPK is dependent on dual phosphorylation of a TXY motif by an MKK, which is considered the sole kinase to phosphorylate and activate MAPK. Here, we report a novel regulatory mechanism of MAPK phosphorylation and activation besides the canonical MAPK cascade. A rice (Oryza sativa) calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK), CPK18, was identified as an upstream kinase of MAPK (MPK5) in vitro and in vivo. Curiously, CPK18 was shown to phosphorylate and activate MPK5 without affecting the phosphorylation of its TXY motif. Instead, CPK18 was found to predominantly phosphorylate two Thr residues (Thr-14 and Thr-32) that are widely conserved in MAPKs from land plants. Further analyses reveal that the newly identified CPK18-MPK5 pathway represses defense gene expression and negatively regulates rice blast resistance. Our results suggest that land plants have evolved an MKK-independent phosphorylation pathway that directly connects calcium signaling to the MAPK machinery. PMID:25035404

  7. Predikin and PredikinDB: a computational framework for the prediction of protein kinase peptide specificity and an associated database of phosphorylation sites

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Neil FW; Brinkworth, Ross I; Huber, Thomas; Kemp, Bruce E; Kobe, Bostjan

    2008-01-01

    Background We have previously described an approach to predicting the substrate specificity of serine-threonine protein kinases. The method, named Predikin, identifies key conserved substrate-determining residues in the kinase catalytic domain that contact the substrate in the region of the phosphorylation site and so determine the sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site. Predikin was implemented originally as a web application written in Javascript. Results Here, we describe a new version of Predikin, completely revised and rewritten as a modular framework that provides multiple enhancements compared with the original. Predikin now consists of two components: (i) PredikinDB, a database of phosphorylation sites that links substrates to kinase sequences and (ii) a Perl module, which provides methods to classify protein kinases, reliably identify substrate-determining residues, generate scoring matrices and score putative phosphorylation sites in query sequences. The performance of Predikin as measured using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) graph analysis equals or surpasses that of existing comparable methods. The Predikin website has been redesigned to incorporate the new features. Conclusion New features in Predikin include the use of SQL queries to PredikinDB to generate predictions, scoring of predictions, more reliable identification of substrate-determining residues and putative phosphorylation sites, extended options to handle protein kinase and substrate data and an improved web interface. The new features significantly enhance the ability of Predikin to analyse protein kinases and their substrates. Predikin is available at . PMID:18501020

  8. Lipopolysaccharide-induced activation of NF-{kappa}B non-canonical pathway requires BCL10 serine 138 and NIK phosphorylations

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Borthakur, Alip; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Tobacman, Joanne K.

    2010-11-15

    Background and aims: B-cell lymphoma/leukemia (BCL)-10 and reactive oxygen species mediate two pathways of NF-{kappa}B (RelA) activation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in human colonic epithelial cells. The pathway for LPS activation of RelB by the non-canonical pathway (RelB) in non-myeloid cells was not yet reported, but important for understanding the range of potential microbial LPS-induced effects in inflammatory bowel disease. Methods: Experiments were performed in human colonic epithelial cells and in mouse embryonic fibroblasts deficient in components of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) signalosome, in order to detect mediators of the non-canonical pathway of NF-{kappa}B activation, including nuclear RelB and p52 and phospho- and total NF-{kappa}B inducing kinase (NIK). BCL10 was silenced by siRNA and effects of mutations of specific phosphorylation sites of BCL10 (Ser138Gly and Ser218Gly) were determined. Results: By the non-canonical pathway, LPS exposure increased nuclear RelB and p52, and phospho-NIK, with no change in total NIK. Phosphorylation of BCL10 serine 138 was required for NIK phosphorylation, since mutation of this residue eliminated the increases in phospho-NIK and nuclear RelB and p52. Mutations of either serine 138 or serine 218 reduced RelA, p50, and phospho-I{kappa}B{alpha} of the canonical pathway. Effects of LPS stimulation and BCL10 silencing on NIK phosphorylation were demonstrated in confocal images. Conclusions: LPS induces activation of both canonical and non-canonical pathways of NF-{kappa}B in human colonic epithelial cells, and the non-canonical pathway requires phosphorylations of BCL10 (serine 138) and NIK. These findings demonstrate the important role of BCL10 in mediating LPS-induced inflammation in human colonic epithelial cells and may open new avenues for therapeutic interventions.

  9. Analysis of protein phosphorylation in nerve terminal reveals extensive changes in active zone proteins upon exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Kohansal-Nodehi, Mahdokht; Chua, John JE; Urlaub, Henning; Jahn, Reinhard; Czernik, Dominika

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter release is mediated by the fast, calcium-triggered fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane, followed by endocytosis and recycling of the membrane of synaptic vesicles. While many of the proteins governing these processes are known, their regulation is only beginning to be understood. Here we have applied quantitative phosphoproteomics to identify changes in phosphorylation status of presynaptic proteins in resting and stimulated nerve terminals isolated from the brains of Wistar rats. Using rigorous quantification, we identified 252 phosphosites that are either up- or downregulated upon triggering calcium-dependent exocytosis. Particularly pronounced were regulated changes of phosphosites within protein constituents of the presynaptic active zone, including bassoon, piccolo, and RIM1. Additionally, we have mapped kinases and phosphatases that are activated upon stimulation. Overall, our study provides a snapshot of phosphorylation changes associated with presynaptic activity and provides a foundation for further functional analysis of key phosphosites involved in presynaptic plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14530.001 PMID:27115346

  10. Nuclear transition protein 1 from ram elongating spermatids. Mass spectrometric characterization, primary structure and phosphorylation sites of two variants.

    PubMed

    Chirat, F; Martinage, A; Briand, G; Kouach, M; Van Dorsselaer, A; Loir, M; Sautière, P

    1991-05-23

    The ram transition protein 1 (TP1) is present in spermatid cell nuclei in the nonphosphorylated, monophosphorylated and diphosphorylated forms. Its primary structure was determined by automated Edman degradation of S-carboxamidomethylated protein and of peptides generated by cleavage with thermolysin and endoproteinase Lys-C. The ram TP1 is a small basic protein of 54 residues and structurally very close to other mammalian TP1. The mass spectrometric data obtained from the protein and its fragments reveal that ram TP1 is indeed a mixture (approximately 5:1) of two structural variants (Mr 6346 and 6300). These variants differ only by the nature of the residue at position 27 (Cys in the major variant and Gly in the minor variant). The study of phosphorylation sites has shown that four different serine residues could be phosphorylated in the monophosphorylated TP1, at positions 8, 35, 36 or 39. From previous physical studies, it has been postulated that the Tyr32 surrounded by two highly conserved basic clusters was responsible for the destabilization of chromatin by intercalation of its phenol ring between the bases of double-stranded DNA. The presence of three phosphorylatable serine residues in the very conserved sequence 29-42 is another argument for the involvement of this region in the interaction with DNA. PMID:2040274

  11. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-inducible phosphorylation of Smad3.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guannan; Matsuura, Isao; He, Dongming; Liu, Fang

    2009-04-10

    Smad proteins transduce the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) signal at the cell surface into gene regulation in the nucleus. Upon TGF-beta treatment, the highly homologous Smad2 and Smad3 are phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptor at the SSXS motif in the C-terminal tail. Here we show that in addition to the C-tail, three (S/T)-P sites in the Smad3 linker region, Ser(208), Ser(204), and Thr(179) are phosphorylated in response to TGF-beta. The linker phosphorylation peaks at 1 h after TGF-beta treatment, behind the peak of the C-tail phosphorylation. We provide evidence suggesting that the C-tail phosphorylation by the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the TGF-beta-induced linker phosphorylation. Although the TGF-beta receptor is necessary for the linker phosphorylation, the receptor itself does not phosphorylate these sites. We further show that ERK is not responsible for TGF-beta-dependent phosphorylation of these three sites. We show that GSK3 accounts for TGF-beta-inducible Ser(204) phosphorylation. Flavopiridol, a pan-CDK inhibitor, abolishes TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208), suggesting that the CDK family is responsible for phosphorylation of Thr(179) and Ser(208) in response to TGF-beta. Mutation of the linker phosphorylation sites to nonphosphorylatable residues increases the ability of Smad3 to activate a TGF-beta/Smad-target gene as well as the growth-inhibitory function of Smad3. Thus, these observations suggest that TGF-beta-induced phosphorylation of Smad3 linker sites inhibits its antiproliferative activity. PMID:19218245

  12. Simultaneous quantification of protein phosphorylation sites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics: a linear algebra approach for isobaric phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feifei; Yang, Ting; Sheng, Yuan; Zhong, Ting; Yang, Mi; Chen, Yun

    2014-12-01

    As one of the most studied post-translational modifications (PTM), protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in almost all cellular processes. Current methods are able to predict and determine thousands of phosphorylation sites, whereas stoichiometric quantification of these sites is still challenging. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based targeted proteomics is emerging as a promising technique for site-specific quantification of protein phosphorylation using proteolytic peptides as surrogates of proteins. However, several issues may limit its application, one of which relates to the phosphopeptides with different phosphorylation sites and the same mass (i.e., isobaric phosphopeptides). While employment of site-specific product ions allows for these isobaric phosphopeptides to be distinguished and quantified, site-specific product ions are often absent or weak in tandem mass spectra. In this study, linear algebra algorithms were employed as an add-on to targeted proteomics to retrieve information on individual phosphopeptides from their common spectra. To achieve this simultaneous quantification, a LC-MS/MS-based targeted proteomics assay was first developed and validated for each phosphopeptide. Given the slope and intercept of calibration curves of phosphopeptides in each transition, linear algebraic equations were developed. Using a series of mock mixtures prepared with varying concentrations of each phosphopeptide, the reliability of the approach to quantify isobaric phosphopeptides containing multiple phosphorylation sites (≥ 2) was discussed. Finally, we applied this approach to determine the phosphorylation stoichiometry of heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) at Ser78 and Ser82 in breast cancer cells and tissue samples. PMID:25403019

  13. Phosphorylated heat shock protein 27 promotes lipid clearance in hepatic cells through interacting with STAT3 and activating autophagy.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lei; Qi, Zhilin; Zhu, Yanyan; Song, Xiaomeng; Xuan, Chunxia; Ben, Peiling; Lan, Lei; Luo, Lan; Yin, Zhimin

    2016-08-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the major liver disease worldwide. Recently, several studies have identified that the activation of autophagy attenuates hepatic steatosis. Heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) is involved in autophagy in response to various stimuli. In this study, we demonstrate that phosphorylated Hsp27 stimulates autophagy and lipid droplet clearance and interacts with STAT3. In vivo study showed that high fat diet (HFD) feeding increased Hsp25 (mouse orthology of Hsp27) phosphorylation and autophagy in mouse livers. Inhibition of Hsp25 phosphorylation exacerbated HFD-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. In vitro study showed that palmitate-induced lipid overload in hepatic cells was enhanced by Hsp27 knockdown, KRIBB3 treatment and Hsp27-3A (non-phosphorylatable) overexpression but was prevented by Hsp27-WT (wild type) and Hsp27-3D (phosphomimetic) overexpression. Mechanism analysis demonstrated that palmitate could induce Hsp27 phosphorylation which promoted palmitate-induced autophagy. Phosphorylated Hsp27 interacted with STAT3 in response to palmitate treatment, and disrupted the STAT3/PKR complexes, facilitated PKR-dependent eIF2α phosphorylation, and thus stimulated autophagy. To conclude, our study provides a novel mechanism by which the phosphorylated Hsp27 promotes hepatic lipid clearance and suggests a new insight for therapy of steatotic diseases such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). PMID:27185187

  14. Threonine 22 phosphorylation attenuates Hsp90 interaction with co-chaperones and affects its chaperone activity

    PubMed Central

    Mollapour, Mehdi; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Truman, Andrew W.; Xu, Wanping; Vaughan, Cara K.; Beebe, Kristin; Konstantinova, Anna; Vourganti, Srinivas; Panaretou, Barry; Piper, Peter W.; Trepel, Jane B.; Prodromou, Chrisostomos; Pearl, Laurence H.; Neckers, Len

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Heat Shock Protein 90 (Hsp90) is an essential molecular chaperone whose activity is regulated not only by co-chaperones but also by distinct post-translational modifications. We report here that casein kinase 2 phosphorylates a conserved threonine residue (T22) in α-helix 1 of the yeast Hsp90 N-domain both in vitro and in vivo. This α-helix participates in a hydrophobic interaction with the catalytic loop in Hsp90's middle domain, helping to stabilize the chaperone's ATPase competent state. Phospho-mimetic mutation of this residue alters Hsp90 ATPase activity and chaperone function, and impacts interaction with the co-chaperones Aha1 and Cdc37. Over-expression of Aha1 stimulates the ATPase activity, restores co-chaperone interactions, and compensates for the functional defects of these Hsp90 mutants. PMID:21419342

  15. Endogenous phosphorylation of microsomal proteins in bovine corpus luteum. Tenfold activation by adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Hardie, D. Grahame; Stansfield, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Free ribosomes and a smooth-microsomal fraction were prepared from bovine corpus luteum. Both preparations will self-phosphorylate when incubated with Mg2+ and ATP, but at low concentrations of Mg2+ and ATP the self-phosphorylation of the smooth-microsomal fraction was much more dependent on cyclic AMP than was that of free ribosomes, stimulation by the nucleotide being up to 10-fold in the former case. The self-phosphorylation of the smooth-microsomal fraction was studied further. The reaction bears similarities to that brought about by soluble cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, being inhibited by Ca2+ and the heat-stable inhibitor protein from skeletal muscle. Cyclic GMP will activate the reaction at concentrations higher than those required for full activation by cyclic AMP. In the presence of cyclic AMP, phosphate bound to protein is found almost exclusively as phosphoserine. Several proteins are phosphorylated, as judged by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, and the phosphorylation of all of them is markedly stimulated by cyclic AMP. If the reaction is carried out at high concentrations of Mg2+ and ATP, a distinct cyclic AMP-independent phosphorylation is observed. This activity is not inhibited by the heat-stable inhibitor protein, and phosphate is found esterified with both threonine and serine residues. PMID:195580

  16. Platelet Activating Factor Enhances Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis Via PKC, Elevated Intracellular Calcium, and Modulation of Synapsin 1 Dynamics and Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Jennetta W.; Lu, Shao-Ming; Gelbard, Harris A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) is an inflammatory phospholipid signaling molecule implicated in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory and neurotoxicity during neuroinflammation. However, little is known about the intracellular mechanisms mediating PAF’s physiological or pathological effects on synaptic facilitation. We show here that PAF receptors are localized at the synapse. Using fluorescent reporters of presynaptic activity we show that a non-hydrolysable analog of PAF (cPAF) enhances synaptic vesicle release from individual presynaptic boutons by increasing the size or release of the readily releasable pool and the exocytosis rate of the total recycling pool. cPAF also activates previously silent boutons resulting in vesicle release from a larger number of terminals. The underlying mechanism involves elevated calcium within presynaptic boutons and protein kinase C activation. Furthermore, cPAF increases synapsin I phosphorylation at sites 1 and 3, and increases dispersion of synapsin I from the presynaptic compartment during stimulation, freeing synaptic vesicles for subsequent release. These findings provide a conceptual framework for how PAF, regardless of its cellular origin, can modulate synapses during normal and pathologic synaptic activity. PMID:26778968

  17. Biochemical properties of the stimulatory activity of DNA polymerase alpha by the hyper-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Masaharu

    2002-06-01

    Previously, my colleagues and I have reported that the immunopurified hyper-phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein (ppRb) stimulates the activity of DNA polymerase alpha. I describe here the biochemical characteristics of this stimulatory activity. DNA polymerase alpha-stimulatory activity of ppRb was most remarkable when using activated DNA as a template-primer, rather than using poly(dT)-(rA)(10), poly(dA)-(dT)(12-18), and so on. Kinetic analysis showed that there was no significant difference in K(m) value for deoxyribonucleotides of DNA polymerase alpha in the presence of ppRb. Adding ppRb resulted in the overcoming pause site on the template, but did not affect the rate of misincorporation of incorrect deoxyribonucleotides. By adding ppRb, the optimal concentration of template-primer was shifted to a higher region, but not using M13 singly primed DNA. The ppRb seemed to assist the process that DNA polymerase alpha changed its conformation resulting in appropriate enzyme activity. These results suggest that ppRb affects both template-primer and DNA polymerase alpha and makes appropriate circumstances for the enzyme reaction. PMID:12049795

  18. ß1 Integrin Binding Phosphorylates Ezrin at T567 to Activate a Lipid Raft Signalsome Driving Invadopodia Activity and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Antelmi, Ester; Cardone, Rosa A.; Greco, Maria R.; Rubino, Rosa; Di Sole, Francesca; Martino, Nicola A.; Casavola, Valeria; Carcangiu, MariaLuisa; Moro, Loredana; Reshkin, Stephan J.

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation is a critical process in tumor cell invasion and requires matrix degrading protrusions called invadopodia. The Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE1) has recently been shown to be fundamental in the regulation of invadopodia actin cytoskeleton dynamics and activity. However, the structural link between the invadopodia cytoskeleton and NHE1 is still unknown. A candidate could be ezrin, a linker between the NHE1 and the actin cytoskeleton known to play a pivotal role in invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanistic basis for its role remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ezrin phosphorylated at T567 is highly overexpressed in the membrane of human breast tumors and positively associated with invasive growth and HER2 overexpression. Further, in the metastatic cell line, MDA-MB-231, p-ezrin was almost exclusively expressed in invadopodia lipid rafts where it co-localized in a functional complex with NHE1, EGFR, ß1-integrin and phosphorylated-NHERF1. Manipulation by mutation of ezrins T567 phosphorylation state and/or PIP2 binding capacity or of NHE1s binding to ezrin or PIP2 demonstrated that p-ezrin expression and binding to PIP2 are required for invadopodia-mediated ECM degradation and invasion and identified NHE1 as the membrane protein that p-ezrin regulates to induce invadopodia formation and activity. PMID:24086451

  19. mTORC1 directly phosphorylates and activates ERα upon estrogen stimulation.

    PubMed

    Alayev, A; Salamon, R S; Berger, S M; Schwartz, N S; Cuesta, R; Snyder, R B; Holz, M K

    2016-07-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women. Approximately 75% of breast cancers are estrogen receptor-α (ERα) positive, underscoring the dependence of cancer cells on estrogen for growth and survival. Patients treated with endocrine therapy often develop resistance, either de novo or acquired, which in some cases is caused by aberrations w