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Sample records for activating point mutations

  1. A single point mutation leading to loss of catalytic activity in human thiopurine S-methyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    Krynetski, E Y; Schuetz, J D; Galpin, A J; Pui, C H; Relling, M V; Evans, W E

    1995-01-01

    Thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT; S-adenosyl-L-methionine:thiopurine S-methyltransferase, EC 2.1.1.67) activity exhibits genetic polymorphism, with approximately 0.33% of Caucasians and African-Americans inheriting TPMT deficiency as an autosomal recessive trait. To determine the molecular genetic basis for this polymorphism, we cloned the TPMT cDNA from a TPMT-deficient patient who had developed severe hematopoietic toxicity during mercaptopurine therapy. Northern blot analysis of RNA isolated from leukocytes of the deficient patient demonstrated the presence of TPMT mRNAs of comparable size to that in subjects with high TPMT activity. Sequencing of the mutant TPMT cDNA revealed a single point mutation (G238-->C), leading to an amino acid substitution at codon 80 (Ala80-->Pro). When assessed in a yeast heterologous expression system, this mutation led to a 100-fold reduction in TPMT catalytic activity relative to the wild-type cDNA, despite a comparable level of mRNA expression. A mutation-specific PCR amplification method was developed and used to detect the G238-->C mutation in genomic DNA of the propositus and her mother. This inactivating mutation in the human TPMT gene provides insights into the genetic basis for this inherited polymorphism in drug metabolism. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7862671

  2. Transforming activity of the c-Ha-ras oncogene having two point mutations in codons 12 and 61.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, T; Prassolov, V S; Fushimi, M; Nishimura, S

    1985-09-01

    A recombinant plasmid carrying the human c-Ha-ras gene with two point mutations in codons 12 and 61 was constructed and its transforming activity on mouse NIH 3T3 cells was compared with those of genes with a single mutation in either codon 12 or 61. Quantitative analyses revealed that the gene with two mutations had essentially the same transforming activity as the genes with single mutations. These results indicate that a single mutation of the c-Ha-ras gene in either codon 12 or 61 is sufficient to activate the gene and that neither of the two mutation sites involved in activation of the gene needs to be intact for transforming activity.

  3. Multiple cryptic splice sites can be activated by IDS point mutations generating misspliced transcripts.

    PubMed

    Lualdi, Susanna; Pittis, Maria G; Regis, Stefano; Parini, Rossella; Allegri, Anna E; Furlan, Francesca; Bembi, Bruno; Filocamo, Mirella

    2006-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme iduronate-2-sulfatase (IDS) were reported as the cause of the X-linked recessive lysosomal disease, mucopolysaccharidosis II (MPS II). Amongst the different mutations, it emerges that nearly 10% are nucleotide substitutions causing splicing mutations. We now report the molecular characterisation of three MPS II patients with multiple aberrant transcripts due to three different point mutations. The c.418+1G>C that occurred in the invariant splice-site motif, produced only aberrantly spliced transcripts. Whilst the mutations affecting variant motifs (c.419G>T) or coding regions (c.245C>T) led to aberrantly spliced transcripts in addition to correctly spliced transcripts with the respective predicted missense mutation, p.G140V or p.A82V. A combination of experimental tests and computational approaches were used to understand the molecular basis underlying the altered transcription patterns. In addition, by using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, the reduction of mRNA amount in two patients observed was likely due to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway. Overall, our results further emphasised the importance of cloning and sequencing independent transcripts to reveal less abundant, aberrant products, which often could not be detected by direct sequencing. Moreover, the different splicing patterns observed in the three patients as a consequence of point mutations show how sensitive the balance is between constitutive and cryptic splice sites in the IDS gene. The generation of such diverse transcripts, together with their level of expression, could contribute to the profound phenotypic variability reported in MPS II.

  4. Point mutations in the S protein connect the sialic acid binding activity with the enteropathogenicity of transmissible gastroenteritis coronavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Krempl, C; Schultze, B; Laude, H; Herrler, G

    1997-01-01

    Enteropathogenic transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), a porcine coronavirus, is able to agglutinate erythrocytes because of sialic acid binding activity. Competitive inhibitors that may mask the sialic acid binding activity can be inactivated by sialidase treatment of virions. Here, we show that TGEV virions with efficient hemagglutinating activity were also obtained when cells were treated with sialidase prior to infection. This method was used to analyze TGEV mutants for hemagglutinating activity. Recently, mutants with strongly reduced enteropathogenicity that have point mutations or a deletion of four amino acids within residues 145 to 155 of the S protein have been described. Here, we show that in addition to their reduced pathogenicity, these mutants also have lost hemagglutinating activity. These results connect sialic acid binding activity with the enteropathogenicity of TGEV. PMID:9060696

  5. A point mutation in a silencer module reduces the promoter activity for the human mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase.

    PubMed

    Nagahara, Noriyuki; Sreeja, V G; Li, Qing; Shimizu, Takako; Tsuchiya, Terumasa; Fujii-Kuriyama, Yoshiaki

    2004-11-01

    A promoter region of human mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (MST) [EC 2.8.1.2] is G+C-rich and TATA-less, showing features of a house-keeping gene. In the core promoter, a GC box (-284:GGGGCGTGGC:-275) and an initiator (-219:TTATATG:-225) are found. A cap site hunting analysis for human liver cDNA revealed four possible transcriptional start sites, nucleotides -223, -159, -35 and -25. Point mutagenesis and deletion studies suggest that a module of the silencer element is -394:GCTG:-391. A replacement of -391G to C lost the silencer function; on the other hand, a replacement of -394G to T or C, -393C to T or -392T to G markedly reduced the promoter activity. PMID:15507321

  6. Genetic analysis of the Kirsten-ras-revertant 1 gene: Potentiation of its tumor suppressor activity by specific point mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayama, Hitoshi Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki ); Matsuzaki, Tomoko; Ikawa, Yoji; Noda, Makoto )

    1990-06-01

    Kirsten-ras-revertant 1 (Krev-1) cDNA encodes a ras-related protein and exhibits an activity of inducing flat revertants at certain frequencies (2-5% of total transfectants) when introduced into a v-K-ras-transformed mouse NIH 3T3 cell line, DT. Toward understanding the mechanism of action of Krev-1 protein, the authors constructed a series of point mutants of Krev-1 cDNA and tested their biological activities in DT cells and HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells harboring the activated N-ras gene. Substitutions of the amino acid residues in the putative guanine nucleotide-binding regions (Asp{sup 17} and Asn{sup 116}), in the putative effector-binding domain (residue 38), at the putative acylation site (Cys{sup 181}), and at the unique Thr{sup 61} all decreased the transformation suppressor activity. On the other hand, substitutions such as Gly{sup 12} to Val{sup 12} and Gln{sup 63} to Glu{sup 63} were found to significantly increase the transformation suppressor/tumor suppressor activity of Krev-1. These findings are consistent with the idea that Krev-1 protein is regulated like many other G proteins by the guanine triphosphate/guanine diphosphate-exchange mechanism probably in response to certain negative growth-regulatory signals.

  7. Point mutation instability (PIN) mutator phenotype as model for true back mutations seen in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 - a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Etresia; Pretorius, Pieter J

    2012-05-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH), the last enzyme in the tyrosine catabolism pathway. The liver mosaicism observed in HT1 patients is due to the reversion to the wild type of one allele of the original point mutation in fah. It is generally accepted that these reversions are true back mutations; however, the mechanism is still unresolved. Previous reports excluded intragenic recombination, mitotic recombination, or homologous recombination with a pseudogene as possible mechanisms of mutation reversion in HT1. Sequence analysis did not reveal DNA motifs, tandem repeats or other sequence peculiarities that may be involved in mutation reversion. We propose the hypothesis that a point mutation instability mutator (PIN) phenotype brought about by the sustained stress environment created by the accumulating metabolites in the cell is the driver of the true back mutations in HT1. The metabolites accumulating in HT1 create a sustained stress environment by activating the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and AKT survival pathways, inducing aberrant mitosis and development of death resistant cells, depleting glutathione, and impairing DNA ligase IV and possibly DNA polymerases δ and ε. This continual production of proliferative and stress-related survival signals in the cellular environment coupled with the mutagenicity of FAA, may instigate a mutator phenotype and could end in tumorigenesis and/or mutation reversion. The establishment of a PIN-mutator phenotype therefore not only seems to be a possible mechanism underlying the true back mutations, but also contributes to explaining the clinical heterogeneity seen in hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

  8. Details in the catalytic mechanism of mammalian thioredoxin reductase 1 revealed using point mutations and juglone-coupled enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianqiang; Cheng, Qing; Arnér, Elias S J

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1) is a key enzyme in redox regulation, antioxidant defense, and cellular growth. TrxR1 can catalyze efficient reduction of juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone; walnut toxin) in a reaction which, in contrast to reduction of most other substrates of TrxR1, is not dependent upon an intact selenocysteine (Sec, U) residue of the enzyme. Using a number of TrxR1 mutant variants, we here found that a sole Cys residue at the C-terminal tail of TrxR1 is required for high-efficiency juglone-coupled NADPH oxidase activity of Sec-deficient enzyme, occurring with mixed one- and two-electron reactions producing superoxide. The activity also utilizes the FAD and the N-terminal redox active disulfide/dithiol motif of TrxR1. If a sole Cys residue at the C-terminal tail of TrxR1, in the absence of Sec, was moved further towards the C-terminal end of the protein compared to its natural position at residue 497, juglone reduction was, surprisingly, further increased. Ala substitutions of Trp407, Asn418 and Asn419 in a previously described "guiding bar", thought to mediate interactions of the C-terminal tail of TrxR1 with the FAD/dithiol site at the N-terminal domain of the other subunit in the dimeric enzyme, lowered turnover with juglone about 4.5-fold. Four residues of Sec-deficient TrxR1 were found to be easily arylated by juglone, including the Cys residue at position 497. Based upon our observations we suggest a model for involvement of the juglone-arylated C-terminal motif of TrxR1 to explain its high activity with juglone. This study thus provides novel insights into the catalytic mechanisms of TrxR1. One-electron juglone reduction by TrxR1 producing superoxide should furthermore contribute to the well-known prooxidant cytotoxicity of juglone. PMID:26898501

  9. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    PubMed Central

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  10. Copper(II) complexes of alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) and (H9A) stability structure and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Matusiak, Agnieszka; Kuczer, Mariola; Czarniewska, Elżbieta; Rosiński, Grzegorz; Kowalik-Jankowska, Teresa

    2014-09-01

    Mono- and polynuclear copper(II) complexes of the alloferon 1 with point mutations (H1A) A(1)GVSGH(6)GQH(9)GVH(12)G (Allo1A) and (H9A) H(1)GVSGH(6)GQA(9)GVH(12)G (Allo9A) have been studied by potentiometric, UV-visible, CD, EPR spectroscopic and mass spectrometry (MS) methods. To obtain a complete complex speciation different metal-to-ligand molar ratios ranging from 1:1 to 4:1 for Allo1A and to 3:1 for Allo9A were studied. The presence of the His residue in first position of the peptide chain changes the coordination abilities of the Allo9A peptide in comparison to that of the Allo1A. Imidazole-N3 atom of N-terminal His residue of the Allo9A peptide forms stable 6-membered chelate with the terminal amino group. Furthermore, the presence of two additional histidine residues in the Allo9A peptide (H(6),H(12)) leads to the formation of the CuL complex with 4N {NH2,NIm-H(1),NIm-H(6),NIm-H(12)} binding site in wide pH range (5-8). For the Cu(II)-Allo1A system, the results demonstrated that at physiological pH7.4 the predominant complex the CuH-1L consists of the 3N {NH2,N(-),CO,NIm} coordination mode. The inductions of phenoloxidase activity and apoptosis in vivo in Tenebrio molitor cells by the ligands and their copper(II) complexes at pH7.4 were studied. The Allo1A, Allo1K peptides and their copper(II) complexes displayed the lowest hemocytotoxic activity while the most active was the Cu(II)-Allo9A complex formed at pH7.4. The results may suggest that the N-terminal-His(1) and His(6) residues may be more important for their proapoptotic properties in insects than those at positions 9 and 12 in the peptide chain. PMID:24935092

  11. VACTERL with the mitochondrial NP 3243 point mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, M.S.; Dorndorf, W.; Schachenmayr, W.; Seibel, P.; Reichmann, H.

    1996-04-24

    The VACTERL association of vertebral, anal, cardiovascular, tracheo-esophageal, renal, and limb defects is one of the more common congenital disorders with limb deficiency arising during blastogenesis. The cause is probably heterogeneous; a molecular basis has not been defined. We report on a family in which a female infant with VACTERL was born in 1977 and died at age 1 month due to renal failure. Because her mother and sister later developed classical mitochondrial cytopathy associated with the A-G point mutation at nucleotide position (np) 3243 of mitochondrial (mt) DNA, we performed a molecular analysis of mt DNA in preserved kidney tissue from the VACTERL case. We discovered 100% mutant mt DNA in multicystic and 32% mutant mt DNA in normal kidney tissue. Mild deficiency of complex I respiratory chain enzyme activity was found in the mother`s muscle biopsy. Other maternal relatives were healthy but had low levels of mutant mt DNA in blood. This is the first report to provide a precise molecular basis for a case of VACTERL. The differing tissue pathology depending on the percentage of mutant mt DNA suggests a causal connection between the mutation and symptoms. VACTERL, and this type of multicystic renal dysplasia, are new phenotypes for the np 3243 point mutation. The possibility of a mitochondrial disorder should be born in mind and also that VACTERL may occur as a first manifestation of a mutation that has been present for generations. This would have major implications for patient management and for genetic counselling regarding both the risk of recurrence and risk of other mitochondrial syndromes in affected families. 19 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The point mutation process in proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    An optimized scoring matrix for residue-by-residue comparisons of distantly related protein sequences has been developed. The scoring matrix is based on observed exchanges and mutabilities of amino acids in 1572 closely related sequences derived from a cross-section of protein groups. Very few superimposed or parallel mutations are included in the data. The scoring matrix is most useful for demonstrating the relatedness of proteins between 65 and 85% different.

  13. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-10-01

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments generated by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Laser desorption mass spectrometry for point mutation detection

    SciTech Connect

    Taranenko, N.I.; Chung, C.N.; Zhu, Y.F.

    1996-12-31

    A point mutation can be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited or acquired diseases. Laser desorption mass spectrometry coupled with allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was first used for point mutation detection. G551D is one of several mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene present in 1-3% of the mutant CFTR alleles in most European populations. In this work, two different approaches were pursued to detect G551D point mutation in the cystic fibrosis gene. The strategy is to amplify the desired region of DNA template by PCR using two primers that overlap one base at the site of the point mutation and which vary in size. If the two primers based on the normal sequence match the target DNA sequence, a normal PCR product will be produced. However, if the alternately sized primers that match the mutant sequence recognize the target DNA, an abnormal PCR product will be produced. Thus, the mass spectrometer can be used to identify patients that are homozygous normal, heterozygous for a mutation or homozygous abnormal at a mutation site. Another approach to identify similar mutations is the use of sequence specific restriction enzymes which respond to changes in the DNA sequence. Mass spectrometry is used to detect the length of the restriction fragments by digestion of a PCR generated target fragment. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Activating point mutations in the common beta subunit of the human GM-CSF, IL-3 and IL-5 receptors suggest the involvement of beta subunit dimerization and cell type-specific molecules in signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, B J; D'Andrea, R; Gonda, T J

    1995-01-01

    We have combined retroviral expression cloning with random mutagenesis to identify two activating point mutations in the common signal-transducing subunit (h beta c) of the receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-3 and IL-5 by virtue of their ability to confer factor independence on the haemopoietic cell line, FDC-P1. One mutation (V449E) is located within the transmembrane domain and, by analogy with a similar mutation in the neu oncogene, may act by inducing dimerization of h beta c. The other mutation (I374N) lies in the extracellular, membrane-proximal portion of h beta c. Neither of these mutants, nor a previously described mutant of h beta c (FI delta, which has a small duplication in the extracellular region), was capable of inducing factor independence in CTLL-2 cells, while only V449E could induce factor independence in BAF-B03 cells. These results imply that the extracellular and transmembrane mutations act by different mechanisms. Furthermore, they imply that the mutants, and hence also wild-type h beta c, interact with cell type-specific signalling molecules. Models are presented which illustrate how these mutations may act and predict some of the characteristics of the putative receptor-associated signalling molecules. Images PMID:7556069

  16. Identification of and Molecular Basis for SIRT6 Loss-of-Function Point Mutations in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kugel, Sita; Feldman, Jessica L; Klein, Mark A; Silberman, Dafne M; Sebastián, Carlos; Mermel, Craig; Dobersch, Stephanie; Clark, Abbe R; Getz, Gad; Denu, John M; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2015-10-20

    Chromatin factors have emerged as the most frequently dysregulated family of proteins in cancer. We have previously identified the histone deacetylase SIRT6 as a key tumor suppressor, yet whether point mutations are selected for in cancer remains unclear. In this manuscript, we characterized naturally occurring patient-derived SIRT6 mutations. Strikingly, all the mutations significantly affected either stability or catalytic activity of SIRT6, indicating that these mutations were selected for in these tumors. Further, the mutant proteins failed to rescue sirt6 knockout (SIRT6 KO) cells, as measured by the levels of histone acetylation at glycolytic genes and their inability to rescue the tumorigenic potential of these cells. Notably, the main activity affected in the mutants was histone deacetylation rather than demyristoylation, pointing to the former as the main tumor-suppressive function for SIRT6. Our results identified cancer-associated point mutations in SIRT6, cementing its function as a tumor suppressor in human cancer.

  17. Effect of mtDNA point mutations on cellular bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Szczepanowska, Joanna; Malinska, Dominika; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Duszynski, Jerzy

    2012-10-01

    This overview discusses the results of research on the effects of most frequent mtDNA point mutations on cellular bioenergetics. Thirteen proteins coded by mtDNA are crucial for oxidative phosphorylation, 11 of them constitute key components of the respiratory chain complexes I, III and IV and 2 of mitochondrial ATP synthase. Moreover, pathogenic point mutations in mitochondrial tRNAs and rRNAs generate abnormal synthesis of the mtDNA coded proteins. Thus, pathogenic point mutations in mtDNA usually disturb the level of key parameter of the oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. the electric potential on the inner mitochondrial membrane (Δψ), and in a consequence calcium signalling and mitochondrial dynamics in the cell. Mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species is also modified in the mutated cells. The results obtained with cultured cells and describing biochemical consequences of mtDNA point mutations are full of contradictions. Still they help elucidate the biochemical basis of pathologies and provide a valuable tool for finding remedies in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012). PMID:22406627

  18. Predicting folding free energy changes upon single point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Lin; Gao, Yang; Zhang, Jie; Zhenirovskyy, Maxim; Alexov, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: The folding free energy is an important characteristic of proteins stability and is directly related to protein's wild-type function. The changes of protein's stability due to naturally occurring mutations, missense mutations, are typically causing diseases. Single point mutations made in vitro are frequently used to assess the contribution of given amino acid to the stability of the protein. In both cases, it is desirable to predict the change of the folding free energy upon single point mutations in order to either provide insights of the molecular mechanism of the change or to design new experimental studies. Results: We report an approach that predicts the free energy change upon single point mutation by utilizing the 3D structure of the wild-type protein. It is based on variation of the molecular mechanics Generalized Born (MMGB) method, scaled with optimized parameters (sMMGB) and utilizing specific model of unfolded state. The corresponding mutations are built in silico and the predictions are tested against large dataset of 1109 mutations with experimentally measured changes of the folding free energy. Benchmarking resulted in root mean square deviation = 1.78 kcal/mol and slope of the linear regression fit between the experimental data and the calculations was 1.04. The sMMGB is compared with other leading methods of predicting folding free energy changes upon single mutations and results discussed with respect to various parameters. Availability: All the pdb files we used in this article can be downloaded from http://compbio.clemson.edu/downloadDir/mentaldisorders/sMMGB_pdb.rar Contact: ealexov@clemson.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22238268

  19. A point mutation in NEMO associated with anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency pathology results in destabilization of the oligomer and reduces lipopolysaccharide- and tumor necrosis factor-mediated NF-kappa B activation.

    PubMed

    Vinolo, Emilie; Sebban, Hélène; Chaffotte, Alain; Israël, Alain; Courtois, Gilles; Véron, Michel; Agou, Fabrice

    2006-03-10

    The NEMO (NF-kappaB essential modulator) protein plays a crucial role in the canonical NF-kappaB pathway as the regulatory component of the IKK (IkappaB kinase) complex. The human disease anhidrotic ectodermal dysplasia with immunodeficiency (EDA-ID) has been recently linked to mutations in NEMO. We investigated the effect of an alanine to glycine substitution found in the NEMO polypeptide of an EDA-ID patient. This pathogenic mutation is located within the minimal oligomerization domain of the protein, which is required for the IKK activation in response to diverse stimuli. The mutation does not dramatically change the native-like state of the trimer, but temperature-induced unfolding studied by circular dichroism showed that it leads to an important loss in the oligomer stability. Furthermore, fluorescence studies showed that the tyrosine located in the adjacent zinc finger domain, which is possibly required for NEMO ubiquitination, exhibits an alteration in its spectral properties. This is probably due to a conformational change of this domain, providing evidence for a close interaction between the oligomerization domain and the zinc finger. In addition, functional complementation assays using NEMO-deficient pre-B and T lymphocytes showed that the pathogenic mutation reduced TNF-alpha and LPS-induced NF-kappaB activation by altering the assembly of the IKK complex. Altogether, our findings provide understanding as to how a single point mutation in NEMO leads to the observed EDA-ID phenotype in relation to the NEMO-dependent mechanism of IKK activation.

  20. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-01-01

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser78 to Cys78 resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys78 in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  1. Enhancement of the Chaperone Activity of Alkyl Hydroperoxide Reductase C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Resulting from a Point-Specific Mutation Confers Heat Tolerance in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Taek; Lee, Seung Sik; Mondal, Suvendu; Tripathi, Bhumi Nath; Kim, Siu; Lee, Keun Woo; Hong, Sung Hyun; Bai, Hyoung-Woo; Cho, Jae-Young; Chung, Byung Yeoup

    2016-08-31

    Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (PaAhpC) is a member of the 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. Here, we examined the peroxidase and molecular chaperone functions of PaAhpC using a site-directed mutagenesis approach by substitution of Ser and Thr residues with Cys at positions 78 and 105 located between two catalytic cysteines. Substitution of Ser with Cys at position 78 enhanced the chaperone activity of the mutant (S78C-PaAhpC) by approximately 9-fold compared with that of the wild-type protein (WT-PaAhpC). This increased activity may have been associated with the proportionate increase in the high-molecular-weight (HMW) fraction and enhanced hydrophobicity of S78C-PaAhpC. Homology modeling revealed that mutation of Ser(78) to Cys(78) resulted in a more compact decameric structure than that observed in WT-PaAhpC and decreased the atomic distance between the two neighboring sulfur atoms of Cys(78) in the dimer-dimer interface of S78C-PaAhpC, which could be responsible for the enhanced hydrophobic interaction at the dimer-dimer interface. Furthermore, complementation assays showed that S78C-PaAhpC exhibited greatly improved the heat tolerance, resulting in enhanced survival under thermal stress. Thus, addition of Cys at position 78 in PaAhpC modulated the functional shifting of this protein from a peroxidase to a chaperone. PMID:27457208

  2. Active-Site Engineering of Benzaldehyde Lyase Shows That a Point Mutation Can Confer Both New Reactivity and Susceptibility to Mechanism-Based Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gabriel S.; Kneen, Malea M.; Petsko, Gregory A.; Ringe, Dagmar; McLeish, Michael J.

    2010-02-11

    Benzaldehyde lyase (BAL) from Pseudomonas putida is a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the breakdown of (R)-benzoin. Here we report that a point mutant, BAL A28S, not only catalyzes the decarboxylation of benzoylformate but, like benzoylformate decarboxylase (BFDC), is also inactivated by the benzoylformate analogues methyl benzoylphosphonate (MBP) and benzoylphosphonate (BP). The latter has no effect on wild-type BAL, and the inactivation of the A28S variant is shown to result from phosphorylation of the newly introduced serine residue. This lends support to the proposal that an appropriately placed nucleophile facilitates the expulsion of carbon dioxide from the active site in many ThDP-dependent decarboxylases.

  3. Nucleotide sequence determines the accelerated rate of point mutations.

    PubMed

    Kini, R Manjunatha; Chinnasamy, Arunkumar

    2010-09-01

    Although the theory of evolution was put forth about 150 years ago our understanding of how molecules drive evolution remains poor. It is well-established that proteins evolve at different rates, essentially based on their functional role and three-dimensional structure. However, the highly variable rates of evolution of different proteins - especially the rapidly evolving ones - within a single organism are poorly understood. Using examples of genes for fast-evolving toxins and human hereditary diseases, we show for the first time that specific nucleotide sequences appear to determine point mutation rates. Based on mutation rates, we have classified triplets (not just codons) into stable, unstable and intermediate groups. Toxin genes contain a relatively higher percentage of unstable triplets in their exons compared to introns, whereas non-toxin genes contain a higher percentage of unstable triplets in their introns. Thus the distribution of stable and unstable triplets is correlated with and may explain the accelerated evolution of point mutations in toxins. Similarly, at the genomic level, lower organisms with genes that evolve faster contain a higher percentage of unstable triplets compared to higher organisms. These findings show that mutation rates of proteins, and hence of the organisms, are DNA sequence-dependent and thus provide a proximate mechanism of evolution at the molecular level. PMID:20362603

  4. Introducing point mutations into the ATGs of the putative open reading frames of the HSV-1 gene encoding the latency associated transcript (LAT) reduces its anti-apoptosis activity.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Dale; Henderson, Gail; Hsiang, Chinhui; Osorio, Nelson; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Jones, Clinton; Wechsler, Steven L

    2008-02-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) gene has anti-apoptosis activity that directly or indirectly enhances the virus's reactivation phenotype in small animal models. The first 1.5 kb of the primary 8.3 kb LAT is sufficient and some or all of it is necessary for LAT's anti-apoptosis in transient transfection assays and for LAT's ability to enhance the reactivation phenotype. Based on LAT's genomic sequence, the first 1.5 kb contains eight potential open reading frames (ORFs) defined as an ATG followed by an in frame termination codon. In this study, point mutations were introduced into the ATGs of ORFs present in the 1.5 kb fragment of LAT. Mutagenesis of all eight ATGs in LAT ORFs consistently reduced the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT in transiently transfected mouse neuroblastoma cells regardless of whether apoptosis was induced by caspase 8 or caspase 9. Mutation of the six ATGs located in the stable intron sequences within the 1.5 kb LAT had a dramatic effect on caspase 9, but not caspase 8, induced apoptosis. For both caspase 8 and caspase 9 induced apoptosis, mutating the two ATGs in the exon of the LAT 1.5 kb fragment reduced, but did not eliminate the anti-apoptotic activity of LAT. These studies suggest that altering the fine structure of regulatory RNA or expression of a putative LAT ORF regulates the anti-apoptosis activity of LAT. These studies also indicate that more than one function is present in the 1.5 kb LAT fragment.

  5. Repository of mutations from Oman: The entry point to a national mutation database

    PubMed Central

    Rajab, Anna; Hamza, Nishath; Al Harasi, Salma; Al Lawati, Fatma; Gibbons, Una; Al Alawi, Intesar; Kobus, Karoline; Hassan, Suha; Mahir, Ghariba; Al Salmi, Qasim; Mons, Barend; Robinson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is a rapidly developing Muslim country with well-organized government-funded health care services, and expanding medical genetic facilities. The preservation of tribal structures within the Omani population coupled with geographical isolation has produced unique patterns of rare mutations. In order to provide diagnosticians and researchers with access to an up-to-date resource that will assist them in their daily practice we collated and analyzed all of the Mendelian disease-associated mutations identified in the Omani population. By the 1 st of August 2015, the dataset contained 300 mutations detected in over 150 different genes. More than half of the data collected reflect novel genetic variations that were first described in the Omani population, and most disorders with known mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. A number of novel Mendelian disease genes have been discovered in Omani nationals, and the corresponding mutations are included here. The current study provides a comprehensive resource of the mutations in the Omani population published in scientific literature or reported through service provision that will be useful for genetic care in Oman and will be a starting point for variation databases as next-generation sequencing technologies are introduced into genetic medicine in Oman. PMID:26594346

  6. Repository of mutations from Oman: The entry point to a national mutation database.

    PubMed

    Rajab, Anna; Hamza, Nishath; Al Harasi, Salma; Al Lawati, Fatma; Gibbons, Una; Al Alawi, Intesar; Kobus, Karoline; Hassan, Suha; Mahir, Ghariba; Al Salmi, Qasim; Mons, Barend; Robinson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Sultanate of Oman is a rapidly developing Muslim country with well-organized government-funded health care services, and expanding medical genetic facilities. The preservation of tribal structures within the Omani population coupled with geographical isolation has produced unique patterns of rare mutations. In order to provide diagnosticians and researchers with access to an up-to-date resource that will assist them in their daily practice we collated and analyzed all of the Mendelian disease-associated mutations identified in the Omani population. By the 1 (st) of August 2015, the dataset contained 300 mutations detected in over 150 different genes. More than half of the data collected reflect novel genetic variations that were first described in the Omani population, and most disorders with known mutations are inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. A number of novel Mendelian disease genes have been discovered in Omani nationals, and the corresponding mutations are included here. The current study provides a comprehensive resource of the mutations in the Omani population published in scientific literature or reported through service provision that will be useful for genetic care in Oman and will be a starting point for variation databases as next-generation sequencing technologies are introduced into genetic medicine in Oman. PMID:26594346

  7. Point mutations of the mTOR-RHEB pathway in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arindam P.; Marshall, Christopher B.; Coric, Tatjana; Shim, Eun-hee; Kirkman, Richard; Ballestas, Mary E.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; Sudarshan, Sunil

    2015-01-01

    Aberrations in the mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) axis are frequently reported in cancer. Using publicly available tumor genome sequencing data, we identified several point mutations in MTOR and its upstream regulator RHEB (Ras homolog enriched in brain) in patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common histology of kidney cancer. Interestingly, we found a prominent cluster of hyperactivating mutations in the FAT (FRAP-ATM-TTRAP) domain of mTOR in renal cell carcinoma that led to an increase in both mTORC1 and mTORC2 activities and led to an increased proliferation of cells. Several of the FAT domain mutants demonstrated a decreased binding of DEPTOR (DEP domain containing mTOR-interacting protein), while a subset of these mutations showed altered binding of the negative regulator PRAS40 (proline rich AKT substrate 40). We also identified a recurrent mutation in RHEB in ccRCC patients that leads to an increase in mTORC1 activity. In vitro characterization of this RHEB mutation revealed that this mutant showed considerable resistance to TSC2 (Tuberous Sclerosis 2) GAP (GTPase activating protein) activity, though its interaction with TSC2 remained unaltered. Mutations in the FAT domain of MTOR and in RHEB remained sensitive to rapamycin, though several of these mutations demonstrated residual mTOR kinase activity after treatment with rapamycin at clinically relevant doses. Overall, our data suggests that point mutations in the mTOR pathway may lead to downstream mTOR hyperactivation through multiple different mechanisms to confer a proliferative advantage to a tumor cell. PMID:26255626

  8. Mutations affecting enzymatic activity in liver arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Vockley, J.G.; Tabor, D.E.; Goodman, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    The hydrolysis of arginine to ornithine and urea is catalyzed by arginase in the last step of the urea cycle. We examined a group of arginase deficient patients by PCR-SSCP analysis to characterize the molecular basis of this disorder. A heterogeneous population of nonsense mutations, microdeletions, and missense mutations has been identified in our cohort. Microdeletions which introduce premature stop codons downstream of the deletion and nonsense mutations result in no arginase activity. These mutations occur randomly along the gene. The majority of missense mutations identified appear to occur in regions of high cross-species homology. To test the effect of these missense mutations on arginase activity, site-directed mutagenesis was used to re-create the patient mutations for in vivo expression studies in a prokaryotic fusion-protein expression system. Of 4 different missense mutations identified in 6 individuals, only one was located outside of a conserved region. The three substitution mutations within the conserved regions had a significant effect on enzymatic activity (0-3.1 nmole/30min, normal is 1300-1400 nmoles/30min, as determined by in vitro arginase assay), while the fourth mutation, a T to S substitution, did not. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis was utilized to create mutations not in residues postulated to play a significant role in the enzymatic function or active site formation in manganese-binding proteins such as arginase. We have determined that the substitution of glycine for a histidine residue, located in a very highly conserved region of exon 3, and the substitution of a histidine and an aspartic acid residue within a similarly conserved region in exon 4, totally abolishes enzymatic activity. Mutations substituting glycine for an additional histidine and aspartic acid residue in exon 4 and two aspartic acid residues in exon 7 have also been created. We are currently in the process of characterizing these mutations.

  9. Stabilization of G protein-coupled receptors by point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Heydenreich, Franziska M.; Vuckovic, Ziva; Matkovic, Milos; Veprintsev, Dmitry B.

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are flexible integral membrane proteins involved in transmembrane signaling. Their involvement in many physiological processes makes them interesting targets for drug development. Determination of the structure of these receptors will help to design more specific drugs, however, their structural characterization has so far been hampered by the low expression and their inherent instability in detergents which made protein engineering indispensable for structural and biophysical characterization. Several approaches to stabilize the receptors in a particular conformation have led to breakthroughs in GPCR structure determination. These include truncations of the flexible regions, stabilization by antibodies and nanobodies, fusion partners, high affinity and covalently bound ligands as well as conformational stabilization by mutagenesis. In this review we focus on stabilization of GPCRs by insertion of point mutations, which lead to increased conformational and thermal stability as well as improved expression levels. We summarize existing mutagenesis strategies with different coverage of GPCR sequence space and depth of information, design and transferability of mutations and the molecular basis for stabilization. We also discuss whether mutations alter the structure and pharmacological properties of GPCRs. PMID:25941489

  10. A point mutation in the putative TATA box, detected in nondiseased individuals and patients with hereditary breast cancer, decreases promoter activity of the 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 gene 2 (EDH17B2) in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Peltoketo, H.; Piao, Y.; Isomaa, V.

    1994-09-01

    EDH17B2, the gene encoding 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, has been suggested as a candidate for the familial breast cancer gene, BRCA1, located on 17q12-q21. We analyzed the promoter region of EDH17B2 in DNA from 20 control individuals and 40 patients with familial breast cancer. Two frequent (designated vI and vIII) and two rare (vII and vIV) nucleotide variations were present in both the breast cancer patients and the controls, except the alteration vII, which was found only in one patient. Although the data do not support the identification of EDH17B2 as the BRCA1 gene, it is of interest that point mutation vIV (A {yields} C) was located in the putative TATA box of the EDH17B2 gene. Reporter gene analysis showed that the mutation vIV decreases EDH17B2 promoter activity by an average of 45% in in vitro assays, suggesting that nucleotide A at position -27 is significant for efficient transcription. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Point Mutations within and outside the Homeodomain Identify Sequences Required for Proboscipedia Homeotic Function in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Benassayag, C.; Boube, M.; Seroude, L.; Cribbs, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    The Drosophila homeotic gene proboscipedia (pb) encodes a homeodomain protein homologous to vertebrate HoxA2/B2 required for adult mouthparts formation. A transgenic Hsp70-pb (HSPB) element that rescues pb mutations also induces the dominant transformation of antennae to maxillary palps. To identify sequences essential to PB protein function, we screened for EMS-induced HSPB mutations leading to phenotypic reversion of the HSPB transformation. Ten revertants harbor identified point mutations in HSPB coding sequences. The point mutations that remove all detectable phenotypes in vivo reside either within the homeodomain or, more unexpectedly, in evolutionarily nonconserved regions outside the homeodomain. Two independent homeodomain mutations that change the highly conserved Arginine-5 in the N-terminal hinge show effects on adult eye development, suggesting a previously unsuspected role for Arg5 in functional specificity. Three additional revertant mutations outside the homeodomain reduce but do not abolish PB(+) activity, identifying protein elements that contribute quantitatively to pb function. This in vivo analysis shows that apart from the conserved motifs of PB, other elements throughout the protein make important contributions to homeotic function. PMID:9215898

  12. A single point mutation enhances hydroxynitrile synthesis by halohydrin dehalogenase.

    PubMed

    Schallmey, Marcus; Jekel, Peter; Tang, Lixia; Majerić Elenkov, Maja; Höffken, Hans Wolfgang; Hauer, Bernhard; Janssen, Dick B

    2015-03-01

    The cyanide-mediated ring opening of epoxides catalyzed by halohydrin dehalogenases yields β-hydroxynitriles that are of high interest for synthetic chemistry. The best studied halohydrin dehalogenase to date is the enzyme from Agrobacterium radiobacter, but this enzyme (HheC) exhibits only low cyanolysis activities. Sequence comparison between a pair of related halohydrin dehalogenases from Corynebacterium and Mycobacterium suggested that substitution of a threonine that interacts with the active site might be responsible for the higher cyanolytic activity of the former enzyme. Here we report that a variant of HheC in which this substitution (T134A) is adopted displays an up to 11-fold higher activity in cyanide-mediated epoxide ring-opening. The mutation causes removal of the hydrogen bond between residue 134 and the side chain O of the active site serine 132, which donates a hydrogen bond to the substrate oxygen. The mutation also increases dehalogenase rates with various substrates. Structural analysis revealed that the anion-binding site of the mutant enzyme remained unaltered, showing that the enhanced activity is due to altered interactions with the substrate oxygen rather than changes in the nucleophile binding site.

  13. [New DNA diagnostic system for determination and identification of homo- and heterozygote point mutations].

    PubMed

    Patrushev, L I; Zykova, E S; Kaiushin, A L; Korosteleva, M D; Miroshnikov, A I

    1998-03-01

    A straightforward and effective PCR-based assay system is devised that allows one to reveal and identify homozygous and heterozygous point mutations. The system uses two sets of allele-specific primers. In one set, the 3'-nucleotide matches the allele under study so that the primer functions effectively only if the DNA contains the corresponding allele. To increase primer specificity, template-noncomplementary nucleotides are introduced near its 3'-end. The primers from another set invariably bear a 3'-terminal mismatch, and, in addition, the mutant nucleotides of the alleles under study form mismatches with the internal nucleotides of the primers. In such combination, the primer activity is suppressed if the DNA contains a homozygous mutation. The assay system devised was utilized to reveal the Leiden mutation in the gene for factor V of the human blood clotting system in patients with thrombophilia.

  14. Somatic Activating PIK3CA Mutations Cause Venous Malformation.

    PubMed

    Limaye, Nisha; Kangas, Jaakko; Mendola, Antonella; Godfraind, Catherine; Schlögel, Matthieu J; Helaers, Raphael; Eklund, Lauri; Boon, Laurence M; Vikkula, Miikka

    2015-12-01

    Somatic mutations in TEK, the gene encoding endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2, cause more than half of sporadically occurring unifocal venous malformations (VMs). Here, we report that somatic mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the catalytic p110α subunit of PI3K, cause 54% (27 out of 50) of VMs with no detected TEK mutation. The hotspot mutations c.1624G>A, c.1633G>A, and c.3140A>G (p.Glu542Lys, p.Glu545Lys, and p.His1047Arg), frequent in PIK3CA-associated cancers, overgrowth syndromes, and lymphatic malformation (LM), account for >92% of individuals who carry mutations. Like VM-causative mutations in TEK, the PIK3CA mutations cause chronic activation of AKT, dysregulation of certain important angiogenic factors, and abnormal endothelial cell morphology when expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The p110α-specific inhibitor BYL719 restores all abnormal phenotypes tested, in PIK3CA- as well as TEK-mutant HUVECs, demonstrating that they operate via the same pathogenic pathways. Nevertheless, significant genotype-phenotype correlations in lesion localization and histology are observed between individuals with mutations in PIK3CA versus TEK, pointing to gene-specific effects. PMID:26637981

  15. Investigating the Impact of Asp181 Point Mutations on Interactions between PTP1B and Phosphotyrosine Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Sun, Xun; Zhao, Xian

    2014-05-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) is a key negative regulator of insulin and leptin signaling, which suggests that it is an attractive therapeutic target in type II diabetes and obesity. The aim of this research is to explore residues which interact with phosphotyrosine substrate can be affected by D181 point mutations and lead to increased substrate binding. To achieve this goal, molecular dynamics simulations were performed on wild type (WT) and two mutated PTP1B/substrate complexes. The cross-correlation and principal component analyses show that point mutations can affect the motions of some residues in the active site of PTP1B. Moreover, the hydrogen bond and energy decomposition analyses indicate that apart from residue 181, point mutations have influence on the interactions of substrate with several residues in the active site of PTP1B.

  16. Schema theory for genetic programming with one-point crossover and point mutation.

    PubMed

    Poli, R; Langdon, W B

    1998-01-01

    We review the main results obtained in the theory of schemata in genetic programming (GP), emphasizing their strengths and weaknesses. Then we propose a new, simpler definition of the concept of schema for GP, which is closer to the original concept of schema in genetic algorithms (GAs). Along with a new form of crossover, one-point crossover, and point mutation, this concept of schema has been used to derive an improved schema theorem for GP that describes the propagation of schemata from one generation to the next. We discuss this result and show that our schema theorem is the natural counterpart for GP of the schema theorem for GAs, to which it asymptotically converges.

  17. A point mutation and a RNA processing mutation in a carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSI) deficient patient

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, L.; Summer, M.; Sierra-Rivera, E.; Freeman, M.

    1994-09-01

    Deficiency of carbamyl phosphate synthetase I (CPSID) results in a life-threatening disease due to hyperammonemia. A better understanding of the molecular basis of CPSID was achieved by studying the genetic defects in a CPSID patient. CPSI message was analyzed from hepatic tissue through Northern blot analysis, reverse transcription of liver mRNA followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification (RT-PCR), dideoxy fingerprinting, and direct DNA sequencing. Northern blot analysis of the patient revealed a diminished amount of normal sized CPSI message and multiple other bands not detected in controls. Analysis of the amplified coding region revealed a single point mutation leading to an asparagine to lysine substitution at codon 715. The patient`s cDNA was homozygous and genomic DNA heterozygous for the point mutation which was not found in ten unrelated CPSID patients. The point mutation causes a change from a highly-conserved neutral amino acid to a polar basic residue within a nucleotide/bicarbonate binding domain which points to its importance in normal CPSI function. The other allele which was absent in RT-PCR fragements presumably leads to the multi-form poly-A message detected by Northern blot analysis and allows the point mutation to become the dominant expressed allele. These mutations represent the second reported molecular defect in CPSI and the first to involve a mutation in a functional domain and in RNA processing.

  18. Retinitis pigmentosa: impact of different Pde6a point mutations on the disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Sothilingam, Vithiyanjali; Garcia Garrido, Marina; Jiao, Kangwei; Buena-Atienza, Elena; Sahaboglu, Ayse; Trifunović, Dragana; Balendran, Sukirthini; Koepfli, Tanja; Mühlfriedel, Regine; Schön, Christian; Biel, Martin; Heckmann, Angelique; Beck, Susanne C; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wissinger, Bernd; Seeliger, Mathias W; Paquet-Durand, François

    2015-10-01

    Mutations in the PDE6A gene can cause rod photoreceptors degeneration and the blinding disease retinitis pigmentosa (RP). While a number of pathogenic PDE6A mutations have been described, little is known about their impact on compound heterozygous situations and potential interactions of different disease-causing alleles. Here, we used a novel mouse model for the Pde6a R562W mutation in combination with an existing line carrying the V685M mutation to generate compound heterozygous Pde6a V685M/R562W animals, exactly homologous to a case of human RP. We compared the progression of photoreceptor degeneration in these compound heterozygous mice with the homozygous V685M and R562W mutants, and additionally with the D670G line that is known for a relatively mild phenotype. We investigated PDE6A expression, cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate accumulation, calpain and caspase activity, in vivo retinal function and morphology, as well as photoreceptor cell death and survival. This analysis confirms the severity of different Pde6a mutations and indicates that compound heterozygous mutants behave like intermediates of the respective homozygous situations. Specifically, the severity of the four different Pde6a situations may be categorized by the pace of photoreceptor degeneration: V685M (fastest) > V685M/R562W > R562W > D670G (slowest). While calpain activity was strongly increased in all four mutants, caspase activity was not. This points to the execution of non-apoptotic cell death and may lead to the identification of new targets for therapeutic interventions. For individual RP patients, our study may help to predict time-courses for Pde6a-related retinal degeneration and thereby facilitate the definition of a window-of-opportunity for clinical interventions. PMID:26188004

  19. Point mutations in the tyrosine aminotransferase gene in tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed

    Natt, E; Kida, K; Odievre, M; Di Rocco, M; Scherer, G

    1992-10-01

    Tyrosinemia type II (Richner-Hanhart syndrome, RHS) is a disease of autosomal recessive inheritance characterized by keratitis, palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, mental retardation, and elevated blood tyrosine levels. The disease results from deficiency in hepatic tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT; L-tyrosine:2-oxoglutarate aminotransferase, EC 2.6.1.5), a 454-amino acid protein encoded by a gene with 12 exons. To identify the causative mutations in five TAT alleles cloned from three RHS patients, chimeric genes constructed from normal and mutant TAT alleles were tested in directing TAT activity in a transient expression assay. DNA sequence analysis of the regions identified as nonfunctional revealed six different point mutations. Three RHS alleles have nonsense mutations at codons 57, 223, and 417, respectively. One "complex" RHS allele carries a GT----GG splice donor mutation in intron 8 together with a Gly----Val substitution at amino acid 362. A new splice acceptor site in intron 2 of the fifth RHS allele leads to a shift in reading frame.

  20. Polar body mutation load analysis in a patient with A3243G tRNALeu(UUR) point mutation.

    PubMed

    Vandewoestyne, Mado; Heindryckx, Björn; Lepez, Trees; Van Coster, Rudy; Gerris, Jan; De Sutter, Petra; Deforce, Dieter

    2011-07-01

    Diseases associated with point mutations in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are maternally inherited. We evaluated whether pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, based on polar body mutation load detection could be used to distinguish healthy from affected oocytes. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) analysis was used and validated, to determine A3243G tRNA(Leu(UUR)) mutation load in metaphase II oocytes and their respective first polar bodies. The results of this study show for the first time that the mutation load measured in the polar bodies correlates well with the mutation load in the respective oocytes. Therefore, human polar body analysis can be used as diagnostic tool to prevent transmission of mitochondrial disorders.

  1. Single Quantum Dot Analysis Enables Multiplexed Point Mutation Detection by Gap Ligase Chain Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yunke; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2014-01-01

    Gene point mutations present important biomarkers for genetic diseases. However, existing point mutation detection methods suffer from low sensitivity, specificity, and tedious assay processes. In this report, we propose an assay technology which combines the outstanding specificity of gap ligase chain reaction (Gap-LCR), the high sensitivity of single molecule coincidence detection and superior optical properties of quantum dots (QDs) for multiplexed detection of point mutations in genomic DNA. Mutant-specific ligation products are generated by Gap-LCR and subsequently captured by QDs to form DNA-QD nanocomplexes that are detected by single molecule spectroscopy (SMS) through multi-color fluorescence burst coincidence analysis, allowing for multiplexed mutation detection in a separation-free format. The proposed assay is capable of detecting zeptomoles of KRAS codon 12 mutation variants with near 100% specificity. Its high sensitivity allows direct detection of KRAS mutation in crude genomic DNA without PCR pre-amplification. PMID:23239594

  2. The frequency of point mutations in mitochondrial DNA is elevated in the Alzheimer's brain.

    PubMed

    Chang, S W; Zhang, D; Chung, H D; Zassenhaus, H P

    2000-06-24

    Using a PCR-based strategy, we found that point mutation frequencies in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) were 2- to 3-fold higher in the parietal gyrus, hippocampus, and cerebellum from subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to normal controls. In contrast, levels of a commonly studied deletion mutation, mtDNA(4977), were not elevated in AD. The frequency of point mutations did not vary significantly among the three brain areas, whereas the frequency of mtDNA(4977) was 15- to 25-fold lower in the cerebellum in comparison to the cortex; this regional variation was seen in both the normal and Alzheimer's brain. In blood mtDNA, point mutation frequencies were not elevated in AD patients. The elevated frequency of point mutations in all three brain regions is consistent with the idea that increased oxidant stress is associated with AD.

  3. PoPMuSiC, rationally designing point mutations in protein structures.

    PubMed

    Kwasigroch, J M; Gilis, D; Dehouck, Y; Rooman, M

    2002-12-01

    PoPMuSiC is an efficient tool for rational computer-aided design of single-site mutations in proteins and peptides. Two types of queries can be submitted. The first option allows to estimate the changes in folding free energy for specific point mutations given by the user. In the second option, all possible point mutations in a given protein or protein region are performed and the most stabilizing or destabilizing mutations, or the neutral mutations with respect to thermodynamic stability, are selected. For each sequence position or secondary structure the deviation from the most stable sequence is moreover evaluated, which helps to identify the most suitable sites for the introduction of mutations.

  4. Kinase inhibitor-responsive genotypes in EGFR mutated lung adenocarcinomas: moving past common point mutations or indels into uncommon kinase domain duplications and rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations found by traditional or comprehensive molecular profiling of lung adenocarcinomas include indels of exon 19 (the exon 19 deletion delE746_A750 being the most common) and the exon 21 L858R point mutation. The current approval labels for first line palliative gefitinib 250 mg/day, erlotinib 150 mg/day and afatinib 40 mg/day for advanced lung cancers require the presence of the aforementioned classical/sensitizing EGFR mutations. Other gefitinib, erlotinib and afatinib sensitizing mutations include exon 18 indels, G719X, exon 19 insertions, A763_Y764insFQEA, S768I and L861Q; for which off-label EGFR kinase inhibitor use is generally agreed upon by thoracic oncologists. The main biological mechanism of resistance to approved first line EGFR inhibitors is the selection/acquisition of EGFR-T790M that in itself can be inhibited by osimertinib 80 mg/day, a 3rd generation EGFR inhibitor that is bypassed by EGFR-C797X mutations. Another class of de novo inhibitor insensitive mutation includes EGFR exon 20 insertions. More recently, the dichotomy of only point mutations or indels explaining aberrant kinase activation of EGFR plus inhibitor response has been shattered by the discovery of uncommon (<0.5% of all EGFR mutations) genomic events involving exon 18–25 kinase domain duplications (KDD) and rearrangements (EGFR-RAD51 or EGFR-PURB). The latter lead to oncogene addiction, enhanced sensitivity to kinase inhibitors in vitro and clinical responses to approved EGFR inhibitors. The enhanced landscape of EGFR inhibitor-responsive genotypes highlights that comprehensive molecular profiling may be necessary to maximize the identification of all cases that can benefit from precision oncology. PMID:27413714

  5. Mu Opioid Receptor Gene: New Point Mutations in Opioid Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Dinarvand, Amin; Goodarzi, Ali; Vousooghi, Nasim; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Dinarvand, Rasoul; Ostadzadeh, Fahimeh; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mu opioid receptor gene and drug addiction has been shown in various studies. Here, we have evaluated the existence of polymorphisms in exon 3 of this gene in Iranian population and investigated the possible association between these mutations and opioid addiction. Methods 79 opioid-dependent subjects (55 males, 24 females) and 134 non-addict or control individuals (74 males, 60 females) participated in the study. Genomic DNA was extracted from volunteers’ peripheral blood and exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) whose products were then sequenced. Results Three different heterozygote polymorphisms were observed in 3 male individuals: 759T > C and 877G > A mutations were found in 2 control volunteers and 1043G > C substitution was observed in an opioid-addicted subject. Association between genotype and opioid addiction for each mutation was not statistically significant. Discussion It seems that the sample size used in our study is not enough to confirm or reject any association between 759T > C, 877G > A and 1043G > C substitutions in exon 3 of the mu opioid receptor gene and opioid addiction susceptibility in Iranian population. PMID:25436079

  6. Evidence that a point mutation in dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase confers resistance to pyrimethamine in falciparum malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, D S; Walliker, D; Wellems, T E

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of a genetic cross of Plasmodium falciparum and of independent parasite isolates from Southeast Asia, Africa, and South America indicates that resistance to pyrimethamine, an antifolate used in the treatment of malaria, results from point mutations in the gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase (EC 1.5.1.3 and EC 2.1.1.45, respectively). Parasites having a mutation from Thr-108/Ser-108 to Asn-108 in DHFR-TS are resistant to the drug. The Asn-108 mutation occurs in a region analogous to the C alpha-helix bordering the active site cavity of bacterial, avian, and mammalian enzymes. Additional point mutations (Asn-51 to Ile-51 and Cys-59 to Arg-59) are associated with increased pyrimethamine resistance and also occur at sites expected to border the active site cavity. Analogies with known inhibitor/enzyme structures from other organisms suggest that the point mutations occur where pyrimethamine contacts the enzyme and may act by inhibiting binding of the drug. Images PMID:2904149

  7. Predicting protein folding rate change upon point mutation using residue-level coevolutionary information.

    PubMed

    Mallik, Saurav; Das, Smita; Kundu, Sudip

    2016-01-01

    Change in folding kinetics of globular proteins upon point mutation is crucial to a wide spectrum of biological research, such as protein misfolding, toxicity, and aggregations. Here we seek to address whether residue-level coevolutionary information of globular proteins can be informative to folding rate changes upon point mutations. Generating residue-level coevolutionary networks of globular proteins, we analyze three parameters: relative coevolution order (rCEO), network density (ND), and characteristic path length (CPL). A point mutation is considered to be equivalent to a node deletion of this network and respective percentage changes in rCEO, ND, CPL are found linearly correlated (0.84, 0.73, and -0.61, respectively) with experimental folding rate changes. The three parameters predict the folding rate change upon a point mutation with 0.031, 0.045, and 0.059 standard errors, respectively.

  8. Clinical features of MELAS and its relation with A3243G gene point mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Junhong; Fang, Wanghui; Jun, Qili; Shi, Kaili

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) mostly occur in children. The point mutation A3243G of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) may work as a specific bio-marker for mitochondrial disorders. The related clinical features, however, may vary among individuals. This study therefore investigated the relation between MELAS clinical features and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA, in an attempt to provide further evidences for genetic diagnosis of MELAS. Children with MELAS-like syndromes were tested for both blood lactate level and point mutation A3243G of mtDNA. Further family study was performed by mtDNA mutation screening at the same loci for those who had positive gene mutation at A3243G loci. Those who were negative for A3243G point mutation were examined by muscle biopsy and genetic screening. Both clinical and genetic features were analyzed. In all 40 cases with positive A3243G mutation, 36 children fitted clinical diagnosis of MELAS. In other 484 cases with negative mutation, only 8 children were clinically diagnosed with MELAS. Blood lactate levels in both groups were all elevated (P>0.05). In a further genetic screening of 28 families, 10 biological mothers and 8 siblings of MELAS children had positive A3243G point mutations but without any clinical symptoms. Certain difference existed in the clinical manifestations between children who were positive and negative for A3243G mutation of mtDNA but without statistical significance. MELAS showed maternal inheritance under most circumstances.

  9. Point Mutations Effects on Charge Transport Properties of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roemer, Rudolf A.; Shih, Chi-Tin; Roche, Stephan

    2008-03-01

    We report on a theoretical study of point mutations effects on charge transfer properties in the DNA sequence of the tumor-suppressor p53 gene. On the basis of effective tight-binding models which simulate hole propagation along the DNA, a statistical analysis of mutation-induced charge transfer modifications is performed. In contrast to non-cancerous mutations, mutation hotspots tend to result in significantly weaker changes of transmission properties. This suggests that charge transport could play a significant role for DNA-repairing deficiency yielding carcinogenesis.

  10. Activating STAT6 mutations in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Mehmet; Li, Hongxiu; Bernard, Denzil; Amin, Nisar A.; Ouillette, Peter; Jones, Siân; Saiya-Cork, Kamlai; Parkin, Brian; Jacobi, Kathryn; Shedden, Kerby; Wang, Shaomeng; Chang, Alfred E.; Kaminski, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is the second most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Western world. FL cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors influence FL biology and clinical outcome. To further our understanding of the genetic basis of FL, we performed whole-exome sequencing of 23 highly purified FL cases and 1 transformed FL case and expanded findings to a combined total of 114 FLs. We report recurrent mutations in the transcription factor STAT6 in 11% of FLs and identified the STAT6 amino acid residue 419 as a novel STAT6 mutation hotspot (p.419D/G, p.419D/A, and p.419D/H). FL-associated STAT6 mutations were activating, as evidenced by increased transactivation in HEK293T cell–based transfection/luciferase reporter assays, heightened interleukin-4 (IL-4) –induced activation of target genes in stable STAT6 transfected lymphoma cell lines, and elevated baseline expression levels of STAT6 target genes in primary FL B cells harboring mutant STAT6. Mechanistically, FL-associated STAT6 mutations facilitated nuclear residency of STAT6, independent of IL-4–induced STAT6-Y641 phosphorylation. Structural modeling of STAT6 based on the structure of the STAT1-DNA complex revealed that most FL-associated STAT6 mutants locate to the STAT6-DNA interface, potentially facilitating heightened interactions. The genetic and functional data combined strengthen the recognition of the IL-4/JAK/STAT6 axis as a driver of FL pathogenesis. PMID:25428220

  11. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animal models for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1.

    PubMed

    Aponte, J L; Sega, G A; Hauser, L J; Dhar, M S; Withrow, C M; Carpenter, D A; Rinchik, E M; Culiat, C T; Johnson, D K

    2001-01-16

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah(6287SB) allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah(5961SB) is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah(6287SB) and Fah(5961SB) mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah(5961SB) and Fah(6287SB) as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  12. Point mutations in the murine fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase gene: Animalmodels for the human genetic disorder hereditary tyrosinemia type 1

    SciTech Connect

    Aponte, Jennifer; Sega, Gary A; Hauser, Loren John; Dhar, Madhu; Withrow, Catherine; Carpenter, D A; Rinchik, Eugene M.; Culiat, Cymbeline T; Johnson, Dabney K

    2001-01-01

    Hereditary tyrosinemia type 1 (HT1) is a severe autosomal recessive metabolic disease associated with point mutations in the human fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) gene that disrupt tyrosine catabolism. An acute form of HT1 results in death during the first months of life because of hepatic failure, whereas a chronic form leads to gradual development of liver disease often accompanied by renal dysfunction, childhood rickets, neurological crisis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Mice homozygous for certain chromosome 7 deletions of the albino Tyr; c locus that also include Fah die perinatally as a result of liver dysfunction and exhibit a complex syndrome characterized by structural abnormalities and alterations in gene expression in the liver and kidney. Here we report that two independent, postnatally lethal mutations induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and mapped near Tyr are alleles of Fah. The Fah6287SB allele is a missense mutation in exon 6, and Fah5961SB is a splice mutation causing loss of exon 7, a subsequent frameshift in the resulting mRNA, and a severe reduction of Fah mRNA levels. Increased levels of the diagnostic metabolite succinylacetone in the urine of the Fah6287SB and Fah5961SB mutants indicate that these mutations cause a decrease in Fah enzymatic activity. Thus, the neonatal phenotype present in both mutants is due to a deficiency in Fah caused by a point mutation, and we propose Fah5961SB and Fah6287SB as mouse models for acute and chronic forms of human HT1, respectively.

  13. Structural Analysis of Single-Point Mutations Given an RNA Sequence: A Case Study with RNAMute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churkin, Alexander; Barash, Danny

    2006-12-01

    We introduce here for the first time the RNAMute package, a pattern-recognition-based utility to perform mutational analysis and detect vulnerable spots within an RNA sequence that affect structure. Mutations in these spots may lead to a structural change that directly relates to a change in functionality. Previously, the concept was tried on RNA genetic control elements called "riboswitches" and other known RNA switches, without an organized utility that analyzes all single-point mutations and can be further expanded. The RNAMute package allows a comprehensive categorization, given an RNA sequence that has functional relevance, by exploring the patterns of all single-point mutants. For illustration, we apply the RNAMute package on an RNA transcript for which individual point mutations were shown experimentally to inactivate spectinomycin resistance in Escherichia coli. Functional analysis of mutations on this case study was performed experimentally by creating a library of point mutations using PCR and screening to locate those mutations. With the availability of RNAMute, preanalysis can be performed computationally before conducting an experiment.

  14. HMG CoA lyase deficiency: identification of five causal point mutations in codons 41 and 42, including a frequent Saudi Arabian mutation, R41Q.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, G A; Ozand, P T; Robert, M F; Ashmarina, L; Roberts, J; Gibson, K M; Wanders, R J; Wang, S; Chevalier, I; Plöchl, E; Miziorko, H

    1998-02-01

    The hereditary deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) CoA lyase (HL; OMIM 246450 [http://www3.ncbi.nlm.nih. gov:80/htbin-post/Omim/dispmim?246450]) results in episodes of hypoketotic hypoglycemia and coma and is reported to be frequent and clinically severe in Saudi Arabia. We found genetic diversity among nine Saudi HL-deficient probands: six were homozygous for the missense mutation R41Q, and two were homozygous for the frameshift mutation F305fs(-2). In 32 non-Saudi HL-deficient probands, we found three R41Q alleles and also discovered four other deleterious point mutations in codons 41 and 42: R41X, D42E, D42G, and D42H. In purified mutant recombinant HL, all four missense mutations in codons 41 and 42 cause a marked decrease in HL activity. We developed a screening procedure for HL missense mutations that yields residual activity at levels comparable to those obtained using purified HL peptides. Codons 41 and 42 are important for normal HL catalysis and account for a disproportionate 21 (26%) of 82 of mutant alleles in our group of HL-deficient probands.

  15. A maternally inherited autosomal point mutation in human phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) leads to male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Kashir, Junaid; Konstantinidis, Michalis; Jones, Celine; Lemmon, Bernadette; Chang Lee, Hoi; Hamer, Rebecca; Heindryckx, Bjorn; Deane, Charlotte M.; De Sutter, Petra; Fissore, Rafael A.; Parrington, John; Wells, Dagan; Coward, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Male factor and idiopathic infertility contribute significantly to global infertility, with abnormal testicular gene expression considered to be a major cause. Certain types of male infertility are caused by failure of the sperm to activate the oocyte, a process normally regulated by calcium oscillations, thought to be induced by a sperm-specific phospholipase C, PLCzeta (PLCζ). Previously, we identified a point mutation in an infertile male resulting in the substitution of histidine for proline at position 398 of the protein sequence (PLCζH398P), leading to abnormal PLCζ function and infertility. METHODS AND RESULTS Here, using a combination of direct-sequencing and mini-sequencing of the PLCζ gene from the patient and his family, we report the identification of a second PLCζ mutation in the same patient resulting in a histidine to leucine substitution at position 233 (PLCζH233L), which is predicted to disrupt local protein interactions in a manner similar to PLCζH398P and was shown to exhibit abnormal calcium oscillatory ability following predictive 3D modelling and cRNA injection in mouse oocytes respectively. We show that PLCζH233L and PLCζH398P exist on distinct parental chromosomes, the former inherited from the patient's mother and the latter from his father. Neither mutation was detected utilizing custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism assays in 100 fertile males and females, or 8 infertile males with characterized oocyte activation deficiency. CONCLUSIONS Collectively, our findings provide further evidence regarding the importance of PLCζ at oocyte activation and forms of male infertility where this is deficient. Additionally, we show that the inheritance patterns underlying male infertility are more complex than previously thought and may involve maternal mechanisms. PMID:22095789

  16. One-Step Ligation on RNA Amplification for the Detection of Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Jingjing; Coetzer, Mia; Angione, Stephanie; Kantor, Rami; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2015-11-01

    The detection of point mutations is required in the diagnosis of many human diseases. The conformal specificity of DNA ligases was elegantly used to distinguish single-nucleotide mismatches. However, to detect point mutations in RNA retroviruses, conventional ligase-mediated approaches require the reverse transcription of viral genomes before separate ligation and amplification steps. We developed one-step ligation on RNA amplification (LRA) for the direct detection of RNA point mutations. The process combines the ligase-mediated joining of two oligonucleotides and subsequent hot start amplification into a single-tube reaction. We report that modifications to the structure of the oligonucleotide ligation probes improve the rate of ligation and the specificity of mutation detection on RNA. We applied LRA to the detection of a common, clinically relevant HIV-1 reverse transcriptase drug-resistant point mutation, K103N, and compared it with allele-specific PCR and pyrosequencing. LRA achieved a limit of specific quantitation of 1:100 (1%), and a limit of specific detection for mutant K103N RNA transcripts among excess wild-type strands of 1:10,000 (0.01%). LRA also exhibited good detection threshold of 5 × 10(2) copies/μL K103N RNA transcripts. LRA is a novel point mutation detection method, with potential utilization in HIV drug resistance detection and early diagnostics of genetic disorders associated with other infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:26322949

  17. Electrochemical detection of point mutation based on surface hybridization assay conjugated allele-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhu, Jing; Li, Guiyin; Chen, Zhencheng; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2013-04-15

    In this work, we developed an electrochemical detection method based on allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) and surface hybridization assay technique for the point mutation detection. A high-fidelity Vent(R)™(exo⁻) DNA polymerase, which eliminated the 3'→5' proofreading exonuclease activity by genetical engineering, was used to discriminate and extend the detection probe that perfectly matched with mutant target DNA and generate a redox-active DNA replica which folded into a molecular beacon structure by intramolecular hybridization. After hybridized with capture probe modified on gold electrode by self-assembly reaction, the redox tags can be closed to electrode, resulting in a substantial current with the maximized sensitivity for point mutation analysis. However, when there is an allele mismatch in the wild target DNA, and so no the redox-active replica DNA can be obtained. In this case, no remarkable current signal can be trigged. The proposed approach has been successfully implemented for the identification of single base mutation at the -28 position in human β-globin gene with a detection limit of 0.5 fM, demonstrating that this method provides a highly specific, sensitive and cost-efficient approach for point mutation detection.

  18. Fly-TILL: reverse genetics using a living point mutation resource.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jennifer L; Till, Bradley J; Henikoff, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Mutagenesis with ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) has been the standard for traditional genetic screens, and in recent years has been applied to reverse genetics. However, reverse-genetic strategies require maintaining a viable germline library so that mutations that are discovered can subsequently be recovered. In applying our TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) method to establish a Drosophila reverse-genetic service (Fly-TILL), we chose to screen the Zuker lines, a large collection of EMS-mutagenized second- and third-chromosome balanced lines that had been established for forward-genetic screening. For the past four years, our Fly-TILL service has screened this collection to provide approximately 150 allelic series of point mutations for the fly community. Our analysis of >2000 point mutations and indels have provided a glimpse into the population dynamics of this valuable genetic resource. We found evidence for selection and differential recovery of mutations, depending on distance from balancer breakpoints. Although this process led to variable mutational densities, we have nevertheless been able to deliver potentially valuable mutations in genes selected by Fly-TILL users. We anticipate that our findings will help guide the future implementation of point-mutation resources for the Drosophila community.

  19. Analysis of any point mutation in DNA. The amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS).

    PubMed Central

    Newton, C R; Graham, A; Heptinstall, L E; Powell, S J; Summers, C; Kalsheker, N; Smith, J C; Markham, A F

    1989-01-01

    We have improved the "polymerase chain reaction" (PCR) to permit rapid analysis of any known mutation in genomic DNA. We demonstrate a system, ARMS (Amplification Refractory Mutation System), that allows genotyping solely by inspection of reaction mixtures after agarose gel electrophoresis. The system is simple, reliable and non-isotopic. It will clearly distinguish heterozygotes at a locus from homozygotes for either allele. The system requires neither restriction enzyme digestion, allele-specific oligonucleotides as conventionally applied, nor the sequence analysis of PCR products. The basis of the invention is that unexpectedly, oligonucleotides with a mismatched 3'-residue will not function as primers in the PCR under appropriate conditions. We have analysed DNA from patients with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, from carriers of the disease and from normal individuals. Our findings are in complete agreement with allele assignments derived by direct sequencing of PCR products. Images PMID:2785681

  20. A novel point mutation in the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human glucocorticoid receptor (hGR) causing generalized glucocorticoid resistance: the importance of the C terminus of hGR LBD in conferring transactivational activity.

    PubMed

    Charmandari, Evangelia; Raji, Annaswamy; Kino, Tomoshige; Ichijo, Takamasa; Tiulpakov, Anatoly; Zachman, Keith; Chrousos, George P

    2005-06-01

    Glucocorticoid resistance is a rare, familial or sporadic condition characterized by partial end-organ insensitivity to glucocorticoids. The clinical spectrum of the condition is broad, ranging from completely asymptomatic to severe hyperandrogenism and/or mineralocorticoid excess. The molecular basis of glucocorticoid resistance has been ascribed to mutations in the human glucocorticoid receptor-alpha (hGRalpha) gene, which impair one or more of the molecular mechanisms of GR action, thus altering tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids. We identified a new case of generalized glucocorticoid resistance in a young woman who presented with a long-standing history of fatigue, anxiety, hyperandrogenism, and hypertension. The disease was caused by a novel, heterozygous mutation (T-->C) at nucleotide position 2318 (exon 9) of the hGRalpha gene, which resulted in substitution of leucine by proline at amino acid position 773 in the ligand-binding domain of the receptor. We systematically investigated the molecular mechanisms through which the natural hGRalphaL773P mutant impaired glucocorticoid signal transduction. Compared with the wild-type hGRalpha, hGRalphaL773P demonstrated a 2-fold reduction in the ability to transactivate the glucocorticoid-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter, exerted a dominant negative effect on the wild-type receptor, had a 2.6-fold reduction in the affinity for ligand, showed delayed nuclear translocation (30 vs. 12 min), and, although it preserved its ability to bind to DNA, displayed an abnormal interaction with the GR-interacting protein 1 coactivator in vitro. We conclude that the carboxyl terminus of the ligand-binding domain of hGRalpha is extremely important in conferring transactivational activity by altering multiple functions of this composite transcription factor. PMID:15769988

  1. Abnormal behavior associated with a point mutation in the structural gene for monoamine oxidase A

    SciTech Connect

    Brunner, H.G. ); Nelen, M.; Ropers, H.H.; van Oost, B.A. )

    1993-10-22

    Genetic and metabolic studies have been done on a large kindred in which several males are affected by a syndrome of borderline mental retardation and abnormal behavior. The types of behavior that occurred include impulsive aggression, arson, attempted rape, and exhibitionism. Analysis of 24-hour urine samples indicated markedly disturbed monoamine metabolism. This syndrome was associated with a complete and selective deficiency of enzymatic activity of monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). In each of five affected males, a point mutation was identified in the eighth exon of the MAOA structural gene, which changes a glutamine to a termination codon. Thus, isolated complete MAOA deficiency in this family is associated with a recognizable behavioral phenotype that includes disturbed regulation of impulsive aggression.

  2. First Japanese Case of Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase II Deficiency with the Homozygous Point Mutation S113L.

    PubMed

    Shima, Atsushi; Yasuno, Tetsuhiko; Yamada, Kenji; Yamaguchi, Miyoko; Kohno, Ryuichi; Yamaguchi, Seiji; Kido, Hiroshi; Fukuda, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Carnitine palmitoyltransferase II (CPT II) deficiency is a rare inherited disorder related to recurrent episodes of rhabdomyolysis. The adult myopathic form of CPT II deficiency is relatively benign and difficult to diagnose. The point mutation S113L in CPT2 is very common in Caucasian patients, whereas F383Y is the most common mutation among Japanese patients. We herein present a case of CPT II deficiency in a Japanese patient homozygous for the missense mutation S113L. The patient showed a decreased frequency of rhabdomyolysis recurrence after the administration of a diet containing medium-chain triglyceride oil and supplementation with carnitine and bezafibrate. PMID:27629963

  3. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called “CENP-A”) is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923–937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest. PMID:26294252

  4. Point mutation impairs centromeric CENH3 loading and induces haploid plants.

    PubMed

    Karimi-Ashtiyani, Raheleh; Ishii, Takayoshi; Niessen, Markus; Stein, Nils; Heckmann, Stefan; Gurushidze, Maia; Banaei-Moghaddam, Ali Mohammad; Fuchs, Jörg; Schubert, Veit; Koch, Kerstin; Weiss, Oda; Demidov, Dmitri; Schmidt, Klaus; Kumlehn, Jochen; Houben, Andreas

    2015-09-01

    The chromosomal position of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 (also called "CENP-A") is the assembly site for the kinetochore complex of active centromeres. Any error in transcription, translation, modification, or incorporation can affect the ability to assemble intact CENH3 chromatin and can cause centromere inactivation [Allshire RC, Karpen GH (2008) Nat Rev Genet 9 (12):923-937]. Here we show that a single-point amino acid exchange in the centromere-targeting domain of CENH3 leads to reduced centromere loading of CENH3 in barley, sugar beet, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Haploids were obtained after cenh3 L130F-complemented cenh3-null mutant plants were crossed with wild-type A. thaliana. In contrast, in a noncompeting situation (i.e., centromeres possessing only mutated or only wild-type CENH3), no uniparental chromosome elimination occurs during early embryogenesis. The high degree of evolutionary conservation of the identified mutation site offers promising opportunities for application in a wide range of crop species in which haploid technology is of interest. PMID:26294252

  5. Insights into enzyme point mutation effect by molecular simulation: phenylethylamine oxidation catalyzed by monoamine oxidase A.

    PubMed

    Oanca, Gabriel; Purg, Miha; Mavri, Janez; Shih, Jean C; Stare, Jernej

    2016-05-21

    The I335Y point mutation effect on the kinetics of phenylethylamine decomposition catalyzed by monoamine oxidase A was elucidated by means of molecular simulation. The established empirical valence bond methodology was used in conjunction with the free energy perturbation sampling technique and a classical force field representing the state of reactants and products. The methodology allows for the simulation of chemical reactions, in the present case the breaking of the α-C-H bond in a phenylethylamine substrate and the subsequent hydrogen transfer to the flavin cofactor, resulting in the formation of the N-H bond on flavin. The empirical parameters were calibrated against the experimental data for the simulated reaction in a wild type protein and then used for the calculation of the reaction free energy profile in the I335Y mutant. In very good agreement with the measured kinetic data, mutation increases the free energy barrier for the rate limiting step by slightly more than 1 kcal mol(-1) and consequently decreases the rate constant by about an order of magnitude. The magnitude of the computed effect slightly varies with simulation settings, but always remains in reasonable agreement with the experiment. Analysis of trajectories reveals a major change in the interaction between phenyl rings of the substrate and the neighboring Phe352 residue upon the I335Y mutation due to the increased local polarity, leading to an attenuated quadrupole interaction between the rings and destabilization of the transition state. Additionally, the increased local polarity in the mutant allows for a larger number of water molecules to be present near the active site, effectively shielding the catalytic effect of the enzyme and contributing to the increased barrier. PMID:27121693

  6. DNA methylation associated with repeat-induced point mutation in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Singer, M J; Marcotte, B A; Selker, E U

    1995-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a process that efficiently detects DNA duplications prior to meiosis in Neurospora crassa and peppers them with G:C to A:T mutations. Cytosine methylation is typically associated with sequences affected by RIP, and methylated cytosines are not limited to CpG dinucleotides. We generated and characterized a collection of methylated and unmethylated amRIP alleles to investigate the connection(s) between DNA methylation and mutations by RIP. Alleles of am harboring 84 to 158 mutations in the 2.6-kb region that was duplicated were heavily methylated and triggered de novo methylation when reintroduced into vegetative N. crassa cells. Alleles containing 45 and 56 mutations were methylated in the strains originally isolated but did not become methylated when reintroduced into vegetative cells. This provides the first evidence for de novo methylation in the sexual cycle and for a maintenance methylation system in Neurospora cells. No methylation was detected in am alleles containing 8 and 21 mutations. All mutations in the eight primary alleles studied were either G to A or C to T, with respect to the coding strand of the am gene, suggesting that RIP results in only one type of mutation. We consider possibilities for how DNA methylation is triggered by some sequences altered by RIP. PMID:7565710

  7. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find “hot spots” in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants’ experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models. PMID:26361227

  8. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models.

  9. Structure Based Thermostability Prediction Models for Protein Single Point Mutations with Machine Learning Tools.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lei; Yarlagadda, Ramya; Reed, Charles C

    2015-01-01

    Thermostability issue of protein point mutations is a common occurrence in protein engineering. An application which predicts the thermostability of mutants can be helpful for guiding decision making process in protein design via mutagenesis. An in silico point mutation scanning method is frequently used to find "hot spots" in proteins for focused mutagenesis. ProTherm (http://gibk26.bio.kyutech.ac.jp/jouhou/Protherm/protherm.html) is a public database that consists of thousands of protein mutants' experimentally measured thermostability. Two data sets based on two differently measured thermostability properties of protein single point mutations, namely the unfolding free energy change (ddG) and melting temperature change (dTm) were obtained from this database. Folding free energy change calculation from Rosetta, structural information of the point mutations as well as amino acid physical properties were obtained for building thermostability prediction models with informatics modeling tools. Five supervised machine learning methods (support vector machine, random forests, artificial neural network, naïve Bayes classifier, K nearest neighbor) and partial least squares regression are used for building the prediction models. Binary and ternary classifications as well as regression models were built and evaluated. Data set redundancy and balancing, the reverse mutations technique, feature selection, and comparison to other published methods were discussed. Rosetta calculated folding free energy change ranked as the most influential features in all prediction models. Other descriptors also made significant contributions to increasing the accuracy of the prediction models. PMID:26361227

  10. Rapid evolution of cis-regulatory sequences via local point mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. R.; Wray, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although the evolution of protein-coding sequences within genomes is well understood, the same cannot be said of the cis-regulatory regions that control transcription. Yet, changes in gene expression are likely to constitute an important component of phenotypic evolution. We simulated the evolution of new transcription factor binding sites via local point mutations. The results indicate that new binding sites appear and become fixed within populations on microevolutionary timescales under an assumption of neutral evolution. Even combinations of two new binding sites evolve very quickly. We predict that local point mutations continually generate considerable genetic variation that is capable of altering gene expression.

  11. Point mutations throughout the GLI3 gene cause Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalff-Suske, M; Wild, A; Topp, J; Wessling, M; Jacobsen, E M; Bornholdt, D; Engel, H; Heuer, H; Aalfs, C M; Ausems, M G; Barone, R; Herzog, A; Heutink, P; Homfray, T; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; König, R; Kunze, J; Meinecke, P; Müller, D; Rizzo, R; Strenge, S; Superti-Furga, A; Grzeschik, K H

    1999-09-01

    Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome, characterized by craniofacial and limb anomalies (GCPS; MIM 175700), previously has been demonstrated to be associated with translocations as well as point mutations affecting one allele of the zinc finger gene GLI3. In addition to GCPS, Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS; MIM 146510) and post-axial polydactyly type A (PAP-A; MIM 174200), two other disorders of human development, are caused by GLI3 mutations. In order to gain more insight into the mutational spectrum associated with a single phenotype, we report here the extension of the GLI3 mutation analysis to 24 new GCPS cases. We report the identification of 15 novel mutations present in one of the patient's GLI3 alleles. The mutations map throughout the coding gene regions. The majority are truncating mutations (nine of 15) that engender prematurely terminated protein products mostly but not exclusively N-terminally to or within the central region encoding the DNA-binding domain. Two missense and two splicing mutations mapping within the zinc finger motifs presumably also interfere with DNA binding. The five mutations identified within the protein regions C-terminal to the zinc fingers putatively affect additional functional properties of GLI3. In cell transfection experiments using fusions of the DNA-binding domain of yeast GAL4 to different segments of GLI3, transactivating capacity was assigned to two adjacent independent domains (TA(1)and TA(2)) in the C-terminal third of GLI3. Since these are the only functional domains affected by three C-terminally truncating mutations, we postulate that GCPS may be due either to haploinsufficiency resulting from the complete loss of one gene copy or to functional haploinsufficiency related to compromised properties of this transcription factor such as DNA binding and transactivation. PMID:10441342

  12. Stochastic Drift in Mitochondrial DNA Point Mutations: A Novel Perspective Ex Silico

    PubMed Central

    Poovathingal, Suresh Kumar; Gruber, Jan; Halliwell, Barry; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2009-01-01

    The mitochondrial free radical theory of aging (mFRTA) implicates Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced mutations of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a major cause of aging. However, fifty years after its inception, several of its premises are intensely debated. Much of this uncertainty is due to the large range of values in the reported experimental data, for example on oxidative damage and mutational burden in mtDNA. This is in part due to limitations with available measurement technologies. Here we show that sample preparations in some assays necessitating high dilution of DNA (single molecule level) may introduce significant statistical variability. Adding to this complexity is the intrinsically stochastic nature of cellular processes, which manifests in cells from the same tissue harboring varying mutation load. In conjunction, these random elements make the determination of the underlying mutation dynamics extremely challenging. Our in silico stochastic study reveals the effect of coupling the experimental variability and the intrinsic stochasticity of aging process in some of the reported experimental data. We also show that the stochastic nature of a de novo point mutation generated during embryonic development is a major contributor of different mutation burdens in the individuals of mouse population. Analysis of simulation results leads to several new insights on the relevance of mutation stochasticity in the context of dividing tissues and the plausibility of ROS ”vicious cycle” hypothesis. PMID:19936024

  13. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates. PMID:26982177

  14. Novel point mutations in the ERG11 gene in clinical isolates of azole resistant Candida species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Danielly Beraldo dos Santos; Rodrigues, Luana Mireli Carbonera; Almeida, Adriana Araújo de; Oliveira, Kelly Mari Pires de; Grisolia, Alexéia Barufatti

    2016-03-01

    The azoles are the class of medications most commonly used to fight infections caused by Candida sp. Typically, resistance can be attributed to mutations in ERG11 gene (CYP51) which encodes the cytochrome P450 14α-demethylase, the primary target for the activity of azoles. The objective of this study was to identify mutations in the coding region of theERG11 gene in clinical isolates of Candida species known to be resistant to azoles. We identified three new synonymous mutations in the ERG11 gene in the isolates of Candida glabrata (C108G, C423T and A1581G) and two new nonsynonymous mutations in the isolates of Candida krusei--A497C (Y166S) and G1570A (G524R). The functional consequence of these nonsynonymous mutations was predicted using evolutionary conservation scores. The G524R mutation did not have effect on 14α-demethylase functionality, while the Y166S mutation was found to affect the enzyme. This observation suggests a possible link between the mutation and dose-dependent sensitivity to voriconazole in the clinical isolate of C. krusei. Although the presence of the Y166S in phenotype of reduced azole sensitivity observed in isolate C. krusei demands investigation, it might contribute to the search of new therapeutic agents against resistant Candida isolates.

  15. A New Approach To the Diagnosis of Point Mutations in Native DNA Using Graphene Oxide.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, A A; Maksimova, N R; Kaimonov, V S; Alexandrov, G N; Smagulova, S A

    2016-01-01

    Development of new methods for the diagnosis of point mutations is a pressing issue. We have developed a new approach to the design of graphene oxide-based test systems for the diagnosis of point mutations in native DNA. This new approach is based on the use of graphene oxide for the adsorption and quenching of fluorescently labeled primers in a post-amplification PCR mixture followed by detection of fluorescently labeled PCR products. It is possible to detect fluorescently labelled amplicons in the presence of an excess of primers in a PCR product solution due to the different affinities of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA molecules to graphene oxide, as well as the ability of graphene oxide to act as a quencher of the fluorophores adsorbed on its surface. The new approach was tested by designing a graphene oxide-based test system for the DNA diagnosis of the point mutation associated with the development of the 3M syndrome in Yakuts. The developed approach enables one to design graphene oxide-based test systems suitable for the diagnosis of any point mutations in native DNA. PMID:27437142

  16. A New Approach To the Diagnosis of Point Mutations in Native DNA Using Graphene Oxide

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, A.A.; Maksimova, N.R.; Kaimonov, V.S.; Alexandrov, G.N.; Smagulova, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Development of new methods for the diagnosis of point mutations is a pressing issue. We have developed a new approach to the design of graphene oxide-based test systems for the diagnosis of point mutations in native DNA. This new approach is based on the use of graphene oxide for the adsorption and quenching of fluorescently labeled primers in a post-amplification PCR mixture followed by detection of fluorescently labeled PCR products. It is possible to detect fluorescently labelled amplicons in the presence of an excess of primers in a PCR product solution due to the different affinities of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA molecules to graphene oxide, as well as the ability of graphene oxide to act as a quencher of the fluorophores adsorbed on its surface. The new approach was tested by designing a graphene oxide-based test system for the DNA diagnosis of the point mutation associated with the development of the 3M syndrome in Yakuts. The developed approach enables one to design graphene oxide-based test systems suitable for the diagnosis of any point mutations in native DNA. PMID:27437142

  17. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia: clinical spectrum, experience with hormonal diagnosis, and report on new point mutations of the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Peter, M; Viemann, M; Partsch, C J; Sippell, W G

    1998-08-01

    X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare developmental disorder of the human adrenal cortex and is caused by deletion or mutation of the DAX-1 gene, a recently discovered member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequently associated with AHC. AHC occurs as part of a contiguous gene syndrome together with glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. The present series, collected over the past 2 decades, includes 18 AHC boys from 16 families: 4 with AHC, GKD, and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy; 2 with AHC and GKD; and 12 with AHC (5 young adults with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). Most of the boys presented with salt wasting and hyperpigmentation during the neonatal period. Plasma steroid determinations performed in the first weeks of life often showed confusing results, probably caused by steroids produced in the neonates' persisting fetocortex. Aldosterone deficiency usually preceded cortisol deficiency, which explains why the patients more often presented with salt-wasting rather than with hypoglycemic symptoms. An ACTH test was often necessary to detect cortisol deficiency in the very young infants. In some patients, serial testing was necessary to establish the correct diagnosis. In 4 boys studied during the first 3 months after birth, we found pubertal LH, FSH, and testosterone plasma levels indicating postnatal transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as in normal boys. Previous studies have shown that the DAX-1 gene is deleted in the AHC patients with a contiguous gene syndrome and is mutated in nondeletion patients. Most of the point mutations identified in AHC patients were frameshift mutations and stop mutations. In the 15 patients available for molecular analysis of the DAX-1 gene, there were large deletions in 6 patients and point mutations in another 7 patients. All of the point mutations identified in the present study resulted in a nonfunctional

  18. Adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL) and infantile autism: Absence of previously reported point mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Fon, E.A.; Sarrazin, J.; Rouleau, G.A.

    1995-12-18

    Autism is a heterogeneous neuropsychiatric syndrome of unknown etiology. There is evidence that a deficiency in the enzyme adenylosuccinate lyase (ADSL), essential for de novo purine biosynthesis, could be involved in the pathogenesis of certain cases. A point mutation in the ADSL gene, resulting in a predicted serine-to-proline substitution and conferring structural instability to the mutant enzyme, has been reported previously in 3 affected siblings. In order to determine the prevalence of the mutation, we PCR-amplified the exon spanning the site of this mutation from the genomic DNA of patients fulfilling DSM-III-R criteria for autistic disorder. None of the 119 patients tested were found to have this mutation. Furthermore, on preliminary screening using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP), no novel mutations were detected in the coding sequence of four ADSL exons, spanning approximately 50% of the cDNA. In light of these findings, it appears that mutations in the ADSL gene represent a distinctly uncommon cause of autism. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Insilico modeling and molecular dynamic simulation of claudin-1 point mutations in HCV infection.

    PubMed

    Vipperla, Bhavaniprasad; Dass, J Febin Prabhu; Jayanthi, S

    2014-01-01

    Claudin-1 (CLDN1) in association with envelope glycoprotein (CD81) mediates the fusion of HCV into the cytosol. Recent studies have indicated that point mutations in CLDN1 are important for the entry of hepatitis C virus (HCV). To validate these findings, we employed a computational platform to investigate the structural effect of two point mutations (I32M and E48K). Initially, three-dimensional co-ordinates for CLDN1 receptor sequence were generated. Then, three mutant models were built using the point mutation including a double mutant (I32M/E48K) model from the native model structure. Finally, all the four model structures including the native and three mutant models were subjected to molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for a period of 25 ns to appreciate their dynamic behavior. The MD trajectory files were analyzed using cluster and principal component method. The analysis suggested that either of the single mutation has negligible effect on the overall structure of CLDN1 compared to the double mutant form. However, the double mutant model of CLDN1 shows significant negative impact through the impairment of H-bonds and the simultaneous increase in solvent accessible surface area. Our simulation results are visibly consistent with the experimental report suggesting that the CLDN1 receptor distortion is prominent due to the double mutation with large surface accessibility. This increase in accessible surface area due to the coexistence of double mutation may be presumed as one of the key factor that results in permissive action of HCV attachment and infection. PMID:23914916

  20. Sensitive detection of point mutation by electrochemiluminescence and DNA ligase-based assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Huijuan; Wu, Baoyan

    2008-12-01

    The technology of single-base mutation detection plays an increasingly important role in diagnosis and prognosis of genetic-based diseases. Here we reported a new method for the analysis of point mutations in genomic DNA through the integration of allele-specific oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) with magnetic beads-based electrochemiluminescence (ECL) detection scheme. In this assay the tris(bipyridine) ruthenium (TBR) labeled probe and the biotinylated probe are designed to perfectly complementary to the mutant target, thus a ligation can be generated between those two probes by Taq DNA Ligase in the presence of mutant target. If there is an allele mismatch, the ligation does not take place. The ligation products are then captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the ECL signal of the TBR label. Results showed that the new method held a low detection limit down to 10 fmol and was successfully applied in the identification of point mutations from ASTC-α-1, PANC-1 and normal cell lines in codon 273 of TP53 oncogene. In summary, this method provides a sensitive, cost-effective and easy operation approach for point mutation detection.

  1. Method for detecting point mutations in DNA utilizing fluorescence energy transfer

    DOEpatents

    Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Parkhurst, Kay M.; Middendorf, Lyle

    2001-01-01

    A method for detecting point mutations in DNA using a fluorescently labeled oligomeric probe and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is disclosed. The selected probe is initially labeled at each end with a fluorescence dye, which act together as a donor/acceptor pair for FRET. The fluorescence emission from the dyes changes dramatically from the duplex stage, wherein the probe is hybridized to the complementary strand of DNA, to the single strand stage, when the probe is melted to become detached from the DNA. The change in fluorescence is caused by the dyes coming into closer proximity after melting occurs and the probe becomes detached from the DNA strand. The change in fluorescence emission as a function of temperature is used to calculate the melting temperature of the complex or T.sub.m. In the case where there is a base mismatch between the probe and the DNA strand, indicating a point mutation, the T.sub.m has been found to be significantly lower than the T.sub.m for a perfectly match probelstand duplex. The present invention allows for the detection of the existence and magnitude of T.sub.m, which allows for the quick and accurate detection of a point mutation in the DNA strand and, in some applications, the determination of the approximate location of the mutation within the sequence.

  2. A single-point mutation enhances dual functionality of a scorpion toxin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueli; Gao, Bin; Zhu, Shunyi

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion venom represents a tremendous, hitherto partially explored peptide library that has been proven to be useful not only for understanding ion channels but also for drug design. MeuTXKα3 is a functionally unknown scorpion toxin-like peptide. Here we describe new transcripts of this gene arising from alternative polyadenylation and its biological function as well as a mutant with a single-point substitution at site 30. Native-like MeuTXKα3 and its mutant were produced in Escherichia coli and their toxic function against Drosophila Shaker K(+) channel and its mammalian counterparts (rKv1.1-rKv1.3) were assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp technique. The results show that MeuTXKα3 is a weak toxin with a wide-spectrum of activity on both Drosophila and mammalian K(+) channels. The substitution of a proline at site 30 by an asparagine, an evolutionarily conserved functional residue in the scorpion α-KTx family, led to an increased activity on rKv1.2 and rKv1.3 but a decreased activity on the Shaker channel without changing the potency on rKv1.1, suggesting a key role of this site in species selectivity of scorpion toxins. MeuTXKα3 was also active on a variety of bacteria with lethal concentrations ranging from 4.66 to 52.01μM and the mutant even had stronger activity on some of these bacterial species. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on a bi-functional short-chain peptide in the lesser Asian scorpion venom. Further extensive mutations of MeuTXKα3 at site 30 could help improve its K(+) channel-blocking and antibacterial functions.

  3. Fast, sensitive point of care electrochemical molecular system for point mutation and select agent detection.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, J A; Nemeth, A C; Dicke, W C; Wang, D; Manalili Wheeler, S; Hannis, J C; Collier, G B; Drader, J J

    2016-07-01

    Point of care molecular diagnostics benefits from a portable battery-operated device capable of performing a fast turnaround using reliable inexpensive cartridges. We describe a prototype device for performing a molecular diagnostics test for clinical and biodefense samples in 16 minutes using a prototype capable of an 8 minute PCR reaction, followed by hybridization and detection on an electrochemical microarray based on the i-STAT® system. We used human buccal swabs for hemochromatosis testing including in-device DNA extraction. Additional clinical and biodefense samples included influenza A and bacterial select agents Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis and Francisella tularensis. PMID:27280174

  4. Active-to-absorbing-state phase transition in an evolving population with mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Niladri

    2015-10-01

    We study the active to absorbing phase transition (AAPT) in a simple two-component model system for a species and its mutant. We uncover the nontrivial critical scaling behavior and weak dynamic scaling near the AAPT that shows the significance of mutation and highlights the connection of this model with the well-known directed percolation universality class. Our model should be a useful starting point to study how mutation may affect extinction or survival of a species.

  5. De novo point mutations in patients diagnosed with ataxic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Perkins, Emma M; Miller, Jack W; Davies, Wayne I L; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Fawcett, Katherine A; Sims, David; Gillard, Elodie; Hudspith, Karl; Skehel, Paul; Williams, Jonathan; O'Regan, Mary; Jayawant, Sandeep; Jefferson, Rosalind; Hughes, Sarah; Lustenberger, Andrea; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Jackson, Mandy; Tucker, Stephen J; Németh, Andrea H

    2015-07-01

    Cerebral palsy is a sporadic disorder with multiple likely aetiologies, but frequently considered to be caused by birth asphyxia. Genetic investigations are rarely performed in patients with cerebral palsy and there is little proven evidence of genetic causes. As part of a large project investigating children with ataxia, we identified four patients in our cohort with a diagnosis of ataxic cerebral palsy. They were investigated using either targeted next generation sequencing or trio-based exome sequencing and were found to have mutations in three different genes, KCNC3, ITPR1 and SPTBN2. All the mutations were de novo and associated with increased paternal age. The mutations were shown to be pathogenic using a combination of bioinformatics analysis and in vitro model systems. This work is the first to report that the ataxic subtype of cerebral palsy can be caused by de novo dominant point mutations, which explains the sporadic nature of these cases. We conclude that at least some subtypes of cerebral palsy may be caused by de novo genetic mutations and patients with a clinical diagnosis of cerebral palsy should be genetically investigated before causation is ascribed to perinatal asphyxia or other aetiologies.

  6. The fitness effects of a point mutation in Escherichia coli change with founding population density.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huansheng; Plague, Gordon R

    2016-08-01

    Although intraspecific competition plays a seminal role in organismal evolution, little is known about the fitness effects of mutations at different population densities. We identified a point mutation in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) gene in Escherichia coli that confers significantly higher fitness than the wildtype at low founding population density, but significantly lower fitness at high founding density. Because CRP is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of nearly 500 genes, we compared global gene expression profiles of the mutant and wildtype strains. This mutation (S63F) does not affect expression of crp itself, but it does significantly affect expression of 170 and 157 genes at high and low founding density, respectively. Interestingly, acid resistance genes, some of which are known to exhibit density-dependent effects in E. coli, were consistently differentially expressed at high but not low density. As such, these genes may play a key role in reducing the crp mutant's fitness at high density, although other differentially expressed genes almost certainly also contribute to the fluctuating fitness differences we observed. Whatever the causes, we suspect that many mutations may exhibit density-dependent fitness effects in natural populations, so the fate of new mutations may frequently depend on the effective population size when they originate. PMID:27344657

  7. De novo point mutations in patients diagnosed with ataxic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Parolin Schnekenberg, Ricardo; Perkins, Emma M.; Miller, Jack W.; Davies, Wayne I. L.; D’Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Fawcett, Katherine A.; Sims, David; Gillard, Elodie; Hudspith, Karl; Skehel, Paul; Williams, Jonathan; O’Regan, Mary; Jayawant, Sandeep; Jefferson, Rosalind; Hughes, Sarah; Lustenberger, Andrea; Ragoussis, Jiannis

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a sporadic disorder with multiple likely aetiologies, but frequently considered to be caused by birth asphyxia. Genetic investigations are rarely performed in patients with cerebral palsy and there is little proven evidence of genetic causes. As part of a large project investigating children with ataxia, we identified four patients in our cohort with a diagnosis of ataxic cerebral palsy. They were investigated using either targeted next generation sequencing or trio-based exome sequencing and were found to have mutations in three different genes, KCNC3, ITPR1 and SPTBN2. All the mutations were de novo and associated with increased paternal age. The mutations were shown to be pathogenic using a combination of bioinformatics analysis and in vitro model systems. This work is the first to report that the ataxic subtype of cerebral palsy can be caused by de novo dominant point mutations, which explains the sporadic nature of these cases. We conclude that at least some subtypes of cerebral palsy may be caused by de novo genetic mutations and patients with a clinical diagnosis of cerebral palsy should be genetically investigated before causation is ascribed to perinatal asphyxia or other aetiologies. PMID:25981959

  8. The fitness effects of a point mutation in Escherichia coli change with founding population density.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huansheng; Plague, Gordon R

    2016-08-01

    Although intraspecific competition plays a seminal role in organismal evolution, little is known about the fitness effects of mutations at different population densities. We identified a point mutation in the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) gene in Escherichia coli that confers significantly higher fitness than the wildtype at low founding population density, but significantly lower fitness at high founding density. Because CRP is a transcription factor that regulates the expression of nearly 500 genes, we compared global gene expression profiles of the mutant and wildtype strains. This mutation (S63F) does not affect expression of crp itself, but it does significantly affect expression of 170 and 157 genes at high and low founding density, respectively. Interestingly, acid resistance genes, some of which are known to exhibit density-dependent effects in E. coli, were consistently differentially expressed at high but not low density. As such, these genes may play a key role in reducing the crp mutant's fitness at high density, although other differentially expressed genes almost certainly also contribute to the fluctuating fitness differences we observed. Whatever the causes, we suspect that many mutations may exhibit density-dependent fitness effects in natural populations, so the fate of new mutations may frequently depend on the effective population size when they originate.

  9. Combining isothermal rolling circle amplification and electrochemiluminescence for highly sensitive point mutation detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Qiang; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2008-12-01

    Many pathogenic and genetic diseases are associated with changes in the sequence of particular genes. We describe here a rapid and highly efficient assay for the detection of point mutation. This method is a combination of isothermal rolling circle amplification (RCA) and high sensitive electrochemluminescence (ECL) detection. In the design, a circular template generated by ligation upon the recognition of a point mutation on DNA targets was amplified isothermally by the Phi29 polymerase using a biotinylated primer. The elongation products were hybridized with tris (bipyridine) ruthenium (TBR)-tagged probes and detected in a magnetic bead based ECL platform, indicating the mutation occurrence. P53 was chosen as a model for the identification of this method. The method allowed sensitive determination of the P53 mutation from wild-type and mutant samples. The main advantage of RCA-ECL is that it can be performed under isothermal conditions and avoids the generation of false-positive results. Furthermore, ECL provides a faster, more sensitive, and economical option to currently available electrophoresis-based methods.

  10. JAK-2 V617F mutation increases heparanase procoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Inna; Chap, Dafna; Hoffman, Ron; Axelman, Elena; Brenner, Benjamin; Nadir, Yona

    2016-01-01

    Patients with polycythaemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythaemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are at increased risk of arterial and venous thrombosis. In patients with ET a positive correlation was observed between JAK-2 V617F mutation, that facilitates erythropoietin receptor signalling, and thrombotic events, although the mechanism involved is not clear. We previously demonstrated that heparanase protein forms a complex and enhances the activity of the blood coagulation initiator tissue factor (TF) which leads to increased factor Xa production and subsequent activation of the coagulation system. The present study was aimed to evaluate heparanase procoagulant activity in myeloproliferative neoplasms. Forty bone marrow biopsies of patients with ET, PV, PMF and chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML) were immunostained to heparanase, TF and TF pathway inhibitor (TFPI). Erythropoietin receptor positive cell lines U87 human glioma and MCF-7 human breast carcinoma were studied. Heparanase and TFPI staining were more prominent in ET, PV and PMF compared to CML. The strongest staining was in JAK-2 positive ET biopsies. Heparanase level and procoagulant activity were higher in U87 cells transfected to over express JAK-2 V617F mutation compared to control and the effect was reversed using JAK-2 inhibitors (Ruxolitinib, VZ3) and hydroxyurea, although the latter drug did not inhibit JAK-2 phosphorylation. Erythropoietin increased while JAK-2 inhibitors decreased the heparanase level and procoagulant activity in U87 and MCF-7 parental cells. In conclusion, JAK-2 is involved in heparanase up-regulation via the erythropoietin receptor. The present findings may potentially point to a new mechanism of thrombosis in JAK-2 positive ET patients. PMID:26489695

  11. An ECL-PCR method for quantitative detection of point mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Debin; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Chen, Qun; Liu, Jinfeng

    2005-04-01

    A new method for identification of point mutations was proposed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a sequence from genomic DNA was followed by digestion with a kind of restriction enzyme, which only cut the wild-type amplicon containing its recognition site. Reaction products were detected by electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay after adsorption of the resulting DNA duplexes to the solid phase. One strand of PCR products carries biotin to be bound on a streptavidin-coated microbead for sample selection. Another strand carries Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR) to react with tripropylamine (TPA) to emit light for ECL detection. The method was applied to detect a specific point mutation in H-ras oncogene in T24 cell line. The results show that the detection limit for H-ras amplicon is 100 fmol and the linear range is more than 3 orders of magnitude, thus, make quantitative analysis possible. The genotype can be clearly discriminated. Results of the study suggest that ECL-PCR is a feasible quantitative method for safe, sensitive and rapid detection of point mutation in human genes.

  12. Dew inspired breathing-based detection of genetic point mutation visualized by naked eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Liping; Wang, Tongzhou; Huang, Tianqi; Hou, Wei; Huang, Guoliang; Du, Yanan

    2014-09-01

    A novel label-free method based on breathing-induced vapor condensation was developed for detection of genetic point mutation. The dew-inspired detection was realized by integration of target-induced DNA ligation with rolling circle amplification (RCA). The vapor condensation induced by breathing transduced the RCA-amplified variances in DNA contents into visible contrast. The image could be recorded by a cell phone for further or even remote analysis. This green assay offers a naked-eye-reading method potentially applied for point-of-care liver cancer diagnosis in resource-limited regions.

  13. Point mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy in a Latvian population

    PubMed Central

    Baumane, Kristine; Zalite, Solveiga; Ranka, Renate; Zole, Egija; Pole, Ilva; Sepetiene, Svetlana; Laganovska, Guna; Baumanis, Viesturs; Pliss, Liana

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To study mutations associated with Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) in patients suspected of having this mitochondrial disorder in a Latvian population. Additional aims were to determine the heteroplasmy status of all non-synonymous polymorphisms identified in the current study and to identify the mitochondrial haplogroups of the studied participants because these factors may contribute to the manifestation of LHON. Methods Twelve patients, including patients in two families, were enrolled in the current study. LHON was suspected based on the findings of ophthalmologic examinations. In clinically affected individuals, the presence of all previously reported LHON-associated mutations was assessed with sequencing analysis. Additionally, the SURVEYOR endonuclease assay was used to detect heteroplasmy. The mitochondrial haplogroups were identified with restriction analysis and the sequencing of hypervariable segment 1. Results In one family (mother and son), there was one primary LHON-associated mutation, G11778A. In addition, one rare previously reported LHON-associated polymorphism, A13637G, was detected in two unrelated patients. A non-synonymous polymorphism at T6253C was found in one individual. This mutation was reported in the background of the 3460 mutation among LHON patients in a Chinese population. No non-synonymous point mutations in mitochondrial DNA were found in five of the study participants. Conclusions Molecular analysis of 12 patients with suspected LHON confirmed the diagnosis in four patients and allowed the use of appropriate prophylactic measures and treatment. Further investigations and additional studies of different populations are necessary to confirm the role of the non-synonymous polymorphisms A13637G and T6253C in the manifestation of LHON and the associations of these polymorphisms with mitochondrial haplogroups and heteroplasmy. PMID:24319328

  14. Four novel point mutations in the PMP22 gene with phenotypes of HNPP and Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Brožková, Dana; Mazanec, Radim; Rychlý, Zdeněk; Haberlová, Jana; Böhm, Jiří; Staněk, Jan; Plevová, Pavlína; Lisoňová, Jana; Sabová, Jana; Sakmaryová, Iva; Seeman, Pavel

    2011-11-01

    We report four novel point mutations in the PMP22 gene with two different phenotypes: mutation p.Ser79Thr arose de novo in a patient with the Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy (DSN) phenotype; and mutations c.78+5 G>A, c.320-1 G>C, and p.Trp140Stop segregated with HNPP in 5 families.Our findings show that point mutations in PMP22 may be more likely in HNPP patients than in CMT1 patients after exclusion of CMT1A/HNPP. PMID:22006697

  15. Cytosine Methylation Associated with Repeat-Induced Point Mutation Causes Epigenetic Gene Silencing in Neurospora Crassa

    PubMed Central

    Irelan, J. T.; Selker, E. U.

    1997-01-01

    Repeated DNA sequences are frequently mutated during the sexual cycle in Neurospora crassa by a process named repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). RIP is often associated with methylation of cytosine residues in and around the mutated sequences. Here we demonstrate that this methylation can silence a gene located in nearby, unique sequences. A large proportion of strains that had undergone RIP of a linked duplication flanking a single-copy transgene, hph (hygromycin B phosphotransferase), showed partial silencing of hph. These strains were all heavily methylated throughout the single-copy hph sequences and the flanking sequences. Silencing was alleviated by preventing methylation, either by 5-azacytidine (5AC) treatment or by introduction of a mutation (eth-1) known to reduce intracellular levels of S-adenosylmethionine. Silenced strains exhibited spontaneous reactivation of hph at frequencies of 10(-4) to 0.5. Reactivated strains, as well as cells that were treated with 5AC, gave rise to cultures that were hypomethylated and partially hygromycin resistant, indicating that some of the original methylation was propagated by a maintenance mechanism. Gene expression levels were found to be variable within a population of clonally related cells, and this variation was correlated with epigenetically propagated differences in methylation patterns. PMID:9178002

  16. Partial duplication and point mutations of the ornithine carbamoyl transferase (OCT) gene in congenital hyperammonaemia

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert-Dussardier, B.; Rozet, J.M.; Seques, B.; Munnich, A.

    1994-09-01

    ACT deficiency is an enzymopathy of the urea cycle inherited as a partially dominant X-linked trait. Affected males often die during the neonatal period with untractable hyperammonaemic coma but may sometimes present with a late onset disease. Heterozygous females are sometimes symptomatic. Twenty-two unrelated patients (18 males and 4 females) were studied by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis followed by direct sequencing of the OCT exons. Nine of them were found to carry point mutations already reported by others (G50Z, E87K, L88N, R827, R141Z, P225L) or by our group (R277W, 2 patients). A duplication (4 bp) in exon 5 (nt177-XTCACTCAC Xnt178) was found in a male patient with a severe neonatal OCT deficiency. This change led to a frameshift mutation with no in-frame stop codon. To our knowledge, this is the first duplication reported in OCT deficiency. Eight novel missense mutations were found in 12 additional patients: R40H (exon 2, 3 patients), C109S (exon 4, 1 patient), T125M (exon 5, 1 patient), R129Q (exon 5, 3 patients), G188R (exon 6, 1 patient), A209V (exon 6, 1 patient), H302L (exon 9, 2 patients). Four of these mutations occurred in CpG doublets and all of them involved conserved regions of the gene. No such alterations were found in 70 control genes. Phenotype-genotype correlations will be discussed.

  17. Rapid generation of mouse models with defined point mutations by the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    PubMed

    Inui, Masafumi; Miyado, Mami; Igarashi, Maki; Tamano, Moe; Kubo, Atsushi; Yamashita, Satoshi; Asahara, Hiroshi; Fukami, Maki; Takada, Shuji

    2014-06-23

    Introducing a point mutation is a fundamental method used to demonstrate the roles of particular nucleotides or amino acids in the genetic elements or proteins, and is widely used in in vitro experiments based on cultured cells and exogenously provided DNA. However, the in vivo application of this approach by modifying genomic loci is uncommon, partly due to its technical and temporal demands. This leaves many in vitro findings un-validated under in vivo conditions. We herein applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to generate mice with point mutations in their genomes, which led to single amino acid substitutions in proteins of interest. By microinjecting gRNA, hCas9 mRNA and single-stranded donor oligonucleotides (ssODN) into mouse zygotes, we introduced defined genomic modifications in their genome with a low cost and in a short time. Both single gRNA/WT hCas9 and double nicking set-ups were effective. We also found that the distance between the modification site and gRNA target site was a significant parameter affecting the efficiency of the substitution. We believe that this is a powerful technique that can be used to examine the relevance of in vitro findings, as well as the mutations found in patients with genetic disorders, in an in vivo system.

  18. Point Mutations in Centromeric Histone Induce Post-zygotic Incompatibility and Uniparental Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Kuppu, Sundaram; Tan, Ek Han; Nguyen, Hanh; Rodgers, Andrea; Comai, Luca; Britt, Anne B.

    2015-01-01

    The centromeric histone 3 variant (CENH3, aka CENP-A) is essential for the segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis and meiosis. To better define CENH3 functional constraints, we complemented a null allele in Arabidopsis with a variety of mutant alleles, each inducing a single amino acid change in conserved residues of the histone fold domain. Many of these transgenic missense lines displayed wild-type growth and fertility on self-pollination, but exhibited frequent post-zygotic death and uniparental inheritance when crossed with wild-type plants. The failure of centromeres marked by these missense mutation in the histone fold domain of CENH3 reproduces the genome elimination syndromes described with chimeric CENH3 and CENH3 from diverged species. Additionally, evidence that a single point mutation is sufficient to generate a haploid inducer provide a simple one-step method for the identification of non-transgenic haploid inducers in existing mutagenized collections of crop species. As proof of the extreme simplicity of this approach to create haploid-inducing lines, we performed an in silico search for previously identified point mutations in CENH3 and identified an Arabidopsis line carrying the A86V substitution within the histone fold domain. This A87V non-transgenic line, while fully fertile on self-pollination, produced postzygotic death and uniparental haploids when crossed to wild type. PMID:26352591

  19. Activating mutations in CTNNB1 in aldosterone producing adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Åkerström, Tobias; Maharjan, Rajani; Sven Willenberg, Holger; Cupisti, Kenko; Ip, Julian; Moser, Ana; Stålberg, Peter; Robinson, Bruce; Alexander Iwen, K.; Dralle, Henning; Walz, Martin K.; Lehnert, Hendrik; Sidhu, Stan; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso; Hellman, Per; Björklund, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism (PA) is the most common cause of secondary hypertension with a prevalence of 5–10% in unreferred hypertensive patients. Aldosterone producing adenomas (APAs) constitute a large proportion of PA cases and represent a surgically correctable form of the disease. The WNT signaling pathway is activated in APAs. In other tumors, a frequent cause of aberrant WNT signaling is mutation in the CTNNB1 gene coding for β-catenin. Our objective was to screen for CTNNB1 mutations in a well-characterized cohort of 198 APAs. Somatic CTNNB1 mutations were detected in 5.1% of the tumors, occurring mutually exclusive from mutations in KCNJ5, ATP1A1, ATP2B3 and CACNA1D. All of the observed mutations altered serine/threonine residues in the GSK3β binding domain in exon 3. The mutations were associated with stabilized β-catenin and increased AXIN2 expression, suggesting activation of WNT signaling. By CYP11B2 mRNA expression, CYP11B2 protein expression, and direct measurement of aldosterone in tumor tissue, we confirmed the ability for aldosterone production. This report provides compelling evidence that aberrant WNT signaling caused by mutations in CTNNB1 occur in APAs. This also suggests that other mechanisms that constitutively activate the WNT pathway may be important in APA formation. PMID:26815163

  20. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present.

  1. Point Mutations in Exon 1B of APC Reveal Gastric Adenocarcinoma and Proximal Polyposis of the Stomach as a Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Variant.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Woods, Susan L; Healey, Sue; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Lee, Jason S; Sivakumaran, Haran; Wayte, Nicci; Nones, Katia; Waterfall, Joshua J; Pearson, John; Patch, Anne-Marie; Senz, Janine; Ferreira, Manuel A; Kaurah, Pardeep; Mackenzie, Robertson; Heravi-Moussavi, Alireza; Hansford, Samantha; Lannagan, Tamsin R M; Spurdle, Amanda B; Simpson, Peter T; da Silva, Leonard; Lakhani, Sunil R; Clouston, Andrew D; Bettington, Mark; Grimpen, Florian; Busuttil, Rita A; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Boussioutas, Alex; Jeanjean, Marie; Chong, George; Fabre, Aurélie; Olschwang, Sylviane; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Bellos, Evangelos; Coin, Lachlan; Rioux, Kevin; Bathe, Oliver F; Wen, Xiaogang; Martin, Hilary C; Neklason, Deborah W; Davis, Sean R; Walker, Robert L; Calzone, Kathleen A; Avital, Itzhak; Heller, Theo; Koh, Christopher; Pineda, Marbin; Rudloff, Udo; Quezado, Martha; Pichurin, Pavel N; Hulick, Peter J; Weissman, Scott M; Newlin, Anna; Rubinstein, Wendy S; Sampson, Jone E; Hamman, Kelly; Goldgar, David; Poplawski, Nicola; Phillips, Kerry; Schofield, Lyn; Armstrong, Jacqueline; Kiraly-Borri, Cathy; Suthers, Graeme K; Huntsman, David G; Foulkes, William D; Carneiro, Fatima; Lindor, Noralane M; Edwards, Stacey L; French, Juliet D; Waddell, Nicola; Meltzer, Paul S; Worthley, Daniel L; Schrader, Kasmintan A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2016-05-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma and proximal polyposis of the stomach (GAPPS) is an autosomal-dominant cancer-predisposition syndrome with a significant risk of gastric, but not colorectal, adenocarcinoma. We mapped the gene to 5q22 and found loss of the wild-type allele on 5q in fundic gland polyps from affected individuals. Whole-exome and -genome sequencing failed to find causal mutations but, through Sanger sequencing, we identified point mutations in APC promoter 1B that co-segregated with disease in all six families. The mutations reduced binding of the YY1 transcription factor and impaired activity of the APC promoter 1B in luciferase assays. Analysis of blood and saliva from carriers showed allelic imbalance of APC, suggesting that these mutations lead to decreased allele-specific expression in vivo. Similar mutations in APC promoter 1B occur in rare families with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Promoter 1A is methylated in GAPPS and sporadic FGPs and in normal stomach, which suggests that 1B transcripts are more important than 1A in gastric mucosa. This might explain why all known GAPPS-affected families carry promoter 1B point mutations but only rare FAP-affected families carry similar mutations, the colonic cells usually being protected by the expression of the 1A isoform. Gastric polyposis and cancer have been previously described in some FAP-affected individuals with large deletions around promoter 1B. Our finding that GAPPS is caused by point mutations in the same promoter suggests that families with mutations affecting the promoter 1B are at risk of gastric adenocarcinoma, regardless of whether or not colorectal polyps are present. PMID:27087319

  2. Toward point-of-care testing for JAK2 V617F mutation on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xinju; Xu, Xiao; Kang, Zhihua; Li, Shibao; Wu, Zhiyuan; Yang, Zhiliu; Yao, Bo; Guan, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Molecular genetics now plays a crucial role in diagnosis, the identification of prognostic markers, and monitoring of hematological malignancies. Demonstration of acquired changes such as the JAK2 V617F mutation within myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has quickly moved from a research setting to the diagnostic laboratory. Microfluidics-based assays can reduce the assay time and sample/reagent consumption and enhance the reaction efficiency; however, no current assay has integrated isothermal amplification for point-of-care MPN JAK2 V617F mutation testing with a microchip. In this report, an integrated microchip that performs the whole human blood genomic DNA extraction, loop-mediated isothermal nucleic acid amplification (LAMP) and visual detection for point-of-care genetic mutation testing is demonstrated. This method was validated on DNA from cell lines as well as on whole blood from patients with MPN. The results were compared with those obtained by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis. This chip enjoys a high accuracy, operability, and cost/time efficiency within 1h. All these benefits provide the chip with a potency toward a point-of-care genetic analysis. All samples identified as positive by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis (n=27) proved positive when tested by microchip assay. None of the 30 negative controls gave false positive results. In addition, a patient with polycythemia vera diagnosed as being JAK2 V617F-negative by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis was found to be positive by the microchip. This microchip would possibly be very attractive in developing a point-of-care platform for quick preliminary diagnosis of MPN or other severe illness in resource-limited settings. PMID:26235214

  3. Toward point-of-care testing for JAK2 V617F mutation on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Weiwei; Zhang, Xinju; Xu, Xiao; Kang, Zhihua; Li, Shibao; Wu, Zhiyuan; Yang, Zhiliu; Yao, Bo; Guan, Ming

    2015-09-01

    Molecular genetics now plays a crucial role in diagnosis, the identification of prognostic markers, and monitoring of hematological malignancies. Demonstration of acquired changes such as the JAK2 V617F mutation within myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) has quickly moved from a research setting to the diagnostic laboratory. Microfluidics-based assays can reduce the assay time and sample/reagent consumption and enhance the reaction efficiency; however, no current assay has integrated isothermal amplification for point-of-care MPN JAK2 V617F mutation testing with a microchip. In this report, an integrated microchip that performs the whole human blood genomic DNA extraction, loop-mediated isothermal nucleic acid amplification (LAMP) and visual detection for point-of-care genetic mutation testing is demonstrated. This method was validated on DNA from cell lines as well as on whole blood from patients with MPN. The results were compared with those obtained by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis. This chip enjoys a high accuracy, operability, and cost/time efficiency within 1h. All these benefits provide the chip with a potency toward a point-of-care genetic analysis. All samples identified as positive by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis (n=27) proved positive when tested by microchip assay. None of the 30 negative controls gave false positive results. In addition, a patient with polycythemia vera diagnosed as being JAK2 V617F-negative by unlabeled probe melting curve analysis was found to be positive by the microchip. This microchip would possibly be very attractive in developing a point-of-care platform for quick preliminary diagnosis of MPN or other severe illness in resource-limited settings.

  4. Wide variety of point mutations in the H gene of Bombay and para-Bombay individuals that inactivate H enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, M; Nishihara, S; Shinya, N; Kudo, T; Iwasaki, H; Seno, T; Okubo, Y; Narimatsu, H

    1997-07-15

    by the combinatorial activity of two fucosyltransferases, the Lewis enzyme and the secretor enzyme, and the secretor status was solely determined by the secretor enzyme activity, not by H enzyme activity. Bombay individuals were confirmed to be homozygous for the inactivated H and Se genes. As expected from the very low frequency of Bombay and para-Bombay individuals in the population, ie, approximately one in two or 300,000, the H gene mutations were found to be very variable, unlike the cases of the point mutations in the other glycosyltransferase genes; the ABO genes, the Lewis gene, and the secretor gene.

  5. Clustered mutations in hominid genome evolution are consistent with APOBEC3G enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Yishay; Gabay, Orshay; Arbiza, Leonardo; Sams, Aaron J.; Keinan, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The gradual accumulation of mutations by any of a number of mutational processes is a major driving force of divergence and evolution. Here, we investigate a potentially novel mutational process that is based on the activity of members of the AID/APOBEC family of deaminases. This gene family has been recently shown to introduce—in multiple types of cancer—enzyme-induced clusters of co-occurring somatic mutations caused by cytosine deamination. Going beyond somatic mutations, we hypothesized that APOBEC3—following its rapid expansion in primates—can introduce unique germline mutation clusters that can play a role in primate evolution. In this study, we tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive comparative genomic screen for APOBEC3-induced mutagenesis patterns across different hominids. We detected thousands of mutation clusters introduced along primate evolution which exhibit features that strongly fit the known patterns of APOBEC3G mutagenesis. These results suggest that APOBEC3G-induced mutations have contributed to the evolution of all genomes we studied. This is the first indication of site-directed, enzyme-induced genome evolution, which played a role in the evolution of both modern and archaic humans. This novel mutational mechanism exhibits several unique features, such as its higher tendency to mutate transcribed regions and regulatory elements and its ability to generate clusters of concurrent point mutations that all occur in a single generation. Our discovery demonstrates the exaptation of an anti-viral mechanism as a new source of genomic variation in hominids with a strong potential for functional consequences. PMID:27056836

  6. HER2 activating mutations are targets for colorectal cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kavuri, Shyam M.; Jain, Naveen; Galimi, Francesco; Cottino, Francesca; Leto, Simonetta M.; Migliardi, Giorgia; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Monsey, John; Trusolino, Livio; Jacobs, Samuel A.; Bertotti, Andrea; Bose, Ron

    2015-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas project identified HER2 somatic mutations and gene amplification in 7% of colorectal cancer patients. Introduction of the HER2 mutations, S310F, L755S, V777L, V842I, and L866M, into colon epithelial cells increased signaling pathways and anchorage-independent cell growth, indicating that they are activating mutations. Introduction of these HER2 activating mutations into colorectal cancer cell lines produced resistance to cetuximab and panitumumab by sustaining MAPK phosphorylation. HER2 mutations are potently inhibited by low nanomolar doses of the irreversible tyrosine kinase inhibitors, neratinib and afatinib. HER2 gene sequencing of 48 cetuximab resistant, quadruple (KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA) WT colorectal cancer patient-derived xenografts (PDX’s) identified 4 PDX’s with HER2 mutations. HER2 targeted therapies were tested on two PDX’s. Treatment with a single HER2 targeted drug (trastuzumab, neratinib, or lapatinib) delayed tumor growth, but dual HER2 targeted therapy with trastuzumab plus tyrosine kinase inhibitors produced regression of these HER2 mutated PDX’s. PMID:26243863

  7. Bi-Directional SIFT Predicts a Subset of Activating Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, William; Lazarus, Robert A.; Zhang, Zemin

    2009-01-01

    Advancements in sequencing technologies have empowered recent efforts to identify polymorphisms and mutations on a global scale. The large number of variations and mutations found in these projects requires high-throughput tools to identify those that are most likely to have an impact on function. Numerous computational tools exist for predicting which mutations are likely to be functional, but none that specifically attempt to identify mutations that result in hyperactivation or gain-of-function. Here we present a modified version of the SIFT (Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant) algorithm that utilizes protein sequence alignments with homologous sequences to identify functional mutations based on evolutionary fitness. We show that this bi-directional SIFT (B-SIFT) is capable of identifying experimentally verified activating mutants from multiple datasets. B-SIFT analysis of large-scale cancer genotyping data identified potential activating mutations, some of which we have provided detailed structural evidence to support. B-SIFT could prove to be a valuable tool for efforts in protein engineering as well as in identification of functional mutations in cancer. PMID:20011534

  8. Activation Mechanism of Oncogenic Deletion Mutations in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2.

    PubMed

    Foster, Scott A; Whalen, Daniel M; Özen, Ayşegül; Wongchenko, Matthew J; Yin, JianPing; Yen, Ivana; Schaefer, Gabriele; Mayfield, John D; Chmielecki, Juliann; Stephens, Philip J; Albacker, Lee A; Yan, Yibing; Song, Kyung; Hatzivassiliou, Georgia; Eigenbrot, Charles; Yu, Christine; Shaw, Andrey S; Manning, Gerard; Skelton, Nicholas J; Hymowitz, Sarah G; Malek, Shiva

    2016-04-11

    Activating mutations in protein kinases drive many cancers. While how recurring point mutations affect kinase activity has been described, the effect of in-frame deletions is not well understood. We show that oncogenic deletions within the β3-αC loop of HER2 and BRAF are analogous to the recurrent EGFR exon 19 deletions. We identify pancreatic carcinomas with BRAF deletions mutually exclusive with KRAS mutations. Crystal structures of BRAF deletions reveal the truncated loop restrains αC in an active "in" conformation, imparting resistance to inhibitors like vemurafenib that bind the αC "out" conformation. Characterization of loop length explains the prevalence of five amino acid deletions in BRAF, EGFR, and HER2 and highlights the importance of this region for kinase activity and inhibitor efficacy. PMID:26996308

  9. Specific point mutations in Lactobacillus casei ATCC 27139 cause a phenotype switch from Lac- to Lac+.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Kuo; Chen, Hung-Wen; Lo, Ta-Chun; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2009-03-01

    Lactose metabolism is a changeable phenotype in strains of Lactobacillus casei. In this study, we found that L. casei ATCC 27139 was unable to utilize lactose. However, when exposed to lactose as the sole carbon source, spontaneous Lac(+) clones could be obtained. A gene cluster (lacTEGF-galKETRM) involved in the metabolism of lactose and galactose in L. casei ATCC 27139 (Lac(-)) and its Lac(+) revertant (designated strain R1) was sequenced and characterized. We found that only one nucleotide, located in the lacTEGF promoter (lacTp), of the two lac-gal gene clusters was different. The protein sequence identity between the lac-gal gene cluster and those reported previously for some L. casei (Lac(+)) strains was high; namely, 96-100 % identity was found and no premature stop codon was identified. A single point mutation located within the lacTp promoter region was also detected for each of the 41 other independently isolated Lac(+) revertants of L. casei ATCC 27139. The revertants could be divided into six classes based on the positions of the point mutations detected. Primer extension experiments conducted on transcription from lacTp revealed that the lacTp promoter of these six classes of Lac(+) revertants was functional, while that of L. casei ATCC 27139 was not. Northern blotting experiments further confirmed that the lacTEGF operon of strain R1 was induced by lactose but suppressed by glucose, whereas no blotting signal was ever detected for L. casei ATCC 27139. These results suggest that a single point mutation in the lacTp promoter was able to restore the transcription of a fully functional lacTEGF operon and cause a phenotype switch from Lac(-) to Lac(+) for L. casei ATCC 27139. PMID:19246746

  10. TERT promoter mutations and monoallelic activation of TERT in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, F W; Bielski, C M; Rinne, M L; Hahn, W C; Sellers, W R; Stegmeier, F; Garraway, L A; Kryukov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Here we report that promoter mutations in telomerase (TERT), the most common noncoding mutations in cancer, give rise to monoallelic expression of TERT. Through deep RNA sequencing, we find that TERT activation in human cancer cell lines can occur in either mono- or biallelic manner. Without exception, hotspot TERT promoter mutations lead to the re-expression of only one allele, accounting for approximately half of the observed cases of monoallelic TERT expression. Furthermore, we show that monoallelic TERT expression is highly prevalent in certain tumor types and widespread across a broad spectrum of cancers. Taken together, these observations provide insights into the mechanisms of TERT activation and the ramifications of noncoding mutations in cancer. PMID:26657580

  11. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Comeron, Josep M.; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S.; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F.; Manak, J. Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  12. A Mismatch EndoNuclease Array-Based Methodology (MENA) for Identifying Known SNPs or Novel Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Comeron, Josep M; Reed, Jordan; Christie, Matthew; Jacobs, Julia S; Dierdorff, Jason; Eberl, Daniel F; Manak, J Robert

    2016-01-01

    Accurate and rapid identification or confirmation of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), point mutations and other human genomic variation facilitates understanding the genetic basis of disease. We have developed a new methodology (called MENA (Mismatch EndoNuclease Array)) pairing DNA mismatch endonuclease enzymology with tiling microarray hybridization in order to genotype both known point mutations (such as SNPs) as well as identify previously undiscovered point mutations and small indels. We show that our assay can rapidly genotype known SNPs in a human genomic DNA sample with 99% accuracy, in addition to identifying novel point mutations and small indels with a false discovery rate as low as 10%. Our technology provides a platform for a variety of applications, including: (1) genotyping known SNPs as well as confirming newly discovered SNPs from whole genome sequencing analyses; (2) identifying novel point mutations and indels in any genomic region from any organism for which genome sequence information is available; and (3) screening panels of genes associated with particular diseases and disorders in patient samples to identify causative mutations. As a proof of principle for using MENA to discover novel mutations, we report identification of a novel allele of the beethoven (btv) gene in Drosophila, which encodes a ciliary cytoplasmic dynein motor protein important for auditory mechanosensation. PMID:27600073

  13. Point-Mutation Effects on Charge-Transport Properties of the Tumor-Suppressor Gene p53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Chi-Tin; Roche, Stephan; Römer, Rudolf A.

    2008-01-01

    We report on a theoretical study of point mutations effects on charge transfer properties in the DNA sequence of the tumor-suppressor p53 gene. On the basis of effective tight-binding models which simulate hole propagation along the DNA, a statistical analysis of mutation-induced charge transfer modifications is performed. In contrast to noncancerous mutations, mutation hot spots tend to result in significantly weaker changes of transmission properties. This suggests that charge transport could play a significant role for DNA-repairing deficiency yielding carcinogenesis.

  14. Discovery of Point Mutations in the Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel from African Aedes aegypti Populations: Potential Phylogenetic Reasons for Gene Introgression

    PubMed Central

    Muranami, Yuto; Kawashima, Emiko; Osei, Joseph H. N.; Sakyi, Kojo Yirenkyi; Dadzie, Samuel; de Souza, Dziedzom K.; Appawu, Maxwell; Ohta, Nobuo; Minakawa, Noboru

    2016-01-01

    Background Yellow fever is endemic in some countries in Africa, and Aedes aegpyti is one of the most important vectors implicated in the outbreak. The mapping of the nation-wide distribution and the detection of insecticide resistance of vector mosquitoes will provide the beneficial information for forecasting of dengue and yellow fever outbreaks and effective control measures. Methodology/Principal Findings High resistance to DDT was observed in all mosquito colonies collected in Ghana. The resistance and the possible existence of resistance or tolerance to permethrin were suspected in some colonies. High frequencies of point mutations at the voltage-gated sodium channel (F1534C) and one heterozygote of the other mutation (V1016I) were detected, and this is the first detection on the African continent. The frequency of F1534C allele and the ratio of F1534C homozygotes in Ae. aegypti aegypti (Aaa) were significantly higher than those in Ae. aegypti formosus (Aaf). We could detect the two types of introns between exon 20 and 21, and the F1534C mutations were strongly linked with one type of intron, which was commonly found in South East Asian and South and Central American countries, suggesting the possibility that this mutation was introduced from other continents or convergently selected after the introgression of Aaa genes from the above area. Conclusions/Significance The worldwide eradication programs in 1940s and 1950s might have caused high selection pressure on the mosquito populations and expanded the distribution of insecticide-resistant Ae. aegypti populations. Selection of the F1534C point mutation could be hypothesized to have taken place during this period. The selection of the resistant population of Ae. aegypti with the point mutation of F1534C, and the worldwide transportation of vector mosquitoes in accordance with human activity such as trading of used tires, might result in the widespread distribution of F1534C point mutation in tropical countries

  15. Glucocerebrosidase activity in Parkinson's disease with and without GBA mutations.

    PubMed

    Alcalay, Roy N; Levy, Oren A; Waters, Cheryl C; Fahn, Stanley; Ford, Blair; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Mazzoni, Pietro; Pauciulo, Michael W; Nichols, William C; Gan-Or, Ziv; Rouleau, Guy A; Chung, Wendy K; Wolf, Pavlina; Oliva, Petra; Keutzer, Joan; Marder, Karen; Zhang, Xiaokui

    2015-09-01

    Glucocerebrosidase (GBA) mutations have been associated with Parkinson's disease in numerous studies. However, it is unknown whether the increased risk of Parkinson's disease in GBA carriers is due to a loss of glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity. We measured glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots in patients with Parkinson's disease (n = 517) and controls (n = 252) with and without GBA mutations. Participants were recruited from Columbia University, New York, and fully sequenced for GBA mutations and genotyped for the LRRK2 G2019S mutation, the most common autosomal dominant mutation in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. Glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity in dried blood spots was measured by a mass spectrometry-based assay and compared among participants categorized by GBA mutation status and Parkinson's disease diagnosis. Parkinson's disease patients were more likely than controls to carry the LRRK2 G2019S mutation (n = 39, 7.5% versus n = 2, 0.8%, P < 0.001) and GBA mutations or variants (seven homozygotes and compound heterozygotes and 81 heterozygotes, 17.0% versus 17 heterozygotes, 6.7%, P < 0.001). GBA homozygotes/compound heterozygotes had lower enzymatic activity than GBA heterozygotes (0.85 µmol/l/h versus 7.88 µmol/l/h, P < 0.001), and GBA heterozygotes had lower enzymatic activity than GBA and LRRK2 non-carriers (7.88 µmol/l/h versus 11.93 µmol/l/h, P < 0.001). Glucocerebrosidase activity was reduced in heterozygotes compared to non-carriers when each mutation was compared independently (N370S, P < 0.001; L444P, P < 0.001; 84GG, P = 0.003; R496H, P = 0.018) and also reduced in GBA variants associated with Parkinson's risk but not with Gaucher disease (E326K, P = 0.009; T369M, P < 0.001). When all patients with Parkinson's disease were considered, they had lower mean glucocerebrosidase enzymatic activity than controls (11.14 µmol/l/h versus 11.85 µmol/l/h, P = 0.011). Difference compared to controls persisted in patients with

  16. The silent point mutations at the cleavage site of 2A/2B have no effect on the self-cleavage activity of 2A of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zong-liang; Zhou, Jian-hua; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yao-zhong; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2014-12-01

    The 2A region of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) polyprotein is 18 amino acids in length, and 2A self-cleavage site (2A/2B) contains a conserved amino acid motif G2A/P2B. To investigate the synonymous codon usage for Glycine at the 2A/2B cleavage site of FMDV, 66 2A/2B1 nucleotide sequences were aligned and found that the synonymous codon usage of G2A is conserved and GGG was the most frequently used. To examine the role of synonymous codons for G2A in self-cleavage efficiency of 2A/2B, recombinant constructs which contains the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase protein (CAT) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) linked by the FMDV 2A sequence with four synonymous codons for G2A were produced. The activities of all the F2As based plasmids were determined in CHO cells. The results showed that the synonymous codon usage patterns for G2A at the cleavage site (2A/2B) have no effect on the cleavage efficiency. This suggests that the synonymous codon usage of 2A peptide has no effect on the cleavage efficiency of FMDV 2A element. PMID:25152485

  17. Mutations Closer to the Active Site Improve the Promiscuous Aldolase Activity of 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase More Effectively than Distant Mutations.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mehran; van der Meer, Jan-Ytzen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Poddar, Harshwardhan; Baas, Bert-Jan; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2016-07-01

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which catalyzes enol-keto tautomerization as part of a degradative pathway for aromatic hydrocarbons, promiscuously catalyzes various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions. These include the aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde. Here, we demonstrate that 4-OT can be engineered into a more efficient aldolase for this condensation reaction, with a >5000-fold improvement in catalytic efficiency (kcat /Km ) and a >10(7) -fold change in reaction specificity, by exploring small libraries in which only "hotspots" are varied. The hotspots were identified by systematic mutagenesis (covering each residue), followed by a screen for single mutations that give a strong improvement in the desired aldolase activity. All beneficial mutations were near the active site of 4-OT, thus underpinning the notion that new catalytic activities of a promiscuous enzyme are more effectively enhanced by mutations close to the active site. PMID:27238293

  18. Screening of point mutations by multiple SSCP analysis in the dystrophin gene

    SciTech Connect

    Lasa, A.; Baiget, M.; Gallano, P.

    1994-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a lethal, X-linked neuromuscular disorder. The population frequency of DMD is one in approximately 3500 boys, of which one third is thought to be a new mutant. The DMD gene is the largest known to date, spanning over 2,3 Mb in band Xp21.2; 79 exons are transcribed into a 14 Kb mRNA coding for a protein of 427 kD which has been named dystrophin. It has been shown that about 65% of affected boys have a gene deletion with a wide variation in localization and size. The remaining affected individuals who have no detectable deletions or duplications would probably carry more subtle mutations that are difficult to detect. These mutations occur in several different exons and seem to be unique to single patients. Their identification represents a formidable goal because of the large size and complexity of the dystrophin gene. SSCP is a very efficient method for the detection of point mutations if the parameters that affect the separation of the strands are optimized for a particular DNA fragment. The multiple SSCP allows the simultaneous study of several exons, and implies the use of different conditions because no single set of conditions will be optimal for all fragments. Seventy-eight DMD patients with no deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene were selected for the multiple SSCP analysis. Genomic DNA from these patients was amplified using the primers described for the diagnosis procedure (muscle promoter and exons 3, 8, 12, 16, 17, 19, 32, 45, 48 and 51). We have observed different mobility shifts in bands corresponding to exons 8, 12, 43 and 51. In exons 17 and 45, altered electrophoretic patterns were found in different samples identifying polymorphisms already described.

  19. Evidence that specific mtDNA point mutations may not accumulate in skeletal muscle during normal human aging.

    PubMed Central

    Pallotti, F.; Chen, X.; Bonilla, E.; Schon, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    It is unclear at present whether specific mtDNA point mutations accumulate during normal human aging. In order to address this question, we used quantitative PCR of total DNA isolated from skeletal muscle from normal individuals of various ages to search for the presence and amount of spontaneous mtDNA point mutations in two small regions of the human mitochondrial genome. We observed low levels of somatic mutations above background in both regions, but there was no correlation between the amount of mutation detected and the age of the subject. These results contrasted with our finding of an age-related increase in the amount of the mtDNA "common deletion" in these very samples. Thus, it appears that both somatic mtDNA point mutations and mtDNA deletions can arise at low frequency in normal individuals but that, unlike deletions, there is no preferential amplification or accumulation of specific point mutations in skeletal muscle over the course of the normal human life span. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8751860

  20. New point mutation in Golga3 causes multiple defects in spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bentson, Lisa F.; Agbor, Valentine A.; Agbor, Larry N.; Lopez, Anita C.; Nfonsam, Landry E.; Bornstein, Sheila S.; Handel, Mary Ann; Linder, Carol C.

    2014-01-01

    repro27 mice exhibit fully penetrant male-specific infertility associated with a nonsense mutation in the golgin subfamily A member 3 gene (Golga3). GOLGA3 is a Golgi complex-associated protein implicated in protein trafficking, apoptosis, positioning of the Golgi, and spermatogenesis. In repro27 mutant mice, a point mutation in exon 18 of the Golga3 gene that inserts a premature termination codon leads to an absence of GOLGA3 protein expression. GOLGA3 protein was undetectable in the brain, heart, and liver in both mutant and control mice. While spermatogenesis in Golga3repro27 mutant mice appears to initiate normally, development is disrupted in late meiosis during the first wave of spermatogenesis, leading to significant germ cell loss between 15 and 18 days postpartum (dpp). Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase dUTP-mediated nick end labeling analysis showed elevated DNA fragmentation in meiotic germ cells by 12 dpp, suggesting apoptosis as a mechanism of germ cell loss. The few surviving postmeiotic round spermatids exhibited abnormal spermiogenesis with defects in acrosome formation, head and tail development, and extensive vacuolization in the seminiferous epithelium. Analysis of epididymal sperm showed significantly low sperm concentration and motility, and in vitro fertilization with mutant sperm was unsuccessful. Golga3repro27 mice lack GOLGA3 protein and thus provide an in vivo tool to aid in deciphering the role of GOLGA3 in Golgi complex positioning, cargo trafficking, and apoptosis signaling in male germ cells. PMID:23495255

  1. The molecular basis of antifolate resistance in Plasmodium falciparum: looking beyond point mutations.

    PubMed

    Heinberg, Adina; Kirkman, Laura

    2015-04-01

    Drugs that target the folate-synthesis pathway have a long history of effectiveness against a variety of pathogens. As antimalarials, the antifolates were safe and well tolerated, but resistance emerged quickly and has persisted even with decreased drug pressure. The primary determinants of resistance in Plasmodium falciparum are well-described point mutations in the enzymes dihydropteroate synthase and dihydrofolate reductase targeted by the combination sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. Recent work has highlighted the contributions of additional parasite adaptation to antifolate resistance. In fact, the evolution of antifolate-resistant parasites is multifaceted and complex. Gene amplification of the first enzyme in the parasite folate synthesis pathway, GTP-cyclohydrolase, is strongly associated with resistant parasites and potentially contributes to persistence of resistant parasites. Further understanding of how parasites adjust flux through the folate pathway is important to the further development of alternative agents targeting this crucial synthesis pathway.

  2. Mitochondrially targeted ZFNs for selective degradation of pathogenic mitochondrial genomes bearing large-scale deletions or point mutations.

    PubMed

    Gammage, Payam A; Rorbach, Joanna; Vincent, Anna I; Rebar, Edward J; Minczuk, Michal

    2014-04-01

    We designed and engineered mitochondrially targeted obligate heterodimeric zinc finger nucleases (mtZFNs) for site-specific elimination of pathogenic human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). We used mtZFNs to target and cleave mtDNA harbouring the m.8993T>G point mutation associated with neuropathy, ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa (NARP) and the "common deletion" (CD), a 4977-bp repeat-flanked deletion associated with adult-onset chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia and, less frequently, Kearns-Sayre and Pearson's marrow pancreas syndromes. Expression of mtZFNs led to a reduction in mutant mtDNA haplotype load, and subsequent repopulation of wild-type mtDNA restored mitochondrial respiratory function in a CD cybrid cell model. This study constitutes proof-of-principle that, through heteroplasmy manipulation, delivery of site-specific nuclease activity to mitochondria can alleviate a severe biochemical phenotype in primary mitochondrial disease arising from deleted mtDNA species.

  3. Point mutations in firefly luciferase C-domain demonstrate its significance in green color of bioluminescence.

    PubMed

    Modestova, Yulia; Koksharov, Mikhail I; Ugarova, Natalia N

    2014-09-01

    Firefly luciferase is a two-domain enzyme that catalyzes the bioluminescent reaction of firefly luciferin oxidation. Color of the emitted light depends on the structure of the enzyme, yet the exact color-tuning mechanism remains unknown by now, and the role of the C-domain in it is rarely discussed, because a very few color-shifting mutations in the C-domain were described. Recently we reported a strong red-shifting mutation E457K in the C-domain; the bioluminescence spectra of this enzyme were independent of temperature or pH. In the present study we investigated the role of the residue E457 in the enzyme using the Luciola mingrelica luciferase with a thermostabilized N-domain as a parent enzyme for site-directed mutagenesis. We obtained a set of mutants and studied their catalytic properties, thermal stability and bioluminescence spectra. Experimental spectra were represented as a sum of two components (bioluminescence spectra of putative "red" and "green" emitters); λmax of these components were constant for all the mutants, but the ratio of these emitters was defined by temperature and mutations in the C-domain. We suggest that each emitter is stabilized by a specific conformation of the active site; thus, enzymes with two forms of the active site coexist in the reactive media. The rigid structure of the C-domain is crucial for maintaining the conformation corresponding to the "green" emitter. We presume that the emitters are the keto- and enol forms of oxyluciferin.

  4. Mutational analysis of the active center of plant fructosyltransferases: Festuca 1-SST and barley 6-SFT.

    PubMed

    Altenbach, Denise; Nüesch, Eveline; Ritsema, Tita; Boller, Thomas; Wiemken, Andres

    2005-08-29

    The active center of the glycoside hydrolase family 32 contains the three characteristic motifs (N/S)DPNG, RDP, and EC. We replaced the N-terminal region including the (N/S)DPNG motif of barley 6-SFT (sucrose:fructan 6-fructosyltransferase) by the corresponding region of Festuca 1-SST (sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase). The chimeric enzyme, expressed in Pichia, retained the specificity of 6-SFT. Attempts to replace a larger piece at the N-terminus including also the RDP motif failed. A point mutation introduced in the RDP motif of 1-SST abolished enzymatic activity. Interestingly, point mutations of the EC-motif resulted in an enzyme which had lost the capability to form 1-kestose and glucose from sucrose but still accepted 1-kestose, producing fructose and sucrose as well as nystose.

  5. Site-Selective Ribosylation of Fluorescent Nucleobase Analogs Using Purine-Nucleoside Phosphorylase as a Catalyst: Effects of Point Mutations.

    PubMed

    Stachelska-Wierzchowska, Alicja; Wierzchowski, Jacek; Bzowska, Agnieszka; Wielgus-Kutrowska, Beata

    2015-12-28

    Enzymatic ribosylation of fluorescent 8-azapurine derivatives, like 8-azaguanine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, with purine-nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) as a catalyst, leads to N9, N8, and N7-ribosides. The final proportion of the products may be modulated by point mutations in the enzyme active site. As an example, ribosylation of the latter substrate by wild-type calf PNP gives N7- and N8-ribosides, while the N243D mutant directs the ribosyl substitution at N9- and N7-positions. The same mutant allows synthesis of the fluorescent N7-β-d-ribosyl-8-azaguanine. The mutated form of the E. coli PNP, D204N, can be utilized to obtain non-typical ribosides of 8-azaadenine and 2,6-diamino-8-azapurine as well. The N7- and N8-ribosides of the 8-azapurines can be analytically useful, as illustrated by N7-β-d-ribosyl-2,6-diamino-8-azapurine, which is a good fluorogenic substrate for mammalian forms of PNP, including human blood PNP, while the N8-riboside is selective to the E. coli enzyme.

  6. Haemophilia B caused by a point mutation in a donor splice junction of the human factor IX gene.

    PubMed

    Rees, D J; Rizza, C R; Brownlee, G G

    Haemophilia B (Christmas disease) is an inherited, recessive, sex-linked, haemorrhagic condition caused by a defect in the intrinsic clotting factor IX. This disease occurs in males at a frequency of approximately 1 in 30,000. Patients differ in the severity of their clinical symptoms, and variation in the clotting activity and in the concentration of factor IX antigen in their plasma has been demonstrated. There is probably heterogeneity in the molecular defects of the factor IX gene causing the disease. Here we study a severely affected, antigen-negative patient, and show that the only significant sequence difference from the normal factor IX gene is a point mutation changing the obligatory GT to a TT within the donor splice junction of exon f. We infer that this change is the cause of the disease in this individual. In addition, we have used oligodeoxynucleotide probes specific for this mutation to demonstrate the feasibility of carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis for relatives of the patient.

  7. The architecture of a prototypical bacterial signaling circuit enables a single point mutation to confer novel network properties.

    PubMed

    Ram, Sri; Goulian, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Even a single mutation can cause a marked change in a protein's properties. When the mutant protein functions within a network, complex phenotypes may emerge that are not intrinsic properties of the protein itself. Network architectures that enable such dramatic changes in function from a few mutations remain relatively uncharacterized. We describe a remarkable example of this versatility in the well-studied PhoQ/PhoP bacterial signaling network, which has an architecture found in many two-component systems. We found that a single point mutation that abolishes the phosphatase activity of the sensor kinase PhoQ results in a striking change in phenotype. The mutant responds to stimulus in a bistable manner, as opposed to the wild-type, which has a graded response. Mutant cells in on and off states have different morphologies, and their state is inherited over many generations. Interestingly, external conditions that repress signaling in the wild-type drive the mutant to the on state. Mathematical modeling and experiments suggest that the bistability depends on positive autoregulation of the two key proteins in the circuit, PhoP and PhoQ. The qualitatively different characteristics of the mutant come at a substantial fitness cost. Relative to the off state, the on state has a lower fitness in stationary phase cultures in rich medium (LB). However, due to the high inheritance of the on state, a population of on cells can be epigenetically trapped in a low-fitness state. Our results demonstrate the remarkable versatility of the prototypical two-component signaling architecture and highlight the tradeoffs in the particular case of the PhoQ/PhoP system.

  8. Exome sequencing for bipolar disorder points to roles of de novo loss-of-function and protein-altering mutations.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Matoba, N; Sawada, T; Kazuno, A-A; Ishiwata, M; Fujii, K; Matsuo, K; Takata, A; Kato, T

    2016-07-01

    Although numerous genetic studies have been conducted for bipolar disorder (BD), its genetic architecture remains elusive. Here we perform, to the best of our knowledge, the first trio-based exome sequencing study for BD to investigate potential roles of de novo mutations in the disease etiology. We identified 71 de novo point mutations and one de novo copy-number mutation in 79 BD probands. Among the genes hit by de novo loss-of-function (LOF; nonsense, splice site or frameshift) or protein-altering (LOF, missense and inframe indel) mutations, we found significant enrichment of genes highly intolerant (first percentile of intolerant genes assessed by Residual Variation Intolerance Score) to protein-altering variants in general population, an observation that is also reported in autism and schizophrenia. When we performed a joint analysis using the data of schizoaffective disorder in published studies, we found global enrichment of de novo LOF and protein-altering mutations in the combined group of bipolar I and schizoaffective disorders. Considering relationship between de novo mutations and clinical phenotypes, we observed significantly earlier disease onset among the BD probands with de novo protein-altering mutations when compared with non-carriers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of genes hit by de novo protein-altering mutations in bipolar I and schizoaffective disorders did not identify any significant enrichment. These results of exploratory analyses collectively point to the roles of de novo LOF and protein-altering mutations in the etiology of bipolar disorder and warrant further large-scale studies. PMID:27217147

  9. Exome sequencing for bipolar disorder points to roles of de novo loss-of-function and protein-altering mutations.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, M; Matoba, N; Sawada, T; Kazuno, A-A; Ishiwata, M; Fujii, K; Matsuo, K; Takata, A; Kato, T

    2016-07-01

    Although numerous genetic studies have been conducted for bipolar disorder (BD), its genetic architecture remains elusive. Here we perform, to the best of our knowledge, the first trio-based exome sequencing study for BD to investigate potential roles of de novo mutations in the disease etiology. We identified 71 de novo point mutations and one de novo copy-number mutation in 79 BD probands. Among the genes hit by de novo loss-of-function (LOF; nonsense, splice site or frameshift) or protein-altering (LOF, missense and inframe indel) mutations, we found significant enrichment of genes highly intolerant (first percentile of intolerant genes assessed by Residual Variation Intolerance Score) to protein-altering variants in general population, an observation that is also reported in autism and schizophrenia. When we performed a joint analysis using the data of schizoaffective disorder in published studies, we found global enrichment of de novo LOF and protein-altering mutations in the combined group of bipolar I and schizoaffective disorders. Considering relationship between de novo mutations and clinical phenotypes, we observed significantly earlier disease onset among the BD probands with de novo protein-altering mutations when compared with non-carriers. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of genes hit by de novo protein-altering mutations in bipolar I and schizoaffective disorders did not identify any significant enrichment. These results of exploratory analyses collectively point to the roles of de novo LOF and protein-altering mutations in the etiology of bipolar disorder and warrant further large-scale studies.

  10. Combinatorial reshaping of a lipase structure for thermostability: additive role of surface stabilizing single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Singh, Ranvir; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2014-05-16

    Thermostable lipases are of high priority for industrial applications. In the present study, targeted improvement of the thermostability of a lipase from metagenomic origin was examined by using a combinatorial protein engineering approach exploring additive effects of single amino acid substitutions. A variant (LipR5) was generated after combination of two thermostabilizing mutations (R214C & N355K). Thermostability of the variant enzyme was analyzed by half-life measurement and circular dichroism (CD). To assess whether catalytic properties were affected by mutation, the optimal reaction conditions were determined. The protein LipR5, displayed optimum activity at 50°C and pH 8.0. It showed two fold enhancement in thermostability (at 60°C) as compared to LipR3 (R214C) and nearly 168 fold enhancement as compared to parent enzyme (LipR1). Circular dichroism and fluorescence study suggest that the protein structure had become more rigid and stable to denaturation. Study of 3D model suggested that Lys355 was involved in formation of a Hydrogen bond with OE1 of Glu284. Lys355 was also making salt bridge with OE2 of Glu284. PMID:24751523

  11. Recurrent de novo point mutations in lamin A cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Maria; Brown, W Ted; Gordon, Leslie B; Glynn, Michael W; Singer, Joel; Scott, Laura; Erdos, Michael R; Robbins, Christiane M; Moses, Tracy Y; Berglund, Peter; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Durkin, Sandra; Csoka, Antonei B; Boehnke, Michael; Glover, Thomas W; Collins, Francis S

    2003-05-15

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare genetic disorder characterized by features reminiscent of marked premature ageing. Here, we present evidence of mutations in lamin A (LMNA) as the cause of this disorder. The HGPS gene was initially localized to chromosome 1q by observing two cases of uniparental isodisomy of 1q-the inheritance of both copies of this material from one parent-and one case with a 6-megabase paternal interstitial deletion. Sequencing of LMNA, located in this interval and previously implicated in several other heritable disorders, revealed that 18 out of 20 classical cases of HGPS harboured an identical de novo (that is, newly arisen and not inherited) single-base substitution, G608G(GGC > GGT), within exon 11. One additional case was identified with a different substitution within the same codon. Both of these mutations result in activation of a cryptic splice site within exon 11, resulting in production of a protein product that deletes 50 amino acids near the carboxy terminus. Immunofluorescence of HGPS fibroblasts with antibodies directed against lamin A revealed that many cells show visible abnormalities of the nuclear membrane. The discovery of the molecular basis of this disease may shed light on the general phenomenon of human ageing.

  12. Identification of an active new mutator transposable element in maize.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bao-Cai; Chen, Zongliang; Shen, Yun; Zhang, Yafeng; Lai, Jinsheng; Sun, Samuel S M

    2011-09-01

    Robertson's Mutator (Mu) system has been used in large scale mutagenesis in maize, exploiting its high mutation frequency, controllability, preferential insertion in genes, and independence of donor location. Eight Mutator elements have been fully characterized (Mu1, Mu2 /Mu1.7, Mu3, Mu4, Mu5, Mu6/7, Mu8, MuDR), and three are defined by TIR (Mu10, Mu11 and Mu12). The genome sequencing revealed a complex family of Mu-like-elements (MULEs) in the B73 genome. In this article, we report the identification of a new Mu element, named Mu13. Mu13 showed typical Mu characteristics by having a ∼220 bp TIR, creating a 9 bp target site duplication upon insertion, yet the internal sequence is completely different from previously identified Mu elements. Mu13 is not present in the B73 genome or a Zea mays subsp. parviglumis accession, but in W22 and several inbreds that found the Robertson's Mutator line. Analysis of mutants isolated from the UniformMu mutagenic population indicated that the Mu13 element is active in transposition. Two novel insertions were found in expressed genes. To test other unknown Mu elements, we selected six new Mu elements from the B73 genome. Southern analysis indicated that most of these elements were present in the UniformMu lines. From these results, we conclude that Mu13 is a new and active Mu element that significantly contributed to the mutagenesis in the UniformMu population. The Robertson's Mutator line may harbor other unknown active Mu elements.

  13. A Noncoding Point Mutation of Zeb1 Causes Multiple Developmental Malformations and Obesity in Twirler Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kurima, Kiyoto; Hertzano, Ronna; Gavrilova, Oksana; Monahan, Kelly; Shpargel, Karl B.; Nadaraja, Garani; Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Lee, Kyu Yup; Ito, Taku; Higashi, Yujiro; Eisenman, David J.; Strome, Scott E.; Griffith, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Heterozygous Twirler (Tw) mice develop obesity and circling behavior associated with malformations of the inner ear, whereas homozygous Tw mice have cleft palate and die shortly after birth. Zeb1 is a zinc finger protein that contributes to mesenchymal cell fate by repression of genes whose expression defines epithelial cell identity. This developmental pathway is disrupted in inner ears of Tw/Tw mice. The purpose of our study was to comprehensively characterize the Twirler phenotype and to identify the causative mutation. The Tw/+ inner ear phenotype includes irregularities of the semicircular canals, abnormal utricular otoconia, a shortened cochlear duct, and hearing loss, whereas Tw/Tw ears are severely malformed with barely recognizable anatomy. Tw/+ mice have obesity associated with insulin-resistance and have lymphoid organ hypoplasia. We identified a noncoding nucleotide substitution, c.58+181G>A, in the first intron of the Tw allele of Zeb1 (Zeb1Tw). A knockin mouse model of c.58+181G>A recapitulated the Tw phenotype, whereas a wild-type knockin control did not, confirming the mutation as pathogenic. c.58+181G>A does not affect splicing but disrupts a predicted site for Myb protein binding, which we confirmed in vitro. In comparison, homozygosity for a targeted deletion of exon 1 of mouse Zeb1, Zeb1ΔEx1, is associated with a subtle abnormality of the lateral semicircular canal that is different than those in Tw mice. Expression analyses of E13.5 Twirler and Zeb1ΔEx1 ears confirm that Zeb1ΔEx1 is a null allele, whereas Zeb1Tw RNA is expressed at increased levels in comparison to wild-type Zeb1. We conclude that a noncoding point mutation of Zeb1 acts via a gain-of-function to disrupt regulation of Zeb1Tw expression, epithelial-mesenchymal cell fate or interactions, and structural development of the inner ear in Twirler mice. This is a novel mechanism underlying disorders of hearing or balance. PMID:21980308

  14. Oncogenically active MYD88 mutations in human lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ngo, Vu N.; Young, Ryan M.; Schmitz, Roland; Jhavar, Sameer; Xiao, Wenming; Lim, Kian-Huat; Kohlhammer, Holger; Xu, Weihong; Yang, Yandan; Zhao, Hong; Shaffer, Arthur L.; Romesser, Paul; Wright, George; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Ott, German; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Fisher, Richard I.; Braziel, Rita M.; Tubbs, Raymond R.; Cook, J. R.; Weisenburger, Denny D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2016-01-01

    The activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) remains the least curable form of this malignancy despite recent advances in therapy1. Constitutive nuclear factor (NF)-κB and JAK kinase signalling promotes malignant cell survival in these lymphomas, but the genetic basis for this signalling is incompletely understood. Here we describe the dependence of ABC DLBCLs on MYD88, an adaptor protein that mediates toll and interleukin (IL)-1 receptor signalling2,3, and the discovery of highly recurrent oncogenic mutations affecting MYD88 in ABC DLBCL tumours. RNA interference screening revealed that MYD88 and the associated kinases IRAK1 and IRAK4 are essential for ABC DLBCL survival. High-throughput RNA resequencing uncovered MYD88 mutations in ABC DLBCL lines. Notably, 29% of ABC DLBCL tumours harboured the same amino acid substitution, L265P, in the MYD88 Toll/IL-1 receptor (TIR) domain at an evolutionarily invariant residue in its hydrophobic core. This mutation was rare or absent in other DLBCL subtypes and Burkitt’s lymphoma, but was observed in 9% of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphomas. At a lower frequency, additional mutations were observed in the MYD88 TIR domain, occurring in both the ABC and germinal centre B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL subtypes. Survival of ABC DLBCL cells bearing the L265P mutation was sustained by the mutant but not the wild-type MYD88 isoform, demonstrating that L265P is a gain-of-function driver mutation. The L265P mutant promoted cell survival by spontaneously assembling a protein complex containing IRAK1 and IRAK4, leading to IRAK4 kinase activity, IRAK1 phosphorylation, NF-κB signalling, JAK kinase activation of STAT3, and secretion of IL-6, IL-10 and interferon-β. Hence, theMYD88 signalling pathway is integral to the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL, supporting the development of inhibitors of IRAK4 kinase and other components of this pathway for the treatment of tumours bearing oncogenic MYD88 mutations

  15. Point mutations in dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase genes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Urdaneta, L; Plowe, C; Goldman, I; Lal, A A

    1999-09-01

    The present study was designed to characterize mutations in dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) genes of Plasmodium falciparum in the Bolivar region of Venezuela, where high levels of clinical resistance to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP, Fansidar; F. Hoffman-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland) has been documented. We used a nested mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion methods to measure 1) the prevalence of DHFR mutations at 16, 50, 51, 59, 108, and 164 codon positions, and 2) the prevalence of mutations in the 436, 437, 581, and 613 codon sites in DHPS gene. In the case of the DHFR gene, of the 54 parasite isolates analyzed, we detected the presence of Asn-108 and Ile-51 in 96% of the isolates and Arg-50 mutation in 64% of the isolates. Each of these mutations has been associated with high level of resistance to pyrimethamine. Only 2 samples (4%) showed the wild type Ser-108 mutation and none showed Thr-108 and Val-16 mutations that are specific for resistance to cycloguanil. In the case of DHPS gene, we found a mutation at position 437 (Gly) in 100% of the isolates and Gly-581 in 96% of the isolates. The simultaneous presence of mutations Asn-108 and Ile-51 in the DHFR gene and Gly-437 and Gly-581 in the DHPS gene in 96% of the samples tested suggested that a cumulative effect of mutations could be the major mechanism conferring high SP resistance in this area. PMID:10497990

  16. Practicability of detecting somatic point mutation from RNA high throughput sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Quanhu; Zhao, Shilin; Li, Chung-I; Shyr, Yu; Guo, Yan

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, somatic mutations are detected by examining DNA sequence. The maturity of sequencing technology has allowed researchers to screen for somatic mutations in the whole genome. Increasingly, researchers have become interested in identifying somatic mutations through RNAseq data. With this motivation, we evaluated the practicability of detecting somatic mutations from RNAseq data. Current somatic mutation calling tools were designed for DNA sequencing data. To increase performance on RNAseq data, we developed a somatic mutation caller GLMVC based on bias reduced generalized linear model for both DNA and RNA sequencing data. Through comparison with MuTect and Varscan we showed that GLMVC performed better for somatic mutation detection using exome sequencing or RNAseq data. GLMVC is freely available for download at the following website: https://github.com/shengqh/GLMVC/wiki.

  17. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R.; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U.; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Frenkel, Lisa M.; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole L.; Gupta, Ravindra K.; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F.; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Wainberg, Mark A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E.; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W.

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  18. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations: Potential Applications for Point-of-Care Genotypic Resistance Testing.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Jordan, Michael R; Raizes, Elliot; Chua, Arlene; Parkin, Neil; Kantor, Rami; Van Zyl, Gert U; Mukui, Irene; Hosseinipour, Mina C; Frenkel, Lisa M; Ndembi, Nicaise; Hamers, Raph L; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole L; Gupta, Ravindra K; Fokam, Joseph; Zeh, Clement; Schapiro, Jonathan M; Carmona, Sergio; Katzenstein, David; Tang, Michele; Aghokeng, Avelin F; De Oliveira, Tulio; Wensing, Annemarie M J; Gallant, Joel E; Wainberg, Mark A; Richman, Douglas D; Fitzgibbon, Joseph E; Schito, Marco; Bertagnolio, Silvia; Yang, Chunfu; Shafer, Robert W

    2015-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of acquired and transmitted HIV-1 drug resistance is an obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) hardest hit by the HIV-1 pandemic. Genotypic drug resistance testing could facilitate the choice of initial ART in areas with rising transmitted drug resistance (TDR) and enable care-providers to determine which individuals with virological failure (VF) on a first- or second-line ART regimen require a change in treatment. An inexpensive near point-of-care (POC) genotypic resistance test would be useful in settings where the resources, capacity, and infrastructure to perform standard genotypic drug resistance testing are limited. Such a test would be particularly useful in conjunction with the POC HIV-1 viral load tests that are currently being introduced in LMICs. A POC genotypic resistance test is likely to involve the use of allele-specific point mutation assays for detecting drug-resistance mutations (DRMs). This study proposes that two major nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI)-associated DRMs (M184V and K65R) and four major NNRTI-associated DRMs (K103N, Y181C, G190A, and V106M) would be the most useful for POC genotypic resistance testing in LMIC settings. One or more of these six DRMs was present in 61.2% of analyzed virus sequences from ART-naïve individuals with intermediate or high-level TDR and 98.8% of analyzed virus sequences from individuals on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen with intermediate or high-level acquired drug resistance. The detection of one or more of these DRMs in an ART-naïve individual or in a individual with VF on a first-line NRTI/NNRTI-containing regimen may be considered an indication for a protease inhibitor (PI)-containing regimen or closer virological monitoring based on cost-effectiveness or country policy. PMID:26717411

  19. Kinetic Results for Mutations of Conserved Residues H304 and R309 of Human Sulfite Oxidase Point to Mechanistic Complexities

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Amanda C.; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Arnold, Anna R.; Tollin, Gordon; Enemark, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Several point mutations in the gene of human sulfite oxidase (hSO) result in isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency, an inherited metabolic disorder. Three conserved residues (H304, R309, K322) are hydrogen bonded to the phosphate group of the molybdenum cofactor, and the R309H and K322R mutations are responsible for isolated sulfite oxidase deficiency. The kinetic effects of the K322R mutation have been previously reported (Rajapakshe et al. 2012, Chem. Biodiversity 9, 1621-1634); here we investigate several mutants of H304 and R309 by steady-state kinetics, laser flash photolysis studies of intramolecular electron transfer (IET), and spectroelectrochemistry. An unexpected result is that all of the mutants show decreased rates of IET but increased steady-state rates of catalysis. However, in all cases the rate of IET is greater than the overall turnover rate, showing that IET is not the rate determining step for any of the mutations. PMID:24968320

  20. High rate of A2142G point mutation associated with clarithromycin resistance among Iranian Helicobacter pylori clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Khashei, Reza; Dara, Mahintaj; Bazargani, Abdollah; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran; Taghavi, Alireza; Moeini, Maryam; Dehghani, Behzad; Sohrabi, Maryam

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the clarithromycin resistance and its associated molecular mechanisms among Helicobacter pylori isolates from dyspeptic patients in Shiraz, Iran. From January to May 2014, 100 H. pylori strains were isolated from patients with gastroduodenal disorders. The resistance to clarithromycin was quantitatively evaluated, using Epsilometer (E-test) method. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed on all the isolates to detect A2143G and A2142G mutations in 23S rRNA gene. The H. pylori isolation rate was found to be 31.4%. E-test showed that 20% of isolates were resistant to clarithromycin (MIC ≥ 1 mg/L). MIC of clarithromycin ranged between 0.016 and 24 mg/L. Findings of PCR-RFLP showed that the A2142G was the most (90%) frequently point mutation, followed by the A2143G (10%). No statistically significant difference was found between H. pylori clarithromycin resistance point mutations and patients' gender or age. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of high frequency of A2142G point mutation in Iran and probably in other regions of the world. Considering the increasing trend of H. pylori resistance to clarithromycin due to these mutations, it is crucial to investigate the new therapeutic approaches against H. pylori infection. PMID:27357065

  1. Leber's hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) associated with mitochondrial DNA point mutation G11778A in two Croatian families.

    PubMed

    Martin-Kleiner, Irena; Gabrilovac, Jelka; Bradvica, Mario; Vidović, Tomislav; Cerovski, Branimir; Fumić, Ksenija; Boranić, Milivoj

    2006-03-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuroretinopathy (LHON) is manifested as a bilateral acute or subacute loss of central vision due to optic atrophy. It is linked to point mutations of mitochondrial DNA, which is inherited maternally. The most common mitochondrial DNA point mutations associated with LHON are G3460A, G11778A and T14484C. These mutations are linked with the defects of subunits of the complex I (NADH-dehydrogenase-ubiquinone reductase) in mitochondria. The G11778A mitochondrial DNA point mutation is manifested by a severe visual impairment. In this paper two Croatian families with the LHON G11778A mutation are presented. Three LHON patients from two families were younger males which had the visual acuity of 0.1 or below, the ophthalmoscopy revealed telangiectatic microangiopathy and papilloedema, while Goldmann kinetic perimetry showed a central scotoma. The mothers and female relatives were LHON mutants without symptoms, whereas their sons suffered from a severe visual impairment. Molecular diagnosis helps to explain the cause of LHON disease.

  2. Anti-GD2 with an FC point mutation reduces complement fixation and decreases antibody-induced allodynia

    PubMed Central

    Sorkin, Linda S.; Otto, Mario; Baldwin, William M.; Vail, Emily; Gillies, Stephen D.; Handgretinger, Rupert; Barfield, Raymond C.; Yu, Hui Ming; Yu, Alice L.

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies against GD2 ganglioside, such as ch14.18, the human–mouse chimeric antibody, have been shown to be effective for the treatment of neuroblastoma. However, treatment is associated with generalized, relatively opiate-resistant pain. We investigated if a point mutation in ch14.18 antibody (hu14.18K332A) to limit complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) would ameliorate the pain behavior, while preserving antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In vitro, CDC and ADCC were measured using europium-TDA assay. In vivo, allodynia was evaluated by measuring thresholds to von Frey filaments applied to the hindpaws after injection of either ch14.18 or hu14.18K332 into wild type rats or rats with deficient complement factor 6. Other rats were pretreated with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist and tested following ch14.18 injection. The mutation reduces the antibody’s ability to activate complement, while maintaining its ADCC capabilities. Injection of hu14.18K322 (1 or 3 mg/kg) produced faster resolving allodynia than that engendered by ch14.18 (1 mg/kg). Injection of ch14.18 (1 mg/kg) into rats with C6 complement deficiency further reduced antibody-induced allodynia, while pre-treatment with complement factor C5a receptor antagonist completely abolished ch14.18-induced allodynia. These findings showed that mutant hu14.18 K322 elicited less allodynia than ch14.18 and that ch14.18-elicited allodynia is due to activation of the complement cascade: in part, to formation of membrane attack complex, but more importantly to release of complement factor C5a. Development of immunotherapeutic agents with decreased complement-dependent lysis while maintaining cellular cytotoxicity may offer treatment options with reduced adverse side effects, thereby allowing dose escalation of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:20171010

  3. Influence of point mutations on the stability, dimerization, and oligomerization of human cystatin C and its L68Q variant.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Aneta; Jankowska, Elżbieta; Orlikowska, Marta; Behrendt, Izabela; Czaplewska, Paulina; Rodziewicz-Motowidło, Sylwia

    2012-01-01

    Human cystatin C (hCC) is a small but very intriguing protein. Produced by all nucleated cells is found in almost all tissues and body fluids where, at physiological conditions, plays a role of a very potent inhibitor of cysteine proteases. Biologically active hCC is a monomeric protein but during cellular trafficking it forms dimers, transiently losing its inhibitory activity. In vitro, dimerization of cystatin C was observed for the mature protein during crystallization trials, revealing that the mechanism of this process is based on the three dimensional swapping of the protein domains. In our work we have focused on the impact of two proposed "hot spots" in cystatin C structure on its conformational stability. Encouraged by promising results of the theoretical calculations, we designed and produced several hCC hinge region point mutation variants that display a variety of conformational stability and propensity for dimerization and aggregation. A similar approach, i.e., rational mutagenesis, has been also applied to study the amyloidogenic L68Q variant to determine the contribution of hydrophobic interactions and steric effect on the stability of monomeric cystatin C. In this overview we would like to summarize the results of our studies. The impact of a particular mutation on the properties of the studied proteins will be presented in the context of their thermal and mechanical stability, in vitro dimerization tendency as well as the outcome of crystallization. Better understanding of the mechanism and, especially, factors affecting conformational stability of cystatin C and access to stable monomeric and dimeric versions of the protein opens new perspectives in explaining the role of dimers and the domain swapping process in hCC oligomerization, as well as designing potential inhibitors of this process.

  4. A limited spectrum of mutations causes constitutive activation of the yeast alpha-factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Sommers, C M; Martin, N P; Akal-Strader, A; Becker, J M; Naider, F; Dumont, M E

    2000-06-13

    Activation of G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) by binding of ligand is the initial event in diverse cellular signaling pathways. To examine the frequency and diversity of mutations that cause constitutive activation of one particular GPCR, the yeast alpha-factor receptor, we screened libraries of random mutations for constitutive alleles. In initial screens for mutant receptor alleles that exhibit signaling in the absence of added ligand, 14 different point mutations were isolated. All of these 14 mutants could be further activated by alpha-factor. Ten of the mutants also acquired the ability to signal in response to binding of desTrp(1)¿Ala(3)ălpha-factor, a peptide that acts as an antagonist toward normal alpha-factor receptors. Of these 10 mutants, at least eight alleles residing in the third, fifth, sixth, and seventh transmembrane segments exhibit bona fide constitutive signaling. The remaining alleles are hypersensitive to alpha-factor rather than constitutive. They can be activated by low concentrations of endogenous alpha-factor present in MATa cells. The strongest constitutively active receptor alleles were recovered multiple times from the mutational libraries, and extensive mutagenesis of certain regions of the alpha-factor receptor did not lead to recovery of any additional constitutive alleles. Thus, only a limited number of mutations is capable of causing constitutive activation of this receptor. Constitutive and hypersensitive signaling by the mutant receptors is partially suppressed by coexpression of normal receptors, consistent with preferential association of the G protein with unactivated receptors. PMID:10841771

  5. Point mutation in essential genes with loss or mutation of the second allele: relevance to the retention of tumor-specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Beck-Engeser, G B; Monach, P A; Mumberg, D; Yang, F; Wanderling, S; Schreiber, K; Espinosa, R; Le Beau, M M; Meredith, S C; Schreiber, H

    2001-08-01

    Antigens that are tumor specific yet retained by tumor cells despite tumor progression offer stable and specific targets for immunologic and possibly other therapeutic interventions. Therefore, we have studied two CD4(+) T cell-recognized tumor-specific antigens that were retained during evolution of two ultraviolet-light-induced murine cancers to more aggressive growth. The antigens are ribosomal proteins altered by somatic tumor-specific point mutations, and the progressor (PRO) variants lack the corresponding normal alleles. In the first tumor, 6132A-PRO, the antigen is encoded by a point-mutated L9 ribosomal protein gene. The tumor lacks the normal L9 allele because of an interstitial deletion from chromosome 5. In the second tumor, 6139B-PRO, both alleles of the L26 gene have point mutations, and each encodes a different tumor-specific CD4(+) T cell-recognized antigen. Thus, for both L9 and L26 genes, we observe "two hit" kinetics commonly observed in genes suppressing tumor growth. Indeed, reintroduction of the lost wild-type L9 allele into the 6132A-PRO variant suppressed the growth of the tumor cells in vivo. Since both L9 and L26 encode proteins essential for ribosomal biogenesis, complete loss of the tumor-specific target antigens in the absence of a normal allele would abrogate tumor growth.

  6. Sdt97: A Point Mutation in the 5′ Untranslated Region Confers Semidwarfism in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jiping; Han, Zhengshu; Han, Aonan; Liu, Xuejun; Zhang, Shiyong; Fu, Binying; Hu, Jun; Su, Jingping; Li, Shaoqing; Wang, Shengjun; Zhu, Yingguo

    2016-01-01

    Semidwarfism is an important agronomic trait in rice breeding programs. The semidwarf mutant gene Sdt97 was previously described. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the mutant is yet to be elucidated. In this study, we identified the mutant gene by a map-based cloning method. Using a residual heterozygous line (RHL) population, Sdt97 was mapped to the long arm of chromosome 6 in the interval of nearly 60 kb between STS marker N6 and SNP marker N16 within the PAC clone P0453H04. Sequencing of the candidate genes in the target region revealed that a base transversion from G to C occurred in the 5′ untranslated region of Sdt97. qRT-PCR results confirmed that the transversion induced an obvious change in the expression pattern of Sdt97 at different growth and developmental stages. Plants transgenic for Sdt97 resulted in the restoration of semidwarfism of the mutant phenotype, or displayed a greater dwarf phenotype than the mutant. Our results indicate that a point mutation in the 5′ untranslated region of Sdt97 confers semidwarfism in rice. Functional analysis of Sdt97 will open a new field of study for rice semidwarfism, and also expand our knowledge of the molecular mechanism of semidwarfism in rice. PMID:27172200

  7. Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences.

  8. A Novel Point Mutation Promotes Growth Phase-Dependent Daptomycin Tolerance in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Mechler, Lukas; Herbig, Alexander; Paprotka, Kerstin; Fraunholz, Martin; Nieselt, Kay

    2015-01-01

    Recalcitrance of genetically susceptible bacteria to antibiotic killing is a hallmark of bacterial drug tolerance. This phenomenon is prevalent in biofilms, persisters, and also planktonic cells and is associated with chronic or relapsing infections with pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Here we report the in vitro evolution of an S. aureus strain that exhibits a high degree of nonsusceptibility to daptomycin as a result of cyclic challenges with bactericidal concentrations of the drug. This phenotype was attributed to stationary growth phase-dependent drug tolerance and was clearly distinguished from resistance. The underlying genetic basis was revealed to be an adaptive point mutation in the putative inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter gene pitA. Drug tolerance caused by this allele, termed pitA6, was abrogated when the upstream gene pitR was inactivated. Enhanced tolerance toward daptomycin, as well as the acyldepsipeptide antibiotic ADEP4 and various combinations of other drugs, was accompanied by elevated intracellular concentrations of Pi and polyphosphate, which may reversibly interfere with critical cellular functions. The evolved strain displayed increased rates of survival within human endothelial cells, demonstrating the correlation of intracellular persistence and drug tolerance. These findings will be useful for further investigations of S. aureus drug tolerance, toward the development of additional antipersister compounds and strategies. PMID:26100694

  9. Effector diversification within compartments of the Leptosphaeria maculans genome affected by Repeat-Induced Point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Rouxel, Thierry; Grandaubert, Jonathan; Hane, James K.; Hoede, Claire; van de Wouw, Angela P.; Couloux, Arnaud; Dominguez, Victoria; Anthouard, Véronique; Bally, Pascal; Bourras, Salim; Cozijnsen, Anton J.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Degrave, Alexandre; Dilmaghani, Azita; Duret, Laurent; Fudal, Isabelle; Goodwin, Stephen B.; Gout, Lilian; Glaser, Nicolas; Linglin, Juliette; Kema, Gert H. J.; Lapalu, Nicolas; Lawrence, Christopher B.; May, Kim; Meyer, Michel; Ollivier, Bénédicte; Poulain, Julie; Schoch, Conrad L.; Simon, Adeline; Spatafora, Joseph W.; Stachowiak, Anna; Turgeon, B. Gillian; Tyler, Brett M.; Vincent, Delphine; Weissenbach, Jean; Amselem, Joëlle; Quesneville, Hadi; Oliver, Richard P.; Wincker, Patrick; Balesdent, Marie-Hélène; Howlett, Barbara J.

    2011-01-01

    Fungi are of primary ecological, biotechnological and economic importance. Many fundamental biological processes that are shared by animals and fungi are studied in fungi due to their experimental tractability. Many fungi are pathogens or mutualists and are model systems to analyse effector genes and their mechanisms of diversification. In this study, we report the genome sequence of the phytopathogenic ascomycete Leptosphaeria maculans and characterize its repertoire of protein effectors. The L. maculans genome has an unusual bipartite structure with alternating distinct guanine and cytosine-equilibrated and adenine and thymine (AT)-rich blocks of homogenous nucleotide composition. The AT-rich blocks comprise one-third of the genome and contain effector genes and families of transposable elements, both of which are affected by repeat-induced point mutation, a fungal-specific genome defence mechanism. This genomic environment for effectors promotes rapid sequence diversification and underpins the evolutionary potential of the fungus to adapt rapidly to novel host-derived constraints. PMID:21326234

  10. Heteroduplex analysis of the dystrophin gene: Application to point mutation and carrier detection

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, T.W.; Papp, A.C.; Snyder, P.J.; Sedra, M.S.; Western, L.M.; Bartolo, C.; Mendell, J.R.; Moxley, R.T.

    1994-03-01

    Approximately one-third of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients have undefined mutations in the dystrophin gene. For carrier and prenatal studies in families without detectable mutations, the indirect restriction fragment length polymorphism linkage approach is used. Using a multiplex amplification and heteroduplex analysis of dystrophin exons, the authors identified nonsense mutations in two DMD patients. Although the nonsense mutations are predicted to severely truncate the dystrophin protein, both patients presented with mild clinical courses of the disease. As a result of identifying the mutation in the affected boys, direct carrier studies by heteroduplex analysis were extended to other relatives. The authors conclude that the technique is not only ideal for mutation detection but is also useful for diagnostic testing. 29 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Mapping Point Mutations in the Drosophila Rosy Locus Using Denaturing Gradient Gel Blots

    PubMed Central

    Gray, M.; Charpentier, A.; Walsh, K.; Wu, P.; Bender, W.

    1991-01-01

    Mutations within the rosy locus of Drosophila were mapped using blots of genomic DNA fragments separated on denaturing gradient gels. DNA sequence differences between otherwise identical small rosy DNA fragments were detected among the mutants as mobility shifts on the blots. Mutations were mapped to within a few hundred base pairs of rosy sequence in 100 of 130 mutants tested--a 77% detection rate. The sequence changes in 43 rosy mutations are presented; all but six of these were single base changes. Thirty-four of 36 sequenced mutations induced by the alkylating agents N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea and ethyl methanesulfonate were transitions. All of the mutations mapped in the rosy transcription unit. Twenty-three of the 43 sequenced mutations change the predicted rosy gene polypeptide sequence; the remainder would interrupt protein translation (17), or disrupt mRNA processing (3). PMID:1901817

  12. Active Learning: A PowerPoint Tutorial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gareis, Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    Individual or group presentations are common assignments in business communication courses, and many students use PowerPoint slides as audiovisual support. Frequently, curriculum constraints don't allow instructors much time to teach effective design and delivery of presentation graphics in their courses; guidelines in the form of minilectures or…

  13. Mosaic Activating Mutations in FGFR1 Cause Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Bennett, James T; Tan, Tiong Yang; Alcantara, Diana; Tétrault, Martine; Timms, Andrew E; Jensen, Dana; Collins, Sarah; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J M; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Christensen, Katherine M; Braddock, Stephen R; Brandling-Bennett, Heather; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Chung, Brian; Lehman, Anna; Su, John; Ng, SuYuen; Amor, David J; Majewski, Jacek; Biesecker, Les G; Boycott, Kym M; Dobyns, William B; O'Driscoll, Mark; Moog, Ute; McDonell, Laura M

    2016-03-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a sporadic condition characterized by ocular, cutaneous, and central nervous system anomalies. Key clinical features include a well-demarcated hairless fatty nevus on the scalp, benign ocular tumors, and central nervous system lipomas. Seizures, spasticity, and intellectual disability can be present, although affected individuals without seizures and with normal intellect have also been reported. Given the patchy and asymmetric nature of the malformations, ECCL has been hypothesized to be due to a post-zygotic, mosaic mutation. Despite phenotypic overlap with several other disorders associated with mutations in the RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways, the molecular etiology of ECCL remains unknown. Using exome sequencing of DNA from multiple affected tissues from five unrelated individuals with ECCL, we identified two mosaic mutations, c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) and c.1966A>G (p.Lys656Glu) within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR1, in two affected individuals each. These two residues are the most commonly mutated residues in FGFR1 in human cancers and are associated primarily with CNS tumors. Targeted resequencing of FGFR1 in multiple tissues from an independent cohort of individuals with ECCL identified one additional individual with a c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) mutation in FGFR1. Functional studies of ECCL fibroblast cell lines show increased levels of phosphorylated FGFRs and phosphorylated FRS2, a direct substrate of FGFR1, as well as constitutive activation of RAS-MAPK signaling. In addition to identifying the molecular etiology of ECCL, our results support the emerging overlap between mosaic developmental disorders and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942290

  14. Mosaic Activating Mutations in FGFR1 Cause Encephalocraniocutaneous Lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, James T.; Tan, Tiong Yang; Alcantara, Diana; Tétrault, Martine; Timms, Andrew E.; Jensen, Dana; Collins, Sarah; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.M.; Lindhurst, Marjorie J.; Christensen, Katherine M.; Braddock, Stephen R.; Brandling-Bennett, Heather; Hennekam, Raoul C.M.; Chung, Brian; Lehman, Anna; Su, John; Ng, SuYuen; Amor, David J.; Majewski, Jacek; Biesecker, Les G.; Boycott, Kym M.; Dobyns, William B.; O’Driscoll, Mark; Moog, Ute; McDonell, Laura M.

    2016-01-01

    Encephalocraniocutaneous lipomatosis (ECCL) is a sporadic condition characterized by ocular, cutaneous, and central nervous system anomalies. Key clinical features include a well-demarcated hairless fatty nevus on the scalp, benign ocular tumors, and central nervous system lipomas. Seizures, spasticity, and intellectual disability can be present, although affected individuals without seizures and with normal intellect have also been reported. Given the patchy and asymmetric nature of the malformations, ECCL has been hypothesized to be due to a post-zygotic, mosaic mutation. Despite phenotypic overlap with several other disorders associated with mutations in the RAS-MAPK and PI3K-AKT pathways, the molecular etiology of ECCL remains unknown. Using exome sequencing of DNA from multiple affected tissues from five unrelated individuals with ECCL, we identified two mosaic mutations, c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) and c.1966A>G (p.Lys656Glu) within the tyrosine kinase domain of FGFR1, in two affected individuals each. These two residues are the most commonly mutated residues in FGFR1 in human cancers and are associated primarily with CNS tumors. Targeted resequencing of FGFR1 in multiple tissues from an independent cohort of individuals with ECCL identified one additional individual with a c.1638C>A (p.Asn546Lys) mutation in FGFR1. Functional studies of ECCL fibroblast cell lines show increased levels of phosphorylated FGFRs and phosphorylated FRS2, a direct substrate of FGFR1, as well as constitutive activation of RAS-MAPK signaling. In addition to identifying the molecular etiology of ECCL, our results support the emerging overlap between mosaic developmental disorders and tumorigenesis. PMID:26942290

  15. Post-zygotic Point Mutations Are an Underrecognized Source of De Novo Genomic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Acuna-Hidalgo, Rocio; Bo, Tan; Kwint, Michael P.; van de Vorst, Maartje; Pinelli, Michele; Veltman, Joris A.; Hoischen, Alexander; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Gilissen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    De novo mutations are recognized both as an important source of genetic variation and as a prominent cause of sporadic disease in humans. Mutations identified as de novo are generally assumed to have occurred during gametogenesis and, consequently, to be present as germline events in an individual. Because Sanger sequencing does not provide the sensitivity to reliably distinguish somatic from germline mutations, the proportion of de novo mutations that occur somatically rather than in the germline remains largely unknown. To determine the contribution of post-zygotic events to de novo mutations, we analyzed a set of 107 de novo mutations in 50 parent-offspring trios. Using four different sequencing techniques, we found that 7 (6.5%) of these presumed germline de novo mutations were in fact present as mosaic mutations in the blood of the offspring and were therefore likely to have occurred post-zygotically. Furthermore, genome-wide analysis of “de novo” variants in the proband led to the identification of 4/4,081 variants that were also detectable in the blood of one of the parents, implying parental mosaicism as the origin of these variants. Thus, our results show that an important fraction of de novo mutations presumed to be germline in fact occurred either post-zygotically in the offspring or were inherited as a consequence of low-level mosaicism in one of the parents. PMID:26054435

  16. Chemical reconstitution of a chloride pump inactivated by a single point mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Rüdiger, M; Haupts, U; Gerwert, K; Oesterhelt, D

    1995-01-01

    The arginine residue R108 plays an essential role in the transport mechanism of the light-driven anion pump halorhodopsin (HR) as demonstrated by complete inactivation of chloride transport in mutant HR-R108Q. In the presence of substrate anions, guanidinium ions bind to the mutant protein with affinities in the mM range, thereby restoring transport activity and photochemical properties of wild type. One guanidinium ion and one anion are bound per molecule of HR-R108Q. For HR wild type, HR-R108Q-guanidinium and HR-R108K, differences in transport activity and anion selectivity are found which may be explained by effects of anion solvation. The agreement between light-induced FTIR difference spectra of HR wild type and HR-R108Q-guanidinium demonstrates that no structural changes occur in the reconstituted mutant and that the photoreactions of wild type and reconstituted mutant are identical. Furthermore, an IR absorbance band of the guanidino group of R108 can be identified at 1695/1688 cm-1. In HR-R108Q, a guanidinium ion binding close to the mutated residue is proposed to mimick the role of the R108 side chain as the anion uptake site. Thus the wild type reaction mechanism is reconstituted. PMID:7737112

  17. Point mutations associated with organophosphate and carbamate resistance in Chinese strains of Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minghui; Dong, Yande; Ran, Xin; Wu, Zhiming; Guo, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Yingmei; Xing, Dan; Yan, Ting; Wang, Gang; Zhu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Hengduan; Li, Chunxiao; Zhao, Tongyan

    2014-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase resistance has been well documented in many insects, including several mosquito species. We tested the resistance of five wild, Chinese strains of the mosquito Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to two kinds of pesticides, dichlorvos and propoxur. An acetylcholinesterase gene (ace1) was cloned and sequenced from a pooled sample of mosquitoes from these five strains and the amino acids of five positions were found to vary (V185M, G247S, A328S, A391T, and T682A). Analysis of the correlation between mutation frequencies and resistance levels (LC50) suggests that two point mutations, G247S (r2 = 0.732, P = 0.065) and A328S (r2 = 0.891, P = 0.016), are associated with resistance to propoxur but not to dichlorvos. Although the V185M mutation was not associated with either dichlorvos or propoxur resistance, its RS genotype frequency was correlated with propoxur resistance (r2 = 0.815, P = 0.036). And the HWE test showed the A328S mutation is linked with V185M, also with G247S mutation. This suggested that these three mutations may contribute synergistically to propoxur resistance. The T682A mutation was negatively correlated with propoxur (r2 = 0.788, P = 0.045) resistance. Knowledge of these mutations may help design strategies for managing pesticide resistance in wild mosquito populations.

  18. Relics of repeat-induced point mutation direct heterochromatin formation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Zachary A.; Honda, Shinji; Khlafallah, Tamir K.; Jeffress, Jennifer K.; Freitag, Michael; Mohn, Fabio; Schübeler, Dirk; Selker, Eric U.

    2009-01-01

    Both RNAi-dependent and -independent mechanisms have been implicated in the establishment of heterochromatin domains, which may be stabilized by feedback loops involving chromatin proteins and modifications of histones and DNA. Neurospora crassa sports features of heterochromatin found in higher eukaryotes, namely cytosine methylation (5mC), methylation of histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me), and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), and is a model to investigate heterochromatin establishment and maintenance. We mapped the distribution of HP1, 5mC, H3K9me3, and H3K4me2 at 100 bp resolution and explored their interplay. HP1, H3K9me3, and 5mC were extensively co-localized and defined 44 heterochromatic domains on linkage group VII, all relics of repeat-induced point mutation. Interestingly, the centromere was found in an ∼350 kb heterochromatic domain with no detectable H3K4me2. 5mC was not found in genes, in contrast to the situation in plants and animals. H3K9me3 is required for HP1 localization and DNA methylation in N. crassa. In contrast, we found that localization of H3K9me3 was independent of 5mC or HP1 at virtually all heterochromatin regions. In addition, we observed complete restoration of DNA methylation patterns after depletion and reintroduction of the H3K9 methylation machinery. These data show that A:T-rich RIP'd DNA efficiently directs methylation of H3K9, which in turn, directs methylation of associated cytosines. PMID:19092133

  19. The Molecular Basis of Muscular Dystrophy in the mdx Mouse: A Point Mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sicinski, Piotr; Geng, Yan; Ryder-Cook, Allan S.; Barnard, Eric A.; Darlison, Mark G.; Barnard, Pene J.

    1989-06-01

    The mdx mouse is an X-linked myopathic mutant, an animal model for human Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In both mouse and man the mutations lie within the dystrophin gene, but the phenotypic differences of the disease in the two species confer much interest on the molecular basis of the mdx mutation. The complementary DNA for mouse dystrophin has been cloned, and the sequence has been used in the polymerase chain reaction to amplify normal and mdx dystrophin transcripts in the area of the mdx mutation. Sequence analysis of the amplification products showed that the mdx mouse has a single base substitution within an exon, which causes premature termination of the polypeptide chain.

  20. Identification of a Novel GJA8 (Cx50) Point Mutation Causes Human Dominant Congenital Cataracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xiang-Lian; Zhang, Yilan; Wu, Yaming; Lv, Jineng; Zhang, Wei; Jin, Zi-Bing; Qu, Jia; Gu, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Hereditary cataracts are clinically and genetically heterogeneous lens diseases that cause a significant proportion of visual impairment and blindness in children. Human cataracts have been linked with mutations in two genes, GJA3 and GJA8, respectively. To identify the causative mutation in a family with hereditary cataracts, family members were screened for mutations by PCR for both genes. Sequencing the coding regions of GJA8, coding for connexin 50, revealed a C > A transversion at nucleotide 264, which caused p.P88T mutation. To dissect the molecular consequences of this mutation, plasmids carrying wild-type and mutant mouse ORFs of Gja8 were generated and ectopically expressed in HEK293 cells and human lens epithelial cells, respectively. The recombinant proteins were assessed by confocal microscopy and Western blotting. The results demonstrate that the molecular consequences of the p.P88T mutation in GJA8 include changes in connexin 50 protein localization patterns, accumulation of mutant protein, and increased cell growth.

  1. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Islam T M; Ma, Eric J; Hill, Nichola J; Meixell, Brandt W; Lindberg, Mark; Albrecht, Randy A; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context. PMID:27101787

  2. A point mutation in the polymerase protein PB2 allows a reassortant H9N2 influenza isolate of wild-bird origin to replicate in human cells.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Islam T M; Ma, Eric J; Hill, Nichola J; Meixell, Brandt W; Lindberg, Mark; Albrecht, Randy A; Bahl, Justin; Runstadler, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    H9N2 influenza A viruses are on the list of potentially pandemic subtypes. Therefore, it is important to understand how genomic reassortment and genetic polymorphisms affect phenotypes of H9N2 viruses circulating in the wild bird reservoir. A comparative genetic analysis of North American H9N2 isolates of wild bird origin identified a naturally occurring reassortant virus containing gene segments derived from both North American and Eurasian lineage ancestors. The PB2 segment of this virus encodes 10 amino acid changes that distinguish it from other H9 strains circulating in North America. G590S, one of the 10 amino acid substitutions observed, was present in ~12% of H9 viruses worldwide. This mutation combined with R591 has been reported as a marker of pathogenicity for human pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses. Screening by polymerase reporter assay of all the natural polymorphisms at these two positions identified G590/K591 and S590/K591 as the most active, with the highest polymerase activity recorded for the SK polymorphism. Rescued viruses containing these two polymorphic combinations replicated more efficiently in MDCK cells and they were the only ones tested that were capable of establishing productive infection in NHBE cells. A global analysis of all PB2 sequences identified the K591 signature in six viral HA/NA subtypes isolated from several hosts in seven geographic locations. Interestingly, introducing the K591 mutation into the PB2 of a human-adapted H3N2 virus did not affect its polymerase activity. Our findings demonstrate that a single point mutation in the PB2 of a low pathogenic H9N2 isolate could have a significant effect on viral phenotype and increase its propensity to infect mammals. However, this effect is not universal, warranting caution in interpreting point mutations without considering protein sequence context.

  3. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2016-09-09

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9.

  4. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27609304

  5. New molecular beacon for p53 gene point mutation and significant potential in serving as the polymerization primer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jianguo; Dong, Haiyan; Shen, Weiyu; He, Sudan; Li, Hongling; Lu, Yusheng; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Jia, Lee

    2015-04-15

    Molecular beacon (MB) is usually explored as a convenient probe for various bioassays. In an enzymatic polymerization-based biosensing system, primer, and MB, sometimes involving other oligonucleotides, are often required to collaboratively generate an amplified fluorescent signal to detect target molecules with high sensitivity and specificity. In the current study, a multifunctional primer-integrated MB (MP-MB) was developed to detect the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Compared with the traditional MB, our MP-MB can not only selectively identify the target of interest and signal sensitively its hybridization event, but also act as the primer during enzymatic polymerization. Specifically, hybridization of MP-MB to target p53 gene restored the fluorescence intensity and activated the pre-locked primer designed by changing the molecular configuration of MP-MB. Moreover, the p53 gene could be detected down to 1nM with a linear response range of 1×10(-9)-3×10(-7)M, and p53 gene point mutation was readily distinguished from the wild-type one. Its potential application as a primer of replication in enzymatic polymerization-based assay systems was validated by running parallel gel electrophoreses in comparison with the native counterpart of MP-MB without any chemical modification. Owning to its excellent assay characteristics, less species requirement, broad sequence diversity and preserved intrinsic bioactivity, the proof-of-concept of MP-MB exhibits a great potential in various biomedical applications.

  6. Altering a gene involved in nuclear distribution increases the repeat-induced point mutation process in the fungus Podospora anserina.

    PubMed Central

    Bouhouche, Khaled; Zickler, Denise; Debuchy, Robert; Arnaise, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is a homology-dependent gene-silencing mechanism that introduces C:G-to-T:A transitions in duplicated DNA segments. Cis-duplicated sequences can also be affected by another mechanism called premeiotic recombination (PR). Both are active over the sexual cycle of some filamentous fungi, e.g., Neurospora crassa and Podospora anserina. During the sexual cycle, several developmental steps require precise nuclear movement and positioning, but connections between RIP, PR, and nuclear distributions have not yet been established. Previous work has led to the isolation of ami1, the P. anserina ortholog of the Aspergillus nidulans apsA gene, which is required for nuclear positioning. We show here that ami1 is involved in nuclear distribution during the sexual cycle and that alteration of ami1 delays the fruiting-body development. We also demonstrate that ami1 alteration affects loss of transgene functions during the sexual cycle. Genetically linked multiple copies of transgenes are affected by RIP and PR much more frequently in an ami1 mutant cross than in a wild-type cross. Our results suggest that the developmental slowdown of the ami1 mutant during the period of RIP and PR increases time exposure to the duplication detection system and thus increases the frequency of RIP and PR. PMID:15166143

  7. Analyses of point mutation repair and allelic heterogeneity generated by CRISPR/Cas9 and single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Bialk, Pawel; Sansbury, Brett; Rivera-Torres, Natalia; Bloh, Kevin; Man, Dula; Kmiec, Eric B.

    2016-01-01

    The repair of a point mutation can be facilitated by combined activity of a single-stranded oligonucleotide and a CRISPR/Cas9 system. While the mechanism of action of combinatorial gene editing remains to be elucidated, the regulatory circuitry of nucleotide exchange executed by oligonucleotides alone has been largely defined. The presence of the appropriate CRISPR/Cas9 system leads to an enhancement in the frequency of gene editing directed by single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides. While CRISPR/Cas9 executes double-stranded DNA cleavage efficiently, closure of the broken chromosomes is dynamic, as varying degrees of heterogeneity of the cleavage products appear to accompany the emergence of the corrected base pair. We provide a detailed analysis of allelic variance at and surrounding the target site. In one particular case, we report sequence alteration directed by a distinct member of the same gene family. Our data suggests that single-stranded DNA molecules may influence DNA junction heterogeneity created by CRISPR/Cas9. PMID:27609304

  8. Point mutations in EBV gH that abrogate or differentially affect B cell and epithelial cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Liguo; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M. . E-mail: lhuttf@lsuhsc.edu

    2007-06-20

    Cell fusion mediated by Epstein-Barr virus requires three conserved glycoproteins, gB and gHgL, but activation is cell type specific. B cell fusion requires interaction between MHC class II and a fourth virus glycoprotein, gp42, which complexes non-covalently with gHgL. Epithelial cell fusion requires interaction between gHgL and a novel epithelial cell coreceptor and is blocked by excess gp42. We show here that gp42 interacts directly with gH and that point mutations in the region of gH recognized by an antibody that differentially inhibits epithelial and B cell fusion significantly impact both the core fusion machinery and cell-specific events. Substitution of alanine for glycine at residue 594 completely abrogates fusion with either B cells or epithelial cells. Substitution of alanine for glutamic acid at residue 595 reduces fusion with epithelial cells, greatly enhances fusion with B cells and allows low levels of B cell fusion even in the absence of gL.

  9. A new point mutation in the iron-sulfur subunit of succinate dehydrogenase confers resistance to boscalid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Duan, Yabing; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    Research has established that mutations in highly conserved amino acids of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex in various fungi confer SDH inhibitor (SDHI) resistance. For Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, a necrotrophic fungus with a broad host range and a worldwide distribution, boscalid resistance has been attributed to the mutation H132R in the highly conserved SdhD subunit protein of the SDH complex. In our previous study, however, only one point mutation, A11V in SdhB (GCA to GTA change in SdhB), was detected in S. sclerotiorum boscalid-resistant (BR) mutants. In the current study, replacement of the SdhB gene in a boscalid-sensitive (BS) S. sclerotiorum strain with the mutant SdhB gene conferred resistance. Compared with wild-type strains, BR and GSM (SdhB gene in the wild-type strain replaced by the mutant SdhB gene) mutants were more sensitive to osmotic stress, lacked the ability to produce sclerotia and exhibited lower expression of the pac1 gene. Importantly, the point mutation was not located in the highly conserved sequence of the iron-sulfur subunit of SDH. These results suggest that resistance based on non-conserved vs. conserved protein domains differs in mechanism. In addition to increasing our understanding of boscalid resistance in S. sclerotiorum, the new information will be useful for the development of alternative antifungal drugs.

  10. A new point mutation in the iron-sulfur subunit of succinate dehydrogenase confers resistance to boscalid in Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Duan, Yabing; Wang, Jianxin; Zhou, Mingguo

    2015-09-01

    Research has established that mutations in highly conserved amino acids of the succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) complex in various fungi confer SDH inhibitor (SDHI) resistance. For Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, a necrotrophic fungus with a broad host range and a worldwide distribution, boscalid resistance has been attributed to the mutation H132R in the highly conserved SdhD subunit protein of the SDH complex. In our previous study, however, only one point mutation, A11V in SdhB (GCA to GTA change in SdhB), was detected in S. sclerotiorum boscalid-resistant (BR) mutants. In the current study, replacement of the SdhB gene in a boscalid-sensitive (BS) S. sclerotiorum strain with the mutant SdhB gene conferred resistance. Compared with wild-type strains, BR and GSM (SdhB gene in the wild-type strain replaced by the mutant SdhB gene) mutants were more sensitive to osmotic stress, lacked the ability to produce sclerotia and exhibited lower expression of the pac1 gene. Importantly, the point mutation was not located in the highly conserved sequence of the iron-sulfur subunit of SDH. These results suggest that resistance based on non-conserved vs. conserved protein domains differs in mechanism. In addition to increasing our understanding of boscalid resistance in S. sclerotiorum, the new information will be useful for the development of alternative antifungal drugs. PMID:25441450

  11. Functional significance of point mutations in stress chaperone mortalin and their relevance to Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Renu; Ryu, Jihoon; Ahn, Hyo Min; Saxena, Nishant; Chaudhary, Anupama; Yun, Chae-Ok; Kaul, Sunil C

    2015-03-27

    Mortalin/mtHsp70/Grp75 (mot-2), a heat shock protein 70 family member, is an essential chaperone, enriched in cancers, and has been shown to possess pro-proliferative and anti-apoptosis functions. An allelic form of mouse mortalin (mot-1) that differs by two amino acids, M618V and G624R, in the C terminus substrate-binding domain has been reported. Furthermore, genome sequencing of mortalin from Parkinson disease patients identified two missense mutants, R126W and P509S. In the present study, we investigated the significance of these mutations in survival, proliferation, and oxidative stress tolerance in human cells. Using mot-1 and mot-2 recombinant proteins and specific antibodies, we performed screening to find their binding proteins and then identified ribosomal protein L-7 (RPL-7) and elongation factor-1 α (EF-1α), which differentially bind to mot-1 and mot-2, respectively. We demonstrate that mot-1, R126W, or P509S mutant (i) lacks mot-2 functions involved in carcinogenesis, such as p53 inactivation and hTERT/hnRNP-K (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K) activation; (ii) causes increased level of endogenous oxidative stress; (iii) results in decreased tolerance of cells to exogenous oxidative stress; and (iv) shows differential binding and impact on the RPL-7 and EF-1α proteins. These factors may mediate the transformation of longevity/pro-proliferative function of mot-2 to the premature aging/anti-proliferative effect of mutants, and hence may have significance in cellular aging, Parkinson disease pathology, and prognosis. PMID:25645922

  12. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  13. Novel FOXC2 Mutation in Hereditary Distichiasis Impairs DNA-Binding Activity and Transcriptional Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Leilei; He, Jie; Han, Bing; Lu, Linna; Fan, Jiayan; Zhang, He; Ge, Shengfang; Zhou, Yixiong; Jia, Renbing; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-01-01

    Distichiasis presents as double rows of eyelashes arising from aberrant differentiation of the meibomian glands of the eyelids, and it may be sporadic or hereditary. FOXC2 gene mutations in hereditary distichiasis are rarely reported. Here, we examined two generations of a Chinese family with hereditary distichiasis but without lymphedema or other features of LD syndrome. The FOXC2 gene was amplified and sequenced in all family members. Subcellular localization and luciferase assays were performed to assess the activity of the mutant FOXC2 protein. Clinical examinations showed distichiasis, lower eyelid ectropion, congenital ptosis and photophobia in all affected individuals. Sequence analysis revealed a novel frameshift mutation, c.964_965insG, in the coding region of the FOXC2 gene. This mutation caused protein truncation due to the presence of a premature stop codon. A fluorescence assay showed that this mutation did not change the nuclear localization of the protein. However, it impaired DNA-binding activity and decreased transcriptional activation. This is the first report of a FOXC2 mutation in hereditary distichiasis in the Chinese population. The findings of our study expand the FOXC2 mutation spectrum and contribute to the understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation of this disease. PMID:27570485

  14. Identification of weak points prone for mutation in ferredoxin of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, V

    2008-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, the causative agent for human trichomoniasis, is a problematic sexually transmitted disease mainly in women. At present, metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis is an infrequent but challenging problem with no universally successful treatment. Genetic mutation is believed to be an important factor leading to increasing drug resistance. Understanding the mutation status will help to design accurate strategies of therapy against mutant strains of T. vaginalis. The author performed a bioinformatic analysis to determine positions that tend to comply peptide motifs in the amino acid sequence of ferredoxin of T. vaginalis. Based on this study, the weak linkages in the studied protein can be identified and can be useful information for prediction of possible new mutations that can lead to drug resistance. In addition, the results from this study can be good information for further research on the diagnosis for mutants and new effective drug development. PMID:18445954

  15. The H1047R point mutation in p110 alpha changes the morphology of human colon HCT116 cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, G; Pehlke, C; Pepermans, R; Cannon, JL; Lidke, D; Rajput, A

    2015-01-01

    The class IA phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K) is involved in controlling changes in cell morphology, which is a highly coordinated cellular event. This event is powered by actin filament polymerization and remodeling. The gain-of-function mutations in the catalytic subunit of p110α of class IA PI3K, which occur in up to one-third of human colorectal cancers (CRCs), are capable of causing dysregulation of cell signaling and thus may result in the alteration in cell morphology and motility and in turn cause cancer metastasis. In vivo studies have demonstrated that cell lines bearing the H1047R point mutation, the most frequent cancer-specific mutation in the kinase domain of p110α, are more metastatic than cells carrying wild-type p110α. In the current study, we show that the H1047R in p110α of PI3K decreases F-actin polymerization, increases the formation of filopodia and significantly changes the cell morphology in HCT116 cancer cells. The anti-apoptotic protein B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), which is also involved in actin polymerization and cell migration, is downregulated by the H1047R mutation in p110α. Our data suggest that the H1047R mutation in PI3K is responsible for the rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, alteration in cell morphology and enhancing cell motility, and that Bcl-2 may be involved in the H1047R mutation-mediated morphological changes and increased migratory capability. PMID:27551473

  16. Constitutive mutations of Agrobacterium tumefaciens transcriptional activator virG.

    PubMed Central

    Pazour, G J; Ta, C N; Das, A

    1992-01-01

    The virulence (vir) genes of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti plasmids are positively regulated by virG in conjunction with virA and plant-derived inducing molecules. A procedure that utilizes both genetic selection and a genetic screen was developed to isolate mutations in virG that led to elevated levels of vir gene expression in the absence of virA and plant phenolic inducers. Mutants were isolated at a frequency of 1 in 10(7) to 10(8). Substitution mutations at two positions in the virG coding region were found to result in the desired phenotype. One mutant had an asparagine-to-aspartic acid substitution at residue 54, and the other contained an isoleucine-to-leucine substitution at residue 106. In both cases, the mutant phenotype required the presence of the active-site aspartic acid residue at position 52. Further analysis showed that no other substitution at residue 54 resulted in a constitutive phenotype. In contrast, several substitutions at residue 106 led to a constitutive phenotype. The possible roles of the residues at positions 54 and 106 in VirG function are discussed. PMID:1597431

  17. [Point mutations of genes encoding proteins involvedin RNA splicing in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes].

    PubMed

    Barańska, Marta; Czerwińska-Rybak, Joanna; Gil, Lidia; Komarnicki, Mieczysław

    2015-01-01

    The myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) constitute heterogeneous group of clonal disorders, characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, peripheral cytopenia and increased risk of acute myeloid leukemia development. Molecular mechanisms behind MDS have not been fully explained, however recent studies based on new technologies confirmed that epigenetic abnormalities and somatic mutation in the spliceasome machinery are crucial in pathogenesis of these diseases. Abnormal mRNA splicing (excision of intronic sequences from mRNA) has been found in over half of all MDS patients and resulted in accumulation of cytogenetical and molecular changes. The biological impact of splicing factor genes mutations has been evaluated only in a limited extend and current studies concentrate on analysis of MDS transcriptome. Molecular characteristic of classical and alternative splicing is presented in the paper, according to current knowledge. We review the most prominent findings from recent years concerning mutation in the spliceasome machinery with respect to MDS phenotype and disease prognosis. Perspectives in applying of novel diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for myelodysplasia, based on spliceosome mutations identification are also presented.

  18. ALK kinase domain mutations in primary anaplastic large cell lymphoma: consequences on NPM-ALK activity and sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lovisa, Federica; Cozza, Giorgio; Cristiani, Andrea; Cuzzolin, Alberto; Albiero, Alessandro; Mussolin, Lara; Pillon, Marta; Moro, Stefano; Basso, Giuseppe; Rosolen, Angelo; Bonvini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    ALK inhibitor crizotinib has shown potent antitumor activity in children with refractory Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) and the opportunity to include ALK inhibitors in first-line therapies is oncoming. However, recent studies suggest that crizotinib-resistance mutations may emerge in ALCL patients. In the present study, we analyzed ALK kinase domain mutational status of 36 paediatric ALCL patients at diagnosis to identify point mutations and gene aberrations that could impact on NPM-ALK gene expression, activity and sensitivity to small-molecule inhibitors. Amplicon ultra-deep sequencing of ALK kinase domain detected 2 single point mutations, R335Q and R291Q, in 2 cases, 2 common deletions of exon 23 and 25 in all the patients, and 7 splicing-related INDELs in a variable number of them. The functional impact of missense mutations and INDELs was evaluated. Point mutations were shown to affect protein kinase activity, signalling output and drug sensitivity. INDELs, instead, generated kinase-dead variants with dominant negative effect on NPM-ALK kinase, in virtue of their capacity of forming non-functional heterocomplexes. Consistently, when co-expressed, INDELs increased crizotinib inhibitory activity on NPM-ALK signal processing, as demonstrated by the significant reduction of STAT3 phosphorylation. Functional changes in ALK kinase activity induced by both point mutations and structural rearrangements were resolved by molecular modelling and dynamic simulation analysis, providing novel insights into ALK kinase domain folding and regulation. Therefore, these data suggest that NPM-ALK pre-therapeutic mutations may be found at low frequency in ALCL patients. These mutations occur randomly within the ALK kinase domain and affect protein activity, while preserving responsiveness to crizotinib.

  19. A valveless rotary microfluidic device for multiplex point mutation identification based on ligation-rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Heo, Hyun Young; Chung, Soyi; Kim, Yong Tae; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-04-15

    Genetic variations such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and point mutations are important biomarkers to monitor disease prognosis and diagnosis. In this study, we developed a novel rotary microfluidic device which can perform multiplex SNP typing on the mutation sites of TP53 genes. The microdevice consists of three glass layers: a channel wafer, a Ti/Pt electrode-patterned resistance temperature detector (RTD) wafer, and a rotary plate in which twelve reaction chambers were fabricated. A series of sample injection, ligation-rolling circle amplification (L-RCA) reaction, and fluorescence detection of the resultant amplicons could be executed by rotating the top rotary plate, identifying five mutation points related with cancer prognosis. The use of the rotary plate eliminates the necessity of microvalves and micropumps to control the microfluidic flow in the channel, simplifying the chip design and chip operation for multiplex SNP detection. The proposed microdevice provides an advanced genetic analysis platform in terms of multiplexity, simplicity, and portability in the fields of biomedical diagnostics. PMID:26606304

  20. Mutations in man

    SciTech Connect

    Obe, G.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains 13 selections that cover some of the following topics: DNA repair, gene or point mutations, aspects of nondisjunction, origin and significance of chromosomal alterations, structure and organization of the human genome, and mutagenic activity of cigarette smoke.

  1. A comparison of ARMS and mutation specific IHC for common activating EGFR mutations analysis in small biopsy and cytology specimens of advanced non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Guoqing; Hao, Yueyue; Xu, Yinhong; Zhang, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    We have compared mutation analysis by Amplification Refractory Mutation System (ARMS) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant-specific antibodies for their ability to detect two common activating EGFR mutations in a cohort of 115 advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including cytology material, core biopsy, and bronchoscopic biopsies. Assessment of EGFR mutation status was performed by using antibodies and ARMS assay specific to the two major forms of mutant EGFR, exon 19 deletion E746-A750 (c.2235_2249del15 or c.2236_2250del15, p. Glu746_Ala750 del) and exon 21 L858R point mutation (c.2573T>G, p.Leu858Arg). In this study the optimal buffer for antigen retrieval was sodium citrate (pH 6.0). Q score was used to evaluate the specific mutant EGFR proteins expression. Validation using clinical material showed deletions in exon 19 were detected in 19.1% and L858R mutation in 20% of all cases by ARMS assay. A cutoff value of score 1 was used as positive by IHC. No wild type cases were immuno-reactive. The antibodies performed well in cytology, core biopsies and bronchoscopic biopsies. There were only one false positive case using L858R IHC (sensitivity 100%, specificity 98.5%, positive predictive value 96%, negative predictive value 100%). All 23 E746-A750 exon 19 deletions identified by mutation analysis were positive by IHC. The sensitivity of exon 19 IHC for E746-A750 was 100%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100% and negative predictive value 100%. The result of the IHC stains was finely correlated with mutations status determined by ARMS assay. Although inferior to molecular genetic analysis of the EGFR gene, IHC is highly specific and sensitive for the targeted EGFR mutations. The antibodies are likely to be of clinical value in cases especially where limited tumor material is available, or in situations where molecular genetic analysis is not readily available.

  2. [Increasing activity of a monoamine oxidase by random mutation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuejun; Ma, Yuanhui; Shao, Jianhua; Lai, Dunyue; Wang, Zhiguo; Chen, Zhenming

    2014-01-01

    The monoamine oxidase mutant A-1 (F210V/L213C) from Aspergillus niger showed some catalytic activity on mexiletine. To futher improve its activity, the mutant was subjected to directed evolution with MegaWHOP PCR (Megaprimer PCR of Whole Plasmid) and selection employing a high-throughput agar plate-based colorimetric screen. This approach led to the identification of a mutant ep-1, which specific activity was 189% of that for A-1. The ep-1 also showed significantly improved enantioselectivity, with the E value increased from 101 to 282; its kinetic k(cat)/K(m) value increased from 0.001 51 mmol/(L x s) to 0.002 89 mmol/(L x s), suggesting that catalytic efficiency of ep-1 had been improved. The mutant showed obviously higher specific activities on 7 of all tested 11 amines substrates, and the others were comparable. Sequence analysis revealed that there was a new mutation T162A on ep-1. The molecular dynamics simulation indicated that T162A may affect the secondary structure of the substrate channel and expand the binding pocket. PMID:24818485

  3. Dynamic Harmony Search with Polynomial Mutation Algorithm for Valve-Point Economic Load Dispatch

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, M.; Sree Ranga Raja, T.

    2015-01-01

    Economic load dispatch (ELD) problem is an important issue in the operation and control of modern control system. The ELD problem is complex and nonlinear with equality and inequality constraints which makes it hard to be efficiently solved. This paper presents a new modification of harmony search (HS) algorithm named as dynamic harmony search with polynomial mutation (DHSPM) algorithm to solve ORPD problem. In DHSPM algorithm the key parameters of HS algorithm like harmony memory considering rate (HMCR) and pitch adjusting rate (PAR) are changed dynamically and there is no need to predefine these parameters. Additionally polynomial mutation is inserted in the updating step of HS algorithm to favor exploration and exploitation of the search space. The DHSPM algorithm is tested with three power system cases consisting of 3, 13, and 40 thermal units. The computational results show that the DHSPM algorithm is more effective in finding better solutions than other computational intelligence based methods. PMID:26491710

  4. The detection of pfcrt and pfmdr1 point mutations as molecular markers of chloroquine drug resistance, Pahang, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Malaria is still a public health problem in Malaysia with chloroquine (CQ) being the first-line drug in the treatment policy of uncomplicated malaria. There is a scarcity in information about the magnitude of Plasmodium falciparum CQ resistance. This study aims to investigate the presence of single point mutations in the P. falciparum chloroquine-resistance transporter gene (pfcrt) at codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371 and in P. falciparum multi-drug resistance-1 gene (pfmdr1) at codons 86 and 1246, as molecular markers of CQ resistance. Methods A total of 75 P. falciparum blood samples were collected from different districts of Pahang state, Malaysia. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt gene (codons 76, 271, 326, 356 and 371) and pfmdr1 gene (codons 86 and 1246) were analysed by using mutation-specific nested PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) methods. Results Mutations of pfcrt K76T and pfcrt R371I were the most prevalent among pfcrt gene mutations reported by this study; 52% and 77%, respectively. Other codons of the pfcrt gene and the positions 86 and 1246 of the pfmdr1 gene were found mostly of wild type. Significant associations of pfcrt K76T, pfcrt N326S and pfcrt I356T mutations with parasitaemia were also reported. Conclusion The high existence of mutant pfcrt T76 may indicate the low susceptibility of P. falciparum isolates to CQ in Peninsular Malaysia. The findings of this study establish baseline data on the molecular markers of P. falciparum CQ resistance, which may help in the surveillance of drug resistance in Peninsular Malaysia. PMID:22853645

  5. The identification of point mutations in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients by using reverse-transcription PCR and the protein truncation test

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, R.J.; Bobrow, M.; Roberts, R.G.

    1995-08-01

    The protein truncation test (PTT) is a mutation-detection method that monitors the integrity of the open reading frame (ORF). More than 60% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) result from gross frameshifting deletions in the dystrophin gene that are detectable by multiplex PCR system. It has become apparent that virtually all of the remaining DMD mutations also disrupt the translational reading frame, making the PTT a logical next step toward a comprehensive strategy for the identification of all DMD mutations. We report here a pilot study involving 22 patients and describe the mutations characterized. These constitute 12 point mutations or small insertions/deletions and 4 gross rearrangements. We also have a remaining five patients in whom there does not appear to be mutation in the ORF. We believe that reverse-transcription-PCR/PTT is an efficient method by which to screen for small mutations in DMD patients with no deletion. 29 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Point mutations in the promoter region of the CYBB gene leading to mild chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Weening, R S; De Boer, M; Kuijpers, T W; Neefjes, V M; Hack, W W; Roos, D

    2000-12-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a clinical syndrome of recurrent bacterial and fungal infections caused by a rare disorder of phagocytic cells. In CGD, the phagocytes are unable to generate oxygen radicals after stimulation of these cells, due to a defect in the NADPH oxidase system. This NADPH oxidase is a multicomponent enzyme of at least four subunits, of which the beta-subunit of cytochrome b558, gp91-phox, is encoded by an X-linked gene (called CYBB). We report here five patients from two families; in each family we found a different mutation in the promoter region of CYBB. Both mutations prevented the expression of gp91-phox in the patients' neutrophils and thus caused inability of these cells to generate oxygen radicals. However, the mutations left the gp91-phox expression and the function of the NADPH oxidase in the patients' eosinophils intact. The relatively mild course of the CGD in these patients can probably be attributed to the fact that the eosinophils have retained their oxidative capacity. Furthermore, our results indicate that neutrophils and eosinophils differ in their regulation of gp91-phox expression.

  7. Phenotypic Switching in Mycoplasma gallisepticum Hemadsorption Is Governed by a High-Frequency, Reversible Point Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Winner, Florian; Markovà, Ivana; Much, Peter; Lugmair, Albin; Siebert-Gulle, Karin; Vogl, Gunther; Rosengarten, Renate; Citti, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum is a flask-shaped organism that commonly induces chronic respiratory disease in chickens and infectious sinusitis in turkeys. Phenotypic switching in M. gallisepticum hemadsorption (HA) was found to correlate with phase variation of the GapA cytadhesin concurrently with that of the CrmA protein, which exhibits cytadhesin-related features and is encoded by a gene located downstream of the gapA gene as part of the same transcription unit. In clones derived from strain Rlow, detailed genetic analyses further revealed that on-off switching in GapA expression is governed by a reversible base substitution occurring at the beginning of the gapA structural gene. In HA− variants, this event generates a stop codon that results in the premature termination of GapA translation and consequently affects the expression of CrmA. Sequences flanking the mutation spot do not feature any repeated motifs that could account for error-prone mutation via DNA slippage and the exact mechanism underlying this high-frequency mutational event remains to be elucidated. An HA− mutant deficient in producing CrmA, mHAD3, was obtained by disrupting the crmA gene by using transposition mutagenesis. Despite a fully functional gapA gene, the amount of GapA detected in this mutant was considerably lower than in HA+ clonal variants, suggesting that, in absence of CrmA, GapA might be subjected to a higher turnover. PMID:12595441

  8. Mcl-1-Bim complexes accommodate surprising point mutations via minor structural changes

    SciTech Connect

    Fire, Emiko; Gullá, Stefano V.; Grant, Robert A.; Keating, Amy E.

    2010-06-25

    Mcl-1 is an antiapoptotic Bcl-2-family protein that protects cells against death. Structures of Mcl-1, and of other anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins, reveal a surface groove into which the {alpha}-helical BH3 regions of certain proapoptotic proteins can bind. Despite high overall structural conservation, differences in this groove afford binding specificity that is important for the mechanism of Bcl-2 family function. We report the crystal structure of human Mcl-1 bound to a BH3 peptide derived from human Bim and the structures for three complexes that accommodate large physicochemical changes at conserved Bim sites. The mutations had surprisingly modest effects on complex stability, and the structures show that Mcl-1 can undergo small changes to accommodate the mutant ligands. For example, a shift in a leucine side chain fills a hole left by an isoleucine-to-alanine mutation at the first hydrophobic buried position of Bim BH3. Larger changes are also observed, with shifting of helix {alpha}3 accommodating an isoleucine-to-tyrosine mutation at this same position. We surveyed the variation in available Mcl-1 and Bcl-x{sub L} structures and observed moderate flexibility that is likely critical for facilitating interactions of diverse BH3-only proteins with Mcl-1. With the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family members attracting significant attention as therapeutic targets, these structures contribute to our growing understanding of how specificity is achieved and can help to guide the design of novel inhibitors that target Mcl-1.

  9. Emphasizing Saddle Points through Game Theory: A Classroom Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dorrington, Jenny; Jones, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces the necessary game-theoretic background and explains how game-theoretic experiments of the Matching Pennies game can be used as a classroom activity to develop intuition about saddle points. (Author/ASK)

  10. Electrophysiological characteristics according to activity level of myofascial trigger points.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong Hun; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the differences in electrophysiological characteristics of normal muscles versus muscles with latent or active myofascial trigger points, and identified the neuromuscular physiological characteristics of muscles with active myofascial trigger points, thereby providing a quantitative evaluation of myofascial pain syndrome and clinical foundational data for its diagnosis. [Subjects] Ninety adults in their 20s participated in this study. Subjects were equally divided into three groups: the active myofascial trigger point group, the latent myofascial trigger point group, and the control group. [Methods] Maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), endurance, median frequency (MDF), and muscle fatigue index were measured in all subjects. [Results] No significant differences in MVIC or endurance were revealed among the three groups. However, the active trigger point group had significantly different MDF and muscle fatigue index compared with the control group. [Conclusion] Given that muscles with active myofascial trigger points had an increased MDF and suffered muscle fatigue more easily, increased recruitment of motor unit action potential of type II fibers was evident. Therefore, electrophysiological analysis of these myofascial trigger points can be applied to evaluate the effect of physical therapy and provide a quantitative diagnosis of myofascial pain syndrome.

  11. Structural analysis of point mutations at the Vaccinia virus A20/D4 interface.

    PubMed

    Contesto-Richefeu, Céline; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Brazzolotto, Xavier; Burmeister, Wim P; Peyrefitte, Christophe N; Iseni, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    The Vaccinia virus polymerase holoenzyme is composed of three subunits: E9, the catalytic DNA polymerase subunit; D4, a uracil-DNA glycosylase; and A20, a protein with no known enzymatic activity. The D4/A20 heterodimer is the DNA polymerase cofactor, the function of which is essential for processive DNA synthesis. The recent crystal structure of D4 bound to the first 50 amino acids of A20 (D4/A201-50) revealed the importance of three residues, forming a cation-π interaction at the dimerization interface, for complex formation. These are Arg167 and Pro173 of D4 and Trp43 of A20. Here, the crystal structures of the three mutants D4-R167A/A201-50, D4-P173G/A201-50 and D4/A201-50-W43A are presented. The D4/A20 interface of the three structures has been analysed for atomic solvation parameters and cation-π interactions. This study confirms previous biochemical data and also points out the importance for stability of the restrained conformational space of Pro173. Moreover, these new structures will be useful for the design and rational improvement of known molecules targeting the D4/A20 interface. PMID:27599859

  12. Active point out-of-plane ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Alexis; Guo, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Haichong K.; Kang, Hyunjae; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Boctor, Emad M.

    2015-03-01

    Image-guided surgery systems are often used to provide surgeons with informational support. Due to several unique advantages such as ease of use, real-time image acquisition, and no ionizing radiation, ultrasound is a common intraoperative medical imaging modality used in image-guided surgery systems. To perform advanced forms of guidance with ultrasound, such as virtual image overlays or automated robotic actuation, an ultrasound calibration process must be performed. This process recovers the rigid body transformation between a tracked marker attached to the transducer and the ultrasound image. Point-based phantoms are considered to be accurate, but their calibration framework assumes that the point is in the image plane. In this work, we present the use of an active point phantom and a calibration framework that accounts for the elevational uncertainty of the point. Given the lateral and axial position of the point in the ultrasound image, we approximate a circle in the axial-elevational plane with a radius equal to the axial position. The standard approach transforms all of the imaged points to be a single physical point. In our approach, we minimize the distances between the circular subsets of each image, with them ideally intersecting at a single point. We simulated in noiseless and noisy cases, presenting results on out-of-plane estimation errors, calibration estimation errors, and point reconstruction precision. We also performed an experiment using a robot arm as the tracker, resulting in a point reconstruction precision of 0.64mm.

  13. Point mutation of Arg440 to his in cytochrome P450c17 causes severe 17{alpha}-hydroxylase deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Fardella, C.E.; Hum, D.W.; Miller, W.L.; Homoki, J.

    1994-07-01

    Genetic disorders in the gene encoding P450c17 cause 17{alpha}-hydroxylase deficiency. The consequent defects in the synthesis of cortisol and sex steroids cause sexual infantilism and a female phenotype in both genetic sexes as well as mineralorcorticoid excess and hypertension. A 15-yr-old patient from Germany was seen for absent pubertal development and mild hypertension with hypokalemia, high concentrations of 17-deoxysteroids, and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Analysis of her P450c17 gene by polymerase chain reaction amplification and direct sequencing showed mutation of codon 440 from CGC (Arg) to CAC (His). Expression of a vector encoding this mutated form of P450c17 in transfected nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells showed that the mutant P450c17 protein was produced, but it lacked both 17{alpha}-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities. To date, 15 different P450c17 mutations have been described in 23 patients with 17{alpha}-hydroxylase deficiency, indicating that mutations in this gene are due to random events. 36 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV. PMID:26340409

  15. Single point mutations in the helicase domain of the NS3 protein enhance dengue virus replicative capacity in human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and circumvent the type I interferon response.

    PubMed

    Silveira, G F; Strottmann, D M; de Borba, L; Mansur, D S; Zanchin, N I T; Bordignon, J; dos Santos, C N Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease worldwide. The outcome of the infection is determined by the interplay of viral and host factors. In the present study, we evaluated the cellular response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mdDCs) infected with recombinant dengue virus type 1 (DV1) strains carrying a single point mutation in the NS3hel protein (L435S or L480S). Both mutated viruses infect and replicate more efficiently and produce more viral progeny in infected mdDCs compared with the parental, non-mutated virus (vBACDV1). Additionally, global gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays revealed that the mutated DVs induce the up-regulation of the interferon (IFN) signalling and pattern recognition receptor (PRR) canonical pathways in mdDCs. Pronounced production of type I IFN were detected specifically in mdDCs infected with DV1-NS3hel-mutated virus compared with mdDCs infected with the parental virus. In addition, we showed that the type I IFN produced by mdDCs is able to reduce DV1 infection rates, suggesting that cytokine function is effective but not sufficient to mediate viral clearance of DV1-NS3hel-mutated strains. Our results demonstrate that single point mutations in subdomain 2 have important implications for adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity of DV1-NS3hel. Although a direct functional connection between the increased ATPase activity and viral replication still requires further studies, these mutations speed up viral RNA replication and are sufficient to enhance viral replicative capacity in human primary cell infection and circumvent type I IFN activity. This information may have particular relevance for attenuated vaccine protocols designed for DV.

  16. HOW A SINGLE-POINT MUTATION IN HORSERADISH PEROXIDASE MARKEDLY ENHANCES ENANTIOSELECTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Antipov, Eugene; Cho, Art E.; Klibanov, Alexander M.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of all possible mutations at position 178 on the enantioselectivity of yeast surface-bound horseradish peroxidase (HRP) toward chiral phenols has been investigated. In contrast to their wild-type predecessor, most HRP mutants are enantioselective, with the Arg178Glu variant exhibiting the greatest, 25-fold (S)/(R) preference. Using kinetic analysis of enzymatic oxidation of various substrate analogs and molecular modeling of enzyme-substrate complexes, this enantioselectivity enhancement is attributed to changes in the transition state energy due to electrostatic repulsion between the carboxylates of the enzyme's Glu178 and the substrate's (R)-enantiomer. PMID:19610634

  17. Whole exome sequencing identifies the first STRADA point mutation in a patient with polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE).

    PubMed

    Bi, Weimin; Glass, Ian A; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Eng, Christine M; Yang, Yaping; Sun, Angela

    2016-08-01

    Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome (PMSE) is an ultra rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe, infantile-onset intractable epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, macrocephaly, and craniofacial dysmorphism. The molecular diagnosis of this condition has thus far only been made in 16 Old Order Mennonite patients carrying a homozygous 7 kb founder deletion of exons 9-13 of STRADA. We performed clinical whole exome sequencing (WES) on a 4-year-old Indian male with global developmental delay, history of failure to thrive, infantile spasms, repetitive behaviors, hypotonia, low muscle mass, marked joint laxity, and dysmorphic facial features including tall forehead, long face, arched eyebrows, small chin, wide mouth, and tented upper lip. A homozygous single nucleotide duplication, c.842dupA (p.D281fs), in exon 10 of STRADA was identified. Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation in the individual and identified both parents as carriers. In light of the molecular discoveries, the patient's clinical phenotype was considered to be a good fit for PMSE. We identified for the first time a homozygous point mutation in STRADA causing PMSE. Additional bi-allelic mutations related to PMSE thus far have not been observed in Baylor ∼6,000 consecutive clinical WES cases, supporting the rarity of this disorder. Our findings may have treatment implications for the patient since previous studies have shown rapamycin as a potential therapeutic agent for the seizures and cognitive problems in PMSE patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27170158

  18. Identification of a Point Mutation Impairing the Binding between Aquaporin-4 and Neuromyelitis Optica Autoantibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Francesco; Mola, Maria Grazia; Simone, Laura; Rosito, Stefania; Alberga, Domenico; Mangiatordi, Giuseppe Felice; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Nicolotti, Orazio; Frigeri, Antonio; Svelto, Maria; Nicchia, Grazia Paola

    2014-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is characterized by the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies (NMO-IgGs) against supra-molecular assemblies of aquaporin-4 (AQP4), known as orthogonal array of particles (OAPs). NMO-IgGs have a polyclonal origin and recognize different conformational epitopes involving extracellular AQP4 loops A, C, and E. Here we hypothesize a pivotal role for AQP4 transmembrane regions (TMs) in epitope assembly. On the basis of multialignment analysis, mutagenesis, NMO-IgG binding, and cytotoxicity assay, we have disclosed the key role of aspartate 69 (Asp69) of TM2 for NMO-IgG epitope assembly. Mutation of Asp69 to histidine severely impairs NMO-IgG binding for 85.7% of the NMO patient sera analyzed here. Although Blue Native-PAGE, total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, and water transport assays indicate that the OAP Asp69 mutant is similar in structure and function to the wild type, molecular dynamic simulations have revealed that the D69H mutation has the effect of altering the structural rearrangements of extracellular loop A. In conclusion, Asp69 is crucial for the spatial control of loop A, the particular molecular conformation of which enables the assembly of NMO-IgG epitopes. These findings provide additional clues for new strategies for NMO treatment and a wealth of information to better approach NMO pathogenesis. PMID:25239624

  19. A Point Mutation in PDGFRB Causes Autosomal-Dominant Penttinen Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Jennifer J.; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica Y.; Keppler-Noreuil, Kim M.; Sapp, Julie; Crenshaw, Molly; Finch, NiCole A.; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Rademakers, Rosa; Sybert, Virginia P.; Biesecker, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    Penttinen syndrome is a distinctive disorder characterized by a prematurely aged appearance with lipoatrophy, epidermal and dermal atrophy along with hypertrophic lesions that resemble scars, thin hair, proptosis, underdeveloped cheekbones, and marked acro-osteolysis. All individuals have been simplex cases. Exome sequencing of an affected individual identified a de novo c.1994T>C p.Val665Ala variant in PDGFRB, which encodes the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β. Three additional unrelated individuals with this condition were shown to have the identical variant in PDGFRB. Distinct mutations in PDGFRB have been shown to cause infantile myofibromatosis, idiopathic basal ganglia calcification, and an overgrowth disorder with dysmorphic facies and psychosis, none of which overlaps with the clinical findings in Penttinen syndrome. We evaluated the functional consequence of this causative variant on the PDGFRB signaling pathway by transfecting mutant and wild-type cDNA into HeLa cells, and transfection showed ligand-independent constitutive signaling through STAT3 and PLCγ. Penttinen syndrome is a clinically distinct genetic condition caused by a PDGFRB gain-of-function mutation that is associated with a specific and unusual perturbation of receptor function. PMID:26279204

  20. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy and retinoblastoma explained by compound heterozygosity of SUCLA2 point mutation and 13q14 deletion

    PubMed Central

    Matilainen, Sanna; Isohanni, Pirjo; Euro, Liliya; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Pihko, Helena; Kivelä, Tero; Knuutila, Sakari; Suomalainen, Anu

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in SUCLA2, encoding the ß-subunit of succinyl-CoA synthetase of Krebs cycle, are one cause of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndrome. Patients have been reported to have severe progressive childhood-onset encephalomyopathy, and methylmalonic aciduria, often leading to death in childhood. We studied two families, with children manifesting with slowly progressive mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, hearing impairment and transient methylmalonic aciduria, without mtDNA depletion. The other family also showed dominant inheritance of bilateral retinoblastoma, which coexisted with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy in one patient. We found a variant in SUCLA2 leading to Asp333Gly change, homozygous in one patient and compound heterozygous in one. The latter patient also carried a deletion of 13q14 of the other allele, discovered with molecular karyotyping. The deletion spanned both SUCLA2 and RB1 gene regions, leading to manifestation of both mitochondrial disease and retinoblastoma. We made a homology model for human succinyl-CoA synthetase and used it for structure–function analysis of all reported pathogenic mutations in SUCLA2. On the basis of our model, all previously described mutations were predicted to result in decreased amounts of incorrectly assembled protein or disruption of ADP phosphorylation, explaining the severe early lethal manifestations. However, the Asp333Gly change was predicted to reduce the activity of the otherwise functional enzyme. On the basis of our findings, SUCLA2 mutations should be analyzed in patients with slowly progressive encephalomyopathy, even in the absence of methylmalonic aciduria or mitochondrial DNA depletion. In addition, an encephalomyopathy in a patient with retinoblastoma suggests mutations affecting SUCLA2. PMID:24986829

  1. [SMN1 Gene Point Mutations in Type I-IV Proximal Spinal Muscular Atrophy Patients with a Single Copy of SMN1].

    PubMed

    2015-09-01

    Type I-IV proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is one of the most common autosomal-recessive diseas- es, which are characterized in the majority of cases by a severely disabling course. Proximal SMA results from mutations in the telomeric copy of SMN-SMN1 gene. Major SMN1 gene mutation types are deletions in the exons 7 and/or 8, which were revealed to be in the homozygous state in 95% of patients. Deletions in the in- dicated exons of SMN1 gene were revealed in a compound-heterozygous state in combination with intragenic point mutations in the remainder 5% of proximal SMA cases. In the present study, we conducted an analysis of point mutations in eight patients with type I-III proximal SMA phenotype, which had a deletion in 7-8- exons of SMN1 gene in the heterozygous state. We revealed seven different mutations, two of which (c.824G > C (p.Gly275A1a) and c.825-2A > T) are described here for the first time. In addition, mutation c.824G > C (p.Gly275A1a) was observed twice in the examined sample. In seven cases a heterozygous carrier of point mutations was one of the parents of the affected children (in six cases, the father; in one case, the mother). Only one mutation, c.43C > T (p.Gln15X), emerged de novo in a genital cell of the child's father. PMID:26606804

  2. Enhancing Human Spermine Synthase Activity by Engineered Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Zheng, Yueli; Petukh, Margo; Pegg, Anthony; Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Alexov, Emil

    2013-01-01

    Spermine synthase (SMS) is an enzyme which function is to convert spermidine into spermine. It was shown that gene defects resulting in amino acid changes of the wild type SMS cause Snyder-Robinson syndrome, which is a mild-to-moderate mental disability associated with osteoporosis, facial asymmetry, thin habitus, hypotonia, and a nonspecific movement disorder. These disease-causing missense mutations were demonstrated, both in silico and in vitro, to affect the wild type function of SMS by either destabilizing the SMS dimer/monomer or directly affecting the hydrogen bond network of the active site of SMS. In contrast to these studies, here we report an artificial engineering of a more efficient SMS variant by transferring sequence information from another organism. It is confirmed experimentally that the variant, bearing four amino acid substitutions, is catalytically more active than the wild type. The increased functionality is attributed to enhanced monomer stability, lowering the pKa of proton donor catalytic residue, optimized spatial distribution of the electrostatic potential around the SMS with respect to substrates, and increase of the frequency of mechanical vibration of the clefts presumed to be the gates toward the active sites. The study demonstrates that wild type SMS is not particularly evolutionarily optimized with respect to the reaction spermidine → spermine. Having in mind that currently there are no variations (non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism, nsSNP) detected in healthy individuals, it can be speculated that the human SMS function is precisely tuned toward its wild type and any deviation is unwanted and disease-causing. PMID:23468611

  3. Intrachromosomal Amplification, Locus Deletion and Point Mutation in the Aquaglyceroporin AQP1 Gene in Antimony Resistant Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis

    PubMed Central

    Monte-Neto, Rubens; Laffitte, Marie-Claude N.; Leprohon, Philippe; Reis, Priscila; Frézard, Frédéric; Ouellette, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Background Antimony resistance complicates the treatment of infections caused by the parasite Leishmania. Methodology/Principal Findings Using next generation sequencing, we sequenced the genome of four independent Leishmania guyanensis antimony-resistant (SbR) mutants and found different chromosomal alterations including aneuploidy, intrachromosomal gene amplification and gene deletion. A segment covering 30 genes on chromosome 19 was amplified intrachromosomally in three of the four mutants. The gene coding for the multidrug resistance associated protein A involved in antimony resistance was also amplified in the four mutants, most likely through chromosomal translocation. All mutants also displayed a reduced accumulation of antimony mainly due to genomic alterations at the level of the subtelomeric region of chromosome 31 harboring the gene coding for the aquaglyceroporin 1 (LgAQP1). Resistance involved the loss of LgAQP1 through subtelomeric deletions in three mutants. Interestingly, the fourth mutant harbored a single G133D point mutation in LgAQP1 whose role in resistance was functionality confirmed through drug sensitivity and antimony accumulation assays. In contrast to the Leishmania subspecies that resort to extrachromosomal amplification, the Viannia strains studied here used intrachromosomal amplification and locus deletion. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of a naturally occurred point mutation in AQP1 in antimony resistant parasites. PMID:25679388

  4. Internal Point Mutations of the Capsid Modify the Serotype of Rice Yellow Mottle Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hébrard, Eugénie; Pinel-Galzi, Agnès; Catherinot, Vincent; Labesse, Gilles; Brugidou, Christophe; Fargette, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Rice yellow mottle virus is classified in five major serotypes; the molecular diversity of the coat protein (CP) is well established, but the amino acids involved in the recognition by discriminant monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) remain unknown. Reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree and sequence alignment of the CP gene of a sample representative of the continental-large diversity were used to identify 10 serospecific amino acids (i.e., conserved in all isolates belonging to the same serotype and distinct in other serotypes). Positions occupied by serospecific residues were localized on the crystal structure of the CP monomer and on modeled capsomers. Structural, molecular, and serological properties of each serotype were analyzed, and subsequently, hypotheses on the potential role of amino acids in discriminating reactions with antibodies were formulated. The residues 114 and 115 (serospecific of Sr1) and 190 (serospecific of Sr2) were localized on the outer surface of the capsid and might be directly involved in the immunoreactivity with MAb D and MAb A, respectively. In contrast, residues 180 (Sr3) and 178 (Sr5) lay within the inner surface of the capsid. To understand the role of these internal positions in the recognition with the antibodies, two substitutions (T180K and G178D) were introduced in the CP of an infectious clone. These mutations modified the antigenicity with MAb G and MAb E discriminating Sr3 and Sr5, respectively, while the reaction with MAb D remained unaffected. This result suggests an indirect effect of these two internal mutations on local immunostructure while the global structure was maintained. PMID:15767440

  5. Late-onset muscle weakness in partial phosphofructokinase deficiency: a unique myopathy with vacuoles, abnormal mitochondria, and absence of the common exon 5/intron 5 junction point mutation.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, K; Vasconcelos, O; Goldfarb, L; Dalakas, M C

    1996-05-01

    Three patients (ages 51, 59, and 79) from two generations of an Ashkenazi Jewish family had partial (33% activity) phosphofructokinase (PFK) deficiency that presented with fixed muscle weakness after the age of 50 years. MR spectroscopy revealed accumulation of phosphomonoesters during exercise. Muscle biopsy showed a vacuolar myopathy with increased autophagic activity and several ragged-red and cytochrome c oxidase-negative fibers. The older patient, age 79 at biopsy, had several necrotic fibers. Electron microscopy revealed subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar glycogen accumulation and proliferation of mitochondria with paracrystalline inclusions, probably related to reduced availability of energy due to impaired glycolysis. The common point mutation of exon 5/intron 5 junction seen in Jewish Ashkenazi patients with PFK deficiency was excluded. We conclude that late-onset fixed muscle weakness occurs in partial PFK deficiency and it may represent the end result of continuing episodes of muscle fiber destruction. Partial enzyme deficiency in two successive generations suggests a unique molecular mechanism.

  6. Two novel point mutations in clinical Staphylococcus aureus reduce linezolid susceptibility and switch on the stringent response to promote persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Chua, Kyra; Davies, John K; Newton, Hayley J; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F; Holmes, Natasha E; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Hong, Jong-In; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Stinear, Timothy P; Howden, Benjamin P

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus frequently invades the human bloodstream, leading to life threatening bacteremia and often secondary foci of infection. Failure of antibiotic therapy to eradicate infection is frequently described; in some cases associated with altered S. aureus antimicrobial resistance or the small colony variant (SCV) phenotype. Newer antimicrobials, such as linezolid, remain the last available therapy for some patients with multi-resistant S. aureus infections. Using comparative and functional genomics we investigated the molecular determinants of resistance and SCV formation in sequential S. aureus isolates from a patient who had a persistent and recurrent S. aureus infection, after failed therapy with multiple antimicrobials, including linezolid. Two point mutations in key staphylococcal genes dramatically affected clinical behaviour of the bacterium, altering virulence and antimicrobial resistance. Most strikingly, a single nucleotide substitution in relA (SACOL1689) reduced RelA hydrolase activity and caused accumulation of the intracellular signalling molecule guanosine 3', 5'-bis(diphosphate) (ppGpp) and permanent activation of the stringent response, which has not previously been reported in S. aureus. Using the clinical isolate and a defined mutant with an identical relA mutation, we demonstrate for the first time the impact of an active stringent response in S. aureus, which was associated with reduced growth, and attenuated virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. In addition, a mutation in rlmN (SACOL1230), encoding a ribosomal methyltransferase that methylates 23S rRNA at position A2503, caused a reduction in linezolid susceptibility. These results reinforce the exquisite adaptability of S. aureus and show how subtle molecular changes cause major alterations in bacterial behaviour, as well as highlighting potential weaknesses of current antibiotic treatment regimens.

  7. Comparative modeling of DszC, an enzyme in biodesulfurization, and performing in silico point mutation for increasing tendency to oil.

    PubMed

    Torktaz, Ibrahim; Etemadifar, Zahra; Derikvand, Peyman

    2012-01-01

    Desulfurization protein named DszC from Rhodococcus erythropolis is the key enzyme for biodesulforization of dibenzothiophene (DBT) in 4S pathway, which is a pathway with four enzymes. DszC enzyme biodesulfurizes DBT and its derivatives in oil components and biphasic systems. It functions well at the oil- water interface. In this study point mutation performed in DszC enzyme regarding to increase protein hydrophobicity and stability for application in immobilized form. 3D model of DszC predicted using Phyre2, SAM-T08 and M4t servers. I-Mutant 2 server used to determine potential spots for point mutation, and Molegro Virtual Docker (MVD) used for performing point mutation on 3D model. Hydrophobicity plots generated by Bioedit version 7.0.8.0 in Kyte-Doolittle scale indicated that protein hydrophobicity is increased after mutation. Also protein stability increased 26.11 units in scale of DDC2. PMID:22493530

  8. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members.

  9. Functional Assessment of Residues in the Amino- and Carboxyl-Termini of Crustacean Hyperglycemic Hormone (CHH) in the Mud Crab Scylla olivacea Using Point-Mutated Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chun-Jing; Huang, Shiau-Shan; Toullec, Jean-Yves; Chang, Cheng-Yen; Chen, Yun-Ru; Huang, Wen-San; Lee, Chi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To assess functional importance of the residues in the amino- and carboxyl-termini of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the mud crab Scylla olivacea (Sco-CHH), both wild-type and point-mutated CHH peptides were produced with an amidated C-terminal end. Spectral analyses of circular dichroism, chromatographic retention time, and mass spectrometric analysis of the recombinant peptides indicate that they were close in conformation to native CHH and were produced with the intended substitutions. The recombinant peptides were subsequently used for an in vivo hyperglycemic assay. Two mutants (R13A and I69A rSco-CHH) completely lacked hyperglycemic activity, with temporal profiles similar to that of vehicle control. Temporal profiles of hyperglycemic responses elicited by 4 mutants (I2A, F3A, D12A, and D60A Sco-CHH) were different from that elicited by wild-type Sco-CHH; I2A was unique in that it exhibited significantly higher hyperglycemic activity, whereas the remaining 3 mutants showed lower activity. Four mutants (D4A, Q51A, E54A, and V72A rSco-CHH) elicited hyperglycemic responses with temporal profiles similar to those evoked by wild-type Sco-CHH. In contrast, the glycine-extended version of V72A rSco-CHH (V72A rSco-CHH-Gly) completely lost hyperglycemic activity. By comparing our study with previous ones of ion-transport peptide (ITP) and molt-inhibiting hormone (MIH) using deleted or point-mutated mutants, detail discussion is made regarding functionally important residues that are shared by both CHH and ITP (members of Group I of the CHH family), and those that discriminate CHH from ITP, and Group-I from Group-II peptides. Conclusions summarized in the present study provide insights into understanding of how functional diversification occurred within a peptide family of multifunctional members. PMID:26261986

  10. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution.

  11. Conformational Tinkering Drives Evolution of a Promiscuous Activity through Indirect Mutational Effects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gloria; Hong, Nansook; Baier, Florian; Jackson, Colin J; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko

    2016-08-16

    How remote mutations can lead to changes in enzyme function at a molecular level is a central question in evolutionary biochemistry and biophysics. Here, we combine laboratory evolution with biochemical, structural, genetic, and computational analysis to dissect the molecular basis for the functional optimization of phosphotriesterase activity in a bacterial lactonase (AiiA) from the metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) superfamily. We show that a 1000-fold increase in phosphotriesterase activity is caused by a more favorable catalytic binding position of the paraoxon substrate in the evolved enzyme that resulted from conformational tinkering of the active site through peripheral mutations. A nonmutated active site residue, Phe68, was displaced by ∼3 Å through the indirect effects of two second-shell trajectory mutations, allowing molecular interactions between the residue and paraoxon. Comparative mutational scanning, i.e., examining the effects of alanine mutagenesis on different genetic backgrounds, revealed significant changes in the functional roles of Phe68 and other nonmutated active site residues caused by the indirect effects of trajectory mutations. Our work provides a quantitative measurement of the impact of second-shell mutations on the catalytic contributions of nonmutated residues and unveils the underlying intramolecular network of strong epistatic mutational relationships between active site residues and more remote residues. Defining these long-range conformational and functional epistatic relationships has allowed us to better understand the subtle, but cumulatively significant, role of second- and third-shell mutations in evolution. PMID:27444875

  12. Error-prone polymerase activity causes multinucleotide mutations in humans

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    About 2% of human genetic polymorphisms have been hypothesized to arise via multinucleotide mutations (MNMs), complex events that generate SNPs at multiple sites in a single generation. MNMs have the potential to accelerate the pace at which single genes evolve and to confound studies of demography and selection that assume all SNPs arise independently. In this paper, we examine clustered mutations that are segregating in a set of 1092 human genomes, demonstrating that the signature of MNM becomes enriched as large numbers of individuals are sampled. We estimate the percentage of linked SNP pairs that were generated by simultaneous mutation as a function of the distance between affected sites and show that MNMs exhibit a high percentage of transversions relative to transitions, findings that are reproducible in data from multiple sequencing platforms and cannot be attributed to sequencing error. Among tandem mutations that occur simultaneously at adjacent sites, we find an especially skewed distribution of ancestral and derived alleles, with GC → AA, GA → TT, and their reverse complements making up 27% of the total. These mutations have been previously shown to dominate the spectrum of the error-prone polymerase Pol ζ, suggesting that low-fidelity DNA replication by Pol ζ is at least partly responsible for the MNMs that are segregating in the human population. We develop statistical estimates of MNM prevalence that can be used to correct phylogenetic and population genetic inferences for the presence of complex mutations. PMID:25079859

  13. Identification of point mutations in exon 2 of GDF9 gene in Kermani sheep.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhshzadeh, R; Mohammadabadi, M R; Esmailizadeh, A K; Moradi Shahrebabak, H; Bordbar, F; Ansari Namin, S

    2016-01-01

    Screening the fertile ewes from national herds to detect the major genes for prolificacy is an effective way to create the fertile flocks. Growth differentiation factor (GDF) 9 is a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily that is essential for folliculogenesis and female fertility. The aim of this study was to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in exon 2 of GDF9 gene in Kermani sheep breed using PCR-SSCP. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood of collected samples using salting-out method. Whole exon 2 of GDF9 gene was amplified (634 bp and 647 bp fragments) using designed specific primers. The single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) patterns of PCR products were studied using electrophoresis on acrylamide gel and silver-nitrate staining method. Finally, 4 banding patterns for the first primer pair and 4 banding patterns for the second primer pair were obtained. Also, indices of population genetic per SNP were calculated using Gen Alex 6.41 software. The sequencing results showed the presence of 3 mutations (SNP) (443, 477 and 721 positions) in the studied population. PMID:27487501

  14. Identification of point mutations in exon 2 of GDF9 gene in Kermani sheep.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhshzadeh, R; Mohammadabadi, M R; Esmailizadeh, A K; Moradi Shahrebabak, H; Bordbar, F; Ansari Namin, S

    2016-01-01

    Screening the fertile ewes from national herds to detect the major genes for prolificacy is an effective way to create the fertile flocks. Growth differentiation factor (GDF) 9 is a member of the transforming growth factor β superfamily that is essential for folliculogenesis and female fertility. The aim of this study was to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in exon 2 of GDF9 gene in Kermani sheep breed using PCR-SSCP. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood of collected samples using salting-out method. Whole exon 2 of GDF9 gene was amplified (634 bp and 647 bp fragments) using designed specific primers. The single stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) patterns of PCR products were studied using electrophoresis on acrylamide gel and silver-nitrate staining method. Finally, 4 banding patterns for the first primer pair and 4 banding patterns for the second primer pair were obtained. Also, indices of population genetic per SNP were calculated using Gen Alex 6.41 software. The sequencing results showed the presence of 3 mutations (SNP) (443, 477 and 721 positions) in the studied population.

  15. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor transmembrane point mutation (G275E) associated with resistance to spinosad in Frankliniella occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Puinean, Alin M; Lansdell, Stuart J; Collins, Toby; Bielza, Pablo; Millar, Neil S

    2013-01-01

    High levels of resistance to spinosad, a macrocyclic lactone insecticide, have been reported previously in western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis, an economically important insect pest of vegetables, fruit and ornamental crops. We have cloned the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) α6 subunit from F. occidentalis (Foα6) and compared the nucleotide sequence of Foα6 from susceptible and spinosad-resistant insect populations (MLFOM and R1S respectively). A single nucleotide change has been identified in Foα6, resulting in the replacement of a glycine (G) residue in susceptible insects with a glutamic acid (E) in resistant insects. The resistance-associated mutation (G275E) is predicted to lie at the top of the third α-helical transmembrane domain of Foα6. Although there is no direct evidence identifying the location of the spinosad binding site, the analogous amino acid in the C. elegans glutamate-gated chloride channel lies in close proximity (4.4 Å) to the known binding site of ivermectin, another macrocyclic lactone pesticide. The functional consequences of the resistance-associated mutation have been examined in the human nAChR α7 subunit. Introduction of an analogous (A272E) mutation in α7 abolishes the modulatory effects of spinosad whilst having no significant effect upon activation by acetylcholine, consistent with spinosad having an allosteric mechanism of action. PMID:23016960

  16. Activating HER2 mutations in HER2 gene amplification negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Kavuri, Shyam M.; Searleman, Adam C.; Shen, Wei; Shen, Dong; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Monsey, John; Goel, Nicholas; Aronson, Adam B.; Li, Shunqiang; Ma, Cynthia X.; Ding, Li; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ellis, Matthew J.

    2012-01-01

    Data from eight breast cancer genome sequencing projects identified 25 patients with HER2 somatic mutations in cancers lacking HER2 gene amplification. To determine the phenotype of these mutations, we functionally characterized thirteen HER2 mutations using in vitro kinase assays, protein structure analysis, cell culture and xenograft experiments. Seven of these mutations are activating mutations, including G309A, D769H, D769Y, V777L, P780ins, V842I, and R896C. HER2 in-frame deletion 755-759, which is homologous to EGFR exon 19 in-frame deletions, had a neomorphic phenotype with increased phosphorylation of EGFR or HER3. L755S produced lapatinib resistance, but was not an activating mutation in our experimental systems. All of these mutations were sensitive to the irreversible kinase inhibitor, neratinib. These findings demonstrate that HER2 somatic mutation is an alternative mechanism to activate HER2 in breast cancer and they validate HER2 somatic mutations as drug targets for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23220880

  17. Suppressor Mutations for Presenilin 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Mutants Modulate γ-Secretase Activities.

    PubMed

    Futai, Eugene; Osawa, Satoko; Cai, Tetsuo; Fujisawa, Tomoya; Ishiura, Shoichi; Tomita, Taisuke

    2016-01-01

    γ-Secretase is a multisubunit membrane protein complex containing presenilin (PS1) as a catalytic subunit. Familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) mutations within PS1 were analyzed in yeast cells artificially expressing membrane-bound substrate, amyloid precursor protein, or Notch fused to Gal4 transcriptional activator. The FAD mutations, L166P and G384A (Leu-166 to Pro and Gly-384 to Ala substitution, respectively), were loss-of-function in yeast. We identified five amino acid substitutions that suppress the FAD mutations. The cleavage of amyloid precursor protein or Notch was recovered by the secondary mutations. We also found that secondary mutations alone activated the γ-secretase activity. FAD mutants with suppressor mutations, L432M or S438P within TMD9 together with a missense mutation in the second or sixth loops, regained γ-secretase activity when introduced into presenilin null mouse fibroblasts. Notably, the cells with suppressor mutants produced a decreased amount of Aβ42, which is responsible for Alzheimer disease. These results indicate that the yeast system is useful to screen for mutations and chemicals that modulate γ-secretase activity.

  18. Characterization and a point mutational approach of a psychrophilic lipase from an arctic bacterium, Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Wi, Ah Ram; Jeon, Sung-Jong; Kim, Sunghui; Park, Ha Ju; Kim, Dockyu; Han, Se Jong; Yim, Joung Han; Kim, Han-Woo

    2014-06-01

    A bacterium with lipolytic activity was isolated from the Chukchi Sea within the Arctic Ocean. The lipase BpL5 from the isolate, Bacillus pumilus ArcL5, belongs to subfamily 4 of lipase family I. The optimum pH and temperature of the recombinant enzyme BpL5, as expressed in Escherichia coli, were 9.0 and 20 °C, respectively. The enzyme retained 85 % of its activity at 5 °C. There was a significant difference between temperatures for maximal activity (20 °C) and for protein denaturation (approx. 45 °C). The enzyme preferred middle-chain (C8) p-nitrophenyl substrates. Two mutants, S139A and S139Y, were rationally designed based on the 3D-structure model, and their activities were compared with that of the wild type. The both mutants showed significantly improved activity against tricaprylin.

  19. G2385R and I2020T Mutations Increase LRRK2 GTPase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jihoon; Joe, Eun-hye; Son, Ilhong; Seol, Wongi

    2016-01-01

    The LRRK2 mutation is a major causal mutation in familial Parkinson's disease. Although LRRK2 contains functional GTPase and kinase domains and their activities are altered by pathogenic mutations, most studies focused on LRRK2 kinase activity because the most prevalent mutant, G2019S, enhances kinase activity. However, the G2019S mutation is extremely rare in the Asian population. Instead, the G2385R mutation was reported as a major risk factor in the Asian population. Similar to other LRRK2 studies, G2385R studies have also focused on kinase activity. Here, we investigated GTPase activities of G2385R with other LRRK2 mutants, such as G2019S, R1441C, and I2020T, as well as wild type (WT). Our results suggest that both I2020T and G2385R contain GTPase activities stronger than that of WT. A kinase assay using the commercial recombinant proteins showed that I2020T harbored stronger activity, whereas G2385R had weaker activity than that of WT, as reported previously. This is the first report of LRRK2 I2020T and G2385R GTPase activities and shows that most of the LRRK2 mutations that are pathogenic or a risk factor altered either kinase or GTPase activity, suggesting that their physiological consequences are caused by altered enzyme activities. PMID:27314038

  20. Familial adult onset hyperinsulinism due to an activating glucokinase mutation: Implications for pharmacological glucokinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Challis, Benjamin G.; Harris, Julie; Sleigh, Alison; Isaac, Iona; Orme, Steve M.; Seevaratnam, Nandini; Dhatariya, Ketan; Simpson, Helen L.; Semple, Robert K.

    2016-01-01

    Context Glucokinase (GCK) phosphorylates and thereby “traps” glucose in cells, thus serving as a gatekeeper for cellular glucose metabolism, particularly in hepatocytes and pancreatic beta cells. In humans, activating GCK mutations cause familial hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (GCK-HH), leading to keen interest in the potential of small molecule glucokinase activators (GKAs) as treatments for diabetes mellitus. Many such agents have been developed, however observation of side effects including hypertriglyceridaemia and hepatic steatosis have delayed their clinical development. Objective To describe the clinical presentation and metabolic profiles of affected family members in a kindred with familial hyperinsulinism of adult presentation due to a known activating mutation in GCK. Design Clinical, biochemical and metabolic assessment, and GCK sequencing in affected family members. Results In the 60 year-old female proband, hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia (blood glucose 2.1mmol/mol, insulin 18pmol/l) was confirmed following 34 hours of fasting, however abdominal computed tomography (CT), pancreatic MRI, endoscopic ultrasound, octreotide scintigraphy and selective arterial calcium stimulation failed to localise an insulinoma. A prolonged OGTT revealed fasting hypoglycaemia that was exacerbated after glucose challenge, consistent with dysregulated glucose-stimulated insulin release. A heterozygous activating mutation, p.Val389Leu, in the glucokinase gene (GCK) was found in the proband and four other family members. Of these, two had been investigated elsewhere for recurrent hypoglycaemia in adulthood, while the other two adult relatives were asymptomatic despite profound hypoglycaemia. All three of the available family members with the p.Val389Leu mutation had normal serum lipid profiles, normal rates of fasting hepatic de novo lipogenesis and had hepatic triglyceride levels commensurate with their degree of adiposity. Conclusion Activating GCK mutations may

  1. Understanding the lid movements of LolA in Escherichia coli using molecular dynamics simulation and in silico point mutation.

    PubMed

    Murahari, Priyadarshini; Anishetty, Sharmila; Pennathur, Gautam

    2013-12-01

    The Lol system in Escherichia coli is involved in localization of lipoproteins and hence is essential for growth of the organism. LolA is a periplasmic chaperone that binds to outer-membrane specific lipoproteins and transports them from inner membrane to outer membrane through LolB. The hydrophobic lipid-binding cavity of LolA consists of α-helices which act as a lid in regulating the transfer of lipoproteins from LolA to LolB. The current study aims to investigate the structural changes observed in LolA during the transition from open to closed conformation in the absence of lipoprotein. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out for two LolA crystal structures; LolA(R43L), and in silico mutated MsL43R for a simulation time of 50 ns in water environment. We have performed an in silico point mutation of leucine to arginine in MsL43R to evaluate the importance of arginine to induce structural changes and impact the stability of protein structure. A complete dynamic analysis of open to closed conformation reveals the existence of two distinct levels; closing of lid and closing of entrance of hydrophobic cavity. Our analysis reveals that the structural flexibility of LolA is an important factor for its role as a periplasmic chaperone. PMID:23962984

  2. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K. W.; McDonald-McGinn, D. M.; Gaudenz, K.; Whitaker, L. A.; Bartlett, S. P.; Markowitz, R. I.; Robin, N. H.; Nwokoro, N.; Mulvihill, J. J.; Losken, H. W.; Mulliken, J. B.; Guttmacher, A. E.; Wilroy, R. S.; Clarke, L. A.; Hollway, G.; Adès, L. C.; Haan, E. A.; Mulley, J. C.; Cohen, M. M.; Bellus, G. A.; Francomano, C. A.; Moloney, D. M.; Wall, S. A.; Wilkie, A. O. M.; Zackai, E. H.

    1997-01-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. ImagesFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:9042914

  3. Identification of point mutations and large intragenic deletions in Fanconi anemia using next-generation sequencing technology.

    PubMed

    Nicchia, Elena; Greco, Chiara; De Rocco, Daniela; Pecile, Vanna; D'Eustacchio, Angela; Cappelli, Enrico; Corti, Paola; Marra, Nicoletta; Ramenghi, Ugo; Pillon, Marta; Farruggia, Piero; Dufour, Carlo; Pallavicini, Alberto; Torelli, Lucio; Savoia, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare bone marrow failure disorder characterized by clinical and genetic heterogeneity with at least 17 genes involved, which make molecular diagnosis complex and time-consuming. Since next-generation sequencing technologies could greatly improve the genetic testing in FA, we sequenced DNA samples with known and unknown mutant alleles using the Ion PGM (™) system (IPGM). The molecular target of 74.2 kb in size covered 96% of the FA-coding exons and their flanking regions. Quality control testing revealed high coverage. Comparing the IPGM and Sanger sequencing output of FANCA,FANCC, and FANCG we found no false-positive and a few false-negative variants, which led to high sensitivity (95.58%) and specificity (100%) at least for these two most frequently mutated genes. The analysis also identified novel mutant alleles, including those in rare complementation groups FANCF and FANCL. Moreover, quantitative evaluation allowed us to characterize large intragenic deletions of FANCA and FANCD2, suggesting that IPGM is suitable for identification of not only point mutations but also copy number variations. PMID:26740942

  4. A unique point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene (FGFR3) defines a new craniosynostosis syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Muenke, M.; Gripp, K.W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.

    1997-03-01

    The underlying basis of many forms of syndromic craniosynostosis has been defined on a molecular level. However, many patients with familial or sporadic craniosynostosis do not have the classical findings of those craniosynostosis syndromes. Here we present 61 individuals from 20 unrelated families where coronal synostosis is due to an amino acid substitution (Pro250Arg) that results from a single point mutation in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 gene on chromosome 4p. In this instance, a new clinical syndrome is being defined on the basis of the molecular finding. In addition to the skull findings, some patients had abnormalities on radiographs of hands and feet, including thimble-like middle phalanges, coned epiphyses, and carpal and tarsal fusions. Brachydactyly was seen in some cases; none had clinically significant syndactyly or deviation of the great toe. Sensorineural hearing loss was present in some, and developmental delay was seen in a minority. While the radiological findings of hands and feet can be very helpful in diagnosing this syndrome, it is not in all cases clearly distinguishable on a clinical basis from other craniosynostosis syndromes. Therefore, this mutation should be tested for in patients with coronal synostosis. 54 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Modulating non-native aggregation and electrostatic protein-protein interactions with computationally designed single-point mutations.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, C J; Blanco, M A; Costanzo, J A; Enterline, M; Fernandez, E J; Robinson, A S; Roberts, C J

    2016-06-01

    Non-native protein aggregation is a ubiquitous challenge in the production, storage and administration of protein-based biotherapeutics. This study focuses on altering electrostatic protein-protein interactions as a strategy to modulate aggregation propensity in terms of temperature-dependent aggregation rates, using single-charge variants of human γ-D crystallin. Molecular models were combined to predict amino acid substitutions that would modulate protein-protein interactions with minimal effects on conformational stability. Experimental protein-protein interactions were quantified by the Kirkwood-Buff integrals (G22) from laser scattering, and G22 showed semi-quantitative agreement with model predictions. Experimental initial-rates for aggregation showed that increased (decreased) repulsive interactions led to significantly increased (decreased) aggregation resistance, even based solely on single-point mutations. However, in the case of a particular amino acid (E17), the aggregation mechanism was altered by substitution with R or K, and this greatly mitigated improvements in aggregation resistance. The results illustrate that predictions based on native protein-protein interactions can provide a useful design target for engineering aggregation resistance; however, this approach needs to be balanced with consideration of how mutations can impact aggregation mechanisms. PMID:27160179

  6. Predicting protein thermal stability changes upon point mutations using statistical potentials: Introducing HoTMuSiC

    PubMed Central

    Pucci, Fabrizio; Bourgeas, Raphaël; Rooman, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    The accurate prediction of the impact of an amino acid substitution on the thermal stability of a protein is a central issue in protein science, and is of key relevance for the rational optimization of various bioprocesses that use enzymes in unusual conditions. Here we present one of the first computational tools to predict the change in melting temperature ΔTm upon point mutations, given the protein structure and, when available, the melting temperature Tm of the wild-type protein. The key ingredients of our model structure are standard and temperature-dependent statistical potentials, which are combined with the help of an artificial neural network. The model structure was chosen on the basis of a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the system. The parameters of the model were identified on a set of more than 1,600 mutations with experimentally measured ΔTm. The performance of our method was tested using a strict 5-fold cross-validation procedure, and was found to be significantly superior to that of competing methods. We obtained a root mean square deviation between predicted and experimental ΔTm values of 4.2 °C that reduces to 2.9 °C when ten percent outliers are removed. A webserver-based tool is freely available for non-commercial use at soft.dezyme.com. PMID:26988870

  7. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency.

  8. Alanine-Scanning Mutational Analysis of Durancin GL Reveals Residues Important for Its Antimicrobial Activity.

    PubMed

    Ju, Xingrong; Chen, Xinquan; Du, Lihui; Wu, Xueyou; Liu, Fang; Yuan, Jian

    2015-07-22

    Durancin GL is a novel class IIa bacteriocin with 43 residues produced by Enterococcus durans 41D. This bacteriocin demonstrates narrow inhibition spectrum and potent antimicrobial activity against several Listeria monocytogenes strains, including nisin-resistant L. monocytogenes NR30. A systematic alanine-scanning mutational analysis with site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze durancin GL residues important for antimicrobial activity and specificity. Results showed that three mutations lost their antimicrobial activity, ten mutations demonstrated a decreased effect on the activity, and seven mutations exhibited relatively high activity. With regard to inhibitory spectrum, four mutants demonstrated a narrower antimicrobial spectrum than wild-type durancin GL. Another four mutants displayed a broader target cell spectrum and increased potency relative to wild-type durancin GL. These findings broaden our understanding of durancin GL residues important for its antimicrobial activity and contribute to future rational design of variants with increased potency. PMID:26168032

  9. Activation of Developmentally Mutated Human Globin Genes by Cell Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Enver, Tariq; Takegawa, Susumu; Anagnou, Nicholas P.; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    1988-11-01

    Human fetal globin genes are not expressed in hybrid cells produced by the fusion of normal human lymphocytes with mouse erythroleukemia cells. In contrast, when lymphocytes from persons with globin gene developmental mutations (hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin) are used for these fusions, fetal globin is expressed in the hybrid cells. Thus, mutations of developmental origin can be reconstituted in vitro by fusing mutant lymphoid cells with differentiated cell lines of the proper lineage. This system can readily be used for analyses, such as globin gene methylation, that normally require large numbers of pure nucleated erythroid cells, which are difficult to obtain.

  10. A rare branch-point mutation is associated with missplicing of fibrillin-2 in a large family with congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

    PubMed Central

    Maslen, C; Babcock, D; Raghunath, M; Steinmann, B

    1997-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an autosomal dominant disorder that is phenotypically similar to but genetically distinct from Marfan syndrome. Genetic-linkage analysis has implicated the fibrillin-2 gene (FBN2) as the CCA locus. Mutation analysis of two isolated CCA patients revealed missense mutations, indicating that defects in FBN2 may be responsible for this disorder. However, cosegregation of a mutant allele with the disease phenotype has not yet been established. We have investigated the primary cause of CCA in a large well-characterized kindred with five generations comprising 18 affected individuals. Previous studies demonstrated linkage of this family's CCA phenotype to FBN2. Mutation analysis of cDNA derived from the proband and her affected brother, using a nonisotopic RNase cleavage assay, revealed the partial skipping of exon 31. Approximately 25% mutant transcript is produced, which is apparently sufficient to cause a CCA phenotype. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA revealed an unusual base composition for intron 30 and identified the mutation, a g-26t transversion, in the vicinity of the splicing branch-point site in intron 30. Genomic DNA from 30 additional family members, both affected and unaffected, then was analyzed for the mutation. The results clearly demonstrate cosegregation of the branch-point mutation with the CCA phenotype. This is the first report of a CCA mutation in a multiplex family, unequivocally establishing that mutation in FBN2 are responsible for the CCA phenotype. In addition, branch-point mutations only very rarely have been associated with human disease, suggesting that the unusual composition of this intron influences splicing stability. Images Figure 2ab Figure 2c Figure 3ab Figure 3c Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9199560

  11. Locus control region HS2 point mutations are generally not responsible for elevated fetal hemoglobin expression of sickle cell patients

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    The locus control region (LCR), composed of four hypersensitive sites (HS1-4) 5{prime} of the {epsilon} globin gene, confers strong, copy-number dependent expression on globin genes in transgenic mice. Several {beta}-globin gene cluster haplotypes carry the sickle cell gene, and show variable levels of fetal hemoglobin (Hb F) expression in association with DNA sequence differences in HS2, {gamma} and {beta} globin promoters, and {gamma}IVSII: The Senegal (SEN or No. 3) haplotype generally has high (>10%) Hb F, Benin (BEN or No. 19) has intermediate Hb F (but some low and some high), and Banu (BAN or No. 20) generally has low Hb F. Huisman and colleagues have proposed that `factors produced under conditions of hematopoietic stress, together with genetic determinants on the haplotype-3 like LCR sequences, allow for high level expression of {gamma} globin genes`. We have now used slot blot to screen high Hb F (>9.5%) and low Hb F cases for two of the three HS2 point mutations described by Oener et al. Comparing eight high Hb F BEN/BEN with two low Hb F BEN/BEN, all ten had the BEN mutations considered by Oener et al. to be associated with low Hb F. Comparing three high Hb F BEN/BAN with two low Hb F BEN/BAN, all five were heterozygous at three positions; this is consistent with BEN having G and T and BAN having A at both positions. DNA sequencing of HS2 for BAN, which is generally associated with low HB F, showed that the point mutations at all three positions were those seen in SEN (generally high Hb F); only the AT repeat region showed major differences, confirming results of Huisman and colleagues. Hence, if there is any effect of HS2 of the Senegal sickle cell haplotype in causing elevated Hb F under hematopoietic stress, it must be due to specific variation in the AT repeat region, which Oener et al. have suggested may bind a silencer.

  12. GNA14 Somatic Mutation Causes Congenital and Sporadic Vascular Tumors by MAPK Activation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Young H; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; Qiu, Jingyao; Straub, Robert; Bruckner, Anna; Bercovitch, Lionel; Narayan, Deepak; McNiff, Jennifer; Ko, Christine; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Antaya, Richard; Halaban, Ruth; Choate, Keith A

    2016-08-01

    Vascular tumors are among the most common neoplasms in infants and children; 5%-10% of newborns present with or develop lesions within the first 3 months of life. Most are benign infantile hemangiomas that typically regress by 5 years of age; other vascular tumors include congenital tufted angiomas (TAs), kaposiform hemangioendotheliomas (KHEs), and childhood lobular capillary hemangiomas (LCHs). Some of these lesions can become locally invasive and unresponsive to pharmacologic intervention, leading to significant complications. Recent investigation has revealed that activating mutations in HRAS, KRAS, NRAS, GNAQ, and GNA11 can cause certain types of rare childhood vascular tumors, and we have now identified causal recurrent somatic activating mutations in GNA14 by whole-exome and targeted sequencing. We found somatic activating GNA14 c.614A>T (p.Gln205Leu) mutations in one KHE, one TA, and one LCH and a GNA11 c.547C>T (p.Arg183Cys) mutation in two LCH lesions. We examined mutation pathobiology via expression of mutant GNA14 or GNA11 in primary human endothelial cells and melanocytes. GNA14 and GNA11 mutations induced changes in cellular morphology and rendered cells growth-factor independent by upregulating the MAPK pathway. Our findings identify GNA14 mutations as a cause of childhood vascular tumors, offer insight into mechanisms of oncogenic transformation by mutations affecting Gaq family members, and identify potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27476652

  13. A new point mutation (C446R) in the thyroid hormone receptor-{beta} gene of a family with resistance to thyroid hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, R.E.; Chyna, B.; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Sunthornthepvarakul, T.; Refetoff, S.; Duell, P.B.

    1994-05-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a condition of impaired end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone characterized by goiter and elevated thyroid hormone levels with an appropriately normal TSH. RTH has been associated with mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor-{beta} (TR{beta}) gene. The authors report studies carried out in 21 members of a family (F119), 12 of whom exhibited the RTH phenotype. A point mutation was detected in the T{sub 3}-binding domain of the TR{beta} gene. It resulted in replacement of the normal cysteine-446 with an arginine (C446R) that has not been previously reported. The clinical characteristics of this family are similar to those reported in other families with RTH, namely goiter, tachycardia, and learning disabilities. Thyroid function tests are also typical of other subjects with RTH. The mean values ({+-}SD) in untreated affected subjects compared to those in unaffected family members were: free T{sub 4} index, 250 {+-} 21 vs. 108 {+-} 13; total T{sub 3}, 4.3 {+-} 0.4 vs. 2.4 {+-} 0.4 nmol/L; and TSH, 4.5 {+-} 1.1 vs. 2.4 {+-} 1.1 mU/L. DNA samples from 18 family members were screened for the TR{beta} mutation, which results in the loss of a BsmI restriction site, and each of the 11 subjects with abnormal thyroid function tests were heterozygous for the mutant allele. The mutant TR{beta} expressed in Cos-I cells did not bind T{sub 3} (K{sub a} of C446R/wild-type, <0.05). T{sub 3} at a concentration up to 100 nmol/L failed to enhance the transactivation of a reporter gene, and the mutant receptor inhibited the T{sub 3}-mediated transcriptional activation of the wild-type TR{beta}. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. A pilot study of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in a sample of Croatian patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus associated with maternal inheritance.

    PubMed

    Martin-Kleiner, I; Pape-Medvidović, E; Pavlić-Renar, I; Metelko, Z; Kusec, R; Gabrilovac, J; Boranić, M

    2004-12-01

    In this work, patients having type 2 diabetes mellitus and diabetic mothers were tested for the presence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G. This mutation is associated with the MELAS syndrome (mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes), diabetes and deafness. Twenty-two diabetic persons were screened. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood lymphocytes and from swabs of oral mucosa. The mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G was detected using PCR-RFLP test. The mutation was detected in oral mucosal DNA of two patients (but not from lymphocyte DNA). One patient was a man with hearing and visual impairments and proteinuria; the other was a woman having proteinuria but no hearing impairment. The mutation was not detectable in oral mucosal DNA from the control persons: 20 diabetic patients having diabetic fathers and 22 healthy, nondiabetic volunteers. The incidence of mitochondrial DNA point mutation A3243G in this study of Croatian diabetic patients is in line with data in the literature.

  15. Single point mutations in various domains of a plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increase H(+)-pumping and permit yeast growth at low pH.

    PubMed Central

    Morsomme, P; de Kerchove d'Exaerde, A; De Meester, S; Thinès, D; Goffeau, A; Boutry, M

    1996-01-01

    In plants, the proton pump-ATPase (H(+)-ATPase) of the plasma membrane is encoded by a multigene family. The PMA2 (plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase) isoform from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia was previously shown to be capable of functionally replacing the yeast H(+)-ATPase, provided that the external pH was kept above pH 5.5. In this study, we used a positive selection to isolate 19 single point mutations of PMA2 which permit the growth of yeast cells at pH 4.0. Thirteen mutations were restricted to the C-terminus region, but another six mutations were found in four other regions of the enzyme. Kinetic studies determined on nine mutated PMA2 compared with the wild-type PMA2 revealed an activated enzyme characterized by an alkaline shift of the optimum pH and a slightly higher specific ATPase activity. However, the most striking difference was a 2- to 3-fold increase of H(+)-pumping in both reconstituted vesicles and intact cells. These results indicate that point mutations in various domains of the plant H(+)-ATPase improve the coupling between H(+)-pumping and ATP hydrolysis, resulting in better growth at low pH. Moreover, the yeast cells expressing the mutated PMA2 showed a marked reduction in the frequency of internal membrane proliferation seen with the strain expressing the wild-type PMA2, indicating a relationship between H(+)-ATPase activity and perturbations of the secretory pathway. Images PMID:8896445

  16. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  17. New Tricks for Old Proteins: Single Mutations in a Nonenzymatic Protein Give Rise to Various Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Yurii S; Dunston, Tiffany T; Makhlynets, Olga V; Moroz, Olesia V; Wu, Yibing; Yoon, Jennifer H; Olsen, Alissa B; McLaughlin, Jaclyn M; Mack, Korrie L; Gosavi, Pallavi M; van Nuland, Nico A J; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2015-12-01

    Design of a new catalytic function in proteins, apart from its inherent practical value, is important for fundamental understanding of enzymatic activity. Using a computationally inexpensive, minimalistic approach that focuses on introducing a single highly reactive residue into proteins to achieve catalysis we converted a 74-residue-long C-terminal domain of calmodulin into an efficient esterase. The catalytic efficiency of the resulting stereoselective, allosterically regulated catalyst, nicknamed AlleyCatE, is higher than that of any previously reported de novo designed esterases. The simplicity of our design protocol should complement and expand the capabilities of current state-of-art approaches to protein design. These results show that even a small nonenzymatic protein can efficiently attain catalytic activities in various reactions (Kemp elimination, ester hydrolysis, retroaldol reaction) as a result of a single mutation. In other words, proteins can be just one mutation away from becoming entry points for subsequent evolution.

  18. New Tricks for Old Proteins: Single Mutations in a Nonenzymatic Protein Give Rise to Various Enzymatic Activities.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Yurii S; Dunston, Tiffany T; Makhlynets, Olga V; Moroz, Olesia V; Wu, Yibing; Yoon, Jennifer H; Olsen, Alissa B; McLaughlin, Jaclyn M; Mack, Korrie L; Gosavi, Pallavi M; van Nuland, Nico A J; Korendovych, Ivan V

    2015-12-01

    Design of a new catalytic function in proteins, apart from its inherent practical value, is important for fundamental understanding of enzymatic activity. Using a computationally inexpensive, minimalistic approach that focuses on introducing a single highly reactive residue into proteins to achieve catalysis we converted a 74-residue-long C-terminal domain of calmodulin into an efficient esterase. The catalytic efficiency of the resulting stereoselective, allosterically regulated catalyst, nicknamed AlleyCatE, is higher than that of any previously reported de novo designed esterases. The simplicity of our design protocol should complement and expand the capabilities of current state-of-art approaches to protein design. These results show that even a small nonenzymatic protein can efficiently attain catalytic activities in various reactions (Kemp elimination, ester hydrolysis, retroaldol reaction) as a result of a single mutation. In other words, proteins can be just one mutation away from becoming entry points for subsequent evolution. PMID:26555770

  19. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  20. Landscape of activating cancer mutations in FGFR kinases and their differential responses to inhibitors in clinical use

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Norman, Richard A.; Ogg, Derek; Breed, Jason; Ashford, Paul; Potterton, Andrew; Edwards, Mina; Williams, Sarah V.; Thomson, Gary S.; Pang, Camilla S.M.; Knowles, Margaret A.; Breeze, Alexander L.; Orengo, Christine; Phillips, Chris; Katan, Matilda

    2016-01-01

    Frequent genetic alterations discovered in FGFRs and evidence implicating some as drivers in diverse tumors has been accompanied by rapid progress in targeting FGFRs for anticancer treatments. Wider assessment of the impact of genetic changes on the activation state and drug responses is needed to better link the genomic data and treatment options. We here apply a direct comparative and comprehensive analysis of FGFR3 kinase domain variants representing the diversity of point-mutations reported in this domain. We reinforce the importance of N540K and K650E and establish that not all highly activating mutations (for example R669G) occur at high-frequency and conversely, that some “hotspots” may not be linked to activation. Further structural characterization consolidates a mechanistic view of FGFR kinase activation and extends insights into drug binding. Importantly, using several inhibitors of particular clinical interest (AZD4547, BGJ-398, TKI258, JNJ42756493 and AP24534), we find that some activating mutations (including different replacements of the same residue) result in distinct changes in their efficacy. Considering that there is no approved inhibitor for anticancer treatments based on FGFR-targeting, this information will be immediately translatable to ongoing clinical trials. PMID:26992226

  1. Balancing Protein Stability and Activity in Cancer: A New Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations Affecting CBL Ubiquitin Ligase Activation.

    PubMed

    Li, Minghui; Kales, Stephen C; Ma, Ke; Shoemaker, Benjamin A; Crespo-Barreto, Juan; Cangelosi, Andrew L; Lipkowitz, Stanley; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-02-01

    Oncogenic mutations in the monomeric Casitas B-lineage lymphoma (Cbl) gene have been found in many tumors, but their significance remains largely unknown. Several human c-Cbl (CBL) structures have recently been solved, depicting the protein at different stages of its activation cycle and thus providing mechanistic insight underlying how stability-activity tradeoffs in cancer-related proteins-may influence disease onset and progression. In this study, we computationally modeled the effects of missense cancer mutations on structures representing four stages of the CBL activation cycle to identify driver mutations that affect CBL stability, binding, and activity. We found that recurrent, homozygous, and leukemia-specific mutations had greater destabilizing effects on CBL states than random noncancer mutations. We further tested the ability of these computational models, assessing the changes in CBL stability and its binding to ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2, by performing blind CBL-mediated EGFR ubiquitination assays in cells. Experimental CBL ubiquitin ligase activity was in agreement with the predicted changes in CBL stability and, to a lesser extent, with CBL-E2 binding affinity. Two thirds of all experimentally tested mutations affected the ubiquitin ligase activity by either destabilizing CBL or disrupting CBL-E2 binding, whereas about one-third of tested mutations were found to be neutral. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that computational methods incorporating multiple protein conformations and stability and binding affinity evaluations can successfully predict the functional consequences of cancer mutations on protein activity, and provide a proof of concept for mutations in CBL. PMID:26676746

  2. Racing to block tumorigenesis after pRb loss: an innocuous point mutation wins with synthetic lethality.

    PubMed

    Bauzon, Frederick; Zhu, Liang

    2010-06-01

    A major goal of tumor suppressor research is to neutralize the tumorigenic effects of their loss. Since loss of pRb does not induce tumorigenesis in many types of cells, natural mechanisms may neutralize the tumorigenic effects of pRb loss in these cells. For susceptible cells, neutralizing the tumorigenic effects of pRb loss could logically be achieved by correcting the deregulated activities of pRb targets to render pRb-deficient cells less abnormal. This line of research has unexpectedly revealed that knocking out the pRb target Skp2 did not render Rb1 deficient cells less abnormal but, rather, induced apoptosis in them, thereby completely blocking tumorigenesis in Rb1+/- mice and after targeted deletion of Rb1 in pituitary intermediate lobe (IL). Skp2 is a substrate-recruiting component of the SCFSkp2 E3 biquitin ligase; one of its substrates is Thr187-phosphorylated p27Kip1. A p27T187A knockin (KI) mutation phenocopied Skp2 knockout (KO) in inducing apoptosis following Rb1 loss. Thus, Skp2 KO or p27T187A KI are synthetic lethal with pRb inactivation. Since homozygous p27T187A KI mutations show no adverse effects in mice, inhibiting p27T187 phosphorylation or p27T187p ubiquitination could be a highly therapeutic and minimally toxic intervention strategy for pRb deficiency-induced tumorigenesis.

  3. The Ec-NhaA antiporter switches from antagonistic to synergistic antiport upon a single point mutation

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Manish; Sukenik, Shahar; Friedler, Assaf; Padan, Etana

    2016-01-01

    The Na+, Li+/H+ antiporter of Escherichia coli (Ec-NhaA) maintains pH, Na+ homeostasis in enterobacteria. We used isothermal titration calorimetry to perform a detailed thermodynamic analysis of Li+ binding to Ec-NhaA and several of its mutants. We found that, in line with the canonical alternative access mechanistic model of secondary transporters, Li+/H+ binding to the antiporter is antagonistically coupled. Binding of Li+ displaces 2 H+ from the binding site. The process is enthalpically driven, the enthalpic gain just compensating for an entropic loss and the buffer-associated enthalpic changes dominate the overall free-energy change. Li+ binding, H+ release and antiporter activity were all affected to the same extent by mutations in the Li+ binding site (D163E, D163N, D164N, D164E), while D133C changed the H+/Li+ stoichiometry to 4. Most striking, however, was the mutation, A167P, which converted the Ec-NhaA antagonistic binding into synergistic binding which is only known to occur in Cl−/H+ antiporter. PMID:27021484

  4. A genomic point mutation in the extracellular domain of the thyrotropin receptor in patients with Graves` ophthalmopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Bahn, R.S.; Dutton, C.M.; Heufelder, A.E.; Sarkar, G. |

    1994-02-01

    Orbital and pretibial fibroblasts are targets of autoimmune attack in Graves` ophthalmopathy (GO) and pretibial dermopathy (PTD). The fibroblast autoantigen involved in these peripheral manifestations of Graves` disease and the reason for the association of GO and PTD with hyperthyroidism are unknown. RNA encoding the full-length extracellular domain of the TSH receptor has been demonstrated in orbital and dermal fibroblasts from patients with GO and normal subjects, suggesting a possible antigenic link between fibroblasts and thyrocytes. RNA was isolated from cultured orbital, pretibial, and abdominal fibroblasts obtained from patients with severe GO (n = 22) and normal subjects (n = 5). RNA was reverse transcribed, and the resulting cDNA was amplified by the polymerase chain reaction, using primers spanning overlapping regions of the entire extracellular domain of the TSH receptor. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed an A for C substitution in the first position of codon 52 in 2 of the patients, both of whom had GO, PTD, and acropachy. Genomic DNA isolated from the 2 affected patients, and not from an additional 12 normal subjects, revealed the codon 52 mutation by direct sequencing and AciI restriction enzyme digestions. In conclusion, the authors have demonstrated the presence of a genomic point mutation, leading to a threonine for proline amino acid shift in the predicted peptide, in the extracellular domain of the TSH receptor in two patients with severe GO, PTD, acropachy, and high thyroid-stimulating immunoglobulin levels. RNA encoding this mutant product was demonstrated in the fibroblasts of these patients. They suggest that the TSH receptor may be an important fibroblast autoantigen in GO and PTD, and that this mutant form of the receptor may have unique immunogenic properties. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Point mutation of the xylose reductase (XR) gene reduces xylitol accumulation and increases citric acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Weyda, István; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius accumulates xylitol when it grows on D-xylose. In fungi, D-xylose is reduced to xylitol by the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR). Xylitol is then further oxidized by the NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). The cofactor impairment between the XR and XDH can lead to the accumulation of xylitol under oxygen-limiting conditions. Most of the XRs are NADPH dependent and contain a conserved Ile-Pro-Lys-Ser motif. The only known naturally occurring NADH-dependent XR (from Candida parapsilosis) carries an arginine residue instead of the lysine in this motif. In order to overcome xylitol accumulation in A. carbonarius a Lys-274 to Arg point mutation was introduced into the XR with the aim of changing the specificity toward NADH. The effect of the genetic engineering was examined in fermentation for citric acid production and xylitol accumulation by using D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Fermentation with the mutant strain showed a 2.8-fold reduction in xylitol accumulation and 4.5-fold increase in citric acid production compared to the wild-type strain. The fact that the mutant strain shows decreased xylitol levels is assumed to be associated with the capability of the mutated XR to use the NADH generated by the XDH, thus preventing the inhibition of XDH by the high levels of NADH and ensuring the flux of xylose through the pathway. This work shows that enhanced production of citric acid can be achieved using xylose as the sole carbon source by reducing accumulation of other by-products, such as xylitol.

  6. Resistance to the Novel Fungicide Pyrimorph in Phytophthora capsici: Risk Assessment and Detection of Point Mutations in CesA3 That Confer Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Zhili; Shao, Jingpeng; Chen, Lei; Lu, Xiaohong; Hu, Jian; Qin, Zhaohai; Liu, Xili

    2013-01-01

    Pyrimorph is a novel fungicide with high activity against the plant pathogen Phytophthora capsici. We investigated the risk that P. capsici can develop resistance to pyrimorph. The baseline sensitivities of 226 P. capsici isolates, tested by mycelial growth inhibition, showed a unimodal distribution with a mean EC50 value of 1.4261 (±0.4002) µg/ml. Twelve pyrimorph-resistant mutants were obtained by repeated exposure to pyrimorph in vitro with a frequency of approximately 1×10−4. The resistance factors of the mutants ranged from 10.67 to 56.02. Pyrimorph resistance of the mutants was stable after 10 transfers on pyrimorph-free medium. Fitness in sporulation, cystospore germination, and pathogenicity in the pyrimorph-resistant mutants was similar to or less than that in the parental wild-type isolates. On detached pepper leaves and pepper plants treated with the recommended maximum dose of pyrimorph, however, virulence was greater for mutants with a high level of pyrimorph resistance than for the wild type. The results suggest that the risk of P. capsici developing resistance to pyrimorph is low to moderate. Among mutants with a high level of pyrimorph resistance, EC50 values for pyrimorph and CAA fungicides flumorph, dimethomorph, and mandipropamid were positively correlated. This indicated that point mutations in cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) may confer resistance to pyrimorph. Comparison of CesA3 in isolates with a high level of pyrimorph resistance and parental isolates showed that an amino acid change from glutamine to lysine at position 1077 resulted in stable, high resistance in the mutants. Based on the point mutations, an allele-specific PCR method was developed to detect pyrimorph resistance in P. capsici populations. PMID:23431382

  7. Resistance to the novel fungicide pyrimorph in Phytophthora capsici: risk assessment and detection of point mutations in CesA3 that confer resistance.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhili; Shao, Jingpeng; Chen, Lei; Lu, Xiaohong; Hu, Jian; Qin, Zhaohai; Liu, Xili

    2013-01-01

    Pyrimorph is a novel fungicide with high activity against the plant pathogen Phytophthora capsici. We investigated the risk that P. capsici can develop resistance to pyrimorph. The baseline sensitivities of 226 P. capsici isolates, tested by mycelial growth inhibition, showed a unimodal distribution with a mean EC(50) value of 1.4261 (± 0.4002) µg/ml. Twelve pyrimorph-resistant mutants were obtained by repeated exposure to pyrimorph in vitro with a frequency of approximately 1 × 10(-4). The resistance factors of the mutants ranged from 10.67 to 56.02. Pyrimorph resistance of the mutants was stable after 10 transfers on pyrimorph-free medium. Fitness in sporulation, cystospore germination, and pathogenicity in the pyrimorph-resistant mutants was similar to or less than that in the parental wild-type isolates. On detached pepper leaves and pepper plants treated with the recommended maximum dose of pyrimorph, however, virulence was greater for mutants with a high level of pyrimorph resistance than for the wild type. The results suggest that the risk of P. capsici developing resistance to pyrimorph is low to moderate. Among mutants with a high level of pyrimorph resistance, EC(50) values for pyrimorph and CAA fungicides flumorph, dimethomorph, and mandipropamid were positively correlated. This indicated that point mutations in cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) may confer resistance to pyrimorph. Comparison of CesA3 in isolates with a high level of pyrimorph resistance and parental isolates showed that an amino acid change from glutamine to lysine at position 1077 resulted in stable, high resistance in the mutants. Based on the point mutations, an allele-specific PCR method was developed to detect pyrimorph resistance in P. capsici populations.

  8. Three novel mutations of CHD7 gene in two turkish patients with charge syndrome; A double point mutation and an insertion

    PubMed Central

    Bozkaya, O Giray; Ataman, E; Randa, C; Cura, D Onur; Gürsoy, S; Aksel, O; Ulgenalp, A

    2015-01-01

    The CHARGE (coloboma, heart defects, atresia, retardation, genital, ear) syndrome is a genetic disease characterized by ocular coloboma, choanal atresia or stenosis and semicircular canal abnormalities. Most of the patients clinically diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome have mutations in chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7 (CHD7) gene. The CHD7 gene is located on chromosome 8q12.1, and up to now, there are more than 500 pathogenic mutations identified in the literature. We report two patients diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome with two novel mutations in the CHD7 gene: the first patient has double consecutive novel mutations in three adjacent codons, and the other has a novel insertion. PMID:26929907

  9. Point mutations in the post-M2 region of human alpha-ENaC regulate cation selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ji, H L; Parker, S; Langloh, A L; Fuller, C M; Benos, D J

    2001-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that an arginine-rich region immediately following the second transmembrane domain may constitute part of the inner mouth of the epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) pore and, hence, influence conduction and/or selectivity properties of the channel by expressing double point mutants in Xenopus oocytes. Double point mutations of arginines in this post-M2 region of the human alpha-ENaC (alpha-hENaC) led to a decrease and increase in the macroscopic conductance of alphaR586E,R587Ebetagamma- and alphaR589E,R591Ebetagamma-hENaC, respectively, but had no effect on the single-channel conductance of either double point mutant. However, the apparent equilibrium dissociation constant for Na+ was decreased for both alphaR586E,R587Ebetagamma- and alphaR589E,R591Ebetagamma-hENaC, and the maximum amiloride-sensitive Na+ current was decreased for alphaR586E,R587Ebetagamma-hENaC and increased for alphaR589E,R591Ebetagamma-hENaC. The relative permeabilities of Li+ and K+ vs. Na+ were increased 11.25- to 27.57-fold for alphaR586E,R587Ebetagamma-hENaC compared with wild type. The relative ion permeability of these double mutants and wild-type ENaC was inversely related to the crystal diameter of the permeant ions. Thus the region of positive charge is important for the ion permeation properties of the channel and may form part of the pore itself. PMID:11401828

  10. Improvement of the Mutation-Discrimination Threshold for Rare Point Mutations by a Separation-Free Ligase Detection Reaction Assay Based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer.

    PubMed

    Hagihara, Kenta; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Nakajima, Chinami; Esaki, Shinsuke; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a separation-free ligase detection reaction assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer from a donor quantum dot to an acceptor fluorescent dye. This assay could successfully detect one cancer mutation among 10 wild-type templates. In the current study, the mutation-discrimination threshold was improved by one order of magnitude by replacing the original acceptor dye (Alexa Fluor 647) with another fluorescent dye (Cyanine 5) that was spectrally similar but more fluorescent. PMID:26960620

  11. From Whole Gene Deletion to Point Mutations of EP300-Positive Rubinstein-Taybi Patients: New Insights into the Mutational Spectrum and Peculiar Clinical Hallmarks.

    PubMed

    Negri, Gloria; Magini, Pamela; Milani, Donatella; Colapietro, Patrizia; Rusconi, Daniela; Scarano, Emanuela; Bonati, Maria Teresa; Priolo, Manuela; Crippa, Milena; Mazzanti, Laura; Wischmeijer, Anita; Tamburrino, Federica; Pippucci, Tommaso; Finelli, Palma; Larizza, Lidia; Gervasini, Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a rare congenital neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by growth deficiency, skeletal abnormalities, dysmorphic features, and intellectual disability. Causative mutations in CREBBP and EP300 genes have been identified in ∼55% and ∼8% of affected individuals. To date, only 28 EP300 alterations in 29 RSTS clinically described patients have been reported. EP300 analysis of 22 CREBBP-negative RSTS patients from our cohort led us to identify six novel mutations: a 376-kb deletion depleting EP300 gene; an exons 17-19 deletion (c.(3141+1_3142-1)_(3590+1_3591-1)del/p.(Ile1047Serfs*30)); two stop mutations, (c.3829A>T/p.(Lys1277*) and c.4585C>T/p.(Arg1529*)); a splicing mutation (c.1878-12A>G/p.(Ala627Glnfs*11)), and a duplication (c.4640dupA/p.(Asn1547Lysfs*3)). All EP300-mutated individuals show a mild RSTS phenotype and peculiar findings including maternal gestosis, skin manifestation, especially nevi or keloids, back malformations, and a behavior predisposing to anxiety. Furthermore, the patient carrying the complete EP300 deletion does not show a markedly severe clinical picture, even if a more composite phenotype was noticed. By characterizing six novel EP300-mutated patients, this study provides further insights into the EP300-specific clinical presentation and expands the mutational repertoire including the first case of a whole gene deletion. These new data will enhance EP300-mutated cases identification highlighting distinctive features and will improve the clinical practice allowing a better genotype-phenotype correlation.

  12. Mutation-Independent Activation of the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Regairaz, Marie; Munier, Fabienne; Sartelet, Hervé; Castaing, Marine; Marty, Virginie; Renauleaud, Céline; Doux, Camille; Delbé, Jean; Courty, José; Fabre, Monique; Ohta, Shigeru; Viehl, Philippe; Michiels, Stefan; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Vassal, Gilles

    2016-02-01

    Activating mutations of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) have been identified as important players in neuroblastoma development. Our goal was to evaluate the significance of overall ALK activation in neuroblastoma. Expression of phosphorylated ALK, ALK, and its putative ligands, pleiotrophin and midkine, was screened in 289 neuroblastomas and 56 paired normal tissues. ALK was expressed in 99% of tumors and phosphorylated in 48% of cases. Pleiotrophin and midkine were expressed in 58% and 79% of tumors, respectively. ALK activation was significantly higher in tumors than in paired normal tissues, together with ALK and midkine expression. ALK activation was largely independent of mutations and correlated with midkine expression in tumors. ALK activation in tumors was associated with favorable features, including a younger age at diagnosis, hyperdiploidy, and detection by mass screening. Antitumor activity of the ALK inhibitor TAE684 was evaluated in wild-type or mutated ALK neuroblastoma cell lines and xenografts. TAE684 was cytotoxic in vitro in all cell lines, especially those harboring an ALK mutation. TAE684 efficiently inhibited ALK phosphorylation in vivo in both F1174I and R1275Q xenografts but demonstrated antitumor activity only against the R1275Q xenograft. In conclusion, ALK activation occurs frequently during neuroblastoma oncogenesis, mainly through mutation-independent mechanisms. However, ALK activation is not associated with a poor outcome and is not always a driver of cell proliferation and/or survival in neuroblastoma. PMID:26687816

  13. Sensitivity of single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis in detecting p53 point mutations in tumors with mixed cell populations

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.K.; Zhen Ye; Darras, B.T. Tufts Univ., Boston, MA )

    1993-06-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor-suppressor gene are commonly found in human cancers of diverse origin. Once of a number of methods developed to analyze large numbers of DNA samples for specific mutations is the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis. This method is particularly well suited for analysis of tissues, such as brain tumors, with mixed cell populations. It takes advantage of the fact that, in a mixed cell population containing DNA with and without a mutation (e.g., the p53 gene mutation), both molecular species will be amplified by the PCR. A mutation within a PCR-amplified DNA fragment will alter the secondary structure of the amplified fragment and affect its electrophoretic mobility in a nondenaturing gel. The DNA fragments with the mutation are detected as an aberrantly migrating allele that can be seen concurrently with the wild-type allele. Although many studies have used this technique to screen for p53 mutations in tumors, with detection of a number of different mutations the limit of detection of point mutations in a background of wild-type DNA is not known. To test this, mixtures of mutant DNA from tumor D317 with a G-to-A point mutation in codon 272 of the p53 gene; or from tumor D263 (with a G-to-A point mutation in codon 175 of the p53 gene) and wild-type DNA from leukocytes, in ratios of 1:100, 5:95, 10:90, 15:85, 50:50, and 30:70, were prepared. The mixtures containing 100 ng of DNA were amplified using standard PCR technique. After the double-stranded DNAs were denatured, the DNA samples were loaded and electrophoresed on a nondenaturing acrylamide gel. The mutant allele was detectable even when the ratio of mutant to wild-type DNA was 5:95 in tumor D317. For tumor D263, the mutant allele was detectable when the ratio of mutant to wild-type DNA was 15:85, and it was not detectable at 10:90.

  14. Diffusion-collision of foldons elucidates the kinetic effects of point mutations and suggests control strategies of the folding process of helical proteins.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Emidio; Compiani, Mario

    2006-07-01

    In this article we use mutation studies as a benchmark for a minimal model of the folding process of helical proteins. The model ascribes a pivotal role to the collisional dynamics of a few crucial residues (foldons) and predicts the folding rates by exploiting information drawn from the protein sequence. We show that our model rationalizes the effects of point mutations on the kinetics of folding. The folding times of two proteins and their mutants are predicted. Stability and location of foldons have a critical role as the determinants of protein folding. This allows us to elucidate two main mechanisms for the kinetic effects of mutations. First, it turns out that the mutations eliciting the most notable effects alter protein stability through stabilization or destabilization of the foldons. Secondly, the folding rate is affected via a modification of the foldon topology by those mutations that lead to the birth or death of foldons. The few mispredicted folding rates of some mutants hint at the limits of the current version of the folding model proposed in the present article. The performance of our folding model declines in case the mutated residues are subject to strong long-range forces. That foldons are the critical targets of mutation studies has notable implications for design strategies and is of particular interest to address the issue of the kinetic regulation of single proteins in the general context of the overall dynamics of the interactome.

  15. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S.; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  16. One Hundred Twenty-One Dystrophin Point Mutations Detected from Stored DNA Samples by Combinatorial Denaturing High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Torella, Annalaura; Trimarco, Amelia; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Cuomo, Anna; Aurino, Stefania; Piluso, Giulio; Minetti, Carlo; Politano, Luisa; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are caused by a large number of different mutations in the dystrophin gene. Outside of the deletion/duplication “hot spots,” small mutations occur at unpredictable positions. These account for about 15 to 20% of cases, with the major group being premature stop codons. When the affected male is deceased, carrier testing for family members and prenatal diagnosis become difficult and expensive. We tailored a cost-effective and reliable strategy to discover point mutations from stored DNA samples in the absence of a muscle biopsy. Samples were amplified in combinatorial pools and tested by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. An anomalous elution profile belonging to two different pools univocally addressed the allelic variation to an unambiguous sample. Mutations were then detected by sequencing. We identified 121 mutations of 99 different types. Fifty-six patients show stop codons that represent the 46.3% of all cases. Three non-obvious single amino acid mutations were considered as causative. Our data support combinatorial denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography analysis as a clear-cut strategy for time and cost-effective identification of small mutations when only DNA is available. PMID:19959795

  17. Synergistic and compensatory effects of two point mutations conferring target-site resistance to fipronil in the insect GABA receptor RDL.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yixi; Meng, Xiangkun; Yang, Yuanxue; Li, Hong; Wang, Xin; Yang, Baojun; Zhang, Jianhua; Li, Chunrui; Millar, Neil S; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    Insecticide resistance can arise from a variety of mechanisms, including changes to the target site, but is often associated with substantial fitness costs to insects. Here we describe two resistance-associated target-site mutations that have synergistic and compensatory effects that combine to produce high and persistent levels of resistance to fipronil, an insecticide targeting on γ-aminobytyric acid (GABA) receptors. In Nilaparvata lugens, a major pest of rice crops in many parts of Asia, we have identified a single point mutation (A302S) in the GABA receptor RDL that has been identified previously in other species and which confers low levels of resistance to fipronil (23-fold) in N. lugans. In addition, we have identified a second resistance-associated RDL mutation (R300Q) that, in combination with A302S, is associated with much higher levels of resistance (237-fold). The R300Q mutation has not been detected in the absence of A302S in either laboratory-selected or field populations, presumably due to the high fitness cost associated with this mutation. Significantly, it appears that the A302S mutation is able to compensate for deleterious effects of R300Q mutation on fitness cost. These findings identify a novel resistance mechanism and may have important implications for the spread of insecticide resistance. PMID:27557781

  18. A single point mutation reveals gating of the human ClC-5 Cl-/H+ antiporter.

    PubMed

    De Stefano, Silvia; Pusch, Michael; Zifarelli, Giovanni

    2013-12-01

    ClC-5 is a 2Cl(-)/1H(+) antiporter highly expressed in endosomes of proximal tubule cells. It is essential for endocytosis and mutations in ClC-5 cause Dent's disease, potentially leading to renal failure. However, the physiological role of ClC-5 is still unclear. One of the main issues is whether the strong rectification of ClC-5 currents observed in heterologous systems, with currents elicited only at positive voltages, is preserved in vivo and what is the origin of this rectification. In this work we identified a ClC-5 mutation, D76H, which, besides the typical outward currents of the wild-type (WT), shows inward tail currents at negative potentials that allow the estimation of the reversal of ClC-5 currents for the first time. A detailed analysis of the dependence of these inward tail currents on internal and external pH and [Cl(-)] shows that they are generated by a coupled transport of Cl(-) and H(+) with a 2 : 1 stoichiometry. From this result we conclude that the inward tail currents are caused by a gating mechanism that regulates ClC-5 transport activity and not by a major alteration of the transport mechanism itself. This implies that the strong rectification of the currents of WT ClC-5 is at least in part caused by a gating mechanism that activates the transporter at positive potentials. These results elucidate the biophysical properties of ClC-5 and contribute to the understanding of its physiological role.

  19. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:24701363

  20. Novel Point Mutations and A8027G Polymorphism in Mitochondrial-DNA-Encoded Cytochrome c Oxidase II Gene in Mexican Patients with Probable Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Loera-Castañeda, Verónica; Sandoval-Ramírez, Lucila; Pacheco Moisés, Fermín Paul; Macías-Islas, Miguel Ángel; Alatorre Jiménez, Moisés Alejandro; González-Renovato, Erika Daniela; Cortés-Enríquez, Fernando; Célis de la Rosa, Alfredo; Velázquez-Brizuela, Irma E; Ortiz, Genaro Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been thought to contribute to Alzheimer disease (AD) pathogenesis through the accumulation of mitochondrial DNA mutations and net production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase plays a key role in the regulation of aerobic production of energy and is composed of 13 subunits. The 3 largest subunits (I, II, and III) forming the catalytic core are encoded by mitochondrial DNA. The aim of this work was to look for mutations in mitochondrial cytochrome c-oxidase gene II (MTCO II) in blood samples from probable AD Mexican patients. MTCO II gene was sequenced in 33 patients with diagnosis of probable AD. Four patients (12%) harbored the A8027G polymorphism and three of them were early onset (EO) AD cases with familial history of the disease. In addition, other four patients with EOAD had only one of the following point mutations: A8003C, T8082C, C8201T, or G7603A. Neither of the point mutations found in this work has been described previously for AD patients, and the A8027G polymorphism has been described previously; however, it hasn't been related to AD. We will need further investigation to demonstrate the role of the point mutations of mitochondrial DNA in the pathogenesis of AD.

  1. Conversion of human 5-lipoxygenase to a 15-lipoxygenase by a point mutation to mimic phosphorylation at Serine-663

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Nathaniel C.; Rui, Zhe; Neau, David B.; Waight, Maria T.; Bartlett, Sue G.; Boeglin, William E.; Brash, Alan R.; Newcomer, Marcia E.

    2012-08-31

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) initiates biosynthesis of the proinflammatory leukotriene lipid mediators and, together with 15-LOX, is also required for synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxins. The catalytic activity of 5-LOX is regulated through multiple mechanisms, including Ca{sup 2+}-targeted membrane binding and phosphorylation at specific serine residues. To investigate the consequences of phosphorylation at S663, we mutated the residue to the phosphorylation mimic Asp, providing a homogenous preparation suitable for catalytic and structural studies. The S663D enzyme exhibits robust 15-LOX activity, as determined by spectrophotometric and HPLC analyses, with only traces of 5-LOX activity remaining; synthesis of the anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 from arachidonic acid is also detected. The crystal structure of the S663D mutant in the absence and presence of arachidonic acid (in the context of the previously reported Stable-5-LOX) reveals substantial remodeling of helices that define the active site so that the once fully encapsulated catalytic machinery is solvent accessible. Our results suggest that phosphorylation of 5-LOX at S663 could not only down-regulate leukotriene synthesis but also stimulate lipoxin production in inflammatory cells that do not express 15-LOX, thus redirecting lipid mediator biosynthesis to the production of proresolving mediators of inflammation.

  2. Activating PI3Kδ mutations in a cohort of 669 patients with primary immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Elgizouli, M; Lowe, D M; Speckmann, C; Schubert, D; Hülsdünker, J; Eskandarian, Z; Dudek, A; Schmitt-Graeff, A; Wanders, J; Jørgensen, S F; Fevang, B; Salzer, U; Nieters, A; Burns, S; Grimbacher, B

    2016-02-01

    The gene PIK3CD codes for the catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase δ (PI3Kδ), and is expressed solely in leucocytes. Activating mutations of PIK3CD have been described to cause an autosomal dominant immunodeficiency that shares clinical features with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). We screened a cohort of 669 molecularly undefined primary immunodeficiency patients for five reported mutations (four gain-of-function mutations in PIK3CD and a loss of function mutation in PIK3R1) using pyrosequencing. PIK3CD mutations were identified in three siblings diagnosed with CVID and two sporadic cases with a combined immunodeficiency (CID). The PIK3R1 mutation was not identified in the cohort. Our patients with activated PI3Kδ syndrome (APDS) showed a range of clinical and immunological findings, even within a single family, but shared a reduction in naive T cells. PIK3CD gain of function mutations are more likely to occur in patients with defective B and T cell responses and should be screened for in CVID and CID, but are less likely in patients with a pure B cell/hypogammaglobulinaemia phenotype. PMID:26437962

  3. Recurrent mTORC1-activating RRAGC mutations in follicular lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Okosun, Jessica; Wolfson, Rachel L; Wang, Jun; Araf, Shamzah; Wilkins, Lucy; Castellano, Brian M; Escudero-Ibarz, Leire; Al Seraihi, Ahad Fahad; Richter, Julia; Bernhart, Stephan H; Efeyan, Alejo; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Clear, Andrew; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Bödör, Csaba; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Mansbridge, Christopher; Johnson, Peter; Davies, Andrew; Strefford, Jonathan C; Packham, Graham; Barrans, Sharon; Jack, Andrew; Du, Ming-Qing; Calaminici, Maria; Lister, T Andrew; Auer, Rebecca; Montoto, Silvia; Gribben, John G; Siebert, Reiner; Chelala, Claude; Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M; Fitzgibbon, Jude

    2016-02-01

    Follicular lymphoma is an incurable B cell malignancy characterized by the t(14;18) translocation and mutations affecting the epigenome. Although frequent gene mutations in key signaling pathways, including JAK-STAT, NOTCH and NF-κB, have also been defined, the spectrum of these mutations typically overlaps with that in the closely related diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Using a combination of discovery exome and extended targeted sequencing, we identified recurrent somatic mutations in RRAGC uniquely enriched in patients with follicular lymphoma (17%). More than half of the mutations preferentially co-occurred with mutations in ATP6V1B2 and ATP6AP1, which encode components of the vacuolar H(+)-ATP ATPase (V-ATPase) known to be necessary for amino acid-induced activation of mTORC1. The RagC variants increased raptor binding while rendering mTORC1 signaling resistant to amino acid deprivation. The activating nature of the RRAGC mutations, their existence in the dominant clone and their stability during disease progression support their potential as an excellent candidate for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26691987

  4. Recurrent mTORC1-activating RRAGC mutations in follicular lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Araf, Shamzah; Wilkins, Lucy; Castellano, Brian M.; Escudero-Ibarz, Leire; Al Seraihi, Ahad Fahad; Richter, Julia; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Efeyan, Alejo; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Clear, Andrew; Guerra-Assunção, José Afonso; Bödör, Csaba; Quentmeier, Hilmar; Mansbridge, Christopher; Johnson, Peter; Davies, Andrew; Strefford, Jonathan C.; Packham, Graham; Barrans, Sharon; Jack, Andrew; Du, Ming-Qing; Calaminici, Maria; Lister, T. Andrew; Auer, Rebecca; Montoto, Silvia; Gribben, John G.; Siebert, Reiner; Chelala, Claude; Zoncu, Roberto; Sabatini, David M.; Fitzgibbon, Jude

    2015-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma is an incurable B-cell malignancy1 characterized by the t(14;18) and mutations in one or more components of the epigenome2,3. Whilst frequent gene mutations in signaling pathways, including JAK-STAT, NOTCH and NF-κB, have also been defined2-7, the spectrum of these mutations typically overlap with the closely-related diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)6-13. A combination of discovery exome and extended targeted sequencing revealed recurrent somatic mutations in RRAGC uniquely enriched in FL patients (17%). More than half of the mutations preferentially co-occurred with ATP6V1B2 and ATP6AP1 mutations, components of the vacuolar H+-adenosine triphosphate ATPase (v-ATPase) known to be necessary for amino acid-induced mTORC1 activation. The RagC mutants increased raptor binding whilst rendering mTORC1 signaling resistant to amino acid deprivation. Collectively, the activating nature of the RRAGC mutations, their existence within the dominant clone and stability during disease progression supports their potential as an excellent candidate to be therapeutically exploited. PMID:26691987

  5. Loss of striatal cannabinoid CB1 receptor function in attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder mice with point-mutation of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maura; Federici, Mauro; Rossi, Silvia; De Chiara, Valentina; Napolitano, Francesco; Studer, Valeria; Motta, Caterina; Sacchetti, Lucia; Romano, Rosaria; Musella, Alessandra; Bernardi, Giorgio; Siracusano, Alberto; Gu, Howard H; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2011-11-01

    Abnormal dopamine (DA) transmission in the striatum plays a pivotal role in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As striatal DA signalling modulates the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the present study was aimed at investigating cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) function in a model of ADHD obtained by triple point-mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in mice, making them insensitive to cocaine [DAT cocaine-insensitive (DAT-CI) mice]. DAT-CI mice had a marked hyperactive phenotype, and neurophysiological recordings revealed that the sensitivity of CB1Rs controlling GABA-mediated synaptic currents [CB1Rs((GABA)) ] in the striatum was completely lost. In contrast, CB1Rs modulating glutamate transmission [CB1Rs((Glu)) ], and GABA(B) receptors were not affected in this model of ADHD. In DAT-CI mice, the blockade of CB1R((GABA)) function was complete even after cocaine or environmental manipulations activating the endogenous DA-dependent reward system, which are known to sensitize these receptors in control animals. Conversely, the hedonic property of sucrose was intact in DAT-CI mice, indicating normal sweet perception in these animals. Our results point to CB1Rs as novel molecular players in ADHD, and suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with the ECS might prove effective in this disorder. PMID:22034972

  6. Loss of striatal cannabinoid CB1 receptor function in attention-deficit / hyperactivity disorder mice with point-mutation of the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Castelli, Maura; Federici, Mauro; Rossi, Silvia; De Chiara, Valentina; Napolitano, Francesco; Studer, Valeria; Motta, Caterina; Sacchetti, Lucia; Romano, Rosaria; Musella, Alessandra; Bernardi, Giorgio; Siracusano, Alberto; Gu, Howard H; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro; Centonze, Diego

    2011-11-01

    Abnormal dopamine (DA) transmission in the striatum plays a pivotal role in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). As striatal DA signalling modulates the endocannabinoid system (ECS), the present study was aimed at investigating cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) function in a model of ADHD obtained by triple point-mutation in the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in mice, making them insensitive to cocaine [DAT cocaine-insensitive (DAT-CI) mice]. DAT-CI mice had a marked hyperactive phenotype, and neurophysiological recordings revealed that the sensitivity of CB1Rs controlling GABA-mediated synaptic currents [CB1Rs((GABA)) ] in the striatum was completely lost. In contrast, CB1Rs modulating glutamate transmission [CB1Rs((Glu)) ], and GABA(B) receptors were not affected in this model of ADHD. In DAT-CI mice, the blockade of CB1R((GABA)) function was complete even after cocaine or environmental manipulations activating the endogenous DA-dependent reward system, which are known to sensitize these receptors in control animals. Conversely, the hedonic property of sucrose was intact in DAT-CI mice, indicating normal sweet perception in these animals. Our results point to CB1Rs as novel molecular players in ADHD, and suggest that therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with the ECS might prove effective in this disorder.

  7. Active retrodirective arrays for SPS beam pointing. [phase conjugation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernoff, R.

    1980-01-01

    The basic requirement of the SPS beam pointing system is that it deliver a certain amount of S-band (lambda = 12.5 cm) power to a 9.6 km diameter receiving rectenna on the ground. The power is transmitted from a 1.0 km diameter antenna array on the SPS, which is, for a rectenna at about plus or minus 40 deg. latitude, some 37.5x10 to the 6th power km distant. At the present time ARA's appear to be the best bet to realize this very stringent beam pointing requirement. An active retrodirective array (ARA) transmits a beam towards the apparent source of an illuminating signal called the pilot. The array produces, not merely reflects, RF power. Retrodirectivity is achieved by retransmitting from each element of the array a signal whose phase is the "conjugate" of that received by the element. Phase conjugate circuits and pointing errors in ARA's are described. Results obtained using a 2-element X-band ARA and an 8-element S-band ARA are included.

  8. A methylated Neurospora 5S rRNA pseudogene contains a transposable element inactivated by repeat-induced point mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, B S; Garrett-Engele, P W; Stevens, J N; Fritz, D Y; Garrett-Engele, C; Metzenberg, R L; Selker, E U

    1998-01-01

    In an analysis of 22 of the roughly 100 dispersed 5S rRNA genes in Neurospora crassa, a methylated 5S rRNA pseudogene, Psi63, was identified. We characterized the Psi63 region to better understand the control and function of DNA methylation. The 120-bp 5S rRNA-like region of Psi63 is interrupted by a 1.9-kb insertion that has characteristics of sequences that have been modified by repeat-induced point mutation (RIP). We found sequences related to this insertion in wild-type strains of N. crassa and other Neurospora species. Most showed evidence of RIP; but one, isolated from the N. crassa host of Psi63, showed no evidence of RIP. A deletion from near the center of this sequence apparently rendered it incapable of participating in RIP with the related full-length copies. The Psi63 insertion and the related sequences have features of transposons and are related to the Fot1 class of fungal transposable elements. Apparently Psi63 was generated by insertion of a previously unrecognized Neurospora transposable element into a 5S rRNA gene, followed by RIP. We name the resulting inactivated Neurospora transposon PuntRIP1 and the related sequence showing no evidence of RIP, but harboring a deletion that presumably rendered it defective for transposition, dPunt. PMID:9691037

  9. A simple extension to the CMASA method for the prediction of catalytic residues in the presence of single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Flores, David I; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Brizuela, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    The automatic identification of catalytic residues still remains an important challenge in structural bioinformatics. Sequence-based methods are good alternatives when the query shares a high percentage of identity with a well-annotated enzyme. However, when the homology is not apparent, which occurs with many structures from the structural genome initiative, structural information should be exploited. A local structural comparison is preferred to a global structural comparison when predicting functional residues. CMASA is a recently proposed method for predicting catalytic residues based on a local structure comparison. The method achieves high accuracy and a high value for the Matthews correlation coefficient. However, point substitutions or a lack of relevant data strongly affect the performance of the method. In the present study, we propose a simple extension to the CMASA method to overcome this difficulty. Extensive computational experiments are shown as proof of concept instances, as well as for a few real cases. The results show that the extension performs well when the catalytic site contains mutated residues or when some residues are missing. The proposed modification could correctly predict the catalytic residues of a mutant thymidylate synthase, 1EVF. It also successfully predicted the catalytic residues for 3HRC despite the lack of information for a relevant side chain atom in the PDB file. PMID:25268770

  10. Analgesia and unwanted benzodiazepine effects in point-mutated mice expressing only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Ralvenius, William T.; Benke, Dietmar; Acuña, Mario A.; Rudolph, Uwe; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Agonists at the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABAA receptors (BDZs) enhance synaptic inhibition through four subtypes (α1, α2, α3 and α5) of GABAA receptors (GABAAR). When applied to the spinal cord, they alleviate pathological pain; however, insufficient efficacy after systemic administration and undesired effects preclude their use in routine pain therapy. Previous work suggested that subtype-selective drugs might allow separating desired antihyperalgesia from unwanted effects, but the lack of selective agents has hitherto prevented systematic analyses. Here we use four lines of triple GABAAR point-mutated mice, which express only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAAR subtype at a time, to show that targeting only α2GABAARs achieves strong antihyperalgesia and reduced side effects (that is, no sedation, motor impairment and tolerance development). Additional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses in these mice explain why clinically relevant antihyperalgesia cannot be achieved with nonselective BDZs. These findings should foster the development of innovative subtype-selective BDZs for novel indications such as chronic pain. PMID:25865415

  11. A simple extension to the CMASA method for the prediction of catalytic residues in the presence of single point mutations.

    PubMed

    Flores, David I; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R; Brizuela, Carlos A

    2014-01-01

    The automatic identification of catalytic residues still remains an important challenge in structural bioinformatics. Sequence-based methods are good alternatives when the query shares a high percentage of identity with a well-annotated enzyme. However, when the homology is not apparent, which occurs with many structures from the structural genome initiative, structural information should be exploited. A local structural comparison is preferred to a global structural comparison when predicting functional residues. CMASA is a recently proposed method for predicting catalytic residues based on a local structure comparison. The method achieves high accuracy and a high value for the Matthews correlation coefficient. However, point substitutions or a lack of relevant data strongly affect the performance of the method. In the present study, we propose a simple extension to the CMASA method to overcome this difficulty. Extensive computational experiments are shown as proof of concept instances, as well as for a few real cases. The results show that the extension performs well when the catalytic site contains mutated residues or when some residues are missing. The proposed modification could correctly predict the catalytic residues of a mutant thymidylate synthase, 1EVF. It also successfully predicted the catalytic residues for 3HRC despite the lack of information for a relevant side chain atom in the PDB file.

  12. A Simple Extension to the CMASA Method for the Prediction of Catalytic Residues in the Presence of Single Point Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Flores, David I.; Sotelo-Mundo, Rogerio R.; Brizuela, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The automatic identification of catalytic residues still remains an important challenge in structural bioinformatics. Sequence-based methods are good alternatives when the query shares a high percentage of identity with a well-annotated enzyme. However, when the homology is not apparent, which occurs with many structures from the structural genome initiative, structural information should be exploited. A local structural comparison is preferred to a global structural comparison when predicting functional residues. CMASA is a recently proposed method for predicting catalytic residues based on a local structure comparison. The method achieves high accuracy and a high value for the Matthews correlation coefficient. However, point substitutions or a lack of relevant data strongly affect the performance of the method. In the present study, we propose a simple extension to the CMASA method to overcome this difficulty. Extensive computational experiments are shown as proof of concept instances, as well as for a few real cases. The results show that the extension performs well when the catalytic site contains mutated residues or when some residues are missing. The proposed modification could correctly predict the catalytic residues of a mutant thymidylate synthase, 1EVF. It also successfully predicted the catalytic residues for 3HRC despite the lack of information for a relevant side chain atom in the PDB file. PMID:25268770

  13. The Oncogenic Activity of RET Point Mutants for Follicular Thyroid Cells May Account for the Occurrence of Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma in Patients Affected by Familial Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Melillo, Rosa Marina; Cirafici, Anna Maria; De Falco, Valentina; Bellantoni, Marie; Chiappetta, Gennaro; Fusco, Alfredo; Carlomagno, Francesca; Picascia, Antonella; Tramontano, Donatella; Tallini, Giovanni; Santoro, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    Activating germ-line point mutations in the RET receptor are responsible for multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-associated medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), whereas somatic RET rearrangements are prevalent in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). Some rare kindreds, carrying point mutations in RET, are affected by both cancer types, suggesting that, under specific circumstances, point mutations in RET can drive the generation of PTC. Here we describe a family whose siblings, affected by both PTC and MTC, carried a germ-line point mutation in the RET extracellular domain, converting cysteine 634 into serine. We tested on thyroid follicular cells the transforming activity of RET(C634S), RET(K603Q), another mutant identified in a kindred with both PTC and MTC, RET(C634R) a commonly isolated allele in MEN2A, RET(M918T) responsible for MEN2B and also identified in kindreds with both PTC and MTC, and RET/PTC1 the rearranged oncogene that characterizes bona fide PTC in patients without MTC. We show that the various RET point mutants, but not wild-type RET, scored constitutive kinase activity and exerted mitogenic effects for thyroid PC Cl 3 cells, albeit at significantly lower levels compared to RET/PTC1. The low mitogenic activity of RET point mutants paralleled their reduced kinase activity compared to RET/PTC. Furthermore, RET point mutants maintained a protein domain, the intracellular juxtamembrane domain, that exerted negative effects on the mitogenic activity. In conclusion, RET point mutants can behave as dominant oncogenes for thyroid follicular cells. Their transforming activity, however, is rather modest, providing a possible explanation for the rare association of MTC with PTC. PMID:15277225

  14. Pacemaker activity of the human sinoatrial node: effects of HCN4 mutations on the hyperpolarization-activated current.

    PubMed

    Verkerk, Arie O; Wilders, Ronald

    2014-03-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated 'funny' current, If, plays an important modulating role in the pacemaker activity of the human sinoatrial node (SAN). If is carried by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which are tetramers built of four HCN subunits. In human SAN, HCN4 is the most abundant of the four isoforms of the HCN family. Since 2003, several loss-of-function mutations in the HCN4 gene, which encodes the HCN4 protein, or in the KCNE2 gene, which encodes the MiRP1 accessory β-subunit, have been associated with sinus node dysfunction. Voltage-clamp experiments on HCN4 channels expressed in COS-7 cells, Xenopus oocytes, or HEK-293 cells have revealed changes in the expression and kinetics of mutant channels, but the extent to which these changes would affect If flowing during a human SAN action potential is unresolved. Here, we review the changes in expression and kinetics of HCN4 mutant channels and provide an overview of their effects on If during the time course of a human SAN action potential, both under resting conditions and upon adrenergic stimulation. These effects are assessed in simulated action potential clamp experiments, with action potentials recorded from isolated human SAN pacemaker cells as command potential and kinetics of If based on voltage-clamp data from these cells. Results from in vitro and in silico experiments show several inconsistencies with clinical observations, pointing to challenges for future research.

  15. The cytosol-synthesized subunit II (Cox2) precursor with the point mutation W56R is correctly processed in yeast mitochondria to rescue cytochrome oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Torres, Valentín; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; García-Villegas, Rodolfo; Pérez-Martínez, Xochitl; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; González-Halphen, Diego

    2012-12-01

    Deletion of the yeast mitochondrial gene COX2 encoding subunit 2 (Cox2) of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) results in loss of respiration (Δcox2 strain). Supekova et al. (2010) [1] transformed a Δcox2 strain with a vector expressing Cox2 with a mitochondrial targeting sequence (MTS) and the point mutation W56R (Cox2(W56R)), restoring respiratory growth. Here, the CcO carrying the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) was characterized. Yeast mitochondria from the wild-type (WT) and the Δcox2+Cox2(W56R) strains were subjected to Blue Native electrophoresis. In-gel activity of CcO and spectroscopic quantitation of cytochromes revealed that only 60% of CcO is present in the complemented strain, and that less CcO is found associated in supercomplexes as compared to WT. CcOs from the WT and the mutant exhibited similar subunit composition, although activity was 20-25% lower in the enzyme containing Cox2(W56R) than in the one with Cox2(WT). Tandem mass spectrometry confirmed that W(56) was substituted by R(56) in Cox2(W56R). In addition, Cox2(W56R) exhibited the same N-terminus than Cox2(WT), indicating that the MTS of Oxa1 and the leader sequence of 15 residues were removed from Cox2(W56R) during maturation. Thus, Cox2(W56R) is identical to Cox2(WT) except for the point mutation W56R. Mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis is strongly reduced in Δcox2 mutants, but the Cox2(W56R) complemented strain led to full restoration of Cox1 synthesis. We conclude that the cytosol-synthesized Cox2(W56R) follows a rate-limiting process of import, maturation or assembly that yields lower steady-state levels of CcO. Still, the allotopically-expressed Cox2(W56R) restores CcO activity and allows mitochondrial Cox1 synthesis to advance at WT levels.

  16. Impact of kinase activating and inactivating patient mutations on binary PKA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Röck, Ruth; Mayrhofer, Johanna E.; Bachmann, Verena; Stefan, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    The second messenger molecule cAMP links extracellular signals to intracellular responses. The main cellular cAMP effector is the compartmentalized protein kinase A (PKA). Upon receptor initiated cAMP-mobilization, PKA regulatory subunits (R) bind cAMP thereby triggering dissociation and activation of bound PKA catalytic subunits (PKAc). Mutations in PKAc or RIa subunits manipulate PKA dynamics and activities which contribute to specific disease patterns. Mutations activating cAMP/PKA signaling contribute to carcinogenesis or hormone excess, while inactivating mutations cause hormone deficiency or resistance. Here we extended the application spectrum of a Protein-fragment Complementation Assay based on the Renilla Luciferase to determine binary protein:protein interactions (PPIs) of the PKA network. We compared time- and dose-dependent influences of cAMP-elevation on mutually exclusive PPIs of PKAc with the phosphotransferase inhibiting RIIb and RIa subunits and the protein kinase inhibitor peptide (PKI). We analyzed PKA dynamics following integration of patient mutations into PKAc and RIa. We observed that oncogenic modifications of PKAc(L206R) and RIa(Δ184-236) as well as rare disease mutations in RIa(R368X) affect complex formation of PKA and its responsiveness to cAMP elevation. With the cell-based PKA PPI reporter platform we precisely quantified the mechanistic details how inhibitory PKA interactions and defined patient mutations contribute to PKA functions. PMID:26347651

  17. Promoter-dependent activity on androgen receptor N-terminal domain mutations in androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro-Cuccaro, Rieko; Davies, John; Mongan, Nigel P; Bunch, Trevor; Brown, Rosalind S; Audi, Laura; Watt, Kate; McEwan, Iain J; Hughes, Ieuan A

    2014-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) mutations are associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). Missense mutations identified in the AR-N-terminal domain (AR-NTD) are rare, and clinical phenotypes are typically mild. We investigated 7 missense mutations and 2 insertion/deletions located in the AR-NTD. This study aimed to elucidate the pathogenic role of AR-NTD mutants in AIS and to use this knowledge to further define AR-NTD function. AR-NTD mutations (Q120E, A159T, G216R, N235K, G248V, L272F, and P380R) were introduced into AR-expression plasmids. Stably expressing cell lines were established for del57L and ins58L. Transactivation was measured using luciferase reporter constructs under the control of GRE and Pem promoters. Intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy and partial proteolysis studies were performed for mutations which showed reduced activities by using a purified AR-AF1 protein. Pem-luciferase reporter activation was reduced for A159T, N235K, and G248V but not the GRE-luciferase reporter. Protein structure analysis detected no significant change in the AR-AF1 region for these mutations. Reduced cellular expression and transactivation activity were observed for ins58L. The mutations Q120E, G216R, L272F, P380R, and del57L showed small or no detectable changes in function. Thus, clinical and experimental analyses have identified novel AR-signalling defects associated with mutations in the structurally disordered AR-NTD domain in patients with AIS.

  18. Analysis of PIK3CA Mutations and Activation Pathways in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muroni, Maria Rosaria; Sanges, Francesca; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Ena, Sara; Pira, Giovanna; Murgia, Luciano; Manca, Alessandra; Uras, Maria Gabriela; Sarobba, Maria Giuseppina; Urru, Silvana; De Miglio, Maria Rosaria

    2015-01-01

    Background Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) accounts for 12–24% of all breast carcinomas, and shows worse prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Molecular studies demonstrated that TNBCs are a heterogeneous group of tumors with different clinical and pathologic features, prognosis, genetic-molecular alterations and treatment responsivity. The PI3K/AKT is a major pathway involved in the regulation of cell survival and proliferation, and is the most frequently altered pathway in breast cancer, apparently with different biologic impact on specific cancer subtypes. The most common genetic abnormality is represented by PIK3CA gene activating mutations, with an overall frequency of 20–40%. The aims of our study were to investigate PIK3CA gene mutations on a large series of TNBC, to perform a wider analysis on genetic alterations involving PI3K/AKT and BRAF/RAS/MAPK pathways and to correlate the results with clinical-pathologic data. Materials and Methods PIK3CA mutation analysis was performed by using cobas® PIK3CA Mutation Test. EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes were analyzed by sequencing. Immunohistochemistry was carried out to identify PTEN loss and to investigate for PI3K/AKT pathways components. Results PIK3CA mutations were detected in 23.7% of TNBC, whereas no mutations were identified in EGFR, AKT1, BRAF, and KRAS genes. Moreover, we observed PTEN loss in 11.3% of tumors. Deregulation of PI3K/AKT pathways was revealed by consistent activation of pAKT and p-p44/42 MAPK in all PIK3CA mutated TNBC. Conclusions Our data shows that PIK3CA mutations and PI3K/AKT pathway activation are common events in TNBC. A deeper investigation on specific TNBC genomic abnormalities might be helpful in order to select patients who would benefit from current targeted therapy strategies. PMID:26540293

  19. Somatic Point Mutations in mtDNA Control Region Are Influenced by Genetic Background and Associated with Healthy Aging: A GEHA Study

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Giuseppina; Romeo, Giuseppe; Dato, Serena; Crocco, Paolina; Bruni, Amalia C.; Hervonen, Antti; Majamaa, Kari; Sevini, Federica; Franceschi, Claudio; Passarino, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Tissue specific somatic mutations occurring in the mtDNA control region have been proposed to provide a survival advantage. Data on twins and on relatives of long-lived subjects suggested that the occurrence/accumulation of these mutations may be genetically influenced. To further investigate control region somatic heteroplasmy in the elderly, we analyzed the segment surrounding the nt 150 position (previously reported as specific of Leukocytes) in various types of leukocytes obtained from 195 ultra-nonagenarians sib-pairs of Italian or Finnish origin collected in the frame of the GEHA Project. We found a significant correlation of the mtDNA control region heteroplasmy between sibs, confirming a genetic influence on this phenomenon. Furthermore, many subjects showed heteroplasmy due to mutations different from the C150T transition. In these cases heteroplasmy was correlated within sibpairs in Finnish and northern Italian samples, but not in southern Italians. This suggested that the genetic contribution to control region mutations may be population specific. Finally, we observed a possible correlation between heteroplasmy and Hand Grip strength, one of the best markers of physical performance and of mortality risk in the elderly. Our study provides new evidence on the relevance of mtDNA somatic mutations in aging and longevity and confirms that the occurrence of specific point mutations in the mtDNA control region may represent a strategy for the age-related remodelling of organismal functions. PMID:20976236

  20. In vitro susceptibility and a new point mutation associated with tylosin-resistance in Japanese canine intestinal spirochetes.

    PubMed

    Prapasarakul, Nuvee; Ochi, Kozo; Adachi, Yoshikazu

    2003-12-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of six commonly used antimicrobial agents against 29 isolates of intestinal spirochetes isolated from dogs in Japan were examined by the agar dilution technique. In addition, the genetic basis of tylosin resistance in in vitro selected resistant mutants of two reference strains and three tylosin-susceptible field isolates obtained by three successive subcultures on blood agar containing 1 microg/ml of tylosin was investigated. Carbadox was the most active (MIC: < 0.00625) of all the antimicrobial agents. Although all the isolates were susceptible to tylosin, some were resistant to erythromycin. Tiamulin, lincomycin and dimetridazole were also very active against the isolates. All the resistant isolates did not harbor any plasmids. In vitro selected tylosin-resistant mutants of previously tylosin-susceptible isolates showed a new mutation in which their adenine at the base position equivalent to 2062 of 23S rDNA of Escherichia coli has been replaced by cytosine. These findings may both provide guidance towards the proper choice of antimicrobial agents for the treatment of canine intestinal spirochetosis, and add to the understanding of the genetic basis of tylosin resistance. PMID:14709813

  1. Low prevalence of clarithromycin-resistant Helicobacter pylori isolates with A2143G point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene in North India.

    PubMed

    Gehlot, Valentina; Mahant, Shweta; Mukhopadhyay, Asish Kumar; Das, Kunal; Alam, Jawed; Ghosh, Prachetash; Das, Rajashree

    2016-09-01

    Resistance of Helicobacter pylori to clarithromycin is associated with a single base substitution in the 23S rRNA gene. In this study, clarithromycin-resistant H. pylori isolates were analysed for the presence of 23S rRNA gene mutations. H. pylori were isolated from 68 patients suffering from various gastroduodenal diseases in North India. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by the agar dilution method, and point mutations in clarithromycin-resistant strains were identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and DNA sequencing. Clarithromycin resistance was observed in 11.8% (8/68) of the H. pylori isolates in North India. The A2143G point mutation in the 23S rRNA gene was found in 87.5% (7/8) of the clarithromycin-resistant strains, and the A2142G mutation in association with the T2182C mutation was found in 12.5% (1/8). In conclusion, the continued high prevalence of clarithromycin-sensitive H. pylori strains (88.2%) observed in this study allows the use of the triple-therapy regimen for the treatment of H. pylori infection in this region. Surveillance studies need to be conducted at regular intervals for clarithromycin resistance in the population. To our knowledge, this is the first study in India to report that point mutations at position A2143G and at A2142G in association with T2182C are associated with clarithromycin resistance, confirming reports from other parts of the world. PMID:27530837

  2. Lethal Factor Active-Site Mutations Affect Catalytic Activity In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, S. E.; Hanna, P. C.

    1998-01-01

    The lethal factor (LF) protein of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin contains the thermolysin-like active-site and zinc-binding consensus motif HEXXH (K. R. Klimpel, N. Arora, and S. H. Leppla, Mol. Microbiol. 13:1093–1100, 1994). LF is hypothesized to act as a Zn2+ metalloprotease in the cytoplasm of macrophages, but no proteolytic activities have been previously shown on any target substrate. Here, synthetic peptides are hydrolyzed by LF in vitro. Mass spectroscopy and peptide sequencing of isolated cleavage products separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography indicate that LF seems to prefer proline-containing substrates. Substitution mutations within the consensus active-site residues completely abolish all in vitro catalytic functions, as does addition of 1,10-phenanthroline, EDTA, and certain amino acid hydroxamates, including the novel zinc metalloprotease inhibitor ZINCOV. In contrast, the protease inhibitors bestatin and lysine CMK, previously shown to block LF activity on macrophages, did not block LF activity in vitro. These data provide the first direct evidence that LF may act as an endopeptidase. PMID:9573135

  3. In Vivo Analysis of Disease-Associated Point Mutations Unveils Profound Differences in mRNA Splicing of Peripherin-2 in Rod and Cone Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Becirovic, Elvir; Böhm, Sybille; Nguyen, Ong Nam Phuong; Riedmayr, Lisa Maria; Koch, Mirja Annika; Schulze, Elisabeth; Kohl, Susanne; Borsch, Oliver; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Ader, Marius; Michalakis, Stylianos; Biel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Point mutations in peripherin-2 (PRPH2) are associated with severe retinal degenerative disorders affecting rod and/or cone photoreceptors. Various disease-causing mutations have been identified, but the exact contribution of a given mutation to the clinical phenotype remains unclear. Exonic point mutations are usually assumed to alter single amino acids, thereby influencing specific protein characteristics; however, they can also affect mRNA splicing. To examine the effects of distinct PRPH2 point mutations on mRNA splicing and protein expression in vivo, we designed PRPH2 minigenes containing the three coding exons and relevant intronic regions of human PRPH2. Minigenes carrying wild type PRPH2 or PRPH2 exon 2 mutations associated with rod or cone disorders were expressed in murine photoreceptors using recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors. We detect three PRPH2 splice isoforms in rods and cones: correctly spliced, intron 1 retention, and unspliced. In addition, we show that only the correctly spliced isoform results in detectable protein expression. Surprisingly, compared to rods, differential splicing leads to lower expression of correctly spliced and higher expression of unspliced PRPH2 in cones. These results were confirmed in qRT-PCR experiments from FAC-sorted murine rods and cones. Strikingly, three out of five cone disease-causing PRPH2 mutations profoundly enhanced correct splicing of PRPH2, which correlated with strong upregulation of mutant PRPH2 protein expression in cones. By contrast, four out of six PRPH2 mutants associated with rod disorders gave rise to a reduced PRPH2 protein expression via different mechanisms. These mechanisms include aberrant mRNA splicing, protein mislocalization, and protein degradation. Our data suggest that upregulation of PRPH2 levels in combination with defects in the PRPH2 function caused by the mutation might be an important mechanism leading to cone degeneration. By contrast, the pathology of rod

  4. Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Contributes to Pancreatic Tumorigenesis by Inducing Tumor-Related Gene Mutations.

    PubMed

    Sawai, Yugo; Kodama, Yuzo; Shimizu, Takahiro; Ota, Yuji; Maruno, Takahisa; Eso, Yuji; Kurita, Akira; Shiokawa, Masahiro; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Uza, Norimitsu; Matsumoto, Yuko; Masui, Toshihiko; Uemoto, Shinji; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Chiba, Tsutomu

    2015-08-15

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) develops via an accumulation of various gene mutations. The mechanism underlying the mutations in PDAC development, however, is not fully understood. Recent insight into the close association between the mutation pattern of various cancers and specific mutagens led us to investigate the possible involvement of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), a DNA editing enzyme, in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Our immunohistochemical findings revealed AID protein expression in human acinar ductal metaplasia, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and PDAC. Both the amount and intensity of the AID protein expression increased with the progression from precancerous to cancerous lesions in human PDAC tissues. To further assess the significance of ectopic epithelial AID expression in pancreatic tumorigenesis, we analyzed the phenotype of AID transgenic (AID Tg) mice. Consistent with our hypothesis that AID is involved in the mechanism of the mutations underlying pancreatic tumorigenesis, we found precancerous lesions developing in the pancreas of AID Tg mice. Using deep sequencing, we also detected Kras and c-Myc mutations in our analysis of the whole pancreas of AID Tg mice. In addition, Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of Kras, c-Myc, and Smad4 mutations, with the typical mutational footprint of AID in precancerous lesions in AID Tg mice separated by laser capture microdissection. Taken together, our findings suggest that AID contributes to the development of pancreatic precancerous lesions by inducing tumor-related gene mutations. Our new mouse model without intentional manipulation of specific tumor-related genes provides a powerful system for analyzing the mutations involved in PDAC.

  5. Frequencies, Laboratory Features, and Granulocyte Activation in Chinese Patients with CALR-Mutated Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Ruiyuan; Chang, Jianmei; Li, Jianlan; Tan, Yanhong; Xu, Zhifang; Ren, Fanggang; Zhao, Junxia; Pan, Jie; Zhang, Na; Wang, Xiaojuan; He, Jianxia; Yang, Wanfang; Wang, Hongwei

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the CALR gene have been recently identified as acquired alterations in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In this study, we evaluated mutation frequencies, laboratory features, and granulocyte activation in Chinese patients with MPNs. A combination of qualitative allele-specific polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing was used to detect three driver mutations (i.e., CALR, JAK2V617F, and MPL). CALR mutations were identified in 8.4% of cases with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and 5.3% of cases with primary myelofibrosis (PMF). Moreover, 25% of polycythemia vera, 29.5% of ET, and 48.1% of PMF were negative for all three mutations (JAK2V617F, MPL, and CALR). Compared with those patients with JAK2V617F mutation, CALR-mutated ET patients displayed unique hematological phenotypes, including higher platelet counts, and lower leukocyte counts and hemoglobin levels. Significant differences were not found between Chinese PMF patients with mutants CALR and JAK2V617F in terms of laboratory features. Interestingly, patients with CALR mutations showed markedly decreased levels of leukocyte alkaline phosphatase (LAP) expression, whereas those with JAK2V617F mutation presented with elevated levels. Overall, a lower mutant rate of CALR gene and a higher triple-negative rate were identified in the cohort of Chinese patients with MPNs. This result indicates that an undiscovered mutant gene may have a significant role in these patients. Moreover, these pathological features further imply that the disease biology varies considerably between mutants CALR and JAK2V617F. PMID:26375990

  6. Activation of Antibiotic Production in Bacillus spp. by Cumulative Drug Resistance Mutations.

    PubMed

    Tojo, Shigeo; Tanaka, Yukinori; Ochi, Kozo

    2015-12-01

    Bacillus subtilis strains produce a wide range of antibiotics, including ribosomal and nonribosomal peptide antibiotics, as well as bacilysocin and neotrehalosadiamine. Mutations in B. subtilis strain 168 that conferred resistance to drugs such as streptomycin and rifampin resulted in overproduction of the dipeptide antibiotic bacilysin. Cumulative drug resistance mutations, such as mutations in the mthA and rpsL genes, which confer low- and high-level resistance, respectively, to streptomycin, and mutations in rpoB, which confer resistance to rifampin, resulted in cells that overproduced bacilysin. Transcriptional analysis demonstrated that the enhanced transcription of biosynthesis genes was responsible for the overproduction of bacilysin. This approach was effective also in activating the cryptic genes of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, leading to actual production of antibiotic(s).

  7. Segmental basal cell naevus syndrome caused by an activating mutation in smoothened.

    PubMed

    Khamaysi, Z; Bochner, R; Indelman, M; Magal, L; Avitan-Hersh, E; Sarig, O; Sprecher, E; Bergman, R

    2016-07-01

    Aberrant sonic hedgehog signalling, mostly due to PTCH1 mutations, has been shown to play a central role in the pathogenesis of basal cell carcinoma (BCC), as well as in basal cell naevus syndrome (BCNS). Mutations in smoothened (SMO) encoding a receptor for sonic hedgehog have been reported in sporadic BCCs but not in BCNS. We report a case with multiple BCCs, pits and comedones in a segmental distribution over the upper part of the body, along with other findings compatible with BCNS. Histopathologically, there were different types of BCC. A heterozygous mutation (c.1234C>T, p.L412F) in SMO was detected in three BCCs but not in peripheral blood lymphocytes or the uninvolved skin. These were compatible with the type 1 mosaic form of BCNS. The p.L412F mutation was found experimentally to result in increased SMO transactivating activity, and the patient responded to vismodegib therapy. Activating mutations in SMO may cause BCNS. The identification of a gain-of-function mutation in SMO causing a type 1 mosaic form of BCNS further expands our understanding of the pathogenesis of BCC, with implications for the treatment of these tumours, whether sporadic or inherited. PMID:26822128

  8. A protein-targeting strategy used to develop a selective inhibitor of the E17K point mutation in the PH domain of Akt1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deyle, Kaycie M.; Farrow, Blake; Qiao Hee, Ying; Work, Jeremy; Wong, Michelle; Lai, Bert; Umeda, Aiko; Millward, Steven W.; Nag, Arundhati; Das, Samir; Heath, James R.

    2015-05-01

    Ligands that can bind selectively to proteins with single amino-acid point mutations offer the potential to detect or treat an abnormal protein in the presence of the wild type (WT). However, it is difficult to develop a selective ligand if the point mutation is not associated with an addressable location, such as a binding pocket. Here we report an all-chemical synthetic epitope-targeting strategy that we used to discover a 5-mer peptide with selectivity for the E17K-transforming point mutation in the pleckstrin homology domain of the Akt1 oncoprotein. A fragment of Akt1 that contained the E17K mutation and an I19[propargylglycine] substitution was synthesized to form an addressable synthetic epitope. Azide-presenting peptides that clicked covalently onto this alkyne-presenting epitope were selected from a library using in situ screening. One peptide exhibits a 10:1 in vitro selectivity for the oncoprotein relative to the WT, with a similar selectivity in cells. This 5-mer peptide was expanded into a larger ligand that selectively blocks the E17K Akt1 interaction with its PIP3 (phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate) substrate.

  9. Antitumor effects and molecular mechanisms of ponatinib on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hee; Kwak, Yeonui; Kim, Nam Doo; Sim, Taebo

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant mutational activation of FGFR2 is associated with endometrial cancers (ECs). AP24534 (ponatinib) currently undergoing clinical trials has been known to be an orally available multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our biochemical kinase assay showed that AP24534 is potent against wild-type FGFR1-4 and 5 mutant FGFRs (V561M-FGFR1, N549H-FGFR2, K650E-FGFR3, G697C-FGFR3, N535K-FGFR4) and possesses the strongest kinase-inhibitory activity on N549H-FGFR2 (IC50 of 0.5 nM) among all FGFRs tested. We therefore investigated the effects of AP24534 on endometrial cancer cells harboring activating FGFR2 mutations and explored the underlying molecular mechanisms. AP24534 significantly inhibited the proliferation of endometrial cancer cells bearing activating FGFR2 mutations (N549K, K310R/N549K, S252W) and mainly induced G1/S cell cycle arrest leading to apoptosis. AP24534 also diminished the kinase activity of immunoprecipitated FGFR2 derived from MFE-296 and MFE-280 cells and reduced the phosphorylation of FGFR2 and FRS2 on MFE-296 and AN3CA cells. AP24534 caused substantial reductions in ERK phosphorylation, PLCγ signaling and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs bearing FGFR2 activating mutations. Akt signaling pathway was also deactivated by AP24534. AP24534 causes the chemotherapeutic effect through mainly the blockade of ERK, PLCγ and STAT5 signal transduction on ECs. Moreover, AP24534 inhibited migration and invasion of endometrial cancer cells with FGFR2 mutations. In addition, AP24534 significantly blocked anchorage-independent growth of endometrial cancer cells. We, for the first time, report the molecular mechanisms by which AP24534 exerts antitumor effects on ECs with FGFR2 activating mutations, which would provide mechanistic insight into ongoing clinical investigations of AP24534 for ECs.

  10. Novel mutations in dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase deficiency in two cousins with borderline-normal PDH complex activity.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jessie M; Levandovskiy, Valeriy; Mackay, Neviana; Raiman, Julian; Renaud, Deborah L; Clarke, Joe T R; Feigenbaum, Annette; Elpeleg, Orly; Robinson, Brian H

    2006-07-15

    We have diagnosed dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (DLD) deficiency in two male second cousins, who presented with markedly different clinical phenotypes. Patient 1 had a recurrent encephalopathy, and patient 2 had microcephaly and lactic acidosis. Their presentation is unusual, in that the DLD subunit deficiency had little effect on pyruvate dehydrogenase complex activity, but caused a severe reduction in the activities of other enzymes that utilize this subunit. We have identified two mutations in the DLD gene in each patient. The second cousins have one novel mutation in common resulting in a substitution of isoleucine for threonine (I47T), which has not been previously reported in the literature. Patient 1 has a second mutation that has been reported to be common in the Ashkenazi Jewish population, G229C. Patient 2 has a second mutation, E375K, which has also been previously reported in the literature. Enzyme kinetic measurements on patient fibroblasts show that under certain conditions, one heteroallelic mutation may have a higher K(m). This may account for the differing clinical phenotypes. These findings have important repercussions for other patients with similar clinical phenotypes, as DLD activity is not normally measured in cases with normal PDHc activity.

  11. Mutations of fumarase that distinguish between the active site and a nearby dicarboxylic acid binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, T.; Lees, M.; Banaszak, L.

    1997-01-01

    Two mutant forms of fumarase C from E. coli have been made using PCR and recombinant DNA. The recombinant form of the protein included a histidine arm on the C-terminal facilitating purification. Based on earlier studies, two different carboxylic acid binding sites, labeled A- and B-, were observed in crystal structures of the wild type and inhibited forms of the enzyme. A histidine at each of the sites was mutated to an asparagine. H188N at the A-site resulted in a large decrease in specific activity, while the H129N mutation at the B-site had essentially no effect. From the results, we conclude that the A-site is indeed the active site, and a dual role for H188 as a potential catalytic base is proposed. Crystal structures of the two mutant proteins produced some unexpected results. Both mutations reduced the affinity for the carboxylic acids at their respective sites. The H129N mutant should be particularly useful in future kinetic studies because it sterically blocks the B-site with the carboxyamide of asparagine assuming the position of the ligand's carboxylate. In the H188N mutation at the active site, the new asparagine side chain still interacts with an active site water that appears to have moved slightly as a result of the mutation. PMID:9098893

  12. Protein Adsorption and Reorganization on Nanoparticles Probed by the Coffee-Ring Effect: Application to Single Point Mutation Detection.

    PubMed

    Devineau, Stéphanie; Anyfantakis, Manos; Marichal, Laurent; Kiger, Laurent; Morel, Mathieu; Rudiuk, Sergii; Baigl, Damien

    2016-09-14

    The coffee-ring effect denotes the accumulation of particles at the edge of an evaporating sessile drop pinned on a substrate. Because it can be detected by simple visual inspection, this ubiquitous phenomenon can be envisioned as a robust and cost-effective diagnostic tool. Toward this direction, here we systematically analyze the deposit morphology of drying drops containing polystyrene particles of different surface properties with various proteins (bovine serum albumin (BSA) and different forms of hemoglobin). We show that deposit patterns reveal information on both the adsorption of proteins onto particles and their reorganization following adsorption. By combining pattern analysis with adsorption isotherm and zeta potential measurements, we show that the suppression of the coffee-ring effect and the formation of a disk-shaped pattern is primarily associated with particle neutralization by protein adsorption. However, our findings also suggest that protein reorganization following adsorption can dramatically invert this tendency. Exposure of hydrophobic (respectively charged) residues can lead to disk (respectively ring) deposit morphologies independently of the global particle charge. Surface tension measurements and microscopic observations of the evaporating drops show that the determinant factor of the deposit morphology is the accumulation of particles at the liquid/gas interface during evaporation. This general behavior opens the possibility to probe protein adsorption and reorganization on particles by the analysis of the deposit patterns, the formation of a disk being the robust signature of particles rendered hydrophobic by protein adsorption. We show that this method is sensitive enough to detect a single point mutation in a protein, as demonstrated here by the distinct patterns formed by human native hemoglobin h-HbA and its mutant form h-HbS, which is responsible for sickle cell anemia. PMID:27562632

  13. A CRISPR/Cas9 mediated point mutation in the alpha 6 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor confers resistance to spinosad in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Christoph T; Garrood, William T; Puinean, A Mirel; Eckel-Zimmer, Manuela; Williamson, Martin S; Davies, T G Emyr; Bass, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Spinosad, a widely used and economically important insecticide, targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) of the insect nervous system. Several studies have associated loss of function mutations in the insect nAChR α6 subunit with resistance to spinosad, and in the process identified this particular subunit as the specific target site. More recently a single non-synonymous point mutation, that does not result in loss of function, was identified in spinosad resistant strains of three insect species that results in an amino acid substitution (G275E) of the nAChR α6 subunit. The causal role of this mutation has been called into question as, to date, functional evidence proving its involvement in resistance has been limited to the study of vertebrate receptors. Here we use the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing platform to introduce the G275E mutation into the nAChR α6 subunit of Drosophila melanogaster. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation in Dα6 transcripts of mutant flies and verified that it does not disrupt the normal splicing of the two exons in close vicinity to the mutation site. A marked decrease in sensitivity to spinosad (66-fold) was observed in flies with the mutation compared to flies of the same genetic background minus the mutation, clearly demonstrating the functional role of this amino acid substitution in resistance to spinosad. Although the resistance levels observed are 4.7-fold lower than exhibited by a fly strain with a null mutation of Dα6, they are nevertheless predicated to be sufficient to result in resistance to spinosad at recommended field rates. Reciprocal crossings with susceptible fly strains followed by spinosad bioassays revealed G275E is inherited as an incompletely recessive trait, thus resembling the mode of inheritance described for this mutation in the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis. This study both resolves a debate on the functional significance of a target

  14. A CRISPR/Cas9 mediated point mutation in the alpha 6 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor confers resistance to spinosad in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Christoph T; Garrood, William T; Puinean, A Mirel; Eckel-Zimmer, Manuela; Williamson, Martin S; Davies, T G Emyr; Bass, Chris

    2016-06-01

    Spinosad, a widely used and economically important insecticide, targets the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) of the insect nervous system. Several studies have associated loss of function mutations in the insect nAChR α6 subunit with resistance to spinosad, and in the process identified this particular subunit as the specific target site. More recently a single non-synonymous point mutation, that does not result in loss of function, was identified in spinosad resistant strains of three insect species that results in an amino acid substitution (G275E) of the nAChR α6 subunit. The causal role of this mutation has been called into question as, to date, functional evidence proving its involvement in resistance has been limited to the study of vertebrate receptors. Here we use the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing platform to introduce the G275E mutation into the nAChR α6 subunit of Drosophila melanogaster. Reverse transcriptase-PCR and sequencing confirmed the presence of the mutation in Dα6 transcripts of mutant flies and verified that it does not disrupt the normal splicing of the two exons in close vicinity to the mutation site. A marked decrease in sensitivity to spinosad (66-fold) was observed in flies with the mutation compared to flies of the same genetic background minus the mutation, clearly demonstrating the functional role of this amino acid substitution in resistance to spinosad. Although the resistance levels observed are 4.7-fold lower than exhibited by a fly strain with a null mutation of Dα6, they are nevertheless predicated to be sufficient to result in resistance to spinosad at recommended field rates. Reciprocal crossings with susceptible fly strains followed by spinosad bioassays revealed G275E is inherited as an incompletely recessive trait, thus resembling the mode of inheritance described for this mutation in the western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis. This study both resolves a debate on the functional significance of a target

  15. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and SOS-Dependent Increase in Mutation Frequency Are Impacted by Escherichia coli Topoisomerase I C-Terminal Point Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jenny; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Banda, Srikanth; Tyagi, Rakhi

    2015-01-01

    Topoisomerase functions are required in all organisms for many vital cellular processes, including transcription elongation. The C terminus domains (CTD) of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I interact directly with RNA polymerase to remove transcription-driven negative supercoiling behind the RNA polymerase complex. This interaction prevents inhibition of transcription elongation from hypernegative supercoiling and R-loop accumulation. The physiological function of bacterial topoisomerase I in transcription is especially important for a rapid network response to an antibiotic challenge. In this study, Escherichia coli with a topA66 single nucleotide deletion mutation, which results in a frameshift in the TopA CTD, was shown to exhibit increased sensitivity to trimethoprim and quinolone antimicrobials. The topoisomerase I-RNA polymerase interaction and the SOS response to the antimicrobial agents were found to be significantly reduced by this topA66 mutation. Consequently, the mutation frequency measured by rifampin selection following SOS induction was diminished in the topA66 mutant. The increased antibiotic sensitivity for the topA66 mutant can be reversed by the expression of recombinant E. coli topoisomerase I but not by the expression of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I that has a nonhomologous CTD even though the recombinant M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I can restore most of the plasmid DNA linking number deficiency caused by the topA66 mutation. Direct interactions of E. coli topoisomerase I as part of transcription complexes are likely to be required for the rapid network response to an antibiotic challenge. Inhibitors of bacterial topoisomerase I functions and interactions may sensitize pathogens to antibiotic treatment and limit the mutagenic response. PMID:26248366

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and SOS-Dependent Increase in Mutation Frequency Are Impacted by Escherichia coli Topoisomerase I C-Terminal Point Mutation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jenny; Annamalai, Thirunavukkarasu; Cheng, Bokun; Banda, Srikanth; Tyagi, Rakhi; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching

    2015-10-01

    Topoisomerase functions are required in all organisms for many vital cellular processes, including transcription elongation. The C terminus domains (CTD) of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I interact directly with RNA polymerase to remove transcription-driven negative supercoiling behind the RNA polymerase complex. This interaction prevents inhibition of transcription elongation from hypernegative supercoiling and R-loop accumulation. The physiological function of bacterial topoisomerase I in transcription is especially important for a rapid network response to an antibiotic challenge. In this study, Escherichia coli with a topA66 single nucleotide deletion mutation, which results in a frameshift in the TopA CTD, was shown to exhibit increased sensitivity to trimethoprim and quinolone antimicrobials. The topoisomerase I-RNA polymerase interaction and the SOS response to the antimicrobial agents were found to be significantly reduced by this topA66 mutation. Consequently, the mutation frequency measured by rifampin selection following SOS induction was diminished in the topA66 mutant. The increased antibiotic sensitivity for the topA66 mutant can be reversed by the expression of recombinant E. coli topoisomerase I but not by the expression of recombinant Mycobacterium tuberculosis topoisomerase I that has a nonhomologous CTD even though the recombinant M. tuberculosis topoisomerase I can restore most of the plasmid DNA linking number deficiency caused by the topA66 mutation. Direct interactions of E. coli topoisomerase I as part of transcription complexes are likely to be required for the rapid network response to an antibiotic challenge. Inhibitors of bacterial topoisomerase I functions and interactions may sensitize pathogens to antibiotic treatment and limit the mutagenic response.

  17. Functional impact of mutational activation on the Listeria monocytogenes central virulence regulator PrfA

    PubMed Central

    Miner, Maurine D.; Port, Gary C.; Freitag, Nancy E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The transcriptional activator PrfA is required for the expression of virulence factors necessary for Listeria monocytogenes pathogenesis. PrfA is believed to become activated following L. monocytogenes entry into the cytosol of infected host cells resulting in the induction of target genes whose products are required for bacterial intracellular growth and cell-to-cell spread. Several mutations have been identified that appear to lock PrfA into its highly activated cytosolic form (known as prfA* mutations). In this study PrfA and five PrfA* mutant proteins exhibiting differing degrees of activity were purified and analyzed to define the influences of the mutations on distinct aspects of PrfA activity. Based on limited proteolytic digestion conformational changes were detected for the PrfA* mutant proteins in comparison to wild type PrfA. For all but one mutant (PrfA Y63C), the DNA binding affinity as measured by electophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) appeared to directly correlate with levels of PrfA mutational activation such that the high activity mutants exhibited the largest increases in DNA binding affinity and moderately activated mutants exhibited more moderate increases. Surprisingly, the ability of PrfA and PrfA* mutants to form dimers in solution appeared to inversely correlate with levels of PrfA-dependent gene expression. Based on comparisons of protein activity and structural similarities with PrfA family members Crp and CooA, the prfA* mutations modify distinct aspects of PrfA activity that include DNA binding and protein-protein interactions. PMID:18957610

  18. Active multi-point microrheology of cytoskeletal networks

    PubMed Central

    Paust, Tobias; Mertens, Lina Katinka; Martin, Ines; Beil, Michael; Walther, Paul; Schimmel, Thomas; Marti, Othmar

    2016-01-01

    Summary Active microrheology is a valuable tool to determine viscoelastic properties of polymer networks. Observing the response of the beads to the excitation of a reference leads to dynamic and morphological information of the material. In this work we present an expansion of the well-known active two-point microrheology. By measuring the response of multiple particles in a viscoelastic medium in response to the excitation of a reference particle, we are able to determine the force propagation in the polymer network. For this purpose a lock-in technique is established that allows for extraction of the periodical motion of embedded beads. To exert a sinusoidal motion onto the reference bead an optical tweezers setup in combination with a microscope is used to investigate the motion of the response beads. From the lock-in data the so called transfer tensor can be calculated, which is a direct measure for the ability of the network to transmit mechanical forces. We also take a closer look at the influence of noise on lock-in measurements and state some simple rules for improving the signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:27335739

  19. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Sagafos, Dagrun; Rush, Anthony M; Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Lampert, Angelika; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient's peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences.

  20. Recurrent activating mutations of CD28 in peripheral T-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Rohr, J; Guo, S; Huo, J; Bouska, A; Lachel, C; Li, Y; Simone, P D; Zhang, W; Gong, Q; Wang, C; Cannon, A; Heavican, T; Mottok, A; Hung, S; Rosenwald, A; Gascoyne, R; Fu, K; Greiner, T C; Weisenburger, D D; Vose, J M; Staudt, L M; Xiao, W; Borgstahl, G E O; Davis, S; Steidl, C; McKeithan, T; Iqbal, J; Chan, W C

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) comprise a heterogeneous group of mature T-cell neoplasms with a poor prognosis. Recently, mutations in TET2 and other epigenetic modifiers as well as RHOA have been identified in these diseases, particularly in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL). CD28 is the major co-stimulatory receptor in T cells which, upon binding ligand, induces sustained T-cell proliferation and cytokine production when combined with T-cell receptor stimulation. We have identified recurrent mutations in CD28 in PTCLs. Two residues-D124 and T195-were recurrently mutated in 11.3% of cases of AITL and in one case of PTCL, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS). Surface plasmon resonance analysis of mutations at these residues with predicted differential partner interactions showed increased affinity for ligand CD86 (residue D124) and increased affinity for intracellular adaptor proteins GRB2 and GADS/GRAP2 (residue T195). Molecular modeling studies on each of these mutations suggested how these mutants result in increased affinities. We found increased transcription of the CD28-responsive genes CD226 and TNFA in cells expressing the T195P mutant in response to CD3 and CD86 co-stimulation and increased downstream activation of NF-κB by both D124V and T195P mutants, suggesting a potential therapeutic target in CD28-mutated PTCLs. PMID:26719098

  1. Recurrent activating mutation in PRKACA in cortisol-producing adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerald; Scholl, Ute I; Healy, James M; Choi, Murim; Prasad, Manju L; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Kunstman, John W; Kuntsman, John W; Korah, Reju; Suttorp, Anna-Carinna; Dietrich, Dimo; Haase, Matthias; Willenberg, Holger S; Stålberg, Peter; Hellman, Per; Akerström, Göran; Björklund, Peyman; Carling, Tobias; Lifton, Richard P

    2014-06-01

    Adrenal tumors autonomously producing cortisol cause Cushing's syndrome. We performed exome sequencing of 25 tumor-normal pairs and identified 2 subgroups. Eight tumors (including three carcinomas) had many somatic copy number variants (CNVs) with frequent deletion of CDC42 and CDKN2A, amplification of 5q31.2 and protein-altering mutations in TP53 and RB1. Seventeen tumors (all adenomas) had no somatic CNVs or TP53 or RB1 mutations. Six of these had known gain-of-function mutations in CTNNB1 (β-catenin) or GNAS (Gαs). Six others had somatic mutations in PRKACA (protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit) resulting in a p.Leu206Arg substitution. Further sequencing identified this mutation in 13 of 63 tumors (35% of adenomas with overt Cushing's syndrome). PRKACA, GNAS and CTNNB1 mutations were mutually exclusive. Leu206 directly interacts with the regulatory subunit of PKA, PRKAR1A. Leu206Arg PRKACA loses PRKAR1A binding, increasing the phosphorylation of downstream targets. PKA activity induces cortisol production and cell proliferation, providing a mechanism for tumor development. These findings define distinct mechanisms underlying adrenal cortisol-producing tumors. PMID:24747643

  2. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing

    PubMed Central

    Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient’s peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences. PMID:27598514

  3. SCN10A Mutation in a Patient with Erythromelalgia Enhances C-Fiber Activity Dependent Slowing.

    PubMed

    Kist, Andreas M; Sagafos, Dagrun; Rush, Anthony M; Neacsu, Cristian; Eberhardt, Esther; Schmidt, Roland; Lunden, Lars Kristian; Ørstavik, Kristin; Kaluza, Luisa; Meents, Jannis; Zhang, Zhiping; Carr, Thomas Hedley; Salter, Hugh; Malinowsky, David; Wollberg, Patrik; Krupp, Johannes; Kleggetveit, Inge Petter; Schmelz, Martin; Jørum, Ellen; Lampert, Angelika; Namer, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) Nav1.7 have been identified as a key mechanism underlying chronic pain in inherited erythromelalgia. Mutations in TTX resistant channels, such as Nav1.8 or Nav1.9, were recently connected with inherited chronic pain syndromes. Here, we investigated the effects of the p.M650K mutation in Nav1.8 in a 53 year old patient with erythromelalgia by microneurography and patch-clamp techniques. Recordings of the patient's peripheral nerve fibers showed increased activity dependent slowing (ADS) in CMi and less spontaneous firing compared to a control group of erythromelalgia patients without Nav mutations. To evaluate the impact of the p.M650K mutation on neuronal firing and channel gating, we performed current and voltage-clamp recordings on transfected sensory neurons (DRGs) and neuroblastoma cells. The p.M650K mutation shifted steady-state fast inactivation of Nav1.8 to more hyperpolarized potentials and did not significantly alter any other tested gating behaviors. The AP half-width was significantly broader and the stimulated action potential firing rate was reduced for M650K transfected DRGs compared to WT. We discuss the potential link between enhanced steady state fast inactivation, broader action potential width and the potential physiological consequences. PMID:27598514

  4. A novel human autoimmune syndrome caused by combined hypomorphic and activating mutations in ZAP-70.

    PubMed

    Chan, Alice Y; Punwani, Divya; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Cowan, Morton J; Olson, Jean L; Mathes, Erin F; Sunderam, Uma; Fu, Shu Man; Srinivasan, Rajgopal; Kuriyan, John; Brenner, Steven E; Weiss, Arthur; Puck, Jennifer M

    2016-02-01

    A brother and sister developed a previously undescribed constellation of autoimmune manifestations within their first year of life, with uncontrollable bullous pemphigoid, colitis, and proteinuria. The boy had hemophilia due to a factor VIII autoantibody and nephrotic syndrome. Both children required allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), which resolved their autoimmunity. The early onset, severity, and distinctive findings suggested a single gene disorder underlying the phenotype. Whole-exome sequencing performed on five family members revealed the affected siblings to be compound heterozygous for two unique missense mutations in the 70-kD T cell receptor ζ-chain associated protein (ZAP-70). Healthy relatives were heterozygous mutation carriers. Although pre-HCT patient T cells were not available, mutation effects were determined using transfected cell lines and peripheral blood from carriers and controls. Mutation R192W in the C-SH2 domain exhibited reduced binding to phosphorylated ζ-chain, whereas mutation R360P in the N lobe of the catalytic domain disrupted an autoinhibitory mechanism, producing a weakly hyperactive ZAP-70 protein. Although human ZAP-70 deficiency can have dysregulated T cells, and autoreactive mouse thymocytes with weak Zap-70 signaling can escape tolerance, our patients' combination of hypomorphic and activating mutations suggested a new disease mechanism and produced previously undescribed human ZAP-70-associated autoimmune disease. PMID:26783323

  5. Systems-level response to point mutations in a core metabolic enzyme modulates genotype-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, Shimon; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Budnik, Bogdan; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2015-04-28

    Linking the molecular effects of mutations to fitness is central to understanding evolutionary dynamics. Here, we establish a quantitative relation between the global effect of mutations on the E. coli proteome and bacterial fitness. We created E. coli strains with specific destabilizing mutations in the chromosomal folA gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and quantified the ensuing changes in the abundances of 2,000+ E. coli proteins in mutant strains using tandem mass tags with subsequent LC-MS/MS. mRNA abundances in the same E. coli strains were also quantified. The proteomic effects of mutations in DHFR are quantitatively linked to phenotype: the SDs of the distributions of logarithms of relative (to WT) protein abundances anticorrelate with bacterial growth rates. Proteomes hierarchically cluster first by media conditions, and within each condition, by the severity of the perturbation to DHFR function. These results highlight the importance of a systems-level layer in the genotype-phenotype relationship.

  6. Short peptides from leucyl-tRNA synthetase rescue disease-causing mitochondrial tRNA point mutations.

    PubMed

    Perli, Elena; Fiorillo, Annarita; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Montanari, Arianna; Grazioli, Paola; Campese, Antonio F; Di Micco, Patrizio; Tuppen, Helen A; Genovese, Ilaria; Poser, Elena; Preziuso, Carmela; Taylor, Robert W; Morea, Veronica; Colotti, Gianni; d'Amati, Giulia

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial (mt) genes coding for mt-tRNAs are responsible for a range of syndromes, for which no effective treatment is available. We recently showed that the carboxy-terminal domain (Cterm) of human mt-leucyl tRNA synthetase rescues the pathologic phenotype associated either with the m.3243A>G mutation in mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)) or with mutations in the mt-tRNA(Ile), both of which are aminoacylated by Class I mt-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mt-aaRSs). Here we show, by using the human transmitochondrial cybrid model, that the Cterm is also able to improve the phenotype caused by the m.8344A>G mutation in mt-tRNA(Lys), aminoacylated by a Class II aaRS. Importantly, we demonstrate that the same rescuing ability is retained by two Cterm-derived short peptides, β30_31 and β32_33, which are effective towards both the m.8344A>G and the m.3243A>G mutations. Furthermore, we provide in vitro evidence that these peptides bind with high affinity wild-type and mutant human mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)) and mt-tRNA(Lys), and stabilize mutant mt-tRNA(Leu(UUR)). In conclusion, we demonstrate that small Cterm-derived peptides can be effective tools to rescue cellular defects caused by mutations in a wide range of mt-tRNAs.

  7. Short peptides from leucyl-tRNA synthetase rescue disease-causing mitochondrial tRNA point mutations

    PubMed Central

    Perli, Elena; Fiorillo, Annarita; Giordano, Carla; Pisano, Annalinda; Montanari, Arianna; Grazioli, Paola; Campese, Antonio F.; Di Micco, Patrizio; Tuppen, Helen A.; Genovese, Ilaria; Poser, Elena; Preziuso, Carmela; Taylor, Robert W.; Morea, Veronica; Colotti, Gianni; d'Amati, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial (mt) genes coding for mt-tRNAs are responsible for a range of syndromes, for which no effective treatment is available. We recently showed that the carboxy-terminal domain (Cterm) of human mt-leucyl tRNA synthetase rescues the pathologic phenotype associated either with the m.3243A>G mutation in mt-tRNALeu(UUR) or with mutations in the mt-tRNAIle, both of which are aminoacylated by Class I mt-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (mt-aaRSs). Here we show, by using the human transmitochondrial cybrid model, that the Cterm is also able to improve the phenotype caused by the m.8344A>G mutation in mt-tRNALys, aminoacylated by a Class II aaRS. Importantly, we demonstrate that the same rescuing ability is retained by two Cterm-derived short peptides, β30_31 and β32_33, which are effective towards both the m.8344A>G and the m.3243A>G mutations. Furthermore, we provide in vitro evidence that these peptides bind with high affinity wild-type and mutant human mt-tRNALeu(UUR) and mt-tRNALys, and stabilize mutant mt-tRNALeu(UUR). In conclusion, we demonstrate that small Cterm-derived peptides can be effective tools to rescue cellular defects caused by mutations in a wide range of mt-tRNAs. PMID:26721932

  8. High-level azithromycin resistance occurs in Neisseria gonorrhoeae as a result of a single point mutation in the 23S rRNA genes.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Stephanie A; Dave, Jayshree; Ison, Catherine A

    2010-09-01

    High-level azithromycin resistance (AZM-HR), defined as a MIC of > or = 256 mg/liter, emerged in Neisseria gonorrhoeae in the United Kingdom in 2004. To determine the mechanism of this novel phenotype, isolates from the United Kingdom that were AZM-HR (n, 19), moderately AZM resistant (MICs, 2 to 8 mg/liter) (n, 26), or sensitive (MICs, 0.12 to 0.25 mg/liter) (n, 4) were screened for methylase (erm) genes and for mutations in the mtrR promoter region, associated with efflux pump upregulation. All AZM-resistant isolates and 12 sensitive isolates were screened for mutations in domain V of each 23S rRNA allele. All AZM-HR isolates contained the A2059G mutation (Escherichia coli numbering) in three (3 isolates) or four (16 isolates) 23S rRNA alleles. Most (22/26) moderately AZM resistant isolates contained the C2611T mutation in at least 3/4 alleles. The remainder contained four wild-type alleles, as did 8/12 sensitive isolates, while one allele was mutated in the remaining four sensitive isolates. Serial passage of AZM-sensitive colonies on an erythromycin-containing medium selected AZM-HR if the parent strain already contained mutation A2059G in one 23S rRNA allele. The resultant AZM-HR strains contained four mutated alleles. Eight isolates (five moderately AZM resistant and three AZM-HR) contained mutations in the mtrR promoter. No methylase genes were detected. This is the first evidence that AZM-HR in gonococci may result from a single point mutation (A2059G) in the peptidyltransferase loop in domain V of the 23S rRNA gene. Mutation of a single allele is insufficient to confer AZM-HR, but AZM-HR can develop under selection pressure. The description of a novel resistance mechanism will aid in screening for the AZM-HR phenotype. PMID:20585125

  9. A Point Mutation in DNA Polymerase β (POLB) Gene Is Associated with Increased Progesterone Receptor (PR) Expression and Intraperitoneal Metastasis in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xiaohui; Wu, Xiaoling; Ren, Shuyang; Wang, Hongyi; Li, Zhongwu; Alshenawy, Weaam; Li, Wenmei; Cui, Jiantao; Luo, Guangbin; Siegel, Robert S.; Fu, Sidney W.; Lu, Youyong

    2016-01-01

    Increased expression of progesterone receptor (PR) has been reported in gastric cancer (GC). We have previously identified a functional T889C point mutation in DNA polymerase beta (POLB), a DNA repair gene in GC. To provide a detailed analysis of molecular changes associated with the mutation, human cDNA microarrays focusing on 18 signal transduction pathways were used to analyze differential gene expression profiles between GC tissues with T889C mutant in POLB gene and those with wild type. Among the differentially expressed genes, notably, PR was one of the significantly up-regulated genes in T889C mutant POLB tissues, which were subsequently confirmed in POLB gene transfected AGS cell line. Interestingly, patients with T889C mutation and PR positivity were associated with higher incidence of intraperitoneal metastasis (IM). In vitro studies indicate that PR expression was upregulated in AGS cell line when transfected with T889C mutant expression vector. Cotransfection of T889C mutant allele and PR gene induced cell migration in the cell line. These data demonstrated that T889C mutation-associated PR overexpression results in increased IM. Therefore, T889C mutation-associated PR overexpression may serve as a biomarker for an adverse prognosis for human GC. PMID:27471563

  10. Episodic ataxia/myokymia syndrome is associated with point mutations in the human potassium channel gene-KCNA1 (Kv1.1)

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, D.L.; Gancher, S.T.; Nutt, J.G.

    1994-09-01

    Episodic ataxia (EA) is a rare, familial disorder producing attacks of generalized ataxia, with normal or near-normal neurological function between attacks. One type of EA (MIM No.160120) displays autosomal dominant inheritance and is characterized by episodes of ataxia lasting seconds to minutes with myokymia (rippling of small muscles) evident between attacks. Genetic linkage studies in 4 families suggested localization of an EA/myokymia gene near the K{sup +} channel gene KCNA1 (Kv1.1) on chromosome 12p. Chemical cleavage mismatch and DNA sequence analysis of the KCNA1 coding region in these families identified 4 different missense point mutations present in the heterozygous state. The mutations found were Val174Phe, Arg239Ser, Phe249Ile and Val408Ala; the residue numbers correspond to those in the published amino acid sequence of KCNA1 (Genbank Accession No. L02750). Each of these mutations affects an amino acid residue that is invariant among Drosophila melanogaster, mouse, rat and human, The mutations were present in the affected members of the family and absent in all of the unaffected members and in at least 70 unrelated control individuals. These data strongly suggest that EA/myokymia can result from mutations in the KCNA1 gene.

  11. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  12. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations.

    PubMed

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease's high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics' assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions' setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning.

  13. Development of a High-Resolution Melting Approach for Scanning Beta Globin Gene Point Mutations in the Greek and Other Mediterranean Populations

    PubMed Central

    Chassanidis, Christos; Boutou, Effrossyni; Voskaridou, Ersi; Balassopoulou, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    Beta-thalassaemia is one of the most common autosomal recessive disorders worldwide. The disease’s high incidence, which is observed in the broader Mediterranean area has led to the establishment of molecular diagnostics’ assays to prevent affected births. Therefore, the development of a reliable, cost-effective and rapid scanning method for β globin gene point mutations, easily adapted to a routine laboratory, is absolutely essential. Here, we describe, for the first time, the development of a High-Resolution Melting Analysis (HRMA) approach, suitable for scanning the particularly heterogeneous beta globin gene mutations present in the Greek population, and thus adaptable to the Mediterranean and other areas where these mutations have been identified. Within this context, β globin gene regions containing mutations frequently identified in the Greek population were divided in ten overlapping amplicons. Our reactions’ setup allowed for the simultaneous amplification of multiple primer sets and partial multiplexing, thereby resulting in significant reduction of the experimental time. DNA samples from β-thalassaemia patients/carriers with defined genotypes were tested. Distinct genotypes displayed distinguishable melting curves, enabling accurate detection of mutations. The described HRMA can be adapted to a high-throughput level. It represents a rapid, simple, cost-effective, reliable, highly feasible and sensitive method for β-thalassaemia gene scanning. PMID:27351925

  14. In silico study of the human rhodopsin and meta rhodopsin II/S-arrestin complexes: impact of single point mutations related to retina degenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Mokarzel-Falcón, Leonardo; Padrón-García, Juan Alexander; Carrasco-Velar, Ramón; Berry, Colin; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A

    2008-03-01

    We propose two models of the human S-arrestin/rhodopsin complex in the inactive dark adapted rhodopsin and meta rhodopsin II form, obtained by homology modeling and knowledge based docking. First, a homology model for the human S-arrestin was built and validated by molecular dynamics, showing an average root mean square deviation difference from the pattern behavior of 0.76 A. Then, combining the human S-arrestin model and the modeled structure of the two human rhodopsin forms, we propose two models of interaction for the human S-arrestin/rhodopsin complex. The models involve two S-arrestin regions related to the N domain (residues 68-78; 170-182) and a third constituent of the C domain (248-253), with the rhodopsin C terminus (330-348). Of the 22 single point mutations related to retinitis pigmentosa and congenital night blindness located in the cytoplasmatic portion of rhodopsin or in S-arrestin, our models locate 16 in the interaction region and relate two others to possible dimer formation. Our calculations also predict that the light activated complex is more stable than the dark adapted rhodopsin and, therefore, of higher affinity to S-arrestin.

  15. The Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal Syndrome Point Mutation F231L in the ERCC1 DNA Repair Protein Causes Dissociation of the ERCC1-XPF Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Faridounnia, Maryam; Wienk, Hans; Kovačič, Lidija; Folkers, Gert E.; Jaspers, Nicolaas G. J.; Kaptein, Robert; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Boelens, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    The ERCC1-XPF heterodimer, a structure-specific DNA endonuclease, is best known for its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The ERCC1 point mutation F231L, located at the hydrophobic interaction interface of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F), leads to severe NER pathway deficiencies. Here, we analyze biophysical properties and report the NMR structure of the complex of the C-terminal tandem helix-hairpin-helix domains of ERCC1-XPF that contains this mutation. The structures of wild type and the F231L mutant are very similar. The F231L mutation results in only a small disturbance of the ERCC1-XPF interface, where, in contrast to Phe231, Leu231 lacks interactions stabilizing the ERCC1-XPF complex. One of the two anchor points is severely distorted, and this results in a more dynamic complex, causing reduced stability and an increased dissociation rate of the mutant complex as compared with wild type. These data provide a biophysical explanation for the severe NER deficiencies caused by this mutation. PMID:26085086

  16. Genomic rearrangements of the CDKN2A locus are infrequent in Italian malignant melanoma families without evidence of CDKN2A/CDK4 point mutations.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, Marina; Scaini, Maria Chiara; Ghiorzo, Paola; Sestini, Roberta; Bruno, William; Menin, Chiara; Gensini, Francesca; Piazzini, Mauro; Testori, Alessandro; Manoukian, Siranoush; Orlando, Claudio; D'Andrea, Emma; Bianchi-Scarrà, Giovanna; Genuardi, Maurizio

    2008-12-01

    Predisposition to familial cutaneous malignant melanoma has been associated with mutations in the CDKN2A and CDK4 genes. However, only a small subgroup of melanoma pedigrees harbour CDKN2A or CDK4 germline mutations. It is possible that other types of CDKN2A rearrangements, not detectable by routine PCR-based approaches, are involved in a fraction of melanoma cases negative for point sequence changes. In order to gain insights on the possible role of CDKN2A large deletions or duplications in melanoma susceptibility in the Italian population, we screened a series of 124 cutaneous malignant melanoma families referred to five national medical/cancer genetics centres. All probands were negative for point mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4. All samples were tested by MLPA (multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification), and the results were confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR in a subset of 53 cases. No genomic rearrangements were detected in this series, one of the largest so far investigated. These data suggest that large deletions/duplications in the CDKN2A locus are infrequently involved in the development of familial melanoma in the Italian population. Based on these results, routine search for these rearrangements in CDKN2A- and CDK4-mutation negative melanoma families is not warranted, although it would be reasonable to pursue it in selected cases with very strong family history and/or showing linkage to 9p21.

  17. The Cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal Syndrome Point Mutation F231L in the ERCC1 DNA Repair Protein Causes Dissociation of the ERCC1-XPF Complex.

    PubMed

    Faridounnia, Maryam; Wienk, Hans; Kovačič, Lidija; Folkers, Gert E; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Kaptein, Robert; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Boelens, Rolf

    2015-08-14

    The ERCC1-XPF heterodimer, a structure-specific DNA endonuclease, is best known for its function in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. The ERCC1 point mutation F231L, located at the hydrophobic interaction interface of ERCC1 (excision repair cross-complementation group 1) and XPF (xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group F), leads to severe NER pathway deficiencies. Here, we analyze biophysical properties and report the NMR structure of the complex of the C-terminal tandem helix-hairpin-helix domains of ERCC1-XPF that contains this mutation. The structures of wild type and the F231L mutant are very similar. The F231L mutation results in only a small disturbance of the ERCC1-XPF interface, where, in contrast to Phe(231), Leu(231) lacks interactions stabilizing the ERCC1-XPF complex. One of the two anchor points is severely distorted, and this results in a more dynamic complex, causing reduced stability and an increased dissociation rate of the mutant complex as compared with wild type. These data provide a biophysical explanation for the severe NER deficiencies caused by this mutation.

  18. Long-range effects of histone point mutations on DNA remodeling revealed from computational analyses of SIN-mutant nucleosome structures

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Fei; Colasanti, Andrew V.; Li, Yun; Olson, Wilma K.

    2010-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes impedes the binding and access of molecules involved in its processing. The SWI/SNF multi-protein assembly, found in yeast, is one of many regulatory factors that stimulate the remodeling of DNA required for its transcription. Amino-acid point mutations in histones H3 or H4 partially bypass the requirement of the SWI/SNF complex in this system. The mechanisms underlying the observed remodeling, however, are difficult to discern from the crystal structures of nucleosomes bearing these so-called SIN (SWI/SNF INdependent) mutations. Here, we report detailed analyses of the conformations and interactions of the histones and DNA in these assemblies. We find that the loss of direct protein–DNA contacts near point-mutation sites, reported previously, is coupled to unexpected additional long-range effects, i.e. loss of intermolecular contacts and accompanying DNA conformational changes at sequentially and spatially distant sites. The SIN mutations seemingly transmit information relevant to DNA binding across the nucleosome. The energetic cost of deforming the DNA to the states found in the SIN-mutant structures helps to distinguish the mutants that show phenotypes in yeast from those that do not. Models incorporating these deformed dimer steps suggest ways that nucleosomal DNA may be remodeled during its biological processing. PMID:20647418

  19. A Point Mutation in the Ubiquitin Ligase RNF170 That Causes Autosomal Dominant Sensory Ataxia Destabilizes the Protein and Impairs Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Forrest A; Lu, Justine P; Sliter, Danielle A; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J H

    2015-05-29

    RNF170 is an endoplasmic reticulum membrane ubiquitin ligase that contributes to the ubiquitination of activated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors, and also, when point mutated (arginine to cysteine at position 199), causes autosomal dominant sensory ataxia (ADSA), a disease characterized by neurodegeneration in the posterior columns of the spinal cord. Here we demonstrate that this point mutation inhibits RNF170 expression and signaling via IP3 receptors. Inhibited expression of mutant RNF170 was seen in cells expressing exogenous RNF170 constructs and in ADSA lymphoblasts, and appears to result from enhanced RNF170 autoubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. The basis for these effects was probed via additional point mutations, revealing that ionic interactions between charged residues in the transmembrane domains of RNF170 are required for protein stability. In ADSA lymphoblasts, platelet-activating factor-induced Ca(2+) mobilization was significantly impaired, whereas neither Ca(2+) store content, IP3 receptor levels, nor IP3 production were altered, indicative of a functional defect at the IP3 receptor locus, which may be the cause of neurodegeneration. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic deletion of RNF170 showed that RNF170 mediates the addition of all of the ubiquitin conjugates known to become attached to activated IP3 receptors (monoubiquitin and Lys(48)- and Lys(63)-linked ubiquitin chains), and that wild-type and mutant RNF170 have apparently identical ubiquitin ligase activities toward IP3 receptors. Thus, the Ca(2+) mobilization defect seen in ADSA lymphoblasts is apparently not due to aberrant IP3 receptor ubiquitination. Rather, the defect likely reflects abnormal ubiquitination of other substrates, or adaptation to the chronic reduction in RNF170 levels.

  20. Recurrent activating mutations of G-protein-coupled receptor CYSLTR2 in uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amanda R; Ceraudo, Emilie; Sher, Jessica J; Guan, Youxin; Shoushtari, Alexander N; Chang, Matthew T; Zhang, Jenny Q; Walczak, Edward G; Kazmi, Manija A; Taylor, Barry S; Huber, Thomas; Chi, Ping; Sakmar, Thomas P; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanomas are molecularly distinct from cutaneous melanomas and lack mutations in BRAF, NRAS, KIT, and NF1. Instead, they are characterized by activating mutations in GNAQ and GNA11, two highly homologous α subunits of Gαq/11 heterotrimeric G proteins, and in PLCB4 (phospholipase C β4), the downstream effector of Gαq signaling 1–3. We analyzed genomics data from 136 uveal melanoma samples and found a recurrent mutation in CYSLTR2 (cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 2) encoding a p.Leu129Gln substitution in 4 of 9 samples that lacked mutations in GNAQ, GNA11, and PLCB4 but in 0 of 127 samples that harbored mutations in these genes. The Leu129Gln CysLT2R mutant protein constitutively activates endogenous Gαq and is unresponsive to stimulation by leukotriene. Expression of Leu129Gln CysLT2R in melanocytes enforces expression of a melanocyte-lineage signature, drives phorbol ester–independent growth in vitro, and promotes tumorigenesis in vivo. Our findings implicate CYSLTR2 as a uveal melanoma oncogene and highlight the critical role of Gαq signaling in uveal melanoma pathogenesis. PMID:27089179

  1. Dehydrated Hereditary Stomatocytosislinked to gain-of-function mutations in mechanically activated PIEZO1 ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Albuisson, Juliette; Murthy, Swetha E.; Bandell, Michael; Coste, Bertrand; Louis-dit-Picard, Hélène; Mathur, Jayanti; Fénéant-Thibault, Madeleine; Tertian, Gérard; de Jaureguiberry, Jean-Pierre; Syfuss, Pierre-Yves; Cahalan, Stuart; Garçon, Loic; Toutain, Fabienne; Rohrlich, Pierre Simon; Delaunay, Jean; Picard, Véronique; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Patapoutian, Ardem

    2013-01-01

    Dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis (DHS) is a genetic condition with defective red blood cell (RBC) membrane properties that causes an imbalance in intracellular cation concentrations. Recently, two missense mutations inthe mechanically activated PIEZO1(FAM38A) ion channel were associated with DHS. However, it is not known how these mutations affect PIEZO1 function. Here, by combining linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing in a large pedigree and Sanger sequencing in two additional kindreds and 11 unrelated DHS cases, we identifythree novel missense mutations and one recurrent duplication in PIEZO1, demonstrating that it is the major gene for DHS. All the DHS-associated mutations locate at C-terminal half of PIEZO1. Remarkably, we find that all PIEZO1 mutations give rise to mechanically activated currents that inactivate more slowly than wild-type currents. This gain-of-function PIEZO1 phenotype provides insight that helps to explain the increased permeability of cations in RBCs of DHS patients. Our findings also suggest a new role for mechanotransduction in RBC biology and pathophysiology. PMID:23695678

  2. A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutations based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junqi; Fu, Rongxin; Xie, Liping; Li, Qi; Zhou, Wenhan; Wang, Ruliang; Ye, Jiancheng; Wang, Dong; Xue, Ning; Lin, Xue; Lu, Ying; Huang, Guoliang

    2015-10-01

    A smart device for label-free and real-time detection of gene point mutation-related diseases was developed based on the high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation. The main components of the device included a Peltier cooler and a mini PC board for image processing. Heat from the hot side of the Peltier cooler causes the fluid in a copper chamber to evaporate, and the vapor condenses on the surface of a microarray chip placed on the cold side of the cooler. The high dark phase contrast of vapor condensation relative to the analytes on the microarray chip was explored. Combined with rolling circle amplification, the device visualizes less-to-more hydrophilic transitions caused by gene trapping and DNA amplification. A lung cancer gene point mutation was analysed, proving the high selectivity and multiplex analysis capability of this low-cost device. PMID:26266399

  3. ISODEX: An entry point for developing countries into space activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skinner, Mark Andrew

    2015-08-01

    Several threads current in the community of international space actors have led to calls at UN COPUOS Scientific & Technical Sub-Committee meetings for enhancing the scientific information available on man-made space objects, whilst fostering international space object data sharing. Growing awareness of the problems of space debris proliferation and space traffic management, especially amongst developing countries and non-traditional space faring nations, have fueled their desires to become involved in the areas of space object tracking, utilizing relatively modest astronomical instrumentation. Additionally, several commercial satellite operators, members of the Satellite Data Association, have called for augmentation of the information available from existing catalogs. This confluence of factors has led to an international discussion, at the UN and elsewhere, of the possibility of creating a clearing-house for parties willing to share data on space objects, with a working title of the “International Space Object Data Exchange” (ISODEX). We discuss the ideas behind this concept, how it might be implemented, and it might enhance the public’s knowledge of space activities, as well as providing an entry point into space for developing countries.

  4. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Foucras, Gilles; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2015-12-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host's inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:26658352

  5. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Foucras, Gilles; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2015-12-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host's inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

  6. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host’s inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:26658352

  7. Point mutation in mitochondrial tRNA gene is associated with polycystic ovary syndrome and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yu; Zhuo, Guangchao; Zhang, Caijuan; Leng, Jianhang

    2016-04-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is characterized by chronic anovulation, hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovaries. To date, the molecular mechanisms underlying PCOS have remained to be fully elucidated. As recent studies have revealed a positive association between mitochondrial dysfunction and PCOS, current investigations focus on mutations in the mitochondrial genome of patients with POCS. The present study reported a Chinese patient with PCOS. Sequence analysis of the mitochondrial genome showed the presence of homoplasmic ND5 T12338C and tRNASer (UCN) C7492T mutations as well as a set of polymorphisms belonging to the human mitochondrial haplogroup F2. The T12338C mutation is known to decrease the ND5 mRNA levels and to inhibit the processing of RNA precursors. The C7492T mutation, which occurred at the highly conserved nucleotide in the anticodon stem of the tRNASer (UCN) gene, is important for the tRNA steady‑state level as well as the aminoacylation ability. Therefore, the combination of the ND5 T12338C and tRNASer (UCN) C7492T mutations may lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and is likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of PCOS. The present study provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of PCOS. PMID:26935780

  8. A novel one cycle allele specific primer extension--molecular beacon displacement method for DNA point mutation detection with improved specificity.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaomin; Huang, Yong; Guan, Yuan; Zhao, Meiping; Li, Yuanzong

    2007-02-12

    We report here a new method for the real-time detection of DNA point mutations with molecular beacon as the fluorescence tracer and 3' (exo-) Bst DNA polymerase large fragment as the polymerase. The method is based on the mechanism of allele specific primer extension-strand displacement (ASPE-SD). To improve the specificity of the method only one cycle of the allele specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used that could largely eliminate the non-specific reactions between the primers and template of the "wrong" genotype. At first, the primer and molecular beacon both hybridize to the DNA template, and the molecular beacon emits intensive fluorescence. The role of 3' exonuclease excision of Bst DNA polymerase large fragment is utilized for primer extension. When 3'-termini matches its corresponding template, the primer would efficiently extend and replace the molecular beacon that would simultaneously return to its closed form leading to the quenching of the fluorescence. However, when 3'-termini of the primer mismatches its corresponding template primer extension and molecular beacon displacement would not happen and fluorescence of the hybridized molecular beacon holds the line without fluorescence quenching. This approach was fully demonstrated in synthetic template systems and applied to detect point mutation at codon 259, a possible point mutation site in exon 7 of p53 gene, obtained from human genomic DNA samples with unambiguous differentiation power.

  9. Activating Mutations in PIK3CA Lead to Widespread Modulation of the Tyrosine Phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Blair, Brian G.; Pinto, Sneha M.; Nirujogi, Raja S.; Jelinek, Christine A.; Malhotra, Radhika; Kim, Min-Sik; Park, Ben Ho; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    The human oncogene PIK3CA is frequently mutated in human cancers. Two hotspot mutations in PIK3CA, E545K and H1047R, have been shown to regulate widespread signaling events downstream of AKT, leading to increased cell proliferation, growth, survival, and motility. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile the global phosphotyrosine proteome of isogenic knock-in cell lines containing these activating mutations, where we identified 824 unique phosphopeptides. Although it is well understood that these mutations result in hyperactivation of the serine/threonine kinase AKT, we found a surprisingly widespread modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of proteins in the mutant cells. In the tyrosine kinome alone, 29 tyrosine kinases were altered in their phosphorylation status. Many of the regulated phosphosites that we identified were located in the kinase domain or the canonical activation sites, indicating that these kinases and their downstream signaling pathways were activated. Our study demonstrates that there is frequent and unexpected cross-talk that occurs between tyrosine signaling pathways and serine/threonine signaling pathways activated by the canonical PI3K-AKT axis. PMID:26267517

  10. XPD Helicase Structures and Activities: Insights into the Cancer and Aging Phenotypes from XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Tainer, John; Fan, Li; Fuss, Jill O.; Cheng, Quen J.; Arvai, Andrew S.; Hammel, Michal; Roberts, Victoria A.; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Tainer, John A.

    2008-06-02

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  11. XPD Helicase Structures And Activities: Insights Into the Cancer And Aging Phenotypes From XPD Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, L.; Fuss, J.O.; Cheng, Q.J.; Arvai, A.S.; Hammel, M.; Roberts, V.A.; Cooper, P.K.; Tainer, J.A.

    2009-05-18

    Mutations in XPD helicase, required for nucleotide excision repair (NER) as part of the transcription/repair complex TFIIH, cause three distinct phenotypes: cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), or aging disorders Cockayne syndrome (CS), and trichothiodystrophy (TTD). To clarify molecular differences underlying these diseases, we determined crystal structures of the XPD catalytic core from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius and measured mutant enzyme activities. Substrate-binding grooves separate adjacent Rad51/RecA-like helicase domains (HD1, HD2) and an arch formed by 4FeS and Arch domains. XP mutations map along the HD1 ATP-binding edge and HD2 DNA-binding channel and impair helicase activity essential for NER. XP/CS mutations both impair helicase activity and likely affect HD2 functional movement. TTD mutants lose or retain helicase activity but map to sites in all four domains expected to cause framework defects impacting TFIIH integrity. These results provide a foundation for understanding disease consequences of mutations in XPD and related 4Fe-4S helicases including FancJ.

  12. Hotspot activating PRKD1 somatic mutations in polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas of the salivary glands.

    PubMed

    Weinreb, Ilan; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Martelotto, Luciano G; Waggott, Daryl; Ng, Charlotte K Y; Perez-Ordonez, Bayardo; Harding, Nicholas J; Alfaro, Javier; Chu, Kenneth C; Viale, Agnes; Fusco, Nicola; da Cruz Paula, Arnaud; Marchio, Caterina; Sakr, Rita A; Lim, Raymond; Thompson, Lester D R; Chiosea, Simion I; Seethala, Raja R; Skalova, Alena; Stelow, Edward B; Fonseca, Isabel; Assaad, Adel; How, Christine; Wang, Jianxin; de Borja, Richard; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; Howlett, Christopher J; Nichols, Anthony C; Wen, Y Hannah; Katabi, Nora; Buchner, Nicholas; Mullen, Laura; Kislinger, Thomas; Wouters, Bradly G; Liu, Fei-Fei; Norton, Larry; McPherson, John D; Rubin, Brian P; Clarke, Blaise A; Weigelt, Britta; Boutros, Paul C; Reis-Filho, Jorge S

    2014-11-01

    Polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinoma (PLGA) is the second most frequent type of malignant tumor of the minor salivary glands. We identified PRKD1 hotspot mutations encoding p.Glu710Asp in 72.9% of PLGAs but not in other salivary gland tumors. Functional studies demonstrated that this kinase-activating alteration likely constitutes a driver of PLGA.

  13. Novel Point and Combo-Mutations in the Genome of Hepatitis B Virus-Genotype D: Characterization and Impact on Liver Disease Progression to Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Somenath; Ghosh, Alip; Dasgupta, Debanjali; Ghosh, Amit; Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Roy, Gaurav; Das, Soumyojit; Das, Kausik; Gupta, Subash; Basu, Keya; Basu, Analabha; Datta, Simanti; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Banerjee, Soma

    2014-01-01

    prediction more accurately than point mutations and hence these predictors may support the existing surveillance strategies in proper management of the patients. PMID:25333524

  14. The prognostic IDH1( R132 ) mutation is associated with reduced NADP+-dependent IDH activity in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bleeker, Fonnet E; Atai, Nadia A; Lamba, Simona; Jonker, Ard; Rijkeboer, Denise; Bosch, Klazien S; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Troost, Dirk; Vandertop, W Peter; Bardelli, Alberto; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2010-04-01

    Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1) occur at high frequency in gliomas and seem to be a prognostic factor for survival in glioblastoma patients. In our set of 98 glioblastoma patients, IDH1 ( R132 ) mutations were associated with improved survival of 1 year on average, after correcting for age and other variables with Cox proportional hazards models. Patients with IDH1 mutations were on average 17 years younger than patients without mutation. Mutated IDH1 has a gain of function to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate by NADPH-dependent reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, but it is unknown whether NADPH production in gliomas is affected by IDH1 mutations. We assessed the effect of IDH1 (R132 ) mutations on IDH-mediated NADPH production in glioblastomas in situ. Metabolic mapping and image analysis was applied to 51 glioblastoma samples of which 16 carried an IDH1 (R132 ) mutation. NADP+-dependent IDH activity was determined in comparison with activity of NAD+-dependent IDH and all other NADPH-producing dehydrogenases, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. The occurrence of IDH1 mutations correlated with approx. twofold diminished NADP+-dependent IDH activity, whereas activity of NAD+-dependent IDH and the other NADP+-dependent dehydrogenases was not affected in situ in glioblastoma. The total NADPH production capacity in glioblastoma was provided for 65% by IDH activity and the occurrence of IDH1 (R132 ) mutation reduced this capacity by 38%. It is concluded that NADPH production is hampered in glioblastoma with IDH1 (R132 ) mutation. Moreover, mutated IDH1 consumes rather than produces NADPH, thus likely lowering NADPH levels even further. The low NADPH levels may sensitize glioblastoma to irradiation and chemotherapy, thus explaining the prolonged survival of patients with mutated glioblastoma.

  15. Mutational analysis of amino acid residues involved in catalytic activity of a family 18 chitinase from tulip bulbs.

    PubMed

    Suzukawa, Keisuke; Yamagami, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kuhara, Satoru; Aso, Yoichi; Ishiguro, Masatsune

    2003-02-01

    We expressed chitinase-1 (TBC-1) from tulip bulbs (Tulipa bakeri) in E. coli cells and used site-directed mutagenesis to identify amino acid residues essential for catalytic activity. Mutations at Glu-125 and Trp-251 completely abolished enzyme activity, and activity decreased with mutations at Asp-123 and Trp-172 when glycolchitin was the substrate. Activity changed with the mutations of Trp-251 to one of several amino acids with side-chains of little hydrophobicity, suggesting that hydrophobic interaction of Trp-251 is important for the activity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation analysis with hevamine as the model compound showed that the distance between Asp-123 and Glu-125 was extended by mutation of Trp-251. Kinetic studies of Trp-251-mutated chitinases confirmed these various phenomena. The results suggested that Glu-125 and Trp-251 are essential for enzyme activity and that Trp-251 had a direct role in ligand binding.

  16. Structural mutations that probe the interactions between the catalytic and dianion activation sites of triosephosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiang; Amyes, Tina L; Wierenga, Rik K; Loria, J Patrick; Richard, John P

    2013-08-27

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) catalyzes the isomerization of dihydroxyacetone phosphate to form d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The effects of two structural mutations in TIM on the kinetic parameters for catalysis of the reaction of the truncated substrate glycolaldehyde (GA) and the activation of this reaction by phosphite dianion are reported. The P168A mutation results in similar 50- and 80-fold decreases in (kcat/Km)E and (kcat/Km)E·HPi, respectively, for deprotonation of GA catalyzed by free TIM and by the TIM·HPO(3)(2-) complex. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphite dianion binding energy or the magnitude of phosphite dianion activation of TIM for catalysis of deprotonation of GA. A loop 7 replacement mutant (L7RM) of TIM from chicken muscle was prepared by substitution of the archaeal sequence 208-TGAG with 208-YGGS. L7RM exhibits a 25-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E and a larger 170-fold decrease in (kcat/Km)E·HPi for reactions of GA. The mutation has little effect on the observed and intrinsic phosphodianion binding energy and only a modest effect on phosphite dianion activation of TIM. The observation that both the P168A and loop 7 replacement mutations affect mainly the kinetic parameters for TIM-catalyzed deprotonation but result in much smaller changes in the parameters for enzyme activation by phosphite dianion provides support for the conclusion that catalysis of proton transfer and dianion activation of TIM take place at separate, weakly interacting, sites in the protein catalyst.

  17. DNA transposon activity is associated with increased mutation rates in genes of rice and other grasses

    PubMed Central

    Wicker, Thomas; Yu, Yeisoo; Haberer, Georg; Mayer, Klaus F. X.; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Rounsley, Steve; Chen, Mingsheng; Zuccolo, Andrea; Panaud, Olivier; Wing, Rod A.; Roffler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    DNA (class 2) transposons are mobile genetic elements which move within their ‘host' genome through excising and re-inserting elsewhere. Although the rice genome contains tens of thousands of such elements, their actual role in evolution is still unclear. Analysing over 650 transposon polymorphisms in the rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, we find that DNA repair following transposon excisions is associated with an increased number of mutations in the sequences neighbouring the transposon. Indeed, the 3,000 bp flanking the excised transposons can contain over 10 times more mutations than the genome-wide average. Since DNA transposons preferably insert near genes, this is correlated with increases in mutation rates in coding sequences and regulatory regions. Most importantly, we find this phenomenon also in maize, wheat and barley. Thus, these findings suggest that DNA transposon activity is a major evolutionary force in grasses which provide the basis of most food consumed by humankind. PMID:27599761

  18. DNA transposon activity is associated with increased mutation rates in genes of rice and other grasses.

    PubMed

    Wicker, Thomas; Yu, Yeisoo; Haberer, Georg; Mayer, Klaus F X; Marri, Pradeep Reddy; Rounsley, Steve; Chen, Mingsheng; Zuccolo, Andrea; Panaud, Olivier; Wing, Rod A; Roffler, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    DNA (class 2) transposons are mobile genetic elements which move within their 'host' genome through excising and re-inserting elsewhere. Although the rice genome contains tens of thousands of such elements, their actual role in evolution is still unclear. Analysing over 650 transposon polymorphisms in the rice species Oryza sativa and Oryza glaberrima, we find that DNA repair following transposon excisions is associated with an increased number of mutations in the sequences neighbouring the transposon. Indeed, the 3,000 bp flanking the excised transposons can contain over 10 times more mutations than the genome-wide average. Since DNA transposons preferably insert near genes, this is correlated with increases in mutation rates in coding sequences and regulatory regions. Most importantly, we find this phenomenon also in maize, wheat and barley. Thus, these findings suggest that DNA transposon activity is a major evolutionary force in grasses which provide the basis of most food consumed by humankind. PMID:27599761

  19. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Harboring an Activating KRAS K117N Missense Mutation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Vignesh; Margolskee, Elizabeth; Kluk, Michael; Giorgadze, Tamara; Orazi, Attilio

    2016-09-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease (RDD) or sinus histiocytosis with massive lymphadenopathy is a rare histiocytic proliferation that is generally considered to be reactive with a benign clinical course. The etiology of RDD is very poorly understood. Recent studies have shown frequent BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, and PIK3CA activating mutations in several histiocytic neoplasms highlighting the emerging importance of the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway in the pathogenesis of these diseases. Here we report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease involving the submandibular salivary gland with a KRAS K117N missense mutation discovered by next-generation sequencing. These results suggest that at least a subset of RDD cases may be clonal processes. Further mutational studies on this rare histiocytic disease should be undertaken to better characterize its pathogenesis as well as open up potential avenues for therapy.

  20. Genetic Studies on the Loss of Mu Mutator Activity in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Donald S.

    1986-01-01

    Mutator activity of the Mu mutator system of maize can be lost by either outcrossing or inbreeding Mu stocks. The nature of these two kinds of Mu-loss phenomena was analyzed by testing the results of crossing Mu-loss stocks by active Mu lines. Outcross- Mu-loss stocks are capable of supporting Mu activity if crossed by an active mutator line. Inbred-Mu-loss stocks, however, inactivate the active Mu system contributed by a Mu line. Also, inbred- Mu-loss lines do not regain Mu activity after at least three generations of outcrossing to non-Mu stocks. These results suggest that, once the Mu system is inactivated by inbreeding, it remains inactivated for at least three generations of outcrossing. Further, once the system responsible for inactivation is established, it will, in turn, inactivate an active Mu system contributed by crossing with Mu plants. The outcross-Mu-loss does not seem to involve such an inactivation system. These results are interpreted in the light of recent evidence that Mu inactivation results from the modification of Mu 1 transposable elements involved in the Mu phenotype. PMID:17246337

  1. Electrodermal screening of biologically active points for upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ying-Jung; Hu, Wen-Long; Hung, I-Ling; Hsieh, Chia-Jung; Hung, Yu-Chiang

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the relationship between the electrical resistance of the skin at biologically active points (BAPs) on the main meridians and upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). Electrical resistance to direct current at 20 BAPs on the fingers and toes of 100 patients with (38 men, 12 women; mean age [range], 58.20 ± 19.62 [18-83] years) and without (27 men, 23 women; 49.54 ± 12.12 [22-74] years) UGIB was measured through electrodermal screening (EDS), based on the theory of electroacupuncture according to Voll (EAV). Data were compared through analysis of variance (ANOVA), receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, and logistic regression. The initial readings were lower in the UGIB group, indicating blood and energy deficiency due to UGIB. Significant differences in indicator drop values were observed at nine BAPs (p < 0.05) on the bilateral small intestine, bilateral stomach, bilateral circulation, bilateral fibroid degeneration, and right lymph meridians. The area under the ROC curve values of the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians were larger than 0.5, suggesting the diagnostic accuracy of EDS for UGIB on the basis of the indicator drop of these BAPs. Logistic regression revealed that when the indicator drop of the BAP on the left stomach meridian increased by one score, the risk of UGIB increased by about 1.545-3.523 times. In conclusion, the change in the electrical resistance of the skin measured by EDS at the BAPs on the bilateral small intestine and stomach meridians provides specific information on UGIB.

  2. Neonatal diabetes mellitus: description of two Puerto Rican children with KCNJ11 activating gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Nieves-Rivera, Francisco; González-Pijem, Lilliam

    2011-06-01

    Neonatal diabetes mellitus (NDM) is a rare disorder. A one-month-old boy presented with vomiting, hyperglycemia (968 mg/dl [53.8 mmol/L]), severe acetonemia, and metabolic acidosis (pH 6.95, HCO3-4.2 mmol/L). A second child (three months of age) presented with upper respiratory tract symptoms and a plasma glucose level of 835 mg/dl, without acetonemia or acidosis. Both were hospitalized and managed with intravenous fluids and then discharged on insulin. Genetic testing identified the presence of the de nova V59M and E322K activating mutations in the KCNJ11 gene encoding the sulphonylurea/potassium channel (Kir6.2 subunit) of the insulin beta cell. Both patients were switched to glibenclamide and remain off insulin. To our knowledge, these are the first children in Puerto Rico identified with NDM secondary to a KCNJ11 activating mutation. We conclude that NDM secondary to KCNJ11/Kir6.2 activating mutations, although unusual, should be considered in similar cases since patients with these mutations could come off insulin.

  3. Analysis of phenotype, enzyme activity and genotype of Chinese patients with POMT1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haipo; Manya, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Jiao, Hui; Fu, Xiaona; Xiao, Jiangxi; Li, Xiaoqing; Wang, Jingmin; Jiang, Yuwu; Toda, Tatsushi; Endo, Tamao; Wu, Xiru; Xiong, Hui

    2016-08-01

    Protein O-mannosyltransferase 1 (POMT1) is a glycosyltransferase involved in α-dystroglycan glycosylation. POMT1 mutations cause a wide spectrum of clinical conditions from Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS), which involves muscle, eye and brain abnormalities, to mild forms of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy with mental retardation. We aimed to elucidate the impact of different POMT1 mutations on the clinical phenotype. We report five Chinese patients with POMT1 mutations: one had a typical clinical manifestation of WWS, and the other four were diagnosed with congenital muscular dystrophy with mental retardation of varying severity. We analyzed the influence of the POMT1 mutations on POMT activity by assaying the patients' muscles and cultured skin fibroblasts. We demonstrated different levels of decreased POMT activity that correlated highly with decreased α-dystroglycan glycosylation. Our results suggest that POMT activity is inversely proportional to clinical severity, and demonstrate that skin fibroblasts can be used for differential diagnosis of patients with α-dystroglycanopathies. We have provided clinical, histological, enzymatic and genetic evidence of POMT1 involvement in five unrelated Chinese patients.

  4. Increased sleep spindle activity in patients with Costello syndrome (HRAS gene mutation).

    PubMed

    Della Marca, Giacomo; Leoni, Chiara; Dittoni, Serena; Battaglia, Domenica; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Colicchio, Salvatore; Gnoni, Valentina; Gambardella, Maria L; Mariotti, Paolo; Alfieri, Paolo; Tartaglia, Marco; Zampino, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    Costello syndrome is a congenital disorder because of HRAS gene mutation, frequently associated with neurologic impairment and sleep disorders. The aims of the study were to evaluate the sleep EEG, and particularly the sleep spindles, in a population of patients with Costello syndrome and to compare them with those characterizing unaffected subjects. Eleven subjects (5 men and 6 women) with Costello syndrome were included in the study; age ranged between 18 months and 31 years (mean, 9.6 ± 9.4 years). The diagnosis was posed on the basis of established clinical criteria and confirmed molecularly. Sleep EEG was studied by means of full-night, laboratory-based video-polysomnography, performed overnight, during hospitalization. Sleep activity was quantified by means of power spectral analysis. Patients heterozygous for an HRAS mutation exhibited increased EEG power in 12- to 15-Hz activity band compared with age-matched control subjects. In conclusion, the authors observed a consistent increase in the amplitude of cortical sleep spindles in all our subjects with an HRAS mutation. These "giant" spindles were not associated with any evidence of structural damage of the cortex or the thalami and should be considered as phenotypic feature of sleep EEG activity in Costello syndrome because of HRAS mutation.

  5. A new point mutation in the ND1 mitochondrial gene identified in a type II diabetic patient

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, V.N.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K.

    1995-08-01

    A novel mutation in a mitochondrial gene was identified in a patient with type II diabetes mellitus. G-to-A transition was localized at the nt3316 position of gene ND1 and resulted in alanine threonine replacement at position 4 of mitochondrial NAD-H-dehydrogenase. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  6. Predicting Binding Free Energy Change Caused by Point Mutations with Knowledge-Modified MM/PBSA Method.

    PubMed

    Petukh, Marharyta; Li, Minghui; Alexov, Emil

    2015-07-01

    A new methodology termed Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) was developed to predict the changes of the binding free energy caused by mutations. The method utilizes 3D structures of the corresponding protein-protein complexes and takes advantage of both approaches: sequence- and structure-based methods. The method has two components: a MM/PBSA-based component, and an additional set of statistical terms delivered from statistical investigation of physico-chemical properties of protein complexes. While the approach is rigid body approach and does not explicitly consider plausible conformational changes caused by the binding, the effect of conformational changes, including changes away from binding interface, on electrostatics are mimicked with amino acid specific dielectric constants. This provides significant improvement of SAAMBE predictions as indicated by better match against experimentally determined binding free energy changes over 1300 mutations in 43 proteins. The final benchmarking resulted in a very good agreement with experimental data (correlation coefficient 0.624) while the algorithm being fast enough to allow for large-scale calculations (the average time is less than a minute per mutation).

  7. Predicting Binding Free Energy Change Caused by Point Mutations with Knowledge-Modified MM/PBSA Method

    PubMed Central

    Petukh, Marharyta; Li, Minghui; Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    A new methodology termed Single Amino Acid Mutation based change in Binding free Energy (SAAMBE) was developed to predict the changes of the binding free energy caused by mutations. The method utilizes 3D structures of the corresponding protein-protein complexes and takes advantage of both approaches: sequence- and structure-based methods. The method has two components: a MM/PBSA-based component, and an additional set of statistical terms delivered from statistical investigation of physico-chemical properties of protein complexes. While the approach is rigid body approach and does not explicitly consider plausible conformational changes caused by the binding, the effect of conformational changes, including changes away from binding interface, on electrostatics are mimicked with amino acid specific dielectric constants. This provides significant improvement of SAAMBE predictions as indicated by better match against experimentally determined binding free energy changes over 1300 mutations in 43 proteins. The final benchmarking resulted in a very good agreement with experimental data (correlation coefficient 0.624) while the algorithm being fast enough to allow for large-scale calculations (the average time is less than a minute per mutation). PMID:26146996

  8. Systems-level response to point mutations in a core metabolic enzyme modulates genotype-phenotype relationship.

    PubMed

    Bershtein, Shimon; Choi, Jeong-Mo; Bhattacharyya, Sanchari; Budnik, Bogdan; Shakhnovich, Eugene

    2015-04-28

    Linking the molecular effects of mutations to fitness is central to understanding evolutionary dynamics. Here, we establish a quantitative relation between the global effect of mutations on the E. coli proteome and bacterial fitness. We created E. coli strains with specific destabilizing mutations in the chromosomal folA gene encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and quantified the ensuing changes in the abundances of 2,000+ E. coli proteins in mutant strains using tandem mass tags with subsequent LC-MS/MS. mRNA abundances in the same E. coli strains were also quantified. The proteomic effects of mutations in DHFR are quantitatively linked to phenotype: the SDs of the distributions of logarithms of relative (to WT) protein abundances anticorrelate with bacterial growth rates. Proteomes hierarchically cluster first by media conditions, and within each condition, by the severity of the perturbation to DHFR function. These results highlight the importance of a systems-level layer in the genotype-phenotype relationship. PMID:25892240

  9. Altered Activation of Protein Kinase PKR and Enhanced Apoptosis in Dystonia Cells Carrying a Mutation in PKR Activator Protein PACT*

    PubMed Central

    Vaughn, Lauren S; Bragg, D. Cristopher; Sharma, Nutan; Camargos, Sarah; Cardoso, Francisco; Patel, Rekha C

    2015-01-01

    PACT is a stress-modulated activator of the interferon-induced double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR). Stress-induced phosphorylation of PACT is essential for PACT's association with PKR leading to PKR activation. PKR activation leads to phosphorylation of translation initiation factor eIF2α inhibition of protein synthesis and apoptosis. A recessively inherited form of early-onset dystonia DYT16 has been recently identified to arise due to a homozygous missense mutation P222L in PACT. To examine if the mutant P222L protein alters the stress-response pathway, we examined the ability of mutant P222L to interact with and activate PKR. Our results indicate that the substitution mutant P222L activates PKR more robustly and for longer duration albeit with slower kinetics in response to the endoplasmic reticulum stress. In addition, the affinity of PACT-PACT and PACT-PKR interactions is enhanced in dystonia patient lymphoblasts, thereby leading to intensified PKR activation and enhanced cellular death. P222L mutation also changes the affinity of PACT-TRBP interaction after cellular stress, thereby offering a mechanism for the delayed PKR activation in response to stress. Our results demonstrate the impact of a dystonia-causing substitution mutation on stress-induced cellular apoptosis. PMID:26231208

  10. Quantitative metabolome analysis profiles activation of glutaminolysis in glioma with IDH1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Ohka, Fumiharu; Ito, Maki; Ranjit, Melissa; Senga, Takeshi; Motomura, Ayako; Motomura, Kazuya; Saito, Kaori; Kato, Keiko; Kato, Yukinari; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Natsume, Atsushi

    2014-06-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1), which localizes to the cytosol and peroxisomes, catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and in parallel converts NADP(+) to NADPH. IDH1 mutations are frequently detected in grades 2-4 gliomas and in acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Mutations of IDH1 have been identified at codon 132, with arginine being replaced with histidine in most cases. Mutant IDH1 gains novel enzyme activity converting α-KG to D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) which acts as a competitive inhibitor of α-KG. As a result, the activity of α-KG-dependent enzyme is reduced. Based on these findings, 2-HG has been proposed to be an oncometabolite. In this study, we established HEK293 and U87 cells that stably expressed IDH1-WT and IDH1-R132H and investigated the effect of glutaminase inhibition on cell proliferation with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON). We found that cell proliferation was suppressed in IDH1-R132H cells. The addition of α-KG restored cell proliferation. The metabolic features of 33 gliomas with wild type IDH1 (IDH1-WT) and with IDH1-R132H mutation were examined by global metabolome analysis using capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS). We showed that the 2-HG levels were highly elevated in gliomas with IDH1-R132H mutation. Intriguingly, in gliomas with IDH1-R132H, glutamine and glutamate levels were significantly reduced which implies replenishment of α-KG by glutaminolysis. Based on these results, we concluded that glutaminolysis is activated in gliomas with IDH1-R132H mutation and that development of novel therapeutic approaches targeting activated glutaminolysis is warranted.

  11. Resistance Assessment for Oxathiapiprolin in Phytophthora capsici and the Detection of a Point Mutation (G769W) in PcORP1 that Confers Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jianqiang; Cai, Meng; Dong, Xue; Liu, Li; Lin, Dong; Zhang, Can; Pang, Zhili; Liu, Xili

    2016-01-01

    The potential for oxathiapiprolin resistance in Phytophthora capsici was evaluated. The baseline sensitivities of 175 isolates to oxathiapiprolin were initially determinated and found to conform to a unimodal curve with a mean EC50 value of 5.61 × 10-4 μg/ml. Twelve stable oxathiapiprolin-resistant mutants were generated by fungicide adaptation in two sensitive isolates, LP3 and HNJZ10. The fitness of the LP3-mutants was found to be similar to or better than that of the parental isolate LP3, while the HNJZ10-mutants were found to have lost the capacity to produce zoospores. Taken together these results suggest that the risk of P. capsici developing resistance to oxathiapiprolin is moderate. Comparison of the PcORP1 genes in the LP3-mutants and wild-type parental isolate, which encode the target protein of oxathiapiprolin, revealed that a heterozygous mutation caused the amino acid substitution G769W. Transformation and expression of the mutated PcORP1-769W allele in the sensitive wild-type isolate BYA5 confirmed that the mutation in PcORP1 was responsible for the observed oxathiapiprolin resistance. Finally diagnostic tests including As-PCR and CAPs were developed to detect the oxathiapiprolin resistance resulting from the G769W point mutation in field populations of P. capsici. PMID:27199944

  12. Infantile demyelinating neuropathy associated with a de novo point mutation on Ser72 in PMP22 and basal lamina onion bulbs in skin biopsy.

    PubMed

    Ceuterick-de Groote, C; De Jonghe, P; Timmerman, V; Van Goethem, G; Löfgren, A; Ceulemans, B; Van Broeckhoven, C; Martin, J J

    2001-01-01

    Codon 72 has been designated as a hot spot for distinct missense mutations in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) gene. Ser72Leu substitution was associated with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome (DSS) in four patients and with congenital hypomyelination neuropathy (CHN) in one patient. Our objective was to report one other DSS patient with Ser72Leu substitution in PMP22 and to concurrently illustrate how less invasive procedures such as skin biopsy could provide a rapid and reliable alternative to conventional sural nerve biopsy for the characterization of histophenotypic features. A skin biopsy was carried out in a 2 4/12-year-old girl with muscle atrophy, hypotonia and weakness, as well as generalized areflexia and absent sensory and motor nerve responses. Standard electron microscope techniques were used. PMP22 was screened by automated direct nucleotide sequencing analysis. Morphological examination revealed basal lamina onion bulbs surrounding a de- or hypomyelinated axon in all nerve bundles. Mutation analysis demonstrated a missense point mutation in codon 72 of the PMP22 gene leading to a Ser72Leu substitution. Further genotype-phenotype correlations will have to determine whether morphologically distinct phenotypes can be correlated with specific mutations. For this purpose, cutaneous nerve bundles could serve as an alternative tool to help identify and classify subtypes in this heterogeneous syndrome. PMID:11314784

  13. Microbead-based ligase detection reaction assay using a molecular beacon probe for the detection of low-abundance point mutations.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Sho; Hagihara, Kenta; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Masahiko

    2014-01-01

    A microbead-based ligase detection reaction (LDR) assay using a molecular beacon probe was developed for the facile and rapid detection of point mutations present in low copy numbers in a mixed population of wild-type DNA. Biotin-tagged ligation products generated in the LDR were captured on the surface of streptavidin-modified magnetic beads for purification and concentration. The resulting product-tethered microbeads were combined with a molecular beacon probe solution, and the suspension was directly flowed into a capillary. The microbeads were accumulated in a confined space within the capillary using a bar magnet. The packed bead sample was then scanned by a fluorescence scanning imager to detect the presence of any mutations. With the developed methodology, we were able to successfully detect one cancer mutation in a mixture of 400 wild-type templates (t test at 95% confidence level). Furthermore, the post-LDR processing, typically the most laborious and time-consuming step in LDR-based mutation detection assays, could be carried out much more rapidly (approximately 20 min). This was enabled by the simple bead and fluid manipulations involved in the present assay.

  14. Cancer-Associated SF3B1 Hotspot Mutations Induce Cryptic 3' Splice Site Selection through Use of a Different Branch Point.

    PubMed

    Darman, Rachel B; Seiler, Michael; Agrawal, Anant A; Lim, Kian H; Peng, Shouyong; Aird, Daniel; Bailey, Suzanna L; Bhavsar, Erica B; Chan, Betty; Colla, Simona; Corson, Laura; Feala, Jacob; Fekkes, Peter; Ichikawa, Kana; Keaney, Gregg F; Lee, Linda; Kumar, Pavan; Kunii, Kaiko; MacKenzie, Crystal; Matijevic, Mark; Mizui, Yoshiharu; Myint, Khin; Park, Eun Sun; Puyang, Xiaoling; Selvaraj, Anand; Thomas, Michael P; Tsai, Jennifer; Wang, John Y; Warmuth, Markus; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Ping; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Furman, Richard R; Yu, Lihua; Smith, Peter G; Buonamici, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Recurrent mutations in the spliceosome are observed in several human cancers, but their functional and therapeutic significance remains elusive. SF3B1, the most frequently mutated component of the spliceosome in cancer, is involved in the recognition of the branch point sequence (BPS) during selection of the 3' splice site (ss) in RNA splicing. Here, we report that common and tumor-specific splicing aberrations are induced by SF3B1 mutations and establish aberrant 3' ss selection as the most frequent splicing defect. Strikingly, mutant SF3B1 utilizes a BPS that differs from that used by wild-type SF3B1 and requires the canonical 3' ss to enable aberrant splicing during the second step. Approximately 50% of the aberrantly spliced mRNAs are subjected to nonsense-mediated decay resulting in downregulation of gene and protein expression. These findings ascribe functional significance to the consequences of SF3B1 mutations in cancer. PMID:26565915

  15. Impaired dNTPase Activity of SAMHD1 by Phosphomimetic Mutation of Thr-592*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Chenxiang; Ji, Xiaoyun; Wu, Li; Xiong, Yong

    2015-01-01

    SAMHD1 is a cellular protein that plays key roles in HIV-1 restriction and regulation of cellular dNTP levels. Mutations in SAMHD1 are also implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. The anti-HIV-1 activity of SAMHD1 is negatively modulated by phosphorylation at residue Thr-592. The mechanism underlying the effect of phosphorylation on anti-HIV-1 activity remains unclear. SAMHD1 forms tetramers that possess deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate triphosphohydrolase (dNTPase) activity, which is allosterically controlled by the combined action of GTP and all four dNTPs. Here we demonstrate that the phosphomimetic mutation T592E reduces the stability of the SAMHD1 tetramer and the dNTPase activity of the enzyme. To better understand the underlying mechanisms, we determined the crystal structures of SAMHD1 variants T592E and T592V. Although the neutral substitution T592V does not perturb the structure, the charged T592E induces large conformational changes, likely triggered by electrostatic repulsion from a distinct negatively charged environment surrounding Thr-592. The phosphomimetic mutation results in a significant decrease in the population of active SAMHD1 tetramers, and hence the dNTPase activity is substantially decreased. These results provide a mechanistic understanding of how SAMHD1 phosphorylation at residue Thr-592 may modulate its cellular and antiviral functions. PMID:26294762

  16. Mutations in MAP3K7 that Alter the Activity of the TAK1 Signaling Complex Cause Frontometaphyseal Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Wade, Emma M; Daniel, Philip B; Jenkins, Zandra A; McInerney-Leo, Aideen; Leo, Paul; Morgan, Tim; Addor, Marie Claude; Adès, Lesley C; Bertola, Debora; Bohring, Axel; Carter, Erin; Cho, Tae-Joon; Duba, Hans-Christoph; Fletcher, Elaine; Kim, Chong A; Krakow, Deborah; Morava, Eva; Neuhann, Teresa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Veenstra-Knol, Irma; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wilson, Louise C; Hennekam, Raoul C M; Sutherland-Smith, Andrew J; Strom, Tim M; Wilkie, Andrew O M; Brown, Matthew A; Duncan, Emma L; Markie, David M; Robertson, Stephen P

    2016-08-01

    Frontometaphyseal dysplasia (FMD) is a progressive sclerosing skeletal dysplasia affecting the long bones and skull. The cause of FMD in some individuals is gain-of-function mutations in FLNA, although how these mutations result in a hyperostotic phenotype remains unknown. Approximately one half of individuals with FMD have no identified mutation in FLNA and are phenotypically very similar to individuals with FLNA mutations, except for an increased tendency to form keloid scars. Using whole-exome sequencing and targeted Sanger sequencing in 19 FMD-affected individuals with no identifiable FLNA mutation, we identified mutations in two genes-MAP3K7, encoding transforming growth factor β (TGF-β)-activated kinase (TAK1), and TAB2, encoding TAK1-associated binding protein 2 (TAB2). Four mutations were found in MAP3K7, including one highly recurrent (n = 15) de novo mutation (c.1454C>T [ p.Pro485Leu]) proximal to the coiled-coil domain of TAK1 and three missense mutations affecting the kinase domain (c.208G>C [p.Glu70Gln], c.299T>A [p.Val100Glu], and c.502G>C [p.Gly168Arg]). Notably, the subjects with the latter three mutations had a milder FMD phenotype. An additional de novo mutation was found in TAB2 (c.1705G>A, p.Glu569Lys). The recurrent mutation does not destabilize TAK1, or impair its ability to homodimerize or bind TAB2, but it does increase TAK1 autophosphorylation and alter the activity of more than one signaling pathway regulated by the TAK1 kinase complex. These findings show that dysregulation of the TAK1 complex produces a close phenocopy of FMD caused by FLNA mutations. Furthermore, they suggest that the pathogenesis of some of the filaminopathies caused by FLNA mutations might be mediated by misregulation of signaling coordinated through the TAK1 signaling complex. PMID:27426733

  17. [Role of the activating mutation Val617Phe of Janus kinase 2 gene in myeloproliferative diseases and significance of its detection].

    PubMed

    Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Szilvási, Anikó; Meggyesi, Nóra; Király, Viktória; Halm, Gabriella; Lueff, Sándor; Nahajevszky, Sarolta; Mikala, Gábor; Sipos, Andrea; Lovas, Nóra; Csukly, Zoltán; Mátrai, Zoltán; Tamáska, Júlia; Tordai, Attila; Masszi, Tamás

    2007-02-01

    The Val617Phe point mutation of Janus kinase 2 gene is believed to participate in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative syndrome characterised by the clonal alteration of hematopoietic stem cells. According to current results, the frequency of Val617Phe activating mutation is around 80% in polycythaemia vera, 35% in essential thrombocythemia, and 50% in chronic idiopathic myelofibrosis. The diagnoses of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and idiopathic myelofibrosis were so far based on the exclusion of secondary factors as well as bone marrow biopsy histology. The goal of the present work was to establish simple molecular genetic techniques for the routine testing of Janus kinase 2 gene Val617Phe mutation, and to compare the clinical phenotypes of Val617Phe mutation positive and negative myeloproliferative syndromes. We employed the allele specific polymerase chain technique for detection of Val617Phe mutation in 252 patients with myeloproliferative syndrome. We measured Val617Phe frequency as 85,4% (117/137) in polycythemia vera, 56,6% (56/99) in essential thrombocythemia, and 87,5% (14/16) in idiopathic myelofibrosis. We found significantly elevated hemoglobin levels and white blood cell counts (measured at the time of diagnosis) in Val617Phe-positive polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia patient groups compared to Val617Phe-negative patients. However, the frequencies of splenomegaly and other complications (thrombosis, bleeding, transformation to acute leukemia) were not significantly different between the mutation-positive and negative groups. In conclusion, the non-invasive mutation analysis of the Janus kinase 2 Val617Phe is suitable for routine laboratory application and helps the differential diagnosis of myeloproliferative syndrome. Although the exact role of Val617Phe mutation testing has not yet been identified on the basis of a broad professional consensus, the testing is suggested in cases of erythrocytoses and thrombocytoses of

  18. Two novel exonic point mutations in HEXA identified in a juvenile Tay-Sachs patient: role of alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay.

    PubMed

    Levit, A; Nutman, D; Osher, E; Kamhi, E; Navon, R

    2010-06-01

    We have identified three mutations in the beta-hexoseaminidase A (HEXA) gene in a juvenile Tay-Sachs disease (TSD) patient, which exhibited a reduced level of HEXA mRNA. Two mutations are novel, c.814G>A (p.Gly272Arg) and c.1305C>T (p.=), located in exon 8 and in exon 11, respectively. The third mutation, c.1195A>G (p.Asn399Asp) in exon 11, has been previously characterized as a common polymorphism in African-Americans. Hex A activity measured in TSD Glial cells, transfected with HEXA cDNA constructs bearing these mutations, was unaltered from the activity level measured in normal HEXA cDNA. Analysis of RT-PCR products revealed three aberrant transcripts in the patient, one where exon 8 was absent, one where exon 11 was absent and a third lacking both exons 10 and 11. All three novel transcripts contain frameshifts resulting in premature termination codons (PTCs). Transfection of mini-gene constructs carrying the c.814G>A and c.1305C>T mutations proved that the two mutations result in exon skipping. mRNAs that harbor a PTC are detected and degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway to prevent synthesis of abnormal proteins. However, although NMD is functional in the patient's fibroblasts, aberrant transcripts are still present. We suggest that the level of correctly spliced transcripts as well as the efficiency in which NMD degrade the PTC-containing transcripts, apparently plays an important role in the phenotype severity of the unique patient and thus should be considered as a potential target for drug therapy. PMID:20363167

  19. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  20. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Young, Christian D.; Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B.; Gatza, Michael L.; Morrison, Meghan M.; Moore, Preston D.; Whitwell, Corbin A.; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E.; Silva, Grace O.; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A.; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J.; Perou, Charles M.; Weaver, Alissa M.; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A.; Chang, Jenny C.; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Arteaga, Carlos L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR. PMID:25953087

  1. Activating PIK3CA Mutations Induce an Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR)/Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase (ERK) Paracrine Signaling Axis in Basal-like Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Christian D; Zimmerman, Lisa J; Hoshino, Daisuke; Formisano, Luigi; Hanker, Ariella B; Gatza, Michael L; Morrison, Meghan M; Moore, Preston D; Whitwell, Corbin A; Dave, Bhuvanesh; Stricker, Thomas; Bhola, Neil E; Silva, Grace O; Patel, Premal; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M; Levin, Maren; Horiates, Marina; Palma, Norma A; Wang, Kai; Stephens, Philip J; Perou, Charles M; Weaver, Alissa M; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A; Chang, Jenny C; Park, Ben Ho; Liebler, Daniel C; Cook, Rebecca S; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in PIK3CA, the gene encoding the p110α catalytic subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) have been shown to transform human mammary epithelial cells (MECs). These mutations are present in all breast cancer subtypes, including basal-like breast cancer (BLBC). Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), we identified 72 protein expression changes in human basal-like MECs with knock-in E545K or H1047R PIK3CA mutations versus isogenic MECs with wild-type PIK3CA. Several of these were secreted proteins, cell surface receptors or ECM interacting molecules and were required for growth of PIK3CA mutant cells as well as adjacent cells with wild-type PIK3CA. The proteins identified by MS were enriched among human BLBC cell lines and pointed to a PI3K-dependent amphiregulin/EGFR/ERK signaling axis that is activated in BLBC. Proteins induced by PIK3CA mutations correlated with EGFR signaling and reduced relapse-free survival in BLBC. Treatment with EGFR inhibitors reduced growth of PIK3CA mutant BLBC cell lines and murine mammary tumors driven by a PIK3CA mutant transgene, all together suggesting that PIK3CA mutations promote tumor growth in part by inducing protein changes that activate EGFR.

  2. PAK4 kinase activity and somatic mutation promote carcinoma cell motility and influence inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Whale, Andrew D.; Dart, Anna; Holt, Mark; Jones, Gareth E.; Wells, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor (c-Met) are associated with cancer cell motility and invasiveness. p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4), a potential therapeutic target, is recruited to and activated by c-Met. In response, PAK4 phosphorylates LIM kinase 1 (LIMK1) in an HGF-dependent manner in metastatic prostate carcinoma cells. PAK4 overexpression is known to induce increased cell migration speed but the requirement for kinase activity has not been established. We have used a panel of PAK4 truncations and mutations in a combination of over-expression and RNAi rescue experiments to determine the requirement for PAK4 kinase activity during carcinoma cell motility downstream of HGF. We find that neither the kinase domain alone nor a PAK4 mutant unable to bind Cdc42 is able to fully rescue cell motility in a PAK4-deficient background. Nevertheless, we find that PAK4 kinase activity and associated LIMK1 activity are essential for carcinoma cell motility, highlighting PAK4 as a potential anti-metastatic therapeutic target. We also show here that overexpression of PAK4 harboring a somatic mutation, E329K, increased the HGF-driven motility of metastatic prostate carcinoma cells. E329 lies within the G-loop region of the kinase. Our data suggest E329K mutation leads to a modest increase in kinase activity conferring resistance to competitive ATP inhibitors in addition to promoting cell migration. The existence of such a mutation may have implications for the development of PAK4-specific competitive ATP inhibitors should PAK4 be further explored for clinical inhibition. PMID:22689056

  3. In vitro mutation analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana small GTP-binding proteins and detection of GAP-like activities in plant cells.

    PubMed

    Anai, T; Matsui, M; Nomura, N; Ishizaki, R; Uchimiya, H

    1994-06-13

    Previously, we have reported the molecular cloning of ara genes encoding a small GTP-binding protein from Arabidopsis thaliana. The criterion based on amino acid sequences suggest that such an ara gene family can be classified to be of the YPT/rab type. To examine the biochemical properties of ARA proteins, several deletions and point mutations were introduced into ara cDNAs. Mutant proteins were expressed in E. coli as GST-chimeric molecules and analyzed in terms of their GTP-binding or GTP-hydrolysing ability in vitro. The results indicate that four conserved amino acid sequence regions of ARA proteins are necessary for GTP-binding. A point mutation of Asn at position 72 for ARA-2, or 71 for ARA-4, to Ile decreased GTP-binding and a point mutation of Gln at position 126 for ARA-2, or 125 for ARA-4, to Leu suppressed GTP-hydrolysis activity. Furthermore, certain factors associated with the membrane fraction accelerated GTPase activities of ARA proteins, suggesting the presence of GTPase activating protein(s) (GAP(s)) in the vesicular transport system of higher plant cells.

  4. TERT Promoter Mutations Lead to High Transcriptional Activity under Hypoxia and Temozolomide Treatment and Predict Poor Prognosis in Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Lingxuan; Li, Zhonghua; Zhang, Xue; Wu, Anhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study explored the effects of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) promoter mutations on transcriptional activity of the TERT gene under hypoxic and temozolomide (TMZ) treatment conditions, and investigated the status and prognostic value of these mutations in gliomas. Methods The effect of TERT promoter mutations on the transcriptional activity of the TERT gene under hypoxic and TMZ treatment conditions was investigated in glioma cells using the luciferase assay. TERT promoter mutations were detected in 101 glioma samples (grades I–IV) and 49 other brain tumors by sequencing. TERT mRNA expression in gliomas was examined by real-time PCR. Hazard ratios from survival analysis of glioma patients were determined relative to the presence of TERT promoter mutations. Results Mutations in the TERT promoter enhanced gene transcription even under hypoxic and TMZ treatment conditions, inducing upregulation of TERT mRNA expression. Mutations were detected in gliomas, but not in meningiomas, pituitary adenomas, cavernomas, intracranial metastases, normal brain tissues, or peripheral blood of glioma patients. Patients with TERT promoter mutations had lower survival rates, even after adjusting for other known or potential risk factors, and the incidence of mutation was correlated with patient age. Conclusion TERT promoter mutations were specific to gliomas. TERT promoter mutations maintained its ability of inducing high transcriptional activity even under hypoxic and TMZ treatment conditions, and the presence of mutations was associated with poor prognosis in glioma patients. These findings demonstrate that TERT promoter mutations are novel prognostic markers for gliomas that can inform prospective therapeutic strategies. PMID:24937153

  5. An activating Pik3ca mutation coupled with Pten loss is sufficient to initiate ovarian tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kinross, Kathryn M; Montgomery, Karen G; Kleinschmidt, Margarete; Waring, Paul; Ivetac, Ivan; Tikoo, Anjali; Saad, Mirette; Hare, Lauren; Roh, Vincent; Mantamadiotis, Theo; Sheppard, Karen E; Ryland, Georgina L; Campbell, Ian G; Gorringe, Kylie L; Christensen, James G; Cullinane, Carleen; Hicks, Rodney J; Pearson, Richard B; Johnstone, Ricky W; McArthur, Grant A; Phillips, Wayne A

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the p110α subunit of PI3K (PIK3CA) that result in enhanced PI3K activity are frequently observed in human cancers. To better understand the role of mutant PIK3CA in the initiation or progression of tumorigenesis, we generated mice in which a PIK3CA mutation commonly detected in human cancers (the H1047R mutation) could be conditionally knocked into the endogenous Pik3ca locus. Activation of this mutation in the mouse ovary revealed that alone, Pik3caH1047R induced premalignant hyperplasia of the ovarian surface epithelium but no tumors. Concomitantly, we analyzed several human ovarian cancers and found PIK3CA mutations coexistent with KRAS and/or PTEN mutations, raising the possibility that a secondary defect in a co-regulator of PI3K activity may be required for mutant PIK3CA to promote transformation. Consistent with this notion, we found that Pik3caH1047R mutation plus Pten deletion in the mouse ovary led to the development of ovarian serous adenocarcinomas and granulosa cell tumors. Both mutational events were required for early, robust Akt activation. Pharmacological inhibition of PI3K/mTOR in these mice delayed tumor growth and prolonged survival. These results demonstrate that the Pik3caH1047R mutation with loss of Pten is enough to promote ovarian cell transformation and that we have developed a model system for studying possible therapies.

  6. A novel TMPRSS6 mutation that prevents protease auto-activation causes IRIDA

    PubMed Central

    Altamura, Sandro; D'Alessio, Flavia; Selle, Barbara; Muckenthaler, Martina U.

    2010-01-01

    IRIDA (iron-refractory iron-deficiency anaemia) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder hallmarked by hypochromic microcytic anaemia, low transferrin saturation and high levels of the iron-regulated hormone hepcidin. The disease is caused by mutations in the transmembrane serine protease TMPRSS6 (transmembrane protease serine 6) that prevent inactivation of HJV (haemojuvelin), an activator of hepcidin transcription. In the present paper, we describe a patient with IRIDA who carries a novel mutation (Y141C) in the SEA domain of the TMPRSS6 gene. Functional characterization of the TMPRSS6(Y141C) mutant protein in cultured cells showed that it localizes to similar subcellular compartments as wild-type TMPRSS6 and binds HJV, but fails to auto-catalytically activate itself. As a consequence, hepcidin mRNA expression is increased, causing the clinical symptoms observed in this IRIDA patient. The present study provides important mechanistic insight into how TMPRSS6 is activated. PMID:20704562

  7. Truncating PREX2 mutations activate its GEF activity and alter gene expression regulation in NRAS-mutant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Lissanu Deribe, Yonathan; Shi, Yanxia; Rai, Kunal; Nezi, Luigi; Amin, Samir B.; Wu, Chia-Chin; Akdemir, Kadir C.; Mahdavi, Mozhdeh; Peng, Qian; Chang, Qing Edward; Hornigold, Kirsti; Arold, Stefan T.; Welch, Heidi C. E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Chin, Lynda

    2016-01-01

    PREX2 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent Rac-exchange factor 2) is a PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) binding protein that is significantly mutated in cutaneous melanoma and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Here, genetic and biochemical analyses were conducted to elucidate the nature and mechanistic basis of PREX2 mutation in melanoma development. By generating an inducible transgenic mouse model we showed an oncogenic role for a truncating PREX2 mutation (PREX2E824*) in vivo in the context of mutant NRAS. Using integrative cross-species gene expression analysis, we identified deregulated cell cycle and cytoskeleton organization as significantly perturbed biological pathways in PREX2 mutant tumors. Mechanistically, truncation of PREX2 activated its Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity, abolished binding to PTEN and activated the PI3K (phosphatidyl inositol 3 kinase)/Akt signaling pathway. We further showed that PREX2 truncating mutations or PTEN deletion induces down-regulation of the tumor suppressor and cell cycle regulator CDKN1C (also known as p57KIP2). This down-regulation occurs, at least partially, through DNA hypomethylation of a differentially methylated region in chromosome 11 that is a known regulatory region for expression of the CDKN1C gene. Together, these findings identify PREX2 as a mediator of NRAS-mutant melanoma development that acts through the PI3K/PTEN/Akt pathway to regulate gene expression of a cell cycle regulator. PMID:26884185

  8. Intragenic suppression of an active site mutation in the human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Izumi, T; Malecki, J; Chaudhry, M A; Weinfeld, M; Hill, J H; Lee, J C; Mitra, S

    1999-03-19

    The apurinic/apyrimidinic endonucleases (APE) contain several highly conserved sequence motifs. The glutamic acid residue in a consensus motif, LQE96TK98 in human APE (hAPE-1), is crucial because of its role in coordinating Mg2+, an essential cofactor. Random mutagenesis of the inactive E96A mutant cDNA, followed by phenotypic screening in Escherichia coli, led to isolation of an intragenic suppressor with a second site mutation, K98R. Although the Km of the suppressor mutant was about sixfold higher than that of the wild-type enzyme, their kcat values were similar for AP endonuclease activity. These results suggest that the E96A mutation affects only the DNA-binding step, but not the catalytic step of the enzyme. The 3' DNA phosphoesterase activities of the wild-type and the suppressor mutant were also comparable. No global change of the protein conformation is induced by the single or double mutations, but a local perturbation in the structural environment of tryptophan residues may be induced by the K98R mutation. The wild-type and suppressor mutant proteins have similar Mg2+ requirement for activity. These results suggest a minor perturbation in conformation of the suppressor mutant enabling an unidentified Asp or Glu residue to substitute for Glu96 in positioning Mg2+ during catalysis. The possibility that Asp70 is such a residue, based on its observed proximity to the metal-binding site in the wild-type protein, was excluded by site-specific mutation studies. It thus appears that another acidic residue coordinates with Mg2+ in the mutant protein. These results suggest a rather flexible conformation of the region surrounding the metal binding site in hAPE-1 which is not obvious from the X-ray crystallographic structure. PMID:10074406

  9. The protist Trichomonas vaginalis harbors multiple lineages of transcriptionally active Mutator-like elements

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Fabrício R; Silva, Joana C; Benchimol, Marlene; Costa, Gustavo GL; Pereira, Gonçalo AG; Carareto, Claudia MA

    2009-01-01

    Background For three decades the Mutator system was thought to be exclusive of plants, until the first homolog representatives were characterized in fungi and in early-diverging amoebas earlier in this decade. Results Here, we describe and characterize four families of Mutator-like elements in a new eukaryotic group, the Parabasalids. These Trichomonas vaginalis Mutator- like elements, or TvMULEs, are active in T. vaginalis and patchily distributed among 12 trichomonad species and isolates. Despite their relatively distinctive amino acid composition, the inclusion of the repeats TvMULE1, TvMULE2, TvMULE3 and TvMULE4 into the Mutator superfamily is justified by sequence, structural and phylogenetic analyses. In addition, we identified three new TvMULE-related sequences in the genome sequence of Candida albicans. While TvMULE1 is a member of the MuDR clade, predominantly from plants, the other three TvMULEs, together with the C. albicans elements, represent a new and quite distinct Mutator lineage, which we named TvCaMULEs. The finding of TvMULE1 sequence inserted into other putative repeat suggests the occurrence a novel TE family not yet described. Conclusion These findings expand the taxonomic distribution and the range of functional motif of MULEs among eukaryotes. The characterization of the dynamics of TvMULEs and other transposons in this organism is of particular interest because it is atypical for an asexual species to have such an extreme level of TE activity; this genetic landscape makes an interesting case study for causes and consequences of such activity. Finally, the extreme repetitiveness of the T. vaginalis genome and the remarkable degree of sequence identity within its repeat families highlights this species as an ideal system to characterize new transposable elements. PMID:19622157

  10. Activation of initiation factor 2 by ligands and mutations for rapid docking of ribosomal subunits.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Michael Y; Zorzet, Anna; Andersson, Dan I; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2011-01-19

    We previously identified mutations in the GTPase initiation factor 2 (IF2), located outside its tRNA-binding domain, compensating strongly (A-type) or weakly (B-type) for initiator tRNA formylation deficiency. We show here that rapid docking of 30S with 50S subunits in initiation of translation depends on switching 30S subunit-bound IF2 from its inactive to active form. Activation of wild-type IF2 requires GTP and formylated initiator tRNA (fMet-tRNA(i)). In contrast, extensive activation of A-type IF2 occurs with only GTP or with GDP and fMet-tRNA(i), implying a passive role for initiator tRNA as activator of IF2 in subunit docking. The theory of conditional switching of GTPases quantitatively accounts for all our experimental data. We find that GTP, GDP, fMet-tRNA(i) and A-type mutations multiplicatively increase the equilibrium ratio, K, between active and inactive forms of IF2 from a value of 4 × 10(-4) for wild-type apo-IF2 by factors of 300, 8, 80 and 20, respectively. Functional characterization of the A-type mutations provides keys to structural interpretation of conditional switching of IF2 and other multidomain GTPases. PMID:21151095

  11. A three-dimensional model of mammalian tyrosinase active site accounting for loss of function mutations.

    PubMed

    Schweikardt, Thorsten; Olivares, Concepción; Solano, Francisco; Jaenicke, Elmar; García-Borrón, José Carlos; Decker, Heinz

    2007-10-01

    Tyrosinases are the first and rate-limiting enzymes in the synthesis of melanin pigments responsible for colouring hair, skin and eyes. Mutation of tyrosinases often decreases melanin production resulting in albinism, but the effects are not always understood at the molecular level. Homology modelling of mouse tyrosinase based on recently published crystal structures of non-mammalian tyrosinases provides an active site model accounting for loss-of-function mutations. According to the model, the copper-binding histidines are located in a helix bundle comprising four densely packed helices. A loop containing residues M374, S375 and V377 connects the CuA and CuB centres, with the peptide oxygens of M374 and V377 serving as hydrogen acceptors for the NH-groups of the imidazole rings of the copper-binding His367 and His180. Therefore, this loop is essential for the stability of the active site architecture. A double substitution (374)MS(375) --> (374)GG(375) or a single M374G mutation lead to a local perturbation of the protein matrix at the active site affecting the orientation of the H367 side chain, that may be unable to bind CuB reliably, resulting in loss of activity. The model also accounts for loss of function in two naturally occurring albino mutations, S380P and V393F. The hydroxyl group in S380 contributes to the correct orientation of M374, and the substitution of V393 for a bulkier phenylalanine sterically impedes correct side chain packing at the active site. Therefore, our model explains the mechanistic necessity for conservation of not only active site histidines but also adjacent amino acids in tyrosinase. PMID:17850513

  12. Disease Mutations in Rab7 Result in Unregulated Nucleotide Exchange and Inappropriate Activation

    SciTech Connect

    B McCray; E Skordalakes; J Taylor

    2011-12-31

    Rab GTPases are molecular switches that orchestrate vesicular trafficking, maturation and fusion by cycling between an active, GTP-bound form, and an inactive, GDP-bound form. The activity cycle is coupled to GTP hydrolysis and is tightly controlled by regulatory proteins. Missense mutations of the GTPase Rab7 cause a dominantly inherited axonal degeneration known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B through an unknown mechanism. We present the 2.8 A crystal structure of GTP-bound L129F mutant Rab7 which reveals normal conformations of the effector binding regions and catalytic site, but an alteration to the nucleotide binding pocket that is predicted to alter GTP binding. Through extensive biochemical analysis, we demonstrate that disease-associated mutations in Rab7 do not lead to an intrinsic GTPase defect, but permit unregulated nucleotide exchange leading to both excessive activation and hydrolysis-independent inactivation. Consistent with augmented activity, mutant Rab7 shows significantly enhanced interaction with a subset of effector proteins. In addition, dynamic imaging demonstrates that mutant Rab7 is abnormally retained on target membranes. However, we show that the increased activation of mutant Rab7 is counterbalanced by unregulated, GTP hydrolysis-independent membrane cycling. Notably, disease mutations are able to rescue the membrane cycling of a GTPase-deficient mutant. Thus, we demonstrate that disease mutations uncouple Rab7 from the spatial and temporal control normally imposed by regulatory proteins and cause disease not by a gain of novel toxic function, but by misregulation of native Rab7 activity.

  13. Disease-associated mutations inactivate AMP-lysine hydrolase activity of Aprataxin.

    PubMed

    Seidle, Heather F; Bieganowski, Pawel; Brenner, Charles

    2005-06-01

    Ataxia-oculomotor apraxia syndrome 1 is an early onset cerebellar ataxia that results from loss of function mutations in the APTX gene, encoding Aprataxin, which contains three conserved domains. The forkhead-associated domain of Aprataxin mediates protein-protein interactions with molecules that respond to DNA damage, but the cellular phenotype of the disease does not appear to be consistent with a major loss in DNA damage responses. Disease-associated mutations in Aprataxin target a histidine triad domain that is similar to Hint, a universally conserved AMP-lysine hydrolase, or truncate the protein NH2-terminal to a zinc finger. With novel fluorigenic substrates, we demonstrate that Aprataxin possesses an active-site-dependent AMP-lysine and GMP-lysine hydrolase activity that depends additionally on the zinc finger for protein stability and on the forkhead associated domain for enzymatic activity. Alleles carrying any of eight recessive mutations associated with ataxia and oculomotor apraxia encode proteins with huge losses in protein stability and enzymatic activity, consistent with a null phenotype. The mild presentation allele, APTX-K197Q, associated with ataxia but not oculomotor apraxia, encodes a protein with a mild defect in stability and activity, while enzyme encoded by the atypical presentation allele, APTX-R199H, retained substantial function, consistent with altered and not loss of activity. The data suggest that the essential function of Aprataxin is reversal of nucleotidylylated protein modifications, that all three domains contribute to formation of a stable enzyme, and that the in vitro behavior of cloned APTX alleles can score disease-associated mutations. PMID:15790557

  14. Mutations of the Opsin Gene (Y102H and I307N) Lead to Light-induced Degeneration of Photoreceptors and Constitutive Activation of Phototransduction in Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Budzynski, Ewa; Gross, Alecia K.; McAlear, Suzanne D.; Peachey, Neal S.; Shukla, Meera; He, Feng; Edwards, Malia; Won, Jungyeon; Hicks, Wanda L.; Wensel, Theodore G.; Naggert, Jurgen K.; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the Rhodopsin (Rho) gene can lead to autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa (RP) in humans. Transgenic mouse models with mutations in Rho have been developed to study the disease. However, it is difficult to know the source of the photoreceptor (PR) degeneration in these transgenic models because overexpression of wild type (WT) Rho alone can lead to PR degeneration. Here, we report two chemically mutagenized mouse models carrying point mutations in Rho (Tvrm1 with an Y102H mutation and Tvrm4 with an I307N mutation). Both mutants express normal levels of rhodopsin that localize to the PR outer segments and do not exhibit PR degeneration when raised in ambient mouse room lighting; however, severe PR degeneration is observed after short exposures to bright light. Both mutations also cause a delay in recovery following bleaching. This defect might be due to a slower rate of chromophore binding by the mutant opsins compared with the WT form, and an increased rate of transducin activation by the unbound mutant opsins, which leads to a constitutive activation of the phototransduction cascade as revealed by in vitro biochemical assays. The mutant-free opsins produced by the respective mutant Rho genes appear to be more toxic to PRs, as Tvrm1 and Tvrm4 mutants lacking the 11-cis chromophore degenerate faster than mice expressing WT opsin that also lack the chromophore. Because of their phenotypic similarity to humans with B1 Rho mutations, these mutants will be important tools in examining mechanisms underlying Rho-induced RP and for testing therapeutic strategies. PMID:20207741

  15. The STAT3 HIES mutation is a gain-of-function mutation that activates genes via AGG-element carrying promoters

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Ji, Jin-Jun; Le, Wangping; Xu, Yan S.; Dou, Dandan; Pan, Jieli; Jiao, Yifeng; Zhong, Tianfei; Wu, Dehong; Wang, Yumei; Wen, Chengping; Xie, Guan-Qun; Yao, Feng; Zhao, Heng; Fan, Yong-Sheng; Chin, Y. Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Cytokine or growth factor activated STAT3 undergoes multiple post-translational modifications, dimerization and translocation into nuclei, where it binds to serum-inducible element (SIE, ‘TTC(N3)GAA’)-bearing promoters to activate transcription. The STAT3 DNA binding domain (DBD, 320–494) mutation in hyper immunoglobulin E syndrome (HIES), called the HIES mutation (R382Q, R382W or V463Δ), which elevates IgE synthesis, inhibits SIE binding activity and sensitizes genes such as TNF-α for expression. However, the mechanism by which the HIES mutation sensitizes STAT3 in gene induction remains elusive. Here, we report that STAT3 binds directly to the AGG-element with the consensus sequence ‘AGG(N3)AGG’. Surprisingly, the helical N-terminal region (1–355), rather than the canonical STAT3 DBD, is responsible for AGG-element binding. The HIES mutation markedly enhances STAT3 AGG-element binding and AGG-promoter activation activity. Thus, STAT3 is a dual specificity transcription factor that promotes gene expression not only via SIE- but also AGG-promoter activity. PMID:26384563

  16. Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia in a Japanese Man Caused by a Point Albumin Gene Mutation (R218P)

    PubMed Central

    Osaki, Yoshinori; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Nakagawa, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Katsumi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Fukazawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) is a familial autosomal dominant disease caused by mutation in the albumin gene that produces a condition of euthyroid hyperthyroxinemia. In patients with FDH, serum-free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations as measured by several commercial methods are often falsely increased with normal thyrotropin (TSH). Therefore, several diagnostic steps are needed to differentiate TSH-secreting tumor or generalized resistance to thyroid hormone from FDH. We herein report a case of a Japanese man born in Aomori prefecture, with FDH caused by a mutant albumin gene (R218P). We found that a large number of FDH patients reported in Japan to date might have been born in Aomori prefecture and have shown the R218P mutation. In conclusion, FDH needs to be considered among the differential diagnoses in Japanese patients born in Aomori prefecture and showing normal TSH levels and elevated FT4 levels. PMID:27081329

  17. Dejerine-Sottas syndrome and vestibular loss due to a point mutation in the PMP22 gene.

    PubMed

    Jen, Joanna; Baloh, Robert H; Ishiyama, Akira; Baloh, Robert W

    2005-10-15

    We describe a father and daughter with Dejerine-Sottas syndrome and bilateral vestibular loss due to an L71P missense mutation in the peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22). The combination of vestibular loss and peripheral neuropathy led to profound imbalance at a young age. It is important to recognize this combination of peripheral nerve and vestibular deficits since rehabilitation strategies and prognosis are different. PMID:15992829

  18. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease: a valine to phenylalanine point mutation in a putative extracellular loop of myelin proteolipid.

    PubMed Central

    Pham-Dinh, D; Popot, J L; Boespflug-Tanguy, O; Landrieu, P; Deleuze, J F; Boué, J; Jollès, P; Dautigny, A

    1991-01-01

    In the central nervous system, myelin proteolipid protein isoforms (PLP and DM20) play an essential structural role in myelination. It has been shown in several species that myelination is impaired by molecular defects resulting from single base mutations in the PLP gene. We have used DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction to study the PLP gene coding regions from 17 patients in 15 unrelated families with similar Pelizaeus-Merzbacher phenotype. In one case amplification of peripheral nerve PLP/DM20 cDNAs revealed that a silent T----C transition was unrelated to the disease. In one family a nonsilent mutation was identified that leads to a phenylalanine substitution for valine-218 in PLP/DM20 proteins. We investigated the inheritance of the mutant allele in 19 subjects of this four-generation family and found a strict cosegregation of the Phe218 substitution with transmission and expression of the disease. The effect of the Val218----Phe mutation is discussed in the frame of a recently suggested topological model of PLP/DM20, according to which Val218 is part of an extracellular loop that connects the last two of four membrane-spanning alpha-helices. Images PMID:1715570

  19. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zuowei; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Sahin, Orhan; Yaeger, Michael; Plummer, Paul; Zhai, Weiwei; Shen, Zhangqi; Dai, Lei; Chen, Swaine L; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-09-20

    Infections due to clonal expansion of highly virulent bacterial strains are clear and present threats to human and animal health. Association of genetic changes with disease is now a routine, but identification of causative mutations that enable disease remains difficult. Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans mainly via the foodborne route. C. jejuni typically colonizes the gut, but a hypervirulent and rapidly expanding clone of C. jejuni recently emerged, which is able to translocate across the intestinal tract, causing systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals. The genetic basis responsible for this hypervirulence is unknown. Here, we developed a strategy, termed "directed genome evolution," by using hybridization between abortifacient and nonabortifacient strains followed by selection in an animal disease model and whole-genome sequence analysis. This strategy successfully identified SNPs in porA, encoding the major outer membrane protein, are responsible for the hypervirulence. Defined mutagenesis verified that these mutations were both necessary and sufficient for causing abortion. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified porA as the gene with the top genome-wide signal of adaptive evolution using Fu's Fs, a population genetic metric for recent population size changes, which is consistent with the recent expansion of clone "sheep abortion." These results identify a key virulence factor in Campylobacter and a potential target for the control of this zoonotic pathogen. Furthermore, this study provides general, unbiased experimental and computational approaches that are broadly applicable for efficient elucidation of disease-causing mutations in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27601641

  20. Assessing the Risk That Phytophthora melonis Can Develop a Point Mutation (V1109L) in CesA3 Conferring Resistance to Carboxylic Acid Amide Fungicides

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Zhu, Shusheng; Lu, Xiaohong; Pang, Zhili; Cai, Meng; Liu, Xili

    2012-01-01

    The risk that the plant pathogen Phytophthora melonis develops resistance to carboxylic acid amide (CAA) fungicides was determined by measuring baseline sensitivities of field isolates, generating resistant mutants, and measuring the fitness of the resistant mutants. The baseline sensitivities of 80 isolates to flumorph, dimethomorph and iprovalicarb were described by unimodal curves, with mean EC50 values of 0.986 (±0.245), 0.284 (±0.060) and 0.327 (±0.068) µg/ml, respectively. Seven isolates with different genetic background (as indicated by RAPD markers) were selected to generate CAA-resistance. Fifty-five resistant mutants were obtained from three out of seven isolates by spontaneous selection and UV-mutagenesis with frequencies of 1×10−7 and 1×10−6, respectively. CAA-resistance was stable for all mutants. The resistance factors of these mutants ranged from 7 to 601. The compound fitness index (CFI  =  mycelial growth × zoospore production × pathogenicity) was often lower for the CAA-resistant isolates than for wild-type isolates, suggesting that the risk of P. melonis developing resistance to CAA fungicides is low to moderate. Among the CAA-resistant isolates, a negative correlation between EC50 values was found for iprovalicarb vs. flumorph and for iprovalicarb vs. dimethomorph. Comparison of the full-length cellulose synthase 3 (CesA3) between wild-type and CAA-resistant isolates revealed only one point mutation at codon position 1109: a valine residue (codon GTG in wild-type isolates) was converted to leucine (codon CTG in resistant mutants). This represents a novel point mutation with respect to mutations in CesA3 conferring resistance to CAA fungicides. Based on this mutation, an efficient allelic-specific PCR (AS-PCR) method was developed for rapid detection of CAA-resistance in P. melonis populations. PMID:22848705

  1. Tmc1 Point Mutation Affects Ca2+ Sensitivity and Block by Dihydrostreptomycin of the Mechanoelectrical Transducer Current of Mouse Outer Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Corns, Laura F.; Johnson, Stuart L.; Kros, Corné J.

    2016-01-01

    The transduction of sound into electrical signals depends on mechanically sensitive ion channels in the stereociliary bundle. The molecular composition of this mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channel is not yet known. Transmembrane channel-like protein isoforms 1 (TMC1) and 2 (TMC2) have been proposed to form part of the MET channel, although their exact roles are still unclear. Using Beethoven (Tmc1Bth/Bth) mice, which have an M412K point mutation in TMC1 that adds a positive charge, we found that Ca2+ permeability and conductance of the MET channel of outer hair cells (OHCs) were reduced. Tmc1Bth/Bth OHCs were also less sensitive to block by the permeant MET channel blocker dihydrostreptomycin, whether applied extracellularly or intracellularly. These findings suggest that the amino acid that is mutated in Bth is situated at or near the negatively charged binding site for dihydrostreptomycin within the permeation pore of the channel. We also found that the Ca2+ dependence of the operating range of the MET channel was altered by the M412K mutation. Depolarization did not increase the resting open probability of the MET current of Tmc1Bth/Bth OHCs, whereas raising the intracellular concentration of the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA caused smaller increases in resting open probability in Bth mutant OHCs than in wild-type control cells. We propose that these observations can be explained by the reduced Ca2+ permeability of the mutated MET channel indirectly causing the Ca2+ sensor for adaptation, at or near the intracellular face of the MET channel, to become more sensitive to Ca2+ influx as a compensatory mechanism. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the auditory system, the hair cells convert sound-induced mechanical movement of the hair bundles atop these cells into electrical signals through the opening of mechanically gated ion channels at the tips of the bundles. Although the nature of these mechanoelectrical transducer (MET) channels is still unclear, recent studies implicate

  2. Retinitis Pigmentosa Mutations in Bad Response to Refrigeration 2 (Brr2) Impair ATPase and Helicase Activity.

    PubMed

    Ledoux, Sarah; Guthrie, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Brr2 is an RNA-dependent ATPase required to unwind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex during spliceosome assembly. Mutations within the ratchet helix of the Brr2 RNA binding channel result in a form of degenerative human blindness known as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The biochemical consequences of these mutations on Brr2's RNA binding, helicase, and ATPase activity have not yet been characterized. Therefore, we identified the largest construct of Brr2 that is soluble in vitro, which truncates the first 247 amino acids of the N terminus (Δ247-Brr2), to characterize the effects of the RP mutations on Brr2 activity. The Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants exhibit a gradient of severity of weakened RNA binding, reduced helicase activity, and reduced ATPase activity compared with wild type Δ247-Brr2. The globular C-terminal Jab1/Mpn1-like domain of Prp8 increases the ability of Δ247-Brr2 to bind the U4/U6 snRNA duplex at high pH and increases Δ247-Brr2's RNA-dependent ATPase activity and the extent of RNA unwinding. However, this domain of Prp8 does not differentially affect the Δ247-Brr2 RP mutants compared with the wild type Δ247-Brr2. When stimulated by Prp8, wild type Δ247-Brr2 is able to unwind long stable duplexes in vitro, and even the RP mutants capable of binding RNA with tight affinity are incapable of fully unwinding short duplex RNAs. Our data suggest that the RP mutations within the ratchet helix impair Brr2 translocation through RNA helices. PMID:27072132

  3. Human single-chain urokinase is activated by the omptins PgtE of Salmonella enterica and Pla of Yersinia pestis despite mutations of active site residues.

    PubMed

    Järvinen, Hanna M; Laakkonen, Liisa; Haiko, Johanna; Johansson, Tiira; Juuti, Katri; Suomalainen, Marjo; Buchrieser, Carmen; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Korhonen, Timo K

    2013-08-01

    Fibrinolysis is important in cell migration and tightly regulated by specific inhibitors and activators; of the latter, urokinase (uPA) associates with enhancement of cell migration. Active uPA is formed through cleavage of the single-chain uPA (scuPA). The Salmonella enterica strain 14028R cleaved human scuPA at the peptide bond Lys158-Ile159, the site cleaved also by the physiological activator human plasmin. The cleavage led to activation of scuPA, while no cleavage or activation were detected with the mutant strain 14028R lacking the omptin protease PgtE. Complementation and expression studies confirmed the role of PgtE in scuPA activation. Similar cleavage and activation of scuPA were detected with recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the omptin genes pla from Yersinia pestis, ompT and ompP from E. coli, sopA from Shigella flexneri, and leo from Legionella pneumophila. For these omptins the activation of scuPA is the only shared function so far detected. Only poor cleavage and activation of scuPA were seen with YcoA of Y. pestis and YcoB of Yersinia pseudotuberculosis that are considered to be proteolytically inactive omptin variants. Point mutations of active site residues in Pla and PgtE had different effects on the proteolysis of plasminogen and of scuPA, indicating versatility in omptin proteolysis.

  4. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E; Lapin, Morten; Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S S; Bang, Jeanne Mari V; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F; Carey, John C; Yu, Ping; Vaughn, Cecily; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A; Andresen, Brage S

    2016-05-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3' splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping.

  5. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kristjansdottir, Karen; Petersen, Ulrika S. S.; Bang, Jeanne Mari V.; Guerra, Barbara; Andersen, Henriette Skovgaard; Dobrowolski, Steven F.; Carey, John C.; Yu, Ping; Calhoun, Amy; Larsen, Martin R.; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Stevenson, David A.; Andresen, Brage S.

    2016-01-01

    Costello syndrome (CS) may be caused by activating mutations in codon 12/13 of the HRAS proto-oncogene. HRAS p.Gly12Val mutations have the highest transforming activity, are very frequent in cancers, but very rare in CS, where they are reported to cause a severe, early lethal, phenotype. We identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting the function of a critical Exonic Splicing Enhancer (ESE) and creation of an Exonic Splicing Silencer (ESS). We show that this vulnerability of HRAS exon 2 is caused by a weak 3’ splice site, which makes exon 2 inclusion dependent on binding of splicing stimulatory proteins, like SRSF2, to the critical ESE. Because the majority of cancer- and CS- causing mutations are located here, they affect splicing differently. Therefore, our results also demonstrate that the phenotype in CS and somatic cancers is not only determined by the different transforming potentials of mutant HRAS proteins, but also by the efficiency of exon 2 inclusion resulting from the different HRAS mutations. Finally, we show that a splice switching oligonucleotide (SSO) that blocks access to the critical ESE causes exon 2 skipping and halts proliferation of cancer cells. This unravels a potential for development of new anti-cancer therapies based on SSO-mediated HRAS exon 2 skipping. PMID:27195699

  6. Impact of cofactor-binding loop mutations on thermotolerance and activity of E. coli transketolase.

    PubMed

    Morris, P; Rios-Solis, L; García-Arrazola, R; Lye, G J; Dalby, P A

    2016-07-01

    Improvement of thermostability in engineered enzymes can allow biocatalysis on substrates with poor aqueous solubility. Denaturation of the cofactor-binding loops of Escherichia coli transketolase (TK) was previously linked to the loss of enzyme activity under conditions of high pH or urea. Incubation at temperatures just below the thermal melting transition, above which the protein aggregates, was also found to anneal the enzyme to give an increased specific activity. The potential role of cofactor-binding loop instability in this process remained unclear. In this work, the two cofactor-binding loops (residues 185-192 and 382-392) were progressively mutated towards the equivalent sequence from the thermostable Thermus thermophilus TK and variants assessed for their impact on both thermostability and activity. Cofactor-binding loop 2 variants had detrimental effects on specific activity at elevated temperatures, whereas the H192P mutation in cofactor-binding loop 1 resulted in a two-fold improved stability to inactivation at elevated temperatures, and increased the critical onset temperature for aggregation. The specific activity of H192P was 3-fold and 19-fold higher than that for wild-type at 60°C and 65°C respectively, and also remained 2.7-4 fold higher after re-cooling from pre-incubations at either 55°C or 60°C for 1h. Interestingly, H192P was also 2-times more active than wild-type TK at 25°C. Optimal activity was achieved at 60°C for H192P compared to 55°C for wild type. These results show that cofactor-binding loop 1, plays a pivotal role in partial denaturation and aggregation at elevated temperatures. Furthermore, a single rigidifying mutation within this loop can significantly improve the enzyme specific activity, as well as the stability to thermal denaturation and aggregation, to give an increased temperature optimum for activity.

  7. A novel SCARB2 mutation in progressive myoclonus epilepsy indicated by reduced β-glucocerebrosidase activity.

    PubMed

    Zeigler, Marsha; Meiner, Vardiella; Newman, J P; Steiner-Birmanns, Bettina; Bargal, Ruth; Sury, Vivi; Mengistu, Getu; Kakhlon, Or; Leykin, Ina; Argov, Zohar; Abramsky, Oded; Lossos, Alexander

    2014-04-15

    Action myoclonus renal failure (AMRF) syndrome is a rare form of progressive myoclonus epilepsy with renal dysfunction related to mutations in the SCARB2 gene. This gene is involved in lysosomal mannose-6-phosphate-independent trafficking of β-glucocerebrosidase (GC), an enzyme deficient in Gaucher disease. We report a family with myoclonic epilepsy, ataxia and skeletal muscle atrophy but without cognitive impairment or overt renal disease. A novel SCARB2 mutation was indicated by a striking discrepancy between lymphocyte and fibroblast GC activity in the proband evaluated for possible Gaucher disease. Our findings expand the genetic and phenotypic diversity of AMRF and suggest that low GC activity may present an important biochemical clue to the diagnosis of AMRF.

  8. Progranulin Mutations Affects Brain Oscillatory Activity in Fronto-Temporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Moretti, Davide V.; Benussi, Luisa; Fostinelli, Silvia; Ciani, Miriam; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a clinical stage indicating a prodromal phase of dementia. This practical concept could be used also for fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). Progranulin (PGRN) has been recently recognized as a useful diagnostic biomarker for fronto-temporal lobe degeneration (FTLD) due to GRN null mutations. Electroencephalography (EEG) is a reliable tool in detecting brain networks changes. The working hypothesis of the present study is that EEG oscillations could detect different modifications among FTLD stages (FTD-MCI versus overt FTD) as well as differences between GRN mutation carriers versus non-carriers in patients with overt FTD. Materials and Methods: EEG in all patients and PGRN dosage in patients with a clear FTD were detected. The cognitive state has been investigated through mini mental state examination (MMSE). Results: MCI-FTD showed a significant lower spectral power in both alpha and theta oscillations as compared to overt FTD. GRN mutations carriers affected by FTLD show an increase in high alpha and decrease in theta oscillations as compared to non-carriers. Conclusion: EEG frequency rhythms are sensible to different stage of FTD and could detect changes in brain oscillatory activity affected by GRN mutations. PMID:26973510

  9. Somatic Activating Mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 Are Associated with Congenital Hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Ayturk, Ugur M; Couto, Javier A; Hann, Steven; Mulliken, John B; Williams, Kaitlin L; Huang, August Yue; Fishman, Steven J; Boyd, Theonia K; Kozakewich, Harry P W; Bischoff, Joyce; Greene, Arin K; Warman, Matthew L

    2016-04-01

    Congenital hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor that forms in utero. Postnatally, the tumor either involutes quickly (i.e., rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma [RICH]) or partially regresses and stabilizes (i.e., non-involuting congenital hemangioma [NICH]). We hypothesized that congenital hemangiomas arise due to somatic mutation and performed massively parallel mRNA sequencing on affected tissue from eight participants. We identified mutually exclusive, mosaic missense mutations that alter glutamine at amino acid 209 (Glu209) in GNAQ or GNA11 in all tested samples, at variant allele frequencies (VAF) ranging from 3% to 33%. We verified the presence of the mutations in genomic DNA using a combination of molecular inversion probe sequencing (MIP-seq) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR). The Glu209 GNAQ and GNA11 missense variants we identified are common in uveal melanoma and have been shown to constitutively activate MAPK and/or YAP signaling. When we screened additional archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) congenital cutaneous and hepatic hemangiomas, 4/8 had GNAQ or GNA11 Glu209 variants. The same GNAQ or GNA11 mutation is found in both NICH and RICH, so other factors must account for these tumors' different postnatal behaviors.

  10. Elastase Activity in Aspergillus fumigatus Can Arise by Random, Spontaneous Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Blanco, Jose L.; López-Rodas, Victoria; Flores-Moya, Antonio; Costas, Eduardo; García, Marta E.

    2010-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus Fresenius has the capacity to degrade elastin (the principal protein of the lungs) and it is considered that elastase activity (EA) is among the most important pathogenicity factors of this mold. In particular, there is a strong correlation between EA in A. fumigatus and invasive aspergillosis. However, EA is not universal in this mold, and it is unknown whether the capacity to degrade elastin is the consequence of physiological mechanisms and/or genetic changes (putative adaptive mutations) induced after the exposure to this substrate or, on the contrary, it is due to random spontaneous mutations that occur under nonselective conditions. In order to discriminate between these possibilities, a Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis was carried out on an elastase-negative (EA−) A. fumigatus strain, using as selective factor a culture medium containing elastin as the sole source of nitrogen. Here we show that the EA− → EA+ transformation in A. fumigatus appears by rare, random mutations before the exposure of the strain to selective conditions. This work represents the first experimental evidence of pathogenicity factor acquisition in mycelial fungi by preselective mutation. PMID:21350652

  11. Somatic Activating Mutations in GNAQ and GNA11 Are Associated with Congenital Hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Couto, Javier A.; Hann, Steven; Mulliken, John B.; Williams, Kaitlin L.; Huang, August Yue; Fishman, Steven J.; Boyd, Theonia K.; Kozakewich, Harry P.W.; Bischoff, Joyce; Greene, Arin K.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hemangioma is a rare vascular tumor that forms in utero. Postnatally, the tumor either involutes quickly (i.e., rapidly involuting congenital hemangioma [RICH]) or partially regresses and stabilizes (i.e., non-involuting congenital hemangioma [NICH]). We hypothesized that congenital hemangiomas arise due to somatic mutation and performed massively parallel mRNA sequencing on affected tissue from eight participants. We identified mutually exclusive, mosaic missense mutations that alter glutamine at amino acid 209 (Glu209) in GNAQ or GNA11 in all tested samples, at variant allele frequencies (VAF) ranging from 3% to 33%. We verified the presence of the mutations in genomic DNA using a combination of molecular inversion probe sequencing (MIP-seq) and digital droplet PCR (ddPCR). The Glu209 GNAQ and GNA11 missense variants we identified are common in uveal melanoma and have been shown to constitutively activate MAPK and/or YAP signaling. When we screened additional archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) congenital cutaneous and hepatic hemangiomas, 4/8 had GNAQ or GNA11 Glu209 variants. The same GNAQ or GNA11 mutation is found in both NICH and RICH, so other factors must account for these tumors’ different postnatal behaviors. PMID:27058448

  12. Novel Mutations in the Transcriptional Activator Domain of the Human TBX20 in Patients with Atrial Septal Defect

    PubMed Central

    Monroy-Muñoz, Irma Eloisa; Rodríguez-Pérez, José Manuel; Muñoz-Medina, José Esteban; Angeles-Martínez, Javier; García-Trejo, José J.; Morales-Ríos, Edgar; Massó, Felipe; Sandoval-Jones, Juan Pablo; Cervantes-Salazar, Jorge; García-Montes, José Antonio; Calderón-Colmenero, Juan; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Background. The relevance of TBX20 gene in heart development has been demonstrated in many animal models, but there are few works that try to elucidate the effect of TBX20 mutations in human congenital heart diseases. In these studies, all missense mutations associated with atrial septal defect (ASD) were found in the DNA-binding T-box domain, none in the transcriptional activator domain. Methods. We search for TBX20 mutations in a group of patients with ASD or ventricular septal defect (VSD) using the High Resolution Melting (HRM) method and DNA sequencing. Results. We report three missense mutations (Y309D, T370O, and M395R) within the transcriptional activator domain of human TBX20 that were associated with ASD. Conclusions. This is the first association of TBX20 transcriptional activator domain missense mutations with ASD. These findings could have implications for diagnosis, genetic screening, and patient follow-up. PMID:25834824

  13. Activating JAK1 mutation may predict the sensitivity of JAK-STAT inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuqun; Luo, Chonglin; Gu, Qingyang; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Guan; Sun, Hongye; Qian, Ziliang; Tan, Yexiong; Qin, Yuxin; Shen, Yuhong; Xu, Xiaowei; Chen, Shu-Hui; Chan, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hongyang; Mao, Mao; Fang, Douglas D

    2016-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common type of cancers worldwide. However, current therapeutic approaches for this epidemic disease are limited, and its 5-year survival rate hasn't been improved in the past decades. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have become an excellent in vivo system for understanding of disease biology and drug discovery. In order to identify new therapeutic targets for HCC, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on more than 60 HCC PDX models. Among them, four models exhibited protein-altering mutations in JAK1 (Janus Kinase 1) gene. To explore the transforming capability, these mutations were then introduced into HEK293FT and Ba/F3 cells. The results demonstrated that JAK1S703I mutation was able to activate JAK-STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) signaling pathway and drive cell proliferation in the absence of cytokine stimulation in vitro. Furthermore,the sensitivity to the treatment of a JAK1/2 inhibitor, ruxolitinib, was observed in JAK1S703I mutant PDX model, but not in other non-activating mutant or wild type models. Pharmacodynamic analysis showed that phosphorylation of STAT3 in the Ruxolitinib-treated tumor tissues was significantly suppressed. Collectively, our results suggested that JAK1S703I is an activating mutation for JAK-STAT signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo, and JAK-STAT pathway might represent a new therapeutic approach for HCC treatment. Monotherapy using a more potent and specific JAK1 inhibitor and combinatory therapy should be further explored in JAK1 mutant PDX models. PMID:26701727

  14. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  15. Activating JAK1 mutation may predict the sensitivity of JAK-STAT inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shuqun; Luo, Chonglin; Gu, Qingyang; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Guan; Sun, Hongye; Qian, Ziliang; Tan, Yexiong; Qin, Yuxin; Shen, Yuhong; Xu, Xiaowei; Chen, Shu-Hui; Chan, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hongyang; Mao, Mao; Fang, Douglas D

    2016-02-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common type of cancers worldwide. However, current therapeutic approaches for this epidemic disease are limited, and its 5-year survival rate hasn't been improved in the past decades. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have become an excellent in vivo system for understanding of disease biology and drug discovery. In order to identify new therapeutic targets for HCC, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on more than 60 HCC PDX models. Among them, four models exhibited protein-altering mutations in JAK1 (Janus Kinase 1) gene. To explore the transforming capability, these mutations were then introduced into HEK293FT and Ba/F3 cells. The results demonstrated that JAK1S703I mutation was able to activate JAK-STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) signaling pathway and drive cell proliferation in the absence of cytokine stimulation in vitro. Furthermore,the sensitivity to the treatment of a JAK1/2 inhibitor, ruxolitinib, was observed in JAK1S703I mutant PDX model, but not in other non-activating mutant or wild type models. Pharmacodynamic analysis showed that phosphorylation of STAT3 in the Ruxolitinib-treated tumor tissues was significantly suppressed. Collectively, our results suggested that JAK1S703I is an activating mutation for JAK-STAT signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo, and JAK-STAT pathway might represent a new therapeutic approach for HCC treatment. Monotherapy using a more potent and specific JAK1 inhibitor and combinatory therapy should be further explored in JAK1 mutant PDX models.

  16. Activating JAK1 mutation may predict the sensitivity of JAK-STAT inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shuqun; Luo, Chonglin; Gu, Qingyang; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Guan; Sun, Hongye; Qian, Ziliang; Tan, Yexiong; Qin, Yuxin; Shen, Yuhong; Xu, Xiaowei; Chen, Shu-Hui; Chan, Chi-Chung; Wang, Hongyang; Mao, Mao; Fang, Douglas D.

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common type of cancers worldwide. However, current therapeutic approaches for this epidemic disease are limited, and its 5-year survival rate hasn't been improved in the past decades. Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor models have become an excellent in vivo system for understanding of disease biology and drug discovery. In order to identify new therapeutic targets for HCC, whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on more than 60 HCC PDX models. Among them, four models exhibited protein-altering mutations in JAK1 (Janus Kinase 1) gene. To explore the transforming capability, these mutations were then introduced into HEK293FT and Ba/F3 cells. The results demonstrated that JAK1S703I mutation was able to activate JAK-STAT (Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription) signaling pathway and drive cell proliferation in the absence of cytokine stimulation in vitro. Furthermore, the sensitivity to the treatment of a JAK1/2 inhibitor, ruxolitinib, was observed in JAK1S703I mutant PDX model, but not in other non-activating mutant or wild type models. Pharmacodynamic analysis showed that phosphorylation of STAT3 in the Ruxolitinib-treated tumor tissues was significantly suppressed. Collectively, our results suggested that JAK1S703I is an activating mutation for JAK-STAT signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo, and JAK-STAT pathway might represent a new therapeutic approach for HCC treatment. Monotherapy using a more potent and specific JAK1 inhibitor and combinatory therapy should be further explored in JAK1 mutant PDX models. PMID:26701727

  17. Mutational Analysis of AREA, a Transcriptional Activator Mediating Nitrogen Metabolite Repression in Aspergillus nidulans and a Member of the “Streetwise” GATA Family of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard A.; Arst, Herbert N.

    1998-01-01

    Summary: The transcriptional activator AREA is a member of the GATA family of transcription factors and mediates nitrogen metabolite repression in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. The nutritional versatility of A. nidulans and its amenability to classical and reverse genetic manipulations make the AREA DNA binding domain (DBD) a useful model for analyzing GATA family DBDs, particularly as structures of two AREA-DNA complexes have been determined. The 109 extant mutant forms of the AREA DBD surveyed here constitute one of the highest totals of eukaryotic transcription factor DBD mutants, are discussed in light of the roles of individual residues, and are compared to corresponding mutant sequence changes in other fungal GATA factor DBDs. Other topics include delineation of the DBD using both homology and mutational truncation, use of frameshift reversion to detect regions of tolerance to mutational change, the finding that duplication of the DBD can apparently enhance AREA function, and use of the AREA system to analyze a vertebrate GATA factor DBD. Some major points to emerge from work on the AREA DBD are (i) tolerance to sequence change (with retention of function) is surprisingly great, (ii) mutational changes in a transcription factor can have widely differing, even opposing, effects on expression of different structural genes so that monitoring expression of one or even several structural genes can be insufficient and possibly misleading, and (iii) a mutational change altering local hydrophobic packing and DNA binding target specificity can markedly influence the behavior of mutational changes elsewhere in the DBD. PMID:9729601

  18. Binding of AID to DNA does not correlate with mutator activity.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Allysia J; Husain, Solomon; Chaudhuri, Jayanta

    2014-07-01

    The DNA deaminase activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) by deaminating cytidines to uridines at V region (V) genes and switch (S) regions. The mechanism by which AID is recruited to V genes and S region DNA is poorly understood. In this study, we used the CH12 B lymphoma line to demonstrate that, although S regions can efficiently recruit AID and undergo mutations and deletions, AID neither binds to nor mutates the V gene, thus clearly demonstrating intraimmunoglobulin locus specificity. Depletion of the RNA-binding protein polypyrimidine tract binding protein-2, previously shown to promote recruitment of AID to S regions, enables stable association of AID with the V gene. Surprisingly, AID binding to the V gene does not induce SHM. These results unmask a striking lack of correlation between AID binding and its mutator activity, providing evidence for the presence of factors required downstream of AID binding to effect SHM. Furthermore, our findings suggest that S regions are preferred targets for AID and, aided by polypyrimidine tract binding protein-2, act as "sinks" to sequester AID activity from other genomic regions.

  19. Point mutations in the major outer membrane protein drive hypervirulence of a rapidly expanding clone of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zuowei; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Sahin, Orhan; Yaeger, Michael; Plummer, Paul; Zhai, Weiwei; Shen, Zhangqi; Dai, Lei; Zhang, Qijing

    2016-01-01

    Infections due to clonal expansion of highly virulent bacterial strains are clear and present threats to human and animal health. Association of genetic changes with disease is now a routine, but identification of causative mutations that enable disease remains difficult. Campylobacter jejuni is an important zoonotic pathogen transmitted to humans mainly via the foodborne route. C. jejuni typically colonizes the gut, but a hypervirulent and rapidly expanding clone of C. jejuni recently emerged, which is able to translocate across the intestinal tract, causing systemic infection and abortion in pregnant animals. The genetic basis responsible for this hypervirulence is unknown. Here, we developed a strategy, termed “directed genome evolution,” by using hybridization between abortifacient and nonabortifacient strains followed by selection in an animal disease model and whole-genome sequence analysis. This strategy successfully identified SNPs in porA, encoding the major outer membrane protein, are responsible for the hypervirulence. Defined mutagenesis verified that these mutations were both necessary and sufficient for causing abortion. Furthermore, sequence analysis identified porA as the gene with the top genome-wide signal of adaptive evolution using Fu’s Fs, a population genetic metric for recent population size changes, which is consistent with the recent expansion of clone “sheep abortion.” These results identify a key virulence factor in Campylobacter and a potential target for the control of this zoonotic pathogen. Furthermore, this study provides general, unbiased experimental and computational approaches that are broadly applicable for efficient elucidation of disease-causing mutations in bacterial pathogens. PMID:27601641

  20. Combination of a modified block PCR and endonuclease IV-based signal amplification system for ultra-sensitive detection of low-abundance point mutations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xianjin; Xu, Anqin; Zhai, Junqiu; Zhao, Meiping

    2013-12-15

    By combination of a modified block PCR and endonuclease IV-based signal amplification system, we have developed a novel approach for ultra-sensitive detection of point mutations. The method can effectively identify mutant target sequence immersed in a large background of wild-type sequences with abundance down to 0.03% (for C→A) and 0.005% (for C→G). This sensitivity is among the highest in comparison with other existing approaches and the operating procedures are simple and time saving. The method holds great potential for future application in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research.

  1. Effectiveness of Point-Based Physical Activity Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largo-Wight, Erin; Todorovich, John R.; O'Hara, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    Understanding and promoting physical activity is critical to combat the growing obesity epidemic in the U.S. This study was designed to compare two 10-week physical activity programs among college students. One hundred and thirty-six undergraduate college students participated in this randomized posttest only control group study. Seventy-seven…

  2. Identification of a point mutation in growth factor repeat C of the low density lipoprotein-receptor gene in a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia

    SciTech Connect

    Soutar, A.K.; Knight, B.L.; Patel, D.D. )

    1989-06-01

    The coding region of the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor gene from a patient (MM) with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) has been sequenced from six overlapping 500-base-pair amplified fragments of the cDNA from cultured skin fibroblasts. Two separate single nucleotide base changes from the normal sequence were detected. The first involved substitution of guanine for adenine in the third position of the codon for amino acid residue Cys-27 and did not affect the protein sequence. The second mutation was substitution of thymine for cytosine in the DNA for the codon for amino acid residue 664, changing the codon from CCG (proline) to CTG (leucine) and introducing a new site for the restriction enzyme PstI. MM is a true homozygote with two identical genes, and the mutation cosegregated with clinically diagnosed FH in his family in which first cousin marriages occurred frequently. LDL receptors in MM's skin fibroblasts bind less LDL than normal and with reduced affinity. Thus this naturally occurring single point mutation affects both intracellular transport of the protein and ligand binding and occurs in growth factor-like repeat C, a region that has not previously been found to influence LDL binding.

  3. Genetic basis of human complement C4A deficiency. Detection of a point mutation leading to nonexpression.

    PubMed Central

    Barba, G; Rittner, C; Schneider, P M

    1993-01-01

    The fourth component of the human complement system (C4) is coded for by two genes, C4A and C4B, located within the MHC. Null alleles of C4 (C4Q0) are defined by the absence of C4 protein in plasma. These null alleles are due either to large gene deletions or to nonexpression of the respective genes. In a previous study, evidence was obtained for nonexpressed defective genes at the C4A locus, and for gene conversion at the C4B locus. To further characterize the molecular basis of these non-expressed C4A genes, we selected nine pairs of PCR primers from flanking genomic intron sequences to amplify all 41 exons from individuals with a defective C4A gene. The amplified products were subjected to single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis to detect possible mutations. PCR products exhibiting a variation in the SSCP pattern were sequenced directly. In 10 of 12 individuals studied, we detected a 2-bp insertion in exon 29 leading to nonexpression due to the creation of a termination codon, which was observed in linkage to the haplotype HLA-B60-DR6 in seven cases. In one of the other two individuals without this mutation, evidence was obtained for gene conversion to the C4B isotype. The genetic basis of C4A nonexpression in the second individual is not yet known and will be subject to further analysis. Images PMID:8473511

  4. Modification of a Hydrophobic Layer by a Point Mutation in Syntaxin 1A Regulates the Rate of Synaptic Vesicle Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Lagow, Robert D; Bao, Hong; Cohen, Evan N; Daniels, Richard W; Zuzek, Aleksej; Williams, Wade H; Macleod, Gregory T; Sutton, R. Bryan; Zhang, Bing

    2007-01-01

    Both constitutive secretion and Ca2+-regulated exocytosis require the assembly of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide–sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes. At present, little is known about how the SNARE complexes mediating these two distinct pathways differ in structure. Using the Drosophila neuromuscular synapse as a model, we show that a mutation modifying a hydrophobic layer in syntaxin 1A regulates the rate of vesicle fusion. Syntaxin 1A molecules share a highly conserved threonine in the C-terminal +7 layer near the transmembrane domain. Mutation of this threonine to isoleucine results in a structural change that more closely resembles those found in syntaxins ascribed to the constitutive secretory pathway. Flies carrying the I254 mutant protein have increased levels of SNARE complexes and dramatically enhanced rate of both constitutive and evoked vesicle fusion. In contrast, overexpression of the T254 wild-type protein in neurons reduces vesicle fusion only in the I254 mutant background. These results are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations of the SNARE core complex, suggesting that T254 serves as an internal brake to dampen SNARE zippering and impede vesicle fusion, whereas I254 favors fusion by enhancing intermolecular interaction within the SNARE core complex. PMID:17341138

  5. A conventional point of view on active magnetic bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. Ming; Dill, Jim

    1993-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings used in rotating machinery should be designed as locally controlled, independent devices similar to other types of bearings. The functions of control electronics and power amplifiers can be simply and explicitly related to general bearing properties such as load capacity, stiffness, and damping. The dynamics of a rotor and its supporting active magnetic bearings are analyzed in a modified conventional method with an extended state vector containing the bearing state variables.

  6. Mutation Analysis of the LH Receptor Gene in Leydig Cell Adenoma and Hyperplasia and Functional and Biochemical Studies of Activating Mutations of the LH Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Lumbroso, Serge; Verhoef-Post, Miriam; Richter-Unruh, Annette; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.; Funaro, Ada; Beishuizen, Auke; van Marle, André; Drop, Stenvert L. S.; Themmen, Axel P. N.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Germline and somatic activating mutations in the LH receptor (LHR) gene have been reported. Objective: Our objective was to perform mutation analysis of the LHR gene of patients with Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Functional studies were conducted to compare the D578H-LHR mutant with the wild-type (WT)-LHR and the D578G-LHR mutant, a classic cause of testotoxicosis. The three main signal transduction pathways in which LHR is involved were studied. Patients: We describe eight male patients with gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty due to Leydig cell adenoma or hyperplasia. Results: The D578H-LHR mutation was found in the adenoma or nodule with hyperplasia in all but two patients. D578H-LHR displayed a constitutively increased but noninducible production of cAMP, led to a very high production of inositol phosphates, and induced a slight phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK in the absence of human chorionic gonadotropin. The D578G-LHR showed a response intermediate between WT-LHR and the D578H-LHR. Subcellular localization studies showed that the WT-LHR was almost exclusively located at the cell membrane, whereas the D578H-LHR showed signs of internalization. D578H-LHR was the only receptor to colocalize with early endosomes in the absence of human chorionic gonadotropin. Conclusions: Although several LHR mutations have been reported in testotoxicosis, the D578H-LHR mutation, which has been found only as a somatic mutation, appears up until now to be specifically responsible for Leydig cell adenomas. This is reflected by the different activation of the signal transduction pathways, when compared with the WT-LHR or D578G-LHR, which may explain the tumorigenesis in the D578H mutant. PMID:21490077

  7. Mutational analysis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virD2: tyrosine 29 is essential for endonuclease activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, A M; Das, A

    1992-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirD2 polypeptide, in the presence of VirD1, catalyzes a site- and strand-specific nicking reaction at the T-DNA border sequences. VirD2 is found tightly attached to the 5' end of the nicked DNA. The protein-DNA complex is presumably formed via a tyrosine residue of VirD2 (F. Durrenberger, A. Crameri, B. Hohn, and Z. Koukolikova-Nicola, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 86:9154-9158, 1989). A mutational approach was used to study whether a tyrosine residue(s) of VirD2 is required for its activity. By site-specific mutagenesis, a tyrosine (Y) residue at position 29, 68, 99, 119, 121, 160, or 195 of the octopine Ti plasmid pTiA6 VirD2 was altered to phenylalanine (F). The Y-29-F or Y-121-F mutation completely abolished nicking activity of VirD2 in vivo in Escherichia coli. Two other substitutions, Y-68-F and Y-160-F, drastically reduced VirD2 activity. A substitution at position 99, 119, or 195 had no effect on VirD2 activity. Additional mutagenesis experiments showed that at position 29, no other amino acid could substitute for tyrosine without destroying VirD2 activity. At position 121, only a tryptophan (W) residue could be substituted. This, however, yielded a mutant protein with significantly reduced VirD2 activity. The nicked DNA from strains bearing a Y-68-F, Y-99-F, Y-119-F, Y-160-F, Y-195-F, or Y-121-W mutation in VirD2 was always found to contain a tightly linked protein. Images PMID:1309520

  8. Effect of lysine to alanine mutations on the phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition of glutaminase.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Charles J; Acheff, Eric; Kennedy, Ryan; Taylor, Lynn; Curthoys, Norman P

    2015-09-01

    The GLS1 gene encodes a mitochondrial glutaminase that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, small intestine and many transformed cells. Recent studies have identified multiple lysine residues in glutaminase that are sites of N-acetylation. Interestingly, these sites are located within either a loop segment that regulates access of glutamine to the active site or the dimer:dimer interface that participates in the phosphate-dependent oligomerization and activation of the enzyme. These two segments also contain the binding sites for bis-2[5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]ethylsulfide (BPTES), a highly specific and potent uncompetitive inhibitor of this glutaminase. BPTES is also the lead compound for development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents. To provide a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of N-acetylation, the corresponding lysine to alanine mutations were constructed in the hGACΔ1 plasmid. The wild type and mutated proteins were purified by Ni(+)-affinity chromatography and their phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition profiles were analyzed. Two of the alanine substitutions in the loop segment (K311A and K328A) and the one in the dimer:dimer interface (K396A) form enzymes that require greater concentrations of phosphate to produce half-maximal activation and exhibit greater sensitivity to BPTES inhibition. By contrast, the K320A mutation results in a glutaminase that exhibits near maximal activity in the absence of phosphate and is not inhibited by BPTES. Thus, lysine N-acetylation may contribute to the acute regulation of glutaminase activity in various tissues and alter the efficacy of BPTES-type inhibitors.

  9. Germline NLRP1 Mutations Cause Skin Inflammatory and Cancer Susceptibility Syndromes via Inflammasome Activation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Franklin L; Mamaï, Ons; Sborgi, Lorenzo; Boussofara, Lobna; Hopkins, Richard; Robinson, Kim; Szeverényi, Ildikó; Takeichi, Takuya; Balaji, Reshmaa; Lau, Aristotle; Tye, Hazel; Roy, Keya; Bonnard, Carine; Ahl, Patricia J; Jones, Leigh Ann; Baker, Paul; Lacina, Lukas; Otsuka, Atsushi; Fournie, Pierre R; Malecaze, François; Lane, E Birgitte; Akiyama, Masashi; Kabashima, Kenji; Connolly, John E; Masters, Seth L; Soler, Vincent J; Omar, Salma Samir; McGrath, John A; Nedelcu, Roxana; Gribaa, Moez; Denguezli, Mohamed; Saad, Ali; Hiller, Sebastian; Reversade, Bruno

    2016-09-22

    Inflammasome complexes function as key innate immune effectors that trigger inflammation in response to pathogen- and danger-associated signals. Here, we report that germline mutations in the inflammasome sensor NLRP1 cause two overlapping skin disorders: multiple self-healing palmoplantar carcinoma (MSPC) and familial keratosis lichenoides chronica (FKLC). We find that NLRP1 is the most prominent inflammasome sensor in human skin, and all pathogenic NLRP1 mutations are gain-of-function alleles that predispose to inflammasome activation. Mechanistically, NLRP1 mutations lead to increased self-oligomerization by disrupting the PYD and LRR domains, which are essential in maintaining NLRP1 as an inactive monomer. Primary keratinocytes from patients experience spontaneous inflammasome activation and paracrine IL-1 signaling, which is sufficient to cause skin inflammation and epidermal hyperplasia. Our findings establish a group of non-fever inflammasome disorders, uncover an unexpected auto-inhibitory function for the pyrin domain, and provide the first genetic evidence linking NLRP1 to skin inflammatory syndromes and skin cancer predisposition. PMID:27662089

  10. Target DNA sequence directly regulates the frequency of activation-induced deaminase-dependent mutations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhangguo; Viboolsittiseri, Sawanee S; O'Connor, Brian P; Wang, Jing H

    2012-10-15

    Activation-induced deaminase (AID) catalyses class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B lymphocytes to enhance Ab diversity. CSR involves breaking and rejoining highly repetitive switch (S) regions in the IgH (Igh) locus. S regions appear to be preferential targets of AID. To determine whether S region sequence per se, independent of Igh cis regulatory elements, can influence AID targeting efficiency and mutation frequency, we established a knock-in mouse model by inserting a core Sγ1 region into the first intron of proto-oncogene Bcl6, which is a non-Ig target of SHM. We found that the mutation frequency of the inserted Sγ1 region was dramatically higher than that of the adjacent Bcl6 endogenous sequence. Mechanistically, S region-enhanced SHM was associated with increased recruitment of AID and RNA polymerase II, together with Spt5, albeit to a lesser extent. Our studies demonstrate that target DNA sequences influence mutation frequency via regulating AID recruitment. We propose that the nucleotide sequence preference may serve as an additional layer of AID regulation by restricting its mutagenic activity to specific sequences despite the observation that AID has the potential to access the genome widely.

  11. Deep Intronic Mutation and Pseudo Exon Activation as a Novel Muscular Hypertrophy Modifier in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Bouyer, Claire; Forestier, Lionel; Renand, Gilles; Oulmouden, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Myostatin is essential for proper regulation of myogenesis, and inactivation of Myostatin results in muscle hypertrophy. Here, we identified an unexpected mutation in the myostatin gene which is almost fixed in Blonde d'Aquitaine cattle. In skeletal muscle, the mutant allele was highly expressed leading to an abnormal transcript consisting of a 41-bp inclusion and premature termination codons and to residual levels of a correctly spliced transcript. This expression pattern, caused by a leaky intronic mutation with regard to spliceosome activity and its apparent stability with regard to surveillance mechanisms, could contribute to the moderate muscle hypertrophy in this cattle breed. This finding is of importance for genetic counseling for meat quantity and quality in livestock production and possibly to manipulate myostatin pre-mRNA in human muscle diseases. PMID:24827585

  12. A GPR54-activating mutation in a patient with central precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Teles, Milena Gurgel; Bianco, Suzy D C; Brito, Vinicius Nahime; Trarbach, Ericka B; Kuohung, Wendy; Xu, Shuyun; Seminara, Stephanie B; Mendonca, Berenice B; Kaiser, Ursula B; Latronico, Ana Claudia

    2008-02-14

    Gonadotropin-dependent, or central, precocious puberty is caused by early maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. In girls, this condition is most often idiopathic. Recently, a G protein-coupled receptor, GPR54, and its ligand, kisspeptin, were described as an excitatory neuroregulator system for the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In this study, we have identified an autosomal dominant GPR54 mutation--the substitution of proline for arginine at codon 386 (Arg386Pro)--in an adopted girl with idiopathic central precocious puberty (whose biologic family was not available for genetic studies). In vitro studies have shown that this mutation leads to prolonged activation of intracellular signaling pathways in response to kisspeptin. The Arg386Pro mutant appears to be associated with central precocious puberty.

  13. Myopathic lamin mutations cause reductive stress and activate the nrf2/keap-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K; Ponce, Jessica M; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A; Young, Grant H; Moore, Steven A; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  14. Myopathic Lamin Mutations Cause Reductive Stress and Activate the Nrf2/Keap-1 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dialynas, George; Shrestha, Om K.; Ponce, Jessica M.; Zwerger, Monika; Thiemann, Dylan A.; Young, Grant H.; Moore, Steven A.; Yu, Liping; Lammerding, Jan; Wallrath, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the human LMNA gene cause muscular dystrophy by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. The LMNA gene encodes A-type lamins, intermediate filaments that form a network underlying the inner nuclear membrane, providing structural support for the nucleus and organizing the genome. To better understand the pathogenesis caused by mutant lamins, we performed a structural and functional analysis on LMNA missense mutations identified in muscular dystrophy patients. These mutations perturb the tertiary structure of the conserved A-type lamin Ig-fold domain. To identify the effects of these structural perturbations on lamin function, we modeled these mutations in Drosophila Lamin C and expressed the mutant lamins in muscle. We found that the structural perturbations had minimal dominant effects on nuclear stiffness, suggesting that the muscle pathology was not accompanied by major structural disruption of the peripheral nuclear lamina. However, subtle alterations in the lamina network and subnuclear reorganization of lamins remain possible. Affected muscles had cytoplasmic aggregation of lamins and additional nuclear envelope proteins. Transcription profiling revealed upregulation of many Nrf2 target genes. Nrf2 is normally sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap-1. Under oxidative stress Nrf2 dissociates from Keap-1, translocates into the nucleus, and activates gene expression. Unexpectedly, biochemical analyses revealed high levels of reducing agents, indicative of reductive stress. The accumulation of cytoplasmic lamin aggregates correlated with elevated levels of the autophagy adaptor p62/SQSTM1, which also binds Keap-1, abrogating Nrf2 cytoplasmic sequestration, allowing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and target gene activation. Elevated p62/SQSTM1 and nuclear enrichment of Nrf2 were identified in muscle biopsies from the corresponding muscular dystrophy patients, validating the disease relevance of our Drosophila model. Thus, novel connections were made

  15. Identification of FGFR4-activating mutations in human rhabdomyosarcomas that promote metastasis in xenotransplanted models

    PubMed Central

    VI, James G. Taylor; Cheuk, Adam T.; Tsang, Patricia S.; Chung, Joon-Yong; Song, Young K.; Desai, Krupa; Yu, Yanlin; Chen, Qing-Rong; Shah, Kushal; Youngblood, Victoria; Fang, Jun; Kim, Su Young; Yeung, Choh; Helman, Lee J.; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Ngo, Vu; Staudt, Louis M.; Wei, Jun S.; Khanna, Chand; Catchpoole, Daniel; Qualman, Stephen J.; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Merlino, Glenn; Chanock, Stephen J.; Khan, Javed

    2009-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a childhood cancer originating from skeletal muscle, and patient survival is poor in the presence of metastatic disease. Few determinants that regulate metastasis development have been identified. The receptor tyrosine kinase FGFR4 is highly expressed in RMS tissue, suggesting a role in tumorigenesis, although its functional importance has not been defined. Here, we report the identification of mutations in FGFR4 in human RMS tumors that lead to its activation and present evidence that it functions as an oncogene in RMS. Higher FGFR4 expression in RMS tumors was associated with advanced-stage cancer and poor survival, while FGFR4 knockdown in a human RMS cell line reduced tumor growth and experimental lung metastases when the cells were transplanted into mice. Moreover, 6 FGFR4 tyrosine kinase domain mutations were found among 7 of 94 (7.5%) primary human RMS tumors. The mutants K535 and E550 increased autophosphorylation, Stat3 signaling, tumor proliferation, and metastatic potential when expressed in a murine RMS cell line. These mutants also transformed NIH 3T3 cells and led to an enhanced metastatic phenotype. Finally, murine RMS cell lines expressing the K535 and E550 FGFR4 mutants were substantially more susceptible to apoptosis in the presence of a pharmacologic FGFR inhibitor than the control cell lines expressing the empty vector or wild-type FGFR4. Together, our results demonstrate that mutationally activated FGFR4 acts as an oncogene, and these are what we believe to be the first known mutations in a receptor tyrosine kinase in RMS. These findings support the potential therapeutic targeting of FGFR4 in RMS. PMID:19809159

  16. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene: correlation between sulfate transport activity and chondrodysplasia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Karniski, L P

    2001-07-01

    The diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene encodes a transmembrane protein that transports sulfate into chondrocytes to maintain adequate sulfation of proteoglycans. Mutations in this gene are responsible for four recessively inherited chondrodysplasias that include diastrophic dysplasia, multiple epiphyseal dysplasia, atelosteogenesis type 2 and achondrogenesis 1B (ACG-1B). To determine whether the DTDST mutations found in individuals with these chondrodysplasias differ functionally from each other, we compared the sulfate transport activity of 11 reported DTDST mutations. Five mutations, G255E, Delta a1751, L483P, R178X and N425D, had minimal sulfate transport function following expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Two mutations, Delta V340 and R279W, transported sulfate at rates of 17 and 32%, respectively, of wild-type DTDST. Four mutations, A715V, C653S, Q454P and G678V, had rates of sulfate transport nearly equal to that of wild-type DTDST. Transport kinetics were not different among the four mutations with near-normal sulfate transport function and wild-type DTDST. When the sulfate transport function of the different DTDST mutations are grouped according to the general phenotypes, individuals with the most severe form, ACG-1B, tend to be homozygous for null mutations, individuals with the moderately severe atelosteogenesis type 2 have at least one allele with a loss-of-function mutation, and individuals with the mildest forms are typically homozygous for mutations with residual sulfate transport function. However, in the X.laevis oocyte expression system, the correlation between residual transport function and the severity of phenotype was not absolute, suggesting that factors in addition to the intrinsic sulfate transport properties of the DTDST protein may influence the phenotype in individuals with DTDST mutations. PMID:11448940

  17. [A point mutation in the coat protein gene affects long distance transport of the tobacco mosaic virus].

    PubMed

    Koshkina, T E; Baranova, E N; Zavriev, S K

    2003-01-01

    A mutation resulting in substitution of positively charged Lys53 with negatively charged Glu in the coat protein was introduced in the infectious cDNA copy of the genome of wild-type tobacco mosaic virus strain U1. Kinetic analysis of long-distance virus transport in plants showed that systemic distribution of the mutant virus was delayed by 5-6 days as compared with the wild-type one. On evidence of RNA sequencing in the mutant progeny, Glu50 of the coat protein was substituted with Lys after passage I to compensate for the loss of the positive charge at position 53. Electron microscopy revealed atypical inclusions (rodlike structures, multiple electron-dense globular particles) in the nuclear interchromatin space of leaf mesophyll cells infected with the mutant but not with the wild-type virus. PMID:12942648

  18. Unusual Reversible Oligomerization of Unfolded Dengue Envelope Protein Domain 3 at High Temperatures and Its Abolition by a Point Mutation.

    PubMed

    Saotome, Tomonori; Nakamura, Shigeyoshi; Islam, Mohammad M; Nakazawa, Akiko; Dellarole, Mariano; Arisaka, Fumio; Kidokoro, Shun-Ichi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2016-08-16

    We report differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) experiments between 10 and 120 °C of Dengue 4 envelope protein domain 3 (DEN4 ED3), a small 107-residue monomeric globular protein domain. The thermal unfolding of DEN4 ED3 was fully reversible and exhibited two peculiar endothermic peaks. AUC (analytical ultracentrifugation) experiments at 25 °C indicated that DEN4 ED3 was monomeric. Detailed thermodynamic analysis indicated that the two endothermic peaks separated with an increasing protein concentration, and global fitting of the DSC curves strongly suggested the presence of unfolded tetramers at temperatures around 80-90 °C, which dissociated to unfolded monomers at even higher temperatures. To further characterize this rare thermal unfolding process, we designed and constructed a DEN4 ED3 variant that would unfold according to a two-state model, typical of globular proteins. We thus substituted Val 380, the most buried residue at the dimeric interface in the protein crystal, with less hydrophobic amino acids (Ala, Ser, Thr, Asn, and Lys). All variants showed a single heat absorption peak, typical of small globular proteins. In particular, the DSC thermogram of DEN4 V380K indicated a two-state reversible thermal unfolding independent of protein concentration, indicating that the high-temperature oligomeric state was successfully abolished by a single mutation. These observations confirmed the standard view that small monomeric globular proteins undergo a two-state unfolding. However, the reversible formation of unfolded oligomers at high temperatures is a truly new phenomenon, which was fully inhibited by an accurately designed single mutation. PMID:27433922

  19. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior. PMID:24206670

  20. Disruption of dopamine neuron activity pattern regulation through selective expression of a human KCNN3 mutation.

    PubMed

    Soden, Marta E; Jones, Graham L; Sanford, Christina A; Chung, Amanda S; Güler, Ali D; Chavkin, Charles; Luján, Rafael; Zweifel, Larry S

    2013-11-20

    The calcium-activated small conductance potassium channel SK3 plays an essential role in the regulation of dopamine neuron activity patterns. Here we demonstrate that expression of a human disease-related SK3 mutation (hSK3Δ) in dopamine neurons of mice disrupts the balance between tonic and phasic dopamine neuron activity. Expression of hSK3Δ suppressed endogenous SK currents, reducing coupling between SK channels and NMDA receptors (NMDARs) and increasing permissiveness for burst firing. Consistent with enhanced excitability of dopamine neurons, hSK3Δ increased evoked calcium signals in dopamine neurons in vivo and potentiated evoked dopamine release. Specific expression of hSK3Δ led to deficits in attention and sensory gating and heightened sensitivity to a psychomimetic drug. Sensory-motor alterations and psychomimetic sensitivity were recapitulated in a mouse model of transient, reversible dopamine neuron activation. These results demonstrate the cell-autonomous effects of a human ion channel mutation on dopamine neuron physiology and the impact of activity pattern disruption on behavior.

  1. Mutation analysis of PobR and PcaU, closely related transcriptional activators in acinetobacter.

    PubMed

    Kok, R G; D'Argenio, D A; Ornston, L N

    1998-10-01

    Acinetobacter PobR and PcaU are transcriptional activators that closely resemble each other in primary structure, DNA-binding sites, metabolic modulators, and physiological function. PobR responds to the inducer-metabolite p-hydroxybenzoate and activates transcription of pobA, the structural gene for the enzyme that converts p-hydroxybenzoate to protocatechuate. This compound, differing from p-hydroxybenzoate only in that it contains an additional oxygen atom, binds to PcaU and thereby specifically activates transcription of the full set of genes for protocatechuate catabolism. Particular experimental attention has been paid to PobR and PcaU from Acinetobacter strain ADP1, which exhibits exceptional competence for natural transformation. This trait allowed selection of mutant strains in which pobR function had been impaired by nucleotide substitutions introduced by PCR replication errors. Contrary to expectation, the spectrum of amino acids whose substitution led to loss of function in PobR shows no marked similarity to the spectrum of amino acids conserved by the demand for continued function during evolutionary divergence of PobR, PcaU, and related proteins. Surface plasmon resonance was used to determine the ability of mutant PobR proteins to bind to DNA in the pobA-pobR intergenic region. Deleterious mutations that strongly affect DNA binding all cluster in and around the PobR region that contains a helix-turn-helix motif, whereas mutations causing defects in the central portion of the PobR primary sequence do not seem to have a significant effect on operator binding. PCR-generated mutations allowing PobR to mimic PcaU function invariably caused a T57A amino acid substitution, making the helix-turn-helix sequence of PobR more like that of PcaU. The mutant PobR depended on p-hydroxybenzoate for its activity, but this dependence could be relieved by any of six amino acid substitutions in the center of the PobR primary sequence. Independent mutations allowing Pca

  2. Probing impact of active site residue mutations on stability and activity of Neisseria polysaccharea amylosucrase.

    PubMed

    Daudé, David; Topham, Christopher M; Remaud-Siméon, Magali; André, Isabelle

    2013-12-01

    The amylosucrase from Neisseria polysaccharea is a transglucosidase from the GH13 family of glycoside-hydrolases that naturally catalyzes the synthesis of α-glucans from the widely available donor sucrose. Interestingly, natural molecular evolution has modeled a dense hydrogen bond network at subsite -1 responsible for the specific recognition of sucrose and conversely, it has loosened interactions at the subsite +1 creating a highly promiscuous subsite +1. The residues forming these subsites are considered to be likely involved in the activity as well as the overall stability of the enzyme. To assess their role, a structure-based approach was followed to reshape the subsite -1. A strategy based on stability change predictions, using the FoldX algorithm, was considered to identify the best candidates for site-directed mutagenesis and guide the construction of a small targeted library. A miniaturized purification protocol was developed and both mutant stability and substrate promiscuity were explored. A range of 8 °C between extreme melting temperature values was observed and some variants were able to synthesize series of oligosaccharides with distributions differing from that of the parental enzyme. The crucial role of subsite -1 was thus highlighted and the biocatalysts generated can now be considered as starting points for further engineering purposes.

  3. Novel gene mutations in patients with 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency that confer partial enzyme activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuemei; Zhang, Martin Y H; Miller, Walter L; Portale, Anthony A

    2002-06-01

    The rate-limiting, hormonally regulated step in the biological activation of vitamin D is its 1alpha-hydroxylation to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)(2)D] in the kidney, catalyzed by the mitochondrial cytochrome P450 enzyme, P450c1alpha. We previously cloned the human P450c1alpha cDNA and gene, and identified 14 different mutations, including 7 missense, in 19 patients with 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, also known as vitamin D-dependent rickets type 1. None of the missense mutations encoded a protein with detectable enzymatic activity in vitro. Although there is phenotypic variation among such patients, the molecular basis of this variation is unknown. We analyzed 6 additional patients with clinical and radiographic features of rickets; in 4 patients the laboratory abnormalities were typical of 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, but in 2 they were unusually mild [mild hypocalcemia and normal serum 1,25-(OH)(2)D concentration]. Direct sequencing revealed that all patients had P450c1alpha mutations on both alleles. Five new and 2 known mutations were identified. The new mutations included a 5-bp deletion with a 6-bp novel insertion causing a frameshift in exon 2, and a G to A change at +1 of intron 2; a minigene experiment proved that this intronic mutation prevented proper splicing. Three new missense mutations were found and tested by expressing the mutant cDNA in mouse Leydig MA-10 cells. The R389G mutant was totally inactive, but mutant L343F retained 2.3% of wild-type activity, and mutant E189G retained 22% of wild-type activity. The two mutations that confer partial enzyme activity in vitro were found in the 2 patents with mild laboratory abnormalities, suggesting that such mutations contribute to the phenotypic variation observed in patients with 1alpha-hydroxylase deficiency.

  4. A Thrombomodulin Mutation that Impairs Active Protein C Generation Is Detrimental in Severe Pneumonia-Derived Gram-Negative Sepsis (Melioidosis)

    PubMed Central

    Kager, Liesbeth M.; Wiersinga, W. Joost; Roelofs, Joris J. T. H.; de Boer, Onno J.; Weiler, Hartmut; van 't Veer, Cornelis; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Background During severe (pneumo)sepsis inflammatory and coagulation pathways become activated as part of the host immune response. Thrombomodulin (TM) is involved in a range of host defense mechanisms during infection and plays a pivotal role in activation of protein C (PC) into active protein C (APC). APC has both anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study we investigated the effects of impaired TM-mediated APC generation during melioidosis, a common form of community-acquired Gram-negative (pneumo)sepsis in South-East Asia caused by Burkholderia (B.) pseudomallei. Methodology/Principal Findings (WT) mice and mice with an impaired capacity to activate protein C due to a point mutation in their Thbd gene (TMpro/pro mice) were intranasally infected with B. pseudomallei and sacrificed after 24, 48 or 72 hours for analyses. Additionally, survival studies were performed. When compared to WT mice, TMpro/pro mice displayed a worse survival upon infection with B. pseudomallei, accompanied by increased coagulation activation, enhanced lung neutrophil influx and bronchoalveolar inflammation at late time points, together with increased hepatocellular injury. The TMpro/pro mutation had limited if any impact on bacterial growth and dissemination. Conclusion/Significance TM-mediated protein C activation contributes to protective immunity after infection with B. pseudomallei. These results add to a better understanding of the regulation of the inflammatory and procoagulant response during severe Gram-negative (pneumo)sepsis. PMID:24762740

  5. 78 FR 44624 - Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire); Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... AFFAIRS [OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire)] Proposed Information Collection (Conduct the Point-of-Care Research Questionnaire); Activities Under OMB Review AGENCY: Veterans...) 395-7316. Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-NEW (Conduct the Point of Care Research...

  6. Selective disruption of high sensitivity heat activation but not capsaicin activation of TRPV1 channels by pore turret mutations.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Yang, Fan; Cao, Xu; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Wang, KeWei; Zheng, Jie

    2012-04-01

    The capsaicin receptor transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV)1 is a highly heat-sensitive ion channel. Although chemical activation and heat activation of TRPV1 elicit similar pungent, painful sensation, the molecular mechanism underlying synergistic activation remains mysterious. In particular, where the temperature sensor is located and whether heat and capsaicin share a common activation pathway are debated. To address these fundamental issues, we searched for channel mutations that selectively affected one form of activation. We found that deletion of the first 10 amino acids of the pore turret significantly reduced the heat response amplitude and shifted the heat activation threshold, whereas capsaicin activation remained unchanged. Removing larger portions of the turret disrupted channel function. Introducing an artificial sequence to replace the deleted region restored sensitive capsaicin activation in these nonfunctional channels. The heat activation, however, remained significantly impaired, with the current exhibiting diminishing heat sensitivity to a level indistinguishable from that of a voltage-gated potassium channel, Kv7.4. Our results demonstrate that heat and capsaicin activation of TRPV1 are structurally and mechanistically distinct processes, and the pore turret is an indispensible channel structure involved in the heat activation process but is not part of the capsaicin activation pathway. Synergistic effect of heat and capsaicin on TRPV1 activation may originate from convergence of the two pathways on a common activation gate.

  7. VEGF neutralizing aerosol therapy in primary pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Virginie; Rabbe, Nathalie; Guilleminault, Laurent; Paul, Flora; Schlick, Laurène; Azzopardi, Nicolas; Duruisseaux, Michael; Fouquenet, Delphine; Montharu, Jérôme; Redini, Françoise; Paintaud, Gilles; Lemarié, Etienne; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie; Heuzé-Vourc'h, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    K-ras mutations promote angiogenesis in lung cancer and contribute to the drug resistance of cancer cells. It is not clear whether K-ras mutated adenocarcinomas are sensitive to anti-angiogenic therapy with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Anti-angiogenic mAbs are usually delivered systemically, but only a small proportion reaches the lung after intravenous injection. We investigated the relevance of a non-invasive pulmonary route for the delivery of anti-VEGF mAbs in the mouse K-ras(LA1) model. We found that pulmonary delivery of these mAbs significantly reduced the number of tumor lesions and inhibited malignant progression. The antitumor effect involves the VEGFR2-dependent inhibition of blood vessel growth, which impairs tumor proliferation. Pharmacokinetic analysis of aerosolized anti-VEGF showed its low rate of passage into the bloodstream, suggesting that this delivery route is associated with reduced systemic side effects. Our findings highlight the value of the aerosol route for administration of anti-angiogenic mAbs in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with K-ras activating-mutations. PMID:25484066

  8. KA1-targeted regulatory domain mutations activate Chk1 in the absence of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gong, Eun-Yeung; Smits, Veronique A J; Fumagallo, Felipe; Piscitello, Desiree; Morrice, Nick; Freire, Raimundo; Gillespie, David A

    2015-01-01

    The Chk1 protein kinase is activated in response to DNA damage through ATR-mediated phosphorylation at multiple serine-glutamine (SQ) residues within the C-terminal regulatory domain, however the molecular mechanism is not understood. Modelling indicates a high probability that this region of Chk1 contains a kinase-associated 1 (KA1) domain, a small, compact protein fold found in multiple protein kinases including SOS2, AMPK and MARK3. We introduced mutations into Chk1 designed to disrupt specific structural elements of the predicted KA1 domain. Remarkably, six of seven Chk1 KA1 mutants exhibit constitutive biological activity (Chk1-CA) in the absence of DNA damage, profoundly arresting cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle. Cell cycle arrest induced by selected Chk1-CA mutants depends on kinase catalytic activity, which is increased several-fold compared to wild-type, however phosphorylation of the key ATR regulatory site serine 345 (S345) is not required. Thus, mutations targeting the putative Chk1 KA1 domain confer constitutive biological activity by circumventing the need for ATR-mediated positive regulatory phosphorylation. PMID:26039276

  9. Metabolic activity of permafrost bacteria below the freezing point

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and -20 degrees C on the basis of incorporation of (14)C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5 degrees C) to 20 days (-10 degrees C) to ca. 160 days (-20 degrees C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature.

  10. Metabolic Activity of Permafrost Bacteria below the Freezing Point

    PubMed Central

    Rivkina, E. M.; Friedmann, E. I.; McKay, C. P.; Gilichinsky, D. A.

    2000-01-01

    Metabolic activity was measured in the laboratory at temperatures between 5 and −20°C on the basis of incorporation of 14C-labeled acetate into lipids by samples of a natural population of bacteria from Siberian permafrost (permanently frozen soil). Incorporation followed a sigmoidal pattern similar to growth curves. At all temperatures, the log phase was followed, within 200 to 350 days, by a stationary phase, which was monitored until the 550th day of activity. The minimum doubling times ranged from 1 day (5°C) to 20 days (−10°C) to ca. 160 days (−20°C). The curves reached the stationary phase at different levels, depending on the incubation temperature. We suggest that the stationary phase, which is generally considered to be reached when the availability of nutrients becomes limiting, was brought on under our conditions by the formation of diffusion barriers in the thin layers of unfrozen water known to be present in permafrost soils, the thickness of which depends on temperature. PMID:10919774

  11. CSF1R copy number changes, point mutations, and RNA and protein overexpression in renal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Soares, Maria J; Pinto, Mafalda; Henrique, Rui; Vieira, Joana; Cerveira, Nuno; Peixoto, Ana; Martins, Ana T; Oliveira, Jorge; Jerónimo, Carmen; Teixeira, Manuel R

    2009-06-01

    Renal cell carcinomas comprise a heterogeneous group of tumors. Of these, 80% are clear cell renal cell carcinomas, which are characterized by loss of 3p, often with concomitant gain of 5q22qter. Although VHL is considered the main target gene of the 3p deletions, none has been identified as the relevant target gene for the 5q gain. We have studied 75 consecutive kidney tumors and paired normal kidney samples to evaluate at the genomic and expression levels the tyrosine kinase genes CSF1R and PDGFRB as potential targets in this region. Our findings show that RNA expression of CSF1R, but not of PDGFRB, was significantly higher in clear cell renal cell carcinomas than in normal tissue samples, something that was corroborated at the protein level by immunohistochemistry. The CSF1R staining pattern in clear cell renal cell carcinomas was clearly different from that observed in other renal cell carcinomas, suggesting its potential usefulness in differential diagnosis. FISH analysis demonstrated whole chromosomal gain and relative CSF1R/PDGFRB copy number gain in clear cell renal cell carcinomas, which might contribute to CSF1R overexpression. Finally, one polymorphism and two novel mutations were identified in CSF1R in clear cell renal cell carcinoma patients. Our data allow us to conclude that CSF1R plays a relevant role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma carcinogenesis and raise the possibility that CSF1R may represent a future valuable therapeutic target in these patients.

  12. In silico point mutation and evolutionary trace analysis applied to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in deciphering ligand-binding surfaces.

    PubMed

    Parthiban, Marimuthu; Shanmughavel, Piramanayagam; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2010-10-01

    The nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the Cys-loop superfamily and contain ligand gated ion channels (LGIC). These receptors are located mostly in the central nervous system (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS). nAChRs reside at pre-synaptic regions to mediate acetylcholine neurotransmission and in the post synaptic membrane to propagate nerve impulses through neurons via acetylcholine. Malfunction of this neurotransmitter receptor is believed to cause various neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia, and nAChRs are thus important drug targets. In the present work, starting from an earlier model of pentameric alpha7nAChR, a considerable effort has been taken to investigate interaction with ligands by performing docking studies with a diverse array of agonists and antagonists. Analysis of these docking complexes reveals identification of possible ligand-interacting residues. Some of these residues, e.g. Ser34, Gln55, Ser146, and Tyr166, which are evolutionarily conserved, were specifically subjected to virtual mutations based on their amino acid properties and found to be highly sensitive in the presence of antagonists by docking. Further, the study was extended using evolutionary trace analysis, revealing conserved and class-specific residues close to the putative ligand-binding site, further supporting the results of docking experiments.

  13. Characterization of two MODY2 mutations with different susceptibility to activation

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, Sara; Platz, Christian; Waterstradt, Rica; Baltrusch, Simone

    2015-09-04

    Glucokinase plays a key role in glucose sensing in pancreatic beta cells and in liver metabolism. Heterozygous inactivating glucokinase mutations cause the autosomal dominantly inherited MODY2 subtype of maturity-onset diabetes of the young. The goal of this study was to elucidate the pathogenicity of the recently described glucokinase mutants L304P and L315H, located in an alpha-helix and connecting region, respectively, at the outer region of the large domain of glucokinase. Both mutants showed wild-type-like cytosolic localization, but faster protein degradation in insulin-secreting MIN6 cells. However, strongly reduced nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of the mutants was observed in primary hepatocytes suggesting reduced interaction with the liver specific glucokinase regulatory protein. Both mutants displayed a significantly lowered glucokinase activity compared to the wild-type protein. Even though the L315H protein showed the lowest enzymatic activity, this mutant was very sensitive to allosteric activation. The endogenous activator fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase evoked an increase in glucokinase activity for both mutants, but much stronger for L315H compared to L304P. The synthetic activator RO281675 was ineffective against the L304P mutant. Expression of the mutant proteins evoked loss of glucose-induced insulin secretion in MIN6 cells. Administration of RO281675 increased insulin secretion, however, only for the L315H mutant. Thus, a glucokinase activator drug therapy may help MODY2 patients not in general, but seems to be a useful strategy for carriers of the L315H glucokinase mutation. - Highlights: • The GK mutants L304P and L315H display a highly reduced enzymatic activity. • In hepatocytes both mutations lower the nuclear/cytoplasmic localization ratio of GK. • Both mutants inhibit stimulus-secretion coupling in insulin-producing cells. • Activation by fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase and by RO281675 is stronger for L315H. • RO281675 stimulates

  14. High incidence of biallelic point mutations in the Runt domain of the AML1/PEBP2 alpha B gene in Mo acute myeloid leukemia and in myeloid malignancies with acquired trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Preudhomme, C; Warot-Loze, D; Roumier, C; Grardel-Duflos, N; Garand, R; Lai, J L; Dastugue, N; Macintyre, E; Denis, C; Bauters, F; Kerckaert, J P; Cosson, A; Fenaux, P

    2000-10-15

    The AML1 gene, situated in 21q22, is often rearranged in acute leukemias through t(8;21) translocation, t(12;21) translocation, or less often t(3;21) translocation. Recently, point mutations in the Runt domain of the AML1 gene have also been reported in leukemia patients. Observations for mutations of the Runt domain of the AML1 gene in bone marrow cells were made in 300 patients, including 131 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 94 with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 28 with blast crisis chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), 3 with atypical CML, 41 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 3 with essential thrombocythemia (ET). Forty-one of the patients had chromosome 21 abnormalities, including t(8;21) in 6 of the patients with AML, t(12;21) in 8 patients with ALL, acquired trisomy 21 in 17 patients, tetrasomy 21 in 7 patients, and constitutional trisomy 21 (Down syndrome) in 3 patients. A point mutation was found in 14 cases (4.7%), including 9 (22%) of the 41 patients with AML of the Mo type (MoAML) (none of them had detectable chromosome 21 rearrangement) and 5 (38%) of the 13 myeloid malignancies with acquired trisomy 21 (1 M1AML, 2 M2AML, 1 ET, and 1 atypical CML). In at least 8 of 9 mutated cases of MoAML, both AML alleles were mutated: 3 patients had different stop codon mutations of the 2 AML1 alleles, and 5 patients had the same missense or stop codon mutation in both AML1 alleles, which resulted in at least 3 of the patients having duplication of the mutated allele and deletion of the normal residual allele, as shown by FISH analysis and by comparing microsatellite analyses of several chromosome 21 markers on diagnosis and remission samples. In the remaining mutated cases, with acquired trisomy 21, a missense mutation of AML1, which involved 2 of the 3 copies of the AML1 gene, was found. Four of the 7 mutated cases could be reanalyzed in complete remission, and no AML1 mutation was found, showing that mutations were acquired in the leukemic clone. In

  15. Identification of a Tumor Specific, Active-Site Mutation in Casein Kinase 1α by Chemical Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Okerberg, Eric S; Hainley, Anna; Brown, Heidi; Aban, Arwin; Alemayehu, Senait; Shih, Ann; Wu, Jane; Patricelli, Matthew P; Kozarich, John W; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Rosenblum, Jonathan S

    2016-01-01

    We describe the identification of a novel, tumor-specific missense mutation in the active site of casein kinase 1α (CSNK1A1) using activity-based proteomics. Matched normal and tumor colon samples were analyzed using an ATP acyl phosphate probe in a kinase-targeted LC-MS2 platform. An anomaly in the active-site peptide from CSNK1A1 was observed in a tumor sample that was consistent with an altered catalytic aspartic acid. Expression and analysis of the suspected mutant verified the presence of asparagine in the probe-labeled, active-site peptide for CSNK1A1. Genomic sequencing of the colon tumor samples confirmed the presence of a missense mutation in the catalytic aspartic acid of CSNK1A1 (GAC→AAC). To our knowledge, the D163N mutation in CSNK1A1 is a newly defined mutation to the conserved, catalytic aspartic acid of a protein kinase and the first missense mutation identified using activity-based proteomics. The tumorigenic potential of this mutation remains to be determined. PMID:27031502

  16. Identification of a Tumor Specific, Active-Site Mutation in Casein Kinase 1α by Chemical Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Okerberg, Eric S.; Hainley, Anna; Brown, Heidi; Aban, Arwin; Alemayehu, Senait; Shih, Ann; Wu, Jane; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Kozarich, John W.; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Rosenblum, Jonathan S.

    2016-01-01

    We describe the identification of a novel, tumor-specific missense mutation in the active site of casein kinase 1α (CSNK1A1) using activity-based proteomics. Matched normal and tumor colon samples were analyzed using an ATP acyl phosphate probe in a kinase-targeted LC-MS2 platform. An anomaly in the active-site peptide from CSNK1A1 was observed in a tumor sample that was consistent with an altered catalytic aspartic acid. Expression and analysis of the suspected mutant verified the presence of asparagine in the probe-labeled, active-site peptide for CSNK1A1. Genomic sequencing of the colon tumor samples confirmed the presence of a missense mutation in the catalytic aspartic acid of CSNK1A1 (GAC→AAC). To our knowledge, the D163N mutation in CSNK1A1 is a newly defined mutation to the conserved, catalytic aspartic acid of a protein kinase and the first missense mutation identified using activity-based proteomics. The tumorigenic potential of this mutation remains to be determined. PMID:27031502

  17. Active versus Passive Proprioceptive Straight-Ahead Pointing in Normal Subjects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chokron, Sylvie; Colliot, Pascale; Atzeni, Thierry; Bartolomeo, Paolo; Ohlmann, Theophile

    2004-01-01

    Eighty blindfolded healthy female subjects participated in an active and a passive straight-ahead pointing task to study the estimation of the subjective sagittal middle in the presence or absence of an active haptic exploration. Subjects were to point straight-ahead with their left or right index finger starting from different right- or…

  18. Mutations, kataegis, and translocations in B lymphocytes: towards a mechanistic understanding of AID promiscuous activity

    PubMed Central

    Casellas, Rafael; Basu, Uttiya; Yewdell, William T.; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Robbiani, Davide F.; Di Noia, Javier M.

    2016-01-01

    As B cells engage in the immune response they express the deaminase AID to initiate the hypermutation and recombination of immunoglobulin genes, which are crucial processes for the efficient recognition and disposal of pathogens, However, AID must be tightly controlled in B cells to minimize off-targeting mutations, which can drive chromosomal translocations and the development of B cell malignancies, such as lymphomas. Recent genomic and biochemical analyses have begun to unravel the crucial question of how AID-mediated deamination is targeted outside immunoglobulin genes. Here, we discuss the transcriptional and topological features that are emerging as key drivers of AID promiscuous activity. PMID:26898111

  19. Selected cysteine point mutations confer mercurial sensitivity to the mercurial-insensitive water channel MIWC/AQP-4.

    PubMed

    Shi, L B; Verkman, A S

    1996-01-16

    The mercurial-insensitive water channel (MIWC or AQP-4) is a 30-32 kDA integral membrane protein expressed widely in fluid-transporting epithelia [Hasegawa et al. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 5497-5500]. To investigate the mercurial insensitivity and key residues involved in MIWC-mediated water transport, amino acids just proximal to the conserved NPA motifs (residues 69-74 and 187-190) were mutated individually to cysteine. Complementary RNAs were expressed in Xenopus oocytes for assay of osmotic water permeability (Pf) and HgCl2 inhibition dose-response. Oocytes expressing the cysteine mutants were highly water permeable, with Pf values (24-33 x 10(-3) cm/s) not different from that of wild-type (WT) MIWC. Pf was reversibly inhibited by HgCl2 in mutants S70C, G71C, G72C, H73C, and S189C but insensitive to HgCl2 in the other mutants. K1/2 values for 50% inhibition of Pf by HgCl2 were as follows (in millimolar): 0.40 (S70C), 0.36 (G71C), 0.14 (G72C), 0.45 (H73C), 0.24 (S189C), and > 1 for WT MIWC and the other mutants. To test the hypothesis that these residues are near the MIWC aqueous pore, residues 72 and 188 were mutated individually to the larger amino acid tryptophan. Pf in oocytes expressing mutants G72W or A188W (1.3-1.4 x 10(-3) cm/s) was not greater than that in water-injected oocytes even though these proteins were expressed at the oocyte plasma membrane as shown by quantitative immunofluorescence. Coinjection of cRNAs encoding WT MIWC and G72W or A188W indicated a dominant negative effect; Pf (x 10(-3) cm/s) was 22 (0.25 ng of WT), 10 (0.25 ng of WT + 0.25 ng of G72W), and 12 (0.25 ng of WT + 0.25 ng of A188W). Taken together, these results suggest the MIWC is mercurial-insensitive because of absence of a cysteine residue near the NPA motifs and that residues 70-73 and 189 are located at or near the MIWC aqueous pore. In contrast to previous data for the channel-forming integral protein of 28kDa (CHIP28), the finding of a dominant negative phenotype for

  20. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M. Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S. R. Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1–547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2. PMID:26405799

  1. The H29D Mutation Does Not Enhance Cytosolic Ca2+ Activation of the Cardiac Ryanodine Receptor.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhichao; Guo, Wenting; Yuen, Siobhan M Wong King; Wang, Ruiwu; Zhang, Lin; Van Petegem, Filip; Chen, S R Wayne

    2015-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the cardiac ryanodine receptor (RyR2) harbors a large number of naturally occurring mutations that are associated with stress-induced ventricular tachyarrhythmia and sudden death. Nearly all these disease-associated N-terminal mutations are located at domain interfaces or buried within domains. Mutations at these locations would alter domain-domain interactions or the stability/folding of domains. Recently, a novel RyR2 mutation H29D associated with ventricular arrhythmia at rest was found to enhance the activation of single RyR2 channels by diastolic levels of cytosolic Ca2+. Unlike other N-terminal disease-associated mutations, the H29D mutation is located on the surface of the N-terminal domain. It is unclear how this surface-exposed H29D mutation that does not appear to interact with other parts of the RyR2 structure could alter the intrinsic properties of the channel. Here we carried out detailed functional characterization of the RyR2-H29D mutant at the molecular and cellular levels. We found that the H29D mutation has no effect on the basal level or the Ca2+ dependent activation of [3H]ryanodine binding to RyR2, the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of single RyR2 channels, or the cytosolic Ca2+- or caffeine-induced Ca2+ release in HEK293 cells. In addition, the H29D mutation does not alter the propensity for spontaneous Ca2+ release or the thresholds for Ca2+ release activation or termination. Furthermore, the H29D mutation does not have significant impact on the thermal stability of the N-terminal region (residues 1-547) of RyR2. Collectively, our data show that the H29D mutation exerts little or no effect on the function of RyR2 or on the folding stability of the N-terminal region. Thus, our results provide no evidence that the H29D mutation enhances the cytosolic Ca2+ activation of RyR2.

  2. M-CSF receptor mutations in hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids impair not only kinase activity but also surface expression

    SciTech Connect

    Hiyoshi, Masateru; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Yukihara, Mamiko; Bhuyan, Farzana; Suzu, Shinya

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Many mutations were identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of HDLS. •All of the mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity. •Most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface. •These defects further suggest that HDLS is caused by a loss of Fms function. -- Abstract: The tyrosine kinase Fms, the cell surface receptor for M-CSF and IL-34, is critical for microglial proliferation and differentiation in the brain. Recently, a number of mutations have been identified in Fms as a putative genetic cause of hereditary diffuse leukoencephalopathy with spheroids (HDLS), implying an important role of microglial dysfunction in HDLS pathogenesis. In this study, we initially confirmed that 11 mutations, which reside within the ATP-binding or major tyrosine kinase domain, caused a severe impairment of ligand-induced Fms auto-phosphorylation. Intriguingly, we found that 10 of the 11 mutants also showed a weak cell surface expression, which was associated with a concomitant increase in the low molecular weight hypo-N-glycosylated immature gp130Fms-like species. Indeed, the mutant proteins heavily accumulated to the Golgi-like perinuclear regions. These results indicate that all of the Fms mutations tested severely impair the kinase activity and most of the mutations also impair the trafficking to the cell surface, further suggesting that HDLS is caused by the loss of Fms function.

  3. Point mutations in an epigenetic factor lead to multiple types of bone tumors: role of H3.3 histone variant in bone development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shigeaki; Ishii, Takeaki; Kouzmenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Coordinated post-translational modifications (PTMs) of nucleosomal histones emerge as a key mechanism of gene regulation by defining chromatin configuration. Patterns of histone modifications vary in different cells and constitute core elements of cell-specific epigenomes. Recently, in addition to canonical histone proteins produced during the S phase of cell cycle, several non-canonical histone variants have been identified and shown to express in a DNA replication-independent manner. These histone variants generate diversity in nucleosomal structures and add further complexity to mechanisms of epigenetic regulation. Cell-specific functions of histone variants remain to be determined. Several recent studies reported an association between some point mutations in the non-canonical histone H3.3 and particular types of brain and bone tumors. This suggests a possibility of differential physiological effects of histone variants in different cells and tissues, including bone. In this review, we outline the roles of histone variants and their PTMs in the epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure and discuss possible mechanisms of biological effects of the non-canonical histone mutations found in bone tumors on tumorigenesis in differentiating bone stem cells. PMID:26157578

  4. Disruption of RB/E2F-1 interaction by single point mutations in E2F-1 enhances S-phase entry and apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shan, B; Durfee, T; Lee, W H

    1996-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (RB) has been proposed to function as a negative regulator of cell proliferation by complexing with cellular proteins such as the transcription factor E2F. To study the biological consequences of the RB/E2F-1 interaction, point mutants of E2F-1 which fail to bind to RB were isolated by using the yeast two-hybrid system. Sequence analysis revealed that within the minimal 18-amino acid peptide of E2F-1 required for RB binding, five residues, Tyr (position 411), Glu (419), and Asp-Leu-Phe (423-425), are critical. These amino acids are conserved among the known E2F family members. While mutation of any of these five amino acids abolished binding to RB, all mutants retained their full transactivation potential. Expression of mutated E2F-1, when compared with that of wild-type, significantly accelerated entry into S phase and subsequent apoptosis. These results provide direct genetic evidence for the biological significance of the RB/E2F interaction and strongly suggest that the interplay between RB and E2F is critical for proper cell cycle progression. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8570615

  5. Catch-and-Hold Activation of Muscle Acetylcholine Receptors Having Transmitter Binding Site Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Prasad; Bruhova, Iva; Gupta, Shaweta; Auerbach, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Agonists turn on receptors because their target sites have a higher affinity in the active versus resting conformation of the protein. We used single-channel electrophysiology to measure the lower-affinity (LA) and higher-affinity (HA) equilibrium dissociation constants for acetylcholine in adult-type muscle mouse nicotinic receptors (AChRs) having mutations of agonist binding site amino acids. For a series of agonists and for all mutations of αY93, αG147, αW149, αY190, αY198, εW55, and δW57, the change in LA binding energy was approximately half that in HA binding energy. The results were analyzed as a linear free energy relationship between LA and HA agonist binding, the slope of which (κ) gives the fraction of the overall binding chemical potential where the LA complex is established. The linear correlation between LA and HA binding energies suggests that the overall binding process is by an integrated mechanism (catch-and-hold). For the agonist and the above mutations, κ ∼ 0.5, but side-chain substitutions of two residues had a slope that was significantly higher (0.90; αG153) or lower (0.25; εP121). The results suggest that backbone rearrangements in loop B, loop C, and the non-α surface participate in both LA binding and the LA ↔ HA affinity switch. It appears that all of the intermediate steps in AChR activation comprise a single, energetically coupled process. PMID:24988344

  6. LYN-activating mutations mediate antiestrogen resistance in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Luis J; Fox, Emily M; Balko, Justin M; Garrett, Joan T; Kuba, María Gabriela; Estrada, Mónica Valeria; González-Angulo, Ana María; Mills, Gordon B; Red-Brewer, Monica; Mayer, Ingrid A; Abramson, Vandana; Rizzo, Monica; Kelley, Mark C; Meszoely, Ingrid M; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2014-12-01

    Estrogen receptor-positive (ER(+)) breast cancers adapt to hormone deprivation and become resistant to antiestrogen therapy. Here, we performed deep sequencing on ER(+) tumors that remained highly proliferative after treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and identified a D189Y mutation in the inhibitory SH2 domain of the SRC family kinase (SFK) LYN. Evaluation of 463 breast tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas revealed four LYN mutations, two of which affected the SH2 domain. In addition, LYN was upregulated in multiple ER(+) breast cancer lines resistant to long-term estrogen deprivation (LTED). An RNAi-based kinome screen revealed that LYN is required for growth of ER(+) LTED breast cancer cells. Kinase assays and immunoblot analyses of SRC substrates in transfected cells indicated that LYN(D189Y) has higher catalytic activity than WT protein. Further, LYN(D189Y) exhibited reduced phosphorylation at the inhibitory Y507 site compared with LYN(WT). Other SH2 domain LYN mutants, E159K and K209N, also exhibited higher catalytic activity and reduced inhibitory site phosphorylation. LYN(D189Y) overexpression abrogated growth inhibition by fulvestrant and/or the PI3K inhibitor BKM120 in 3 ER(+) breast cancer cell lines. The SFK inhibitor dasatinib enhanced the antitumor effect of BKM120 and fulvestrant against estrogen-deprived ER(+) xenografts but not LYN(D189Y)-expressing xenografts. These results suggest that LYN mutations mediate escape from antiestrogens in a subset of ER(+) breast cancers.

  7. The effects of R683S (G) genetic mutations on the JAK2 activity, structure and stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Guo, Hua-Yan; Wang, Man; Geng, Hong-Li; Bian, Mei-Ru; Cao, Jiang; Chen, Chong; Zeng, Ling-Yu; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Wu, Qing-Yun

    2013-09-01

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) is an important mediator of cytokine receptor signaling and plays key roles in the hematopoietic and immune response. The acquired JAK2 R683S (G) mutations are presumed to be a biomarker for B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). However, how these mutations leading to the B-ALL is still unclear. The crystal structure of JAK2 JH2 domain suggests that the residue R683 locating in the linker between the N and C lobes of JH2 domain is important for keeping the compact structure, activity and structural stability of this domain. Mutations R683S, R683G and R683E significantly increase JAK2 activity and decrease its structural stability. While the R683K and R683H mutations almost have no effects on the JAK2 activity and structural stability. Furthermore, the spectroscopic experiments imply that mutations R683S, R683G and R683E impair the structure of JAK2 JH2 domain, and lead JAK2 to partially unfolded state. It may be this partially unfolded state that caused JAK2 R683S (G) constitutive activation. This study provides clues in understanding the mechanism of JAK2 R683S (G) mutations caused B-ALL.

  8. Myofascial trigger points: spontaneous electrical activity and its consequences for pain induction and propagation.

    PubMed

    Ge, Hong-You; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Yue, Shou-Wei

    2011-03-25

    Active myofascial trigger points are one of the major peripheral pain generators for regional and generalized musculoskeletal pain conditions. Myofascial trigger points are also the targets for acupuncture and/or dry needling therapies. Recent evidence in the understanding of the pathophysiology of myofascial trigger points supports The Integrated Hypothesis for the trigger point formation; however unanswered questions remain. Current evidence shows that spontaneous electrical activity at myofascial trigger point originates from the extrafusal motor endplate. The spontaneous electrical activity represents focal muscle fiber contraction and/or muscle cramp potentials depending on trigger point sensitivity. Local pain and tenderness at myofascial trigger points are largely due to nociceptor sensitization with a lesser contribution from non-nociceptor sensitization. Nociceptor and non-nociceptor sensitization at myofascial trigger points may be part of the process of muscle ischemia associated with sustained focal muscle contraction and/or muscle cramps. Referred pain is dependent on the sensitivity of myofascial trigger points. Active myofascial trigger points may play an important role in the transition from localized pain to generalized pain conditions via the enhanced central sensitization, decreased descending inhibition and dysfunctional motor control strategy.

  9. Evidence of ectopic recombination and a repeat-induced point (RIP) mutation in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, the agent responsible for white mold.

    PubMed

    Goldfarb, Míriam; Santana, Mateus Ferreira; Salomão, Tânia Maria Fernandes; Queiroz, Marisa Vieira de; Barros, Everaldo Gonçalves de

    2016-01-01

    Two retrotransposons from the superfamilies Copia and Gypsy named as Copia-LTR_SS and Gypsy-LTR_SS, respectively, were identified in the genomic bank of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. These transposable elements (TEs) contained direct and preserved long terminal repeats (LTR). Domains related to codified regions for gag protein, integrase, reverse transcriptase and RNAse H were identified in Copia-LTR_SS, whereas in Gypsy-LTR_SS only domains for gag, reverse transcriptase and RNAse H were found. The abundance of identified LTR-Solo suggested possible genetic recombination events in the S. sclerotiorum genome. Furthermore, alignment of the sequences for LTR elements from each superfamily suggested the presence of a RIP (repeat-induced point mutation) silencing mechanism that may directly affect the evolution of this species. PMID:27560652

  10. Evidence of ectopic recombination and a repeat-induced point (RIP) mutation in the genome of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, the agent responsible for white mold

    PubMed Central

    Goldfarb, Míriam; Santana, Mateus Ferreira; Salomão, Tânia Maria Fernandes; de Queiroz, Marisa Vieira; de Barros, Everaldo