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Sample records for activation analysis applied

  1. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  2. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  3. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  4. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  5. Activity anorexia: An interplay between basic and applied behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierce, W D; Epling, W F; Dews, P B; Estes, W K; Morse, W H; Van Orman, W; Herrnstein, R J

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between basic research with nonhumans and applied behavior analysis is illustrated by our work on activity anorexia. When rats are fed one meal a day and allowed to run on an activity wheel, they run excessively, stop eating, and die of starvation. Convergent evidence, from several different research areas, indicates that the behavior of these animals and humans who self-starve is functionally similar. A biobehavioral theory of activity anorexia is presented that details the cultural contingencies, behavioral processes, and physiology of anorexia. Diagnostic criteria and a three-stage treatment program for activity-based anorexia are outlined. The animal model permits basic research on anorexia that for practical and ethical reasons cannot be conducted with humans. Thus, basic research can have applied importance.

  6. Neutron-activation analysis applied to copper ores and artifacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linder, N. F.

    1970-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is used for quantitative identification of trace metals in copper. Establishing a unique fingerprint of impurities in Michigan copper would enable identification of artifacts made from this copper.

  7. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  8. The Applied Behavior Analysis Research Paradigm and Single-Subject Designs in Adapted Physical Activity Research.

    PubMed

    Haegele, Justin A; Hodge, Samuel Russell

    2015-10-01

    There are basic philosophical and paradigmatic assumptions that guide scholarly research endeavors, including the methods used and the types of questions asked. Through this article, kinesiology faculty and students with interests in adapted physical activity are encouraged to understand the basic assumptions of applied behavior analysis (ABA) methodology for conducting, analyzing, and presenting research of high quality in this paradigm. The purposes of this viewpoint paper are to present information fundamental to understanding the assumptions undergirding research methodology in ABA, describe key aspects of single-subject research designs, and discuss common research designs and data-analysis strategies used in single-subject studies.

  9. A laser-induced repetitive fast neutron source applied for gold activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sungman; Park, Sangsoon; Lee, Kitae; Cha, Hyungki

    2012-12-15

    A laser-induced repetitively operated fast neutron source was developed for applications in laser-driven nuclear physics research. The developed neutron source, which has a neutron yield of approximately 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n/pulse and can be operated up to a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, was applied for a gold activation analysis. Relatively strong delayed gamma spectra of the activated gold were measured at 333 keV and 355 keV, and proved the possibility of the neutron source for activation analyses. In addition, the nuclear reactions responsible for the measured gamma spectra of gold were elucidated by the 14 MeV fast neutrons resulting from the D(t,n)He{sup 4} nuclear reaction, for which the required tritium originated from the primary fusion reaction, D(d,p)T{sup 3}.

  10. Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) and short-lived neutron activation analysis (NAA) applied to the characterization of legacy materials

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Perry, D.L.; Reijonen, J.P.; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Garabedian, G.F.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-02-13

    Without quality historical records that provide the composition of legacy materials, the elemental and/or chemical characterization of such materials requires a manual analytical strategy that may expose the analyst to unknown toxicological hazards. In addition, much of the existing legacy inventory also incorporates radioactivity, and, although radiological composition may be determined by various nuclear-analytical methods, most importantly, gamma-spectroscopy, current methods of chemical characterization still require direct sample manipulation, thereby presenting special problems with broad implications for both the analyst and the environment. Alternately, prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) provides a'single-shot' in-situ, non-destructive method that provides a complete assay of all major entrained elemental constituents.1-3. Additionally, neutron activation analysis (NAA) using short-lived activation products complements PGAA and is especially useful when NAA activation surpasses the PGAA in elemental sensitivity.

  11. Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szapacs, Cindy

    2006-01-01

    Teaching strategies that work for typically developing children often do not work for those diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. However, teaching strategies that work for children with autism do work for typically developing children. In this article, the author explains how the principles and concepts of Applied Behavior Analysis can be…

  12. Developments in analysis of basaltic ash applied to recent activity at Etna and Stromboli volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lautze, N. C.; Taddeucci, J.; Andronico, D.; Tornetta, L.; Cannata, C.; Houghton, B. F.; Cristaldi, A.

    2009-12-01

    Advances in analytical techniques coupled with recent high levels of activity at Etna and Stromboli have offered a unique opportunity to sample and analyze of basaltic ash particles. We have performed new micro-scale analysis of basaltic ash from a variety of eruptive conditions: a weak ash-producing event at Etna on 11 November 2006, ash emission, paroxysmal explosions and lava-sea water interaction during the 2007 eruptive crisis of Stromboli volcano, and finally more typical Strombolian activity in 2008 at Stromboli. Etna samples were collected at eight locations between 2 and 20 km from source. Stromboli samples were collected between 28 February and 19 March 2007, and from single explosions in September 2008. A JEOL JSM 6500 Field Emission Scanning Electron Microprobe (FE-SEM) was used to image and quantify millimeter- to submicron-scale features of ash particles. Beside qualitative observation of the particles, semi-automated FE-SEM data include particle morphoscopy (area, perimeter, compactness, equivalent diameter) and surface chemistry. The morphoscopy data can be compared to grain size data collected by conventional techniques, while the surface chemistry data can be considered a proxy for component analysis, more typically performed using a binocular microscope, as it reflects the degree of crystallinity and alteration of the particles. Preliminary data indicate that insight into the particle source and eruptive dynamics of both volcanoes can be obtained from detailed analysis of the ash. In particular, the different sources of ash at Stromboli have highly distinctive alteration signatures, while the Etna samples exemplify the potential of the approach to discern subtle differences in ash particles from the same plume collected at different locations, thus outlining relatively small-scale plume zonations.

  13. Applied Surface Analysis Workshop.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    field of surface analysis attended the Workshop. The list of participants follows. 5! A, I Charles Anderson Albert L. Botkin Case Western Reserve...Louis, MO 63166 University of Dayton 300 College Park Richard Chase Dayton, OH 45469 Case Western Reserve University University Circle Brian E. P...Dayton, OH 45469 300 College Park Dayton, OH 45469 Richard W. Hoffman Case Western Reserve University Martin Kordesch Cleveland, OH 44106 Case Western

  14. Women in applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    McSweeney, Frances K.; Donahoe, Patricia; Swindell, Samantha

    2000-01-01

    The status of women in applied behavior analysis was examined by comparing the participation of women in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) to their participation in three similar journals. For all journals, the percentage of articles with at least one female author, the percentage of authors who are female, and the percentage of articles with a female first author increased from 1978 to 1997. Participation by women in JABA was equal to or greater than participation by women in the comparison journals. However, women appeared as authors on papers in special sections of Behavior Modification substantially more often when the editor was female than when the editor was male. In addition, female membership on the editorial boards of JABA, Behavior Modification, and Behaviour Research and Therapy failed to increase from 1978 to 1997. We conclude that a “glass ceiling” reduces the participation of women at the highest levels of applied behavior analysis and related fields. PMID:22478351

  15. The Fourier analysis applied to the relationship between (7)Be activity in the Serbian atmosphere and meteorological parameters.

    PubMed

    Rajačić, M M; Todorović, D J; Krneta Nikolić, J D; Janković, M M; Djurdjević, V S

    2016-09-01

    Air sample monitoring in Serbia, Belgrade started in the 1960s, while (7)Be activity in air and total (dry and wet) deposition has been monitored for the last 22 years by the Environment and Radiation Protection Department of the Institute for Nuclear Sciences, Vinca. Using this data collection, the changes of the (7)Be activity in the air and the total (wet and dry) deposition samples, as well as their correlation with meteorological parameters (temperature, pressure, cloudiness, sunshine duration, precipitation and humidity) that affect (7)Be concentration in the atmosphere, were mathematically described using the Fourier analysis. Fourier analysis confirmed the expected; the frequency with the largest intensity in the harmonic spectra of the (7)Be activity corresponds to a period of 1 year, the same as the largest intensity frequency in Fourier series of meteorological parameters. To analyze the quality of the results produced by the Fourier analysis, we compared the measured values of the parameters with the values calculated according to the Fourier series. Absolute deviations between measured and predicted mean monthly values are in range from 0.02 mBq/m(3) to 0.7 mBq/m(3) for (7)Be activity in air, and 0.01 Bq/m(2) and 0.6 Bq/m(2) for (7)Be activity in deposition samples. Relatively good agreement of measured and predicted results offers the possibility of prediction of the (7)Be activity.

  16. For the Love of Statistics: Appreciating and Learning to Apply Experimental Analysis and Statistics through Computer Programming Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mascaró, Maite; Sacristán, Ana Isabel; Rufino, Marta M.

    2016-01-01

    For the past 4 years, we have been involved in a project that aims to enhance the teaching and learning of experimental analysis and statistics, of environmental and biological sciences students, through computational programming activities (using R code). In this project, through an iterative design, we have developed sequences of R-code-based…

  17. Applying STAMP in Accident Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leveson, Nancy; Daouk, Mirna; Dulac, Nicolas; Marais, Karen

    2003-01-01

    Accident models play a critical role in accident investigation and analysis. Most traditional models are based on an underlying chain of events. These models, however, have serious limitations when used for complex, socio-technical systems. Previously, Leveson proposed a new accident model (STAMP) based on system theory. In STAMP, the basic concept is not an event but a constraint. This paper shows how STAMP can be applied to accident analysis using three different views or models of the accident process and proposes a notation for describing this process.

  18. Activities report in applied physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Research concerning acoustics, heat, architecture, materials research, and (optical) instrumentation is presented; active noise control and acoustic path identification were investigated. Energy conservation, solar energy, and building physics activities were carried out. Ultraviolet absorbing glasses, glass fibers, sheet glass, and aluminium and silicon oxynitrides, were studied. Glass fiber based sensor and laser applications, and optical space-instrumentation are discussed. Signal processing, sensors, and integrated electronics applications were developed. Scale model experiments for flow induced noise and vibrations, caused by engines, ventilators, wind turbines, and propellers, were executed. A multispectral charge coupled device airborne scanner, with four modules (one for forward observations) is described. A ground radar, based on seismic exploration signal processing and used for the location of pipes, sewers and cables, was developed.

  19. Applied PhD Research in a Work-Based Environment: An Activity Theory-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Granata, S. N.; Dochy, F.

    2016-01-01

    Activity theory is used to compare PhD undertaken at university, that is, academic PhD, with PhD performed in collaboration with industry, that is, semi-industrial PhD. The research is divided into a literature review and a case study. Semi-industrial and academic PhD are modelled as activity systems, and differences are highlighted in terms of…

  20. Increasing Active Student Responding in a University Applied Behavior Analysis Course: The Effect of Daily Assessment and Response Cards on End of Week Quiz Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malanga, Paul R.; Sweeney, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The study compared the effects of daily assessment and response cards on average weekly quiz scores in an introduction to applied behavior analysis course. An alternating treatments design (Kazdin 1982, "Single-case research designs." New York: Oxford University Press; Cooper et al. 2007, "Applied behavior analysis." Upper Saddle River:…

  1. On differentiation in applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1985-01-01

    Distinct types of activity in the field of applied behavior analysis are noted and discussed. Four metaphorical types of activity are considered: prospecting, farming, building, and guiding. Prospecting consists of time-limited exploration of a variety of beaviors, populations, or settings. Farming consists of producing new behaviors in the same setting using independent variables provided by the researchers or normally available in the setting. Building consists of combining procedural elements to create new programs or systems or to rehabilitate aspects of existing programs. Guiding involves pointing out connections between the principles of human behavior and the problems, populations, settings, and procedures with which researchers are (or could be) working. Advantages of each sphere are noted, and benefits of this division of labor to the field as a whole are discussed. PMID:22478631

  2. Active magnetic bearings applied to industrial compressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, R. G.; Hustak, J. F.; Schoeneck, K. A.

    1993-01-01

    The design and shop test results are given for a high-speed eight-stage centrifugal compressor supported by active magnetic bearings. A brief summary of the basic operation of active magnetic bearings and the required rotor dynamics analysis are presented with specific attention given to design considerations for optimum rotor stability. The concerns for retrofits of magnetic bearings in existing machinery are discussed with supporting analysis of a four-stage centrifugal compressor. The current status of industrial machinery in North America using this new support system is presented and recommendations are given on design and analysis requirements for successful machinery operation of either retrofit or new design turbomachinery.

  3. The basic importance of applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Epling, W. Frank; Pierce, W. David

    1986-01-01

    We argue that applied behavior analysis is relevant to basic research. Modification studies, and a broad range of investigations that focus on the precipitating and maintaining conditions of socially significant human behavior, have basic importance. Applied behavior analysis may aid basic researchers in the design of externally valid experiments and thereby enhance the theoretical significance of basic research for understanding human behavior. Applied research with humans, directed at culturally-important problems, will help to propagate the science of human behavior. Such a science will also be furthered by analogue experiments that model socially important behavior. Analytical-applied studies and analogue experiments are forms of applied behavior analysis that could suggest new environment-behavior relationships. These relationships could lead to basic research and principles that further the prediction, control, and understanding of behavior. PMID:22478650

  4. Applied Behavior Analysis and Statistical Process Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, B. L.

    1995-01-01

    Incorporating statistical process control (SPC) methods into applied behavior analysis is discussed. It is claimed that SPC methods would likely reduce applied behavior analysts' intimate contacts with problems and would likely yield poor treatment and research decisions. Cases and data presented by Pfadt and Wheeler (1995) are cited as examples.…

  5. Applied Behavior Analysis in Flying Training Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    often referred to as behavior modification ) which promotes improvements in human learning through an analysis of the contingencies surrounding a...Company, in press. Bandura, A. Principles of behavior modification . New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 1969. Bostow, D.E., & Bailey, J.S. Modification of...tutors for kindergarten children. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 1974, 7, 223-232. Kazdin, A.E. Behavior modification in applied settings

  6. Caldwell University's Department of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Reeve, Kenneth F; Reeve, Sharon A

    2016-05-01

    Since 2004, faculty members at Caldwell University have developed three successful graduate programs in Applied Behavior Analysis (i.e., PhD, MA, non-degree programs), increased program faculty from two to six members, developed and operated an on-campus autism center, and begun a stand-alone Applied Behavior Analysis Department. This paper outlines a number of strategies used to advance these initiatives, including those associated with an extensive public relations campaign. We also outline challenges that have limited our programs' growth. These strategies, along with a consideration of potential challenges, might prove useful in guiding academicians who are interested in starting their own programs in behavior analysis.

  7. Cluster analysis applied to multiparameter geophysical dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giuseppe, M. G.; Troiano, A.; Troise, C.; De Natale, G.

    2012-04-01

    Multi-parameter acquisition is a common geophysical field practice nowadays. Regularly seismic velocity and attenuation, gravity and electromagnetic dataset are acquired in a certain area, to obtain a complete characterization of the some investigate feature of the subsoil. Such a richness of information is often underestimated, although an integration of the analysis could provide a notable improving in the imaging of the investigated structures, mostly because the handling of distinct parameters and their joint inversion still presents several and severe problems. Post-inversion statistical techniques represent a promising approach to these questions, providing a quick, simple and elegant way to obtain this advantageous but complex integration. We present an approach based on the partition of the analyzed multi parameter dataset in a number of different classes, identified as localized regions of high correlation. These classes, or 'Cluster', are structured in such a way that the observations pertaining to a certain group are more similar to each other than the observations belonging to a different one, according to an optimal logical criterion. Regions of the subsoil sharing the same physical characteristic are so identified, without a-priori or empirical relationship linking the distinct measured parameters. The retrieved imaging results highly affordable in a statistical sense, specifically due to this lack of external hypothesis that are, instead, indispensable in a full joint inversion, were works, as matter of fact, just a real constrain for the inversion process, not seldom of relative consistence. We apply our procedure to a certain number of experimental dataset, related to several structures at very different scales presents in the Campanian district (southern Italy). These structures goes from the shallows evidence of the active fault zone originating the M 7.9 Irpinia earthquake to the main feature characterizing the Campi Flegrei Caldera and the Mt

  8. Defining applied behavior analysis: An historical analogy

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, Samuel M.

    1982-01-01

    This article examines two criteria for a definition of applied behavior analysis. The criteria are derived from a 19th century attempt to establish medicine as a scientific field. The first criterion, experimental determinism, specifies the methodological boundaries of an experimental science. The second criterion, philosophic doubt, clarifies the tentative nature of facts and theories derived from those facts. Practices which will advance the science of behavior are commented upon within each criteria. To conclude, the problems of a 19th century form of empiricism in medicine are related to current practices in applied behavior analysis. PMID:22478557

  9. Applied Behavior Analysis: Beyond Discrete Trial Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steege, Mark W.; Mace, F. Charles; Perry, Lora; Longenecker, Harold

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the problem of autism-specific special education programs representing themselves as Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) programs when the only ABA intervention employed is Discrete Trial Teaching (DTT), and often for limited portions of the school day. Although DTT has many advantages to recommend its use, it is not well suited to teach…

  10. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, J. M.; Foxx, R. M.; Jacobson, J. W.; Green, G.; Mulick, J. A.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the origins and characteristics of the positive behavior support (PBS) movement and examines those features in the context of the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We raise a number of concerns about PBS as an approach to delivery of behavioral services and its impact on how ABA is viewed by those in human services. We…

  11. Applied Behavior Analysis as Technological Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.

    1991-01-01

    To the extent that applied behavior analysis represents a scientific and practical approach to the study of behavior, its technological character is essential. The most serious problem evident in the field is not that the research being done is too technical but that more good research of all types is needed. (JDD)

  12. Epithermal neutron activation, radiometric, correlation and principal component analysis applied to the distribution of major and trace elements in some igneous and metamorphic rocks from Romania.

    PubMed

    Cristache, C I; Duliu, O G; Culicov, O A; Frontasyeva, M V; Ricman, C; Toma, M

    2009-05-01

    Six major (Na, Al, K, Ca, Ti, Fe) and 28 trace (Sc, Cr, V, Mn, Co, Zn, Cu, As, Br, Sr, Rb, Zr, Mo, Sn, Sb, Ba, Cs, La, Ce, Nd, Eu, Sm, Tb, Hf, Ta, W, Th and U) elements were determined by epithermal neutron activation analysis (ENAA) in nine Meridional Carpathian and Macin Mountains samples of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Correlation and principal factor analysis were used to interpret data while natural radionuclides radiometry shows a good correlation with ENAA results.

  13. Image analysis applied to luminescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maire, Eric; Lelievre-Berna, Eddy; Fafeur, Veronique; Vandenbunder, Bernard

    1998-04-01

    We have developed a novel approach to study luminescent light emission during migration of living cells by low-light imaging techniques. The equipment consists in an anti-vibration table with a hole for a direct output under the frame of an inverted microscope. The image is directly captured by an ultra low- light level photon-counting camera equipped with an image intensifier coupled by an optical fiber to a CCD sensor. This installation is dedicated to measure in a dynamic manner the effect of SF/HGF (Scatter Factor/Hepatocyte Growth Factor) both on activation of gene promoter elements and on cell motility. Epithelial cells were stably transfected with promoter elements containing Ets transcription factor-binding sites driving a luciferase reporter gene. Luminescent light emitted by individual cells was measured by image analysis. Images of luminescent spots were acquired with a high aperture objective and time exposure of 10 - 30 min in photon-counting mode. The sensitivity of the camera was adjusted to a high value which required the use of a segmentation algorithm dedicated to eliminate the background noise. Hence, image segmentation and treatments by mathematical morphology were particularly indicated in these experimental conditions. In order to estimate the orientation of cells during their migration, we used a dedicated skeleton algorithm applied to the oblong spots of variable intensities emitted by the cells. Kinetic changes of luminescent sources, distance and speed of migration were recorded and then correlated with cellular morphological changes for each spot. Our results highlight the usefulness of the mathematical morphology to quantify kinetic changes in luminescence microscopy.

  14. Research on Mobile Learning Activities Applying Tablets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Juskeviciene, Anita; Bireniene, Virginija

    2015-01-01

    The paper aims to present current research on mobile learning activities in Lithuania while implementing flagship EU-funded CCL project on application of tablet computers in education. In the paper, the quality of modern mobile learning activities based on learning personalisation, problem solving, collaboration, and flipped class methods is…

  15. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, J.M; Foxx, Richard M; Jacobson, John W; Green, Gina; Mulick, James A

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the origins and characteristics of the positive behavior support (PBS) movement and examines those features in the context of the field of applied behavior analysis (ABA). We raise a number of concerns about PBS as an approach to delivery of behavioral services and its impact on how ABA is viewed by those in human services. We also consider the features of PBS that have facilitated its broad dissemination and how ABA might benefit from emulating certain practices of the PBS movement. PMID:22478452

  16. Wavelet analysis applied to the IRAS cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, William D.; Wilson, Robert W.; Anderson, Charles H.

    1994-01-01

    The structure of infrared cirrus clouds is analyzed with Laplacian pyramid transforms, a form of non-orthogonal wavelets. Pyramid and wavelet transforms provide a means to decompose images into their spatial frequency components such that all spatial scales are treated in an equivalent manner. The multiscale transform analysis is applied to IRAS 100 micrometer maps of cirrus emission in the north Galactic pole region to extract features on different scales. In the maps we identify filaments, fragments and clumps by separating all connected regions. These structures are analyzed with respect to their Hausdorff dimension for evidence of the scaling relationships in the cirrus clouds.

  17. Progressive-Ratio Schedules and Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan

    2010-01-01

    Establishing appropriate relations between the basic and applied areas of behavior analysis has been of long and persistent interest to the author. In this article, the author illustrates that there is a direct relation between how hard an organism will work for access to an object or activity, as indexed by the largest ratio completed under a…

  18. Sneak analysis applied to process systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whetton, Cris

    Traditional safety analyses, such as HAZOP, FMEA, FTA, and MORT, are less than effective at identifying hazards resulting from incorrect 'flow' - whether this be flow of information, actions, electric current, or even the literal flow of process fluids. Sneak Analysis (SA) has existed since the mid nineteen-seventies as a means of identifying such conditions in electric circuits; in which area, it is usually known as Sneak Circuit Analysis (SCA). This paper extends the ideas of Sneak Circuit Analysis to a general method of Sneak Analysis applied to process plant. The methods of SA attempt to capitalize on previous work in the electrical field by first producing a pseudo-electrical analog of the process and then analyzing the analog by the existing techniques of SCA, supplemented by some additional rules and clues specific to processes. The SA method is not intended to replace any existing method of safety analysis; instead, it is intended to supplement such techniques as HAZOP and FMEA by providing systematic procedures for the identification of a class of potential problems which are not well covered by any other method.

  19. Applied spectrophotometry: analysis of a biochemical mixture.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Toni A; Schultz, Emeric; Borland, Michael G; Pugh, Michael Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Spectrophotometric analysis is essential for determining biomolecule concentration of a solution and is employed ubiquitously in biochemistry and molecular biology. The application of the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Lawis routinely used to determine the concentration of DNA, RNA or protein. There is however a significant difference in determining the concentration of a given species (RNA, DNA, protein) in isolation (a contrived circumstance) as opposed to determining that concentration in the presence of other species (a more realistic situation). To present the student with a more realistic laboratory experience and also to fill a hole that we believe exists in student experience prior to reaching a biochemistry course, we have devised a three week laboratory experience designed so that students learn to: connect laboratory practice with theory, apply the Beer-Lambert-Bougert Law to biochemical analyses, demonstrate the utility and limitations of example quantitative colorimetric assays, demonstrate the utility and limitations of UV analyses for biomolecules, develop strategies for analysis of a solution of unknown biomolecular composition, use digital micropipettors to make accurate and precise measurements, and apply graphing software.

  20. Augmented multivariate image analysis applied to quantitative structure-activity relationship modeling of the phytotoxicities of benzoxazinone herbicides and related compounds on problematic weeds.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Mirlaine R; Matias, Stella V B G; Macedo, Renato L G; Freitas, Matheus P; Venturin, Nelson

    2013-09-11

    Two of major weeds affecting cereal crops worldwide are Avena fatua L. (wild oat) and Lolium rigidum Gaud. (rigid ryegrass). Thus, development of new herbicides against these weeds is required; in line with this, benzoxazinones, their degradation products, and analogues have been shown to be important allelochemicals and natural herbicides. Despite earlier structure-activity studies demonstrating that hydrophobicity (log P) of aminophenoxazines correlates to phytotoxicity, our findings for a series of benzoxazinone derivatives do not show any relationship between phytotoxicity and log P nor with other two usual molecular descriptors. On the other hand, a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis based on molecular graphs representing structural shape, atomic sizes, and colors to encode other atomic properties performed very accurately for the prediction of phytotoxicities of these compounds against wild oat and rigid ryegrass. Therefore, these QSAR models can be used to estimate the phytotoxicity of new congeners of benzoxazinone herbicides toward A. fatua L. and L. rigidum Gaud.

  1. Tissue Microarray Analysis Applied to Bone Diagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Rafael Barrios; Silva, Maria Regina Regis; Alves, Maria Teresa Seixas; Evison, Martin Paul; Guimarães, Marco Aurelio; Francisco, Rafaella Arrabaca; Astolphi, Rafael Dias; Iwamura, Edna Sadayo Miazato

    2017-01-01

    Taphonomic processes affecting bone post mortem are important in forensic, archaeological and palaeontological investigations. In this study, the application of tissue microarray (TMA) analysis to a sample of femoral bone specimens from 20 exhumed individuals of known period of burial and age at death is described. TMA allows multiplexing of subsamples, permitting standardized comparative analysis of adjacent sections in 3-D and of representative cross-sections of a large number of specimens. Standard hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-Schiff and silver methenamine, and picrosirius red staining, and CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry were applied to TMA sections. Osteocyte and osteocyte lacuna counts, percent bone matrix loss, and fungal spheroid element counts could be measured and collagen fibre bundles observed in all specimens. Decalcification with 7% nitric acid proceeded more rapidly than with 0.5 M EDTA and may offer better preservation of histological and cellular structure. No endothelial cells could be detected using CD31 and CD34 immunohistochemistry. Correlation between osteocytes per lacuna and age at death may reflect reported age-related responses to microdamage. Methodological limitations and caveats, and results of the TMA analysis of post mortem diagenesis in bone are discussed, and implications for DNA survival and recovery considered. PMID:28051148

  2. Applying phasor approach analysis of multiphoton FLIM measurements to probe the metabolic activity of three-dimensional in vitro cell culture models

    PubMed Central

    Lakner, Pirmin H.; Monaghan, Michael G.; Möller, Yvonne; Olayioye, Monilola A.; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) can measure and discriminate endogenous fluorophores present in biological samples. This study seeks to identify FLIM as a suitable method to non-invasively detect a shift in cellular metabolic activity towards glycolysis or oxidative phosphorylation in 3D Caco-2 models of colorectal carcinoma. These models were treated with potassium cyanide or hydrogen peroxide as controls, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) as a physiologically-relevant influencer of cell metabolic behaviour. Autofluorescence, attributed to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), was induced by two-photon laser excitation and its lifetime decay was analysed using a standard multi-exponential decay approach and also a novel custom-written code for phasor-based analysis. While both methods enabled detection of a statistically significant shift of metabolic activity towards glycolysis using potassium cyanide, and oxidative phosphorylation using hydrogen peroxide, employing the phasor approach required fewer initial assumptions to quantify the lifetimes of contributing fluorophores. 3D Caco-2 models treated with EGF had increased glucose consumption, production of lactate, and presence of ATP. FLIM analyses of these cultures revealed a significant shift in the contribution of protein-bound NADH towards free NADH, indicating increased glycolysis-mediated metabolic activity. This data demonstrate that FLIM is suitable to interpret metabolic changes in 3D in vitro models. PMID:28211922

  3. Reachability Analysis Applied to Space Situational Awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, M.; Scheeres, D.

    Several existing and emerging applications of Space Situational Awareness (SSA) relate directly to spacecraft Rendezvous, Proximity Operations, and Docking (RPOD) and Formation / Cluster Flight (FCF). When multiple Resident Space Ob jects (RSOs) are in vicinity of one another with appreciable periods between observations, correlating new RSO tracks to previously known objects becomes a non-trivial problem. A particularly difficult sub-problem is seen when long breaks in observations are coupled with continuous, low- thrust maneuvers. Reachability theory, directly related to optimal control theory, can compute contiguous reachability sets for known or estimated control authority and can support such RSO search and correlation efforts in both ground and on-board settings. Reachability analysis can also directly estimate the minimum control authority of a given RSO. For RPOD and FCF applications, emerging mission concepts such as fractionation drastically increase system complexity of on-board autonomous fault management systems. Reachability theory, as applied to SSA in RPOD and FCF applications, can involve correlation of nearby RSO observations, control authority estimation, and sensor track re-acquisition. Additional uses of reachability analysis are formation reconfiguration, worst-case passive safety, and propulsion failure modes such as a "stuck" thruster. Existing reachability theory is applied to RPOD and FCF regimes. An optimal control policy is developed to maximize the reachability set and optimal control law discontinuities (switching) are examined. The Clohessy-Wiltshire linearized equations of motion are normalized to accentuate relative control authority for spacecraft propulsion systems at both Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO). Several examples with traditional and low thrust propulsion systems in LEO and GEO are explored to illustrate the effects of relative control authority on the time-varying reachability set surface. Both

  4. Graphical analysis of reversible radioligand binding from time-activity measurements applied to (N- sup 11 C-methyl)-(-)-cocaine PET studies in human subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.; Wolf, A.P.; Dewey, S.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; MacGregor, R.R.; Hitzemann, R.; Bendriem, B.; Gatley, S.J. )

    1990-09-01

    A graphical method of analysis applicable to ligands that bind reversibly to receptors or enzymes requiring the simultaneous measurement of plasma and tissue radioactivities for multiple times after the injection of a radiolabeled tracer is presented. It is shown that there is a time t after which a plot of integral of t0ROI(t')dt'/ROI(t) versus integral of t0Cp(t')dt'/ROI(t) (where ROI and Cp are functions of time describing the variation of tissue radioactivity and plasma radioactivity, respectively) is linear with a slope that corresponds to the steady-state space of the ligand plus the plasma volume,.Vp. For a two-compartment model, the slope is given by lambda + Vp, where lambda is the partition coefficient and the intercept is -1/(kappa 2(1 + Vp/lambda)). For a three-compartment model, the slope is lambda(1 + Bmax/Kd) + Vp and the intercept is -(1 + Bmax/Kd)/k2 + (koff(1 + Kd/Bmax))-1 (1 + Vp/lambda(1 + Bmax/Kd))-1 (where Bmax represents the concentration of ligand binding sites and Kd the equilibrium dissociation constant of the ligand-binding site complex, koff (k4) the ligand-binding site dissociation constant, and k2 is the transfer constant from tissue to plasma). This graphical method provides the ratio Bmax/Kd from the slope for comparison with in vitro measures of the same parameter. It also provides an easy, rapid method for comparison of the reproducibility of repeated measures in a single subject, for longitudinal or drug intervention protocols, or for comparing experimental results between subjects. Although the linearity of this plot holds when ROI/Cp is constant, it can be shown that, for many systems, linearity is effectively reached some time before this. This analysis has been applied to data from (N-methyl-11C)-(-)-cocaine studies in normal human volunteers and the results are compared to the standard nonlinear least-squares analysis.

  5. Applying thiouracil tagging to mouse transcriptome analysis.

    PubMed

    Gay, Leslie; Karfilis, Kate V; Miller, Michael R; Doe, Chris Q; Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-02-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach for studying mouse development, physiology and disease models. Here we describe a protocol for mouse thiouracil tagging (TU tagging), a transcriptome analysis technology that includes in vivo covalent labeling, purification and analysis of cell type-specific RNA. TU tagging enables the isolation of RNA from a given cell population of a complex tissue, avoiding transcriptional changes induced by cell isolation trauma, as well as the identification of actively transcribed RNAs and not preexisting transcripts. Therefore, in contrast to other cell-specific transcriptional profiling methods based on the purification of tagged ribosomes or nuclei, TU tagging provides a direct examination of transcriptional regulation. We describe how to (i) deliver 4-thiouracil to transgenic mice to thio-label cell lineage-specific transcripts, (ii) purify TU-tagged RNA and prepare libraries for Illumina sequencing and (iii) follow a straightforward bioinformatics workflow to identify cell type-enriched or differentially expressed genes. Tissue containing TU-tagged RNA can be obtained in 1 d, RNA-seq libraries can be generated within 2 d and, after sequencing, an initial bioinformatics analysis can be completed in 1 additional day.

  6. Magnetic Analysis Techniques Applied to Desert Varnish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidgall, E. R.; Moskowitz, B. M.; Dahlberg, E. D.; Kuhlman, K. R.

    2003-01-01

    Desert varnish is a black or reddish coating commonly found on rock samples from arid regions. Typically, the coating is very thin, less than half a millimeter thick. Previous research has shown that the primary components of desert varnish are silicon oxide clay minerals (60%), manganese and iron oxides (20-30%), and trace amounts of other compounds [1]. Desert varnish is thought to originate when windborne particles containing iron and manganese oxides are deposited onto rock surfaces where manganese oxidizing bacteria concentrate the manganese and form the varnish [4,5]. If desert varnish is indeed biogenic, then the presence of desert varnish on rock surfaces could serve as a biomarker, indicating the presence of microorganisms. This idea has considerable appeal, especially for Martian exploration [6]. Magnetic analysis techniques have not been extensively applied to desert varnish. The only previous magnetic study reported that based on room temperature demagnetization experiments, there were noticeable differences in magnetic properties between a sample of desert varnish and the substrate sandstone [7]. Based upon the results of the demagnetization experiments, the authors concluded that the primary magnetic component of desert varnish was either magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite ( Fe2O3).

  7. Analysis of the interaction between experimental and applied behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Virues-Ortega, Javier; Hurtado-Parrado, Camilo; Cox, Alison D; Pear, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    To study the influences between basic and applied research in behavior analysis, we analyzed the coauthorship interactions of authors who published in JABA and JEAB from 1980 to 2010. We paid particular attention to authors who published in both JABA and JEAB (dual authors) as potential agents of cross-field interactions. We present a comprehensive analysis of dual authors' coauthorship interactions using social networks methodology and key word analysis. The number of dual authors more than doubled (26 to 67) and their productivity tripled (7% to 26% of JABA and JEAB articles) between 1980 and 2010. Dual authors stood out in terms of number of collaborators, number of publications, and ability to interact with multiple groups within the field. The steady increase in JEAB and JABA interactions through coauthors and the increasing range of topics covered by dual authors provide a basis for optimism regarding the progressive integration of basic and applied behavior analysis.

  8. Moving Forward: Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tincani, Matt

    2007-01-01

    A controversy has emerged about the relationship between positive behavior support and applied behavior analysis. Some behavior analysts suggest that positive behavior support and applied behavior analysis are the same (e.g., Carr & Sidener, 2002). Others argue that positive behavior support is harmful to applied behavior analysis (e.g., Johnston,…

  9. Applying Mechanics to Swimming Performance Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barthels, Katharine

    1989-01-01

    Swimming teachers and coaches can improve their feedback to swimmers, when correcting or refining swim movements, by applying some basic biomechanical concepts relevant to swimming. This article focuses on the biomechanical considerations used in analyzing swimming performance. Techniques for spotting and correcting problems that impede…

  10. Introduction: Conversation Analysis in Applied Linguistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sert, Olcay; Seedhouse, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This short, introductory paper presents an up-to-date account of works within the field of Applied Linguistics which have been influenced by a Conversation Analytic paradigm. The article reviews recent studies in classroom interaction, materials development, proficiency assessment and language teacher education. We believe that the publication of…

  11. Reachability Analysis Applied to Space Situational Awareness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    12:207-242. [15] L. S. Breger, G. Inalhan, M. Tillerson, J. P. How, “Cooperative spacecraft Formation Flying: Model Predictive Control With Open And...applying them to the nonlinear relative orbit equations of motion, which are appropriate both for general SSA and spacecraft proximity operations... Nonlinear System (RNS). This assumption does not restrict the scope of these results in the context of SSA, as in orbital scenarios control and

  12. Applied surface analysis in magnetic storage technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windeln, Johannes; Bram, Christian; Eckes, Heinz-Ludwig; Hammel, Dirk; Huth, Johanna; Marien, Jan; Röhl, Holger; Schug, Christoph; Wahl, Michael; Wienss, Andreas

    2001-07-01

    This paper gives a synopsis of today's challenges and requirements for a surface analysis and materials science laboratory with a special focus on magnetic recording technology. The critical magnetic recording components, i.e. the protective carbon overcoat (COC), the disk layer structure, the read/write head including the giant-magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, are described and options for their characterization with specific surface and structure analysis techniques are given. For COC investigations, applications of Raman spectroscopy to the structural analysis and determination of thickness, hydrogen and nitrogen content are discussed. Hardness measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) scratching techniques are presented. Surface adsorption phenomena on disk substrates or finished disks are characterized by contact angle analysis or so-called piezo-electric mass adsorption systems (PEMAS), also known as quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). A quickly growing field of applications is listed for various X-ray analysis techniques, such as disk magnetic layer texture analysis for X-ray diffraction, compositional characterization via X-ray fluorescence, compositional analysis with high lateral resolution via electron microprobe analysis. X-ray reflectometry (XRR) has become a standard method for the absolute measurement of individual layer thicknesses contained in multi-layer stacks and thus, is the successor of ellipsometry for this application. Due to the ongoing reduction of critical feature sizes, the analytical challenges in terms of lateral resolution, sensitivity limits and dedicated nano-preparation have been consistently growing and can only be met by state-of-the-art Auger electron spectrometers (AES), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis, time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) characterization, focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning and TEM lamella preparation via FIB. The depth profiling of GMR sensor full stacks was significantly

  13. Meta-analysis in applied ecology.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Gavin

    2010-02-23

    This overview examines research synthesis in applied ecology and conservation. Vote counting and pooling unweighted averages are widespread despite the superiority of syntheses based on weighted combination of effects. Such analyses allow exploration of methodological uncertainty in addition to consistency of effects across species, space and time, but exploring heterogeneity remains controversial. Meta-analyses are required to generalize in ecology, and to inform evidence-based decision-making, but the more sophisticated statistical techniques and registers of research used in other disciplines must be employed in ecology to fully realize their benefits.

  14. Applied Spectrophotometry: Analysis of a Biochemical Mixture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trumbo, Toni A.; Schultz, Emeric; Borland, Michael G.; Pugh, Michael Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Spectrophotometric analysis is essential for determining biomolecule concentration of a solution and is employed ubiquitously in biochemistry and molecular biology. The application of the Beer-Lambert-Bouguer Lawis routinely used to determine the concentration of DNA, RNA or protein. There is however a significant difference in determining the…

  15. Suppression of spontaneous epileptiform activity with applied currents.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M; Durand, D

    1991-12-20

    It has been well established that both applied and endogenous electric fields can modulate neuronal activity in various preparations. In this paper, we present the effects of applied currents on spontaneous epileptiform activity in the CA1 region of the rat hippocampus. A computer-controlled system was designed to detect the spontaneous abnormal activity and then apply current pulses of programmable amplitude with monopolar electrodes in the stratum pyramidale. The epileptiform activity was generated by subperfusion of the neural tissue with an elevated potassium artificial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) solution. Extracellular recordings showed that the interictal bursts could be fully suppressed in 90% of the slices by subthreshold currents with an average amplitude of 12.5 microA. Intracellular recordings showed that the anodic currents generated hyperpolarization of the somatic membrane thereby suppressing neuronal firing. This inhibitory effect of applied current pulses is important for the understanding of electric field effects on abnormal neuronal activity and could be an effective means of preventing the spread of epileptiform activity.

  16. Thermal analysis applied to irradiated propolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Andrea Harumi; Machado, Luci Brocardo; del Mastro, Nélida Lucia

    2002-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by bees. Raw propolis requires a decontamination procedure and irradiation appears as a promising technique for this purpose. The valuable properties of propolis for food and pharmaceutical industries have led to increasing interest in its technological behavior. Thermal analysis is a chemical analysis that gives information about changes on heating of great importance for technological applications. Ground propolis samples were 60Co gamma irradiated with 0 and 10 kGy. Thermogravimetry curves shown a similar multi-stage decomposition pattern for both irradiated and unirradiated samples up to 600°C. Similarly, through differential scanning calorimetry , a coincidence of melting point of irradiated and unirradiated samples was found. The results suggest that the irradiation process do not interfere on the thermal properties of propolis when irradiated up to 10 kGy.

  17. Biomechanics and motion analysis applied to sports.

    PubMed

    Zheng, N; Barrentine, S W

    2000-05-01

    The development of motion analysis and the application of biomechanical analysis techniques to sports has paralleled the exponential growth of computational and videographic technology. Technological developments have provided for advances in the investigation of the human body and the action of the human body during sports believed to be unobtainable a few years ago. Technological advancements have brought biomechanical applications into a wide range of fields from orthopedics to entertainment. An area that has made tremendous gains using biomechanics is sports science. Coaches, therapists, and physicians are using biomechanics to improve performance, rehabilitation, and the prevention of sports related injuries. Functional analyses of athletic movements that were impossible a few years ago are available and used today. With new advancements, the possibilities for investigating the way a human interacts and reacts to environmental conditions are ever expanding.

  18. Reliability analysis applied to structural tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, P.; Payne, A. O.

    1972-01-01

    The application of reliability theory to predict, from structural fatigue test data, the risk of failure of a structure under service conditions because its load-carrying capability is progressively reduced by the extension of a fatigue crack, is considered. The procedure is applicable to both safe-life and fail-safe structures and, for a prescribed safety level, it will enable an inspection procedure to be planned or, if inspection is not feasible, it will evaluate the life to replacement. The theory has been further developed to cope with the case of structures with initial cracks, such as can occur in modern high-strength materials which are susceptible to the formation of small flaws during the production process. The method has been applied to a structure of high-strength steel and the results are compared with those obtained by the current life estimation procedures. This has shown that the conventional methods can be unconservative in certain cases, depending on the characteristics of the structure and the design operating conditions. The suitability of the probabilistic approach to the interpretation of the results from full-scale fatigue testing of aircraft structures is discussed and the assumptions involved are examined.

  19. Subpixels analysis model applied to floodplain monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldo Osorio, J. D.; García Galiano, S. G.

    2009-04-01

    The traditional techniques to gauge hydrological events often fail with the extreme events. A particular case is the floods spatial detection. In this work, the remote sensing techniques and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) have been merged to develop a key tool for monitoring of floods. The low density of gauge stations networks in the development countries becomes remote sensing techniques the most suitable and economic way to delimitate the flood area and compute the damages cost. The common classification techniques of satellite images use "hard methods" in the sense of a pixel is assigned to an unique land cover class. For coarse resolution, the pixels inevitably will be mixed, so "soft methods" can be used in order to assign several land cover classes according to the surface fractions covered by each one. The main objective of this work is the dynamic monitoring of floods in large areas, based on satellite images -with moderate spatial resolution but with high time resolution- and Digital Elevation Model (DEM). Classified maps with finer spatial resolution can be built through the methodology of Subpixels Analysis developed. The procedure is supported on both the Linear Mixture Model (LMM) and Spatial Coherence Analysis (SCA) hypothesis. The LMM builds the land cover fraction maps through an optimization procedure which uses Lagrange Multipliers, while the SCA defines the most likely place for the land cover fractions within the coarse pixel using linear programming. A subsequent procedure improves the flooded area identification using both the drainage direction and flow accumulation raster maps derived from DEM of the study zone. The Subpixels Analysis technique was validated using historical data of floods which were obtained from satellite images. The procedure improves the spatial resolution of classified maps from satellite images with coarse resolution, while the "hard methods" keep the spatial resolution from the input coarse satellite image.

  20. Artificial intelligence applied to process signal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corsberg, Dan

    1988-01-01

    Many space station processes are highly complex systems subject to sudden, major transients. In any complex process control system, a critical aspect of the human/machine interface is the analysis and display of process information. Human operators can be overwhelmed by large clusters of alarms that inhibit their ability to diagnose and respond to a disturbance. Using artificial intelligence techniques and a knowledge base approach to this problem, the power of the computer can be used to filter and analyze plant sensor data. This will provide operators with a better description of the process state. Once a process state is recognized, automatic action could be initiated and proper system response monitored.

  1. Scanning methods applied to bitemark analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Peter J.; Bush, Mary A.

    2010-06-01

    The 2009 National Academy of Sciences report on forensics focused criticism on pattern evidence subdisciplines in which statements of unique identity are utilized. One principle of bitemark analysis is that the human dentition is unique to the extent that a perpetrator may be identified based on dental traits in a bitemark. Optical and electron scanning methods were used to measure dental minutia and to investigate replication of detail in human skin. Results indicated that being a visco-elastic substrate, skin effectively reduces the resolution of measurement of dental detail. Conclusions indicate caution in individualization statements.

  2. Multivariate analysis applied to tomato hybrid production.

    PubMed

    Balasch, S; Nuez, F; Palomares, G; Cuartero, J

    1984-11-01

    Twenty characters were measured on 60 tomato varieties cultivated in the open-air and in polyethylene plastic-house. Data were analyzed by means of principal components, factorial discriminant methods, Mahalanobis D(2) distances and principal coordinate techniques. Factorial discriminant and Mahalanobis D(2) distances methods, both of which require collecting data plant by plant, lead to similar conclusions as the principal components method that only requires taking data by plots. Characters that make up the principal components in both environments studied are the same, although the relative importance of each one of them varies within the principal components. By combining information supplied by multivariate analysis with the inheritance mode of characters, crossings among cultivars can be experimented with that will produce heterotic hybrids showing characters within previously established limits.

  3. Toward applied behavior analysis of life aloft.

    PubMed

    Brady, J V

    1990-01-01

    This article deals with systems at multiple levels, at least from cell to organization. It also deals with learning, decision making, and other behavior at multiple levels. Technological development of a human behavioral ecosystem appropriate to space environments requires an analytic and synthetic orientation, explicitly experimental in nature, dictated by scientific and pragmatic considerations, and closely approximating procedures of established effectiveness in other areas of natural science. The conceptual basis of such an approach has its roots in environmentalism which has two main features: (1) knowledge comes from experience rather than from innate ideas, divine revelation, or other obscure sources; and (2) action is governed by consequences rather than by instinct, reason, will, beliefs, attitudes or even the currently fashionable cognitions. Without an experimentally derived data base founded upon such a functional analysis of human behavior, the overgenerality of "ecological systems" approaches render them incapable of ensuring the successful establishment of enduring space habitats. Without an experimentally derived function account of individual behavioral variability, a natural science of behavior cannot exist. And without a natural science of behavior, the social sciences will necessarily remain in their current status as disciplines of less than optimal precision or utility. Such a functional analysis of human performance should provide an operational account of behavior change in a manner similar to the way in which Darwin's approach to natural selection accounted for the evolution of phylogenetic lines (i.e., in descriptive, nonteleological terms). Similarly, as Darwin's account has subsequently been shown to be consonant with information obtained at the cellular level, so too should behavior principles ultimately prove to be in accord with an account of ontogenetic adaptation at a biochemical level. It would thus seem obvious that the most

  4. Toward applied behavior analysis of life aloft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, J. V.

    1990-01-01

    This article deals with systems at multiple levels, at least from cell to organization. It also deals with learning, decision making, and other behavior at multiple levels. Technological development of a human behavioral ecosystem appropriate to space environments requires an analytic and synthetic orientation, explicitly experimental in nature, dictated by scientific and pragmatic considerations, and closely approximating procedures of established effectiveness in other areas of natural science. The conceptual basis of such an approach has its roots in environmentalism which has two main features: (1) knowledge comes from experience rather than from innate ideas, divine revelation, or other obscure sources; and (2) action is governed by consequences rather than by instinct, reason, will, beliefs, attitudes or even the currently fashionable cognitions. Without an experimentally derived data base founded upon such a functional analysis of human behavior, the overgenerality of "ecological systems" approaches render them incapable of ensuring the successful establishment of enduring space habitats. Without an experimentally derived function account of individual behavioral variability, a natural science of behavior cannot exist. And without a natural science of behavior, the social sciences will necessarily remain in their current status as disciplines of less than optimal precision or utility. Such a functional analysis of human performance should provide an operational account of behavior change in a manner similar to the way in which Darwin's approach to natural selection accounted for the evolution of phylogenetic lines (i.e., in descriptive, nonteleological terms). Similarly, as Darwin's account has subsequently been shown to be consonant with information obtained at the cellular level, so too should behavior principles ultimately prove to be in accord with an account of ontogenetic adaptation at a biochemical level. It would thus seem obvious that the most

  5. Sensitivity analysis applied to stalled airfoil wake and steady control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patino, Gustavo; Gioria, Rafael; Meneghini, Julio

    2014-11-01

    The sensitivity of an eigenvalue to base flow modifications induced by an external force is applied to the global unstable modes associated to the onset of vortex shedding in the wake of a stalled airfoil. In this work, the flow regime is close to the first instability of the system and its associated eigenvalue/eigenmode is determined. The sensitivity analysis to a general punctual external force allows establishing the regions where control devices must be in order to stabilize the global modes. Different types of steady control devices, passive and active, are used in the regions predicted by the sensitivity analysis to check the vortex shedding suppression, i.e. the primary instability bifurcation is delayed. The new eigenvalue, modified by the action of the device, is also calculated. Finally the spectral finite element method is employed to determine flow characteristics before and after of the bifurcation in order to cross check the results.

  6. Rotary spectra analysis applied to static stabilometry.

    PubMed

    Chiaramello, E; Knaflitz, M; Agostini, V

    2011-01-01

    Static stabilometry is a technique aimed at quantifying postural sway during quiet standing in the upright position. Many different models and many different techniques to analyze the trajectories of the Centre of Pressure (CoP) have been proposed. Most of the parameters calculated according to these different approaches are affected by a relevant intra- and inter-subject variability or do not have a clear physiological interpretation. In this study we hypothesize that CoP trajectories have rotational characteristics, therefore we decompose them in clockwise and counter-clockwise components, using the rotary spectra analysis. Rotary spectra obtained studying a population of healthy subjects are described through the group average of spectral parameters, i.e., 95% spectral bandwidth, mean frequency, median frequency, and skewness. Results are reported for the clockwise and the counter-clockwise components and refer to the upright position maintained with eyes open or closed. This study demonstrates that the approach is feasible and that some of the spectral parameters are statistically different between the open and closed eyes conditions. More research is needed to demonstrate the clinical applicability of this approach, but results so far obtained are promising.

  7. Digital photoelastic analysis applied to implant dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, K.; Hariprasad, M. P.; Bhuvanewari, S.

    2016-12-01

    Development of improved designs of implant systems in dentistry have necessitated the study of stress fields in the implant regions of the mandible/maxilla for better understanding of the biomechanics involved. Photoelasticity has been used for various studies related to dental implants in view of whole field visualization of maximum shear stress in the form of isochromatic contours. The potential of digital photoelasticity has not been fully exploited in the field of implant dentistry. In this paper, the fringe field in the vicinity of the connected implants (All-On-Four® concept) is analyzed using recent advances in digital photoelasticity. Initially, a novel 3-D photoelastic model making procedure, to closely mimic all the anatomical features of the human mandible is proposed. By choosing appropriate orientation of the model with respect to the light path, the essential region of interest were sought to be analysed while keeping the model under live loading conditions. Need for a sophisticated software module to carefully identify the model domain has been brought out. For data extraction, five-step method is used and isochromatics are evaluated by twelve fringe photoelasticity. In addition to the isochromatic fringe field, whole field isoclinic data is also obtained for the first time in implant dentistry, which could throw important information in improving the structural stability of the implant systems. Analysis is carried out for the implant in the molar as well as the incisor region. In addition, the interaction effects of loaded molar implant on the incisor area are also studied.

  8. Goals Analysis Procedure Guidelines for Applying the Goals Analysis Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Motley, Albert E., III

    2000-01-01

    One of the key elements to successful project management is the establishment of the "right set of requirements", requirements that reflect the true customer needs and are consistent with the strategic goals and objectives of the participating organizations. A viable set of requirements implies that each individual requirement is a necessary element in satisfying the stated goals and that the entire set of requirements, taken as a whole, is sufficient to satisfy the stated goals. Unfortunately, it is the author's experience that during project formulation phases' many of the Systems Engineering customers do not conduct a rigorous analysis of the goals and objectives that drive the system requirements. As a result, the Systems Engineer is often provided with requirements that are vague, incomplete, and internally inconsistent. To complicate matters, most systems development methodologies assume that the customer provides unambiguous, comprehensive and concise requirements. This paper describes the specific steps of a Goals Analysis process applied by Systems Engineers at the NASA Langley Research Center during the formulation of requirements for research projects. The objective of Goals Analysis is to identify and explore all of the influencing factors that ultimately drive the system's requirements.

  9. Detrital Zircon Geochronology Applied to Basin Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehrels, G. E.

    2014-12-01

    During the past ~15 years, detrital zircon geochronology has developed into a powerful tool for analyzing sedimentary features and processes. One of the most common applications is to use the ages of the youngest detrital zircons in a sample to constrain the maximum age of deposition. In an ideal case, for example in a region with active volcanism, the youngest zircon grains would have crystallized immediately prior to deposition and the lag time between crystallization and deposition is negligible. Such ages provide opportunities for reconstructing the chrono-stratigraphy of a sedimentary sequence, and establishing the chrono-correlation of sedimentary units and surfaces across broad regions. Most sedimentary units also yield detrital zircon grains that significantly predate deposition (because of the extreme durability of zircon). The ages of these grains provide a fingerprint (or chrono-facies) that can be used for comparison of sedimentary units. Such comparisons have traditionally been based on the presence/absence of age populations, but with larger data sets it is becoming possible to determine proportions of ages in a robust fashion, and thereby compare strata much more quantitatively. Common methodology for conducting these types of analyses is to determine ages for several hundred detrital zircon grains from each sample, with random selection of grains to generate a robust age distribution. If necessary, additional analyses are conducted on "young-looking" grains to improve precision on the max depo age. Such analyses commonly yield max depo ages that are reliable to 1-2%. Determining whether a max depo age approximates true depo age commonly requires geologic arguments (e.g., presence of volcanic lithic fragments, size/shape of the youngest zircon crystals, order of youngest ages in a sedimentary sequence). In addition to these chronologic applications, detrital zircon ages provide powerful tools for determining provenance, reconstructing dispersal

  10. Treatment Integrity in Applied Behavior Analysis with Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gresham, Frank M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    A review of 158 applied behavior analysis studies with children as subjects, published in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" between 1980 and 1990, found that (1) 16% measured the accuracy of independent variable implementation, and (2) two-thirds did not operationally define components of the independent variable. Specific recommendations…

  11. Negative reinforcement in applied behavior analysis: an emerging technology.

    PubMed

    Iwata, B A

    1987-01-01

    Although the effects of negative reinforcement on human behavior have been studied for a number of years, a comprehensive body of applied research does not exist at this time. This article describes three aspects of negative reinforcement as it relates to applied behavior analysis: behavior acquired or maintained through negative reinforcement, the treatment of negatively reinforced behavior, and negative reinforcement as therapy. A consideration of research currently being done in these areas suggests the emergence of an applied technology on negative reinforcement.

  12. Negative Reinforcement in Applied Behavior Analysis: An Emerging Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwata, Brian A.

    1987-01-01

    The article describes three aspects of negative reinforcement as it relates to applied behavior analysis: behavior acquired or maintained through negative reinforcement, the treatment of negatively reinforced behavior, and negative reinforcement as therapy. Current research suggests the emergence of an applied technology on negative reinforcement.…

  13. Animal Research in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Timothy L.; Poling, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes the 6 studies with nonhuman animal subjects that have appeared in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" and offers suggestions for future research in this area. Two of the reviewed articles described translational research in which pigeons were used to illustrate and examine behavioral phenomena of applied significance…

  14. B. F. Skinner's contributions to applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward K.; Smith, Nathaniel G.; Altus, Deborah E.

    2005-01-01

    Our paper reviews and analyzes B. F. Skinner's contributions to applied behavior analysis in order to assess his role as the field's originator and founder. We found, first, that his contributions fall into five categorizes: the style and content of his science, his interpretations of typical and atypical human behavior, the implications he drew from his science for application, his descriptions of possible applications, and his own applications to nonhuman and human behavior. Second, we found that he explicitly or implicitly addressed all seven dimensions of applied behavior analysis. These contributions and the dimensions notwithstanding, he neither incorporated the field's scientific (e.g., analytic) and social dimensions (e.g., applied) into any program of published research such that he was its originator, nor did he systematically integrate, advance, and promote the dimensions so to have been its founder. As the founder of behavior analysis, however, he was the father of applied behavior analysis. PMID:22478444

  15. Swimming and other activities: applied aspects of fish swimming performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Farrell, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Human activities such as hydropower development, water withdrawals, and commercial fisheries often put fish species at risk. Engineered solutions designed to protect species or their life stages are frequently based on assumptions about swimming performance and behaviors. In many cases, however, the appropriate data to support these designs are either unavailable or misapplied. This article provides an overview of the state of knowledge of fish swimming performance – where the data come from and how they are applied – identifying both gaps in knowledge and common errors in application, with guidance on how to avoid repeating mistakes, as well as suggestions for further study.

  16. The Significance of Regional Analysis in Applied Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommers, Lawrence M.

    Regional analysis is central to applied geographic research, contributing to better planning and policy development for a variety of societal problems facing the United States. The development of energy policy serves as an illustration of the capabilities of this type of analysis. The United States has had little success in formulating a national…

  17. Applying Systems Analysis to Program Failure in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Margaret E.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Certain systems analysis techniques can be applied to examinations of program failure in continuing education to locate weaknesses in planning and implementing stages. Questions to guide an analysis and various procedures are recommended. Twelve issues that contribute to failures or discontinuations are identified. (Author/MLW)

  18. Quantitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinarity of Applied Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Duan, Xiaojun; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Zhang, Pengyuan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of mathematical techniques in scientific research leads to the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. This viewpoint is validated quantitatively here by statistical and network analysis on the corpus PNAS 1999-2013. A network describing the interdisciplinary relationships between disciplines in a panoramic view is built based on the corpus. Specific network indicators show the hub role of applied mathematics in interdisciplinary research. The statistical analysis on the corpus content finds that algorithms, a primary topic of applied mathematics, positively correlates, increasingly co-occurs, and has an equilibrium relationship in the long-run with certain typical research paradigms and methodologies. The finding can be understood as an intrinsic cause of the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinarity of Applied Mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengyuan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of mathematical techniques in scientific research leads to the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. This viewpoint is validated quantitatively here by statistical and network analysis on the corpus PNAS 1999–2013. A network describing the interdisciplinary relationships between disciplines in a panoramic view is built based on the corpus. Specific network indicators show the hub role of applied mathematics in interdisciplinary research. The statistical analysis on the corpus content finds that algorithms, a primary topic of applied mathematics, positively correlates, increasingly co-occurs, and has an equilibrium relationship in the long-run with certain typical research paradigms and methodologies. The finding can be understood as an intrinsic cause of the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. PMID:26352604

  20. To apply or not to apply: a survey analysis of grant writing costs and benefits.

    PubMed

    von Hippel, Ted; von Hippel, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed 113 astronomers and 82 psychologists active in applying for federally funded research on their grant-writing history between January, 2009 and November, 2012. We collected demographic data, effort levels, success rates, and perceived non-financial benefits from writing grant proposals. We find that the average proposal takes 116 PI hours and 55 CI hours to write; although time spent writing was not related to whether the grant was funded. Effort did translate into success, however, as academics who wrote more grants received more funding. Participants indicated modest non-monetary benefits from grant writing, with psychologists reporting a somewhat greater benefit overall than astronomers. These perceptions of non-financial benefits were unrelated to how many grants investigators applied for, the number of grants they received, or the amount of time they devoted to writing their proposals. We also explored the number of years an investigator can afford to apply unsuccessfully for research grants and our analyses suggest that funding rates below approximately 20%, commensurate with current NIH and NSF funding, are likely to drive at least half of the active researchers away from federally funded research. We conclude with recommendations and suggestions for individual investigators and for department heads.

  1. To Apply or Not to Apply: A Survey Analysis of Grant Writing Costs and Benefits

    PubMed Central

    von Hippel, Ted; von Hippel, Courtney

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed 113 astronomers and 82 psychologists active in applying for federally funded research on their grant-writing history between January, 2009 and November, 2012. We collected demographic data, effort levels, success rates, and perceived non-financial benefits from writing grant proposals. We find that the average proposal takes 116 PI hours and 55 CI hours to write; although time spent writing was not related to whether the grant was funded. Effort did translate into success, however, as academics who wrote more grants received more funding. Participants indicated modest non-monetary benefits from grant writing, with psychologists reporting a somewhat greater benefit overall than astronomers. These perceptions of non-financial benefits were unrelated to how many grants investigators applied for, the number of grants they received, or the amount of time they devoted to writing their proposals. We also explored the number of years an investigator can afford to apply unsuccessfully for research grants and our analyses suggest that funding rates below approximately 20%, commensurate with current NIH and NSF funding, are likely to drive at least half of the active researchers away from federally funded research. We conclude with recommendations and suggestions for individual investigators and for department heads. PMID:25738742

  2. Applied behavior analysis: New directions from the laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Epling, W. Frank; Pierce, W. David

    1983-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis began when laboratory based principles were extended to humans inorder to change socially significant behavior. Recent laboratory findings may have applied relevance; however, the majority of basic researchers have not clearly communicated the practical implications of their work. The present paper samples some of the new findings and attempts to demonstrate their applied importance. Schedule-induced behavior which occurs as a by-product of contingencies of reinforcement is discussed. Possible difficulties in treatment and management of induced behaviors are considered. Next, the correlation-based law of effect and the implications of relative reinforcement are explored in terms of applied examples. Relative rate of reinforcement is then extended to the literature dealing with concurrent operants. Concurrent operant models may describe human behavior of applied importance, and several techniques for modification of problem behavior are suggested. As a final concern, the paper discusses several new paradigms. While the practical importance of these models is not clear at the moment, it may be that new practical advantages will soon arise. Thus, it is argued that basic research continues to be of theoretical and practical importance to applied behavior analysis. PMID:22478574

  3. Animal research in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Timothy L; Poling, Alan

    2011-01-01

    This review summarizes the 6 studies with nonhuman animal subjects that have appeared in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and offers suggestions for future research in this area. Two of the reviewed articles described translational research in which pigeons were used to illustrate and examine behavioral phenomena of applied significance (say-do correspondence and fluency), 3 described interventions that changed animals' behavior (self-injury by a baboon, feces throwing and spitting by a chimpanzee, and unsafe trailer entry by horses) in ways that benefited the animals and the people in charge of them, and 1 described the use of trained rats that performed a service to humans (land-mine detection). We suggest that each of these general research areas merits further attention and that the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis is an appropriate outlet for some of these publications.

  4. B. F. Skinner's Contributions to Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Edward K.; Smith, Nathaniel G.; Altus, Deborah E.

    2005-01-01

    Our paper reviews and analyzes B. F. Skinner's contributions to applied behavior analysis in order to assess his role as the field's originator and founder. We found, first, that his contributions fall into five categorizes: the style and content of his science, his interpretations of typical and atypical human behavior, the implications he drew…

  5. Positive Behavior Support and Applied Behavior Analysis: A Familial Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Glen; Carr, Edward G.; Horner, Robert H.; Zarcone, Jennifer R.; Schwartz, Ilene

    2008-01-01

    Positive behavior support (PBS) emerged in the mid-1980s as an approach for understanding and addressing problem behaviors. PBS was derived primarily from applied behavior analysis (ABA). Over time, however, PBS research and practice has incorporated evaluative methods, assessment and intervention procedures, and conceptual perspectives associated…

  6. Applied Behavior Analysis Is a Science And, Therefore, Progressive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Ross, Robert K.; Smith, Tristram; Weiss, Mary Jane

    2016-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science and, therefore, involves progressive approaches and outcomes. In this commentary we argue that the spirit and the method of science should be maintained in order to avoid reductionist procedures, stifled innovation, and rote, unresponsive protocols that become increasingly removed from meaningful…

  7. Research in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering (ICASE) in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized and abstracts of published reports are presented. The major categories of the ICASE research program are: (1) numerical methods, with particular emphasis on the development and analysis of basic numerical algorithms; (2) control and parameter identification; (3) computational problems in engineering and the physical sciences, particularly fluid dynamics, acoustics, and structural analysis; and (4) computer systems and software, especially vector and parallel computers.

  8. Recent reinforcement-schedule research and applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lattal, Kennon A.; Neef, Nancy A.

    1996-01-01

    Reinforcement schedules are considered in relation to applied behavior analysis by examining several recent laboratory experiments with humans and other animals. The experiments are drawn from three areas of contemporary schedule research: behavioral history effects on schedule performance, the role of instructions in schedule performance of humans, and dynamic schedules of reinforcement. All of the experiments are discussed in relation to the role of behavioral history in current schedule performance. The paper concludes by extracting from the experiments some more general issues concerning reinforcement schedules in applied research and practice. PMID:16795888

  9. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists.

  10. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  11. Developing an interdisciplinary master's program in applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lowenkron, Barry; Mitchell, Lynda

    1995-01-01

    At many universities, faculty interested in behavior analysis are spread across disciplines. This makes difficult the development of behavior-analytically oriented programs, and impedes regular contact among colleagues who share common interests. However, this separation by disciplines can be a source of strength if it is used to develop interdisciplinary programs. In this article we describe how a bottom-up strategy was used to develop two complementary interdisciplinary MS programs in applied behavior analysis, and conclude with a description of the benefits—some obvious, some surprising—that can emerge from the development of such programs. PMID:22478230

  12. Applying activity-based costing to the nuclear medicine unit.

    PubMed

    Suthummanon, Sakesun; Omachonu, Vincent K; Akcin, Mehmet

    2005-08-01

    Previous studies have shown the feasibility of using activity-based costing (ABC) in hospital environments. However, many of these studies discuss the general applications of ABC in health-care organizations. This research explores the potential application of ABC to the nuclear medicine unit (NMU) at a teaching hospital. The finding indicates that the current cost averages 236.11 US dollars for all procedures, which is quite different from the costs computed by using ABC. The difference is most significant with positron emission tomography scan, 463 US dollars (an increase of 96%), as well as bone scan and thyroid scan, 114 US dollars (a decrease of 52%). The result of ABC analysis demonstrates that the operational time (machine time and direct labour time) and the cost of drugs have the most influence on cost per procedure. Clearly, to reduce the cost per procedure for the NMU, the reduction in operational time and cost of drugs should be analysed. The result also indicates that ABC can be used to improve resource allocation and management. It can be an important aid in making management decisions, particularly for improving pricing practices by making costing more accurate. It also facilitates the identification of underutilized resources and related costs, leading to cost reduction. The ABC system will also help hospitals control costs, improve the quality and efficiency of the care they provide, and manage their resources better.

  13. Probabilistic Analysis Techniques Applied to Complex Spacecraft Power System Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Rusick, Jeffrey J.

    2005-01-01

    Electric power system performance predictions are critical to spacecraft, such as the International Space Station (ISS), to ensure that sufficient power is available to support all the spacecraft s power needs. In the case of the ISS power system, analyses to date have been deterministic, meaning that each analysis produces a single-valued result for power capability because of the complexity and large size of the model. As a result, the deterministic ISS analyses did not account for the sensitivity of the power capability to uncertainties in model input variables. Over the last 10 years, the NASA Glenn Research Center has developed advanced, computationally fast, probabilistic analysis techniques and successfully applied them to large (thousands of nodes) complex structural analysis models. These same techniques were recently applied to large, complex ISS power system models. This new application enables probabilistic power analyses that account for input uncertainties and produce results that include variations caused by these uncertainties. Specifically, N&R Engineering, under contract to NASA, integrated these advanced probabilistic techniques with Glenn s internationally recognized ISS power system model, System Power Analysis for Capability Evaluation (SPACE).

  14. [Research activities in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period April 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995.

  15. Differential item functioning analysis by applying multiple comparison procedures.

    PubMed

    Eusebi, Paolo; Kreiner, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Analysis within a Rasch measurement framework aims at development of valid and objective test score. One requirement of both validity and objectivity is that items do not show evidence of differential item functioning (DIF). A number of procedures exist for the assessment of DIF including those based on analysis of contingency tables by Mantel-Haenszel tests and partial gamma coefficients. The aim of this paper is to illustrate Multiple Comparison Procedures (MCP) for analysis of DIF relative to a variable defining a very large number of groups, with an unclear ordering with respect to the DIF effect. We propose a single step procedure controlling the false discovery rate for DIF detection. The procedure applies for both dichotomous and polytomous items. In addition to providing evidence against a hypothesis of no DIF, the procedure also provides information on subset of groups that are homogeneous with respect to the DIF effect. A stepwise MCP procedure for this purpose is also introduced.

  16. Cladistic analysis applied to the classification of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hone, D. W. E.; Mahony, S. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Martin, K. T.

    2007-11-01

    Cladistics is a systematic method of classification that groups entities on the basis of sharing similar characteristics in the most parsimonious manner. Here cladistics is applied to the classification of volcanoes using a dataset of 59 Quaternary volcanoes and 129 volcanic edifices of the Tohoku region, Northeast Japan. Volcano and edifice characteristics recorded in the database include attributes of volcano size, chemical composition, dominant eruptive products, volcano morphology, dominant landforms, volcano age and eruptive history. Without characteristics related to time the volcanic edifices divide into two groups, with characters related to volcano size, dominant composition and edifice morphology being the most diagnostic. Analysis including time based characteristics yields four groups with a good correlation between these groups and the two groups from the analysis without time for 108 out of 129 volcanic edifices. Thus when characters are slightly changed the volcanoes still form similar groupings. Analysis of the volcanoes both with and without time yields three groups based on compositional, eruptive products and morphological characters. Spatial clusters of volcanic centres have been recognised in the Tohoku region by Tamura et al. ( Earth Planet Sci Lett 197:105 106, 2002). The groups identified by cladistic analysis are distributed unevenly between the clusters, indicating a tendency for individual clusters to form similar kinds of volcanoes with distinctive but coherent styles of volcanism. Uneven distribution of volcano types between clusters can be explained by variations in dominant magma compositions through time, which are reflected in eruption products and volcanic landforms. Cladistic analysis can be a useful tool for elucidating dynamic igneous processes that could be applied to other regions and globally. Our exploratory study indicates that cladistics has promise as a method for classifying volcanoes and potentially elucidating dynamic

  17. 44 CFR 7.912 - To what programs or activities does this regulation apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... activities does this regulation apply? 7.912 Section 7.912 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL... Financial Assistance From FEMA General § 7.912 To what programs or activities does this regulation apply? (a) The Act and this regulation apply to each FEMA recipient and to each program or activity operated...

  18. Compatibility of person-centered planning and applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Holburn, Steve

    2001-01-01

    In response to Osborne (1999), the aims and practices of person-centered planning (PCP) are compared to the basic principles of applied behavior analysis set forth by Baer, Wolf, and Risley (1968, 1987). The principal goal of PCP is social integration of people with disabilities; it qualifies as a socially important behavior, and its problems have been displayed sufficiently. However, social integration is a complex social problem whose solution requires access to system contingencies that influence lifestyles. Nearly all of the component goals of PCP proposed by O'Brien (1987b) have been reliably quantified, although concurrent measurement of outcomes such as friendship, autonomy, and respect presents a formidable challenge. Behavioral principles such as contingency and contextual control are operative within PCP, but problems in achieving reliable implementation appear to impede an experimental analysis. PMID:22478371

  19. Classical mechanics approach applied to analysis of genetic oscillators.

    PubMed

    Vasylchenkova, Anastasiia; Mraz, Miha; Zimic, Nikolaj; Moskon, Miha

    2016-04-05

    Biological oscillators present a fundamental part of several regulatory mechanisms that control the response of various biological systems. Several analytical approaches for their analysis have been reported recently. They are, however, limited to only specific oscillator topologies and/or to giving only qualitative answers, i.e., is the dynamics of an oscillator given the parameter space oscillatory or not. Here we present a general analytical approach that can be applied to the analysis of biological oscillators. It relies on the projection of biological systems to classical mechanics systems. The approach is able to provide us with relatively accurate results in the meaning of type of behaviour system reflects (i.e. oscillatory or not) and periods of potential oscillations without the necessity to conduct expensive numerical simulations. We demonstrate and verify the proposed approach on three different implementations of amplified negative feedback oscillator.

  20. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  1. Shape analysis applied in heavy ion reactions near Fermi energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Huang, M.; Wada, R.; Liu, X.; Lin, W.; Wang, J.

    2017-03-01

    A new method is proposed to perform shape analyses and to evaluate their validity in heavy ion collisions near the Fermi energy. In order to avoid erroneous values of shape parameters in the calculation, a test particle method is utilized in which each nucleon is represented by n test particles, similar to that used in the Boltzmann–Uehling–Uhlenbeck (BUU) calculations. The method is applied to the events simulated by an antisymmetrized molecular dynamics model. The geometrical shape of fragments is reasonably extracted when n = 100 is used. A significant deformation is observed for all fragments created in the multifragmentation process. The method is also applied to the shape of the momentum distribution for event classification. In the momentum case, the errors in the eigenvalue calculation become much smaller than those of the geometrical shape analysis and the results become similar between those with and without the test particle method, indicating that in intermediate heavy ion collisions the shape analysis of momentum distribution can be used for the event classification without the test particle method.

  2. Automated SEM Modal Analysis Applied to the Diogenites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, L. E.; Spilde, M. N.; Papike, James J.

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of volume proportions of minerals, or modal analysis, is routinely accomplished by point counting on an optical microscope, but the process, particularly on brecciated samples such as the diogenite meteorites, is tedious and prone to error by misidentification of very small fragments, which may make up a significant volume of the sample. Precise volume percentage data can be gathered on a scanning electron microscope (SEM) utilizing digital imaging and an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). This form of automated phase analysis reduces error, and at the same time provides more information than could be gathered using simple point counting alone, such as particle morphology statistics and chemical analyses. We have previously studied major, minor, and trace-element chemistry of orthopyroxene from a suite of diogenites. This abstract describes the method applied to determine the modes on this same suite of meteorites and the results of that research. The modal abundances thus determined add additional information on the petrogenesis of the diogenites. In addition, low-abundance phases such as spinels were located for further analysis by this method.

  3. Physical Activity and Wellness: Applied Learning through Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Lynn Hunt; Franzidis, Alexia

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how two university professors teamed up to initiate a university-sponsored physical activity and wellness expo in an effort to promote an authentic and transformative learning experience for preservice students.

  4. Applying Transtheoretical Model to Promote Physical Activities Among Women

    PubMed Central

    Pirzadeh, Asiyeh; Mostafavi, Firoozeh; Ghofranipour, Fazllolah; Feizi, Awat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physical activity is one of the most important indicators of health in communities but different studies conducted in the provinces of Iran showed that inactivity is prevalent, especially among women. Objectives: Inadequate regular physical activities among women, the importance of education in promoting the physical activities, and lack of studies on the women using transtheoretical model, persuaded us to conduct this study with the aim of determining the application of transtheoretical model in promoting the physical activities among women of Isfahan. Materials and Methods: This research was a quasi-experimental study which was conducted on 141 women residing in Isfahan, Iran. They were randomly divided into case and control groups. In addition to the demographic information, their physical activities and the constructs of the transtheoretical model (stages of change, processes of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy) were measured at 3 time points; preintervention, 3 months, and 6 months after intervention. Finally, the obtained data were analyzed through t test and repeated measures ANOVA test using SPSS version 16. Results: The results showed that education based on the transtheoretical model significantly increased physical activities in 2 aspects of intensive physical activities and walking, in the case group over the time. Also, a high percentage of people have shown progress during the stages of change, the mean of the constructs of processes of change, as well as pros and cons. On the whole, a significant difference was observed over the time in the case group (P < 0.01). Conclusions: This study showed that interventions based on the transtheoretical model can promote the physical activity behavior among women. PMID:26834796

  5. Neighborhood Design, Physical Activity, and Wellbeing: Applying the Walkability Model.

    PubMed

    Zuniga-Teran, Adriana A; Orr, Barron J; Gimblett, Randy H; Chalfoun, Nader V; Guertin, David P; Marsh, Stuart E

    2017-01-13

    Neighborhood design affects lifestyle physical activity, and ultimately human wellbeing. There are, however, a limited number of studies that examine neighborhood design types. In this research, we examine four types of neighborhood designs: traditional development, suburban development, enclosed community, and cluster housing development, and assess their level of walkability and their effects on physical activity and wellbeing. We examine significant associations through a questionnaire (n = 486) distributed in Tucson, Arizona using the Walkability Model. Among the tested neighborhood design types, traditional development showed significant associations and the highest value for walkability, as well as for each of the two types of walking (recreation and transportation) representing physical activity. Suburban development showed significant associations and the highest mean values for mental health and wellbeing. Cluster housing showed significant associations and the highest mean value for social interactions with neighbors and for perceived safety from crime. Enclosed community did not obtain the highest means for any wellbeing benefit. The Walkability Model proved useful in identifying the walkability categories associated with physical activity and perceived crime. For example, the experience category was strongly and inversely associated with perceived crime. This study provides empirical evidence of the importance of including vegetation, particularly trees, throughout neighborhoods in order to increase physical activity and wellbeing. Likewise, the results suggest that regular maintenance is an important strategy to improve mental health and overall wellbeing in cities.

  6. Neighborhood Design, Physical Activity, and Wellbeing: Applying the Walkability Model

    PubMed Central

    Zuniga-Teran, Adriana A.; Orr, Barron J.; Gimblett, Randy H.; Chalfoun, Nader V.; Guertin, David P.; Marsh, Stuart E.

    2017-01-01

    Neighborhood design affects lifestyle physical activity, and ultimately human wellbeing. There are, however, a limited number of studies that examine neighborhood design types. In this research, we examine four types of neighborhood designs: traditional development, suburban development, enclosed community, and cluster housing development, and assess their level of walkability and their effects on physical activity and wellbeing. We examine significant associations through a questionnaire (n = 486) distributed in Tucson, Arizona using the Walkability Model. Among the tested neighborhood design types, traditional development showed significant associations and the highest value for walkability, as well as for each of the two types of walking (recreation and transportation) representing physical activity. Suburban development showed significant associations and the highest mean values for mental health and wellbeing. Cluster housing showed significant associations and the highest mean value for social interactions with neighbors and for perceived safety from crime. Enclosed community did not obtain the highest means for any wellbeing benefit. The Walkability Model proved useful in identifying the walkability categories associated with physical activity and perceived crime. For example, the experience category was strongly and inversely associated with perceived crime. This study provides empirical evidence of the importance of including vegetation, particularly trees, throughout neighborhoods in order to increase physical activity and wellbeing. Likewise, the results suggest that regular maintenance is an important strategy to improve mental health and overall wellbeing in cities. PMID:28098785

  7. Applied Behavior Analysis is a Science and, Therefore, Progressive.

    PubMed

    Leaf, Justin B; Leaf, Ronald; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Ala'i-Rosales, Shahla; Ross, Robert K; Smith, Tristram; Weiss, Mary Jane

    2016-02-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a science and, therefore, involves progressive approaches and outcomes. In this commentary we argue that the spirit and the method of science should be maintained in order to avoid reductionist procedures, stifled innovation, and rote, unresponsive protocols that become increasingly removed from meaningful progress for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We describe this approach as progressive. In a progressive approach to ABA, the therapist employs a structured yet flexible process, which is contingent upon and responsive to child progress. We will describe progressive ABA, contrast it to reductionist ABA, and provide rationales for both the substance and intent of ABA as a progressive scientific method for improving conditions of social relevance for individuals with ASD.

  8. Evaluating the effectiveness of teacher training in Applied Behaviour Analysis.

    PubMed

    Grey, Ian M; Honan, Rita; McClean, Brian; Daly, Michael

    2005-09-01

    Interventions for children with autism based upon Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) has been repeatedly shown to be related both to educational gains and to reductions in challenging behaviours. However, to date, comprehensive training in ABA for teachers and others have been limited. Over 7 months, 11 teachers undertook 90 hours of classroom instruction and supervision in ABA. Each teacher conducted a comprehensive functional assessment and designed a behaviour support plan targeting one behaviour for one child with an autistic disorder. Target behaviours included aggression, non-compliance and specific educational skills. Teachers recorded observational data for the target behaviour for both baseline and intervention sessions. Support plans produced an average 80 percent change in frequency of occurrence of target behaviours. Questionnaires completed by parents and teachers at the end of the course indicated a beneficial effect for the children and the educational environment. The potential benefits of teacher implemented behavioural intervention are discussed.

  9. Statistical model applied to motor evoked potentials analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ying; Thakor, Nitish V; Jia, Xiaofeng

    2011-01-01

    Motor evoked potentials (MEPs) convey information regarding the functional integrity of the descending motor pathways. Absence of the MEP has been used as a neurophysiological marker to suggest cortico-spinal abnormalities in the operating room. Due to their high variability and sensitivity, detailed quantitative studies of MEPs are lacking. This paper applies a statistical method to characterize MEPs by estimating the number of motor units and single motor unit potential amplitudes. A clearly increasing trend of single motor unit potential amplitudes in the MEPs after each pulse of the stimulation pulse train is revealed by this method. This statistical method eliminates the effects of anesthesia, and provides an objective assessment of MEPs. Consequently this statistical method has high potential to be useful in future quantitative MEPs analysis.

  10. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    We are developing a machine learning system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being learned. Using this information (which we call a domain theory''), our learning algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, the KBANN algorithm maps inference rules, such as consensus sequences, into a neural (connectionist) network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples of refine these inference rules. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis and have also been extending the capabilities of our learning system along several dimensions.

  11. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W. . Dept. of Computer Sciences); Noordewier, M.O. . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1992-01-01

    We are primarily developing a machine teaming (ML) system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being teamed. Using this information, our teaming algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, our KBANN algorithm maps inference rules about a given recognition task into a neural network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples to refine these inference rules. We call these rules a domain theory, following the convention in the machine teaming community. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis. In addition, we have been extending the capabilities of our teaming system along several dimensions. We have also been investigating parallel algorithms that perform sequence alignments in the presence of frameshift errors.

  12. Robust regression applied to fractal/multifractal analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portilla, F.; Valencia, J. L.; Tarquis, A. M.; Saa-Requejo, A.

    2012-04-01

    Fractal and multifractal are concepts that have grown increasingly popular in recent years in the soil analysis, along with the development of fractal models. One of the common steps is to calculate the slope of a linear fit commonly using least squares method. This shouldn't be a special problem, however, in many situations using experimental data the researcher has to select the range of scales at which is going to work neglecting the rest of points to achieve the best linearity that in this type of analysis is necessary. Robust regression is a form of regression analysis designed to circumvent some limitations of traditional parametric and non-parametric methods. In this method we don't have to assume that the outlier point is simply an extreme observation drawn from the tail of a normal distribution not compromising the validity of the regression results. In this work we have evaluated the capacity of robust regression to select the points in the experimental data used trying to avoid subjective choices. Based on this analysis we have developed a new work methodology that implies two basic steps: • Evaluation of the improvement of linear fitting when consecutive points are eliminated based on R p-value. In this way we consider the implications of reducing the number of points. • Evaluation of the significance of slope difference between fitting with the two extremes points and fitted with the available points. We compare the results applying this methodology and the common used least squares one. The data selected for these comparisons are coming from experimental soil roughness transect and simulated based on middle point displacement method adding tendencies and noise. The results are discussed indicating the advantages and disadvantages of each methodology. Acknowledgements Funding provided by CEIGRAM (Research Centre for the Management of Agricultural and Environmental Risks) and by Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación (MICINN) through project no

  13. Applying AI tools to operational space environmental analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krajnak, Mike; Jesse, Lisa; Mucks, John

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Air Force and National Oceanic Atmospheric Agency (NOAA) space environmental operations centers are facing increasingly complex challenges meeting the needs of their growing user community. These centers provide current space environmental information and short term forecasts of geomagnetic activity. Recent advances in modeling and data access have provided sophisticated tools for making accurate and timely forecasts, but have introduced new problems associated with handling and analyzing large quantities of complex data. AI (Artificial Intelligence) techniques have been considered as potential solutions to some of these problems. Fielding AI systems has proven more difficult than expected, in part because of operational constraints. Using systems which have been demonstrated successfully in the operational environment will provide a basis for a useful data fusion and analysis capability. Our approach uses a general purpose AI system already in operational use within the military intelligence community, called the Temporal Analysis System (TAS). TAS is an operational suite of tools supporting data processing, data visualization, historical analysis, situation assessment and predictive analysis. TAS includes expert system tools to analyze incoming events for indications of particular situations and predicts future activity. The expert system operates on a knowledge base of temporal patterns encoded using a knowledge representation called Temporal Transition Models (TTM's) and an event database maintained by the other TAS tools. The system also includes a robust knowledge acquisition and maintenance tool for creating TTM's using a graphical specification language. The ability to manipulate TTM's in a graphical format gives non-computer specialists an intuitive way of accessing and editing the knowledge base. To support space environmental analyses, we used TAS's ability to define domain specific event analysis abstractions. The prototype system defines

  14. A Hygrothermal Risk Analysis Applied to Residential Unvented Attics

    SciTech Connect

    Pallin, Simon B; Kehrer, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    Aresidential building, constructed with an unvented attic, is acommonroof assembly in the United States.The expected hygrothermal performance and service life of the roof are difficult to estimate due to a number of varying parameters.Typical parameters expected to vary are the climate, direction, and slope of the roof as well as the radiation properties of the surface material. Furthermore, influential parameters are indoor moisture excess, air leakages through the attic floor, and leakages from air-handling unit and ventilation ducts. In addition, the type of building materials such as the insulation material and closed or open cell spray polyurethane foam will influence the future performance of the roof. A development of a simulation model of the roof assembly will enable a risk and sensitivity analysis, in which the most important varying parameters on the hygrothermal performance can be determined. The model is designed to perform probabilistic simulations using mathematical and hygrothermal calculation tools. The varying input parameters can be chosen from existing measurements, simulations, or standards. An analysis is applied to determine the risk of consequences, such as mold growth, rot, or energy demand of the HVAC unit. Furthermore, the future performance of the roof can be simulated in different climates to facilitate the design of an efficient and reliable roof construction with the most suitable technical solution and to determine the most appropriate building materials for a given climate

  15. Extended Kramers-Moyal analysis applied to optical trapping.

    PubMed

    Honisch, Christoph; Friedrich, Rudolf; Hörner, Florian; Denz, Cornelia

    2012-08-01

    The Kramers-Moyal analysis is a well-established approach to analyze stochastic time series from complex systems. If the sampling interval of a measured time series is too low, systematic errors occur in the analysis results. These errors are labeled as finite time effects in the literature. In the present article, we present some new insights about these effects and discuss the limitations of a previously published method to estimate Kramers-Moyal coefficients at the presence of finite time effects. To increase the reliability of this method and to avoid misinterpretations, we extend it by the computation of error estimates for estimated parameters using a Monte Carlo error propagation technique. Finally, the extended method is applied to a data set of an optical trapping experiment yielding estimations of the forces acting on a Brownian particle trapped by optical tweezers. We find an increased Markov-Einstein time scale of the order of the relaxation time of the process, which can be traced back to memory effects caused by the interaction of the particle and the fluid. Above the Markov-Einstein time scale, the process can be very well described by the classical overdamped Markov model for Brownian motion.

  16. Microbial solar cells: applying photosynthetic and electrochemically active organisms.

    PubMed

    Strik, David P B T B; Timmers, Ruud A; Helder, Marjolein; Steinbusch, Kirsten J J; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2011-01-01

    Microbial solar cells (MSCs) are recently developed technologies that utilize solar energy to produce electricity or chemicals. MSCs use photoautotrophic microorganisms or higher plants to harvest solar energy, and use electrochemically active microorganisms in the bioelectrochemical system to generate electrical current. Here, we review the principles and performance of various MSCs in an effort to identify the most promising systems, as well as the bottlenecks and potential solutions, for "real-life" MSC applications. We present an outlook on future applications based on the intrinsic advantages of MSCs, specifically highlighting how these living energy systems can facilitate the development of an electricity-producing green roof.

  17. Inducing in situ, nonlinear soil response applying an active source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, P.A.; Bodin, P.; Gomberg, J.; Pearce, F.; Lawrence, Z.; Menq, F.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    [1] It is well known that soil sites have a profound effect on ground motion during large earthquakes. The complex structure of soil deposits and the highly nonlinear constitutive behavior of soils largely control nonlinear site response at soil sites. Measurements of nonlinear soil response under natural conditions are critical to advancing our understanding of soil behavior during earthquakes. Many factors limit the use of earthquake observations to estimate nonlinear site response such that quantitative characterization of nonlinear behavior relies almost exclusively on laboratory experiments and modeling of wave propagation. Here we introduce a new method for in situ characterization of the nonlinear behavior of a natural soil formation using measurements obtained immediately adjacent to a large vibrator source. To our knowledge, we are the first group to propose and test such an approach. Employing a large, surface vibrator as a source, we measure the nonlinear behavior of the soil by incrementally increasing the source amplitude over a range of frequencies and monitoring changes in the output spectra. We apply a homodyne algorithm for measuring spectral amplitudes, which provides robust signal-to-noise ratios at the frequencies of interest. Spectral ratios are computed between the receivers and the source as well as receiver pairs located in an array adjacent to the source, providing the means to separate source and near-source nonlinearity from pervasive nonlinearity in the soil column. We find clear evidence of nonlinearity in significant decreases in the frequency of peak spectral ratios, corresponding to material softening with amplitude, observed across the array as the source amplitude is increased. The observed peak shifts are consistent with laboratory measurements of soil nonlinearity. Our results provide constraints for future numerical modeling studies of strong ground motion during earthquakes.

  18. Active Learning Techniques Applied to an Interdisciplinary Mineral Resources Course.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aird, H. M.

    2015-12-01

    An interdisciplinary active learning course was introduced at the University of Puget Sound entitled 'Mineral Resources and the Environment'. Various formative assessment and active learning techniques that have been effective in other courses were adapted and implemented to improve student learning, increase retention and broaden knowledge and understanding of course material. This was an elective course targeted towards upper-level undergraduate geology and environmental majors. The course provided an introduction to the mineral resources industry, discussing geological, environmental, societal and economic aspects, legislation and the processes involved in exploration, extraction, processing, reclamation/remediation and recycling of products. Lectures and associated weekly labs were linked in subject matter; relevant readings from the recent scientific literature were assigned and discussed in the second lecture of the week. Peer-based learning was facilitated through weekly reading assignments with peer-led discussions and through group research projects, in addition to in-class exercises such as debates. Writing and research skills were developed through student groups designing, carrying out and reporting on their own semester-long research projects around the lasting effects of the historical Ruston Smelter on the biology and water systems of Tacoma. The writing of their mini grant proposals and final project reports was carried out in stages to allow for feedback before the deadline. Speakers from industry were invited to share their specialist knowledge as guest lecturers, and students were encouraged to interact with them, with a view to employment opportunities. Formative assessment techniques included jigsaw exercises, gallery walks, placemat surveys, think pair share and take-home point summaries. Summative assessment included discussion leadership, exams, homeworks, group projects, in-class exercises, field trips, and pre-discussion reading exercises

  19. Multitaper Spectral Analysis and Wavelet Denoising Applied to Helioseismic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komm, R. W.; Gu, Y.; Hill, F.; Stark, P. B.; Fodor, I. K.

    1999-01-01

    Estimates of solar normal mode frequencies from helioseismic observations can be improved by using Multitaper Spectral Analysis (MTSA) to estimate spectra from the time series, then using wavelet denoising of the log spectra. MTSA leads to a power spectrum estimate with reduced variance and better leakage properties than the conventional periodogram. Under the assumption of stationarity and mild regularity conditions, the log multitaper spectrum has a statistical distribution that is approximately Gaussian, so wavelet denoising is asymptotically an optimal method to reduce the noise in the estimated spectra. We find that a single m-upsilon spectrum benefits greatly from MTSA followed by wavelet denoising, and that wavelet denoising by itself can be used to improve m-averaged spectra. We compare estimates using two different 5-taper estimates (Stepian and sine tapers) and the periodogram estimate, for GONG time series at selected angular degrees l. We compare those three spectra with and without wavelet-denoising, both visually, and in terms of the mode parameters estimated from the pre-processed spectra using the GONG peak-fitting algorithm. The two multitaper estimates give equivalent results. The number of modes fitted well by the GONG algorithm is 20% to 60% larger (depending on l and the temporal frequency) when applied to the multitaper estimates than when applied to the periodogram. The estimated mode parameters (frequency, amplitude and width) are comparable for the three power spectrum estimates, except for modes with very small mode widths (a few frequency bins), where the multitaper spectra broadened the modest compared with the periodogram. We tested the influence of the number of tapers used and found that narrow modes at low n values are broadened to the extent that they can no longer be fit if the number of tapers is too large. For helioseismic time series of this length and temporal resolution, the optimal number of tapers is less than 10.

  20. The Evidence-Based Practice of Applied Behavior Analysis.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Timothy A; Detrich, Ronnie; Wilczynski, Susan M; Spencer, Trina D; Lewis, Teri; Wolfe, Katie

    2014-05-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a model of professional decision-making in which practitioners integrate the best available evidence with client values/context and clinical expertise in order to provide services for their clients. This framework provides behavior analysts with a structure for pervasive use of the best available evidence in the complex settings in which they work. This structure recognizes the need for clear and explicit understanding of the strength of evidence supporting intervention options, the important contextual factors including client values that contribute to decision making, and the key role of clinical expertise in the conceptualization, intervention, and evaluation of cases. Opening the discussion of EBP in this journal, Smith (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) raised several key issues related to EBP and applied behavior analysis (ABA). The purpose of this paper is to respond to Smith's arguments and extend the discussion of the relevant issues. Although we support many of Smith's (The Behavior Analyst, 36, 7-33, 2013) points, we contend that Smith's definition of EBP is significantly narrower than definitions that are used in professions with long histories of EBP and that this narrowness conflicts with the principles that drive applied behavior analytic practice. We offer a definition and framework for EBP that aligns with the foundations of ABA and is consistent with well-established definitions of EBP in medicine, psychology, and other professions. In addition to supporting the systematic use of research evidence in behavior analytic decision making, this definition can promote clear communication about treatment decisions across disciplines and with important outside institutions such as insurance companies and granting agencies.

  1. First Attempt of Applying Factor Analysis in Moving Base Gravimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Roman, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    For gravimetric observation systems on mobile platforms (land/sea/airborne), the Low Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) issue is the main barrier to achieving an accurate, high resolution gravity signal. Normally, low-pass filters (Childers et al 1999, Forsberg et al 2000, Kwon and Jekeli 2000, Hwang et al 2006) are applied to smooth or remove the high frequency "noise" - even though some of the high frequency component is not necessarily noise. This is especially true for aerogravity surveys such as those from the Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project. These gravity survey flights have a spatial resolution of 10 km between tracks but higher resolution along track. The along track resolution is improved due to the lower flight height (6.1 km), equipment sensitivity, and improved modeling of potential errors. Additionally, these surveys suffer from a loss of signal power due to the increased flight elevation. Hence, application of a low-pass filter removes possible signal sensed in the along-track direction that might otherwise prove useful for various geophysical and geodetic applications. Some cutting-edge developments in Wavelets and Artificial Neural Networks had been successfully applied for obtaining improved results (Li 2008 and 2011, Liang and Liu 2013). However, a clearer and fundamental understanding of the error characteristics will further improve the quality of the gravity estimates out of these gravimetric systems. Here, instead of using any predefined basis function or any a priori model, the idea of Factor Analysis is first employed to try to extract the underlying factors of the noises in the systems. Real data sets collected by both land vehicle and aircraft will be processed as the examples.

  2. Applying thiouracil (TU)-tagging for mouse transcriptome analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Leslie; Karfilis, Kate V.; Miller, Michael R.; Doe, Chris Q.; Stankunas, Kryn

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful approach to study mouse development, physiology, and disease models. Here, we describe a protocol for mouse thiouracil-tagging (TU-tagging), a transcriptome analysis technology that includes in vivo covalent labeling, purification, and analysis of cell type-specific RNA. TU-tagging enables 1) the isolation of RNA from a given cell population of a complex tissue, avoiding transcriptional changes induced by cell isolation trauma, and 2) the identification of actively transcribed RNAs and not pre-existing transcripts. Therefore, in contrast to other cell-specific transcriptional profiling methods based on purification of tagged ribosomes or nuclei, TU-tagging provides a direct examination of transcriptional regulation. We describe how to: 1) deliver 4-thiouracil to transgenic mice to thio-label cell lineage-specific transcripts, 2) purify TU-tagged RNA and prepare libraries for Illumina sequencing, and 3) follow a straight-forward bioinformatics workflow to identify cell type-enriched or differentially expressed genes. Tissue containing TU-tagged RNA can be obtained in one day, RNA-Seq libraries generated within two days, and, following sequencing, an initial bioinformatics analysis completed in one additional day. PMID:24457332

  3. Applying DNA computation to intractable problems in social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rick C S; Yang, Stephen J H

    2010-09-01

    From ancient times to the present day, social networks have played an important role in the formation of various organizations for a range of social behaviors. As such, social networks inherently describe the complicated relationships between elements around the world. Based on mathematical graph theory, social network analysis (SNA) has been developed in and applied to various fields such as Web 2.0 for Web applications and product developments in industries, etc. However, some definitions of SNA, such as finding a clique, N-clique, N-clan, N-club and K-plex, are NP-complete problems, which are not easily solved via traditional computer architecture. These challenges have restricted the uses of SNA. This paper provides DNA-computing-based approaches with inherently high information density and massive parallelism. Using these approaches, we aim to solve the three primary problems of social networks: N-clique, N-clan, and N-club. Their accuracy and feasible time complexities discussed in the paper will demonstrate that DNA computing can be used to facilitate the development of SNA.

  4. Applying microscopy to the analysis of nuclear structure and function.

    PubMed

    Iborra, Francisco; Cook, Peter R; Jackson, Dean A

    2003-02-01

    One of the ultimate goals of biological research is to understand mechanisms of cell function within living organisms. With this in mind, many sophisticated technologies that allow us to inspect macromolecular structure in exquisite detail have been developed. Although knowledge of structure derived from techniques such as X-ray crystallography and nuclear magnetic resonance is of vital importance, these approaches cannot reveal the remarkable complexity of molecular interactions that exists in vivo. With this in mind, this review focuses on the use of microscopy techniques to analyze cell structure and function. We describe the different basic microscopic methodologies and how the routine techniques are best applied to particular biological problems. We also emphasize the specific capabilities and uses of light and electron microscopy and highlight their individual advantages and disadvantages. For completion, we also comment on the alternative possibilities provided by a variety of advanced imaging technologies. We hope that this brief analysis of the undoubted power of microscopy techniques will be enough to stimulate a wider participation in this rapidly developing area of biological discovery.

  5. Activity recognition in planetary navigation field tests using classification algorithms applied to accelerometer data.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen; Ade, Carl; Broxterman, Ryan; Barstow, Thomas; Nelson, Thomas; Warren, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Accelerometer data provide useful information about subject activity in many different application scenarios. For this study, single-accelerometer data were acquired from subjects participating in field tests that mimic tasks that astronauts might encounter in reduced gravity environments. The primary goal of this effort was to apply classification algorithms that could identify these tasks based on features present in their corresponding accelerometer data, where the end goal is to establish methods to unobtrusively gauge subject well-being based on sensors that reside in their local environment. In this initial analysis, six different activities that involve leg movement are classified. The k-Nearest Neighbors (kNN) algorithm was found to be the most effective, with an overall classification success rate of 90.8%.

  6. Differential Network Analysis Applied to Preoperative Breast Cancer Chemotherapy Response

    PubMed Central

    Warsow, Gregor; Struckmann, Stephan; Kerkhoff, Claus; Reimer, Toralf; Engel, Nadja; Fuellen, Georg

    2013-01-01

    In silico approaches are increasingly considered to improve breast cancer treatment. One of these treatments, neoadjuvant TFAC chemotherapy, is used in cases where application of preoperative systemic therapy is indicated. Estimating response to treatment allows or improves clinical decision-making and this, in turn, may be based on a good understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Ever increasing amounts of high throughput data become available for integration into functional networks. In this study, we applied our software tool ExprEssence to identify specific mechanisms relevant for TFAC therapy response, from a gene/protein interaction network. We contrasted the resulting active subnetwork to the subnetworks of two other such methods, OptDis and KeyPathwayMiner. We could show that the ExprEssence subnetwork is more related to the mechanistic functional principles of TFAC therapy than the subnetworks of the other two methods despite the simplicity of ExprEssence. We were able to validate our method by recovering known mechanisms and as an application example of our method, we identified a mechanism that may further explain the synergism between paclitaxel and doxorubicin in TFAC treatment: Paclitaxel may attenuate MELK gene expression, resulting in lower levels of its target MYBL2, already associated with doxorubicin synergism in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. We tested our hypothesis in three breast cancer cell lines, confirming it in part. In particular, the predicted effect on MYBL2 could be validated, and a synergistic effect of paclitaxel and doxorubicin could be demonstrated in the breast cancer cell lines SKBR3 and MCF-7. PMID:24349128

  7. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 21 - Activities to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Activities to Which This Part Applies A Appendix A... 1964 Pt. 21, App. A Appendix A to Part 21—Activities to Which This Part Applies 1. Use of grants made.... 141(a)). 6. Use of Coast Guard personnel for duty in connection with maritime instruction and...

  8. 13 CFR 101.106 - Does Federal law apply to SBA programs and activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does Federal law apply to SBA programs and activities? 101.106 Section 101.106 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATION Overview § 101.106 Does Federal law apply to SBA programs and activities? (a)...

  9. Factor Analysis Applied the VFY-218 RCS Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Alex; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Present statistical factor analysis of computer simulations and measurement data for the VFY-218 configuration. Factor analysis try to quantify the statistical grouping of measurements and simulations.

  10. Ion Beam Analysis applied to laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutroneo, M.; Macková, A.; Havranek, V.; Malinsky, P.; Torrisi, L.; Kormunda, M.; Barchuk, M.; Ullschmied, J.; Dudzak, R.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the research activity on Ion Beam Analysis methods performed at Tandetron Laboratory (LT) of the Institute of Nuclear Physics AS CR, Rez, Czech Republic. Recently, many groups are paying attention to implantation by laser generated plasma. This process allows to insert a controllable amount of energetic ions into the surface layers of different materials modifying the physical and chemical properties of the surface material. Different substrates are implanted by accelerated ions from plasma through terawatt iodine laser, at nominal intensity of 1015 W/cm2, at the PALS Research Infrastructure AS CR, in the Czech Republic. This regime of the laser matter interaction generates, multi-MeV proton beams, and multi-charged ions that are tightly confined in time (hundreds ps) and space (source radius of a few microns). These ion beams have a much lower transverse temperature, a much shorter duration and a much higher current than those obtainable from conventional accelerators. The implementation of protons and ions acceleration driven by ultra-short high intensity lasers is exhibited by adopting suitable irradiation conditions as well as tailored targets. An overview of implanted targets and their morphological and structural characterizations is presented and discussed.

  11. Phase plane analysis: applying chaos theory in health care.

    PubMed

    Priesmeyer, H R; Sharp, L F

    1995-01-01

    This article applies the new science of nonlinearity to administrative issues and accounts receivable management in health care, and it provides a new perspective on common operating and quality control measures.

  12. Multi-Criteria Analysis for Biomass Utilization Applying Data Envelopment Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimoto, Hidetsugu; Hoshino, Satoshi; Kuki, Yasuaki

    This paper aimed to consider about material-recycling, preventing global warming, and economic efficiency on preset and planed 195 Biomass Towns applying DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis), which can evaluate operational efficiency entities such as private companies or projects. In the results, although the Biomass Town can recycle material efficiently, it was clarified that preventing global warming and business profitability was brushed off like it in Biomass Town Design. Moreover, from the point of view of operational efficiency, we suggested an improvement of the Biomass Town scale for more efficiency-enhancing applying DEA. We found that applying DEA was able to catch more improvements or indicator as compared with cost-benefit analysis and cost-effectiveness analysis.

  13. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  14. Applied Missing Data Analysis. Methodology in the Social Sciences Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Craig K.

    2010-01-01

    Walking readers step by step through complex concepts, this book translates missing data techniques into something that applied researchers and graduate students can understand and utilize in their own research. Enders explains the rationale and procedural details for maximum likelihood estimation, Bayesian estimation, multiple imputation, and…

  15. [Effects of applying endophytic fungi on the soil biological characteristics and enzyme activities under continuously cropped peanut].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Xing-Xiang; Lü, Li-Xin; Xiao, Yi; Dai, Chuan-Chao

    2012-10-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of applying endophytic fungi Phomopsis liquidambari strain B3, Phomopsis sp. strain NJ4.1, and Ceratobasidum stevensii strain B6 on the soil biological characteristics and enzyme activities under continuously cropped peanut at its different growth stages. Compared with the control, applying B3 increased the peanut yield significantly by 19.8%, and applying NJ4.1, B3 and B6 increased the peanut nodule number significantly by 20.4%, 29.3% and 27.6%, respectively. In the three treatments of applying endophytic fungi, the average population of soil bacteria and actinomycetes in the whole growth period of peanut was higher than that of the control, and the soil microbial biomass carbon was significantly greater at germination and seedling stages. The soil microbial biomass nitrogen increased at germination stage, but decreased at flowering stage. The DGGE analysis indicated that at flowering stage, the soil bacteria and fungi in treatment B3 had the largest band number and diversity. From germination stage to maturing stage, the three treatments of applying endophytic fungi had higher activities of soil invertase and catalase than the control, but less difference in soil urease activity. It was suggested that applying endophytic fungi could improve the peanut continuous cropping soil environment, and applying B3 had the best effect.

  16. 26 CFR 601.527 - Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. 601.527 Section 601.527 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Conference and Practice Requirements Requirements for Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Activities § 601.527 Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. The...

  17. 26 CFR 601.527 - Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. 601.527 Section 601.527 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Conference and Practice Requirements Requirements for Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Activities § 601.527 Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. The...

  18. 26 CFR 601.527 - Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. 601.527 Section 601.527 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Conference and Practice Requirements Requirements for Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Activities § 601.527 Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. The...

  19. 26 CFR 601.527 - Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. 601.527 Section 601.527 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Conference and Practice Requirements Requirements for Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Activities § 601.527 Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. The...

  20. 26 CFR 601.527 - Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. 601.527 Section 601.527 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Conference and Practice Requirements Requirements for Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms Activities § 601.527 Other provisions applied to representation in alcohol, tobacco, and firearms activities. The...

  1. How Has Applied Behavior Analysis and Behavior Therapy Changed?: An Historical Analysis of Journals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donohue, William; Fryling, Mitch

    2007-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis and behavior therapy are now nearly a half century old. It is interesting to ask if and how these disciplines have changed over time, particularly regarding some of their key internal controversies (e.g., role of cognitions). We examined the first five years and the 2000-2004 five year period of the "Journal of Applied…

  2. Applying Model Analysis to a Resource-Based Analysis of the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Trevor I.; Wittmann, Michael C.; Carter, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we analyzed the Force and Motion Conceptual Evaluation in terms of a resources-based model that allows for clustering of questions so as to provide useful information on how students correctly or incorrectly reason about physics. In this paper, we apply model analysis to show that the associated model plots provide more information…

  3. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, C

    1992-10-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  4. Applying Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Support Quantitative Safety Analysis for Proposed Reduced Wake Separation Conops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortle, John F.; Allocco, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a scenario-driven hazard analysis process to identify, eliminate, and control safety-related risks. Within this process, we develop selective criteria to determine the applicability of applying engineering modeling to hypothesized hazard scenarios. This provides a basis for evaluating and prioritizing the scenarios as candidates for further quantitative analysis. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for closely spaced parallel runways. For arrivals, the process identified 43 core hazard scenarios. Of these, we classified 12 as appropriate for further quantitative modeling, 24 that should be mitigated through controls, recommendations, and / or procedures (that is, scenarios not appropriate for quantitative modeling), and 7 that have the lowest priority for further analysis.

  5. TOA Analysis Applied to Improve ELF/VLF Wave Generation Efficiency at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis is applied to observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. Geometric modulation is used together with a variable pulse length modulation format to determine the ideal arc length maximizing the ELF/VLF signal magnitude observed on the ground. Observations indicate that the ELF/VLF signal magnitude increases with arc length to a certain extent, after which the magnitude decreases. The end result is that an optimal arc length is identified, maximizing ELF/VLF signal magnitude and minimizing the HF power required to produce that magnitude. A standard frequency analysis is presented together with the TOA analysis to provide a complete context for the experimental results.

  6. PIXE measurement applied to trace elemental analysis of human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, M.; Matsugi, E.; Miyasaki, K.; Yamagata, T.; Inoue, M.; Ogata, H.; Shimoura, S.

    1987-03-01

    PIXE measurement was applied for trace elemental analyses of 40 autoptic human kidneys. To investigate the reproducibility of the PIXE data, 9 targets obtained from one human liver were examined. The targets were prepared by wet-digestion using nitric and sulfuric acid. Yttrium was used as an internal standard. The extracted elemental concentrations for K, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Cd were in reasonable agreement with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and flame photometry (FP). Various correlations among the elements K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, and Cd were examined individually for the renal cortex and renal medulla.

  7. Time-of-arrival analysis applied to ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. C.; Fujimaru, S.

    2012-12-01

    Time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis is applied to observations performed during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. In 2012, a variety of ELF/VLF wave generation techniques were employed to identify the dominant source altitude for each case. Observations were performed for beat-wave modulation, AM modulation, STF modulation, ICD modulation, and cubic frequency modulation, among others. For each of these cases, we identify the dominant ELF/VLF source altitude and compare the experimental results with theoretical HF heating predictions.

  8. GPS ensemble analysis applied to Antarctic vertical velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, E. J.; Clarke, P. J.; King, M. A.; Williams, S. D. P.

    2014-12-01

    GPS data is used to provide estimates of vertical land motion caused by e.g. glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) and hydrologic loading. The vertical velocities estimated from the GPS data are often assimilated into GIA models or used for comparison purposes. GIA models are very important as they provide time-variable gravity corrections needed to estimate ice mass change over Greenland and Antarctica. While state-of-the art global GPS analysis has previously been performed for many Antarctic sites, formal errors in the resulting site velocities are typically obtained from noise analysis of each individual time series without consideration of processing or metadata issues. Here we present analysis of the results from two full global runs including a variety of parameter and reference frame alignment choices, and compare the results to previous work with a view to assessing if the size of the formal errors from the standard method is truly representative.

  9. Systems design analysis applied to launch vehicle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.; Verderaime, V.

    1993-01-01

    As emphasis shifts from optimum-performance aerospace systems to least lift-cycle costs, systems designs must seek, adapt, and innovate cost improvement techniques in design through operations. The systems design process of concept, definition, and design was assessed for the types and flow of total quality management techniques that may be applicable in a launch vehicle systems design analysis. Techniques discussed are task ordering, quality leverage, concurrent engineering, Pareto's principle, robustness, quality function deployment, criteria, and others. These cost oriented techniques are as applicable to aerospace systems design analysis as to any large commercial system.

  10. Musculoskeletal modelling of muscle activation and applied external forces for the correction of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study uses biomechanical modelling and computational optimization to investigate muscle activation in combination with applied external forces as a treatment for scoliosis. Bracing, which incorporates applied external forces, is the most popular non surgical treatment for scoliosis. Non surgical treatments which make use of muscle activation include electrical stimulation, postural control, and therapeutic exercises. Electrical stimulation has been largely dismissed as a viable treatment for scoliosis, although previous studies have suggested that it can potentially deliver similarly effective corrective forces to the spine as bracing. Methods The potential of muscle activation for scoliosis correction was investigated over different curvatures both with and without the addition of externally applied forces. The five King’s classifications of scoliosis were investigated over a range of Cobb angles. A biomechanical model of the spine was used to represent various scoliotic curvatures. Optimization was applied to the model to reduce the curves using combinations of both deep and superficial muscle activation and applied external forces. Results Simulating applied external forces in combination with muscle activation at low Cobb angles (< 20 degrees) over the 5 King’s classifications, it was possible to reduce the magnitude of the curve by up to 85% for classification 4, 75% for classifications 3 and 5, 65% for classification 2, and 60% for classification 1. The reduction in curvature was less at larger Cobb angles. For King’s classifications 1 and 2, the serratus, latissimus dorsi, and trapezius muscles were consistently recruited by the optimization algorithm for activation across all Cobb angles. When muscle activation and external forces were applied in combination, lower levels of muscle activation or less external force was required to reduce the curvature of the spine, when compared with either muscle activation or external force applied

  11. Soil Studies: Applying Acid-Base Chemistry to Environmental Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Donna M.; Sterling, Donna R.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory activities for chemistry students focus attention on the use of acid-base chemistry to examine environmental conditions. After using standard laboratory procedures to analyze soil and rainwater samples, students use web-based resources to interpret their findings. Uses CBL probes and graphing calculators to gather and analyze data and…

  12. Applying Motivational Analysis in a Web-Based Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ChanLin, Lih-Juan

    2009-01-01

    An important facet of effective Web-based instructional design is the consideration of learning activities to stimulate students' learning motivation. In order to create a motivating interaction environment, the design of motivational strategies to foster student interest in learning is essential. The study employed Keller's ARCS Motivational…

  13. Setting events in applied behavior analysis: Toward a conceptual and methodological expansion

    PubMed Central

    Wahler, Robert G.; Fox, James J.

    1981-01-01

    The contributions of applied behavior analysis as a natural science approach to the study of human behavior are acknowledged. However, it is also argued that applied behavior analysis has provided limited access to the full range of environmental events that influence socially significant behavior. Recent changes in applied behavior analysis to include analysis of side effects and social validation represent ways in which the traditional applied behavior analysis conceptual and methodological model has been profitably expanded. A third area of expansion, the analysis of setting events, is proposed by the authors. The historical development of setting events as a behavior influence concept is traced. Modifications of the basic applied behavior analysis methodology and conceptual systems that seem necessary to setting event analysis are discussed and examples of descriptive and experimental setting event analyses are presented. PMID:16795646

  14. Action, Content and Identity in Applied Genre Analysis for ESP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowerdew, John

    2011-01-01

    Genres are staged, structured, communicative events, motivated by various communicative purposes, and performed by members of specific discourse communities (Swales 1990; Bhatia 1993, 2004; Berkenkotter & Huckin 1995). Since its inception, with the two seminal works on the topic by Swales (1990) and Bhatia (1993), genre analysis has taken pride of…

  15. Applying Adult Learning Theory through a Character Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the behavior of a character, Celie, in a movie, 'The Color Purple," through the lens of two adult learning theorists to determine the relationships the character has with each theory. The development and portrayal of characters in movies can be explained and understood by the analysis of adult learning…

  16. Applying Skinner's Analysis of Verbal Behavior to Persons with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Mark; Baker, Jonathan C.; Sadowski, Katherine Ann

    2011-01-01

    Skinner's 1957 analysis of verbal behavior has demonstrated a fair amount of utility to teach language to children with autism and other various disorders. However, the learning of language can be forgotten, as is the case for many elderly suffering from dementia or other degenerative diseases. It appears possible that Skinner's operants may…

  17. Applying Score Analysis to a Rehearsal Pedagogy of Expressive Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byo, James L.

    2014-01-01

    The discoveries of score analysis (e.g., minor seventh chord, ostinato, phrase elision, melodic fragment, half cadence) are more than just compositional techniques or music vocabulary. They are sounds--fascinating, storytelling, dynamic modes of expression--that when approached as such enrich the rehearsal experience. This article presents a…

  18. Best practices: applying management analysis of excellence to immunization.

    PubMed

    Wishner, Amy; Aronson, Jerold; Kohrt, Alan; Norton, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The authors applied business management tools to analyze and promote excellence and to evaluate differences between average and above-average immunization peformers in private practices. The authors conducted a pilot study of 10 private practices in Pennsylvania using tools common in management to assess practices' organizational climate and managerial style. Authoritative and coaching styles of physician leaders were common to both groups. Managerial styles that emphasized higher levels of clarity and responsibility managerial styles were evident in the large practices; and rewards and flexibility styles were higher in the small above-average practices. The findings of this pilot study match results seen in high performers in other industries. It concludes that the authoritative style appears to have the most impact on performance. It has interesting implications for training/behavior change to improve immunization rates, along with traditional medical interventions.

  19. A value analysis model applied to the management of amblyopia.

    PubMed Central

    Beauchamp, G R; Bane, M C; Stager, D R; Berry, P M; Wright, W W

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the value of amblyopia-related services by utilizing a health value model (HVM). Cost and quality criteria are evaluated in accordance with the interests of patients, physicians, and purchasers. METHODS: We applied an HVM to a hypothetical statistical ("median") child with amblyopia whose visual acuity is 20/80 and to a group of children with amblyopia who are managed by our practice. We applied the model to calculate the value of these services by evaluating the responses of patients and physicians and relating these responses to clinical outcomes. RESULTS: The consensus value of care for the hypothetical median child was calculated to be 0.406 (of 1.000). For those children managed in our practice, the calculated value is 0.682. Clinically, 79% achieved 20/40 or better visual acuity, and the mean final visual acuity was 0.2 logMAR (20/32). Value appraisals revealed significant concerns about the financial aspects of amblyopia-related services, particularly among physicians. Patients rated services more positively than did physicians. CONCLUSIONS: Amblyopia care is difficult, sustained, and important work that requires substantial sensitivity to and support of children and families. Compliance and early detection are essential to success. The value of amblyopia services is rated significantly higher by patients than by physicians. Relative to the measured value, amblyopia care is undercompensated. The HVM is useful to appraise clinical service delivery and its variation. The costs of failure and the benefits of success are high; high-value amblyopia care yields substantial dividends and should be commensurately compensated in the marketplace. PMID:10703133

  20. Current Human Reliability Analysis Methods Applied to Computerized Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald L. Boring

    2012-06-01

    Computerized procedures (CPs) are an emerging technology within nuclear power plant control rooms. While CPs have been implemented internationally in advanced control rooms, to date no US nuclear power plant has implemented CPs in its main control room (Fink et al., 2009). Yet, CPs are a reality of new plant builds and are an area of considerable interest to existing plants, which see advantages in terms of enhanced ease of use and easier records management by omitting the need for updating hardcopy procedures. The overall intent of this paper is to provide a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures. It is beyond the scope of this document to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper serves as a review of current HRA as it may be used for the analysis and review of computerized procedures.

  1. An Inverse Kinematic Approach Using Groebner Basis Theory Applied to Gait Cycle Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    AN INVERSE KINEMATIC APPROACH USING GROEBNER BASIS THEORY APPLIED TO GAIT CYCLE ANALYSIS THESIS Anum Barki AFIT-ENP-13-M-02 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR...copyright protection in the United States. AFIT-ENP-13-M-02 AN INVERSE KINEMATIC APPROACH USING GROEBNER BASIS THEORY APPLIED TO GAIT CYCLE ANALYSIS THESIS...APPROACH USING GROEBNER BASIS THEORY APPLIED TO GAIT CYCLE ANALYSIS Anum Barki, BS Approved: Dr. Ronald F. Tuttle (Chairman) Date Dr. Kimberly Kendricks

  2. Applying Cognitive Work Analysis to Time Critical Targeting Functionality

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    Target List/Dynamic Target Queue (DTL/ DTQ ) in the same place. Figure 4-27 shows the task steps involved in achieving Goal 7. 4- 30 Figure 4-27...GUI WG to brainstorm the order of columns in the DTL/ DTQ Table, a critical component of the TCTF CUI, with successful results, which were...Cognitive Work Analysis DTD Display Task Description DTL/ DTQ Dynamic Target List/Dynamic Target Queue FDO Fighter Duty Officer FEBA Forward Edge

  3. Response deprivation and reinforcement in applied settings: A preliminary analysis

    PubMed Central

    Konarski, Edward A.; Johnson, Moses R.; Crowell, Charles R.; Whitman, Thomas L.

    1980-01-01

    First-grade children engaged in seatwork behaviors under reinforcement schedules established according to the Premack Principle and the Response Deprivation Hypothesis. Across two experiments, schedules were presented to the children in a counter-balanced fashion which fulfilled the conditions of one, both, or neither of the hypotheses. Duration of on-task math and coloring in Experiment 1 and on-task math and reading in Experiment 2 were the dependent variables. A modified ABA-type withdrawal design, including a condition to control for the noncontingent effects of a schedule, indicated an increase of on-task instrumental responding only in those schedules where the condition of response deprivation was present but not where it was absent, regardless of the probability differential between the instrumental and contingent responses. These results were consistent with laboratory findings supporting the necessity of response deprivation for producing the reinforcement effect in single response, instrumental schedules. However, the results of the control procedure were equivocal so the contribution of the contingent relationship between the responses to the increases in instrumental behavior could not be determined. Nevertheless, these results provided tentative support for the Response Deprivation Hypothesis as a new approach to establishing reinforcement schedules while indicating the need for further research in this area. The possible advantages of this technique for applied use were identified and discussed. PMID:16795635

  4. Applying temporal network analysis to the venture capital market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Feng, Ling; Zhu, Rongqian; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Using complex network theory to study the investment relationships of venture capital firms has produced a number of significant results. However, previous studies have often neglected the temporal properties of those relationships, which in real-world scenarios play a pivotal role. Here we examine the time-evolving dynamics of venture capital investment in China by constructing temporal networks to represent (i) investment relationships between venture capital firms and portfolio companies and (ii) the syndication ties between venture capital investors. The evolution of the networks exhibits rich variations in centrality, connectivity and local topology. We demonstrate that a temporal network approach provides a dynamic and comprehensive analysis of real-world networks.

  5. Applied analysis/computational mathematics. Final report 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Lax, P.; Berger, M.

    1993-12-01

    This is the final report for the Courant Mathematics and Computing Laboratory (CMCL) research program for the years 1991--1993. Our research efforts encompass the formulation of physical problems in terms of mathematical models (both old and new), the mathematical analysis of such models, and their numerical resolution. This last step involves the development and implementation of efficient methods for large scale computation. Our analytic and numerical work often go hand in hand; new theoretical approaches often have numerical counterparts, while numerical experimentation often suggests avenues for analytical investigation.

  6. Inconsistencies in the harmonic analysis applied to pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascual-Granado, J.; Garrido, R.; Suárez, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    Harmonic analysis is the fundamental mathematical method used for the identification of pulsation frequencies in asteroseismology and other fields of physics. Here we introduce a test to evaluate the validity of the hypothesis in which Fourier theorem is based: the convergence of the expansion series. The huge number of difficulties found in the interpretation of the periodograms of pulsating stars observed by CoRoT and Kepler satellites lead us to test whether the function underlying these time series is analytic or not. Surprisingly, the main result is that these are originated from non-analytic functions, therefore, the condition for Parseval's theorem is not guaranteed.

  7. Operational modal analysis applied to the concert harp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chomette, B.; Le Carrou, J.-L.

    2015-05-01

    Operational modal analysis (OMA) methods are useful to extract modal parameters of operating systems. These methods seem to be particularly interesting to investigate the modal basis of string instruments during operation to avoid certain disadvantages due to conventional methods. However, the excitation in the case of string instruments is not optimal for OMA due to the presence of damped harmonic components and low noise in the disturbance signal. Therefore, the present study investigates the least-square complex exponential (LSCE) and the modified least-square complex exponential methods in the case of a string instrument to identify modal parameters of the instrument when it is played. The efficiency of the approach is experimentally demonstrated on a concert harp excited by some of its strings and the two methods are compared to a conventional modal analysis. The results show that OMA allows us to identify modes particularly present in the instrument's response with a good estimation especially if they are close to the excitation frequency with the modified LSCE method.

  8. Dynamical systems analysis applied to working memory data.

    PubMed

    Gasimova, Fidan; Robitzsch, Alexander; Wilhelm, Oliver; Boker, Steven M; Hu, Yueqin; Hülür, Gizem

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we investigate weekly fluctuations in the working memory capacity (WMC) assessed over a period of 2 years. We use dynamical system analysis, specifically a second order linear differential equation, to model weekly variability in WMC in a sample of 112 9th graders. In our longitudinal data we use a B-spline imputation method to deal with missing data. The results show a significant negative frequency parameter in the data, indicating a cyclical pattern in weekly memory updating performance across time. We use a multilevel modeling approach to capture individual differences in model parameters and find that a higher initial performance level and a slower improvement at the MU task is associated with a slower frequency of oscillation. Additionally, we conduct a simulation study examining the analysis procedure's performance using different numbers of B-spline knots and values of time delay embedding dimensions. Results show that the number of knots in the B-spline imputation influence accuracy more than the number of embedding dimensions.

  9. Principles of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography applied in pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Hancu, Gabriel; Simon, Brigitta; Rusu, Aura; Mircia, Eleonora; Gyéresi, Arpád

    2013-01-01

    Since its introduction capillary electrophoresis has shown great potential in areas where electrophoretic techniques have rarely been used before, including here the analysis of pharmaceutical substances. The large majority of pharmaceutical substances are neutral from electrophoretic point of view, consequently separations by the classic capillary zone electrophoresis; where separation is based on the differences between the own electrophoretic mobilities of the analytes; are hard to achieve. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, a hybrid method that combines chromatographic and electrophoretic separation principles, extends the applicability of capillary electrophoretic methods to neutral analytes. In micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, surfactants are added to the buffer solution in concentration above their critical micellar concentrations, consequently micelles are formed; micelles that undergo electrophoretic migration like any other charged particle. The separation is based on the differential partitioning of an analyte between the two-phase system: the mobile aqueous phase and micellar pseudostationary phase. The present paper aims to summarize the basic aspects regarding separation principles and practical applications of micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography, with particular attention to those relevant in pharmaceutical analysis.

  10. Multivariate calibration applied to the quantitative analysis of infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Multivariate calibration methods are very useful for improving the precision, accuracy, and reliability of quantitative spectral analyses. Spectroscopists can more effectively use these sophisticated statistical tools if they have a qualitative understanding of the techniques involved. A qualitative picture of the factor analysis multivariate calibration methods of partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) is presented using infrared calibrations based upon spectra of phosphosilicate glass thin films on silicon wafers. Comparisons of the relative prediction abilities of four different multivariate calibration methods are given based on Monte Carlo simulations of spectral calibration and prediction data. The success of multivariate spectral calibrations is demonstrated for several quantitative infrared studies. The infrared absorption and emission spectra of thin-film dielectrics used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices demonstrate rapid, nondestructive at-line and in-situ analyses using PLS calibrations. Finally, the application of multivariate spectral calibrations to reagentless analysis of blood is presented. We have found that the determination of glucose in whole blood taken from diabetics can be precisely monitored from the PLS calibration of either mind- or near-infrared spectra of the blood. Progress toward the non-invasive determination of glucose levels in diabetics is an ultimate goal of this research. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Synchronisation and coupling analysis: applied cardiovascular physics in sleep medicine.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Niels; Riedl, Maik; Kramer, Jan; Muller, Andreas; Penzel, Thomas; Kurths, Jurgen

    2013-01-01

    Sleep is a physiological process with an internal program of a number of well defined sleep stages and intermediate wakefulness periods. The sleep stages modulate the autonomous nervous system and thereby the sleep stages are accompanied by different regulation regimes for the cardiovascular and respiratory system. The differences in regulation can be distinguished by new techniques of cardiovascular physics. The number of patients suffering from sleep disorders increases unproportionally with the increase of the human population and aging, leading to very high expenses in the public health system. Therefore, the challenge of cardiovascular physics is to develop highly-sophisticated methods which are able to, on the one hand, supplement and replace expensive medical devices and, on the other hand, improve the medical diagnostics with decreasing the patient's risk. Methods of cardiovascular physics are used to analyze heart rate, blood pressure and respiration to detect changes of the autonomous nervous system in different diseases. Data driven modeling analysis, synchronization and coupling analysis and their applications to biosignals in healthy subjects and patients with different sleep disorders are presented. Newly derived methods of cardiovascular physics can help to find indicators for these health risks.

  12. Unsupervised feature relevance analysis applied to improve ECG heartbeat clustering.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Sotelo, J L; Peluffo-Ordoñez, D; Cuesta-Frau, D; Castellanos-Domínguez, G

    2012-10-01

    The computer-assisted analysis of biomedical records has become an essential tool in clinical settings. However, current devices provide a growing amount of data that often exceeds the processing capacity of normal computers. As this amount of information rises, new demands for more efficient data extracting methods appear. This paper addresses the task of data mining in physiological records using a feature selection scheme. An unsupervised method based on relevance analysis is described. This scheme uses a least-squares optimization of the input feature matrix in a single iteration. The output of the algorithm is a feature weighting vector. The performance of the method was assessed using a heartbeat clustering test on real ECG records. The quantitative cluster validity measures yielded a correctly classified heartbeat rate of 98.69% (specificity), 85.88% (sensitivity) and 95.04% (general clustering performance), which is even higher than the performance achieved by other similar ECG clustering studies. The number of features was reduced on average from 100 to 18, and the temporal cost was a 43% lower than in previous ECG clustering schemes.

  13. Vistas in applied mathematics: Numerical analysis, atmospheric sciences, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Balakrishnan, A.V.; Dorodnitsyn, A.A.; Lions, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Advances in the theory and application of numerical modeling techniques are discussed in papers contributed, primarily by Soviet scientists, on the occasion of the 60th birthday of Gurii I. Marchuk. Topics examined include splitting techniques for computations of industrial flows, the mathematical foundations of the k-epsilon turbulence model, splitting methods for the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, the approximation of inhomogeneous hyperbolic boundary-value problems, multigrid methods, and the finite-element approximation of minimal surfaces. Consideration is given to dynamic modeling of moist atmospheres, satellite observations of the earth radiation budget and the problem of energy-active ocean regions, a numerical model of the biosphere for use with GCMs, and large-scale modeling of ocean circulation. Also included are several papers on modeling problems in immunology.

  14. PSYCHOANALYSIS AND THE ARTS: THE SLIPPERY GROUND OF APPLIED ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Abella, Adela

    2016-01-01

    The ways in which today's psychoanalysts approach art closely follow the avenues opened by Freud a hundred years ago. Drawing mainly on Freud's studies on Jensen's Gradiva (1907) and on Leonardo da Vinci (1910a), the author examines the main paradigms he used in discussing artistic activity, including his doubts and hesitations. Present-day approaches to art are then examined via a discussion of the advantages and pitfalls of psychobiography, of the case study, and of textual approaches. The author makes a case for the type of interdisciplinary dialogue in which the goal is to establish a cross-fertilization between psychoanalysis and other fields of knowledge while striving to avoid hypersaturation of a work of art in order to foster expansion of the mind.

  15. On applying continuous wavelet transform in wheeze analysis.

    PubMed

    Taplidou, Styliani A; Hadjileontiadis, Leontios J; Kitsas, Ilias K; Panoulas, Konstantinos I; Penzel, Thomas; Gross, Volker; Panas, Stavros M

    2004-01-01

    The identification of continuous abnormal lung sounds, like wheezes, in the total breathing cycle is of great importance in the diagnosis of obstructive airways pathologies. To this vein, the current work introduces an efficient method for the detection of wheezes, based on the time-scale representation of breath sound recordings. The employed Continuous Wavelet Transform is proven to be a valuable tool at this direction, when combined with scale-dependent thresholding. Analysis of lung sound recordings from 'wheezing' patients shows promising performance in the detection and extraction of wheezes from the background noise and reveals its potentiality for data-volume reduction in long-term wheezing screening, such as in sleep-laboratories.

  16. Applying Machine Learning to GlueX Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    GlueX is a high energy physics experiment with the goal of collecting data necessary for understanding confinement in quantum chromodynamics. Beginning in 2015, GlueX will collect huge amounts of data describing billions of particle collisions. In preparation for data collection, efforts are underway to develop a methodology for analyzing these large data sets. One of the primary challenges in GlueX data analysis is isolating events of interest from a proportionally large background. GlueX has recently begun approaching this selection problem using machine learning algorithms, specifically boosted decision trees. Preliminary studies indicate that these algorithms have the potential to offer vast improvements in both signal selection efficiency and purity over more traditional techniques.

  17. Downside Risk analysis applied to the Hedge Funds universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perelló, Josep

    2007-09-01

    Hedge Funds are considered as one of the portfolio management sectors which shows a fastest growing for the past decade. An optimal Hedge Fund management requires an appropriate risk metrics. The classic CAPM theory and its Ratio Sharpe fail to capture some crucial aspects due to the strong non-Gaussian character of Hedge Funds statistics. A possible way out to this problem while keeping the CAPM simplicity is the so-called Downside Risk analysis. One important benefit lies in distinguishing between good and bad returns, that is: returns greater or lower than investor's goal. We revisit most popular Downside Risk indicators and provide new analytical results on them. We compute these measures by taking the Credit Suisse/Tremont Investable Hedge Fund Index Data and with the Gaussian case as a benchmark. In this way, an unusual transversal lecture of the existing Downside Risk measures is provided.

  18. Applying Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior to persons with dementia.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mark; Baker, Jonathan C; Sadowski, Katherine Ann

    2011-03-01

    Skinner's 1957 analysis of verbal behavior has demonstrated a fair amount of utility to teach language to children with autism and other various disorders. However, the learning of language can be forgotten, as is the case for many elderly suffering from dementia or other degenerative diseases. It appears possible that Skinner's operants may facilitate not only acquisition of language but also the ability to recall items or objects that may have appeared to be "forgotten." The present study examined the utility of having a series of adults in long-term care emit tacts, echoics, or intraverbals upon presentation of various visual stimuli. Compared to a no-verbal response condition, it appears that the incorporation of Skinner's verbal operants can in fact improve recall for this population. Implications for the retraining of lost language are presented.

  19. Geostatistical analysis as applied to two environmental radiometric time series.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, Mark; Lind, Bjørn; Gerland, Sebastian; Rudjord, Anne Liv

    2003-03-01

    This article details the results of an investigation into the application of geostatistical data analysis to two environmental radiometric time series. The data series employed consist of 99Tc values for seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus) and seawater samples taken as part of a marine monitoring program conducted on the coast of northern Norway by the Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority. Geostatistical methods were selected in order to provide information on values of the variables at unsampled times and to investigate the temporal correlation exhibited by the data sets. This information is of use in the optimisation of future sampling schemes and for providing information on the temporal behaviour of the variables in question that may not be obtained during a cursory analysis. The results indicate a high degree of temporal correlation within the data sets, the correlation for the seawater and seaweed data being modelled with an exponential and linear function, respectively. The semi-variogram for the seawater data indicates a temporal range of correlation of approximately 395 days with no apparent random component to the overall variance structure and was described best by an exponential function. The temporal structure of the seaweed data was best modelled by a linear function with a small nugget component. Evidence of drift was present in both semi-variograms. Interpolation of the data sets using the fitted models and a simple kriging procedure were compared, using a cross-validation procedure, with simple linear interpolation. Results of this exercise indicate that, for the seawater data, the kriging procedure outperformed the simple interpolation with respect to error distribution and correlation of estimates with actual values. Using the unbounded linear model with the seaweed data produced estimates that were only marginally better than those produced by the simple interpolation.

  20. Applying data mining for the analysis of breast cancer data.

    PubMed

    Liou, Der-Ming; Chang, Wei-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Data mining, also known as Knowledge-Discovery in Databases (KDD), is the process of automatically searching large volumes of data for patterns. For instance, a clinical pattern might indicate a female who have diabetes or hypertension are easier suffered from stroke for 5 years in a future. Then, a physician can learn valuable knowledge from the data mining processes. Here, we present a study focused on the investigation of the application of artificial intelligence and data mining techniques to the prediction models of breast cancer. The artificial neural network, decision tree, logistic regression, and genetic algorithm were used for the comparative studies and the accuracy and positive predictive value of each algorithm were used as the evaluation indicators. 699 records acquired from the breast cancer patients at the University of Wisconsin, nine predictor variables, and one outcome variable were incorporated for the data analysis followed by the tenfold cross-validation. The results revealed that the accuracies of logistic regression model were 0.9434 (sensitivity 0.9716 and specificity 0.9482), the decision tree model 0.9434 (sensitivity 0.9615, specificity 0.9105), the neural network model 0.9502 (sensitivity 0.9628, specificity 0.9273), and the genetic algorithm model 0.9878 (sensitivity 1, specificity 0.9802). The accuracy of the genetic algorithm was significantly higher than the average predicted accuracy of 0.9612. The predicted outcome of the logistic regression model was higher than that of the neural network model but no significant difference was observed. The average predicted accuracy of the decision tree model was 0.9435 which was the lowest of all four predictive models. The standard deviation of the tenfold cross-validation was rather unreliable. This study indicated that the genetic algorithm model yielded better results than other data mining models for the analysis of the data of breast cancer patients in terms of the overall accuracy of

  1. Applied Climate-Change Analysis: The Climate Wizard Tool

    PubMed Central

    Girvetz, Evan H.; Zganjar, Chris; Raber, George T.; Maurer, Edwin P.; Kareiva, Peter; Lawler, Joshua J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although the message of “global climate change” is catalyzing international action, it is local and regional changes that directly affect people and ecosystems and are of immediate concern to scientists, managers, and policy makers. A major barrier preventing informed climate-change adaptation planning is the difficulty accessing, analyzing, and interpreting climate-change information. To address this problem, we developed a powerful, yet easy to use, web-based tool called Climate Wizard (http://ClimateWizard.org) that provides non-climate specialists with simple analyses and innovative graphical depictions for conveying how climate has and is projected to change within specific geographic areas throughout the world. Methodology/Principal Findings To demonstrate the Climate Wizard, we explored historic trends and future departures (anomalies) in temperature and precipitation globally, and within specific latitudinal zones and countries. We found the greatest temperature increases during 1951–2002 occurred in northern hemisphere countries (especially during January–April), but the latitude of greatest temperature change varied throughout the year, sinusoidally ranging from approximately 50°N during February-March to 10°N during August-September. Precipitation decreases occurred most commonly in countries between 0–20°N, and increases mostly occurred outside of this latitudinal region. Similarly, a quantile ensemble analysis based on projections from 16 General Circulation Models (GCMs) for 2070–2099 identified the median projected change within countries, which showed both latitudinal and regional patterns in projected temperature and precipitation change. Conclusions/Significance The results of these analyses are consistent with those reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, but at the same time, they provide examples of how Climate Wizard can be used to explore regionally- and temporally-specific analyses of climate

  2. Applied Drama and the Higher Education Learning Spaces: A Reflective Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyo, Cletus

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores Applied Drama as a teaching approach in Higher Education learning spaces. The exploration takes a reflective analysis approach by first examining the impact that Applied Drama has had on my career as a Lecturer/Educator/Teacher working in Higher Education environments. My engagement with Applied Drama practice and theory is…

  3. Exploratory Factor Analysis as a Construct Validation Tool: (Mis)applications in Applied Linguistics Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karami, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Factor analysis has been frequently exploited in applied research to provide evidence about the underlying factors in various measurement instruments. A close inspection of a large number of studies published in leading applied linguistic journals shows that there is a misconception among applied linguists as to the relative merits of exploratory…

  4. Applied and computational harmonic analysis on graphs and networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irion, Jeff; Saito, Naoki

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, the advent of new sensor technologies and social network infrastructure has provided huge opportunities and challenges for analyzing data recorded on such networks. In the case of data on regular lattices, computational harmonic analysis tools such as the Fourier and wavelet transforms have well-developed theories and proven track records of success. It is therefore quite important to extend such tools from the classical setting of regular lattices to the more general setting of graphs and networks. In this article, we first review basics of graph Laplacian matrices, whose eigenpairs are often interpreted as the frequencies and the Fourier basis vectors on a given graph. We point out, however, that such an interpretation is misleading unless the underlying graph is either an unweighted path or cycle. We then discuss our recent effort of constructing multiscale basis dictionaries on a graph, including the Hierarchical Graph Laplacian Eigenbasis Dictionary and the Generalized Haar-Walsh Wavelet Packet Dictionary, which are viewed as generalizations of the classical hierarchical block DCTs and the Haar-Walsh wavelet packets, respectively, to the graph setting. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our dictionaries by using them to simultaneously segment and denoise 1-D noisy signals sampled on regular lattices, a problem where classical tools have difficulty.

  5. Improving the flash flood frequency analysis applying dendrogeomorphological evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Villanueva, V.; Ballesteros, J. A.; Bodoque, J. M.; Stoffel, M.; Bollschweiler, M.; Díez-Herrero, A.

    2009-09-01

    Flash floods are one of the natural hazards that cause major damages worldwide. Especially in Mediterranean areas they provoke high economic losses every year. In mountain areas with high stream gradients, floods events are characterized by extremely high flow and debris transport rates. Flash flood analysis in mountain areas presents specific scientific challenges. On one hand, there is a lack of information on precipitation and discharge due to a lack of spatially well distributed gauge stations with long records. On the other hand, gauge stations may not record correctly during extreme events when they are damaged or the discharge exceeds the recordable level. In this case, no systematic data allows improvement of the understanding of the spatial and temporal occurrence of the process. Since historic documentation is normally scarce or even completely missing in mountain areas, tree-ring analysis can provide an alternative approach. Flash floods may influence trees in different ways: (1) tilting of the stem through the unilateral pressure of the flowing mass or individual boulders; (2) root exposure through erosion of the banks; (3) injuries and scars caused by boulders and wood transported in the flow; (4) decapitation of the stem and resulting candelabra growth through the severe impact of boulders; (5) stem burial through deposition of material. The trees react to these disturbances with specific growth changes such as abrupt change of the yearly increment and anatomical changes like reaction wood or callus tissue. In this study, we sampled 90 cross sections and 265 increment cores of trees heavily affected by past flash floods in order to date past events and to reconstruct recurrence intervals in two torrent channels located in the Spanish Central System. The first study site is located along the Pelayo River, a torrent in natural conditions. Based on the external disturbances of trees and their geomorphological position, 114 Pinus pinaster (Ait

  6. Beyond Time out and Table Time: Today's Applied Behavior Analysis for Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutot, E. Amanda; Hume, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Recent mandates related to the implementation of evidence-based practices for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require that autism professionals both understand and are able to implement practices based on the science of applied behavior analysis (ABA). The use of the term "applied behavior analysis" and its related concepts…

  7. Beyond Time Out and Table Time: Today's Applied Behavior Analysis for Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boutot, E. Amanda; Hume, Kara

    2010-01-01

    Recent mandates related to the implementation of evidence-based practices for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) require that autism professionals both understand and are able to implement practices based on the science of applied behavior analysis (ABA). The use of the term "applied behavior analysis" and its related concepts…

  8. Continuous wavelet transformation applied to the simultaneous quantitative analysis of two-component mixtures.

    PubMed

    Dinç, E; Baleanu, D; Ustündağ, O; Aboul-Enein, H Y

    2004-08-01

    In this paper we developed a graphical method based on Haar (HA) and Mexican (MEX) one-dimensional continuous wavelet transforms and we applied it to a mixture of hydrochlorothiazide (HCT) and spironolactone (SP) in the presence of strongly overlapping signals. Keeping in mind to obtain an appropriately transformed spectrum, we tested several values of the scaling parameter a and the point number of the analysed spectrum in the concentration range of 2-22 microg/ml for both active compounds. The optimal values of the scale parameters and the corresponding frequencies were found to be a = 32 and 0.031 for HA and a = 30 and 0.008 for MEX corresponding to 400 points. HA and MEX methods based on a zero crossing technique were applied to the analysed signal and their regression lines at the selected points were obtained. The validation of the above methods was carried out by analysing different synthetic mixtures containing HCT and SP. MATLAB 6.5 software was used for one-dimensional wavelet analysis and the basic concepts about wavelet method were briefly explained. The method developed in this paper is rapid, easy to apply, inexpensive and is suitable for analysing the overlapping signals of compounds in their mixtures without any chemical pre-treatment.

  9. 24 CFR 1000.242 - When does the requirement for exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities? 1000.242 Section 1000.242 Housing and Urban... ACTIVITIES Indian Housing Plan (IHP) § 1000.242 When does the requirement for exemption from taxation apply to affordable housing activities? The requirement for exemption from taxation applies only to...

  10. The effect of keyboard keyswitch make force on applied force and finger flexor muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Rempel, D; Serina, E; Klinenberg, E; Martin, B J; Armstrong, T J; Foulke, J A; Natarajan, S

    1997-08-01

    The design of the force-displacement characteristics or 'feel' of keyboard keyswitches has been guided by preference and performance data; there has been very little information on how switch 'feel' alters muscle activity or applied force. This is a laboratory-based repeated measures design experiment to evaluate the effect of computer keyboard keyswitch design on applied finger force and muscle activity during a typing task. Ten experienced typists typed on three keyboards which differed in keyswitch make force (0.34, 0.47 and 1.02 N) while applied fingertip force and finger flexor electromyograms were recorded. The keyboard testing order was randomized and subjects typed on each keyboard for three trials, while data was collected for a minimum of 80 keystrokes per trial. No differences in applied fingertip force or finger flexor EMG were observed during typing on keyboards with switch make force of 0.34 or 0.47 N. However, applied fingertip force increased by approximately 40% (p < 0.05) and EMG activity increased by approximately 20% (p < 0.05) when the keyswitch make force was increased from 0.47 to 1.02 N. These results suggest that, in order to minimize the biomechanical loads to forearm tendons and muscles of keyboard users, keyswitches with a make force of 0.47 N or less should be considered over switches with a make force of 1.02 N.

  11. 34 CFR 363.53 - What special conditions apply to services and activities under this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... EDUCATION THE STATE SUPPORTED EMPLOYMENT SERVICES PROGRAM What Post-Award Conditions Must Be Met by a State... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What special conditions apply to services and activities under this program? 363.53 Section 363.53 Education Regulations of the Offices of the...

  12. 5 CFR 875.206 - As a new active workforce member, when may I apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false As a new active workforce member, when may I apply? 875.206 Section 875.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  13. 5 CFR 875.206 - As a new active workforce member, when may I apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false As a new active workforce member, when may I apply? 875.206 Section 875.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  14. 5 CFR 875.206 - As a new active workforce member, when may I apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false As a new active workforce member, when may I apply? 875.206 Section 875.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  15. 5 CFR 875.206 - As a new active workforce member, when may I apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false As a new active workforce member, when may I apply? 875.206 Section 875.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  16. 5 CFR 875.206 - As a new active workforce member, when may I apply?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false As a new active workforce member, when may I apply? 875.206 Section 875.206 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL LONG TERM CARE INSURANCE PROGRAM Eligibility §...

  17. DATE analysis: A general theory of biological change applied to microarray data.

    PubMed

    Rasnick, David

    2009-01-01

    In contrast to conventional data mining, which searches for specific subsets of genes (extensive variables) to correlate with specific phenotypes, DATE analysis correlates intensive state variables calculated from the same datasets. At the heart of DATE analysis are two biological equations of state not dependent on genetic pathways. This result distinguishes DATE analysis from other bioinformatics approaches. The dimensionless state variable F quantifies the relative overall cellular activity of test cells compared to well-chosen reference cells. The variable pi(i) is the fold-change in the expression of the ith gene of test cells relative to reference. It is the fraction phi of the genome undergoing differential expression-not the magnitude pi-that controls biological change. The state variable phi is equivalent to the control strength of metabolic control analysis. For tractability, DATE analysis assumes a linear system of enzyme-connected networks and exploits the small average contribution of each cellular component. This approach was validated by reproducible values of the state variables F, RNA index, and phi calculated from random subsets of transcript microarray data. Using published microarray data, F, RNA index, and phi were correlated with: (1) the blood-feeding cycle of the malaria parasite, (2) embryonic development of the fruit fly, (3) temperature adaptation of Killifish, (4) exponential growth of cultured S. pneumoniae, and (5) human cancers. DATE analysis was applied to aCGH data from the great apes. A good example of the power of DATE analysis is its application to genomically unstable cancers, which have been refractory to data mining strategies.

  18. Inclusive Elementary Classroom Teacher Knowledge of and Attitudes toward Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism Spectrum Disorder and Their Use of Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCormick, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine inclusive elementary teacher knowledge and attitude toward Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and applied behavior analysis (ABA) and their use of ABA. Furthermore, this study examined if knowledge and attitude predicted use of ABA. A survey was developed and administered through a web-based program. Of the…

  19. Biomolecular filters for improved separation of output signals in enzyme logic systems applied to biomedical analysis.

    PubMed

    Halámek, Jan; Zhou, Jian; Halámková, Lenka; Bocharova, Vera; Privman, Vladimir; Wang, Joseph; Katz, Evgeny

    2011-11-15

    Biomolecular logic systems processing biochemical input signals and producing "digital" outputs in the form of YES/NO were developed for analysis of physiological conditions characteristic of liver injury, soft tissue injury, and abdominal trauma. Injury biomarkers were used as input signals for activating the logic systems. Their normal physiological concentrations were defined as logic-0 level, while their pathologically elevated concentrations were defined as logic-1 values. Since the input concentrations applied as logic 0 and 1 values were not sufficiently different, the output signals being at low and high values (0, 1 outputs) were separated with a short gap making their discrimination difficult. Coupled enzymatic reactions functioning as a biomolecular signal processing system with a built-in filter property were developed. The filter process involves a partial back-conversion of the optical-output-signal-yielding product, but only at its low concentrations, thus allowing the proper discrimination between 0 and 1 output values.

  20. Applied Behavior Analysis Is Ideal for the Development of a Land Mine Detection Technology Using Animals

    PubMed Central

    Jones, B. M

    2011-01-01

    The detection and subsequent removal of land mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) from many developing countries are slow, expensive, and dangerous tasks, but have the potential to improve the well-being of millions of people. Consequently, those involved with humanitarian mine and UXO clearance are actively searching for new and more efficient detection technologies. Remote explosive scent tracing (REST) using trained dogs has the potential to be one such technology. However, details regarding how best to train, test, and deploy dogs in this role have never been made publicly available. This article describes how the key characteristics of applied behavior analysis, as described by Baer, Wolf and Risley (1968, 1987), served as important objectives for the research and development of the behavioral technology component of REST while the author worked in humanitarian demining. PMID:22532731

  1. Color changes in wood during heating: kinetic analysis by applying a time-temperature superposition method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Miyuki; Yokoyama, Misao; Umemura, Kenji; Gril, Joseph; Yano, Ken'ichiro; Kawai, Shuichi

    2010-04-01

    This paper deals with the kinetics of the color properties of hinoki ( Chamaecyparis obtusa Endl.) wood. Specimens cut from the wood were heated at 90-180°C as accelerated aging treatment. The specimens completely dried and heated in the presence of oxygen allowed us to evaluate the effects of thermal oxidation on wood color change. Color properties measured by a spectrophotometer showed similar behavior irrespective of the treatment temperature with each time scale. Kinetic analysis using the time-temperature superposition principle, which uses the whole data set, was successfully applied to the color changes. The calculated values of the apparent activation energy in terms of L *, a *, b *, and Δ E^{*}_{ab} were 117, 95, 114, and 113 kJ/mol, respectively, which are similar to the values of the literature obtained for other properties such as the physical and mechanical properties of wood.

  2. Applied behavior analysis is ideal for the development of a land mine detection technology using animals.

    PubMed

    Jones, B M

    2011-01-01

    The detection and subsequent removal of land mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) from many developing countries are slow, expensive, and dangerous tasks, but have the potential to improve the well-being of millions of people. Consequently, those involved with humanitarian mine and UXO clearance are actively searching for new and more efficient detection technologies. Remote explosive scent tracing (REST) using trained dogs has the potential to be one such technology. However, details regarding how best to train, test, and deploy dogs in this role have never been made publicly available. This article describes how the key characteristics of applied behavior analysis, as described by Baer, Wolf and Risley (1968, 1987), served as important objectives for the research and development of the behavioral technology component of REST while the author worked in humanitarian demining.

  3. Evaluation of cleaning methods applied in home environments after renovation and remodeling activities.

    PubMed

    Yiin, Lih-Ming; Lu, Shou-En; Sannoh, Sulaiman; Lim, Benjamin S; Rhoads, George G

    2004-10-01

    We conducted a cleaning trial in 40 northern New Jersey homes where home renovation and remodeling (R&R) activities were undertaken. Two cleaning protocols were used in the study: a specific method recommended by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), in the 1995 "Guidelines for the Evaluation and Control of Lead-Based Paint Hazards in Housing," using a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA)-filtered vacuum cleaner and a tri-sodium phosphate solution (TSP); and an alternative method using a household vacuum cleaner and a household detergent. Eligible homes were built before the 1970s with potential lead-based paint and had recent R&R activities without thorough cleaning. The two cleaning protocols were randomly assigned to the participants' homes and followed the HUD-recommended three-step procedure: vacuuming, wet washing, and repeat vacuuming. Wipe sampling was conducted on floor surfaces or windowsills before and after cleaning to evaluate the efficacy. All floor and windowsill data indicated that both methods (TSP/HEPA and non-TSP/non-HEPA) were effective in reducing lead loading on the surfaces (P < 0.001). When cleaning was applied to surfaces with initial lead loading above the clearance standards, the reductions were even greater, above 95% for either cleaning method. The mixed-effect model analysis showed no significant difference between the two methods. Baseline lead loading was found to be associated with lead loading reduction significantly on floors (P < 0.001) and marginally on windowsills (P = 0.077). Such relations were different between the two cleaning methods significantly on floors (P < 0.001) and marginally on windowsills (P = 0.066), with the TSP/HEPA method being favored for higher baseline levels and the non-TSP/non-HEPA method for lower baseline levels. For the 10 homes with lead abatement, almost all post-cleaning lead loadings were below the standards using either cleaning method. Based on our results, we recommend

  4. Applying Transactional Analysis and Personality Assessment to Improve Patient Counseling and Communication Skills

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Lesa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To teach pharmacy students how to apply transactional analysis and personality assessment to patient counseling to improve communication. Design A lecture series for a required pharmacy communications class was developed to teach pharmacy students how to apply transactional analysis and personality assessment to patient counseling. Students were asked to apply these techniques and to report their experiences. A personality self-assessment was also conducted. Assessment After attending the lecture series, students were able to apply the techniques and demonstrated an understanding of the psychological factors that may affect patient communication, an appreciation for the diversity created by different personality types, the ability to engage patients based on adult-to-adult interaction cues, and the ability to adapt the interactive patient counseling model to different personality traits. Conclusion Students gained a greater awareness of transactional analysis and personality assessment by applying these concepts. This understanding will help students communicate more effectively with patients. PMID:17786269

  5. Applying independent component analysis to detect silent speech in magnetic resonance imaging signals.

    PubMed

    Abe, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Toshimitsu; Takikawa, Yoriko; Arai, Hajime; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2011-10-01

    Independent component analysis (ICA) can be usefully applied to functional imaging studies to evaluate the spatial extent and temporal profile of task-related brain activity. It requires no a priori assumptions about the anatomical areas that are activated or the temporal profile of the activity. We applied spatial ICA to detect a voluntary but hidden response of silent speech. To validate the method against a standard model-based approach, we used the silent speech of a tongue twister as a 'Yes' response to single questions that were delivered at given times. In the first task, we attempted to estimate one number that was chosen by a participant from 10 possibilities. In the second task, we increased the possibilities to 1000. In both tasks, spatial ICA was as effective as the model-based method for determining the number in the subject's mind (80-90% correct per digit), but spatial ICA outperformed the model-based method in terms of time, especially in the 1000-possibility task. In the model-based method, calculation time increased by 30-fold, to 15 h, because of the necessity of testing 1000 possibilities. In contrast, the calculation time for spatial ICA remained as short as 30 min. In addition, spatial ICA detected an unexpected response that occurred by mistake. This advantage was validated in a third task, with 13 500 possibilities, in which participants had the freedom to choose when to make one of four responses. We conclude that spatial ICA is effective for detecting the onset of silent speech, especially when it occurs unexpectedly.

  6. Active and passive infrared thermography applied to the detection and characterization of hidden defects in structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-04-01

    direct thermal modelling or inverse thermal modelling will be presented and discussed. Conclusion and perspectives will be proposed in link with structure monitoring or cultural heritage applications. References [1] Maldague, X.P.V. "Theory and practice of infrared technology for non-destructive testing", John Wiley & sons Inc., 2001. [2] Dumoulin J. and Averty R., « Development of an infrared system coupled with a weather station for real time atmospheric corrections using GPU computing: Application to bridge monitoring", QIRT 2012, Naples, Italy, June 2012. [3] J. Dumoulin, L. Ibos, C. Ibarra-Castanedo, A Mazioud, M. Marchetti, X. Maldague and A. Bendada, « Active infrared thermography applied to defect detection and characterization on asphalt pavement samples: comparison between experiments and numerical simulations », Journal of Modern Optics, Special Issue on Advanced Infrared Technology and Applications, Volume 57, Issue 18, October 2010 , pages 1759 - 1769, doi:10.1080/09500340.2010.522738 [4] F. Taillade, M. Quiertant, K. Benzarti, J. Dumoulin, Ch. Aubagnac, Chapter 9: "Nondestructive Evaluation of FRP Strengthening Systems Bonded on Concrete Structures using Pulsed Stimulated Infrared Thermography ", pp 193-208, Book title "Infrared Thermography", Editeur Raghu V. Prakash, ISBN 978-953-51-0242-7, Intech, open access at the following address http://www.intechopen.com/books/editor/infrared-thermography, march 2012. [5] Cooley J.W., Tukey J.W., "An algorithm for the machine calculation of complex Fourier series", Mathematics of Computation, vol. 19, n° 90, 1965, p. 297-301. [6] Rajic N., "Principal component thermography for flaw contrast enhancement and flaw depth characterization in composite structures", Composite Structures, vol 58, pp 521-528, 2002. [7] Marinetti S., Grinzato E., Bison P. G., Bozzi E., Chimenti M., Pieri G. and Salvetti O. "Statistical analysis of IR thermographic sequences by PCA," Infrared Physics & Technology vol 46 pp 85-91, 2004.

  7. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science is summarized. The Institute conducts unclassified basic research in applied mathematics in order to extend and improve problem solving capabilities in science and engineering, particularly in aeronautics and space.

  8. Applied behavior analysis: understanding and changing behavior in the community-a representative review.

    PubMed

    Luyben, Paul D

    2009-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis, a psychological discipline, has been characterized as the science of behavior change (Chance, 2006). Research in applied behavior analysis has been published for approximately 40 years since the initial publication of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis in 1968. The field now encompasses a wide range of human behavior. Although much of the published research centers on problem behaviors that occur in schools and among people with disabilities, a substantial body of knowledge has emerged in community settings. This article provides a review of the behavioral community research published in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis as representative of this work, including research in the areas of home and family, health, safety, community involvement and the environment, recreation and sports, crime and delinquency, and organizations. In the interest of space, research in schools and with people with disabilities has been excluded from this review.

  9. Performance analysis of high quality parallel preconditioners applied to 3D finite element structural analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kolotilina, L.; Nikishin, A.; Yeremin, A.

    1994-12-31

    The solution of large systems of linear equations is a crucial bottleneck when performing 3D finite element analysis of structures. Also, in many cases the reliability and robustness of iterative solution strategies, and their efficiency when exploiting hardware resources, fully determine the scope of industrial applications which can be solved on a particular computer platform. This is especially true for modern vector/parallel supercomputers with large vector length and for modern massively parallel supercomputers. Preconditioned iterative methods have been successfully applied to industrial class finite element analysis of structures. The construction and application of high quality preconditioners constitutes a high percentage of the total solution time. Parallel implementation of high quality preconditioners on such architectures is a formidable challenge. Two common types of existing preconditioners are the implicit preconditioners and the explicit preconditioners. The implicit preconditioners (e.g. incomplete factorizations of several types) are generally high quality but require solution of lower and upper triangular systems of equations per iteration which are difficult to parallelize without deteriorating the convergence rate. The explicit type of preconditionings (e.g. polynomial preconditioners or Jacobi-like preconditioners) require sparse matrix-vector multiplications and can be parallelized but their preconditioning qualities are less than desirable. The authors present results of numerical experiments with Factorized Sparse Approximate Inverses (FSAI) for symmetric positive definite linear systems. These are high quality preconditioners that possess a large resource of parallelism by construction without increasing the serial complexity.

  10. Risk analysis for confined space entries: Critical analysis of four tools applied to three risk scenarios.

    PubMed

    Burlet-Vienney, Damien; Chinniah, Yuvin; Bahloul, Ali; Roberge, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Investigation reports of fatal confined space accidents nearly always point to a problem of identifying or underestimating risks. This paper compares 4 different risk analysis tools developed for confined spaces by applying them to 3 hazardous scenarios. The tools were namely 1. a checklist without risk estimation (Tool A), 2. a checklist with a risk scale (Tool B), 3. a risk calculation without a formal hazard identification stage (Tool C), and 4. a questionnaire followed by a risk matrix (Tool D). Each tool's structure and practical application were studied. Tools A and B gave crude results comparable to those of more analytic tools in less time. Their main limitations were lack of contextual information for the identified hazards and greater dependency on the user's expertise and ability to tackle hazards of different nature. Tools C and D utilized more systematic approaches than tools A and B by supporting risk reduction based on the description of the risk factors. Tool D is distinctive because of 1. its comprehensive structure with respect to the steps suggested in risk management, 2. its dynamic approach to hazard identification, and 3. its use of data resulting from the risk analysis.

  11. System Analysis Applied to Autonomy: Application to High-Altitude Long-Endurance Remotely Operated Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    Maturation of intelligent systems technologies and their incorporation into aerial platforms are dictating the development of new analysis tools and incorporation of such tools into existing system analysis methodologies in order to fully capture the trade-offs of autonomy on vehicle and mission success. A first-order "system analysis of autonomy" methodology is outlined in this paper. Further, this analysis methodology is subsequently applied to notional high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) aerial vehicle missions.

  12. Effect of dehydrogenase, phosphatase and urease activity in cotton soil after applying thiamethoxam as seed treatment.

    PubMed

    Jyot, Gagan; Mandal, Kousik; Singh, Balwinder

    2015-05-01

    Soil enzymes are indicators of microbial activities in soil and are often considered as an indicator of soil health and fertility. They are very sensitive to the agricultural practices, pH of the soil, nutrients, inhibitors and weather conditions. To understand the effect of an insecticide, thiamethoxam, on different soil enzyme activities, the experiments were conducted at cotton experimental fields of Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana. The results here were presented to understand the impact of thiamethoxam on soil enzyme activities. Thiamethoxam was applied as seed treatment to control the pest. Soil from three localities, i.e. soil in which seed was treated with recommended dose at 2.1 g a.i. kg(-1), soil in which seed was treated with four times recommended dose at 8.4 g a.i. kg(-1) and from the control field, were tested for different enzyme activities. Phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities were high in control soil in comparison to control soil while no effect of this insecticide on urease activity. Thiamethoxam had inhibitory effects on dehydrogenase and phosphatase activities. Therefore, it can be attributed that agricultural practices, weather conditions and use of thiamethoxam might be responsible for the different level of enzyme activities in soil.

  13. An Error Analysis for the Finite Element Method Applied to Convection Diffusion Problems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-01

    D TFhG-]NOLOGY k 4b 00 \\" ) ’b Technical Note BN-962 AN ERROR ANALYSIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD APPLIED TO CONVECTION DIFFUSION PROBLEM by I...Babu~ka and W. G. Szym’czak March 1981 V.. UNVI I Of- ’i -S AN ERROR ANALYSIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD P. - 0 w APPLIED TO CONVECTION DIFFUSION ...AOAO98 895 MARYLAND UNIVYCOLLEGE PARK INST FOR PHYSICAL SCIENCE--ETC F/G 12/I AN ERROR ANALYIS FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT METHOD APPLIED TO CONV..ETC (U

  14. Prompt-Gamma Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Richard M

    1993-01-01

    A permanent, full-time instrument for prompt-gamma activation analysis is nearing completion as part of the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF). The design of the analytical system has been optimized for high gamma detection efficiency and low background, particularly for hydrogen. Because of the purity of the neutron beam, shielding requirements are modest and the scatter-capture background is low. As a result of a compact sample-detector geometry, the sensitivity (counting rate per gram of analyte) is a factor of four better than the existing Maryland-NIST thermal-neutron instrument at this reactor. Hydrogen backgrounds of a few micrograms have already been achieved, which promises to be of value in numerous applications where quantitative nondestructive analysis of small quantities of hydrogen in materials is necessary.

  15. Analysis of Phoenix Anomalies and IV & V Findings Applied to the GRAIL Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    NASA IV&V was established in 1993 to improve safety and cost-effectiveness of mission critical software. Since its inception the tools and strategies employed by IV&V have evolved. This paper examines how lessons learned from the Phoenix project were developed and applied to the GRAIL project. Shortly after selection, the GRAIL project initiated a review of the issues documented by IV&V for Phoenix. The motivation was twofold: the learn as much as possible about the types of issues that arose from the flight software product line slated for use on GRAIL, and to identify opportunities for improving the effectiveness of IV&V on GRAIL. The IV&V Facility provided a database dump containing 893 issues. These were categorized into 16 bins, and then analyzed according to whether the project responded by changing the affected artifacts or using as-is. The results of this analysis were compared to a similar assessment of post-launch anomalies documented by the project. Results of the analysis were discussed with the IV&V team assigned to GRAIL. These discussions led to changes in the way both the project and IV&V approached the IV&V task, and improved the efficiency of the activity.

  16. Screening sensitivity analysis of a radionuclides atmospheric dispersion model applied to the Fukushima disaster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Sylvain; Korsakissok, Irène; Mallet, Vivien

    2014-10-01

    Numerical models used to forecast the atmospheric dispersion of radionuclides following nuclear accidents are subject to substantial uncertainties. Input data, such as meteorological forecasts or source term estimations, as well as poorly known model parameters contribute for a large part to this uncertainty. A sensitivity analysis with the method of Morris was carried out in the case of the Fukushima disaster as a first step towards the uncertainty analysis of the Polyphemus/Polair3D model. The main difficulties stemmed from the high dimension of the model's input and output. Simple perturbations whose magnitudes were devised from a thorough literature review were applied to 19 uncertain inputs. Several outputs related to atmospheric activity and ground deposition were aggregated, revealing different inputs rankings. Other inputs based on gamma dose rates measurements were used to question the possibility of calibrating the inputs uncertainties. Some inputs, such as the cloud layer thickness, were found to have little influence on most considered outputs and could therefore be safely discarded from further studies. On the contrary, wind perturbations and emission factors for iodine and caesium are predominant. The performance indicators derived from dose rates observations displayed strong sensitivities. This emphasises the share of the overall uncertainty due to input uncertainties and asserts the relevance of the simple perturbation scheme that was employed in this work.

  17. Non-computer approach to structure-activity study. An expanded Fibonacci search applied to structurally diverse types of compounds.

    PubMed

    Santora, N J; Auyang, K

    1975-10-01

    The Fibonacci search technique, first applied to a structure-activity study by Bustard, has been expanded to allow the analysis of a broad class of structural types of compounds. The compounds are first arranged in order of increasing value of a molecular property of the analogs such as log P, Sigmapi, Sigmasigma, or Rm. A successful Fibonacci search of the compounds will find the most active analog in a small, predetermined number of steps. Examples are given where insight as to mechanism of action is indicated by the combination of various parameters such as log P and pKa. Additional examples illustrate the use of Fibonacci search to establish the parabolic dependence of the biological activity of lipophilicity and sigma, where such dependency had not been observed initially. This technique allows the treatment of a variety of structurally diverse types of compounds simultaneously. It is to be stressed that Fibonacci search can be applied to structure-activity studies without the use of a computer.

  18. Applied Behavior Analysis: Its Impact on the Treatment of Mentally Retarded Emotionally Disturbed People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Coe, David A.

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews applications of the applied behavior analysis ideas of B. F. Skinner and others to persons with both mental retardation and emotional disturbance. The review examines implications of behavior analysis for operant conditioning and radical behaviorism, schedules of reinforcement, and emotion and mental illness. (DB)

  19. Sociosexuality Education for Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Pamela S.; Condo, Bethany; Hardaway, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has emerged as one of the most effective empirically based strategies for instructing individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four ABA-based strategies that have been found effective are video modeling, visual strategies, social script fading, and task analysis. Individuals with ASD often struggle with…

  20. Applied Behaviour Analysis and Intellectual Disability: A Long-Term Relationship?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Remington, Bob

    1998-01-01

    This evaluative review describes the history of applied behavior analysis in the area of developmental disability and its strengths and weaknesses. Emphasis is placed on the fact that behavior analysis can continue to provide valuable insights into the education and treatment of people with mental retardation. (Author/CR)

  1. Improving Skill Development: An Exploratory Study Comparing a Philosophical and an Applied Ethical Analysis Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Saggaf, Yeslam; Burmeister, Oliver K.

    2012-01-01

    This exploratory study compares and contrasts two types of critical thinking techniques; one is a philosophical and the other an applied ethical analysis technique. The two techniques analyse an ethically challenging situation involving ICT that a recent media article raised to demonstrate their ability to develop the ethical analysis skills of…

  2. An Objective Comparison of Applied Behavior Analysis and Organizational Behavior Management Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culig, Kathryn M.; Dickinson, Alyce M.; McGee, Heather M.; Austin, John

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an objective review, analysis, and comparison of empirical studies targeting the behavior of adults published in Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) and Journal of Organizational Behavior Management (JOBM) between 1997 and 2001. The purpose of the comparisons was to identify similarities and differences with respect to…

  3. A Cost-Benefit Analysis Applied to Example Proposals for Army Training and Education Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    ARI Research Note 2008-01 A Cost-Benefit Analysis Applied to Example Proposals for Army Training and Education Research John E. Morrison, J. Dexter...2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a, CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER A Cost-Benefit Analysis Applied to Example Proposalsfor Army DASWO1 -04-C-0003 and W74V8H-05-C...elements of the current analysis were 21 proposed R&D efforts derived from concepts discussed in the workshop. Total costs were calculated in two ways: (1

  4. Spherical harmonic decomposition applied to spatial-temporal analysis of human high-density electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingeier, B. M.; Nunez, P. L.; Silberstein, R. B.

    2001-11-01

    We demonstrate an application of spherical harmonic decomposition to the analysis of the human electroencephalogram (EEG). We implement two methods and discuss issues specific to the analysis of hemispherical, irregularly sampled data. Spatial sampling requirements and performance of the methods are quantified using simulated data. The analysis is applied to experimental EEG data, confirming earlier reports of an approximate frequency-wave-number relationship in some bands.

  5. Evaluation of bitterness in white wine applying descriptive analysis, time-intensity analysis, and temporal dominance of sensations analysis.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Martina; Fischer, Ulrich

    2012-06-30

    Bitterness in wine, especially in white wine, is a complex and sensitive topic as it is a persistent sensation with negative connotation by consumers. However, the molecular base for bitter taste in white wines is still widely unknown yet. At the same time studies dealing with bitterness have to cope with the temporal dynamics of bitter perception. The most common method to describe bitter taste is the static measurement amongst other attributes during a descriptive analysis. A less frequently applied method, the time-intensity analysis, evaluates the temporal gustatory changes focusing on bitterness alone. The most recently developed multidimensional approach of the temporal dominance of sensations method reveals the temporal dominance of bitter taste in relation to other attributes. In order to compare the results comprised with these different sensory methodologies, 13 commercial white wines were evaluated by the same panel. To facilitate a statistical comparison, parameters were extracted from bitterness curves obtained from time-intensity and temporal dominance of sensations analysis and were compared to bitter intensity as well as bitter persistency based on descriptive analysis. Analysis of variance differentiated significantly the wines regarding all measured bitterness parameters obtained from the three sensory techniques. Comparing the information of all sensory parameters by multiple factor analysis and correlation, each technique provided additional valuable information regarding the complex bitter perception in white wine.

  6. Enzymatic activity of a mine soil varies according to vegetation cover and level of compost applied.

    PubMed

    de Varennes, Amerilis; Abreu, Maria Manuela; Qu, Guiwei; Cunha-Queda, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    We applied three doses of compost from mixed municipal solid waste (0, 15, and 30 g kg(-1) of soil) to a soil developed on pyrite mine wastes. Part of the soil was planted with young Erica australis L. collected at the mine; part was fertilized with N-P-K-Mg and sown with Dactylis glomerata L .Bare soil without mineral fertilization was included in the experiment, as well. Compost application to bare soil increased pH, provided plant nutrients, and enhanced the activity of the six soil enzymes tested. Growth of D. glomerata, and E. australis was stimulated in compost-amended soil compared with unamended controls. The presence of D. glomerata led to the greatest activities of soil acid phosphatase, beta-glucosidase, and cellulase compared with bare soil or with soil with E. australis. The presence of E. australis increased the activities of protease and cellulase in amended soil, compared with control, but it impaired dehydrogenase, fl-glucosidase, and acid phosphatase activities. These negative impacts probably derived from phenolic compounds known to be released from roots of this species. The survival strategy of this species seems to include a small need for P in the shoots, and the release of exudates that impair microbial activity and P cycling.

  7. Time-of-Arrival Analysis Applied to ELF/VLF Wave Generation Experiments at HAARP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimaru, S.; Moore, R. C.

    2010-12-01

    A time-of-arrival (TOA) analysis is applied to observations during ELF/VLF wave generation experiments performed at the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) HF transmitter in Gakona, Alaska. This TOA technique provides measurements of the ELF/VLF current source with a ranging resolution of ˜2~km. Only recently has this TOA technique been applied to ELF/VLF waves generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere, although it has the potential to provide very useful measurements regarding the spatial distribution of the ELF/VLF source region. Over the course of several experiment campaigns performed at HAARP over the last two years, ELF/VLF signals have been generated with a specific frequency-time format, permitting the TOA analysis to be performed on ELF/VLF signals generated under varying ambient conditions. In this paper, we summarize these experimental results, demonstrating that: 1) the TOA technique is a valid experimental measure of the magnitude and phase of the received ELF/VLF signal as a function of time, 2) assuming speed-of-light propagation, the TOA technique may be used to estimate the location of the dominant ELF/VLF source region, and 3) the TOA analysis has the capability to distinguish between "direct" and "ionospherically-reflected" signal paths. We provide analyses of ELF/VLF wave generation as a function of modulation frequency, HF frequency, and HF power. During specific experiments, the direction of the HF beam was pointed toward and away from the receiver, producing different TOA results. Particularly interesting TOA observations occur when sporadic-E layers are present. It is observed, for instance, that the peak amplitude is significantly (>150~μ sec) delayed compared to ELF/VLF waves generated in the absence of sporadic-E. It is at present unknown whether the ELF/VLF source region is at a higher altitude (within the sporadic-E layer itself, for instance) or whether the HF wave reflected from the sporadic-E layer

  8. Applying Association Rule of the Data Mining Method for the Network Event Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wankyung; Soh, Wooyoung

    2007-12-01

    Network event analysis gives useful information on the network status that helps protect from attacks. It involves finding sets of frequently used packet information such as IP addresses and requires real-time processing by its nature. This paper applies association rules to network event analysis. Originally association rules used for data mining can be applied to find frequent item sets. So, if frequent items occur on networks, information system can guess that there is a threat. But existed association rules such as Apriori algorithm are not suitable for analyzing network events on real-time due to the high usage of CPU and memory and thus low processing speed. This paper develops a network event audit module by applying association rules to network events using a new algorithm instead of Apriori algorithm. Test results show that the application of the new algorithm gives drastically low usage of both CPU and memory for network event analysis compared with existing Apriori algorithm.

  9. The active analog approach applied to the pharmacophore identification of benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebib, Souhail; Bourguignon, Jean-Jacques; Wermuth, Camille-Georges

    1987-07-01

    Applied to seven potent benzodiazepine-receptor ligands belonging to chemically different classes, the active analog approach allowed the stepwise identification of the pharmacophoric pattern associated with the recognition by the benzodiazepine receptor. A unique pharmacophore model was derived which involves six critical zones: (a) a π-electron rich aromatic (PAR) zone; (b) two electron-rich zones δ1 and δ2 placed at 5.0 and 4.5 Å respectively from the reference centroid in the PAR zone; (c) a freely rotating aromatic ring (FRA) region; (d) an out-of-plane region (OPR), strongly associated with agonist properties; and (e) an additional hydrophobic region (AHR). The model accommodates all presently known ligands of the benzodiazepine receptor, identifies sensitivity to steric hindrance close to the δ1 zone, accounts for R and S differential affinities and distinguishes requirements for agonist versus non-agonist activity profiles.

  10. Applied neuroanatomy elective to reinforce and promote engagement with neurosensory pathways using interactive and artistic activities.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vinh; Yeh, Pon-Hsiu; Vogel, Kristine S; Moore, Charleen M

    2015-01-01

    One in six Americans is currently affected by neurologic disease. As the United States population ages, the number of neurologic complaints is expected to increase. Thus, there is a pressing need for more neurologists as well as more neurology training in other specialties. Often interest in neurology begins during medical school, so improving education in medical neural courses is a critical step toward producing more neurologists and better neurology training in other specialists. To this end, a novel applied neuroanatomy elective was designed at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) to complement the traditional first-year medical neuroscience course and promote engagement and deep learning of the material with a focus on neurosensory pathways. The elective covered four neurosensory modalities (proprioception/balance, vision, auditory, and taste/olfaction) over four sessions, each with a short classroom component and a much longer activity component. At each session, students reviewed the neurosensory pathways through structured presentations and then applied them to preplanned interactive activities, many of which allowed students to utilize their artistic talents. Students were required to complete subjective pre-course and post-course surveys and reflections. The survey results and positive student comments suggest that the elective was a valuable tool when used in parallel with the traditional medical neuroscience course in promoting engagement and reinforcement of the neurosensory material.

  11. International publication trends in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis: 2000-2014.

    PubMed

    Martin, Neil T; Nosik, Melissa R; Carr, James E

    2016-06-01

    Dymond, Clarke, Dunlap, and Steiner's (2000) analysis of international publication trends in the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA) from 1970 to 1999 revealed low numbers of publications from outside North America, leading the authors to express concern about the lack of international involvement in applied behavior analysis. They suggested that a future review would be necessary to evaluate any changes in international authorship in the journal. As a follow-up, we analyzed non-U.S. publication trends in the most recent 15 years of JABA and found similar results. We discuss potential reasons for the relative paucity of international authors and suggest potential strategies for increasing non-U.S. contributions to the advancement of behavior analysis.

  12. Activities for the Promotion of Gender Equality in Japan—Japan Society of Applied Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodate, Kashiko; Tanaka, Kazuo

    2005-10-01

    Since 1946, the Japan Society of Applied Physics (JSAP) has strived to promote research and development in applied physics for benefits beyond national boundaries. Activities of JSAP involve multidisciplinary fields, from physics and engineering to life sciences. Of its 23,000 members, 48% are from industry, 29% from academia, and about 7% from semi-autonomous national research laboratories. Its large industrial membership is one of the distinctive features of JSAP. In preparation for the First IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics (Paris, 2002), JSAP members took the first step under the strong leadership of then-JSAP President Toshio Goto, setting up the Committee for the Promotion Equal Participation of Men and Women in Science and Technology. Equality rather than women's advancement is highlighted to further development in science and technology. Attention is also paid to balancing the number of researchers from different age groups and affiliations. The committee has 22 members: 12 female and 10 male; 7 from corporations, 12 from universities, and 3 from semi-autonomous national research institutes. Its main activities are to organize symposia and meetings, conduct surveys among JSAP members, and provide child-care facilities at meetings and conferences. In 2002 the Japan Physics Society and the Chemical Society of Japan jointly created the Japan Inter-Society Liaison Association for the Promotion of Equal Participation of Men and Women in Science and Engineering. Membership has grown to 44 societies (of which 19 are observers) ranging from mathematics, information, and life sciences to civil engineering. Joint activities across sectors and empower the whole. The Gender Equality Bureau in the Cabinet Office recently launched a large-scale project called "Challenge Campaign" to encourage girls to major in natural science and engineering, which JSAP is co-sponsoring.

  13. Ordinary and Activated Bone Grafts: Applied Classification and the Main Features

    PubMed Central

    Deev, R. V.; Drobyshev, A. Y.; Bozo, I. Y.; Isaev, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Bone grafts are medical devices that are in high demand in clinical practice for substitution of bone defects and recovery of atrophic bone regions. Based on the analysis of the modern groups of bone grafts, the particularities of their composition, the mechanisms of their biological effects, and their therapeutic indications, applicable classification was proposed that separates the bone substitutes into “ordinary” and “activated.” The main differential criterion is the presence of biologically active components in the material that are standardized by qualitative and quantitative parameters: growth factors, cells, or gene constructions encoding growth factors. The pronounced osteoinductive and (or) osteogenic properties of activated osteoplastic materials allow drawing upon their efficacy in the substitution of large bone defects. PMID:26649300

  14. Investigation of Volcanic Seismo-Acoustic Signals: Applying Subspace Detection to Lava Fountain Activity at Etna Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciotto, M.; Rowe, C. A.; Cannata, A.; Arrowsmith, S.; Privitera, E.; Gresta, S.

    2011-12-01

    The current eruption of Mount Etna, which began in January, 2011, has produced numerous energetic episodes of lava fountaining, which have bee recorded by the INGV seismic and acoustic sensors located on and around the volcano. The source of these events was the pit crater on the east flank of the Southeast crater of Etna. Simultaneously, small levels of activity were noted in the Bocca Nuova as well, prior to its lava fountaining activity. We will present an analysis of seismic and acoustic signals related to the 2011 activity wherein we apply the method of subspace detection to determine whether the source exhibits a temporal evolution within or between fountaining events, or otherwise produces repeating, classifiable events occurring through the continuous explosive degassing. We will examine not only the raw waveforms, but also spectral variations in time as well as time-varying statistical functions such as signal skewness and kurtosis. These results will be compared to straightforward cross-correlation analysis. In addition to classification performance, the subspace method has promise to outperform standard STA/LTA methods for real-time event detection in cases where similar events can be expected.

  15. Experimental investigation of different active noise control concepts applied to a passenger car equipped with an active windshield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misol, M.; Algermissen, S.; Monner, H. P.

    2012-05-01

    The main purpose of this work is the implementation and experimental investigation of different active structural acoustic control (ASAC) concepts for the reduction of interior noise in an automobile passenger compartment. For the control experiments, a medium-class test car was used, which had been equipped with an active windshield. The active windshield consists of the serial-production laminated glass pane augmented with piezoceramic patch-transducers applied to the blackened rim of the windshield. A multi-reference test provided measurement data for the identification of a local discrete-time state-space model (SSM). The subsequent acquisition of frequency response functions (FRF) by way of using the same actuators but measuring on a much finer grid provided the database for the formulation of a least-squares problem to derive a global system model. Based on the local and global discrete-time SSMs, different controllers were designed and experimentally realized. The comparison of the vibration levels in open- and closed-loop showed a global reduction of 5-7 dB in the acoustically relevant frequency band containing the second and third structural resonance of the windshield system. The occurrence of complex operational deflection shapes (ODS) was identified as the main limitation concerning the disturbance rejection of the active system. The acoustic performance of the ASAC system is reflected in a reduction up to 15 dB in sound pressure level (SPL).

  16. Evolution of Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Individuals With Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolery, Mark; Barton, Erin E.; Hine, Jeffrey F.

    2005-01-01

    Two issues of each volume of the Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis were reviewed to identify research reports focusing on individuals with autism. The identified articles were analyzed to describe the ages of individuals with autism, the settings in which the research occurred, the nature of the behaviors targeted for intervention, and the…

  17. Using Applied Behaviour Analysis as Standard Practice in a UK Special Needs School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foran, Denise; Hoerger, Marguerite; Philpott, Hannah; Jones, Elin Walker; Hughes, J. Carl; Morgan, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how applied behaviour analysis can be implemented effectively and affordably in a maintained special needs school in the UK. Behaviour analysts collaborate with classroom teachers to provide early intensive behaviour education for young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and function based behavioural…

  18. Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Severe Psychiatric Disorders: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scotti, Joseph R.; And Others

    Clinical research in the area of severe psychiatric disorders constituted the major focus for the discipline of applied behavior analysis during the early 1960s. Recently, however, there appears to be a notable lack of a behavioral focus within many inpatient psychiatric settings and a relative dearth of published behavioral treatment studies with…

  19. Applied Behavior Analysis in Autism Spectrum Disorders: Recent Developments, Strengths, and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Turygin, Nicole C.; Beighley, Jennifer; Rieske, Robert; Tureck, Kimberly; Matson, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Autism has become one of the most heavily researched topics in the field of mental health and education. While genetics has been the most studied of all topics, applied behavior analysis (ABA) has also received a great deal of attention, and has arguably yielded the most promising results of any research area to date. The current paper provides a…

  20. Graphical and Numerical Descriptive Analysis: Exploratory Tools Applied to Vietnamese Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haughton, Dominique; Phong, Nguyen

    2004-01-01

    This case study covers several exploratory data analysis ideas, the histogram and boxplot, kernel density estimates, the recently introduced bagplot--a two-dimensional extension of the boxplot--as well as the violin plot, which combines a boxplot with a density shape plot. We apply these ideas and demonstrate how to interpret the output from these…

  1. Applied Behavior Analysis Programs for Autism: Sibling Psychosocial Adjustment during and Following Intervention Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cebula, Katie R.

    2012-01-01

    Psychosocial adjustment in siblings of children with autism whose families were using a home-based, applied behavior analysis (ABA) program was compared to that of siblings in families who were not using any intensive autism intervention. Data gathered from parents, siblings and teachers indicated that siblings in ABA families experienced neither…

  2. A Self-Administered Parent Training Program Based upon the Principles of Applied Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maguire, Heather M.

    2012-01-01

    Parents often respond to challenging behavior exhibited by their children in such a way that unintentionally strengthens it. Applied behavior analysis (ABA) is a research-based science that has been proven effective in remediating challenging behavior in children. Although many parents could benefit from using strategies from the field of ABA with…

  3. A National UK Census of Applied Behavior Analysis School Provision for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, G. M.; Fletcher, R.; Hastings, R. P.

    2012-01-01

    Over more than a decade, specialist Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) schools or classes for children with autism have developed in the UK and Ireland. However, very little is known internationally about how ABA is defined in practice in school settings, the characteristics of children supported in ABA school settings, and the staffing structures…

  4. Applied Behaviour Analysis: Does Intervention Intensity Relate to Family Stressors and Maternal Well-Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwichtenberg, A.; Poehlmann, J.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Interventions based on applied behaviour analysis (ABA) are commonly recommended for children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD); however, few studies address how this intervention model impacts families. The intense requirements that ABA programmes place on children and families are often cited as a critique of the programme,…

  5. Conversation after Right Hemisphere Brain Damage: Motivations for Applying Conversation Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Scott; Armstrong, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Despite the well documented pragmatic deficits that can arise subsequent to Right Hemisphere Brain Damage (RHBD), few researchers have directly studied everyday conversations involving people with RHBD. In recent years, researchers have begun applying Conversation Analysis (CA) to the everyday talk of people with aphasia. This research programme…

  6. A Case Study in the Misrepresentation of Applied Behavior Analysis in Autism: The Gernsbacher Lectures

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward K

    2009-01-01

    I know that most men, including those at ease with problems of the greatest complexity, can seldom accept the simplest and most obvious truth if it be such as would oblige them to admit the falsity of conclusions which they have proudly taught to others, and which they have woven, thread by thread, into the fabrics of their life. (Tolstoy, 1894) This article presents a case study in the misrepresentation of applied behavior analysis for autism based on Morton Ann Gernsbacher's presentation of a lecture titled “The Science of Autism: Beyond the Myths and Misconceptions.” Her misrepresentations involve the characterization of applied behavior analysis, descriptions of practice guidelines, reviews of the treatment literature, presentations of the clinical trials research, and conclusions about those trials (e.g., children's improvements are due to development, not applied behavior analysis). The article also reviews applied behavior analysis' professional endorsements and research support, and addresses issues in professional conduct. It ends by noting the deleterious effects that misrepresenting any research on autism (e.g., biological, developmental, behavioral) have on our understanding and treating it in a transdisciplinary context. PMID:22478522

  7. Lovaas Model of Applied Behavior Analysis. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The "Lovaas Model of Applied Behavior Analysis" is a type of behavioral therapy that initially focuses on discrete trials: brief periods of one-on-one instruction, during which a teacher cues a behavior, prompts the appropriate response, and provides reinforcement to the child. Children in the program receive an average of 35 to 40 hours…

  8. Says Who?: Students Apply Their Critical-Analysis Skills to Fight Town Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trimarchi, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    For some time the author looked for a tool to let students apply what they are learning about critical analysis in the science classroom to a relevant life experience. The opportunity occurred when a proposal to use environmentally friendly cleaning products in town buildings appeared on the local town meeting agenda. Using a copy of the proposal…

  9. Logical Criteria Applied in Writing and in Editing by Text Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mandersloot, Wim G. B.

    1996-01-01

    Argues that technical communication editing is most effective if it deals with structure first, and that structure deficiencies can be detected by applying a range of logical analysis criteria to each text part. Concludes that lists, headings, classifications, and organograms must comply with the laws of categorization and relevant logical…

  10. 3D neutronic calculations: CAD-MCNP methodology applied to vessel activation in KOYO-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herreras, Y.; Lafuente, A.; Sordo, F.; Cabellos, O.; Perlado, J. M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents a methodology for 3D neutronic calculations suitable for complex and extensive geometries. The geometry of the system design is first fully modelled with a CAD program, and subsequently processed through a MCNP-CAD interface in order to generate an MCNP geometry file. Neutronic irradiation results are finally achieved running the MCNPX program, where the geometry input card used is directly the MCNP-CAD interface output. This methodology enables accurate neutronic calculations for complex geometries characterised by high detail levels. This procedure will be applied to the Fast Ignition Fusion Reactor KOYO-F to determine first neutron fluxes calculations along the blanket as well as the material activation in the reduced martensitic 9Cr-1Mo steel vessel.

  11. INDEPENDENT COMPONENT ANALYSIS (ICA) APPLIED TO LONG BUNCH BEAMS IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Macek, Robert J.; McCrady, Rodney C.; Pang, Xiaoying

    2012-05-14

    Independent component analysis (ICA) is a powerful blind source separation (BSS) method. Compared to the typical BSS method, principal component analysis (PCA), which is the BSS foundation of the well known model independent analysis (MIA), ICA is more robust to noise, coupling, and nonlinearity. ICA of turn-by-turn beam position data has been used to measure the transverse betatron phase and amplitude functions, dispersion function, linear coupling, sextupole strength, and nonlinear beam dynamics. We apply ICA in a new way to slices along the bunch and discuss the source signals identified as betatron motion and longitudinal beam structure.

  12. Comparison of Applying FOUR Reduced Order Models to a Global Sensitivity Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Oladyshkin, S.; Liu, Y.; Pau, G. S. H.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the comparison of applying four reduced order models (ROMs) to global sensitivity analysis (GSA). ROM is one way to improve computational efficiency in many-query applications such as optimization, uncertainty quantification, sensitivity analysis, inverse modeling where the computational demand can become large. The four ROM methods are: arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC), Gaussian process regression (GPR), cut high dimensional model representation (HDMR), and random sample HDMR. The discussion is mainly based on a global sensitivity analysis performed for a hypothetical large-scale CO2 storage project. Pros and cons of each method will be discussed and suggestions on how each method should be applied individually or combined will be made.

  13. Modulation of motor unit activity in biceps brachii by neuromuscular electrical stimulation applied to the contralateral arm.

    PubMed

    Amiridis, Ioannis G; Mani, Diba; Almuklass, Awad; Matkowski, Boris; Gould, Jeffrey R; Enoka, Roger M

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to determine the influence of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) current intensity and pulse width applied to the right elbow flexors on the discharge characteristics of motor units in the left biceps brachii. Three NMES current intensities were applied for 5 s with either narrow (0.2 ms) or wide (1 ms) stimulus pulses: one at 80% of motor threshold and two that evoked contractions at either ∼10% or ∼20% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force. The discharge times of 28 low-threshold (0.4-21.6% MVC force) and 16 high-threshold (31.7-56.3% MVC force) motor units in the short head of biceps brachii were determined before, during, and after NMES. NMES elicited two main effects: one involved transient deflections in the left-arm force at the onset and offset of NMES and the other consisted of nonuniform modulation of motor unit activity. The force deflections, which were influenced by NMES current intensity and pulse width, were observed only when low-threshold motor units were tracked. NMES did not significantly influence the discharge characteristics of tracked single-threshold motor units. However, a qualitative analysis indicated that there was an increase in the number of unique waveforms detected during and after NMES. The findings indicate that activity of motor units in the left elbow flexors can be modulated by NMES current and pulse width applied to right elbow flexors, but the effects are not distributed uniformly to the involved motor units.

  14. Research in progress in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, fluid mechanics, and computer science during the period October 1, 1993 through March 31, 1994. The major categories of the current ICASE research program are: (1) applied and numerical mathematics, including numerical analysis and algorithm development; (2) theoretical and computational research in fluid mechanics in selected areas of interest to LaRC, including acoustics and combustion; (3) experimental research in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics involving LaRC facilities and scientists; and (4) computer science.

  15. Selective activation of carotid nerve fibers by acetylcholine applied to the cat petrosal ganglion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Alcayaga, J; Iturriaga, R; Varas, R; Arroyo, J; Zapata, P

    1998-03-09

    The petrosal ganglion innervates carotid body chemoreceptors through the carotid (sinus) nerve. These primary sensory neurons are activated by transmitters released from receptor (glomus) cells, acetylcholine (ACh) having been proposed as one of the transmitters involved in this process. Since the perikarya of primary sensory neurons share several properties with peripheral sensory endings, we studied the electrical responses of the carotid nerve and glossopharyngeal branch to ACh locally applied to the cat petrosal ganglion superfused in vitro. Ganglionar applications of AChCl (1 microg-1 mg) generated bursts of action potentials conducted along the carotid nerve, while only a few spikes were exceptionally recorded from the glossopharyngeal branch in response to the largest doses. Carotid nerve responses to ACh were dose-dependent, the higher doses inducing transient desensitization. Application of nicotine to the petrosal ganglion also evoked dose-dependent excitatory responses in the carotid nerve. Responses to ACh were reversibly antagonized by adding hexamethonium to the superfusate, more intense and prolonged block of ACh responses being produced by mecamylamine. Ganglionar applications of gamma-amino butyric acid and serotonin, in doses of up to 5 mg, did not induce firing of action potentials in any of the branches of the glossopharyngeal nerve. Our results indicate that petrosal ganglion neurons projecting through the carotid nerve are selectively activated by ACh acting on nicotinic ACh receptors located in the somata of these neurons. Thus, cholinosensitivity would be shared by the membranes of peripheral endings and perikarya of primary sensory neurons involved in arterial chemoreception.

  16. The mechanics of motorised momentum exchange tethers when applied to active debris removal from LEO

    SciTech Connect

    Caldecott, Ralph; Kamarulzaman, Dayangku N. S.; Kirrane, James P.; Cartmell, Matthew P.; Ganilova, Olga A.

    2014-12-10

    The concept of momentum exchange when applied to space tethers for propulsion is well established, and a considerable body of literature now exists on the on-orbit modelling, the dynamics, and also the control of a large range of tether system applications. The authors consider here a new application for the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether by highlighting three key stages of development leading to a conceptualisation that can subsequently be developed into a technology for Active Debris Removal. The paper starts with a study of the on-orbit mechanics of a full sized motorised tether in which it is shown that a laden and therefore highly massasymmetrical tether can still be forced to spin, and certainly to librate, thereby confirming its possible usefulness for active debris removal (ADR). The second part of the paper concentrates on the modelling of the centripetal deployment of a symmetrical MMET in order to get it initialized for debris removal operations, and the third and final part of the paper provides an entry into scale modelling for low cost mission design and testing. It is shown that the motorised momentum exchange tether offers a potential solution to the removal of large pieces of orbital debris, and that dynamic methodologies can be implemented to in order to optimise the emergent design.

  17. The mechanics of motorised momentum exchange tethers when applied to active debris removal from LEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldecott, Ralph; Kamarulzaman, Dayangku N. S.; Kirrane, James P.; Cartmell, Matthew P.; Ganilova, Olga A.

    2014-12-01

    The concept of momentum exchange when applied to space tethers for propulsion is well established, and a considerable body of literature now exists on the on-orbit modelling, the dynamics, and also the control of a large range of tether system applications. The authors consider here a new application for the Motorised Momentum Exchange Tether by highlighting three key stages of development leading to a conceptualisation that can subsequently be developed into a technology for Active Debris Removal. The paper starts with a study of the on-orbit mechanics of a full sized motorised tether in which it is shown that a laden and therefore highly massasymmetrical tether can still be forced to spin, and certainly to librate, thereby confirming its possible usefulness for active debris removal (ADR). The second part of the paper concentrates on the modelling of the centripetal deployment of a symmetrical MMET in order to get it initialized for debris removal operations, and the third and final part of the paper provides an entry into scale modelling for low cost mission design and testing. It is shown that the motorised momentum exchange tether offers a potential solution to the removal of large pieces of orbital debris, and that dynamic methodologies can be implemented to in order to optimise the emergent design.

  18. A multistate analysis of active life expectancy.

    PubMed

    Rogers, A; Rogers, R G; Branch, L G

    1989-01-01

    With today's lower mortality rates, longer expectations of life, and new medical technologies, the nation's health policy focus has shifted from emphasis on individual survival to emphasis on personal health and independent living. Using longitudinal data sets and new methodological techniques, researchers have begun to assess active life expectancies, estimating not only how long a subpopulation can expect to live beyond each age, but what fractions of the expected remaining lifetime will be lived as independent, dependent, or institutionalized. New ideas are addressed, applying recently developed multistate life table methods to Waves One and Two of the Massachusetts Health Care Panel Study. Expectations of active life are presented for those 65 and older who initially are in one of two functional states of well-being. Included are expectations of life, for those, for example, who were independent and remained so, or those who were dependent and became independent. Although public health officials are concerned about the number of elderly who cease being independent, preliminary analysis shows that a significant number of the dependent elderly regain their independence, a situation which needs to be addressed in health care planning.

  19. Revealing unobserved factors underlying cortical activity with a rectified latent variable model applied to neural population recordings.

    PubMed

    Whiteway, Matthew R; Butts, Daniel A

    2017-03-01

    The activity of sensory cortical neurons is not only driven by external stimuli but also shaped by other sources of input to the cortex. Unlike external stimuli, these other sources of input are challenging to experimentally control, or even observe, and as a result contribute to variability of neural responses to sensory stimuli. However, such sources of input are likely not "noise" and may play an integral role in sensory cortex function. Here we introduce the rectified latent variable model (RLVM) in order to identify these sources of input using simultaneously recorded cortical neuron populations. The RLVM is novel in that it employs nonnegative (rectified) latent variables and is much less restrictive in the mathematical constraints on solutions because of the use of an autoencoder neural network to initialize model parameters. We show that the RLVM outperforms principal component analysis, factor analysis, and independent component analysis, using simulated data across a range of conditions. We then apply this model to two-photon imaging of hundreds of simultaneously recorded neurons in mouse primary somatosensory cortex during a tactile discrimination task. Across many experiments, the RLVM identifies latent variables related to both the tactile stimulation as well as nonstimulus aspects of the behavioral task, with a majority of activity explained by the latter. These results suggest that properly identifying such latent variables is necessary for a full understanding of sensory cortical function and demonstrate novel methods for leveraging large population recordings to this end.NEW & NOTEWORTHY The rapid development of neural recording technologies presents new opportunities for understanding patterns of activity across neural populations. Here we show how a latent variable model with appropriate nonlinear form can be used to identify sources of input to a neural population and infer their time courses. Furthermore, we demonstrate how these sources are

  20. A study in the founding of applied behavior analysis through its publications.

    PubMed

    Morris, Edward K; Altus, Deborah E; Smith, Nathaniel G

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a study of the founding of applied behavior analysis through its publications. Our methods included hand searches of sources (e.g., journals, reference lists), search terms (i.e., early, applied, behavioral, research, literature), inclusion criteria (e.g., the field's applied dimension), and (d) challenges to their face and content validity. Our results were 36 articles published between 1959 and 1967 that we organized into 4 groups: 12 in 3 programs of research and 24 others. Our discussion addresses (a) limitations in our method (e.g., the completeness of our search), (b) challenges to the validity of our methods and results (e.g., convergent validity), and (c) priority claims about the field's founding. We conclude that the claims are irresolvable because identification of the founding publications depends significantly on methods and because the field's founding was an evolutionary process. We close with suggestions for future research.

  1. A Study in the Founding of Applied Behavior Analysis Through Its Publications

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward K.; Altus, Deborah E.; Smith, Nathaniel G.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a study of the founding of applied behavior analysis through its publications. Our methods included hand searches of sources (e.g., journals, reference lists), search terms (i.e., early, applied, behavioral, research, literature), inclusion criteria (e.g., the field's applied dimension), and (d) challenges to their face and content validity. Our results were 36 articles published between 1959 and 1967 that we organized into 4 groups: 12 in 3 programs of research and 24 others. Our discussion addresses (a) limitations in our method (e.g., the completeness of our search), (b) challenges to the validity of our methods and results (e.g., convergent validity), and (c) priority claims about the field's founding. We conclude that the claims are irresolvable because identification of the founding publications depends significantly on methods and because the field's founding was an evolutionary process. We close with suggestions for future research. PMID:25729133

  2. Applying behavior analysis to clinical problems: review and analysis of habit reversal.

    PubMed Central

    Miltenberger, R G; Fuqua, R W; Woods, D W

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a review and analysis of habit reversal, a multicomponent procedure developed by Azrin and Nunn (1973, 1974) for the treatment of nervous habits, tics, and stuttering. The article starts with a discussion of the behaviors treated with habit reversal, behavioral covariation among habits, and functional analysis and assessment of habits. Research on habit reversal and simplified versions of the procedure is then described. Next the article discusses the limitations of habit reversal and the evidence for its generality. The article concludes with an analysis of the behavioral processes involved in habit reversal and suggestions for future research. PMID:9757583

  3. Common cause evaluations in applied risk analysis of nuclear power plants. [PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, T.; Ligon, D.; Stamatelatos, M.

    1983-04-01

    Qualitative and quantitative approaches were developed for the evaluation of common cause failures (CCFs) in nuclear power plants and were applied to the analysis of the auxiliary feedwater systems of several pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Key CCF variables were identified through a survey of experts in the field and a review of failure experience in operating PWRs. These variables were classified into categories of high, medium, and low defense against a CCF. Based on the results, a checklist was developed for analyzing CCFs of systems. Several known techniques for quantifying CCFs were also reviewed. The information provided valuable insights in the development of a new model for estimating CCF probabilities, which is an extension of and improvement over the Beta Factor method. As applied to the analysis of the PWR auxiliary feedwater systems, the method yielded much more realistic values than the original Beta Factor method for a one-out-of-three system.

  4. Applying behavior analysis to school violence and discipline problems: Schoolwide positive behavior support

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Cynthia M.; Kincaid, Donald

    2005-01-01

    School discipline is a growing concern in the United States. Educators frequently are faced with discipline problems ranging from infrequent but extreme problems (e.g., shootings) to less severe problems that occur at high frequency (e.g., bullying, insubordination, tardiness, and fighting). Unfortunately, teachers report feeling ill prepared to deal effectively with discipline problems in schools. Further, research suggests that many commonly used strategies, such as suspension, expulsion, and other reactive strategies, are not effective for ameliorating discipline problems and may, in fact, make the situation worse. The principles and technology of behavior analysis have been demonstrated to be extremely effective for decreasing problem behavior and increasing social skills exhibited by school children. Recently, these principles and techniques have been applied at the level of the entire school, in a movement termed schoolwide positive behavior support. In this paper we review the tenets of schoolwide positive behavior support, demonstrating the relation between this technology and applied behavior analysis. PMID:22478439

  5. Investigation of Cervical Fleksor and Extensor Muscle Activation During Isometric Neck Extension Applied by Therraband

    PubMed Central

    Önal, Sercan; Can, Filiz; Yakut, Yavuz; Baltacı, Gül

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Therrabands are commonly used for resistive exercises, streching and stabilization exercises and also isometric exercises. However, principles of practice of therrabands are mostly focused on exercise variety. Likewise it is only given point to exercise variety during therrabands’ usage at cervical region. Nevertheless, for effective usage of therrabands and for proper assessment of effectiveness response, it is necessary to know the amount of resistance being given or muscle activation response against the resistance given. The aim of this study was to compare activations of cervical flexor and extensor muscles during isometric extension exercise against the resistance of therraband in healthy individuals. Methods: 14 healthy subjects (8 female,6 male)aged between 19-32 have been included in the study. Subjects with neck problems, systemic diseases, history of trauma or operation were excluded. Neck isometric exercises with therraband was 2 sets with 2 minutes’ intervals and EMG records have been taken during exercises. After preparation of the skin, surface electrodes placed on the motor points of sternocleidomastoideus(SCM) and erector spinae(ES) muscles. After taking the average of 3 measures, the first 10 seconds of muscular activations were recorded. The average of integrated EMG(iEMG) values of each records was used for statistical data. Independent T test and Mann Whitney U test were used for the analysis of findings. Results: There was no significant difference between the right ES and left ES’s mean iEMG during isometric neck extension against therraband (p=0.06). Although there was no difference between right SCM and right ES muscles action potentials(t=-0.895; p=0.379), there was a significant difference between left SCM and left ES muscles’ action potentials (z= -2.435; p=0.01). When all the right and left SCM and ES muscle activations were compared, a significant difference was detected in favour of ES muscles ( t= -2.133; p= 0

  6. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan–glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  7. Activation of Schwann cells in vitro by magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongyang; Huang, Liangliang; Liu, Liang; Luo, Beier; Liang, Miaomiao; Sun, Zhen; Zhu, Shu; Quan, Xin; Yang, Yafeng; Ma, Teng; Huang, Jinghui; Luo, Zhuojing

    2015-01-01

    Schwann cells (SCs) are attractive seed cells in neural tissue engineering, but their application is limited by attenuated biological activities and impaired functions with aging. Therefore, it is important to explore an approach to enhance the viability and biological properties of SCs. In the present study, a magnetic composite made of magnetically responsive magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and a biodegradable chitosan-glycerophosphate polymer were prepared and characterized. It was further explored whether such magnetic nanocomposites via applied magnetic fields would regulate SC biological activities. The magnetization of the magnetic nanocomposite was measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compositional characterization of the magnetic nanocomposite was examined by Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray diffraction. The tolerance of SCs to the magnetic fields was tested by flow-cytometry assay. The proliferation of cells was examined by a 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine-labeling assay, a PrestoBlue assay, and a Live/Dead assay. Messenger ribonucleic acid of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF in SCs was assayed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The amount of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF secreted from SCs was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. It was found that magnetic nanocomposites containing 10% MNPs showed a cross-section diameter of 32.33±1.81 µm, porosity of 80.41%±0.72%, and magnetization of 5.691 emu/g at 8 kOe. The 10% MNP magnetic nanocomposites were able to support cell adhesion and spreading and further promote proliferation of SCs under magnetic field exposure. Interestingly, a magnetic field applied through the 10% MNP magnetic scaffold significantly increased the gene expression and protein secretion of BDNF, GDNF, NT-3, and VEGF. This work is the first stage in our understanding of how to precisely regulate the viability and biological properties of SCs in tissue-engineering grafts, which combined with additional

  8. Current research activities: Applied and numerical mathematics, fluid mechanics, experiments in transition and turbulence and aerodynamics, and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, fluid mechanics including fluid dynamics, acoustics, and combustion, aerodynamics, and computer science during the period 1 Apr. 1992 - 30 Sep. 1992 is summarized.

  9. Applied behaviour analysis and standard treatment in intellectual disability: 2-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hassiotis, Angela; Canagasabey, Anton; Robotham, Daniel; Marston, Louise; Romeo, Renee; King, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Applied behaviour analysis by a specialist team plus standard treatment for adults with intellectual disability displaying challenging behaviour was reported to be clinically and cost-effective after 6 months. In a 2-year follow-up of the same trial cohort, participants receiving the specialist intervention had significantly lower total and subdomain Aberrant Behavior Checklist scores than those receiving usual care alone. After adjustment for baseline covariates there was no significant difference in costs between the trial arms.

  10. Applying the least restrictive alternative principle to treatment decisions: A legal and behavioral analysis

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, J. M.; Sherman, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The least restrictive alternative concept is widely used in mental health law. This paper addresses how the concept has been applied to treatment decisions. The paper offers both a legal and a behavioral analysis to some problems that have emerged in recent years concerning the selection of behavioral procedures used to change client behavior. The paper also offers ways of improving the application of the concept, which involve developing a more behaviorally functional perspective toward restrictiveness. PMID:22478138

  11. Classical linear-control analysis applied to business-cycle dynamics and stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingrove, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    Linear control analysis is applied as an aid in understanding the fluctuations of business cycles in the past, and to examine monetary policies that might improve stabilization. The analysis shows how different policies change the frequency and damping of the economic system dynamics, and how they modify the amplitude of the fluctuations that are caused by random disturbances. Examples are used to show how policy feedbacks and policy lags can be incorporated, and how different monetary strategies for stabilization can be analytically compared. Representative numerical results are used to illustrate the main points.

  12. RGB photoelasticity applied to the analysis of membrane residual stress in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajovalasit, A.; Petrucci, G.; Scafidi, M.

    2012-02-01

    The measurement of residual stresses is of great relevance in the glass industry. The analysis of residual stress in glass is usually made by photoelastic methods because glass is a photoelastic material. This paper considers the determination of membrane residual stresses in glass plates by automatic digital photoelasticity in white light (RGB photoelasticity). The proposed method is applied to the analysis of membrane residual stresses in some tempered glass. The proposed method can effectively replace manual methods based on the use of white light, which are currently provided by some technical standards.

  13. Improving skill development: an exploratory study comparing a philosophical and an applied ethical analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Saggaf, Yeslam; Burmeister, Oliver K.

    2012-09-01

    This exploratory study compares and contrasts two types of critical thinking techniques; one is a philosophical and the other an applied ethical analysis technique. The two techniques analyse an ethically challenging situation involving ICT that a recent media article raised to demonstrate their ability to develop the ethical analysis skills of ICT students and professionals. In particular the skill development focused on includes: being able to recognise ethical challenges and formulate coherent responses; distancing oneself from subjective judgements; developing ethical literacy; identifying stakeholders; and communicating ethical decisions made, to name a few.

  14. System Sensitivity Analysis Applied to the Conceptual Design of a Dual-Fuel Rocket SSTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reports the results of initial efforts to apply the System Sensitivity Analysis (SSA) optimization method to the conceptual design of a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicle. SSA is an efficient, calculus-based MDO technique for generating sensitivity derivatives in a highly multidisciplinary design environment. The method has been successfully applied to conceptual aircraft design and has been proven to have advantages over traditional direct optimization methods. The method is applied to the optimization of an advanced, piloted SSTO design similar to vehicles currently being analyzed by NASA as possible replacements for the Space Shuttle. Powered by a derivative of the Russian RD-701 rocket engine, the vehicle employs a combination of hydrocarbon, hydrogen, and oxygen propellants. Three primary disciplines are included in the design - propulsion, performance, and weights & sizing. A complete, converged vehicle analysis depends on the use of three standalone conceptual analysis computer codes. Efforts to minimize vehicle dry (empty) weight are reported in this paper. The problem consists of six system-level design variables and one system-level constraint. Using SSA in a 'manual' fashion to generate gradient information, six system-level iterations were performed from each of two different starting points. The results showed a good pattern of convergence for both starting points. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the method, possible areas of improvement, and future work is included.

  15. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  16. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  17. Decoding Dynamic Brain Patterns from Evoked Responses: A Tutorial on Multivariate Pattern Analysis Applied to Time Series Neuroimaging Data.

    PubMed

    Grootswagers, Tijl; Wardle, Susan G; Carlson, Thomas A

    2017-04-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) or brain decoding methods have become standard practice in analyzing fMRI data. Although decoding methods have been extensively applied in brain-computer interfaces, these methods have only recently been applied to time series neuroimaging data such as MEG and EEG to address experimental questions in cognitive neuroscience. In a tutorial style review, we describe a broad set of options to inform future time series decoding studies from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. Using example MEG data, we illustrate the effects that different options in the decoding analysis pipeline can have on experimental results where the aim is to "decode" different perceptual stimuli or cognitive states over time from dynamic brain activation patterns. We show that decisions made at both preprocessing (e.g., dimensionality reduction, subsampling, trial averaging) and decoding (e.g., classifier selection, cross-validation design) stages of the analysis can significantly affect the results. In addition to standard decoding, we describe extensions to MVPA for time-varying neuroimaging data including representational similarity analysis, temporal generalization, and the interpretation of classifier weight maps. Finally, we outline important caveats in the design and interpretation of time series decoding experiments.

  18. A review of dendrogeomorphological research applied to flood risk analysis in Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díez-Herrero, A.; Ballesteros, J. A.; Ruiz-Villanueva, V.; Bodoque, J. M.

    2013-08-01

    Over the last forty years, applying dendrogeomorphology to palaeoflood analysis has improved estimates of the frequency and magnitude of past floods worldwide. This paper reviews the main results obtained by applying dendrogeomorphology to flood research in several case studies in Central Spain. These dendrogeomorphological studies focused on the following topics: (1) anatomical analysis to understand the physiological response of trees to flood damage and improve sampling efficiency; (2) compiling robust flood chronologies in ungauged mountain streams, (3) determining flow depth and estimating flood discharge using two-dimensional hydraulic modelling, and comparing them with other palaeostage indicators; (4) calibrating hydraulic model parameters (i.e. Manning roughness); and (5) implementing stochastic-based, cost-benefit analysis to select optimal mitigation measures. The progress made in these areas is presented with suggestions for further research to improve the applicability of dendrogeochronology to palaeoflood studies. Further developments will include new methods for better identification of the causes of specific types of flood damage to trees (e.g. tilted trees) or stable isotope analysis of tree rings to identify the climatic conditions associated with periods of increasing flood magnitude or frequency.

  19. Quantification of applied dose in irradiated citrus fruits by DNA Comet Assay together with image analysis.

    PubMed

    Cetinkaya, Nurcan; Ercin, Demet; Özvatan, Sümer; Erel, Yakup

    2016-02-01

    The experiments were conducted for quantification of applied dose for quarantine control in irradiated citrus fruits. Citrus fruits exposed to doses of 0.1 to 1.5 kGy and analyzed by DNA Comet Assay. Observed comets were evaluated by image analysis. The tail length, tail moment and tail DNA% of comets were used for the interpretation of comets. Irradiated citrus fruits showed the separated tails from the head of the comet by increasing applied doses from 0.1 to 1.5 kGy. The mean tail length and mean tail moment% levels of irradiated citrus fruits at all doses are significantly different (p < 0.01) from control even for the lowest dose at 0.1 kGy. Thus, DNA Comet Assay may be a practical quarantine control method for irradiated citrus fruits since it has been possible to estimate the applied low doses as small as 0.1 kGy when it is combined with image analysis.

  20. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... working conditions of participants in activities under title I of WIA? 667.274 Section 667.274 Employees... and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities under title I of... working conditions of employees are equally applicable to working conditions of participants engaged...

  1. 20 CFR 667.274 - What health and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... working conditions of participants in activities under title I of WIA? 667.274 Section 667.274 Employees... and safety standards apply to the working conditions of participants in activities under title I of... working conditions of employees are equally applicable to working conditions of participants engaged...

  2. 34 CFR 79.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 79.6 Section 79.6 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES § 79.6 What...

  3. Preliminary Work Domain Analysis for Human Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Kerry; Miller, Matthew; Feigh, Karen

    2015-01-01

    A work domain analysis (WDA) of human extravehicular activity (EVA) is presented in this study. A formative methodology such as Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) offers a new perspective to the knowledge gained from the past 50 years of living and working in space for the development of future EVA support systems. EVA is a vital component of human spaceflight and provides a case study example of applying a work domain analysis (WDA) to a complex sociotechnical system. The WDA presented here illustrates how the physical characteristics of the environment, hardware, and life support systems of the domain guide the potential avenues and functional needs of future EVA decision support system development.

  4. Applying Independent Component Analysis to Clinical fMRI at 7 T

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Simon Daniel; Schöpf, Veronika; Cardoso, Pedro; Geissler, Alexander; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Wurnig, Moritz; Trattnig, Siegfried; Beisteiner, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Increased BOLD sensitivity at 7 T offers the possibility to increase the reliability of fMRI, but ultra-high field is also associated with an increase in artifacts related to head motion, Nyquist ghosting, and parallel imaging reconstruction errors. In this study, the ability of independent component analysis (ICA) to separate activation from these artifacts was assessed in a 7 T study of neurological patients performing chin and hand motor tasks. ICA was able to isolate primary motor activation with negligible contamination by motion effects. The results of General Linear Model (GLM) analysis of these data were, in contrast, heavily contaminated by motion. Secondary motor areas, basal ganglia, and thalamus involvement were apparent in ICA results, but there was low capability to isolate activation in the same brain regions in the GLM analysis, indicating that ICA was more sensitive as well as more specific. A method was developed to simplify the assessment of the large number of independent components. Task-related activation components could be automatically identified via these intuitive and effective features. These findings demonstrate that ICA is a practical and sensitive analysis approach in high field fMRI studies, particularly where motion is evoked. Promising applications of ICA in clinical fMRI include presurgical planning and the study of pathologies affecting subcortical brain areas. PMID:24032007

  5. Applying latent semantic analysis to large-scale medical image databases.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, Spyridon; Kalamboukis, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) although has been used successfully in text retrieval when applied to CBIR induces scalability issues with large image collections. The method so far has been used with small collections due to the high cost of storage and computational time for solving the SVD problem for a large and dense feature matrix. Here we present an effective and efficient approach of applying LSA skipping the SVD solution of the feature matrix and overcoming in this way the deficiencies of the method with large scale datasets. Early and late fusion techniques are tested and their performance is calculated. The study demonstrates that early fusion of several composite descriptors with visual words increase retrieval effectiveness. It also combines well in a late fusion for mixed (textual and visual) ad hoc and modality classification. The results reported are comparable to state of the art algorithms without including additional knowledge from the medical domain.

  6. Applied Behavior Analysis, Autism, and Occupational Therapy: A Search for Understanding.

    PubMed

    Welch, Christie D; Polatajko, H J

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapists strive to be mindful, competent practitioners and continuously look for ways to improve practice. Applied behavior analysis (ABA) has strong evidence of effectiveness in helping people with autism achieve goals, yet it does not seem to be implemented in occupational therapy practice. To better understand whether ABA could be an evidence-based option to expand occupational therapy practice, the authors conducted an iterative, multiphase investigation of relevant literature. Findings suggest that occupational therapists apply developmental and sensory approaches to autism treatment. The occupational therapy literature does not reflect any use of ABA despite its strong evidence base. Occupational therapists may currently avoid using ABA principles because of a perception that ABA is not client centered. ABA principles and occupational therapy are compatible, and the two could work synergistically.

  7. An uncertainty analysis of the PVT gauging method applied to sub-critical cryogenic propellant tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Dresar, Neil T.

    2004-06-01

    The PVT (pressure, volume, temperature) method of liquid quantity gauging in low-gravity is based on gas law calculations assuming conservation of pressurant gas within the propellant tank and the pressurant supply bottle. There is interest in applying this method to cryogenic propellant tanks since the method requires minimal additional hardware or instrumentation. To use PVT with cryogenic fluids, a non-condensable pressurant gas (helium) is required. With cryogens, there will be a significant amount of propellant vapor mixed with the pressurant gas in the tank ullage. This condition, along with the high sensitivity of propellant vapor pressure to temperature, makes the PVT method susceptible to substantially greater measurement uncertainty than is the case with less volatile propellants. A conventional uncertainty analysis is applied to example cases of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks. It appears that the PVT method may be feasible for liquid oxygen. Acceptable accuracy will be more difficult to obtain with liquid hydrogen.

  8. Advantages and drawbacks of applying periodic time-variant modal analysis to spur gear dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Rune; Santos, Ilmar F.; Hede, Ivan A.

    2010-07-01

    A simplified torsional model with a reduced number of degrees-of-freedom is used in order to investigate the potential of the technique. A time-dependent gear mesh stiffness function is introduced and expanded in a Fourier series. The necessary number of Fourier terms is determined in order to ensure sufficient accuracy of the results. The method of time-variant modal analysis is applied, and the changes in the fundamental and the parametric resonance frequencies as a function of the rotational speed of the gears, are found. By obtaining the stationary and parametric parts of the time-dependent modes shapes, the importance of the time-varying component relative to the stationary component is investigated and quantified. The method used for calculation and subsequent sorting of the left and right eigenvectors based on a first order Taylor expansion is explained. The advantages and drawbacks of applying the methodology to wind turbine gearboxes are addressed and elucidated.

  9. RS-34 Phoenix In-Space Propulsion System Applied to Active Debris Removal Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esther, Elizabeth A.; Burnside, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    In-space propulsion is a high percentage of the cost when considering Active Debris Removal mission. For this reason it is desired to research if existing designs with slight modification would meet mission requirements to aid in reducing cost of the overall mission. Such a system capable of rendezvous, close proximity operations, and de-orbit of Envisat class resident space objects has been identified in the existing RS-34 Phoenix. RS-34 propulsion system is a remaining asset from the de-commissioned United States Air Force Peacekeeper program; specifically the pressure-fed storable bi-propellant Stage IV Post Boost Propulsion System. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) gained experience with the RS-34 propulsion system on the successful Ares I-X flight test program flown in the Ares I-X Roll control system (RoCS). The heritage hardware proved extremely robust and reliable and sparked interest for further utilization on other potential in-space applications. Subsequently, MSFC has obtained permission from the USAF to obtain all the remaining RS-34 stages for re-use opportunities. The MSFC Advanced Concepts Office (ACO) was commissioned to lead a study for evaluation of the Rocketdyne produced RS-34 propulsion system as it applies to an active debris removal design reference mission for resident space object targets including Envisat. Originally designed, the RS-34 Phoenix provided in-space six-degrees-of freedom operational maneuvering to deploy payloads at multiple orbital locations. The RS-34 Concept Study lead by sought to further understand application for a similar orbital debris design reference mission to provide propulsive capability for rendezvous, close proximity operations to support the capture phase of the mission, and deorbit of single or multiple large class resident space objects. Multiple configurations varying the degree of modification were identified to trade for dry mass optimization and

  10. Effects of Applying STR for Group Learning Activities on Learning Performance in a Synchronous Cyber Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Tony C. T.; Shadiev, Rustam; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to apply Speech to Text Recognition (STR) for individual oral presentations and group discussions of students in a synchronous cyber classroom. An experiment was conducted to analyze the effectiveness of applying STR on learning performance. Students' perceptions and behavioral intentions toward using STR were also investigated.…

  11. Analysis of possibility of applying the PVDF foil in industrial vibration sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, A.

    2015-11-01

    There are many machines using the piezoelectric effects. Systems with smart materials are often used because they have high potential applications for example transducers can be applied to receive required characteristic of projected system. Every engineer and designer know how important it is properly mathematical model and method of the analysis. Also it is important to consider all parameters of analyzed system for example glue layer between elements. Geometrical and material parameters has a significant impact on the characteristics of the all system's components because the omission of the influence of one of them results in inaccuracy in the analysis of the system. In article the modeling and testing of vibrating systems with piezoelectric ceramic materials transducers used as actuators and vibration dampers. The method of analysis of the vibrating sensor systems will be presented, mathematical model, and characteristics, to determine the influence of the system's properties on these characteristics. Main scientific point of the project is to analyze and demonstrate possibility of applying new construction with the PVDF foil or any other belonging to a group of smart materials in industrial sensors. Currently, the vibration level sensors are used by practically all manufacturers of piezoelectric ceramic plates to generate and detect the vibration of the fork.

  12. X-ray microfluorescence with synchrotron radiation applied in the analysis of pigments from ancient Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calza, C.; Anjos, M. J.; Mendonça de Souza, S. M. F.; Brancaglion, A., Jr.; Lopes, R. T.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, X-ray microfluorescence with the synchrotron radiation technique was applied in the analysis of pigments found in decorative paintings in the sarcophagus of an Egyptian mummy. This female mummy, from the Roman Period, which was embalmed with the arms and legs swathed separately is considered one of the most important pieces of the Egyptian Collection from the National Museum (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil). The measurements were performed at the XRF beamline D09B of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), using the white beam and a Si(Li) detector with resolution of 165 eV at 5.9 keV. The possible pigments found in the samples were: Egyptian blue, Egyptian green frit, green earth, verdigris, malachite, ochre, realgar, chalk, gypsum, bone white, ivory black and magnetite. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to the results in order to verify if the samples belong to the same period of a linen wrapping fragment, whose provenance was well established.

  13. Analysis of Preconditioning and Relaxation Operators for the Discontinuous Galerkin Method Applied to Diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkins, H. L.; Shu, Chi-Wang

    2001-01-01

    The explicit stability constraint of the discontinuous Galerkin method applied to the diffusion operator decreases dramatically as the order of the method is increased. Block Jacobi and block Gauss-Seidel preconditioner operators are examined for their effectiveness at accelerating convergence. A Fourier analysis for methods of order 2 through 6 reveals that both preconditioner operators bound the eigenvalues of the discrete spatial operator. Additionally, in one dimension, the eigenvalues are grouped into two or three regions that are invariant with order of the method. Local relaxation methods are constructed that rapidly damp high frequencies for arbitrarily large time step.

  14. Advanced Behavioral Applications in Schools: A Review of R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies: An Applied Behavior Analysis Systems Approach"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    R. Douglas Greer's "Designing Teaching Strategies" is an important book directed to advanced students in applied behavior analysis for classrooms. This review presents some of the striking features of the Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS[R]) program and the individualized instruction that the book advances. These include…

  15. System Analysis Applied to Autonomy: Application to Human-Rated Lunar/Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Larry A.

    2006-01-01

    System analysis is an essential technical discipline for the modern design of spacecraft and their associated missions. Specifically, system analysis is a powerful aid in identifying and prioritizing the required technologies needed for mission and/or vehicle development efforts. Maturation of intelligent systems technologies, and their incorporation into spacecraft systems, are dictating the development of new analysis tools, and incorporation of such tools into existing system analysis methodologies, in order to fully capture the trade-offs of autonomy on vehicle and mission success. A "system analysis of autonomy" methodology will be outlined and applied to a set of notional human-rated lunar/Mars lander missions toward answering these questions: 1. what is the optimum level of vehicle autonomy and intelligence required? and 2. what are the specific attributes of an autonomous system implementation essential for a given surface lander mission/application in order to maximize mission success? Future human-rated lunar/Mars landers, though nominally under the control of their crew, will, nonetheless, be highly automated systems. These automated systems will range from mission/flight control functions, to vehicle health monitoring and prognostication, to life-support and other "housekeeping" functions. The optimum degree of autonomy afforded to these spacecraft systems/functions has profound implications from an exploration system architecture standpoint.

  16. Automated sleep EEG analysis applied to the evaluation of drugs: illustration by study of clorazepate dipotassium.

    PubMed

    Smith, J R; Karacan, I; Keane, B P; Yang, M

    1976-12-01

    An automated sleep EEG analysis system was used to evaluate the effects of clorazepate dipotassium in normal subjects. Ten young-adult men slept 18 consecutive nights in the laboratory. On days 8-15 clorazepate (7.5 mg) was administered three times daily; on days 5-7 and 16-18 a placebo was administered in a similar fashion. The drug reduced amounts of alpha and delta activity and increased the amount of beta activity and the number of spindles. These effects generally persisted through the 3 day placebo recovery period. Our results suggest that sleep EEG waveform descriptors are sensitive indicators of drug activity and that beta activity in particular may be useful in the detailed description of various drug effects.

  17. A Sensor Fault Detection Methodology applied to Piezoelectric Active Systems in Structural Health Monitoring Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibaduiza, D.; Anaya, M.; Forero, E.; Castro, R.; Pozo, F.

    2016-07-01

    Damage detection is the basis of the damage identification task in Structural Health Monitoring. A good damage detection process can ensure the adequate work of a SHM System because allows to know early information about the presence of a damage in a structure under evaluation. However this process is based on the premise that all sensors are well installed and they are working properly, however, it is not true all the time. Problems such as debonding, cuts and the use of the sensors under different environmental and operational conditions result in changes in the vibrational response and a bad functioning in the SHM system. As a contribution to evaluate the state of the sensors in a SHM system, this paper describes a methodology for sensor fault detection in a piezoelectric active system. The methodology involves the use of PCA for multivariate analysis and some damage indices as pattern recognition technique and is tested in a blade from a wind turbine where different scenarios are evaluated including sensor cuts and debonding.

  18. Bayesian Statistical Analysis Applied to NAA Data for Neutron Flux Spectrum Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, D.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we present a statistical method, based on Bayesian statistics, to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum from the activation data of different isotopes. The experimental data were acquired during a neutron activation analysis (NAA) experiment [A. Borio di Tigliole et al., Absolute flux measurement by NAA at the Pavia University TRIGA Mark II reactor facilities, ENC 2012 - Transactions Research Reactors, ISBN 978-92-95064-14-0, 22 (2012)] performed at the TRIGA Mark II reactor of Pavia University (Italy). In order to evaluate the neutron flux spectrum, subdivided in energy groups, we must solve a system of linear equations containing the grouped cross sections and the activation rate data. We solve this problem with Bayesian statistical analysis, including the uncertainties of the coefficients and the a priori information about the neutron flux. A program for the analysis of Bayesian hierarchical models, based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulations, is used to define the problem statistical model and solve it. The energy group fluxes and their uncertainties are then determined with great accuracy and the correlations between the groups are analyzed. Finally, the dependence of the results on the prior distribution choice and on the group cross section data is investigated to confirm the reliability of the analysis.

  19. Applying reliability analysis to design electric power systems for More-electric aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baozhu

    The More-Electric Aircraft (MEA) is a type of aircraft that replaces conventional hydraulic and pneumatic systems with electrically powered components. These changes have significantly challenged the aircraft electric power system design. This thesis investigates how reliability analysis can be applied to automatically generate system topologies for the MEA electric power system. We first use a traditional method of reliability block diagrams to analyze the reliability level on different system topologies. We next propose a new methodology in which system topologies, constrained by a set reliability level, are automatically generated. The path-set method is used for analysis. Finally, we interface these sets of system topologies with control synthesis tools to automatically create correct-by-construction control logic for the electric power system.

  20. Graphical Analysis of PET Data Applied to Reversible and Irreversible Tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Jean

    1999-11-18

    Graphical analysis refers to the transformation of multiple time measurements of plasma and tissue uptake data into a linear plot, the slope of which is related to the number of available tracer binding sites. This type of analysis allows easy comparisons among experiments. No particular model structure is assumed, however it is assumed that the tracer is given by bolus injection and that both tissue uptake and the plasma concentration of unchanged tracer are monitored following tracer injection. The requirement of plasma measurements can be eliminated in some cases when a reference region is available. There are two categories of graphical methods which apply to two general types of ligands--those which bind reversibly during the scanning procedure and those which are irreversible or trapped during the time of the scanning procedure.

  1. Quantitative Schlieren analysis applied to holograms of crystals grown on Spacelab 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Howard L.

    1986-01-01

    In order to extract additional information about crystals grown in the microgravity environment of Spacelab, a quantitative schlieren analysis technique was developed for use in a Holography Ground System of the Fluid Experiment System. Utilizing the Unidex position controller, it was possible to measure deviation angles produced by refractive index gradients of 0.5 milliradians. Additionally, refractive index gradient maps for any recorded time during the crystal growth were drawn and used to create solute concentration maps for the environment around the crystal. The technique was applied to flight holograms of Cell 204 of the Fluid Experiment System that were recorded during the Spacelab 3 mission on STS 51B. A triglycine sulfate crystal was grown under isothermal conditions in the cell and the data gathered with the quantitative schlieren analysis technique is consistent with a diffusion limited growth process.

  2. A comparative assessment of texture analysis techniques applied to bone tool use-wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Adam S.; Gleason, Matthew A.

    2016-06-01

    The study of bone tools, a specific class of artifacts often essential to perishable craft production, provides insight into industries otherwise largely invisible archaeologically. Building on recent breakthroughs in the analysis of microwear, this research applies confocal laser scanning microscopy and texture analysis techniques drawn from the field of surface metrology to identify use-wear patterns on experimental and archaeological bone artifacts. Our approach utilizes both conventional parameters and multi-scale geometric characterizations of the areas of worn surfaces to identify statistical similarities as a function of scale. The introduction of this quantitative approach to the study of microtopography holds significant potential for advancement in use-wear studies by reducing inter-observer variability and identifying new parameters useful in the detection of differential wear-patterns.

  3. Escalation research: Providing new frontiers for applying behavior analysis to organizational behavior

    PubMed Central

    Goltz, Sonia M.

    2000-01-01

    Decision fiascoes such as escalation of commitment, the tendency of decision makers to “throw good money after bad,” can have serious consequences for organizations and are therefore of great interest in applied research. This paper discusses the use of behavior analysis in organizational behavior research on escalation. Among the most significant aspects of behavior-analytic research on escalation is that it has indicated that both the patterns of outcomes that decision makers have experienced for past decisions and the patterns of responses that they make are critical for understanding escalation. This research has also stimulated the refinement of methods by researchers to better assess decision making and the role reinforcement plays in it. Finally, behavior-analytic escalation research has not only indicated the utility of reinforcement principles for predicting more complex human behavior but has also suggested some additional areas for future exploration of decision making using behavior analysis. PMID:22478347

  4. Nonlinear analysis, scientific computation, and continuum mechanics applied to the science of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurtin, Morton E.; Williams, William O.

    1993-03-01

    This grant enabled the department to form the Research Group in Mathematical Materials Science in 1990, a group that formed the nucleus of the Center for Nonlinear Analysis, established in 1991, by the ARO. The Center has created a vigorous environment for collaboration among mathematicians and allied scientists. Within the international mathematics community the Center has assumed a leadership role, especially for questions related to materials science. The major research effort has focused toward developing, analyzing, and unifying mathematical models that characterize material behavior at a phenomenological level. The main thrust is applied nonlinear analysis, nonlinear continuum physics, and scientific computation. The educational goals have been to train young scientists and to train and involve female and minority students in the sciences.

  5. Scaling analysis applied to the NORVEX code development and thermal energy flight experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skarda, J. Raymond Lee; Namkoong, David; Darling, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A scaling analysis is used to study the dominant flow processes that occur in molten phase change material (PCM) under 1 g and microgravity conditions. Results of the scaling analysis are applied to the development of the NORVEX (NASA Oak Ridge Void Experiment) computer program and the preparation of the Thermal Energy Storage (TES) flight experiment. The NORVEX computer program which is being developed to predict melting and freezing with void formation in a 1 g or microgravity environment of the PCM is described. NORVEX predictions are compared with the scaling and similarity results. The approach to be used to validate NORVEX with TES flight data is also discussed. Similarity and scaling show that the inertial terms must be included as part of the momentum equation in either the 1 g or microgravity environment (a creeping flow assumption is invalid). A 10(exp -4) environment was found to be a suitable microgravity environment for the proposed PCM.

  6. Effect of salt solutions applied during wheat conditioning on lipase activity and lipid stability of whole wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Doblado-Maldonado, Andrés F; Arndt, Elizabeth A; Rose, Devin J

    2013-09-01

    Lipolytic activity in whole wheat flour (WWF) is largely responsible for the loss in baking quality during storage. Metal ions affect the activity of seed lipases; however, no previous studies have applied this information to WWF in a way that reduces lipase activity, is practical for commercial manufacture, and uses common food ingredients. NaCl, KCl, Ca-propionate, or FeNa-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeNa-EDTA) were applied to hard red winter (HRW) and hard white spring (HWS) wheats during conditioning as aqueous solutions at concentrations that would be acceptable in baked goods. Salts affected lipase activity to different degrees depending on the type of wheat used. Inhibition was greater in HRW compared with HWS WWF, probably due to higher lipase activity in HRW wheat. In HRW WWF, 1% NaCl (flour weight) reduced hydrolytic and oxidative rancidity and resulted in higher loaf volume and lower firmness than untreated WWF after 24 weeks of storage.

  7. Determination of the acute toxicities of physicochemical pretreatment and advanced oxidation processes applied to dairy effluents on activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Sivrioğlu, Özge; Yonar, Taner

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the acute toxicities of raw, physicochemical pre-treated, ozonated, and Fenton reagent applied samples of dairy wastewater toward activated sludge microorganisms, evaluated using the International Organization for Standardization's respiration inhibition test (ISO 8192), are presented. Five-day biological oxygen demand (BOD5) was measured to determine the biodegradability of physicochemical treatment, ozonation, Fenton oxidation or no treatment (raw samples) of dairy wastewater. Chemical pretreatment positively affected biodegradability, and the inhibition exhibited by activated sludge was removed to a considerable degree. Ozonation and the Fenton process exhibited good chemical oxygen demand removal (61%) and removal of toxins. Low sludge production was observed for the Fenton process applied to dairy effluents. We did not determine the inhibitory effect of the Fenton-process on the activated sludge mixture. The pollutant-removal efficiencies of the applied processes and their associated operating costs were determined.

  8. Limit Cycle Analysis Applied to the Oscillations of Decelerating Blunt-Body Entry Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenenberger, Mark; Queen, Eric M.

    2008-01-01

    Many blunt-body entry vehicles have nonlinear dynamic stability characteristics that produce self-limiting oscillations in flight. Several different test techniques can be used to extract dynamic aerodynamic coefficients to predict this oscillatory behavior for planetary entry mission design and analysis. Most of these test techniques impose boundary conditions that alter the oscillatory behavior from that seen in flight. Three sets of test conditions, representing three commonly used test techniques, are presented to highlight these effects. Analytical solutions to the constant-coefficient planar equations-of-motion for each case are developed to show how the same blunt body behaves differently depending on the imposed test conditions. The energy equation is applied to further illustrate the governing dynamics. Then, the mean value theorem is applied to the energy rate equation to find the effective damping for an example blunt body with nonlinear, self-limiting dynamic characteristics. This approach is used to predict constant-energy oscillatory behavior and the equilibrium oscillation amplitudes for the various test conditions. These predictions are verified with planar simulations. The analysis presented provides an overview of dynamic stability test techniques and illustrates the effects of dynamic stability, static aerodynamics and test conditions on observed dynamic motions. It is proposed that these effects may be leveraged to develop new test techniques and refine test matrices in future tests to better define the nonlinear functional forms of blunt body dynamic stability curves.

  9. Topological data analysis (TDA) applied to reveal pedogenetic principles of European topsoil system.

    PubMed

    Savic, Aleksandar; Toth, Gergely; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2017-05-15

    Recent developments in applied mathematics are bringing new tools that are capable to synthesize knowledge in various disciplines, and help in finding hidden relationships between variables. One such technique is topological data analysis (TDA), a fusion of classical exploration techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA), and a topological point of view applied to clustering of results. Various phenomena have already received new interpretations thanks to TDA, from the proper choice of sport teams to cancer treatments. For the first time, this technique has been applied in soil science, to show the interaction between physical and chemical soil attributes and main soil-forming factors, such as climate and land use. The topsoil data set of the Land Use/Land Cover Area Frame survey (LUCAS) was used as a comprehensive database that consists of approximately 20,000 samples, each described by 12 physical and chemical parameters. After the application of TDA, results obtained were cross-checked against known grouping parameters including five types of land cover, nine types of climate and the organic carbon content of soil. Some of the grouping characteristics observed using standard approaches were confirmed by TDA (e.g., organic carbon content) but novel subtle relationships (e.g., magnitude of anthropogenic effect in soil formation), were discovered as well. The importance of this finding is that TDA is a unique mathematical technique capable of extracting complex relations hidden in soil science data sets, giving the opportunity to see the influence of physicochemical, biotic and abiotic factors on topsoil formation through fresh eyes.

  10. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  11. Clinical usefulness of the clock drawing test applying rasch analysis in predicting of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Doo Han; Lee, Jae Shin

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the clinical usefulness of the clock drawing test applying Rasch analysis for predicting the level of cognitive impairment. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 187 stroke patients with cognitive impairment were enrolled in this study. The 187 patients were evaluated by the clock drawing test developed through Rasch analysis along with the mini-mental state examination of cognitive evaluation tool. An analysis of the variance was performed to examine the significance of the mini-mental state examination and the clock drawing test according to the general characteristics of the subjects. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was performed to determine the cutoff point for cognitive impairment and to calculate the sensitivity and specificity values. [Results] The results of comparison of the clock drawing test with the mini-mental state showed significant differences in according to gender, age, education, and affected side. A total CDT of 10.5, which was selected as the cutoff point to identify cognitive impairement, showed a sensitivity, specificity, Youden index, positive predictive, and negative predicive values of 86.4%, 91.5%, 0.8, 95%, and 88.2%. [Conclusion] The clock drawing test is believed to be useful in assessments and interventions based on its excellent ability to identify cognitive disorders.

  12. Multivariate Curve Resolution Applied to Hyperspectral Imaging Analysis of Chocolate Samples.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; de Juan, Anna; Tauler, Romà

    2015-08-01

    This paper shows the application of Raman and infrared hyperspectral imaging combined with multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to the analysis of the constituents of commercial chocolate samples. The combination of different spectral data pretreatment methods allowed decreasing the high fluorescent Raman signal contribution of whey in the investigated chocolate samples. Using equality constraints during MCR analysis, estimations of the pure spectra of the chocolate sample constituents were improved, as well as their relative contributions and their spatial distribution on the analyzed samples. In addition, unknown constituents could be also resolved. White chocolate constituents resolved from Raman hyperspectral image indicate that, at macro scale, sucrose, lactose, fat, and whey constituents were intermixed in particles. Infrared hyperspectral imaging did not suffer from fluorescence and could be applied for white and milk chocolate. As a conclusion of this study, micro-hyperspectral imaging coupled to the MCR method is confirmed to be an appropriate tool for the direct analysis of the constituents of chocolate samples, and by extension, it is proposed for the analysis of other mixture constituents in commercial food samples.

  13. Symmetry analysis for nonlinear time reversal methods applied to nonlinear acoustic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dos Santos, Serge; Chaline, Jennifer

    2015-10-01

    Using symmetry invariance, nonlinear Time Reversal (TR) and reciprocity properties, the classical NEWS methods are supplemented and improved by new excitations having the intrinsic property of enlarging frequency analysis bandwidth and time domain scales, with now both medical acoustics and electromagnetic applications. The analysis of invariant quantities is a well-known tool which is often used in nonlinear acoustics in order to simplify complex equations. Based on a fundamental physical principle known as symmetry analysis, this approach consists in finding judicious variables, intrinsically scale dependant, and able to describe all stages of behaviour on the same theoretical foundation. Based on previously published results within the nonlinear acoustic areas, some practical implementation will be proposed as a new way to define TR-NEWS based methods applied to NDT and medical bubble based non-destructive imaging. This paper tends to show how symmetry analysis can help us to define new methodologies and new experimental set-up involving modern signal processing tools. Some example of practical realizations will be proposed in the context of biomedical non-destructive imaging using Ultrasound Contrast Agents (ACUs) where symmetry and invariance properties allow us to define a microscopic scale-invariant experimental set-up describing intrinsic symmetries of the microscopic complex system.

  14. Testing and Analysis Validation of a Metallic Repair Applied to a PRSEUS Tension Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Przekop, Adam; Jegley, Dawn C.

    2013-01-01

    A design and analysis of a repair concept applicable to a stiffened composite panel based on the Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure was recently completed. The damage scenario considered was a midbay-to-midbay saw-cut with a severed stiffener, flange and skin. Advanced modeling techniques such as mesh-independent definition of compliant fasteners and elastic-plastic material properties for metal parts were utilized in the finite element analysis supporting the design effort. A bolted metallic repair was selected so that it could be easily applied in the operational environment. The present work describes results obtained from a tension panel test conducted to validate both the repair concept and finite element analysis techniques used in the design effort. The test proved that the proposed repair concept is capable of sustaining load levels that are higher than those resulting from the current working stress allowables. This conclusion enables upward revision of the stress allowables that had been kept at an overly-conservative level due to concerns associated with repairability of the panels. Correlation of test data with finite element analysis results is also presented and assessed.

  15. Effects of Social Support About Physical Activity on Social Networking Sites: Applying the Theory of Planned Behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ni; Campo, Shelly; Yang, Jingzhen; Janz, Kathleen F; Snetselaar, Linda G; Eckler, Petya

    2015-01-01

    Despite the physical and mental health benefits of leisure-time physical activity (LTPA), only about half of college students participate in the recommended amount of LTPA. While college students are avid users of social network sites (SNSs), whether SNSs would be an effective channel for promoting LTPA through peer social support is unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of social support from students' contacts on SNSs on their intention to participate in LTPA, applying the Theory of Planned Behavior. Participants were recruited through a mass e-mail sent to undergraduate students at a large Midwestern university in fall 2011. In total, 439 surveys were analyzed. Descriptive analyses and analysis for mediating effects were conducted. Social support about LTPA from contacts on SNSs has indirect effect on intention through affective attitude, instrumental attitude, and perceived behavioral control (PBC). The results indicate that social support about LTPA from contacts on SNSs might not be effective to change students' intention unless attitudes and PBC are changed. Future interventions aiming to promote students' intention to participate in LTPA by increasing support from contacts on SNSs should increase affective attitude, instrumental attitude, and PBC at the same time.

  16. Common reduced spaces of representation applied to multispectral texture analysis in cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvo, Joris; Angulo, Jesus; Breugnot, Josselin; Borbes, Sylvie; Closs, Brigitte

    2016-03-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA) is a technique of multivariate data analysis widely used in various fields like biology, ecology or economy to reduce data dimensionality while retaining most important information. It is becoming a standard practice in multispectral/hyperspectral imaging since those multivariate data generally suffer from a high redundancy level. Nevertheless, by definition, PCA is meant to be applied to a single multispectral/hyperspectral image at a time. When several images have to be treated, running a PCA on each image would generate specific reduced spaces, which is not suitable for comparison between results. Thus, we focus on two PCA based algorithms that could define common reduced spaces of representation. The first method arises from literature and is computed with the barycenter covariance matrix. On the contrary, we designed the second algorithm with the idea of correcting standard PCA using permutations and inversions of eigenvectors. These dimensionality reduction methods are used within the context of a cosmetological study of a foundation make-up. Available data are in-vivo multispectral images of skin acquired on different volunteers in time series. The main purpose of this study is to characterize the make-up degradation especially in terms of texture analysis. Results have to be validate by statistical prediction of time since applying the product. PCA algorithms produce eigenimages that separately enhance skin components (pores, radiance, vessels...). From these eigenimages, we extract morphological texture descriptors and intent a time prediction. Accuracy of common reduced spaces outperform classical PCA one. In this paper, we detail how PCA is extended to the multiple groups case and explain what are the advantages of common reduced spaces when it comes to study several multispectral images.

  17. A new technique for fractal analysis applied to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic signals.

    PubMed

    Bullmore, E; Brammer, M; Alarcon, G; Binnie, C

    1992-11-09

    Application of a new method of fractal analysis to human, intracerebrally recorded, ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) signals is reported. 'Frameshift-Richardson' (FR) analysis involves estimation of fractal dimension (1 < FD < 2) of consecutive, overlapping 10-s epochs of digitised EEG data; it is suggested that this technique offers significant operational advantages over use of algorithms for FD estimation requiring preliminary reconstruction of EEG data in phase space. FR analysis was found to reduce substantially the volume of EEG data, without loss of diagnostically important information concerning onset, propagation and evolution of ictal EEG discharges. Arrhythmic EEG events were correlated with relatively increased FD; rhythmic EEG events with relatively decreased FD. It is proposed that development of this method may lead to: (i) enhanced definition and localisation of initial ictal changes in the EEG presumed due to multi-unit activity; and (ii) synoptic visualisation of long periods of EEG data.

  18. Value of Information Analysis Applied to the Economic Evaluation of Interventions Aimed at Reducing Juvenile Delinquency: An Illustration

    PubMed Central

    Eeren, Hester V.; Schawo, Saskia J.; Scholte, Ron H. J.; Busschbach, Jan J. V.; Hakkaart, Leona

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate whether a value of information analysis, commonly applied in health care evaluations, is feasible and meaningful in the field of crime prevention. Methods Interventions aimed at reducing juvenile delinquency are increasingly being evaluated according to their cost-effectiveness. Results of cost-effectiveness models are subject to uncertainty in their cost and effect estimates. Further research can reduce that parameter uncertainty. The value of such further research can be estimated using a value of information analysis, as illustrated in the current study. We built upon an earlier published cost-effectiveness model that demonstrated the comparison of two interventions aimed at reducing juvenile delinquency. Outcomes were presented as costs per criminal activity free year. Results At a societal willingness-to-pay of €71,700 per criminal activity free year, further research to eliminate parameter uncertainty was valued at €176 million. Therefore, in this illustrative analysis, the value of information analysis determined that society should be willing to spend a maximum of €176 million in reducing decision uncertainty in the cost-effectiveness of the two interventions. Moreover, the results suggest that reducing uncertainty in some specific model parameters might be more valuable than in others. Conclusions Using a value of information framework to assess the value of conducting further research in the field of crime prevention proved to be feasible. The results were meaningful and can be interpreted according to health care evaluation studies. This analysis can be helpful in justifying additional research funds to further inform the reimbursement decision in regard to interventions for juvenile delinquents. PMID:26146831

  19. NextGen Brain Microdialysis: Applying Modern Metabolomics Technology to the Analysis of Extracellular Fluid in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chi-Ya; Anderzhanova, Elmira; Asara, John M.; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Turck, Christoph W.

    2015-01-01

    Microdialysis is a powerful method for in vivo neurochemical analyses. It allows fluid sampling in a dynamic manner in specific brain regions over an extended period of time. A particular focus has been the neurochemical analysis of extracellular fluids to explore central nervous system functions. Brain microdialysis recovers neurotransmitters, low-molecular-weight neuromodulators and neuropeptides of special interest when studying behavior and drug effects. Other small molecules, such as central metabolites, are typically not assessed despite their potential to yield important information related to brain metabolism and activity in selected brain regions. We have implemented a liquid chromatography online mass spectrometry metabolomics platform for an expanded analysis of mouse brain microdialysates. The method is sensitive and delivers information for a far greater number of analytes than commonly used electrochemical and fluorescent detection or biochemical assays. The metabolomics platform was applied to the analysis of microdialysates in a foot shock-induced mouse model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The rich metabolite data information was then used to delineate affected prefrontal molecular pathways that reflect individual susceptibility for developing PTSD-like symptoms. We demonstrate that hypothesis-free metabolomics can be adapted to the analysis of microdialysates for the discovery of small molecules with functional significance. PMID:27602357

  20. Agriculture: Laws and Regulations that Apply to Your Agricultural Operation by Farm Activity

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A general description of EPA’s requirements applicable to agriculture, and should only be used as a guide. Since rules and regulations may change use this information is a starting place to determine which regulations apply to your agricultural operation.

  1. How High Is the Tramping Track? Mathematising and Applying in a Calculus Model-Eliciting Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Caroline; Dreyfus, Tommy; Thomas, Michael O. J.

    2010-01-01

    Two complementary processes involved in mathematical modelling are mathematising a realistic situation and applying a mathematical technique to a given realistic situation. We present and analyse work from two undergraduate students and two secondary school teachers who engaged in both processes during a mathematical modelling task that required…

  2. The Challenge of Finding Faculty Time for Applied Research Activities in Ontario Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenkrantz, Otte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how the role of Ontario college faculty has evolved since the advent of the Post-Secondary Education Choice and Excellence Act of 2000 and the Colleges of Applied Arts and Technology Act of 2002 in terms of whether or not the decision to create a research culture at the colleges included making time…

  3. UNCERT: geostatistics, uncertainty analysis and visualization software applied to groundwater flow and contaminant transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingle, William L.; Poeter, Eileen P.; McKenna, Sean A.

    1999-05-01

    UNCERT is a 2D and 3D geostatistics, uncertainty analysis and visualization software package applied to ground water flow and contaminant transport modeling. It is a collection of modules that provides tools for linear regression, univariate statistics, semivariogram analysis, inverse-distance gridding, trend-surface analysis, simple and ordinary kriging and discrete conditional indicator simulation. Graphical user interfaces for MODFLOW and MT3D, ground water flow and contaminant transport models, are provided for streamlined data input and result analysis. Visualization tools are included for displaying data input and output. These include, but are not limited to, 2D and 3D scatter plots, histograms, box and whisker plots, 2D contour maps, surface renderings of 2D gridded data and 3D views of gridded data. By design, UNCERT's graphical user interface and visualization tools facilitate model design and analysis. There are few built in restrictions on data set sizes and each module (with two exceptions) can be run in either graphical or batch mode. UNCERT is in the public domain and is available from the World Wide Web with complete on-line and printable (PDF) documentation. UNCERT is written in ANSI-C with a small amount of FORTRAN77, for UNIX workstations running X-Windows and Motif (or Lesstif). This article discusses the features of each module and demonstrates how they can be used individually and in combination. The tools are applicable to a wide range of fields and are currently used by researchers in the ground water, mining, mathematics, chemistry and geophysics, to name a few disciplines.

  4. Nonparametric functional data estimation applied to ozone data: prediction and extreme value analysis.

    PubMed

    Quintela-del-Río, Alejandro; Francisco-Fernández, Mario

    2011-02-01

    The study of extreme values and prediction of ozone data is an important topic of research when dealing with environmental problems. Classical extreme value theory is usually used in air-pollution studies. It consists in fitting a parametric generalised extreme value (GEV) distribution to a data set of extreme values, and using the estimated distribution to compute return levels and other quantities of interest. Here, we propose to estimate these values using nonparametric functional data methods. Functional data analysis is a relatively new statistical methodology that generally deals with data consisting of curves or multi-dimensional variables. In this paper, we use this technique, jointly with nonparametric curve estimation, to provide alternatives to the usual parametric statistical tools. The nonparametric estimators are applied to real samples of maximum ozone values obtained from several monitoring stations belonging to the Automatic Urban and Rural Network (AURN) in the UK. The results show that nonparametric estimators work satisfactorily, outperforming the behaviour of classical parametric estimators. Functional data analysis is also used to predict stratospheric ozone concentrations. We show an application, using the data set of mean monthly ozone concentrations in Arosa, Switzerland, and the results are compared with those obtained by classical time series (ARIMA) analysis.

  5. On the Formal-Logical Analysis of the Foundations of Mathematics Applied to Problems in Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalanov, Temur Z.

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of the foundations of mathematics applied to problems in physics was proposed. The unity of formal logic and of rational dialectics is methodological basis of the analysis. It is shown that critical analysis of the concept of mathematical quantity - central concept of mathematics - leads to the following conclusion: (1) The concept of ``mathematical quantity'' is the result of the following mental operations: (a) abstraction of the ``quantitative determinacy of physical quantity'' from the ``physical quantity'' at that the ``quantitative determinacy of physical quantity'' is an independent object of thought; (b) abstraction of the ``amount (i.e., abstract number)'' from the ``quantitative determinacy of physical quantity'' at that the ``amount (i.e., abstract number)'' is an independent object of thought. In this case, unnamed, abstract numbers are the only sign of the ``mathematical quantity''. This sign is not an essential sign of the material objects. (2) The concept of mathematical quantity is meaningless, erroneous, and inadmissible concept in science because it represents the following formal-logical and dialectical-materialistic error: negation of the existence of the essential sign of the concept (i.e., negation of the existence of the essence of the concept) and negation of the existence of measure of material object.

  6. Reflections of the social environment in chimpanzee memory: applying rational analysis beyond humans

    PubMed Central

    Marewski, Julian N.; Schooler, Lael J.; Gilby, Ian C.

    2016-01-01

    In cognitive science, the rational analysis framework allows modelling of how physical and social environments impose information-processing demands onto cognitive systems. In humans, for example, past social contact among individuals predicts their future contact with linear and power functions. These features of the human environment constrain the optimal way to remember information and probably shape how memory records are retained and retrieved. We offer a primer on how biologists can apply rational analysis to study animal behaviour. Using chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) as a case study, we modelled 19 years of observational data on their social contact patterns. Much like humans, the frequency of past encounters in chimpanzees linearly predicted future encounters, and the recency of past encounters predicted future encounters with a power function. Consistent with the rational analyses carried out for human memory, these findings suggest that chimpanzee memory performance should reflect those environmental regularities. In re-analysing existing chimpanzee memory data, we found that chimpanzee memory patterns mirrored their social contact patterns. Our findings hint that human and chimpanzee memory systems may have evolved to solve similar information-processing problems. Overall, rational analysis offers novel theoretical and methodological avenues for the comparative study of cognition. PMID:27853606

  7. Reflections of the social environment in chimpanzee memory: applying rational analysis beyond humans.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Jeffrey R; Marewski, Julian N; Schooler, Lael J; Gilby, Ian C

    2016-08-01

    In cognitive science, the rational analysis framework allows modelling of how physical and social environments impose information-processing demands onto cognitive systems. In humans, for example, past social contact among individuals predicts their future contact with linear and power functions. These features of the human environment constrain the optimal way to remember information and probably shape how memory records are retained and retrieved. We offer a primer on how biologists can apply rational analysis to study animal behaviour. Using chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) as a case study, we modelled 19 years of observational data on their social contact patterns. Much like humans, the frequency of past encounters in chimpanzees linearly predicted future encounters, and the recency of past encounters predicted future encounters with a power function. Consistent with the rational analyses carried out for human memory, these findings suggest that chimpanzee memory performance should reflect those environmental regularities. In re-analysing existing chimpanzee memory data, we found that chimpanzee memory patterns mirrored their social contact patterns. Our findings hint that human and chimpanzee memory systems may have evolved to solve similar information-processing problems. Overall, rational analysis offers novel theoretical and methodological avenues for the comparative study of cognition.

  8. Restricted Modal Analysis Applied to Internal Annular Combustor Autospectra and Cross-Spectra Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2007-01-01

    A treatment of the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a combustor as determined by two pressure time history measurements is developed herein. It is applied to a Pratt and Whitney PW4098 engine combustor over a range of operating conditions. For modes other than the plane wave the assumption is made that there are distinct frequency bands in which the individual modes, including the plane wave mode, overlap such that if circumferential mode m and circumferential mode m-1 are present then circumferential mode m-2 is not. In the analysis used herein at frequencies above the first cutoff mode frequency, only pairs of circumferential modes are individually present at each frequency. Consequently, this is a restricted modal analysis. As part of the analysis one specifies mode cut-on frequencies. This creates a set of frequencies that each mode spans. One finding was the successful use of the same modal span frequencies over a range of operating conditions for this particular engine. This suggests that for this case the cut-on frequencies are in proximity at each operating condition. Consequently, the combustion noise spectrum related to the circumferential modes might not change much with operating condition.

  9. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  10. A Proposal of "Applied Social Activities" Module for Undergraduate Program of Turkish Language and Literature Teachers: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarac, Cemal

    2011-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine the views on the contributions provided for the prospective teachers with the course of Applied Social Activities suggested to be in the undergraduate program of the Turkish Language and Literature Teaching. A qualitative research method was used in order to evaluate the views of prospective teachers about…

  11. 30 CFR 585.428 - What effect does applying for a renewal have on my activities and payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What effect does applying for a renewal have on my activities and payments? 585.428 Section 585.428 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES...

  12. 30 CFR 585.428 - What effect does applying for a renewal have on my activities and payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What effect does applying for a renewal have on my activities and payments? 585.428 Section 585.428 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ALTERNATE USES OF EXISTING FACILITIES...

  13. 30 CFR 285.428 - What effect does applying for a renewal have on my activities and payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What effect does applying for a renewal have on my activities and payments? 285.428 Section 285.428 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE RENEWABLE ENERGY ALTERNATE...

  14. 50 CFR 80.68 - What requirements apply to financing an activity from more than one annual apportionment?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... complete the project, it must recover any expended Federal funds that did not result in commensurate... FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE-WILDLIFE AND... apply to financing an activity from more than one annual apportionment? The following conditions...

  15. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply..., subparts A, B, H, J, K, M and R of this title, which implement the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning...

  16. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply..., subparts A, B, H, J, K, M and R of this title, which implement the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning...

  17. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply..., subparts A, B, H, J, K, M and R of this title, which implement the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning...

  18. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply..., subparts A, B, H, J, K, M and R of this title, which implement the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning...

  19. 24 CFR 1000.40 - Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply to affordable housing activities...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Do lead-based paint poisoning... AMERICAN HOUSING ACTIVITIES General § 1000.40 Do lead-based paint poisoning prevention requirements apply..., subparts A, B, H, J, K, M and R of this title, which implement the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning...

  20. 40 CFR 29.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 29.6 Section 29.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS...

  1. 40 CFR 29.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 29.6 Section 29.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS...

  2. 40 CFR 29.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 29.6 Section 29.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS...

  3. 40 CFR 29.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 29.6 Section 29.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS...

  4. 40 CFR 29.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 29.6 Section 29.6 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PROGRAMS...

  5. Two-Stage Hands-On Technology Activity to Develop Preservice Teachers' Competency in Applying Science and Mathematics Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Kuen-Yi; Williams, P. John

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the implementation of a two-stage hands-on technology learning activity, based on Dewey's learning experience theory that is designed to enhance preservice teachers' primary and secondary experiences in developing their competency to solve hands-on problems that apply science and mathematics concepts. The major conclusions…

  6. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  7. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  8. 45 CFR 660.6 - What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What procedures apply to the selection of programs and activities under these regulations? 660.6 Section 660.6 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION INTERGOVERNMENTAL REVIEW OF THE NATIONAL...

  9. Low-Rank and Sparsity Analysis Applied to Speech Enhancement Via Online Estimated Dictionary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Pengfei; Qin, Jun

    2016-12-01

    We propose an online estimated dictionary based single channel speech enhancement algorithm, which focuses on low rank and sparse matrix decomposition. In this proposed algorithm, a noisy speech spectral matrix is considered as the summation of low rank background noise components and an activation of the online speech dictionary, on which both low rank and sparsity constraints are imposed. This decomposition takes the advantage of local estimated dictionary high expressiveness on speech components. The local dictionary can be obtained through estimating the speech presence probability by applying Expectation Maximal algorithm, in which a generalized Gamma prior for speech magnitude spectrum is used. The evaluation results show that the proposed algorithm achieves significant improvements when compared to four other speech enhancement algorithms.

  10. O. Ivar lovaas: pioneer of applied behavior analysis and intervention for children with autism.

    PubMed

    Smith, Tristram; Eikeseth, Svein

    2011-03-01

    O. Ivar Lovaas (1927-2010) devoted nearly half a century to ground-breaking research and practice aimed at improving the lives of children with autism and their families. In the 1960s, he pioneered applied behavior analytic (ABA) interventions to decrease severe challenging behaviors and establish communicative language. Later, he sought to improve outcomes by emphasizing early intervention for preschoolers with autism, provided in family homes with active parental participation. His studies indicated that many children who received early intensive ABA made dramatic gains in development. Lovaas also disseminated ABA widely through intervention manuals, educational films, and public speaking. Moreover, as an enthusiastic teacher and devoted mentor, he inspired many students and colleagues to enter the field of ABA and autism intervention.

  11. Multimodel Bayesian analysis of data-worth applied to unsaturated fractured tuffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Dan; Ye, Ming; Neuman, Shlomo P.; Xue, Liang

    2012-01-01

    To manage water resource and environmental systems effectively requires suitable data. The worth of collecting such data depends on their potential benefit and cost, including the expected cost (risk) of failing to take an appropriate decision. Evaluating this risk calls for a probabilistic approach to data-worth assessment. Recently we [39] developed a multimodel approach to optimum value-of-information or data-worth analysis based on model averaging within a maximum likelihood Bayesian framework. Adopting a two-dimensional synthetic example, we implemented our approach using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with and without lead order approximations, finding that the former approach was almost equally accurate but computationally more efficient. Here we apply our methodology to pneumatic permeability data from vertical and inclined boreholes drilled into unsaturated fractured tuff near Superior, Arizona. In an attempt to improve computational efficiency, we introduce three new approximations that require less computational effort and compare results with those obtained by the original Monte Carlo method. The first approximation disregards uncertainty in model parameter estimates, the second does so for estimates of potential new data, and the third disregards both uncertainties. We find that only the first approximation yields reliable quantitative assessments of reductions in predictive uncertainty brought about by the collection of new data. We conclude that, whereas parameter uncertainty may sometimes be disregarded for purposes of analyzing data worth, the same does not generally apply to uncertainty in estimates of potential new data.

  12. Applying different independent component analysis algorithms and support vector regression for IT chain store sales forecasting.

    PubMed

    Dai, Wensheng; Wu, Jui-Yu; Lu, Chi-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Sales forecasting is one of the most important issues in managing information technology (IT) chain store sales since an IT chain store has many branches. Integrating feature extraction method and prediction tool, such as support vector regression (SVR), is a useful method for constructing an effective sales forecasting scheme. Independent component analysis (ICA) is a novel feature extraction technique and has been widely applied to deal with various forecasting problems. But, up to now, only the basic ICA method (i.e., temporal ICA model) was applied to sale forecasting problem. In this paper, we utilize three different ICA methods including spatial ICA (sICA), temporal ICA (tICA), and spatiotemporal ICA (stICA) to extract features from the sales data and compare their performance in sales forecasting of IT chain store. Experimental results from a real sales data show that the sales forecasting scheme by integrating stICA and SVR outperforms the comparison models in terms of forecasting error. The stICA is a promising tool for extracting effective features from branch sales data and the extracted features can improve the prediction performance of SVR for sales forecasting.

  13. School-Wide PBIS: Extending the Impact of Applied Behavior Analysis. Why is This Important to Behavior Analysts?

    PubMed

    Putnam, Robert F; Kincaid, Donald

    2015-05-01

    Horner and Sugai (2015) recently wrote a manuscript providing an overview of school-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports (PBIS) and why it is an example of applied behavior analysis at the scale of social importance. This paper will describe why school-wide PBIS is important to behavior analysts, how it helps promote applied behavior analysis in schools and other organizations, and how behavior analysts can use this framework to assist them in the promotion and implementation of applied behavior analysis at both at the school and organizational level, as well as, the classroom and individual level.

  14. Audio spectrum analysis of umbilical artery Doppler ultrasound signals applied to a clinical material.

    PubMed

    Thuring, Ann; Brännström, K Jonas; Jansson, Tomas; Maršál, Karel

    2014-12-01

    Analysis of umbilical artery flow velocity waveforms characterized by pulsatility index (PI) is used to evaluate fetoplacental circulation in high-risk pregnancies. However, an experienced sonographer may be able to further differentiate between various timbres of Doppler audio signals. Recently, we have developed a method for objective audio signal characterization; the method has been tested in an animal model. In the present pilot study, the method was for the first time applied to human pregnancies. Doppler umbilical artery velocimetry was performed in 13 preterm fetuses before and after two doses of 12 mg betamethasone. The auditory measure defined by the frequency band where the spectral energy had dropped 15 dB from its maximum level (MAXpeak-15 dB ), increased two days after betamethasone administration (p = 0.001) parallel with a less pronounced decrease in PI (p = 0.04). The new auditory parameter MAXpeak-15 dB reflected the changes more sensitively than the PI did.

  15. Applying machine learning techniques to DNA sequence analysis. Progress report, February 14, 1991--February 13, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Shavlik, J.W.

    1992-04-01

    We are developing a machine learning system that modifies existing knowledge about specific types of biological sequences. It does this by considering sample members and nonmembers of the sequence motif being learned. Using this information (which we call a ``domain theory``), our learning algorithm produces a more accurate representation of the knowledge needed to categorize future sequences. Specifically, the KBANN algorithm maps inference rules, such as consensus sequences, into a neural (connectionist) network. Neural network training techniques then use the training examples of refine these inference rules. We have been applying this approach to several problems in DNA sequence analysis and have also been extending the capabilities of our learning system along several dimensions.

  16. Methods of economic analysis applied to fusion research. Fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Hazelrigg, Jr, G A

    1980-12-31

    The current study reported here has involved three separate tasks. The first task deals with the development of expected utility analysis techniques for economic evaluation of fusion research. A decision analytic model is developed for the incorporation of market uncertainties, as well as technological uncertainties in an economic evaluation of long-range energy research. The model is applied to the case of fusion research. The second task deals with the potential effects of long-range energy RD and D on fossil fuel prices. ECON's previous fossil fuel price model is extended to incorporate a dynamic demand function. The dynamic demand function supports price fluctuations such as those observed in the marketplace. The third task examines alternative uses of fusion technologies, specifically superconducting technologies and first wall materials to determine the potential for alternative, nonfusion use of these technologies. In both cases, numerous alternative uses are found.

  17. Applying high resolution SyXRD analysis on sulfate attacked concrete field samples

    SciTech Connect

    Stroh, J.; Schlegel, M.-C.; Irassar, E.F.; Meng, B.; Emmerling, F.

    2014-12-15

    High resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SyXRD) was applied for a microstructural profile analysis of concrete deterioration after sulfate attack. The cement matrices consist of ordinary Portland cement and different amounts of supplementary cementitious materials, such as fly ash, natural pozzolana and granulated blast furnace slag. The changes of the phase composition were determined along the direction of sulfate ingress. This approach allows the identification of reaction fronts and zones of different phase compositions and conclusions about the mechanisms of sulfate attack. Two reaction fronts were localized in the initial 4 mm from the sample surface. The mechanism of deterioration caused by the exposition in the sulfate-bearing soil is discussed. SyXRD is shown to be a reliable method for investigation of cementitious materials with aggregates embedded in natural environments.

  18. A Cost-Benefit Analysis Applied to Example Proposals for Army Training and Education Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    Benefi t Analysis Applied to Example Proposals for Army Training and Education Research I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S Approved...license under the clause at DFARS 252.227-7013 (NOV 95). I N S T I T U T E F O R D E F E N S E A N A L Y S E S IDA Document D-3469 John E. Morrison...Technology (DUSD ( S &T)). The operational need for the work was identified by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC). Dr. John E. Morrison was

  19. Applied behavior analysis programs for autism: sibling psychosocial adjustment during and following intervention use.

    PubMed

    Cebula, Katie R

    2012-05-01

    Psychosocial adjustment in siblings of children with autism whose families were using a home-based, applied behavior analysis (ABA) program was compared to that of siblings in families who were not using any intensive autism intervention. Data gathered from parents, siblings and teachers indicated that siblings in ABA families experienced neither significant drawbacks nor benefits in terms of their behavioral adjustment, sibling relationship quality and self-concept compared to control group siblings, either during or following intervention use. Parents and siblings perceived improvements in sibling interaction since the outset of ABA, with parents somewhat more positive in their views than were siblings. Social support was associated with better sibling outcomes in all groups. Implications for supporting families using ABA are considered.

  20. Sustaining Comprehensive Physical Activity Practice in Elementary School: A Case Study Applying Mixed Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tjomsland, Hege Eikland

    2010-01-01

    This study examines an elementary school which during enrollment in the European Network of Health Promoting Schools, 1993-2003, and the Norwegian Physical Activity and Healthy Meals Project, 2004-2006, selected physical activity (PA) as a prioritized area. Survey data, school documents, and focus group data were collected and analyzed through a…

  1. Applying Active Learning at the Graduate Level: Merger Issues at Newco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Bruce K.

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that active learning can benefit students in public relations and integrated communication courses at the graduate level. Describes how three active learning approaches--research and field work, student accountabilities for learning, and student reflection and reflexive exercises--were used in a graduate class project to help a Fortune 50…

  2. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen’s temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home. PMID:26007738

  3. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-05-21

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen's temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home.

  4. Brief Report: The Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Physical Activity in Young People Who Smoke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everson, Emma S.; Daley, Amanda J.; Ussher, Michael

    2007-01-01

    It has been hypothesised that physical activity may be useful as a smoking cessation intervention for young adults. In order to inform such interventions, this study evaluated the theory of planned behaviour (TPB) for understanding physical activity behaviour in young smokers. Regular smokers aged 16-19 years (N=124), self-reported physical…

  5. Using magnets and magnetic beads to dissect signaling pathways activated by mechanical tension applied to cells.

    PubMed

    Marjoram, R J; Guilluy, C; Burridge, K

    2016-02-01

    Cellular tension has implications in normal biology and pathology. Membrane adhesion receptors serve as conduits for mechanotransduction that lead to cellular responses. Ligand-conjugated magnetic beads are a useful tool in the study of how cells sense and respond to tension. Here we detail methods for their use in applying tension to cells and strategies for analyzing the results. We demonstrate the methods by analyzing mechanotransduction through VE-cadherin on endothelial cells using both permanent magnets and magnetic tweezers.

  6. Success Factors of European Syndromic Surveillance Systems: A Worked Example of Applying Qualitative Comparative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ziemann, Alexandra; Fouillet, Anne; Brand, Helmut; Krafft, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Syndromic surveillance aims at augmenting traditional public health surveillance with timely information. To gain a head start, it mainly analyses existing data such as from web searches or patient records. Despite the setup of many syndromic surveillance systems, there is still much doubt about the benefit of the approach. There are diverse interactions between performance indicators such as timeliness and various system characteristics. This makes the performance assessment of syndromic surveillance systems a complex endeavour. We assessed if the comparison of several syndromic surveillance systems through Qualitative Comparative Analysis helps to evaluate performance and identify key success factors. Materials and Methods We compiled case-based, mixed data on performance and characteristics of 19 syndromic surveillance systems in Europe from scientific and grey literature and from site visits. We identified success factors by applying crisp-set Qualitative Comparative Analysis. We focused on two main areas of syndromic surveillance application: seasonal influenza surveillance and situational awareness during different types of potentially health threatening events. Results We found that syndromic surveillance systems might detect the onset or peak of seasonal influenza earlier if they analyse non-clinical data sources. Timely situational awareness during different types of events is supported by an automated syndromic surveillance system capable of analysing multiple syndromes. To our surprise, the analysis of multiple data sources was no key success factor for situational awareness. Conclusions We suggest to consider these key success factors when designing or further developing syndromic surveillance systems. Qualitative Comparative Analysis helped interpreting complex, mixed data on small-N cases and resulted in concrete and practically relevant findings. PMID:27182731

  7. Applying active learning to assertion classification of concepts in clinical text.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yukun; Mani, Subramani; Xu, Hua

    2012-04-01

    Supervised machine learning methods for clinical natural language processing (NLP) research require a large number of annotated samples, which are very expensive to build because of the involvement of physicians. Active learning, an approach that actively samples from a large pool, provides an alternative solution. Its major goal in classification is to reduce the annotation effort while maintaining the quality of the predictive model. However, few studies have investigated its uses in clinical NLP. This paper reports an application of active learning to a clinical text classification task: to determine the assertion status of clinical concepts. The annotated corpus for the assertion classification task in the 2010 i2b2/VA Clinical NLP Challenge was used in this study. We implemented several existing and newly developed active learning algorithms and assessed their uses. The outcome is reported in the global ALC score, based on the Area under the average Learning Curve of the AUC (Area Under the Curve) score. Results showed that when the same number of annotated samples was used, active learning strategies could generate better classification models (best ALC-0.7715) than the passive learning method (random sampling) (ALC-0.7411). Moreover, to achieve the same classification performance, active learning strategies required fewer samples than the random sampling method. For example, to achieve an AUC of 0.79, the random sampling method used 32 samples, while our best active learning algorithm required only 12 samples, a reduction of 62.5% in manual annotation effort.

  8. Physical activity and sedentary behaviour: applying lessons to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hill, K; Gardiner, P A; Cavalheri, V; Jenkins, S C; Healy, G N

    2015-05-01

    In health and disease, the benefits of regular participation in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity are well documented. However, individuals with chronic conditions, such as those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), typically do very little activity at a moderate or vigorous intensity. Much of their day is instead spent in sedentary behaviour, such as sitting or reclining, which requires very little energy expenditure. This high level of time spent in sedentary behaviour can have serious health consequences, including increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and premature mortality. There is emerging evidence to suggest that participation in light intensity physical activities (e.g. standing or slow walking) may have benefits for cardio-metabolic health. Given the low aerobic capacity of individuals with moderate to severe COPD, increasing light intensity activity (through reducing sedentary time) may be a feasible additional strategy to improve health in this population, alongside traditional recommendations to increase the time spent in moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity. This review provides an overview of physical activity and sedentary behaviour, with a particular emphasis on these behaviours for people with COPD. It provides suggestions for the measurement of these behaviours within the clinical setting, as well as for interventions that may be effective at increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviour in this population.

  9. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Applied QSAR with Quantum Chemical Descriptors for Predicting Radical Scavenging Activities of Carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Jhin, Changho; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-01-01

    One of the physiological characteristics of carotenoids is their radical scavenging activity. In this study, the relationship between radical scavenging activities and quantum chemical descriptors of carotenoids was determined. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) applied quantitative structure-activity relationship models (QSAR) were also developed for predicting and comparing radical scavenging activities of carotenoids. Semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 quantum chemical calculations were done by MOPAC. Ionisation energies of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids and the product of chemical potentials of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids were significantly correlated with the radical scavenging activities, and consequently these descriptors were used as independent variables for the QSAR study. The ANFIS applied QSAR models were developed with two triangular-shaped input membership functions made for each of the independent variables and optimised by a backpropagation method. High prediction efficiencies were achieved by the ANFIS applied QSAR. The R-square values of the developed QSAR models with the variables calculated by PM6 and PM7 methods were 0.921 and 0.902, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated reliabilities of the selected quantum chemical descriptors and the significance of QSAR models.

  10. Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System Applied QSAR with Quantum Chemical Descriptors for Predicting Radical Scavenging Activities of Carotenoids

    PubMed Central

    Jhin, Changho; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2015-01-01

    One of the physiological characteristics of carotenoids is their radical scavenging activity. In this study, the relationship between radical scavenging activities and quantum chemical descriptors of carotenoids was determined. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) applied quantitative structure-activity relationship models (QSAR) were also developed for predicting and comparing radical scavenging activities of carotenoids. Semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 quantum chemical calculations were done by MOPAC. Ionisation energies of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids and the product of chemical potentials of neutral and monovalent cationic carotenoids were significantly correlated with the radical scavenging activities, and consequently these descriptors were used as independent variables for the QSAR study. The ANFIS applied QSAR models were developed with two triangular-shaped input membership functions made for each of the independent variables and optimised by a backpropagation method. High prediction efficiencies were achieved by the ANFIS applied QSAR. The R-square values of the developed QSAR models with the variables calculated by PM6 and PM7 methods were 0.921 and 0.902, respectively. The results of this study demonstrated reliabilities of the selected quantum chemical descriptors and the significance of QSAR models. PMID:26474167

  11. Soil microbial activity is affected by Roundup WeatherMax and pesticides applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Lancaster, Sarah H; Haney, Richard L; Senseman, Scott A; Hons, Frank M; Chandler, James M

    2006-09-20

    Adoption of glyphosate-based weed control systems has led to increased use of the herbicide with continued use of additional pesticides. Combinations of pesticides may affect soil microbial activity differently than pesticides applied alone. Research was conducted to evaluate the influence of glyphosate-based cotton pest management systems on soil microbial activity. Soil was treated with commercial formulations of trifluralin, aldicarb, and mefenoxam + pentachloronitrobenzene (PCNB) with or without glyphosate (applied as Roundup WeatherMax). The soil microbial activity was measured by quantifying C and N mineralization. Soil microbial biomass was determined using the chloroform fumigation-incubation method. Soils treated with glyphosate alone exhibited greater cumulative C mineralization 30 days after treatment than all other treatments, which were similar to the untreated control. The addition of Roundup WeatherMax reduced C mineralization in soils treated with fluometuron, aldicarb, or mefenoxam + PCNB formulations. These results indicate that glyphosate-based herbicides alter the soil microbial response to other pesticides.

  12. The elastic modulus correction term in creep activation energies Applied to oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malu, M.; Tien, J. K.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of elastic modulus and the temperature dependence of elastic modulus on creep activation energies for an oxide dispersion strengthened nickel-base superalloy are investigated. This superalloy is commercially known as Inconel Alloy MA 753, strengthened both by gamma-prime precipitates and by yttria particles. It is shown that at intermediate temperatures, say below 1500 F, where elastic modulus is weakly dependent on temperature, the modulus correction term to creep activation energy is small. Accordingly, modulus corrections are insignificant for the superalloy considered, which shows high apparent creep activation energies at this temperature. On the contrary, at very high temperatures, the elastic modulus correction term can be significant, thus reducing the creep activation energy to that of vacancy self-diffusion. In order to obtain high-temperature creep resistance, a high-value elastic modulus with a weak dependence on temperature is required.

  13. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Activities to Which This Subpart Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Civil Rights Act of 1964 Pt. 900, Subpt. D, App. A Appendix A to Subpart D of Part 900—Activities to... (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERGOVERNMENTAL PERSONNEL ACT PROGRAMS...

  14. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Activities to Which This Subpart Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Civil Rights Act of 1964 Pt. 900, Subpt. D, App. A Appendix A to Subpart D of Part 900—Activities to... (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERGOVERNMENTAL PERSONNEL ACT PROGRAMS...

  15. 5 CFR Appendix A to Subpart D of... - Activities to Which This Subpart Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Civil Rights Act of 1964 Pt. 900, Subpt. D, App. A Appendix A to Subpart D of Part 900—Activities to... (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) INTERGOVERNMENTAL PERSONNEL ACT PROGRAMS...

  16. Applying Socioecological Model to Improve Women’s Physical Activity: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Hadi; Majlessi, Fershteh; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Sadeghi, Roya; Hasani Kabootarkhani, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Background: A sedentary life without sufficient physical activity is recognized as a risk factor for various diseases, and a major modifiable risk factor for noncommunicable diseases. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of intervention using socioecological model in promoting women’s physical activity in the city of Kerman, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double-blinded, controlled study, 360 women were studied at health and medical centers of Kerman. This educational intervention was based on socioecological model and conducted on 4 levels of personal, social, organizational, and political. Data collection tool included a researcher-made questionnaire based on constructs of socioecological model and the international physical activity inventory. Results: The results indicated insignificant differences between the two groups in terms of perceived social, physical, and political support and also with regard to level of physical activity before intervention. However after the intervention and according to independent t test, significant differences were observed between two groups in perceived social, physical, and political support and also level of physical activity (P < 0.001). Furthermore, mean values of the above terms increased in the intervention group. Conclusions: According to the results, interventions based on socioecological model can positively affect women’s physical activity. PMID:27247781

  17. A study and evaluation of image analysis techniques applied to remotely sensed data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, R. J.; Dasarathy, B. V.; Lybanon, M.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of phenomena causing nonlinearities in the transformation from Landsat multispectral scanner coordinates to ground coordinates is presented. Experimental results comparing rms errors at ground control points indicated a slight improvement when a nonlinear (8-parameter) transformation was used instead of an affine (6-parameter) transformation. Using a preliminary ground truth map of a test site in Alabama covering the Mobile Bay area and six Landsat images of the same scene, several classification methods were assessed. A methodology was developed for automatic change detection using classification/cluster maps. A coding scheme was employed for generation of change depiction maps indicating specific types of changes. Inter- and intraseasonal data of the Mobile Bay test area were compared to illustrate the method. A beginning was made in the study of data compression by applying a Karhunen-Loeve transform technique to a small section of the test data set. The second part of the report provides a formal documentation of the several programs developed for the analysis and assessments presented.

  18. The clinical utility of force/displacement analysis of muscle testing in applied kinesiology.

    PubMed

    Caruso, W; Leisman, G

    2001-01-01

    Manual muscle testing procedures are the subject of a force and displacement analysis. Equipment was fabricated, tested, and employed to gather force, displacement, and time data for examining muscle test parameters as practiced by applied kinesiology (A.K.) clinicians. Simple mathematical procedures are used to process the data in an effort to find potential patterns of force and displacement which would correspond to the testing of strong and weak muscles on healthy subjects. Particular attention is paid to the leading edge of the force pulses, as most clinicians report that they derive most of their assessment from the initial thrust imparted on the patient's limb. An analysis of the simple linear regression of the slope of the leading edge of a force pulse reveals that a high dx/dF is indicative of a weak muscle test result (as perceived by the tester), and a low dx/dF is indicative of a strong muscle test. Thresholds for dx/dF are determined to discriminate between inhibited and facilitated muscle test results. The data lay the groundwork for future studies that examine the objectivity of A.K. muscle testing.

  19. An Appraisal of Social Network Theory and Analysis as Applied to Public Health: Challenges and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Valente, Thomas W; Pitts, Stephanie R

    2016-12-15

    The use of social network theory and analysis methods as applied to public health has expanded greatly in the past decade, yielding a significant academic literature that spans almost every conceivable health issue. This review identifies several important theoretical challenges that confront the field but also provides opportunities for new research. These challenges include (a) measuring network influences, (b) identifying appropriate influence mechanisms, (c) the impact of social media and computerized communications, (d) the role of networks in evaluating public health interventions, and (e) ethics. Next steps for the field are outlined and the need for funding is emphasized. Recently developed network analysis techniques, technological innovations in communication, and changes in theoretical perspectives to include a focus on social and environmental behavioral influences have created opportunities for new theory and ever broader application of social networks to public health topics. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Public Health Volume 38 is March 20, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  20. Restricted Acoustic Modal Analysis Applied to Internal Combustor Spectra and Cross-Spectra Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2006-01-01

    A treatment of the modal decomposition of the pressure field in a combustor as determined by two Kulite pressure measurements is developed herein. It is applied to a Pratt & Whitney PW4098 engine combustor over a range of operating conditions. For modes other than the plane wave the new part of the treatment is the assumption that there are distinct frequency bands in which the individual modes, including the plane wave mode, overlap such that if circumferential mode m and circumferential mode m-1 are present than circumferential mode m 2 is not. Consequently, in the analysis used herein at frequencies above the first cut-off mode frequency, only pairs of circumferential modes are individually present at each frequency. Consequently, this is a restricted modal analysis. A new result is that the successful use of the same modal span frequencies over a range of operating conditions for this particular engine suggests that the temperature, T, and the velocity, v, of the flow at each operating condition are related by c(sup 2)-v(sup 2) = a constant where c is the speed of sound.

  1. Acquaintance Rape: Applying Crime Scene Analysis to the Prediction of Sexual Recidivism.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Robert J B; Goodwill, Alasdair M; Hanson, R Karl; Dahle, Klaus-Peter

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the current study was to enhance the assessment and predictive accuracy of risk assessments for sexual offenders by utilizing detailed crime scene analysis (CSA). CSA was conducted on a sample of 247 male acquaintance rapists from Berlin (Germany) using a nonmetric, multidimensional scaling (MDS) Behavioral Thematic Analysis (BTA) approach. The age of the offenders at the time of the index offense ranged from 14 to 64 years (M = 32.3; SD = 11.4). The BTA procedure revealed three behavioral themes of hostility, criminality, and pseudo-intimacy, consistent with previous CSA research on stranger rape. The construct validity of the three themes was demonstrated through correlational analyses with known sexual offending measures and criminal histories. The themes of hostility and pseudo-intimacy were significant predictors of sexual recidivism. In addition, the pseudo-intimacy theme led to a significant increase in the incremental validity of the Static-99 actuarial risk assessment instrument for the prediction of sexual recidivism. The results indicate the potential utility and validity of crime scene behaviors in the applied risk assessment of sexual offenders.

  2. A natural flow wing design employing 3-D nonlinear analysis applied at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Steven X. S.; Wood, Richard M.; Brown, S. Melissa

    1989-01-01

    A wing-design study has been conducted on a 65-deg-swept leading-edge delta wing in which a near-conical geometry was employed to take advantage of the naturally occurring conical flow which arises over such a wing in a supersonic flow field. Three-dimensional nonlinear analysis methods were used in the study. In preliminary design, wing planform, design conditions, and near-conical concept were derived and a baseline standard wing (conventional airfoil distribution) and a baseline near-conical wing were chosen. During the initial analysis, a full-potential solver was employed to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of the baseline standard delta wing and the near-conical delta wing. Modifications due to airfoil thickness, leading-edge radius, and camber were then applied to the baseline near-conical wing. The final design employed a Euler solver to analyze the best wing configurations found in the initial design, and to extend this study to develop a more refined wing. Benefits due to each modification are discussed, and a final natural flow wing geometry is chosen and its aerodynamic characteristics are compared with the baseline wings.

  3. Synthesis of semantic modelling and risk analysis methodology applied to animal welfare.

    PubMed

    Bracke, M B M; Edwards, S A; Metz, J H M; Noordhuizen, J P T M; Algers, B

    2008-07-01

    Decision-making on animal welfare issues requires a synthesis of information. For the assessment of farm animal welfare based on scientific information collected in a database, a methodology called 'semantic modelling' has been developed. To date, however, this methodology has not been generally applied. Recently, a qualitative Risk Assessment approach has been published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) for the first time, concerning the welfare of intensively reared calves. This paper reports on a critical analysis of this Risk Assessment (RA) approach from a semantic-modelling (SM) perspective, emphasizing the importance of several seemingly self-evident principles, including the definition of concepts, application of explicit methodological procedures and specification of how underlying values and scientific information lead to the RA output. In addition, the need to include positive aspects of welfare and overall welfare assessments are emphasized. The analysis shows that the RA approach for animal welfare could benefit from SM methodology to support transparent and science-based decision-making.

  4. Selection of clinical features for pattern recognition applied to gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Altilio, Rosa; Paoloni, Marco; Panella, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    This paper deals with the opportunity of extracting useful information from medical data retrieved directly from a stereophotogrammetric system applied to gait analysis. A feature selection method to exhaustively evaluate all the possible combinations of the gait parameters is presented, in order to find the best subset able to classify among diseased and healthy subjects. This procedure will be used for estimating the performance of widely used classification algorithms, whose performance has been ascertained in many real-world problems with respect to well-known classification benchmarks, both in terms of number of selected features and classification accuracy. Precisely, support vector machine, Naive Bayes and K nearest neighbor classifiers can obtain the lowest classification error, with an accuracy greater than 97 %. For the considered classification problem, the whole set of features will be proved to be redundant and it can be significantly pruned. Namely, groups of 3 or 5 features only are able to preserve high accuracy when the aim is to check the anomaly of a gait. The step length and the swing speed are the most informative features for the gait analysis, but also cadence and stride may add useful information for the movement evaluation.

  5. Propensity score applied to survival data analysis through proportional hazards models: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Gayat, Etienne; Resche-Rigon, Matthieu; Mary, Jean-Yves; Porcher, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    Propensity score methods are increasingly used in medical literature to estimate treatment effect using data from observational studies. Despite many papers on propensity score analysis, few have focused on the analysis of survival data. Even within the framework of the popular proportional hazard model, the choice among marginal, stratified or adjusted models remains unclear. A Monte Carlo simulation study was used to compare the performance of several survival models to estimate both marginal and conditional treatment effects. The impact of accounting or not for pairing when analysing propensity-score-matched survival data was assessed. In addition, the influence of unmeasured confounders was investigated. After matching on the propensity score, both marginal and conditional treatment effects could be reliably estimated. Ignoring the paired structure of the data led to an increased test size due to an overestimated variance of the treatment effect. Among the various survival models considered, stratified models systematically showed poorer performance. Omitting a covariate in the propensity score model led to a biased estimation of treatment effect, but replacement of the unmeasured confounder by a correlated one allowed a marked decrease in this bias. Our study showed that propensity scores applied to survival data can lead to unbiased estimation of both marginal and conditional treatment effect, when marginal and adjusted Cox models are used. In all cases, it is necessary to account for pairing when analysing propensity-score-matched data, using a robust estimator of the variance.

  6. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April, 1986 through September 30, 1986 is summarized.

  7. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    This report summarizes research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period April l, 1988 through September 30, 1988.

  8. Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computer science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Research conducted at the Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering in applied mathematics, numerical analysis, and computer science during the period October 1, 1986 through March 31, 1987 is summarized.

  9. Modern Optimal Control Methods Applied in Active Control of a Tetrahedron.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-01

    1 -4 44 1111 -tW, -- Sw- op VNI V 9 Z4 1 M , Nt m 211 W- 7 NZE W17 gn Y 1 ;z" N, A Y.7 4", r6 19...TOSFEB 1 0 1981 -~j 0"?TO EHD t APPLIED IN CTIVE 9ONTROL OFA TETRAHEDRON. THESIS AFIT/GA/A/8OP2"-Alan x /Janiszewski Approved for public release... 1 II. System Model......................5 General Configuration ................ Equations of Motion ................... 10 Modal

  10. Quadratic Time-Frequency Analysis of Hydroacoustic Signals as Applied to Acoustic Emissions of Large Whales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bras, Ronan; Victor, Sucic; Damir, Malnar; Götz, Bokelmann

    2014-05-01

    In order to enrich the set of attributes in setting up a large database of whale signals, as envisioned in the Baleakanta project, we investigate methods of time-frequency analysis. The purpose of establishing the database is to increase and refine knowledge of the emitted signal and of its propagation characteristics, leading to a better understanding of the animal migrations in a non-invasive manner and to characterize acoustic propagation in oceanic media. The higher resolution for signal extraction and a better separation from other signals and noise will be used for various purposes, including improved signal detection and individual animal identification. The quadratic class of time-frequency distributions (TFDs) is the most popular set of time-frequency tools for analysis and processing of non-stationary signals. Two best known and most studied members of this class are the spectrogram and the Wigner-Ville distribution. However, to be used efficiently, i.e. to have highly concentrated signal components while significantly suppressing interference and noise simultaneously, TFDs need to be optimized first. The optimization method used in this paper is based on the Cross-Wigner-Ville distribution, and unlike similar approaches it does not require prior information on the analysed signal. The method is applied to whale signals, which, just like the majority of other real-life signals, can generally be classified as multicomponent non-stationary signals, and hence time-frequency techniques are a natural choice for their representation, analysis, and processing. We present processed data from a set containing hundreds of individual calls. The TFD optimization method results into a high resolution time-frequency representation of the signals. It allows for a simple extraction of signal components from the TFD's dominant ridges. The local peaks of those ridges can then be used for the signal components instantaneous frequency estimation, which in turn can be used as

  11. Descriptor-Based Analysis Applied to HCN Synthesis from NH3 and CH4

    SciTech Connect

    Grabow, L

    2011-08-18

    The design of solid metal catalysts using theoretical methods has been a long-standing goal in heterogeneous catalysis. Recent developments in methodology and computer technology as well as the establishment of a descriptor-based approach for the analysis of reaction mechanisms and trends across the periodic table allow for the fast screening for new catalytic materials and have lead to first examples of computational discoveries of new materials. The underlying principles of the descriptor-based approach are the existence of relations between the surface electronic structure, adsorption energies and activation barriers that result in volcano-shaped activity plots as function of simple descriptors, such as atomic binding energies or the d-band center. Linear scaling relations have been established between the adsorption energies of hydrogen-containing molecules such as CH{sub x}, NH{sub x}, OH{sub x} and SH{sub x} and the C, N O and S adsorption energies on transition-metal surfaces. Transition-state energies have also been shown to scale linearly with adsorption energies in a similar fashion. Recently, a single transition state scaling relation has been identified for a large number of C-C, C-O, C-N, N-O, N-N, and O-O coupling reactions. The scaling relations provide a powerful tool for the investigation of reaction mechanisms and the prediction of potential energy surfaces. They limit the number of independent variables to a few, typically adsorption energies of key atoms. Using this information as input to a microkinetic model provides an understanding of trends in catalytic activity across the transition metals. In most cases a volcano-shaped relation between activity and the key variables, the descriptors, is observed. In the present paper we will provide an example of the approach outlined above and show how one can obtain an understanding of activity/selectivity trends of a reaction with just a few new calculations.

  12. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.

  13. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; ...

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimizationmore » problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.« less

  14. Applying a Wearable Voice-Activated Computer to Instructional Applications in Clean Room Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Corey A.; Lupisella, Mark L.

    2004-01-01

    The use of wearable computing technology in restrictive environments related to space applications offers promise in a number of domains. The clean room environment is one such domain in which hands-free, heads-up, wearable computing is particularly attractive for education and training because of the nature of clean room work We have developed and tested a Wearable Voice-Activated Computing (WEVAC) system based on clean room applications. Results of this initial proof-of-concept work indicate that there is a strong potential for WEVAC to enhance clean room activities.

  15. Multiobjective optimization in a pseudometric objective space as applied to a general model of business activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachaturov, R. V.

    2016-09-01

    It is shown that finding the equivalence set for solving multiobjective discrete optimization problems is advantageous over finding the set of Pareto optimal decisions. An example of a set of key parameters characterizing the economic efficiency of a commercial firm is proposed, and a mathematical model of its activities is constructed. In contrast to the classical problem of finding the maximum profit for any business, this study deals with a multiobjective optimization problem. A method for solving inverse multiobjective problems in a multidimensional pseudometric space is proposed for finding the best project of firm's activities. The solution of a particular problem of this type is presented.

  16. Applying gap analysis and a comparison index to evaluate protected areas in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Trisurat, Yongyut

    2007-02-01

    Protected areas in Thailand were first established 40 years ago. The total area of existing protected areas covers 18.2% of the country's land area and the Class 1 Watershed, another form of protection, encompasses 18.1%. The government of Thailand intends to increase protected area systems to 25% of the country in 2006 and 30% in 2016. There are always questions arising about how much is enough protected areas to effectively protect biodiversity. The objective of this article is to assess the representation of ecosystems in the protected area network. This article also recommends which underrepresented ecosystems should be added to fill the gaps in representativeness. The research applies a gap analysis and a comparison index to assess the representation of ecosystems within the protected area network. The spatial analyses were applied to measure three aspects of representativeness, namely forest type, altitude, and natural land system. The analyses indicate that the existing protected area system covers 24.4% of the country's land area, nearly meeting the 25% target proposed by the National Forest Policy; and 83.8% of these areas are under forest cover. Most protected areas are situated in high altitudes, where biological diversity is less than in lowlands. Mangrove forest and riparian floodplain are extremely underrepresented in the existing system. Peat swamp forest, dry dipterocarp forest, and beach forest are relatively well represented. In addition, these five ecosystems are threatened by human pressures and natural disasters; therefore, they should be targeted as high priorities for the selection of new reserves. Future research should incorporate aquatic and marine ecosystems, as well as animal distributions, which were not included in this research due to data unavailabilities.

  17. Applying Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA) to Event-related Potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Ankoor S.; Knuth, Kevin H.; Lakatos, Peter; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2004-04-01

    Event-related potentials (ERPs) generated in response to multiple presentations of the same sensory stimulus vary from trial to trial. Accumulating evidence suggests that this variability relates to a similar trial-to-trial variation in the perception of the stimulus. In order to understand this variability, we previously developed differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA) as a method for defining dynamical components that contribute to the ERP. The underlying model asserted that: (i) multiple components comprise the ERP; (ii) these components vary in amplitude and latency from trial to trial; and (iii) these components may co-vary. A Bayesian framework was used to derive maximum a posteriori solutions to estimate these components and their latency and amplitude variability. Our original goal in developing dVCA was to produce a method for automated estimation of components in ERPs. However, we discovered that it is better to apply the algorithm in stages because of the complexity of the ERP and to use the results to define interesting subsets of the data, which are further analyzed independently. This paper describes this method and illustrates its application to actual neural signals recorded in response to a visual stimulus. Interestingly, dVCA of these data suggests two distinct response modes (or states) with differing components and variability. Furthermore, analyses of residual signals obtained by subtracting the estimated components from the actual data illustrate gamma-frequency (circa 40 Hz) oscillations, which may underlie communication between various brain regions. These findings demonstrate the power of dVCA and underscore the necessity to apply this algorithm in a guided rather than a ballistic fashion. Furthermore, they highlight the need to examine the residual signals for those features of the signals that were not anticipated and not modeled in the derivation of the algorithm.

  18. Multiple Intelligences and Positive Life Habits: 174 Activities for Applying Them in Your Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beachner, Lynne; Pickett, Anola

    This book offers teachers a toolbox for discovering the innate strengths and talents and the unique learning styles of each student. Drawing from Howard Gardner's work on multiple intelligences, the book offers more than a dozen activities specifically tailored to each of the eight multiple intelligences: verbal/linguistic, mathematical/logical,…

  19. High throughput, quantitative analysis of human osteoclast differentiation and activity.

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Nowell, Cameron J; Rueda, Patricia; Henriksen, Kim; Pierce, Tracie; Cook, Anna E; Pastoureau, Philippe; Sabatini, Massimo; Charman, William N; Christopoulos, Arthur; Summers, Roger J; Sexton, Patrick M; Langmead, Christopher J

    2017-02-15

    Osteoclasts are multinuclear cells that degrade bone under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Osteoclasts are therefore a major target of osteoporosis therapeutics aimed at preserving bone. Consequently, analytical methods for osteoclast activity are useful for the development of novel biomarkers and/or pharmacological agents for the treatment of osteoporosis. The nucleation state of an osteoclast is indicative of its maturation and activity. To date, activity is routinely measured at the population level with only approximate consideration of the nucleation state (an 'osteoclast population' is typically defined as cells with ≥3 nuclei). Using a fluorescent substrate for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), a routinely used marker of osteoclast activity, we developed a multi-labelled imaging method for quantitative measurement of osteoclast TRAP activity at the single cell level. Automated image analysis enables interrogation of large osteoclast populations in a high throughput manner using open source software. Using this methodology, we investigated the effects of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) on osteoclast maturation and activity and demonstrated that TRAP activity directly correlates with osteoclast maturity (i.e. nuclei number). This method can be applied to high throughput screening of osteoclast-targeting compounds to determine changes in maturation and activity.

  20. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  1. Content Analysis in Systems Engineering Acquisition Activities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-30

    shape requirements definitions for system upgrade or modification contracts and new baseline contracts. Finally, content analysis training and skill...back to the system designers, this information can then be used to shape requirements definition for system upgrade or modification contracts and new...Activity System Requirements Definition Ensuring the system requirements adequately reflect the stakeholder requirements Negotiating modifications to

  2. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Chief, Accession Medical Standards Analysis & Research Activity Li Yuanzhang, PhD Senior Statistician Department of Epidemiology David N...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AMSARA, Department of Epidemiology , Division of Preventive Medicine Walter Reed Army Institute of Research 503... Epidemiology of Injury form the Assessment of Recruit Strength and Motivation study ARMS) and Program

  3. Differentiating semantic categories during the acquisition of novel words: correspondence analysis applied to event-related potentials.

    PubMed

    Fargier, Raphaël; Ploux, Sabine; Cheylus, Anne; Reboul, Anne; Paulignan, Yves; Nazir, Tatjana A

    2014-11-01

    Growing evidence suggests that semantic knowledge is represented in distributed neural networks that include modality-specific structures. Here, we examined the processes underlying the acquisition of words from different semantic categories to determine whether the emergence of visual- and action-based categories could be tracked back to their acquisition. For this, we applied correspondence analysis (CA) to ERPs recorded at various moments during acquisition. CA is a multivariate statistical technique typically used to reveal distance relationships between words of a corpus. Applied to ERPs, it allows isolating factors that best explain variations in the data across time and electrodes. Participants were asked to learn new action and visual words by associating novel pseudowords with the execution of hand movements or the observation of visual images. Words were probed before and after training on two consecutive days. To capture processes that unfold during lexical access, CA was applied on the 100-400 msec post-word onset interval. CA isolated two factors that organized the data as a function of test sessions and word categories. Conventional ERP analyses further revealed a category-specific increase in the negativity of the ERPs to action and visual words at the frontal and occipital electrodes, respectively. The distinct neural processes underlying action and visual words can thus be tracked back to the acquisition of word-referent relationships and may have its origin in association learning. Given current evidence for the flexibility of language-induced sensory-motor activity, we argue that these associative links may serve functions beyond word understanding, that is, the elaboration of situation models.

  4. 6 CFR Appendix A to Part 21 - Activities to Which This Part Applies

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Pt. 21, App. A Appendix A to Part 21... Boating Safety Financial Assistance program. 7. U.S. Coast Guard State Access to Oil Spill Liability Trust.... Grants to educational institutions, associations, States, or other entities for research, analysis,...

  5. Life Science Start-up Activities at the Universities of Applied Sciences (UAS).

    PubMed

    Huber, Gerda

    2014-12-01

    The universities of applied sciences (UAS) provide several values for the society and economy of a country. Besides education of high level professionals, transfer of knowledge from research to applications in industry or as new start-up companies is an important task. This is done in different ways in the various disciplines. In Life Sciences, a key industry branch in Switzerland, innovation is a competitive success factor and research findings from UAS/Life Sciences contribute to the valorization of new technologies to products, services and to business performance. In order to foster awareness for the innovation need of industry, UAS install processes and support for transfer of research and technology results to marketable applications. Furthermore they may facilitate contacts of researchers and students with entrepreneurs in order to animate start-up founding as a true alternative to being employed. Access to coaching and entrepreneurial training completes the essential basis.

  6. Bayesian Information-Gap Decision Analysis Applied to a CO2 Leakage Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, D.; Vesselinov, V. V.

    2014-12-01

    We describe a decision analysis in the presence of uncertainty that combines a non-probabilistic approach (information-gap decision theory) with a probabilistic approach (Bayes' theorem). Bayes' theorem is one of the most popular techniques for probabilistic uncertainty quantification (UQ). It is effective in many situations, because it updates our understanding of the uncertainties by conditioning on real data using a mathematically rigorous technique. However, the application of Bayes' theorem in science and engineering is not always rigorous. There are two reasons for this: (1) We can enumerate the possible outcomes of dice-rolling, but not the possible outcomes of real-world contamination remediation; (2) We can precisely determine conditional probabilities for coin-tossing, but substantial uncertainty surrounds the conditional probabilities for real-world contamination remediation. Of course, Bayes' theorem is rigorously applicable beyond dice-rolling and coin-tossing, but even in cases that are constructed to be simple with ostensibly good probabilistic models, applying Bayes' theorem to the real world may not work as well as one might expect. Bayes' theorem is rigorously applicable only if all possible events can be described, and their conditional probabilities can be derived rigorously. Outside of this domain, it may still be useful, but its use lacks at least some rigor. The information-gap approach allows us to circumvent some of the highlighted shortcomings of Bayes' theorem. In particular, it provides a way to account for possibilities beyond those described by our models, and a way to deal with uncertainty in the conditional distribution that forms the core of Bayesian analysis. We have developed a three-tiered technique enables one to make scientifically defensible decisions in the face of severe uncertainty such as is found in many geologic problems. To demonstrate the applicability, we apply the technique to a CO2 leakage problem. The goal is to

  7. Principal Components Analysis Based Unsupervised Feature Extraction Applied to Gene Expression Analysis of Blood from Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever Patients

    PubMed Central

    Taguchi, Y-h.

    2017-01-01

    Dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) sometimes occurs after recovery from the disease caused by Dengue virus (DENV), and is often fatal. However, the mechanism of DHF has not been determined, possibly because no suitable methodologies are available to analyse this disease. Therefore, more innovative methods are required to analyse the gene expression profiles of DENV-infected patients. Principal components analysis (PCA)-based unsupervised feature extraction (FE) was applied to the gene expression profiles of DENV-infected patients, and an integrated analysis of two independent data sets identified 46 genes as critical for DHF progression. PCA using only these 46 genes rendered the two data sets highly consistent. The application of PCA to the 46 genes of an independent third data set successfully predicted the progression of DHF. A fourth in vitro data set confirmed the identification of the 46 genes. These 46 genes included interferon- and heme-biosynthesis-related genes. The former are enriched in binding sites for STAT1, STAT2, and IRF1, which are associated with DHF-promoting antibody-dependent enhancement, whereas the latter are considered to be related to the dysfunction of spliceosomes, which may mediate haemorrhage. These results are outcomes that other type of bioinformatic analysis could hardly achieve. PMID:28276456

  8. High infrasonic goniometry applied to the detection of a helicopter in a high activity environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chritin, Vincent; Van Lancker, Eric; Wellig, Peter; Ott, Beat

    2016-10-01

    A current concern of armasuisse is the feasibility of a fixed or mobile acoustic surveillance and recognition network of sensors allowing to permanently monitor the noise immissions of a wide range of aerial activities such as civil or military aviation, and other possible acoustic events such as transient events, subsonic or sonic booms or other. This objective requires an ability to detect, localize and recognize a wide range of potential acoustic events of interest, among others possibly parasitic acoustic events (natural and industrial events on the ground for example), and possibly high background noise (for example close to urban or high activity areas). This article presents a general discussion and conclusion about this problem, based on 20 years of experience totalizing a dozen of research programs or internal researches by IAV, with an illustration through one central specific experimental case-study carried out within the framework of an armasuisse research program.

  9. Tractography-activation models applied to subcallosal cingulate deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lujan, J Luis; Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Choi, Ki Sueng; Holtzheimer, Paul E; Gross, Robert E; Mayberg, Helen S; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2013-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subcallosal cingulate white matter (SCCWM) is an experimental therapy for major depressive disorder (MDD). The specific axonal pathways that mediate the anti-depressant effects of DBS remain unknown. Patient-specific tractography-activation models (TAMs) are a new tool to help identify pathways modulated by DBS. TAMs consist of four basic components: 1) anatomical and diffusion-weighted imaging data acquired on the patient; 2) probabilistic tractography from the brain region surrounding the implanted DBS electrode; 3) finite element models of the electric field generated by the patient-specific DBS parameter settings; and 4) application of the DBS electric field to multi-compartment cable models of axons, with trajectories defined by the tractography, to predict action potential generation in specific pathways. This study presents TAM predictions from DBS of the SCCWM in one MDD patient. Our findings suggest that small differences in electrode location can generate substantial differences in the directly activated pathways.

  10. Sunlight-driven copper-catalyst activation applied to photolatent click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Beniazza, Rédouane; Lambert, Romain; Harmand, Lydie; Molton, Florian; Duboc, Carole; Denisov, Sergey; Jonusauskas, Gedeminas; McClenaghan, Nathan D; Lastécouères, Dominique; Vincent, Jean-Marc

    2014-10-06

    The synthesis, full characterization, photoreduction properties, and catalytic activity for the copper(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction of a copper(II)-DMEDA (N,N'-dimethylethylendiamine) complex is reported. Spectroscopic studies (UV/Vis, EPR) demonstrated that under daylight illumination highly effective copper(II) to copper(I) reduction occurs in this complex. These findings are in agreement with a high photoreduction quantum yield value of 0.22 in MeOH, and a value approaching unity as determined in THF. The reduction process, which can also be conducted by irradiation at 365 nm by using a standard TLC (thin layer chromatography) lamp, is ascribed to a highly efficient photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process mediated by the benzophenone photosensitizer present in the carboxylate counterion. Having deaerated the reaction mixture, the photogenerated copper(I) species proved to be highly active for the CuAAC reaction, demonstrated by reactions conducted with low catalyst loading (0.5 mol %) on a range of clickable protected and non-protected mono- and disaccharides. Once initiated, the reaction can be stopped at any time on introducing air into the reaction medium. Deoxygenation followed by irradiation restores the activity, making the copper(II)-DMEDA complex a switchable catalyst of practical value.

  11. Integrated Geophysical Methods Applied to Geotechnical and Geohazard Engineering: From Qualitative to Quantitative Analysis and Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Near-Surface is a region of day-to-day human activity on the earth. It is exposed to the natural phenomena which sometimes cause disasters. This presentation covers a broad spectrum of the geotechnical and geohazard ways of mitigating disaster and conserving the natural environment using geophysical methods and emphasizes the contribution of geophysics to such issues. The presentation focusses on the usefulness of geophysical surveys in providing information to mitigate disasters, rather than the theoretical details of a particular technique. Several techniques are introduced at the level of concept and application. Topics include various geohazard and geoenvironmental applications, such as for earthquake disaster mitigation, preventing floods triggered by tremendous rain, for environmental conservation and studying the effect of global warming. Among the geophysical techniques, the active and passive surface wave, refraction and resistivity methods are mainly highlighted. Together with the geophysical techniques, several related issues, such as performance-based design, standardization or regularization, internet access and databases are also discussed. The presentation discusses the application of geophysical methods to engineering investigations from non-uniqueness point of view and introduces the concepts of integrated and quantitative. Most geophysical analyses are essentially non-unique and it is very difficult to obtain unique and reliable engineering solutions from only one geophysical method (Fig. 1). The only practical way to improve the reliability of investigation is the joint use of several geophysical and geotechnical investigation methods, an integrated approach to geophysics. The result of a geophysical method is generally vague, here is a high-velocity layer, it may be bed rock, this low resistivity section may contain clayey soils. Such vague, qualitative and subjective interpretation is not worthwhile on general engineering design works

  12. Applying Activity Theory to Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning and Work-Based Activities in Corporate Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collis, Betty; Margaryan, Anoush

    2004-01-01

    Business needs in many corporations call for learning outcomes that involve problem solutions, and creating and sharing new knowledge within workplace situations that may involve collaboration among members of a team. We argue that work-based activities (WBA) and computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) are appropriate components for…

  13. Protocol for Data Collection and Analysis Applied to Automated Facial Expression Analysis Technology and Temporal Analysis for Sensory Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Crist, Courtney A; Duncan, Susan E; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2016-08-26

    We demonstrate a method for capturing emotional response to beverages and liquefied foods in a sensory evaluation laboratory using automated facial expression analysis (AFEA) software. Additionally, we demonstrate a method for extracting relevant emotional data output and plotting the emotional response of a population over a specified time frame. By time pairing each participant's treatment response to a control stimulus (baseline), the overall emotional response over time and across multiple participants can be quantified. AFEA is a prospective analytical tool for assessing unbiased response to food and beverages. At present, most research has mainly focused on beverages. Methodologies and analyses have not yet been standardized for the application of AFEA to beverages and foods; however, a consistent standard methodology is needed. Optimizing video capture procedures and resulting video quality aids in a successful collection of emotional response to foods. Furthermore, the methodology of data analysis is novel for extracting the pertinent data relevant to the emotional response. The combinations of video capture optimization and data analysis will aid in standardizing the protocol for automated facial expression analysis and interpretation of emotional response data.

  14. Methods for Applying Accurate Digital PCR Analysis on Low Copy DNA Samples

    PubMed Central

    Whale, Alexandra S.; Cowen, Simon; Foy, Carole A.; Huggett, Jim F.

    2013-01-01

    Digital PCR (dPCR) is a highly accurate molecular approach, capable of precise measurements, offering a number of unique opportunities. However, in its current format dPCR can be limited by the amount of sample that can be analysed and consequently additional considerations such as performing multiplex reactions or pre-amplification can be considered. This study investigated the impact of duplexing and pre-amplification on dPCR analysis by using three different assays targeting a model template (a portion of the Arabidopsis thaliana alcohol dehydrogenase gene). We also investigated the impact of different template types (linearised plasmid clone and more complex genomic DNA) on measurement precision using dPCR. We were able to demonstrate that duplex dPCR can provide a more precise measurement than uniplex dPCR, while applying pre-amplification or varying template type can significantly decrease the precision of dPCR. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that the pre-amplification step can introduce measurement bias that is not consistent between experiments for a sample or assay and so could not be compensated for during the analysis of this data set. We also describe a model for estimating the prevalence of molecular dropout and identify this as a source of dPCR imprecision. Our data have demonstrated that the precision afforded by dPCR at low sample concentration can exceed that of the same template post pre-amplification thereby negating the need for this additional step. Our findings also highlight the technical differences between different templates types containing the same sequence that must be considered if plasmid DNA is to be used to assess or control for more complex templates like genomic DNA. PMID:23472156

  15. Multivariate analysis applied to monthly rainfall over Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Thábata T.; Oliveira-Júnior, José F.; Lyra, Gustavo B.; Gois, Givanildo; Zeri, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    Spatial and temporal patterns of rainfall were identified over the state of Rio de Janeiro, southeast Brazil. The proximity to the coast and the complex topography create great diversity of rainfall over space and time. The dataset consisted of time series (1967-2013) of monthly rainfall over 100 meteorological stations. Clustering analysis made it possible to divide the stations into six groups (G1, G2, G3, G4, G5 and G6) with similar rainfall spatio-temporal patterns. A linear regression model was applied to a time series and a reference. The reference series was calculated from the average rainfall within a group, using nearby stations with higher correlation (Pearson). Based on t-test (p < 0.05) all stations had a linear spatiotemporal trend. According to the clustering analysis, the first group (G1) contains stations located over the coastal lowlands and also over the ocean facing area of Serra do Mar (Sea ridge), a 1500 km long mountain range over the coastal Southeastern Brazil. The second group (G2) contains stations over all the state, from Serra da Mantiqueira (Mantiqueira Mountains) and Costa Verde (Green coast), to the south, up to stations in the Northern parts of the state. Group 3 (G3) contains stations in the highlands over the state (Serrana region), while group 4 (G4) has stations over the northern areas and the continent-facing side of Serra do Mar. The last two groups were formed with stations around Paraíba River (G5) and the metropolitan area of the city of Rio de Janeiro (G6). The driest months in all regions were June, July and August, while November, December and January were the rainiest months. Sharp transitions occurred when considering monthly accumulated rainfall: from January to February, and from February to March, likely associated with episodes of "veranicos", i.e., periods of 4-15 days of duration with no rainfall.

  16. An improved leaping detector for flow analysis applied to iron speciation in drugs

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Sérgio R. B.; Araújo, Mário C. U.; Honorato, Ricardo S.; Zagatto, Elias A. G.; Lima, José F. C.; Lapa, Rui A. S.

    2000-01-01

    A low inner volume (ca. 64 ml) probe was built up in an injector-commutator in order to behave as a photometric leaping detector in flow analysis. It comprises a bicolour light-emitting diode (BLED), as a source of pulsed radiation in the red and green visible region, and two phototransistors as transducers. Sample injection, detector relocation, analytical signal recording, data treatment and definition of the spectral working range were computer-controlled. The feasibility of the system was initially demonstrated in the flow-injection speciation of iron, and the overall standard deviation of results was estimated as ± 1.6 and ± 1.4% for 1.6–4.0 mg l−1 Fe(II) or total iron after eightfold processing of synthetic samples. The system was further applied to drug analysis: the mean deviations of results for typical samples were estimated as ± 5.2 and ± 3.3%, and the relative standard deviation as ± 1.6 and ± 1.3% for Fe(II) and total iron, respectively. Results were compared with those obtained by a conventional spectrophotometric procedure and no statistic differences at the 95% confidence level were found. In relation to an earlier system with multi-site detection, the proposed system is more stable, presenting low drift with a relative standard deviation of 0.026% and 0.039% for measurements (n=120 during 4 h of observation) with green and red emission. It is also faster with a sampling rate of 133 h−1 and carryover problems are not found. The possibility of compensating the Schlieren noise by dual-wavelength spectrophotometry is discussed. PMID:18924860

  17. From Nose to Brain: Un-Sensed Electrical Currents Applied in the Nose Alter Activity in Deep Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Tali; Shushan, Sagit; Ravia, Aharon; Hahamy, Avital; Secundo, Lavi; Weissbrod, Aharon; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Holtzman, Yael; Cohen-Atsmoni, Smadar; Roth, Yehudah; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Rules linking patterns of olfactory receptor neuron activation in the nose to activity patterns in the brain and ensuing odor perception remain poorly understood. Artificially stimulating olfactory neurons with electrical currents and measuring ensuing perception may uncover these rules. We therefore inserted an electrode into the nose of 50 human volunteers and applied various currents for about an hour in each case. This induced assorted non-olfactory sensations but never once the perception of odor. To validate contact with the olfactory path, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure resting-state brain activity in 18 subjects before and after un-sensed stimulation. We observed stimulation-induced neural decorrelation specifically in primary olfactory cortex, implying contact with the olfactory path. These results suggest that indiscriminate olfactory activation does not equate with odor perception. Moreover, this effort serendipitously uncovered a novel path for minimally invasive brain stimulation through the nose. PMID:27591145

  18. From Nose to Brain: Un-Sensed Electrical Currents Applied in the Nose Alter Activity in Deep Brain Structures.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Tali; Shushan, Sagit; Ravia, Aharon; Hahamy, Avital; Secundo, Lavi; Weissbrod, Aharon; Ben-Yakov, Aya; Holtzman, Yael; Cohen-Atsmoni, Smadar; Roth, Yehudah; Sobel, Noam

    2016-09-02

    Rules linking patterns of olfactory receptor neuron activation in the nose to activity patterns in the brain and ensuing odor perception remain poorly understood. Artificially stimulating olfactory neurons with electrical currents and measuring ensuing perception may uncover these rules. We therefore inserted an electrode into the nose of 50 human volunteers and applied various currents for about an hour in each case. This induced assorted non-olfactory sensations but never once the perception of odor. To validate contact with the olfactory path, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to measure resting-state brain activity in 18 subjects before and after un-sensed stimulation. We observed stimulation-induced neural decorrelation specifically in primary olfactory cortex, implying contact with the olfactory path. These results suggest that indiscriminate olfactory activation does not equate with odor perception. Moreover, this effort serendipitously uncovered a novel path for minimally invasive brain stimulation through the nose.

  19. Control of forces applied by individual fingers engaged in restraint of an active object.

    PubMed

    Burstedt, M K; Birznieks, I; Edin, B B; Johansson, R S

    1997-07-01

    We investigated the coordination of fingertip forces in subjects who used the tips of two fingers to restrain an instrumented manipulandum with horizontally oriented grip surfaces. The grip surfaces were subjected to tangential pulling forces in the distal direction in relation to the fingers. The subjects used either the right index and middle fingers (unimanual grasp) or both index fingers (bimanual grasp) to restrain the manipulandum. To change the frictional condition at the digit-object interfaces, either both grip surfaces were covered with sandpaper or one was covered with sandpaper and the other with rayon. The forces applied normally and tangentially to the grip surfaces were measured separately at each plate along with the position of the plates. Subjects could have performed the present task successfully with many different force distributions between the digits. However, they partitioned the load in a manner that reflected the frictional condition at the local digit-object interfaces. When both digits contacted sandpaper, they typically partitioned the load symmetrically, but when one digit made contact with rayon and the other with sandpaper, the digit contacting the less slippery material (sandpaper) took up a larger part of the load. The normal forces were also influenced by the frictional condition, but they reflected the average friction at the two contact sites rather than the local friction. That is, when friction was low at one of the digit-object interfaces, only the applied normal forces increased at both digits. Thus sensory information related to the local frictional condition at the respective digit-object interfaces controlled the normal force at both digits. The normal:tangential force ratio at each digit appeared to be a controlled variable. It was adjusted independently at each digit to the minimum ratio required to prevent frictional slippage, keeping an adequate safety margin against slippage. This was accomplished by the scaling of

  20. Clinical analysis of the rap stress stimulator applied for crus fracture after skeletal external fixation

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Ping; Hong, Jiayuan; Chen, Wei; Wu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Open crus fracture is still difficult in clinical treatment because of the delayed fracture union and high rate of nonunion after the operation. A consensus has been reached that mechanical stress can promote fracture healing. We independently developed a stress stimulator, which can provide longitudinal pressure for the fixed fracture end of the lower legs to promote fracture healing. The purpose of this study is to explore the advantages and clinical effect of the rap stress stimulator applied for open crus fracture after skeletal external fixation. Material and methods One hundred and sixty-five patients (183 limbs) who suffered from open tibia and fibula fracture received skeletal external fixation, of which 108 limbs were treated with the rap stress stimulator after external fixation and 75 limbs were treated with regular functional exercises of muscle contraction and joint activity only. Then the fracture healing time and rate of nonunion were compared between the two groups. Results The mean fracture healing time and rate of nonunion in the group treated with the rap stress stimulator were 138.27 ±4.45 days and 3.70% respectively, compared to 153.43 ±4.89 days and 10.67% in the group treated without the stimulator. Conclusions The rap stress stimulator significantly shortened the fracture healing time and reduced the rate of nonunion for treating open tibia and fibula fractures. PMID:26170856

  1. Atomic force microscopy analysis of synthetic membranes applied in release studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olejnik, Anna; Nowak, Izabela

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic membranes are commonly used in drug release studies and are applied mostly in quality control. They contain pores through which the drug can be diffused directly into the receptor fluid. Investigation of synthetic membranes permits determination of their structure and characterization of their properties. We suggest that the preliminary characterization of the membranes can be relevant to the interpretation of the release results. The aim of this study was to compare eight synthetic membranes by using atomic force microscopy in order to predict and understand their behavior in the release experiments. The results proved that polytetrafluoroethylene membrane was not suitable for the release study of tetrapeptide due to its hydrophobic nature, thickness and the specific structure with high trapezoid shaped blocks. The additional substructures in pores of mixed cellulose esters and nylon membranes detected by AFM influenced the diffusion rate of the active compound. These findings indicate that the selection of the membrane for the release studies should be performed cautiously by taking into consideration the membrane properties and by analyzing them prior the experiment.

  2. Applying Chemical Imaging Analysis to Improve Our Understanding of Cold Cloud Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, A.; Knopf, D. A.; Wang, B.; Alpert, P. A.; Roedel, T.; Gilles, M. K.; Moffet, R.; Tivanski, A.

    2012-12-01

    The impact that atmospheric ice nucleation has on the global radiation budget is one of the least understood problems in atmospheric sciences. This is in part due to the incomplete understanding of various ice nucleation pathways that lead to ice crystal formation from pre-existing aerosol particles. Studies investigating the ice nucleation propensity of laboratory generated particles indicate that individual particle types are highly selective in their ice nucleating efficiency. This description of heterogeneous ice nucleation would present a challenge when applying to the atmosphere which contains a complex mixture of particles. Here, we employ a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical methods to relate particle physical and chemical properties with observed water uptake and ice nucleation. Field-collected particles from urban environments impacted by anthropogenic and marine emissions and aging processes are investigated. Single particle characterization is provided by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). A particle-on-substrate approach coupled to a vapor controlled cooling-stage and a microscope system is applied to determine the onsets of water uptake and ice nucleation including immersion freezing and deposition ice nucleation as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. We observe for urban aerosol particles that for T > 230 K the oxidation level affects initial water uptake and that subsequent immersion freezing depends on particle mixing state, e.g. by the presence of insoluble particles. For T < 230 K the particles initiate deposition ice nucleation well below the homogeneous freezing limit. Particles collected throughout one day for similar meteorological conditions show very similar

  3. Uncertainty Optimization Applied to the Monte Carlo Analysis of Planetary Entry Trajectories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olds, John; Way, David

    2001-01-01

    Recently, strong evidence of liquid water under the surface of Mars and a meteorite that might contain ancient microbes have renewed interest in Mars exploration. With this renewed interest, NASA plans to send spacecraft to Mars approx. every 26 months. These future spacecraft will return higher-resolution images, make precision landings, engage in longer-ranging surface maneuvers, and even return Martian soil and rock samples to Earth. Future robotic missions and any human missions to Mars will require precise entries to ensure safe landings near science objective and pre-employed assets. Potential sources of water and other interesting geographic features are often located near hazards, such as within craters or along canyon walls. In order for more accurate landings to be made, spacecraft entering the Martian atmosphere need to use lift to actively control the entry. This active guidance results in much smaller landing footprints. Planning for these missions will depend heavily on Monte Carlo analysis. Monte Carlo trajectory simulations have been used with a high degree of success in recent planetary exploration missions. These analyses ascertain the impact of off-nominal conditions during a flight and account for uncertainty. Uncertainties generally stem from limitations in manufacturing tolerances, measurement capabilities, analysis accuracies, and environmental unknowns. Thousands of off-nominal trajectories are simulated by randomly dispersing uncertainty variables and collecting statistics on forecast variables. The dependability of Monte Carlo forecasts, however, is limited by the accuracy and completeness of the assumed uncertainties. This is because Monte Carlo analysis is a forward driven problem; beginning with the input uncertainties and proceeding to the forecasts outputs. It lacks a mechanism to affect or alter the uncertainties based on the forecast results. If the results are unacceptable, the current practice is to use an iterative, trial

  4. An IMU-to-Body Alignment Method Applied to Human Gait Analysis.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Valencia, Laura Susana; Elias, Arlindo; Rocon, Eduardo; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; Frizera, Anselmo

    2016-12-10

    This paper presents a novel calibration procedure as a simple, yet powerful, method to place and align inertial sensors with body segments. The calibration can be easily replicated without the need of any additional tools. The proposed method is validated in three different applications: a computer mathematical simulation; a simplified joint composed of two semi-spheres interconnected by a universal goniometer; and a real gait test with five able-bodied subjects. Simulation results demonstrate that, after the calibration method is applied, the joint angles are correctly measured independently of previous sensor placement on the joint, thus validating the proposed procedure. In the cases of a simplified joint and a real gait test with human volunteers, the method also performs correctly, although secondary plane errors appear when compared with the simulation results. We believe that such errors are caused by limitations of the current inertial measurement unit (IMU) technology and fusion algorithms. In conclusion, the presented calibration procedure is an interesting option to solve the alignment problem when using IMUs for gait analysis.

  5. Applying a sociolinguistic model to the analysis of informed consent documents.

    PubMed

    Granero-Molina, José; Fernández-Sola, Cayetano; Aguilera-Manrique, Gabriel

    2009-11-01

    Information on the risks and benefits related to surgical procedures is essential for patients in order to obtain their informed consent. Some disciplines, such as sociolinguistics, offer insights that are helpful for patient-professional communication in both written and oral consent. Communication difficulties become more acute when patients make decisions through an informed consent document because they may sign this with a lack of understanding and information, and consequently feel deprived of their freedom to make their choice about different treatments or surgery. This article discusses findings from documentary analysis using the sociolinguistic SPEAKING model, which was applied to the general and specific informed consent documents required for laparoscopic surgery of the bile duct at Torrecárdenas Hospital, Almería, Spain. The objective of this procedure was to identify flaws when information was provided, together with its readability, its voluntary basis, and patients' consent. The results suggest potential linguistic communication difficulties, different languages being used, cultural clashes, asymmetry of communication between professionals and patients, assignment of rights on the part of patients, and overprotection of professionals and institutions.

  6. An IMU-to-Body Alignment Method Applied to Human Gait Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Valencia, Laura Susana; Elias, Arlindo; Rocon, Eduardo; Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; Frizera, Anselmo

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel calibration procedure as a simple, yet powerful, method to place and align inertial sensors with body segments. The calibration can be easily replicated without the need of any additional tools. The proposed method is validated in three different applications: a computer mathematical simulation; a simplified joint composed of two semi-spheres interconnected by a universal goniometer; and a real gait test with five able-bodied subjects. Simulation results demonstrate that, after the calibration method is applied, the joint angles are correctly measured independently of previous sensor placement on the joint, thus validating the proposed procedure. In the cases of a simplified joint and a real gait test with human volunteers, the method also performs correctly, although secondary plane errors appear when compared with the simulation results. We believe that such errors are caused by limitations of the current inertial measurement unit (IMU) technology and fusion algorithms. In conclusion, the presented calibration procedure is an interesting option to solve the alignment problem when using IMUs for gait analysis. PMID:27973406

  7. Doppler picture velocimetry applied to hypersonics: automated DPV fringe pattern analysis using the FFT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pichler, Alexander; George, Alfred; Seiler, Friedrich; Srulijes, Julio; Sauerwein, Berthold

    2009-10-01

    Doppler picture velocimetry (DPV) is a tool for visualizing and measuring the flow velocity distribution of tracer particles in a laser light sheet. A frequency sensitive Michelson interferometer, tuned for detecting the velocity distribution by the Doppler effect, visualizes the velocity information of tracer particles crossing an illuminating laser light sheet as interference fringe patterns. Many efforts have been done to evaluate best these DPV patterns, in order to obtain the frequency distribution and, by applying the Doppler formula, the velocity profile of the tracers. The first processing method, developed in 1982, relied on manual processing of the pictures by the user, due to the unavailability of suitable high performance picture processing algorithms. This drawback made DPV being considered as a rather time-consuming measurement technique with limited accuracy, compared to existing commercial velocity measurement systems (e.g. PIV). This is no more the state of the art: The new DPV analysis software, presented in this paper, allows automated processing of the interference fringe samples obtained by two images, a reference picture without frequency shift and a Doppler picture containing the frequency shift, using single beam velocimetry. Based on Fast Fourier transformation (FFT), the presented algorithm determines the corresponding velocity profile (in pseudo colours) within only a few seconds on a standard personal computer without user intervention.

  8. Parametric sensitivity analysis applied to a specific one-dimensional internal bone remodelling problem.

    PubMed

    Ramtani, S

    2007-08-01

    The relative importance of the various parameters in inducing bone mass loss and osteoclastic perforations is still controversial. Therefore, there is a significant motivation to better understand the parameters behind such dynamic response, and great interest to carry out a parametric sensitivity study as it can provide useful information. As an application, the widely-accepted bone remodelling equation [M.G. Mullender, R. Huiskes, H. Weinans, A physiological approach to the simulation of bone remodeling as self organizational control process, J. Biomech. 27 (1994) 1389.] is investigated using the "n units" model [M. Zidi, S. Ramtani, Bone remodeling theory applied to the study of n unit-elements model, J Biomech. 32 (1999) 743.]. This analysis pointed out that the power in the modulus density relationship p and the power to which density is raised in normalizing the energy stimulus q, known as strongly implicated in the stability condition of the remodelling process, were also stated as insensitive parameters in the bone loss area.

  9. Spatial analysis techniques applied to uranium prospecting in Chihuahua State, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinojosa de la Garza, Octavio R.; Montero Cabrera, María Elena; Sanín, Luz H.; Reyes Cortés, Manuel; Martínez Meyer, Enrique

    2014-07-01

    To estimate the distribution of uranium minerals in Chihuahua, the advanced statistical model "Maximun Entropy Method" (MaxEnt) was applied. A distinguishing feature of this method is that it can fit more complex models in case of small datasets (x and y data), as is the location of uranium ores in the State of Chihuahua. For georeferencing uranium ores, a database from the United States Geological Survey and workgroup of experts in Mexico was used. The main contribution of this paper is the proposal of maximum entropy techniques to obtain the mineral's potential distribution. For this model were used 24 environmental layers like topography, gravimetry, climate (worldclim), soil properties and others that were useful to project the uranium's distribution across the study area. For the validation of the places predicted by the model, comparisons were done with other research of the Mexican Service of Geological Survey, with direct exploration of specific areas and by talks with former exploration workers of the enterprise "Uranio de Mexico". Results. New uranium areas predicted by the model were validated, finding some relationship between the model predictions and geological faults. Conclusions. Modeling by spatial analysis provides additional information to the energy and mineral resources sectors.

  10. The evolution of the Journal of Applied Oral Science: a bibliometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, Valéria Cristina Trindade; Amadei, José Roberto Plácido; Santos, Carlos Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make a brief diagnosis of the evolution of the Journal of Applied Oral Science (JAOS) between 2005 and 2007, by reviewing quantitative and qualitative aspects of the articles published in the JAOS within this period. All articles published in the JAOS in the time span established for this survey were analyzed retrospectively and a discussion was undertaken on the data referring to the main bibliometric indexes of production, authorship, bibliographic sources of the published articles, and the most frequently cited scientific journals in the main dental research fields. A total of 247 papers authored and co-authored by 1,139 contributors were reviewed, most of them being original research articles. The number of authors per article was 4.61 on the average. Regarding the geographic distribution, the authors represented almost all of the Brazilian States. Most published articles belonged to the following dental research fields: Endodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Dental Materials and Prosthodontics. The ranking of the most frequently cited scientific journals included the most reputable publications in these dental research fields. In conclusion, between 2005 and 2007, the JAOS either maintained or improved considerably its bibliometric indexes. The analysis of the data retrieved in this study allowed evaluating the journal's current management strategies, and identifying important issues that will help outlining the future directions for the internationalization of this journal.

  11. THE EVOLUTION OF THE JOURNAL OF APPLIED ORAL SCIENCE: A BIBLIOMETRIC ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    Ferraz, Valéria Cristina Trindade; Amadei, José Roberto Plácido; Santos, Carlos Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to make a brief diagnosis of the evolution of the Journal of Applied Oral Science (JAOS) between 2005 and 2007, by reviewing quantitative and qualitative aspects of the articles published in the JAOS within this period. All articles published in the JAOS in the time span established for this survey were analyzed retrospectively and a discussion was undertaken on the data referring to the main bibliometric indexes of production, authorship, bibliographic sources of the published articles, and the most frequently cited scientific journals in the main dental research fields. A total of 247 papers authored and coauthored by 1,139 contributors were reviewed, most of them being original research articles. The number of authors per article was 4.61 on the average. Regarding the geographic distribution, the authors represented almost all of the Brazilian States. Most published articles belonged to the following dental research fields: Endodontics, Restorative Dentistry, Dental Materials and Prosthodontics. The ranking of the most frequently cited scientific journals included the most reputable publications in these dental research fields. In conclusion, between 2005 and 2007, the JAOS either maintained or improved considerably its bibliometric indexes. The analysis of the data retrieved in this study allowed evaluating the journal's current management strategies, and identifying important issues that will help outlining the future directions for the internationalization of this journal. PMID:19082402

  12. Applying Monte Carlo Simulation to Launch Vehicle Design and Requirements Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, J. M.; Beard, B. B.

    2010-01-01

    This Technical Publication (TP) is meant to address a number of topics related to the application of Monte Carlo simulation to launch vehicle design and requirements analysis. Although the focus is on a launch vehicle application, the methods may be applied to other complex systems as well. The TP is organized so that all the important topics are covered in the main text, and detailed derivations are in the appendices. The TP first introduces Monte Carlo simulation and the major topics to be discussed, including discussion of the input distributions for Monte Carlo runs, testing the simulation, how many runs are necessary for verification of requirements, what to do if results are desired for events that happen only rarely, and postprocessing, including analyzing any failed runs, examples of useful output products, and statistical information for generating desired results from the output data. Topics in the appendices include some tables for requirements verification, derivation of the number of runs required and generation of output probabilistic data with consumer risk included, derivation of launch vehicle models to include possible variations of assembled vehicles, minimization of a consumable to achieve a two-dimensional statistical result, recontact probability during staging, ensuring duplicated Monte Carlo random variations, and importance sampling.

  13. Analysis and control of unified active power filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthu, Subramanian

    1999-11-01

    The combined series and shunt active filters have been proposed to alleviate the power quality problems at the demand-side power systems. However, the conventional approach for the control of the combined active filter systems have resulted in large operating capacity of the shunt active filter because reactive power compensation involves only the shunt active filter. Furthermore, the harmonic mitigation problems are handled mainly by indirect harmonic compensation schemes rather than direct harmonic isolation schemes. This thesis presents the analysis and control of Unified Active Power Filter (UAPF) and proposes a novel concept of load reactive power compensation involving both the series active filter and the shunt active filter. The thesis also applies discrete-time sliding-mode control technique to enhance the performance of the combined active filter system in terms of fast dynamic response and effective solution to harmonic mitigation problems. The thesis also presents simulation and experimental results to provide verification of the proposed UAPF concept. The involvement of series active filter for reactive power compensation is achieved by controlling the phase difference between the load voltage and the utility voltage. The complete steady-state operating characteristics of UAPF are analyzed with the identification of the different operating modes of UAPF and the analysis of active and reactive power handled by the active filter components. The performance of UAPF to meet the stringent power quality standards are realized by applying discrete-time sliding-mode control schemes for the load voltage regulation and the active power factor correction. The control algorithms are developed to track a given load voltage and line current reference signals respectively. The effect of computational delay in DSP implementation is studied extensively and the control law is designed with the consideration for the computational delay. The systematic approach for the

  14. Ergonomics work analysis applied to dentistry--a Brazilian case study.

    PubMed

    Custódio, R A R; Silva, C E S; Brandão, J G T

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the Ergonomic Work Analysis method in a Brazilian Dentist's office. Through the study, the constraints and the strategies in avoiding them were identified. It was found that dentists hardly use the position most indicated by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the Federation Dentaire Internacionale (FDI) for both the patient and the dentist, which is respectively supine and 9 o'clock, due to the limited space and layout. Five types of treatments performed by the professional have been studied. The frequency and duration of actions in these treatments were accounted for and the standard positions adopted were identified. The AET was found to be a very suitable method to grasp the dentist's activity and build a point of view of the profession, which is characterized as: stressful, perfectionist and restrictive. Time management is presented as an important strategy to control the tension arising from performing the treatments.

  15. School-wide PBIS: An Example of Applied Behavior Analysis Implemented at a Scale of Social Importance.

    PubMed

    Horner, Robert H; Sugai, George

    2015-05-01

    School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) is an example of applied behavior analysis implemented at a scale of social importance. In this paper, PBIS is defined and the contributions of behavior analysis in shaping both the content and implementation of PBIS are reviewed. Specific lessons learned from implementation of PBIS over the past 20 years are summarized.

  16. Dissemination of effective physical activity interventions: are we applying the evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Ballew, Paula; Brownson, Ross C.; Haire-Joshu, Debra; Heath, Gregory W.; Kreuter, Matthew W.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Given sparse knowledge on dissemination, this study sought to explore key benefits, barriers and contextual factors that are perceived to be important to the adoption and implementation of the ‘Community Guide's’ evidence-based physical activity recommendations. Design. We conducted case studies in two states where extensive adoption and implementation of the Guide's recommendations have occurred and in two states where widespread dissemination has lagged. Interviews (n = 76) were semi-structured and included both quantitative and qualitative methods. Participant perceptions from the following areas were examined: (i) priority of physical activity, (ii) awareness of and ability to define the term ‘evidence-based approaches’ and (iii) awareness, adoption, facilitators, benefits, challenges and barriers to Guide adoption. Results. Key enabling factors among high capacity states included: funds and direction from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; leadership support; capable staff; and successful partnerships and collaborations. Restraining forces among low capacity states included: the Guide recommendations being too new; participants being too new to current job; lack of time and training on how to use the Guide recommendations; limited funds and other resources and lack of leadership. Conclusion. To be effective, we must gain an understanding of contextual factors when designing for dissemination. PMID:20156839

  17. Activity Analysis and Cost Analysis in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, John E.; Slighton, Robert L.

    There is no unique answer to the question of what an ongoing program costs in medical schools. The estimates of program costs generated by classical methods of cost accounting are unsatisfactory because such accounting cannot deal with the joint production or joint cost problem. Activity analysis models aim at calculating the impact of alternative…

  18. Decision Analysis Science Modeling for Application and Fielding Selection Applied to Metal Decontamination Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, L.E.; Ebadian, M.A.

    1998-01-01

    During the decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) activities being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), approximately 550,000 metric tons of contaminated metal will be generated by the disposition of contaminated buildings. The majority of the structural steel is considered to be radiologically contaminated. The D and D activities require the treatment of the structural steel to reduce occupational and environmental radiological exposures during dismantlement. Treatment technologies may also be required for possible recycling. Many proven commercial treatment technologies are available. These treatment processes vary in aggressiveness, safety requirements, secondary waste generation, necessary capital, and operation and maintenance costs. Choosing the appropriate technology to meet the decontamination objectives for structural steel is a difficult process. A single information source comparing innovative and nuclear and non-nuclear technologies in the areas of safety, cost and effectiveness is not currently commercially available to perform a detailed analysis. This study presents comparable data related to operation and maintenance, cost, and health and safely aspects of three readily available technologies and one innovative technology for nuclear decontamination. The technologies include Advance Recyclable Media System (ARMS{trademark}), NELCO Porta Shot Blast{trademark} (JHJ-2000), Pegasus Coating Removal System 7 (PCRS-7) and the innovative laser ablation technology called the Yag Eraser{trademark}.

  19. Methodological optimization of applying neuroactive agents for the study of locomotor-like activity in the mudpuppies (Necturus Maculatus)

    PubMed Central

    Lavrov, Igor; Cheng, Jianguo

    2008-01-01

    We compared the effects of mode of delivery of neuroactive agents and the effects of Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a vehicle for dissolving neuroactive agents, on locomotor-like activity in vitro. By superfusion, D-glutamate (0.3 – 0.9 mM) produced robust walking-like activity at superfusion rates 10–25 ml/min. In contrast, bolus application of the same or higher doses of glutamate (0.1–1.5 mM) failed to induce any rhythmic activity. Superfusion with AP-5, a NMDA receptor antagonist, produced dose-dependent inhibition of the ongoing walking-like activity induced by D-glutamate and completely blocked the activity at 20 µM. In contrast, bolus application of AP-5 did not block the walking-like activity at concentrations up to 120 µM. Similarly, superfusion of AP-5 inhibited the initiation of walking-like activity and completely blocked the initiation at 20 µM, while bolus application of AP-5 failed to do so at concentrations up to 120 µM. Superfusion of strychnine, a glycine receptor antagonist, blocked the walking-like activity at concentrations of 3–5 µM, while its bolus application altered NMDA-induced, but not glutamate-induced, walking-like activity to a synchronized pattern. DMSO significantly affected the walking-like activity in a dose-dependent manner at concentrations ranging 1–10% (v/v). These results demonstrate that the way by which the neuroactive agents are applied is a significant factor that determines the outcome of experiments on the neural control of locomotion. Also, the dose-dependent effects of DMSO on the activity of neural networks for locomotion should be taken into account in data interpretation. PMID:18692523

  20. Applying and comparing two chemometric methods in absorption spectral analysis of photopigments from Arctic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; He, Jianfeng; Xia, Lihua; Cai, Minghong; Lin, Ling; Guang, Yingzhi

    2010-11-01

    Pigment absorption property of two arctic microalgae species (Skeletonema marinoi and Chlorella sp.) cultured at three temperatures (0, 4 and 8°C) was analyzed. Carotenoids and chlorophyll (Chl) c were positive factors to the high cell activities and primary productivities of S. marinoi at 4°C and 0°C, respectively; whereas Chl a had a positive effect on Chlorella sp. at all three temperatures, and carotenoids had a relatively high effect at 0°C. The absorption locations of photopigments were analyzed in detail using both fourth derivative and Symlet-6 wavelet analysis. Both methods precisely detected pigments with a relative large content; the fourth derivative analysis specifically detected the existence of a Chl a peak at about 410 nm and showed better differentiation of diatoxanthin, whereas the wavelet analysis distinctively indicated the existence of chlorophyllide a, β-carotene, and Chl c. The separation limit to pigment peaks of the fourth derivative spectra (4 nm) was 1 nm higher than that of the wavelet high-frequency spectra (3 nm). The wavelet high-frequency spectra were more stable in detecting pigment locations and were more effective in discriminating microalgae. Small algebraic difference of 10(-16) between the reconstructed absorption spectra obtained by the inverse wavelet transform and their corresponding original spectra also showed the validity of Symlet-6 wavelet in the detection of pigments. Another specific discovery of this research is the existence of a Chl a allomer in Chlorella sp., which was detected by both methods.

  1. Applying Antonio Gramsci's philosophy to postcolonial feminist social and political activism in nursing.

    PubMed

    Racine, Louise

    2009-07-01

    Through its social and political activism goals, postcolonial feminist theoretical approaches not only focus on individual issues that affect health but encompass the examination of the complex interplay between neocolonialism, neoliberalism, and globalization, in mediating the health of non-Western immigrants and refugees. Postcolonial feminism holds the promise to influence nursing research and practice in the 21st century where health remains a goal to achieve and a commitment for humanity. This is especially relevant for nurses, who act as global citizens and as voices for the voiceless. The commitment of nursing to social justice must be further strengthened by relying on postcolonial theories to address issues of health inequities that arise from marginalization and racialization. In using postcolonial feminist theories, nurse researchers locate the inquiry process within a Gramscian philosophy of praxis that represents knowledge in action.

  2. Lessons learned from applied field research activities in Africa during the malaria eradication era

    PubMed Central

    Bruce-Chwatt, Leonard J.

    1984-01-01

    The Malaria Conference in Equatorial Africa, convened by the World Health Organization in 1950 in Kampala, Uganda, was a milestone in the history of modern malaria control activities on the continent of Africa. It presented and assessed the available international information on epidemiological aspects of this disease and attempted to coordinate the various methods of research and control of malaria. Its two main recommendations were that malaria should be controlled by all available methods, irrespective of the degree of endemicity of the disease, and that the benefits that malaria control might bring to the indigenous population should be evaluated. The first period of field research and pilot control projects in Africa was between 1950 and 1964. A large number of studies in several African countries showed that the use of residual insecticides such as DDT and HCH might decrease, at times considerably, the amount of malaria transmission, but interruption of transmission could not be achieved, except in two relatively small projects in the forest areas of Cameroon and Liberia. During the second period, from 1965 to 1974, the difficulties of malaria eradication and control in Africa became more evident because of the development of resistance of Anopheles gambiae to DDT, HCH, and dieldrin; moreover administrative, logistic, and financial problems had emerged. It became clear that the prospects for malaria control (let alone those for eradication) were related to the availability of a network of basic health services. A number of “pre-eradication” programmes were set up in order to develop better methods of malaria control and to improve the rural health infrastructures. Much field research on the chemotherapy of malaria was carried out and the value of collective or selective administration of antimalarial drugs was fully recognized, although it became obvious that this could not play an important part in the decrease of transmission of malaria in Africa. The

  3. Single Phase Passive Rectification Versus Active Rectification Applied to High Power Stirling Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santiago, Walter; Birchenough, Arthur G.

    2006-01-01

    Stirling engine converters are being considered as potential candidates for high power energy conversion systems required by future NASA explorations missions. These types of engines typically contain two major moving parts, the displacer and the piston, in which a linear alternator is attached to the piston to produce a single phase sinusoidal waveform at a specific electric frequency. Since all Stirling engines perform at low electrical frequencies (less or equal to 100 Hz), space explorations missions that will employ these engines will be required to use DC power management and distribution (PMAD) system instead of an AC PMAD system to save on space and weight. Therefore, to supply such DC power an AC to DC converter is connected to the Stirling engine. There are two types of AC to DC converters that can be employed, a passive full bridge diode rectifier and an active switching full bridge rectifier. Due to the inherent line inductance of the Stirling Engine-Linear Alternator (SE-LA), their sinusoidal voltage and current will be phase shifted producing a power factor below 1. In order to keep power the factor close to unity, both AC to DC converters topologies will implement power factor correction. This paper discusses these power factor correction methods as well as their impact on overall mass for exploration applications. Simulation results on both AC to DC converters topologies with power factor correction as a function of output power and SE-LA line inductance impedance are presented and compared.

  4. Virtual screening for environmental pollutants: structure-activity relationships applied to a database of industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Oberg, Tomas

    2006-04-01

    The current risk paradigm calls for individual consideration and evaluation of each separate environmental pollutant, but this does not reflect accurately the cumulative impact of anthropogenic chemicals. In the present study, previously validated structure-activity relationships were used to estimate simultaneously the baseline toxicity and atmospheric persistence of approximately 50,000 compounds. The results from this virtual screening indicate fairly stable statistical distributions among small anthropogenic compounds. The baseline toxicity was not changed much by halogen substitution, but a distinct increase seemed to occur in the environmental persistence with increased halogenation. The ratio of the atmospheric half-lives to the median lethal concentrations provides a continuous scale with which to rank and summarize the incremental environmental impacts in a mixture-exposure situation. Halogenated compounds as a group obtained a high ranking in this data set, with well-known pollutants at the very top: DDT metabolites and derivatives, polychlorinated biphenyls, diphenyl ethers and dibenzofurans, chlorinated paraffins, chlorinated benzenes and derivatives, hydrochlorofluorocarbons, and dichlorononylphenol. Environmentally friendly chemicals that obtained the lowest rank are nearly all hydroxylated and water-soluble. Virtual screening can assist with "green chemistry" in designing safe and degradable products and enable assessment of the efficiency in chemicals risk management.

  5. Experimental Studies of Active and Passive Flow Control Techniques Applied in a Twin Air-Intake

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Shrey; Jindal, Aman; Maurya, Shivam P.; Jain, Anuj

    2013-01-01

    The flow control in twin air-intakes is necessary to improve the performance characteristics, since the flow traveling through curved and diffused paths becomes complex, especially after merging. The paper presents a comparison between two well-known techniques of flow control: active and passive. It presents an effective design of a vortex generator jet (VGJ) and a vane-type passive vortex generator (VG) and uses them in twin air-intake duct in different combinations to establish their effectiveness in improving the performance characteristics. The VGJ is designed to insert flow from side wall at pitch angle of 90 degrees and 45 degrees. Corotating (parallel) and counterrotating (V-shape) are the configuration of vane type VG. It is observed that VGJ has the potential to change the flow pattern drastically as compared to vane-type VG. While the VGJ is directed perpendicular to the side walls of the air-intake at a pitch angle of 90 degree, static pressure recovery is increased by 7.8% and total pressure loss is reduced by 40.7%, which is the best among all other cases tested for VGJ. For bigger-sized VG attached to the side walls of the air-intake, static pressure recovery is increased by 5.3%, but total pressure loss is reduced by only 4.5% as compared to all other cases of VG. PMID:23935422

  6. [Geometry, analysis, and computation in mathematics and applied science]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.

    1994-02-01

    The principal investigators` work on a variety of pure and applied problems in Differential Geometry, Calculus of Variations and Mathematical Physics has been done in a computational laboratory and been based on interactive scientific computer graphics and high speed computation created by the principal investigators to study geometric interface problems in the physical sciences. We have developed software to simulate various physical phenomena from constrained plasma flow to the electron microscope imaging of the microstructure of compound materials, techniques for the visualization of geometric structures that has been used to make significant breakthroughs in the global theory of minimal surfaces, and graphics tools to study evolution processes, such as flow by mean curvature, while simultaneously developing the mathematical foundation of the subject. An increasingly important activity of the laboratory is to extend this environment in order to support and enhance scientific collaboration with researchers at other locations. Toward this end, the Center developed the GANGVideo distributed video software system and software methods for running lab-developed programs simultaneously on remote and local machines. Further, the Center operates a broadcast video network, running in parallel with the Center`s data networks, over which researchers can access stored video materials or view ongoing computations. The graphical front-end to GANGVideo can be used to make ``multi-media mail`` from both ``live`` computing sessions and stored materials without video editing. Currently, videotape is used as the delivery medium, but GANGVideo is compatible with future ``all-digital`` distribution systems. Thus as a byproduct of mathematical research, we are developing methods for scientific communication. But, most important, our research focuses on important scientific problems; the parallel development of computational and graphical tools is driven by scientific needs.

  7. An overview of research activities on materials for nuclear applications at the INL Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility

    SciTech Connect

    P. Calderoni; P. Sharpe; M. Shimada

    2009-09-01

    The Safety, Tritium and Applied Research facility at the Idaho National Laboratory is a US Department of Energy National User Facility engaged in various aspects of materials research for nuclear applications related to fusion and advanced fission systems. Research activities are mainly focused on the interaction of tritium with materials, in particular plasma facing components, liquid breeders, high temperature coolants, fuel cladding, cooling and blanket structures and heat exchangers. Other activities include validation and verification experiments in support of the Fusion Safety Program, such as beryllium dust reactivity and dust transport in vacuum vessels, and support of Advanced Test Reactor irradiation experiments. This paper presents an overview of the programs engaged in the activities, which include the US-Japan TITAN collaboration, the US ITER program, the Next Generation Power Plant program and the tritium production program, and a presentation of ongoing experiments as well as a summary of recent results with emphasis on fusion relevant materials.

  8. Valuation of OSA process and folic acid addition as excess sludge minimization alternatives applied in the activated sludge process.

    PubMed

    Martins, C L; Velho, V F; Ramos, S R A; Pires, A S C D; Duarte, E C N F A; Costa, R H R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of the oxic-settling-anaerobic (OSA)-process and the folic acid addition applied in the activated sludge process to reduce the excess sludge production. The study was monitored during two distinct periods: activated sludge system with OSA-process, and activated sludge system with folic acid addition. The observed sludge yields (Yobs) were 0.30 and 0.08 kgTSS kg(-1) chemical oxygen demand (COD), control phase and OSA-process (period 1); 0.33 and 0.18 kgTSS kg(-1) COD, control phase and folic acid addition (period 2). The Yobs decreased by 73 and 45% in phases with the OSA-process and folic acid addition, respectively, compared with the control phases. The sludge minimization alternatives result in a decrease in excess sludge production, without negatively affecting the performance of the effluent treatment.

  9. [Effects of applying different kind fertilizers on enzyme activities related to carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles in reddish paddy soil].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Li; Wang, Qiu-Bing; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Sun, Xiao-Min; Dai, Xiao-Qin; Yang, Feng-Ting; Bu, Jin-Feng; Wang, Hui-min

    2013-04-01

    Based on the long-term fixed position experimental data from Qianyanzhou Ecological Experiment Station, Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1998, this paper analyzed the effects of applying different kind fertilizers (straw, ST; pig manure, OM; and chemical fertilizer, NPK) on the nutrients (C, N, and P) status and the activities of related enzymes ( beta-1,4-glucosidase, betaG; beta-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase, NAG; L-leucine aminopeptidase, LAP; and acid phosphatase, AP) in reddish paddy soil. With the application of OM, the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP increased significantly, as compared with other treatments, and were 1.4, 2. 6, and 1.9 times higher than the control (CK) , respectively. Applying OM also improved the ratio of soil organic carbon to total nitrogen (C/N), but decreased the soil betaG/(NAG+LAP) ratio, suggesting that pig manure could benefit the degradation of soil cellulose and the accumulation of soil organic carbon. Applying NPK increased the activities of soil betaG, NAG, and LAP, but decreased the AP activity, with a decrement of 34% as compared with CK. Under the application of NPK, the soilbetaG/AP and (NAG+ LAP)/AP ratios increased, but the ratios of soil organic carbon to total phosphorus (C/P) and of soil total nitrogen to total phosphorus (N/P) decreased, indicating that chemical fertilizers could induce the accumulation of soil inorganic phosphorus, and inhibit the microbial functions of degrading polysaccharides and phosphate phospholipids.

  10. Performance analysis of continuous tracking laser Doppler vibrometry applied to rotating structures in coast-down

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martarelli, M.; Castellini, P.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper a performance analysis of the so-called tracking continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometry (TCSLDV) exploited in coast-down has been performed. This non-contact measurement system is able to scan continuously over a rotating surface during coast-down and to determine vibration operational deflection shapes (ODSs) and natural frequencies in short time, i.e. the temporal extent of the coast-down. The method is based on a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) whose laser beam is driven to scan continuously over the whole rotor surface synchronously with its rotation, so that the LDV output is modulated by the structure's ODSs. This technique has a full-field nature that enables it to measure simultaneously the time and spatial dependence of the vibration in a unique measurement. However, the TCSLDV presents some criticalities in practical applications, especially when applied to rotary transient and fast processes. In fact, if the vibration is transient and decays very fast, then the laser beam could not have had the time to scan the complete structure surface and the modulation of the ODS could be partial. An analytical model reproducing a representative experiment has been developed in order to evaluate the sensitivity of results to testing conditions. The laser beam trajectory in both the fixed and rotating reference systems has been synthesized showing its dependence on experimental parameters as the rotation speed variation during coast-down. It has been demonstrated the decrease in speed induces the deformation of the laser trajectory influencing the LDV output time history, spectrum and consequently the recovered ODS.

  11. Quasi-dynamic Material Flow Analysis applied to the Austrian Phosphorus cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoboli, Ottavia; Rechberger, Helmut

    2013-04-01

    Phosphorus (P) is one of the key elements that sustain life on earth and that allow achieving the current high levels of food production worldwide. It is a non-renewable resource, without any existing substitute. Because of its current dissipative use by mankind and to its very slow geochemical cycle, this resource is rapidly depleting and it is strongly connected to the problem of ensuring food security. Moreover P is also associated to important environmental problems. Its extraction often generates hazardous wastes, while its accumulation in water bodies can lead to eutrophication, with consequent severe ecological damages. It is therefore necessary to analyze and understand in detail the system of P, in regard to its use and management, to identify the processes that should be targeted in order to reduce the overall consumption of this resource. This work aims at establishing a generic quasi-dynamic model, which describes the Austrian P-budget and which allows investigating the trends of P use in the past, but also selected future scenarios. Given the importance of P throughout the whole anthropogenic metabolism, the model is based on a comprehensive system that encompasses several economic sectors, from agriculture and animal husbandry to industry, consumption and waste and wastewater treatment. Furthermore it includes the hydrosphere, to assess the losses of P into water bodies, due to the importance of eutrophication problems. The methodology applied is Material Flow Analysis (MFA), which is a systemic approach to assess and balance the stocks and flows of a material within a system defined in space and time. Moreover the model is integrated in the software STAN, a freeware tailor-made for MFA. Particular attention is paid to the characteristics and the quality of the data, in order to include data uncertainty and error propagation in the dynamic balance.

  12. Further Insight and Additional Inference Methods for Polynomial Regression Applied to the Analysis of Congruence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Ayala; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Doveh, Etti

    2010-01-01

    In their seminal paper, Edwards and Parry (1993) presented the polynomial regression as a better alternative to applying difference score in the study of congruence. Although this method is increasingly applied in congruence research, its complexity relative to other methods for assessing congruence (e.g., difference score methods) was one of the…

  13. Towards an Analysis of Review Article in Applied Linguistics: Its Classes, Purposes and Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azar, Ali Sorayyaei; Hashim, Azirah

    2014-01-01

    The classes, purposes and characteristics associated with the review article in the field of applied linguistics were analyzed. The data were collected from a randomly selected corpus of thirty two review articles from a discipline-related key journal in applied linguistics. The findings revealed that different sub-genres can be identified within…

  14. A Pilot Study for Applying an Extravehicular Activity Exercise Prebreathe Protocol to the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodruff, Kristin K.; Johnson, Anyika N.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Gernhardt, Michael; Schneider, Suzanne M.; Foster, Philip P.

    2000-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a serious risk to astronauts performing extravehicular activity (EVA). To reduce this risk, the addition of ten minutes of moderate exercise (75% VO2pk) during prebreathe has been shown to decrease the total prebreathe time from 4 to 2 hours and to decrease the incidence of DCS. The overall purpose of this pilot study was to develop an exercise protocol using flight hardware and an in-flight physical fitness cycle test to perform prebreathe exercise before an EVA. Eleven subjects volunteered to participate in this study. The first objective of this study was to compare the steady-state heart rate (HR) and oxygen consumption (VO2) from a submaximal arm and leg exercise (ALE) session with those predicted from a maximal ALE test. The second objective was to compare the steady-state HR and V02 from a submaximal elastic tube and leg exercise (TLE) session with those predicted from the maximal ALE test. The third objective involved a comparison of the maximal ALE test with a maximal leg-only (LE) test to conform to the in- flight fitness assessment test. The 75% VO2pk target HR from the LE test was significantly less than the target HR from the ALE test. Prescribing exercise using data from the maximal ALE test resulted in the measured submaximal values being higher than predicted VO2 and HR. The results of this pilot study suggest that elastic tubing is valid during EVA prebreathe as a method of arm exercise with the flight leg ergometer and it is recommended that prebreathe countermeasure exercise protocol incorporate this method.

  15. Applying fractal analysis to heart rate time series of sheep experiencing pain.

    PubMed

    Stubsjøen, Solveig M; Bohlin, Jon; Skjerve, Eystein; Valle, Paul S; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2010-08-04

    The objective assessment of pain is difficult in animals and humans alike. Detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) is a method which extracts "hidden" information from heart rate time series, and may offer a novel way of assessing the subjective experience associated with pain. The aim of this study was to investigate whether any fractal differences could be detected in heart rate time series of sheep due to the infliction of ischaemic pain. Heart rate variability (HRV) was recorded continuously in five ewes during treatment sequences of baseline, intervention and post-intervention for up to 60 min. Heart rate time series were subjected to a DFA, and the median of the scaling coefficients (alpha) was found to be alpha=1.10 for the baseline sequences, 1.01 for the intervention sequences and 1.00 for the post-intervention sequences. The complexity in the regulation of heartbeats decreased between baseline and intervention (p approximately 0.03) and baseline and post-intervention (p approximately 0.01), indicating reperfusion pain and nociceptive sensitization in the post-intervention sequence. Random time series based on Gaussian white noise were generated, with similar mean and variance to the HRV sequences. No difference was found between these series (p approximately 0.28), pointing to a true difference in complexity in the original data. We found no difference in the scaling coefficient alpha between the different treatments, possibly due to the small sample size or a fear induced sympathetic arousal during test day 1 confounding the results. The decrease in the scaling coefficient alpha may be due to sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal. DFA of heart rate time series may be a useful method to evaluate the progressive shift of cardiac regulation toward sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal produced by pain or negative emotional responses such as fear.

  16. Mustiscaling Analysis applied to field Water Content through Distributed Fiber Optic Temperature sensing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez Buelga, Javier; Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Sanchez, Raul; Gil, Maria; Tarquis, Ana M.

    2014-05-01

    signal variation, or to see at which scales signals are most correlated. This can give us an insight into the dominant processes An alternative to both of the above methods has been described recently. Relative entropy and increments in relative entropy has been applied in soil images (Bird et al., 2006) and in soil transect data (Tarquis et al., 2008) to study scale effects localized in scale and provide the information that is complementary to the information about scale dependencies found across a range of scales. We will use them in this work to describe the spatial scaling properties of a set of field water content data measured in an extension of a corn field, in a plot of 500 m2 and an spatial resolution of 25 cm. These measurements are based on an optics cable (BruggSteal) buried on a ziz-zag deployment at 30cm depth. References Bird, N., M.C. Díaz, A. Saa, and A.M. Tarquis. 2006. A review of fractal and multifractal analysis of soil pore-scale images. J. Hydrol. 322:211-219. Kravchenko, A.N., R. Omonode, G.A. Bollero, and D.G. Bullock. 2002. Quantitative mapping of soil drainage classes using topographical data and soil electrical conductivity. Soil Sci. Soc. Am. J. 66:235-243. Lark, R.M., A.E. Milne, T.M. Addiscott, K.W.T. Goulding, C.P. Webster, and S. O'Flaherty. 2004. Scale- and location-dependent correlation of nitrous oxide emissions with soil properties: An analysis using wavelets. Eur. J. Soil Sci. 55:611-627. Lark, R.M., S.R. Kaffka, and D.L. Corwin. 2003. Multiresolution analysis of data on electrical conductivity of soil using wavelets. J. Hydrol. 272:276-290. Lark, R. M. and Webster, R. 1999. Analysis and elucidation of soil variation using wavelets. European J. of Soil Science, 50(2): 185-206. Mandelbrot, B.B. 1982. The fractal geometry of nature. W.H. Freeman, New York. Percival, D.B., and A.T. Walden. 2000. Wavelet methods for time series analysis. Cambridge Univ. Press, Cambridge, UK. Tarquis, A.M., N.R. Bird, A.P. Whitmore, M.C. Cartagena, and

  17. Uncertainty optimization applied to the Monte Carlo analysis of planetary entry trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, David Wesley

    2001-10-01

    Future robotic missions to Mars, as well as any human missions, will require precise entries to ensure safe landings near science objectives and pre-deployed assets. Planning for these missions will depend heavily on Monte Carlo analyses to evaluate active guidance algorithms, assess the impact of off-nominal conditions, and account for uncertainty. The dependability of Monte Carlo forecasts, however, is limited by the accuracy and completeness of the assumed uncertainties. This is because Monte Carlo analysis is a forward driven problem; beginning with the input uncertainties and proceeding to the forecast output statistics. An improvement to the Monte Carlo analysis is needed that will allow the problem to be worked in reverse. In this way, the largest allowable dispersions that achieve the required mission objectives can be determined quantitatively. This thesis proposes a methodology to optimize the uncertainties in the Monte Carlo analysis of spacecraft landing footprints. A metamodel is used to first write polynomial expressions for the size of the landing footprint as functions of the independent uncertainty extrema. The coefficients of the metamodel are determined by performing experiments. The metamodel is then used in a constrained optimization procedure to minimize a cost-tolerance function. First, a two-dimensional proof-of-concept problem was used to evaluate the feasibility of this optimization method. Next, the optimization method was further demonstrated on the Mars Surveyor Program 2001 Lander. The purpose of this example was to demonstrate that the methodology developed during the proof-of-concept could be scaled to solve larger, more complicated, "real world" problems. This research has shown that is possible to control the size of the landing footprint and establish tolerances for mission uncertainties. A simplified metamodel was developed, which is enabling for realistic problems with more than just a few uncertainties. A confidence interval on

  18. Multiple response optimization applied to the development of a capillary electrophoretic method for pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Candioti, Luciana Vera; Robles, Juan C; Mantovani, Víctor E; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2006-03-15

    Multiple response simultaneous optimization by using the desirability function was used for the development of a capillary electrophoresis method for the simultaneous determination of four active ingredients in pharmaceutical preparations: vitamins B(6) and B(12), dexamethasone and lidocaine hydrochloride. Five responses were simultaneously optimized: the three resolutions, the analysis time and the capillary current. This latter response was taken into account in order to improve the quality of the separations. The separation was carried out by using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with a silica capillary and UV detection (240 nm). The optimum conditions were: 57.0 mmol l(-1) sodium phosphate buffer solution, pH 7.0 and voltage=17.2 kV. Good results concerning precision (CV lower than 2%), accuracy (recoveries ranged between 98.5 and 102.6%) and selectivity were obtained in the concentration range studied for the four compounds. These results are comparable to those provided by the reference high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique.

  19. Advanced behavioral applications in schools: A review of R. Douglas Greer's designing teaching strategies: An applied behavior analysis systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Moxley, Roy A.

    2004-01-01

    R. Douglas Greer1s Designing Teaching Strategies is an important book directed to advanced students in applied behavior analysis for classrooms. This review presents some of the striking features of the Comprehensive Applied Behavior Analysis to Schooling (CABAS®) program and the individualized instruction that the book advances. These include its instruction in literacy, its use of graphing, and its flexibility in systematic organization. Although its readability could be improved, this book has much to recommend it in an approach that has acquired an international following. PMID:22477295

  20. Different spectrophotometric methods applied for the analysis of binary mixture of flucloxacillin and amoxicillin: A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Attia, Khalid A M; Nassar, Mohammed W I; El-Zeiny, Mohamed B; Serag, Ahmed

    2016-05-15

    Three different spectrophotometric methods were applied for the quantitative analysis of flucloxacillin and amoxicillin in their binary mixture, namely, ratio subtraction, absorbance subtraction and amplitude modulation. A comparative study was done listing the advantages and the disadvantages of each method. All the methods were validated according to the ICH guidelines and the obtained accuracy, precision and repeatability were found to be within the acceptable limits. The selectivity of the proposed methods was tested using laboratory prepared mixtures and assessed by applying the standard addition technique. So, they can be used for the routine analysis of flucloxacillin and amoxicillin in their binary mixtures.

  1. Toward a Technology of Derived Stimulus Relations: An Analysis of Articles Published in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis," 1992-2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rehfeldt, Ruth Anne

    2011-01-01

    Every article on stimulus equivalence or derived stimulus relations published in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" was evaluated in terms of characteristics that are relevant to the development of applied technologies: the type of participants, settings, procedure automated vs. tabletop), stimuli, and stimulus sensory modality; types of…

  2. Method developments approaches in supercritical fluid chromatography applied to the analysis of cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Lesellier, E; Mith, D; Dubrulle, I

    2015-12-04

    Analyses of complex samples of cosmetics, such as creams or lotions, are generally achieved by HPLC. These analyses are often multistep gradients, due to the presence of compounds with a large range of polarity. For instance, the bioactive compounds may be polar, while the matrix contains lipid components that are rather non-polar, thus cosmetic formulations are usually oil-water emulsions. Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) uses mobile phases composed of carbon dioxide and organic co-solvents, allowing for good solubility of both the active compounds and the matrix excipients. Moreover, the classical and well-known properties of these mobile phases yield fast analyses and ensure rapid method development. However, due to the large number of stationary phases available for SFC and to the varied additional parameters acting both on retention and separation factors (co-solvent nature and percentage, temperature, backpressure, flow rate, column dimensions and particle size), a simplified approach can be followed to ensure a fast method development. First, suited stationary phases should be carefully selected for an initial screening, and then the other operating parameters can be limited to the co-solvent nature and percentage, maintaining the oven temperature and back-pressure constant. To describe simple method development guidelines in SFC, three sample applications are discussed in this paper: UV-filters (sunscreens) in sunscreen cream, glyceryl caprylate in eye liner and caffeine in eye serum. Firstly, five stationary phases (ACQUITY UPC(2)) are screened with isocratic elution conditions (10% methanol in carbon dioxide). Complementary of the stationary phases is assessed based on our spider diagram classification which compares a large number of stationary phases based on five molecular interactions. Secondly, the one or two best stationary phases are retained for further optimization of mobile phase composition, with isocratic elution conditions or, when

  3. Transition path theory analysis of c-Src kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yilin; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S.; Roux, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    Nonreceptor tyrosine kinases of the Src family are large multidomain allosteric proteins that are crucial to cellular signaling pathways. In a previous study, we generated a Markov state model (MSM) to simulate the activation of c-Src catalytic domain, used as a prototypical tyrosine kinase. The long-time kinetics of transition predicted by the MSM was in agreement with experimental observations. In the present study, we apply the framework of transition path theory (TPT) to the previously constructed MSM to characterize the main features of the activation pathway. The analysis indicates that the activating transition, in which the activation loop first opens up followed by an inward rotation of the αC-helix, takes place via a dense set of intermediate microstates distributed within a fairly broad “transition tube” in a multidimensional conformational subspace connecting the two end-point conformations. Multiple microstates with negligible equilibrium probabilities carry a large transition flux associated with the activating transition, which explains why extensive conformational sampling is necessary to accurately determine the kinetics of activation. Our results suggest that the combination of MSM with TPT provides an effective framework to represent conformational transitions in complex biomolecular systems. PMID:27482115

  4. Corticomuscular coherence analysis on hand movement distinction for active rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xinxin; Xiao, Siyuan; Qi, Yu; Hu, Xiaoling; Wang, Yiwen; Zheng, Xiaoxiang

    2013-01-01

    Active rehabilitation involves patient's voluntary thoughts as the control signals of restore device to assist stroke rehabilitation. Although restoration of hand opening stands importantly in patient's daily life, it is difficult to distinguish the voluntary finger extension from thumb adduction and finger flexion using stroke patients' electroencephalography (EMG) on single muscle activity. We propose to implement corticomuscular coherence analysis on electroencephalography (EEG) and EMG signals on Extensor Digitorum to extract their intention involved in hand opening. EEG and EMG signals of 8 subjects are simultaneously collected when executing 4 hand movement tasks (finger extension, thumb adduction, finger flexion, and rest). We explore the spatial and temporal distribution of the coherence and observe statistically significant corticomuscular coherence appearing at left motor cortical area and different patterns within beta frequency range for 4 movement tasks. Linear discriminate analysis is applied on the coherence pattern to distinguish finger extension from thumb adduction, finger flexion, and rest. The classification results are greater than those by EEG only. The results indicate the possibility to detect voluntary hand opening based on coherence analysis between single muscle EMG signal and single EEG channel located in motor cortical area, which potentially helps active hand rehabilitation for stroke patients.

  5. Risk-informed criticality analysis as applied to waste packages subject to a subsurface igneous intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, Darby Suzan

    Practitioners of many branches of nuclear facility safety use probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology, which evaluates the reliability of a system along with the consequences of various failure states. One important exception is nuclear criticality safety, which traditionally produces binary results (critical or subcritical, based upon value of the effective multiplication factor, keff). For complex systems, criticality safety can benefit from application of the more flexible PRA techniques. A new risk-based technique in criticality safety analysis is detailed. In addition to identifying the most reactive configuration(s) and determining subcriticality, it yields more information about the relative reactivity contributions of various factors. By analyzing a more complete system, confidence that the system will remain subcritical is increased and areas where additional safety features would be most effective are indicated. The first step in the method is to create a criticality event tree (a specialized form of event tree where multiple outcomes stemming from a single event are acceptable). The tree lists events that impact reactivity by changing a system parameter. Next, the value of keff is calculated for the end states using traditional methods like the MCNP code. As calculations progress, the criticality event tree is modified; event branches demonstrated to have little effect on reactivity may be collapsed (thus reducing the total number of criticality runs), and branches may be added if more information is needed to characterize the system. When the criticality event tree is mature, critical limits are determined according to traditional validation techniques. Finally, results are evaluated. Criticality for the system is determined by comparing the value of k eff for each end state to the critical limit derived for those cases. The relative contributions of various events to criticality are identified by comparing end states resulting from different

  6. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  7. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  8. Comparative analysis of several sediment transport formulations applied to dam-break flows over erodible beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cea, Luis; Bladé, Ernest; Corestein, Georgina; Fraga, Ignacio; Espinal, Marc; Puertas, Jerónimo

    2014-05-01

    Transitory flows generated by dam failures have a great sediment transport capacity, which induces important morphological changes on the river topography. Several studies have been published regarding the coupling between the sediment transport and hydrodynamic equations in dam-break applications, in order to correctly model their mutual interaction. Most of these models solve the depth-averaged shallow water equations to compute the water depth and velocity. On the other hand, a wide variety of sediment transport formulations have been arbitrarily used to compute the topography evolution. These are based on semi-empirical equations which have been calibrated under stationary and uniform conditions very different from those achieved in dam-break flows. Soares-Frazao et al. (2012) proposed a Benchmark test consisting of a dam-break over a mobile bed, in which several teams of modellers participated using different numerical models, and concluded that the key issue which still needs to be investigated in morphological modelling of dam-break flows is the link between the solid transport and the hydrodynamic variables. This paper presents a comparative analysis of different sediment transport formulations applied to dam-break flows over mobile beds. All the formulations analysed are commonly used in morphological studies in rivers, and include the formulas of Meyer-Peter & Müller (1948), Wong-Parker (2003), Einstein-Brown (1950), van Rijn (1984), Engelund-Hansen (1967), Ackers-White (1973), Yang (1973), and a Meyer-Peter & Müller type formula but with ad-hoc coefficients. The relevance of corrections on the sediment flux direction and magnitude due to the bed slope and the non-equilibrium hypothesis is also analysed. All the formulations have been implemented in the numerical model Iber (Bladé et al. (2014)), which solves the depth-averaged shallow water equations coupled to the Exner equation to evaluate the bed evolution. Two different test cases have been

  9. Activities of the Japan Society of Applied Physics Committee for Diversity Promotion in Science and Technology (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitani-Gamo, Mikka

    2009-04-01

    Since 2001, the Japan Society of Applied Physics (JSAP) Committee for Diversity Promotion in Science and Technology has worked to promote gender equality, both within and between academic societies, and in society as a whole. Main activities of the Committee are: (1) organizing symposia and informal meetings during domestic JSAP conferences to stimulate discussion and raise awareness; (2) encouraging young researchers in pursuit of their careers through the newly designed "career-explorer mark;" (3) offering childcare at biannual JSAP conferences; and (4) helping future scientists and engineers prepare to lead the fields of science and technology on a global level with the creation of an educational roadmap. In this presentation, recent activities of the JSAP Committee are introduced and reviewed.

  10. A response-restriction analysis of stereotypy in adolescents with mental retardation: implications for applied behavior analysis.

    PubMed Central

    McEntee, J E; Saunders, R R

    1997-01-01

    The behavior of 4 adolescents with severe or profound mental retardation was evaluated in the presence of four sets of materials during periods of unstructured leisure activity. Functional engagement with the materials, stereotypic engagement with the materials, stereotypy without interaction with the materials, and other aberrant behaviors were recorded. Across a series of experimental conditions, the number of sets of materials was reduced from four to one by eliminating the set most frequently manipulated in each preceeding condition. In the final condition, four sets of materials were again made available for manipulation. The procedures replicated Green and Striefel's (1988) response-restriction analysis of the activity preferences and play behaviors of children with autism. In general, the results of the present experiment replicate those of Green and Striefel in that reallocation of responding was idiosyncratic and unpredictable as sets of materials were removed. Nevertheless, the results provided insight into how responding might be reallocated if it were restricted through behavioral interventions rather than by restriction of access. Thus, the results are discussed with respect to how response-restriction analyses may be useful in identifying topographies of behavior that could be included in differential reinforcement contigencies that are designed to affect stereotypic behavior and in the selection and arrangement of environmental stimuli to minimize the presence of evokers of stereotypy. PMID:9316261

  11. Analysis of DOE international environmental management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategic Plan (April 1994) states that DOE`s long-term vision includes world leadership in environmental restoration and waste management activities. The activities of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) can play a key role in DOE`s goals of maintaining U.S. global competitiveness and ensuring the continuation of a world class science and technology community. DOE`s interest in attaining these goals stems partly from its participation in organizations like the Trade Policy Coordinating Committee (TPCC), with its National Environmental Export Promotion Strategy, which seeks to strengthen U.S. competitiveness and the building of public-private partnerships as part of U.S. industrial policy. The International Interactions Field Office task will build a communication network which will facilitate the efficient and effective communication between DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, and contractors. Under this network, Headquarters will provide the Field Offices with information on the Administration`s policies and activities (such as the DOE Strategic Plan), interagency activities, as well as relevant information from other field offices. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will, in turn, provide Headquarters with information on various international activities which, when appropriate, will be included in reports to groups like the TPCC and the EM Focus Areas. This task provides for the collection, review, and analysis of information on the more significant international environmental restoration and waste management initiatives and activities which have been used or are being considered at LLNL. Information gathering will focus on efforts and accomplishments in meeting the challenges of providing timely and cost effective cleanup of its environmentally damaged sites and facilities, especially through international technical exchanges and/or the implementation of foreign-development technologies.

  12. Theoretical analysis of the pulse-clamp method as applied to neural stimulating electrodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, I. C.; Tolmachev, Y. V.; Nagy, Z.; Minkoff, M.; Merrill, D. R.; Mortimer, J. T.; Scherson, D. A.; Case Western Reserve Univ.

    2001-02-01

    A mathematical model was developed to simulate potential pulse clamp experiments at inert-electrode/aqueous solution interfaces in the absence of dioxygen or other adventitious redox active species. This model incorporates a potential invariant interfacial capacitor, a kinetically slow redox couple with parameters consistent with the H{sub 2}O/H{sub 2} reaction on polycrystalline Au in acid electrolytes as the only faradaic process involved, and diffusion as the only mode of mass transport in solution phase. Numerical integration of the resulting system of differential equations was found to yield results in good agreement with experimental data reported by Mortimer and co-workers for Au in dearated sulfuric acid solutions. A detailed analysis of these calculations identified the fast and slow recoverable charges to be capacitive and the unrecoverable charges to be faradaic. The results obtained indicated that for small overpotentials the charge is stored in the interfacial capacitor, and that significant faradaic processes occur only when the overpotential is large. Furthermore, during the delay, and despite the fact that no current flows through the external circuit, the capacitor discharges via the faradaic reaction, increasing the total amount of product generated. More importantly, under the conditions selected for the simulations, none of the faradaic charge is recovered during the potential controlled stage of the sequence. These results provide insight into the relationships between stimulus parameters and charge injected into irreversible faradaic reactions, which may generate biologically harmful species. In general, as stimulus pulse durations increase, unrecoverable charge increases. Also, as the delay increases between the end of the primary and beginning of the secondary pulse, unrecoverable charge increases. Furthermore, based on the mathematical model used herein, the use of an electrode material with a small exchange current density would allow

  13. Multi-Level Discourse Analysis in a Physics Teaching Methods Course from the Psychological Perspective of Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vieira, Rodrigo Drumond; Kelly, Gregory J.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present and apply a multi-level method for discourse analysis in science classrooms. This method is based on the structure of human activity (activity, actions, and operations) and it was applied to study a pre-service physics teacher methods course. We argue that such an approach, based on a cultural psychological perspective,…

  14. Using Module Analysis for Multiple Choice Responses: A New Method Applied to Force Concept Inventory Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewe, Eric; Bruun, Jesper; Bearden, Ian G.

    2016-01-01

    We describe "Module Analysis for Multiple Choice Responses" (MAMCR), a new methodology for carrying out network analysis on responses to multiple choice assessments. This method is used to identify modules of non-normative responses which can then be interpreted as an alternative to factor analysis. MAMCR allows us to identify conceptual…

  15. Prediction of Radical Scavenging Activities of Anthocyanins Applying Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) with Quantum Chemical Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Jhin, Changho; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2014-01-01

    Radical scavenging activity of anthocyanins is well known, but only a few studies have been conducted by quantum chemical approach. The adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) is an effective technique for solving problems with uncertainty. The purpose of this study was to construct and evaluate quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting radical scavenging activities of anthocyanins with good prediction efficiency. ANFIS-applied QSAR models were developed by using quantum chemical descriptors of anthocyanins calculated by semi-empirical PM6 and PM7 methods. Electron affinity (A) and electronegativity (χ) of flavylium cation, and ionization potential (I) of quinoidal base were significantly correlated with radical scavenging activities of anthocyanins. These descriptors were used as independent variables for QSAR models. ANFIS models with two triangular-shaped input fuzzy functions for each independent variable were constructed and optimized by 100 learning epochs. The constructed models using descriptors calculated by both PM6 and PM7 had good prediction efficiency with Q-square of 0.82 and 0.86, respectively. PMID:25153627

  16. Continuous Recording and Interobserver Agreement Algorithms Reported in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" (1995-2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudford, Oliver C.; Taylor, Sarah Ann; Martin, Neil T.

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed all research articles in 10 recent volumes of the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis (JABA)": Vol. 28(3), 1995, through Vol. 38(2), 2005. Continuous recording was used in the majority (55%) of the 168 articles reporting data on free-operant human behaviors. Three methods for reporting interobserver agreement (exact agreement,…

  17. Choosing among Multiple Achievement Measures: Applying Multitrait--Multimethod Confirmatory Factor Analysis to State Assessment, ACT, and Student GPA Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickinson, Emily R.; Adelson, Jill L.

    2016-01-01

    Practitioners and researchers interested in understanding student achievement, its predictors, and how it relates to other student outcomes are likely unaware of how the source information about achievement may offer subtly different pictures. This study applies multitrait-multimethod (MTMM) confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) within a structural…

  18. Treatment Integrity of School-Based Interventions with Children in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" 1991-2005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Laura Lee; Gresham, Frank M.; DiGennaro, Florence D.; Reed, Derek D.

    2007-01-01

    We reviewed all school-based experimental studies with individuals 0 to 18 years published in the "Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis" (JABA) between 1991 and 2005. A total of 142 articles (152 studies) that met review criteria were included. Nearly all (95%) of these experiments provided an operational definition of the independent variable,…

  19. Creation of a Commission for Accreditation of Programs and Services Using Applied Behavior Analysis for Treatment Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The field of Applied Behavior Analysis has evolved to the point of providing services in many organizations and educational settings in the United States. ABA is considered in a growing number of schools, provider organizations, and by states, as the most effective intervention approach for children with autism. Advances in the research have led…

  20. Preparing Research Leaders for Special Education: A Ph.D. Program with an Emphasis in Applied Behavior Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heward, William L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    An Ohio State University doctoral program for special education leadership personnel emphasizing applied behavior analysis is described. The program features intensive formal coursework, special topic seminars, participation in three research studies prior to dissertation, supervised college teaching and advising experiences, and a 10-week summer…

  1. Beyond Autism Treatment: The Application of Applied Behavior Analysis in the Treatment of Emotional and Psychological Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Robert K.

    2007-01-01

    The field of applied behavior analysis (ABA) has increasingly come to be associated with the treatment of autism in young children. This phenomenon is largely the result of empirical research demonstrating effective treatment outcomes in this population. The same cannot be said with regard to the treatment of conditions often referred to as…

  2. IDEIA and the Means to Change Behavior Should Be Enough: Growing Support for Using Applied Behavior Analysis in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloh, Christopher; Axelrod, Saul

    2008-01-01

    With the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, classrooms are now mandated to employ behavioral methods to address target behaviors. These relevant behavioral strategies have long been advanced and disseminated by the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). Notwithstanding this capability, proponents of the…

  3. Group Training of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Knowledge Competencies to Community-Based Service Providers for Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luiselli, James K.; St. Amand, CarrieAnne; MaGee, Christine; Sperry, James M.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a training program to teach applied behavior analysis (ABA) knowledge competencies to paraprofessional staff (N = 47) at a habilitation services agency for adults with developmental disabilities. Before and following training, staff completed assessment of knowledge tests for three content areas: basic learning principles,…

  4. The Impact of Size and Specialisation on Universities' Department Performance: A DEA Analysis Applied to Austrian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leitner, Karl-Heinz; Prikoszovits, Julia; Schaffhauser-Linzatti, Michaela; Stowasser, Rainer; Wagner, Karin

    2007-01-01

    This paper explores the performance efficiency of natural and technical science departments at Austrian universities using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA). We present DEA as an alternative tool for benchmarking and ranking the assignment of decision-making units (organisations and organisational units). The method applies a multiple input and…

  5. Parents' Experiences of Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA)-Based Interventions for Children Diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPhilemy, Catherine; Dillenburger, Karola

    2013-01-01

    Applied behaviour analysis (ABA)-based programmes are endorsed as the gold standard for treatment of children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) in most of North America. This is not the case in most of Europe, where instead a non-specified "eclectic" approach is adopted. We explored the social validity of ABA-based interventions with…

  6. Analysis of domain wall dynamics based on skewness of magnetic Barkhausen noise for applied stress determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Song; Tian, GuiYun; Dobmann, Gerd; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Skewness of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) signal is used as a new feature for applied stress determination. After experimental studies, skewness presents its ability for measuring applied tensile stress compared with conventional feature, meanwhile, a non-linear behavior of this new feature and an independence of the excitation conditions under compressive stress are found and discussed. Effective damping during domain wall motion influencing the asymmetric shape of the MBN statistical distribution function is discussed under compressive and tensile stress variation. Domain wall (DW) energy and distance between pinning edges of the DW are considered altering the characteristic relaxation time, which is the reason for the non-linear phenomenon of skewness.

  7. Dutch Young Adults Ratings of Behavior Change Techniques Applied in Mobile Phone Apps to Promote Physical Activity: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Belmon, Laura S; te Velde, Saskia J; Brug, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions delivered through new device technology, including mobile phone apps, appear to be an effective method to reach young adults. Previous research indicates that self-efficacy and social support for physical activity and self-regulation behavior change techniques (BCT), such as goal setting, feedback, and self-monitoring, are important for promoting physical activity; however, little is known about evaluations by the target population of BCTs applied to physical activity apps and whether these preferences are associated with individual personality characteristics. Objective This study aimed to explore young adults’ opinions regarding BCTs (including self-regulation techniques) applied in mobile phone physical activity apps, and to examine associations between personality characteristics and ratings of BCTs applied in physical activity apps. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional online survey among healthy 18 to 30-year-old adults (N=179). Data on participants’ gender, age, height, weight, current education level, living situation, mobile phone use, personality traits, exercise self-efficacy, exercise self-identity, total physical activity level, and whether participants met Dutch physical activity guidelines were collected. Items for rating BCTs applied in physical activity apps were selected from a hierarchical taxonomy for BCTs, and were clustered into three BCT categories according to factor analysis: “goal setting and goal reviewing,” “feedback and self-monitoring,” and “social support and social comparison.” Results Most participants were female (n=146), highly educated (n=169), physically active, and had high levels of self-efficacy. In general, we observed high ratings of BCTs aimed to increase “goal setting and goal reviewing” and “feedback and self-monitoring,” but not for BCTs addressing “social support and social comparison.” Only 3 (out of 16 tested) significant associations between personality

  8. Mobilization of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and estrogenic activity in simulated rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids.

    PubMed

    Giudice, Ben D; Young, Thomas M

    2011-10-01

    Municipal biosolids are commonly applied to land as soil amendment or fertilizer as a form of beneficial reuse of what could otherwise be viewed as waste. Balanced against this benefit are potential risks to groundwater and surface water quality from constituents that may be mobilized during storm events. The objective of the present study was to characterize the mobilization of selected endocrine-disrupting compounds, heavy metals, and total estrogenic activity in rainfall runoff from land-applied biosolids. Rainfall simulations were conducted on soil plots amended with biosolids. Surface runoff and leachate was collected and analyzed for the endocrine-disrupting compounds bisphenol A, 17α-ethynylestradiol, triclocarban, triclosan, octylphenol, and nonylphenol; a suite of 16 metals; and estrogenic activity via the estrogen receptor-mediated chemical activated luciferase gene expression (ER-CALUX) bioassay. Triclocarban (2.3-17.3 ng/L), triclosan (<51-309 ng/L), and octylphenol (<4.9-203 ng/L) were commonly detected. Chromium (2.0-22 µg/L), Co (2.5-10 µg/L), Ni (28-235 µg/L), Cu (14-110 µg/L), As (1.2-2.7 µg/L), and Se (0.29-12 µg/L) were quantifiable over background levels. Triclosan, Ni, and Cu were detected at levels that might pose some risk to aquatic life, though levels of metals in the biosolids were well below the maximum allowable regulatory limits. The ER-CALUX results were mostly explained by background bisphenol A contamination and octylphenol in runoff, although unknown contributors or matrix effects were also found.

  9. Improving Data Analysis in Second Language Acquisition by Utilizing Modern Developments in Applied Statistics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson-Hall, Jenifer; Herrington, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this article we introduce language acquisition researchers to two broad areas of applied statistics that can improve the way data are analyzed. First we argue that visual summaries of information are as vital as numerical ones, and suggest ways to improve them. Specifically, we recommend choosing boxplots over barplots and adding locally…

  10. Applied and Transformed Understanding in Introductory Psychology: Analysis of a Final Essay Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of the impact of the introductory psychology course on students' understanding of their life experiences and course-related ideas. Student responses to a final essay assignment were analyzed to construct composites for areas of applied and transformed understanding. Results are important for psychology teachers…

  11. Publication Bias in Studies of an Applied Behavior-Analytic Intervention: An Initial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sham, Elyssa; Smith, Tristram

    2014-01-01

    Publication bias arises when studies with favorable results are more likely to be reported than are studies with null findings. If this bias occurs in studies with single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) on applied behavior-analytic (ABA) interventions, it could lead to exaggerated estimates of intervention effects. Therefore, we conducted an…

  12. Family-Centred Applied Behaviour Analysis Verbal Behaviour Intervention for Young Taiwanese Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Szu-Yin

    2016-01-01

    Current educational policy promotes the use of evidence-based practices to maximize children's learning outcomes. With the goal of enhancing a child's ability to learn functional language, the purpose of this study was to focus on involving families through the utilization of evidence-based intervention based upon the Applied Behaviour Analysis…

  13. Birds of a Feather: Applied Behavior Analysis and Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2013-01-01

    Applied behavior analysts have been helping people to enhance the quality of their lives for decades. Its characteristics as described by Baer, Wolf, and Risley continue to guide efforts to help clients and their significant others. Yet, this knowledge often languishes unused and unappreciated. Distortions and misrepresentations of applied…

  14. Applying the Bootstrap to Taxometric Analysis: Generating Empirical Sampling Distributions to Help Interpret Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruscio, John; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron; Meron, Mati

    2007-01-01

    Meehl's taxometric method was developed to distinguish categorical and continuous constructs. However, taxometric output can be difficult to interpret because expected results for realistic data conditions and differing procedural implementations have not been derived analytically or studied through rigorous simulations. By applying bootstrap…

  15. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  16. Theoretical analysis of condensation in the presence of noncondensable gases as applied to open cycle OTEC condensers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, C. B.; Bell, K. J.

    The open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion condenser was analyzed from a theoretical standpoint. Interfacial temperature profiles and gas concentrations in the axial direction were determined, and their effects on the rate of condensation studied. For the analysis, the vapor phase was modeled using diffusion equations for simultaneous heat and mass transfer processes, while the liquid phase was modeled using a falling film analysis. This analysis was then applied to a plate fin condenser, and the effect of varying the fin density along the condenser lengths was investigated. General engineering aspects of heat exchanger design are discussed for condensation of vapor mixtures in the presence of noncondensable gases.

  17. Enhancing filterability of activated sludge from landfill leachate treatment plant by applying electrical field ineffective on bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Akkaya, Gulizar Kurtoglu; Sekman, Elif; Top, Selin; Sagir, Ece; Bilgili, Mehmet Sinan; Guvenc, Senem Yazici

    2017-03-09

    The aim of this study is to investigate filterability enhancement of activated sludge supplied form a full-scale leachate treatment plant by applying DC electric field while keeping the biological operational conditions in desirable range. The activated sludge samples were received from the nitrification tank in the leachate treatment plant of Istanbul's Odayeri Sanitary Landfill Site. Experimental sets were conducted as laboratory-scale batch studies and were duplicated for 1A, 2A, 3A, 4A, and 5A of electrical currents and 2, 5, 10, 15, and 30 min of exposure times under continuous aeration. Physicochemical parameters such as temperature, pH, and oxidation reduction potential in the mixture right after each experimental set and biochemical parameters such as chemical oxygen demand, total phosphorus, and ammonia nitrogen in supernatant were analyzed to define the sets that remain in the range of ideal biological operational conditions. Later on, sludge filterability properties such as capillary suction time, specific resistance to filtration, zeta potential, and particle size were measured for remaining harmless sets. Additionally, cost analyses were conducted in respect to energy and electrode consumptions. Application of 2A DC electric field and 15-min exposure time was found to be the most favorable conditions to enhance filterability of the landfill leachate-activated sludge.

  18. Neutron activation analysis detection limits using {sup 252}Cf sources

    SciTech Connect

    DiPrete, D.P.; Sigg, R.A.

    2000-07-01

    The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) developed a neutron activation analysis (NAA) facility several decades ago using low-flux {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Through this time, the facility has addressed areas of applied interest in managing the Savannah River Site (SRS). Some applications are unique because of the site's operating history and its chemical-processing facilities. Because sensitivity needs for many applications are not severe, they can be accomplished using an {approximately}6-mg {sup 252}Cf NAA facility. The SRTC {sup 252}Cf facility continues to support applied research programs at SRTC as well as other SRS programs for environmental and waste management customers. Samples analyzed by NAA include organic compounds, metal alloys, sediments, site process solutions, and many other materials. Numerous radiochemical analyses also rely on the facility for production of short-lived tracers, yielding by activation of carriers and small-scale isotope production for separation methods testing. These applications are more fully reviewed in Ref. 1. Although the flux [{approximately}2 x 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s] is low relative to reactor facilities, more than 40 elements can be detected at low and sub-part-per-million levels. Detection limits provided by the facility are adequate for many analytical projects. Other multielement analysis methods, particularly inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, can now provide sensitivities on dissolved samples that are often better than those available by NAA using low-flux isotopic sources. Because NAA allows analysis of bulk samples, (a) it is a more cost-effective choice when its sensitivity is adequate than methods that require digestion and (b) it eliminates uncertainties that can be introduced by digestion processes.

  19. Segmenting Business Students Using Cluster Analysis Applied to Student Satisfaction Survey Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new application of cluster analysis to segment business school students according to their degree of satisfaction with various aspects of the academic program. The resulting clusters provide additional insight into drivers of student satisfaction that are not evident from analysis of the responses of the student body as a…

  20. A Monte Carlo Investigation of the Analysis of Variance Applied to Non-Independent Bernoulli Variates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John F., Jr.

    The applicability of the Analysis of Variance, ANOVA, procedures to the analysis of dichotomous repeated measure data is described. The design models for which data were simulated in this investigation were chosen to represent simple cases of two experimental situations: situation one, in which subjects' responses to a single randomly selected set…